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Sample records for plane strain crack

  1. Plane-strain crack problems in microstructured solids governed by dipolar gradient elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourgiotis, P. A.; Georgiadis, H. G.

    2009-11-01

    The present study aims at determining the elastic stress and displacement fields around the tips of a finite-length crack in a microstructured solid under remotely applied plane-strain loading (mode I and II cases). The material microstructure is modeled through the Toupin-Mindlin generalized continuum theory of dipolar gradient elasticity. According to this theory, the strain-energy density assumes the form of a positive-definite function of the strain tensor (as in classical elasticity) and the gradient of the strain tensor (additional term). A simple but yet rigorous version of the theory is employed here by considering an isotropic linear expression of the elastic strain-energy density that involves only three material constants (the two Lamé constants and the so-called gradient coefficient). First, a near-tip asymptotic solution is obtained by the Knein-Williams technique. Then, we attack the complete boundary value problem in an effort to obtain a full-field solution. Hypersingular integral equations with a cubic singularity are formulated with the aid of the Fourier transform. These equations are solved by analytical considerations on Hadamard finite-part integrals and a numerical treatment. The results show significant departure from the predictions of standard fracture mechanics. In view of these results, it seems that the classical theory of elasticity is inadequate to analyze crack problems in microstructured materials. Indeed, the present results indicate that the stress distribution ahead of the crack tip exhibits a local maximum that is bounded. Therefore, this maximum value may serve as a measure of the critical stress level at which further advancement of the crack may occur. Also, in the vicinity of the crack tip, the crack-face displacement closes more smoothly as compared to the standard result and the strain field is bounded. Finally, the J-integral (energy release rate) in gradient elasticity was evaluated. A decrease of its value is noticed

  2. The elastostatic plane strain mode I crack tip stress and displacement fields in a generalized linear neo-Hookean elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begley, Matthew R.; Creton, Costantino; McMeeking, Robert M.

    2015-11-01

    A general asymptotic plane strain crack tip stress field is constructed for linear versions of neo-Hookean materials, which spans a wide variety of special cases including incompressible Mooney elastomers, the compressible Blatz-Ko elastomer, several cases of the Ogden constitutive law and a new result for a compressible linear neo-Hookean material. The nominal stress field has dominant terms that have a square root singularity with respect to the distance of material points from the crack tip in the undeformed reference configuration. At second order, there is a uniform tension parallel to the crack. The associated displacement field in plane strain at leading order has dependence proportional to the square root of the same coordinate. The relationship between the amplitude of the crack tip singularity (a stress intensity factor) and the plane strain energy release rate is outlined for the general linear material, with simplified relationships presented for notable special cases.

  3. Effect of fiber volume fraction on the off-crack-plane fracture energy in strain-hardening engineered cementitious composites

    SciTech Connect

    Maalej, M.; Hashida, Toshiyuki; Li, V.C.

    1995-12-01

    In this paper, the results of an experimental study on the effect of fiber volume fraction on the off-crack-plane fracture energy in a strain-hardening engineered cementitious composite (ECC) are presented. Unlike the well-known quasi-brittle behavior of fiber-reinforced concrete, ECC exhibits quasi-ductile response by developing a large damage zone prior to fracture localization. In the damage zone, the material is microcracked but continues to strain-harden locally. The areal dimension of the damage zone has been observed to be on the order of 1,000 cm{sup 2} in double cantilever beam specimens. The energy absorption of the off-crack-plane inelastic deformation process has been measured to be more than 50% of the total fracture energy of up to 34 kJ/m{sup 2}. This magnitude of fracture energy is the highest ever reported for a fiber cementitious composite.

  4. Bonded half planes containing an arbitrarily oriented crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Aksogan, O.

    1973-01-01

    The plane elastostatic problem for two bonded half planes containing an arbitrarily oriented crack in the neighborhood of the interface is considered. Using Mellin transforms, the problem is formulated as a system of singular integral equations. The equations are solved for various crack orientations, material combinations, and external loads. The numerical results given include the stress intensity factors, tHe strain energy release rates, and tHe probable cleavage angles giving the direction of crack propagation.

  5. Experimental and theoretical strain distributions for stationary and growing cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerberich, W. W.; Davidson, D. L.; Kaczorowski, M.

    E XPERIMENTAL strain distributions are determined very near the crack tip in Fe-3wt.%Si single crystals. Both in situ stereoimaging and electron channeling techniques give reasonably reproducible distributions. By growing fatigue cracks on a {100} cleavage plane, the singularity strengths have been determined for both growing and stationary cracks under relatively plane stress and plane strain conditions. This has allowed a comparison to existing theoretical models. It is shown that the HRR singularity (Hutchinson, Rice and Rosengren, 1968) for stationary cracks is very good to within I μm of the crack tip and a hardening model for the growing crack (gao and hwang, Advances in Fracture Research, edited by D. Francois. 5th Int. Conf. on Fracture, Cannes, France, 2, 669, 1981) is surprisingly good. Other issues such as fracture criteria are discussed since strains greater than unity were measured at the crack tip in this relatively brittle material.

  6. A plane stress finite element model for elastic-plastic mode I/II crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Mark Anthony

    A finite element program has been developed to perform quasi-static, elastic-plastic crack growth simulations. The model provides a general framework for mixed-mode I/II elastic-plastic fracture analysis using small strain assumptions and plane stress, plane strain, and axisymmetric finite elements. Cracks are modeled explicitly in the mesh. As the cracks propagate, automatic remeshing algorithms delete the mesh local to the crack tip, extend the crack, and build a new mesh around the new tip. State variable mapping algorithms transfer stresses and displacements from the old mesh to the new mesh. The von Mises material model is implemented in the context of a non-linear Newton solution scheme. The fracture criterion is the critical crack tip opening displacement, and crack direction is predicted by the maximum tensile stress criterion at the crack tip. The implementation can accommodate multiple curving and interacting cracks. An additional fracture algorithm based on nodal release can be used to simulate fracture along a horizontal plane of symmetry. A core of plane strain elements can be used with the nodal release algorithm to simulate the triaxial state of stress near the crack tip. Verification and validation studies compare analysis results with experimental data and published three-dimensional analysis results. Fracture predictions using nodal release for compact tension, middle-crack tension, and multi-site damage test specimens produced accurate results for residual strength and link-up loads. Curving crack predictions using remeshing/mapping were compared with experimental data for an Arcan mixed-mode specimen. Loading angles from 0 degrees to 90 degrees were analyzed. The maximum tensile stress criterion was able to predict the crack direction and path for all loading angles in which the material failed in tension. Residual strength was also accurately predicted for these cases.

  7. Strain rate effects in stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Parkins, R.N. . Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials)

    1990-03-01

    Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was initially developed as a rapid, ad hoc laboratory method for assessing the propensity for metals an environments to promote stress corrosion cracking. It is now clear, however, that there are good theoretical reasons why strain rate, as opposed to stress per se, will often be the controlling parameter in determining whether or not cracks are nucleated and, if so, are propagated. The synergistic effects of the time dependence of corrosion-related reactions and microplastic strain provide the basis for mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion cracking in high-pressure pipelines and other structures. However, while this may be readily comprehended in the context of laboratory slow strain tests, its extension to service situations may be less apparent. Laboratory work involving realistic stressing conditions, including low-frequency cyclic loading, shows that strain or creep rates give good correlation with thresholds for cracking and with crack growth kinetics.

  8. Closure of fatigue cracks at high strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyyer, N. S.; Dowling, N. E.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on smooth specimens to study the closure behavior of short cracks at high cyclic strains under completely reversed cycling. Testing procedures and methodology, and closure measurement techniques, are described in detail. The strain levels chosen for the study cover from predominantly elastic to grossly plastic strains. Crack closure measurements are made at different crack lengths. The study reveals that, at high strains, cracks close only as the lowest stress level in the cycle is approached. The crack opening is observed to occur in the compressive part of the loading cycle. The applied stress needed to open a short crack under high strain is found to be less than for cracks under small scale yielding. For increased plastic deformations, the value of sigma sub op/sigma sub max is observed to decrease and approaches the value of R. Comparison of the experimental results with existing analysis is made and indicates the limitations of the small scale yielding approach where gross plastic deformation behavior occurs.

  9. Biaxial load effects on the crack border elastic strain energy and strain energy rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eftis, J.; Subramonian, N.; Liebowitz, H.

    1977-01-01

    The validity of the singular solution (first term of a series representation) is investigated for the crack tip stress and displacement field in an infinite sheet with a flat line crack with biaxial loads applied to the outer boundaries. It is shown that if one retains the second contribution to the series approximations for stress and displacement in the calculation of the local elastic strain energy density and elastic strain energy rate in the crack border region, both these quantities have significant biaxial load dependency. The value of the J-integral does not depend on the presence of the second term of the series expansion for stress and displacement. Thus J(I) is insensitive to the presence of loads applied parallel to the plane of the crack.

  10. Plane Strain Testing with Passive Restraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhnenko, Roman; Labuz, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    A plane strain condition for testing rock is developed through passive restraint in the form of a thick-walled cylinder. The so-called biaxial frame generates the intermediate principal stress that imposes a triaxial state of stress on a prismatic specimen. Major and minor principal stresses and corresponding strains are accurately measured, providing data to calculate the elastic (Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio), inelastic (dilatancy angle), and strength (friction angle and cohesion) parameters of the rock. Results of experiments conducted on Indiana limestone in plane strain compression are compared with the results of axisymmetric compression and extension. With proper system calibration, Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio are consistent among the tests. The plane strain apparatus enforces in-plane deformation with the three principal stresses at failure being different, and it allows one to determine the Paul-Mohr-Coulomb failure surface, which includes an intermediate stress effect.

  11. Turbulent Plane Wakes Subjected to Successive Strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Michael M.

    2003-01-01

    Six direct numerical simulations of turbulent time-evolving strained plane wakes have been examined to investigate the response of a wake to successive irrotational plane strains of opposite sign. The orientation of the applied strain field has been selected so that the flow is the time-developing analogue of a spatially developing wake evolving in the presence of either a favourable or an adverse streamwise pressure gradient. The magnitude of the applied strain rate a is constant in time t until the total strain e(sup at) reaches about four. At this point, a new simulation is begun with the sign of the applied strain being reversed (the original simulation is continued as well). When the total strain is reduced back to its original value of one, yet another simulation is begun with the sign of the strain being reversed again back to its original sign. This process is done for both initially "favourable" and initially "adverse" strains, providing simulations for each of these strain types from three different initial conditions. The evolution of the wake mean velocity deficit and width is found to be very similar for all the adversely strained cases, with both measures rapidly achieving exponential growth at the rate associated with the cross-stream expansive strain e(sup at). In the "favourably" strained cases, the wake widths approach a constant and the velocity deficits ultimately decay rapidly as e(sup -2at). Although all three of these cases do exhibit the same asymptotic exponential behaviour, the time required to achieve this is longer for the cases that have been previously adversely strained (by at approx. equals 1). These simulations confirm the generality of the conclusions drawn in Rogers (2002) regarding the response of plane wakes to strain. The evolution of strained wakes is not consistent with the predictions of classical self-similar analysis; a more general equilibrium similarity solution is required to describe the results. At least for the cases

  12. Analysis of a Generally Oriented Crack in a Functionally Graded Strip Sandwiched Between Two Homogeneous Half Planes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shbeeb, N.; Binienda, W. K.; Kreider, K.

    1999-01-01

    The driving forces for a generally oriented crack embedded in a Functionally Graded strip sandwiched between two half planes are analyzed using singular integral equations with Cauchy kernels, and integrated using Lobatto-Chebyshev collocation. Mixed-mode Stress Intensity Factors (SIF) and Strain Energy Release Rates (SERR) are calculated. The Stress Intensity Factors are compared for accuracy with previously published results. Parametric studies are conducted for various nonhomogeneity ratios, crack lengths. crack orientation and thickness of the strip. It is shown that the SERR is more complete and should be used for crack propagation analysis.

  13. Stress intensity factors in bonded half planes containing inclined cracks and subjected to antiplane shear loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassani, J. L.; Erdogan, F.

    1978-01-01

    The antiplane shear problem for two bonded dissimilar half planes containing a semi-infinite crack or two arbitrarily located collinear cracks was considered. For the semi-infinite crack the problem was solved for a concentrated wedge load and the stress intensity factor and the angular distribution of stresses were calculated. For finite cracks the problem was reduced to a pair of integral equations. Numerical results were obtained for cracks fully imbedded in a homogeneous medium, one crack tip touching the interface, and a crack crossing the interface for various crack angles.

  14. Stress intensity factors in bonded half planes containing inclined cracks and subjected to antiplane shear loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassani, J. L.; Erdogan, F.

    1979-01-01

    The antiplane shear problem for two bonded dissimilar half planes containing a semi-infinite crack or two arbitrarily located collinear cracks is considered. For the semi-infinite crack the problem is solved for a concentrated wedge load and the stress intensity factor and the angular distribution of stresses are calculated. For finite cracks the problem is reduced to a pair of integral equations. Numerical results are obtained for cracks fully imbedded in a homogeneous medium, one crack tip touching the interface, and a crack crossing the interface for various crack angles.

  15. Strain oxidation cracking of austenitic stainless steels at 610 C

    SciTech Connect

    Calvar, M. Le; Scott, P.M.; Magnin, T.; Rieux, P.

    1998-02-01

    Strain oxidation cracking of both forged and welded austenitic stainless steels (SS) was studied. Creep and slow strain rate tests (SSRT) were performed in vacuum, air, and a gas furnace environment (air + carbon dioxide [CO{sub 2}] + water [H{sub 2}O]). Results showed cracking was environmentally dependent. Almost no cracking was observed in vacuum, whereas intergranular cracking was observed with increasing severity in passing from an air to a gas furnace environment. The most severe cracking was associated with formation of a less protective film formed in the gas furnace environment (air: haematite-like M{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide; gas furnace environment: spinel M{sub 3}O{sub 4} oxide). Cracking depended strongly on the carbon content and the sensitization susceptibility of the material: the higher the carbon content, the more susceptible the alloy. This cracking was believed to be similar to other oxidation-induced cracking phenomena.

  16. Intergranular strain evolution near fatigue crack tips in polycrystalline metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L. L.; Gao, Y. F.; Lee, S. Y.; Barabash, R. I.; Lee, J. H.; Liaw, P. K.

    2011-11-01

    The deformation field near a steady fatigue crack includes a plastic zone in front of the crack tip and a plastic wake behind it, and the magnitude, distribution, and history of the residual strain along the crack path depend on the stress multiaxiality, material properties, and history of stress intensity factor and crack growth rate. An in situ, full-field, non-destructive measurement of lattice strain (which relies on the intergranular interactions of the inhomogeneous deformation fields in neighboring grains) by neutron diffraction techniques has been performed for the fatigue test of a Ni-based superalloy compact tension specimen. These microscopic grain level measurements provided unprecedented information on the fatigue growth mechanisms. A two-scale model is developed to predict the lattice strain evolution near fatigue crack tips in polycrystalline materials. An irreversible, hysteretic cohesive interface model is adopted to simulate a steady fatigue crack, which allows us to generate the stress/strain distribution and history near the fatigue crack tip. The continuum deformation history is used as inputs for the micromechanical analysis of lattice strain evolution using the slip-based crystal plasticity model, thus making a mechanistic connection between macro- and micro-strains. Predictions from perfect grain-boundary simulations exhibit the same lattice strain distributions as in neutron diffraction measurements, except for discrepancies near the crack tip within about one-tenth of the plastic zone size. By considering the intergranular damage, which leads to vanishing intergranular strains as damage proceeds, we find a significantly improved agreement between predicted and measured lattice strains inside the fatigue process zone. Consequently, the intergranular damage near fatigue crack tip is concluded to be responsible for fatigue crack growth.

  17. Intergranular Strain Evolution near Fatigue Crack Tips in Polycrystalline Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Lili; Gao, Yanfei; Lee, Sooyeol; Barabash, Rozaliya; Lee, Jinhaeng; Liaw, Peter K

    2011-01-01

    The deformation field near a steady fatigue crack includes a plastic zone in front of the crack tip and a plastic wake behind it, and the magnitude, distribution, and history of the residual strain along the crack path depend on the stress multiaxiality, material properties, and history of stress intensity factor and crack growth rate. An in situ, full-field, non-destructive measurement of lattice strain (which relies on the intergranular interactions of the inhomogeneous deformation fields in neighboring grains) by neutron diffraction techniques has been performed for the fatigue test of a Ni-based superalloy compact tension specimen. These microscopic grain level measurements provided unprecedented information on the fatigue growth mechanisms. A two-scale model is developed to predict the lattice strain evolution near fatigue crack tips in polycrystalline materials. An irreversible, hysteretic cohesive interface model is adopted to simulate a steady fatigue crack, which allows us to generate the stress/strain distribution and history near the fatigue crack tip. The continuum deformation history is used as inputs for the micromechanical analysis of lattice strain evolution using the slip-based crystal plasticity model, thus making a mechanistic connection between macro- and micro-strains. Predictions from perfect grain-boundary simulations exhibit the same lattice strain distributions as in neutron diffraction measurements, except for discrepancies near the crack tip within about one-tenth of the plastic zone size. By considering the intergranular damage, which leads to vanishing intergranular strains as damage proceeds, we find a significantly improved agreement between predicted and measured lattice strains inside the fatigue process zone. Consequently, the intergranular damage near fatigue crack tip is concluded to be responsible for fatigue crack growth.

  18. The crack problem for a half plane stiffened by elastic cover plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1981-01-01

    An elastic half plane containing a crack and stiffened by a cover plate is discussed. The asymptotic nature of the stress state in the half plane around an end point of the stiffener to determine the likely orientation of a possible fracture initiation and growth was studied. The problem is formulated for an arbitrary oriented radial crack in a system of singular integral equations. For an internal crack and for an edge crack, the problem is solved and the stress intensity factors at the crack tips and the interface stress are calculated. A cracked half plane with two symmetrically located cover plates is also considered. It is concluded that the case of two stiffeners appears to be more severe than that of a single stiffener.

  19. Fatigue Crack Growth Rate and Stress-Intensity Factor Corrections for Out-of-Plane Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Herman, Dave J.; James, Mark A.

    2003-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth rate testing is performed by automated data collection systems that assume straight crack growth in the plane of symmetry and use standard polynomial solutions to compute crack length and stress-intensity factors from compliance or potential drop measurements. Visual measurements used to correct the collected data typically include only the horizontal crack length, which for cracks that propagate out-of-plane, under-estimates the crack growth rates and over-estimates the stress-intensity factors. The authors have devised an approach for correcting both the crack growth rates and stress-intensity factors based on two-dimensional mixed mode-I/II finite element analysis (FEA). The approach is used to correct out-of-plane data for 7050-T7451 and 2025-T6 aluminum alloys. Results indicate the correction process works well for high DeltaK levels but fails to capture the mixed-mode effects at DeltaK levels approaching threshold (da/dN approximately 10(exp -10) meter/cycle).

  20. A half plane and a strip with an arbitrarily located crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Arin, K.

    1973-01-01

    A technique is presented for dealing with the problem of an elastic domain containing an arbitrarily oriented internal crack. The problem is formulated as a system of integral equations for a fictitious layer of body forces imbedded in the plane along a closed smooth curve encircling the original domain. The problems of a half plane with a crack in the neighborhood of its free boundary and of an infinite strip containing a symmetrically located internal crack with an arbitrary orientation are considered as examples. In each case the stress intensity factors are computed and are given as functions of the crack angle.

  1. Out-of-plane deviation of a mode I+III crack encountering a tougher obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblond, Jean-Baptiste; Ponson, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    One possible explanation of out-of-plane deviations of cracks loaded in mode I+III was suggested by Gao and Rice in 1986. These authors noted that small in-plane undulations of the crack front, arising from fluctuations of the fracture toughness, should generate a small local mode-II component, causing the crack to depart from planarity. Their analysis is completed here by explicitly calculating the evolution in time of the out-of-plane deviation of a mode-I+III crack encountering a tougher obstacle. The calculation is based on (i) first-order formulae for the stress intensity factors of a crack slightly perturbed within and out of its plane; and (ii) a "double" propagation criterion combining a Griffith condition on the local energy-release rate and a Goldstein-Salganik condition on the local stress intensity factor of mode II. It is predicted that the crack must evolve toward a stationary state, wherein the orthogonal distance from the average fracture plane to the perturbed crack front is constant outside the obstacle and varies linearly across it. We hope that this theoretical prediction will encourage comparison with experiments, and propose a fracture test involving propagation of a mode-I+III crack through a 3D-printed specimen containing some designed obstacle. xml:lang="fr"

  2. Characterization of oriented cracks with differential strain analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegfried, R.; Simmons, G.

    1978-01-01

    Linear strain of a rock sample as a function of hydrostatic pressure can be measured with a precision of 2 millionths. Such high-precision data for three orthogonal directions allow calculation of the distribution function for the porosity due to cracks' closing completely at a given pressure. Such data for at least six independent directions yield the zero-pressure strain tensor due to cracks' closing completely at a given pressure. The principal values and axes of this tensor distribution function provide information about the orientation of cracks as a function of closure pressure. The mathematical basis for the technique is developed, and the technique is illustrated with differential strain data for two samples, the Westerly (Rhode Island) granite and the Twin Sisters (Washington) dunite. Strain-tensor calculations reveal that each of these samples has a different type of anisotropic crack distribution.

  3. Finite strain stress fields near the tip of an interface crack between a soft incompressible elastic material and a rigid substrate.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, V R; Hui, C-Y

    2009-05-01

    We present a numerical study of finite strain stress fields near the tip of an interface crack between a rigid substrate and an incompressible hyperelastic solid using the finite element method (FEM). The finite element (FE) simulations make use of a remeshing scheme to overcome mesh distortion. Analyses are carried out by assuming that the crack tip is either pinned, i.e., the elastic material is perfectly bonded (no slip) to the rigid substrate, or the crack lies on a frictionless interface. We focus on a material which hardens exponentially. To explore the effect of geometric constraint on the near tip stress fields, simulations are carried out under plane stress and plane strain conditions. For both the frictionless interface and the pinned crack under plane stress deformation, we found that the true stress field directly ahead of the crack tip is dominated by the normal opening stress and the crack face opens up smoothly. This is also true for an interface crack along a frictionless boundary in plane strain deformation. However, for a pinned interface crack under plane strain deformation, the true opening normal stress is found to be lower than the shear stress and the transverse normal stress. Also, the crack opening profile for a pinned crack under plane strain deformation is completely different from those seen in plane stress and in plane strain (frictionless interface). The crack face flips over and the tip angle is almost tangential to the interface. Our results suggest that interface friction can play a very important role in interfacial fracture of soft materials on hard substrates. PMID:19437055

  4. Numerical simulation of out-of-plane distortion fatigue crack growth in bridge girders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MIller, Paula A.

    Aging of the United States infrastructure systems has resulted in the degradation of many operational bridge structures throughout the country. Structural deficiencies can result from material fatigue caused by cyclical loadings leading to localized structural damage. While fatigue crack growth is viewed as a serviceability problem, unstable crack growth can compromise the integrity of the structure. Multi-girder bridges designed with transverse cross bracing systems can be prone to distortion fatigue at unstiffened web gaps. Cracking is exhibited within this fatigue prone region from the application of cyclical multi-mode loadings. Focus of fatigue analysis has largely been directed at pure Mode I loading through the development of AASHTO fatigue classifications for crack initiation and the Paris Law for crack propagation. Numerical modeling approaches through the ABAQUS Extended Finite Element Method offers a unique avenue in which this detail can be assessed. Finite element simulations were developed to first evaluate the applicability of the Paris Law crack propagation under multi-mode loading against experimental data. Following the validation, fatigue crack growth in plate girders with various web gap sizes was assessed due to mixed-mode loadings. Modeling results showed enlargement of horizontal initial crack lengths within stiffer web gap regions arrested crack development. Crack directionality was also seen to change as initial crack lengths were increased. From this research it is hypothesized that deterioration of the transverse stiffener connection can be minimized by increasing the horizontal length of initial fatigue cracks. Enlargement of the crack plane away from regions of localized stress concentrations within the web gap may result in arrestment of the out-of-plane distortion induced cracking.

  5. Near tip stress and strain fields for short elastic cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soediono, A. H.; Kardomateas, G. A.; Carlson, R. L.

    1994-01-01

    Recent experimental fatigue crack growth studies have concluded an apparent anomalous behavior of short cracks. To investigate the reasons for this unexpected behavior, the present paper focuses on identifying the crack length circumstances under which the requirements for a single parameter (K(sub I) or delta K(sub I) if cyclic loading is considered) characterization are violated. Furthermore, an additional quantity, the T stress, as introduced by Rice, and the related biaxiality ratio, B, are calculated for several crack lengths and two configurations, the single-edge-cracked and the centrally-cracked specimen. It is postulated that a two-parameter characterization by K and T (or B) is needed for the adequate description of the stress and strain field around a short crack. To further verify the validity of this postulate, the influence of the third term of the Williams series on the stress, strain and displacement fields around the crack tip and in particular on the B parameter is also examined. It is found that the biaxiality ratio would be more negative if the third term effects are included in both geometries. The study is conducted using the finite element method with linearly elastic material and isoparametric elements and axial (mode I) loading. Moreover, it is clearly shown that it is not proper to postulate the crack size limits for 'short crack' behavior as a normalized ratio with the specimen width, a/w; it should instead be stated as an absolute, or normalized with respect to a small characteristic dimension such as the grain size. Finally, implications regarding the prediction of cyclic (fatigue) growth of short cracks are discussed.

  6. Growth behavior of surface cracks in the circumferential plane of solid and hollow cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.; Shivakumar, V.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the growth behavior of surface fatigue cracks in the circumferential plane of solid and hollow cylinders. In the solid cylinders, the fatigue cracks were found to have a circular arc crack front with specific upper and lower limits to the arc radius. In the hollow cylinders, the fatigue cracks were found to agree accurately with the shape of a transformed semiellipse. A modification to the usual nondimensionalization expression used for surface flaws in flat plates was found to give correct trends for the hollow cylinder problem.

  7. Development of crystallographic-orientation-dependent internal strains around a fatigue-crack tip during overloading and underloading

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.; Huang, E.-W.; Wu, W.; Liaw, P.K.; Paradowska, A.M.

    2013-05-15

    In-situ neutron diffraction was employed to directly measure the crystallographic-orientation-dependent (i.e. hkl) internal strains as a function of distance from the crack tip on the pre-cracked Hastelloy C-2000 compact-tension specimen. Both in-plane (IP) and through-thickness (TT) strain evolutions for various grain orientations were examined during tensile overloading and compressive underloading cycles. After overloading, underloading and their combination loadings were applied and unloaded, the significantly different (hkl) residual strain profiles were obtained in the vicinity of the crack tip. The load responses of the (200) grain orientation in both the IP and TT directions were more significant than those of any other orientations. It is suggested that the different orientation-dependent strain distributions around the crack tip are caused by the combined effects of elastic and plastic anisotropy of each (hkl) reflection upon loading and the subsequent development of residual stresses generated near the crack tip during unloading as a result of the plastic deformation. - Highlights: ► (hkl) strains are examined in situ using neutron diffraction. ► Distinct strain responses are developed around the crack tip under loading. ► The strain response of the (200) grain orientation is more significant. ► Possible mechanisms for the orientation-dependent strain responses are provided.

  8. Fracture Mechanics of Thin, Cracked Plates Under Tension, Bending and Out-of-Plane Shear Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zehnder, Alan T.; Hui, C. Y.; Potdar, Yogesh; Zucchini, Alberto

    1999-01-01

    Cracks in the skin of aircraft fuselages or other shell structures can be subjected to very complex stress states, resulting in mixed-mode fracture conditions. For example, a crack running along a stringer in a pressurized fuselage will be subject to the usual in-plane tension stresses (Mode-I) along with out-of-plane tearing stresses (Mode-III like). Crack growth and initiation in this case is correlated not only with the tensile or Mode-I stress intensity factor, K(sub I), but depends on a combination of parameters and on the history of crack growth. The stresses at the tip of a crack in a plate or shell are typically described in terms of either the small deflection Kirchhoff plate theory. However, real applications involve large deflections. We show, using the von-Karman theory, that the crack tip stress field derived on the basis of the small deflection theory is still valid for large deflections. We then give examples demonstrating the exact calculation of energy release rates and stress intensity factors for cracked plates loaded to large deflections. The crack tip fields calculated using the plate theories are an approximation to the actual three dimensional fields. Using three dimensional finite element analyses we have explored the relationship between the three dimensional elasticity theory and two dimensional plate theory results. The results show that for out-of-plane shear loading the three dimensional and Kirchhoff theory results coincide at distance greater than h/2 from the crack tip, where h/2 is the plate thickness. Inside this region, the distribution of stresses through the thickness can be very different from the plate theory predictions. We have also explored how the energy release rate varies as a function of crack length to plate thickness using the different theories. This is important in the implementation of fracture prediction methods using finite element analysis. Our experiments show that under certain conditions, during fatigue crack

  9. A viscoelastic Unitary Crack-Opening strain tensor for crack width assessment in fractured concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciumè, Giuseppe; Benboudjema, Farid

    2016-09-01

    A post-processing technique which allows computing crack width in concrete is proposed for a viscoelastic damage model. Concrete creep is modeled by means of a Kelvin-Voight cell while the damage model is that of Mazars in its local form. Due to the local damage approach, the constitutive model is regularized with respect to finite element mesh to avoid mesh dependency in the computed solution (regularization is based on fracture energy). The presented method is an extension to viscoelasticity of the approach proposed by Matallah et al. (Int. J. Numer. Anal. Methods Geomech. 34(15):1615-1633, 2010) for a purely elastic damage model. The viscoelastic Unitary Crack-Opening (UCO) strain tensor is computed accounting for evolution with time of surplus of stress related to damage; this stress is obtained from decomposition of the effective stress tensor. From UCO the normal crack width is then derived accounting for finite element characteristic length in the direction orthogonal to crack. This extension is quite natural and allows for accounting of creep impact on opening/closing of cracks in time dependent problems. A graphical interpretation of the viscoelastic UCO using Mohr's circles is proposed and application cases together with a theoretical validation are presented to show physical consistency of computed viscoelastic UCO.

  10. Ultrafast vascular strain compounding using plane wave transmission.

    PubMed

    Hansen, H H G; Saris, A E C M; Vaka, N R; Nillesen, M M; de Korte, C L

    2014-03-01

    Deformations of the atherosclerotic vascular wall induced by the pulsating blood can be estimated using ultrasound strain imaging. Because these deformations indirectly provide information on mechanical plaque composition, strain imaging is a promising technique for differentiating between stable and vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. This paper first explains 1-D radial strain estimation as applied intravascularly in coronary arteries. Next, recent methods for noninvasive vascular strain estimation in a transverse imaging plane are discussed. Finally, a compounding technique that our group recently developed is explained. This technique combines motion estimates of subsequently acquired focused ultrasound images obtained at various insonification angles. However, because the artery moves and deforms during the multi-angle acquisition, errors are introduced when compounding. Recent advances in computational power have enabled plane wave ultrasound acquisition, which allows 100 times faster image acquisition and thus might resolve the motion artifacts. In this paper the performance of strain imaging using plane wave compounding is investigated using simulations of an artery with a vulnerable plaque and experimental data of a two-layered vessel phantom. The results show that plane wave compounding outperforms 0° focused strain imaging. For the simulations, the root mean squared error reduced by 66% and 50% for radial and circumferential strain, respectively. For the experiments, the elastographic signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratio (SNR(e) and CNR(e)) increased with 2.1 dB and 3.7 dB radially, and 5.6 dB and 16.2dB circumferentially. Because of the high frame rate, the plane wave compounding technique can even be further optimized and extended to 3D in future.

  11. Experimental and Analytical Investigations on Plane Strain Toughness for 7085 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuey, R. T.; Barlat, F.; Karabin, M. E.; Chakrabarti, D. J.

    2009-02-01

    Data are presented on plane strain fracture toughness, yield strength, and strain hardening for three orientations of samples from quarter-thickness ( t/4) and midthickness ( t/2) locations of alloy 7085 plates with different gages aged past peak strength with different 2nd step aging times (T7X). These data are fit to an expression adapted from Hahn and Rosenfield (1968), in which toughness is proportional to strain hardening, the square root of yield strength, and the square root of a critical strain ɛ c . Strain-hardening exponent n is replaced by an alternative measure, since the stress-strain data do not follow a power law. With increased overaging, the increase of strain hardening dominates the decrease of strength, such that toughness increases. The critical strain, which represents the influence of the microstructure on toughness, has no trend with overaging time. Constituents and grain boundary precipitates, thought to be the microstructural elements most differentiating alloy 7085 from alloy 7050, are quantified at t/4 and at t/2 on one plate. From this the greater critical strain at t/2 than at t/4 is mainly attributed to greater effective spacing of constituents. Critical strain is also greater with longitudinal loading and crack propagating in the long transverse direction, but definite understanding of this will require better anisotropic fracture mechanics and further microstructural characterization.

  12. Description of crack growth using the strip-yield model for computation of crack opening loads, crack tip stretch, and strain rates

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, A.U. de; Hoeve, H.J. ten; Henriksen, T.K.

    1999-07-01

    Nowadays, application of the strip-yield model for computation of crack opening load levels is well known. In this paper the incremental formulation of a fatigue crack growth law is used to demonstrate the role of the crack opening load level in time-independent fatigue crack growth. Less known is the ability of the strip-yield model to define the strain rate at the crack tip. A threshold level {dot {var{underscore}epsilon}}{sub th} of this strain rate is introduced and used to formulate a criterion for initiation of time-dependent accelerated fatigue crack growth. This process is called corrosion fatigue. To account for effects of environment and frequency on the crack growth rate a time-dependent part is added to the incremental fatigue crack growth law. The resulting incremental crack growth equation is integrated to obtain the crack growth rate for a load cycle. The model discussed in this paper is a mechanical model. Physical aspects other than strain rate, loading frequency and load wave shape are not modeled in an explicit way. Hence, the model is valid for specific environment/base metal combinations. However, in consideration of the effects of small variations of environment, temperature, and other variables on the crack growth rates, it can be used as a reference solution. The fatigue crack growth model has been implemented in the NASGRO (ESACRACK) software. The time-dependent part is still subject to further evaluation.

  13. Crack Growth Mechanisms under Anti-Plane Shear in Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, Allison Lynne

    The research conducted for this dissertation focuses on determining the mechanisms associated with crack growth in polymer matrix composite laminates subjected to anti-plane shear (mode III) loading. For mode III split-beam test methods were proposed, and initial evaluations were conducted. A single test method was selected for further evaluation. Using this test method, it was determined that the apparent mode III delamination toughness, GIIIc , depended on geometry, which indicated a true material property was not being measured. Transverse sectioning and optical microscopy revealed an array of transverse matrix cracks, or echelon cracks, oriented at approximately 45° and intersecting the plane of the delamination. Subsequent investigations found the echelon array formed prior to the onset of planar delamination advance and that growth of the planar delamination is always coupled to echelon array formation in these specimens. The evolution of the fracture surfaces formed by the echelon array and planar delamination were studied, and it was found that the development was similar to crack growth in homogenous materials subjected to mode III or mixed mode I-III loading, although the composite laminate architecture constrained the fracture surface development differently than homogenous materials. It was also found that, for split-beam specimens such as those used herein, applying an anti-plane shear load results in twisting of the specimen's uncracked region which gives rise to a mixed-mode I-III load condition. This twisting has been related to the apparent mode III toughness as well as the orientation of the transverse matrix cracks. A finite element model was then developed to study the mechanisms of initial echelon array formation. From this, it is shown that an echelon array will develop, but will become self-limiting prior to the onset of planar delamination growth.

  14. Analysis of Mode III Elastodynamic Cracked Plane using the Fractal Two-Level Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J.; Lee, Y. Y.; Leung, A. Y. T.

    2010-05-01

    In this study, the fractal two-level finite element method, which has mainly been used for static cracked plane problems, is applied to the cracked plane problem. Using the transformation process in the proposed method, the infinite dimension of the finite element matrices that are assembled for a singular region is made finite in terms of the dynamics stress intensity factors directly, and thus the computational time can be reduced significantly. The Newmark time integration scheme is then used to obtain the dynamic stress intensity factors. The results from the proposed method are in reasonable agreement with those of classical methods. The main drawback of the time integration scheme is that numerical oscillations are induced in some cases.

  15. Detection of cracks under cladding using magneto-optic imaging and rotating in-plane magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, Gerald L.; Skaugset, Richard L.; Thome, David K.; Shih, William C.

    1996-11-01

    Conventional nondestructive inspection (NDI) of steel components, using magnetic particle, flux-leakage or near surface ultrasonic methods, is rendered difficult by the presence of protective coatings such as paint or stainless- steel cladding. Thick-section nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs), having as-welded cladding up to 0.25 inches thick are a case in point. Here, magnetic particle techniques do not work and ultrasonic techniques are difficult to apply because of cladding roughens and variable elastic properties in the cladding and the weld interface. An NDI technique that is essentially unaffected by standard thicknesses of protective coatings would be a major advance. Magneto-optic imaging is one such technique. While conventional magneto-optic/eddy current imagers (MOIs) are a proven technology in the NDI of nonferromagnetic conductors, they do not possess a self-contained method for magnetizing steel. The purpose of this work was to develop methods for producing rotating, in-plane magnetization and then combine this technology with magneto-optic imaging to produce a self-contained instrument capable of real-time imaging of cracks in steel through protective coatings. We successfully demonstrated rotating in-plane magnetization using special 'quadrature' magnetic-yokes designed to accommodate both flat and cylindrical steel surfaces. The yokes were attached one at a time, to an MOI of reduced size, and the combined system was placed on a sample of the appropriate curvature containing cracks. A two-channel power amplifier was used to drive the yoke coils in quadrature. The resulting crack images were found to be much less sensitive to liftoff than conventional magnetic particle or flux-leakage NDI. In particular, cracks in steel were successfully imaged through 0.125 inches of stainless-steel cladding, making it likely that images of cracks in steel under even thicker cladding should be possible after further development of the technology. Unlike

  16. Fracture angle and strain-energy-density-factor of a crack at hole at an arbitrary angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Y. C.; Forman, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    For both the maximum stress criterion and strain-energy-density-factor (S) theory, fracture angle (the initial angle of crack growth) is predicted by using opening and sliding mode stress intensity factors. These theoretical predictions are consistent with experimental fracture angles. For the S theory, the crack spreads in the direction of the negative fracture angle in a plane for which S is a minimum. This quantity was obtained analytically. The experimental data of the critical S on plexiglass fracture specimens remains essentially constant.

  17. Finite Element Modeling of Plane Strain Toughness for 7085 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabin, M. E.; Barlat, F.; Shuey, R. T.

    2009-02-01

    In this work, the constitutive model for 7085-T7X (overaged) aluminum alloy plate samples with controlled microstructures was developed. Different lengths of 2nd step aging times produced samples with similar microstructure but different stress-strain curves ( i.e., different nanostructure). A conventional phenomenological strain-hardening law with no strain gradient effects was proposed to capture the peculiar hardening behavior of the material samples investigated in this work. The classical Gurson-Tvergaard potential, which includes the influence of void volume fraction (VVF) on the plastic flow behavior, as well as an extension proposed by Leblond et al.,[3] were considered. Unlike the former, the latter is able to account for the influence of strain hardening on the VVF growth. All the constitutive coefficients used in this work were based on experimental stress-strain curves obtained in uniaxial tension and on micromechanical modeling results of a void embedded in a matrix. These material models were used in finite element (FE) simulations of a compact tension (CT) specimen. An engineering criterion based on the instability of plastic flow at a crack tip was used for the determination of plane strain toughness K Ic . The influence of the microstructure was lumped into a single state variable, the initial void volume fraction. The simulation results showed that the strain-hardening behavior has a significant influence on K Ic .

  18. The influence of strain rate and hydrogen on the plane-strain ductility of Zircaloy cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Link, T.M.; Motta, A.T.; Koss, D.A.

    1998-03-01

    The authors studied the ductility of unirradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding under loading conditions prototypical of those found in reactivity-initiated accidents (RIA), i.e.: near plane-strain deformation in the hoop direction (transverse to the cladding axis) at room temperature and 300 C and high strain rates. To conduct these studies, they developed a specimen configuration in which near plane-strain deformation is achieved in the gage section, and a testing methodology that allows one to determine both the limit strain at the onset of localized necking and the fracture strain. The experiments indicate that there is little effect of strain rate (10{sup {minus}3} to 10{sup 2} s{sup {minus}1}) on the ductility of unhydrided Zircaloy tubing deformed under near plane-strain conditions at either room temperature or 300 C. Preliminary experiments on cladding containing 190 ppm hydrogen show only a small loss of fracture strain but no clear effect on limit strain. The experiments also indicate that there is a significant loss of Zircaloy ductility when surface flaws are present in the form of thickness imperfections.

  19. To Crack or Not to Crack: Strain in High TemperatureSuperconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Godeke, Arno

    2007-08-22

    Round wire Bi 2212 is emerging as a viable successor ofNb3Sn in High Energy Physics and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, to generatemagnetic fields that surpass the intrinsic limitations of Nb3Sn. Ratherbold claims are made on achievable magnetic fields in applications usingBi 2212, due to the materials' estimated critical magnetic field of 100 Tor higher. High transport currents in high magnetic fields, however, leadto large stress on, and resulting large strain in the superconductor. Theeffect of strain on the critical properties of Bi-2212 is far fromunderstood, and strain is, as with Nb3Sn, often treated as a secondaryparameter in the design of superconducting magnets. Reversibility of thestrain induced change of the critical surface of Nb3Sn, points to anelectronic origin of the observed strain dependence. Record breaking highfield magnets are enabled by virtue of such reversible behavior. Straineffects on the critical surface of Bi-2212, in contrast, are mainlyirreversible and suggest a non-electronic origin of the observed straindependence, which appears to be dominated by the formation of cracks inthe superconductor volumes. A review is presented of available results onthe effects of strain on the critical surface of Bi-2212, Bi-2223 andYBCO. It is shown how a generic behavior emerges for the (axial) straindependence of the critical current density, and how the irreversiblereduction of the critical current density is dominated by strain inducedcrack formation in the superconductor. From this generic model it becomesclear that magnets using high temperature superconductors will be strainlimited far before the intrinsic magnetic field limitations will beapproached, or possibly even before the magnetic field limitation ofNb3Sn can be surpassed. On a positive note, in a very promising recentresult from NIST on the axial strain dependence of the critical currentdensity in extremely well aligned YBCO, reversible behavior was observed.This result emphasizes the need

  20. I-V characteristics of in-plane and out-of-plane strained edge-hydrogenated armchair graphene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Cartamil-Bueno, S. J. E-mail: rbolivar@ugr.es; Rodríguez-Bolívar, S. E-mail: rbolivar@ugr.es

    2015-06-28

    The effects of tensile strain on the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of hydrogenated-edge armchair graphene nanoribbons are investigated by using DFT theory. The strain is introduced in two different ways related to the two types of systems studied in this work: in-plane strained systems (A) and out-of-plane strained systems due to bending (B). These two kinds of strain lead to make a distinction among three cases: in-plane strained systems with strained electrodes (A1) and with unstrained electrodes (A2), and out-of-plane homogeneously strained systems with unstrained, fixed electrodes (B). The systematic simulations to calculate the electronic transmission between two electrodes were focused on systems of 8 and 11 dimers in width. The results show that the differences between cases A2 and B are negligible, even though the strain mechanisms are different: in the plane case, the strain is uniaxial along its length; while in the bent case, the strain is caused by the arc deformation. Based on the study, a new type of nanoelectromechanical system solid state switching device is proposed.

  1. Investigation of flaw geometry and loading effects on plane strain fracture in metallic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, L. R.; Finger, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    The effects on fracture and flaw growth of weld-induced residual stresses, combined bending and tension stresses, and stress fields adjacent to circular holes in 2219-T87 aluminum and 5AI-2.5Sn(ELI) titanium alloys were evaluated. Static fracture tests were conducted in liquid nitrogen; fatigue tests were performed in room air, liquid nitrogen, and liquid hydrogen. Evaluation of results was based on linear elastic fracture mechanics concepts and was directed to improving existing methods of estimating minimum fracture strength and fatigue lives for pressurized structure in spacecraft and booster systems. Effects of specimen design in plane-strain fracture toughness testing were investigated. Four different specimen types were tested in room air, liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen environments using the aluminum and titanium alloys. Interferometry and holograph were used to measure crack-opening displacements in surface-flawed plexiglass test specimens. Comparisons were made between stress intensities calculated using displacement measurements, and approximate analytical solutions.

  2. Characterization of a soft elastomeric capacitive strain sensor for fatigue crack monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangxiong; Li, Jian; Laflamme, Simon; Bennett, Caroline; Matamoros, Adolfo

    2015-04-01

    Fatigue cracks have been one of the major factors for the deterioration of steel bridges. In order to maintain structural integrity, monitoring fatigue crack activities such as crack initiation and propagation is critical to prevent catastrophic failure of steel bridges due to the accumulation of fatigue damage. Measuring the strain change under cracking is an effective way of monitoring fatigue cracks. However, traditional strain sensors such as metal foil gauges are not able to capture crack development due to their small size, limited measurement range, and high failure rate under harsh environmental conditions. Recently, a newly developed soft elastomeric capacitive sensor has great promise to overcome these limitations. In this paper, crack detection capability of the capacitive sensor is demonstrated through Finite Element (FE) analysis. A nonlinear FE model of a standard ASTM compact tension specimen is created which is calibrated to experimental data to simulate its response under fatigue loading, with the goal to 1) depict the strain distribution of the specimen under the large area covered by the capacitive sensor due to cracking; 2) characterize the relationship between capacitance change and crack width; 3) quantify the minimum required resolution of data acquisition system for detecting the fatigue cracks. The minimum resolution serves as a basis for the development of a dedicated wireless data acquisition system for the capacitive strain sensor.

  3. Crack growth measured on flat and curved surfaces at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, T. W.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1967-01-01

    Multiple element continuity gage measures plane stress crack growth plus surface crack growth under plane strain conditions. The gage measures flat and curved surfaces and operates at cryogenic temperatures.

  4. Prediction of fatigue crack growth kinetics in the plane structural elements of aircraft in the biaxial stress state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanyavskij, A. A.; Karaev, K. Z.; Grigor'ev, V. M.; Koronov, M. Z.; Orlov, E. F.

    1991-07-01

    The kinetics of fatigue crack growth in the case of a complex stress state is investigated with particular reference to D16T aluminum alloy. By using simulation models in the form of plane cruciform specimens, the characteristics of fatigue crack growth are investigated under conditions of uniaxial and biaxial tension-compression, with the ratio of the main stresses varying from -1 to 1.5. An algorithm is developed which makes it possible to predict the kinetics of fatigue crack growth and the equivalent stress level under conditions of multiparametric loading.

  5. Concurrent Monitoring of In-plane Strain and Out-of-plane Displacement of Tire Using Digital Image Correlation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraoka, Naoki; Matsuzaki, Ryosuke; Todoroki, Akira

    In order to improve performance of anti lock brake system (ABS) and detect condition of road surface, intelligent tires that monitor strain of interior surface and rolling radius of tire are demanded. However, the high stiffness of an attached sensor like a strain gauge causes debonding of sensors from tire rubber. In the present study, noncontact concurrent monitoring method is proposed using digital image correlation method (DICM) and spotlight projection. In-plane strain and out-of-plane displacement (rolling radius) are calculated by using image processing with an image of interior surface of tire that is taken with a single CCD camera fixed on wheel rim. New monitoring system is applied to Al beam and commercially available radial tire. As a result, this monitoring system is proved to be able to measure in-plane strain and out-of-plane displacement with high accuracy, and confirmed to be effective for concurrent monitoring of tires.

  6. Strained layer superlattice focal plane array having a planar structure

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Jin K; Carroll, Malcolm S; Gin, Aaron; Marsh, Phillip F; Young, Erik W; Cich, Michael J

    2012-10-23

    An infrared focal plane array (FPA) is disclosed which utilizes a strained-layer superlattice (SLS) formed of alternating layers of InAs and In.sub.xGa.sub.1-xSb with 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5 epitaxially grown on a GaSb substrate. The FPA avoids the use of a mesa structure to isolate each photodetector element and instead uses impurity-doped regions formed in or about each photodetector for electrical isolation. This results in a substantially-planar structure in which the SLS is unbroken across the entire width of a 2-D array of the photodetector elements which are capped with an epitaxially-grown passivation layer to reduce or eliminate surface recombination. The FPA has applications for use in the wavelength range of 3-25 .mu.m.

  7. Analysis of a Griffith crack at the interface of two piezoelectric materials under anti-plane loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherrous, M.; Ferdjani, H.

    2016-11-01

    The main objective of this work is the contribution to the study of the piezoelectric structures which contain preexisting defect (crack). For that, we consider a Griffith crack located at the interface of two piezoelectric materials in a semi-infinite plane structure. The structure is subjected to an anti-plane shearing combined with an in-plane electric displacement. Using integral Fourier transforms, the equations of piezoelectricity are converted analytically to a system of singular integral equations. The singular integral equations are further reduced to a system of algebraic equations and solved numerically by using Chebyshev polynomials. The stress intensity factor and the electric displacement intensity factor are calculated and used for the determination of the energy release rate which will be taken as fracture criterion. At the end, numerical results are presented for various parameters of the problem; they are also presented for an infinite plane structure.

  8. Cracking and Stress-Strain Behavior of Rock-Like Material Containing Two Flaws Under Uniaxial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanlin; Zhang, Lianyang; Wang, Weijun; Pu, Chengzhi; Wan, Wen; Tang, Jingzhou

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates the cracking and stress-strain behavior, especially the local strain concentration near the flaw tips, of rock-like material containing two flaws. A series of uniaxial compression tests were carried out on rock-like specimens containing two flaws, with strain gauges mounted near the flaw tips to measure the local strain concentration under the uniaxial compressive loading. Four different types of cracks (wing cracks, anti-wing cracks, coplanar shear cracks and oblique shear cracks) and seven patterns of crack coalescences (T1 and T2; S1 and S2; and TS1, TS2 and TS3) are observed in the experiments. The type of crack coalescence is related to the geometry of the flaws. In general, the crack coalescence varies from the S-mode to the TS-mode and then to the T-mode with the increase of the rock bridge ligament angle. The stress-strain curves of the specimens containing two flaws are closely related to the crack development and coalescence process. The strain measurements indicate that the local tensile strain concentration below or above the pre-existing flaw tip causes wing or anti-wing cracks, while the local compressive strain concentration near the flaw tip is related to the shear crack. The measured local tensile strain shows a jump at the initiation of wing- and anti-wing cracks, reflecting the instant opening of the wing- and anti-wing crack propagating through the strain gauge. During the propagation of wing- and anti-wing cracks, the measured local tensile strain gradually increases with few jumps, implying that the opening deformation of wing- and anti-wing cracks occurs in a stable manner. The shear cracks initiate followed by a large and abrupt compressive strain jump and then quickly propagate in an unstable manner resulting in the failure of specimens.

  9. Dynamic optical interferometry applied to analyse out of plane displacement fields for crack propagation in brittle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedan, S.; Pop, O.; Valle, V.; Cottron, M.

    2006-08-01

    We propose in this paper, to analyse, the evolution of out-of-plane displacement fields for a crack propagation in brittle materials. As the crack propagation is a complex process that involves the deformation mechanisms, the out-of-plane displacement measurement gives pertinent information about the 3D effects. For investigation, we use the interferometric method. The optical device includes a laser source, a Michelson interferometer and an ultra high-speed CCD camera. To take into account the crack velocity, we dispose of a maximum frame rate of 1Mfps. The experimental tests have been carried out for a SEN (Single Edge Notch) specimen of PMMA material. The crack propagation is initiated by adding a dynamic energy given by the impact of a cutter on the initial crack. The obtained interferograms are analysed with a new phase extraction method entitled MPC [6]. This analysis, which has been developed specially for dynamic studies, gives the out-of-plane displacement with an accuracy of about 10 nm.

  10. The role of local strains from prior cold work on stress corrosion cracking of α-brass in Mattsson's solution

    SciTech Connect

    Ulaganathan, Jaganathan Newman, Roger C.

    2014-06-01

    The dynamic strain rate ahead of a crack tip formed during stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under a static load is assumed to arise from the crack propagation. The strain surrounding the crack tip would be redistributed as the crack grows, thereby having the effect of dynamic strain. Recently, several studies have shown cold work to cause accelerated crack growth rates during SCC, and the slip-dissolution mechanism has been widely applied to account for this via a supposedly increased crack-tip strain rate in cold worked material. While these interpretations consider cold work as a homogeneous effect, dislocations are generated inhomogeneously within the microstructure during cold work. The presence of grain boundaries results in dislocation pile-ups that cause local strain concentrations. The local strains generated from cold working α-brass by tensile elongation were characterized using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The role of these local strains in SCC was studied by measuring the strain distributions from the same regions of the sample before cold work, after cold work, and after SCC. Though, the cracks did not always initiate or propagate along boundaries with pre-existing local strains from the applied cold work, the local strains surrounding the cracked boundaries had contributions from both the crack propagation and the prior cold work. - Highlights: • Plastic strain localization has a complex relationship with SCC susceptibility. • Surface relief created by cold work creates its own granular strain localization. • Cold work promotes crack growth but several other factors are involved.

  11. Characterization of network parameters for UHMWPE by plane strain compression.

    PubMed

    Abreu, E L; Ngo, H D; Bellare, A

    2014-04-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (PE) is used as a bearing material for total joint replacement prostheses since it is a tough, wear-resistant semicrystalline polymer. Despite its high resistance to wear, PE components have shown measureable wear in vivo, which can cause wear-particle induced osteolysis. Crosslinking of PE using ionizing radiation has been shown to increase wear resistance since both chemical crosslinks and physical entanglements provide high resistance to wear. Molecular characterization of crosslinked PEs is usually conducted using equilibrium swelling or by quantifying gel content. In this study, we compared crosslink densities and molecular weight between crosslinks derived from equilibrium swelling to those obtained by applying the Gaussian and Eight-Chain model to describe plane strain compression of the PE melt. The latter approach has the advantage of accounting for contributions of entanglements to the overall crosslink density, which solvent-based techniques largely neglect. As expected, the crosslink density calculated from model fitting increased monotonically with increase in radiation dose in a 0-200kGy dose range, with a corresponding monotonic decrease in molecular weight between crosslinks, but provided higher values of crosslink density and correspondingly lower values of molecular weight between crosslinks compared to the equilibrium swelling technique.

  12. Evidence concerning crack-tip constraint and strain-rate effects in fracture-toughness testing

    SciTech Connect

    Merkle, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    The procedures for measuring the plane strain fracture toughness, K/sub Ic/, of metals were originally developed for relatively high yield strength materials, the toughnesses of which were not affected by stain rate. The application of these procedures to lower yield strength and higher toughness structural and pressure vessel steels have since revealed a perplexing combination of problems involving the effects of geometry, stable crack growth and strain rate on the measured values of toughness. Only the geometric problems were encountered in the development of the procedures for measuring K/sub Ic/. For fracture in the linear elastic range of the load-displacement curve, these problems were overcome by specifying specimen dimensions sufficiently large with respect of the plastic zone size at fracture. However, in the case of structural and pressure vessel steels, it is not always possible to test specimens large enough for fracture to occur prior to general yielding. Therefore, in these cases, the effects of large-scale yielding prior to fracture cannot be avoided, but since they presently have no analytical explanation they are being treated empirically.

  13. Characterization of optical anisotropy in quantum wells under compressive anisotropic in-plane strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biermann, Mark L.; Walters, Matthew; Diaz-Barriga, James; Rabinovich, W. S.

    2003-10-01

    Anisotropic in-plane strain in quantum wells leads to an optical polarization anisotropy that can be exploited for device applications. We have determined that for many anisotropic compressive strain cases, the dependence of the optical anisotropy is linear in the strain anisotropy. This result holds for a variety of well and barrier materials and widths and for various overall strain conditions. Further, the polarization anisotropy per strain anisotropy varies as the reciprocal of the energy separation of the relevant hole sub-bands. Hence, a general result for the polarization anisotropy per strain anisotropy is avialable for cases of compressive anisotropic in-plane strain.

  14. Strain and Cracking Surveillance in Engineered Cementitious Composites by Piezoresistive Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jia Huan; Hou, Tsung Chan

    2010-12-01

    Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECCs) are novel cement-based ultraductile materials which is crack resistant and undergoes strain hardening when loaded in tension. In particular, the material is piezoresistive with changes in electrical resistance correlated with mechanical strain. The unique electrical properties of ECC render them a smart material capable of measuring strain and the evolution of structural damage. In this study, the conductivity of the material prior to loading was quantified. The piezoresistive property of ECC structural specimens are exploited to directly measure levels of cracking pattern and tensile strain. Changes in ECC electrical resistance are measured using a four-probe direct-current (DC) resistance test as specimens are monotonically loaded in tension. The change in piezoresistivity correlates the cracking and strain in the ECC matrix and results in a nonlinear change in the material conductivity.

  15. Back-Face Strain for Monitoring Stable Crack Extension in Precracked Flexure Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    Calibrations relating back-face strain to crack length in precracked flexure specimens were developed for different strain gage sizes. The functions were verified via experimental compliance measurements of notched and precracked ceramic beams. Good agreement between the functions and experiments occurred, and fracture toughness was calculated via several operational methods: maximum test load and optically measured precrack length; load at 2 percent crack extension and optical precrack length; maximum load and back-face strain crack length. All the methods gave vary comparable results. The initiation toughness, K(sub Ii) , was also estimated from the initial compliance and load.The results demonstrate that stability of precracked ceramics specimens tested in four-point flexure is a common occurrence, and that methods such as remotely-monitored load-point displacement are only adequate for detecting stable extension of relatively deep cracks.

  16. Determination of Stress Coefficient Terms in Cracked Solids for Monoclinic Materials with Plane Symmetry at x3 = 0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, F. G.

    1998-01-01

    Determination of all the coefficients in the crack tip field expansion for monoclinic materials under two-dimensional deformation is presented in this report. For monoclinic materials with a plane of material symmetry at x(sub 3) = 0, the in-plane deformation is decoupled from the anti-plane deformation. In the case of in-plane deformation, utilizing conservation laws of elasticity and Betti's reciprocal theorem, together with selected auxiliary fields, T-stress and third-order stress coefficients near the crack tip are evaluated first from path-independent line integrals. To determine the T-stress terms using the J-integral and Betti's reciprocal work theorem, auxiliary fields under a concentrated force and moment acting at the crack tip are used respectively. Through the use of Stroh formalism in anisotropic elasticity, analytical expressions for all the coefficients including the stress intensity factors are derived in a compact form that has surprisingly simple structure in terms of the Barnett-Lothe tensors, L. The solution forms for degenerated materials, orthotropic, and isotropic materials are presented.

  17. Microstructure-sensitive small fatigue crack growth assessment. Effect of strain ratio multiaxial strain state and geometric discontinuities

    DOE PAGES

    Castelluccio, Gustavo M.; McDowell, David L.

    2015-09-16

    Fatigue crack initiation in the high cycle fatigue regime is strongly influenced by microstructural features. Research efforts have usually focused on predicting fatigue resistance against crack incubation without considering the early fatigue crack growth after encountering the first grain boundary. However, a significant fraction of the variability of the total fatigue life can be attributed to growth of small cracks as they encounter the first few grain boundaries, rather than crack formation within the first grain. Our paper builds on the framework previously developed by the authors to assess microstructure-sensitive small fatigue crack formation and early growth under complex loadingmore » conditions. Moreover, the scheme employs finite element simulations that explicitly render grains and crystallographic directions along with simulation of microstructurally small fatigue crack growth from grain to grain. The methodology employs a crystal plasticity algorithm in ABAQUS that was previously calibrated to study fatigue crack initiation in RR1000 Ni-base superalloy. Our work present simulations with non-zero applied mean strains and geometric discontinuities that were not previously considered for calibration. Results exhibit trends similar to those found in experiments for multiple metallic materials, conveying a consistent physical description of fatigue damage phenomena.« less

  18. Microstructure-sensitive small fatigue crack growth assessment. Effect of strain ratio multiaxial strain state and geometric discontinuities

    SciTech Connect

    Castelluccio, Gustavo M.; McDowell, David L.

    2015-09-16

    Fatigue crack initiation in the high cycle fatigue regime is strongly influenced by microstructural features. Research efforts have usually focused on predicting fatigue resistance against crack incubation without considering the early fatigue crack growth after encountering the first grain boundary. However, a significant fraction of the variability of the total fatigue life can be attributed to growth of small cracks as they encounter the first few grain boundaries, rather than crack formation within the first grain. Our paper builds on the framework previously developed by the authors to assess microstructure-sensitive small fatigue crack formation and early growth under complex loading conditions. Moreover, the scheme employs finite element simulations that explicitly render grains and crystallographic directions along with simulation of microstructurally small fatigue crack growth from grain to grain. The methodology employs a crystal plasticity algorithm in ABAQUS that was previously calibrated to study fatigue crack initiation in RR1000 Ni-base superalloy. Our work present simulations with non-zero applied mean strains and geometric discontinuities that were not previously considered for calibration. Results exhibit trends similar to those found in experiments for multiple metallic materials, conveying a consistent physical description of fatigue damage phenomena.

  19. In situ SEM observation of microscale strain fields around a crack tip in polycrystalline molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. J.; Li, W. C.; Jin, Y. J.; Wang, L. F.; Zhao, C. W.; Xing, Y. M.; Lang, F. C.; Yan, L.; Yang, S. T.

    2016-06-01

    In situ scanning electron microscopy was employed to investigate the crack initiation and propagation in polycrystalline molybdenum under uniaxial tensile load at room temperature. The microscale grid pattern was fabricated using the sputtering deposition technology on the specimen surface covered with a fine square mesh copper grid. The microscale strain fields around the crack tip were measured by geometric phase analysis technique and compared with the theoretical solutions based on the linear elastic fracture mechanics theory. The results showed that as the displacement increases, the crack propagated mainly perpendicular to the tensile direction during the fracture process of molybdenum. The normal strain ɛ xx and shear strain ɛ xy are relatively small, and the normal strain ɛ yy holds a dominant position in the deformation fields and plays a key role in the whole fracture process of molybdenum. With the increase in displacement, the ɛ yy increases rapidly and the two lobes grow significantly but maintain the same shape and orientation. The experimental ɛ yy is in agreement with the theoretical solution. Along the x-axis in front of the crack tip, there is minor discrepancy between the experimental ɛ yy and theoretical ɛ yy within 25 μm from the crack tip, but the agreement between them is very good far from the crack tip (>25 μm).

  20. Detection of Steel Fatigue Cracks with Strain Sensing Sheets Based on Large Area Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yao; Glisic, Branko

    2015-01-01

    Reliable early-stage damage detection requires continuous monitoring over large areas of structure, and with sensors of high spatial resolution. Technologies based on Large Area Electronics (LAE) can enable direct sensing and can be scaled to the level required for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of civil structures and infrastructure. Sensing sheets based on LAE contain dense arrangements of thin-film strain sensors, associated electronics and various control circuits deposited and integrated on a flexible polyimide substrate that can cover large areas of structures. This paper presents the development stage of a prototype strain sensing sheet based on LAE for crack detection and localization. Two types of sensing-sheet arrangements with size 6 × 6 inch (152 × 152 mm) were designed and manufactured, one with a very dense arrangement of sensors and the other with a less dense arrangement of sensors. The sensing sheets were bonded to steel plates, which had a notch on the boundary, so the fatigue cracks could be generated under cyclic loading. The sensors within the sensing sheet that were close to the notch tip successfully detected the initialization of fatigue crack and localized the damage on the plate. The sensors that were away from the crack successfully detected the propagation of fatigue cracks based on the time history of the measured strain. The results of the tests have validated the general principles of the proposed sensing sheets for crack detection and identified advantages and challenges of the two tested designs. PMID:25853407

  1. Initiation and Evolution of Matrix Cracking in Non-Symmetric Laminates under in-Plane and Flexural Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adumitroaie, Adi

    applications in the range of cryogenic temperatures. The process of matrix cracking under I, II, or mixed I-II modes conditions are included in the present model. The loading case can be in-plane, flexural or combination of the two. There is no limitation on the configuration of the laminate or on the number of the cracking plies, as it is the case of the most models available in the literature, where only symmetric stacking sequences are addressed. The analytical model is validated against available experimental data for the case of both membrane and flexural loading.

