Science.gov

Sample records for plane wave diffraction

  1. Numerical errors of diffraction computing using plane wave spectrum decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozacki, Tomasz

    2008-09-01

    In the paper the numerical determination of diffraction patterns using plane wave spectrum decomposition (PWS) is investigated. The simple formula for sampling selection for error-free numerical computation is proposed and its applicability is discussed. The usage of this formula presents practical difficulty for some diffraction problems due to required large memory load. A new multi-Fourier transform PWS (MPWS) method is elaborated which overcomes memory requirement of the PWS method. The performances of the PWS and MPWS methods are verified through extensive numerical simulations.

  2. A precise angular spectrum of plane-waves diffraction theory for leaky wave materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, W. D.; Hunsinger, B. J.

    1988-08-01

    This paper describes a computational leaky-wave diffraction-theory technique which very accurately describes leaky wave propagation; it combines the method of Kharusi and Farnell (1971) based on the angular spectrum of plane-wave formalism with the measured values of velocity and attenuation provided by the slowness surface measurement method of Murray and Ash (1977). The technique was shown to predict accurately the magnitude and phase of beam profiles propagating over long distances in bare-surface 100-plane-cut semiinsulating GaAs. The technique was also shown to be a good predictor of beam profile propagation through metallic grating structures required in acoustic charge transport device application.

  3. Spectral scattering operators in problems of wave diffraction by plane screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, L. N.; Prosvirnin, S. L.

    The operator method, a version of the semiinversion method used in the theory of diffraction, is examined with reference to two-dimensional stationary problems of electromagnetic wave diffraction by plane screens. Spectral scattering operators are derived for a series of periodic and nonperiodic structures. Practically important problems concerning the diffraction of wave beams, wave propagation in waveguide systems, and diffraction radiation are examined, and a detailed interpretation of results is presented.

  4. Fraunhofer diffraction of the plane wave by a multilevel (quantized) spiral phase plate.

    PubMed

    Kotlyar, Victor V; Kovalev, Alexey A

    2008-01-15

    We obtain an analytical expression in the form of a finite sum of plane waves that describes the paraxial scalar Fraunhofer diffraction of a limited plane wave by a multilevel (quantized) spiral phase plate (SPP) bounded by a polygonal aperture. For several topological charges of the SPP we numerically obtain the minimal number of SPP sectors for which the RMS between the Fraunhofer diffraction patterns for multilevel and continuous SPP does not exceed 2%.

  5. Fast calculation method for optical diffraction on tilted planes by use of the angular spectrum of plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, Kyoji; Schimmel, Hagen; Wyrowski, Frank

    2003-09-01

    A novel method for simulating field propagation is presented. The method, based on the angular spectrum of plane waves and coordinate rotation in the Fourier domain, removes geometric limitations posed by conventional propagation calculation and enables us to calculate complex amplitudes of diffracted waves on a plane not parallel to the aperture. This method can be implemented by using the fast Fourier transformation twice and a spectrum interpolation. It features computation time that is comparable with that of standard calculation methods for diffraction or propagation between parallel planes. To demonstrate the method, numerical results as well as a general formulation are reported for a single-axis rotation.

  6. Plane-wave Fresnel diffraction by elliptic apertures: a Fourier-based approach.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Riccardo

    2014-10-01

    A simple theoretical approach to evaluate the scalar wavefield, produced, within paraxial approximation, by the diffraction of monochromatic plane waves impinging on elliptic apertures or obstacles is presented. We find that the diffracted field can be mathematically described in terms of a Fourier series with respect to an angular variable suitably related to the elliptic parametrization of the observation plane. The convergence features of such Fourier series are analyzed, and a priori truncation criterion is also proposed. Two-dimensional maps of the optical intensity diffraction patterns are then numerically generated and compared, at a visual level, with several experimental pictures produced in the past. The last part of this work is devoted to carrying out an analytical investigation of the diffracted field along the ellipse axis. A uniform approximation is derived on applying a method originally developed by Schwarzschild, and an asymptotic estimate, valid in the limit of small eccentricities, is also obtained via the Maggi-Rubinowicz boundary wave theory.

  7. Plane Wave Diffraction by a Finite Plate with Impedance Boundary Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Rab; Ayub, Muhammad; Javaid, Akmal

    2014-01-01

    In this study we have examined a plane wave diffraction problem by a finite plate having different impedance boundaries. The Fourier transforms were used to reduce the governing problem into simultaneous Wiener-Hopf equations which are then solved using the standard Wiener-Hopf procedure. Afterwards the separated and interacted fields were developed asymptotically by using inverse Fourier transform and the modified stationary phase method. Detailed graphical analysis was also made for various physical parameters we were interested in. PMID:24755624

  8. Plane-wave Fresnel diffraction by elliptic apertures: a Fourier-based approach.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Riccardo

    2014-10-01

    A simple theoretical approach to evaluate the scalar wavefield, produced, within paraxial approximation, by the diffraction of monochromatic plane waves impinging on elliptic apertures or obstacles is presented. We find that the diffracted field can be mathematically described in terms of a Fourier series with respect to an angular variable suitably related to the elliptic parametrization of the observation plane. The convergence features of such Fourier series are analyzed, and a priori truncation criterion is also proposed. Two-dimensional maps of the optical intensity diffraction patterns are then numerically generated and compared, at a visual level, with several experimental pictures produced in the past. The last part of this work is devoted to carrying out an analytical investigation of the diffracted field along the ellipse axis. A uniform approximation is derived on applying a method originally developed by Schwarzschild, and an asymptotic estimate, valid in the limit of small eccentricities, is also obtained via the Maggi-Rubinowicz boundary wave theory. PMID:25401234

  9. Plane-wave diffraction by a wedge - A spectral domain approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarkowski, A.; Boersma, J.; Mittra, R.

    1984-01-01

    The canonical problem of plane wave diffraction by a wedge in the context of the spectral domain approach which exploits the relationship between the induced current on a scatterer and its far field is investigated. It is shown how the exact solution to the wedge diffraction problem can be manipulated in a form which enables one to interpret the far scattered field as the Fourier transform of the physical optics (PO) current on the two faces of the wedge augmented by the fringe current near the tip of the wedge. A uniform asymptotic expansion for the total field which slightly modifies the Ansatz in the uniform asymptotic theory of electromagnetic edge diffraction is constructed.

  10. Electromagnetic diffraction by plane reflection diffraction gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bocker, R. P.; Marathay, A. S.

    1972-01-01

    A plane wave theory was developed to study electromagnetic diffraction by plane reflection diffraction gratings of infinite extent. A computer program was written to calculate the energy distribution in the various orders of diffraction for the cases when the electric or magnetic field vectors are parallel to the grating grooves. Within the region of validity of this theory, results were in excellent agreement with those in the literature. Energy conservation checks were also made to determine the region of validity of the plane wave theory. The computer program was flexible enough to analyze any grating profile that could be described by a single value function f(x). Within the region of validity the program could be used with confidence. The computer program was used to investigate the polarization and blaze properties of the diffraction grating.

  11. Diffraction of a plane wave by an infinitely long circular cylinder or a sphere: solution from Mie theory.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jianqi; Jia, Xiaowei

    2013-08-10

    Diffraction of an infinitely long circular cylinder normally illuminated by a plane wave is discussed from the classical Mie theory. A rigorous expression of the diffracted light is obtained, which is simply characterized by a factor (θ/2)/sin(θ/2) and the sinc function sin(αθ)/(αθ). Numerical calculation shows an apparent difference between our results and those from scalar wave diffraction theory, especially in large diffraction angles. The factor (θ/2)/sin(θ/2) is introduced into the diffracted light by a sphere, which leads to an alternative approximation of the diffracted light.

  12. Plane-wave diffraction by a wedge: A spectral domain approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarkowski, A.; Mittra, R.

    1981-11-01

    In this paper we investigate the canonical problem of plane wave diffraction by a wedge in the context of the spectral domain approach which exploits the relationship between the induced current on a scatterer and its far field. We show how the Sommerfeld solution to the wedge diffraction problem can be manipulated in a form which enables one to interpret the far scattered field as the Fourier transform of the physical optics current on the two faces of the wedge, augmented by the fringe current near the tip of the wedge. We also show that the uniform asymptotic expansion derived by Lee and Deschamps on the basis of the Lewis, Ahluwalia and Boersma ansatz can be rigorously obtained using the approach presented in this paper.

  13. Scattering and diffraction of plane SH-waves by periodically distributed canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ba, Zhenning; Liang, Jianwen; Zhang, Yanju

    2016-06-01

    A new method is presented to study the scattering and diffraction of plane SH-waves by periodically distributed canyons in a layered half-space. This method uses the indirect boundary element method combined with Green's functions of uniformly distributed loads acting on periodically distributed inclined lines. The periodicity feature of the canyons is exploited to limit the discretization effort to a single canyon, which avoids errors induced by the truncation of the infinite boundary, and the computational complexity and the demand on memory can be significantly reduced. Furthermore, the total wave fields are decomposed into the free field and scattered field in the process of calculation, which means that the method has definite physical meaning. The implementation of the method is described in detail and its accuracy is verified. Parametric studies are performed in the frequency domain by taking periodically distributed canyons of semi-circular and semi-elliptic cross-sections as examples. Numerical results show that the dynamic responses of periodically distributed canyons can be quite different from those for a single canyon and significant dynamic interactions exist between the canyons.

  14. Complex coordinate implementation in the curvilinear coordinate method: application to plane-wave diffraction by nonperiodic rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Edee, Kofi; Granet, Gérard; Plumey, Jean-Píerre

    2007-04-01

    We investigate the electromagnetic modeling of plane-wave diffraction by nonperiodic surfaces by using the curvilinear coordinate method (CCM). This method is often used with a Fourier basis expansion, which results in the periodization of both the geometry and the electromagnetic field. We write the CCM in a complex coordinate system in order to introduce the perfectly matched layer concept in a simple and efficient way. The results, presented for a perfectly conducting surface, show the efficiency of the model.

  15. Solving the problem of electromagnetic wave diffraction at a finite plane grating with small elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyurkchan, A. G.; Manenkov, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    Two approaches for solving the three-dimensional problem of wave diffraction at a finite grating consisting of bodies of revolution are proposed. An approximate solution is obtained for a grating with small elements. This solution is applied to consider gratings with a large number of elements. The coincidence of the results obtained by the two methods is shown. The reflection and transmission coefficients are compared for finite and infinite gratings.

  16. Spectral and time evolution in diffraction from a slit of polychromatic and nonstationary plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sereda, Leonid; Ferrari, Aldo; Bertolotti, Mario

    1996-07-01

    A study of the changes in the spectrum and of the time intensity of the diffraction pattern of nonstationary light sources, started earlier [J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 12, 1519 (1995)] is completed. The evolution of the spectrum for the off-axis points of the diffraction pattern from a source with a Gaussian spectrum is discussed, and the reason for the red and blue shifts of the spectral maximum is found analytically. The maximum values of the shifts are estimated. It is shown that the normalized spatial distribution of energy of the diffraction pattern from a time Gaussian-shaped pulsed source coincides exactly with the normalized spatial distribution of intensity from a stationary source with Gaussian spectral density and the same bandwidth. The influence of the spectral changes on the time intensity of the diffraction pattern for the Gaussian-shaped pulsed source is also discussed. The values of the diffraction angle are calculated when a slit splits the Gaussian-shaped pulse into two separate pulses. Moreover, it is shown that from these values of the diffraction angle two separate pulses can recombine.

  17. An investigation of the diffraction of an acoustic plane wave by a curved surface of finite impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearns, James Andrew

    1990-08-01

    The diffraction effects which would occur near the tops of hills and ridges was analyzed. The diffraction of a high frequency plane wave due to its grazing of a two-dimensional curved surface of finite impedance was studied. Laboratory scale models were constructed and measurements were made of the field on, above, and behind either of two curved surfaces possessing distinctly different impedances; that is, one was soft while the other was hard. The experimental technique consisted of simultaneously measuring the pressure at a reference point and at a field point due to a transient pulse generated by an electric spark. The pressure waveforms were digitized and processed. The ratio of the discrete Fourier transforms of the two waveforms provided an estimate of the insertion loss between them. The results of the measurements were compared with the predictions of theory which was derived by Pierce using the method of matched asymptotic expansions (MAE). The predictions relied upon the experimental evaluation of the impedance of each surface at grazing angles of incidence. This evaluation was achieved by a fairly standard technique involving empirical models of various generic types of surfaces. An example was shown of the important role that the structural intricacies of a surface play in the determination of an appropriate model. The comparison between the measurements and predictions clearly indicated that the theory gives an excellent description of the field anywhere near a curved surface. The theory was also shown to give nearly as good of a description of the field surrounding a curved surface even at distances far behind the surface yet near the line of sight.

  18. A Investigation of the Diffraction of AN Acoustic Plane Wave by a Curved Surface of Finite Impedance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearns, James Andrew

    Phenomena associated with long range propagation of sound over irregular topography motivated the research work which was described in this thesis. Specifically,the goal of the work was to analyze the diffraction effects which would occur near the tops of hills and ridges. From this particular goal, the research work evolved into a study of the diffraction of a high frequency plane wave due to its grazing of a two-dimensional curved surface of finite impedance. Laboratory scale models were constructed and measurements were made of the field on, above, and behind either of two curved surfaces possessing distinctly different impedances; that is, one was soft while the other was hard. The experimental technique consisted of simultaneously measuring the pressure at a reference point and at a field point due to a transient pulse generated by an electric spark. The pressure waveforms were digitized and processed. As described in the thesis, the ratio of the discrete Fourier transforms of the two waveforms provided an estimate of the insertion loss between them. The results of the measurements were compared with the predictions of a theory which was derived by Pierce using the method of Matched Asymptotic Expansions (MAE). The predictions relied upon the experimental evaluation of the impedance of each surface at grazing angles of incidence. This evaluation was achieved by a fairly standard technique involving empirical models of various generic types of surfaces. An example was shown of the important role that the structural intricacies of a surface play in the determination of an appropriate model. The comparison between the measurements and predictions clearly indicated that the theory gives an excellent description of the field anywhere near a curved surface. Further, with a simple modification, the theory was also shown to give nearly as good of a description of the field surrounding a curved surface even at distances far behind the surface yet near the line of sight.

  19. An investigation of the diffraction of an acoustic plane wave by a curved surface of finite impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearns, James A.

    1989-12-01

    Phenomena associated with long range propagation of sound over irregular topography motivated this work, which was to analyze the diffraction effects which would occur near the tops of hills and ridges. The diffraction of a high frequency plane wave due to its grazing of a two-dimensional curved surface of finite impedance was also studied. Laboratory scale models were constructed and measurements were made of the field on, above, and behind either of two curved surfaces possessing distinctly different impedances; that is, one was soft while the other was hard. The experimental technique consisted of simultaneously measuring the pressure at a reference point and at a field point due to a transient pulse generated by an electric spark. The pressure waveforms were digitized and processed. The ratio of the discrete Fourier transforms of the two waveforms provided an estimate of the insertion loss between them. The results of the measurements were compared with the predictions of a theory which was derived by Pierce using the method of Matched Asymptotic Expansions (MAE). The predictions relied upon the experimental evaluation of the impedance of each surface at grazing angles of incidence. This evaluation was achieved by a fairly standard technique involving empirical models of various generic types of surfaces. An example was shown of the important role that the structural intricacies of a surface play in the determination of an appropriate model. The comparison between the measurements and predictions indicated that the theory gives an excellent description of the field anywhere near a curved surface. Further, with a simple modification, the theory was also shown to give nearly as good of a description of the field surrounding a curved surface even at distances far behind the surface yet near the line of sight.

  20. Vortex characteristics of Fraunhofer diffractions of a plane wave by a spiral phase plate limited by pseudoring polygonal apertures.

    PubMed

    Tang, Huiqin; Wang, Taofen; Zhu, Kaicheng

    2008-08-15

    We introduce a multilevel spiral phase plate (SPP) limited by a pseudoring polygonal aperture (PRPA). Such an SPP has the advantages of easier fabrication and greater suppression of the sidelobes of the diffraction field over that generated with a polygonal aperture (PA). The Fraunhofer diffraction fields generated by an SPP with a PRPA or with a PA have the same topological charge features and a similar diffraction pattern. Numerical evaluations show that the maximum bright annular-intensity difference between the diffraction patterns for the SPP with a PRPA and that of a PA does not exceed 3% under optimal design parameters.

  1. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, S.P.

    1988-03-08

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

  2. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, Stanley P.

    1988-01-01

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive.

  3. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, S.P.

    1987-03-12

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Realizing in-plane surface diffraction by x-ray multiple-beam diffraction with large incidence angle

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xian-Rong Gog, Thomas; Assoufid, Lahsen; Peng, Ru-Wen; Siddons, D. P.

    2014-11-03

    Based on rigorous dynamical-theory calculations, we demonstrate the principle of an x-ray multiple-beam diffraction (MBD) scheme that overcomes the long-lasting difficulties of high-resolution in-plane diffraction from crystal surfaces. This scheme only utilizes symmetric reflection geometry with large incident angles but activates the out-of-plane and in-plane diffraction processes simultaneously and separately in the continuous MBD planes. The in-plane diffraction is realized by detoured MBD, where the intermediate diffracted waves propagate parallel to the surface, which corresponds to an absolute Bragg surface diffraction configuration that is extremely sensitive to surface structures. A series of MBD diffraction and imaging techniques may be developed from this principle to study surface/interface (misfit) strains, lateral nanostructures, and phase transitions of a wide range of (pseudo)cubic crystal structures, including ultrathin epitaxial films and multilayers, quantum dots, strain-engineered semiconductor or (multi)ferroic materials, etc.

  5. Plane waves as tractor beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgács, Péter; Lukács, Árpád; Romańczukiewicz, Tomasz

    2013-12-01

    It is shown that in a large class of systems, plane waves act as tractor beams: i.e., an incident plane wave can exert a pulling force on the scatterer. The underlying physical mechanism for the pulling force is due to the sufficiently strong scattering of the incoming wave into another mode carrying more momentum, in which case excess momentum is created behind the scatterer. This tractor beam or negative radiation pressure (NRP) effect, is found to be generic in systems with multiple scattering channels. In a birefringent medium, electromagnetic plane waves incident on a thin plate exert NRP of the same order of magnitude as optical radiation pressure, while in artificial dielectrics (metamaterials), the magnitude of NRP can even be macroscopic. In two dimensions, we study various scattering situations on vortices, and NRP is shown to occur by the scattering of heavy baryons into light leptons off cosmic strings, and by neutron scattering off vortices in the XY model.

  6. Plane waves in noncommutative fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, M. C. B.; Holender, L.; Santos, M. A.; Vancea, I. V.

    2013-08-01

    We study the dynamics of the noncommutative fluid in the Snyder space perturbatively at the first order in powers of the noncommutative parameter. The linearized noncommutative fluid dynamics is described by a system of coupled linear partial differential equations in which the variables are the fluid density and the fluid potentials. We show that these equations admit a set of solutions that are monochromatic plane waves for the fluid density and two of the potentials and a linear function for the third potential. The energy-momentum tensor of the plane waves is calculated.

  7. Anisotropic diffraction of bulk acoustic wave beams in lithium niobate.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Natalya F; Chizhikov, Sergey I; Molchanov, Vladimir Ya; Yushkov, Konstantin B

    2015-12-01

    The formalism of planar diffraction tensor was applied to the analysis of anisotropy of bulk acoustic wave diffraction and to build a full map of anisotropic diffractional coefficients for three bulk acoustic wave modes propagating in lithium niobate. For arbitrary propagation direction the diffractional coefficients derived allow estimation of ultrasonic beam divergence in far-field. Analysis of obtained data revealed that the maxima of acousto-optic figure of merit for anisotropic diffraction in the YZ plane correspond to moderate diffractional spreading of the beams exceeding isotropic diffraction 2-3 times. PMID:26150402

  8. Electron diffraction by plasmon waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García de Abajo, F. J.; Barwick, B.; Carbone, F.