  2. Crack

    MedlinePlus

    ... sound the drug makes as it heats up. Short-Term Effects Crack is a stimulant that is absorbed through ... quickly, after about 5 or 10 minutes. Other short-term effects include: higher heart rate, breathing rate, blood pressure , ...

  3. Acoustic emission for characterising the crack propagation in strain-hardening cement-based composites (SHCC)

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, S.C.; Pirskawetz, S.; Zijl, G.P.A.G. van; Schmidt, W.

    2015-03-15

    This paper presents the analysis of crack propagation in strain-hardening cement-based composite (SHCC) under tensile and flexural load by using acoustic emission (AE). AE is a non-destructive technique to monitor the development of structural damage due to external forces. The main objective of this research was to characterise the cracking behaviour in SHCC in direct tensile and flexural tests by using AE. A better understanding of the development of microcracks in SHCC will lead to a better understanding of pseudo strain-hardening behaviour of SHCC and its general performance. ARAMIS optical deformation analysis was also used in direct tensile tests to observe crack propagation in SHCC materials. For the direct tensile tests, SHCC specimens were prepared with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibre with three different volume percentages (1%, 1.85% and 2.5%). For the flexural test beam specimens, only a fibre dosage of 1.85% was applied. It was found that the application of AE in SHCC can be a good option to analyse the crack growth in the specimens under increasing load, the location of the cracks and most importantly the identification of matrix cracking and fibre rupture or slippage.

  4. Strain energy density and surface layer energy for a crack-like ellipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kipp, M. E.; Sih, G. C.

    1973-01-01

    Some of the fundamental concepts of sharp crack fracture criteria are applied to cracks and narrow ellipses. The strain energy density theory is extended to notch boundaries, where the energy in a surface layer is calculated and the location of failure initiation is determined. The concept of a core region near the notch tip, and its consequences, are examined in detail. The example treated is that of an elliptical cavity loaded uniformly at a large distance from the hole, and at an angle to the hole; the results are shown to approach that of the crack solution for narrow ellipses, and to display quite satisfactory agreement with recently published experimental data under both tensile and compressive loading conditions. Results also indicate that in globally unstable configurations in brittle materials, the original loading and notch geometry are sufficient to predict the subsequent crack trajectory with considerable accuracy.

  5. Measurement of in-plane strain with dual beam spatial phase-shift digital shearography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xin; Chen, Xu; Li, Junrui; Wang, Yonghong; Yang, Lianxiang

    2015-11-01

    Full-field in-plane strain measurement under dynamic loading by digital shearography remains a big challenge in practice. A phase measurement for in-plane strain information within one time frame has to be achieved to solve this problem. This paper presents a dual beam spatial phase-shift digital shearography system with the capacity to measure phase distribution corresponding to in-plane strain information within a single time frame. Two laser beams with different wavelengths are symmetrically arranged to illuminate the object under test, and two cameras with corresponding filters, which enable simultaneous recording of two shearograms, are utilized for data acquisition. The phase information from the recorded shearograms, which corresponds to the in-plane strain, is evaluated by the spatial phase-shift method. The spatial phase-shift shearography system realizes a measurement of the in-plane strain through the introduction of the spatial phase-shift technique, using one frame after the loading and one frame before loading. This paper presents the theory of the spatial phase-shift digital shearography for in-plane strain measurement and its derivation, experimental results, and the technique’s potential.

  6. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of Interstitial Free Steel Via Slow Strain Rate Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murkute, Pratik; Ramkumar, J.; Mondal, K.

    2016-07-01

    An interstitial free steel is subjected to slow strain rate tests to investigate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior at strain rates ranging from 10-4 to 10-6s-1 in air and 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The ratios of time to failure, failure strain, and ultimate tensile stress at different strain rates in air to that in corrosive were considered as SCC susceptibility. Serrated stress-strain curve observed at lowest strain rate is explained by the Portevin-Le Chatelier effect. Maximum susceptibility to SCC at lowest strain rate is attributed to the soluble γ-FeOOH in the rust analyzed by Fourier Transformed Infrared spectroscopy. Mechanism for SCC relates to the anodic dissolution forming the groove, where hydrogen embrittlement can set in and finally fracture happens due to triaxiality.

  7. Cracking monitoring by FBG strain sensor in the small scale dam model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Liang; Li, Hongnan; Li, Dongsheng

    2009-03-01

    Accurate measurement of strain variation and effective prediction of failure within models has been a major objective for strain sensors in dam model tests. In this paper, a FBG strain sensor with enhanced strain sensitivity and packaged by two gripper tubes is presented and applied in the seismic tests of a small scale dam model. This paper discusses the principle of enhanced sensitivity of the FBG strain sensor. Calibration experiments were conducted to evaluate the sensor's strain transferring characteristics on plates of different material. This paper also investigates the applicability of the FBG strain sensors in seismic tests of a dam model by conducting a comparison between the test measurements of FBG sensors and analytical predictions, monitoring the failure progress and predicting the cracking inside the dam model. Results of the dam model tests prove that this FBG strain sensor has the advantages of small size, high precision and embedability, demonstrate promising potential in cracking and failure monitoring and in identification of the dam model.

  8. Fatigue crack initiation and strain-controlled fatigue of some high strength low alloy steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. H.; Fine, M. E.

    1982-01-01

    Initiation and growth of fatigue microcracks were investigated in several Nb and V alloyed high strength low alloy steels, including conventional and dual phase microstructures. Fatigue microcracks initiated along prominent slip bands. Macrocracks formed by linking up of small microcracks. At low applied stress or strain, the number of cycles to crack initiation increased with the cyclic yield stress. Comparing the cyclic stress-strain curves to the monotonie stress-strain curves, cyclic hardening or softening occurred, depending upon strain amplitude. Plateau regions were observed in plots of cyclic stress amplitude vs cyclic plastic strain amplitude obtained by increasing the total strain amplitude in steps after 30 cycles at each step. In polycrystalline 0.03 pct Nb steel, the plateau region was identified with prominent slip band formation, as others have observed in single crystals of copper, C-doped iron, and other metals.

  9. Ultrasensitive Cracking-Assisted Strain Sensors Based on Silver Nanowires/Graphene Hybrid Particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Song; Wei, Yong; Wei, Siman; Lin, Yong; Liu, Lan

    2016-09-28

    Strain sensors with ultrahigh sensitivity under microstrain have numerous potential applications in heartbeat monitoring, pulsebeat detection, sound signal acquisition, and recognition. In this work, a two-part strain sensor (i.e., polyurethane part and brittle conductive hybrid particles layer on top) based on silver nanowires/graphene hybrid particles is developed via a simple coprecipitation, reduction, vacuum filtration, and casting process. Because of the nonuniform interface, weak interfacial bonding, and the hybrid particles' point-to-point conductive networks, the crack and overlap morphologies are successfully formed on the strain sensor after a prestretching; the crack-based stain sensor exhibits gauge factors as high as 20 (Δε < 0.3%), 1000 (0.3% < Δε < 0.5%), and 4000 (0.8% < Δε < 1%). In addition, we demonstrate the sensing mechanism under strain results in the high gauge factor of the strain sensor. Combined with its good response to bending, high strain resolution, and high working stability, the developed strain sensor is promising in the applications of electronic skins, motion sensors, and health monitoring sensors.

  10. Ultrasensitive Cracking-Assisted Strain Sensors Based on Silver Nanowires/Graphene Hybrid Particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Song; Wei, Yong; Wei, Siman; Lin, Yong; Liu, Lan

    2016-09-28

    Strain sensors with ultrahigh sensitivity under microstrain have numerous potential applications in heartbeat monitoring, pulsebeat detection, sound signal acquisition, and recognition. In this work, a two-part strain sensor (i.e., polyurethane part and brittle conductive hybrid particles layer on top) based on silver nanowires/graphene hybrid particles is developed via a simple coprecipitation, reduction, vacuum filtration, and casting process. Because of the nonuniform interface, weak interfacial bonding, and the hybrid particles' point-to-point conductive networks, the crack and overlap morphologies are successfully formed on the strain sensor after a prestretching; the crack-based stain sensor exhibits gauge factors as high as 20 (Δε < 0.3%), 1000 (0.3% < Δε < 0.5%), and 4000 (0.8% < Δε < 1%). In addition, we demonstrate the sensing mechanism under strain results in the high gauge factor of the strain sensor. Combined with its good response to bending, high strain resolution, and high working stability, the developed strain sensor is promising in the applications of electronic skins, motion sensors, and health monitoring sensors. PMID:27599264

  11. Strain energy density: Distance criterion for the initiation of hydrogen-induced cracking of Alloy X-750

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.M. Jr.; Symons, D.M.; Kearns, J.J.

    1991-12-31

    A criterion for initiation of subcritical crack growth at blunt notches and sharp defects was developed and applied to hydrogen- induced cracking of the Ni-base superalloy X-750. Onset of crack growth is shown to occur when a critical strain energy density is attained at a distance from the notch and crack tips characteristic of the microstructure along the prospective crack path. Rising load crack growth initiation data were obtained using homogeneous hydrogen precharged notched and fatigue precracked bend specimens. Notch root radius, grain size and hydrogen concentration were varied. Crack growth initiation loads were dependent on both notch root radius and bulk precharged hydrogen concentration. These data were shown to be correlated using a critical strain energy at-a-distance (SEDAD) criterion. Furthermore, an elastic-plastic analysis of the strain energy distributions showed that the critical strain energy density value is attained at one grain diameter from the notch and fatigue precrack tips. Mechanical and microstructural aspects of crack growth process and relevance to hydrogen-induced cracking are discussed.

  12. Influence of uniaxial, biaxial and plane strain pre-straining on the dynamic tensile properties of high strength sheet steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larour, P.; Verleysen, P.; Bleck, W.

    2006-08-01

    The influence of pre-straining and microstructure on the dynamic properties of car body high strength steels has been investigated at room temperature. The mechanical properties of a dual phase steel DP600, a TRIP steel TRIP700 and an austenitic steel AISI 301LN2B (1.4318) have been determined performing high speed servohydraulic and split-Hopkinson bar tensile tests in the strain rate range from 0.005s-1 up to 950s-1. The pre-straining modes and levels, respectively 10% uniaxial, 10% plane strain and 5% biaxial pre-straining, have been chosen in this investigation according to industrial use. 10% plane strain pre-straining brings the highest increase of yield and tensile strength values. 5% biaxial and 10% uniaxial pre-straining have similar effect on strength properties. The austenitic steel presents a pronounced minimum for tensile strength values at around 1/s. A combination of adiabatic heating and exothermic γ to α' transformation produces some significant softening effects in the austenitic steel grade.

  13. Strain-induced corrosion cracking behaviour of low-alloy steels under boiling water reactor conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, H. P.; Ritter, S.

    2008-09-01

    The strain-induced corrosion cracking (SICC) behaviour of different low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and piping steels and of a RPV weld filler/weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) material was characterized under simulated boiling water reactor (BWR)/normal water chemistry (NWC) conditions by slow rising load (SRL) and very low-frequency fatigue tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens. Under highly oxidizing BWR/NWC conditions (ECP ⩾+50 mV SHE, ⩾0.4 ppm dissolved oxygen), the SICC crack growth rates were comparable for all materials (hardness <350 HV5) and increased (once initiated) with increasing loading rates and with increasing temperature with a possible maximum/plateau at 250 °C. A minimum KI value of 25 MPa m 1/2 had to be exceeded to initiate SICC in SRL tests. Above this value, the SICC rates increased with increasing loading rate d KI/d t, but were not dependent on the actual KI values up to 60 MPa m 1/2. A maximum in SICC initiation susceptibility occurred at intermediate temperatures around 200-250 °C and at slow strain rates in all materials. In contrast to crack growth, the SICC initiation susceptibility was affected by environmental and material parameters within certain limits.

  14. Nanoscale domains and preferred cracking planes in Pb(Zn1/3Nb2/3)O3-(6-7)% PbTiO3 single crystals studied by piezoresponse force microscopy and fractography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Meng Fei; Zeng, Kaiyang

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents recent studies on surface and cross-sectional domain structures of Pb(Zn1/3Nb2/3)O3-(6-7)%PbTiO3 (PZN-PT) single crystals using piezoresponse force microscopy and three-point bending technique. The surface domain structures for the rhombohedral-based single crystals in (001) orientation are found to be influenced by polishing process, whereas the surface domains on the (011)-oriented single crystals are aligned along [011¯] direction, unaffected by the polishing process. On the other hand, the domain structures on the cross-sectional fracture surface show preferential alignment which agrees reasonably with the rhombohedral dipoles on the {100} and {110} planes. The differences between the surface and cross-sectional domain structures could be attributed to stress compensation between the surface strain effect and the minimization of elastic energy. In addition, both surface and cross-sectional surface demonstrate nanoscale domains, about 100-200 nm in size. Further fractography observation suggests that the preferred cracking planes for the PZN-PT single crystals are {110} and {100} planes. The {110} planes may be the slip planes along which material pile up is observed upon indentation loading. The pile up results in tensile hoop stress, producing radial cracks along the {100} cleavage planes. To accommodate the localized stress change, new ferroelastic domains by mechanical stress are then formed without interrupting the out-of-plane piezoelectric response. Since the material pile up is thought to cause enhanced toughness along {110} planes, the PZN-PT single crystal in [011]-poled orientation exhibits more superior piezoelectric properties compared to that of the [001]-poled counterpart.

  15. Autofrettage: Stress distribution under load and retained stresses after depressurization. A modified plane-strain case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avitzur, Boaz

    1993-04-01

    There is a long-standing interest in developing a capability to predict the distribution of retained stresses in thick-walled pressure vessels after the removal of an internal pressure--post autofrettage. The key to such a prediction is in the capacity to compute the stress distribution in a vessel while under externally imposed stress sufficient enough to cause at least partial plastic deformation. A good approximation of the stress distribution was developed by Mises in his 1913 plane-stress solution. The fact that such vessels are not representative of the plane-stress condition not withstanding, Mises recognized that his solution was mathematically restricted to a limited range of vessels' wall ratios. More recently, Avitzur offered a solution similar to that of Mises, but for a plane-strain condition. Depending on the material's Poisson's factor, Avitzur's solution is also mathematically applicable for a limited range of vessels' wall ratios only. The wall ratio, beyond which Avitzur's solution in plane-strain is not applicable, is a few times larger than that which limits Mises' solution in plane-stress. This work introduces a modification to Avitzur's solution in plane-strain, which makes its applicability unlimited.

  16. Tunable biaxial in-plane compressive strain in a Si nanomembrane transferred on a polyimide film

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Munho; Mi, Hongyi; Cho, Minkyu; Seo, Jung-Hun; Ma, Zhenqiang; Zhou, Weidong; Gong, Shaoqin

    2015-05-25

    A method of creating tunable and programmable biaxial compressive strain in silicon nanomembranes (Si NMs) transferred onto a Kapton{sup ®} HN polyimide film has been demonstrated. The programmable biaxial compressive strain (up to 0.54%) was generated utilizing a unique thermal property exhibited by the Kapton HN film, namely, it shrinks from its original size when exposed to elevated temperatures. The correlation between the strain and the annealing temperature was carefully investigated using Raman spectroscopy and high resolution X-ray diffraction. It was found that various amounts of compressive strains can be obtained by controlling the thermal annealing temperatures. In addition, a numerical model was used to evaluate the strain distribution in the Si NM. This technique provides a viable approach to forming in-plane compressive strain in NMs and offers a practical platform for further studies in strain engineering.

  17. Tunable biaxial in-plane compressive strain in a Si nanomembrane transferred on a polyimide film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Munho; Mi, Hongyi; Cho, Minkyu; Seo, Jung-Hun; Zhou, Weidong; Gong, Shaoqin; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2015-05-01

    A method of creating tunable and programmable biaxial compressive strain in silicon nanomembranes (Si NMs) transferred onto a Kapton® HN polyimide film has been demonstrated. The programmable biaxial compressive strain (up to 0.54%) was generated utilizing a unique thermal property exhibited by the Kapton HN film, namely, it shrinks from its original size when exposed to elevated temperatures. The correlation between the strain and the annealing temperature was carefully investigated using Raman spectroscopy and high resolution X-ray diffraction. It was found that various amounts of compressive strains can be obtained by controlling the thermal annealing temperatures. In addition, a numerical model was used to evaluate the strain distribution in the Si NM. This technique provides a viable approach to forming in-plane compressive strain in NMs and offers a practical platform for further studies in strain engineering.

  18. Hydrogen Concentration and Strain Fields Near Fatigue Cracks in Pipeline Steel Measured Via Neutron Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Matthew; Slifka, Andrew; Drexler, Elizabeth; Hydrogen Pipeline Safety Team

    Hydrogen (H2) is desirable for energy storage as it is cleaner burning and can store a larger amount of energy than an equal mass of gasoline. One problem in the development of a hydrogen economy is to find or develop materials that ensure the safe, reliable, and cost-effective flow of energy from the source to the user. It is expected steels will be needed to serve this function. However, the existing network of natural gas pipeline, for example, is constructed of ferrous materials which are susceptible to embrittlement and subsequent increased fatigue crack growth rates after exposure to hydrogen. In order to improve current modeling efforts, experimental determination of hydrogen concentration, hydrogen diffusion rates, and strain fields are required to inform and validate the model. Here we report neutron imaging measurements of the hydrogen concentration near a fatigue crack and the corresponding strain field, measured via neutron transmission Bragg edge spectroscopy. Nist Materials Measurement Laboratory, Applied Chemicals and Materials Division.

  19. Effect of closure of collinear cracks on the stress-strain state and the limiting equilibrium of bent shallow shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatskii, I. P.; Makoviichuk, N. V.

    2011-05-01

    The problem of closure of collinear cracks during bending of a shallow shell is considered within the framework of the Kirchhoff theory. Crack closure is described using the model of contact along a line on one of the shell faces. Strain and moment intensity factors and fracture load are studied as functions of shell curvature and defect location, and the distribution of contact forces along the cracks is investigated.

  20. Optical Strain and Crack-Detection Measurements on a Rotating Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woike, Mark; Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Clem, Michelle; Fralick, Gustave

    2013-01-01

    The development of techniques for the in-situ measurement and structural health monitoring of the rotating components in gas turbine engines is of major interest to NASA. As part of this on-going effort, several experiments have been undertaken to develop methods for detecting cracks and measuring strain on rotating turbine engine like disks. Previous methods investigated have included the use of blade tip clearance sensors to detect the presence of cracks by monitoring the change in measured blade tip clearance and analyzing the combined disk-rotor system's vibration response. More recently, an experiment utilizing a novel optical Moiré based concept has been conducted on a subscale turbine engine disk to demonstrate a potential strain measurement and crack detection technique. Moiré patterns result from the overlap of two repetitive patterns with slightly different spacing. When this technique is applied to a rotating disk, it has the potential to allow for the detection of very small changes in spacing and radial growth in a rotating disk due to a flaw such as a crack. This investigation was a continuation of previous efforts undertaken in 2011-2012 to validate this optical concept. The initial demonstration attempted on a subscale turbine engine disk was inconclusive due to the minimal radial growth experienced by the disk during operation. For the present experiment a new subscale Aluminum disk was fabricated and improvements were made to the experimental setup to better demonstrate the technique. A circular reference pattern was laser etched onto a subscale engine disk and the disk was operated at speeds up to 12 000 rpm as a means of optically monitoring the Moiré created by the shift in patterns created by the radial growth due the presence of the simulated crack. Testing was first accomplished on a clean defect free disk as a means of acquiring baseline reference data. A notch was then machined in to the disk to simulate a crack and testing was repeated

  1. Optical Strain and Crack-Detection Measurements on a Rotating Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woike, Mark; Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Clem, Michelle M.; Fralick, Gustave

    2013-01-01

    The development of techniques for the in-situ measurement and structural health monitoring of the rotating components in gas turbine engines is of major interest to NASA. As part of this on-going effort, several experiments have been undertaken to develop methods for detecting cracks and measuring strain on rotating turbine engine like disks. Previous methods investigated have included the use of blade tip clearance sensors to detect the presence of cracks by monitoring the change in measured blade tip clearance and analyzing the combined disk-rotor system's vibration response. More recently, an experiment utilizing a novel optical Moiré based concept has been conducted on a subscale turbine engine disk to demonstrate a potential strain measurement and crack detection technique. Moiré patterns result from the overlap of two repetitive patterns with slightly different spacing. When this technique is applied to a rotating disk, it has the potential to allow for the detection of very small changes in spacing and radial growth in a rotating disk due to a flaw such as a crack. This investigation was a continuation of previous efforts undertaken in 2011 to 2012 to validate this optical concept. The initial demonstration attempted on a subscale turbine engine disk was inconclusive due to the minimal radial growth experienced by the disk during operation. For the present experiment a new subscale Aluminum disk was fabricated and improvements were made to the experimental setup to better demonstrate the technique. A circular reference pattern was laser etched onto a subscale engine disk and the disk was operated at speeds up to 12 000 rpm as a means of optically monitoring the Moiré created by the shift in patterns created by the radial growth due the presence of the simulated crack. Testing was first accomplished on a clean defect free disk as a means of acquiring baseline reference data. A notch was then machined in to the disk to simulate a crack and testing was

  2. Sudden bending of cracked laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sih, G. C.; Chen, E. P.

    1980-01-01

    A dynamic approximate laminated plate theory is developed with emphasis placed on obtaining effective solution for the crack configuration where the 1/square root of r stress singularity and the condition of plane strain are preserved. The radial distance r is measured from the crack edge. The results obtained show that the crack moment intensity tends to decrease as the crack length to laminate plate thickness is increased. Hence, a laminated plate has the desirable feature of stabilizing a through crack as it increases its length at constant load. Also, the level of the average load intensity transmitted to a through crack can be reduced by making the inner layers to be stiffer than the outer layers. The present theory, although approximate, is useful for analyzing laminate failure to crack propagation under dynamic load conditions.

  3. Engineering of optical polarization based on electronic band structures of A-plane ZnO layers under biaxial strains

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Hiroaki Tabata, Hitoshi; Hasuike, Noriyuki; Harima, Hiroshi

    2014-09-21

    In-plane anisotropic strains in A-plane layers on the electronic band structure of ZnO were investigated from the viewpoint of optical polarization anisotropy. Investigations utilizing k·p perturbation theory revealed that energy transitions and associated oscillation strengths were dependent on in-plane strains. The theoretical correlation between optical polarizations and in-plane strains was experimentally demonstrated using A-plane ZnO layers with different in-plane strains. Finally, optical polarization anisotropy and its implications for in-plane optical properties are discussed in relation to the energy shift between two orthogonal directions. Higher polarization rotations were obtained in an A-plane ZnO layer with in-plane biaxially compressive strains as compared to strain-free ZnO. This study provides detailed information concerning the role played by in-plane strains in optically polarized applications based on nonpolar ZnO in the ultra-violet region.

  4. The growth and coalescence of ellipsoidal voids in plane strain under combined shear and tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheyvaerts, F.; Onck, P. R.; Tekogˇlu, C.; Pardoen, T.

    2011-02-01

    New extensions of a model for the growth and coalescence of ellipsoidal voids based on the Gurson formalism are proposed in order to treat problems involving shear and/or voids axis not necessarily aligned with the main loading direction, under plane strain loading conditions. These extensions are motivated and validated using 3D finite element void cell calculations with overall plane strain enforced in one direction. The starting point is the Gologanu model dealing with spheroidal void shape. A void rotation law based on homogenization theory is coupled to this damage model. The predictions of the model closely agree with the 3D cell calculations, capturing the effect of the initial void shape and orientation on the void rotation rate. An empirical correction is also introduced for the change of the void aspect ratio in the plane transverse to the main axis of the void departing from its initially circular shape. This correction is needed for an accurate prediction of the onset of coalescence. Next, a new approach is proposed to take strain hardening into account within the Thomason criterion for internal necking, avoiding the use of strain hardening-dependent fitting parameters. The coalescence criterion is generalized to any possible direction of the coalescence plane and void orientation. Finally, the model is supplemented by a mathematical description of the final drop of the stress carrying capacity during coalescence. The entire model is developed for plane strain conditions, setting the path to a 3D extension. After validation of the model, a parametric study addresses the effect of shear on the ductility of metallic alloys for a range of microstructural and flow parameters, under different stress states. In general, the presence of shear, for identical stress triaxiality, decreases the ductility, partly explaining recent experimental results obtained in the low stress triaxiality regime.

  5. A numerical method for determining the strain rate intensity factor under plane strain conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, S.; Kuo, C.-Y.; Jeng, Y.-R.

    2016-07-01

    Using the classical model of rigid perfectly plastic solids, the strain rate intensity factor has been previously introduced as the coefficient of the leading singular term in a series expansion of the equivalent strain rate in the vicinity of maximum friction surfaces. Since then, many strain rate intensity factors have been determined by means of analytical and semi-analytical solutions. However, no attempt has been made to develop a numerical method for calculating the strain rate intensity factor. This paper presents such a method for planar flow. The method is based on the theory of characteristics. First, the strain rate intensity factor is derived in characteristic coordinates. Then, a standard numerical slip-line technique is supplemented with a procedure to calculate the strain rate intensity factor. The distribution of the strain rate intensity factor along the friction surface in compression of a layer between two parallel plates is determined. A high accuracy of this numerical solution for the strain rate intensity factor is confirmed by comparison with an analytic solution. It is shown that the distribution of the strain rate intensity factor is in general discontinuous.

  6. Bio-inspired sensitive and reversible mechanochromisms via strain-dependent cracks and folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Songshan; Zhang, Dianyun; Huang, Wenhan; Wang, Zhaofeng; Freire, Stephan G.; Yu, Xiaoyuan; Smith, Andrew T.; Huang, Emily Y.; Nguon, Helen; Sun, Luyi

    2016-07-01

    A number of marine organisms use muscle-controlled surface structures to achieve rapid changes in colour and transparency with outstanding reversibility. Inspired by these display tactics, we develop analogous deformation-controlled surface-engineering approaches via strain-dependent cracks and folds to realize the following four mechanochromic devices: (1) transparency change mechanochromism (TCM), (2) luminescent mechanochromism (LM), (3) colour alteration mechanochromism (CAM) and (4) encryption mechanochromism (EM). These devices are based on a simple bilayer system that exhibits a broad range of mechanochromic behaviours with high sensitivity and reversibility. The TCM device can reversibly switch between transparent and opaque states. The LM can emit intensive fluorescence as stretched with very high strain sensitivity. The CAM can turn fluorescence from green to yellow to orange as stretched within 20% strain. The EM device can reversibly reveal and conceal any desirable patterns.

  7. Bio-inspired sensitive and reversible mechanochromisms via strain-dependent cracks and folds

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Songshan; Zhang, Dianyun; Huang, Wenhan; Wang, Zhaofeng; Freire, Stephan G.; Yu, Xiaoyuan; Smith, Andrew T.; Huang, Emily Y.; Nguon, Helen; Sun, Luyi

    2016-01-01

    A number of marine organisms use muscle-controlled surface structures to achieve rapid changes in colour and transparency with outstanding reversibility. Inspired by these display tactics, we develop analogous deformation-controlled surface-engineering approaches via strain-dependent cracks and folds to realize the following four mechanochromic devices: (1) transparency change mechanochromism (TCM), (2) luminescent mechanochromism (LM), (3) colour alteration mechanochromism (CAM) and (4) encryption mechanochromism (EM). These devices are based on a simple bilayer system that exhibits a broad range of mechanochromic behaviours with high sensitivity and reversibility. The TCM device can reversibly switch between transparent and opaque states. The LM can emit intensive fluorescence as stretched with very high strain sensitivity. The CAM can turn fluorescence from green to yellow to orange as stretched within 20% strain. The EM device can reversibly reveal and conceal any desirable patterns. PMID:27389480

  8. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF CRACK AND STRAIN BEHAVIOR OF RC SLAB IN STEEL-CONCRETE COMPOSITE GIRDER UNDER NEGATIVE BENDING

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Junichi; Nakajima, Akinori; Suzuki, Yasuo

    The sophisticated numerical analysis method is required to simulate the strain behavior of the reinforcement and the crack width of the RC slab, although many researches are conducted on the cracking behavior of the RC slab in the composite girder under the negative bending. In this paper, the numerical analysis method is constructed to evaluate the strain behavior of the reinforcement and the crack width of the RC slab in the steel-concrete composite girder subjected to the negative bending. The analysis method using the rigid body spring model takes into account the imperfect composite action between the steel girder and the RC slab, the bond between the reinforcement and the concrete, and the shrinkage of the concrete. As a result, it is confirmed that the analysis method can simulate the crack and the strain behavior of RC slab quantitatively in the steel-concrete composite girder under the negative bending.

  9. Simultaneous realization of high catalytic activity and stability for catalytic cracking of n-heptane on highly exposed (010) crystal planes of nanosheet ZSM-5 zeolite.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xia; Zhang, Yaoyuan; Jiang, Guiyuan; Liu, Jia; Han, Shanlei; Zhao, Zhen; Wang, Ruipu; Li, Cong; Xu, Chunming; Duan, Aijun; Wang, Yajun; Liu, Jian; Wei, Yuechang

    2016-08-01

    Nanosheet ZSM-5 zeolite with highly exposed (010) crystal planes demonstrates high reactivity and good anti-coking stability for the catalytic cracking of n-heptane, which is attributed to the synergy of high external surface area and acid sites, fully accessible channel intersection acid sites, and hierarchical porosity caused by the unique morphology.

  10. The plane strain shear fracture of the advanced high strength steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Li

    2013-12-16

    The “shear fracture” which occurs at the high-curvature die radii in the sheet metal forming has been reported to remarkably limit the application of the advanced high strength steels (AHSS) in the automobile industry. However, this unusual fracture behavior generally cannot be predicted by the traditional forming limit diagram (FLD). In this research, a new experimental system was developed in order to simulate the shear fracture, especially at the plane strain state which is the most common state in the auto-industry and difficult to achieve in the lab due to sample size. Furthermore, the system has the capability to operate in a strain rate range from quasi-static state to the industrial forming state. One kinds of AHSS, Quenching-Partitioning (QP) steels have been performed in this test and the results show that the limiting fracture strain is related to the bending ratio and strain rate. The experimental data support that deformation-induced heating is an important cause of “shear fracture” phenomena for AHSS: a deformation-induced quasi-heating caused by smaller bending ratio and high strain rate produce a smaller limiting plane strain and lead a “shear fracture” in the component.

  11. Non-local dynamic solution of two parallel cracks in a functionally graded piezoelectric material under harmonic anti-plane shear wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hai-Tao; Sang, Jian-Bing; Zhou, Zhen-Gong

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates a functionally graded piezoelectric material (FGPM) containing two parallel cracks under harmonic anti-plane shear stress wave based on the non-local theory. The electric permeable boundary condition is considered. To overcome the mathematical difficulty, a one-dimensional non-local kernel is used instead of a two-dimensional one for the dynamic fracture problem to obtain the stress and the electric displacement fields near the crack tips. The problem is formulated through Fourier transform into two pairs of dual-integral equations, in which the unknown variables are jumps of displacements across the crack surfaces. Different from the classical solutions, that the present solution exhibits no stress and electric displacement singularities at the crack tips.

  12. Analysis of crack propagation as an energy absorption mechanism in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, D. F.; Murphy, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    The crack initiation and crack propagation capability was extended to the previously developed generalized plane strain, finite element micromechanics analysis. Also, an axisymmetric analysis was developed, which contains all of the general features of the plane analysis, including elastoplastic material behavior, temperature-dependent material properties, and crack propagation. These analyses were used to generate various example problems demonstrating the inelastic response of, and crack initiation and propagation in, a boron/aluminum composite.

  13. Slow Strain Rate Tensile Testing to Assess the Ability of Superalloys to Resist Environment-Assisted Intergranular Cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Banik, Anthony; McDevitt, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Intergranular fatigue crack initiation and growth due to environmental degradation, especially at notched features, can often limit the fatigue life of disk superalloys at high temperatures. For clear comparisons, the effects of alloy composition on cracking in air needs to be understood and compared separately from variables associated with notches and cracks such as effective stress concentration, plastic flow, stress relaxation, and stress redistribution. The objective of this study was to attempt using simple tensile tests of specimens with uniform gage sections to compare the effects of varied alloy composition on environment-assisted cracking of several powder metal and cast and wrought superalloys including ME3, LSHR, Udimet 720, ATI 718Plus alloy, Haynes 282, and Inconel 740. Slow and fast strain-rate tensile tests were found to be a useful tool to compare propensities for intergranular surface crack initiation and growth. The effects of composition and heat treatment on tensile fracture strain and associated failure modes were compared. Environment interactions were determined to often limit ductility, by promoting intergranular surface cracking. The response of various superalloys and heat treatments to slow strain rate tensile testing varied substantially, showing that composition and microstructure can significantly influence environmental resistance to cracking.

  14. Stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 using the constant strain rate test

    SciTech Connect

    Bulischeck, T. S.; van Rooyen, D.

    1980-01-01

    The most recent corrosion problems experienced in nuclear steam generators tubed with Inconel alloy 600 is a phenomenon labeled ''denting''. Denting has been found in various degrees of severity in many operating pressurized water reactors. Laboratory investigations have shown that Inconel 600 exhibits intergranular SCC when subjected to high stresses and exposed to deoxygenated water at elevated temperatures. A research project was initiated at Brookhaven National Laboratory in an attempt to improve the qualitative and quantitative understanding of factors influencing SCC in high temperature service-related environments. An effort is also being made to develop an accelerated test method which could be used to predict the service life of tubes which have been deformed or are actively denting. Several heats of commercial Inconel 600 tubing were procured for testing in deaerated pure and primary water at temperatures from 290 to 365/sup 0/C. U-bend type specimens were used to determine crack initiation times which may be expected for tubes where denting has occurred but is arrested and provide baseline data for judging the accelerating effects of the slow strain rate method. Constant extension rate tests were employed to determine the crack velocities experienced in the crack propagation stage and predict failure times of tubes which are actively denting. 8 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Note: Optimization of piezoresistive response of pure carbon nanotubes networks as in-plane strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yu; Chen, L.; Sammynaiken, R.; Lin, Y.; Zhang, W. J.

    2011-12-01

    The use of carbon nanotubes (CNT) for the application in in-plane strain detection is promising. In recent years, in-plane strain sensors constructed from CNT networks have been developed; however, few studied optimization of these sensors. In this paper, a study of the optimization of pure CNT networks in terms of piezoresistive response is reported. The so-called pure CNT networks are CNT networks free of surfactants. The performances of piezoresistive response are gauge factor (GF) and linearity. The variables are the number of layers of networks, concentration of CNT solution, and length of sonication time. As a result, the study concluded an optimal pure CNT networks sensor (GF: 2.59, linearity 0.98) with ten layers of networks, 0.8 mg/ml concentration, and 2 h of sonication time.

  16. The unique effect of in-plane anisotropic strain in the magnetization control by electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. Y.; Wang, J.; Hu, F. X.; Liu, Y.; Kuang, H.; Wu, R. R.; Sun, J. R.; Shen, B. G.

    2016-05-01

    The electric field control of magnetization in both (100)- and (011)-Pr0.7Sr0.3MnO3/Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)0.7Ti0.3O3(PSMO/PMN-PT) heterostructures were investigated. It was found that the in-plane isotropic strain induced by electric field only slightly reduces the magnetization at low temperature in (100)-PSMO/PMN-PT film. On the other hand, for (011)-PSMO/PMN-PT film, the in-plane anisotropic strain results in in-plane anisotropic, nonvolatile change of magnetization at low-temperature. The magnetization, remanence and coercivity along in-plane [100] direction are suppressed by the electric field while the ones along [01-1] direction are enhanced, which is ascribed to the extra effective magnetic anisotropy induced by the electric field via anisotropic piezostrains. More interestingly, such anisotropic modulation behaviors are nonvolatile, demonstrating a memory effect.

  17. Biologically inspired crack delocalization in a high strain-rate environment.

    PubMed

    Knipprath, Christian; Bond, Ian P; Trask, Richard S

    2012-04-01

    Biological materials possess unique and desirable energy-absorbing mechanisms and structural characteristics worthy of consideration by engineers. For example, high levels of energy dissipation at low strain rates via triggering of crack delocalization combined with interfacial hardening by platelet interlocking are observed in brittle materials such as nacre, the iridescent material in seashells. Such behaviours find no analogy in current engineering materials. The potential to mimic such toughening mechanisms on different length scales now exists, but the question concerning their suitability under dynamic loading conditions and whether these mechanisms retain their energy-absorbing potential is unclear. This paper investigates the kinematic behaviour of an 'engineered' nacre-like structure within a high strain-rate environment. A finite-element (FE) model was developed which incorporates the pertinent biological design features. A parametric study was carried out focusing on (i) the use of an overlapping discontinuous tile arrangement for crack delocalization and (ii) application of tile waviness (interfacial hardening) for improved post-damage behaviour. With respect to the material properties, the model allows the permutation and combination of a variety of different material datasets. The advantage of such a discontinuous material shows notable improvements in sustaining high strain-rate deformation relative to an equivalent continuous morphology. In the case of the continuous material, the shockwaves propagating through the material lead to localized failure while complex shockwave patterns are observed in the discontinuous flat tile arrangement, arising from platelet interlocking. The influence of the matrix properties on impact performance is investigated by varying the dominant material parameters. The results indicate a deceleration of the impactor velocity, thus delaying back face nodal displacement. A final series of FE models considered the

  18. Biologically inspired crack delocalization in a high strain-rate environment

    PubMed Central

    Knipprath, Christian; Bond, Ian P.; Trask, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    Biological materials possess unique and desirable energy-absorbing mechanisms and structural characteristics worthy of consideration by engineers. For example, high levels of energy dissipation at low strain rates via triggering of crack delocalization combined with interfacial hardening by platelet interlocking are observed in brittle materials such as nacre, the iridescent material in seashells. Such behaviours find no analogy in current engineering materials. The potential to mimic such toughening mechanisms on different length scales now exists, but the question concerning their suitability under dynamic loading conditions and whether these mechanisms retain their energy-absorbing potential is unclear. This paper investigates the kinematic behaviour of an ‘engineered’ nacre-like structure within a high strain-rate environment. A finite-element (FE) model was developed which incorporates the pertinent biological design features. A parametric study was carried out focusing on (i) the use of an overlapping discontinuous tile arrangement for crack delocalization and (ii) application of tile waviness (interfacial hardening) for improved post-damage behaviour. With respect to the material properties, the model allows the permutation and combination of a variety of different material datasets. The advantage of such a discontinuous material shows notable improvements in sustaining high strain-rate deformation relative to an equivalent continuous morphology. In the case of the continuous material, the shockwaves propagating through the material lead to localized failure while complex shockwave patterns are observed in the discontinuous flat tile arrangement, arising from platelet interlocking. The influence of the matrix properties on impact performance is investigated by varying the dominant material parameters. The results indicate a deceleration of the impactor velocity, thus delaying back face nodal displacement. A final series of FE models considered the

  19. Biologically inspired crack delocalization in a high strain-rate environment.

    PubMed

    Knipprath, Christian; Bond, Ian P; Trask, Richard S

    2012-04-01

    Biological materials possess unique and desirable energy-absorbing mechanisms and structural characteristics worthy of consideration by engineers. For example, high levels of energy dissipation at low strain rates via triggering of crack delocalization combined with interfacial hardening by platelet interlocking are observed in brittle materials such as nacre, the iridescent material in seashells. Such behaviours find no analogy in current engineering materials. The potential to mimic such toughening mechanisms on different length scales now exists, but the question concerning their suitability under dynamic loading conditions and whether these mechanisms retain their energy-absorbing potential is unclear. This paper investigates the kinematic behaviour of an 'engineered' nacre-like structure within a high strain-rate environment. A finite-element (FE) model was developed which incorporates the pertinent biological design features. A parametric study was carried out focusing on (i) the use of an overlapping discontinuous tile arrangement for crack delocalization and (ii) application of tile waviness (interfacial hardening) for improved post-damage behaviour. With respect to the material properties, the model allows the permutation and combination of a variety of different material datasets. The advantage of such a discontinuous material shows notable improvements in sustaining high strain-rate deformation relative to an equivalent continuous morphology. In the case of the continuous material, the shockwaves propagating through the material lead to localized failure while complex shockwave patterns are observed in the discontinuous flat tile arrangement, arising from platelet interlocking. The influence of the matrix properties on impact performance is investigated by varying the dominant material parameters. The results indicate a deceleration of the impactor velocity, thus delaying back face nodal displacement. A final series of FE models considered the

  20. Origins of Negative Strain Rate Dependence of Stress Corrosion Cracking Initiation in Alloy 690, and Intergranular Crack Formation in Thermally Treated Alloy 690

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Sung Soo

    2016-09-01

    We show that enhanced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) initiation in cold-rolled Alloy 690 with decreasing strain rate is related to the rate of short-range ordering (SRO) but not to the time-dependent corrosion process. Evidence for SRO is provided by aging tests on cold-rolled Alloy 690 at 623 K and 693 K (350 °C and 420 °C), respectively, which demonstrate its enhanced lattice contraction and hardness increase with aging temperature and time, respectively. Secondary intergranular cracks formed only in thermally treated and cold-rolled Alloy 690 during SCC tests, which are not SCC cracks, are caused by its lattice contraction by SRO before SCC tests but not by the orientation effect.

  1. Scaling Behavior and Strain Dependence of In-Plane Elastic Properties of Graphene.

    PubMed

    Los, J H; Fasolino, A; Katsnelson, M I

    2016-01-01

    We show by atomistic simulations that, in the thermodynamic limit, the in-plane elastic moduli of graphene at finite temperature vanish with system size L as a power law L(-η(u)) with η(u)≃0.325, in agreement with the membrane theory. We provide explicit expressions for the size and strain dependence of graphene's elastic moduli, allowing comparison to experimental data. Our results explain the recently experimentally observed increase of the Young modulus by more than a factor of 2 for a tensile strain of only a few per mill. The difference of a factor of 2 between the measured asymptotic value of the Young modulus for tensilely strained systems and the value from ab initio calculations remains, however, unsolved. We also discuss the asymptotic behavior of the Poisson ratio, for which our simulations disagree with the predictions of the self-consistent screening approximation.

  2. Dislocation microstructures and strain-gradient plasticity with one active slip plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Sergio; Garroni, Adriana; Müller, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    We study dislocation networks in the plane using the vectorial phase-field model introduced by Ortiz and coworkers, in the limit of small lattice spacing. We show that, in a scaling regime where the total length of the dislocations is large, the phase field model reduces to a simpler model of the strain-gradient type. The limiting model contains a term describing the three-dimensional elastic energy and a strain-gradient term describing the energy of the geometrically necessary dislocations, characterized by the tangential gradient of the slip. The energy density appearing in the strain-gradient term is determined by the solution of a cell problem, which depends on the line tension energy of dislocations. In the case of cubic crystals with isotropic elasticity our model shows that complex microstructures may form in which dislocations with different Burgers vector and orientation react with each other to reduce the total self-energy.

  3. Analysis of plane-plastic stress problems with axial symmetry in strain-hardening range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, M H Lee

    1951-01-01

    A simple method is developed for solving plane-plastic-stress problems with axial symmetry in the strain-hardening range which is based on the deformation theory of plasticity employing the finite-strain concept. The equations defining the problems are first reduced to two simultaneous nonlinear differential equations involving two dependent variables: (a) the octahedral shear strain, and (b) a parameter indicating the ratio of principal stresses. By multiplying the load and dividing the radius by an arbitrary constant, it is possible to solve these problems without iteration for any value of the modified load. The constant is determined by the boundary condition. This method is applied to a circular membrane under pressure, a rotating disk without and with a central hole, and an infinite plate with a circular hole. Two materials, inconel x and 16-25-6, the octahedral shear stress-strain relations of which do not follow the power law, are used. Distributions of octahedral shear strain, as well as of principal stresses and strains, are obtained. These results are compared with the results of the same problems in the elastic range.

  4. Band gap modulation of transition-metal dichalcogenide MX2 nanosheets by in-plane strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xiangying; Ju, Weiwei; Zhang, Ruizhi; Guo, Chongfeng; Yong, Yongliang; Cui, Hongling; Li, Xiaohong

    2016-10-01

    The electronic properties of quasi-two-dimensional honeycomb structures of MX2 nanosheets (M=Mo, W and X=S, Se) subjected to in-plane biaxial strain have been investigated using first-principles calculations. We demonstrate that the band gap of MX2 nanosheets can be widely tuned by applying tensile or compressive strain, and these ultrathin materials undergo a universal reversible semiconductor-metal transition at a critical strain. Compared to WX2, MoX2 need a smaller critical tensile strain for the band gap close, and MSe2 need a smaller critical compressive strain than MS2. Taking bilayer MoS2 as an example, the variation of the band structures was studied and the semiconductor-metal transition involves a slightly different physical mechanism between tensile and compressive strain. The ability to tune the band gap of MX2 nanosheets in a controlled fashion over a wide range of energy opens up the possibility for its usage in a range of application.

  5. In-plane displacement and strain measurements using a camera phone and digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Liping; Pan, Bing

    2014-05-01

    In-plane displacement and strain measurements of planar objects by processing the digital images captured by a camera phone using digital image correlation (DIC) are performed in this paper. As a convenient communication tool for everyday use, the principal advantages of a camera phone are its low cost, easy accessibility, and compactness. However, when used as a two-dimensional DIC system for mechanical metrology, the assumed imaging model of a camera phone may be slightly altered during the measurement process due to camera misalignment, imperfect loading, sample deformation, and temperature variations of the camera phone, which can produce appreciable errors in the measured displacements. In order to obtain accurate DIC measurements using a camera phone, the virtual displacements caused by these issues are first identified using an unstrained compensating specimen and then corrected by means of a parametric model. The proposed technique is first verified using in-plane translation and out-of-plane translation tests. Then, it is validated through a determination of the tensile strains and elastic properties of an aluminum specimen. Results of the present study show that accurate DIC measurements can be conducted using a common camera phone provided that an adequate correction is employed.

  6. Evaluation of Instability Phenomena in Sands: Plane Strain Versus Triaxial Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alshibli, Khalid A.

    2001-01-01

    Extensive research was carried out in the 1950s on theories of plasticity to extend the concepts developed for metals to materials that failed according to the Mohr-Coulomb criterion. The new ideas made it possible to merge the two distinct concepts (strength and deformation techniques) into one that relies on better understanding of plasticity and resulted in a rapid growth in the field of constitutive modeling of soil behavior. At the same time advanced experimental apparatuses and laboratory procedures were developed to calibrate the models. However, most laboratory experiments on granular materials are performed under Conventional Triaxial Conditions (CTC) for the purposes of evaluating constitutive behavior and stability properties, whereas most geotechnical field problems are closer to the Plane Strain (PS) condition. The triaxial tests performed in most laboratories comprise a simplification over in situ states and allow easier and robust experimentation. Most landslide problems, failure of soils beneath shallow and deep foundations, and failure of retaining structures, are cases that can generally be considered as plane strain. Strength and deformation characteristics of granular materials loaded in plane strain may be considerably different from those observed in CTC. Most studies on sands were limited to evaluating the constitutive behavior and in some cases extended to briefly describing the associated instability phenomena. This paper presents the results of a series of PS and CTC experiments performed on fine uniform silica sand known as F-75 Ottawa sand. Advanced analysis techniques were used to study the instability phenomena, which yielded very accurate measurements of shear bands occurrences and patterns. Destructive thin-sectioning technique along with monitoring the specimen surface deformation was used in the PS experiments and Computed Tomography (CT) was used to investigate the progress of primary and secondary shear bands in specimens

  7. Revision of Standard Method of Test for Plane Strain Fracture Toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, John L., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this grant is to revise ASTM Standard Method of Test E-399 for Plane Strain Fracture Toughness of Metallic Materials based on users' experience, and to harmonize the Method with international standards in the interest of U. S. competitive participation in the global marketplace. Rewriting and reformatting the Method are well along. Research laboratories here and abroad have been engaged in developing technical bases for the Method's novel revision items. Close liaison is being maintained with experts in the field here and abroad to ensure consensus agreement on all substantive matters in anticipation of an eventual circulation of the document for ASTM worldwide approval.

  8. Residual thermal and moisture influences on the strain energy release rate analysis of local delaminations from matrix cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. K.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis utilizing laminated plate theory is developed to calculate the strain energy release rate associated with local delaminations originating at off-axis, single ply, matrix cracks in laminates subjected to uniaxial loads. The analysis includes the contribution of residual thermal and moisture stresses to the strain energy released. Examples are calculated for the strain energy release rate associated with local delaminations originating at 90 degrees and angle-ply (non-90 degrees) matrix ply cracks in glass epoxy and graphite epoxy laminates. The solution developed may be used to assess the relative contribution of mechanical, residual thermal, and moisture stresses on the strain energy release rate for local delamination for a variety of layups and materials.

  9. Strain distribution and crack detection in thin unbonded concrete pavement overlays with fully distributed fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yi; Chen, Genda

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at evaluating the feasibility of strain measurement and crack detection in thin unbonded concrete pavement overlays with pulse prepump Brillouin optical time domain analysis. Single-mode optical fibers with two-layer and three-layer coatings, respectively, were applied as fully distributed sensors, their performances were compared with analytical predictions. They were successfully protected from damage during concrete casting of three full-scale concrete panels when 5 to 10-cm-thick protective mortar covers had been set for 2 h. Experimental results from three-point loading tests of the panels indicated that the strain distributions measured from the two types of sensors were in good agreement, and cracks can be detected at sharp peaks of the measured strain distributions. The two-layer and three-layer coated fibers can be used to measure strains up to 2.33% and 2.42% with a corresponding sensitivity of 5.43×10-5 and 4.66×10-5 GHz/μɛ, respectively. Two cracks as close as 7 to 9 cm can be clearly detected. The measured strains in optical fiber were lower than the analytical prediction by 10% to 25%. Their difference likely resulted from strain transfer through various coatings, idealized point loading, varying optical fiber embedment, and concrete heterogeneity.

  10. Real-time, high-resolution study of nanocrystallization and fatigue cracking in a cyclically strained metallic glass.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng-Cai; Mao, Yun-Wei; Shan, Zhi-Wei; Dao, Ming; Li, Ju; Sun, Jun; Ma, Evan; Suresh, Subra

    2013-12-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) exhibit greater elastic limit and stronger resistance to plastic deformation than their crystalline metal counterparts. Their capacity to withstand plastic straining is further enhanced at submicrometer length scales. For a range of microelectromechanical applications, the resistance of MGs to damage and cracking from thermal and mechanical stress or strain cycling under partial or complete constraint is of considerable scientific and technological interest. However, to our knowledge, no real-time, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations are available of crystallization, damage, and failure from the controlled imposition of cyclic strains or displacements in any metallic glass. Here we present the results of a unique in situ study, inside a high-resolution transmission electron microscope, of glass-to-crystal formation and fatigue of an Al-based MG. We demonstrate that cyclic straining progressively leads to nanoscale surface roughening in the highly deformed region of the starter notch, causing crack nucleation and formation of nanocrystals. The growth of these nanograins during cyclic straining impedes subsequent crack growth by bridging the crack. In distinct contrast to this fatigue behavior, only distributed nucleation of smaller nanocrystals is observed with no surface roughening under monotonic deformation. We further show through molecular dynamics simulation that these findings can be rationalized by the accumulation of strain-induced nonaffine atomic rearrangements that effectively enhances diffusion through random walk during repeated strain cycling. The present results thus provide unique insights into fundamental mechanisms of fatigue of MGs that would help shape strategies for material design and engineering applications. PMID:24255113

  11. Line Spring Model and Its Applications to Part-Through Crack Problems in Plates and Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Aksel, B.

    1986-01-01

    The line spring model is described and extended to cover the problem of interaction of multiple internal and surface cracks in plates and shells. The shape functions for various related crack geometries obtained from the plane strain solution and the results of some multiple crack problems are presented. The problems considered include coplanar surface cracks on the same or opposite sides of a plate, nonsymmetrically located coplanar internal elliptic cracks, and in a very limited way the surface and corner cracks in a plate of finite width and a surface crack in a cylindrical shell with fixed end.

  12. Formation behavior of basal texture under the high temperature plane strain compression deformation in AZ80 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Okayasu, K.; Fukutomi, H.

    2015-04-01

    The formation behavior of basal texture during high temperature deformation of AZ80 magnesium alloys in single phase was investigated by plane strain compression deformation. Three kinds of specimens with different initial textures were machined out from an extruded bar having a <101¯0> texture. Plane strain compression tests were conducted at temperatures of 623K and 723K and a strain rate of 5.0×10-2s-1, with a strain range of between - 0.4 and -1.0. After deformation, the specimens were immediately quenched in oil. Texture measurement was carried out on the compression planes by the Schulz reflection method using nickel filtered Cu Kα radiation. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements were also conducted in order to examine the spatial distribution of orientations. Three kinds of specimens named A, B and C were prepared from the same extruded bar. In the specimens A, B and C, {0001} was distributed preferentially parallel to ND, TD, and RD, respectively. After deformation, texture evaluation was conducted on the mid-plane section. At the plane strain compression deformation, peaks appeared in the true stress-true strain curves irrespective of the kinds of specimen used. It was found that the main components and the pole densities of the textures vary depending on deformation condition and initial texture. Six kinds of texture components were observed after deformation. The (0001)<101¯0> has formed regardless of the initial texture. There are two types of texture components; one exists before the deformation, and the other does not. Either types are considered to have stable orientations for plane strain compression. Also, the basal texture is composed of two crystal orientation components - (0001)<101¯0> and (0001)<112¯0>. When (0001) existed before deformation, an extremely sharp (0001) (compression plane) texture is formed.

  13. Uniqueness of the interior plane strain time-harmonic viscoelastic inverse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yixiao; Barbone, Paul E.; Harari, Isaac; Oberai, Assad A.

    2016-07-01

    Elasticity imaging has emerged as a promising medical imaging technique with applications in the detection, diagnosis and treatment monitoring of several types of disease. In elasticity imaging measured displacement fields are used to generate images of elastic parameters of tissue by solving an inverse problem. When the tissue excitation, and the resulting tissue motion is time-harmonic, elasticity imaging can be extended to image the viscoelastic properties of the tissue. This leads to an inverse problem for the complex-valued shear modulus at a given frequency. In this manuscript we have considered the uniqueness of this inverse problem for an incompressible, isotropic linear viscoelastic solid in a state of plane strain. For a single measured displacement field we conclude that the solution is infinite dimensional, and the data required to render it unique is determined by the measured strain field. In contrast, for two independent displacement fields such that the principal directions of the resulting strain fields are different, the space of possible solutions is eight dimensional, and given additional data, like the value of the shear modulus at four locations, or over a calibration region, we may determine the shear modulus everywhere. We have also considered simple analytical examples that verify these results and offer additional insights. The results derived in this paper may be used as guidelines by the practitioners of elasticity imaging in designing more robust and accurate imaging protocols.

  14. Yield criteria for porous media in plane strain: second-order estimates versus numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, Joseph; Ponte Castañeda, Pedro

    2002-11-01

    This Note presents a comparison of some recently developed "second-order" homogenization estimates for two-dimensional, ideally plastic porous media subjected to plane strain conditions with corresponding yield analysis results using a new linearization technique and systematically optimized finite elements meshes. Good qualitative agreement is found between the second-order theory and the yield analysis results for the shape of the yield surfaces, which exhibit a corner on the hydrostatic axis, as well as for the dependence of the effective flow stress in shear on the porosity, which is found to be non-analytic in the dilute limit. Both of these features are inconsistent with the predictions of the standard Gurson model. To cite this article: J. Pastor, P. Ponte Castañeda, C. R. Mecanique 330 (2002) 741-747.

  15. Strained-layer superlattice focal plane array having a planar structure

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Jin K.; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Gin, Aaron; Marsh, Phillip F.; Young, Erik W.; Cich, Michael J.

    2010-07-13

    An infrared focal plane array (FPA) is disclosed which utilizes a strained-layer superlattice (SLS) formed of alternating layers of InAs and In.sub.xGa.sub.1-xSb with 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5 epitaxially grown on a GaSb substrate. The FPA avoids the use of a mesa structure to isolate each photodetector element and instead uses impurity-doped regions formed in or about each photodetector for electrical isolation. This results in a substantially-planar structure in which the SLS is unbroken across the entire width of a 2-D array of the photodetector elements which are capped with an epitaxially-grown passivation layer to reduce or eliminate surface recombination. The FPA has applications for use in the wavelength range of 3-25 .mu.m.

  16. Cracked shells under skew-symmetric loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lelale, F.

    1982-01-01

    A shell containing a through crack in one of the principal planes of curvature and under general skew-symmetric loading is considered. By employing a Reissner type shell theory which takes into account the effect of transverse shear strains, all boundary conditions on the crack surfaces are satisfied separately. Consequently, unlike those obtained from the classical shell theory, the angular distributions of the stress components around the crack tips are shown to be identical to the distributions obtained from the plane and antiplane elasticity solutions. Extensive results are given for axially and circumferentially cracked cylindrical shells, spherical shells, and toroidal shells under uniform inplane shearing, out of plane shearing, and torsion. The effect of orthotropy on the results is also studied.

  17. Infrared focal plane arrays based on dots in a well and strained layer superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we will review some of the recent progress that we have made on developing single pixel detectors and focal plane arrays based on dots-in-a-well (DWELL) heterostructure and Type II strained layer superlattice (SLS). The DWELL detector consists of an active region composed of InAs quantum dots embedded in InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells. By varying the thickness of the InGaAs well, the DWELL heterostructure allows for the manipulation of the operating wavelength and the nature of the transitions (bound-to-bound, bound-to-quasibound and bound-to-continuum) of the detector. Based on these principles, DWELL samples were grown using molecular beam epitaxy and fabricated into 320 x 256 focal plane arrays (FPAs) with Indium bumps using standard lithography at the University of New Mexico. The FPA evaluated was hybridized to an Indigo 9705 readout integrated circuit (ROIC). From this evaluation, we have reported the first two-color, co-located quantum dot based imaging system that can be used to take multicolor images using a single FPA. We have also been investigating the use of miniband transitions in Type II SLS to develop infrared detectors using PIN and nBn based designs.

  18. Giant strain-sensitivity of acoustic energy dissipation in solids containing dry and saturated cracks with wavy interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, V Yu; Matveev, L A

    2012-01-01

    Mechanisms of acoustic energy dissipation in heterogeneous solids attract much attention in view of their importance for material characterization, nondestructive testing, and geophysics. Due to the progress in measurement techniques in recent years, it has been revealed that rocks can demonstrate extremely high strain sensitivity of seismoacoustic loss. In particular, it has been found that strains of order 10(-8) produced by lunar and solar tides are capable of causing variations in the seismoacoustic decrement on the order of several percent. Some laboratory data (although obtained for higher frequencies) also indicate the presence of very high dissipative nonlinearity. Conventionally discussed dissipation mechanisms (thermoelastic loss in dry solids, Biot and squirt-type loss in fluid-saturated ones) do not suffice to interpret such data. Here the dissipation at individual cracks is revised taking into account the influence of wavy asperities of their surfaces quite typical of real cracks, which can drastically change the values of the relaxation frequencies and can result in giant strain sensitivity of the dissipation without the necessity of assuming the presence of unrealistically thin (and, therefore, unrealistically soft) cracks. In particular, these mechanisms suggest interpretation for observations of pronounced amplitude modulation of seismo-acoustic waves by tidal strains. PMID:22280566

  19. A constitutive framework for modelling thin incompressible viscoelastic materials under plane stress in the finite strain regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroon, M.

    2011-11-01

    Rubbers and soft biological tissues may undergo large deformations and are also viscoelastic. The formulation of constitutive models for these materials poses special challenges. In several applications, especially in biomechanics, these materials are also relatively thin, implying that in-plane stresses dominate and that plane stress may therefore be assumed. In the present paper, a constitutive model for viscoelastic materials in the finite strain regime and under the assumption of plane stress is proposed. It is assumed that the relaxation behaviour in the direction of plane stress can be treated separately, which makes it possible to formulate evolution laws for the plastic strains on explicit form at the same time as incompressibility is fulfilled. Experimental results from biomechanics (dynamic inflation of dog aorta) and rubber mechanics (biaxial stretching of rubber sheets) were used to assess the proposed model. The assessment clearly indicates that the model is fully able to predict the experimental outcome for these types of material.

  20. Cracked shells under skew-symmetric loading. [Reissner theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.

    1981-01-01

    The general problem of a shell containing a through crack in one of the principal planes of curvature and under general skew-symmetric loading is considered. By employing a Reissner type shell theory which takes into account the effect of transverse shear strains, all boundary conditions on the crack surfaces are satisfied separately. Consequently, unlike those obtained from the classical shell theory, the angular distributions of the stress components around the crack tips are shown to be identical to the distributions obtained from the plane and anti-plane elasticity solutions. Results are given for axially and circumferentially cracked cylindrical shells, spherical shells, and toroidal shells under uniform in-plane shearing, out of plane shearing, and torsion. The problem is formulated for specially orthostropic materials, therefore, the effect of orthotropy on the results is also studied.

  1. Wireless Open-Circuit In-Plane Strain and Displacement Sensor Requiring No Electrical Connections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A wireless in-plane strain and displacement sensor includes an electrical conductor fixedly coupled to a substrate subject to strain conditions. The electrical conductor is shaped between its ends for storage of an electric field and a magnetic field, and remains electrically unconnected to define an unconnected open-circuit having inductance and capacitance. In the presence of a time-varying magnetic field, the electrical conductor so-shaped resonates to generate harmonic electric and magnetic field responses. The sensor also includes at least one electrically unconnected electrode having an end and a free portion extending from the end thereof. The end of each electrode is fixedly coupled to the substrate and the free portion thereof remains unencumbered and spaced apart from a portion of the electrical conductor so-shaped. More specifically, at least some of the free portion is disposed at a location lying within the magnetic field response generated by the electrical conductor. A motion guidance structure is slidingly engaged with each electrode's free portion in order to maintain each free portion parallel to the electrical conductor so-shaped.

  2. Fracture Analysis of Semi-Elliptical Surface Cracks in Ductile Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniewicz, S. R.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Leach, A. M.

    2004-01-01

    Accurate life assessment of structural components may require advanced life prediction criteria and methodologies. Structural components often exhibit several different types of defects, among the most prevalent being surface cracks. A semi-elliptical surface crack subjected to monotonic loading will exhibit stable crack growth until the crack has reached a critical size, at which the crack loses stability and fracture ensues (Newman, 2000). The shape and geometry of the flaw are among the most influential factors. When considering simpler crack configurations, such as a through-the-thickness crack, a three-dimensional (3D) geometry may be modeled under the approximation of two-dimensional (2D) plane stress or plane strain. The more complex surface crack is typically modeled numerically with the Finite Element Method (FEM). A semi-elliptical surface crack is illustrated in Figure 1-1.

  3. Fractographic evaluation of creep effects on strain-controlled fatigue-cracking of AISI 304LC and 316 stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldrieve, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Analysis of high temperature low cycle fatigue of AISI 304LC and 316 stainless steels by the method of strainrange partitioning results in four separate strainrange versus life relationships, depending upon the way in which creep-strain and plastic strain are combined within a cycle. Fractography is used in this investigation of the creep-fatigue interaction associated with these cycles. The PP and PC-cycle fractures were transgranular. The PC-cycle resulted in fewer cycles of initiation and shorter total cyclic life for the same applied inelastic strainrange. The CC-cycle had mixed transgranular and intergranular fracture, fewer cycles of initiation and shorter cycle life than PP or PC. The CP-cycle had fully integranular cracking, and failed in fewer cycles than were required for cracks to initate for PP,PC, and CC.

  4. In-plane time-harmonic elastic wave motion and resonance phenomena in a layered phononic crystal with periodic cracks.