    2016-07-01

    An electron beam traversing a structured plasmonic field is shown to undergo diffraction with characteristic angular patterns of both elastic and inelastic outgoing electron components. In particular, a plasmonic grating (e.g., a standing wave formed by two counterpropagating plasmons in a thin film) produces diffraction orders of the same parity as the net number of exchanged plasmons. Large diffracted beam fractions are predicted to occur for realistic plasmon intensities in attainable geometries due to a combination of phase and amplitude changes locally imprinted on the passing electron wave. Our study opens vistas in the study of multiphoton exchanges between electron beams and evanescent optical fields with unexplored effects related to the transversal component of the electron wave function.

  9. Dynamical Diffraction and X-Ray Standing Waves from Atomic Planes Normal to a Twofold Symmetry Axis of the Quasicrystal AlPdMn

    SciTech Connect

    Jach, T.; Zhang, Y.; Colella, R.; de Boissieu, M.; Boudard, M.; Goldman, A.I.; Lograsso, T.A.; Delaney, D.W.; Kycia, S.

    1999-04-01

    We have observed dynamical diffraction in the 0240{ovr 2}4 and 0460{ovr 4}6 reflections of the icosahedral quasicrystal AlPdMn in the back-reflection geometry ({theta}{sub B}=90{degree} ). The x-ray fluorescence from the Al and Pd atoms exhibits strong standing wave behavior, similar to that observed in crystalline materials. The data indicate a long-range order of each species of atoms, with the coherent positions attributable to distributions of the Al and Pd, which we compare to a centrosymmetric model. We observe deviations from the model which imply small departures from inversion symmetry along the twofold symmetry axis and from the expected coherent fractions for Al. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Interior impedance wedge diffraction with surface waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Griesser, Timothy

    1988-01-01

    The exact impedance wedge solution is evaluated asymptotically using the method of steepest descents for plane wave illumination at normal incidence. Uniform but different impedances on each face are considered for both soft and hard polarizations. The asymptotic solution isolates the incident, singly reflected, multiply reflected, diffracted, and surface wave fields. Multiply reflected fields of any order are permitted. The multiply reflected fields from the exact solution are written as ratios of auxiliary Maliuzhinets functions, whereas a geometrical analysis gives the reflected fields as products of reflection coefficients. These two representations are shown to be identical in magnitude, phase and the angular range over which they exist. The diffracted field includes four Fresnel transition functions as in the perfect conductor case, and the expressions for the appropriate discontinuities at the shadow boundaries are presented. The surface wave exists over a finite angular range and only for certain surface impedances. A surface wave transition field is included to retain continuity. Computations are presented for interior wedge diffractions although the formulation is valid for both exterior and interior wedges.

  11. Complex space monofilar approximation of diffraction currents on a conducting half plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindell, I. V.

    1987-01-01

    Simple approximation of diffraction surface currents on a conducting half plane, due to an incoming plane wave, is obtained with a line current (monofile) in complex space. When compared to an approximating current at the edge, the diffraction pattern is seen to improve by an order of magnitude for a minimal increase of computation effort. Thus, the inconvient Fresnel integral functions can be avoided for quick calculations of diffracted fields and the accuracy is good in other directions than along the half plane. The method can be applied to general problems involving planar metal edges.

  12. Electromagnetic diffraction efficiencies for plane reflection diffraction gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marathay, A. S.; Shrode, T. E.

    1973-01-01

    Results are presented of research activities on holographic grating research. A large portion of this work was performed using rigorous vector diffraction theory, therefore, the necessary theory has been included in this report. The diffraction efficiency studies were continued using programs based on a rigorous theory. The simultaneous occurrence of high diffraction efficiencies and the phenomenon of double Wood's anomalies is demonstrated along with a graphic method for determining the necessary grating parameters. Also, an analytical solution for a grating profile that is perfectly blazed is obtained. The performance of the perfectly blazed grating profile is shown to be significantly better than grating profiles previously studied. Finally, a proposed method is described for the analysis of coarse echelle gratings using rigorous vector diffraction that is currently being developed.

  13. Electromagnetic diffraction efficiencies for plane reflection diffraction gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marathay, A. S.; Shrode, T. E.

    1974-01-01

    The theory and computer programs, based on electromagnetic theory, for the analysis and design of echelle gratings were developed. The gratings are designed for instruments that operate in the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum. The theory was developed so that the resulting computer programs will be able to analyze deep (up to 30 wavelengths) gratings by including as many as 100 real or homogeneous diffraction orders. The program calculates the complex amplitude coefficient for each of the diffracted orders. A check on the numerical method used to solve the integral equations is provided by a conservation of energy calculation.

  14. Wave diffraction in weak cosmic-ray-modified shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, G. M.; Zank, G. P.

    1992-01-01

    Weakly multidirectional, long-wavelength cosmic-ray-modified shocks are studied via multiple scale perturbation techniques. The effects of diffraction are discussed in terms of Green's function solutions of the linearized 1 + 3D Burgers and 1 + 3D KdVB equations, and also in terms of solutions with singular Dirac delta initial distributions. The solutions show a monotonic decrease of the wave-front curvature with increasing time owing to the effects of wave diffraction. The shape of the wave surface is discussed in terms of solutions S to the wave eikonal equation corresponding to singular initial conditions. For the fast magnetosonic wave propagating in the positive x-direction, the wave phase surface S = 0 has elliptic cross sections with the planes x = constant and has a convex paraboloidal shape. Plane-wave solutions of the 1 + 3D KdVB equation are discussed.

  15. Harmonic plane wave propagation in gyroelectric media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillion, Pierre

    2006-05-01

    We analyse the behaviour of harmonic plane waves in unbounded gyroelectric media once the refractive index in the direction of propagation is known from the Fresnel equation. We get, for the electric and magnetic fields, analytical expressions simple enough to use in a plane wave spectrum representation of more structured electromagnetic fields in these media. We also discuss the reflection and refraction of harmonic plane waves at the boundary between an isotropic medium and a gyroelectric material.

  16. Plane wave spectrum of electromagnetic beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doicu, A.; Wriedt, T.

    1997-02-01

    A plane wave spectrum method of Gaussian beams can be derived by using Davis' approximations for the vector potential. An equivalent vector potential is introduced by considering the inverse Fourier transform of the spectrum function of the original vector potential in a given plane. The electromagnetic field, which corresponds to the equivalent vector potential, satisfies Maxwell's equations and can be written as a sum of plane waves. The beam shape coefficients, or the expansion coefficients in terms of regular spherical vector wave functions, are expressed as simple integrals. This version of the plane wave spectrum method offers the possibility to compute higher-order corrections for Gaussian beams.

  17. Aberrations of diffracted wave fields. II. Diffraction gratings.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, V N

    2000-12-01

    The Rayleigh-Sommerfeld theory is applied to diffraction of a spherical wave by a grating. The grating equation is obtained from the aberration-free diffraction pattern, and its aberrations are shown to be the same as the conventional aberrations obtained by using Fermat's principle. These aberrations are shown to be not associated with the diffraction process. Moreover, it is shown that the irradiance distribution of a certain diffraction order is the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of the grating aperture as a whole aberrated by the aberration of that order. PMID:11140481

  18. Photoelectron wave function in photoionization: plane wave or Coulomb wave?

    PubMed

    Gozem, Samer; Gunina, Anastasia O; Ichino, Takatoshi; Osborn, David L; Stanton, John F; Krylov, Anna I

    2015-11-19

    The calculation of absolute total cross sections requires accurate wave functions of the photoelectron and of the initial and final states of the system. The essential information contained in the latter two can be condensed into a Dyson orbital. We employ correlated Dyson orbitals and test approximate treatments of the photoelectron wave function, that is, plane and Coulomb waves, by comparing computed and experimental photoionization and photodetachment spectra. We find that in anions, a plane wave treatment of the photoelectron provides a good description of photodetachment spectra. For photoionization of neutral atoms or molecules with one heavy atom, the photoelectron wave function must be treated as a Coulomb wave to account for the interaction of the photoelectron with the +1 charge of the ionized core. For larger molecules, the best agreement with experiment is often achieved by using a Coulomb wave with a partial (effective) charge smaller than unity. This likely derives from the fact that the effective charge at the centroid of the Dyson orbital, which serves as the origin of the spherical wave expansion, is smaller than the total charge of a polyatomic cation. The results suggest that accurate molecular photoionization cross sections can be computed with a modified central potential model that accounts for the nonspherical charge distribution of the core by adjusting the charge in the center of the expansion.

  19. Photoelectron wave function in photoionization: plane wave or Coulomb wave?

    PubMed

    Gozem, Samer; Gunina, Anastasia O; Ichino, Takatoshi; Osborn, David L; Stanton, John F; Krylov, Anna I

    2015-11-19

    The calculation of absolute total cross sections requires accurate wave functions of the photoelectron and of the initial and final states of the system. The essential information contained in the latter two can be condensed into a Dyson orbital. We employ correlated Dyson orbitals and test approximate treatments of the photoelectron wave function, that is, plane and Coulomb waves, by comparing computed and experimental photoionization and photodetachment spectra. We find that in anions, a plane wave treatment of the photoelectron provides a good description of photodetachment spectra. For photoionization of neutral atoms or molecules with one heavy atom, the photoelectron wave function must be treated as a Coulomb wave to account for the interaction of the photoelectron with the +1 charge of the ionized core. For larger molecules, the best agreement with experiment is often achieved by using a Coulomb wave with a partial (effective) charge smaller than unity. This likely derives from the fact that the effective charge at the centroid of the Dyson orbital, which serves as the origin of the spherical wave expansion, is smaller than the total charge of a polyatomic cation. The results suggest that accurate molecular photoionization cross sections can be computed with a modified central potential model that accounts for the nonspherical charge distribution of the core by adjusting the charge in the center of the expansion. PMID:26509428

  20. A scattering approach to sea wave diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradini, M. L.; Garbuglia, M.; Maponi, P.; Ruggeri, M.

    2016-06-01

    This paper intends to show a model for the diffraction of sea waves approaching an OWC device, which converts the sea waves motion into mechanical energy and then electrical energy. This is a preliminary study to the optimisation of the device, in fact the computation of sea waves diffraction around the device allows the estimation of the sea waves energy which enters into the device. The computation of the diffraction phenomenon is the result of a sea waves scattering problem, solved with an integral equation method.

  1. A uniform GTD analysis of the EM diffraction by a thin dielectric/ferrite half-plane and related configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojas, Roberto G.

    1985-01-01

    A uniform geometrical theory of diffraction (UTD) solution is developed for the problem of the diffraction by a thin dielectric/ferrite half plane when it is excited by a plane, cylindrical, or surface wave field. Both transverse electric and transverse magnetic cases are considered. The solution of this problem is synthesized from the solutions to the related problems of EM diffraction by configurations involving perfectly conducting electric and magnetic walls covered by a dielectric/ferrite half-plane of one half the thickness of the original half-plane.

  2. Double plane wave reverse time migration with plane wave Green's function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z.; Sen, M. K.; Stoffa, P. L.

    2015-12-01

    Reverse time migration (RTM) is effective in obtaining complex subsurface structures from seismic data. By solving the two-way wave equation, RTM can use entire wavefield for imaging. Although powerful computer are becoming available, the conventional pre-stack shot gather RTM is still computationally expensive. Solving forward and backward wavefield propagation for each source location and shot gather is extremely time consuming, especially for large seismic datasets. We present an efficient, accurate and flexible plane wave RTM in the frequency domain where we utilize a compressed plane wave dataset, known as the double plane wave (DPW) dataset. Provided with densely sampled seismic dataset, shot gathers can be decomposed into source and receiver plane wave components with minimal artifacts. The DPW RTM is derived under the Born approximation and utilizes frequency domain plane wave Green's function for imaging. Time dips in the shot profiles can help to estimate the range of plane wave components present in shot gathers. Therefore, a limited number of plane wave Green's functions are needed for imaging. Plane wave Green's functions can be used for imaging both source and receiver plane waves. Source and receiver reciprocity can be used for imaging plane wave components at no cost and save half of the computation time. As a result, the computational burden for migration is substantially reduced. Plane wave components can be migrated independently to recover specific targets with given dips, and ray parameter common image gathers (CIGs) can be generated after migration directly. The ray parameter CIGs can be used to justify the correctness of velocity models. Subsurface anisotropy effects can also be included in our imaging condition, provided with plane wave Green's functions in the anisotropic media.

  3. Wave diffraction by a cosmic string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Núñez, Isabel; Bulashenko, Oleg

    2016-08-01

    We show that if a cosmic string exists, it may be identified through characteristic diffraction pattern in the energy spectrum of the observed signal. In particular, if the string is on the line of sight, the wave field is shown to fit the Cornu spiral. We suggest a simple procedure, based on Keller's geometrical theory of diffraction, which allows to explain wave effects in conical spacetime of a cosmic string in terms of interference of four characteristic rays. Our results are supposed to be valid for scalar massless waves, including gravitational waves, electromagnetic waves, or even sound in case of condensed matter systems with analogous topological defects.

  4. Simple Harmonic Motion in Harmonic Plane Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benumof, Reuben

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the distribution of kinetic and potential energy in transverse and longitudinal waves and examines the transmission of power and momentum. This discussion is intended to aid in understanding the simple harmonic motion of a particle involved in the propagation of a harmonic mechanical plane wave. (HM)

  5. Coded excitation plane wave imaging for shear wave motion detection.

    PubMed

    Song, Pengfei; Urban, Matthew W; Manduca, Armando; Greenleaf, James F; Chen, Shigao

    2015-07-01

    Plane wave imaging has greatly advanced the field of shear wave elastography thanks to its ultrafast imaging frame rate and the large field-of-view (FOV). However, plane wave imaging also has decreased penetration due to lack of transmit focusing, which makes it challenging to use plane waves for shear wave detection in deep tissues and in obese patients. This study investigated the feasibility of implementing coded excitation in plane wave imaging for shear wave detection, with the hypothesis that coded ultrasound signals can provide superior detection penetration and shear wave SNR compared with conventional ultrasound signals. Both phase encoding (Barker code) and frequency encoding (chirp code) methods were studied. A first phantom experiment showed an approximate penetration gain of 2 to 4 cm for the coded pulses. Two subsequent phantom studies showed that all coded pulses outperformed the conventional short imaging pulse by providing superior sensitivity to small motion and robustness to weak ultrasound signals. Finally, an in vivo liver case study on an obese subject (body mass index = 40) demonstrated the feasibility of using the proposed method for in vivo applications, and showed that all coded pulses could provide higher SNR shear wave signals than the conventional short pulse. These findings indicate that by using coded excitation shear wave detection, one can benefit from the ultrafast imaging frame rate and large FOV provided by plane wave imaging while preserving good penetration and shear wave signal quality, which is essential for obtaining robust shear elasticity measurements of tissue.

  6. An investigation of the diffraction of an acoustic plane wave by a curved surface of finite impedance. Ph.D. Thesis Final Technical Report, 1 Feb. 1985 - 1 Sep. 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kearns, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Phenomena associated with long range propagation of sound over irregular topography motivated this work, which was to analyze the diffraction effects which would occur near the tops of hills and ridges. The diffraction of a high frequency plane wave due to its grazing of a two-dimensional curved surface of finite impedance was also studied. Laboratory scale models were constructed and measurements were made of the field on, above, and behind either of two curved surfaces possessing distinctly different impedances; that is, one was soft while the other was hard. The experimental technique consisted of simultaneously measuring the pressure at a reference point and at a field point due to a transient pulse generated by an electric spark. The pressure waveforms were digitized and processed. The ratio of the discrete Fourier transforms of the two waveforms provided an estimate of the insertion loss between them. The results of the measurements were compared with the predictions of a theory which was derived by Pierce using the method of Matched Asymptotic Expansions (MAE). The predictions relied upon the experimental evaluation of the impedance of each surface at grazing angles of incidence. This evaluation was achieved by a fairly standard technique involving empirical models of various generic types of surfaces. An example was shown of the important role that the structural intricacies of a surface play in the determination of an appropriate model. The comparison between the measurements and predictions indicated that the theory gives an excellent description of the field anywhere near a curved surface. Further, with a simple modification, the theory was also shown to give nearly as good of a description of the field surrounding a curved surface even at distances far behind the surface yet near the line of sight.

  7. Horizons and plane waves: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Hubeny, Veronika E.; Rangamani, Mukund

    2003-11-06

    We review the attempts to construct black hole/string solutions in asymptotically plane wave spacetimes. First, we demonstrate that geometries admitting a covariantly constant null Killing vector cannot admit event horizons, which implies that pp-waves can't describe black holes. However, relaxing the symmetry requirements allows us to generate solutions which do possess regular event horizons while retaining the requisite asymptotic properties. In particular, we present two solution generating techniques and use them to construct asymptotically plane wave black string/brane geometries.

  8. Light propagation analysis using a translated plane angular spectrum method with the oblique plane wave incidence.

    PubMed

    Son, Hyeon-ho; Oh, Kyunghwan

    2015-05-01

    A novel angular spectrum method was proposed to numerically analyze off-axis free-space light propagation on a translated plane to an arbitrary angle. Utilizing a shifted angular spectrum method based on an oblique incident plane wave assumption, a generalized light propagation formulation was obtained in a wide range of both tilt angles and sampling intervals, which overcame the limitations of prior attempts. A detailed comparison of the proposed angular spectrum method with prior methods is numerically presented for diffractive optics and computer-generated holograms. The validity of the proposed method was confirmed experimentally by reconstructing a digital holographic image using a spatial light modulator.

  9. Vector plane wave spectrum of an arbitrary polarized electromagnetic wave.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hanming; Chen, Jiabi; Zhuang, Songlin

    2006-03-20

    By using the method of modal expansions of the independent transverse fields, a formula of vector plane wave spectrum (VPWS) of an arbitrary polarized electromagnetic wave in a homogenous medium is derived. In this formula VPWS is composed of TM- and TE-mode plane wave spectrum, where the amplitude and unit polarized direction of every plane wave are separable, which has more obviously physical meaning and is more convenient to apply in some cases compared to previous formula of VPWS. As an example, the formula of VPWS is applied to the well-known radially and azimuthally polarized beam. In addition, vector Fourier-Bessel transform pairs of an arbitrary polarized electromagnetic wave with circular symmetry are also derived.

  10. Vector plane wave spectrum of an arbitrary polarized electromagnetic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hanming; Chen, Jiabi; Zhuang, Songlin

    2006-03-01

    By using the method of modal expansions of the independent transverse fields, a formula of vector plane wave spectrum (VPWS) of an arbitrary polarized electromagnetic wave in a homogenous medium is derived. In this formula VPWS is composed of TM- and TE-mode plane wave spectrum, where the amplitude and unit polarized direction of every plane wave are separable, which has more obviously physical meaning and is more convenient to apply in some cases compared to previous formula of VPWS. As an example, the formula of VPWS is applied to the well-known radially and azimuthally polarized beam. In addition, vector Fourier-Bessel transform pairs of an arbitrary polarized electromagnetic wave with circular symmetry are also derived.

  11. Exact solution for scalar diffraction between tilted and translated planes using impulse functions over a surface.

    PubMed

    Onural, Levent

    2011-03-01

    The diffraction relation between a plane and another plane that is both tilted and translated with respect to the first one is revisited. The derivation of the result becomes easier when the impulse function over a surface is used as a tool. Such an approach converts the original 2D problem to an intermediate 3D problem and thus allows utilization of easy-to-interpret Fourier transform properties due to rotation and translation. An exact solution for the scalar monochromatic propagating waves case when the propagation direction is restricted to be in the forward direction is presented. PMID:21383808

  12. Partial-wave expansions of angular spectra of plane waves.

    PubMed

    Lock, James A

    2006-11-01

    Focused electromagnetic beams are frequently modeled by either an angular spectrum of plane waves or a partial-wave sum of spherical multipole waves. The connection between these two beam models is explored here. The partial-wave expansion of an angular spectrum containing evanescent components is found to possess only odd partial waves. On the other hand, the partial-wave expansion of an alternate angular spectrum constructed so as to be free of evanescent components contains all partial waves but describes a propagating beam with a small amount of standing-wave component mixed in. A procedure is described for minimizing the standing-wave component so as to more accurately model a purely forward propagating experimental beam.