    PubMed

    Golub, Mikhail V; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an elastodynamic analysis of two-dimensional time-harmonic elastic wave propagation in periodically multilayered elastic composites, which are also frequently referred to as one-dimensional phononic crystals, with a periodic array of strip-like interior or interface cracks. The transfer matrix method and the boundary integral equation method in conjunction with the Bloch-Floquet theorem are applied to compute the elastic wave fields in the layered periodic composites. The effects of the crack size, spacing, and location, as well as the incidence angle and the type of incident elastic waves on the wave propagation characteristics in the composite structure are investigated in details. In particular, the band-gaps, the localization and the resonances of elastic waves are revealed by numerical examples. In order to understand better the wave propagation phenomena in layered phononic crystals with distributed cracks, the energy flow vector of Umov and the corresponding energy streamlines are visualized and analyzed. The numerical results demonstrate that large energy vortices obstruct elastic wave propagation in layered phononic crystals at resonance frequencies. They occur before the cracks reflecting most of the energy transmitted by the incoming wave and disappear when the problem parameters are shifted from the resonant ones.

  5. Comparison of fatigue crack propagation in Modes I and III

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, R.O.

    1985-06-01

    The propagation behavior of fatigue cracks in Mode III (anti-plane shear), measured under cyclic torsion, is described and compared with more commonly encountered behavior under Mode I (tensile opening) loads. It is shown that a unique, global characterization of Mode III growth rates, akin to the Paris ''law'' in Mode I, is only possible if characterizating parameters appropriate to large-scale yielding are employed and allowance is made for crack tip shielding from sliding crack surface interference (i.e., friction and abrasion) between mating fracture surfaces. Based on the crack tip stress and deformation fields for Mode III stationary cracks, the cyclic crack tip displacement, (..delta..CTD/sub III/, and plastic strain intensity range ..delta..GAMMA/sub III/, have been proposed and are found to provide an adequate description of behavior in a range of steels, provided crack surface interference is minimized. The magnitude of this interference, which is somewhat analogous to crack closure in Mode I, is further examined in the light of the complex fractography of torsional fatigue failures and the question of a ''fatigue threshold'' for Mode III crack growth. Finally, micro-mechanical models for cyclic crack extension in anti-plane shear are briefly described, and the contrasting behavior between Mode III and Mode I cracks subjected to simple variable amplitude spectra is examined in terms of the differing role of crack tip blunting and closure in influencing shear, as opposed to tensile opening, modes of crack growth.

  6. CLFE2D: A generalized plane strain finite element program laminated composites subject to mechanical and hygrothermal loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buczek, M. B.; Gregory, M. A.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    CLFE2D is a two dimensional generalized plane strain finite element code, using a linear, four node, general quadrilateral, isoparametric element. The program is developed to calculate the displacements, strains, stresses, and strain energy densities in a finite width composite laminate. CLFE2D offers any combination of the following load types: nodal displacements, nodal forces, uniform normal strain, or hygrothermal. The program allows the user to input one set of three dimensional orthotropic material properties. The user can then specify the angle of material principal orientation for each element in the mesh. Output includes displacements, stresses, strains and strain densities at points selected by the user. An option is also available to plot the underformed and deformed finite element meshes.

  7. Mechanical stress measurement by an achromatic optical digital speckle pattern interferometry strain sensor with radial in-plane sensitivity: experimental comparison with electrical strain gauges.

    PubMed

    Viotti, Matias R; Albertazzi G, Armando; Kapp, Walter A

    2011-03-01

    This paper shows the optical setup of a radial in-plane digital speckle pattern interferometer which uses an axis-symmetrical diffractive optical element (DOE) to obtain double illumination. The application of the DOE gives in-plane sensitivity which only depends on the grating period of the DOE instead of the wavelength of the laser used as illumination source. A compact optical layout was built in order to have a portable optical strain sensor with a circular measurement area of about 5 mm in diameter. In order to compare its performance with electrical strain sensors (strain gauges), mechanical loading was generated by a four-point bending device and simultaneously monitored by the optical strain sensor and by two-element strain gauge rosettes. Several mechanical stress levels were measured showing a good agreement between both sensors. Results showed that the optical sensor could measure applied mechanical strains with a mean uncertainty of about 5% and 4% for the maximum and minimum principal strains, respectively. PMID:21364725

  8. Activating and optimizing MoS2 basal planes for hydrogen evolution through the formation of strained sulphur vacancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong; Tsai, Charlie; Koh, Ai Leen; Cai, Lili; Contryman, Alex W.; Fragapane, Alex H.; Zhao, Jiheng; Han, Hyun Soon; Manoharan, Hari C.; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Nørskov, Jens K.; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    As a promising non-precious catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER; refs ,,,,), molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) is known to contain active edge sites and an inert basal plane. Activating the MoS2 basal plane could further enhance its HER activity but is not often a strategy for doing so. Herein, we report the first activation and optimization of the basal plane of monolayer 2H-MoS2 for HER by introducing sulphur (S) vacancies and strain. Our theoretical and experimental results show that the S-vacancies are new catalytic sites in the basal plane, where gap states around the Fermi level allow hydrogen to bind directly to exposed Mo atoms. The hydrogen adsorption free energy (ΔGH) can be further manipulated by straining the surface with S-vacancies, which fine-tunes the catalytic activity. Proper combinations of S-vacancy and strain yield the optimal ΔGH = 0 eV, which allows us to achieve the highest intrinsic HER activity among molybdenum-sulphide-based catalysts.

  9. In-Plane Cracking Behavior and Ultimate Strength for 2D Woven and Braided Melt-Infiltrated SiC/SiC Composites Tensile Loaded in Off-Axis Fiber Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Yun, Hee Mann; DiCarlo, James A.

    2007-01-01

    The tensile mechanical properties of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) in directions off the primary axes of the reinforcing fibers are important for architectural design of CMC components that are subjected to multi-axial stress states. In this study, 2D-woven melt-infiltrated (MI) SiC/SiC composite panels with balanced fiber content in the 0 degree and 90 degree directions were tensile loaded in-plane in the 0 degree direction and at 45 degree to this direction. In addition, a 2D triaxially-braided MI composite panel with balanced fiber content in the plus or minus 67 degree bias directions and reduced fiber content in the axial direction was tensile loaded perpendicular to the axial direction tows (i.e., 23 degrees from the bias fibers). Stress-strain behavior, acoustic emission, and optical microscopy were used to quantify stress-dependent matrix cracking and ultimate strength in the panels. It was observed that both off-axis loaded panels displayed higher composite onset stresses for through-thickness matrix cracking than the 2D-woven 0/90 panels loaded in the primary 0 degree direction. These improvements for off-axis cracking strength can in part be attributed to higher effective fiber fractions in the loading direction, which in turn reduces internal stresses on critical matrix flaws for a given composite stress. Also for the 0/90 panel loaded in the 45 degree direction, an improved distribution of matrix flaws existed due to the absence of fiber tows perpendicular to the loading direction. In addition, for the +67/0/-67 braided panel, the axial tows perpendicular to the loading direction were not only low in volume fraction, but were also were well separated from one another. Both off-axis oriented panels also showed relatively good ultimate tensile strength when compared to other off-axis oriented composites in the literature, both on an absolute strength basis as well as when normalized by the average fiber strength within the composites. Initial

  10. Coeval folding and boudinage under plane strain with the axis of no change perpendicular to the layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengong, M. Enama; Zulauf, G.

    2006-04-01

    Plane-strain coaxial deformation of a competent plasticine layer embedded in an incompetent plasticine matrix was carried out to improve our understanding about the evolution of folds and boudins if the layer is oriented perpendicular to the Y-axis of the finite strain ellipsoid. The rock analogues used were Beck’s green plasticine (matrix) and Beck’s black plasticine (competent layer), both of which are strain-rate softening modelling materials with a stress exponent n=ca. 8. The effective viscosity η of the matrix plasticine was changed by adding different amounts of oil to the original plasticine. At a strain rate dot e of 10-3 s-1 and a finite strain e of 10%, the effective viscosity of the matrix ranges from 1.2×106 to 7.2×106 Pa s. The effective viscosity of the competent layer has been determined as 4.2×107 Pa s. If the viscosity ratio is large (ca. 20) and the initial thickness of the competent layer is small, both folds and boudins develop simultaneously. Although the growth rate of the folds seems to be higher than the growth rate of the boudins, the wavelength of both structures is approximately the same as is suggested by analytical solutions. A further unexpected, but characteristic, aspect of the deformed competent layer is a significant increase in thickness, which can be used to distinguish plane-strain folds and boudins from constrictional folds and boudins.

  11. Dielectric tunability of vertically aligned ferroelectric-metal oxide nanocomposite films controlled by out-of-plane misfit strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huaping; Ma, Xuefu; Zhang, Zheng; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Jie; Chai, Guozhong

    2016-04-01

    A nonlinear thermodynamic model based on the vertically aligned nanocomposite (VAN) thin films of ferroelectric-metal oxide system has been developed to investigate the physical properties of the epitaxial Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO3 (BST) films containing vertical Sm2O3 (SmO) nanopillar arrays on the SrTiO3 substrate. The phase diagrams of out-of-plane lattice mismatch vs. volume fraction of SmO are calculated by minimizing the total free energy. It is found that the phase transformation and dielectric response of BST-SmO VAN systems are extremely dependent on the in-plane misfit strain, the out-of-plane lattice mismatch, the volume fraction of SmO phase, and the external electric field applied to the nanocomposite films at room temperature. In particular, the BST-SmO VAN systems exhibit higher dielectric properties than pure BST films. Giant dielectric response and maximum tunability are obtained near the lattice mismatch where the phase transition occurs. Under the in-plane misfit strain of umf=0.3 % and the out-of-plane lattice mismatch of u3=0.002 , the dielectric tunability can be dramatically enhanced to 90% with the increase of SmO volume fraction, which is well consistent with previous experimental results. This work represents an approach to further understand the dependence of physical properties on the lattice mismatch (in-plane and out-of-plane) and volume fraction, and to manipulate or optimize functionalities in the nanocomposite oxide thin films.

  12. Use of Slow Strain Rate Tensile Testing to Assess the Ability of Several Superalloys to Resist Environmentally-Assisted Intergranular Cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Banik, Anthony; McDevitt, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Intergranular fatigue crack initiation and growth due to environmental degradation, especially at notched features, can often limit the fatigue life of disk superalloys at high temperatures. For clear comparisons, the effects of alloy composition on cracking in air needs to be understood and compared separately from variables associated with notches and cracks such as effective stress concentration, plastic flow, stress relaxation, and stress redistribution. The objective of this study was to attempt using simple tensile tests of specimens with uniform gage sections to compare the effects of varied alloy composition on environment-assisted cracking of several powder metal and cast and wrought superalloys including ME3, LSHR, Udimet 720(TradeMark) ATI 718Plus(Registered TradeMark) alloy, Haynes 282(Trademark), and Inconel 740(TradeMark) Slow and fast strain-rate tensile tests were found to be a useful tool to compare propensities for intergranular surface crack initiation and growth. The effects of composition and heat treatment on tensile fracture strain and associated failure modes were compared. Environment interactions were determined to often limit ductility, by promoting intergranular surface cracking. The response of various superalloys and heat treatments to slow strain rate tensile testing varied substantially, showing that composition and microstructure can significantly influence environmental resistance to cracking.

  13. The combined effect of frontal plane tibiofemoral knee angle and meniscectomy on the cartilage contact stresses and strains.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nicholas; Nayeb-Hashemi, Hamid; Canavan, Paul K

    2009-11-01

    Abnormal tibiofemoral alignment can create loading conditions at the knee that may lead to the initiation and progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). The degenerative changes of the articular cartilage may occur earlier and with greater severity in individuals with abnormal frontal plane tibiofemoral alignment who undergo a partial or total meniscectomy. In this investigation, subject specific 3D finite element knee models were created from magnetic resonance images of two female subjects to study the combined effect of frontal plane tibiofemoral alignment and total and partial meniscectomy on the stress and strain at the knee cartilage. Different amounts of medial and lateral meniscectomies were modeled and subject specific loading conditions were determined from motion analysis and force platform data during single-leg support. The results showed that the maximum stresses and strains occurred on the medial tibial cartilage after medial meniscectomy but a greater percentage change in the contact stresses and strains occurred in the lateral cartilage after lateral meniscectomy for both subjects due to the resultant greater load bearing role of the lateral meniscus. The results indicate that individual's frontal plane knee alignment and their unique local force distribution between the cartilage and meniscus play an important role in the biomechanical effects of total and partial meniscectomy.

  14. First-principles study of nanometer-sharp domain walls in ferromagnetic Fe monolayers under in-plane strain.

    PubMed

    Shimada, T; Okuno, J; Ishii, Y; Kitamura, T

    2012-03-01

    We investigated a nanometer-sharp magnetic domain wall (DW) structure in a free-standing Fe(110) monolayer and studied the crucial role of in-plane strain using fully unconstrained noncollinear ab initio spin-density-functional theory calculations within the generalized gradient approximation. The DW width is calculated to be 0.86 nm. A precise vector-field description of the magnetization density revealed that a noncollinear character in the DW was spatially confined between atoms, whereas a collinear and high magnetization density was localized around each atom. In the rapid rotation of magnetic moments in the DW, we found an electron rearrangement from the d(zx) and d(x(2)-y(2)) states to the d(xy), d(yz) and d(z(2)) states due to a shift of band structures. Applied tensile and compressive in-plane strains both bring about narrower DWs in the monolayer except when the strain is small. The strain dependence of the DW width is discussed in terms of both exchange interaction and magnetocrystalline anisotropy. PMID:22322862

  15. Effects of surface cracks and strain rate on the tensile behavior of Balmoral Red granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardoukhi, Ahmad; Hokka, Mikko; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents an experimental procedure for studying the effects of surface cracks on the mechanical behavior of Balmoral Red granite under dynamic and quasi-static loading. Three different thermal shocks were applied on the surface of the Brazilian Disc test samples by keeping a flame torch at a fixed distance from the sample surface for 10, 30, and 60 seconds. Microscopy clearly shows that the number of the surface cracks increases with the duration of the thermal shock. After the thermal shock, the Brazilian Disc tests were performed using a servohydraulic materials testing machine and a compression Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) device. The results show that the tensile strength of the rock decreases and the rate sensitivity of the rock increases as more cracks are introduced to the structure. The DIC analysis of the Brazilian disc tests shows that the fracture of the sample initiates at the center of the samples or slightly closer to the incident bar contact point. This is followed by crushing of the samples at both contact points with the stress bars.

  16. C-shaped specimen plane strain fracture toughness tests. [metallic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzzard, R. T.; Fisher, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    Test equipment, procedures, and data obtained in the evaluation of C-shaped specimens are presented. Observations reported on include: specimen preparation and dimensional measurement; modifications to the standard ASTM E 399 displacement gage, which permit punch mark gage point engagement; and a measurement device for determining the interior and exterior radii of ring segments. Load displacement ratios were determined experimentally which agreed with analytically determined coefficients for three different gage lengths on the inner surfaces of radially-cracked ring segments.

  17. Effects of heat treatment on stress corrosion cracking of a discontinuously reinforced aluminum (DRA) 7XXX alloy during slow strain rate testing

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, P.M.; Lewandowski, J.J.

    1995-11-01

    Discontinuously reinforced aluminum (DRA) alloys are being developed as candidate materials for the automotive and aerospace industry. Although the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of aluminum alloys have been extensively studied, comparatively little is known about the corrosion and SCC behavior of DRA materials. The intent of the present work was to study the effects of changes in microstructure/heat treatment on the crack nucleation mechanisms in DRAs and their monolithic atrices on the overall slow strain rate SCC performance in a 3.5% NaCl solution (pH = 3.0). For a given heat treatment, MB78 DRA materials show more susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking than the equivalent monolithic material. For the MB78 composite, the UAII material exhibited the maximum susceptibility to SCC. Both the UAI and UAII material were more susceptible to SCC than the OA material. MB78 DRA and monolithic specimens which have been shown to have a continuous ({eta} and {eta}{prime}) layer along the grain boundaries also showed higher susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. Significantly more crack coalescence to form larger cracks was observed for the DRA specimens tested in the NaCl solution compared to the DRA specimens tested in dry-air. Monolithic specimens (OA as well as UA) did not exhibit visible micro-cracks or significant crack coalescence on the surfaces.

  18. Crack Growth Prediction Methodology for Multi-Site Damage: Layered Analysis and Growth During Plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark Anthony

    1999-01-01

    A finite element program has been developed to perform quasi-static, elastic-plastic crack growth simulations. The model provides a general framework for mixed-mode I/II elastic-plastic fracture analysis using small strain assumptions and plane stress, plane strain, and axisymmetric finite elements. Cracks are modeled explicitly in the mesh. As the cracks propagate, automatic remeshing algorithms delete the mesh local to the crack tip, extend the crack, and build a new mesh around the new tip. State variable mapping algorithms transfer stresses and displacements from the old mesh to the new mesh. The von Mises material model is implemented in the context of a non-linear Newton solution scheme. The fracture criterion is the critical crack tip opening displacement, and crack direction is predicted by the maximum tensile stress criterion at the crack tip. The implementation can accommodate multiple curving and interacting cracks. An additional fracture algorithm based on nodal release can be used to simulate fracture along a horizontal plane of symmetry. A core of plane strain elements can be used with the nodal release algorithm to simulate the triaxial state of stress near the crack tip. Verification and validation studies compare analysis results with experimental data and published three-dimensional analysis results. Fracture predictions using nodal release for compact tension, middle-crack tension, and multi-site damage test specimens produced accurate results for residual strength and link-up loads. Curving crack predictions using remeshing/mapping were compared with experimental data for an Arcan mixed-mode specimen. Loading angles from 0 degrees to 90 degrees were analyzed. The maximum tensile stress criterion was able to predict the crack direction and path for all loading angles in which the material failed in tension. Residual strength was also accurately predicted for these cases.

  19. Full in-plane strain tensor analysis using the microscale ring-core FIB milling and DIC approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunt, Alexander J. G.; Salvati, Enrico; Ma, Lifeng; Dolbyna, Igor P.; Neo, Tee K.; Korsunsky, Alexander M.

    2016-09-01

    Microscale Full In-plane Strain Tensor (FIST) analysis is crucial for improving understanding of residual stress and mechanical failure in many applications. This study outlines the first Focused Ion Beam (FIB) milling and Digital Image Correlation (DIC) based technique capable of performing precise, reliable and rapid quantification of this behaviour. The nature of semi-destructive FIB milling overcomes the main limitations of X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) strain tensor quantification: unstrained lattice parameter estimates are not required, analysis is performed in within a precisely defined 3D microscale volume, both amorphous and crystalline materials can be studied and access to X-ray/neutron facilities is not required. The FIST FIB milling and DIC experimental technique is based on extending the ring-core milling geometry to quantify the strain variation with angle and therefore benefits from the excellent precision and simple analytical approach associated with this method. In this study in-plane strain analysis was performed on sample of commercial interest: a porcelain veneered Yttria Partially Stabilised Zirconia (YPSZ) dental prosthesis, and was compared with the results of XRD. The two methods sample different gauge volumes and mechanical states: approximately plane stress for ring-core milling, and a through-thickness average for XRD. We demonstrate using complex analysis methods and Finite Element (FE) modelling that valid comparisons can be drawn between these two stress states. Excellent agreement was obtained between principal stress orientation and magnitudes, leading to realistic residual stress estimates that agree well with the literature (σAv ≈ 460 MPa) . As a measure of validity of the matching approach we report the upper and lower bounds on the (101) interplanar spacing of YPSZ that are found to correspond to the range 2.9586 - 2.9596 Å , closely matching published values.

  20. Microstructural and strain rate effects on the environment-assisted cracking of alpha/beta-titanium alloys in aqueous chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richey, Edward, III

    2000-10-01

    The objectives of this research are to determine the effect of microstructure and crack tip strain rate on environment assisted cracking (EAC) of Ti-6Al-2Sn-2Zr-2Mo-2Cr-Si, and to understand crack tip damage in terms of hydrogen/microstructure/plasticity interaction. Beta-extrusion of Ti-6-22-22, in the alpha/beta solution treated and aged (STA) condition, is susceptible to EAC under active loading in NaCl. KJTH is as low as 33% of KJIC and a fracture mode transition to transgranular (alpha-cleavage is affected by chloride exposure. Ti-6-4 (ELI) in chloride solution exhibits a minimum KJTH of 65 MPa√m, corresponding to a mill-annealed microstructure with alpha2 (K JIC = 79 MPa√m), and higher EAC resistance for a Widmanstatten microstructure. EAC growth rates in Ti-6-4 (ELI) average 3mum/s and are 10-fold slower than those for Ti-6-22-22. Ti-6-22-22 was susceptible to EAC for active loading rates ranging between 10--4 MPa√m/s and 5 Mpa√m/s. alpha2, formed during slow cooling or isothermal aging, dominates the EAC susceptibility of Ti-6-22-22. alpha/beta microstructures without intermetallics or alphas exhibit the highest EAC resistance (KJTH = 50 MPa√m, KJIC = 74 MPa√m). alpha 2 promotes a large reduction in the EAC threshold; KJTH = 34 MPa√m when alpha2 and alphas are present (KJIC = 69 MPa√m). For all microstructures, the fracture path is transgranular through alpha plates. Based on hydrogen environment embrittlement, the increased EAC in STA Ti-6-22-22 vs STA Ti-6-4 is due to increased strain localization occurring in the Ti-6-22-22 which results in larger slip offsets at the surface and increased hydrogen uptake. alphas precipitates in Ti-6--22--22 may exacerbate strain localization; alphas precipitates were not observed in Ti-6-4. A change in the operative dislocation mechanism to dislocation looping would have homogenized deformation and reduced EAC susceptibility; rather, severe EAC was observed in all aged Ti-6-22-22 microstructures

  1. The effect of temperature and moisture on electrical resistance, strain sensitivity and crack sensitivity of steel fiber reinforced smart cement composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teomete, Egemen

    2016-07-01

    Earthquakes, material degradations and other environmental factors necessitate structural health monitoring (SHM). Metal foil strain gages used for SHM have low durability and low sensitivity. These factors motivated researchers to work on cement based strain sensors. In this study, the effects of temperature and moisture on electrical resistance, compressive and tensile strain gage factors (strain sensitivity) and crack sensitivity were determined for steel fiber reinforced cement based composite. A rapid increase of electrical resistance at 200 °C was observed due to damage occurring between cement paste, aggregates and steel fibers. The moisture—electrical resistance relationship was investigated. The specimens taken out of the cure were saturated with water and had a moisture content of 9.49%. The minimum electrical resistance was obtained at 9% moisture at which fiber-fiber and fiber-matrix contact was maximum and the water in micro voids was acting as an electrolyte, conducting electrons. The variation of compressive and tensile strain gage factors (strain sensitivities) and crack sensitivity were investigated by conducting compression, split tensile and notched bending tests with different moisture contents. The highest gage factor for the compression test was obtained at optimal moisture content, at which electrical resistance was minimum. The tensile strain gage factor for split tensile test and crack sensitivity increased by decreasing moisture content. The mechanisms between moisture content, electrical resistance, gage factors and crack sensitivity were elucidated. The relations of moisture content with electrical resistance, gage factors and crack sensitivities have been presented for the first time in this study for steel fiber reinforced cement based composites. The results are important for the development of self sensing cement based smart materials.

  2. The effect of temperature and moisture on electrical resistance, strain sensitivity and crack sensitivity of steel fiber reinforced smart cement composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teomete, Egemen

    2016-07-01

    Earthquakes, material degradations and other environmental factors necessitate structural health monitoring (SHM). Metal foil strain gages used for SHM have low durability and low sensitivity. These factors motivated researchers to work on cement based strain sensors. In this study, the effects of temperature and moisture on electrical resistance, compressive and tensile strain gage factors (strain sensitivity) and crack sensitivity were determined for steel fiber reinforced cement based composite. A rapid increase of electrical resistance at 200 °C was observed due to damage occurring between cement paste, aggregates and steel fibers. The moisture—electrical resistance relationship was investigated. The specimens taken out of the cure were saturated with water and had a moisture content of 9.49%. The minimum electrical resistance was obtained at 9% moisture at which fiber–fiber and fiber–matrix contact was maximum and the water in micro voids was acting as an electrolyte, conducting electrons. The variation of compressive and tensile strain gage factors (strain sensitivities) and crack sensitivity were investigated by conducting compression, split tensile and notched bending tests with different moisture contents. The highest gage factor for the compression test was obtained at optimal moisture content, at which electrical resistance was minimum. The tensile strain gage factor for split tensile test and crack sensitivity increased by decreasing moisture content. The mechanisms between moisture content, electrical resistance, gage factors and crack sensitivity were elucidated. The relations of moisture content with electrical resistance, gage factors and crack sensitivities have been presented for the first time in this study for steel fiber reinforced cement based composites. The results are important for the development of self sensing cement based smart materials.

  3. Deformation fields near a steady fatigue crack with anisotropic plasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yanfei

    2015-11-30

    In this work, from finite element simulations based on an irreversible, hysteretic cohesive interface model, a steady fatigue crack can be realized if the crack extension exceeds about twice the plastic zone size, and both the crack increment per loading cycle and the crack bridging zone size are smaller than the plastic zone size. The corresponding deformation fields develop a plastic wake behind the crack tip and a compressive residual stress field ahead of the crack tip. In addition, the Hill’s plasticity model is used to study the role of plastic anisotropy on the retardation of fatigue crack growth and the elastic strain fields. It is found that for Mode-I cyclic loading, an enhanced yield stress in directions that are inclined from the crack plane will lead to slower crack growth rate, but this retardation is insignificant for typical degrees of plastic anisotropy. Furthermore, these results provide key inputs for future comparisons to neutron and synchrotron diffraction measurements that provide full-field lattice strain mapping near fracture and fatigue crack tips, especially in textured materials such as wrought or rolled Mg alloys.

  4. Deformation fields near a steady fatigue crack with anisotropic plasticity

    DOE PAGES

    Gao, Yanfei

    2015-11-30

    In this work, from finite element simulations based on an irreversible, hysteretic cohesive interface model, a steady fatigue crack can be realized if the crack extension exceeds about twice the plastic zone size, and both the crack increment per loading cycle and the crack bridging zone size are smaller than the plastic zone size. The corresponding deformation fields develop a plastic wake behind the crack tip and a compressive residual stress field ahead of the crack tip. In addition, the Hill’s plasticity model is used to study the role of plastic anisotropy on the retardation of fatigue crack growth andmore » the elastic strain fields. It is found that for Mode-I cyclic loading, an enhanced yield stress in directions that are inclined from the crack plane will lead to slower crack growth rate, but this retardation is insignificant for typical degrees of plastic anisotropy. Furthermore, these results provide key inputs for future comparisons to neutron and synchrotron diffraction measurements that provide full-field lattice strain mapping near fracture and fatigue crack tips, especially in textured materials such as wrought or rolled Mg alloys.« less

  5. Approaches to accommodate noisy data in the direct solution of inverse problems in incompressible plane-strain elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Albocher, U.; Barbone, P.E.; Richards, M.S.; Oberai, A.A.; Harari, I.

    2014-01-01

    We apply the adjoint weighted equation method (AWE) to the direct solution of inverse problems of incompressible plane strain elasticity. We show that based on untreated noisy displacements, the reconstruction of the shear modulus can be very poor. We link this poor performance to loss of coercivity of the weak form when treating problems with discontinuous coefficients. We demonstrate that by smoothing the displacements and appending a regularization term to the AWE formulation, a dramatic improvement in the reconstruction can be achieved. With these improvements, the advantages of the AWE method as a direct solution approach can be extended to a wider range of problems. PMID:25383085

  6. Stress and strain field singularities, micro-cracks, and their role in failure initiation at the composite laminate free-edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dustin, Joshua S.

    A state-of-the-art multi-scale analysis was performed to predict failure initiation at the free-edge of an angle-ply laminate using the Strain Invariant Failure Theory (SIFT), and multiple improvements to this analysis methodology were proposed and implemented. Application of this analysis and theory led to the conclusion that point-wise failure criteria which ignore the singular stress and strain fields from a homogenized analysis and the presence of free-edge damage in the form of micro-cracking, may do so at the expense of failure prediction capability. The main contributions of this work then are made in the study of the laminate free-edge singularity and in the effects of micro-cracking at the composite laminate free-edge. Study of both classical elasticity and finite element solutions of the laminate free-edge stress field based upon the assumption of homogenized lamina properties reveal that the order of the free-edge singularity is sufficiently small such that the domain of dominance of this term away from the laminate free-edge is much smaller than the relevant dimensions of the microstructure. In comparison to a crack-tip field, these free-edge singularities generate stress and strain fields which are half as intense as those at the crack-tip, leading to the conclusion that existing flaws at the free-edge in the form of micro-cracks would be more prone to the initiation of free-edge failure than the existence of a singularity in the free-edge elasticity solutions. A methodical experiment was performed on a family of [±25°/90°] s laminates made of IM7/8552 carbon/epoxy composite, to both characterize micro-cracks present at the laminate free-edge and to study their behavior under the application of a uniform extensional load. The majority of these micro-cracks were of length on the order of a few fiber diameters, though larger micro-cracks as long as 100 fiber diameters were observed in thicker laminates. A strong correlation between the application of

  7. In-plane anisotropy of electrical resistivity in strain-detwinned SrFe[subscript 2]As[subscript 2

    SciTech Connect

    Blomberg, E.C.; Tanatar, M.A.; Kreyssig, A.; Ni, N.; Thaler, A.; Hu, Rongwei; Bud’ko, S.L.; Canfield, P.C.; Goldman, A.I.; Prozorov, R.

    2011-12-09

    Intrinsic, in-plane anisotropy of electrical resistivity was studied on mechanically detwinned single crystals of SrFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} above and below the temperature of the coupled structural/magnetic transition, T{sub TO}. Resistivity is smaller for electrical current flow along the orthorhombic a{sub o} direction (direction of antiferromagnetically alternating magnetic moments) and is larger for transport along the b{sub o} direction (direction of ferromagnetic chains), which is similar to CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} compounds. A strongly first-order structural transition in SrFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} was confirmed by high-energy x-ray measurements, with the transition temperature and character unaffected by moderate strain. For small strain levels, which are just sufficient to detwin the sample, we find a negligible effect on the resistivity above T{sub TO}. With the increase of strain, the resistivity anisotropy starts to develop above T{sub TO}, clearly showing the relation of anisotropy to an anomalously strong response to strain. Our study suggests that electronic nematicity cannot be observed in the FeAs-based compounds in which the structural transition is strongly first order.

  8. Crack propagation and fracture in silicon wafers under thermal stress

    PubMed Central

    Danilewsky, Andreas; Wittge, Jochen; Kiefl, Konstantin; Allen, David; McNally, Patrick; Garagorri, Jorge; Elizalde, M. Reyes; Baumbach, Tilo; Tanner, Brian K.

    2013-01-01

    The behaviour of microcracks in silicon during thermal annealing has been studied using in situ X-ray diffraction imaging. Initial cracks are produced with an indenter at the edge of a conventional Si wafer, which was heated under temperature gradients to produce thermal stress. At temperatures where Si is still in the brittle regime, the strain may accumulate if a microcrack is pinned. If a critical value is exceeded either a new or a longer crack will be formed, which results with high probability in wafer breakage. The strain reduces most efficiently by forming (hhl) or (hkl) crack planes of high energy instead of the expected low-energy cleavage planes like {111}. Dangerous cracks, which become active during heat treatment and may shatter the whole wafer, can be identified from diffraction images simply by measuring the geometrical dimensions of the strain-related contrast around the crack tip. Once the plastic regime at higher temperature is reached, strain is reduced by generating dislocation loops and slip bands and no wafer breakage occurs. There is only a small temperature window within which crack propagation is possible during rapid annealing. PMID:24046487

  9. An investigation of fatigue crack propagation under mode 1 and mixed mode 1/2 loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Tapan Kumar

    An investigation on fatigue crack propagation under mode 1 and mixed mode (1 and 2) loadings has been performed. Fatigue crack growth data in the case of plane strain mode 1 have been obtained by performing experiments on compact tension specimens of 4340 steel for increasing Delta-K(sub 1), decreasing Delta-K(sub 1), and constant Delta-K(sub 1) loading conditions. Under mixed mode plane stress condition, the fatigue crack growth trajectory has been determined by performing experiments on the center cracked thin disk specimen of aluminum 2024. With two mixed mode loading ratios, the subsequent propagation of the main crack has been performed by producing a series of kinks and forks. For practical applications such as the case of a flaw or a crack in aircraft or ship structure in which the loading axis (with respect to the crack) frequently changes, a zig-zag or complicated crack trajectory is very important in both experimental and theoretical studies. In order to apply any specific crack growth criterion for the analysis of the experimental results, a detailed analysis for the stresses near the crack front and the extent of yielding is necessary. A full field solution, based on small deformation, three dimensional elastic-plastic finite element analysis of the centrally cracked thin disk under mode 1 loading has been performed. The solution for the stresses under small-scale yielding and locally fully plastic state has been compared with the HRR plane stress solution. At the outside of the three dimensional zone, within a distance of r sigma(sub 0)/J = 18, HRR dominance is maintained in the presence of a significant amount of compressive stress along the crack flanks. Ahead of this region, the HRR field overestimate the stresses. These results demonstrate a completely reversed state of stress in the near crack front compared to that in the plane strain case. The combined effect of geometry and finite thickness of the specimen on elastic-plastic crack tip stress

  10. Mode I and mixed I/III crack initiation and propagation behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy at 25{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.X.; Kurtz, R.J.; Jones, R.H.

    1997-04-01

    The mode I and mixed-mode I/III fracture behavior of the production-scale heat (No. 832665) of V-4Cr-4Ti has been investigated at 25{degrees}C using compact tension (CT) specimens for a mode I crack and modified CT specimens for a mixed-mode I/III crack. The mode III to mode I load ratio was 0.47. Test specimens were vacuum annealed at 1000{degrees}C for 1 h after final machining. Both mode I and mixed-mode I/III specimens were fatigue cracked prior to J-integral testing. It was noticed that the mixed-mode I/III crack angle decreased from an initial 25 degrees to approximately 23 degrees due to crack plane rotation during fatigue cracking. No crack plane rotation occurred in the mode I specimen. The crack initiation and propagation behavior was evaluated by generating J-R curves. Due to the high ductility of this alloy and the limited specimen thickness (6.35 mm), plane strain requirements were not met so valid critical J-integral values were not obtained. However, it was found that the crack initiation and propagation behavior was significantly different between the mode I and the mixed-mode I/III specimens. In the mode I specimen crack initiation did not occur, only extensive crack tip blunting due to plastic deformation. During J-integral testing the mixed-mode crack rotated to an increased crack angle (in contrast to fatigue precracking) by crack blunting. When the crack initiated, the crack angle was about 30 degrees. After crack initiation the crack plane remained at 30 degrees until the test was completed. Mixed-mode crack initiation was difficult, but propagation was easy. The fracture surface of the mixed-mode specimen was characterized by microvoid coalescence.

  11. Crack initiation observation and local stress analysis in shear fracture tests of ultra-high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ninshu; Takada, Kenji; Sugimoto, Nao

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the local strain and stress at the crack initiation position in shear fracture test pieces of ultra-high strength steels, a butterfly shear fracture specimen was employed. The crack initiation position and propagation direction were observed during shear fracture tests by high speed cameras and investigated through analysing the fracture surface by scanning electron microscope. Further, the finite element method was employed and the stress-triaxiality at the crack initiation position was investigated. It can be obtained that the crack initiated at the position where the stress state is close to uniaxial tensile state or plane strain state more than pure shear stress state.

  12. The influence of matrix fracture strain and interface strength on cross-ply cracking in CFRP in the temperature range of -100 C to +100 C

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, P.W.M.; Andersen, S.I.; Forsogsanlaeg Riso, Roskilde )

    1989-09-01

    The effects of matrix fracture strain and interface strength on cross-ply cracking in CFRP composites were investigated using specimens of a graphite/epoxy laminate, 0/90(4)/0, tested at -100 C, -40 C, room temperature (RT), 60 C, and 100 C. It is shown that the fracture strain (mechanical + thermal strain) distribution can be described by two-parameter Weibull distributions. It was found that, at increasing test temperature, two phenomena influenced the transverse fracture strain and the strength of the interface. From -100 C to RT, ply failure proved to be dominated by the increasing fracture strain of the matrix. Above RT, the influence of the decrease in the interface strength dominates over that of the increased matrix fracture strain. 17 refs.

  13. The strain in the array is mainly in the plane (waves below ~1 Hz)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.; Pavlis, G.; Bodin, P.

    1999-01-01

    We compare geodetic and single-station methods of measuring dynamic deformations and characterize their causes in the frequency bands 0.5-1.0 Hz and 4.0-8.0 Hz. The geodetic approach utilizes data from small-aperture seismic arrays, applying techniques from geodesy. It requires relatively few assumptions and a priori information. The single-station method uses ground velocities recorded at isolated or single stations and assumes all the deformation is due to plane-wave propagation. It also requires knowledge of the azimuth and horizontal velocity of waves arriving at the recording station. Data employed come from a small-aperture, dense seismic array deployed in Geyokcha, Turkmenistan, and include seismograms recorded by broadband STS2 and short-period L28 sensors. Poor agreement between geodetic and single-station estimates in the 4.0-8.0 Hz passband indicates that the displacement field may vary nonlinearly with distance over distances of ~50 m. STS2 geodetic estimates provide a robust standard in the 0.5-1.0 Hz passband because they appear to be computationally stable and require fewer assumptions than single-station estimates. The agreement between STS2 geodetic estimates and single-station L28 estimates is surprisingly good for the S-wave and early surface waves, suggesting that the single-station analysis should be useful with commonly available data. These results indicate that, in the 0.5 to 1.0 Hz passband, the primary source of dynamic deformation is plane-wave propagation along great-circle source-receiver paths. For later arriving energy, the effects of scattering become important. The local structure beneath the array exerts a strong control on the geometry of the dynamic deformation, implying that it may be difficult to infer source characteristics of modern or paleoearthquakes from indicators of dynamic deformations. However, strong site control also suggests that the dynamic deformations may be predictable, which would be useful for engineering

  14. Development of a Plane Strain Tensile Geometry to Assess Shear Fracture in Dual Phase Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. D.; Matlock, D. K.; De Moor, E.; Speer, J. G.

    2014-10-01

    A geometrically modified sample capable of generating a triaxial stress state when tested on a standard uniaxial tensile frame was developed to replicate shear fractures observed during stretch bend tests and industrial sheet stamping operations. Seven commercially produced dual phase (DP) steels were tested using the geometrically modified sample, and the modified sample successfully produced shear fractures on a unique shear plane for all steels. For each steel, void densities were determined, based on metallographic analyses, as a function of imposed displacement. Microstructural properties of ferrite and martensite grain size, martensite volume fraction (MVF), retained austenite content, Vickers hardness, average nanoindentation hardness, average ferrite and martensite constituent hardness, and tensile properties were obtained in order to evaluate potential correlations with void data. A linear correlation was observed between Vickers hardness and the average nanoindentation hardness, verifying the ability of nanoindentation to produce data consistent with more traditional hardness measurement techniques. A linear relationship was observed between the number of voids present at 90% failure displacement and the martensite/ferrite hardness ratio, indicating that a decrease in relative hardness difference in a microstructure can suppress void formation, and potentially extend formability limits. The void population appeared independent of MVF, grain size, and tensile properties suggesting that constituent hardness may be a dominant parameter when considering suppression of void nucleation in DP steels.

  15. Behaviour of Cohesionless Soil Reinforced with Three Dimensional Inclusions Under Plane Strain Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harikumar, M.; Sankar, N.; Chandrakaran, S.

    2015-09-01

    Since 1969, when the concept of earth reinforcing was brought about by Henry Vidal, a large variety of materials such as steel bars, tire shreds, polypropylene, polyester, glass fibres, coir and jute fibres etc. have been widely added to soil mass randomly or in a regular, oriented manner. The conventional reinforcements in use were two dimensional or planar, in the form of strips with negligible widths or in the form of sheets. In this investigation, a novel concept of multi oriented plastic reinforcement (hexa-pods) is discussed. Direct shear tests were conducted on unreinforced and reinforced dry fine, medium and coarse sands. Detailed parametric studies with respect to the effective grain size of soil (d10), normal stress (σ) and the volume ratio of hexa-pods (Vr) were performed. It was noticed that addition of hexa-pods resulted in increase in the shear strength parameters viz. peak deviatoric stresses and increased angle of internal friction. The hexa-pods also changed the brittle behaviour of unreinforced sand samples to ductile ones. Although the peak shear stress did not show a considerable improvement, the angle of internal friction improved noticeably. Addition of a single layer of reinforcement along the shear plane also reduced the post peak loss of strength and changed the soil behavior from brittle to a ductile one.

  16. Subcritical crack growth in two titanium alloys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. N.

    1973-01-01

    Measurement of subcritical crack growth during static loading of precracked titanium alloys in salt water using samples too thin for plane strain loading to predominate was examined as a method for determining the critical stress intensity for crack propagation in salt water. Significant internal crack growth followed by arrest was found at quite low stress intensities, but crack growth rates were relatively low. Assuming these techniques provided a reliable measurement of the critical stress intensity, the value for annealed Ti-4Al-1.5Mo-0.5V alloy was apparently about 35 ksi-in. to the 1/2 power, while that for annealed Ti-4Al-3Mo-1V was below 45 ksi-in. to the 1/2 power. Crack growth was also observed in tests conducted in both alloys in an air environment. At 65 ksi-in. to the 1/2 power, the extent of crack growth was greater in air than in salt water. Ti-4Al-3Mo-1V showed arrested crack growth in air at a stress intensity of 45 ksi-in. to the 1/2 power.

  17. Acoustic emission measurement of fatigue crack closure

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.S.; Rhyim, Y.M. . Center for Advanced Aerospace Materials); Kwon, D. . Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering); Ono, K. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1995-03-01

    In this study the acoustic emission (AE) technique has been applied to measure the crack closure loads precisely and the results have been compared with those measured by the conventional techniques such as the crack opening displacement (COD) method, back face strain gage (BFS) method, and surface strain gage method. In addition, fatigue tests at high stress ratio (R=0.8) have also been conducted to compared the results with those of the above methods at R=0.1 and to verify the accuracy of each method. The material used in the present investigation was an Al-Li 8090 alloy which was supplied as a 44.5mm thick rolled plate in the solution heat treated, 6% stretched and naturally aged condition. The COD and BFS methods show relatively good agreement with each other and measure the through-thickness mean value of crack closure loads. In the plane strain condition, the crack closure levels obtained by the COD and BFS methods were lower than those by the AE and surface train gage methods. The data obtained by the surface strain gage method must be interpreted carefully, because the shape of the compliance curves is affected by the location relative to the crack tip. The intrinsic fatigue life curve (da/dN vs. [Delta]K[sub eff]) obtained by the AE technique fitted well with the curve of high stress ratio (R=0.8) test at high [Delta]K, suggesting that the AE technique is sensitive to local crack-tip behavior on a microscopic scale and can be considered as a reliable measurement method for crack closure phenomena under repetitive loads.

  18. THERMAL-MECHANICAL RESPONSE OF CRACKED SATIN WEAVE CFRP COMPOSITES AT CRYOGENIC TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, S.; Shindo, Y.; Narita, F.; Takeda, T.

    2008-03-03

    This paper examines the thermal-mechanical response of satin weave carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates with internal and/or edge cracks subjected to uniaxial tension load at cryogenic temperatures. Cracks are considered to occur in the transverse fiber bundles and extend through the entire thickness of the fiber bundles. Two-dimentional generalized plane strain finite element models are developed to study the effects of residual thermal stresses and cracks on the mechanical behavior of CFRP woven laminates. A detailed examination of the Young's modulus and stress distributions near the crack tip is carried out which provides insight into material behavior at cryogenic temperatures.

  19. Stress intensity factors in two bonded elastic layers containing cracks perpendicular to and on the interface. I Analysis. II - Solution and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, M.-C.; Erdogan, F.

    1983-01-01

    The basic crack problem which is essential for the study of subcritical crack propagation and fracture of layered structural materials is considered. Because of the apparent analytical difficulties, the problem is idealized as one of plane strain or plane stress. An additional simplifying assumption is made by restricting the formulation of the problem to crack geometries and loading conditions which have a plane of symmetry perpendicular to the interface. The general problem is formulated in terms of a coupled systems of four integral equations. For each relevant crack configuration of practical interest, the singular behavior of the solution near and at the ends and points of intersection of the cracks is investigated and the related characteristic equations are obtained. The edge crack terminating at and crossing the interface, the T-shaped crack consisting of a broken layer and a delamination crack, the cross-shaped crack which consists of a delamination crack intersecting a crack which is perpendicular to the interface, and a delamination crack initiating from a stress-free boundary of the bonded layers are some of the practical crack geometries considered. Previously announced in STAR as N80-18428 and N80-18429

  20. The structure of the near-tip field during transient elastodynamic crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, L. B.; Rosakis, A. J.

    T HE PROCESS of dynamic crack growth in a nominally elastic malerial under conditions of plane strain or plane stress is considered. Of particular concern is the influence of the transient nature of the process on the stress field in the immediate vicinity of the crack tip during nonsteady growth. Asymptotically, the crack tip stress field is square root singular at the crack tip, with the angular variation of the singular field depending weakly on the instantaneous crack tip speed and with the instantaneous stress intensity factor being a scalar multiplier of the singular field. However, for a material particle at a small distance from the moving crack, the local stress field depends not only on instantaneous values of crack speed and stress intensity factor, but also on the past history of these lime-dependent quantities. A representation of the crack tip field is obtained in the form of an expansion about the crack up in powers of radial coordinate, with the coefficients depending on the time rates of change of crack tip speed and stress intensity factor. This representation is used to interpret some experimental observations, with the conclusion that the higher-order expansion provides an accurate description of crack tip fields under fairly severe transient conditions. In addition, some estimates are made of the practical limits of using a stress intensity factor field alone to characterize the local fields.

  1. The effect of size, crack depth and strain rate on fracture toughness—temperature curves of a low activation martensitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edsinger, K.; Odette, G. R.; Lucas, G. E.; Sheckherd, J. W.

    1996-10-01

    Fracture toughness K( T) curves for F82H were determined as a function of specimen size, crack size and strain rate. It was found that F82H shows a relatively abrupt transition from lower-shelf, quasi-cleavage fracture to upper-shelf ductile fracture. However, decreasing specimen size, crack size and strain rate resulted in a shift of the K( T) curve to lower temperatures. The differences in the lower shelf/knee regime were reconciled by combining a critical stressed area criteria for quasi-cleavage fracture with stress fields determined by finite element methods for the different specimen geometries. The results demonstrated that the large effective toughness for small specimens or specimens with shallow cracks are a consequence of having to deform the specimens to much higher Js before the stressed-area criteria are met ahead of the crack. Such large toughnesses and low transition temperatures support the contention that thin-walled ferritic structures should remain a viable option for advanced fusion reactors.

  2. Extreme strain rate and temperature dependence of the mechanical properties of nano silicon nitride thin layers in a basal plane under tension: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xuefeng; Wang, Hongjie; Wei, Yin; Wen, Jiangbo; Niu, Min; Jia, Shuhai

    2014-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to clarify the extreme strain rate and temperature dependence of the mechanical behaviors of nano silicon nitride thin layers in a basal plane under tension. It is found that fracture stresses show almost no change with increasing strain rate. However, fracture strains decrease gradually due to the appearance of additional N(2c)-Si bond breaking defects in the deformation process. With increasing loading temperature, there is a noticeable drop in fracture stress and fracture strain. In the low temperature range, roughness phases can be observed owing to a combination of factors such as configuration evolution and energy change.

  3. Mapping and load response of overload strain fields: Synchrotron X-ray measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, V; Jisrawi, N M; Sadangi, R K; Pao, P S; Horvath, K; Sadananda, K; Ignatov, A; Skaritka, J; Tsakalakos, T

    2009-02-05

    High energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements have been performed to provide quantitative microscopic guidance for modeling of fatigue crack growth. Specifically we report local strain mapping, along with in situ loading strain response, results on 4140 steel fatigue specimens exhibiting the crack growth retardation 'overload effect'. Detailed, 2D, {epsilon}{gamma}{gamma}-strain field mapping shows that a single overload (OL) cycle creates a compressive strain field extending millimeters above and below the crack plane. The OL strain field structures are shown to persist after the crack tip has grown well beyond the OL position. The specimen exhibiting the maximal crack growth rate retardation following overload exhibits a tensile residual strain region at the crack tip. Strain field results, on in situ tensile loaded specimens, show a striking critical threshold load, F{sub c}, phenomenon in their strain response. At loads below F{sub c} the strain response is dominated by a rapid suppression of the compressive OL feature with modest response at the crack tip. At loads above F{sub c} the strain response at the OL position terminates and the response at the crack tip becomes large. This threshold load response behavior is shown to exhibit lower F{sub c} values, and dramatically enhanced rates of strain change with load as the crack tip propagates farther beyond the OL position. The OL strain feature behind the crack tip also is shown to be suppressed by removing the opposing crack faces via an electron discharge cut passing through the crack tip. Finally unique 2D strain field mapping (imaging) results, through the depth of the specimen, of the fatigue crack front and the OL feature in the wake are also presented.

  4. Influence of Drawbeads in Deep-Drawing of Plane-Strain Channel Sections: Experimental and FE Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, M. C.; Baptista, A. J.; Alves, J. L.; Menezes, L. F.; Green, D. E.; Ghaei, A.

    2007-05-01

    The main purpose of the "Numisheet'05 Benchmark♯3: Channel Draw/Cylindrical Cup" was to evaluate the forming characteristics of materials in multi-stage processes. The concept was to verify the strain fields achieved during the two stage forming process and also to test the ability of numerical models to predict both strain and stress fields. The first stage consisted of forming channel sections in an industrial-scale channel draw die. The material that flows through the drawbead and over the die radii into the channel sidewalls is prestrained by cyclic bending and unbending. The prestrained channel sidewalls are subsequently cut and subjected to near plane-strain Marciniak-style cup test. This study emphasizes the analysis of the first stage process, the Channel Draw, since accurate numerical results for the first stage forming and springback are essential to guarantee proper initial state variables for the subsequent stage simulation. Four different sheet materials were selected: mild steel AKDQ-HDG, high strength steel HSLA-HDG, dual phase steel DP600-HDG and an aluminium alloy AA6022-T43. The four sheet materials were formed in the same channel draw die, but with drawbead penetrations of 25%, 50% and 100%. This paper describes the testing and measurement procedures for the numerical simulation of these conditions with DD3IMP FE code. A comparison between experimental and numerical simulation results for the first stage is presented. The experimental results indicate that an increase in drawbead penetration is accompanied by a general decrease in springback, with both sidewall radius of curvature and the sidewall angle increasing with increasing drawbead penetration. An exception to this trend occurs at the shallowest bead penetration: the radius of curvature in the sidewall is larger than expected. The sequence of cyclic tension and compression is numerically studied for each drawbead penetration in order to investigate this phenomenon.

  5. Experimental and theoretical study of polarized photoluminescence caused by anisotropic strain relaxation in nonpolar a-plane textured ZnO grown by a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Chih-Ming; Huang, Yu-En; Feng, Shih-Wei; Kou, Kuang-Yang; Chen, Chien-Hsun; Tu, Li-Wei

    2015-07-13

    Anisotropic strain relaxation and the resulting degree of polarization of photoluminescence (PL) in nonpolar a-plane textured ZnO are experimentally and theoretically studied. A thicker nonpolar a-plane textured ZnO film enhances the anisotropic in-plane strain relaxation, resulting in a larger degree of polarization of PL and better sample quality. Anisotropic in-plane strains, sample quality, and degree of polarization of PL in nonpolar a-plane ZnO are consequences of the degree of anisotropic in-plane strain relaxation. By the k·p perturbation approach, simulation results of the variation of the degree of polarization for the electronic transition upon anisotropic in-plane strain relaxation agree with experimental results.

  6. A Continuum-Atomistic Analysis of Transgranular Crack Propagation in Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakov, V.; Saether, E.; Glaessgen, E.

    2009-01-01

    A concurrent multiscale modeling methodology that embeds a molecular dynamics (MD) region within a finite element (FEM) domain is used to study plastic processes at a crack tip in a single crystal of aluminum. The case of mode I loading is studied. A transition from deformation twinning to full dislocation emission from the crack tip is found when the crack plane is rotated around the [111] crystallographic axis. When the crack plane normal coincides with the [112] twinning direction, the crack propagates through a twinning mechanism. When the crack plane normal coincides with the [011] slip direction, the crack propagates through the emission of full dislocations. In intermediate orientations, a transition from full dislocation emission to twinning is found to occur with an increase in the stress intensity at the crack tip. This finding confirms the suggestion that the very high strain rates, inherently present in MD simulations, which produce higher stress intensities at the crack tip, over-predict the tendency for deformation twinning compared to experiments. The present study, therefore, aims to develop a more realistic and accurate predictive modeling of fracture processes.

  7. A Study of Failure in Small Pressurized Cylindrical Shells Containing a Crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barwell, Craig A.; Eber, Lorenz; Fyfe, Ian M.

    1998-01-01

    The deformation in the vicinity of axial cracks in thin pressurized cylinders is examined using small experimental The deformation in the vicinity of axial cracks in thin pressurized cylinders is examined using small experimental models. The loading applied was either symmetric or unsymmetric about the crack plane, the latter being caused by structural constraints such as stringers. The objective was two fold - one, to provide the experimental results which will allow computer modeling techniques to be evaluated for deformations that are significantly different from that experienced by flat plates, and the other to examine the deformations and conditions associated with the onset of crack kinking which often precedes crack curving. The stresses which control crack growth in a cylindrical geometry depend on conditions introduced by the axial bulging, which is an integral part of this type of failure. For the symmetric geometry, both the hoop and radial strain just ahead off the crack, r = a, were measured and these results compared with those obtained from a variety of structural analysis codes, in particular STAGS [1], ABAQUS and ANSYS. In addition to these measurements, the pressures at the onset of stable and unstable crack growth were obtained and the corresponding crack deformations measured as the pressures were increased to failure. For the unsymmetric cases, measurements were taken of the crack kinking angle, and the displacements in the vicinity of the crack. In general, the strains ahead of the crack showed good agreement between the three computer codes and between the codes and the experiments. In the case of crack behavior, it was determined that modeling stable tearing with a crack-tip opening displacement fracture criterion could be successfully combined with the finite-element analysis techniques as used in structural analysis codes. The analytic results obtained in this study were very compatible with the experimental observations of crack growth

  8. The surface and through crack problems in layered orthotropic plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, Fazil; Wu, Binghua

    1991-01-01

    An analytical method is developed for a relatively accurate calculation of Stress Intensity Factors in a laminated orthotropic plate containing a through or part-through crack. The laminated plate is assumed to be under bending or membrane loading and the mode 1 problem is considered. First three transverse shear deformation plate theories (Mindlin's displacement based first-order theory, Reissner's stress-based first-order theory, and a simple-higher order theory due to Reddy) are reviewed and examined for homogeneous, laminated and heterogeneous orthotropic plates. Based on a general linear laminated plate theory, a method by which the stress intensity factors can be obtained in orthotropic laminated and heterogeneous plates with a through crack is developed. Examples are given for both symmetrically and unsymmetrically laminated plates and the effects of various material properties on the stress intensity factors are studied. In order to implement the line-spring model which is used later to study the surface crack problem, the corresponding plane elasticity problem of a two-bonded orthotropic plated containing a crack perpendicular to the interface is also considered. Three different crack profiles: an internal crack, an edge crack, and a crack terminating at the interface are considered. The effect of the different material combinations, geometries, and material orthotropy on the stress intensity factors and on the power of stress singularity for a crack terminating at the interface is fully examined. The Line Spring model of Rice and Levy is used for the part-through crack problem. The surface crack is assumed to lie in one of the two-layered laminated orthotropic plates due to the limitation of the available plane strain results. All problems considered are of the mixed boundary value type and are reduced to Cauchy type of singular integral equations which are then solved numerically.

  9. Adjustable magnetoelectric effect of self-assembled vertical multiferroic nanocomposite films by the in-plane misfit strain and ferromagnetic volume fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Huaping; Chai, Guozhong; Zhou, Ting; Zhang, Zheng; Kitamura, Takayuki; Zhou, Haomiao

    2014-03-21

    The strain-mediated magnetoelectric (ME) property of self-assembled vertical multiferroic nanocomposite films epitaxially grown on cubic substrates was calculated by a nonlinear thermodynamic theory combined with the elastic theory. The dependent relations of phase state of ferroelectric films with the in-plane misfit strain, out-of-plane misfit strain, temperature, and volume fraction of ferromagnetic phase were confirmed. The effects of in-plane misfit strain and ferromagnetic volume fraction on the polarization and dielectric constant of ferroelectric films at room temperature were elaborately analyzed for the vertical BaTiO{sub 3}-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and PbTiO{sub 3}-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposite films. Our calculated results confirmed the relationship among ME effect and in-plane misfit strain and ferromagnetic volume fraction in the nanocomposite films. The ME voltage coefficients of vertical BaTiO{sub 3}-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and PbTiO{sub 3}-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposite films displayed various maximums and abrupt points at special phases and phase transition boundaries. The ME voltage coefficients of lead-free BaTiO{sub 3}-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposite films epitaxially grown on different substrates could reach a comparative value of ∼2 V·cm{sup −1}·Oe{sup −1} under the controllable in-plane misfit strain induced by substrate clamping. Our results provided an available method for the optimal design of vertical multiferroic nanocomposites with adjustable ME effect by optimizing the ferromagnetic volume fraction and substrate type.

  10. Effect of in-plane magnetic field and applied strain in quantum spin Hall systems: Application to InAs/GaSb quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lun-Hui; Xu, Dong-Hui; Zhang, Fu-Chun; Zhou, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the recent discovery of quantized spin Hall effect in InAs/GaSb quantum wells [Du, Knez, Sullivan, and Du, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 096802 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.096802], we theoretically study the effects of in-plane magnetic field and strain effect to the quantization of charge conductance by using Landauer-B ütikker formalism. Our theory predicts a robustness of the conductance quantization against the in-plane magnetic field up to a very high field of 20 T. We use a disordered hopping term to model the strain and show that the strain may help the quantization of the conductance. Relevance to the experiments will be discussed.

  11. Thermal-Fatigue Crack-Growth Characteristics and Mechanical Strain Cycling Behavior of A-286 Discaloy, and 16-25-6 Austenitic Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert W.; Smith, Gordon T.

    1960-01-01

    Thermal-fatigue crack-growth characteristics of notched- and unnotched-disk specimens of A-286, Discaloy, hot-cold worked 16-25-6, and overaged 16-25-6 were experimentally studied. Separately controlled variables were total strain range (0.0043 to 0.0079 in./in.), maximum cycle temperature (1300 and 1100 F), and hold time at maximum temperature (O and 5 min). A limited number of mechanical, push-pull, constant-strain cycle tests at room temperature were made using notched and un-notched bars of the same materials. In these tests the number of cycles to failure as well as the variation of load change with accumulated cycles was measured, and the effects of mean stress were observed. Constant-strain-range mechanical-fatigue tests at room temperature revealed notched-bar fatigue life to be strongly influenced by mean stress. For a specific strain range, the longest fatigue life was always found to be associated with the least-tensile (or most compressive) mean stress. By defining thermal-fatigue life as the number of cycles required to produce a crack area of 6000 square mils, the relative thermal-fatigue resistances of the test materials were established. Notched-disk specimens of A-286 and Discaloy steels exhibited longer fatigue lives than either hot-cold worked or overaged 16-25-6. On the other hand, unnotched-disk specimens of Discaloy and hot-cold worked 16-25-6 had longer lives than A-286 and overaged 16-25-6. Separation of the crack-growth data into microstage and macrostage periods revealed that the macrostage period accounted for the greatest part of the difference among materials when tested in the notched configuration, while the microstage was largely responsible for the differences encountered in unnotched disks.

  12. Characteristics of thermally-induced transverse cracks in graphite epoxy composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, D. S.; Bowles, D. E.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    The characteristics of thermally induced transverse cracks in T300/5208 graphite-epoxy cross-ply and quasi-isotropic laminates were investigated both experimentally and analytically. The formation of transverse cracks and the subsequent crack spacing present during cool down to -250 F (116K) and thermal cycling between 250 and -250 F (116 and 394K) was investigated. The state of stress in the vicinity of a transverse crack and the influence of transverse cracking on the laminate coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) was predicted using a generalized plane strain finite element analysis and a modified shear lag analysis. A majority of the cross-ply laminates experienced transverse cracking during the initial cool down to -250 F whereas the quasi-isotropic laminates remained uncracked. The in situ transverse strength of the 90 degree layers was more than 1.9 times greater than the transverse strength of the unidirectional 90 degree material for all laminates investigated.

  13. Two-dimensional metal-insulator transition and in-plane magnetoresistance in a high mobility strained Si quantum well.

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffler, F.; Muhlberger, M.; Lai, K. W.; Lyon, S.A.; Tsui, Daniel Chee; Pan, W. Y.

    2005-01-01

    The apparent metal-insulator transition is observed in a high-quality two-dimensional electron system (2DES) in the strained Si quantum well of a Si/Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} heterostructure with mobility {mu} = 1.9 x 10{sup 5} cm{sup 2}/V s at density n = 1.45 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}. The critical density, at which the thermal coefficient of low T resistivity changes sign, is -0.32 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}, a very low value obtained in Si-based 2D systems. The in-plane magnetoresistivity {rho}(B{sub ip}) was measured in the density range, 0.35 x 10{sup 11} < n < 1.45 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}, where the 2DES shows the metallic-like behavior. It first increases and then saturates to a finite value {rho}(B{sub c}) for B{sub ip}>B{sub c} , with B{sub c} the full spin-polarization field. Surprisingly, {rho}(B{sub c})/{rho}(0)-1.8 for all the densities, even down to n = 0.35 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}, only 10% higher than n{sub c}. This is different from that in clean Si metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors, where the enhancement is strongly density dependent and {rho}(B{sub c})/{rho}(0) appears to diverge as n {yields} n{sub c}. Finally, we show that in the fully spin-polarized regime, dependent on the 2DES density, the temperature dependence of {rho}(B{sub ip}) can be either metallic-like or insulating.

  14. Stable Crack Growth During Thermal Actuation of Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jape, S.; Baxevanis, T.; Lagoudas, D. C.

    2016-03-01

    A finite element analysis of crack growth is carried out in shape memory alloys subjected to thermal variations under plane strain, mode I, constant applied loading. The crack is assumed to propagate at a critical level of the crack-tip energy release rate which is modeled using the virtual crack closure technique. The load level, applied at a high temperature at which the austenite phase is stable, is assumed sufficiently low so that the resulting crack-tip energy release rate is smaller than the critical value but sufficiently high so that the critical value is reached during cooling, initiating crack growth (Baxevanis and Lagoudas in Int J Fract 191:191-213, 2015). Stable crack growth is observed, mainly associated with the shielding effect of the transformed material left in the wake of the advancing crack. Results pertaining to the near-tip mechanical fields and fracture toughness are presented and their sensitivity to phase transformation metrics and bias load levels is investigated.

  15. Matrix cracking in laminated composites under monotonic and cyclic loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, David H.; Lee, Jong-Won

    1991-01-01

    An analytical model based on the internal state variable (ISV) concept and the strain energy method is proposed for characterizing the monotonic and cyclic response of laminated composites containing matrix cracks. A modified constitution is formulated for angle-ply laminates under general in-plane mechanical loading and constant temperature change. A monotonic matrix cracking criterion is developed for predicting the crack density in cross-ply laminates as a function of the applied laminate axial stress. An initial formulation for a cyclic matrix cracking criterion for cross-ply laminates is also discussed. For the monotonic loading case, a number of experimental data and well-known models are compared with the present study for validating the practical applicability of the ISV approach.

  16. Shear cracks in thermoplastic and poroelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craster, R. V.; Atkinson, C.