  13. Partial-wave expansions of angular spectra of plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lock, James A.

    2006-11-01

    Focused electromagnetic beams are frequently modeled by either an angular spectrum of plane waves or a partial-wave sum of spherical multipole waves. The connection between these two beam models is explored here. The partial-wave expansion of an angular spectrum containing evanescent components is found to possess only odd partial waves. On the other hand, the partial-wave expansion of an alternate angular spectrum constructed so as to be free of evanescent components contains all partial waves but describes a propagating beam with a small amount of standing-wave component mixed in. A procedure is described for minimizing the standing-wave component so as to more accurately model a purely forward propagating experimental beam.

  14. Optics in a nonlinear gravitational plane wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harte, Abraham I.

    2015-09-01

    Gravitational waves can act like gravitational lenses, affecting the observed positions, brightnesses, and redshifts of distant objects. Exact expressions for such effects are derived here in general relativity, allowing for arbitrarily-moving sources and observers in the presence of plane-symmetric gravitational waves. At least for freely falling sources and observers, it is shown that the commonly-used predictions of linear perturbation theory can be generically overshadowed by nonlinear effects; even for very weak gravitational waves, higher-order perturbative corrections involve secularly-growing terms which cannot necessarily be neglected when considering observations of sufficiently distant sources. Even on more moderate scales where linear effects remain at least marginally dominant, nonlinear corrections are qualitatively different from their linear counterparts. There is a sense in which they can, for example, mimic the existence of a third type of gravitational wave polarization.

  15. Polarization of almost-plane waves.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, C J

    2000-02-01

    The general polarization behavior of almost-plane waves, in which the electric field varies slowly over a circular pupil, is considered, on the basis of an axial Hertz potential treatment and expansion in Zernike polynomials. The resultant modes of a circular aperture are compared with the well-known waveguide (or optical fiber) modes and Gaussian beam modes. The wave can be decomposed into partial waves of electric and magnetic types. The modes for a square pupil are also considered. The particular application of the effect on polarization of focusing the waves is discussed. Another application discussed is the Fresnel reflection from a dielectric interface, it being shown that the Fresnel reflection alters the relative strength of the electric and magnetic components.

  16. Boundary diffraction wave integrals for diffraction modeling of external occulters.

    PubMed

    Cady, Eric

    2012-07-01

    An occulter is a large diffracting screen which may be flown in conjunction with a telescope to image extrasolar planets. The edge is shaped to minimize the diffracted light in a region beyond the occulter, and a telescope may be placed in this dark shadow to view an extrasolar system with the starlight removed. Errors in position, orientation, and shape of the occulter will diffract additional light into this region, and a challenge of modeling an occulter system is to accurately and quickly model these effects. We present a fast method for the calculation of electric fields following an occulter, based on the concept of the boundary diffraction wave: the 2D structure of the occulter is reduced to a 1D edge integral which directly incorporates the occulter shape, and which can be easily adjusted to include changes in occulter position and shape, as well as the effects of sources-such as exoplanets-which arrive off-axis to the occulter. The structure of a typical implementation of the algorithm is included. PMID:22772218

  17. Strings in plane wave backgrounds reexamined

    SciTech Connect

    Jofre, O.; Nunez, C. Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires )

    1994-10-15

    String theory in an exact plane wave background is explored. The four-tachyon scattering amplitude is constructed. The spectrum of states found from the poles in the factorization turns out to be equivalent to that of the theory in flat space-time. The massless vertex operator is obtained from the residue of the first order pole. It exhibits nontrivial modifications with respect to the flat space case.

  18. Fresnel diffraction in the case of an inclined image plane.

    PubMed

    Modregger, Peter; Lübbert, Daniel; Schäfer, Peter; Köhler, Rolf; Weitkamp, Timm; Hanke, Michael; Baumbach, Tilo

    2008-03-31

    An extension of the theoretical formalism of Fresnel diffraction to the case of an inclined image plane is proposed. The resulting numerical algorithm speeds up computation times by typically three orders of magnitude, thus opening the possibility of utilizing previously inapplicable image analysis algorithms for this special type of a non shift-invariant imaging system. This is exemplified by adapting an iterative phase retrieval algorithm developed for electron microscopy to the case of hard x-ray imaging with asymmetric Bragg reflection (the so-called "Bragg Magnifier"). Numerical simulations demonstrate the convergence and feasibility of the iterative phase retrieval algorithm for the case of x-ray imaging with the Bragg Magnifier.

  19. Blackfolds, plane waves and minimal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armas, Jay; Blau, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    Minimal surfaces in Euclidean space provide examples of possible non-compact horizon geometries and topologies in asymptotically flat space-time. On the other hand, the existence of limiting surfaces in the space-time provides a simple mechanism for making these configurations compact. Limiting surfaces appear naturally in a given space-time by making minimal surfaces rotate but they are also inherent to plane wave or de Sitter space-times in which case minimal surfaces can be static and compact. We use the blackfold approach in order to scan for possible black hole horizon geometries and topologies in asymptotically flat, plane wave and de Sitter space-times. In the process we uncover several new configurations, such as black helicoids and catenoids, some of which have an asymptotically flat counterpart. In particular, we find that the ultraspinning regime of singly-spinning Myers-Perry black holes, described in terms of the simplest minimal surface (the plane), can be obtained as a limit of a black helicoid, suggesting that these two families of black holes are connected. We also show that minimal surfaces embedded in spheres rather than Euclidean space can be used to construct static compact horizons in asymptotically de Sitter space-times.

  20. Advanced x-ray stress analysis method for a single crystal using different diffraction plane families

    SciTech Connect

    Imafuku, Muneyuki; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Sueyoshi, Kazuyuki; Akita, Koichi; Ohya, Shin-ichi

    2008-06-09

    Generalized formula of the x-ray stress analysis for a single crystal with unknown stress-free lattice parameter was proposed. This method enables us to evaluate the plane stress states with any combination of diffraction planes. We can choose and combine the appropriate x-ray sources and diffraction plane families, depending on the sample orientation and the apparatus, whenever diffraction condition is satisfied. The analysis of plane stress distributions in an iron single crystal was demonstrated combining with the diffraction data for Fe{l_brace}211{r_brace} and Fe{l_brace}310{r_brace} plane families.

  1. Effect of distorted illumination waves on coherent diffraction microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohmura, Yoshiki; Nishino, Yoshinori; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Miao, Jianwei

    2005-12-01

    Coherent diffraction microscopy requires a well-defined illumination wave such as a plane wave on a specimen. Experimentally, a small pinhole or a focused beam is often used to reduce the illumination area but they unavoidably distort the waves. The distortion of the illumination wave causes artifacts in the phase retrieval of oversampled diffraction patterns. Using computer simulations, we searched for the conditions where strong artifacts arise by changing the Fresnel number, pinhole size, alignment error and photon statistics. The experimental setup with Fresnel number of around 1 and smaller than 1 realized a small reconstruction error when the pinhole radius is larger than a few times the specimen size. These conditions are suitable for the rotation of specimens for the three-dimensional (3D) observations. Such investigation will have an impact in the design of coherent diffraction microscopes for the 3D characterization of nanoscale materials and biological systems using the third generation synchrotron radiation and future x-ray free-electron lasers.

  2. Scalar wave diffraction from a circular aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Cerjan, C.

    1995-01-25

    The scalar wave theory is used to evaluate the expected diffraction patterns from a circular aperture. The standard far-field Kirchhoff approximation is compared to the exact result expressed in terms of oblate spheroidal harmonics. Deviations from an expanding spherical wave are calculated for circular aperture radius and the incident beam wavelength using suggested values for a recently proposed point diffractin interferometer. The Kirchhoff approximation is increasingly reliable in the far-field limit as the aperture radius is increased, although significant errors in amplitude and phase persist.

  3. Stolt's f-k migration for plane wave ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Damien; Le Tarnec, Louis; Muth, Stéphan; Montagnon, Emmanuel; Porée, Jonathan; Cloutier, Guy

    2013-09-01

    Ultrafast ultrasound is an emerging modality that offers new perspectives and opportunities in medical imaging. Plane wave imaging (PWI) allows one to attain very high frame rates by transmission of planar ultrasound wave-fronts. As a plane wave reaches a given scatterer, the latter becomes a secondary source emitting upward spherical waves and creating a diffraction hyperbola in the received RF signals. To produce an image of the scatterers, all the hyperbolas must be migrated back to their apexes. To perform beamforming of plane wave echo RFs and return high-quality images at high frame rates, we propose a new migration method carried out in the frequency-wavenumber (f-k) domain. The f-k migration for PWI has been adapted from the Stolt migration for seismic imaging. This migration technique is based on the exploding reflector model (ERM), which consists in assuming that all the scatterers explode in concert and become acoustic sources. The classical ERM model, however, is not appropriate for PWI. We showed that the ERM can be made suitable for PWI by a spatial transformation of the hyperbolic traces present in the RF data. In vitro experiments were performed to outline the advantages of PWI with Stolt's f-k migration over the conventional delay-and-sum (DAS) approach. The Stolt's f-k migration was also compared with the Fourier-based method developed by J.-Y. Lu. Our findings show that multi-angle compounded f-k migrated images are of quality similar to those obtained with a stateof- the-art dynamic focusing mode. This remained true even with a very small number of steering angles, thus ensuring a highly competitive frame rate. In addition, the new FFT-based f-k migration provides comparable or better contrast-to-noise ratio and lateral resolution than the Lu's and DAS migration schemes. Matlab codes for the Stolt's f-k migration for PWI are provided. PMID:24626107

  4. Stolt's f-k migration for plane wave ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Damien; Le Tarnec, Louis; Muth, Stéphan; Montagnon, Emmanuel; Porée, Jonathan; Cloutier, Guy

    2013-09-01

    Ultrafast ultrasound is an emerging modality that offers new perspectives and opportunities in medical imaging. Plane wave imaging (PWI) allows one to attain very high frame rates by transmission of planar ultrasound wave-fronts. As a plane wave reaches a given scatterer, the latter becomes a secondary source emitting upward spherical waves and creating a diffraction hyperbola in the received RF signals. To produce an image of the scatterers, all the hyperbolas must be migrated back to their apexes. To perform beamforming of plane wave echo RFs and return high-quality images at high frame rates, we propose a new migration method carried out in the frequency-wavenumber (f-k) domain. The f-k migration for PWI has been adapted from the Stolt migration for seismic imaging. This migration technique is based on the exploding reflector model (ERM), which consists in assuming that all the scatterers explode in concert and become acoustic sources. The classical ERM model, however, is not appropriate for PWI. We showed that the ERM can be made suitable for PWI by a spatial transformation of the hyperbolic traces present in the RF data. In vitro experiments were performed to outline the advantages of PWI with Stolt's f-k migration over the conventional delay-and-sum (DAS) approach. The Stolt's f-k migration was also compared with the Fourier-based method developed by J.-Y. Lu. Our findings show that multi-angle compounded f-k migrated images are of quality similar to those obtained with a stateof- the-art dynamic focusing mode. This remained true even with a very small number of steering angles, thus ensuring a highly competitive frame rate. In addition, the new FFT-based f-k migration provides comparable or better contrast-to-noise ratio and lateral resolution than the Lu's and DAS migration schemes. Matlab codes for the Stolt's f-k migration for PWI are provided.

  5. Wave-theory analysis of acousto-optic Bragg diffraction image formation.

    PubMed

    Mehrl, D J; Liu, Z C; Korpel, A

    1993-09-10

    We analyze anastigmatic Bragg diffraction imaging by use of an efficient numerical method that makes use of a plane-wave spectrum formalism applicable to weak acousto-optic diffraction involving threedimensional light and sound fields. Results from this wave-theory analysis are compared with previous results derived on the basis of ray theory, and are shown to be in good agreement, thus corroborating the validity of both techniques.

  6. Plane wave gravitons, curvature singularities and string physics

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, R. . Center for Theoretical Physics)

    1991-03-21

    This paper discusses bounded (compactifying) potentials arising from a conspiracy between plane wave graviton and dilaton condensates. So are string propagation and supersymmetry in spacetimes with curvature singularities.

  7. The plain truth about forming a plane wave of neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagh, Apoorva G.; Abbas, Sohrab; Treimer, Wolfgang

    2011-04-01

    We have attained the first sub-arcsecond collimation of a monochromatic neutron beam by diffracting neutrons from a Bragg prism, viz. a single crystal prism operating in the vicinity of Bragg incidence. Analytical as well numerical computations based on the dynamical diffraction theory, led to the optimised collimator configuration of a silicon {1 1 1} Bragg prism for 5.26 Å neutrons. We fabricated a Bragg prism to these specifications, tested and operated it at the double diffractometer setup in Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin to produce a 0.58 arcsec wide monochromatic neutron beam. With a similarly optimised Bragg prism analyser of opposite asymmetry, we recorded a 0.62 arcsec wide virgin rocking curve for this ultra-parallel beam. With this nearly plane-wave neutron beam, we have recorded the first ever USANS spectrum in Q˜10-6 Å-1 range with a hydroxyapatite casein protein sample and demonstrated the instrument capability to characterise agglomerates up to 150 μm in size. The super-collimated monochromatic beam has also enabled us to record the first neutron diffraction pattern from a macroscopic grating of 200 μm period. The transverse coherence length of 175 μm (FWHM) of the ultra-parallel beam derived from the analysis of this pattern, is the greatest achieved to date for Å wavelength neutrons.

  8. Reflectarray Demonstrated to Transform Spherical Waves into Plane Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Afrosz J.

    1998-01-01

    The development of low-cost, high-efficiency array antennas has been the research focus of NASA Lewis Research Center's Communications Technology Division for the past 15 years. One area of current interest is reflectarray development. Reflectarrays have generally been used to replace reflector antennas. In this capacity, different configurations (such as prime focus and offset) and various applications (such as dual frequency and scanning) have been demonstrated with great success. One potential application that has not been explored previously is the use of reflectarrays to compensate for phase errors in space-power-combining applications, such as a space-fed lens and power-combining amplifiers. Recently, we experimentally investigated the feasibility of using a reflectarray as an alternative to a dielectric lens for such applications. The experiment involved transforming the spherical waves from an orthomode horn to plane waves at the horn aperture. The reflectarray consists of square patches terminated in open stubs to provide the necessary phase compensation.

  9. Spin-dependent diffraction of evanescent waves by subwavelength gratings.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kedi; Wang, Guo Ping

    2015-08-15

    We present a way to observe the spin-to-orbital conversion phenomenon. A spinning evanescent wave can be asymmetrically transformed into propagation waves through one certain diffraction order by a periodical subwavelength grating. By detecting diffraction field distribution behind the grating, we observed spin-dependent diffraction patterns. Furthermore, replacing the periodical grating by a Fibonacci grating, we can simultaneously observe multiple order diffractions of a spin evanescent wave. In this case, the multiple diffraction beams can interfere with each other behind the quasi-periodical grating to form asymmetric interference patterns. Our work provides another way toward the realization of spin-to-orbital conversion of light. PMID:26274640

  10. Diffractive wave transmission in dispersive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lescarret, Vincent

    The aim of this paper is to study the reflection-transmission of diffractive geometrical optic rays described by semi-linear symmetric hyperbolic systems such as the Maxwell-Lorentz equations with the anharmonic model of polarization. The framework is that of P. Donnat's thesis [P. Donnat, Quelques contributions mathématiques en optique non linéaire, chapters 1 and 2, thèse, 1996] and V. Lescarret [V. Lescarret, Wave transmission in dispersive media, M3AS 17 (4) (2007) 485-535]: we consider an infinite WKB expansion of the wave over long times/distances O(1/ɛ) and because of the boundary, we decompose each profile into a hyperbolic (purely oscillating) part and elliptic (evanescent) part as in M. William [M. William, Boundary layers and glancing blow-up in nonlinear geometric optics, Ann. Sci. École Norm. Sup. 33 (2000) 132-209]. Then to get the usual sublinear growth on the hyperbolic part of the profiles, for every corrector, we consider E, the space of bounded functions decomposing into a sum of pure transports and a "quasi compactly" supported part. We make a detailed analysis on the nonlinear interactions on E which leads us to make a restriction on the set of resonant phases. We finally give a convergence result which justifies the use of "quasi compactly" supported profiles.

  11. Tails of plane wave spacetimes: Wave-wave scattering in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harte, Abraham I.

    2013-10-01

    One of the most important characteristics of light in flat spacetime is that it satisfies Huygens’ principle: Initial data for the vacuum Maxwell equations evolve sharply along null (and not timelike) geodesics. In flat spacetime, there are no tails which linger behind expanding wavefronts. Tails generically do exist, however, if the background spacetime is curved. The only nonflat vacuum geometries where electromagnetic fields satisfy Huygens’ principle are known to be those associated with gravitational plane waves. This paper investigates whether perturbations to the plane wave geometry itself also propagate without tails. First-order perturbations to all locally constructed curvature scalars are indeed found to satisfy Huygens’ principles. Despite this, gravitational tails do exist. Locally, they can only perturb one plane wave spacetime into another plane wave spacetime. A weak localized beam of gravitational radiation passing through an arbitrarily strong plane wave therefore leaves behind only a slight perturbation to the waveform of the background plane wave. The planar symmetry of that wave cannot be disturbed by any linear tail. These results are obtained by first deriving the retarded Green function for Lorenz-gauge metric perturbations and then analyzing its consequences for generic initial-value problems.

  12. Colliding plane waves in F(R)=RN gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahamtan, T.; Halilsoy, M.; Habib Mazharimousavi, S.

    2016-10-01

    We identify a region of a specific F( R)= R N gravity solution without external sources which is isometric to the spacetime of colliding plane waves (CPW). The analogy renders construction and collision of plane waves in F( R)= R N gravity possible. The geometry of the interaction region is equivalent to the Reissner-Nordström (RN) one, however there is no Einstein-Maxwell (EM) source --this is made possible by using the model of RN gravity and the parameter N>1 creates the source. For N=1, we naturally recover the plane waves (and their collision) in Einstein's theory.

  13. Plane-wave decomposition of spatially random fields.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tan H; Majeed, Hassaan; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the uniqueness of the plane-wave decomposition of temporally deterministic, spatially random fields. Specifically, we consider the decomposition of spatially ergodic and, thus, statistically homogeneous fields. We show that when the spatial power spectrum is injective, the plane waves are the only possible coherent modes. Furthermore, the randomness of such fields originates in the spatial spectral phase, i.e., the phase associated with the coefficients of each plane wave in the expansion. By contrast, the spectral amplitude is deterministic and is specified by the spatial power spectrum. We end with a discussion showing how the results can be translated in full to the time domain.

  14. Zeno dynamics in wave-packet diffraction spreading

    SciTech Connect

    Porras, Miguel A.; Luis, Alfredo; Gonzalo, Isabel; Sanz, Angel S.

    2011-11-15

    We analyze a simple and feasible practical scheme displaying Zeno, anti-Zeno, and inverse-Zeno effects in the observation of wave-packet spreading caused by free evolution. The scheme is valid both in spatial diffraction of classical optical waves and in time diffraction of a quantum wave packet. In the optical realization, diffraction spreading is observed by placing slits between a light source and a light-power detector. We show that the occurrence of Zeno or anti-Zeno effects depends just on the frequency of observations between the source and detector. These effects are seen to be related to the diffraction mode theory in Fabry-Perot resonators.

  15. DLCQ and plane wave matrix Big Bang models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blau, Matthias; O'Loughlin, Martin

    2008-09-01

    We study the generalisations of the Craps-Sethi-Verlinde matrix big bang model to curved, in particular plane wave, space-times, beginning with a careful discussion of the DLCQ procedure. Singular homogeneous plane waves are ideal toy-models of realistic space-time singularities since they have been shown to arise universally as their Penrose limits, and we emphasise the role played by the symmetries of these plane waves in implementing the flat space Seiberg-Sen DLCQ prescription for these curved backgrounds. We then analyse various aspects of the resulting matrix string Yang-Mills theories, such as the relation between strong coupling space-time singularities and world-sheet tachyonic mass terms. In order to have concrete examples at hand, in an appendix we determine and analyse the IIA singular homogeneous plane wave - null dilaton backgrounds.