    1992-05-01

    T O UNDERSTAND the mechanism of quasi-static plane strain fracture in poro- and thermoelastic materials for arbitrary stress fields, it is necessary to consider not only tensile fracture but also shear fracture. An impulsively sheared semi-infinite crack is considered for the mathematically analogous cases of coupled quasi-static thermo- and poroelastic materials. The exact solution is obtained in Laplace and Fourier transform domains using the Wiener—Hopf technique. The crack tip behaviour is then analysed. The stress intensity factors as a function of the Laplace transform variable are identified for cracks with either permeable (conducting) or impermeable (insulating) crack faces, and are inverted numerically for all times and asymptotically for small times. The case of a steadily propagating shear crack with either permeable or impermeable crack faces is also examined; the crack tip behaviour is examined in detail and compared with the result for a permeable fault. Analytical results are found in the neighbourhood of the crack tip. The pore pressure fields are found explicitly for all x and y.The case where the entire fault is assumed impermeable is reworked and an analytical solution is given for the pore pressure. The relevance of the results for stabilising shear faults and earthquake mechanics is briefly discussed. For the most part, the solutions in this paper and an earlier one refer to situations involving a complete coupling of the poroelastic equations and boundary conditions. This occurs when the material ahead of the crack is continuous and is relevant to the fracture of "virgin" rock. In the other papers cited in this article and elsewhere this has not usually been the case; the interface along which the crack propagates has usually been assumed to have a particular property as far as the pore pressure is concerned. It is worth stressing that the most complete situation is considered here; the pore pressure condition ahead of the crack is set only

  17. Automatic crack propagation tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, M. S.; Weidner, T. J.; Yehia, N. A. B.; Burd, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    A finite element based approach to fully automatic crack propagation tracking is presented. The procedure presented combines fully automatic mesh generation with linear fracture mechanics techniques in a geometrically based finite element code capable of automatically tracking cracks in two-dimensional domains. The automatic mesh generator employs the modified-quadtree technique. Crack propagation increment and direction are predicted using a modified maximum dilatational strain energy density criterion employing the numerical results obtained by meshes of quadratic displacement and singular crack tip finite elements. Example problems are included to demonstrate the procedure.

  18. Energy absorption mechanisms during crack propagation in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, D. P.; Adams, D. F.

    1979-01-01

    The stress distributions around individual fibers in a unidirectional boron/aluminum composite material subjected to axial and transverse loadings are being studied utilizing a generalized plane strain finite element analysis. This micromechanics analysis was modified to permit the analysis of longitudinal sections, and also to incorporate crack initiation and propagation. The analysis fully models the elastoplastic response of the aluminum matrix, as well as temperature dependent material properties and thermal stress effects. The micromechanics analysis modifications are described, and numerical results are given for both longitudinal and transverse models loaded into the inelastic range, to first failure. Included are initially cracked fiber models.

  19. Fatigue crack tip deformation and fatigue crack propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, T. S.; Liu, H. W.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of stress ratio, prestress cycling and plate thickness on the fatigue crack propagation rate are studied on 2024-T351 aluminum alloy. Fatigue crack propagation rate increases with the plate thickness and the stress ratio. Prestress cycling below the static yield strength has no noticeable effect on the fatigue crack propagation rate. However, prestress cycling above the static yield strength causes the material to strain harden and increases the fatigue crack propagation rate. Crack tip deformation is used to study the fatigue crack propagation. The crack tip strains and the crack opening displacements were measured from moire fringe patterns. The moire fringe patterns were obtained by a double exposure technique, using a very high density master grille (13,400 lines per inch).

  20. Environmental Crack Driving Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, M. M.

    2013-03-01

    The effect of environment on the crack driving force is considered, first by assuming quasistatic extension of a stationary crack and second, by use of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) crack growth rate models developed previously by this author and developed further here. A quasistatic thermodynamic energy balance approach, of the Griffith-Irwin type, is used to develop stationary crack threshold expressions, tilde{J}_c , which represent the conjoint mechanical and electrochemical conditions, below which stationary cracks are stable. Expressions for the electrochemical crack driving force (CDF) were derived using an analysis that is analogous to that used by Irwin to derive his "strain energy release rate," G, which Rice showed as being equivalent to his mechanical CDF, J. The derivations show that electrochemical CDFs both for active path dissolution (APD) and hydrogen embrittlement (HE) mechanisms of SCC are simply proportional to Tafel's electrochemical anodic and cathodic overpotentials, η a and η c, respectively. Phenomenological SCC models based on the kinetics of APD and HE crack growth are used to derive expressions for the kinetic threshold, J scc, below which crack growth cannot be sustained. These models show how independent mechanical and environmental CDFs may act together to drive SCC crack advance. Development of a user-friendly computational tool for calculating Tafel's overpotentials is advocated.

  1. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.; Malik, S. N.; Laflen, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    A study was performed to examine the applicability of path-independent (P-I) integrals to crack growth problems in hot section components of gas turbine aircraft engines. Alloy 718 was used and the experimental parameters included combined temperature and strain cycling, thermal gradients, elastic-plastic strain levels, and mean strains. A literature review was conducted of proposed P-I integrals, and those capable of analyzing hot section component problems were selected and programmed into the postprocessor of a finite element code. Detailed elastic-plastic finite element analyses were conducted to simulate crack growth and crack closure of the test specimen, and to evaluate the P-I integrals. It was shown that the selected P-I integrals are very effective for predicting crack growth for isothermal conditions.

  2. Crack Turning Mechanics of Composite Wing Skin Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, F. G.; Reeder, James R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    crack plane in generally anisotropic solids under plane deformation has been studied; (6) The role of T-stress and the higher-order term of sigma(sub y) on the crack turning and stability of the kinked crack has been quantified; (7) Asymptotic crack-tip fields including the effect of transverse shear deformation (Reissner plate theory) in an anisotropic plate under bending, twisting moments, and transverse shear loads has been presented; (8) The expression of the path-independent J-integral in terms of the generalized stress and strain has been derived; (9) Asymptotic crack-tip fields including the effect of transverse shear deformation (Reissner shallow shell theory) in a general anisotropic shell has been developed; (10) The Stroh formalism was used to characterize the crack tip fields in shells up to the second term and the energy release rate was expressed in a very compact form.

  3. Creep crack-growth: A new path-independent T sub o and computational studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stonesifer, R. B.; Atluri, S. N.

    1981-01-01

    Two path independent integral parameters which show some degree of promise as fracture criteria are the C* and delta T sub c integrals. The mathematical aspects of these parameters are reviewed. This is accomplished by deriving generalized vector forms of the parameters using conservation laws which are valid for arbitrary, three dimensional, cracked bodies with crack surface tractions (or applied displacements), body forces, inertial effects and large deformations. Two principal conclusions are that delta T sub c is a valid crack tip parameter during nonsteady as well as steady state creep and that delta T sub c has an energy rate interpretation whereas C* does not. An efficient, small displacement, infinitestimal strain, displacement based finite element model is developed for general elastic/plastic material behavior. For the numerical studies, this model is specialized to two dimensional plane stress and plane strain and to power law creep constitutive relations.

  4. Dynamic steady-state analysis of crack propagation in rubber-like solids using an extended finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroon, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, a computational framework for studying high-speed crack growth in rubber-like solids under conditions of plane stress and steady-state is proposed. Effects of inertia, viscoelasticity and finite strains are included. The main purpose of the study is to examine the contribution of viscoelastic dissipation to the total work of fracture required to propagate a crack in a rubber-like solid. The computational framework builds upon a previous work by the present author (Kroon in Int J Fract 169:49-60, 2011). The model was fully able to predict experimental results in terms of the local surface energy at the crack tip and the total energy release rate at different crack speeds. The predicted distributions of stress and dissipation around the propagating crack tip are presented. The predicted crack tip profiles also agree qualitatively with experimental findings.

  5. Analysis of crack propagation in roller bearings using the boundary integral equation method - A mixed-mode loading problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, L. J.

    1988-01-01

    Crack propagation in a rotating inner raceway of a high-speed roller bearing is analyzed using the boundary integral method. The model consists of an edge plate under plane strain condition upon which varying Hertzian stress fields are superimposed. A multidomain boundary integral equation using quadratic elements was written to determine the stress intensity factors KI and KII at the crack tip for various roller positions. The multidomain formulation allows the two faces of the crack to be modeled in two different subregions, making it possible to analyze crack closure when the roller is positioned on or close to the crack line. KI and KII stress intensity factors along any direction were computed. These calculations permit determination of crack growth direction along which the average KI times the alternating KI is maximum.

  6. The equilibrium concentration of hydrogen atoms ahead of a mixed mode I-mode III crack tip in single crystal iron

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T.Y.; Hack, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    Calculations of the equilibrium hydrogen concentration profiles about a mixed ode I-mode III crack in single crystal iron were performed. Both material anisotropy and the tetragonal nature of the distortion induced in the iron crystal structure by interstitial hydrogen were incorporated. Results show that, unlike the case of a spherical distortion, a strong coupling exists between the strain field of the interstitial hydrogen and the stress field of the crack for orientations of the crack plane that are not coincident with the cube axes of the lattice. As a result, the predicated enhancement of hydrogen in the crack tip region increases with increasing levels of mode III loading for those orientations. The results may help reconcile conflicting observations concerning the potential role of shear stresses in hydrogen embrittlement and preferential cracking of grains ahead of loaded crack tips in sustained load cracking experiments.

  7. Anisotropic strain relaxation and the resulting degree of polarization by one- and two-step growth in nonpolar a-plane GaN grown on r-sapphire substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Shih-Wei Chen, Yu-Yu; Lai, Chih-Ming; Tu, Li-Wei; Han, Jung

    2013-12-21

    Anisotropic strain relaxation and the resulting degree of polarization of the electronic transition in nonpolar a-plane GaN using one- and two-step growth are studied. By using two-step growth, a slower coalescence and a longer roughening-recovery process lead to larger anisotropic strain relaxation, a less striated surface, and lower densities of basal stacking fault (BSF) and prismatic stacking fault (PSF). It is suggested that anisotropic in-plane strains, surface striation, and BSF and PSF densities in nonpolar a-GaN are consequences of the rate of coalescence, the period of roughening-recovery process, and the degree of anisotropic strain relaxation. In addition, the two-step growth mode can enhance the degree of polarization of the electronic transition. The simulation results of the k⋅p perturbation approach show that the oscillator strength and degree of polarization of the electronic transition strongly depend on the in-plane strains upon anisotropic in-plane strain relaxation. The research results provide important information for optimized growth of nonpolar III-nitrides. By using two-step growth and by fabricating the devices on the high-quality nonpolar free-standing GaN substrates, high-efficiency nonpolar a-plane InGaN LEDs can be realized. Nonpolar a-plane InGaN/GaN LEDs can exhibit a strongly polarized light to improve the contrast, glare, eye discomfort and eye strain, and efficiency in display application.

  8. Comparison of the slow strain rate technique and the NACE TM0177/sup (1)/ tensile test for determining sulfide stress cracking resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Hoey, G.R.; Revie, R.W.; Ramsingh, R.R.

    1987-10-01

    Samples of a commercial sour service API C-90 (modified AISI 4130 steel) oil country seamless casing in the asquenched state were tempered at six temperatures in the range of 610 to 780 C. The sulfide stress cracking (SSC) resistance of the tempered steels was investigated by the NACE Standard TMO177 tensile bar test and the slow strain rate technique (SSRT). By the NACE TMO177 test, a maximum SSC threshold stress of 662 MPa (96 ksi) was obtained for a steel with a yield strength of 690 MPa (100 ksi), which has been tempered at 715 C. Data on time to failure, percent reduction of area, and percent elongation by the SSRT correlated well with the threshold stresses of the six tempered steels. Compared with the NACE TMO177 test, the SSRT saved considerable time in determining SSC resistance.

  9. Crack tip process zone domain switching in a soft lead zirconate titanate ceramics.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J. L.; Motahari, S. M.; Varlioglu, M.; Lienert, U.; Bernier, J. V.; Hoffman, M.; Ustundag, E.; Univ. of Florida; Iowa State Univ.; The Univ. of New South Wales

    2007-09-01

    Non-180{sup o} domain switching leads to fracture toughness enhancement in ferroelastic materials. Using a high-energy synchrotron X-ray source and a two-dimensional detector in transmission geometry, non-180{sup o} domain switching and crystallographic lattice strains were measured in situ around a crack tip in a soft tetragonal lead zirconate titanate ceramic. At K{sub 1} = 0.71 MPa m{sup 1/2} and below the initiation toughness, the process zone size, spatial distribution of preferred domain orientations, and lattice strains near the crack tip are a strong function of direction within the plane of the compact tension specimen. Deviatoric stresses and strains calculated using a finite element model and projected to the same directions measured in diffraction correlate with the measured spatial distributions and directional dependencies. Some preferred orientations remain in the crack wake after the crack has propagated; within the crack wake, the tetragonal 0 0 1 axis has a preferred orientation both perpendicular to the crack face and toward the crack front.

  10. Effects of the orientational distribution of cracks in solids.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Stefano; Colombo, Luciano

    2007-02-01

    We derive a theory for the elastic characterization of multicracked solids based on a homogenization technique. We consider a material containing a two-dimensional arbitrary distribution of parallel slit cracks which is elastically equivalent to a crystal with orthorhombic symmetry. We obtain explicit expressions for the macroscopic elastic stiffness tensor which is found to depend upon both the density of cracks and their angular distribution, here described by a suitable order parameter. For the isotropic case, we find that the degradation depends exponentially on the crack density. In addition, we show an unusual elastic behavior of a multicracked medium in the plane strain condition: for a negative Poisson ratio, we obtain an effective Young modulus greater than the actual value of the host matrix.

  11. Formation and interpretation of dilatant echelon cracks.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollard, D.D.; Segall, P.; Delaney, P.T.

    1982-01-01

    The relative displacements of the walls of many veins, joints, and dikes demonstrate that these structures are dilatant cracks. We infer that dilatant cracks propagate in a principal stress plane, normal to the maximum tensile or least compressive stress. Arrays of echelon crack segments appear to emerge from the peripheries of some dilatant cracks. Breakdown of a parent crack into an echelon array may be initiated by a spatial or temporal rotation of the remote principal stresses about an axis parallel to the crack propagation direction. Near the parent-crack tip, a rotation of the local principal stresses is induced in the same sense, but not necessarily through the same angle. Incipient echelon cracks form at the parent-crack tip normal to the local maximum tensile stress. Further longitudinal growth along surfaces that twist about axes parallel to the propagation direction realigns each echelon crack into a remote principal stress plane. The walls of these twisted cracks may be idealized as helicoidal surfaces. An array of helicoidal cracks sweeps out less surface area than one parent crack twisting through the same angle. Thus, many echelon cracks grow from a single parent because the work done in creating the array, as measured by its surface area decreases as the number of cracks increases. -from Authors

  12. The Thermo-Mechanical Problem of Internal and Edge Cracks in Multi-Layered Woven GFRP Laminates at Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, T.; Shindo, Y.; Narita, F.

    2004-06-28

    This paper presents the thermo-mechanical response of multi-layered G-11 woven glass/epoxy laminates with internal and/or edge cracks under tensile loading at cryogenic temperatures obtained from a two-dimensional finite element analysis. A condition of generalized plane strain is assumed to exist in the composite. Cracks are considered to occur in the transverse fiber bundles and extend through the entire thickness of the fiber bundles. The finite element model accounts for the temperature-dependent constituent properties. A detailed examination of the Young's modulus and stress distributions near the crack tip is carried out which provides insight into material behavior at cryogenic temperatures.

  13. Thin Bio-Artificial Tissues in Plane Stress: The Relationship between Cell and Tissue Strain, and an Improved Constitutive Model

    PubMed Central

    Marquez, J. Pablo; Genin, Guy M.; Zahalak, George I.; Elson, Elliot L.

    2005-01-01

    Constitutive models are needed to relate the active and passive mechanical properties of cells to the overall mechanical response of bio-artificial tissues. The Zahalak model attempts to explicitly describe this link for a class of bio-artificial tissues. A fundamental assumption made by Zahalak is that cells stretch in perfect registry with a tissue. We show this assumption to be valid only for special cases, and we correct the Zahalak model accordingly. We focus on short-term and very long-term behavior, and therefore consider tissue constituents that are linear in their loading response (although not necessarily linear in unloading). In such cases, the average strain in a cell is related to the macroscopic tissue strain by a scalar we call the “strain factor”. We incorporate a model predicting the strain factor into the Zahalak model, and then reinterpret experiments reported by Zahalak and co-workers to determine the in situ stiffness of cells in a tissue construct. We find that, without the modification in this article, the Zahalak model can underpredict cell stiffness by an order of magnitude. PMID:15596492

  14. Orthorhombic fault fracture patterns and non-plane strain in a synthetic transfer zone during rifting: Lennard shelf, Canning basin, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John McL.; Nelson, E. P.; Hitzman, M.; Muccilli, P.; Hall, W. D. M.

    2007-06-01

    A complex series of faults occur within transfer zones normal to the WNW-trending rifted northern margin of the Canning basin (Western Australia). These zones controlled basinal fluid flow and the formation of some carbonate-hosted Mississippi Valley-type Zn-Pb deposits along the basin margin during Devonian to Carboniferous rifting. The study area has a regional fault geometry similar to a synthetic overlapping transfer zone. Surface and underground mapping in this transfer zone, combined with 3D modelling, indicate the faults and related extension fractures have an orthorhombic geometry. The orthorhombic fault-fracture mesh developed in response to three-dimensional non-plane strain in which the intermediate finite extension magnitude was non-zero. Pre-mineralisation marine calcite fill in the fault-fracture mesh indicates that it formed early in the deformation history. Later deformation that overprints the Zn-Pb mineralisation and fault-fracture mesh, was associated with a different maximum extension direction and this modified and reactivated the faults with both dip-slip and oblique-slip movement and tilting of earlier structures. The orthorhombic geometry is not observed at a regional scale (>10 × 10 km), indicating probable scale-dependant behaviour. This study indicates that this transfer zone developed either by (1) strain partitioning with synchronous strike-slip structures and adjacent zones of non-plane extension, or (2) by a component of non-plane extension sub-parallel to the basin margin followed by subsequent transtensional overprint of the system (preferred model). Synthetic overlapping transfer zones are inferred to be key regions where orthorhombic fault geometries may develop.

  15. A fast real time measurement system to track in and out of plane optical retardation/ birefringence, true stress, and true strain during biaxial stretching of polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakmak, M.; Hassan, M.; Unsal, E.; Martins, C.

    2012-12-01

    An instrumented and highly integrated biaxial stretching system was designed and constructed to obtain true stress, true strain, and optical behavior of polymeric films during biaxial stretching. With programmable drive motors, any form of temporally varying biaxial deformation profiles, including linear, exponential, logarithmic as well as cyclic, can be applied to a square-shaped films. This machine allows the investigation of mechano-optical behavior of films under profiles captured in industrial processes. To overcome the edge effects, the samples are painted with a dot pattern that is imaged using a high speed video capture system. This system accurately determines the locations of the each dot matrix in subsequent images acquired and calculates the true strains in both directions. The in-plane optical retardation is determined using spectral birefringence method that uses polarized white light and optical spectrometer in the optical train. This is carried out automatically at less than 10 nm in retardation resolution with the light beam passing through the symmetry center of the sample. Out of plane retardation is measured with an identical optical train tilted 45° to the plane of the film with its light beam going through the same spot on the sample as 0° beam. The true stress and birefringences are calculated with the determined instantaneous thickness of the film. With this system, the stress optical behavior of PET's is determined up to very large deformation levels at moderate to high deformation rates. Beyond the initial linear stress optical behavior, these films exhibit sudden positive deviation from linearity and this start of nonlinearity was directly associated with the stress induced crystallization.

  16. Initiation and propagation of small corner cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellyin, Ferdnand; Kujawski, Daniel; Craig, David F.

    1994-01-01

    The behaviour of small corner cracks, inclined or perpendicular to loading direction, is presented. There are two aspects to this investigation: initiation of small cracks and monitoring their subsequent growth. An initial pre-cracking procedure under cyclic compression is adopted to minimize the residual damage at the tip of the growing and self-arresting crack under cyclic compression. A final fatigue specimen, cut from the larger pre-cracked specimen, has two corner flaws. The opening load of corner flaw is monitored using a novel strain gauge approach. The behaviour of small corner cracks is described in terms of growth rate relative to the size of the crack and its shape.

  17. Strain effects on in-plane conductance of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Heui Hwang, Jin; Kwon, Sangku; Hun Kim, Jong; Young Park, Jeong; Park, Joonbum; Sung Kim, Jun; Lee, Jhinhwan; Lyeo, Ho-Ki

    2014-04-21

    We investigated the correlation between electrical transport and mechanical stress in a topological insulator, Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, using conductive probe atomic force microscopy in an ultrahigh vacuum environment. After directly measuring charge transport on the cleaved Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} surface, we found that the current density varied with applied load. Current mapping revealed a variation of the current on different terraces. The current density increased in the low-pressure regime and then decreased in the high-pressure regime. This variation of current density was explained in light of the combined effect of changes in the in-plane conductance due to spin–orbit coupling and hexagonal warping.

  18. Evidence for non-plane strain flattening along the Moine thrust, Loch Srath nan Aisinnin, North-West Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strine, Matthew; Wojtal, Steven F.

    2004-10-01

    We report quartz c-axis patterns, grain-shape fabrics, and microstructures for 11 mylonitic quartzites and quartz-phyllosilicate schists from a transect across the Moine thrust at Loch Srath nan Aisinnin, North-West Scotland. In the footwall samples collected more than 42 m normal distance from the thrust surface, quartz c-axis textures indicate a general flattening strain (i.e. 0< k<1). Samples within 19 m normal distance of the thrust are completely recrystallized and exhibit asymmetric c-axis patterns. Recrystallized hanging wall fault rocks exhibit random c-axis patterns on the scale of a standard thin section. Relict footwall grains provide the closest approximation of finite strain; they have octahedral shear strains ( ɛs) between 1.10 and 1.47 and exhibit general flattening k-values (0.0524-0.659). The long axis of the mean relict grain shape trends parallel to the regional transport direction and plunges gently to the ESE. In contrast, recrystallized footwall grains have a mean grain shape with the longest axis oriented nearly perpendicular to the transport direction. Furthermore, these samples have grain shape k-value ranges from 0.157 to 0.295. Recrystallized hanging wall grain shapes exhibit the lowest octahedral shear 'strains' ( ɛs=0.532-0.733) and largest mean k-values (0.351-0.961) of this sample set. The long axes of the mean recrystallized hanging wall grain shapes are parallel to transport, similar to that of relict footwall grains. Unrecrystallized quartz overgrowths about opaque mineral grains suggest concurrent elongation in all directions within the mylonitic foliation and support the inference of general flattening deformation. The mylonitic foliation and penetrative lineation are consistent with a WNW shearing direction; however, both were folded during later deformation increments. Recrystallized grains in footwall quartzites suggest a 305-320° azimuth for the shearing direction. The best-fit π-axis of the poles to the foliation is 18

  19. Measuring Crack Length in Coarse Grain Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    Due to a coarse grain structure, crack lengths in precracked spinel specimens could not be measured optically, so the crack lengths and fracture toughness were estimated by strain gage measurements. An expression was developed via finite element analysis to correlate the measured strain with crack length in four-point flexure. The fracture toughness estimated by the strain gaged samples and another standardized method were in agreement.

  20. Thermomechanical repository and shaft response analyses using the CAVS (Cracking And Void Strain) jointed rock model: Draft final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dial, B.W.; Maxwell, D.E.

    1986-12-01

    Numerical studies of the far-field repository and near-field shaft response for a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt have been performed with the STEALTH computer code using the CAVS model for jointed rock. CAVS is a constitutive model that can simulate the slip and dilatancy of fracture planes in a jointed rock mass. The initiation and/or propagation of fractures can also be modeled when stress intensity criteria are met. The CAVS models are based on the joint models proposed with appropriate modifications for numerical simulations. The STEALTH/CAVS model has been previously used to model (1) explosive fracturing of a wellbore, (2) earthquake effects on tunnels in a generic nuclear waste repository, (3) horizontal emplacement for a nuclear waste repository in jointed granite, and (4) tunnel response in jointed rock. The use of CAVS to model far-field repository and near-field shaft response was different from previous approaches because it represented a spatially oriented approach to rock response and failure, rather than the traditional stress invariant formulation for yielding. In addition, CAVS tracked the response of the joint apertures to the time-dependent stress changes in the far-field repository and near-field shaft regions. 28 refs., 21 figs., 11 tabs.

  1. Correlation of permeability, velocity, strain and crack spectra for a suite of seven LASL rock samples. Interim report: partial data compilation

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, N.

    1980-09-01

    Compressional and shear velocities, static strain, and permeabilities were measured for a suite of 7 rocks from LASL. The sample included two gneisses (cored parallel and perpendicular to the plane of foliation), a diorite, a granite, two quartzites and a marble. This interim report is a partial compilation of data, presented simply as a useable inventory and as a reference source of data for other studies in the future. The import of this data set is that for each sample it consists of measurements of four physical properties all of which are controlled by the sample's microstructure. Therefore, the sets of data for any one rock are expected to show strong cross-correlations, and to provide insight into the inverse problem of predicting physical properties from petrostructural models.

  2. The Evolution of Stress Intensity Factors and the Propagation of Cracks in Elastic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Avner; Hu, Bei; Velazquez, Juan J. L.

    When a crack Γs propagates in an elastic medium the stress intensity factors evolve with the tip x(s) of Γs. In this paper we derive formulae which describe the evolution of these stress intensity factors for a homogeneous isotropic elastic medium under plane strain conditions. Denoting by ψ=ψ(x,s) the stress potential (ψ is biharmonic and has zero traction along the crack Γs) and by κ(s) the curvature of the crack at the tip x(s), we prove that the stress intensity factors A1(s), A2(s), as functions of s, satisfy: where , are stress intensity factors of the tangential derivative of in the polar coordinate system at x(s) with θ=0 in the direction of the crack at x(s). The case of antiplane shearing is also briefly considered; in this case ψ is harmonic.

  3. Subcritical crack growth under mode I, II, and III loading for Coconino sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Tae Young

    In systems subjected to long-term loading, subcritical crack growth is the principal mechanism causing the time-dependent deformation and failure of rocks. Subcritical crack growth is environmentally-assisted crack growth, which can allow cracks to grow over a long period of time at stresses far smaller than their failure strength and at tectonic strain rates. The characteristics of subcritical crack growth can be described by a relationship between the stress intensity factor and the crack velocity. This study presents the results of studies conducted to validate the constant stress-rate test for determining subcritical crack growth parameters in Coconino sandstone, compared with the conventional testing method, the double torsion test. The results of the constant stress-rate test are in good agreement with the results of double torsion test. More importantly, the stress-rate tests can determine the parameter A with a much smaller standard deviation than the double torsion test. Thus the constant stress-rate test seems to be both a valid and preferred test method for determining the subcritical crack growth parameters in rocks. We investigated statistical aspects of the constant stress-rate test. The effects of the number of tests conducted on the subcritical crack growth parameters were examined and minimum specimen numbers were determined. The mean and standard deviation of the subcritical crack growth parameters were obtained by randomly selecting subsets from the original strength data. In addition, the distribution form of the subcritical crack growth parameters and the relation between the parameter n and A were determined. We extended the constant stress-rate test technique to modes II and III subcritical crack growth in rocks. The experimental results of the modes I, II and III tests show that the values of the subcritical crack growth parameters are similar to each other. The subcritical crack growth parameter n value for Coconino sandstone has the range

  4. Interface cracks in piezoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govorukha, V.; Kamlah, M.; Loboda, V.; Lapusta, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Due to their intrinsic electromechanical coupling behavior, piezoelectric materials are widely used in sensors, actuators and other modern technologies. It is well known that piezoelectric ceramics are very brittle and susceptible to fracture. In many cases, fracture occurs at interfaces as debonding and cracks. This leads to an undesired degradation of electrical and mechanical performance. Because of the practical and fundamental importance of the problem, interface cracks in piezoelectric materials have been actively studied in the last few decades. This review provides a comprehensive survey of recent works on cracks situated at the interface of two materials, at least one of which has piezoelectric or piezoelectromagnetic properties. Different electric boundary conditions along the crack faces are discussed. The oscillating and contact zone models for in-plane straight interface cracks between two dissimilar piezoelectric materials or between piezoelectric and non-piezoelectric ones are reviewed. Different peculiarities related to the investigation of interface cracks in piezoelectric materials for the anti-plane case, for functionally graded and thermopiezoelectric materials are presented. Papers related to magnetoelectroelastic bimaterials, to steady state motion of interface cracks in piezoelectric bimaterials and to circular arc-cracks at the interface of piezoelectric materials are reviewed, and various methods used to address these problems are discussed. The review concludes with an outlook on future research directions.

  5. Bonded orthotropic strips with cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1979-01-01

    The elastostatic problem for a nonhomogeneous plane which consists of two sets of periodically arranged dissimilar orthotropic strips is considered. It is assumed that the plane contains a series of collinear cracks perpendicular to the interfaces and is loaded in tension away from and perpendicular to the cracks. The problem of cracks fully imbedded into the homogeneous strips is considered. The singular behavior of the stresses for two special crack geometries is studied. The first is the case of a broken laminate in which the crack tips touch the interfaces. The second is the case of cracks crossing the interfaces. An interesting result found from the analysis of the latter is that for certain orthotropic material combinations the stress state at the point of intersection of a crack and an interface may be bounded whereas in isotropic materials at this point stresses are always singular. A number of numerical examples are worked out to separate the primary material parameters influencing the stress intensity factors and the powers of stress singularity, and to determine the trends regarding the influence of the secondary parameters. Some numerical results are given for the stress intensity factors in certain basic crack geometries and for typical material combinations.

  6. The effects of crystallographic texture and hydrogen on sulfide stress corrosion cracking behavior of a steel using slow strain rate test method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, Youl; Choi, Yong

    2014-12-01

    The effects of pre-charged hydrogen inside steel and the hydrogen ions on its surface on the sulfide stress corrosion cracking (SSCC) behavior was studied by slow strain rate tests. The specimen had an ASTM grain size number of about 11. Most of precipitates were 30-50 nm in size, and their distribution density was about 106 mm-2. The crystallographic texture consisted of major α-fiber (<110>//RD) components with a maximum peak at {115}<110> relatively close to {001}<110>, and minor γ-fiber (<111>//ND) components with a peak slightly shifted from {111}<112> to {332}<113>. Hydrogen was pre-charged inside the steel by a high-temperature cathodic hydrogen charging (HTCHC) method. SSCC and corrosion tests were carried out in an electrolytic solution (NaCl: CH3COOH: H2O: FeCl2 = 50: 5: 944: 1, pH = 2.7). The corrosion potentials and the corrosion rates of the specimen without hydrogen charging for 24 hours were -490 mVSHE and 1.2 × 10-4 A cm-2, and those with charging were -520 mVSHE and 2.8 × 10-4 A cm-2, respectively. The corrosion resistance in the solution with 1000 ppm iron chloride added was decreased significantly, such that the corrosion potential and corrosion rate were -575 mVSHE and 3.5 × 10-4 A cm-2, respectively. Lower SSCC resistance of the pin-hole pre-notched specimen was observed at the open circuit potential than at the 100 mV cathodically polarized condition. Pre-charged hydrogen inside of the specimen had a greater influence on the SSCC behavior than hydrogen ions on the surface of the specimen during the slow strain rate test.

  7. Analytical modeling and vibration analysis of internally cracked rectangular plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, P. V.; Jain, N. K.; Ramtekkar, G. D.

    2014-10-01

    This study proposes an analytical model for nonlinear vibrations in a cracked rectangular isotropic plate containing a single and two perpendicular internal cracks located at the center of the plate. The two cracks are in the form of continuous line with each parallel to one of the edges of the plate. The equation of motion for isotropic cracked plate, based on classical plate theory is modified to accommodate the effect of internal cracks using the Line Spring Model. Berger's formulation for in-plane forces makes the model nonlinear. Galerkin's method used with three different boundary conditions transforms the equation into time dependent modal functions. The natural frequencies of the cracked plate are calculated for various crack lengths in case of a single crack and for various crack length ratio for the two cracks. The effect of the location of the part through crack(s) along the thickness of the plate on natural frequencies is studied considering appropriate crack compliance coefficients. It is thus deduced that the natural frequencies are maximally affected when the crack(s) are internal crack(s) symmetric about the mid-plane of the plate and are minimally affected when the crack(s) are surface crack(s), for all the three boundary conditions considered. It is also shown that crack parallel to the longer side of the plate affect the vibration characteristics more as compared to crack parallel to the shorter side. Further the application of method of multiple scales gives the nonlinear amplitudes for different aspect ratios of the cracked plate. The analytical results obtained for surface crack(s) are also assessed with FEM results. The FEM formulation is carried out in ANSYS.

  8. Bending effects of unsymmetric adhesively bonded composite repairs on cracked aluminum panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendt, Cory; Sun, C. T.

    1994-01-01

    The bending effects of unsymmetrically bonded composite repairs on cracked aluminum panels were quantified using a plate linear finite element model. Stress intensity factors and strain energy release rates were obtained from the model twice, once with out-of-plane displacement suppressed and another time without these restrictions. Several configurations were examined, crack growth stability was identified, and the effect of a debond was considered. The maximum stress intensity factor was also analyzed. Previous work by other authors was found to underpredict the bending effect.

  9. Effect of frontal plane tibiofemoral angle on the stress and strain at the knee cartilage during the stance phase of gait.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nicholas H; Nayeb-Hashemi, Hamid; Canavan, Paul K; Vaziri, Ashkan

    2010-12-01

    Subject-specific three-dimensional finite element models of the knee joint were created and used to study the effect of the frontal plane tibiofemoral angle on the stress and strain distribution in the knee cartilage during the stance phase of the gait cycle. Knee models of three subjects with different tibiofemoral angle and body weight were created based on magnetic resonance imaging of the knee. Loading and boundary conditions were determined from motion analysis and force platform data, in conjunction with the muscle-force reduction method. During the stance phase of walking, all subjects exhibited a valgus-varus-valgus knee moment pattern with the maximum compressive load and varus knee moment occurring at approximately 25% of the stance phase of the gait cycle. Our results demonstrated that the subject with varus alignment had the largest stresses at the medial compartment of the knee compared to the subjects with normal alignment and valgus alignment, suggesting that this subject might be most susceptible to developing medial compartment osteoarthritis (OA). In addition, the magnitude of stress and strain on the lateral cartilage of the subject with valgus alignment were found to be larger compared to subjects with normal alignment and varus alignment, suggesting that this subject might be most susceptible to developing lateral compartment knee OA.

  10. Fracture behavior of shallow cracks in full-thickness clad beams from an RPV wall section

    SciTech Connect

    Keeney, J.A.; Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.

    1995-04-01

    A testing program is described that utilizes full-thickness clad beam specimens to quantify fracture toughness for shallow cracks in weld material for which metallurgical conditions are prototypic of those found in reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). The beam specimens are fabricated from an RPV shell segment that includes weld, plate and clad material. Metallurgical factors potentially influencing fracture toughness for shallow cracks in the beam specimens include material gradients and material inhomogeneities in welded regions. The shallow-crack clad beam specimens showed a significant loss of constraint similar to that of other shallow-crack single-edge notch bend (SENB) specimens. The stress-based Dodds-Anderson scaling model appears to be effective in adjusting the test data to account for in-plane loss of constraint for uniaxially tested beams, but cannot predict the observed effects of out-of-plane biaxial loading on shallow-crack fracture toughness. A strain-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlation (based on plastic zone width) performed acceptably when applied to the uniaxial and biaxial shallow-crack fracture toughness data.

  11. Analysis of matrix cracking and local delamination in (0/theta/-theta)sub s graphite epoxy laminates under tension load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salpekar, S. A.; Obrien, T. K.

    1991-01-01

    Several 3D finite element analyses of (0/theta/-theta)sub s graphite epoxy laminates, where theta=15, 20, 25, 30, and 45 deg, subjected to axial tension load were performed. The interlaminar stresses in the theta/-theta interface were calculated with and without a matrix crack in the central -theta plies. The interlaminar normal stress changes from a small compressive stress when no matrix crack is present to a high tensile stress at the intersection of the matrix crack and free edge. The analysis of local delamination from the -theta matrix crack indicates a high strain energy release rate and a localized mode I component near the free edge, within one ply distance from the matrix crack. In order to examine the stress state causing the matrix cracking the maximum principal normal stress in a plane perpendicular to the fiber direction in the -theta ply was calculated in an uncracked laminate. The corresponding shear stress parallel to the fiber was also calculated. The principal normal stress at the laminate edge increases through the ply thickness and reached a very high tensile value at the theta/-theta interface indicating that the crack in the -theta ply may initiate at the theta/-theta interface. Crack profiles on the laminate edge in the -theta ply were constructed from the principal stress directions. The cracks were found to be more curved for layups with smaller theta angles, which is consistent with experimental observations in the literature.

  12. Variation of strain energy release rate with plate thickness. [fracture mode transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sih, G. C.; Hartranft, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical model of a through-thickness crack in a statically stretched plate is presented in which the crack front stress state is permitted to vary in the direction of the plate thickness. The amplitude or intensity of this stress field can be made nearly constant over a major portion of the interior crack front which is in a state of plane strain. The average amount of work available for extending a small segment of the crack across the thickness is associated with an energy release rate quantity in a manner similar to the two-dimensional Griffith crack model. The theoretically calculated energy release rate is shown to increase with increasing plate thickness, indicating that available work for crack extension is higher in a thicker plate.

  13. Crack problems in cylindrical and spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.

    1976-01-01

    Standard plate or shell theories were used as a starting point to study the fracture problems in thin-walled cylindrical and spherical shells, assuming that the plane of the crack is perpendicular to the surface of the sheet. Since recent studies have shown that local shell curvatures may have a rather considerable effect on the stress intensity factor, the crack problem was considered in conjunction with a shell rather than a plate theory. The material was assumed to be isotropic and homogeneous, so that approximate solutions may be obtained by approximating the local shell crack geometry with an ideal shell which has a solution, namely a spherical shell with a meridional crack, a cylindrical shell with a circumferential crack, or a cylindrical shell with an axial crack. A method of solution for the specially orthotropic shells containing a crack was described; symmetric and skew-symmetric problems are considered in cylindrical shells with an axial crack.

  14. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (UNIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  15. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  16. A theory of crack healing in polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wool, R. P.; O'Connor, K. M.

    1981-10-01

    A theory of crack healing in polymers is presented in terms of the stages of crack healing, namely, (a) surface rearrangement, (b) surface approach, (c) wetting, (d) diffusion, and (e) randomization. The recovery ratio R of mechanical properties with time was determined as a convolution product, R = Rh (t)*φ(t), where Rh (t) is an intrinsic healing function, and φ(t) is a wetting distribution function for the crack interface or plane in the material. The reptation model of a chain in a tube was used to describe self-diffusion of interpenetrating random coil chains which formed a basis for Rh (t). Applications of the theory are described, including crack healing in amorphous polymers and melt processing of polymer resins by injection or compression molding. Relations are developed for fracture stress σ, strain ɛ, and energy E as a function of time t, temperature T, pressure P, and molecular weight M. Results include (i) during healing or processing at t

  17. Morphological study of near threshold fatigue crack growth in a coarse grain aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, Gerhard; Liu, H. W.

    1984-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation in the near-threshold region has been studied in coarse grain Al 7029 alloy. Over eighty percent of the crack surfaces are planar areas parallel to either 100-oriented or 111-oriented planes. The 100-plane crack surfaces show 'pine tree' morphological features formed by slip on two sets of intersecting planes. The 111-plane crack surfaces were planar and shiny. They were formed primarily by slip on a single dominant 111-oriented slip plane with sparse and very light secondary slip markings. Crack growth rates were measured and correlated with Delta-K.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of propagating cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, M.

    1982-01-01

    Steady state crack propagation is investigated numerically using a model consisting of 236 free atoms in two (010) planes of bcc alpha iron. The continuum region is modeled using the finite element method with 175 nodes and 288 elements. The model shows clear (010) plane fracture to the edge of the discrete region at moderate loads. Analysis of the results obtained indicates that models of this type can provide realistic simulation of steady state crack propagation.

  19. Knuckle Cracking

    MedlinePlus

    ... older obese people. Question: Can cracking knuckles / joints lead to arthritis? Answer: There is no evidence of ... or damaged joints due to arthritis could potentially lead more easily to ligament injury or acute trauma ...

  20. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yau, J. F.; Malik, S. N.; Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.; Laflen, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the Elevated Temperature Crack Growth Project is to evaluate proposed nonlinear fracture mechanics methods for application to combustor liners of aircraft gas turbine engines. During the first year of this program, proposed path-independent (P-I) integrals were reviewed for such applications. Several P-I integrals were implemented into a finite-element postprocessor which was developed and verified as part of the work. Alloy 718 was selected as the analog material for use in the forthcoming experimental work. A buttonhead, single-edge notch specimen was designed and verified for use in elevated-temperature strain control testing with significant inelastic strains. A crack mouth opening displacement measurement device was developed for further use.

  1. Effects of friction and high torque on fatigue crack propagation in Mode III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayeb-Hashemi, H.; McClintock, F. A.; Ritchie, R. O.

    1982-12-01

    Turbo-generator and automotive shafts are often subjected to complex histories of high torques. To provide a basis for fatigue life estimation in such components, a study of fatigue crack propagation in Mode III (anti-plane shear) for a mill-annealed AISI 4140 steel (RB88, 590 MN/m2 tensile strength) has been undertaken, using torsionally-loaded, circumferentially-notched cylindrical specimens. As demonstrated previously for higher strength AISI 4340 steel, Mode III cyclic crack growth rates (dc/dN) IIIcan be related to the alternating stress intensity factor ΔKIII for conditions of small-scale yielding. However, to describe crack propagation behavior over an extended range of crack growth rates (˜10-6 to 10-2 mm per cycle), where crack growth proceeds under elastic-plastic and full plastic conditions, no correlation between (dc/dN) III and ΔKIII is possible. Accordingly, a new parameter for torsional crack growth, termed the plastic strain intensity Γ III, is introduced and is shown to provide a unique description of Mode III crack growth behavior for a wide range of testing conditions, provided a mean load reduces friction, abrasion, and interlocking between mating fracture surfaces. The latter effect is found to be dependent upon the mode of applied loading (i.e., the presence of superimposed axial loads) and the crack length and torque level. Mechanistically, high-torque surfaces were transverse, macroscopically flat, and smeared. Lower torques showed additional axial cracks (longitudinal shear cracking) perpendicular to the main transverse surface. A micro-mechanical model for the main radi l Mode III growth, based on the premise that crack advance results from Mode II coalescence of microcracks initiated at inclusions ahead of the main crack front, is extended to high nominal stress levels, and predicts that Mode III fatigue crack propagation rates should be proportional to the range of plastic strain intensity (ΔΓIII if local Mode II growth rates are

  2. The effect of thickness on fatigue crack propagation in 7475-T731 aluminum alloy sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiuto, R. A.; Hillberry, B. M.

    1984-01-01

    Tests were conducted on three thicknesses of 7475-T731 aluminum alloy sheet to investigate the effect of thickness on fatigue crack propagation under constant amplitude loading conditions and on retardation following a single peak overload. Constant amplitude loading tests were performed at stress ratios of 0.05 and 0.75 to obtain data for conditions with crack closure and without crack closure, respectively. At both stress ratios a thickness effect was clearly evident, with thicker specimens exhibiting higher growth rates in the transition from plane strain to plane stress region. The effect of thickness for a stress ratio of 0.05 corresponded well with the fracturing mode transitions observed on the specimens. A model based on the strain energy release rate which accounted for the fracture mode transition was found to correlate the thickness effects well. The specimens tested at the stress ratio of 0.75 did not make the transition from tensile mode to shear mode, indicating that another mechanism besides crack closure or fracture mode transition was active.

  3. Crack tip plasticity in single crystal UO2: Atomistic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Yongfeng Zhang; Paul C. Millett; Michael Tonks; Bulent Biner; Xiang-Yang Liu; David A. Andersson

    2012-11-01

    The fracture behavior of single crystal uranium dioxide is studied using molecular dynamics simulations at room temperature. Initially, an elliptical notch is created on either {111} or {110} planes, and tensile loading is applied normal to the crack planes. For cracks on both planes, shielding of crack tips by plastic deformation is observed, and crack extension occurs for crack on {111} planes only. Two plastic processes, dislocation emission and phase transformation are identified at crack tips. The dislocations have a Burgers vector of ?110?/2, and glide on {100} planes. Two metastable phases, the so-called Rutile and Scrutinyite phases, are identified during the phase transformation, and their relative stability is confirmed by separate density- functional-theory calculations. Examination of stress concentration near crack tips reveals that dislocation emission is not an effective shielding mechanism. The formation of new phases may effectively shield the crack provided all phase interfaces formed near the crack tips are coherent, as in the case of cracks residing on {110} planes.

  4. The transition from subsonic to supersonic cracks

    PubMed Central

    Behn, Chris; Marder, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present the full analytical solution for steady-state in-plane crack motion in a brittle triangular lattice. This allows quick numerical evaluation of solutions for very large systems, facilitating comparisons with continuum fracture theory. Cracks that propagate faster than the Rayleigh wave speed have been thought to be forbidden in the continuum theory, but clearly exist in lattice systems. Using our analytical methods, we examine in detail the motion of atoms around a crack tip as crack speed changes from subsonic to supersonic. Subsonic cracks feature displacement fields consistent with a stress intensity factor. For supersonic cracks, the stress intensity factor disappears. Subsonic cracks are characterized by small-amplitude, high-frequency oscillations in the vertical displacement of an atom along the crack line, while supersonic cracks have large-amplitude, low-frequency oscillations. Thus, while supersonic cracks are no less physical than subsonic cracks, the connection between microscopic and macroscopic behaviour must be made in a different way. This is one reason supersonic cracks in tension had been thought not to exist. PMID:25713443

  5. Subcritical crack growth of selected aerospace pressure vessel materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, L. R.; Bixler, W. D.

    1972-01-01

    This experimental program was undertaken to determine the effects of combined cyclic/sustained loads, stress level, and crack shape on the fatigue crack growth rate behavior of cracks subjected to plane strain conditions. Material/environment combinations tested included: 2219-T87 aluminum plate in gaseous helium, room air, and 3.5% NaCl solution at room temperature, liquid nitrogen, and liquid hydrogen; 5Al-2.5 Sn (ELI) titanium plate in liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen and 6AL-4V (ELI) STA titanium plate in gaseous helium and methanol at room temperature. Most testing was accomplished using surface flawed specimens instrumented with a clip gage to continuously monitor crack opening displacements at the specimen surface. Tapered double cantilever beam specimens were also tested. Static fracture and ten hour sustained load tests were conducted to determine fracture toughness and apparent threshold stress intensity values. Cyclic tests were performed using sinusoidal loading profiles at 333 MHz (20 cpm) and trapezoidal loading profiles at both 8.3 MHz (0.5 cpm) and 3.3 MHz (0.2 cpm). Data were evaluated using modified linear elastic fracture mechanics parameters.

  6. Fatigue cracks in Eurofer 97 steel: Part II. Comparison of small and long fatigue crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruml, T.; Hutař, P.; Náhlík, L.; Seitl, S.; Polák, J.

    2011-05-01

    The fatigue crack growth rate in the Eurofer 97 steel at room temperature was measured by two different methodologies. Small crack growth data were obtained using cylindrical specimens with a shallow notch and no artificial crack starters. The growth of semicircular cracks of length between 10-2000 μm was followed in symmetrical cycling with constant strain amplitude ( R ɛ = -1). Long crack data were measured using standard CT specimen and ASTM methodology, i.e. R = 0.1. The growth of cracks having the length in the range of 10-30 mm was measured. It is shown that the crack growth rates of both types of cracks are in a very good agreement if J-integral representation is used and usual assumptions of the crack closure effects are taken into account.

  7. Crack tip field and fatigue crack growth in general yielding and low cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minzhong, Z.; Liu, H. W.

    1984-01-01

    Fatigue life consists of crack nucleation and crack propagation periods. Fatigue crack nucleation period is shorter relative to the propagation period at higher stresses. Crack nucleation period of low cycle fatigue might even be shortened by material and fabrication defects and by environmental attack. In these cases, fatigue life is largely crack propagation period. The characteristic crack tip field was studied by the finite element method, and the crack tip field is related to the far field parameters: the deformation work density, and the product of applied stress and applied strain. The cyclic carck growth rates in specimens in general yielding as measured by Solomon are analyzed in terms of J-integral. A generalized crack behavior in terms of delta is developed. The relations between J and the far field parameters and the relation for the general cyclic crack growth behavior are used to analyze fatigue lives of specimens under general-yielding cyclic-load. Fatigue life is related to the applied stress and strain ranges, the deformation work density, crack nucleus size, fracture toughness, fatigue crack growth threshold, Young's modulus, and the cyclic yield stress and strain. The fatigue lives of two aluminum alloys correlate well with the deformation work density as depicted by the derived theory. The general relation is reduced to Coffin-Manson low cycle fatigue law in the high strain region.

  8. Crack modeling of rotating blades with cracked hexahedral finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Jiang, Dongxiang

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic analysis is the basis in investigating vibration features of cracked blades, where the features can be applied to monitor health state of blades, detect cracks in an early stage and prevent failures. This work presents a cracked hexahedral finite element method for dynamic analysis of cracked blades, with the purpose of addressing the contradiction between accuracy and efficiency in crack modeling of blades in rotor system. The cracked hexahedral element is first derived with strain energy release rate method, where correction of stress intensity factors of crack front and formulation of load distribution of crack surface are carried out to improve the modeling accuracy. To consider nonlinear characteristics of time-varying opening and closure effects caused by alternating loads, breathing function is proposed for the cracked hexahedral element. Second, finite element method with contact element is analyzed and used for comparison. Finally, validation of the cracked hexahedral element is carried out in terms of breathing effects of cracked blades and natural frequency in different crack depths. Good consistency is acquired between the results with developed cracked hexahedral element and contact element, while the computation time is significantly reduced in the previous one. Therefore, the developed cracked hexahedral element achieves good accuracy and high efficiency in crack modeling of rotating blades.

  9. Traction boundary integral equation (BIE) formulations and applications to nonplanar and multiple cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruse, Thomas A.; Novati, Giorgio

    The hypersingular Somigliana identity for the stress tensor is used as the basis for a traction boundary integral equation (BIE) suitable for numerical application to nonplanar cracks and to multiple cracks. The variety of derivations of hypersingular traction BIE formulations is reviewed and extended for this problem class. Numerical implementation is accomplished for piecewise-flat models of curved cracks, using local coordinate system integrations. A nonconforming, triangular boundary element implementation of the integral equations is given. Demonstration problems include several three-dimensional approximations to plane-strain fracture mechanics problems, for which exact or highly accurate numerical solutions exist. In all cases, the use of a piecewise-flat traction BIE implementation is shown to give excellent results.

  10. Mode I crack analysis in single crystals with anisotropic discrete dislocation plasticity: II. Stationary crack-tip fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleymani Shishvan, Siamak; Van der Giessen, Erik

    2013-09-01

    Small-scale yielding around a stationary mode I crack in a cubic single crystal is analyzed in terms of plane-strain elastically anisotropic discrete dislocation plasticity (DDP). Two symmetric crack orientations are considered with two objectives in mind. First, we study the sensitivity to materials aspects such as dislocation source density and elastic anisotropy as well as orientation dependence. Plastic deformation around the crack tip in a single crystal is a patchy field due to the discreteness of the slip systems, as demonstrated in analytical solutions and experimental observations. While these solutions/observations have in common that the plastic zone is composed of sectors with specific slip system(s) active inside each sector, detailed comparisons—recapitulated in this paper—reveal a few, yet significant, discrepancies. In an attempt to resolve these issues, the second objective of this paper is to construct sector arrangements of active slip system(s) from the present DDP simulations and compare those with the analytical solutions. We find that the estimated sector arrangements are in best agreement with the hardening analytical solutions of Saeedvafa and Rice (1989 J. Mech. Phys. Solids 37 673-91) indeed, angular variations of stresses around the crack tip confirm this observation.

  11. Cracking of textured zinc coating during forming process

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Z.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1993-09-01

    A model is presented to relate cracking of a zinc coating on steel during forming process with its crystallographic texture. There are three deformation modes that can accommodate strains in a zinc coating caused by external loadings; basal slip, twinning, and cleavage cracking. Twinning of a zinc hexagonal crystal induces a contraction along its c-axis while cleavage relaxes tensile strain along its c-axis. Because of this, when basal slip in grains of a textured zinc coating is difficult under a given loading, either twinning or cleavage occurs, depending on whether the basal plane is parallel or normal to the loading axis and whether the loading is tensile or compressive. The loadings during formability or surface friction tests cause twinning in the basal-textured coating and cleavage cracking in the prism-textured coating. The prism-textured coating contains in extraordinarily high hardness since none of the three deformation modes may be operative under compression. These results derived from the model are confirmed with recent studies on electrogalvanized steels.

  12. Higher-order analysis of crack tip fields in elastic power-law hardening materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, L.; Wang, T. C.; Shih, C. F.

    1993-04-01

    A HIGHER-ORDER asymptotic analysis of a stationary crack in an elastic power-law hardening material has been carried out for plane strain, Mode I. The extent to which elasticity affects the near-tip fields is determined by the strain hardening exponent n. Five terms in the asymptotic series for the stresses have been derived for n = 3. However, only three amplitudes can be independently prescribed. These are K1, K2 and K5 corresponding to amplitudes of the first-, second- and fifth-order terms. Four terms in the asymptotic series have been obtained for n = 5, 7 and 10; in these cases, the independent amplitudes are K1, K2 and K4. It is found that appropriate choices of K2 and K4 can reproduce near-tip fields representative of a broad range of crack tip constraints in moderate and low hardening materials. Indeed, fields characterized by distinctly different stress triaxiality levels (established by finite element analysis) have been matched by the asymptotic series. The zone of dominance of the asymptotic series extends over distances of about 10 crack openings ahead of the crack tip encompassing length scales that are microstructurally significant. Furthermore, the higher-order terms collectively describe a spatially uniform hydrostatic stress field (of adjustable magnitude) ahead of the crack. Our results lend support to a suggestion that J and a measure of near-tip stress triaxiality can describe the full range of near-tip states.

  13. Assessment of damage localization based on spatial filters using numerical crack propagation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deraemaeker, Arnaud

    2011-07-01

    This paper is concerned with vibration based structural health monitoring with a focus on non-model based damage localization. The type of damage investigated is cracking of concrete structures due to the loss of prestress. In previous works, an automated method based on spatial filtering techniques applied to large dynamic strain sensor networks has been proposed and tested using data from numerical simulations. In the simulations, simplified representations of cracks (such as a reduced Young's modulus) have been used. While this gives the general trend for global properties such as eigen frequencies, the change of more local features, such as strains, is not adequately represented. Instead, crack propagation models should be used. In this study, a first attempt is made in this direction for concrete structures (quasi brittle material with softening laws) using crack-band models implemented in the commercial software DIANA. The strategy consists in performing a non-linear computation which leads to cracking of the concrete, followed by a dynamic analysis. The dynamic response is then used as the input to the previously designed damage localization system in order to assess its performances. The approach is illustrated on a simply supported beam modeled with 2D plane stress elements.

  14. Strain energy release rate determination of stress intensity factors by finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, R. M., Jr.; Pipes, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    The stiffness derivative finite element technique is used to determine the Mode I stress intensity factors for three-crack configurations. The geometries examined include the double edge notch, single edge notch, and the center crack. The results indicate that when the specified guidelines of the Stiffness Derivative Method are used, a high degree of accuracy can be achieved with an optimized, relatively coarse finite element mesh composed of standard, four-node, plane strain, quadrilateral elements. The numerically generated solutions, when compared with analytical ones, yield results within 0.001 percent of each other for the double edge crack, 0.858 percent for the single edge crack, and 2.021 percent for the center crack.

  15. Kinetic studies of the stress corrosion cracking of D6AC steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noronha, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of load interactions on the crack growth velocity of D6AC steel under stress corrosion cracking conditions was determined. The environment was a 3.5 percent salt solution. The modified-wedge opening load specimens were fatigue precracked and subjected to a deadweight loading in creep machines. The effects of load shedding on incubation times and crack growth rates were measured using high-sensitivity compliance measurement techniques. Load shedding results in an incubation time, the length of which depends on the amount of load shed and the baseline stress intensity. The sequence of unloading the specimen also controls the subsequent incubation period. The incubation period is shorter when load shedding passes through zero load than when it does not if the specimen initially had the same baseline stress intensity. The crack growth rates following the incubation period are also different from the steady-state crack growth rate at the operating stress intensity. These data show that the susceptibility of this alloy system to stress corrosion cracking depends on the plane-strain fracture toughness and on the yield strength of the material.

  16. Creep crack-growth: A new path-independent integral (T sub c), and computational studies. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stonesifer, R. B.; Atluri, S. N.

    1982-01-01

    The development of valid creep fracture criteria is considered. Two path-independent integral parameters which show some degree of promise are the C* and (Delta T)sub c integrals. The mathematical aspects of these parameters are reviewed by deriving generalized vector forms of the parameters using conservation laws which are valid for arbitrary, three dimensional, cracked bodies with crack surface tractions (or applied displacements), body forces, inertial effects, and large deformations. Two principal conclusions are that (Delta T)sub c has an energy rate interpretation whereas C* does not. The development and application of fracture criteria often involves the solution of boundary/initial value problems associated with deformation and stresses. The finite element method is used for this purpose. An efficient, small displacement, infinitesimal strain, displacement based finite element model is specialized to two dimensional plane stress and plane strain and to power law creep constitutive relations. A mesh shifting/remeshing procedure is used for simulating crack growth. The model is implemented with the quartz-point node technique and also with specially developed, conforming, crack-tip singularity elements which provide for the r to the n-(1+n) power strain singularity associated with the HRR crack-tip field. Comparisons are made with a variety of analytical solutions and alternate numerical solutions for a number of problems.

  17. Crack growth direction in unidirectional off-axis graphite epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.; Gregory, M. A.; Beuth, J. L., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An anisotropic elasticity crack tip stress analysis is implemented using three crack extension direction criteria (the normal stress ratio, the tensor polynominal and the strain energy density) to predict the direction of crack extension in unidirectional off axis graphite-epoxy. The theoretical predictions of crack extension direction are then compared with experimental results for 15 deg off axis tensile coupons with center cracks. Specimens of various aspect ratios and crack orientations are analyzed. It is shown that only the normal stress ratio criterion predicts the correct direction of crack growth.

  18. The partially closed Griffith crack. [under polynomial loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thresher, R. W.; Smith, F. W.

    1973-01-01

    A solution is presented for a Griffith crack subjected to an arbitrary polynomial loading function which causes one end of the crack to remain closed. Closed form expressions are presented for the crack opening length and for the stress and displacements in the plane of the crack. The special case of pure bending is presented as an example and for this case the stress intensity factor is computed.

  19. NASA-Langley Research Center's participation in a round-robin comparison between some current crack-propagation prediction methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, C. M.; Lewis, P. E.

    1979-01-01

    A round-robin study was conducted which evaluated and compared different methods currently in practice for predicting crack growth in surface-cracked specimens. This report describes the prediction methods used by the Fracture Mechanics Engineering Section, at NASA-Langley Research Center, and presents a comparison between predicted crack growth and crack growth observed in laboratory experiments. For tests at higher stress levels, the correlation between predicted and experimentally determined crack growth was generally quite good. For tests at lower stress levels, the predicted number of cycles to reach a given crack length was consistently higher than the experimentally determined number of cycles. This consistent overestimation of the number of cycles could have resulted from a lack of definition of crack-growth data at low values of the stress intensity range. Generally, the predicted critical flaw sizes were smaller than the experimentally determined critical flaw sizes. This underestimation probably resulted from using plane-strain fracture toughness values to predict failure rather than the more appropriate values based on maximum load.

  20. Slow Crack Growth of Germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jon

    2016-01-01

    The fracture toughness and slow crack growth parameters of germanium supplied as single crystal beams and coarse grain disks were measured. Although germanium is anisotropic (A=1.7), it is not as anisotropic as SiC, NiAl, or Cu, as evidence by consistent fracture toughness on the 100, 110, and 111 planes. Germanium does not exhibit significant slow crack growth in distilled water. (n=100). Practical values for engineering design are a fracture toughness of 0.7 MPam and a Weibull modulus of m=6+/-2. For well ground and reasonable handled coupons, fracture strength should be greater than 30 MPa.

  1. Statistical crack mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Dienes, J.K.

    1983-01-01

    An alternative to the use of plasticity theory to characterize the inelastic behavior of solids is to represent the flaws by statistical methods. We have taken such an approach to study fragmentation because it offers a number of advantages. Foremost among these is that, by considering the effects of flaws, it becomes possible to address the underlying physics directly. For example, we have been able to explain why rocks exhibit large strain-rate effects (a consequence of the finite growth rate of cracks), why a spherical explosive imbedded in oil shale produces a cavity with a nearly square section (opening of bedding cracks) and why propellants may detonate following low-speed impact (a consequence of frictional hot spots).

  2. Peridynamic model for fatigue cracking.

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, Stewart Andrew; Abe Askari

    2014-10-01

    The peridynamic theory is an extension of traditional solid mechanics in which the field equations can be applied on discontinuities, such as growing cracks. This paper proposes a bond damage model within peridynamics to treat the nucleation and growth of cracks due to cyclic loading. Bond damage occurs according to the evolution of a variable called the "remaining life" of each bond that changes over time according to the cyclic strain in the bond. It is shown that the model reproduces the main features of S-N data for typical materials and also reproduces the Paris law for fatigue crack growth. Extensions of the model account for the effects of loading spectrum, fatigue limit, and variable load ratio. A three-dimensional example illustrates the nucleation and growth of a helical fatigue crack in the torsion of an aluminum alloy rod.

  3. Modeling the Interactions Between Multiple Crack Closure Mechanisms at Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Riddell, William T.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    A fatigue crack closure model is developed that includes interactions between the three closure mechanisms most likely to occur at threshold; plasticity, roughness, and oxide. This model, herein referred to as the CROP model (for Closure, Roughness, Oxide, and Plasticity), also includes the effects of out-of plane cracking and multi-axial loading. These features make the CROP closure model uniquely suited for, but not limited to, threshold applications. Rough cracks are idealized here as two-dimensional sawtooths, whose geometry induces mixed-mode crack- tip stresses. Continuum mechanics and crack-tip dislocation concepts are combined to relate crack face displacements to crack-tip loads. Geometric criteria are used to determine closure loads from crack-face displacements. Finite element results, used to verify model predictions, provide critical information about the locations where crack closure occurs.

  4. Matrix cracking of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites in shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Varun P.; Zok, Frank W.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanics of cracking in fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) under general loadings remains incomplete. The present paper addresses one outstanding aspect of this problem: the development of matrix cracks in unidirectional plies under shear loading. To this end, we develop a model based on potential energy differences upstream and downstream of a fully bridged steady-state matrix crack. Through a combination of analytical solutions and finite element simulations of the constituent stresses before and after cracking, we identify the dominant stress components that drive crack growth. We show that, when the axial slip lengths are much larger than the fiber diameter and when interfacial slip precedes cracking, the shear stresses in the constituents are largely unaffected by the presence of the crack; the changes that do occur are confined to a 'core' region within a distance of about one fiber diameter from the crack plane. Instead, the driving force for crack growth derives mainly from the axial stresses-tensile in the fibers and compressive in the matrix-that arise upon cracking. These stresses are well-approximated by solutions based on shear-lag analysis. Combining these solutions with the governing equation for crack growth yields an analytical estimate of the critical shear stress for matrix cracking. An analogous approach is used in deriving the critical stresses needed for matrix cracking under arbitrary in-plane loadings. The applicability of these results to cross-ply CMC laminates is briefly discussed.

  5. The crystallography of fatigue crack initiation in Incoloy-908 and A-286 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Krenn, C.R. |

    1996-12-01

    Fatigue crack initiation in the austenitic Fe-Ni superalloys Incoloy-908 and A-286 is examined using local crystallographic orientation measurements. Results are consistent with sharp transgranular initiation and propagation occurring almost exclusively on {l_brace}111{r_brace} planes in Incoloy-908 but on a variety of low index planes in A-286. This difference is attributed to the influence of the semicoherent grain boundary {eta} phase in A-286. Initiation in each alloy occurred both intergranularly and transgranularly and was often associated with blocky surface oxide and carbide inclusions. Taylor factor and resolved shear stress and strain crack initiation hypotheses were tested, but despite an inconclusive suggestion of a minimum required {l_brace}111{r_brace} shear stress, none of the hypotheses were found to convincingly describe preferred initiation sites, even within the subsets of transgranular cracks apparently free from the influence of surface inclusions. Subsurface inclusions are thought to play a significant role in crack initiation. These materials have applications for use in structural conduit for high field superconducting magnets designed for fusion energy use.

  6. Prediction of fatique crack growth under flight-simulation loading with the modified CORPUS model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padmadinata, U. H.; Schijve, J.

    1994-01-01

    The CORPUS (Computation Of Retarded Propagation Under Spectrum loading) crack growth prediction model for variable-amplitude loading, as introduced by De Koning, was based on crack closure. It includes a multiple-overload effect and a transition from plane strain to plane stress. In the modified CORPUS model an underload affected zone (ULZ) is introduced, which is significant for flight-simulation loading in view of the once per flight compressive ground load. The ULZ is associated with reversed plastic deformation induced by the underloads after crack closure has already occurred. Predictions of the crack growth fatigue life are presented for a large variety of flight-simulation test series on 2024-T3 sheet specimens in order to reveal the effects of a number of variables: the design stress level, the gust spectrum severity, the truncation level (clipping), omission of small cycles, and the ground stress level. Tests with different load sequences are also included. The trends of the effects induced by the variables are correctly predicted. The quantitative agreement between the predictions and the test results is also satisfactory.

  7. Non-linear dynamical analysis of crack surface perturbations and their dependence on velocity and direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Dov; Be'ery, Ilan

    2004-04-01

    The fracture surfaces of single crystal [1 0 0] silicon specimens, fractured under three-point bending (3PB) and subjected to a high strain energy upon cracking, revealed exceptional surface perturbations, generated during the unstable propagation. While macroscopically the crack is propagating on the (1 1 1) low energy cleavage plane, microscopic examination revealed small angled deviations from and fluctuations along that plane. Furthermore, while the crack is propagating at a velocity of nearly 3000 m/s in the [1 1¯ 0] direction, its velocity in the [1 1 2¯] direction is two orders of magnitude lower, with distinctive surface perturbations. The amplitude and complexity of the perturbations increase as the normal velocity vector changes its direction and magnitude. These perturbations were recorded with a profilometer and analyzed using non-linear dynamical analysis tools. This study provides an opportunity to interpret surface phenomena of one of the most general cases of fracture and to study the effect of major variables on the nature of the perturbations involved, such as the local crack tip velocity and the crystallographic orientations. It is shown that the surface perturbations are chaotic deterministic in nature and can be described by high order non-linear differential equations; the order of the equation varying with the variations of the local velocity and direction.

  8. Environmentally assisted cracking of LWR materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    Research on environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of light water reactor materials has focused on (a) fatigue initiation in pressure vessel and piping steels, (b) crack growth in cast duplex and austenitic stainless steels (SSs), (c) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic SSs, and (d) EAC in high- nickel alloys. The effect of strain rate during different portions of the loading cycle on fatigue life of carbon and low-alloy steels in 289{degree}C water was determined. Crack growth studies on wrought and cast SSs have been completed. The effect of dissolved-oxygen concentration in high-purity water on IASCC of irradiated Type 304 SS was investigated and trace elements in the steel that increase susceptibility to intergranular cracking were identified. Preliminary results were obtained on crack growth rates of high-nickel alloys in water that contains a wide range of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen concentrations at 289 and 320{degree}C. The program on Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Light Water Reactor Materials is currently focused on four tasks: fatigue initiation in pressure vessel and piping steels, fatigue and environmentally assisted crack growth in cast duplex and austenitic SS, irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic SSs, and environmentally assisted crack growth in high-nickel alloys. Measurements of corrosion-fatigue crack growth rates (CGRs) of wrought and cast stainless steels has been essentially completed. Recent progress in these areas is outlined in the following sections.

  9. The Effects of Crack Openings on Crack Initiation, Propagation and Coalescence Behavior in Rock-Like Materials Under Uniaxial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hao; Zhou, Xiaoping; Zhu, Jiang; Qian, Qihu

    2016-09-01

    This paper experimentally investigates the cracking behavior of rock-like specimens containing artificial open flaws under uniaxial compressive loads. The present experiments mainly focus on the effects of crack openings on crack propagation and coalescence behavior in rock-like materials under uniaxial compression. The real-time crack coalescence processes in the specimens with different crack openings are analyzed. The experimental results show that the crack openings significantly affect the crack initiation stresses and the crack initiation modes. The initiation stresses of wing cracks and coplanar secondary cracks decrease with increasing crack openings. However, the initiation stress of anti-wing cracks increases with increasing crack openings. Moreover, five types of crack coalescence in the specimens containing three pre-existing open flaws under uniaxial compression are observed. The effects of crack openings on the mechanical properties of rock-like materials, which include the complete axial stress-strain curves, peak stresses, peak strains and initiation stresses, are investigated in detail.

  10. Effects of crack geometry and material behavior on scattering by cracks for QNDE applications

    SciTech Connect

    Achenbach, J.D.

    1989-09-15

    In work carried out on this project, the usual mathematical modeling of ultrasonic wave scattering by flaws is being extended to account for several typical characteristics of fatigue and stress-corrosion cracks, and the environment of such cracks. Work has been completed on scattering by macrocrack-microcrack configurations. We have also investigated reflection and transmission by a flaw plane consisting of an infinite array of randomly oriented cracks. In another investigation the propagation of mechanical disturbances in solids with periodically distributed cracks has been studied.

  11. Characterization of M-plane GaN thin films grown on misoriented γ-LiAlO2 (100) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Chiao; Lo, Ikai; Wang, Ying-Chieh; Yang, Chen-Chi; Hu, Chia-Hsuan; Chou, Mitch M. C.; Schaadt, D. M.

    2016-09-01

    M-plane GaN thin films were grown on 11° misoriented γ-LiAlO2 substrates without peeling off or cracking by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Because of anisotropic growth kinetics, which leads to an anisotropic compressive in-plane strain in the M-plane GaN films, the surface presents a rough morphology with worse crystal quality. The crystal quality of sample was optimally improved, XRD rocking curve FWHM of which is about 900 arcsec, by raising growth temperature to 800 °C with proper Ga/N flux ratio. As the crystal quality was improved, the polarization ratio decreased from the unity (less than 0.8) which could be attributed to the effect of exciton localization due to the partial increased in-plane strain.

  12. A simple laminate theory using the orthotropic viscoplasticity theory based on overstress. I - In-plane stress-strain relationships for metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krempl, Erhard; Hong, Bor Zen

    1989-01-01

    A macromechanics analysis is presented for the in-plane, anisotropic time-dependent behavior of metal matrix laminates. The small deformation, orthotropic viscoplasticity theory based on overstress represents lamina behavior in a modified simple laminate theory. Material functions and constants can be identified in principle from experiments with laminae. Orthotropic invariants can be repositories for tension-compression asymmetry and for linear elasticity in one direction while the other directions behave in a viscoplastic manner. Computer programs are generated and tested for either unidirectional or symmetric laminates under in-plane loading. Correlations with the experimental results on metal matrix composites are presented.

  13. Controlled crack growth specimen for brittle systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, David N.

    1992-01-01

    A pure Mode 1 fracture specimen and test procedure has been developed which provides extended, stable, through-thickness crack growth in ceramics and other brittle, nonmetallic materials. Fixed displacement loading, applied at the crack mouth, promotes stable crack extension by reducing the stored elastic strain energy. Extremely fine control of applied displacements is achieved by utilizing the Poisson's expansion of a compressively loaded cylindrical pin. Stable cracks were successfully grown in soda-lime glass and monolithic Al2O3 for lengths in excess of 2O mm without uncontrollable catastrophic failure.

  14. Controlled crack growth specimen for brittle systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, David N.

    1990-01-01

    A pure Mode 1 fracture specimen and test procedure has been developed which provides extended, stable, through-thickness crack growth in ceramics and other brittle, nonmetallic materials. Fixed displacement loading, applied at the crack mouth, promotes stable crack extension by reducing the stored elastic strain energy. Extremely fine control of applied displacements is achieved by utilizing the Poisson's expansion of a compressively loaded cylindrical pin. Stable cracks were successfully grown in soda-lime glass and monolithic Al2O3 for lengths in excess of 20 mm without uncontrollable catastrophic failure.

  15. Crack Healing in Quartz: Influence of Crack Morphology and pOH-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallon, J. A.; Kronenberg, A. K.; Popp, R. K.; Lamb, W. M.

    2004-12-01

    Crack healing in quartz has been investigated by optical microscopy and interferometry of rhombohedral r-cleavage cracks in polished Brazilian quartz prisms that were hydrothermally annealed. Quartz prisms were pre-cracked at room temperature and then annealed at temperatures T of 250° and 400° C for 2.4 to 240 hours, fluid pressure Pf = 41 MPa (equal to confining pressure Pc), and varying pOH- (from 5.4 to 1.2 at 250° C for fluids consisting of distilled water and NaOH solutions). Crack morphologies before and after annealing were recorded for each sample in plane light digital images and apertures were determined from interference fringes recorded using transmitted monochromatic light (λ = 598 nm). As documented in previous studies (Smith and Evans, 1984; Brantley et al., 1990; Beeler and Hickman, 1996), crack healing of quartz is driven by reductions in surface energy and healing rates appear to be limited by diffusional solute transport; sharply defined crack tips become blunted and break up into fluid-filled tubes and inclusions. However, fluid inclusion geometries are also observed with nonequilibrium shapes that depend on initial surface roughness. Crack healing is significant at 400° C after short run durations (24 hr) with healing rates reaching 10-5 mm/s. Crack healing is also observed at T=250° C, but only for smooth cracks with apertures < 0.6 μ m or for cracks subject to low pOH-. The extent of crack healing is sensitive to crack aperture and to hackles formed by fine-scale crack branching during crack growth. Initial crack apertures appear to be governed by the presence of fine particles, often found in the vicinity of hackles, which maintain the separation of crack surfaces. Where rough cracks exhibit healing, hackles are sites of either enhanced or reduced loss of fluid-solid interface depending on slight mismatches and sense of twist of opposing crack surfaces. Hackles of open r-cleavage cracks are replaced either by (1) healed curvilinear

  16. Expansive Soil Crack Depth under Cumulative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Bei-xiao; Chen, Sheng-shui; Han, Hua-qiang; Zheng, Cheng-feng

    2014-01-01

    The crack developing depth is a key problem to slope stability of the expansive soil and its project governance and the crack appears under the roles of dry-wet cycle and gradually develops. It is believed from the analysis that, because of its own cohesion, the expansive soil will have a certain amount of deformation under pulling stress but without cracks. The soil body will crack only when the deformation exceeds the ultimate tensile strain that causes cracks. And it is also believed that, due to the combined effect of various environmental factors, particularly changes of the internal water content, the inherent basic physical properties of expansive soil are weakened, and irreversible cumulative damages are eventually formed, resulting in the development of expansive soil cracks in depth. Starting from the perspective of volumetric strain that is caused by water loss, considering the influences of water loss rate and dry-wet cycle on crack developing depth, the crack developing depth calculation model which considers the water loss rate and the cumulative damages is established. Both the proposal of water loss rate and the application of cumulative damage theory to the expansive soil crack development problems try to avoid difficulties in matrix suction measurement, which will surely play a good role in promoting and improving the research of unsaturated expansive soil. PMID:24737974

  17. Expansive soil crack depth under cumulative damage.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bei-xiao; Chen, Sheng-shui; Han, Hua-qiang; Zheng, Cheng-feng

    2014-01-01

    The crack developing depth is a key problem to slope stability of the expansive soil and its project governance and the crack appears under the roles of dry-wet cycle and gradually develops. It is believed from the analysis that, because of its own cohesion, the expansive soil will have a certain amount of deformation under pulling stress but without cracks. The soil body will crack only when the deformation exceeds the ultimate tensile strain that causes cracks. And it is also believed that, due to the combined effect of various environmental factors, particularly changes of the internal water content, the inherent basic physical properties of expansive soil are weakened, and irreversible cumulative damages are eventually formed, resulting in the development of expansive soil cracks in depth. Starting from the perspective of volumetric strain that is caused by water loss, considering the influences of water loss rate and dry-wet cycle on crack developing depth, the crack developing depth calculation model which considers the water loss rate and the cumulative damages is established. Both the proposal of water loss rate and the application of cumulative damage theory to the expansive soil crack development problems try to avoid difficulties in matrix suction measurement, which will surely play a good role in promoting and improving the research of unsaturated expansive soil. PMID:24737974

  18. Online bridge crack monitoring with smart film.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Benniu; Wang, Shuliang; Li, Xingxing; Zhou, Zhixiang; Zhang, Xu; Yang, Guang; Qiu, Minfeng

    2013-01-01

    Smart film crack monitoring method, which can be used for detecting initiation, length, width, shape, location, and propagation of cracks on real bridges, is proposed. Firstly, the fabrication of the smart film is developed. Then the feasibility of the method is analyzed and verified by the mechanical sensing character of the smart film under the two conditions of normal strain and crack initiation. Meanwhile, the coupling interference between parallel enameled wires of the smart film is discussed, and then low-frequency detecting signal and the custom communication protocol are used to decrease interference. On this basis, crack monitoring system with smart film is designed, where the collected crack data is sent to the remote monitoring center and the cracks are simulated and recurred. Finally, the monitoring system is applied to six bridges, and the effects are discussed. PMID:24489496

  19. Strain on the gastrocnemii and hamstrings affecting standing balance on an inclined plane in spastic cerebral palsy. A study using a geometric model.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, N; Mita, K; Watakabe, M; Akataki, K; Okagawa, T; Kimizuka, M

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use an non-invasive method to determine whether strain on the gastrocnemii and hamstrings influences postural balance in spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Changes in alignment during standing posture with subjects positioned on a platform that was gradually inclined were measured in 10 normal children and 11 children with CP. The changes in postural alignment were plotted and geometric models used to determine the lines where the gastrocnemii and hamstrings were maximally stretched. In this way the relationship between postural alignment and the amount of strain on the gastrocnemii and hamstrings was investigated. On the inclined platform, which caused ankle joints to become dorsiflexed as the inclination angle increased, the gastrocnemii began to be strained and the hip joints began to be flexed (trunk bent forward) at the same time. In the children with CP, the gastrocnemii were more strained by smaller degrees of inclination. Furthermore, there was one child with CP whose hamstrings were also strained on the inclined platform. We confirmed that postural balance was affected by strain on the gastrocnemii and hamstrings.

  20. Interfacial Crack Arrest in Sandwich Panels with Embedded Crack Stoppers Subjected to Fatigue Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martakos, G.; Andreasen, J. H.; Berggreen, C.; Thomsen, O. T.

    2016-08-01

    A novel crack arresting device has been implemented in sandwich panels and tested using a special rig to apply out-of-plane loading on the sandwich panel face-sheets. Fatigue crack propagation was induced in the face-core interface of the sandwich panels which met the crack arrester. The effect of the embedded crack arresters was evaluated in terms of the achieved enhancement of the damage tolerance of the tested sandwich panels. A finite element (FE) model of the experimental setup was used for predicting propagation rates and direction of the crack growth. The FE simulation was based on the adoption of linear fracture mechanics and a fatigue propagation law (i.e. Paris law) to predict the residual fatigue life-time and behaviour of the test specimens. Finally, a comparison between the experimental results and the numerical simulations was made to validate the numerical predictions as well as the overall performance of the crack arresters.

  1. Stress relaxation at crack tip: An alternative to blunting in configurations close to that of the two dimensional approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyola de Oliveira, M. A.; Michot, G.

    1995-11-01

    Due to geometrical limitations of available slip systems by crystallography, it appears statistically that plastic activity is more likely to take place on planes which cut the crack front (jogging planes) than on planes which contain the crack front (blunting planes), as usually put forward by the 2D models. This paper emphasises the fact that in the absence of increase in the crack tip radius, an enhanced shielding can be achieved through a cross-slip mechanism.

  2. Analysis of Multiple Cracks in an Infinite Functionally Graded Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shbeeb, N. I.; Binienda, W. K.; Kreider, K. L.

    1999-01-01

    A general methodology was constructed to develop the fundamental solution for a crack embedded in an infinite non-homogeneous material in which the shear modulus varies exponentially with the y coordinate. The fundamental solution was used to generate a solution to fully interactive multiple crack problems for stress intensity factors and strain energy release rates. Parametric studies were conducted for two crack configurations. The model displayed sensitivity to crack distance, relative angular orientation, and to the coefficient of nonhomogeneity.

  3. Steady crack growth through ductile metals: Computational studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobotka, James C.

    This thesis examines the crack-front response during sustained ductile tearing in structural metals at quasistatic rates using high resolution finite element computations. At load levels approaching the steady-growth regime, well-established computational methods that model material damage break down numerically as vanishingly small load increments produce increasingly large amounts of crack extension. The computational model adopted here determines the deformation history of a steadily advancing crack directly without the need for a priori (transient) analysis that considers blunting of the pre-existing stationary crack and subsequent growth through the associated initial plastic zone. Crack extension occurs at the remotely applied, fixed loading without the need for a local growth criteria. This numerical scheme utilizes a streamline integration technique to determine the elastic-plastic fields, generalized from a two-dimensional to a fully three-dimensional setting and implemented within mixed Matlab/C++/F-90 based software. Modifications of the conventional finite element formulation lead to an efficient procedure -- readily parallelized -- and determine the invariant near-front fields, representative of steady-state growth, on a fixed mesh in a boundary-layer framework. In the small-scale yielding regime, the crack front does not sense the existence of remote boundaries, and computational results retain a strong transferability among various geometric configurations where near-front, plastic deformation remains entirely enclosed by the surrounding linear-elastic material. The global stress intensity factor (KI ) and imposed T-stress fully specify displacement constraints along the far-field boundary, and in a three-dimensional setting, the panel thickness reflects the only natural length scale. The initial studies in this work consider steady crack advance within the small-scale yielding context under plane-strain conditions and mode I loading. These analyses

  4. Distributed coaxial cable crack sensors for crack mapping in RC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Gary G.; Belarbi, Abdeldjelil; Chen, Genda; McDaniel, Ryan

    2005-05-01

    New type of distributed coaxial cable sensors for health monitoring of large-scale civil infrastructure was recently proposed and developed by the authors. This paper shows the results and performance of such sensors mounted on near surface of two flexural beams and a large scale reinforced concrete box girder that was subjected to twenty cycles of combined shear and torsion. The main objectives of this health monitoring study was to correlate the sensor's response to strain in the member, and show that magnitude of the signal's reflection coefficient is related to increases in applied load, repeated cycles, cracking, crack mapping, and yielding. The effect of multiple adjacent cracks, and signal loss was also investigated.

  5. Nucleation of squat cracks in rail, calculation of crack initiation angles in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeimi, Meysam; Li, Zili; Dollevoet, Rolf

    2015-07-01

    A numerical model of wheel-track system is developed for nucleation of squat-type fatigue cracks in rail material. The model is used for estimating the angles of squat cracks in three dimensions. Contact mechanics and multi-axial fatigue analysis are combined to study the crack initiation mechanism in rails. Nonlinear material properties, actual wheel-rail geometries and realistic loading conditions are considered in the modelling process. Using a 3D explicit finite element analysis the transient rolling contact behaviour of wheel on rail is simulated. Employing the critical plane concept, the material points with the largest possibility of crack initiation are determined; based on which, the 3D orientations/angles of the possible squat cracks are estimated. Numerical estimations are compared with sample results of experimental observations on a rail specimen with squat from the site. The findings suggest a proper agreement between results of modelling and experiment. It is observed that squat cracks initiate at an in-plane angle around 13°-22° relative to the rail surface. The initiation angle seen on surface plane is calculated around 29°-48°, while the crack tend to initiate in angles around 25°-31° in the rail cross-section.

  6. Finite-element analysis of crack growth under monotonic and cyclic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    An elastic-plastic (incremental) finite-element analysis, in conjunction with a crack-growth criterion, was used to study crack-growth behavior under monotonic and cyclic loading. The crack-growth criterion was based on crack-tip strain. Whenever the crack-tip strain equals or exceeds a critical strain value, the crack grows. The effects of element-mesh size, critical strain, strain hardening, and specimen type (tension or bending) on crack growth under monotonic loading were investigated. Crack growth under cyclic loading (constant amplitude and simple variable amplitude) were also studied. A combined hardening theory, which incorporates features of both isotropic and kinematic hardening under cyclic loading, was also developed for smooth yield surfaces and was used in the analysis.

  7. BWR pipe crack remedies evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.; Maiya, P.S.; Park, J.Y.; Ruther, W.E.

    1986-10-01

    This paper presents results on: (a) the influence of simulated BWR environments on the stress-corrosion-craking (SCC) susceptibility of Types 304, 316NG, and 347 stainless (SS); (b) fracture-mechanics crack-growth-rate measurements on these materials and weld overlay specimens in different environments; and (c) residual stress measurements and metallographic evaluations of conventional pipe weldments treated by a mechanical-stress-improvement process (MSIP) as well as those produced by a narrow-gap welding procedure. Crack initiation studies on Types 304 and 316NG SS under crevice and non-crevice conditions in 289/sup 0/C water containing 0.25 ppM dissolved oxygen with low sulfate concentrations indicate that SCC initiates at very low strains (<3%) in the nuclear grade material. Crack growth measurements on fracture-mechanics-type specimens, under low-frequency cyclic loading, show that the Type 316NG steel cracks at a somewhat lower rate (approx.40%) than sensitized Type 304 SS in an impurity environment with 0.25 ppM dissolved-oxygen; however, the latter material stops cracking when sulfate is removed from the water. Crack growth in both materials ceases under simulated hydrogen-water chemistry conditions (<5 ppB oxygen) even with 100 ppB sulfate present in the water. An unexpected result was obtained in the test on a weld overlay specimen in the impurity environment, viz., the crack grew to the overlay interface at a nominal rate, branched at 90/sup 0/ in both directions, and then grew at high rate (parallel to the nominal applied load). Residual stress measurements on MSIP-treated weldments and those produced by a narrow-gap welding procedure indicate that these techniques produce compressive stresses over most of the inner surface near the weld and heat-affected zones.

  8. Dynamics of cracking in drying colloidal sheets.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Rajarshi; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh S

    2016-04-01

    Colloidal dispersions are known to display a fascinating network of cracks on drying. We probe the fracture mechanics of free-standing films of aqueous polymer-particle dispersions. Thin films of the dispersion are cast between a pair of plain steel wires and allowed to dry under ambient conditions. The strain induced on the particle network during drying is relieved by cracking. The stress which causes the films to crack has been calculated by measuring the deflection of the wires. The critical cracking stress varied inversely to the two-thirds' power of the film thickness. We also measure the velocity of the tip of a moving crack. The motion of a crack has been modeled as a competition between the release of the elastic energy stored in the particle network, the increase in surface energy as a result of the growth of a crack, the rate of viscous dissipation of the interstitial fluid and the kinetic energy associated with a moving crack. There is fair agreement between the measured crack velocities and predictions.

  9. Dynamics of cracking in drying colloidal sheets.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Rajarshi; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh S

    2016-04-01

    Colloidal dispersions are known to display a fascinating network of cracks on drying. We probe the fracture mechanics of free-standing films of aqueous polymer-particle dispersions. Thin films of the dispersion are cast between a pair of plain steel wires and allowed to dry under ambient conditions. The strain induced on the particle network during drying is relieved by cracking. The stress which causes the films to crack has been calculated by measuring the deflection of the wires. The critical cracking stress varied inversely to the two-thirds' power of the film thickness. We also measure the velocity of the tip of a moving crack. The motion of a crack has been modeled as a competition between the release of the elastic energy stored in the particle network, the increase in surface energy as a result of the growth of a crack, the rate of viscous dissipation of the interstitial fluid and the kinetic energy associated with a moving crack. There is fair agreement between the measured crack velocities and predictions. PMID:26924546

  10. Development of a numerical procedure for mixed mode K-solutions and fatigue crack growth in FCC single crystal superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Srikant

    2005-11-01

    Fatigue-induced failures in aircraft gas turbine and rocket engine turbopump blades and vanes are a pervasive problem. Turbine blades and vanes represent perhaps the most demanding structural applications due to the combination of high operating temperature, corrosive environment, high monotonic and cyclic stresses, long expected component lifetimes and the enormous consequence of structural failure. Single crystal nickel-base superalloy turbine blades are being utilized in rocket engine turbopumps and jet engines because of their superior creep, stress rupture, melt resistance, and thermomechanical fatigue capabilities over polycrystalline alloys. These materials have orthotropic properties making the position of the crystal lattice relative to the part geometry a significant factor in the overall analysis. Computation of stress intensity factors (SIFs) and the ability to model fatigue crack growth rate at single crystal cracks subject to mixed-mode loading conditions are important parts of developing a mechanistically based life prediction for these complex alloys. A general numerical procedure has been developed to calculate SIFs for a crack in a general anisotropic linear elastic material subject to mixed-mode loading conditions, using three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). The procedure does not require an a priori assumption of plane stress or plane strain conditions. The SIFs KI, KII, and KIII are shown to be a complex function of the coupled 3D crack tip displacement field. A comprehensive study of variation of SIFs as a function of crystallographic orientation, crack length, and mode-mixity ratios is presented, based on the 3D elastic orthotropic finite element modeling of tensile and Brazilian Disc (BD) specimens in specific crystal orientations. Variation of SIF through the thickness of the specimens is also analyzed. The resolved shear stress intensity coefficient or effective SIF, Krss, can be computed as a function of crack tip SIFs and the

  11. Short fatigue crack characterization and detection using confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM)

    SciTech Connect

    Varvani-Farahani, A.; Topper, T.H.

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents a new technique for studying the growth and morphology of fatigue cracks. The technique allows short fatigue crack growth, crack depth, aspect ratio (crack depth/half crack length), and crack front configuration to be measured using a Confocal Scanning Laser Microscope (CSLM). CSLM measurements of the initial stage of crack growth in Al 2024-T351 revealed that microstructurally short fatigue cracks grew initially along a plane inclined to the applied stress. The angle of the inclined plane (Stage I crack growth) was found to be about 45 degrees to the axis of the applied tensile load. Aspect ratio and the angle of maximum shear plane (Mode II), obtained using the CSLM technique, showed a good agreement with those obtained using a Surface Removal (SR) technique. The aspect ratios obtained using the CSLM technique were found to remain constant with increasing crack length in Al 2024-T351 and SAE 1045 Steel at 0.83 and 0.80, respectively. Optical sectioning along the length of a crack revealed that the crack front in the interior of the materials has a semi-elliptical shape. These results are in good agreement with results obtained using the SR technique. The CSLM technique was employed to characterize the fracture surface of fatigue cracks in an SAE 1045 Steel. CSLM image processing of the fracture surface near the crack tip constructed a three dimensional profile of fracture surface asperities. The heights of asperities were obtained from this profile. Optical sectioning from a post-image-processed crack provided crack depth and crack mouth width at every point along the crack length for each load level. The crack opening stress was taken as the stress level at which the crack depth stopped increasing with increases in a lied stress. 6 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  12. A damage mechanics approach to high temperature fatigue crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Z.; Takezono, S.; Tao, K.

    1995-12-31

    A nonlocal damage constitutive model is developed for elasto-visco-plastic materials and is used to analyze fatigue crack growth at high temperature. In this model, no kinematic hardening rule is needed to account for the subsequent yielding and strain hardening behavior of the materials. A calculation method for nonlocal damage is introduced. The fatigue crack growth tests and the cyclic strain controlled fatigue tests are carried out at 723 K (450 C) on pure titanium. By means of FEM, the stress distribution near the crack tip, and the relationships between the crack growth rate dl/dN and some mechanical parameters, such as the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD), and the range of viscoplastic strain {Delta}{var_epsilon}{sub y}{sup vp} at the crack tip, are investigated. The mesh size dependence of these mechanical parameters in finite element analysis is discussed. The numerical results are given and compared with the experimental ones.

  13. Detection of Cracking Levels in Brittle Rocks by Parametric Analysis of the Acoustic Emission Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradian, Zabihallah; Einstein, Herbert H.; Ballivy, Gerard

    2016-03-01

    Determination of the cracking levels during the crack propagation is one of the key challenges in the field of fracture mechanics of rocks. Acoustic emission (AE) is a technique that has been used to detect cracks as they occur across the specimen. Parametric analysis of AE signals and correlating these parameters (e.g., hits and energy) to stress-strain plots of rocks let us detect cracking levels properly. The number of AE hits is related to the number of cracks, and the AE energy is related to magnitude of the cracking event. For a full understanding of the fracture process in brittle rocks, prismatic specimens of granite containing pre-existing flaws have been tested in uniaxial compression tests, and their cracking process was monitored with both AE and high-speed video imaging. In this paper, the characteristics of the AE parameters and the evolution of cracking sequences are analyzed for every cracking level. Based on micro- and macro-crack damage, a classification of cracking levels is introduced. This classification contains eight stages (1) crack closure, (2) linear elastic deformation, (3) micro-crack initiation (white patch initiation), (4) micro-crack growth (stable crack growth), (5) micro-crack coalescence (macro-crack initiation), (6) macro-crack growth (unstable crack growth), (7) macro-crack coalescence and (8) failure.

  14. Three-dimensional EBSD characterization of thermo-mechanical fatigue crack morphology in compacted graphite iron

    SciTech Connect

    Pirgazi, Hadi; Ghodrat, Sepideh; Kestens, Leo A.I.

    2014-04-01

    In cylinder heads made of compacted graphitic iron (CGI), heating and cooling cycles can lead to localized cracking due to thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF). To meticulously characterize the complex crack path morphology of CGI under TMF condition, in relation to microstructural features and to find out how and by which mechanisms the cracks predominantly develop, three-dimensional electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD) was employed. Based on the precise quantitative microstructural analysis, it is found that graphite particles not only play a crucial role in the crack initiation, but also are of primary significance for crack propagation, i.e. crack growth is enhanced by the presence of graphite particles. Furthermore, the density of graphite particles on the fracture plane is more than double as high as in any other arbitrary plane of the structure. The obtained results did not indicate a particular crystallographic preference of fracture plane, i.e. the crystal plane parallel to the fracture plane was nearly of random orientation. - Highlights: • Crystallographic features of a thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) crack were studied. • Wide-field 3D EBSD is used to characterize the TMF crack morphology. • Data processing was applied on a large length scale of the order of millimeters. • Graphite density in the fracture plane is much higher than any other random plane. • It is revealed that crack growth is enhanced by the presence of graphite particles.

  15. Fatigue History and in-situ Loading Studies of the overload Effect Using High Resolution X-ray Strain Profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Croft,M.; Jisrawi, N.; Zhong, Z.; Holtz, R.; Sadananda, K.; Skaritka, J.; Tsakalakos, T.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments are used to perform local crack plane strain profiling of 4140 steel compact tension specimens fatigued at constant amplitude, subjected to a single overload cycle, then fatigued some more at constant amplitude. X-ray strain profiling results on a series of samples employing in-situ load cycling are correlated with the crack growth rate (da/dN) providing insight into the da/dN retardation known as the 'overload effect'. Immediately after the overload, the strain under maximum load is greatly reduced but the range of strain, between zero and maximum load, remains unchanged compared to the pre-overload values. At the point of maximum retardation, it is the strain range that is greatly reduced while the maximum-load strain has begun to recover to the pre-overload value. For a sample that has recovered to approximately half of the original da/dN value following the overload, the strain at maximum load is fully recovered while the strain range, though partially recovered, is still substantially reduced. The dominance of the strain range in the overload effect is clearly indicated. Subject to some assumptions, strong quantitative support for a crack growth rate driving force of the suggested form [(K{sub max}){sup -p}({Delta}K){sup p}]{sup {gamma}} is found. A dramatic nonlinear load dependence in the spatial distribution of the strain at maximum retardation is also demonstrated: at low load the response is dominantly at the overload position; whereas at high loads it is dominantly at the crack tip position. This transfer of load response away from the crack tip to the overload position appears fundamental to the overload effect for high R-ratio fatigue as studied here.

  16. Experimental measurement of the near tip strain field in an iron-silicon single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shield, T. W.; Kim, K.-S.

    1994-05-01

    EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS are presented for the plastic deformation field near a crack (200 μm wide notch) tip in an iron-3% silicon single crystal. The specimen was loaded in four point bending and the measurements were made at zero load after extensive plastic deformation had occurred. Results are given for a crack on the (011) plane with its tip along the [01|T] direction. The surface deformation field was measured using moire microscopy and a grating on the specimen surface. The in-plane Almansi strain components have been obtained by digitally processing the moire fringes. A well-structured asymptotic field has been found at a distance of 350-500 μm from the notch tip, where the maximum plastic strain is about 9%. The asymptotic field is observed to be composed of many distinct angular sectors. Three (six symmetric) of these sectors are found to have approximately constant strains. In a fourth (two symmetric) sector, the surface strains are approximately 1/ r singular. Between these sectors there are interconnecting transition sectors. The location of the stress state on the yield surface and the active slip systems in each sector are identified by assuming that the plastic strain rates are normal to a Schmid law yield surface. The slip systems identified in this manner show excellent agreement with direct observations of the slip texture on the surface and dislocation etch pits in the interior of the specimen. The experimental strain measurements also show that the constant strain sectors are regions in which unloading occurs. Because of this unloading, the crack tip stress and deformation state is substantially different from an HRR type field which assumes proportional loading. This strong nonproportional loading is thought to be caused by the presence of material anisotropy. The nonproportional loading also provides a large amount of crack tip shielding that is evidence of a toughening mechanism that results from the presence of material anisotropy.

  17. Environmental stress cracking of polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahan, K. I.

    1980-01-01

    A two point bending method for use in studying the environmental stress cracking and crazing phenomena is described and demonstrated for a variety of polymer/solvent systems. Critical strain values obtained from these curves are reported for various polymer/solvent systems including a considerable number of systems for which critical strain values have not been previously reported. Polymers studied using this technique include polycarbonate (PC), ABS, high impact styrene (HIS), polyphenylene oxide (PPO), and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). Critical strain values obtained using this method compared favorably with available existing data. The major advantage of the technique is the ability to obtain time vs. strain curves over a short period of time. The data obtained suggests that over a short period of time the transition in most of the polymer solvent systems is more gradual than previously believed.

  18. Characterization of crack growth under combined loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, A.; Smith, F. W.; Holston, A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Room-temperature static and cyclic tests were made on 21 aluminum plates in the shape of a 91.4x91.4-cm Maltese cross with 45 deg flaws to develop crack growth and fracture toughness data under mixed-mode conditions. During cyclic testing, it was impossible to maintain a high proportion of shear-mode deformation on the crack tips. Cracks either branched or turned. Under static loading, cracks remained straight if shear stress intensity exceeded normal stress intensity. Mixed-mode crack growth rate data compared reasonably well with published single-mode data, and measured crack displacements agreed with the straight and branched crack analyses. Values of critical strain energy release rate at fracture for pure shear were approximately 50% higher than for pure normal opening, and there was a large reduction in normal stress intensity at fracture in the presence of high shear stress intensity. Net section stresses were well into the inelastic range when fracture occurred under high shear on the cracks.

  19. Crack spectra analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiernan, M.

    1980-09-01

    Crack spectra derived from velocity data have been shown to exhibit systematics which reflect microstructural and textural differences between samples (Warren and Tiernan, 1980). Further research into both properties and information content of crack spectra have yielded the following: Spectral features are reproducible even at low pressures; certain observed spectral features may correspond to non-in-situ crack populations created during sample retrieval; the functional form of a crack spectra may be diagnostic of the sample's grain texture; hysteresis is observed in crack spectra between up and down pressure runs - it may be due to friction between the faces of closed crack populations.

  20. The inclusion problem with a crack crossing the boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Gupta, G. D.

    1973-01-01

    The problem of an elastic plane containing an elastic inclusion is considered. It is assumed that both the plane and the inclusion contain a radial crack and the two cracks are collinear. The problem is formulated in terms of a system of singular integral equations. In the interesting limiting cases in which the crack tips approach the interface from either one or both sides, the dominant parts of the kernels become generalized Cauchy kernels giving rise to stress singularities of other than minus 1/2 power. For these unusual cases of a crack terminating at or crossing the interface stress intensity factors are defined and some detailed results are given for various crack-inclusion geometries and material combinations.

  1. Gear crack propagation investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Ballarini, Roberto

    1996-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to investigate the effect of gear rim thickness on crack propagation life. The FRANC (FRacture ANalysis Code) computer program was used to simulate crack propagation. The FRANC program used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, finite element modeling, and a unique re-meshing scheme to determine crack tip stress distributions, estimate stress intensity factors, and model crack propagation. Various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack propagation life based on the calculated stress intensity factors. Experimental tests were performed in a gear fatigue rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Test gears were installed with special crack propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending fatigue crack growth. Good correlation between predicted and measured crack growth was achieved when the fatigue crack closure concept was introduced into the analysis. As the gear rim thickness decreased, the compressive cyclic stress in the gear tooth fillet region increased. This retarded crack growth and increased the number of crack propagation cycles to failure.

  2. Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... That People Abuse » Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Listen Cocaine is a white ... Version Download "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." Stacey is recovering from her ...

  3. Internal state variable approach for predicting stiffness reductions in fibrous laminated composites with matrix cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jong-Won; Allen, D. H.; Harris, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    A mathematical model utilizing the internal state variable concept is proposed for predicting the upper bound of the reduced axial stiffnesses in cross-ply laminates with matrix cracks. The axial crack opening displacement is explicitly expressed in terms of the observable axial strain and the undamaged material properties. A crack parameter representing the effect of matrix cracks on the observable axial Young's modulus is calculated for glass/epoxy and graphite/epoxy material systems. The results show that the matrix crack opening displacement and the effective Young's modulus depend not on the crack length, but on its ratio to the crack spacing.

  4. Laboratory Study of Crack Development and Crack Interaction in Concrete Blocks due to Swelling of Cracking Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frühwirt, Thomas; Plößer, Arne; Konietzky, Heinz

    2015-04-01

    The main focus of this work was to investigate temporary and spatial features of crack development in concrete blocks due to the action of a swelling agent. A commercial available cement-based mortar which shows heavily swelling behaviour when hydrating is used to provide inside pressure in boreholes in conrete blocks and hence serves as cracking agent. As no data for the swelling behaviour of the cracking agent were available the maximum axial swelling stress and axial free swelling strain were determined experimentally. In a first series of tests on concrete blocks the influence of an external mechanical, unidirectional stress on the development-time and orientation of cracks has been investigated for a range of loading levels. The stress state in the blocks prepared with a single borehole was determined by a superposition of internal stresses caused by swelling pressure and external mechanical loading. For a second series of tests prismatic blocks with two boreholes where prepared. This test setup allowed to realize different orientation of boreholes with respect to the uniaxial loading direction. Complementary tests were done using the cracking agent in both, only one or none of the boreholes. Different modes of crack interaction and influence of filled or unfilled boreholes have been observed. Features of crack development showed significant sensitivity to external loading. Starting even at very low load levels crack orientation was primarely determined by the direction of the external load. Temporal change in crack development due to the different load levels was insignificant and no consistent conclusion could be drawn. Crack interaction phenomena only were observed with two boreholes orientated primarely in direction of the external loading. Even in these cases crack orientation was mainly determined by the external stress field and only locally influenced by other cracks or the unfilled borehole. The work provides us with an extensive catalogue of

  5. A cylindrical shell with an arbitrarily oriented crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yahsi, O. S.; Erdogan, F.

    1982-01-01

    The general problem of a shallow shell with constant curvatures is considered. It is assumed that the shell contains an arbitrarily oriented through crack and the material is specially orthotropic. The nonsymmetric problem is solved for arbitrary self equilibrating crack surface tractions, which, added to an appropriate solution for an uncracked shell, would give the result for a cracked shell under most general loading conditions. The problem is reduced to a system of five singular integral equations in a set of unknown functions representing relative displacements and rotations on the crack surfaces. The stress state around the crack tip is asymptotically analyzed and it is shown that the results are identical to those obtained from the two dimensional in plane and antiplane elasticity solutions. The numerical results are given for a cylindrical shell containing an arbitrarily oriented through crack. Some sample results showing the effect of the Poisson's ratio and the material orthotropy are also presented.

  6. Crack healing in silicon nitride due to oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, S.R.; Tikare, V.; Pawlik, R.

    1991-10-01

    The crack healing behavior of a commercial, MgO-containing, hot pressed Si3N4 was studied as a function of temperature in oxidizing and inert annealing environments. Crack healing occurred at a temperature 800 C or higher due to oxidation regardless of crack size, which ranged from 100 microns (indentation crack) to 1.7 mm (SEPB precrack). The resulting strength and apparent fracture toughness increased at crack healing temperature by 100 percent and 300 percent, respectively. The oxide layer present in the crack plane was found to be highly fatigue resistant, indicating that the oxide is not solely silicate glass, but a mixture of glass, enstatite, and/or cristobalite that was insensitive to fatigue in a room temperature water environment. 20 refs.

  7. Crack healing in silicon nitride due to oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Tikare, Veena; Pawlik, Ralph

    1991-01-01

    The crack healing behavior of a commercial, MgO-containing, hot pressed Si3N4 was studied as a function of temperature in oxidizing and inert annealing environments. Crack healing occurred at a temperature 800 C or higher due to oxidation regardless of crack size, which ranged from 100 microns (indentation crack) to 1.7 mm (SEPB precrack). The resulting strength and apparent fracture toughness increased at crack healing temperature by 100 percent and 300 percent, respectively. The oxide layer present in the crack plane was found to be highly fatigue resistant, indicating that the oxide is not solely silicate glass, but a mixture of glass, enstatite, and/or cristobalite that was insensitive to fatigue in a room temperature water environment.

  8. Crack Turning and Arrest Mechanisms for Integral Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, Richard; Ingraffea, Anthony

    1999-01-01

    In the course of several years of research efforts to predict crack turning and flapping in aircraft fuselage structures and other problems related to crack turning, the 2nd order maximum tangential stress theory has been identified as the theory most capable of predicting the observed test results. This theory requires knowledge of a material specific characteristic length, and also a computation of the stress intensity factors and the T-stress, or second order term in the asymptotic stress field in the vicinity of the crack tip. A characteristic length, r(sub c), is proposed for ductile materials pertaining to the onset of plastic instability, as opposed to the void spacing theories espoused by previous investigators. For the plane stress case, an approximate estimate of r(sub c), is obtained from the asymptotic field for strain hardening materials given by Hutchinson, Rice and Rosengren (HRR). A previous study using of high order finite element methods to calculate T-stresses by contour integrals resulted in extremely high accuracy values obtained for selected test specimen geometries, and a theoretical error estimation parameter was defined. In the present study, it is shown that a large portion of the error in finite element computations of both K and T are systematic, and can be corrected after the initial solution if the finite element implementation utilizes a similar crack tip discretization scheme for all problems. This scheme is applied for two-dimensional problems to a both a p-version finite element code, showing that sufficiently accurate values of both K(sub I) and T can be obtained with fairly low order elements if correction is used. T-stress correction coefficients are also developed for the singular crack tip rosette utilized in the adaptive mesh finite element code FRANC2D, and shown to reduce the error in the computed T-stress significantly. Stress intensity factor correction was not attempted for FRANC2D because it employs a highly accurate

  9. Fluid catalytic cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, R.H.; Bartley, B.H.

    1984-05-01

    A fluid catalytic cracking process is disclosed for sulfur-containing petroleum charge stocks. Sulfur contained in coke deposited on the fluidized cracking catalyst in the reactor is converted to sulfur oxides in the regenerator and removed from regenerator off-gases by incorporating a composite of alumina and bismuth oxides in a particulate cracking catalyst. Sulfur oxides produced during regeneration of the catalyst by burning the coke with air in the regenerator are captured by the alumina-bismuth oxides composite and converted to hydrogen sulfide in the cracking reactor. The hydrogen sulfide so produced is readily separated from petroleum products of the catalytic cracking reaction process.

  10. Modeling and deformation analyzing of InSb focal plane arrays detector under thermal shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Meng, Qingduan; Zhang, Liwen; Lv, Yanqiu

    2014-03-01

    A higher fracture probability appearing in indium antimonide (InSb) infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPAs) subjected to the thermal shock test, restricts its final yield. In light of the proposed equivalent method, where a 32 × 32 array is employed to replace the real 128 × 128 array, a three-dimensional modeling of InSb IRFPAs is developed to explore its deformation rules. To research the damage degree to the mechanical properties of InSb chip from the back surface thinning process, the elastic modulus of InSb chip along the normal direction is lessened. Simulation results show when the out-of-plane elastic modulus of InSb chip is set with 30% of its Young's modulus, the simulated Z-components of strain distribution agrees well with the top surface deformation features in 128 × 128 InSb IRFPAs fracture photographs, especially with the crack origination sites, the crack distribution and the global square checkerboard buckling pattern. Thus the Z-components of strain are selected to explore the deformation rules in the layered structure of InSb IRFPAs. Analyzing results show the top surface deformation of InSb IRFPAs originates from the thermal mismatch between the silicon readout integrated circuits (ROIC) and the intermediate layer above, made up of the alternating indium bump array and the reticular underfill. After passing through both the intermediate layer and the InSb chip, the deformation amplitude is reduced firstly from 2.23 μm to 0.24 μm, finally to 0.09 μm. Finally, von Mises stress criterion is employed to explain the causes that cracks always appear in the InSb chip.

  11. Cracked tooth diagnosis and treatment: An alternative paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Mamoun, John S.; Napoletano, Donato

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the diagnosis and treatment of cracked teeth, and explores common clinical examples of cracked teeth, such as cusp fractures, fractures into tooth furcations, and root fractures. This article provides alternative definitions of terms such as cracked teeth, complete and incomplete fractures and crack lines, and explores the scientific rationale for dental terminology commonly used to describe cracked teeth, such as cracked tooth syndrome, structural versus nonstructural cracks, and vertical, horizontal, and oblique fractures. The article explains the advantages of high magnification loupes (×6–8 or greater), or the surgical operating microscope, combined with co-axial or head-mounted illumination, when observing teeth for microscopic crack lines or enamel craze lines. The article explores what biomechanical factors help to facilitate the development of cracks in teeth, and under what circumstances a full coverage crown may be indicated for preventing further propagation of a fracture plane. Articles on cracked tooth phenomena were located via a PubMed search using a variety of keywords, and via selective hand-searching of citations contained within located articles. PMID:26038667

  12. Nucleation and growth of cracks in vitreous-bonded aluminum oxide at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Jakus, K.; Wiederhorn, S.M.; Hockey, B.J.

    1986-10-01

    The nucleation and growth of cracks was studied at elevated temperatures on a grade of vitreous-bonded aluminium oxide that contained approx. =8 vol% glass at the grain boundaries. Cracks were observed to nucleate within the vitreous phase, close to the tensile surface of the flexural test specimens used in these experiments. Crack nucleation occurred at a strain of approx. =0.08% to 0.12% which corresponded to a crack nucleation time of approx. =35% of the time to failure by creep rupture. Once nucleated, cracks propagated along grain boundaries, as long as the stress for crack propagation was maintained. The crack velocity for cracks that were nucleated by the creep process was found to be linearly proportional to the apparent stress intensity factor, whereas for cracks that were nucleated by indentation, the crack velocity was proportional to the fourth power of the apparent stress intensity factor.

  13. Fatigue crack propagation and cryogenic fracture toughness behavior in powder metallurgy aluminum-lithium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkateswara Rao, K. T.; Ritchie, R. O.

    1991-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation and cryogenic fracture toughness properties of powder metallurgy (P/M) aluminum-lithium alloys have been examined by studying the behavior in mechanically alloyed (MA) Al-4.0Mg-1.5Li-1.1C-0.8O2 (IN-905XL) and rapid solidification processed (RSP) Al-2.6Li-1.0Cu-0.5Mg-0.5Zr (Allied 644-B) extrusions. Results are presented as a function of microstructure, mean stress, and specimen orientation and are compared with previous data on equivalent high-strength aluminum alloys fabricated by both ingot metallurgy (I/M) and P/M methods. It is found that the fatigue crack propagation resistance of the RSP Al-Li alloy is superior to traditional RSP aluminum alloys without lithium and even comparable to I/M Al-Li alloys, particularly at near-threshold and intermediate stress intensity levels. In contrast, crack growth rates in MA 905XL P/M extrusions are nearly three orders of magnitude faster and do not show benefits of alloying with lithium. Growth rate behavior in both alloys, however, is anisotropic; for example, crack growth rates in RSP 644-B alloy are up to three orders of magnitude faster in the T-L, compared to L-T, orientation. However, when characterized in terms of a closure-corrected near-tip "driving force," Δ K ff such differences are reduced. With respect to toughness, plane strain K Ic values ( L-T orientation) in the RSP alloy are observed to increase with decrease in temperature from 298 to 77 K; conversely, the MA alloy shows a small decrease in K Ic at 77 K. Such results are interpreted in terms of the micromechanisms influencing fatigue and fracture behavior in Al-Li alloys, specifically involving the microstructural role of hardening mechanism, slip mode, grain structure, and texture on the development of crack tip shielding (crack path deflection and crack closure) and short-transverse delamination cracking.

  14. Fatigue crack growth behavior in equine cortical bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Debbie Renee

    2001-07-01

    Objectives for this research were to experimentally determine crack growth rates, da/dN, as a function of alternating stress intensity factor, DeltaK, for specimens from lateral and dorsal regions of equine third metacarpal cortical bone tissue, and to determine if the results were described by the Paris law. In one set of experiments, specimens were oriented for crack propagation in the circumferential direction with the crack plane transverse to the long axis of the bone. In the second set of experiments, specimens were oriented for radial crack growth with the crack plane parallel to the long axis of the bone. Results of fatigue tests from the latter specimens were used to evaluate the hypothesis that crack growth rates differ regionally. The final experiments were designed to determine if crack resistance was dependent on region, proportion of hooped osteons (those with circumferentially oriented collagen fibers in the outer lamellae) or number of osteons penetrated by the crack, and to address the hypothesis that hooped osteons resist invasion by cracks better than other osteonal types. The transverse crack growth data for dorsal specimens were described by the Paris law with an exponent of 10.4 and suggested a threshold stress intensity factor, DeltaKth, of 2.0 MPa·m1/2 and fracture toughness of 4.38 MPa·m 1/2. Similar results were not obtained for lateral specimens because the crack always deviated from the intended path and ran parallel to the loading direction. Crack growth for the dorsal and lateral specimens in the radial orientation was described by the Paris law with exponents of 8.7 and 10.2, respectively, and there were no regional differences in the apparent DeltaK th (0.5 MPa·m1/2) or fracture toughness (1.2 MPa·m 1/2). Crack resistance was not associated with cortical region, proportion of hooped osteons or the number of osteons penetrated by the crack. The extent to which cracks penetrate osteons was influenced by whether the collagen fiber

  15. Determination of Stress Intensity Factor Distributions for "Interface" Cracks in Incompressible, Dissimilar Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.

    1997-01-01

    The present study was undertaken in order to develop test methods and procedures for measuring the variation of the stress intensity factor through the thickness in bimaterial specimens containing cracks within and parallel to the bond line using the frozen stress photoelastic method. Since stress freezing materials are incompressible above critical temperature, and since thick plates are to be employed which tend to produce a state of plane strain near the crack tip, the interface near tip fracture equations reduce to the classic form for homogeneous materials. Moreover, zero thickness interfaces do not exist when materials are bonded together. It was decided early on that it would be important to insure a uniform straight and accurate crack tip region through the thickness of the body to reduce scatter in the SIF distribution through the thickness. It was also observed that rubberlike materials which were desired to be modeled exhibited significant tip blunting prior to crack extension and that some blunting of the tip would provide a more realistic model. It should be noted that, in normal stress freezing photoelastic work, it is considered good practice to avoid utilizing data near bond lines in photoelastic models due to the bond line stresses which inevitably develop when two parts are bonded together. Thus, the present study involves certain exploratory aspects in deviating from standard practice in stress freezing work. With the above ideas in mind, several different test methods were investigated and are described in the following sections and appendices. The geometry selected for the program was a thick, edge cracked specimen containing a bond line.

  16. A model for turbulent hydraulic fracture and application to crack propagation at glacier beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Victor C.; Rice, James R.

    2010-09-01

    Glaciological observations of under-flooding suggest that fluid-induced hydraulic fracture of an ice sheet from its bed sometimes occurs quickly, possibly driven by turbulently flowing water in a broad sheet flow. Taking the approximation of a fully turbulent flow into an elastic ice medium with small fracture toughness, we derive an approximate expression for the crack-tip speed, opening displacement and pressure profile. We accomplish this by first showing that a Manning-Strickler channel model for resistance to turbulent flow leads to a mathematical structure somewhat similar to that for resistance to laminar flow of a power law viscous fluid. We then adapt the plane-strain asymptotic crack solution of Desroches et al. (1994) and the power law self-similar solution of Adachi and Detournay (2002) for that case to calculate the desired quantities. The speed of crack growth is shown to scale as the overpressure (in excess of ice overburden) to the power 7/6, inversely as ice elastic modulus to the power 2/3, and as the ratio of crack length to wall roughness scale to the power 1/6. We tentatively apply our model by choosing parameter values thought appropriate for a basal crack driven by the rapid drainage of a surface meltwater lake near the margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Making various approximations perhaps relevant to this setting, we estimate fluid inflow rate to the basal fracture and vertical and horizontal surface displacements and find order-of-magnitude agreement with observations by Das et al. (2008) associated with lake drainage. Finally, we discuss how these preliminary estimates could be improved.

  17. Corrosion pitting and environmentally assisted small crack growth

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Alan

    2014-01-01

    In many applications, corrosion pits act as precursors to cracking, but qualitative and quantitative prediction of damage evolution has been hampered by lack of insights into the process by which a crack develops from a pit. An overview is given of recent breakthroughs in characterization and understanding of the pit-to-crack transition using advanced three-dimensional imaging techniques such as X-ray computed tomography and focused ion beam machining with scanning electron microscopy. These techniques provided novel insights with respect to the location of crack development from a pit, supported by finite-element analysis. This inspired a new concept for the role of pitting in stress corrosion cracking based on the growing pit inducing local dynamic plastic strain, a critical factor in the development of stress corrosion cracks. Challenges in quantifying the subsequent growth rate of the emerging small cracks are then outlined with the potential drop technique being the most viable. A comparison is made with the growth rate for short cracks (through-thickness crack in fracture mechanics specimen) and long cracks and an electrochemical crack size effect invoked to rationalize the data. PMID:25197249

  18. Corrosion pitting and environmentally assisted small crack growth.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Alan

    2014-09-01

    In many applications, corrosion pits act as precursors to cracking, but qualitative and quantitative prediction of damage evolution has been hampered by lack of insights into the process by which a crack develops from a pit. An overview is given of recent breakthroughs in characterization and understanding of the pit-to-crack transition using advanced three-dimensional imaging techniques such as X-ray computed tomography and focused ion beam machining with scanning electron microscopy. These techniques provided novel insights with respect to the location of crack development from a pit, supported by finite-element analysis. This inspired a new concept for the role of pitting in stress corrosion cracking based on the growing pit inducing local dynamic plastic strain, a critical factor in the development of stress corrosion cracks. Challenges in quantifying the subsequent growth rate of the emerging small cracks are then outlined with the potential drop technique being the most viable. A comparison is made with the growth rate for short cracks (through-thickness crack in fracture mechanics specimen) and long cracks and an electrochemical crack size effect invoked to rationalize the data. PMID:25197249

  19. Crack stability and branching at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Robb

    1995-11-01

    The various events that occur at a crack on an interface are explored, and described in terms of a simple graphical construction called the crack stability diagram. For simple Griffith cleavage in a homogeneous material, the stability diagram is a sector of a circle in the space of stress intensity factors, KI/KII. The Griffith circle is limited in both positive and negative KII directions by nonblunting dislocation emission on the cleavage plane. For a branching plane inclined at an angle to the original cleavage plane, both cleavage and emission (which blunts the crack) can be described as a balance between an elastic driving force and a lattice resistance for the event. We use an analytic expression obtained by Cotterell and Rice for cleavage, and show that it is an excellent approximation, but show that the lattice resistance includes a cornering resistance, in addition to the standard surface energy in the final cleavage criterion. Our discussion of the lattaice resistance is derived from simulations in two-dimensional hexagonal lattices with UBER force laws with a variety of shapes. Both branching cleavage and blunting emission can be described in terms of a stability diagram in the space of the remote stress intensity factors, and the competition between events on the initial cleavage plane and those on the branching plane can be described by overlays of the two appropriate stability diagrams. The popular criterion that kII=0 on the branching plane is explored for lattices and found to fail significantly, because the lattice stabilizes cleavage by the anisotropy of the surface energy. Also, in the lattice, dislocation emission must must always be considered as an alternative competing event to branching.

  20. Investigation of Helicopter Longeron Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Baughman, James; Wallace, Terryl A.

    2009-01-01

    Four cracked longerons, containing a total of eight cracks, were provided for study. Cracked regions were cut from the longerons. Load was applied to open the cracks, enabling crack surface examination. Examination revealed that crack propagation was driven by fatigue loading in all eight cases. Fatigue crack initiation appears to have occurred on the top edge of the longerons near geometric changes that affect component bending stiffness. Additionally, metallurgical analysis has revealed a local depletion in alloying elements in the crack initiation regions that may be a contributing factor. Fatigue crack propagation appeared to be initially driven by opening-mode loading, but at a crack length of approximately 0.5 inches (12.7 mm), there is evidence of mixed-mode crack loading. For the longest cracks studied, shear-mode displacements destroyed crack-surface features of interest over significant portions of the crack surfaces.

  1. J-integral estimates for cracks in infinite bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowling, N. E.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis and discussion is presented of existing estimates of the J-integral for cracks in infinite bodies. Equations are presented which provide convenient estimates for Ramberg-Osgood type elastoplastic materials containing cracks and subjected to multiaxial loading. The relationship between J and the strain normal to the crack is noted to be only weakly dependent on state of stress. But the relationship between J and the stress normal to the crack is strongly dependent on state of stress. A plastic zone correction term often employed is found to be arbitrary, and its magnitude is seldom significant.

  2. Atomic scale origin of crack resistance in brittle fracture.

    PubMed

    Mattoni, A; Colombo, L; Cleri, F

    2005-09-01

    We investigate the physical meaning of the intrinsic crack resistance in the Griffith theory of brittle fracture by means of atomic-scale simulations. By taking cubic SiC as a typical brittle material, we show that the widely accepted identification of intrinsic crack resistance with the free surface energy underestimates the energy-release rate. The strain dependence of the Young modulus and surface energy, as well as allowance for lattice trapping, improve the estimate of the crack resistance. In the smallest scale limit, crack resistance can be fitted by an empirical elastoplastic model.

  3. Investigation of Nanomechanical Properties of β-Si3N4 Thin Layers in a Prismatic Plane under Tension: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xuefeng; La, Peiqing; Guo, Xin; Wei, Yupeng; Nan, Xueli; He, Ling

    2013-06-01

    We report molecular dynamics simulations of the nanomechanical properties and fracture mechanisms of β-Si3N4 thin layers in a prismatic plane under uniaxial tension. It is found that the thin layers in the y loading direction display a linear stress-strain relationship at ε < 0.021, and afterward, the stress increases nonlinearly with the strain until fracture occurs. However, for the z direction, the linear response is located at ε < 0.051. The calculated fracture stresses and strains of the thin layers increase with strain rates both in both directions. The thin layers exhibit the higher Young's modulus of 0.345 TPa in the z direction, higher than that in the y direction. The origins of crack derive from N(2c-1)-Si and N(6h-1)-Si bonds for the y and z loading directions, respectively.

  4. Strain energy release rate analysis of the end-notched flexure specimen using the finite-element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salpekar, S. A.; Raju, I. S.; O'Brien, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    Two-dimensional finite-element analysis of the end-notched flexure specimen was performed using 8-node isoparametric, parabolic elements to evaluate compliance and mode II strain energy release rates, G sub II. The G sub II values were computed using two different techniques: the virtual crack-closure technique (VCCT) and the rate of change of compliance with crack length (compliance derivative method). The analysis was performed for various crack-length-to-semi-span (a/L) ratios ranging from 0.2 to 0.9. Three material systems representing a wide range of material properties were analyzed. The compliance and strain energy release rates of the specimen calculated with the present finite-element analysis agree very well with beam theory equations including transverse shear. The G sub II values calculated using the compliance derivative method compared extremely well with those calculated using the VCCT. The G sub II values obtained by the compliance derivative method using the top or bottom beam deflections agreed closely with each other. The strain energy release rates from a plane-stress analysis were higher than the plane-strain values by only a small percentage, indicating that either assumption may be used in the analysis. The G sub II values for one material system calculated from the finte-element analysis agreed with one solution in the literature and disagreed with the other solution in the literature.

  5. Strain-energy-release rate analysis of the end-notched flexure specimen using the finite-element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salpekar, S. A.; Raju, I. S.; Obrien, T. K.

    1987-01-01

    Two-dimensional finite-element analysis of the end-notched flexure specimen was performed using 8-node isoparametric, parabolic elements to evaluate compliance and mode II strain energy release rates, G sub II. The G sub II values were computed using two different techniques: the virtural crack-closure technique (VCCT) and the rate of change of compliance with crack length (compliance derivative method). The analysis was performed for various crack-length-to-semi-span (a/L) ratios ranging from 0.2 to 0.9. Three material systems representing a wide range of material properties were analyzed. The compliance and strain energy release rates of the specimen calculated with the present finite-element analysis agree very well with beam theory equations including transverse shear. The G sub II values calculated using the compliance derivative method compared extremely well with those calculated using the VCCT. The G sub II values obtained by the compliance derivative method using the top or bottom beam deflections agreed closely with each other. The strain energy release rates from a plane-stress analysis were higher than the plane-strain values by only a small percentage, indicating that either assumption may be used in the analysis. The G sub II values for one material system calculated from the finite-element analysis agreed with one solution in the literature and disagreed with the other solution in the literature.

  6. Fluid catalytic cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Bartley, B.H.; Petty, R.H.

    1982-08-17

    Gaseous sulfur compounds are removed from a sulfur-containing gas mixture by reacting sulfur oxides in the gas mixture with alumina in association with bismuth. The process is particularly useful in fluid catalytic cracking of sulfur-containing petroleum charge stocks wherein sulfur is contained in coke deposited on the fluidized cracking catalyst. By the process of this invention, sulfur oxides may be removed from regenerator off-gases from a fluidized catalytic cracking unit by incorporating particulate alumina impregnated with bismuth in particulate cracking catalyst whereby sulfur oxides generated in the regeneration of the catalyst are reacted with bismuth-impregnated alumina. Sulfur oxides produced during regeneration of the catalyst by burning the coke with air are captured and converted to hydrogen sulfide in the cracking reactor. The hydrogen sulfide so produced is readily separated from petroleum products of the catalytic cracking reaction process.

  7. The crack problem in a reinforced cylindrical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yahsi, O. S.; Erdogan, F.

    1986-01-01

    A partially reinforced cylinder containing an axial through crack is considered. The reinforcement is assumed to be fully bonded to the main cylinder. The composite cylinder is thus modelled by a nonhomogeneous shell having a step change in the elastic properties at the z = 0 plane, z being the axial coordinate. Using a Reissner type transverse shear theory the problem is reduced to a pair of singular integral equations. In the special case of a crack tip touching the bimaterial interface it is shown that the dominant parts of the kernels of the integral equations associated with both membrane loading and bending of the shell reduce to the generalized Cauchy kernel obtained for the corresponding plane stress case. The integral equations are solved and the stress intensity factors are given for various crack and shell dimensions. A bonded fiberglass reinforcement which may serve as a crack arrestor is used as an example.

  8. The crack problem in a reinforced cylindrical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yahsi, O. S.; Erdogan, F.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper a partially reinforced cylinder containing an axial through crack is considered. The reinforcement is assumed to be fully bonded to the main cylinder. The composite cylinder is thus modelled by a nonhomogeneous shell having a step change in the elastic properties at the z=0 plane, z being the axial coordinate. Using a Reissner type transverse shear theory the problem is reduced to a pair of singular integral equations. In the special case of a crack tip touching the bimaterial interface it is shown that the dominant parts of the kernels of the integral equations associated with both membrane loading and bending of the shell reduce to the generalized Cauchy kernel obtained for the corresponding plane stress case. The integral equations are solved and the stress intensity factors are given for various crack and shell dimensions. A bonded fiberglass reinforcement which may serve as a crack arrestor is used as an example.