  16. Plane-wave expansion of elliptic cylindrical functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santini, Carlo; Frezza, Fabrizio; Tedeschi, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    Elliptic Cylindrical Waves (ECW), defined as the product of an angular Mathieu function by its corresponding radial Mathieu function, occur in the solution of scattering problems involving two-dimensional structures with elliptic cross sections. In this paper, we explicitly derive the expansion of ECW, along a plane surface, in terms of homogeneous and evanescent plane waves, showing the accuracy of the numerical implementation of the formulas and discussing possible applications of the result.

  17. Properties of the transformation from the spherical wave expansion to the plane wave expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellin, Cecilia; Breinbjerg, Olav; Frandsen, Aksel

    2008-02-01

    The transformation between the spherical wave expansion (SWE) and the plane wave expansion (PWE) is investigated with respect to a range of its fundamental properties. First, the transformation of individual spherical waves is studied in order to understand how these contribute to the different regions of the plane wave spectrum. Second, the number of spherical waves necessary to accurately determine the PWE over different regions of the spectral domain is investigated. Third, numerical aspects of the transformation are addressed.

  18. Exact Nonlinear Internal Equatorial Waves in the f-plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hung-Chu

    2016-07-01

    We present an explicit exact solution of the nonlinear governing equations for internal geophysical water waves propagating westward above the thermocline in the f-plane approximation near the equator. Moreover, the mass transport velocity induced by this internal equatorial wave is eastward and a westward current occurs in the transition zone between the great depth where the water is still and the thermocline.

  19. A differentiated plane wave as an electromagnetic vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannay, J. H.; Nye, J. F.

    2015-04-01

    Differentiating a complex scalar plane wave with respect to its direction produces an isolated straight vortex line and has a natural extension, described in earlier papers, to the vector waves of electromagnetism—a differentiated plane wave (DPW). It epitomizes destructive interference and will be shown to have the local structure of an electromagnetic vortex. In this paper its polarization structure and Poynting vector field are compared and contrasted with that of the family of linear polynomial waves, of which it is a special member. By definition this wider family has a general linear complex vector function of position multiplying a plane wave, but the function must be such that the combination satisfies Maxwell’s equations. This forces translational invariance of the function along the wavevector direction—in other words the wave is ‘non-diffracting’. In a natural sense all possible polarizations are exhibited once only. But the DPW has a distinctive polarization structure only partly explored previously. Both classes of waves share similar Poynting vector fields, which can be ‘elliptic’ (helix-like flow lines) or ‘hyperbolic’, of a repulsive nature, unexpected for a vortex. Both classes can be considered as a limit in the superposition of three closely parallel ordinary plane waves in destructive interference, and this derivation is supplied in full here.

  20. An Apparatus for Constructing an Electromagnetic Plane Wave Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kneubil, Fabiana Botelho; Loures, Marcus Vinicius Russo; Amado, William

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we report on an activity aimed at building an electromagnetic wave. This was part of a class on the concept of mass offered to a group of 20 pre-service Brazilian physics teachers. The activity consisted of building a plane wave using an apparatus in which it is possible to fit some rods representing electric and magnetic fields into…

  1. The Plane-Wave/Super Yang-Mills Duality

    SciTech Connect

    Sadri, D

    2003-10-14

    We present a self-contained review of the Plane-wave/super-Yang-Mills duality, which states that strings on a plane-wave background are dual to a particular large R-charge sector of N=4, D=4 superconformal U(N) gauge theory. This duality is a specification of the usual AdS/CFT correspondence in the ''Penrose limit''. The Penrose limit of AdS{sub 5} S{sup 5} leads to the maximally supersymmetric ten dimensional plane-wave (henceforth the plane-wave) and corresponds to restricting to the large R-charge sector, the BMN sector, of the dual superconformal field theory. After assembling the necessary background knowledge, we state the duality and review some of its supporting evidence. We review the suggestion by 't Hooft that Yang-Mills theories with gauge groups of large rank might be dual to string theories and the realization of this conjecture in the form of the AdS/CFT duality. We discuss plane-waves as exact solutions of supergravity and their appearance as Penrose limits of other backgrounds, then present an overview of string theory on the plane-wave background, discussing the symmetries and spectrum. We then make precise the statement of the proposed duality, classify the BMN operators, and mention some extensions of the proposal. We move on to study the gauge theory side of the duality, studying both quantum and non-planar corrections to correlation functions of BMN operators, and their operator product expansion. The important issue of operator mixing and the resultant need for re-diagonalization is stressed. Finally, we study strings on the plane-wave via light-cone string field theory, and demonstrate agreement on the one-loop correction to the string mass spectrum and the corresponding quantity in the gauge theory. A new presentation of the relevant superalgebra is given.

  2. Arrayed Ultrasonic Transducers on Arc Surface for Plane Wave Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Soon; Kim, Jung-Ho; Kim, Moo-Joon; Ha, Kang-Lyeol; Yamada, Akira

    2004-05-01

    In ultrasonic computed tomography (UCT), it is necessary to synthesize a plane wave using waves emitted from sound sources arranged in the interior surface of a cylinder. In order to transmit a plane wave into a cylindrical surface, an ultrasonic transducer which has many vibrating elements with piezoelectric transverse effect arrayed on an arc surface is proposed. To achieve a wide beam width, the elements should have a small radiation area with a much narrow width. The measured electroacoustic efficiency for the elements was approximately 40% and the beam width defined by -3 dB level from the maximum was as wide as 120 deg. It was confirmed that plane wave synthesis is possible using the proposed transducer array.

  3. Spectral analysis of wave motion in plane solids with boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, S. A.; Doyle, J. F.

    1992-01-01

    A spectral formulation is employed whereby in-plane stress waves are synthesized from the superposition of components at discrete frequencies and wavenumbers. The summations are performed using the fast Fourier transform and the Fourier series, respectively. Because the components are discrete, the solution to problems (over the entire field) with completely arbitrary loading, both in time and space, is made tractable. Waves generated from a line load acting on an infinite and semiinfinite plane are first considered. A cascade approach is then adopted for the treatment of these waves incident on a free, fixed, and elastic boundary. At each stage, the results are compared with those obtained from the available classical solutions and/or finite element results. These studies will form the basis for the investigation of in-plane stress waves in multiply layered media.

  4. On the propagation of plane waves above an impedance surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhong, F. H.; Vanmoorhem, W. K.

    1990-01-01

    The propagation of grazing incidence plane waves along a finite impedance boundary is investigated. A solution of the semi-infinite problem, where a harmonic motion, parallel to the boundary, is imposed along a line perpendicular to the boundary, is obtained. This solution consists of quasiplane waves, waves moving parallel to the boundary with amplitude and phase variations perpendicular to the boundary. Several approximations to the full solution are considered.

  5. In-plane propagation of electromagnetic waves in planar metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Changhyun; Rhee, Joo Yull; Kim, Ki Won; Lee, YoungPak

    2016-08-01

    Some planar metamaterials (MMs) or subwavelength antenna/hole arrays have a considerable amount of in-plane propagation when certain conditions are met. In this paper, the in-plane propagation caused by a wave incident on a MM absorber was studied by using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique. By using a FDTD simulation, we were able to observe a nonnegligible amount of in-plane propagation after the incident wave had arrived at the surface of the planar structure and gradually decreased propagation of the electromagnetic wave in the planar direction gradually decreased. We performed the FDTD simulation carefully to reproduce valid results and to verify the existence of in-plane propagation. For verification of the in-plane propagation explicitly, Poynting vectors were calculated and visualized inside the dielectric substrate between the metallic back-plate and an array of square patches. We also investigated several different structures with resonators of various shapes and found that the amount of facing edges of adjacent metallic patches critically determined the strength of the in-plane propagation. Through this study, we could establish the basis for the existence of in-plane propagation in MMs.

  6. In-plane vibrations of a rectangular plate: Plane wave expansion modelling and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arreola-Lucas, A.; Franco-Villafañe, J. A.; Báez, G.; Méndez-Sánchez, R. A.

    2015-04-01

    Theoretical and experimental results for in-plane vibrations of a uniform rectangular plate with free boundary conditions are obtained. The experimental setup uses electromagnetic-acoustic transducers and a vector network analyzer. The theoretical calculations were obtained using the plane wave expansion method applied to the in-plane thin plate vibration theory. The agreement between theory and experiment is excellent for the lower 95 modes covering a very wide frequency range from DC to 20 kHz. Some measured normal-mode wave amplitudes were compared with the theoretical predictions; very good agreement was observed. The excellent agreement of the classical theory of in-plane vibrations confirms its reliability up to very high frequencies

  7. Antenna arrays for producing plane whistler waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, Reiner; Urrutia, J. Manuel

    2015-11-01

    In a large uniform laboratory plasma helicon modes with mode numbers 1 - 8 have been excited. Using a circular phased array it is shown that positive and negative modes can propagate equally well. The phase fronts of helicons form Archimedian screw surfaces. The electromagnetic field carries linear momentum due to the axial propagation and angular momentum due to the azimuthal propagation. Associated with the orbital angular momentum is a transverse Doppler shift. It is demonstrated that a rapidly rotating ``receiver'' observes a different frequency than the wave. This implies that a rotating electron can undergo cyclotron resonance when moving against the field rotation. Analogous to the axial Doppler shift cyclotron damping and cyclotron instabilities are possible due to the field rotation in helicons. Since helicons exist in unbounded laboratory plasma they should also exist in space plasmas. The angular wave-particle interaction may be an alternate approach for the remedial of energetic electrons. Work supported by NSF/DOE.

  8. Boundary diffraction waves generated from Bessel-X pulses modeled by the FDTD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, K. B.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the boundary diffraction waves generated from Bessel-X pulses passing through a thin circular aperture, a thin circular disk, and a thick circular aperture are simulated by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Two Arago spots, which are formed from the interference of the boundary diffraction waves generated from the two branches of a Bessel-X pulse passing through the thin aperture or the thin disk, are observed clearly. The spots are shown to propagate superluminally relative to the main part of the pulse as reported previously in other papers. In particular, the boundary diffraction waves generated at the two edges located at the entrance and exit planes of the thick aperture are observed to result in four Arago spots. This observation is made possible by the fully vectorial nature of the FDTD method.

  9. Coherent control of atomic beam diffraction by standing light waves

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Bijoy K.

    2003-02-01

    Quantum interference is shown to deliver a means of regulating the diffraction pattern of a thermal atomic beam interacting with two standing-wave electric fields. Parameters have been identified to enhance the diffraction probability of one momentum component over the others, with specific application to Rb atoms.

  10. Adaptive density partitioning technique in the auxiliary plane wave method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurashige, Yuki; Nakajima, Takahito; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2006-01-01

    We have developed the adaptive density partitioning technique (ADPT) in the auxiliary plane wave method, in which a part of the density is expanded to plane waves, for the fast evaluation of Coulomb matrix. Our partitioning is based on the error estimations and allows us to control the accuracy and efficiency. Moreover, we can drastically reduce the core Gaussian products that are left in Gaussian representation (its analytical integrals is the bottleneck in this method). For the taxol molecule with 6-31G** basis, the core Gaussian products accounted only for 5% in submicrohartree error.

  11. Improved fake mode free plane wave expansion method.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Zhou, Wenjun; Chen, Wei; Liu, Anjin; Zheng, Wanhua

    2011-08-01

    We analyze the origin of the fake modes introduced by the plane wave expansion method with three-dimension (3D) supercell approximation. Through the detailed analysis of the energy distribution of fake modes and real modes, we propose the plane wave expansion-three planar-slab waveguides method to remove the fake modes and obtain the fake mode free band structure of a two-dimensional air hole photonic crystal slab. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that such a fake mode free photonic crystal band structure is presented. Our method is also definitely useful in designing other 3D devices.

  12. Inhomogeneous plane wave and the most energetic complex ray.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, M; Poncelet, O

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents a study on the wave surfaces of anisotropic solids. In addition to the classical and real rays, which are defined by the normal to the slowness surfaces, it is obtained complex rays, which are associated to specific inhomogeneous plane waves. Referring to the complex Christoffel's equation and to the Fermat's principle, an intrinsic equation can be associated to these complex rays. Limiting the study to principal planes and plotting the associated complex wave surfaces, it can be shown that four energetic rays always exist in any directions for both quasi-isotropic and anisotropic media (even beyond the cusp). Consequently, it is always possible to define four closed wave surfaces (real or not). PMID:12159950

  13. Optical method for inspecting LSI patterns using reflected diffraction waves.

    PubMed

    Kimura, S; Suda, K; Hase, S; Munakata, C

    1988-03-15

    An optical inspection method has been developed for finding defects in LSI lithographic patterns. A focused He-Ne laser beam scans the patterns on a wafer. The reflected diffraction waves around the wafer are observed. These diffraction waves indicate whether the patterns contain defects. To implement this judgment rapidly, signals of the waves characterizing the patterns are input directly into the address lines of random access memories. The system can detect a defect of ~0.8-microm diameter and inspect a 1-cm(2) chip in 9 s.

  14. Plane-wave analysis of solar acoustic-gravity waves: A (slightly) new approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogart, Richard S.; Sa, L. A. D.; Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Haber, Deborah A.; Toomre, Juri; Hill, Frank

    1995-01-01

    The plane-wave decomposition of the acoustic-gravity wave effects observed in the photosphere provides a computationally efficient technique that probes the structure of the upper convective zone and boundary. In this region, the flat sun approximation is considered as being reasonably accurate. A technique to be used for the systematic plane-wave analysis of Michelson Doppler imager data, as part of the solar oscillations investigation, is described. Estimates of sensitivity are presented, and the effects of using different planar mappings are discussed. The technique is compared with previous approaches to the three dimensional plane-wave problem.

  15. Plane shock wave interaction with a cylindrical water column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sembian, S.; Liverts, M.; Tillmark, N.; Apazidis, N.

    2016-05-01

    A complex system of waves propagating inside a water column due to the impact of plane shock wave is investigated both experimentally and numerically. Flow features, such as, focusing of expansion waves generating large negative pressure, nucleation of cavitation bubbles, and a re-circulation zone are observed and discussed qualitatively and quantitatively. Experiments are conducted on a 22 mm diametrical water column hit by shock waves with Mach numbers 1.75 and 2.4 in a newly constructed exploding wire facility. A new technique to create a properly shaped, repeatable, large diameter water column with straight walls is presented. Qualitative features of the flow are captured using the shadowgraph technique. With the aid of numerical simulations the wave motions inside the column are analyzed; the spatial location of the expansion wave focusing point and the corresponding negative peak pressures is estimated.

  16. Ultrawide phononic band gap for combined in-plane and out-of-plane waves.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Osama R; Hussein, Mahmoud I

    2011-12-01

    We consider two-dimensional phononic crystals formed from silicon and voids, and present optimized unit-cell designs for (1) out-of-plane, (2) in-plane, and (3) combined out-of-plane and in-plane elastic wave propagation. To feasibly search through an excessively large design space (~10(40) possible realizations) we develop a specialized genetic algorithm and utilize it in conjunction with the reduced Bloch mode expansion method for fast band-structure calculations. Focusing on high-symmetry plain-strain square lattices, we report unit-cell designs exhibiting record values of normalized band-gap size for all three categories. For the case of combined polarizations, we reveal a design with a normalized band-gap size exceeding 60%.

  17. Development of attenuation and diffraction corrections for linear and nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves radiating from a uniform line source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Zhang, Shuzeng; Cho, Sungjong; Li, Xiongbing

    2016-04-01

    In recent studies with nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves, harmonic generation measurements have been successfully employed to characterize material damage and microstructural changes, and found to be sensitive to early stages of damage process. A nonlinearity parameter of Rayleigh surface waves was derived and frequently measured to quantify the level of damage. The accurate measurement of the nonlinearity parameter generally requires making corrections for beam diffraction and medium attenuation. These effects are not generally known for nonlinear Rayleigh waves, and therefore not properly considered in most of previous studies. In this paper, the nonlinearity parameter for a Rayleigh surface wave is defined from the plane wave displacement solutions. We explicitly define the attenuation and diffraction corrections for fundamental and second harmonic Rayleigh wave beams radiated from a uniform line source. Attenuation corrections are obtained from the quasilinear theory of plane Rayleigh wave equations. To obtain closed-form expressions for diffraction corrections, multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) models are employed to represent the integral solutions derived from the quasilinear theory of the full two-dimensional wave equation without parabolic approximation. Diffraction corrections are presented for a couple of transmitter-receiver geometries, and the effects of making attenuation and diffraction corrections are examined through the simulation of nonlinearity parameter determination in a solid sample.

  18. Light Diffraction by Large Amplitude Ultrasonic Waves in Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Laszlo; Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    2016-01-01

    Light diffraction from ultrasound, which can be used to investigate nonlinear acoustic phenomena in liquids, is reported for wave amplitudes larger than that typically reported in the literature. Large amplitude waves result in waveform distortion due to the nonlinearity of the medium that generates harmonics and produces asymmetries in the light diffraction pattern. For standing waves with amplitudes above a threshold value, subharmonics are generated in addition to the harmonics and produce additional diffraction orders of the incident light. With increasing drive amplitude above the threshold a cascade of period-doubling subharmonics are generated, terminating in a region characterized by a random, incoherent (chaotic) diffraction pattern. To explain the experimental results a toy model is introduced, which is derived from traveling wave solutions of the nonlinear wave equation corresponding to the fundamental and second harmonic standing waves. The toy model reduces the nonlinear partial differential equation to a mathematically more tractable nonlinear ordinary differential equation. The model predicts the experimentally observed cascade of period-doubling subharmonics terminating in chaos that occurs with increasing drive amplitudes above the threshold value. The calculated threshold amplitude is consistent with the value estimated from the experimental data.

  19. Interaction of Oblique Instability Waves with a Nonlinear Plane Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wundrow, David W.; Hultgren, Lennart S.; Goldstein, M. E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the downstream evolution of a resonant triad of initially non-interacting linear Instability waves in a boundary layer with a weak adverse pressure gradient. The triad consists of a two-dimensional fundamental mode and a pair of equal-amplitude oblique modes that form a subharmonic standing wave in the spanwise direction. The growth rates are small and there is a well-defined common critical layer for these waves. As in Goldstein & Lee (1992), the wave interaction takes place entirely within this critical layer and is initially of the parametric-resonance type. This enhances the spatial growth rate of the subharmonic but does not affect that of the fundamental. However, in contrast to Goldstein & Lee (1992), the initial subharmonic amplitude is assumed to be small enough so that the fundamental can become nonlinear within its own critical layer before it is affected by the subharmonic. The subharmonic evolution is then dominated by the parametric-resonance effects and occurs on a much shorter streamwise scale than that of the fundamental. The subharmonic amplitude continues to increase during this parametric-resonance stage - even as the growth rate of the fundamental approaches zero - and the subharmonic eventually becomes large enough to influence the fundamental which causes both waves to evolve on the same shorter streamwise scale.

  20. Radiation of Electron in the Field of Plane Light Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Zelinsky, A.; Drebot, I.V.; Grigorev, Yu.N.; Zvonareva, O.D.; Tatchyn, R.; /SLAC

    2006-02-24

    Results of integration of a Lorentz equation for a relativistic electron moving in the field of running, plane, linear polarized electromagnetic wave are presented in the paper. It is shown that electron velocities in the field of the wave are almost periodic functions of time. For calculations of angular spectrum of electron radiation intensity expansion of the electromagnetic field in a wave zone into generalized Fourier series was used. Expressions for the radiation intensity spectrum are presented in the paper. Derived results are illustrated for electron and laser beam parameters of NSC KIPT X-ray generator NESTOR. It is shown that for low intensity of the interacting electromagnetic wave the results of energy and angular spectrum calculations in the frame of classical electrodynamics completely coincide with calculation results produced using quantum electrodynamics. Simultaneously, derived expressions give possibilities to investigate dependence of energy and angular Compton radiation spectrum on phase of interaction and the interacting wave intensity.