  9. Analyzing Leakage Through Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romine, William D.

    1993-01-01

    Two related computer programs written for use in analyzing leakage through cracks. Leakage flow laminar or turbulent. One program used to determine dimensions of crack under given flow conditions and given measured rate of leakage. Other used to determine rate of leakage of gas through crack of given dimensions under given flow conditions. Programs, written in BASIC language, accelerate and facilitate iterative calculations and parametric analyses. Solve equations of Fanno flow. Enables rapid solution of leakage problem.

  10. Crack Modelling for Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chady, T.; Napierała, L.

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, possibility of creation of three-dimensional crack models, both random type and based on real-life radiographic images is discussed. Method for storing cracks in a number of two-dimensional matrices, as well algorithm for their reconstruction into three-dimensional objects is presented. Also the possibility of using iterative algorithm for matching simulated images of cracks to real-life radiographic images is discussed.

  11. Cohesive zone finite element analysis of crack initiation from a butt joint’s interface corner

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, E. D.

    2014-09-06

    The Cohesive zone (CZ) fracture analysis techniques are used to predict the initiation of crack growth from the interface corner of an adhesively bonded butt joint. In this plane strain analysis, a thin linear elastic adhesive layer is sandwiched between rigid adherends. There is no preexisting crack in the problem analyzed, and the focus is on how the shape of the traction–separation (T–U) relationship affects the predicted joint strength. Unlike the case of a preexisting interfacial crack, the calculated results clearly indicate that the predicted joint strength depends on the shape of the T–U relationship. Most of the calculations used a rectangular T–U relationship whose shape (aspect ratio) is defined by two parameters: the interfacial strength σ* and the work of separation/unit area Γ. The principal finding of this study is that for a specified adhesive layer thickness, there is any number of σ*, Γ combinations that generate the same predicted joint strength. For each combination there is a corresponding CZ length. We developed an approximate CZ-like elasticity solution to show how such combinations arise and their connection with the CZ length.

  12. Cohesive zone finite element analysis of crack initiation from a butt joint’s interface corner

    DOE PAGES

    Reedy, E. D.

    2014-09-06

    The Cohesive zone (CZ) fracture analysis techniques are used to predict the initiation of crack growth from the interface corner of an adhesively bonded butt joint. In this plane strain analysis, a thin linear elastic adhesive layer is sandwiched between rigid adherends. There is no preexisting crack in the problem analyzed, and the focus is on how the shape of the traction–separation (T–U) relationship affects the predicted joint strength. Unlike the case of a preexisting interfacial crack, the calculated results clearly indicate that the predicted joint strength depends on the shape of the T–U relationship. Most of the calculations usedmore » a rectangular T–U relationship whose shape (aspect ratio) is defined by two parameters: the interfacial strength σ* and the work of separation/unit area Γ. The principal finding of this study is that for a specified adhesive layer thickness, there is any number of σ*, Γ combinations that generate the same predicted joint strength. For each combination there is a corresponding CZ length. We developed an approximate CZ-like elasticity solution to show how such combinations arise and their connection with the CZ length.« less

  13. The role of cyclic plastic zone size on fatigue crack growth behavior in high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korda, Akhmad A.; Miyashita, Y.; Mutoh, Y.

    2015-09-01

    The role of cyclic plastic zone in front of the crack tip was studied in high strength steels. Estimated plastic zone size would be compared with actual observation. Strain controlled fatigue tests of the steels were carried out to obtain cyclic stress-strain curves for plastic zone estimation. Observations of plastic zone were carried out using in situ SEM fatigue crack growth tests under a constant-ΔK. Hard microstructures in structural steels showed to inhibit the extent of plastic deformation around the crack tip. The rate of crack growth can be correlated with the size of plastic zone. The smaller the plastic zone size, the slower the fatigue crack growth.

  14. Fracture Analysis in a Functionally Graded Magnetoelectroelastic Plane by BIEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoynov, Y. D.

    2011-11-01

    A functionally graded magnetoelectroelastic (MEE) plane with a finite crack is considered. The crack is impermeable and subjected to anti-plane mechanical and in-plane electric and magnetic load. The fundamental solutions of the coupled system of the governing equations are derived in a closed form by the Radon transform. They are implemented in a non-hypersingular traction boundary integral equation method (BIEM). A program code in Fortran, based on the BIEM, is created. Comparison with the results obtained by a different method is presented. The numerical examples show the dependence of the stress intensity factor (SIF) on the normalized frequency for different magnitude of the material inhomogeneity. Results for a non-straight crack are also given.

  15. Effect of Measured Welding Residual Stresses on Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, Roy W.; Nelson, Drew; Doty, Laura W. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Welding residual stresses in thin plate A516-70 steel and 2219-T87 aluminum butt weldments were measured by the strain-gage hole drilling and X-ray diffraction methods. The residual stress data were used to construct 3D strain fields which were modeled as thermally induced strains. These 3D strain fields were then analyzed with the WARP31) FEM fracture analysis code in order to predict their effect on fatigue and on fracture. For analyses of fatigue crack advance and subsequent verification testing, fatigue crack growth increments were simulated by successive saw-cuts and incremental loading to generate, as a function of crack length, effects on crack growth of the interaction between residual stresses and load induced stresses. The specimen experimental response was characterized and compared to the WARM linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis predictions. To perform the fracture analysis, the plate material's crack tearing resistance was determined by tests of thin plate M(T) specimens. Fracture analyses of these specimen were performed using WARP31D to determine the critical Crack Tip Opening Angle [CTOA] of each material. These critical CTOA values were used to predict crack tearing and fracture in the weldments. To verify the fracture predictions, weldment M(T) specimen were tested in monotonic loading to fracture while characterizing the fracture process.

  16. Multiple Cracks Propagate Simultaneously in Polymer Liquids in Tension.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qian; Alvarez, Nicolas J; Shabbir, Aamir; Hassager, Ole

    2016-08-19

    Understanding the mechanism of fracture is essential for material and process design. While the initiation of fracture in brittle solids is generally associated with the preexistence of material imperfections, the mechanism for initiation of fracture in viscoelastic fluids, e.g., polymer melts and solutions, remains an open question. We use high speed imaging to visualize crack propagation in entangled polymer liquid filaments under tension. The images reveal the simultaneous propagation of multiple cracks. The critical stress and strain for the onset of crack propagation are found to be highly reproducible functions of the stretch rate, while the position of initiation is completely random. The reproducibility of conditions for fracture points to a mechanism for crack initiation that depends on the dynamic state of the material alone, while the crack profiles reveal the mechanism of energy dissipation during crack propagation. PMID:27588883

  17. Crack Detection with Lamb Wave Wavenumber Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Rogge, Matt; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we present our study of Lamb wave crack detection using wavenumber analysis. The aim is to demonstrate the application of wavenumber analysis to 3D Lamb wave data to enable damage detection. The 3D wavefields (including vx, vy and vz components) in time-space domain contain a wealth of information regarding the propagating waves in a damaged plate. For crack detection, three wavenumber analysis techniques are used: (i) two dimensional Fourier transform (2D-FT) which can transform the time-space wavefield into frequency-wavenumber representation while losing the spatial information; (ii) short space 2D-FT which can obtain the frequency-wavenumber spectra at various spatial locations, resulting in a space-frequency-wavenumber representation; (iii) local wavenumber analysis which can provide the distribution of the effective wavenumbers at different locations. All of these concepts are demonstrated through a numerical simulation example of an aluminum plate with a crack. The 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) was used to obtain the 3D wavefields, of which the vz (out-of-plane) wave component is compared with the experimental measurement obtained from a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) for verification purposes. The experimental and simulated results are found to be in close agreement. The application of wavenumber analysis on 3D EFIT simulation data shows the effectiveness of the analysis for crack detection. Keywords: : Lamb wave, crack detection, wavenumber analysis, EFIT modeling

  18. Transient Elastodynamic Crack Growth in Functionally Graded Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chalivendra, Vijaya B.

    2008-02-15

    A generalized elastic solution for an arbitrarily propagating transient crack in Functionally Graded Materials (FGMs) is obtained through an asymptotic analysis. The shear modulus and mass density of the FGM are assumed to vary exponentially along the gradation direction. The mode-mixity due to the inclination of property gradient with respect to the propagating crack tip is accommodated in the analysis through superposition of the opening and shear modes. First three terms of out of plane displacement field and its gradients about the crack tip are obtained in powers of radial coordinates, with the coefficients depending on the time rate of change of crack tip speed and stress intensity factors. Using these displacement fields, the effect of transient stress intensity factors and acceleration on synthetic contours of constant out of plane displacement under both opening and mixed mode loading conditions has been studied. These contours show that the transient terms cause significant spatial variation on out of plane displacements around the crack tip. Therefore, in studying dynamic fracture of FGMs, it is appropriate to include the transient terms in the field equations for the situations of sudden variation of stress intensity factor or crack tip velocity.

  19. Quantifying weld solidification cracking susceptibility using the varestraint test

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.; Lippold, J.C.; Nelson, T.W.

    1994-12-31

    Since the introduction of the original Varestraint concept in the 1960`s, the longitudinal- and transverse-type Varestraint tests have become the most widely utilized techniques for quantifying weld solidification cracking susceptibility. Conventionally, cracking susceptibility is assessed by threshold strain to cause cracking and the degree of cracking as quantified by total crack strain to cause cracking and the degree of cracking as quantified by total crack length or maximum crack length. Although material-specific quantifications such as the brittle temperature range (BTR) have been proposed for the transverse-type test, similar quantifications have not been developed for the longitudinal type test. Various alloys including 304, 310, 316L, A-286, AL6XN, 20Cb-3, RA253, and RA333 stainless steels, 625, 690, and 718 nickel-base alloys, 2090, 2219, 5083, and 6061 aluminum alloys were investigated using both longitudinal- and transverse-type Varestraint tests. Tests were performed using a newly developed, computer-controlled Varestraint unit equipped with a 3-axis movable torch, spring-loaded fixture and a servo-hydraulic loading system. It was found that extensive cracking was observed in the fusion zone emanating radially from the solid-liquid inteface toward the fusion boundary in the longitudinal-type test, while weld centerline cracking was prevalent in the transverse-type test. The theoretical basis for the formation of the CSR is that liquation-related cracking only occurs in a certain temperature range known as the BTR. The detailed procedure in the development of the CSR in the fusion zone is described and discussed. This approach allows a weldability data base to be created and the comparison of results from different laboratories using different test techniques.

  20. BWR internal cracking issues

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, C.E. Jr.; Lund, A.L.

    1999-07-01

    The regulatory issues associated with cracking of boiling water reactor (BWR) internals is being addressed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and is the subject of a voluntary industry initiative. The lessons learned from this effort will be applied to pressurized water reactor (PWR) internals cracking issues.

  1. Thermal cracking and amplitude dependent attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, D.H.; Toksoez, M.N.

    1980-02-10

    The role of crack and grain boundary contacts in determining seismic wave attenuation in rock is investigated by examining Q as a function of thermal cycling (cracking) and wave strain amplitude. Q values are obtained using a longitudinal resonant bar technique in the 10- to 20-kHz range for maximum strain amplitudes varying from roughly 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -5/. The samples studied include the Berea and Navajo sandstones, Plexiglas, Westerly granite, Solenhofen limestone, and Frederick diabase, the latter two relatively crack free in their virgin state. Measurements were made at room temperature and pressure in air. Q values for both sandstones are constant at low strains (<10/sup -6/) but decrease rapidly with amplitude at higher strains. There is no hysteresis of Q with amplitude. Q values for Plexiglas show no indication of amplitude dependent behavior. The granite, limestone, and diabase are thermally cycled at both fast and slow heating rates in order to induce cracking. Samples slowly cycled at 400/sup 0/C show a marked increase in Q that cannot be entirely explained by outgassing of volatiles. Cycling may also widen thin cracks and grain boundaries, reducing contact areas. Samples heated beyond 400/sup 0/C, or rapidly heated, result in generally decreasing Q values. The amplitude dependence of Q is found to be coupled to the effects of thermal cycling. For rock slowly cycled 400)C or less, the transition from low-amplitude contant Q to high-amplitude variable Q behavior decreases to lower amplitudes as a function of maximum temperature. Above 400/sup 0/C, and possibly in th rapidly heated samples also, the transition moves to higher amplitudes.

  2. A Case for Plane-Strain during the Development of the Indo-Burma Fold-Thrust Belt in Tripura and Mizoram, Northeast India (23-24°N; 91-93°E)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betka, P. M.; Seeber, L.; Steckler, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    , contractional structures that formed internally within the FTB are indicative of east-west horizontal shortening and plane strain. This result suggests that the dextral component of shear measured by geodetic data is primarily partitioned onto discrete right-lateral strike-slip faults such as the Churachandpur-Mao and Kabaw faults.

  3. Separation of crack extension modes in orthotropic delamination models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuth, Jack L.

    1995-01-01

    In the analysis of an interface crack between dissimilar elastic materials, the mode of crack extension is typically not unique, due to oscillatory behavior of near-tip stresses and displacements. This behavior currently limits the applicability of interfacial fracture mechanics as a means to predict composite delamination. The Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) is a method used to extract mode 1 and mode 2 energy release rates from numerical fracture solutions. The mode of crack extension extracted from an oscillatory solution using the VCCT is not unique due to the dependence of mode on the virtual crack extension length, Delta. In this work, a method is presented for using the VCCT to extract Delta-independent crack extension modes for the case of an interface crack between two in-plane orthotropic materials. The method does not involve altering the analysis to eliminate its oscillatory behavior. Instead, it is argued that physically reasonable, Delta-independent modes of crack extension can be extracted from oscillatory solutions. Knowledge of near-tip fields is used to determine the explicit Delta dependence of energy release rate parameters. Energy release rates are then defined that are separated from the oscillatory dependence on Delta. A modified VCCT using these energy release rate definitions is applied to results from finite element analyses, showing that Delta-independent modes of crack extension result. The modified technique has potential as a consistent method for extracting crack extension modes from numerical solutions. The Delta-independent modes extracted using this technique can also serve as guides for testing the convergence of finite element models. Direct applications of this work include the analysis of planar composite delamination problems, where plies or debonded laminates are modeled as in-plane orthotropic materials.

  4. Crack layer theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1984-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  5. Results of crack-arrest tests on irradiated a 508 class 3 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Iskander, S.K.; Milella, P.P.; Pini, M.A.

    1998-02-01

    Ten crack-arrest toughness values for irradiated specimens of A 508 class 3 forging steel have been obtained. The tests were performed according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standard Test Method for Determining Plane-Strain Crack-Arrest Fracture Toughness, K{sub la} of Ferritic Steels, E 1221-88. None of these values are strictly valid in all five ASTM E 1221-88 validity criteria. However, they are useful when compared to unirradiated crack-arrest specimen toughness values since they show the small (averaging approximately 10{degrees}C) shifts in the mean and lower-bound crack-arrest toughness curves. This confirms that a low copper content in ASTM A 508 class 3 forging material can be expected to result in small shifts of the transition toughness curve. The shifts due to neutron irradiation of the lower bound and mean toughness curves are approximately the same as the Charpy V-notch (CVN) 41-J temperature shift. The nine crack-arrest specimens were irradiated at temperatures varying from 243 to 280{degrees}C, and to a fluence varying from 1.7 to 2.7 x 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (> 1 MeV). The test results were normalized to reference values that correspond to those of CVN specimens irradiated at 284{degrees}C to a fluence of 3.2 x 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (> 1 MeV) in the same capsule as the crack-arrest specimens. This adjustment resulted in a shift to lower temperatures of all the data, and in particular moved two data points that appeared to lie close to or lower than the American Society of Mechanical Engineers K{sub la} curve to positions that seemed more reasonable with respect to the remaining data. A special fixture was designed, fabricated, and successfully used in the testing. For reasons explained in the text, special blocks to receive the Oak Ridge National Laboratory clip gage were designed, and greater-than-standard crack-mouth opening displacements measured were accounted for. 24 refs., 13 figs., 12 tabs.

  6. Microstructure and mesh sensitivities of mesoscale surrogate driving force measures for transgranular fatigue cracks in polycrystals

    DOE PAGES

    Castelluccio, Gustavo M.; McDowell, David L.

    2015-05-22

    The number of cycles required to form and grow microstructurally small fatigue cracks in metals exhibits substantial variability, particularly for low applied strain amplitudes. This variability is commonly attributed to the heterogeneity of cyclic plastic deformation within the microstructure, and presents a challenge to minimum life design of fatigue resistant components. Our paper analyzes sources of variability that contribute to the driving force of transgranular fatigue cracks within nucleant grains. We also employ crystal plasticity finite element simulations that explicitly render the polycrystalline microstructure and Fatigue Indicator Parameters (FIPs) averaged over different volume sizes and shapes relative to the anticipatedmore » fatigue damage process zone. Volume averaging is necessary to both achieve description of a finite fatigue damage process zone and to regularize mesh dependence in simulations. Furthermore, results from constant amplitude remote applied straining are characterized in terms of the extreme value distributions of volume averaged FIPs. Grain averaged FIP values effectively mitigate mesh sensitivity, but they smear out variability within grains. Furthermore, volume averaging over bands that encompass critical transgranular slip planes appear to present the most attractive approach to mitigate mesh sensitivity while preserving variability within grains.« less

  7. Microstructure and mesh sensitivities of mesoscale surrogate driving force measures for transgranular fatigue cracks in polycrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Castelluccio, Gustavo M.; McDowell, David L.

    2015-05-22

    The number of cycles required to form and grow microstructurally small fatigue cracks in metals exhibits substantial variability, particularly for low applied strain amplitudes. This variability is commonly attributed to the heterogeneity of cyclic plastic deformation within the microstructure, and presents a challenge to minimum life design of fatigue resistant components. Our paper analyzes sources of variability that contribute to the driving force of transgranular fatigue cracks within nucleant grains. We also employ crystal plasticity finite element simulations that explicitly render the polycrystalline microstructure and Fatigue Indicator Parameters (FIPs) averaged over different volume sizes and shapes relative to the anticipated fatigue damage process zone. Volume averaging is necessary to both achieve description of a finite fatigue damage process zone and to regularize mesh dependence in simulations. Furthermore, results from constant amplitude remote applied straining are characterized in terms of the extreme value distributions of volume averaged FIPs. Grain averaged FIP values effectively mitigate mesh sensitivity, but they smear out variability within grains. Furthermore, volume averaging over bands that encompass critical transgranular slip planes appear to present the most attractive approach to mitigate mesh sensitivity while preserving variability within grains.

  8. Stress intensity factors in a cracked infinite elastic wedge loaded by a rigid punch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Civelek, M. B.

    1978-01-01

    A plane elastic wedge-shaped solid was split through the application of a rigid punch. It was assumed that the coefficient of friction on the the contact area was constant, and the problem had a plane of symmetry with respect to loading and geometry, with the crack in the plane of symmetry. The problem was formulated in terms of a system of integral equations with the contact stress and the derivative of the crack surface displacement as the unknown functions. The solution was obtained for an internal crack and for an edge crack. The results include primarily the stress intensity factors at the crack tips, and the measure of the stress singularity at the wedge apex, and at the end points of the contact area.

  9. Planing of Watercraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Herbert

    1948-01-01

    The present report deals with the processes accompanying the planing of a planing boat or a seaplane on water . The study is largely based upon theoretical investigations; mathematical problems and proofs are not discussed. To analyze theoreticaly actual planing processes, giving due consideration to all aspects of the problem, is probably not possible. The theories therefore treat various simple limiting cases, which in their entirety give a picture of the planing processes and enable the interpretation of the experimental results. The discussion is concerned with the stationary planing attitude: the boat planes at a constant speed V on an originally smooth surface.

  10. Periodic cracking of films supported on compliant substrates

    PubMed Central

    Thouless, M. D.; Li, Z.; Douville, N. J.; Takayama, S.

    2011-01-01

    When a tensile strain is applied to a film supported on a compliant substrate, a pattern of parallel cracks can channel through both the film and substrate. A linear-elastic fracture-mechanics model for the phenomenon is presented to extend earlier analyses in which cracking was limited to the film. It is shown how failure of the substrate reduces the critical strain required to initiate fracture of the film. This effect is more pronounced for relatively tough films. However, there is a critical ratio of the film to substrate toughness above which stable cracks do not form in response to an applied load. Instead, catastrophic failure of the substrate occurs simultaneously with the propagation of a single channel crack. This critical toughness ratio increases with the modulus mismatch between the film and substrate, so that periodic crack patterns are more likely to be observed with relatively stiff films. With relatively low values of modulus mismatch, even a film that is more brittle than the substrate can cause catastrophic failure of the substrate. Below the critical toughness ratio, there is a regime in which stable crack arrays can be formed in the film and substrate. The depth of these arrays increases, while the spacing decreases, as the strain is increased. Eventually, the crack array can become deep enough to cause substrate failure. PMID:21927507

  11. Contributions of Aging to the Fatigue Crack Growth Resistance of Human Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Ivancik, Juliana; Majd, Hessam; Bajaj, Devendra; Romberg, Elaine; Arola, Dwayne

    2012-01-01

    An evaluation of the fatigue crack resistance of human dentin was conducted to identify the degree of degradation that arises with aging and the dependency on tubule orientation. Fatigue crack growth was achieved in specimens of coronal dentin through application of Mode I cyclic loading and over clinically relevant lengths (0 ≤ a ≤ 2 mm). The study considered two directions of cyclic crack growth in which the crack was either in-plane (0°) or perpendicular (90°) to the dentin tubules. Results showed that regardless of tubule orientation, aging of dentin is accompanied by a significant reduction in the resistance to the initiation of fatigue crack growth, as well as a significant increase in the rate of incremental extension. Perpendicular to the tubules, the fatigue crack exponent increased significantly (from m=14.2±1.5 to 24.1±5.0), suggesting an increase in brittleness of the tissue with age. For cracks extending in plane with the tubules, the fatigue crack growth exponent does not change significantly with patient age (from m=25.4±3.03 to 22.9±5.3), but there is a significant increase in the incremental crack growth rate. Regardless of age, coronal dentin exhibits the lowest resistance to fatigue crack growth perpendicular to the tubules. While there are changes in the cyclic crack growth rate and mechanisms of cyclic extension with aging, this tissue maintains its anisotropy. PMID:22484693

  12. Contributions of aging to the fatigue crack growth resistance of human dentin.

    PubMed

    Ivancik, Juliana; Majd, Hessam; Bajaj, Devendra; Romberg, Elaine; Arola, Dwayne

    2012-07-01

    An evaluation of the fatigue crack resistance of human dentin was conducted to identify the degree of degradation that arises with aging and the dependency on tubule orientation. Fatigue crack growth was achieved in specimens of coronal dentin through application of Mode I cyclic loading and over clinically relevant lengths (0 ≤ a ≤ 2 mm). The study considered two directions of cyclic crack growth in which the crack was either in-plane (0°) or perpendicular (90°) to the dentin tubules. Results showed that regardless of tubule orientation, aging of dentin is accompanied by a significant reduction in the resistance to the initiation of fatigue crack growth, as well as a significant increase in the rate of incremental extension. Perpendicular to the tubules, the fatigue crack exponent increased significantly (from m=14.2 ± 1.5 to 24.1 ± 5.0), suggesting an increase in brittleness of the tissue with age. For cracks extending in-plane with the tubules, the fatigue crack growth exponent does not change significantly with patient age (from m=25.4 ± 3.03 to 22.9 ± 5.3), but there is a significant increase in the incremental crack growth rate. Regardless of age, coronal dentin exhibits the lowest resistance to fatigue crack growth perpendicular to the tubules. While there are changes in the cyclic crack growth rate and mechanisms of cyclic extension with aging, this tissue maintains its anisotropy.

  13. Abrupt out-of-plane edge folding of a circular thin plate: Implication for a mature Victoria regia leaf.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pengfei; Zhang, Chen; Dang, Fei; Yan, Yuan; Liu, Yilun; Chen, Xi

    2016-09-01

    Inspired by the observation of the configurations of Victoria regia leaves, we establish a phenomenological buckling model for the abrupt out-of-plane edge folding of a circular thin sheet. A reduced model is first developed, and further refined by a more sophisticated growth strain field so that the resulting buckling morphology resembles that of a mature Victoria regia leaf. Parametric studies are carried out to investigate the effects of geometric, material, and strain field parameters on the buckling morphology. Several main characteristics discovered through numerical studies are verified by theoretical analysis of a simple geometry-based model. Besides, the roles of the thickness variation and cracks are examined. This work may not only shed some light on the morphogenesis of certain plants, but also provide some useful insights on three-dimensional fabrications using mechanical self-assembly. PMID:27628696

  14. Treatment of singularities in cracked bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Raju, I. S.

    1989-01-01

    Three-dimensional finite-element analyses of middle-crack tension (M-T) and bend specimens subjected to mode I loadings were performed to study the stress singularity along the crack front. The specimen was modeled using 20-node isoparametric elements. The displacements and stresses from the analysis were used to estimate the power of singularities using a log-log regression analysis along the crack front. The analyses showed that finite-sized cracked bodies have two singular stress fields of the form rho = C sub o (theta, z) r to the -1/2 power + D sub o (theta, phi) R to the lambda rho power. The first term is the cylindrical singularity with the power -1/2 and is dominant over the middle 96 pct (for Poisson's ratio = 0.3) of the crack front and becomes nearly zero at the free surface. The second singularity is a vertex singularity with the vertex point located at the intersection of the crack front and the free surface. The second term is dominant at the free surface and becomes nearly zero away from the the boundary layer. The thickness of the boundary layer depends on Poisson's ratio of the material and is independent of the specimen type. The thickness of the boundary layer varied from 0 pct to about 5 pct of the total specimen thickness as Poisson's ratio varied from 0.0 to 0.45. Because there are two singular stress fields near the free surface, the strain energy release rate (G) is an appropriate parameter to measure the severity of the crack.

  15. Further Study of near Solidus Intergranular Cracking in Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    A series of tests, performed to determine the strain necessary to initiate intergranular cracking in Inconel 718 as a function of temperature, contained enough scatter near the melting temperature that questions remained as to the best curve of curves to fit to the data. Fracture surface analysis showed that the scatter was due to incipient melting in the grain boundary region. The melting contributed to low fracture strain but had only a small on the incipient cracking strain. Gleeble tests, which could be interrupted by water quenching, were used to study the incipient intergranular melting of Inconel 718. This modified weld simulation test provided a sufficiently rapid quench to preserve the intergranular microstructure created during incipient melting. This structure was studied both microscopically and with energy dispensive X-ray analysis. The implications of incipient melting and low-strain incipient cracking on the development of microfissuring envelopes are discussed.

  16. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.; Maiya, P.S.; Park, J.Y.; Ruther, W.E.

    1988-10-01

    Research during the past year focused on (1) stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austentitic stainless steels (SS), (2) fatigue of Type 316NG SS, and (3) SCC of ferritic steels used in reactor piping, pressure vessels, and steam generators. Stress corrosion cracking studies on austentitic SS explored the critical strains required for crack initiation, the effects of crevice conditions on SCC susceptibility, heat-to-heat variations in SCC susceptibility of Type 316NG and modified Type 347 SS, the effect of heat treatment on the susceptibility of Type 347 SS, threshold stress intensity values for crack growth in Type 316NG SS, and the effects of cuprous ion and several organic salts on the SCC of sensitized Type 304 SS. Crevice conditions were observed to strongly promote SCC. Significant heat-to-heat variations were observed in SCC susceptibility of Types 316NG and 347 SS. No correlation was found between SCC behavior and minor variations in chemical composition. A significant effect of heat treatment was observed in Type 347 SS. A heat that was extremely resistant to SCC after heat treatment at 650/degree/C for 24 h was susceptible to transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC) in the solution-annealed condition. Although there was no sensitization in either condition, the presence or absence of precipitates and differences in precipitate morphology appear to influence the SCC behavior. 20 refs., 20 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Analysis of reinforced concrete structures with occurrence of discrete cracks at arbitrary positions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaauwendraad, J.; Grootenboer, H. J.; Bouma, A. L.; Reinhardt, H. W.

    1980-01-01

    A nonlinear analysis of in-plane loaded plates is presented, which eliminates the disadvantages of the smeared crack approach. The elements used and the computational method are discussed. An example is shown in which one or more discrete cracks are dominant.

  18. Crack Instability Predictions Using a Multi-Term Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanganeh, Mohammad; Forman, Royce G.

    2015-01-01

    Present crack instability analysis for fracture critical flight hardware is normally performed using a single parameter, K(sub C), fracture toughness value obtained from standard ASTM 2D geometry test specimens made from the appropriate material. These specimens do not sufficiently match the boundary conditions and the elastic-plastic constraint characteristics of the hardware component, and also, the crack instability of most commonly used aircraft and aerospace structural materials have some amount of stable crack growth before fracture which makes the normal use of a K(sub C) single parameter toughness value highly approximate. In the past, extensive studies have been conducted to improve the single parameter (K or J controlled) approaches by introducing parameters accounting for the geometry or in-plane constraint effects. Using 'J-integral' and 'A' parameter as a measure of constraint is one of the most accurate elastic-plastic crack solutions currently available. In this work the feasibility of the J-A approach for prediction of the crack instability was investigated first by ignoring the effects of stable crack growth i.e. using a critical J and A and second by considering the effects of stable crack growth using the corrected J-delta a using the 'A' parameter. A broad range of initial crack lengths and a wide range of specimen geometries including C(T), M(T), ESE(T), SE(T), Double Edge Crack (DEC), Three-Hole-Tension (THT) and NC (crack from a notch) manufactured from Al7075 were studied. Improvements in crack instability predictions were observed compared to the other methods available in the literature.

  19. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Clark, R. W.; Gruber, E. E.; Shack, W. J.; Soppet, W. K.; Strain, R. V.

    2007-11-06

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from January to December 2002. Topics that have been investigated include: (a) environmental effects on fatigue crack initiation in carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic stainless steels (SSs), (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic SSs in BWRs, (c) evaluation of causes and mechanisms of irradiation-assisted cracking of austenitic SS in PWRs, and (d) cracking in Ni-alloys and welds. A critical review of the ASME Code fatigue design margins and an assessment of the conservation in the current choice of design margins are presented. The existing fatigue {var_epsilon}-N data have been evaluated to define the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters on the fatigue lives of carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic SSs. Experimental data are presented on the effects of surface roughness on fatigue crack initiation in these materials in air and LWR environments. Crack growth tests were performed in BWR environments on SSs irradiated to 0.9 and 2.0 x 10{sup 21} n x cm{sup -2}. The crack growth rates (CGRs) of the irradiated steels are a factor of {approx}5 higher than the disposition curve proposed in NUREG-0313 for thermally sensitized materials. The CGRs decreased by an order of magnitude in low-dissolved oxygen (DO) environments. Slow-strain-rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted in high-purity 289 C water on steels irradiated to {approx}3 dpa. The bulk S content correlated well with the susceptibility to intergranular SCC in 289 C water. The IASCC susceptibility of SSs that contain >0.003 wt. % S increased drastically. bend tests in inert environments at 23 C were conducted on broken pieces of SSRT specimens and on unirradiated specimens of the same materials after hydrogen charging. The results of the tests and a review of other data in the literature

  20. Analytical Model for Prediction of Reduced Strain Energy Release Rate of Single-Side-Patched Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Y. W.; Lee, W. Y.; McGee, A. S.; Hart, D. C.; Loup, D. C.; Rasmussen, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    A study was undertaken to develop an analytical model that can predict how much reduction in Strain Energy Release Rate (SERR) can be achieved by repairing a cracked plate using a single-side bonded patch. The plate may be subjected to inplane or out-of-plane bending loading. Furthermore, the plate may be flat or curved in a cylindrical shape. The model helps to select patch material (i.e., elastic modulus of the material) and the appropriate patch size in order to reduce the SERR at the crack tip of the patched base plate. In other words, the analytical model can be utilized to select the patch material and patch dimensions required to achieve the desired SERR for a cracked base plate with known modulus, thickness, and crack size. The model is based on axial and bending stresses of the single-side strap joint configuration, which are related to the SERR at the crack tip of a plate with a single-side patch repair. In order to verify the analytical model, finite element analyses were conducted to determine stresses as well as SERR in many different patched plates. The numerical study confirmed the validity of the analytical model in predicting the reduction ratio of SERR resulting from the single-side patch repair.

  1. Quantity Effect of Radial Cracks on the Cracking Propagation Behavior and the Crack Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingjing; Xu, Jun; Liu, Bohan; Yao, Xuefeng; Li, Yibing

    2014-01-01

    In this letter, the quantity effect of radial cracks on the cracking propagation behavior as well as the circular crack generation on the impacted glass plate within the sandwiched glass sheets are experimentally investigated via high-speed photography system. Results show that the radial crack velocity on the backing glass layer decreases with the crack number under the same impact conditions during large quantities of repeated experiments. Thus, the “energy conversion factor” is suggested to elucidate the physical relation between the cracking number and the crack propagation speed. Besides, the number of radial crack also takes the determinative effect in the crack morphology of the impacted glass plate. This study may shed lights on understanding the cracking and propagation mechanism in laminated glass structures and provide useful tool to explore the impact information on the cracking debris. PMID:25048684

  2. Effects of crack geometry and material behavior on scattering by cracks for QNDE applications. Technical progress report, March 1, 1988--August 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Achenbach, J.D.

    1989-09-15

    In work carried out on this project, the usual mathematical modeling of ultrasonic wave scattering by flaws is being extended to account for several typical characteristics of fatigue and stress-corrosion cracks, and the environment of such cracks. Work has been completed on scattering by macrocrack-microcrack configurations. We have also investigated reflection and transmission by a flaw plane consisting of an infinite array of randomly oriented cracks. In another investigation the propagation of mechanical disturbances in solids with periodically distributed cracks has been studied.

  3. Ethylene by Naphta Cracking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Peter

    1977-01-01

    Presents a discussion of the manufacture of ethylene by thermal cracking of hydrocarbon feedstocks that is useful for introducing the subject of industrial chemistry into a chemistry curriculum. (MLH)

  4. Explicit mixed strain-displacement finite elements for compressible and quasi-incompressible elasticity and plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervera, M.; Lafontaine, N.; Rossi, R.; Chiumenti, M.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an explicit mixed finite element formulation to address compressible and quasi-incompressible problems in elasticity and plasticity. This implies that the numerical solution only involves diagonal systems of equations. The formulation uses independent and equal interpolation of displacements and strains, stabilized by variational subscales. A displacement sub-scale is introduced in order to stabilize the mean-stress field. Compared to the standard irreducible formulation, the proposed mixed formulation yields improved strain and stress fields. The paper investigates the effect of this enhancement on the accuracy in problems involving strain softening and localization leading to failure, using low order finite elements with linear continuous strain and displacement fields ( P1 P1 triangles in 2D and tetrahedra in 3D) in conjunction with associative frictional Mohr-Coulomb and Drucker-Prager plastic models. The performance of the strain/displacement formulation under compressible and nearly incompressible deformation patterns is assessed and compared to analytical solutions for plane stress and plane strain situations. Benchmark numerical examples show the capacity of the mixed formulation to predict correctly failure mechanisms with localized patterns of strain, virtually free from any dependence of the mesh directional bias. No auxiliary crack tracking technique is necessary.

  5. Inspecting cracks in foam insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambell, L. W.; Jung, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    Dye solution indicates extent of cracking by penetrating crack and showing original crack depth clearly. Solution comprised of methylene blue in denatured ethyl alcohol penetrates cracks completely and evaporates quickly and is suitable technique for usage in environmental or structural tests.

  6. Cracked Plain, Buried Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    4 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a cracked plain in western Utopia Planitia. The three circular crack patterns indicate the location of three buried meteor impact craters. These landforms are located near 41.9oN, 275.9oW. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates this scene from the lower left.

  7. Mechanisms of fatigue crack retardation following single tensile overloads in powder metallurgy aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, G. H.; Reynolds, A. P.; Starke, E. A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    In ingot metallurgy (IM) alloys, the number of delay cycles following a single tensile overload typically increases from a minimum at an intermediate baseline stress intensity range, Delta-K(B), with decreasing Delta-K(B) approaching threshold and increasing Delta-K(B) approaching unstable fracture to produce a characteristic 'U' shaped curve. Two models have been proposed to explain this behavior. One model is based on the interaction between roughness and plasticity-induced closure, while the other model only utilizes plasticity-induced closure. This article examines these models, using experimental results from constant amplitude and single overload fatigue tests performed on two powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys, AL-905XL and AA 8009. The results indicate that the 'U'-shaped curve is primarily due to plasticity-induced closure, and that the plasticity-induced retardation effect is through-thickness in nature, occurring in both the surface and interior regions. However, the retardation effect is greater at the surface, because the increase in plastic strain at the crack tip and overload plastic zone size are larger in the plane-stress surface regions than in the plane-strain interior regions. These results are not entirely consistent with either of the proposed models.

  8. Deformations and strains in adhesive joints by moire interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, D.; Czarnek, R.; Wood, J.; John, D.; Lubowinski, S.

    1984-01-01

    Displacement fields in a thick adherend lap joint and a cracked lap shear specimen were measured by high sensitivity moire interferometry. Contour maps of in-plane U and V displacements were obtained across adhesive and adherent surfaces. Loading sequences ranged from modest loads to near-failure loads. Quantitative results are given for displacements and certain strains in the adhesive and along the adhesive/adherend boundary lines. The results show nonlinear displacements and strains as a function of loads or stresses and they show viscoelastic or time-dependent response. Moire interferometry is an excellent method for experimental studies of adhesive joint performance. Subwavelength displacement resolution of a few micro-inches, and spatial resolution corresponding to 1600 fringes/inch (64 fringes/mm), were obtained in these studies. The whole-field contour maps offer insights not available from local measurements made by high sensitivity gages.

  9. Spiral and croissant crack in drying thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marthelot, Joel; Roman, Benoit; Bico, Jose; Barthel, Etienne; Teisseire, Jeremie; Dalmas, Davy; Melo, Francisco

    2012-02-01

    Drying mud or crazing in ceramics glaze leads to familiar hierarchical cracks network where a new crack connects perpendicularly to older ones. We report unusual spirals and croissants crack patterns in methylsiloxane drying thin films moderately adhering on a substrate. Such cracks are also observed in a very different situation when magnetron sputtering multilayers are under external tension. The amplitude and wavelength of the pattern are robusts and are orders of magnitude larger than the thickness of the layer. The propagation of the spiral and croissant cracks occurs in a narrow range of adhesion energy between the film and the substrate and strain in the film. We will show how the propagation is driven by a cooperation between fracture and adhesion.

  10. Crack toughness evaluation of hot pressed and forged beryllium.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. H.; Bubsey, R. T.; Brown, W. F., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Fracture toughness tests at room temperature were made on three-point loaded beryllium bend specimens cut from hot pressed block and a forged disk. These specimens had plane proportions conforming to ASTM E 399 and covered a thickness range of from 1/32 to 1/2 in. Two sets of bend specimens were tested, one having fatigue cracks and the other 0.5 mil radius notches. One objective of the investigation was the development of techniques to produce fatigue cracks in accordance with the procedures specified in ASTM E 399. This objective was achieved for the hot pressed material. In plane cracks were not consistently produced in the specimens cut from forged stock.

  11. Plates and shells containing a surface crack under general loading conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, Paul F.; Erdogan, Fazil

    1987-01-01

    Various through and part-through crack problems in plates and shells are considered. The line-spring model of Rice and Levy is generalized to the skew-symmetric case to solve surface crack problems involving mixed-mode, coplanar crack growth. Compliance functions are introduced which are valid for crack depth to thickness ratios at least up to .95. This includes expressions for tension and bending as well as expressions for in-plane shear, out-of-plane shear, and twisting. Transverse shear deformation is taken into account in the plate and shell theories and this effect is shown to be important in comparing stress intensity factors obtained from the plate theory with three-dimensional solutions. Stress intensity factors for cylinders obtained by the line-spring model also compare well with three-dimensional solution. By using the line-spring approach, stress intensity factors can be obtained for the through crack and for part-through crack of any crack front shape, without recalculation integrals that take up the bulk of the computer time. Therefore, parameter studies involving crack length, crack depth, shell type, and shell curvature are made in some detail. The results will be useful in brittle fracture and in fatigue crack propagation studies. All problems considered are of the mixed boundary value type and are reducted to strongly singular integral equations which make use of the finite-part integrals of Hadamard. The equations are solved numerically in a manner that is very efficient.

  12. A Crack Growth Evaluation Method for Interacting Multiple Cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki

    When stress corrosion cracking or corrosion fatigue occurs, multiple cracks are frequently initiated in the same area. According to section XI of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, multiple cracks are considered as a single combined crack in crack growth analysis, if the specified conditions are satisfied. In crack growth processes, however, no prescription for the interference between multiple cracks is given in this code. The JSME Post-Construction Code, issued in May 2000, prescribes the conditions of crack coalescence in the crack growth process. This study aimed to extend this prescription to more general cases. A simulation model was applied, to simulate the crack growth process, taking into account the interference between two cracks. This model made it possible to analyze multiple crack growth behaviors for many cases (e. g. different relative position and length) that could not be studied by experiment only. Based on these analyses, a new crack growth analysis method was suggested for taking into account the interference between multiple cracks.

  13. Fatigue Crack Growth Analysis Under Spectrum Loading in Various Environmental Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheevskiy, S.; Glinka, G.; Lee, E.

    2013-03-01

    The fatigue process consists, from the engineering point of view, of three stages: crack initiation, fatigue crack growth, and the final failure. It is also known that the fatigue process near notches and cracks is governed by local strains and stresses in the regions of maximum stress and strain concentrations. Therefore, the fatigue crack growth can be considered as a process of successive crack increments, and the fatigue crack initiation and subsequent growth can be modeled as one repetitive process. The assumptions mentioned above were used to derive a fatigue crack growth model based, called later as the UniGrow model, on the analysis of cyclic elastic-plastic stresses-strains near the crack tip. The fatigue crack growth rate was determined by simulating the cyclic stress-strain response in the material volume adjacent to the crack tip and calculating the accumulated fatigue damage in a manner similar to fatigue analysis of stationary notches. The fatigue crack growth driving force was derived on the basis of the stress and strain history at the crack tip and the Smith-Watson-Topper (SWT) fatigue damage parameter, D = σmaxΔɛ/2. It was subsequently found that the fatigue crack growth was controlled by a two-parameter driving force in the form of a weighted product of the stress intensity range and the maximum stress intensity factor, Δ K p K {max/1- p }. The effect of the internal (residual) stress induced by the reversed cyclic plasticity has been accounted for and therefore the two-parameter driving force made it possible to predict the effect of the mean stress including the influence of the applied compressive stress, tensile overloads, and variable amplitude spectrum loading. It allows estimating the fatigue life under variable amplitude loading without using crack closure concepts. Several experimental fatigue crack growth datasets obtained for the Al 7075 aluminum alloy were used for the verification of the proposed unified fatigue crack growth

  14. Crack propagation in aluminum sheets reinforced with boron-epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roderick, G. L.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis was developed to predict both the crack growth and debond growth in a reinforced system. The analysis was based on the use of complex variable Green's functions for cracked, isotropic sheets and uncracked, orthotropic sheets to calculate inplane and interlaminar stresses, stress intensities, and strain-energy-release rates. An iterative solution was developed that used the stress intensities and strain-energy-release rates to predict crack and debond growths, respectively, on a cycle-by-cycle basis. A parametric study was made of the effects of boron-epoxy composite reinforcement on crack propagation in aluminum sheets. Results show that the size of the debond area has a significant effect on the crack propagation in the aluminum. For small debond areas, the crack propagation rate is reduced significantly, but these small debonds have a strong tendency to enlarge. Debond growth is most likely to occur in reinforced systems that have a cracked metal sheet reinforced with a relatively thin composite sheet.

  15. The use of roving discs and orthogonal natural frequencies for crack identification and location in rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji, Zyad N.; Olutunde Oyadiji, S.

    2014-11-01

    A variety of approaches that have been developed for the identification and localisation of cracks in a rotor system, which exploit natural frequencies, require a finite element model to obtain the natural frequencies of the intact rotor as baseline data. In fact, such approaches can give erroneous results about the location and depth of a crack if an inaccurate finite element model is used to represent an uncracked model. A new approach for the identification and localisation of cracks in rotor systems, which does not require the use of the natural frequencies of an intact rotor as a baseline data, is presented in this paper. The approach, named orthogonal natural frequencies (ONFs), is based only on the natural frequencies of the non-rotating cracked rotor in the two lateral bending vibration x-z and y-z planes. The approach uses the cracked natural frequencies in the horizontal x-z plane as the reference data instead of the intact natural frequencies. Also, a roving disc is traversed along the rotor in order to enhance the dynamics of the rotor at the cracked locations. At each spatial location of the roving disc, the two ONFs of the rotor-disc system are determined from which the corresponding ONF ratio is computed. The ONF ratios are normalised by the maximum ONF ratio to obtain normalised orthogonal natural frequency curves (NONFCs). The non-rotating cracked rotor is simulated by the finite element method using the Bernoulli-Euler beam theory. The unique characteristics of the proposed approach are the sharp, notched peaks at the crack locations but rounded peaks at non-cracked locations. These features facilitate the unambiguous identification and locations of cracks in rotors. The effects of crack depth, crack location, and mass of a roving disc are investigated. The results show that the proposed method has a great potential in the identification and localisation of cracks in a non-rotating cracked rotor.

  16. Comparative Analysis of Uniaxial Strain Shock Tests and Taylor Tests for Armor and Maraging Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mescheryakov, Yu. I.; Zhigacheva, N. I.; Petrov, Yu. A.; Divakov, A. K.; Cline, C. F.

    2004-07-01

    High-strength constructional 38KhN3MFA steel and 02H18К9M5-BИ maraging steel were tested to determine the yield stress under dynamic loading. The 38KhN3MFA steel was used as central test material to work out the experimental technique. For both kinds of steel the results obtained in the plane shock tests under uniaxial strain condition show approximately the identical yield stress values as those obtained in Taylor tests. Cracking of maraging steel occurs along the shock-induced austenite bands where microhardness is much smaller than that for the rest of the matrix.

  17. Super-stretchable metallic interconnects on polymer with a linear strain of up to 100%

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arafat, Yeasir; Dutta, Indranath; Panat, Rahul

    2015-08-01

    Metal interconnects in flexible and wearable devices are heterogeneous metal-polymer systems that are expected to sustain large deformation without failure. The principal strategy to make strain tolerant interconnect lines on flexible substrates has comprised of creating serpentine structures of metal films with either in-plane or out-of-plane waves, using porous substrates, or using highly ductile materials such as gold. The wavy and helical serpentine patterns preclude high-density packing of interconnect lines on devices, while ductile materials such as Au are cost prohibitive for real world applications. Ductile copper films can be stretched if bonded to the substrate, but show high level of cracking beyond few tens of % strain. In this paper, we demonstrate a material system consisting of Indium metal film over an elastomer (PDMS) with a discontinuous Cr layer such that the metal interconnect can be stretched to extremely high linear strain (up to 100%) without any visible cracks. Such linear strain in metal interconnects exceeds that reported in literature and is obtained without the use of any geometrical manipulations or porous substrates. Systematic experimentation is carried out to explain the mechanisms that allow the Indium film to sustain the high strain level without failure. The islands forming the discontinuous Cr layer are shown to move apart from each other during stretching without delamination, providing strong adhesion to the Indium film while accommodating the large strain in the system. The Indium film is shown to form surface wrinkles upon release from the large strain, confirming its strong adhesion to PDMS. A model is proposed based upon the observations that can explain the high level of stretch-ability of the Indium metal film over the PDMS substrate.

  18. Super-stretchable metallic interconnects on polymer with a linear strain of up to 100%

    SciTech Connect

    Arafat, Yeasir; Dutta, Indranath; Panat, Rahul

    2015-08-24

    Metal interconnects in flexible and wearable devices are heterogeneous metal-polymer systems that are expected to sustain large deformation without failure. The principal strategy to make strain tolerant interconnect lines on flexible substrates has comprised of creating serpentine structures of metal films with either in-plane or out-of-plane waves, using porous substrates, or using highly ductile materials such as gold. The wavy and helical serpentine patterns preclude high-density packing of interconnect lines on devices, while ductile materials such as Au are cost prohibitive for real world applications. Ductile copper films can be stretched if bonded to the substrate, but show high level of cracking beyond few tens of % strain. In this paper, we demonstrate a material system consisting of Indium metal film over an elastomer (PDMS) with a discontinuous Cr layer such that the metal interconnect can be stretched to extremely high linear strain (up to 100%) without any visible cracks. Such linear strain in metal interconnects exceeds that reported in literature and is obtained without the use of any geometrical manipulations or porous substrates. Systematic experimentation is carried out to explain the mechanisms that allow the Indium film to sustain the high strain level without failure. The islands forming the discontinuous Cr layer are shown to move apart from each other during stretching without delamination, providing strong adhesion to the Indium film while accommodating the large strain in the system. The Indium film is shown to form surface wrinkles upon release from the large strain, confirming its strong adhesion to PDMS. A model is proposed based upon the observations that can explain the high level of stretch-ability of the Indium metal film over the PDMS substrate.

  19. ZIP2DL: An Elastic-Plastic, Large-Rotation Finite-Element Stress Analysis and Crack-Growth Simulation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deng, Xiaomin; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    ZIP2DL is a two-dimensional, elastic-plastic finte element program for stress analysis and crack growth simulations, developed for the NASA Langley Research Center. It has many of the salient features of the ZIP2D program. For example, ZIP2DL contains five material models (linearly elastic, elastic-perfectly plastic, power-law hardening, linear hardening, and multi-linear hardening models), and it can simulate mixed-mode crack growth for prescribed crack growth paths under plane stress, plane strain and mixed state of stress conditions. Further, as an extension of ZIP2D, it also includes a number of new capabilities. The large-deformation kinematics in ZIP2DL will allow it to handle elastic problems with large strains and large rotations, and elastic-plastic problems with small strains and large rotations. Loading conditions in terms of surface traction, concentrated load, and nodal displacement can be applied with a default linear time dependence or they can be programmed according to a user-defined time dependence through a user subroutine. The restart capability of ZIP2DL will make it possible to stop the execution of the program at any time, analyze the results and/or modify execution options and resume and continue the execution of the program. This report includes three sectons: a theoretical manual section, a user manual section, and an example manual secton. In the theoretical secton, the mathematics behind the various aspects of the program are concisely outlined. In the user manual section, a line-by-line explanation of the input data is given. In the example manual secton, three types of examples are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and illustrate the use of this program.

  20. Crack identification for rotating machines based on a nonlinear approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalini, A. A., Jr.; Sanches, L.; Bachschmid, N.; Steffen, V., Jr.

    2016-10-01

    In a previous contribution, a crack identification methodology based on a nonlinear approach was proposed. The technique uses external applied diagnostic forces at certain frequencies attaining combinational resonances, together with a pseudo-random optimization code, known as Differential Evolution, in order to characterize the signatures of the crack in the spectral responses of the flexible rotor. The conditions under which combinational resonances appear were determined by using the method of multiple scales. In real conditions, the breathing phenomenon arises from the stress and strain distribution on the cross-sectional area of the crack. This mechanism behavior follows the static and dynamic loads acting on the rotor. Therefore, the breathing crack can be simulated according to the Mayes' model, in which the crack transition from fully opened to fully closed is described by a cosine function. However, many contributions try to represent the crack behavior by machining a small notch on the shaft instead of the fatigue process. In this paper, the open and breathing crack models are compared regarding their dynamic behavior and the efficiency of the proposed identification technique. The additional flexibility introduced by the crack is calculated by using the linear fracture mechanics theory (LFM). The open crack model is based on LFM and the breathing crack model corresponds to the Mayes' model, which combines LFM with a given breathing mechanism. For illustration purposes, a rotor composed by a horizontal flexible shaft, two rigid discs, and two self-aligning ball bearings is used to compose a finite element model of the system. Then, numerical simulation is performed to determine the dynamic behavior of the rotor. Finally, the results of the inverse problem conveyed show that the methodology is a reliable tool that is able to estimate satisfactorily the location and depth of the crack.

  1. Effect of fracture surface roughness on shear crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, T.S.; Watt, D.W. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Mendelsohn, D.A. . Dept. of Engineering Mechanics)

    1992-12-01

    A model of fracture surface interference for Mode I fatigue crack profiles was developed and evaluated. Force required to open the crack faces is estimated from point contact expressions for Mode I stress intensity factor. Force transfer across contacting asperities is estimated and used to calculate Mode II resistance stress intensity factor (applied factor is sum of effective and resistance factors). Electro-optic holographic interferometry was used to measure 3-D displacement field around a Mode I fatigue pre-crack in Al loaded in Mode II shear. Induced Mode I crack face displacements were greater than Mode II displacements. Plane stress shear lip caused displacement normal to surface as the crack faces are displaced. Algorithms are being developed to track the displacements associated with the original coordinate system in the camera. A 2-D boundary element method code for mixed mode I and II loading of a rough crack (sawtooth asperity model) has been completed. Addition of small-scale crack tip yielding and a wear model are completed and underway, respectively.

  2. Mode III fatigue crack propagation in low alloy steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, R. O.; McClintock, F. A.; Nayeb-Hashemi, H.; Ritter, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    To provide a basis for estimating fatigue life in large rotating generator shafts subjected to transient oscillations, a study is made of fatigue crack propagation in Mode III (anti-plane shear) in torsionally-loaded spheroidized AISI4340 steel, and results compared to analogous behavior in Mode I. Torsional S/N curves, determined on smooth bars containing surface defects, showed results surprisingly close to expected unnotched Mode I data, with lifetime increasing from 104 cycles at nominal yield to 106 cycles at half yield. Fatigue crack growth rates in Mode III, measured on circumferentially-notched samples, were found to be slower than in Mode I, although still power-law related to the alternating stress intensity (△K III) for small-scale yielding. Mode III growth rates were only a small fraction (0.002 to 0.0005) of cyclic crack tip displacements (△CTD III) per cycle, in contrast to Mode I where the fraction was much larger (0.1 to 0.01). A micromechanical model for Mode III growth is proposed, where crack advance is considered to take place by a Mode II coalescence of cracks, initiated at inclusions ahead of the main crack front. This mechanism is consistent with the crack increment being a small fraction of △CTDIII per cycle.

  3. Fracture Mechanics Analyses for Interface Crack Problems - A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Shivakumar, Kunigal; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in fracture mechanics analyses of the interfacial crack problem are reviewed. The intent of the review is to renew the awareness of the oscillatory singularity at the crack tip of a bimaterial interface and the problems that occur when calculating mode mixity using numerical methods such as the finite element method in conjunction with the virtual crack closure technique. Established approaches to overcome the nonconvergence issue of the individual mode strain energy release rates are reviewed. In the recent literature many attempts to overcome the nonconvergence issue have been developed. Among the many approaches found only a few methods hold the promise of providing practical solutions. These are the resin interlayer method, the method that chooses the crack tip element size greater than the oscillation zone, the crack tip element method that is based on plate theory and the crack surface displacement extrapolation method. Each of the methods is validated on a very limited set of simple interface crack problems. However, their utility for a wide range of interfacial crack problems is yet to be established.

  4. Fatigue Crack Growth in Bodies with Thermally Sprayed Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovářík, O.; Haušild, P.; Medřický, J.; Tomek, L.; Siegl, J.; Mušálek, R.; Curry, N.; Björklund, S.

    2016-01-01

    Many applications of thermally sprayed coatings call for increased fatigue resistance of coated parts. Despite the intensive research in this area, the influence of coating on fatigue is still not completely understood. In this paper, the localization of crack initiation sites and the dynamics of crack propagation are studied. The resonance bending fatigue test was employed to test flat specimens with both sides coated. Hastelloy-X substrates coated with classical thermal barrier coating consisting of yttria stabilized zirconia and NiCoCrAlY layers. The strain distribution on the coating surface was evaluated by the Digital Image Correlation method through the whole duration of the fatigue test. Localization of crack initiation sites and the mode of crack propagation in the coated specimen are related to the observed resonance frequency. The individual phases of specimen degradation, i.e., the changes of material properties, crack initiation, and crack propagation, were identified. The tested coatings strongly influenced the first two phases, and the influence on the crack propagation was less significant. In general, the presented crack detection method can be used as a sensitive nondestructive testing method well suited for coated parts.

  5. Directional crack propagation of granular water systems.

    PubMed

    Mizuguchi, Tsuyoshi; Nishimoto, Akihiro; Kitsunezaki, So; Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Aoki, Ichio

    2005-05-01

    Pattern dynamics of directional crack propagation phenomena observed in drying process of starch-water mixture is investigated. To visualize the three-dimensional structure of the drying-fracture process two kinds of experiments are performed, i.e., resin solidification planing method and real-time measurement of water content distribution with MR instruments. A cross section with polygonal structure is visualized in both experiments. The depth dependency of cell size is measured. The phenomenological model for water transportation is also discussed.

  6. Effects of loading on the growth rates of deep stress-corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Christman, T.K.

    1990-08-01

    The goal of this research program was to determine the effects of loading on growth of stress-corrosion cracks (SCC) in line pipe steel and whether special loading procedures could actually inhibit crack growth. Of particular interest was the effect of hydrostatic retesting on the subsequent growth of existing cracks. The growth rate experiments showed that the slow-strain rate loading could successfully nucleate a group of fine cracks with depths up to 0.025 inches (0.64 mm). However, the subsequent cyclic loading at typical operating stress levels (lower than experienced during the slow- strain rate loading) produced minimal crack growth and stopped soon after the test was started. The limited growth is believed to be a real phenomenon which means this is not a suitable procedure for the measurement of average crack growth rates. These experiments indicate that cracks grown at high stress (as in the slow-strain rate phase) do not readily propagate at lower stress levels. This may be because of crack closure (compressive crack tip residual stress) induced by the initial higher stress level. If that is true, then hydrostatic retests could inhibit the growth of existing stress-corrosion cracks, especially if the hydrostatic tests are conducted at high stress levels. 15 figures, 3 tabs.

  7. Cracked cue ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    The latest images sent by the Galileo spacecraft reveal that the surface of Jupiter's moon Europa may have contained a layer of “warm ice” or even liquid water. In fact, planetologists are wondering if perhaps it still does.Photos taken earlier this summer show Europa to have a crust of smooth white and brown-tinted ice scarred by long, jagged cracks; some scientists have said the moon looks like a cracked cue ball. “The scale of fracture patterns—extending a distance equivalent to the width of the western United States—dwarf the San Andreas fault in length and width,” said Ronald Greeley, a geologist from Arizona State University and a member of the Galileo imaging team. The cracks are believed to have been caused by the stress of tidal forces created by Jupiter's gravity. Warmth generated by tidal heating also may have been sufficient to soften or liquefy some of the ice.

  8. A penny-shaped crack in a filament reinforced matrix. 1: The filament model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Pacella, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    The electrostatic problem of a penny-shaped crack in an elastic matrix which reinforced by filaments or fibers perpendicular to the plane of the crack was studied. The elastic filament model was developed for application to evaluation studies of the stress intensity factor along the periphery of the crack, the stresses in the filaments or fibers, and the interface shear between the matrix and the filaments or fibers. The requirements expected of the model are a sufficiently accurate representation of the filament and applicability to the interaction problems involving a cracked elastic continuum with multi-filament reinforcements. The technique for developing the model and numerical examples of it are shown.

  9. Prediction of pure water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in nickel base alloys using crack growth rate models

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.D.; Krasodomski, H.T.; Lewis, N.; Makar, G.L.

    1995-02-22

    The Ford/Andresen slip dissolution SCC model, originally developed for stainless steel components in BWR environments, has been applied to Alloy 600 and Alloy X-750 tested in deaerated pure water chemistry. A method is described whereby the crack growth rates measured in compact tension specimens can be used to estimate crack growth in a component. Good agreement was found between model prediction and measured SCC in X-750 threaded fasteners over a wide range of temperatures, stresses, and material condition. Most data support the basic assumption of this model that cracks initiate early in life. The evidence supporting a particular SCC mechanism is mixed. Electrochemical repassivation data and estimates of oxide fracture strain indicate that the slip dissolution model can account for the observed crack growth rates, provided primary rather than secondary creep rates are used. However, approximately 100 cross-sectional TEM foils of SCC cracks including crack tips reveal no evidence of enhanced plasticity or unique dislocation patterns at the crack tip or along the crack to support a classic slip dissolution mechanism. No voids, hydrides, or microcracks are found in the vicinity of the crack tips creating doubt about classic hydrogen related mechanisms. The bulk oxide films exhibit a surface oxide which is often different than the oxides found within a crack. Although bulk chromium concentration affects the rate of SCC, analytical data indicates the mechanism does not result from chromium depletion at the grain boundaries. The overall findings support a corrosion/dissolution mechanism but not one necessarily related to slip at the crack tip.

  10. In plane oscillation of a bifilar pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichsen, Peter F.

    2016-11-01

    The line tensions, the horizontal and vertical accelerations as well as the period of large angle oscillations parallel to the plane of a bifilar suspension are presented and have been experimentally investigated using strain gauges and a smart phone. This system has a number of advantages over the simple pendulum for studying large angle oscillations, and for measuring the acceleration due to gravity.

  11. Stress corrosion cracking of candidate materials for nuclear waste containers

    SciTech Connect

    Maiya, P.S.; Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.

    1989-09-01

    Types 304L and 316L stainless steel (SS), Incoloy 825, Cu, Cu-30%Ni, and Cu-7%Al have been selected as candidate materials for the containment of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca Mountain Site in Nevada. The susceptibility of these materials to stress corrosion cracking has been investigated by slow-strain-rate tests (SSRTs) in water which simulates that from well J-13 (J-13 water) and is representative of the groundwater present at the Yucca Mountain site. The SSRTs were performed on specimens exposed to simulated J-13 water at 93{degree}C and at a strain rate 10{sup {minus}7} s{sup {minus}1} under crevice conditions and at a strain rate of 10{sup {minus}8} s{sup {minus}1} under both crevice and noncrevice conditions. All the tests were interrupted after nominal elongation strains of 1--4%. Examination by scanning electron microscopy showed some crack initiation in virtually all specimens. Optical microscopy of metallographically prepared transverse sections of Type 304L SS suggests that the crack depths are small (<10 {mu}m). Preliminary results suggest that a lower strain rate increases the severity of cracking of Types 304L and 316L SS, Incoloy 825, and Cu but has virtually no effect on Cu-30%Ni and Cu-7%Al. Differences in susceptibility to cracking were evaluated in terms of a stress ratio, which is defined as the ratio of the increase in stress after local yielding in the environment to the corresponding stress increase in an identical test in air, both computed at the same strain. On the basis of this stress ratio, the ranking of materials in order of increasing resistance to cracking is: Types 304L SS < 316L SS < Incoloy 825 {congruent} Cu-30%Ni < Cu {congruent} Cu-7%Al. 9 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Delamination-driven failure processes in two-dimensional composite structures: Delamination growth, crack kinking and nonlinear buckling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sayed, Sami Ibrahim

    Delamination is an important mode of failure in laminated and sandwich composites. This study describes a cohesive layer model which has been successfully employed to predict the initiation and track the growth of delamination. A significant feature of the present model is that it can be used for geometrically nonlinear problems as it is formulated in terms of appropriate stresses and strains. A finite element approach which could account for the contact between delaminated surfaces as well as the progressive failure of the cohesive layer was employed to study several test cases. As a preliminary, examples of a double cantilever and a compressed beam specimens were studied in detail to identify the role of the key parameters of the model, viz. the thickness of the cohesive layer and the strength and stiffness of the cohesive layer material. It is found that the model is fairly robust and is not sensitive to changes in parameters other than the critical strain energy release rates in the opening and shearing modes respectively. This was followed by an investigation of delamination growth in columns and rings made of laminated composite material as well as sandwich columns. A dynamic analysis incorporating appropriate damping with a sufficiently slow rate of application of load was implemented to closely simulate quasi-static loading. Experimental results are found to corroborate the accuracy of the model. In laminated composites, matrix cracking was found to have a significant effect in the advanced stages of loading history and this has been accounted for by the implementation of a micro-mechanical model installed in the material in conjunction with the cohesive layer model placed along the potential delamination. Better correlation with experimental results was thus achieved. It was observed in experiments that the interfacial crack in sandwich structures may not remain at the interface and tends to kink into the core. A kinking model which is based on identifying

  13. An interferometric strain-displacement measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, William N., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A system for measuring the relative in-plane displacement over a gage length as short as 100 micrometers is described. Two closely spaced indentations are placed in a reflective specimen surface with a Vickers microhardness tester. Interference fringes are generated when they are illuminated with a He-Ne laser. As the distance between the indentations expands or contracts with applied load, the fringes move. This motion is monitored with a minicomputer-controlled system using linear diode arrays as sensors. Characteristics of the system are: (1) gage length ranging from 50 to 500 micrometers, but 100 micrometers is typical; (2) least-count resolution of approximately 0.0025 micrometer; and (3) sampling rate of 13 points per second. In addition, the measurement technique is non-contacting and non-reinforcing. It is useful for strain measurements over small gage lengths and for crack opening displacement measurements near crack tips. This report is a detailed description of a new system recently installed in the Mechanisms of Materials Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center. The intent is to enable a prospective user to evaluate the applicability of the system to a particular problem and assemble one if needed.

  14. Propagation of Crack in Glasses under Creep Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, C.; Fortin, J.; Guéguen, Y.; Schubnel, A.

    2012-04-01

    The context of our study is the observation of the mechanical behaviour of glass used for the storage of radioactive wastes. This implies to measure the crack propagation characteristics in glass. Results on the investigation of the micromechanics of creep under triaxial loading conditions are presented in the framework of this study. We performed the experiments in a triaxial cell, with pore fluid pressure, on boro-silicate glass. The chemical composition of the investigated glass is very close to the composition of waste vitrified packages. The matrix of the original glass (OG) is perfectly amorphous, without porosity. A few isolated air bubbles are trapped during the glass flow. Cracks are introduced in the OG through thermal shocks. The evolution of deformation (axial and radial strain) is measured using strain gages. The elastic P and S wave velocities and the acoustic emissions (AE) are also recorded. An experiment in dry conditions was performed (the pore fluid was argon gas) with a confining pressure fixed at 15 MPa. Stress step tests were performed in order to get creep data. A similar experiment was performed in water saturated conditions. Crack-closure is first observed at very low strains. Then elastic deformation is observed up to a stress level where elastic anisotropy develops. This can be clearly detected from ɛ Thomsen parameter increase. At last, at a deviatoric stress of 175 MPa (in dry conditions), we observe dilatancy. This behaviour has never been observed in original glass. Indeed, the OG behaviour is perfectly elastic and brittle. In addition, the constant stress tests show that dilatancy develops during a time constant that depends on the stress level. It can be inferred that crack propagation takes place during the constant stress steps. This behaviour is under investigation. We are also quantifying the velocity of the crack propagation by modelling this phenomenon. Indeed, the crack density can be expressed as a volumic strain, ɛv =

  15. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gruber, E.E.

    1996-07-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from April 1995 to December 1995. Topics that have been investigated include fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steel used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, EAC of Alloy 600 and 690, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of Type 304 SS. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic steels in water that contained various concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during different portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Crack-growth-rate tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens from several heats of Alloys 600 and 690 in simulated LWR environments. Effects of fluoride-ion contamination on susceptibility to intergranular cracking of high- and commercial- purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-tensile tests at 288 degrees Centigrade. Microchemical changes in the specimens were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to determine whether trace impurity elements may contribute to IASCC of these materials.

  16. Experiments with Planing Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sottorf, W

    1934-01-01

    A previous report discusses the experimental program of a systematic exploration of all questions connected with the planing problem as well as the first fundamental results of the investigation of a flat planing surface. The present report is limited to the conversion of the model test data to full scale.

  17. Size effects and strain localization in atomic-scale cleavage modeling.

    PubMed

    Elsner, B A M; Müller, S

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we study the adhesion and decohesion of Cu(1 0 0) surfaces using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. An upper stress to surface decohesion is obtained via the universal binding energy relation (UBER), but the model is limited to rigid separation of bulk-terminated surfaces. When structural relaxations are included, an unphysical size effect arises if decohesion is considered to occur as soon as the strain energy equals the energy of the newly formed surfaces. We employ the nudged elastic band (NEB) method to show that this size effect is opposed by a size-dependency of the energy barriers involved in the transition. Further, we find that the transition occurs via a localization of bond strain in the vicinity of the cleavage plane, which resembles the strain localization at the tip of a sharp crack that is predicted by linear elastic fracture mechanics. PMID:26219654

  18. New plane shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, A.

    1994-12-31

    A classical problem in fluid dynamics is the study of the stability of plane Couette flow. This flow experimentally sustains turbulence for Reynolds numbers greater than 1440 {+-} 40. (The Reynolds number is based on channel width and wall velocity difference). Since plane Couette flow is linearly stable for all Reynolds numbers, obtaining non-trivial mathematical solutions to the plane Couette flow equations is difficult. However, M. Nagata finds a non-trivial number solution of the plane Couette flow equations at low Reynolds number. We confirm these solutions. We compute the minimum Reynolds number at which they exist. We study their stability. We also study the effect of a Coriolis force on plane Poiseuille flow.

  19. Mixed mode fatigue crack growth in the commercial Al-Li alloys, 8090

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, I.; Gregson, P.J. . Dept. of Engineering Materials)

    1994-05-15

    Crystallographic fatigue crack propagation along planar slip bands has been recognized to occur over a particularly wide range of conditions in Al-Li alloys due to the presence of coherent, shearable [delta][prime] (Al[sub 3]Li) precipitates, in conjunction with the strong underlying crystallographic texture often developed in these materials during secondary processing. Such Stage 1 propagation typically produces a highly tortuous crack path during conventional mode 1 fatigue testing. While the net crack growth direction remains parallel to the nominal mode 1 direction, crack tortuosity has been generally recognized as beneficial to fatigue resistance, as both local mixed mode crack-tip loading conditions and roughness induced closure may significantly reduce the driving force for crack extension (i.e. crack shielding'' occurs). Recent investigations of commercial Al-Li plate in the damage tolerant condition have however shown that co-planar Stage 1 crack propagation along preferred [111]-plane orientations may give rise to sustained macroscopic crack deviation from the nominal mode 1 growth direction. Such crack growth raises a number of important questions with regard to conventional, nominally mode 1 based structure lifting and fatigue testing methods when applied to these materials. Work has therefore been carried out to characterized fatigue crack growth during sustained co-planar Stage 1 propagation in a commercial Al-Li alloy, with particular reference to mixed mode loading conditions.

  20. Passivating metals on cracking catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Mckay, D.L.

    1980-01-15

    Metals such as nickel, vanadium and iron contaminating a cracking catalyst are passivated by contacting the cracking catalyst under elevated temperature conditions with antimony selenide, antimony sulfide, antimony sulfate, bismuth selenide, bismuth sulfide, or bismuth phosphate.

  1. The role of crack tip plasticity on the propagation of fracture in rocks and other brittle solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borja, R. I.; Rahmani, H.; Liu, F.; Aydin, A.

    2009-12-01

    Small-scale plastic yielding around a crack tip plays a key role in the propagation of fractures in brittle materials such as rocks. Linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) quantifies the asymptotic strain field around a crack tip under the assumptions of linear elasticity and infinitesimal deformation. However, no material can withstand an infinite stress, and plastic yielding is expected to take place near and around a crack tip. Plastic yielding governs the extension of an existing crack, as well as determines the direction of propagation of splay cracks. Unlike in LEFM, however, no closed-form solution is available for the asymptotic strain field near and around a crack tip in the presence of inelastic deformation. In this work, we resort to finite element modeling for capturing plastic yielding and asymptotic strain field near and around a crack tip. Novel features of the modeling include an enhanced finite element around the crack tip that captures the expected asymptotic strain field, and an elastoplastic constitutive law for near-tip yielding. Through numerical simulations, we infer the likely orientation of splay cracks from the prevailing crystal orientation and overall stress field around the crack tip. We also compare the angular variation of the crack-tip enrichment function in the presence of plastic yielding with the closed-form solution derived from LEFM for different loading conditions and elastoplastic bulk constitutive laws.

  2. Cracking the Credit Hour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laitinen, Amy

    2012-01-01

    The basic currency of higher education--the credit hour--represents the root of many problems plaguing America's higher education system: the practice of measuring time rather than learning. "Cracking the Credit Hour" traces the history of this time-based unit, from the days of Andrew Carnegie to recent federal efforts to define a credit hour. If…

  3. In-plane strain modulated magnetization and magnetoelectric effect in La0.7Sr0.3MnO3-BaTiO3 and La0.7Sr0.3MnO3-BaTiO3-BiFeO3 multilayer's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Virendra; Gaur, Anurag; Chaudhury, Ram Janay; Kumar, Dileep

    2016-10-01

    La0.7Sr0.3MnO3-BaTiO3(LSMO/BTO) and La0.7Sr0.3MnO3-BaTiO3-BiFeO3 (LSMO/BTO/BFO) multilayer thin films are deposited on STO (100) substrate by pulsed laser deposition. In-plane lattice mismatch induced strain is thoroughly investigated with the conclusion, that upper BTO layer of bilayer resides in high strained state, while upper BFO layer of trilayer remains under partially relaxed state. Significantly higher value (∼20) of dielectric constant is observed for LSMO/BTO bilayer in compliance with its higher (12.28 μC/cm2) in-plane strain induced interfacial polarization, which exceeds (2.06 μC/cm2), the observed value of polarization for LSMO/BTO/BFO trilayer. In LSMO/BTO bilayer, antiferromagnetic LSMO phase coexists due to the existence of strong tensile strain between the interfaces, which causes the reduction in value of saturation magnetization up to 50.76 emu/cm3 in comparison to 145.01 emu/cm3 for LSMO/BTO/BFO trilayer. The maximum value of linear magnetoelectric coefficient (α31) observed for LSMO/BTO bilayer is 24.77 mV/cm-Oe, which is higher in comparison to 19.54 mV/cm-Oe for LSMO/BTO/BFO trilayer, where the upper layer undergoes less strain in comparison to the bilayer.

  4. Separation of crack extension modes in composite delamination problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuth, Jack L.

    1994-01-01

    This work concerns fracture mechanics modeling of composite delamination problems. In order to predict delamination resistance, an applied stress intensity factor, K, or energy release rate, G, must be compared to a mode-dependent critical value of K or G from experiment. In the interfacial fracture analysis of most applications and some tests, the mode of crack extension is not uniquely defined. It is instead a function of distance from the crack tip due to the oscillating singularity existing at the tip. In this work, a consistent method is presented of extracting crack extension modes in such cases. In particular, use of the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT) to extract modes of crack extension is studied for cases of a crack along the interface between two in-plane orthotropic materials. Modes of crack extension extracted from oscillatory analyses using VCCT are a function of the virtual crack extension length, delta. Most existing efforts to obtain delta-independent modes of crack extension involve changing the analysis in order to eliminate its oscillatory nature. One such method involves changing one or more properties of the layers to make the oscillatory exponent parameter, epsilon, equal zero. Standardized application of this method would require consistent criteria for identifying which properties can be altered without changing the physical aspects of the problem. Another method involves inserting a thin homogeneous layer (typically referred to as a resin interlayer) along the interface and placing the crack within it. The drawbacks of this method are that it requires increased modeling effort and introduces the thickness of the interlayer as an additional length parameter. The approach presented here does not attempt to alter the interfacial fracture analysis to eliminate its oscillatory behavior. Instead, the argument is made that the oscillatory behavior is non-physical and that if its effects were separated from VCCT quantities, then consistent

  5. Fracture mechanics analyses of partial crack closure in shell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun

    2007-12-01

    This thesis presents the theoretical and finite element analyses of crack-face closure behavior in shells and its effect on the stress intensity factor under a bending load condition. Various shell geometries, such as spherical shell, cylindrical shell containing an axial crack, cylindrical shell containing a circumferential crack and shell with double curvatures, are all studied. In addition, the influence of material orthotropy on the crack closure effect in shells is also considered. The theoretical formulation is developed based on the shallow shell theory of Delale and Erdogan, incorporating the effect of crack-face closure at the compressive edges. The line-contact assumption, simulating the crack-face closure at the compressive edges, is employed so that the contact force at the closure edges is introduced, which can be translated to the mid-plane of the shell, accompanied by an additional distributed bending moment. The unknown contact force is computed by solving a mixed-boundary value problem iteratively, that is, along the crack length, either the normal displacement of the crack face at the compressive edges is equal to zero or the contact pressure is equal to zero. It is found that due to the curvature effects crack closure may not always occur on the entire length of the crack, depending on the direction of the bending load and the geometry of the shell. The crack-face closure influences significantly the magnitude of the stress intensity factors; it increases the membrane component but decreases the bending component. The maximum stress intensity factor is reduced by the crack-face closure. The significant influence of geometry and material orthotropy on rack closure behavior in shells is also predicted based on the analytical solutions. Three-dimensional FEA is performed to validate the theoretical solutions. It demonstrates that the crack face closure occurs actually over an area, not on a line, but the theoretical solutions of the stress intensity

  6. Tomato fruit continues growing while ripening, affecting cuticle properties and cracking.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Eva; Fernández, María Dolores; Hernández, Juan Carlos López; Parra, Jerónimo Pérez; España, Laura; Heredia, Antonio; Cuartero, Jesús

    2012-12-01

    Fruit cuticle composition and their mechanical performance have a special role during ripening because internal pressure is no longer sustained by the degraded cell walls of the pericarp but is directly transmitted to epidermis and cuticle which could eventually crack. We have studied fruit growth, cuticle modifications and its biomechanics, and fruit cracking in tomato; tomato has been considered a model system for studying fleshy fruit growth and ripening. Tomato fruit cracking is a major disorder that causes severe economic losses and, in cherry tomato, crack appearance is limited to the ripening process. As environmental conditions play a crucial role in fruit growing, ripening and cracking, we grow two cherry tomato cultivars in four conditions of radiation and relative humidity (RH). High RH and low radiation decreased the amount of cuticle and cuticle components accumulated. No effect of RH in cuticle biomechanics was detected. However, cracked fruits had a significantly less deformable (lower maximum strain) cuticle than non-cracked fruits. A significant and continuous fruit growth from mature green to overripe has been detected with special displacement sensors. This growth rate varied among genotypes, with cracking-sensitive genotypes showing higher growth rates than cracking-resistant ones. Environmental conditions modified this growth rate during ripening, with higher growing rates under high RH and radiation. These conditions corresponded to those that favored fruit cracking. Fruit growth rate during ripening, probably sustained by an internal turgor pressure, is a key parameter in fruit cracking, because fruits that ripened detached from the vine did not crack.

  7. The effect of prior out-of-plane damage on the in-plane behavior of unreinforced masonry infilled frames

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, R.C.; Jones, W.D.; Burdette, E.G.; Porter, M.L.

    1993-08-25

    In order to address the effect of prior out-of-plane damage on the in-plane behavior of unreinforced masonry infills, two full-scale (24 feet tall by 28 feet long) structural clay tile infills and one frame-only (no infilling) were constructed and tested. The infilled frame, consisting of two wide flange columns surrounded by masonry plasters and an eccentric wide flange purlin, was identical to many of the infills located at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The masonry infill was approximately 12.5 inches thick and was composed of individual four- and eight-inch hollow clay tile (HCT) units. One of the infill panels was tested out-of-plane by four quasi-static actuators -- two on each column. The test structure was deflected out-of-plane equally at all four actuator locations in order to simulate the computed deflection path of the top and bottom chords of a roof truss framing into the columns at these locations. Prior to the infill testing, a bare frame was loaded similarly in order to determine the behavior and stiffness contribution of the frame only. Following the out-of-plane test of the infilled panel, the structure was loaded in-plane to failure in order to ascertain residual strength. A second, identical infilled frame was then constructed and tested in-plane to failure. In this way, in-plane behavior with and without prior out-of-plane damage could be established and compared. For both out-of-plane and in-plane testing, reversed-cyclic quasi-static loading was used in order to obtain full tension/compression hystereses. Also, natural frequencies of the first infilled panel were determined before and after the out-of-plane testing. This paper describes the test series and discusses the conclusions pertinent to the effect of out-of-plane cracking on in-plane stiffness and behavior.

  8. Crack patterns over uneven substrates.

    PubMed

    Nandakishore, Pawan; Goehring, Lucas

    2016-02-28

    Cracks in thin layers are influenced by what lies beneath them. From buried craters to crocodile skin, crack patterns are found over an enormous range of length scales. Regardless of absolute size, their substrates can dramatically influence how cracks form, guiding them in some cases, or shielding regions from them in others. Here we investigate how a substrate's shape affects the appearance of cracks above it, by preparing mud cracks over sinusoidally varying surfaces. We find that as the thickness of the cracking layer increases, the observed crack patterns change from wavy to ladder-like to isotropic. Two order parameters are introduced to measure the relative alignment of these crack networks, and, along with Fourier methods, are used to characterise the transitions between crack pattern types. Finally, we explain these results with a model, based on the Griffith criteria of fracture, that identifies the conditions for which straight or wavy cracks will be seen, and predicts how well-ordered the cracks will be. Our metrics and results can be applied to any situation where connected networks of cracks are expected, or found. PMID:26762761

  9. Crack opening area estimates in pressurized through-wall cracked elbows under bending

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, C.; Gilles, P.; Pignol, M.

    1997-04-01

    One of the most important aspects in the leak-before-break approach is the estimation of the crack opening area corresponding to potential through-wall cracks at critical locations during plant operation. In order to provide a reasonable lower bound to the leak area under such loading conditions, numerous experimental and numerical programs have been developed in USA, U.K. and FRG and widely discussed in literature. This paper aims to extend these investigations on a class of pipe elbows characteristic of PWR main coolant piping. The paper is divided in three main parts. First, a new simplified estimation scheme for leakage area is described, based on the reference stress method. This approach mainly developed in U.K. and more recently in France provides a convenient way to account for the non-linear behavior of the material. Second, the method is carried out for circumferential through-wall cracks located in PWR elbows subjected to internal pressure. Finite element crack area results are presented and comparisons are made with our predictions. Finally, in the third part, the discussion is extended to elbows under combined pressure and in plane bending moment.

  10. Quantitative assessment of the surface crack density in thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Zhong, Zhi-Chun; Zhou, Yi-Chun; Lu, Chun-Sheng

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, a modified shear-lag model is developed to calculate the surface crack density in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). The mechanical properties of TBCs are also measured to quantitatively assess their surface crack density. Acoustic emission (AE) and digital image correlation methods are applied to monitor the surface cracking in TBCs under tensile loading. The results show that the calculated surface crack density from the modified model is in agreement with that obtained from experiments. The surface cracking process of TBCs can be discriminated by their AE characteristics and strain evolution. Based on the correlation of energy released from cracking and its corresponding AE signals, a linear relationship is built up between the surface crack density and AE parameters, with the slope being dependent on the mechanical properties of TBCs. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Energy dissipation associated with crack extension in an elastic-plastic material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Crack extension in elastic-plastic material involves energy dissipation through the creation of new crack surfaces and additional yielding around the crack front. An analytical procedure, using a two-dimensional elastic-plastic finite element method, was developed to calculate the energy dissipation components during a quasi-static crack extension. The fracture of an isotropic compact specimen was numerically simulated using the critical crack-tip-opening-displacement (CTOD) growth criterion. Two specimen sizes were analyzed for three values of critical CTOD. Results from the analyses showed that the total energy dissipation rate consisted of three components: the crack separation energy rate, the plastic energy dissipation rate, and the residual strain energy rate. All three energy dissipation components and the total energy dissipation rate initially increased with crack extension and finally reached constant values.

  12. Energy dissipation associated with crack extension in an elastic-plastic material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Crack extension in elastic-plastic material involves energy dissipation through the creation of new crack surfaces and additional yielding around the crack front. An analytical procedure, using a two-dimensional elastic-plastic finite element method, was developed to calculate the energy dissipation components during a quasi-static crack extension. The fracture of an isotropic compact specimen was numerically simulated using the critical crack-tip-opening-displacement (CTOD) growth criterion. Two specimen sizes were analyzed for three values of critical CTOD. Results from the analysis showed that the total energy dissipation rate consisted of three components: the crack separation energy rate, the plastic energy dissipation rate, and the residual strain energy rate. All three energy dissipation components and the total energy dissipation rate initially increased with crack extension and finally reached constant values.

  13. On the driving force for crack growth during thermal actuation of shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxevanis, T.; Parrinello, A. F.; Lagoudas, D. C.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of thermomechanically induced phase transformation on the driving force for crack growth in polycrystalline shape memory alloys is analyzed in an infinite center-cracked plate subjected to a thermal actuation cycle under mechanical load in plain strain. Finite element calculations are carried out to determine the mechanical fields near the static crack and the crack-tip energy release rate using the virtual crack closure technique. A substantial increase of the energy release rate - an order of magnitude for some material systems - is observed during the thermal cycle due to the stress redistribution induced by large scale phase transformation. Thus, phase transformation occurring due to thermal variations under mechanical load may result in crack growth if the crack-tip energy release rate reaches a material specific critical value.

  14. A Monitoring Method Based on FBG for Concrete Corrosion Cracking.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jianghong; Xu, Fangyuan; Gao, Qian; Liu, Shenglin; Jin, Weiliang; Xu, Yidong

    2016-07-14

    Corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete caused by chloride salt is one of the main determinants of structure durability. Monitoring the entire process of concrete corrosion cracking is critical for assessing the remaining life of the structure and determining if maintenance is needed. Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensing technology is extensively developed in photoelectric monitoring technology and has been used on many projects. FBG can detect the quasi-distribution of strain and temperature under corrosive environments, and thus it is suitable for monitoring reinforced concrete cracking. According to the mechanical principle that corrosion expansion is responsible for the reinforced concrete cracking, a package design of reinforced concrete cracking sensors based on FBG was proposed and investigated in this study. The corresponding relationship between the grating wavelength and strain was calibrated by an equal strength beam test. The effectiveness of the proposed method was verified by an electrically accelerated corrosion experiment. The fiber grating sensing technology was able to track the corrosion expansion and corrosion cracking in real time and provided data to inform decision-making for the maintenance and management of the engineering structure.

  15. A Monitoring Method Based on FBG for Concrete Corrosion Cracking

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jianghong; Xu, Fangyuan; Gao, Qian; Liu, Shenglin; Jin, Weiliang; Xu, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete caused by chloride salt is one of the main determinants of structure durability. Monitoring the entire process of concrete corrosion cracking is critical for assessing the remaining life of the structure and determining if maintenance is needed. Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensing technology is extensively developed in photoelectric monitoring technology and has been used on many projects. FBG can detect the quasi-distribution of strain and temperature under corrosive environments, and thus it is suitable for monitoring reinforced concrete cracking. According to the mechanical principle that corrosion expansion is responsible for the reinforced concrete cracking, a package design of reinforced concrete cracking sensors based on FBG was proposed and investigated in this study. The corresponding relationship between the grating wavelength and strain was calibrated by an equal strength beam test. The effectiveness of the proposed method was verified by an electrically accelerated corrosion experiment. The fiber grating sensing technology was able to track the corrosion expansion and corrosion cracking in real time and provided data to inform decision-making for the maintenance and management of the engineering structure. PMID:27428972

  16. A Monitoring Method Based on FBG for Concrete Corrosion Cracking.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jianghong; Xu, Fangyuan; Gao, Qian; Liu, Shenglin; Jin, Weiliang; Xu, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete caused by chloride salt is one of the main determinants of structure durability. Monitoring the entire process of concrete corrosion cracking is critical for assessing the remaining life of the structure and determining if maintenance is needed. Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensing technology is extensively developed in photoelectric monitoring technology and has been used on many projects. FBG can detect the quasi-distribution of strain and temperature under corrosive environments, and thus it is suitable for monitoring reinforced concrete cracking. According to the mechanical principle that corrosion expansion is responsible for the reinforced concrete cracking, a package design of reinforced concrete cracking sensors based on FBG was proposed and investigated in this study. The corresponding relationship between the grating wavelength and strain was calibrated by an equal strength beam test. The effectiveness of the proposed method was verified by an electrically accelerated corrosion experiment. The fiber grating sensing technology was able to track the corrosion expansion and corrosion cracking in real time and provided data to inform decision-making for the maintenance and management of the engineering structure. PMID:27428972

  17. Scaling and universality in real cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Daguier, P.; Bouchaud, E.

    1996-12-01

    The morphology of fracture surfaces in complex metallic alloys is analyzed. The simultaneous use of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) allows the measurement of the universal roughness exponent {zeta}{sub {perpendicular}} = 0.78 over five decades of lengthscales (0.5 nm--0.5 mm). Furthermore, a small lengthscales regime (1 nm--11 {micro}m) is shown to be characterized by a roughness index {zeta}{sub {perpendicular}Qs} {approx_equal} 0.5. On the other hand, cracks fronts stopped during their propagation at pinning microstructural obstacles in two different metallic alloys is analyzed, and their in-plane roughness index is determined for the first time. In the case of the 8090 Al-Li alloy, which has a very anisotropic microstructure, the roughness of the tensile crack front propagating along the grains length is equal to {zeta} {approx_equal} 0.60. On the other hand, the roughness of the purely three-dimensional fatigue crack front in the Super{alpha}{sub 2} Ti{sub 3}Al-based alloy is equal to {zeta} {approx_equal} 0.54.

  18. Fourier plane imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, Daniel Peralta, Luis Grave de; Alharbi, Nouf; Alhusain, Mdhaoui; Bernussi, Ayrton A.

    2014-09-14

    We show how the image of an unresolved photonic crystal can be reconstructed using a single Fourier plane (FP) image obtained with a second camera that was added to a traditional compound microscope. We discuss how Fourier plane imaging microscopy is an application of a remarkable property of the obtained FP images: they contain more information about the photonic crystals than the images recorded by the camera commonly placed at the real plane of the microscope. We argue that the experimental results support the hypothesis that surface waves, contributing to enhanced resolution abilities, were optically excited in the studied photonic crystals.

  19. Modeling the effective elastic behavior of a transversely cracked laminated composite

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D.J.; Wetherhold, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    The solution for the stress state present in the vicinity of transverse matrix cracks within a composite laminate is typically obtained by assuming a regular crack spacing geometry for the problem and applying a shear-lag analysis. In order to explore the validity of this underlying assumption, the probability density function for the location of the next transverse matrix crack within a crack bounded region is examined. The regular crack spacing assumption is shown to be reasonable from an engineering point of view. Continuing with this assumption, a generalized shear-lag model for multilayer, off-axis laminates subjected to full in-plane loads is developed. This model is used to quantitatively evaluate the effective elastic properties of the damaged material. The results are applicable to materials such as ceramic matrix or polymer matrix unidirectional fiber systems where damage in the form of transverse matrix cracks arises.

  20. Local delamination in laminates with angle ply matrix cracks. Part 1: Tension tests and stress analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin; Hooper, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    Quasi-static tension tests were conducted on AS4/3501-6 graphite epoxy laminates. Dye penetrant enhanced x-radiography was used to document the onset of matrix cracking and the onset of local delaminations at the intersection of the matrix cracks and the free edge. Edge micrographs taken after the onset of damage were used to verify the location of the matrix cracks and local delamination through the laminate thickness. A quasi-3D finite element analysis was conducted to calculate the stresses responsible for matrix cracking in the off-axis plies. Laminated plate theory indicated that the transverse normal stresses were compressive. However, the finite element analysis yielded tensile transverse normal stresses near the free edge. Matrix cracks formed in the off-axis plies near the free edge where in-plane transverse stresses were tensile and had their greatest magnitude. The influence of the matrix crack on interlaminar stresses is also discussed.

  1. Crack Front Segmentation and Facet Coarsening in Mixed-Mode Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Hung; Cambonie, Tristan; Lazarus, Veronique; Nicoli, Matteo; Pons, Antonio J.; Karma, Alain

    2015-12-01

    A planar crack generically segments into an array of "daughter cracks" shaped as tilted facets when loaded with both a tensile stress normal to the crack plane (mode I) and a shear stress parallel to the crack front (mode III). We investigate facet propagation and coarsening using in situ microscopy observations of fracture surfaces at different stages of quasistatic mixed-mode crack propagation and phase-field simulations. The results demonstrate that the bifurcation from propagating a planar to segmented crack front is strongly subcritical, reconciling previous theoretical predictions of linear stability analysis with experimental observations. They further show that facet coarsening is a self-similar process driven by a spatial period-doubling instability of facet arrays.

  2. Thermal-mechanical fatigue crack growth in aircraft engine materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Yi

    1993-08-01

    This thesis summarizes the major technical achievements obtained as a part of a collaborative research and development project between Ecole Polytechnique and Pratt & Whitney Canada. These achievements include: (1) a thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF) testing rig which is capable of studying the fatigue behaviors of gas turbine materials under simultaneous changes of temperatures and strains or stress; (2) an advanced alternative current potential drop (ACPD) measurement system which is capable of performing on-line monitoring of fatigue crack initiation and growth in specimen testing under isothermal and TMF conditions; (3) fatigue crack initiation and short crack growth data for the titanium specimens designed with notch features associated with bolt holes of compressor discs; (4) thermal-mechanical fatigue crack growth data for two titanium alloys being used in PWC engine components, which explained the material fatigue behavior encountered in full-scale component testing; (5) a complete fractographic analysis for the tested specimens which enhanced the understanding of the fatigue crack growth mechanisms and helped to establish an analytical crack growth model; and (6) application of the ACPD fatigue crack monitoring technique to single tooth firtree specimen (STFT) LCF testing of PWA 1480 single crystal alloy. Finally, a comprehensive discussion concerning the results pertaining to this research project is presented.

  3. Thermal-mechanical fatigue crack growth in aircraft engine materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Yi

    1993-05-01

    A thermal mechanical fatigue (TMF) testing rig was built which is capable of studying the fatigue behaviors of gas turbine engine materials under simultaneous changes of temperatures and strains or stress. An advance alternating current potential drop (ACPD) measurement system was also developed which is capable of performing on-line monitoring of fatigue crack initiation and growth in specimen testing under isothermal and TMF conditions. Fatigue crack initiation and short crack growth data were obtained for titanium alloy specimens designed with notch features associated with bolt holes of compressor discs. TMF data were also obtained for two titanium alloys used in aircraft engine components. Those data explained the material fatigue behavior encountered in full-scale component testing. A complete fractographic analysis was performed on the tested specimens enhancing the understanding of the fatigue crack growth mechanisms and helping to formulate an analytical crack growth model. The ACPD fatigue crack monitoring technique was applied to the low cycle fatigue testing of Pratt & Whitney 1480 monocrystalline nickel alloy. A completely automated, computer controlled test procedure was developed which could obtain crack initiation and growth data with greater speed, precision, and reliability than previous methods.

  4. Smart sensing skin for detection and localization of fatigue cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharroub, Sari; Laflamme, Simon; Song, Chunhui; Qiao, Daji; Phares, Brent; Li, Jian

    2015-06-01

    Fatigue cracks on steel components may have strong consequences on the structure’s serviceability and strength. Their detection and localization is a difficult task. Existing technologies enabling structural health monitoring have a complex link signal-to-damage or have economic barriers impeding large-scale deployment. A solution is to develop sensing methods that are inexpensive, scalable, with signals that can directly relate to damage. The authors have recently proposed a smart sensing skin for structural health monitoring applications to mesosystems. The sensor is a thin film soft elastomeric capacitor (SEC) that transduces strain into a measurable change in capacitance. Arranged in a network configuration, the SEC would have the capacity to detect and localize damage by detecting local deformation over a global surface, analogous to biological skin. In this paper, the performance of the SEC at detecting and localizing fatigue cracks in steel structures is investigated. Fatigue cracks are induced in steel specimens equipped with SECs, and data measured continuously. Test results show that the fatigue crack can be detected at an early stage. The smallest detectable crack length and width are 27.2 and 0.254 mm, respectively, and the average detectable crack length and width are 29.8 and 0.432 mm, respectively. Results also show that, when used in a network configuration, only the sensor located over the formed fatigue crack detect the damage, thus validating the capacity of the SEC at damage localization.

  5. Residual strain change resulting from stress corrosion in Carrara marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigtlaender, Anne; Leith, Kerry; Krautblatter, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Residual stresses and strains have been shown to play a fundamental role in determining the elastic behavior of engineering materials, yet the effect of these strains on brittle and elastic behavior of rocks remains unclear. In order to evaluate the impact of stored elastic strains on fracture propagation in rock, we undertook a four-month-long three-point bending test on three large 1100 x 100 x 100 mm Carrara Marble samples. This test induced stable low stress conditions in which strains were concentrated at the tip of a saw cut and pre-cracked notch. A corrosive environment was created at the tip of the notch on two samples (M2 and M4) by dripping calcite saturated water (pH ~ 7.5-8). Sample M5 was loaded in the same way, but kept dry. Samples were unloaded prior to failure, and along with an additional non-loaded reference sample (M0), cored into cylindrical subsamples (ø = 50 mm, h = 100 mm) before being tested for changes in residual elastic strains at the SALSA neutron diffractometer at the Institute Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble, France. Three diffraction peaks corresponding to crystallographic planes hkl (110), (104) and (006) were measured in all three spatial directions relative to the notch. Shifts in the diffraction peak position (d) with respect to a strain free state are indicative of intergranular strain, while changes in the width of the peak (FWHM) reflect changes in intragranular strain. We observe distinctly different patterns in residual and volumetric strains in hkℓ (104) and (006) for the dry M5 and wet tested samples (M2 and M4) indicating the presence of water changes the deformation mechanism, while (110) is strained in compression around 200 μstrain in all samples. A broadening of the diffraction peaks (006) and (110) in front of the crack tip is observed in M2 and M4, while M5 shows no changes in the peak width throughout the depth of the sample. We suggest water present at the crack tip increased the rate of corrosion, allowing a

  6. Nanometer voids prevent crack growth in polymer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Hideaki; Dutriez, Cedric; Satoh, Kotaro; Kamigaito, Masami

    2007-03-01

    Macroscopic voids initiate cracks and cause catastrophic failure in brittle materials. The effect of micrometer voids in the mechanical properties of polymeric materials was studied in 1980's and 90's with the expectation that such small voids may initiate crazing, the toughening mechanism in polymer solids, similar to dispersed rubber particles widely used in industry. However, the micrometer voids showed only limited resistance against crack growth, and it was concluded that much smaller voids are necessary for the drastic change in mechanical properties. We have recently succeeded the nondestructive introduction of nanometer voids (30--70 nm) in polymeric materials using block copolymer template and carbon dioxide (CO2) by partitioning CO2 in CO2-philic nanodomains of block copolymers. The reduction of Young's modulus with such nanometer voids was minimal (2 to 1 GPa) due to the (short-range) ordered spherical voids. While the unprocessed copolymer films failed in brittle manner at around 2 % of tensile strain, the processed copolymer films with nanometer voids did not break up to at least 60 %. A microscopic observation under strain of the crack tip revealed that the nanometer voids were deformed under strain and directly converted into the networked fibrils near the crack tip similar to crazing and thus prevented the crack growth.

  7. [Monitoring of Crack Propagation in Repaired Structures Based on Characteristics of FBG Sensors Reflecting Spectra].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shen-fang; Jin, Xin; Qiu, Lei; Huang, Hong-mei

    2015-03-01

    In order to improve the security of aircraft repaired structures, a method of crack propagation monitoring in repaired structures is put forward basing on characteristics of Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) reflecting spectra in this article. With the cyclic loading effecting on repaired structure, cracks propagate, while non-uniform strain field appears nearby the tip of crack which leads to the FBG sensors' reflecting spectra deformations. The crack propagating can be monitored by extracting the characteristics of FBG sensors' reflecting spectral deformations. A finite element model (FEM) of the specimen is established. Meanwhile, the distributions of strains which are under the action of cracks of different angles and lengths are obtained. The characteristics, such as main peak wavelength shift, area of reflecting spectra, second and third peak value and so on, are extracted from the FBGs' reflecting spectral which are calculated by transfer matrix algorithm. An artificial neural network is built to act as the model between the characteristics of the reflecting spectral and the propagation of crack. As a result, the crack propagation of repaired structures is monitored accurately and the error of crack length is less than 0.5 mm, the error of crack angle is less than 5 degree. The accurately monitoring problem of crack propagation of repaired structures is solved by taking use of this method. It has important significance in aircrafts safety improvement and maintenance cost reducing.

  8. Modeling Transverse Cracking in Laminates With a Single Layer of Elements Per Ply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Der Meer, Frans P.; Davila, Carlos G.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present paper is to investigate the ability of mesolevel X-FEM models with a single layer of elements per ply to capture accurately all aspects of matrix cracking. In particular, we examine whether the model can predict the insitu ply thickness effect on crack initiation and propagation, the crack density as a function of strain, the strain for crack saturation, and the interaction between delamination and transverse cracks. Results reveal that the simplified model does not capture correctly the shear-lag relaxation of the stress field on either side of a crack, which leads to an overprediction of the crack density. It is also shown, however, that after onset of delamination many of the inserted matrix cracks close again, and that the density of open cracks becomes similar to the density predicted by the detailed model. The degree to which the spurious cracks affect the global response is quantified and the reliability of the mesolevel approach with a single layer of elements per ply is discussed.

  9. Fixed sagittal plane imbalance.

    PubMed

    Savage, Jason W; Patel, Alpesh A

    2014-12-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective To discuss the evaluation and management of fixed sagittal plane imbalance. Methods A comprehensive literature review was performed on the preoperative evaluation of patients with sagittal plane malalignment, as well as the surgical strategies to address sagittal plane deformity. Results Sagittal plane imbalance is often caused by de novo scoliosis or iatrogenic flat back deformity. Understanding the etiology and magnitude of sagittal malalignment is crucial in realignment planning. Objective parameters have been developed to guide surgeons in determining how much correction is needed to achieve favorable outcomes. Currently, the goals of surgery are to restore a sagittal vertical axis < 5 cm, pelvic tilt < 20 degrees, and lumbar lordosis equal to pelvic incidence ± 9 degrees. Conclusion Sagittal plane malalignment is an increasingly recognized cause of pain and disability. Treatment of sagittal plane imbalance varies according to the etiology, location, and severity of the deformity. Fixed sagittal malalignment often requires complex reconstructive procedures that include osteotomy correction. Reestablishing harmonious spinopelvic alignment is associated with significant improvement in health-related quality-of-life outcome measures and patient satisfaction.

  10. Fracture Analysis of a Functionally Graded Two-Layer Strip with a Surface Crack Intersecting the Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Licheng; Noda, Naotake

    2008-02-15

    The crack problem for a functionally graded two-layer strip under an in-plane load is investigated. The functionally graded layer is assumed to contain a surface crack intersecting the interface. An auxiliary function related to two layers is used. By using integral transform methods, the singular integral equation is obtained. The parameter influences on the stress intensity factors (SIFs) are studied.

  11. 2. VIEW SOUTH, INCLINE PLANE CAR, INCLINE PLANE TRACK, UPPER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTH, INCLINE PLANE CAR, INCLINE PLANE TRACK, UPPER STATION. - Monongahela Incline Plane, Connecting North side of Grandview Avenue at Wyoming Street with West Carson Street near Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  12. Cracked and Pitted Plain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-536, 6 November 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a typical view--at 1.5 meters (5 feet) per pixel--of surfaces in far western Utopia Planitia. In this region, the plains have developed cracks and pit chains arranged in a polygonal pattern. The pits form by collapse along the trend of a previously-formed crack. This picture is located near 45.0oN, 275.4oW. This April 2003 image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  13. Upgrading of cracking gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.; Ragonese, F.P.; Yurchak, S.

    1990-08-21

    This patent describes an integrated catalytic cracking and gasoline upgrading process. It comprises: withdrawing a product stream from the riser reactor of a catalytic cracking process unit; charging the product stream to a primary fractionation zone; withdrawing an intermediate gasoline stream from the primary fractionation zone, the intermediate gasoline stream comprising olefinic gasoline having an ASTM D86 boiling range from about 90{degrees} to about 170{degrees} C.; contacting a first portion of the intermediate gasoline stream and a C{sub 2}{minus}C{sub 5} olefinic stream with a catalyst under conversion conditions to form an upgraded gasoline stream; and charging a second portion of the intermediate gasoline stream together with the upgraded gasoline stream to a gasoline product storage facility.

  14. Subcritical crack growth at bimaterial interfaces. Part 3: Shear-enhanced fatigue crack growth resistance at polymer/metal interface

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Shang, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth along an Al/epoxy interface was examined under different combinations of mode-I and mode-II loadings using the flexural peel technique. Fatigue crack growth rates were obtained as a function of the total strain energy rate for G{sub II}/G{sub I} ratios of 0.3 to 1.4, achieved by varying the relative thickness of the outerlayers for the flexural peel specimen. Fatigue crack growth resistance of the interface was found to increase with increasing G{sub II}/G{sub I} ratio. Such a shear-enhanced crack growth resistance of the interface resulted in a gradual transition of crack growth mechanism from interfacial at the low G{sub II}/G{sub I} ratio to cohesive at the high G{sub II}/G{sub I} ratio. Under predominantly mode-I loading, the damage in the polymer took the form of crazing and cavitation. In contrast, laminar shear occurred under highly shear loading, resulting in a larger amount of plastic dissipation at the crack tip and improved fatigue crack growth resistance.

  15. In-situ SEM investigation of sub-microscale deformation fields around a crack-tip in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. J.; Zhao, C. W.; Xing, Y. M.; Hou, X. H.; Fan, Z. C.; Jin, Y. J.; Wang, Y.

    2012-12-01

    A combination of in-situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and geometric phase analysis (GPA) was used to study the deformation fields around a crack-tip in single-crystal silicon under uniaxial tensile load. The sub-microscale silicon pillars grating was fabricated using holographic lithography followed by inductively coupled plasma etching. A series of SEM images of dynamic crack with the sub-microscale grating were obtained during tensile testing. The strain fields around the crack-tip were mapped by GPA. The strain fields were compared with the linear elastic fracture mechanics solutions. It was determined that the deformation is performed around the crack-tip area. The normal strain εxx and shear strain εxy are nearly zero, and the strain fields are dominated by the normal strain εyy component. With the increase of displacement load, the crack propagated mainly along the [010] crystal direction and the strains around the crack-tip increased gradually. It is noted that the theoretical prediction is lower than the experimental results from 0 to 2 μm ahead of the crack-tip. However, the agreement between experimental results and theoretical prediction is very good far from the crack-tip (>2 μm).

  16. Replica-based Crack Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Piascik, R. S.; Willard, Scott A.; Dawicke, David S.

    2007-01-01

    A surface replica-based crack inspection method has recently been developed for use in Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) hydrogen feedline flowliners. These flowliners exist to ensure favorable flow of liquid hydrogen over gimble joint bellows, and consist of two rings each containing 38 elongated slots. In the summer of 2002, multiple cracks ranging from 0.1 inches to 0.6 inches long were discovered; each orbiter contained at least one cracked flowliner. These long cracks were repaired and eddy current inspections ensured that no cracks longer than 0.075 inches were present. However, subsequent fracture-mechanics review of flight rationale required detection of smaller cracks, and was the driving force for development of higher-resolution inspection method. Acetate tape surface replicas have been used for decades to detect and monitor small cracks. However, acetate tape replicas have primarily been limited to laboratory specimens because complexities involved in making these replicas - requiring acetate tape to be dissolved with acetone - are not well suited for a crack inspection tool. More recently developed silicon-based replicas are better suited for use as a crack detection tool. A commercially available silicon-based replica product has been determined to be acceptable for use in SSME hydrogen feedlines. A method has been developed using this product and a scanning electron microscope for analysis, which can find cracks as small as 0.005 inches and other features (e.g., pits, scratches, tool marks, etc.) as small as 0.001 inches. The resolution of this method has been validated with dozens of cracks generated in a laboratory setting and this method has been used to locate 55 cracks (ranging in size from 0.040 inches to 0.004 inches) on space flight hardware. These cracks were removed by polishing away the cracked material and a second round of replicas confirmed the repair.

  17. Utopia Cracks and Polygons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-339, 23 April 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a pattern of polygonal cracks and aligned, elliptical pits in western Utopia Planitia. The picture covers an area about 3 km (about 1.9 mi) wide near 44.9oN, 274.7oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  18. Subcritical crack growth in marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nara, Yoshitaka; Nishida, Yuki; Toshinori, Ii; Harui, Tomoki; Tanaka, Mayu; Kashiwaya, Koki

    2016-04-01

    It is essential to study time-dependent deformation and fracturing in various rock materials to prevent natural hazards related to the failure of a rock mass. In addition, information of time-dependent fracturing is essential to ensure the long-term stability of a rock mass surrounding various structures. Subcritical crack growth is one of the main causes of time-dependent fracturing in rock. It is known that subcritical crack growth is influenced by not only stress but also surrounding environment. Studies of subcritical crack growth have been widely conducted for silicate rocks such as igneous rocks and sandstones. By contrast, information of subcritical crack growth in carbonate rocks is not enough. Specifically, influence of surrounding environment on subcritical crack growth in carbonate rock should be clarified to ensure the long-term stability of a rock mass. In this study, subcritical crack growth in marble was investigated. Especially, the influence of the temperature, relative humidity and water on subcritical crack growth in marble is investigated. As rock samples, marbles obtained in Skopje-City in Macedonia and Carrara-City in Italy were used. To measure subcritical crack growth, we used the load relaxation method of the double-torsion (DT) test. All measurements by DT test were conducted under controlled temperature and relative humidity. For both marbles, it was shown that the crack velocity in marble in air increased with increasing relative humidity at a constant temperature. Additionally, the crack velocity in water was much higher than that in air. It was also found that the crack velocity increased with increasing temperature. It is considered that temperature and water have significant influences on subcritical crack growth in marble. For Carrara marble in air, it was recognized that the value of subcritical crack growth index became low when the crack velocity was higher than 10-4 m/s. This is similar to Region II of subcritical crack growth

  19. Fracture analysis of multi-site cracking in fuselage lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuth, J. L.; Hutchinson, J. W.

    1994-09-01

    A two-dimensional plane stress elastic fracture mechanics analysis of a cracked lap joint fastened by rigid pins is presented and results are applied to the problem of multi-site damage (MSD) in riveted lap joints of aircraft fuselage skins. Two problems are addressed, the problem of equal length MSD cracks and the problem of alternating length MSD cracks. For the problem of equal length cracks, two models of rivet/skin interactions are studied and the role of residual stresses due to the riveting process is explored. Stress intensity factors are obtained as a function of normalized crack length. Also, the load distribution among rivet rows and the compliance change of the joint due to MSD cracking are obtained. For the problem of alternating length cracks, attention is focussed on how load is distributed between columns of rivets and how this load shedding can alter crack tip stress intensity factors. The equal and alternating length crack analyses reveal no clear-cut mechanism to explain the relative uniformity of fatigue cracks emerging from lap joint rivet holes in actual aircraft and in mechanical lap joint tests.

  20. Investigating Reaction-Driven Cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Hirth, G.; Savage, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    for constant volume replacement. Natural examples have fracture energy densities due to strain energy density of 100's of MPa [2]. Despite theory and observation, until now lab experiments on peridotite hydration and carbonation have not produced reaction-driven cracking. Slow kinetics and limited reactive surface area in low porosity samples may be the cause. Also, maximum stress may be limited by 'disjoining pressure', above which nano-films along grain boundaries collapse, and crystal growth essentially ceases [7]. To address these issues, we've begun experiments on analog materials with fast reaction rates, e.g., CaO + H2O = Ca(OH)2, to efficiently investigate the role of confining pressure and other factors on reaction-driven fracture events. Intriguingly, commercially available 'demolition mortar', largely CaO, produces stresses of 70 MPa or more around 1 inch bore holes at room T and P [8], even though there is a free surface at the top of the borehole, and hydration in a 'closed' system creates ~ 40% air-filled pore space. [1] Jamtveit et al EPSL 08 [2] Kelemen & Hirth EPSL 12 [3] Kelemen et al AREPS 11 [4] Aharonov et al JGR 98 [5] Fletcher & Merino GCA 01 [6] Macdonald & Fyfe T'phys 85 [7] Espinosa-Marzal & Scherer GSL Special Papers 10 [8] Laefer et al Mag Concrete Res 10

  1. Friction in unconforming grain contacts as a mechanism for tensorial stress strain hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleshin, V.; Van Den Abeele, K.

    2007-04-01

    Materials composed of consolidated grains and/or containing internal contacts are widespread in everyday life (e.g. rocks, geomaterials, concretes, slates, ceramics, composites, etc.). For any simulation of the elastic behavior of this class of solids, be it in seismology, in NDT, or in the modeling of building constructions, the stress-strain constitutive equations are indispensable. Since the most common loading patterns in nature considerably deviate from simple uniaxial compression, the problem of tensorial stress-strain representation arises. In simple loading cases it may be sufficient to use a phenomenological constitutive model. However, in a more general case, phenomenological approaches encounter serious difficulties due to the high number of unknown parameters and the complexity of the model itself. Simplification of the phenomenology can help only partly, since it may require artificial assumptions. For instance, is it enough just to link the volumetric stress to the volumetric strain, or do we have to include shear components as well, and if yes, in what form? We therefore propose a physical tensorial stress-strain model, based on the consideration of plane cracks with friction. To do this, we combine known relations for normal displacements of crack faces given by contact mechanics, the classical Amonton's law of dry friction for lateral displacements, and the equations of elasticity theory for a collection of non-interacting cracks with given orientation. The major advantages of this model consist in the full tensorial representation, the realistic stress-strain curves for uniaxial stress compression and quantitative comparison with experimental data, and a profound account for hysteretic memory effects.

  2. Prediction of Shear-induced Crack Initiation in AHSS Deep Drawing Operation with a Phenomenological Fracture Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Meng; Li, Yaning; Gerlach, Joerg; Wierzbicki, Tomasz

    2010-06-01

    Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) draws enormous attentions in automotive industry because it has great potential in reducing weight and improving fuel efficiency. Nonetheless, their relatively low formability also causes many problems in manufacturing processes, such as shear-induced fracture during deep drawing or stamping. This type of fracture could not be predicted using traditional necking-based Forming Limit Diagram (FLD), which is commonly used by the forming community. In the present paper, a recently developed Modified Mohr-Coulomb (MMC)[1] ductile fracture model is employed to make up the deficiency of FLD. In the limiting case of plane stress, the MMC fracture locus consists of four branches when represented on the plane of the equivalent strain to fracture and the stress triaxiality. A transformation of above 2D fracture locus to the space of principal strains was performed which revealed the existence of two new branches not known before. The existence of those branches explains the formation of shear-induced fracture. As an illustration of this new approach, initiation and propagation of cracks in a series of deep drawing tests is predicted and compared with the experimental observations. It was shown that the location of fracture as well as the magnitude of punch travel corresponding to first fracture was correctly predicted by MMC fracture model for both square and circular punch cases.

  3. Prediction of early-age shrinkage cracking in concrete elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, William Jason

    1999-11-01

    When concrete is prevented from shrinking freely, tensile stresses develop which frequently result in cracking. Cracks in reinforced concrete structures reduce overall durability by allowing the penetration of water and aggressive agents, thereby accelerating the deterioration of the reinforcing steel. Highway pavements, bridge decks, and industrial floors are especially susceptible to this type of deterioration since these structures exhibit high rates of shrinkage and are frequently exposed to aggressive environmental conditions. The objectives of this investigation included the development of experimental procedures for assessing shrinkage cracking potential, the evaluation of mix composition on shrinkage cracking potential, and the development of theoretical models to simulate early-age cracking behavior. Specifically, the influence of a shrinkage-reducing admixture (SRA) was investigated. The shrinkage-reducing admixture substantially reduces free shrinkage and restrained shrinkage cracking while providing similar mechanical properties. An experimental procedure was developed in which a pressurized cylindrical specimen was used to assess tensile creep. Electrical properties were investigated using impedance spectroscopy to evaluate the moisture profiles of drying and wetting concrete. Restrained shrinkage experiments were developed and shrinkage cracking was shown to be size/geometry dependent, even though shrinkage strains and residual stress levels were comparable. A fracture mechanics modeling approach was developed to predict the behavior of a variety of restrained concrete specimens. This modeling approach was used to successfully explain experimental results from a variety of mixture compositions and specimen geometries. The model was used to demonstrate the influence of material and structural properties on the potential for cracking. A favorable correlation was observed between the predictions of the fracture-based model and the experimentally observed

  4. Improved load ratio method for predicting crack length

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Albrecht, P.; Wright, W.; Joyce, J.A.

    1995-04-01

    The elastic compliance from unloading/reloading sequences in a load-displacement record estimates well crack length in elastic-plastic fracture toughness tests of compact tension [C(T)] and bending type specimens. The need for partial unloading of the specimen makes it difficult to run the test under static loading and impossible under either dynamic loading or very high temperatures. Furthermore, fracture toughness testing in which crack length is determined from elastic compliance requires high precision testing equipment and highly skilled technicians. As a result, such tests are confined usually to research laboratories and seldom used under production settings. To eliminate these problems, an improved load ratio method of predicting crack length is proposed that utilizes only the recorded load versus load-line displacement curve (or load versus crack-mouth-opening displacement curve) without unloading/reloading sequences. As a result, the instrumentation is much simpler than in the elastic compliance or potential drop methods. If only a monotonic load-displacement record is to be measured the fracture toughness test becomes almost as simple to perform as a tension test. The method described here improves in three ways the ``original load ratio method`` proposed by Hu et al. First, a blunting term is added to the crack length before maximum load. Second, a strain hardening correction is included after maximum load. And, third, the initial crack length and the physical (final) crack length measured at the end of the test serve to anchor the predicted crack lengths, forcing agreement between predicted and measured values. The method predicts crack extension with excellent accuracy in specimens fabricated from A302, A508, and A533B piping and pressure vessel steels, A588 and A572 structural steels, and HY-80 ship steel.

  5. A three-dimensional quantitative understanding of short fatigue crack growth in high strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Wei

    The behaviors of short fatigue crack (SFC) propagation through grain boundaries (GBs) were monitored during high cycle fatigue in an Al-Li alloy AA8090. The growth behaviors of SFCs were found to be mainly controlled by the twist components (alpha) of crack plane deflection across each of up to first 20 GBs along the crack path. The crack plane twist at the GB can result in a resistance against SFC growth; therefore SFC propagation preferred to follow a path with minimum alpha at each GB. In addition to the grain orientation, the tilting of GB could also affect alpha. An experiment focusing on quantifying GB-resistance was conducted on an Al-Cu alloy AA2024-T351. With a focused ion beam (FIB) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), the micro-notches were made in front of the selected GBs which had a wide range of alpha, followed by monitoring the interaction of crack propagation from the notches with the GBs during fatigue. The crack growth rate was observed to decrease at each GB it had passed; and such growth-rate decrease was proportional to alpha. The resistance of the GB was determined to vary as a Weibull-type function of alpha. Based on these discoveries, a microstructure-based 3-D model was developed to quantify the SFC growth in high-strength Al alloys, allowing the prediction of crack front advancement in 3-D and the quantification of growth rate along the crack front. The simulation results yielded a good agreement with the experimental results about the SFC growth rate on the surface of the AA8090 Al alloy. The model was also used to predict the life of SFC growth statistically in different textures, showing potential application to texture design of alloys. Fatigue crack initiation at constituent particles (beta-phase) was preliminarily studied in the AA2024-T351 Al alloy. Cross-sectioning with the FIB revealed that the 3-D geometry, especially the thickness, of fractured constituent particles (beta-phase) was the key factor controlling the

  6. Investigation of Cracks Found in Helicopter Longerons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Baughman, James M.; Wallace, Terryl A.

    2009-01-01

    Four cracked longerons, containing a total of eight cracks, were provided for study. Cracked regions were cut from the longerons. Load was applied to open the cracks, enabling crack surface examination. Examination revealed that crack propagation was driven by fatigue loading in all eight cases. Fatigue crack initiation appears to have occurred on the top edge of the longerons near geometric changes that affect component bending stiffness. Additionally, metallurigical analysis has revealed a local depletion in alloying elements in the crack initiation regions that may be a contributing factor. Fatigue crack propagation appeared to be initially driven by opening-mode loading, but at a crack length of approximately 0.5 inches (12.7 mm), there is evidence of mixed-mode crack loading. For the longest cracks studied, shear-mode displacements destroyed crack-surface features of interest over significant portions of the crack surfaces.

  7. Crack toughness evaluation of hot pressed and forged beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. H.; Bubsey, R. T.; Brown, W. F., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Beryllium fracture toughness test specimens were fatigue cracked using reversed cycling with a compression load two to three times the tension load. In worked beryllium, textures may be produced which result in fatigue cracks that are out of plane with the starter notch. Specimens of hot pressed stock exhibited load displacement records which were nonlinear throughout their course. Fracture specimens of both hot pressed and forged stock showed essentially no reduction of thickness and the fracture surfaces were flat and normal to the load axis. However, the stress intensity factor at maximum load increased with decreasing thickness. Load-displacement and electric potential records for the hot pressed beryllium specimens exhibited several anomalies such as negative residual crack mouth displacements and a decrease in electrical potential with increasing load.

  8. Interface crack between different orthotropic media under uniform heat flow.

    PubMed

    Ding, Sheng-Hu; Li, Xing

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, plane thermo-elastic solutions are presented for the problem of a crack in two bonded homogeneous orthotropic media with a graded interfacial zone. The graded interfacial zone is treated as a nonhomogeneous interlayer having spatially varying thermo-elastic moduli between dissimilar, homogeneous orthotropic half-planes, which is assumed to vary exponentially in the direction perpendicular to the crack surface. Using singular integral equation method, the mixed boundary value conditions with respect to the temperature field and those with respect to the stress field are reduced to a system of singular integral equations and solved numerically. Numerical results are obtained to show the influence of non-homogeneity parameters of the material thermo-elastic properties, the orthotropy parameters and the dimensionless thermal resistance on the temperature distribution and the thermal stress intensity factors.

  9. Interface crack between different orthotropic media under uniform heat flow.

    PubMed

    Ding, Sheng-Hu; Li, Xing

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, plane thermo-elastic solutions are presented for the problem of a crack in two bonded homogeneous orthotropic media with a graded interfacial zone. The graded interfacial zone is treated as a nonhomogeneous interlayer having spatially varying thermo-elastic moduli between dissimilar, homogeneous orthotropic half-planes, which is assumed to vary exponentially in the direction perpendicular to the crack surface. Using singular integral equation method, the mixed boundary value conditions with respect to the temperature field and those with respect to the stress field are reduced to a system of singular integral equations and solved numerically. Numerical results are obtained to show the influence of non-homogeneity parameters of the material thermo-elastic properties, the orthotropy parameters and the dimensionless thermal resistance on the temperature distribution and the thermal stress intensity factors. PMID:27652063

  10. On the Crack Bifurcation and Fanning of Crack Growth Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Zanganeh, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Crack growth data obtained from ASTM load shedding method for different R values show some fanning especially for aluminum alloys. It is believed by the authors and it has been shown before that the observed fanning is due to the crack bifurcation occurs in the near threshold region which is a function of intrinsic properties of the alloy. Therefore, validity of the ASTM load shedding test procedure and results is confirmed. However, this position has been argued by some experimentalists who believe the fanning is an artifact of the test procedure and thus the obtained results are invalid. It has been shown that using a special test procedure such as using compressively pre-cracked specimens will eliminate the fanning effect. Since not using the fanned data fit can result in a significantly lower calculated cyclic life, design of a component, particularly for rotorcraft and propeller systems will considerably be impacted and therefore this study is of paramount importance. In this effort both test procedures i.e. ASTM load shedding and the proposed compressive pre-cracking have been used to study the fatigue crack growth behavior of compact tension specimens made of aluminum alloy 2524-T3. Fatigue crack growth paths have been closely observed using SEM machines to investigate the effects of compression pre-cracking on the crack bifurcation behavior. The results of this study will shed a light on resolving the existing argument by better understanding of near threshold fatigue crack growth behavior.

  11. Grain boundary chemistry effects on environment-induced crack growth of iron-based alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.

    1992-11-01

    Relation between grain boundary chemistry and environment-induced crack growth of Fe-based alloys is reviewed. The importance of the cleanliness of steels is clearly demonstrated by direct relations between grain boundary chemistry and crack growth behavior for both H and anodic dissolution-induced crack growth. Relationships between strain to failure, work of fracture, K{sub ISCC}, crack velocity and fracture mode and grain boundary chemistry are presented. Only results in which the grain boundary chemistry has been measured directly by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) on intergranular surfaces exposed by in situ fracture have been considered in this review.

  12. Grain boundary chemistry effects on environment-induced crack growth of iron-based alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.

    1992-11-01

    Relation between grain boundary chemistry and environment-induced crack growth of Fe-based alloys is reviewed. The importance of the cleanliness of steels is clearly demonstrated by direct relations between grain boundary chemistry and crack growth behavior for both H and anodic dissolution-induced crack growth. Relationships between strain to failure, work of fracture, K[sub ISCC], crack velocity and fracture mode and grain boundary chemistry are presented. Only results in which the grain boundary chemistry has been measured directly by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) on intergranular surfaces exposed by in situ fracture have been considered in this review.

  13. Analysis of the dynamic characteristics of a slant-cracked cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Zeng, Jin; Lang, Ziqiang; Zhang, Long; Guo, Yuzhu; Wen, Bangchun

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the dynamic characteristics of a slant-cracked cantilever beam are studied based on a new finite element (FE) model where both plane and beam elements are used to reduce the computational costs. Simulation studies show that the proposed model has the same system natural frequencies and vibration responses as those in the pure plane element model but is computationally more efficient. Based on the new model, the effects of loads such as gravity Fg, excitation force amplitude F0 and direction angles of excitation force φ, and crack parameters including slant crack angle θ, dimensionless crack depth s and dimensionless crack location p, on system dynamics have been analyzed. The results indicate that (1) the gravity has a more significant effect on the sub-harmonic resonance responses than on the super-harmonic resonance and resonance responses; (2) The amplitudes of the system responses at both excitation force frequencies fe and its harmonics such as 2fe and 3fe increase almost linearly with the increase of the excitation force amplitude F0; (3) Under the constant excitation force in the flexural direction, the tensile and compressive forces along the longitudinal direction can lead to opposite breathing behaviors of the crack within the super-harmonic and sub-harmonic resonance frequency regions; (4) Vibration is most severe under the straight crack angle (θ=90°) and near the straight crack angle such as θ=100° and 110°, and the vibration responses under smaller or larger crack angles such as θ=30° and θ=150° become weaker; (5) The resonance at 2fe is sensitive to the faint crack signals when s is small and p is large. In addition, the significant vibration responses at the multiple frequency of 3fe and the fractional frequency of 0.5fe can be regarded as a distinguishable feature of the serious crack with large s and small p.

  14. Axial Plane Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tongcang; Ota, Sadao; Kim, Jeongmin; Wong, Zi Jing; Wang, Yuan; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    We present axial plane optical microscopy (APOM) that can, in contrast to conventional microscopy, directly image a sample's cross-section parallel to the optical axis of an objective lens without scanning. APOM combined with conventional microscopy simultaneously provides two orthogonal images of a 3D sample. More importantly, APOM uses only a single lens near the sample to achieve selective-plane illumination microscopy, as we demonstrated by three-dimensional (3D) imaging of fluorescent pollens and brain slices. This technique allows fast, high-contrast, and convenient 3D imaging of structures that are hundreds of microns beneath the surfaces of large biological tissues. PMID:25434770

  15. SNAP focal plane

    SciTech Connect

    Lampton, Michael L.; Kim, A.; Akerlof, C.W.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Berkovitz, J.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers Jr., W.C.; Commins, E.D.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.E.; DiGennaro,R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.S.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.E.; Harvey, P.R.; Heetderks, H.D.; Holland, S.E.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Levi, M.E.; Levin, D.S.; Linder,E.V.; Loken, S.C.; Malina, R.; Massey, R.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.P.; Miquel, R.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto, E.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch,A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, R.; Walder, J.-P.; Wang, G.

    2002-07-29

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square-degree field sensitive in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. We describe the requirements for the instrument suite and the evolution of the focal plane design to the present concept in which all the instrumentation--visible and near-infrared imagers, spectrograph, and star guiders--share one common focal plane.