  1. Ultrafast vascular strain compounding using plane wave transmission.

    PubMed

    Hansen, H H G; Saris, A E C M; Vaka, N R; Nillesen, M M; de Korte, C L

    2014-03-01

    Deformations of the atherosclerotic vascular wall induced by the pulsating blood can be estimated using ultrasound strain imaging. Because these deformations indirectly provide information on mechanical plaque composition, strain imaging is a promising technique for differentiating between stable and vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. This paper first explains 1-D radial strain estimation as applied intravascularly in coronary arteries. Next, recent methods for noninvasive vascular strain estimation in a transverse imaging plane are discussed. Finally, a compounding technique that our group recently developed is explained. This technique combines motion estimates of subsequently acquired focused ultrasound images obtained at various insonification angles. However, because the artery moves and deforms during the multi-angle acquisition, errors are introduced when compounding. Recent advances in computational power have enabled plane wave ultrasound acquisition, which allows 100 times faster image acquisition and thus might resolve the motion artifacts. In this paper the performance of strain imaging using plane wave compounding is investigated using simulations of an artery with a vulnerable plaque and experimental data of a two-layered vessel phantom. The results show that plane wave compounding outperforms 0° focused strain imaging. For the simulations, the root mean squared error reduced by 66% and 50% for radial and circumferential strain, respectively. For the experiments, the elastographic signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratio (SNR(e) and CNR(e)) increased with 2.1 dB and 3.7 dB radially, and 5.6 dB and 16.2dB circumferentially. Because of the high frame rate, the plane wave compounding technique can even be further optimized and extended to 3D in future.

  2. Extended algorithm for the design of diffractive optical elements around the focal plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Rong; Shu, Fang-Jie; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Li, Yong-Ping

    2007-08-01

    We present a multiplane algorithm for three-dimensional uniform illumination. The large-diameter diffractive optical element simulated by this algorithm homogeneously concentrates more than 86.5% of the incident energy into a 200 μm length of columnar space around the focal plane. The intensity profile in the whole space is nearly flattop, and the beam's quality measured by the root mean square is less than 20.6%. The algorithm is very useful if a great deal of tolerance is required for the installation error of the optical system or if it is used for some particular application, such as uniform illumination on an incline plane.

  3. Gravitational scattering of zero-rest-mass plane waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Logi, W. K.; Kovacs, S. J., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The Feyman-diagram technique is used to calculate the differential cross sections for the scattering of zero-rest-mass plane waves of spin 0, 1, and 2 by linearized Schwarzschild and Kerr geometries in the long-wavelength weak-field limit. It is found that the polarization of right (or left) circularly polarized electromagnetic waves is unaffected by the scattering process (i.e., helicity is conserved) and that the two helicity (polarization) states of the photon are scattered differently by the Kerr geometry. This coupling between the photon helicity and the angular momentum of the scatterer also leads to a partial polarization of unpolarized incident light. For gravitational waves, on the other hand, there is neither helicity conservation nor helicity-dependent scattering; the angular momentum of the scatterer has no polarizing effect on incident unpolarized gravitational waves.

  4. Diffracted and head waves associated with waves on nonseparable surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barger, Raymond L.

    1992-01-01

    A theory is presented for computing waves radiated from waves on a smooth surface. With the assumption that attention of the surface wave is due only to radiation and not to dissipation in the surface material, the radiation coefficient is derived in terms of the attenuation factor. The excitation coefficient is determined by the reciprocity condition. Formulas for the shape and the spreading of the radiated wave are derived, and some sample calculations are presented. An investigation of resonant phase matching for nonseparable surfaces is presented with a sample calculation. A discussion of how such calculations might be related to resonant frequencies of nonseparable thin shell structures is included. A description is given of nonseparable surfaces that can be modeled in the vector that facilitates use of the appropriate formulas of differential geometry.

  5. Transition operators in electromagnetic-wave diffraction theory - General theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, G. E.

    1992-01-01

    A formal theory is developed for the scattering of time-harmonic electromagnetic waves from impenetrable immobile obstacles with given linear, homogeneous, and generally nonlocal boundary conditions of Leontovich (impedance) type for the wave of the obstacle's surface. The theory is modeled on the complete Green's function and the transition (T) operator in time-independent formal scattering theory of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. An expression for the differential scattering cross section for plane electromagnetic waves is derived in terms of certain matrix elements of the T operator for the obstacle.

  6. Holography and entropy bounds in the plane wave matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Mints, Aleksey L.

    2006-06-15

    As a quantum theory of gravity, matrix theory should provide a realization of the holographic principle, in the sense that a holographic theory should contain one binary degree of freedom per Planck area. We present evidence that Bekenstein's entropy bound, which is related to area differences, is manifest in the plane wave matrix model. If holography is implemented in this way, we predict crossover behavior at strong coupling when the energy exceeds N{sup 2} in units of the mass scale.

  7. High-Frequency Coupling to Cables for Plane Wave and Random Wave Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pissoort, D.; Vanhee, F.; Boesman, B.; Catrysse, J.; Vandenbosch, G.; Gielen, G.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, the high-frequency coupling from electromagnetic fields to cables is studied and this under (i) plane-wave conditions representing a susceptibility test in a semi-anechoic room and (ii) random wave conditions representing a more realistic environment with many reflections. Two set-ups are considered. First, a s imple wire above an infinite ground plane. Second, a more realistic set-up representing a desktop device with attached cables whose layout is according to EN 55016-2-3:2006 [1]. It is shown that for frequencies above 1 GHz the induced (worst-case) current at the side of the device under test can differ significantly between plane-wave and random wave conditions. Moreover, the random wave condition does necessarily not lead to the highest induced currents.

  8. Runup of tsunami waves on a plane beach: statistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenkulova, Ira; Pelinovsky, Efim; Sergeeva, Anna

    2010-05-01

    Tsunami waves approaching the coast frequently cause extensive coastal flooding, destruction of coastal constructions and loss of lives. Its destructivity can be intensified by the seische oscillations in bays and harbours, induced by tsunami waves. Meanwhile, the process of tsunami wave runup on the coast is usually studied for incident solitary-like disturbances: this is a typical input in laboratory and numerical experiments. Theoretically, this process is studied in the framework of nonlinear shallow-water theory with the use of the hodograph (Legendre) transformation. Analytical solutions are obtained for initial disturbances as a solitary wave: soliton, Gaussian and Lorentz pulses, N - waves and some other pulses of specific shapes. All solutions (theoretical and experimental) do not take into account the real long tsunami record, which usually contains seische oscillations. Such oscillations can be considered as a quasi-stationary random process with known statistics. In this paper the runup of irregular waves on the plane beach is studied in the framework of nonlinear shallow-water theory with an assumption of the non-breaking runup. Typical period of seische oscillations in harbours is 15 -45 min that provides validity of this assumption. Statistical analysis of the runup characteristics (water displacement and shoreline velocity) is carried out for an incident wave field with the Gaussian distribution. The probability density function of the runup characteristics is not Gaussian, and its deviation from the Gaussian distribution can be expressed through the breaking parameter or a self-similarity parameter.

  9. Numerical simulation of shock wave diffraction by TVD schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Victor Y. C.; Yee, H. C.

    1987-01-01

    An upwind total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme and a predictor-corrector symmetric TVD scheme were used to numerically simulate the blast wave diffraction on a stationary object. The objective is to help design an optimum configuration so that lateral motion is minimized and at the same time vortex shedding and flow separation are reduced during a blast wave encounter. Results are presented for a generic configuration for both a coarse grid and a fine grid to illustrate the global and local diffraction flow fields. Numerical experiments for the shock wave reflection on a wedge are also included to validate the current approach. Numerical study indicated that these TVD schemes are more stable and produced higher shock resolution than classical shock capturing methods such as the explicit MacCormack scheme.

  10. Plane-wave scattering by self-complementary metasurfaces in terms of electromagnetic duality and Babinet's principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Yosuke; Urade, Yoshiro; Nakanishi, Toshihiro; Kitano, Masao

    2013-11-01

    We investigate theoretically electromagnetic plane-wave scattering by self-complementary metasurfaces. By using Babinet's principle extended to metasurfaces with resistive elements, we show that the frequency-independent transmission and reflection are realized for normal incidence of a circularly polarized plane wave onto a self-complementary metasurface, even if there is diffraction. Next, we consider two special classes of self-complementary metasurfaces. We show that self-complementary metasurfaces with rotational symmetry can act as coherent perfect absorbers, and those with translational symmetry compatible with their self-complementarity can split the incident power equally, even for oblique incidences.

  11. Microbeam X-Ray Standing Wave and High Resolution Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kazimirov, A.; Bilderback, D.H.; Huang, R.; Sirenko, A.

    2004-05-12

    Post-focusing collimating optics are introduced as a tool to condition X-ray microbeams for the use in high-resolution X-ray diffraction and scattering techniques. As an example, a one-bounce imaging capillary and miniature Si(004) channel-cut crystal were used to produce a microbeam with 10 {mu}m size and an ultimate angular resolution of 2.5 arc sec. This beam was used to measure the strain in semiconductor microstructures by using X-ray high resolution diffraction and standing wave techniques to {delta}d/d < 5x10-4.

  12. Electromagnetic design of an all-diffractive millimeter-wave imaging system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Caihua; Shi, Shouyan; Prather, Dennis W

    2004-04-20

    We present the design and electromagnetic analysis of an all-diffractive millimeter-wave imaging system having a field of view of +/- 15 degrees. This system consists of two 16-level diffractive lenses, with the stop in contact with the first lens. By considering the Seidel aberrations for a diffractive lens and applying the corresponding stop shift formula, we established the expressions of third-order wave aberrations for this system. By setting all primary Seidel aberrations to zero and solving the corresponding system of equations, we obtained two sets of solutions for this two-element all-diffractive system, which totally compensate for all Seidel aberrations. To assess image system performance, we apply the finite-difference time-domain technique and a vector plane-wave spectrum method, in combination, to validate the performance of the system. To reduce the computational cost and thereby enable the complete electromagnetic analysis of the system, a four-step analysis procedure has been developed and applied as an electromagnetic system model.

  13. Electromagnetic Design of an All-Diffractive Millimeter-Wave Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Caihua; Shi, Shouyan; Prather, Dennis W.

    2004-04-01

    We present the design and electromagnetic analysis of an all-diffractive millimeter-wave imaging system having a field of view of +/-15°. This system consists of two 16-level diffractive lenses, with the stop in contact with the first lens. By considering the Seidel aberrations for a diffractive lens and applying the corresponding stop shift formula, we established the expressions of third-order wave aberrations for this system. By setting all primary Seidel aberrations to zero and solving the corresponding system of equations, we obtained two sets of solutions for this two-element all-diffractive system, which totally compensate for all Seidel aberrations. To assess image system performance, we apply the finite-difference time-domain technique and a vector plane-wave spectrum method, in combination, to validate the performance of the system. To reduce the computational cost and thereby enable the complete electromagnetic analysis of the system, a four-step analysis procedure has been developed and applied as an electromagnetic system model.

  14. Waveguide characteristics of coupled in-plane waves.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jie; Lu, Jing; Qiu, Xiaojun

    2012-06-01

    In-plane waves in a waveguide made from a thin plate are described by a superposition of a set of orthogonal functions that satisfy the edge conditions of the waveguide. Due to the Poisson and shear effects, the displacement components of the in-plane waves along the two in-plane orthogonal coordinates are coupled and this coupling affects the propagation and spatial properties of the waveguide modes. The orthogonal functions and their associated wavenumbers represent the characteristics of the uncoupled modes of the waveguide where the above mentioned couplings are ignored. This study demonstrates that the characteristics of the waveguide modes are determined by the couplings of the uncoupled mode pairs, which become significant when the pairs satisfy the conditions of spatial coincidence. At some frequencies, certain waveguide modes can be determined by a single pair of uncoupled modes. For this case, the analytical solution for the waveguide modes exists and provides both a qualitative and quantitative interpretation of the characteristics of the waveguide mode.

  15. Plane-wave spectrum approach for tilted waveguides.

    PubMed

    Einziger, P D; Salzman, J

    1988-12-01

    Scattering of guided modes from an abruptly terminated waveguide is analyzed through an integral-equation formulation. First the boundary-value problem for a plane-stratified waveguide with arbitrary profile is reduced to a canonical system of surface integral equations. A Born-type iterative procedure is then employed to obtain a tractable solution of the scattering field at the termination. The specific choice of a tilted planar termination renders an explicit closed-form expression for the first Born approximation, represented by the plane-wave spectrum of the incident modal field modified by the appropriate Fresnel coefficient. Thus previous ad hoc formulations can be recovered as limiting cases of the suggested rigorous expansion scheme.

  16. Decoding the matrix: Coincident membranes on the plane wave

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Mints, Aleksey L.

    2006-03-15

    At the core of nonperturbative theories of quantum gravity lies the holographic encoding of bulk data in large matrices. At present this mapping is poorly understood. The plane wave matrix model provides a laboratory for isolating aspects of this problem in a controlled setting. At large boosts, configurations of concentric membranes become superselection sectors, whose exact spectra are known. From the bulk point of view, one expects product states of individual membranes to be contained within the full spectrum. However, for non-BPS states this inclusion relation is obscured by Gauss law constraints. Its validity rests on nontrivial relations in representation theory, which we identify and verify by explicit computation.

  17. Various approximations made in augmented-plane-wave calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacalis, N. C.; Blathras, K.; Thomaides, P.; Papaconstantopoulos, D. A.

    1985-10-01

    The effects of various approximations used in performing augmented-plane-wave calculations were studied for elements of the fifth and sixth columns of the Periodic Table, namely V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, and W. Two kinds of approximations have been checked: (i) variation of the number of k points used to iterate to self-consistency, and (ii) approximations for the treatment of the core states. In addition a comparison between relativistic and nonrelativistic calculations is made, and an approximate method of calculating the spin-orbit splitting is given.

  18. Measuring In-Plane Displacements with Variable Sensitivity Using Diffractive Optic Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Robert L.; Gilbert, John A.; Cole, Helen J.; Ashley, Paul R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper introduces a method called diffractive optic interferometry (DOI) which allows in-plane displacement components to be measured with variable sensitivity. DOI relies on binary optical elements fabricated as phase-type Dammann gratings which produce multiple diffraction orders of nearly equal intensity. Sensitivity is varied by combining the different wavefronts produced by a conjugate pair of these binary optical elements; a transmission element is used to produce several illumination beams while a reflective element, replicated on the surface of a specimen, provides the reference for the undeformed state. The steps taken to design and fabricate these binary optical elements are described. The specimen grating is characterized, and tested on a disk subjected to diametrical compression. Overall, the results are excellent, with experimental data agreeing to within a few percent of the theoretical predictions.

  19. Neutron diffraction investigation of an in-plane biaxial fatigued stainless steel sample of cruciform geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taran, Yu V.; Balagurov, A. M.; Sheverev, S. G.; Schreiber, J.; Korsunsky, A. M.; Vorster, W. J. J.; Bomas, H.; Stoeberl, C.

    2008-03-01

    Fatigue and fracture under multiaxial stresses are among the most important current research topics aimed at ensuring improved reliability of industrial components. An ex situ in-plane biaxial low cycle fatigued sample of cruciform geometry from austenitic stainless steel AISI 321 H was investigated on the FSD stress-diffractometer at the IBR-2 pulsed nuclear reactor by using the neutron strain scanner and the uniaxial stress rig. The phase composition of fatigued material was determined and the residual macrostresses and phase microstresses were measured. To the best of our knowledge, no neutron diffraction investigations of materials subjected to biaxial loading have been previously carried out. The first results of the neutron diffraction experiment are presented and discussed.

  20. Compact range reflector analysis using the plane wave spectrum approach with an adjustable sampling rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, James P.; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    1991-06-01

    An improved method for determining the test zone field of compact range reflectors is presented. The plane wave spectrum (PWS) approach is used to obtain the test zone field from knowledge of the reflector aperture field distribution. The method is particularly well suited to the analysis of reflectors with a linearly serrated rim for reduced edge diffraction. Computation of the PWS of the reflector aperture field is facilitated by a closed-form expression for the Fourier transform of a polygonal window function. Inverse transformation in the test zone region is accomplished using a fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm with a properly adjusted sampling rate (which is a function of both the reflector size and the distance from the reflector). The method is validated by comparison with results obtained using surface current and aperture field integration techniques. The performance of several serrated reflectors is evaluated in order to observe the effects of edge diffraction on the test zone fields.

  1. Plane shock wave studies of Westerly granite and Nugget sandstone

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.B.; Anderson, G.D.

    1980-12-01

    Plane shock wave experiments were performed by using a light-gas gun on dry and water-saturated Westerly granite and dry Nugget sandstone. Changes in the slopes of the shock velocity versus particle velocity curves at 2 to 3 GPa and 1 to 2 GPa for dry granite and for dry sandstone, respectively, are attributed to the onset of pore collapse. However, there is little apparent loss of shear strength in either dry rock over the stress range of the experiments (i.e., 9.3 GPa in Westerly granite and 9.2 GPa in Nugget sandstone). Agreement between the shock wave data and quasistatic, uniaxial strain data for the dry rock implies the absence of rate-dependence in uniaxial strain. The shock data on saturated granite agree well with those for dry granite, thus suggesting there was no loss in shear strength as a result of pore pressure buildup.

  2. Comparative analysis on viewing angle change in Fresnel and Fourier holographic images reconstructed by a tilted plane wave.

    PubMed

    Chae, Byung Gyu

    2014-05-20

    We carry out a comparative analysis on a viewing angle change in Fresnel and Fourier holographic images reconstructed by a tilted plane wave. A tilted plane wave illuminating an on-axis hologram generates a diffractive wave carrying the holographic image in a paraxial region of a new diffraction axis. The reconstructed image in the Fresnel hologram is deformed along the new viewing direction, which is well described as Affine transformation. In the Fourier holographic image, the replica of the image is formed without its deformation when the hologram is placed in the front focal plane of the lens, whereas in the case of a hologram that is located at a distance different from a focal length, image deformation arises. This property is investigated through numerical simulation based on a wide-angle diffraction phenomenon. We also perform a similar interpretation for high-order diffraction images appearing in the sampled Fourier hologram and discuss a method for enlarging the viewing angle of the holographic image.

  3. A large-scale wave-current coupled module with wave diffraction effect on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Zhang, NingChuan

    2014-07-01

    Based on the extended mild-slope equation, a large-scale wave module is developed. By combining the eikonal equation and the modified wave action equation, the wave model can account for diffraction in most situations such as in the lee of islands and breakwaters, and using unstructured meshes provides great flexibility for modelling the wave in the complex geomorphology of barriers and islands, also allowing for refinement of the grid resolution within computationally important domains. The numerical implementation of the module is based on the explicit second-order upwind finite-volume schemes in geographic space, the Flux-Corrected Transport (FCT) algorithm in frequency space and the implicit Crank-Nicolson method in directional space. The three-dimensional hydrodynamic module is then modified to couple with the wave model, where the wave readily provides the depth-dependent radiation stress and the wave-induced turbulence coefficient for the current fields, and the wave propagation takes into account the current-induced advection, refraction and diffraction of wave energy and the effect of water level. The applicability of the proposed model to calculate Snell's Law, wave transformation over the breakwaters and the elliptic shoal, wave propagation over the rip current field and the undertow on a sloping beach is evaluated. Numerical results show that the present model makes better predictions of the near-shore wave propagation and complex three-dimensional (3D) near-shore circulation driven by the waves, considering analytical solutions and experimental values.