  16. Axial Plane Optical Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tongcang; Ota, Sadao; Kim, Jeongmin; Wong, Zi Jing; Wang, Yuan; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-12-01

    We present axial plane optical microscopy (APOM) that can, in contrast to conventional microscopy, directly image a sample's cross-section parallel to the optical axis of an objective lens without scanning. APOM combined with conventional microscopy simultaneously provides two orthogonal images of a 3D sample. More importantly, APOM uses only a single lens near the sample to achieve selective-plane illumination microscopy, as we demonstrated by three-dimensional (3D) imaging of fluorescent pollens and brain slices. This technique allows fast, high-contrast, and convenient 3D imaging of structures that are hundreds of microns beneath the surfaces of large biological tissues.

  17. Preventing Cracking of Anodized Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Charles C.; Heslin, Thomas M.

    1995-01-01

    Anodized coatings have been used as optical and thermal surfaces in spacecraft. Particulate contamination from cracked coatings is a concern for many applications. The major cause for the cracking is the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion between the oxide coatings and the aluminum substrate. The loss of water when the coating is exposed to a vacuum also could induce cracking of the coating. Hot-water sealing was identified as the major cause for the cracking of the coatings because of the large temperature change when the parts were immersed in boiling water and the water was absorbed in the coating. when the hot-water sealing process was eliminated, the cracking resistance of the anodized coatings was greatly improved. Also, it was found that dyed black coatings were more susceptible than clear coatings to cracking during thermo-vacuum cyclings.

  18. Out of plane analysis for composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, P. C.; Saff, C. R.; Sanger, Kenneth B.; Mahler, M. A.; Kan, Han Pin; Kautz, Edward F.

    1990-01-01

    Simple two dimensional analysis techniques were developed to aid in the design of strong joints for integrally stiffened/bonded composite structures subjected to out of plane loads. It was found that most out of plane failures were due to induced stresses arising from rapid changes in load path direction or geometry, induced stresses due to changes in geometry caused by buckling, or direct stresses produced by fuel pressure or bearing loads. While the analysis techniques were developed to address a great variety of out of plane loading conditions, they were primarily derived to address the conditions described above. The methods were developed and verified using existing element test data. The methods were demonstrated using the data from a test failure of a high strain wingbox that was designed, built, and tested under a previous program. Subsequently, a set of design guidelines were assembled to assist in the design of safe, strong integral composite structures using the analysis techniques developed.

  19. Analytical modeling for vibration analysis of thin rectangular orthotropic/functionally graded plates with an internal crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, P. V.; Jain, N. K.; Ramtekkar, G. D.

    2015-05-01

    An analytical model is presented for vibration analysis of a thin orthotropic and general functionally graded rectangular plate containing an internal crack located at the center. The continuous line crack is parallel to one of the edges of the plate. The equation of motion of the orthotropic plate is derived using the equilibrium principle. The crack terms are formulated using Line Spring Model. The effect of location of crack along the thickness of the plate on natural frequencies is analyzed using appropriate crack compliance coefficients in the Line Spring Model. By using the Berger formulation for in-plane forces, the derived equation of motion of the cracked plate is transformed into a cubic nonlinear system. Applying the Galerkin's method, the equation is converted into well known Duffing equation. The peak amplitude is obtained by employing Multiple Scales perturbation method. The effect of nonlinearity is also established by deriving frequency response equation for the cracked plate using method of multiple scales. The influence of crack length, boundary conditions and crack location along the thickness, on the natural frequencies of a square and rectangular plate is demonstrated. It is found that the vibration characteristics are affected by the length and location of crack along the thickness of the plate. It is thus deduced that the natural frequencies are minimum when crack is internal and its depth is symmetric about the mid-plane of the plate for all the three boundary conditions considered. Further, it is concluded that the presence of crack across the fibers decreases the frequency more as compared to crack along the fibers. The Effect of varying elasticity ratio on the fundamental frequencies of the cracked plate is also established.

  20. Mode III fatigue crack propagation in low alloy steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, R.O.; McClintock, F.A.; Nayeb-Hashemi, H.; Ritter, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    To provide a basis for estimating fatigue life in large rotating generator shafts subjected to transient oscillations, a study is made of fatigue crack propagation in Mode III (anti-plane shear) in torsionally-loaded spheroidized AISI 4340 steel. Results are compared to analogous behavior in Mode I. The approach investigated the feasibility of using continuum fracture mechanics and preliminary mechanistic modeling to serve as a basis for defect-tolerant life estimation procedures. 38 refs.

  1. Fabrication of reconfigurable protein matrices by cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaoyue; Mills, Kristen L.; Peters, Portia R.; Bahng, Joong Hwan; Liu, Elizabeth Ho; Shim, Jeongsup; Naruse, Keiji; Csete, Marie E.; Thouless, M. D.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2005-05-01

    The interface between extracellular matrices and cells is a dynamic environment that is crucial for regulating important cellular processes such as signal transduction, growth, differentiation, motility and apoptosis. In vitro cellular studies and the development of new biomaterials would benefit from matrices that allow reversible modulation of the cell adhesive signals at a scale that is commensurate with individual adhesion complexes. Here, we describe the fabrication of substrates containing arrays of cracks in which cell-adhesive proteins are selectively adsorbed. The widths of the cracks (120-3,200 nm) are similar in size to individual adhesion complexes (typically 500-3,000 nm) and can be modulated by adjusting the mechanical strain applied to the substrate. Morphology of cells can be reversibly manipulated multiple times through in situ adjustment of crack widths and hence the amount of the cell-adhesive proteins accessible to the cell. These substrates provide a new tool for assessing cellular responses associated with exposure to matrix proteins.

  2. Creep deformation at crack tips in elastic-viscoplastic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, H.

    1981-02-01

    THE EVALUATION of crack growth tests under creep conditions must be based on the stress analysis of a cracked body taking into account elastic, plastic and creep deformation. In addition to the well-known analysis of a cracked body creeping in secondary (steady-state) creep, the stress field at the tip of a stationary crack is calculated for primary (strain-hardening) or tertiary (strain-softening) creep of the whole specimen. For the special hardening creep-law considered, a path-independent integral C∗h, can be defined which correlates the near-tip field to the applied load. It is also shown how, after sudden load application, creep strains develop in the initially elastic or, for a higher load level, plastic body. Characteristic times are derived to distinguish between short times when the creep-zones, in which creep strains are concentrated, are still small, and long times when the whole specimen creeps extensively in primary and finally in secondary and tertiary creep. Comparing the creep-zone sizes with the specimen dimensions or comparing the characteristic times with the test duration, one can decide which deformation mechanism prevails in the bulk of the specimen and which load parameter enters into the near-tip stress field and determines crack growth behavior. The governing load parameter is the stress intensity factor K 1 if the bulk of the specimen is predominantly elastic and it is the J-integral in a fully-plastic situation when large creep strains are still confined to a small zone. The C∗h-integral applies if the bulk of the specimen deforms in primary or tertiary creep, and C∗ is the relevant load parameter for predominantly secondary creep of the whole specimen.

  3. Ultrawide phononic band gap for combined in-plane and out-of-plane waves.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Osama R; Hussein, Mahmoud I

    2011-12-01

    We consider two-dimensional phononic crystals formed from silicon and voids, and present optimized unit-cell designs for (1) out-of-plane, (2) in-plane, and (3) combined out-of-plane and in-plane elastic wave propagation. To feasibly search through an excessively large design space (~10(40) possible realizations) we develop a specialized genetic algorithm and utilize it in conjunction with the reduced Bloch mode expansion method for fast band-structure calculations. Focusing on high-symmetry plain-strain square lattices, we report unit-cell designs exhibiting record values of normalized band-gap size for all three categories. For the case of combined polarizations, we reveal a design with a normalized band-gap size exceeding 60%.

  4. Shuttle Fuel Feedliner Cracking Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tomas E.; Turner, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of material covered during 'Space Shuttle Fuel Feedliner Cracking Investigation MSFC Fluids Workshop' held November 19-21, 2002. Topics covered include: cracks on fuel feed lines of Orbiter space shuttles, fluid driven cracking analysis, liner structural modes, structural motion in a fluid, fluid borne drivers, three dimensional computational fluid dynamics models, fluid borne drivers from pumps, amplification mechanisms, flow parameter mapping, and flight engine flow map.

  5. Computed Tomographic Imaging of Subchondral Fatigue Cracks in the Distal End of the Third Metacarpal Bone in the Thoroughbred Racehorse Can Predict Crack Micromotion in an Ex-Vivo Model

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Marie-Soleil; Morello, Samantha; Rayment, Kelsey; Markel, Mark D.; Vanderby, Ray; Kalscheur, Vicki L.; Hao, Zhengling; McCabe, Ronald P.; Marquis, Patricia; Muir, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Articular stress fracture arising from the distal end of the third metacarpal bone (MC3) is a common serious injury in Thoroughbred racehorses. Currently, there is no method for predicting fracture risk clinically. We describe an ex-vivo biomechanical model in which we measured subchondral crack micromotion under compressive loading that modeled high speed running. Using this model, we determined the relationship between subchondral crack dimensions measured using computed tomography (CT) and crack micromotion. Thoracic limbs from 40 Thoroughbred racehorses that had sustained a catastrophic injury were studied. Limbs were radiographed and examined using CT. Parasagittal subchondral fatigue crack dimensions were measured on CT images using image analysis software. MC3 bones with fatigue cracks were tested using five cycles of compressive loading at -7,500N (38 condyles, 18 horses). Crack motion was recorded using an extensometer. Mechanical testing was validated using bones with 3 mm and 5 mm deep parasagittal subchondral slots that modeled naturally occurring fatigue cracks. After testing, subchondral crack density was determined histologically. Creation of parasagittal subchondral slots induced significant micromotion during loading (p<0.001). In our biomechanical model, we found a significant positive correlation between extensometer micromotion and parasagittal crack area derived from reconstructed CT images (SR = 0.32, p<0.05). Correlations with transverse and frontal plane crack lengths were not significant. Histologic fatigue damage was not significantly correlated with crack dimensions determined by CT or extensometer micromotion. Bones with parasagittal crack area measurements above 30 mm2 may have a high risk of crack propagation and condylar fracture in vivo because of crack micromotion. In conclusion, our results suggest that CT could be used to quantify subchondral fatigue crack dimensions in racing Thoroughbred horses in-vivo to assess risk of

  6. Catalyst for cracking kerosene

    SciTech Connect

    Hsie, C. H.

    1985-06-04

    A catalyst capable of cracking kerosene under lower pressure and temperature comprising kerosene; metal powder mixture of chromium powder, copper powder, lead powder, zinc powder, nickel powder, manganese powder in an amount of 12 to 13 parts by weight per 100 parts by weight of said kerosene; sulfuric acid in an amount of 15 to 30 parts by weight per 100 parts by weight of said kerosene; inorganic powder mixture of aluminum oxide powder, serpentine powder, alum powder, magnesium oxide powder, limestone powder, slake lime powder, silica powder, and granite powder in an amount of 150 to 170 parts by weight per 100 parts by weight of said kerosene.

  7. Crack Development in Cross-Ply Laminates Under Uniaxial Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.

    1996-01-01

    This study addresses matrix-dominated failures in carbon fiber/polymer matrix composite laminates in a cross-ply lay-up. The events of interest are interlaminar fracture in the form of transverse cracks in the 90' plies and longitudinal splitting in the 0 deg plies and interlaminar fracture in the form of 0/90 delamination. These events were observed using various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques during static tensile tests. Acoustic emission (AE) x radiography, and edge view microscopy were the principal ones utilized in a real-time environment. A comparison of the NDE results with an analytical model based on the classical linear fracture mechanics concept of strain energy release rate as a criterion for crack growth was performed. The virtual crack closure theory was incorporated with a finite element model to generate strain energy release rate curves for the analytical case. Celion carbon fiber/polyimide matrix (G30-500/PMR-15) was the material tested with cross-ply lay-ups of (0(2)/90(6))s and (0(4)/90(4))s. The test specimens contained thermally induced cracks caused by the high-temperature processing. The analytical model was updated to compensate for the initial damage and to study further accumulation by taking into account the crack interactions. By correlating the experimental and analytical data, the critical energy release rates were found for the observable events of interest.

  8. Fracture mechanics of matrix cracking and delamination in glass/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caslini, M.; Zanotti, C.; Obrien, T. K.

    1986-01-01

    This study focused on characterizing matrix cracking and delamination behavior in multidirectional laminates. Static tension and tension-tension fatigue tests were conducted on two different layups. Damage onset, accumulation, and residual properties were measured. Matrix cracking was shown to have a considerable influence on residual stiffness of glass epoxy laminates, and could be predicted reasonably well for cracks in 90 deg piles using a simple shear lag analysis. A fracture mechanics analysis for the strain energy release rate associated with 90 deg ply-matrix crack formation was developed and was shown to correlate the onset of 90 deg ply cracks in different laminates. The linear degradation of laminate modulus with delamination area, previously observed for graphite epoxy laminates, was predicted for glass epoxy laminates using a simple rule of mixtures analysis. The strain energy release rate associated with edge delamination formation under static and cyclic loading was difficult to analyze because of the presence of several contemporary damage phenomena.

  9. Hydride-phase formation and its influence on fatigue crack propagationbehavior in a Zircaloy-4 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Garlea, Elena; Choo, H.; Wang, G Y; Liaw, Peter K; Clausen, B; Brown, D. W.; Park, Jae-Sung; Rack, P. D.; Kenik, Edward A

    2010-01-01

    The hydride-phase formation and its influence on the fatigue behavior of a Zircaloy-4 alloy charged with hydrogen gas are investigated. First, the microstructure and fatigue crack propagation rate of the alloy in the as-received condition are studied. Second, the formation and homogeneous distribution of delta zirconium hydride ( -ZrH2) in the bulk, and its effect on the fatigue crack propagation rate are presented. The results show that in the presence of hydrides the zirconium alloy exhibits reduced toughness and enhanced crack growth rates. Finally, the influence of a pre-existing fatigue crack in the specimen and the subsequent hydride formation were investigated. The residual lattice strain profile around the fatigue crack tip was measured using neutron diffraction. The combined effects of residual strains and hydride precipitation on the fatigue behavior are discussed.

  10. Evaluation of shrinkage and cracking in concrete of ring test by acoustic emission method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Chikanori

    2015-03-01

    Drying shrinkage of concrete is one of the typical problems related to reduce durability and defilation of concrete structures. Lime stone, expansive additive and low-heat Portland cement are used to reduce drying shrinkage in Japan. Drying shrinkage is commonly evaluated by methods of measurement for length change of mortar and concrete. In these methods, there is detected strain due to drying shrinkage of free body, although visible cracking does not occur. In this study, the ring test was employed to detect strain and age cracking of concrete. The acoustic emission (AE) method was adopted to detect micro cracking due to shrinkage. It was recognized that in concrete using lime stone, expansive additive and low-heat Portland cement are effective to decrease drying shrinkage and visible cracking. Micro cracking due to shrinkage of this concrete was detected and evaluated by the AE method.

  11. The quarter-point quadratic isoparametric element as a singular element for crack problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, M. A.; Lorensen, W. E.; Pflegel, G.

    1976-01-01

    The quadratic isoparametric elements which embody the inverse square root singularity are used for calculating the stress intensity factors at tips of cracks. The strain singularity at a point or an edge is obtained in a simple manner by placing the mid-side nodes at quarter points in the vicinity of the crack tip or an edge. These elements are implemented in NASTRAN as dummy elements. The method eliminates the use of special crack tip elements and in addition, these elements satisfy the constant strain and rigid body modes required for convergence.

  12. Sensing sheets based on large area electronics for fatigue crack detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao; Glisic, Branko

    2015-03-01

    Reliable early-stage damage detection requires continuous structural health monitoring (SHM) over large areas of structure, and with high spatial resolution of sensors. This paper presents the development stage of prototype strain sensing sheets based on Large Area Electronics (LAE), in which thin-film strain gauges and control circuits are integrated on the flexible electronics and deposited on a polyimide sheet that can cover large areas. These sensing sheets were applied for fatigue crack detection on small-scale steel plates. Two types of sensing-sheet interconnects were designed and manufactured, and dense arrays of strain gauge sensors were assembled onto the interconnects. In total, four (two for each design type) strain sensing sheets were created and tested, which were sensitive to strain at virtually every point over the whole sensing sheet area. The sensing sheets were bonded to small-scale steel plates, which had a notch on the boundary so that fatigue cracks could be generated under cyclic loading. The fatigue tests were carried out at the Carleton Laboratory of Columbia University, and the steel plates were attached through a fixture to the loading machine that applied cyclic fatigue load. Fatigue cracks then occurred and propagated across the steel plates, leading to the failure of these test samples. The strain sensor that was close to the notch successfully detected the initialization of fatigue crack and localized the damage on the plate. The strain sensor that was away from the crack successfully detected the propagation of fatigue crack based on the time history of measured strain. Overall, the results of the fatigue tests validated general principles of the strain sensing sheets for crack detection.

  13. Shear fatigue crack growth - A literature survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.

    1985-01-01

    Recent studies of shear crack growth are reviewed, emphasizing test methods and data analyses. The combined mode I and mode II elastic crack tip stress fields are considered. The development and design of the compact shear specimen are described, and the results of fatigue crack growth tests using compact shear specimens are reviewed. The fatigue crack growth tests are discussed and the results of inclined cracks in tensile panels, center cracks in plates under biaxial loading, cracked beam specimens with combined bending and shear loading, center-cracked panels and double edge-cracked plates under cyclic shear loading are examined and analyzed in detail.

  14. Cracking in thin films of colloidal particles on elastomeric substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael; Sharp, James

    2012-02-01

    The drying of thin colloidal films of particles is a common industrial problem (e.g paint drying, ceramic coatings). An often undesirable side effect is the appearance of cracks. As the liquid in a suspension evaporates, particles are forced into contact both with each other and the substrate, forming a fully wetted film. Under carefully controlled conditions the observed cracks grow orthogonal to the drying front, spaced at regular intervals along it. In this work we investigated the role of the substrate in constraining the film. Atomic force microscopy, was used to image the particle arrangements on the top and bottom surfaces of films, dried on liquid and glass substrates. We present convincing evidence that the interface prevents particle rearrangements at the bottom of the film, leading to a mismatch strain between upper and lower surfaces of the film which appears to drive cracking. We show that when the modulus of the substrate becomes comparable to the stresses measured in the films, the crack spacing is significantly altered. We also show that cracks do not form on liquid substrates. These combined experiments highlight the importance of substrate constraint in the crack formation mechanism.[4pt] [1] M.I. Smith, J.S. Sharp, Langmuir 27, 8009 (2011)

  15. Detection and monitoring of surface micro-cracks by PPP-BOTDA.

    PubMed

    Meng, Dewei; Ansari, Farhad; Feng, Xin

    2015-06-01

    Appearance of micrometer size surface cracks is common in structural elements such as welded connections, beams, and gusset plates in bridges. Brillouin scattering-based sensors are capable of making distributed strain measurements. Pre-pump-pulse Brillouin optical time domain analysis (PPP-BOTDA) provides a centimeter-level spatial resolution, which facilitates detection and monitoring of the cracks. In the work described here, in addition to the shift in Brillouin frequency (distributed strains), change in the Brillouin gain spectrum (BGS) width is investigated for the detection and monitoring of surface micro-cracks. A theoretical analysis was undertaken in order to verify the rationality of the proposed method. The theoretical approach involved simulation of strain within a segment of the optical fiber traversing a crack and use of the simulated strain distribution in the opto-mechanical relations in order to numerically obtain the change in the BGS. Simulations revealed that the increase in crack opening displacements is associated with increase in BGS width and decrease in its peak power. Experimental results also indicated that the increases in crack opening displacements are accompanied with increases in BGS widths. However, it will be difficult to use the decrease in BGS power peak as another indicator due to practical difficulties in establishing generalized power amplitude in all the experiments. The study indicated that, in combination with the shift in Brillouin frequency, the increase in BGS width will provide a strong tool for detection and monitoring of surface micro-crack growths.

  16. Detection and monitoring of surface micro-cracks by PPP-BOTDA.

    PubMed

    Meng, Dewei; Ansari, Farhad; Feng, Xin

    2015-06-01

    Appearance of micrometer size surface cracks is common in structural elements such as welded connections, beams, and gusset plates in bridges. Brillouin scattering-based sensors are capable of making distributed strain measurements. Pre-pump-pulse Brillouin optical time domain analysis (PPP-BOTDA) provides a centimeter-level spatial resolution, which facilitates detection and monitoring of the cracks. In the work described here, in addition to the shift in Brillouin frequency (distributed strains), change in the Brillouin gain spectrum (BGS) width is investigated for the detection and monitoring of surface micro-cracks. A theoretical analysis was undertaken in order to verify the rationality of the proposed method. The theoretical approach involved simulation of strain within a segment of the optical fiber traversing a crack and use of the simulated strain distribution in the opto-mechanical relations in order to numerically obtain the change in the BGS. Simulations revealed that the increase in crack opening displacements is associated with increase in BGS width and decrease in its peak power. Experimental results also indicated that the increases in crack opening displacements are accompanied with increases in BGS widths. However, it will be difficult to use the decrease in BGS power peak as another indicator due to practical difficulties in establishing generalized power amplitude in all the experiments. The study indicated that, in combination with the shift in Brillouin frequency, the increase in BGS width will provide a strong tool for detection and monitoring of surface micro-crack growths. PMID:26192653

  17. Path (un)predictability of two interacting cracks in polycarbonate sheets using Digital Image Correlation.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, J; Dalbe, M-J; Alava, M J; Santucci, S

    2016-01-01

    Crack propagation is tracked here with Digital Image Correlation analysis in the test case of two cracks propagating in opposite directions in polycarbonate, a material with high ductility and a large Fracture Process Zone (FPZ). Depending on the initial distances between the two crack tips, one may observe different complex crack paths with in particular a regime where the two cracks repel each other prior to being attracted. We show by strain field analysis how this can be understood according to the principle of local symmetry: the propagation is to the direction where the local shear - mode KII in fracture mechanics language - is zero. Thus the interactions exhibited by the cracks arise from symmetry, from the initial geometry, and from the material properties which induce the FPZ. This complexity makes any long-range prediction of the path(s) impossible. PMID:27578388

  18. Slow crack growth in glass in combined mode I and mode II loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shetty, D. K.; Rosenfield, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    Slow crack growth in soda-lime glass under combined mode I and mode II loading was investigated in precracked disk specimens in which pure mode I, pure mode II, and various combinations of mode I and mode II were achieved by loading in diametral compression at selected angles with respect to symmetric radial cracks. It is shown that slow crack growth under these conditions can be described by a simple exponential relationship with elastic strain energy release rate as the effective crack-driving force parameter. It is possible to interpret this equation in terms of theoretical models that treat subcritical crack growth as a thermally activated bond-rupture process with an activation energy dependent on the environment, and the elastic energy release rate as the crack-driving force parameter.

  19. Path (un)predictability of two interacting cracks in polycarbonate sheets using Digital Image Correlation.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, J; Dalbe, M-J; Alava, M J; Santucci, S

    2016-01-01

    Crack propagation is tracked here with Digital Image Correlation analysis in the test case of two cracks propagating in opposite directions in polycarbonate, a material with high ductility and a large Fracture Process Zone (FPZ). Depending on the initial distances between the two crack tips, one may observe different complex crack paths with in particular a regime where the two cracks repel each other prior to being attracted. We show by strain field analysis how this can be understood according to the principle of local symmetry: the propagation is to the direction where the local shear - mode KII in fracture mechanics language - is zero. Thus the interactions exhibited by the cracks arise from symmetry, from the initial geometry, and from the material properties which induce the FPZ. This complexity makes any long-range prediction of the path(s) impossible.

  20. Subcritical Crack Growth in Ceramic Composites at High Temperature Measured Using Digital Image Correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Mumm, D.R.; Morris, W.L.; Dadkhah, M.S.; Cox, B.N.

    1996-01-11

    An in situ experimental technique is described that allows high resolution, high sensitivity determination of displacements and full-field strains during high temperature mechanical testing. The technique is used to investigate elevated temperature crack growth in SiC/Nicalon sub f composites. At 1150 degrees C, the reinforcing fibers have a higher creep susceptibility than the matrix. Fiber creep leads to relaxation of crack bridging tractions, resulting in subcritical crack growth. Differential image analysis is used to measure the crack opening displacement profile u(x) of an advancing, bridged crack. With appropriate modeling, such data can be used to determine the traction law, from which the mechanics of cracking and failure may be determined.

  1. Computational modeling of the mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cendales, E. D.; Orjuela, F. A.; Chamarraví, O.

    2016-02-01

    In this article theoretical models and some existing data sets were examined in order to model the two main causes (hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion-cracking under stress) of the called environmentally assisted cracking phenomenon (EAC). Additionally, a computer simulation of flat metal plate subject to mechanical stress and cracking due both to hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion was developed. The computational simulation was oriented to evaluate the effect on the stress-strain behavior, elongation percent and the crack growth rate of AISI SAE 1040 steel due to three corrosive enviroments (H2 @ 0.06MPa; HCl, pH=1.0; HCl, pH=2.5). From the computer simulation we conclude that cracking due to internal corrosion of the material near to the crack tip limits affects more the residual strength of the flat plate than hydrogen embrittlement and generates a failure condition almost imminent of the mechanical structural element.

  2. Path (un)predictability of two interacting cracks in polycarbonate sheets using Digital Image Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Koivisto, J.; Dalbe, M.-J.; Alava, M. J.; Santucci, S.

    2016-01-01

    Crack propagation is tracked here with Digital Image Correlation analysis in the test case of two cracks propagating in opposite directions in polycarbonate, a material with high ductility and a large Fracture Process Zone (FPZ). Depending on the initial distances between the two crack tips, one may observe different complex crack paths with in particular a regime where the two cracks repel each other prior to being attracted. We show by strain field analysis how this can be understood according to the principle of local symmetry: the propagation is to the direction where the local shear - mode KII in fracture mechanics language - is zero. Thus the interactions exhibited by the cracks arise from symmetry, from the initial geometry, and from the material properties which induce the FPZ. This complexity makes any long-range prediction of the path(s) impossible. PMID:27578388

  3. Path (un)predictability of two interacting cracks in polycarbonate sheets using Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivisto, J.; Dalbe, M.-J.; Alava, M. J.; Santucci, S.

    2016-08-01

    Crack propagation is tracked here with Digital Image Correlation analysis in the test case of two cracks propagating in opposite directions in polycarbonate, a material with high ductility and a large Fracture Process Zone (FPZ). Depending on the initial distances between the two crack tips, one may observe different complex crack paths with in particular a regime where the two cracks repel each other prior to being attracted. We show by strain field analysis how this can be understood according to the principle of local symmetry: the propagation is to the direction where the local shear - mode KII in fracture mechanics language - is zero. Thus the interactions exhibited by the cracks arise from symmetry, from the initial geometry, and from the material properties which induce the FPZ. This complexity makes any long-range prediction of the path(s) impossible.

  4. Research on crack width evolution of RC beams strengthened with CFL under cyclic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chen; Huang, Peiyan; Guo, Xinyan

    2008-11-01

    Using carbon fiber laminate (CFL) invented by our group, we take the lead in studying the fatigue behaviors of the beams strengthened with FRP under the cyclic loads. The maximum crack width of the RC beams strengthened with CFL conforms to the law of three-stages, and the main factors which affect the fatigue crack propagation behavior was analyzed. Theoretical analyses are performed for the evolvement rule of maximum crack width of the strengthened RC beams under constant amplitude and random fatigue loads. Then, a method for calculating the propagation rule of maximum flexural crack width under fatigue loads is proposed, based on the initial crack width under static loads and the coefficient of the strain of CFL. This method can be used not only for crack width determination under constant amplitude cyclic load but also the random fatigue load. Using the method, permissive fatigue life can be estimated.

  5. Three-Orthogonal-Direction Stress Mapping around a Fatigue-Crack Tip Using Neutron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, E.-Wen; Lee, Soo Yeol; Woo, Wanchuck; Lee, Kuan-Wei

    2012-08-01

    Quantitative determination of the stress fields around the crack tip is a challenging and important subject to understand the fatigue crack-growth mechanism. In the current study, we measured the distribution of residual stresses and the evolution of the stress fields around a fatigue crack tip subjected to the constant-amplitude cyclic loading in a 304L stainless steel compact-tension (CT) specimen. The three orthogonal stress components ( i.e., crack growth, crack opening, and through thickness) of the CT specimen were determined as a function of distance from the crack tip with 1-mm spatial resolution along the crack-propagation direction. In-situ neutron-diffraction results show that the enlarged tensile stresses were developed during loading along the through-thickness direction at a localized volume close to the crack tip, resulting in the lattice expansion in all three orthogonal directions during P max. The current study suggests that the atypical plane strainlike behavior observed at the midthickness position might be the reason for the mechanism of the faster crack-growth rate inside the interior than that near the surface.

  6. Accelerated fatigue crack growth behavior of PWA 1480

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, Jack; Ghosn, Louis J.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation of the fatigue crack growth (FCG) behavior of PWA 1480 single crystal nickel base superalloy was conducted. Typical Paris region behavior was observed above a delta K of 8 MPa sq rt of m. However, below that stress intensity range, the alloy exhibited highly unusual behavior. This behavior consisted of a region where the crack growth rate became essentially independent of the applied stress intensity. The transition in the FCG behavior was related to a change in the observed crack growth mechanisms. In the Paris region, fatigue failure occurred along (111) facets; however, at the lower stress intensities, (001) fatigue failure was observed. A mechanism was proposed, based on barriers to dislocation motion, to explain the changes in the observed FCG behavior. The FCG data were also evaluated in terms of a recently proposed stress intensity parameter, K sub rss. This parameter, based on the resolved shear stresses on the slip planes, quantified the crack driving force as well as the mode I delta K, and at the same time was also able to predict the microscopic crack path under different stress states.

  7. Plate Thickness Variation Effects on Crack Growth Rates in 7050-T7451 Alloy Thick Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubbe, Joel J.

    2011-02-01

    A study has been accomplished to characterize the fatigue crack growth rates and mechanisms in thick plate (16.51 cm) commercial grade 7050-T7451 aluminum plate in the L-S orientation. Examination of the effects of potential property gradients in the plate material was accomplished through hardness measurements along the short transverse direction and with compact tension tests. Tests exhibited a distinct trend of reduced center plane hardness in the plates. Compact tension specimens and the compliance method were used to determine crack growth rates for specimens machined from the t/4 and t/2 planar locations and oriented for L-S crack growth. Crack growth rate data (long crack) from the tests highlighted significant growth rate differences between the t/4 and t/2 locations. No significant effect of R-ratio was observed in the 0.05-0.3 range tested. Additionally, crack front splitting was noted in all specimens to differing degrees with data showing significant retardation of growth rate curves for the L-S orientation above 13 MPa √m in the center plane, and 10 MPa √m at quarter plane, where branching and splitting parallel to the load axis are dominant growth mechanisms.

  8. Plastic deformation - Its role in fatigue crack propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumdar, P. K.; Jeelani, S.

    1986-01-01

    Recognizing the fact that the effective driving force Delta-K(eff) determines the fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rate and that the shear strain, which is considered to develop due to an occurrence of crack closure, primarily contributes to the plastic deformation, an effort is made here to elucidate the role of plastic deformation in FCP by developing a correlation between the Delta-K(eff) and the applied driving force (Delta-K) with shear strain as variable. The disparity between Delta(K)eff) and Delta-K, which apparently increases with shear strain level, persists at lower values of Delta-K. This suggests a strong influence of the degree of localized deformation on the FCP rates in the near threshold level. Hence, an improvement of FCP rates in the near threshold level should follow an effort that promotes the plastic deformation near the crack tip to a greater degree. This approach could explain the effect of the grain size, microstructure, environment, R-ratio and crack size on the near-threshold FCP rates.

  9. Effect of Voltage Measurement on the Quantitative Identification of Transverse Cracks by Electrical Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Selvakumaran, Lakshmi; Lubineau, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Electrical tomography can be used as a structural health monitoring technique to identify different damage mechanisms in composite laminates. Previous work has established the link between transverse cracking density and mesoscale conductivity of the ply. Through the mesoscale relationship, the conductivity obtained from electrical tomography can be used as a measure of the transverse cracking density. Interpretation of this measure will be accurate provided the assumptions made during homogenization are valid. One main assumption of mesoscale homogenization is that the electric field is in the plane. Here, we test the validity of this assumption for laminates with varying anisotropy ratios and for different distances between the cracked ply and surface that is instrumented with electrodes. We also show the equivalence in electrical response between measurements from cracked laminates and their equivalent mesoscale counterparts. Finally, we propose some general guidelines on the measurement strategy for maximizing the accuracy of transverse cracks identification. PMID:27023542

  10. The Measurement of Surface Cracks in Metals by Using a.c. Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, D. H.; Waechter, R. T.; Collins, R.

    1982-05-01

    This paper describes some recent studies associated with the development of an instrument, the Crack Microgauge, at University College London, for the detection and measurement of surface cracks in metals by using a.c. electric currents in the metal surface. The design of the instrument has enhanced the accuracy of measurement of surface voltages in the neighbourhood of surface-breaking cracks to the point where it is now advantageous to consider the distribution of surface voltages by mathematical analysis. This enables better use to be made of the instrument since measurements can then be more accurately interpreted in terms of crack size and geometry. In contrast, earlier applications of the method relied on the calibration of the instruments against test blocks. The first generation of users of the Crack Microgauge interpreted their readings according to a simple one-dimensional normal crack model. This, however, is an oversimplification for cracks of finite aspect ratio and it leads to underestimates of centre-line crack depth typically of the order of 30-40<%> when the aspect ratio is about 3. The first major contribution of the theory was therefore to provide a model for surface current flow around cracks of finite aspect ratio. For this purpose a useful unfolding theorem was deduced in cases in which the current skin depth is small compared with crack dimensions. This allows the surface field to be unfolded into a plane distribution of potential satisfying Laplace's equation, and it enables us to obtain solutions for many different crack shapes by using standard mathematical methods. An account of these developments is given in ξ 2 of this paper. The unfolding of the surface field gives the global distribution of surface current around a crack, that is, on the length scale of the crack dimensions. On the length scale of the skin depth, however, the solutions need modification in the neighbourhood of the surface and interior edges of the crack. In

  11. Behavior of cyclic fatigue cracks in monolithic silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, C.J.; Ritchie, R.O.; Dauskardt, R.H.

    1995-09-01

    Cyclic fatigue-crack propagation behavior in monolithic silicon nitride is characterized in light of current fatigue-crack growth models for ceramics toughened by grain-bridging mechanisms, with specific emphasis on the role of load ratio. Such models are based on diminished crack-tip shielding in the crack wave under cyclic loads due to frictional-wear degradation of the grain-bridging zone. The notion of cyclic crack growth promoted by diminished shielding is seen to be consistent with measured (long-crack) growth rates, fractography, in situ crack-profile analyses, and measurements of back-face strain compliance. Growth rates are found to display a much larger dependence on the maximum applied stress intensity, K{sub max}, than on the applied stress-intensity range, {Delta}K, with behavior described by the relationship da/dN {proportional_to} K{sub max}{sup 29} {Delta}K. Fatigue thresholds similarly exhibit a marked dependence on the load ratio, R = K{sub min}/K{sub max}; such effects are shown to be inconsistent with traditional models of fatigue-crack closure. In particular, when characterized in terms of K{sub max}, growth rates below {approximately} 10{sup {minus}9} m/cycle exhibit an inverse dependence on load ratio, an observation which is consistent with the grain-bridging phenomenon; specifically, with increasing R, the sliding distance between the grain bridges is decreased, leading to less frictional wear, and hence less degradation in shielding, per loading cycle. The microstructural origins of such behavior are discussed.

  12. Subcritical crack growth in soda-lime glass in combined mode I and mode II loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Dileep; Shetty, Dinesh K.

    1990-01-01

    Subcritical crack growth under mixed-mode loading was studied in soda-lime glass. Pure mode I, combined mode I and mode II, and pure mode II loadings were achieved in precracked disk specimens by loading in diametral compression at selected angles with respect to the symmetric radial crack. Crack growth was monitored by measuring the resistance changes in a microcircuit grid consisting of parallel, electrically conducting grid lines deposited on the surface of the disk specimens by photolithography. Subcritical crack growth rates in pure mode I, pure mode II, and combined mode I and mode II loading could be described by an exponential relationship between crack growth rate and an effective crack driving force derived from a mode I-mode II fracture toughness envelope. The effective crack driving force was based on an empirical representation of the noncoplanar strain energy release rate. Stress intensities for kinked cracks were assessed using the method of caustics and an initial decrease and a subsequent increase in the subcritical crack growth rates of kinked cracks were shown to correlate with the variations of the mode I and the mode II stress intensities.

  13. Effect of multi-functional inhibitors on the electrochemistry within a corrosion crack

    SciTech Connect

    Omura, H.

    1984-01-01

    The electrochemical and mass transport mechanisms in stress corrosion cracking, which depend on the rate of metal dissolution and production of hydrogen, have been used to establish analytically the electrode potential distribution within the crack. When crack growth occurs by enhanced anodic dissolution of the plastically strained tip, the electrode potential at the crack tip always is more active than at the crack mouth because of the electric potential gradient that exists in the electrolyte within the crack. This also gives rise to additional or alternative electrochemical reactions such as hydrogen evolution and anodic dissolution at the crack tip. Furthermore, because of the potential difference from the crack mouth, the electrochemical driving force becomes more favorable for the development of corrosion inside the crack. The analysis predicts the distribution of electrode potential within a crack, and theoretical results have been compared with experimental measurements recorded from a model electrode system. Under free corrosion, a small potential difference may cause a concentration change of Cl/sup -/ ion and increase the chloride attack. In order to reduce the chloride and hydrogen attack, multifunctional inhibitors, such as borax-nitrite with small amounts of surfactant such as MBT or amino-methyl-propanol, are excellent inhibitors. The surfactant interferes in the dissolution reaction and blocks active chloride ion and hydrogen ion by interacting synergistically with the passive film produced by the borax-nitrite, which results in development of a stronger and thicker protective film.

  14. The displacement field associated with line forces in a cracked orthotropic body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehlen, P. C.; Hirth, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    An explicit result is presented for the two-dimensional Green function for an orthotropic body containing a crack along an orthotropic plane and with its tip in an orthotropic direction. A formal solution and a numerical program for its calculation are presented for a crack on a plane rotated about an orthotropic direction. The use of such Green functions to couple a finite element mesh to a surrounding elastic continuum, thereby shortening finite element calculations for composite bodies with macroscopic orthotropic symmetry, is discussed.

  15. Multiple moving interfacial cracks between two dissimilar piezoelectric layers under electromechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nourazar, Mahsa; Ayatollahi, Mojtaba

    2016-07-01

    The dynamic problem of several moving cracks at the interface between two dissimilar piezoelectric materials is analyzed. The combined out-of-plane mechanical and in-plane electrical loads are applied to the layers. Fourier transforms are used to reduce the problem to a system of singular integral equations with simple Cauchy kernel. The integral equations are solved numerically by converting to a system of linear algebraic equations and by using a collocation technique. The results presented consist of the stress intensity factors and the electric displacement intensity factors. It is found that generally the field intensity factors increase with increasing crack propagation speed.

  16. Experiences on IGSCC crack manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Veron, P.

    1997-02-01

    The author presents his experience in manufacturing IGSCC realistic defects, mainly in INCONEL 600 MA Steam Generator Tubes. From that experience he extracts some knowledge about this cracking (influence of chemistry in the environment, stress state, crack growth rate, and occurrence in laboratory condition of break before leak).

  17. Replica-Based Crack Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Willard, Scott A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Surface replication has been proposed as a method for crack detection in space shuttle main engine flowliner slots. The results of a feasibility study show that examination of surface replicas with a scanning electron microscope can result in the detection of cracks as small as 0.005 inch, and surface flaws as small as 0.001 inch, for the flowliner material.

  18. The crack problem in a specially orthotropic shell with double curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1983-01-01

    The crack problem of a shallow shell with two nonzero curvatures is considered. It is assumed that the crack lies in one of the principal planes of curvature and the shell is under Mode I loading condition. The material is assumed to be specially orthotropic. After giving the general formulation of the problem the asymptotic behavior of the stress state around the crack tip is examined. The analysis is based on Reissner's transverse shear theory. Thus, as in the bending of cracked plates, the asymptotic results are shown to be consistent with that obtained from the plane elasticity solution of crack problems. Rather extensive numerical results are obtained which show the effect of material orthotropy on the stress intensity factors in cylindrical and spherical shells and in shells with double curvature. Other results include the stress intensity factors in isotropic toroidal shells with positive or negative curvature ratio, the distribution of the membrane stress resultant outside the crack, and the influence of the material orthotropy on the angular distribution of the stresses around the crack tip. Previously announced in STAR as N83-16782

  19. STRESS CORROSION CRACK GROWTH RESPONSE FOR ALLOY 152/52 DISSIMILAR METAL WELDS IN PWR PRIMARY WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Overman, Nicole R.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-08-15

    As part of ongoing research into primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) susceptibility of alloy 690 and its welds, SCC tests have been conducted on alloy 152/52 dissimilar metal (DM) welds with cracks positioned with the goal to assess weld dilution and fusion line effects on SCC susceptibility. No increased crack growth rate was found when evaluating a 20% Cr dilution zone in alloy 152M joined to carbon steel (CS) that had not undergone a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). However, high SCC crack growth rates were observed when the crack reached the fusion line of that material where it propagated both on the fusion line and in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the carbon steel. Crack surface and crack profile examinations of the specimen revealed that cracking in the weld region was transgranular (TG) with weld grain boundaries not aligned with the geometric crack growth plane of the specimen. The application of a typical pressure vessel PWHT on a second set of alloy 152/52 – carbon steel DM weld specimens was found to eliminate the high SCC susceptibility in the fusion line and carbon steel HAZ regions. PWSCC tests were also performed on alloy 152-304SS DM weld specimens. Constant K crack growth rates did not exceed 5x10-9 mm/s in this material with post-test examinations revealing cracking primarily on the fusion line and slightly into the 304SS HAZ.

  20. Carbon nanotube plane fastener

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirahara, Kaori; Ajioka, Shoichi; Nakayama, Yoshikazu

    2011-12-01

    We report a feature of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) that arises when the surfaces of two vertically-aligned CNT brushes are pressed together. Adhesion between the CNTs creates a plane fastener-like device. Observations from scanning electron microscopy and measurements of adhesion properties indicate a device-dependence on CNT density and shape near the tip region. Among other applications, such fasteners have the potential to attach small components onto micron-sized electronic devices.

  1. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of neutron-irradiated, thermally sensitized type 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Onchi, T.; Hide, K.; Mayuzumi, M.; Hoshiya, T.

    2000-05-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (SS) have been used as core component materials for light water reactors. As reactors age, however, the material tends to suffer from degradation primarily resulting from irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) as well as intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). Neutron-irradiated, thermally sensitized Type 304 (UNS S30400) stainless steels (SS) were examined by slow strain rate (SSR) stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests in 290 C water of 0.2 ppm dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) and by SSR tensile tests in 290 C inert gas environment. Neutron fluences ranged from 4 x 10{sup 22} n/m{sup 2} to 3 x 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} (energy [E] > 1 MeV). percent intergranular (%IG) cracking, which has been used as an intergranular (IG) cracking susceptibility indicator in the SSR SCC tests, changes anomalously with neutron fluence in spite of the strain-to-failure rate decreasing with an increase of neutron fluence. Apparently, %IG is a misleading indicator for the irradiated, thermally sensitized Type 304 SS and for the irradiated, nonsensitized SS when IG cracking susceptibility is compared at different neutron fluences, test temperatures, DO, and strain rates. These test parameters may affect deformation and fracture behaviors of the irradiated SS during the SSR SCC tests, resulting in changing %IG, which is given by the ratio of the total IG cracking area to the entire fracture surface area. It is suggested that strain-to-IG crack initiation for the irradiated, thermally sensitized SS and for the irradiated, nonsensitized SS is the alternative indicator in the SSR SCC tests. An engineering expedient to determine the IG crack initiation strain is given by a deviating point on superposed stress-strain curves in inert gas and in oxygenated water. The strain-to-IG crack initiation becomes smaller with an increase of neutron fluence and DO. The SSR tensile tests in inert gas are needed to obtain strain-to-IG crack initiation in

  2. Hydride-Phase Formation and its Influence on Fatigue Crack Propagation Behavior in a Zircaloy-4 Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garlea, Elena; Choo, Hahn; Wang, Gongyao Y.; Liaw, Peter K.; Clausen, Bjørn; Brown, Donald W.; Park, Jungwon; Rack, Philip D.; Kenik, Edward A.

    2010-11-01

    The hydride-phase formation and its influence on the fatigue behavior of a Zircaloy-4 alloy charged with hydrogen gas are investigated. First, the microstructure and fatigue crack propagation rate of the alloy in the as-received condition are studied. Second, the formation and homogeneous distribution of the delta zirconium hydride in the bulk and its effect on the fatigue crack propagation rate are presented. The results show that in the presence of hydrides, the zirconium alloy exhibits reduced toughness and enhanced crack growth rates. Finally, the influence of a preexisting fatigue crack in the specimen and the subsequent hydride formation are examined. The residual lattice strain profile around the fatigue crack tip is measured using neutron diffraction. It is observed that the combined effects of residual strains and hydride precipitation on the fatigue behavior are more severe leading to propagation of the crack under near threshold loading.

  3. High speed thin plate fatigue crack monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz A. (Inventor); Heyman, Joseph S. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A device and method are provided which non-destructively detect crack length and crack geometry in thin metallic plates. A non-contacting vibration apparatus produces resonant vibrations without introducing extraneous noise. Resulting resonant vibration shifts in cracked plates are correlated to known crack length in plates with similar resonant vibration shifts. In addition, acoustic emissions of cracks at resonance frequencies are correlated to acoustic emissions from known crack geometries.

  4. ZIP3D: An elastic and elastic-plastic finite-element analysis program for cracked bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    ZIP3D is an elastic and an elastic-plastic finite element program to analyze cracks in three dimensional solids. The program may also be used to analyze uncracked bodies or multi-body problems involving contacting surfaces. For crack problems, the program has several unique features including the calculation of mixed-mode strain energy release rates using the three dimensional virtual crack closure technique, the calculation of the J integral using the equivalent domain integral method, the capability to extend the crack front under monotonic or cyclic loading, and the capability to close or open the crack surfaces during cyclic loading. The theories behind the various aspects of the program are explained briefly. Line-by-line data preparation is presented. Input data and results for an elastic analysis of a surface crack in a plate and for an elastic-plastic analysis of a single-edge-crack-tension specimen are also presented.

  5. Stress corrosion cracking of candidate waste container materials

    SciTech Connect

    Maiya, P.S.; Soppet, W.K.; Park, J.Y.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.; Diercks, D.R.

    1990-11-01

    Six alloys have been selected as candidate container materials for the storage of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. These materials are Type 304L stainless steel (SS), Type 316L SS, Incology 825, P-deoxidized Cu, Cu-30%Ni, and Cu-7% Al. The present program has been initiated to determine whether any of these materials can survive for 300 years in the site environment without developing through-wall stress corrosion cracks, and to assess the relative resistance of these materials to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). A series of slow-strain-rate tests (SSRTs) in simulated Well J-13 water which is representative of the groundwater present at the Yucca Mountain site has been completed, and crack-growth-rate (CGR) tests are also being conducted under the same environmental conditions. 13 refs., 60 figs., 22 tabs.

  6. Analysis of delamination in cross-ply laminates initiating from impact induced matrix cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salpekar, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    Two-dimensional finite element analyses of (02/90(8)/02) glass/epoxy and graphite/epoxy composite laminates were performed to investigate some of the characteristics of damage development due to an impact load. A cross section through the thickness of the laminate with fixed ends, and carrying a transverse load in the center, was analyzed. Inclined matrix cracks, such as those produced by a low-velocity impact, were modeled in the 90 deg ply group. The introduction of the matrix cracks caused large interlaminar tensile and shear stresses in the vicinity of both crack tips in the 0/90 and 90/0 interfaces, indicating that matrix cracking may give rise to delamination. The ratio of Mode I to total strain energy release rate, G(I)/G(total), at the beginning of delamination, calculated at the two (top and bottom) matrix crack tips was 60 and 28 percent, respectively, in the glass/epoxy laminate. The corresponding ratio was 97 and 77 percent in the graphite/epoxy laminate. Thus, a significant Mode I component of strain energy release rate may be present at the delamination initiation due to an impact load. The value of strain energy release rate at either crack tip increased due to an increase in the delamination length at the other crack tip and may give rise to an unstable delamination growth under constant load.

  7. The role of elastic anisotropy, length scale and crystallographic slip in fatigue crack nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, C. A.; Vorster, W.; Leen, S. B.; Sakurada, E.; McHugh, P. E.; Dunne, F. P. E.

    2013-05-01

    Fatigue crack nucleation in polycrystal ferritic steel is investigated through experimental observation of multiple large-grained, notched, four-point bend tests combined with explicit microstructural representation of the same samples using crystal plasticity finite element techniques in order to assess fatigue indicator parameters, together with the roles of elastic anisotropy and length scale effects in slip development, and hence in crack nucleation. Elastic anisotropy has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in the distribution and magnitude of polycrystal slip relative to observed crack nucleation sites in the context of constrained cyclic microplasticity. Length scale effects were found not to alter substantively the distributions or magnitudes of slip relative to the observed crack nucleation site, but in detailed analyses of an experimental sample, the location of highest magnitude of geometrically necessary dislocations was found to coincide precisely with the position of predicted peak plasticity and the experimentally observed crack nucleation site. The distributions of microplasticity within polycrystal samples were found to change quite significantly between the first yield and after multiple cycles. As a result, the effective plastic strain per cycle was found to be a better indicator of fatigue crack nucleation than peak effective plastic strain. In nine independently tested and analysed polycrystal samples, the cyclic effective plastic strain and crystallographic system peak accumulated slip were found to be good indicators of a fatigue crack nucleation site.

  8. Failure Analysis With a New Tool Geometry, X-Die, in Areas With High Tension/Compression Strains

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Alf; Thilderkvist, Per

    2007-05-17

    Sheet-metal forming involves a complex strain distribution over the part. The strains consist of tension, compression, and a mix of both. A geometry has been developed, the X-Die, in order to gain insight into the strain behavior of different materials. The X-Die enables strain paths far into the tension/compression region, thus creating the possibility to extend the experimental base both for definition and for further extrapolation of the Forming Limit Curve (FLC) in the tension/compression region, as well as to evaluate FE-simulation results for the same region.Today, evaluation of cracks is made by using FLC. In the conventional test methods, the strains only reach 40% compression (true strain) and often much lower percentages. In conventional test methods, the FLC for any region beyond these levels is extrapolated from existing data.The experimental test proposed in this work consists of a geometry, the X-die, which has shown that rates of 70% tension/compression can be reached (point 0.7/-0.7 in the FLC). Thereby, the region for prediction of cracks on the compression side can be extended in the Forming Limit Diagram (FLD). Furthermore, the strain paths are easy to follow and the limits when cracks appear can be evaluated. Furthermore, the experimental results show that the behavior depends on the material quality. Qualities such as Extreme High Strength Steel (EHSS) and Aluminum have a limited tension/compression rate due to failure in plane strain tension. Material qualities with high r-values, e.g. Mild steel and High Strength Steel (HSS), reach high tension/compression rates before failure and have regions with clearly defined strain signatures. This will be favorable for comparison with numerical simulations, especially for strain signatures in the tension/compression region. Furthermore, the experiments did not indicate any limitation in the compression region besides the one defined in the normal procedure in creation of an FLC.This geometry is

  9. Password Cracking Using Sony Playstations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinhans, Hugo; Butts, Jonathan; Shenoi, Sujeet

    Law enforcement agencies frequently encounter encrypted digital evidence for which the cryptographic keys are unknown or unavailable. Password cracking - whether it employs brute force or sophisticated cryptanalytic techniques - requires massive computational resources. This paper evaluates the benefits of using the Sony PlayStation 3 (PS3) to crack passwords. The PS3 offers massive computational power at relatively low cost. Moreover, multiple PS3 systems can be introduced easily to expand parallel processing when additional power is needed. This paper also describes a distributed framework designed to enable law enforcement agents to crack encrypted archives and applications in an efficient and cost-effective manner.

  10. A computational algorithm for crack determination: The multiple crack case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Kurt; Vogelius, Michael

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm for recovering a collection of linear cracks in a homogeneous electrical conductor from boundary measurements of voltages induced by specified current fluxes is developed. The technique is a variation of Newton's method and is based on taking weighted averages of the boundary data. The method also adaptively changes the applied current flux at each iteration to maintain maximum sensitivity to the estimated locations of the cracks.

  11. Stress intensity and crack displacement for small edge cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, Thomas W.

    1988-01-01

    The weight function method was used to derive stress intensity factors and crack mouth displacement coefficients for small edge cracks (less than 20 percent of the specimen width) in common fracture specimen configurations. Contact stresses due to point application of loads were found to be small but significant for three-point bending and insignificant for four-point bending. The results are compared with available equations and numerical solutions from the literature and with unpublished boundary collocation results.

  12. The Reduction in Fatigue Crack Growth Resistance of Dentin with Depth

    PubMed Central

    Ivancik, J.; Neerchal, N.K.; Romberg, E.; Arola, D.

    2011-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth resistance of dentin was characterized as a function of depth from the dentino-enamel junction. Compact tension (CT) specimens were prepared from the crowns of third molars in the deep, middle, and peripheral dentin. The microstructure was quantified in terms of the average tubule dimensions and density. Fatigue cracks were grown in-plane with the tubules and characterized in terms of the initiation and growth responses. Deep dentin exhibited the lowest resistance to the initiation of fatigue crack growth, as indicated by the stress intensity threshold (ΔKth ≈ 0.8 MPa•m0.5) and the highest incremental fatigue crack growth rate (over 1000 times that in peripheral dentin). Cracks in deep dentin underwent incremental extension under cyclic stresses that were 40% lower than those required in peripheral dentin. The average fatigue crack growth rates increased significantly with tubule density, indicating the importance of microstructure on the potential for tooth fracture. Molars with deep restorations are more likely to suffer from the cracked-tooth syndrome, because of the lower fatigue crack growth resistance of deep dentin. PMID:21628640

  13. The reduction in fatigue crack growth resistance of dentin with depth.

    PubMed

    Ivancik, J; Neerchal, N K; Romberg, E; Arola, D

    2011-08-01

    The fatigue crack growth resistance of dentin was characterized as a function of depth from the dentino-enamel junction. Compact tension (CT) specimens were prepared from the crowns of third molars in the deep, middle, and peripheral dentin. The microstructure was quantified in terms of the average tubule dimensions and density. Fatigue cracks were grown in-plane with the tubules and characterized in terms of the initiation and growth responses. Deep dentin exhibited the lowest resistance to the initiation of fatigue crack growth, as indicated by the stress intensity threshold (ΔK(th) ≈ 0.8 MPa•m(0.5)) and the highest incremental fatigue crack growth rate (over 1000 times that in peripheral dentin). Cracks in deep dentin underwent incremental extension under cyclic stresses that were 40% lower than those required in peripheral dentin. The average fatigue crack growth rates increased significantly with tubule density, indicating the importance of microstructure on the potential for tooth fracture. Molars with deep restorations are more likely to suffer from the cracked-tooth syndrome, because of the lower fatigue crack growth resistance of deep dentin.

  14. Pattern formation during healing of fluid-filled cracks: an analog experiment

    SciTech Connect

    F. Renard; D. K. Dysthe; J. G. Feder; Paul Meakin; S.J.S. Morris; B. Jamtveit

    2009-11-01

    The formation and subsequent healing of cracks and crack networks may control such diverse phenomena as the strengthening of fault zones between earthquakes, fluid migrations in the Earth's crust, or the transport of radioactive materials in nuclear waste disposal. An intriguing pattern-forming process can develop during healing of fluid-filled cracks, where pockets of fluid remain permanently trapped in the solid as the crack tip is displaced driven by surface energy. Here, we present the results of analog experiments in which a liquid was injected into a colloidal inorganic gel to obtain penny-shaped cracks that were subsequently allowed to close and heal under the driving effect of interfacial tension. Depending on the properties of the gel and the injected liquid, two modes of healing were obtained. In the first mode, the crack healed completely through a continuous process. The second mode of healing was discontinuous and was characterized by a 'zipper-like' closure of a front that moved along the crack perimeter, trapping fluid that may eventually form inclusions trapped in the solid. This instability occurred only when the velocity of the crack tip decreased to zero. Our experiments provide a cheap and simple analog to reveal how aligned arrays of fluid inclusions may be captured along preexisting fracture planes and how small amounts of fluids can be permanently trapped in solids, modifying irreversibly their material properties.

  15. Environmental fatigue of an Al-Li-Cu alloy. Part 3: Modeling of crack tip hydrogen damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    Environmental fatigue crack propagation rates and microscopic damage modes in Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090 (Parts 1 and 2) are described by a crack tip process zone model based on hydrogen embrittlement. Da/dN sub ENV equates to discontinuous crack advance over a distance, delta a, determined by dislocation transport of dissolved hydrogen at plastic strains above a critical value; and to the number of load cycles, delta N, required to hydrogenate process zone trap sites that fracture according to a local hydrogen concentration-tensile stress criterion. Transgranular (100) cracking occurs for process zones smaller than the subgrain size, and due to lattice decohesion or hydride formation. Intersubgranular cracking dominates when the process zone encompasses one or more subgrains so that dislocation transport provides hydrogen to strong boundary trapping sites. Multi-sloped log da/dN-log delta K behavior is produced by process zone plastic strain-hydrogen-microstructure interactions, and is determined by the DK dependent rates and proportions of each parallel cracking mode. Absolute values of the exponents and the preexponential coefficients are not predictable; however, fractographic measurements theta sub i coupled with fatigue crack propagation data for alloy 2090 established that the process zone model correctly describes fatigue crack propagation kinetics. Crack surface films hinder hydrogen uptake and reduce da/dN and alter the proportions of each fatigue crack propagation mode.

  16. System and Method for Detecting Cracks and their Location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Stanley E. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A system and method are provided for detecting cracks and their location in a structure. A circuit coupled to a structure has capacitive strain sensors coupled sequentially and in parallel to one another. When excited by a variable magnetic field, the circuit has a resonant frequency that is different for unstrained and strained states. In terms of strained states, the resonant frequency is indicative of a region of the circuit that is experiencing strain induced by strain in a region of the structure in proximity to the region of the circuit. An inductor is electrically coupled to one end of each circuit. A magnetic field response recorder wirelessly transmits the variable magnetic field to the inductor and senses the resonant frequency of the circuit so-excited by the variable magnetic field.

  17. A novel application of speckle interferometry for the measurement of strain distributions in semi-sweet biscuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Q.; Wildman, R. D.; Huntley, J. M.; Whitworth, M. B.

    2003-12-01

    The spontaneous formation of cracks in biscuits following baking, also known as checking, is an issue that manufacturers would like to be able to predict and avoid. Unfortunately the mechanisms driving this phenomenon are not well understood. Speckle interferometry was used to study moisture-induced in-plane strain development in biscuits. This sensitive and non-contacting technique for measuring surface displacements has two major advantages over more commonly used methods; firstly, strains can be detected at a far higher sensitivity (down to 2 × 10-6) than previously accessible and secondly the method is a whole-field technique, enabling observation of the development of strain distributions during moisture migration. For biscuits exposed to step changes in humidity, initial strain rates of up to 10-5min-1 were measured, which decreased as the moisture content approached equilibrium, leading to an accumulated strain of ~10-2 after 48 h. Under these conditions, a homogeneous, uniform strain distribution was observed. The data were used to calculate the hygroscopic expansion coefficient, which was linearly related to moisture content and provides the necessary constitutive link between strain and biscuit moisture content needed to model biscuit checking.

  18. Analysis of interfacial cracks in a TBC/superalloy system under thermomechanical loading

    SciTech Connect

    Nusier, S.Q.; Newaz, G.M.

    1998-10-01

    In thermal barrier coatings (TBC) residual stresses develop during cool down from processing temperature due to the thermal expansion mismatch between the different layers (substrate, bond coat, and TBC). These residual stresses can initiate microcracks at the bond coat/TBC interface and can lead to debonding at the bond coat/TBC interface. The effect of voids or crack-like flaws at the interface can be responsible for initiating debonding and accelerating the oxidation process. Effect of oxide layer growth between bond coat and ceramic layer (TBC) can be modeled as volume increase. In this work the authors represent the change in volume as an induced pressure across the interface. Mixed-mode fracture analysis of a thin circular delamination in an-axisymmetrically multi-layer circular plate is developed. Geometrical nonlinearity is included in the analysis, since they have a large deflection case. The elastic deformation problem of a circular plate subjected to a clamped boundary condition at the edge of the delamination, an out of plane pressure load, and a compressive stress due to thermal mismatch between different layers, was solved numerically using a Rayleigh-Ritz method. The strain energy release rate was evaluated by means of the path-independent M-integral. The numerical results of this problem based on the energy method were verified using finite element method. Both methods correlate well in predicting the energy release rate for Mode I and Mode II, deflection, and postbuckling solutions. The energy release rates G, for both Mode I and Mode II using virtual crack extension method, were evaluated. The specimen was cooled down from processing temperature of 1000 C to 0 C. The variation of the properties as a function of temperature was used for analysis. It was found that the use of temperature dependent properties in contrast to constant properties provides significantly different values of J-integral and G.

  19. Prediction of the thermosonic signal from fatigue cracks in metals using vibration damping measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morbidini, Marco; Cawley, Peter; Barden, Tim; Almond, Darryl; Duffour, Philippe

    2006-11-01

    Thermosonics (also known as ultrasound stimulated thermography or sonic infrared imaging) is a potentially attractive nondestructive testing method for the detection of contacting interface-type defects such as fatigue cracks in metals and delaminations in composites. A high power acoustic horn is typically used to excite a complex vibration field, which causes the defect interfaces to rub and dissipate energy as heat. The resulting local increase in temperature at one of the specimen surfaces can then be measured by an infrared camera. In this study a set of steel beams with fatigue cracks of different depth and variable partial crack opening was tested. Each beam was instrumented with strain gages across the crack and at the back face for the measurement of both the "breathing" behavior of the cracks and the excited vibration. The heat released at the crack was predicted from the measured vibration and an experimental estimate of the additional damping introduced in the specimens by each crack. The cracks were modeled analytically as nonuniform heat sources. Hence the temperature rise expected on the monitoring surface of the specimens could be predicted and compared with the infrared camera measurements. The results show good linear correlation between predictions and measurements, thus validating the prediction algorithm. The relationship between the vibration input and the thermal output will allow, as a longer-term goal, the prediction of the general threshold level of vibration needed for reliable crack detection.

  20. Cracking process of Fe-26Cr-1Mo during low cycle corrosion fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.Q.; Li, J.; Wang, Z.F.; Zhu, Z.Y.; Ke, W. . Corrosion Science Lab.); Zang, Q.S.; Wang, Z.G. . State Key Lab. for Fatigue and Fracture of Materials)

    1994-12-01

    The corrosion fatigue (CF) life has been divided classically into the initiation'' and propagation'' periods. Usually, the crack initiation process dominates the component lifetime under the low cycle CF condition because the crack propagates rapidly one initiated. Despite much work done on the research of the CF crack initiation mechanisms, however, a full understanding of crack initiation is still lacking. There are some limitations in explaining the CF crack initiation in an aqueous solution using the above four mechanisms individually. And, it is difficult to conduct experiments in which one mechanism along can be examined. Although CF is complicated, it is possible to reproduce a specific experiment condition which will have the dominant factor affecting the CF crack initiation. Once the cracks initiate on the smooth metal surface, their coalescence, micropropagation and macropropagation will take place successively. The initiated cracks propagate first in the range of several grains, and the behavior of the microcrack propagation is different from that of macrocrack propagation. For Fe-26Cr-1Mo ferritic stainless steel, the fundamental research work of straining electrode has been done by many investigators, but the observation of the material surface at different deformation processes has not been reported. In the present study, the detailed observation of the cracking process of the material has been carried out in low cycle CF.