  4. A plane wave generation method by wave number domain point focusing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ji-Ho; Choi, Jung-Woo; Kim, Yang-Hann

    2010-11-01

    A method for generation of a wave-field that is a plane wave is described. This method uses an array of loudspeakers phased so that the field in the wave-number domain is nearly concentrated at a point, this point being at the wave-number vector of the desired plane wave. The method described here for such a wave-number concentration makes use of an expansion in spherical harmonics, and requires a relatively small number of measurement points for a good approximate achievement of a plane wave. The measurement points are on a spherical surface surrounding the array of loudspeakers. The input signals for the individual loudspeakers can be derived without a matrix inversion or without explicit assumptions about the loudspeakers. The mathematical development involves spherical harmonics and three-dimensional Fourier transforms. Some numerical examples are given, with various assumptions concerning the nature of the loudspeakers, that support the premise that the method described in the present paper may be useful in applications.

  5. Love wave tomography in southern Africa from a two-plane-wave inversion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Aibing; Li, Lun

    2015-08-01

    Array measurements of surface wave phase velocity can be biased by multipath arrivals. A two-plane-wave (TPW) inversion method, in which the incoming wavefield is represented by the interference of two plane waves, is able to account for the multipath effect and solve for laterally varying phase velocity. Despite broad applications of the TPW method, its usage has been limited to Rayleigh waves. In this study, we have modified the TPW approach and applied it to Love waves. Main modifications include decomposing Love wave amplitude on the transverse component to x and y components in a local Cartesian system for each earthquake and using both components in the inversion. Such decomposition is also applied to the two plane waves to predict the incoming wavefield of an earthquake. We utilize fundamental mode Love wave data recorded at 85 broad-band stations from 69 distant earthquakes and solved for phase velocity in nine frequency bands with centre periods ranging from 34 to 100 s. The average phase velocity in southern Africa increases from 4.30 km s-1 at 34 s to 4.87 km s-1 at 100 s. Compared with predicted Love wave phase velocities from the published 1-D SV velocity model and radial anisotropy model in the region, these values are compatible from 34 to 50 s and slightly higher beyond 50 s, indicating radial anisotropy of VSH > VSV in the shallow upper mantle. A high Love wave velocity anomaly is imaged in the central and southern Kaapvaal craton at all periods, reflecting a cold and depleted cratonic lithosphere. A low velocity anomaly appears in the Bushveld Complex from 34 to 50 s, which can be interpreted as being caused by high iron content from an intracratonic magma intrusion. The modified TPW method provides a new way to measure Love wave phase velocities in a regional array, which are essential in developing radial anisotropic models and understanding the Earth structure in the crust and upper mantle.

  6. Acoustic plane wave preferential orientation of metal oxide superconducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Tolt, Thomas L.; Poeppel, Roger B.

    1991-01-01

    A polycrystalline metal oxide such as YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-X (where 0plane, a high degree of crystalline axes alignment is provided between adjacent grains permitting the conduction of high current densities. With the superconducting metal oxide in the form of a ceramic slip which has not yet set, orientation of the crystal basal planes parallel with the direction of desired current flow is accomplished by an applied acoustic plane wave in the acoustic or ultrasonic frequency range (either progressive or standing) in applying a torque to each crystal particle. The ceramic slip is then set and fired by conventional methods to produce a conductor with preferentially oriented grains and substantially enhanced current carrying capacity.

  7. The implementation of holography in the plane wave matrix model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mints, Aleksey Leonidovich

    It is expected that at the core of nonperturbative theories of quantum gravity, such as M-theory, lies the realization of the holographic principle, in the sense that a holographic theory should contain one binary degree of freedom per Planck area. Present understanding of such theories requires the holographic encoding of bulk data in large matrices. Currently this mapping is poorly understood. The plane wave matrix model provides a laboratory for isolating aspects of this problem in a controlled setting. At large boosts, configurations of concentric membranes become superselection sectors, whose exact spectra are known. From the bulk point of view one expects product states of individual membranes to be contained within the full spectrum. However, for non-BPS states this inclusion relation is obscured by Gauss law constraints. Its validity rests on nontrivial relations in representation theory, which we identify and verify by explicit computation. Beyond the decoding and partial identification of selected states in large matrices, one would like to get a better understanding of the holographic state counting of these degrees of freedom, i.e., entropy. Contrary to the naive expectation of holography realized in terms of the covariant entropy bound, we present evidence that it is the Bekenstein entropy bound, which is related to area differences, that is manifest in the plane wave matrix model. If holography is implemented in this way, we predict crossover behavior at strong coupling when the energy exceeds N2 in units of the mass scale.

  8. Bifurcations of Traveling Wave Solutions of a Nonlinear Wave Model Created by Diffraction in Periodic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jibin; Chen, Fengjuan

    In this paper, we consider a model created by diffraction in periodic media. The study of the traveling wave solutions for this model derives a planar dynamical system with a singular straight line. On the basis of the investigation of the dynamical behavior and bifurcations of solutions of the planar dynamical systems, we obtain all possible explicit exact parametric representations of solutions (including solitary wave solutions, periodic wave solutions, periodic peakon solutions, compactons, etc.) under different parameter conditions.

  9. Terahertz 3D printed diffractive lens matrices for field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays.

    PubMed

    Szkudlarek, Krzesimir; Sypek, Maciej; Cywiński, Grzegorz; Suszek, Jarosław; Zagrajek, Przemysław; Feduniewicz-Żmuda, Anna; Yahniuk, Ivan; Yatsunenko, Sergey; Nowakowska-Siwińska, Anna; Coquillat, Dominique; But, Dmytro B; Rachoń, Martyna; Węgrzyńska, Karolina; Skierbiszewski, Czesław; Knap, Wojciech

    2016-09-01

    We present the concept, the fabrication processes and the experimental results for materials and optics that can be used for terahertz field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays. More specifically, we propose 3D printed arrays of a new type - diffractive multi-zone lenses of which the performance is superior to that of previously used mono-zone diffractive or refractive elements and evaluate them with GaN/AlGaN field-effect transistor terahertz detectors. Experiments performed in the 300-GHz atmospheric window show that the lens arrays offer both a good efficiency and good uniformity, and may improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the terahertz field-effect transistor detectors by more than one order of magnitude. In practice, we tested 3 × 12 lens linear arrays with printed circuit board THz detector arrays used in postal security scanners and observed significant signal-to-noise improvements. Our results clearly show that the proposed technology provides a way to produce cost-effective, reproducible, flat optics for large-size field-effect transistor THz-detector focal plane arrays.

  10. First results from a next-generation off-plane X-ray diffraction grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntaffer, Randall; DeRoo, Casey; Schultz, Ted; Gantner, Brennan; Tutt, James; Holland, Andrew; O'Dell, Stephen; Gaskin, Jessica; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey; Zhang, William W.; Chan, Kai-Wing; Biskach, Michael; McClelland, Ryan; Iazikov, Dmitri; Wang, Xinpeng; Koecher, Larry

    2013-08-01

    Future NASA X-ray spectroscopy missions will require high throughput, high resolving power grating spectrometers. Off-plane reflection gratings are capable of meeting the performance requirements needed to realize the scientific goals of these missions. We have identified a novel grating fabrication method that utilizes common lithographic and microfabrication techniques to produce the high fidelity groove profile necessary to achieve this performance. Application of this process has produced an initial pre-master that exhibits a radial (variable line spacing along the groove dimension), high density (> 6000 grooves/mm), laminar profile. This pre-master has been tested for diffraction efficiency at the BESSY II synchrotron light facility and diffracts up to 55 % of incident light into usable spectral orders. Furthermore, tests of spectral resolving power show that these gratings are capable of obtaining resolving powers well above 1300 ( λ/Δ λ) with limitations due to the test apparatus, not the gratings. Obtaining these results has provided confidence that this fabrication process is capable of producing off-plane reflection gratings for the next generation of X-ray observatories.

  11. Terahertz 3D printed diffractive lens matrices for field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays.

    PubMed

    Szkudlarek, Krzesimir; Sypek, Maciej; Cywiński, Grzegorz; Suszek, Jarosław; Zagrajek, Przemysław; Feduniewicz-Żmuda, Anna; Yahniuk, Ivan; Yatsunenko, Sergey; Nowakowska-Siwińska, Anna; Coquillat, Dominique; But, Dmytro B; Rachoń, Martyna; Węgrzyńska, Karolina; Skierbiszewski, Czesław; Knap, Wojciech

    2016-09-01

    We present the concept, the fabrication processes and the experimental results for materials and optics that can be used for terahertz field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays. More specifically, we propose 3D printed arrays of a new type - diffractive multi-zone lenses of which the performance is superior to that of previously used mono-zone diffractive or refractive elements and evaluate them with GaN/AlGaN field-effect transistor terahertz detectors. Experiments performed in the 300-GHz atmospheric window show that the lens arrays offer both a good efficiency and good uniformity, and may improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the terahertz field-effect transistor detectors by more than one order of magnitude. In practice, we tested 3 × 12 lens linear arrays with printed circuit board THz detector arrays used in postal security scanners and observed significant signal-to-noise improvements. Our results clearly show that the proposed technology provides a way to produce cost-effective, reproducible, flat optics for large-size field-effect transistor THz-detector focal plane arrays. PMID:27607620

  12. Exact solution to plane-wave scattering by an ideal "left-handed" wedge.

    PubMed

    Monzon, Cesar; Forester, Donald W; Smith, Douglas; Loschialpo, Peter

    2006-02-01

    An exact analytical solution to the problem of plane-wave diffraction by a penetrable left-handed medium (LHM) epsilon = micro = -1 wedge of arbitrary angle (subject to valid physical constraints) is presented. Standard analysis involving discontinuous angular eigenfunctions and even/odd symmetry decomposition resulted in a discrete spectrum leading to a series solution resembling the traditional perfect electric conductor wedge solution but exhibiting the expected negative refraction phenomenology. Numerical results are presented, some of which seemed paradoxical but are explainable by classical means. A new type of illusory edge radiation is observed and explained. Also, a novel edge-launched interface standing wave is observed on the directly illuminated side. The exact analytical solution is verified by comparison with finite-difference time-domain simulation on causal LHM materials.

  13. Resonant Enhancement of Charge Density Wave Diffraction in the Rare-Earth Tri-Tellurides

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.S.; Sorini, A.P.; Yi, M.; Chuang, Y.D.; Moritz, B.; Yang, W.L.; Chu, J.-H.; Kuo, H.H.; Gonzalez, A.G.Cruz; Fisher, I.R.; Hussain, Z.; Devereau, T.P.; Shen, Z.X.

    2012-05-15

    We performed resonant soft X-ray diffraction on known charge density wave (CDW) compounds, rare earth tri-tellurides. Near the M{sub 5} (3d - 4f) absorption edge of rare earth ions, an intense diffraction peak is detected at a wavevector identical to that of CDW state hosted on Te{sub 2} planes, indicating a CDW-induced modulation on the rare earth ions. Surprisingly, the temperature dependence of the diffraction peak intensity demonstrates an exponential increase at low temperatures, vastly different than that of the CDW order parameter. Assuming 4f multiplet splitting due to the CDW states, we present a model to calculate X-ray absorption spectrum and resonant profile of the diffraction peak, agreeing well with experimental observations. Our results demonstrate a situation where the temperature dependence of resonant X-ray diffraction peak intensity is not directly related to the intrinsic behavior of the order parameter associated with the electronic order, but is dominated by the thermal occupancy of the valence states.

  14. Superstring theory in AdS(3) and plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, John Sang Won

    This thesis is devoted to the study of string theory in AdS 3 and its applications to recent developments in string theory. The difficulties associated with formulating a consistent string theory in AdS3 and its underlying SL(2, R) WZW model are explained. We describe how these difficulties can be overcome by assuming that the SL(2, R) WZW model contains spectral flow symmetry. The existence of spectral flow symmetry in the fully quantum treatment is proved by a calculation of the one-loop string partition function. We consider Euclidean AdS 3 with the time direction periodically identified, and compute the torus partition function in this background. The string spectrum can be reproduced by viewing the one-loop calculation as the free energy of a gas of strings, thus providing a rigorous proof of the results based on spectral flow arguments. Next, we turn to spacetimes that are quotients of AdS 3, which include the BTZ black hole and conical spaces. Strings propagating in the conical space are described by taking an orbifold of strings in AdS3. We show that the twisted states of these orbifolds can be obtained by fractional spectral flow. We show that the shift in the ground state energy usually associated with orbifold twists is absent in this case, and offer a unified framework in which to view spectral flow. Lastly, we consider the RNS superstrings in AdS 3 x S3 x M , where M may be K3 or T 4, based on supersymmetric extensions of SL(2, R) and SU(2) WZW models. We construct the physical states and calculate the spectrum. A subsector of this theory describes strings propagating in the six dimensional plane wave obtained by the Penrose limit of AdS3 x S3 x M . We reproduce the plane wave spectrum by taking J and the radius to infinity. We show that the plane wave spectrum actually coincides with the large J spectrum at fixed radius, i.e. in AdS3 x S3. Relation to some recent topics of interest such as the Frolov-Tseytlin string and strings with critical tension

  15. Numerical investigation of diffraction of acoustic waves by phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseyenko, Rayisa P.; Declercq, Nico F.; Laude, Vincent

    2012-05-01

    Diffraction as well as transmission of acoustic waves by two-dimensional phononic crystals (PCs) composed of steel rods in water are investigated in this paper. The finite element simulations were performed in order to compute pressure fields generated by a line source that are incident on a finite size PC. Such field maps are analyzed based on the complex band structure for the infinite periodic PC. Finite size computations indicate that the exponential decrease of the transmission at deaf frequencies is much stronger than that in Bragg band gaps.

  16. Initial Operation of S-Band Plane Wave Transformer Photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xiaodong; Pellegrini, Claudio; Rosenzweig, James; Telfer, Soren; Physics, Dept Of; Astronomy Team

    2000-04-01

    An integrated S-Band RF photoinjector based on the plane wave transformer (PWT) is being built and operated in the Particle Beam Physics Laboratory at UCLA. This novel structure integrates a photocathode directly into a PWT Linac making the structure simple and compact. Due to the strong coupling between each adjacent cell, this structure is relatively easy to fabricate and operate. This photoinjector can provide high brightness beams at energies of 15 to 20MeV, with emittance less than 1mm-mrad at charge of 1 nC. These short-pulse beams can be used in various applications: space charge dominated beam physics studies, plasma lenses, plasma accelerators, free-electron laser microbunching techniques, and SASE-FEL physics studies. It will also provide commercial opportunities in chemistry, biology and medicine. The initial operation of the PWT photoinjector with high RF power is described. A comparation of experimental result and theoretical design is also discussed.

  17. Six-mm, plane-wave shock driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Alan M.; Chau, Henry H.

    1994-07-01

    A 6-mm-diameter, plane-wave shock generation system has been developed and characterized as a laboratory bench driver for small scale experiments. The driver is based on an exploding-foil-driven slapper used either directly or to initiate an HE pellet. The slapper is driven by a low-inductance fireset with burst currents on the order of 30 kA and burst times of about 250 ns, with time-to-burst jitter under 10 ns. Both the slapper impact and the detonation breakout of the pellet have been measured to be flat to within 10 ns over a 6-mm diameter. Fabry-Perot velocimetry of impacts with LiF crystals were used to characterize shock pressures and durations. Attenuator plates and flyers driven by the HE were also measured, which provided a variety of available pulse shapes and data for modeling efforts.

  18. Six-mm, plane-wave shock driver

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A.M.; Chau, H.H.

    1993-06-14

    A 6-mm-diameter, plane-wave shock generation system has been developed and characterized as a laboratory bench driver for small scale experiments. The driver is based on an exploding-foil-driven slapper used either directly or to initiate an HE pellet. The slapper is driven by a low-inductance fireset with burst currents on the order of 30 kA and burst times of about 250ns, with a time-to-burst jitter under 10ns. Both the slapper impact and the detonation breakout of the pellet have been measured to be flat to within 10ns over a 6-mm diameter. Fabry-Perot velocimetry of impacts with LiF crystals were used to characterize shock pressures and durations. Attenuator plates and flyers driven by the HE were also measured, which provided a variety of available pulse shapes and data for modeling efforts.

  19. Six-mm, plane-wave shock driver

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A.M.; Chau, H.H. )

    1994-07-10

    A 6-mm-diameter, plane-wave shock generation system has been developed and characterized as a laboratory bench driver for small scale experiments. The driver is based on an exploding-foil-driven slapper used either directly or to initiate an HE pellet. The slapper is driven by a low-inductance fireset with burst currents on the order of 30 kA and burst times of about 250 ns, with time-to-burst jitter under 10 ns. Both the slapper impact and the detonation breakout of the pellet have been measured to be flat to within 10 ns over a 6-mm diameter. Fabry-Perot velocimetry of impacts with LiF crystals were used to characterize shock pressures and durations. Attenuator plates and flyers driven by the HE were also measured, which provided a variety of available pulse shapes and data for modeling efforts. [copyright]American Institute of Physics

  20. Ultrafast acousto-optic imaging with ultrasonic plane waves.

    PubMed

    Laudereau, Jean-Baptiste; Grabar, Alexander A; Tanter, Mickaël; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Ramaz, François

    2016-02-22

    Due to multiple light scattering inside biological tissues, deep non-invasive optical medical imaging is very challenging. Acousto-optic imaging is a technique coupling ultrasound and light that allows recovering optical contrast at depths of few centimeters with a millimeter resolution. Recent advances in acousto-optic imaging are using short focused ultrasound pulses often averaged over several hundred or thousand pulses. As the pulsing rate of commercial probes is limited to about few ultrasound cycles every 100 μs, acquiring an acousto-optic image usually takes several tens of seconds due to the high number of acoustic pulses excitation. We propose here a new acousto-optic imaging technique based on the use of ultrasound plane waves instead of focused ones that allows increasing drastically the imaging rate. PMID:26907033

  1. The angular apodization in coherent plane-wave compounding.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Molares, Alfonso; Torp, Hans; Denarie, Bastien; Løvstakken, Lasse

    2015-11-01

    This article describes the relation between apodization in conventional focused imaging and apodization in coherent plane-wave compounding (CPWC). We pose the hypothesis that equivalent transmit beams can be produced with both methods if the transmit apodization is adequately transformed. We derive a relation between apodization in CPWC and in synthetic transmit aperture imaging (STAI), which we argue to be equivalent to conventional optimal multifocus imaging. We find that under certain conditions, the transformation of the apodization becomes trivial and the same window used in STAI can be applied for CPWC but extended to the whole angle sequence. We test the hypothesis with in silico data and find that the transformed apodization accurately mimics the objective transmit apodization, with differences in the lateral resolution between 3% and 6%. PMID:26559630

  2. Diffraction of Rayleigh wave by simple surface irregularity using boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami Haghighat, Abbas

    2015-06-01

    The topographic amplification effect is studied in this paper in the case of a semi-circular canyon under incident Rayleigh wave. Time-frequency domain boundary element method has been applied to investigate the wave diffraction phenomena. The model consists of a semi-circular canyon cut from an isotropic elastic half plane. The total response is decomposed into free field motion and scattered wave field. The former can be constructed analytically by superposing on incident and reflected Rayleigh waves in the half plane and the later by using boundary element method with linear elements. The analyses are performed in the frequency domain and then converted into time domain using fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm. It is shown that the weak and strong singularities in the governing integral equations for linear elements can be removed by analytical approaches. Different ranges of Rayleigh wavelengths from low to high are considered. The results are presented versus dimensionless frequency and distance. A limiting value for Rayleigh wavelength can be recognized beyond which the canyon has no important effects on scattering of harmonic incident waves. Furthermore, a parametric study has been performed for different values of Poisson’s ratios. The published works in the effects of this parameter are somewhat few and limited to specific values of Poisson’s ratio. Finally, the spatial variations of surface displacements for the Rayleigh wave impulse of Ricker wavelet type are obtained. The spatial distribution shows the generation of backward-scattered Rayleigh wave which its intensity depends on predominant frequency of the input impulse as well as Poisson’s ratio of the medium. Dynamic responses of the points just located at the edges of the semi-circular canyon are compared to each other which accounts for the isolation efficiency of the canyon.

  3. Formation of wave packets in electron diffraction on crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanning, Robert; Bahrim, Cristian

    2012-02-01

    Measurements of electron diffraction typically reveal the atomic structure of crystals and allow finding the length of chemical bonds. The effective electronic charge of each atom in the crystal acts upon the incident electron beam as a netting of narrow pinholes, and Fourier transforms the unique deBroglie wavelength of the projectile electron accelerated at fixed voltage into a wave packet. Using the uncertainty principle one can understand the mechanism that makes an incident electron to become a wave packet travelling inside the crystal at a group velocity identical with the initial speed of the projectile electron. Furthermore, the Pauli Exclusion Principle allows us to understand the fast passage of the projectile electron through the crystal and also, it allows the evaluation of the characteristic time for electron transmission. The project was sponsored by the STAIRSTEP program under the NSF-DUE grant# 0757057.

  4. Laboratory modeling of edge wave generation over a plane beach by breaking waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abcha, Nizar; Ezersky, Alexander; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2015-04-01

    Edge waves play an important role in coastal hydrodynamics: in sediment transport, in formation of coastline structure and coastal bottom topography. Investigation of physical mechanisms leading to the edge waves generation allows us to determine their effect on the characteristics of spatially periodic patterns like crescent submarine bars and cusps observed in the coastal zone. In the present paper we investigate parametric excitation of edge wave with frequency two times less than the frequency of surface wave propagating perpendicular to the beach. Such mechanism of edge wave generation has been studied previously in a large number of papers using the assumption of non-breaking waves. This assumption was used in theoretical calculations and such conditions were created in laboratory experiments. In the natural conditions, the wave breaking is typical when edge waves are generated at sea beach. We study features of such processes in laboratory experiments. Experiments were performed in the wave flume of the Laboratory of Continental and Coast Morphodynamics (M2C), Caen. The flume is equipment with a wave maker controlled by computer. To model a plane beach, a PVC plate is placed at small angle to the horizontal bottom. Several resistive probes were used to measure characteristics of waves: one of them was used to measure free surface displacement near the wave maker and two probes were glued on the inclined plate. These probes allowed us to measure run-up due to parametrically excited edge waves. Run-up height is determined by processing a movie shot by high-speed camera. Sub-harmonic generation of standing edge waves is observed for definite control parameters: edge waves represent themselves a spatial mode with wavelength equal to double width of the flume; the frequency of edge wave is equal to half of surface wave frequency. Appearance of sub-harmonic mode instability is studied using probes and movie processing. The dependence of edge wave exponential

  5. Plane-wave theory of three-dimensional magnonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, M.; Puszkarski, H.

    2008-02-01

    We use the plane-wave method to determine spin-wave spectra of three-dimensional magnonic crystals (the magnetic counterpart of photonic crystals) composed of two different ferromagnetic materials. The scattering centers in the magnonic crystal considered are ferromagnetic spheroids (spheres being a special case) distributed in sites of a cubic (sc, fcc, or bcc) lattice embedded in a matrix of a different ferromagnetic material. We demonstrate that magnonic gaps in such structures occur at spontaneous magnetization contrast and/or exchange contrast values above a certain critical level, which depends on the lattice type. Optimum conditions for magnonic gaps to open are offered by the structure in which the scattering centers are the most densely packed (the fcc lattice). We show that in all three lattice types considered the reduced width of the gap (i.e., the width referred to the gap center) is, in good approximation, a linear function of both the exchange contrast and the magnetization contrast. Also, the gap width proves sensitive to scattering center deformation, and its maximum value to correspond to a scattering center shape close to a sphere. Moreover, our numerical results seem to indicate that dipolar interactions in general result in an effective reduction of the gap width, but their impact only becomes of importance when the lattice constant of the cubic magnonic structure is greater than the ferromagnetic exchange length of the matrix material.

  6. Reflection of cylindrical converging shock wave over a plane wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fu; Si, Ting; Zhai, Zhigang; Luo, Xisheng; Yang, Jiming; Lu, Xiyun

    2016-08-01

    The cylindrical converging shock reflection over a plane wedge is investigated experimentally and numerically in a specially designed shock tube which converts a planar shock into a cylindrical one. When the converging shock is moving along the wedge, both the shock strength and the incident angle are changing, which provides the possibility for the wave transition. The results show that both regular reflection (RR) and Mach reflection (MR) are found on the wedge with different initial incident angles. The wave transitions from direct Mach reflection (DiMR) to inverse Mach reflection (InMR) and further to transitioned regular reflection (TRR) are observed with appropriate initial incident angles. The instability development in the shear layer and strong vortices formation near the wall are evident, which are ascribed not only to the interaction of two shear layers but also to the shock impact and the shock converging effect. Because of the flow unsteadiness after the converging shock, the detachment criterion provides a good estimation for the RR → MR transition, but fails to predict the DiMR → InMR transition, and MR is found to persist slightly below the mechanical equilibrium condition. A hysteresis process is found in the MR → TRR transition and becomes more apparent as the increase of the initial incident angle due to the shock converging effect.

  7. Wind velocity profile reconstruction from intensity fluctuations of a plane wave propagating in a turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Banakh, V A; Marakasov, D A

    2007-08-01

    Reconstruction of a wind profile based on the statistics of plane-wave intensity fluctuations in a turbulent atmosphere is considered. The algorithm for wind profile retrieval from the spatiotemporal spectrum of plane-wave weak intensity fluctuations is described, and the results of end-to-end computer experiments on wind profiling based on the developed algorithm are presented. It is shown that the reconstructing algorithm allows retrieval of a wind profile from turbulent plane-wave intensity fluctuations with acceptable accuracy.

  8. Transfer matrix approach to propagation of angular plane wave spectra through metamaterial multilayer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Partha P.; Li, Han; Aylo, Rola; Nehmetallah, Georges

    2011-10-01

    The development of electromagnetic (EM) metamaterials for perfect lensing and optical cloaking has given rise to novel multilayer bandgap structures using stacks of positive and negative index materials. Propagation of a collection of TE or TM plane waves, comprising the angular plane wave spectrum, through such structures is analyzed by using the transfer matrix method (TMM) on every plane wave component. Results obtained from this TMM approach for a Gaussian spectrum are compared with those using standard FEM techniques.

  9. Theoretical study of the anisotropic diffraction of light waves by acoustic waves in lithium niobate crystals.

    PubMed

    Rouvaen, J M; Waxin, G; Gazalet, M G; Bridoux, E

    1990-03-20

    The anisotropic diffraction of light by high frequency longitudinal ultrasonic waves in the tangential phase matching configuration may present some definite advantages over the same interaction using transverse acoustic waves. A systematic search for favorable crystal cuts in lithium niobate was worked out. The main results of this study are reported here; they enable the choice of the best configuration for a given operating center frequency.

  10. Diffraction efficiency of radially-profiled off-plane reflection gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Drew M.; Tutt, James H.; DeRoo, Casey T.; Marlowe, Hannah; Peterson, Thomas J.; McEntaffer, Randall L.; Menz, Benedikt; Burwitz, Vadim; Hartner, Gisela; Laubis, Christian; Scholze, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Future X-ray missions will require gratings with high throughput and high spectral resolution. Blazed off-plane reflection gratings are capable of meeting these demands. A blazed grating profile optimizes grating efficiency, providing higher throughput to one side of zero-order on the arc of diffraction. This paper presents efficiency measurements made in the 0.3 - 1.5 keV energy band at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) BESSY II facility for three holographically-ruled gratings, two of which are blazed. Each blazed grating was tested in both the Littrow configuration and anti-Littrow configuration in order to test the alignment sensitivity of these gratings with regard to throughput. This paper outlines the procedure of the grating experiment performed at BESSY II and discuss the resulting efficiency measurements across various energies. Experimental results are generally consistent with theory and demonstrate that the blaze does increase throughput to one side of zero-order. However, the total efficiency of the non-blazed, sinusoidal grating is greater than that of the blazed gratings, which suggests that the method of manufacturing these blazed profiles fails to produce facets with the desired level of precision. Finally, evidence of a successful blaze implementation from first diffraction results of prototype blazed gratings produce via a new fabrication technique at the University of Iowa are presented.

  11. Diffraction Efficiency Testing of Sinusoidal and Blazed Off-Plane Reflection Gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutt, James H.; McEntaffer, Randall L.; Marlowe, Hannah; Miles, Drew M.; Peterson, Thomas J.; Deroo, Casey T.; Scholze, Frank; Laubis, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Reflection gratings in the off-plane mount have the potential to enhance the performance of future high resolution soft X-ray spectrometers. Diffraction efficiency can be optimized through the use of blazed grating facets, achieving high-throughput on one side of zero-order. This paper presents the results from a comparison between a grating with a sinusoidally grooved profile and two gratings that have been blazed. The results show that the blaze does increase throughput to one side of zero-order; however, the total throughput of the sinusoidal gratings is greater than the blazed gratings, suggesting the method of manufacturing the blazed gratings does not produce precise facets. The blazed gratings were also tested in their Littrow and anti-Littrow configurations to quantify diffraction efficiency sensitivity to rotations about the grating normal. Only a small difference in the energy at which efficiency is maximized between the Littrow and anti-Littrow configurations is seen with a small shift in peak efficiency towards higher energies in the anti-Littrow case. This is due to a decrease in the effective blaze angle in the anti-Littrow mounting. This is supported by PCGrate-SX V6.1 modeling carried out for each blazed grating which predicts similar response trends in the Littrow and anti-Littrow orientations.

  12. Condition for invariant spectral degree of coherence of an electromagnetic plane wave on scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Chen, Yanru; Xu, Shixue; Wang, Yongqing; Zhou, Muchun; Zhao, Qi; Xin, Yu; Chen, Feinan

    2011-02-01

    Within the accuracy of the first-order Born approximation, the condition for invariant spectral degree of coherence of an electromagnetic plane wave scattered from random media is presented. The condition for the electromagnetic plane wave is different from the one for the scalar plane wave. Results also indicate that, different polarizations of the incident plane wave would have essential effects on analytical forms of the condition. These effects may be due to the correlation-induced changes in the scattered spectral degree of coherence.

  13. The Plane Wave Spectrum in Acousto-Optic Imaging of Ultrasonic Fields.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrl, David Joseph

    This thesis takes an in-depth look at two major areas of acousto-optics: Bragg diffraction imaging and Schlieren imaging. Both of these methods relate to the imaging of ultrasonic sound fields. The latter method is particularly relevant as it forms the basis for many practical signal processing schemes. A review of the angular plane wave spectrum concept is followed by an outline of a three-dimensional acousto -optic interaction formalism. This formalism forms the basis for the wave-theory analyses of Bragg diffraction and Schlieren imaging which are undertaken in later chapters. A ray tracing method, applicable to acousto-optic scattering, is also developed and justified on the basis of eikonal theory. Bragg diffraction imaging is analyzed by means of both ray tracing and wave theory methods, and the results are shown to be in mutual agreement. Also discussed are the development and results of a computer program which generates three-dimensional ray tracings that depict various Bragg diffraction imaging configurations. Experimental results are presented that support our theoretical findings. Schlieren imaging is analyzed in chapter 4. The classical Raman-Nath model (and its limitations) is first discussed. We then proceed to analyze Schlieren imaging by means of wave theory. We find that the Schlieren image of a monophonic sound field possesses an extremely large depth of focus (i.e. it is almost diffraction free). We proceed to show that the Raman-Nath interpretation can be extended to high frequency (Bragg) regimes, provided certain constraints are met. Finally, we examine wideband Schlieren imaging using optical heterodyning, which is of great practical importance in signal processing schemes. Several key results are obtained. We first present an illustrative example of a Schlieren signal processing scheme employing optical heterodyning. Although this scheme is not new per se, we present experimental results of a working experiment in which we correlate a pulse

  14. Bragg diffraction of guided optical waves by spin dipole waves in a ferrimagnetic heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolokoltsev, O. V.; Grishin, A. M.; Pérez, Oliver Cortés; Ordóñez-Romero, C. L.

    2009-05-01

    The peculiarities of the Bragg diffraction of guided optical waves (GOWs) by spin-dipole waves (SDWs) in a ferrite heterostructure, based on Bi3Fe5O12 (BIG) thin film deposited on a standard YIG/GGG sample, is presented. It is shown that the efficiency of waveguide magneto-optic interaction between GOWs and SDWs in BIG/YIG/GGG can be 4-14 times large compared to the standard YIG/GGG waveguide, even in the case when the interacting waves are localized in YIG waveguide layer.

  15. Generation of limited-diffraction wave by approximating theoretical X-wave with simple driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yaqin; Ding, MingYue; Hua, Shaoyan; Ming, Yuchi

    2012-03-01

    X-wave is a particular case of limited diffracting waves which has great potential applications in the enlargement of the field depth in acoustic imaging systems. In practice, the generation of real time X-wave ultrasonic fields is a complex technology which involves precise and specific voltage for the excitations for each distinct array element. In order to simplify the X-wave generating process, L. Castellanos proposed an approach to approximate the X-wave excitations with rectangular pulses. The results suggested the possibility of achieving limited-diffraction waves with relatively simple driving waveforms, which could be implemented with a moderate cost in analogical electronics. In this work, we attempt to improve L. Castellanos's method by calculating the approximation driving pulse not only from rectangular but also triangular driving pulse. The differences between theoretical X-wave signals and driving pulses, related to their excitation effects, are minimized by L2 curve criterion. The driving pulses with the minimal optimization result we chosen. A tradeoff is obtained between the cost of implementation of classical 0-order X-wave and the precision of approximation with the simple pulsed electrical driving. The good agreement of the driving pulse and the result resulting field distributions, with those obtained from the classical X-wave excitations can be justified by the filtering effects induced by the transducer elements in frequency domain. From the simulation results, we can see that the new approach improve the precise of the approximation, the difference between theoretical X-wave and the new approach is lower 10 percent than the difference between theoretical X-wave and rectangular as the driving pulse in simulation.

  16. Rigorous formulation for electromagnetic plane-wave scattering from a general-shaped groove in a perfectly conducting plane: comment.

    PubMed

    Skigin, Diana C; Depine, Ricardo A

    2008-05-01

    We show that the problem of scattering of an obliquely incident plane wave by a general-shaped groove engraved on a perfectly conducting plane, which was recently studied by Basha et al. [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A24, 1647 (2007)], was solved 11 years ago using the same formulation. This method was further extended to deal with a finite number of grooves and also with complex apertures including several nonlossy and lossy dielectrics, as well as real metals.

  17. X-ray diffraction study of A- plane non-polar InN epilayer grown by MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moret, Matthieu; Briot, Olivier; Gil, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    Strong polarisation-induced electric fields in C-plane oriented nitrides semiconductor layers reduce the performance of devices. Eliminating the polarization fields can be achieved by growing nitrides along non polar direction. We have grown non polar A-plane oriented InN on R-plane (1‾102) nitridated sapphire substrate by MOCVD. We have studied the structural anisotropy observed in these layers by analyzing High Resolution XRay Diffraction rocking curve (RC) experiments as a function of the in-plane beam orientation. A-plane InN epilayer have a unique epitaxial relationship on R-Plane sapphire and show a strong structural anisotropy. Full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the InN(11‾20) XRD RC values are contained between 44 and 81 Arcmin. FWHM is smaller when the diffraction occurs along the [0001] and the largest FWHM values, of the (11‾20) RC, are obtained when the diffraction occurs along the [1‾100] in-plane direction. Atomic Force Microscopy imaging revealed morphologies with well organized crystallites. The grains are structured along a unique crystallographic orientation of InN, leading to larger domains in this direction. This structural anisotropy can be, in first approximation, attributed to the difference in the domain sizes observed. XRD reciprocal space mappings (RSM) were performed in asymmetrical configuration on (13‾40) and (2‾202) diffraction plane. RSM are measured with a beam orientation corresponding to a maximal and a minimal width of the (11‾20) Rocking curves, respectively. A simple theoretical model is exposed to interpret the RSM. We concluded that the dominant contribution to the anisotropy is due to the scattering coherence length anisotropy present in our samples.

  18. Development of the plane wave transformer photoelectron linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xiaodong

    2000-11-01

    The design, fabrication and characterization of the UCLA integrated S-Band RF photocathode electron linear accelerator (Linac) based on the plane wave transformer (PWT) structure is presented. This new generation photoinjector integrates a photocathode directly into a PWT linac making the structure simple and compact. Due to the strong coupling between each adjacent cell, the PWT structure is relatively easy to fabricate and operate. This photoinjector can provide high brightness beams at energies of 15 to 20MeV, with emittance less than 1mm.mrad at charge of 1 nC [3]. These short-pulse beams can be used in various applications: space charge dominated beam physics studies, plasma lenses, plasma accelerators, free-electron laser microbunching techniques, and SASE-FEL physics studies. It will also provide commercial opportunities in chemistry, biology and medicine. The principle of photoelectron gun setup, accelerating structure design and beam dynamic study is described. The design, fabrication and testing of this UCLA 10 full cell and 2 half cell PWT structure is discussed in detail. The results of Microwave measurements and first step high power test have showed the success of the UCLA PWT photoinjector design. The measurement results met all the design goals and operation requirements. The experimental requirements for the beam diagnostics are also presented.

  19. NMR Shielding in Metals Using the Augmented Plane Wave Method

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present calculations of solid state NMR magnetic shielding in metals, which includes both the orbital and the complete spin response of the system in a consistent way. The latter contains an induced spin-polarization of the core states and needs an all-electron self-consistent treatment. In particular, for transition metals, the spin hyperfine field originates not only from the polarization of the valence s-electrons, but the induced magnetic moment of the d-electrons polarizes the core s-states in opposite direction. The method is based on DFT and the augmented plane wave approach as implemented in the WIEN2k code. A comparison between calculated and measured NMR shifts indicates that first-principle calculations can obtain converged results and are more reliable than initially concluded based on previous publications. Nevertheless large k-meshes (up to 2 000 000 k-points in the full Brillouin-zone) and some Fermi-broadening are necessary. Our results show that, in general, both spin and orbital components of the NMR shielding must be evaluated in order to reproduce experimental shifts, because the orbital part cancels the shift of the usually highly ionic reference compound only for simple sp-elements but not for transition metals. This development paves the way for routine NMR calculations of metallic systems. PMID:26322148

  20. NEXAFS spectra of aromatic molecules by plane-wave calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratesi, Guido; Brivio, Gian Paolo

    2013-03-01

    Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) is a powerful technique which allows one to determine several important properties of organic molecules, both in the gas phase and in the bulk or adsorbed one and especially, by performing angle-dependent measurements with polarized x-rays, to the absolute orientation of molecules. This calls for the association of measured peaks to specific transitions, which can be guided by theory. To this respect, the use of numerically-efficient yet accurate first-principles simulations in determining the spectral features is desirable, aiming at simulating fairly large systems such as molecules interacting with metal/dielectric surfaces. We consider here a technique from the literature to derive effectively the spectrum from density-functional theory, using pseudopotentials and plane wave basis sets, that was mostly applied to bulk systems. The basic aspects to its applicability to molecular systems will be discussed, taking as examples benzene, pentacene, and related molecules and comparing to experimental and theoretical data in the literature with special emphasis on the spectrum dependence on the photon polarization.

  1. Compressed plane waves yield a compactly supported multiresolution basis for the Laplace operator.

    PubMed

    Ozoliņš, Vidvuds; Lai, Rongjie; Caflisch, Russel; Osher, Stanley

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes an L1 regularized variational framework for developing a spatially localized basis, compressed plane waves, that spans the eigenspace of a differential operator, for instance, the Laplace operator. Our approach generalizes the concept of plane waves to an orthogonal real-space basis with multiresolution capabilities.

  2. Green's function of the strip-slab guide by plane-wave-spectrum synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, T. K.; Basuray, A.; Datta, A. K.

    1987-11-01

    The application of the plane-wave-spectrum method to strip-slab waveguides is described. The dispersion equation of the structure is first evaluated from the condition of self-consistency of rays. By treating the modes as the superpositions of plane waves, Green's function for the structure is subsequently derived.

  3. Modelling ultrasonic array signals in multilayer anisotropic materials using the angular spectrum decomposition of plane wave responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humeida, Yousif; Pinfield, Valerie J.; Challis, Richard E.

    2013-08-01

    Ultrasonic arrays have seen increasing use for the characterisation of composite materials. In this paper, ultrasonic wave propagation in multilayer anisotropic materials has been modelled using plane wave and angular spectrum decomposition techniques. Different matrix techniques, such as the stiffness matrix method and the transfer matrix method, are used to calculate the reflection and transmission coefficients of ultrasonic plane waves in the considered media. Then, an angular decomposition technique is used to derive the bounded beams from finite-width ultrasonic array elements from the plane wave responses calculated earlier. This model is considered to be an analytical exact solution for the problem; hence the diffraction of waves in such composite materials can be calculated for different incident angles for a very wide range of frequencies. This model is validated against experimental measurements using the Full-Matrix Capture (FMC) of array data in both a homogeneous isotropic material, i.e. aluminium, and an inhomogeneous multilayer anisotropic material, i.e. a carbon fibre reinforced composite.

  4. Calculation of VLEED spectra with the extended linear augmented plane wave kp method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasovskii, E. E.; Schattke, W.

    1999-11-01

    We describe a new method to calculate the VLEED (very low energy electron diffraction) spectra within the Bloch waves approach. The method is based on the variational solution of the Schrödinger equation for a semi-infinite crystal. Inside the solid the trial LEED function Φ is a linear combination of propagating and evanescent Bloch waves, which are generated by the inverse ELAPW (extended linear augmented plane waves)-kp method. The trial function is smoothly continuous over the whole space, and it satisfies by construction the equation ( Ĥ - E) Φ=0 both in the crystal and in the vacuum half-spaces. In the surface layer the equation δ‖( Ĥ - E) Φ‖=0 is solved. To illustrate the properties of the method we discuss its application to the 1D case. We have performed a self-consistent band structure calculation of the 1 T chalcogenide VSe2 and obtained from the first principles the normal-incidence target current spectrum (TCS) for its (0001) surface.

  5. Shock wave interactions between slender bodies - Some aspects of three-dimensional shock wave diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooseria, S. J.; Skews, B. W.

    2016-04-01

    A complex interference flowfield consisting of multiple shocks and expansion waves is produced when high-speed slender bodies are placed in close proximity. The disturbances originating from a generator body impinge onto the adjacent receiver body, modifying the local flow conditions over the receiver. This paper aims to uncover the basic gas dynamics produced by two closely spaced slender bodies in a supersonic freestream. Experiments and numerical simulations were used to interpret the flowfield, where good agreement between the predictions and measurements was observed. The numerical data were then used to characterise the attenuation associated with shock wave diffraction, which was found to be interdependent with the bow shock contact perimeter over the receiver bodies. Shock-induced boundary layer separation was observed over the conical and hemispherical receiver bodies. These strong viscous-shock interactions result in double-reflected, as well as double-diffracted shock wave geometries in the interference region, and the diffracting waves progress over the conical and hemispherical receivers' surfaces in "lambda" type configurations. This gives evidence that viscous effects can have a substantial influence on the local bow shock structure surrounding high-speed slender bodies in close proximity.

  6. Tailored complex 3D vortex lattice structures by perturbed multiples of three-plane waves.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Jolly; Vyas, Sunil; Senthilkumaran, Paramasivam; Joseph, Joby

    2012-04-20

    As three-plane waves are the minimum number required for the formation of vortex-embedded lattice structures by plane wave interference, we present our experimental investigation on the formation of complex 3D photonic vortex lattice structures by a designed superposition of multiples of phase-engineered three-plane waves. The unfolding of the generated complex photonic lattice structures with higher order helical phase is realized by perturbing the superposition of a relatively phase-encoded, axially equidistant multiple of three noncoplanar plane waves. Through a programmable spatial light modulator assisted single step fabrication approach, the unfolded 3D vortex lattice structures are experimentally realized, well matched to our computer simulations. The formation of higher order intertwined helices embedded in these 3D spiraling vortex lattice structures by the superposition of the multiples of phase-engineered three-plane waves interference is also studied.

  7. Multi-frame visualization for detonation wave diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagura, Y.; Kasahara, J.; Matsuo, A.

    2016-09-01

    When a detonation wave emerges from a tube into unconfined space filled with a gas mixture, detonation wave diffraction occurs due to abrupt changes in the cross-sectional area. In the present study, we focused on the local explosion in reinitiation and propagation of a transverse detonation wave by performing comprehensive and direct observation with high time resolution visualization in a two-dimensional rectangular channel. Using the visualization methods of shadowgraph and multi-frame, short-time, open-shutter photography, we determined where the wall reflection point is generated, and also determined where the bright point is originated by the local explosion, and investigated the effects of the deviation angle and initial pressure of the gas mixture. We found that the reinitiation of detonation had two modes that were determined by the deviation angle of the channel. If the deviation angle was less than or equal to 30°, the local explosion of reinitiation might occur in the vicinity of the channel wall, and if the deviation angle was greater than or equal to 60°, the local explosion might originate on the upper side of the tube exit. With a deviation angle greater than 60°, the position of the wall reflection point depended on the cell width, so the radial distance of the wall reflection point from the apex of the tube exit was about 12 times the cell width. Similarly, the bright point (local explosion point) was located a distance of about 11 times the cell width from the apex of the tube exit, with a circumferential angle of 48°.

  8. Multi-frame visualization for detonation wave diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagura, Y.; Kasahara, J.; Matsuo, A.

    2016-05-01

    When a detonation wave emerges from a tube into unconfined space filled with a gas mixture, detonation wave diffraction occurs due to abrupt changes in the cross-sectional area. In the present study, we focused on the local explosion in reinitiation and propagation of a transverse detonation wave by performing comprehensive and direct observation with high time resolution visualization in a two-dimensional rectangular channel. Using the visualization methods of shadowgraph and multi-frame, short-time, open-shutter photography, we determined where the wall reflection point is generated, and also determined where the bright point is originated by the local explosion, and investigated the effects of the deviation angle and initial pressure of the gas mixture. We found that the reinitiation of detonation had two modes that were determined by the deviation angle of the channel. If the deviation angle was less than or equal to 30°, the local explosion of reinitiation might occur in the vicinity of the channel wall, and if the deviation angle was greater than or equal to 60°, the local explosion might originate on the upper side of the tube exit. With a deviation angle greater than 60°, the position of the wall reflection point depended on the cell width, so the radial distance of the wall reflection point from the apex of the tube exit was about 12 times the cell width. Similarly, the bright point (local explosion point) was located a distance of about 11 times the cell width from the apex of the tube exit, with a circumferential angle of 48°.

  9. Split-step-type angular plane-wave spectrum method for the study of self-refractive effects in nonlinear wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korpel, A.; Lonngren, K. E.; Banerjee, P. P.; Sim, H. K.; Chatterjee, M. R.

    1986-06-01

    A novel algorithm is reported that simulates the effect of a cubic nonlinearity on wave propagation by combining angular plane-wave spectrum techniques in the Fourier domain with self-induced thin lens techniques in the space domain. The amplitude-dependent propagation constant is briefly derived from the scalar wave equation with cubic nonlinearity. The angular spectrum method is used to derive an expression for the emerging wave in the presence of cubic nonlinearity, including the nonlinearly induced thin lens effect. The propagation of a Gaussian beam and the diffraction from a rectangular aperture are calculated to check the algorithm, and the nonlinear evolution of these cases is presented. Finally, the existence of a particular analytic steady state solution is demonstrated and tested using the algorithm.

  10. Temporal-frequency spectra for plane and spherical waves in a millimetric wave absorption band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, Glaucio L.; Cole, Roy S.

    1991-02-01

    Complete analytical expressions for the temporal power spectral density functions in a millimetric wave absorption region for plane and spherical waves have been developed for both amplitude and phase fluctuations due to atmospheric turbulence. Asymptotic expressions for both high and low scintillation frequencies are derived. Theoretical expressions for the differential phase power spectrum (i.e., the phase difference between two frequencies) are also presented. Experimental results of amplitude and differential phase scintillations measured on a 4.1-km link across central London, are presented. Results show that the plane wave case gives the best agreement with theory for this particular link. It is also shown that neglecting the cross-spectral density term at the higher scintillation frequencies for the differential phase spectrum can lead to a large difference between the theoretical and experimental power spectra. In particular, for a small frequency separation and a large value of the outer scale of turbulence, the highest scintillation frequencies are too low to neglect the cross term.

  11. Stolt’s f-k migration for plane wave ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Damien; Le Tarnec, Louis; Muth, Stéphan; Montagnon, Emmanuel; Porée, Jonathan; Cloutier, Guy

    2013-01-01

    Ultrafast ultrasound is an emerging modality that offers new perspectives and opportunities in medical imaging. Plane wave imaging (PWI) allows one to attain very high frame rates by transmission of planar ultrasound wavefronts. As a plane wave reaches a given scatterer, the latter becomes a secondary source emitting upward spherical waves and creating a diffraction hyperbola in the received RF (radio-frequency) signals. To produce an image of the scatterers, all the hyperbolas must be migrated back to their apexes. In order to perform beamforming of plane wave echo RFs and return high-quality images at high frame rates, we propose a new migration method carried out in the frequency-wavenumber (f-k) domain. The f-k migration for PWI has been adapted from the Stolt migration for seismic imaging. This migration technique is based on the exploding reflector model (ERM), which consists in assuming that all the scatterers explode in concert and become acoustic sources. The classical ERM model, however, is not appropriate for PWI. We showed that the ERM can be made suitable for PWI by a spatial transformation of the hyperbolic traces present in the RF data. In vitro experiments were performed to sketch the advantages of PWI with Stolt’s f-k migration over the conventional delay-and-sum (DAS) approach. The Stolt’s f-k migration was also compared with the Fourier-based method developed by J-Y Lu. Our findings show that multi-angle compounded f-k migrated images are of quality similar to those obtained with a state-of-the-art dynamic focusing mode. This remained true even with a very small number of steering angles thus ensuring a highly competitive frame rate. In addition, the new FFT-based f-k migration provides comparable or better contrast-to-noise ratio and lateral resolution than the Lu’s and DAS migration schemes. Matlab codes of the Stolt’s f-k migration for PWI are provided. PMID:24626107

  12. Plane wave holonomies in quantum gravity. II. A sine wave solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neville, Donald E.

    2015-08-01

    This paper constructs an approximate sinusoidal wave packet solution to the equations of canonical gravity. The theory uses holonomy-flux variables with support on a lattice (LHF =lattice-holonomy flux ). There is an SU(2) holonomy on each edge of the LHF simplex, and the goal is to study the behavior of these holonomies under the influence of a passing gravitational wave. The equations are solved in a small sine approximation: holonomies are expanded in powers of sines and terms beyond sin2 are dropped; also, fields vary slowly from vertex to vertex. The wave is unidirectional and linearly polarized. The Hilbert space is spanned by a set of coherent states tailored to the symmetry of the plane wave case. Fixing the spatial diffeomorphisms is equivalent to fixing the spatial interval between vertices of the loop quantum gravity lattice. This spacing can be chosen such that the eigenvalues of the triad operators are large, as required in the small sine limit, even though the holonomies are not large. Appendices compute the energy of the wave, estimate the lifetime of the coherent state packet, discuss circular polarization and coarse-graining, and determine the behavior of the spinors used in the U(N) SHO realization of LQG.

  13. Rayleigh-wave diffractions due to a void in the layered half space

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Miller, R.D.; Nyquist, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    Void detection is challenging due to the complexity of near-surface materials and the limited resolution of geophysical methods. Although multichannel, high-frequency, surface-wave techniques can provide reliable shear (S)-wave velocities in different geological settings, they are not suitable for detecting voids directly based on anomalies of the S-wave velocity because of limitations on the resolution of S-wave velocity profiles inverted from surface-wave phase velocities. Xia et al. (2006a) derived a Rayleigh-wave diffraction traveltime equation due to a void in the homogeneous half space. Encouraging results of directly detecting a void from Rayleigh-wave diffractions were presented (Xia et al., 2006a). In this paper we used four two-dimensional square voids in the layered half space to demonstrate the feasibility of detecting a void with Rayleigh-wave diffractions. Rayleigh-wave diffractions were recognizable for all these models after removing direct surface waves by F-K filtering. We evaluate the feasibility of applying the Rayleigh-wave diffraction traveltime equation to a void in the layered earth model. The phase velocity of diffracted Rayleigh waves is predominately determined by surrounding materials of a void. The modeling results demonstrate that the Rayleigh-wave diffraction traveltime equation due to a void in the homogeneous half space can be applied to the case of a void in the layered half space. In practice, only two diffraction times are necessary to define the depth to the top of a void and the average velocity of diffracted Rayleigh waves. ?? 2005 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  14. Matter-wave diffraction at the natural limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Christian; Sclafani, Michele; Knobloch, Christian; Lilach, Yigal; Juffmann, Thomas; Kotakoski, Jani; Mangler, Clemens; Winter, Andreas; Turchanin, Andrey; Meyer, Jannik; Cheshnovsky, Ori; Arndt, Markus

    2016-05-01

    The high sensitivity of matter-wave interferometry experiments to forces and perturbations makes them an essential tool for precision measurements and tests of quantum physics. While mostly grating made of laser-light are used, material gratings have the advantage that they are independent of the particle's internal properties. This makes them universally applicable. However, the molecules will experience substantial van der Waals shifts while passing the grating slits, which suggests limiting this perturbation by reducing the material thickness. In a comprehensive study we compared the van der Waals interactions for free-standing gratings made from single and double layer graphene to masks commonly used in atom interferometry. From the population of high fringe orders we deduce a surprisingly strong electrical interaction between the polarizable molecules and the nanomasks. As even for these thinnest diffraction elements which-path information is not shared with the environment, we interpret this as an experimental affirmation of Bohr's arguments in his famous debate with Einstein.

  15. Verification of the Uncertainty Principle by Using Diffraction of Light Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolic, D.; Nesic, Lj

    2011-01-01

    We described a simple idea for experimental verification of the uncertainty principle for light waves. We used a single-slit diffraction of a laser beam for measuring the angular width of zero-order diffraction maximum and obtained the corresponding wave number uncertainty. We will assume that the uncertainty in position is the slit width. For the…

  16. Overall coherence and coherent-mode expansion of spectrally partially coherent plane-wave pulses.

    PubMed

    Lajunen, Hanna; Tervo, Jani; Vahimaa, Pasi

    2004-11-01

    The modal theory for spectrally partially coherent nonstationary plane waves is introduced. The theory is first developed in the space-frequency domain and then extended to the space-time domain. Propagation properties of the coherent modes are analyzed. The concept of the overall degree of coherence is extended to the domain of nonstationary fields, and it is shown that the overall degree of coherence of partially coherent plane-wave pulses is the same in the space-frequency and space-time domains. The theory is applied to the recently introduced concept of spectrally Gaussian Schell-model plane-wave pulses.

  17. Overall coherence and coherent-mode expansion of spectrally partially coherent plane-wave pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajunen, Hanna; Tervo, Jani; Vahimaa, Pasi

    2004-11-01

    The modal theory for spectrally partially coherent nonstationary plane waves is introduced. The theory is first developed in the space-frequency domain and then extended to the space-time domain. Propagation properties of the coherent modes are analyzed. The concept of the overall degree of coherence is extended to the domain of nonstationary fields, and it is shown that the overall degree of coherence of partially coherent plane-wave pulses is the same in the space-frequency and space-time domains. The theory is applied to the recently introduced concept of spectrally Gaussian Schell-model plane-wave pulses.

  18. Full-wave model and numerical study of electromagnetic plane wave scattering by multilayered, fiber-based periodic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. Y.; Lesselier, D.; Zhong, Y.

    2015-07-01

    The present work aims at building up a full-wave computational model of electromagnetic nondestructive testing of composite materials produced by stacking up dielectric slabs one over the other. In each such dielectric slab, a periodic array of infinite cylindrical fibers is embedded. Electromagnetic scattering of such a multilayered, fiber-based periodic composite is investigated here for an obliquely incident plane wave, the plane of incidence of which differs from the plane orthogonal to the fibers' axes. Full-wave field representations are given first by multipole and plane wave expansions. Mode matching at boundaries between layers then yields the propagating matrices, which are applied to connect reflection and transmission coefficients of the longitudinal field components. Power reflection and transmission coefficients are obtained from time-averaged Poynting vectors. Numerical experiments with comparisons with known results illustrate the accuracy of the model proposed.

  19. Diffracted Evanescent Wave Model for Enhanced, Suppressed and Directional Transmission through Subwavelength Apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lezec, Henri

    2005-03-01

    The transmission spectrum of an array of subwavelength apertures in a metal film displays a set of peaks related to the periodicity. Extraordinary transmission efficiencies at these positions have been claimed and associated with discrete grating-coupling conditions that excite surface-plasmon polaritons (SPPs). In this talk, we re-evaluate the magnitude and origin of the effect by proper normalization of the as-collected transmission spectrum of the array to that of the corresponding isolated hole. The normalized spectrum then reveals a sequence of both enhancements and suppressions of modest and similar magnitude (less than a factor of ten). This continuous modulation is inconsistent with an SPP-based interpretation, but rather suggests an underlying mechanism based on interference. A subwavelength aperture couples inefficiently to a specific surface mode such as an SPP because it diffracts light into a continuum of evanescent surface waves with a large distribution of in-plane k-vectors. We show however that these components sum to form an effective surface wave which is coherent over a short range and phase-shifted with respect to the source. We confirm the presence of this composite diffracted evanescent wave (CDEW) via interferometric experiments involving pairs of subwavelength apertures. We propose a new model for the anomalous transmission of hole arrays in which enhancement and suppression result from the interference of light directly incident upon (or emerging from) a given hole with CDEWs launched by neighboring holes. This model successfully predicts equivalent effects in non-metallic systems. In addition, it accounts for the salient optical properties of single apertures surrounded by surface corrugations, such as efficient, low-divergence beaming.

  20. Reduction of Bubble Cavitation by Modifying the Diffraction Wave from a Lithotripter Aperture

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Purpose A new method was devised to suppress the bubble cavitation in the lithotripter focal zone to reduce the propensity of shockwave-induced renal injury. Materials and Methods An edge extender was designed and fabricated to fit on the outside of the ellipsoidal reflector of an electrohydraulic lithotripter to disturb the generation of diffraction wave at the aperture, but with little effect on the acoustic field inside the reflector. Results Although the peak negative pressures at the lithotripter focus using the edge extender at 20 kV were similar to that of the original configuration (-11.1±0.9 vs −10.6±0.7 MPa), the duration of the tensile wave was shortened significantly (3.2±0.54 vs 5.83±0.56 μs, P<0.01). There is no difference, however, in both the amplitude and duration of the compressive shockwaves between these two configurations as well as the −6 dB beam width in the focal plane. The significant suppression effect of bubble cavitation was confirmed by the measured bubble collapse time using passive cavitation detection. At the lithotripter focus, while only about 30 shocks were needed to rupture a blood vessel phantom using the original HM-3 reflector at 20 kV, no damage could be produced after 300 shocks using the edge extender. Meanwhile, the original HM-3 lithotripter at 20 kV can achieve a stone comminution efficiency of 50.4±2.0% on plaster-of-Paris stone phantom after 200 shocks, which is comparable to that of using the edge extender (46.8±4.1%, P=0.005). Conclusions Modifying the diffraction wave at the lithotripter aperture can suppress the shockwave-induced bubble cavitation with significant reduced damage potential on the vessel phantom but satisfactory stone comminution ability. PMID:22332839

  1. Generalized plane-wave expansion of cylindrical functions in lossy media convergent in the whole complex plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frezza, F.; Schettini, G.; Tedeschi, N.

    2011-08-01

    Electromagnetic scattering by buried objects may involve a plane-wave expansion of the related fields, which depends on the objects' geometry. Furthermore, involved media in realistic cases are lossy, which requires the analytic continuation of formulae known for the lossless cases, due to the complex nature of the wave vectors. This problem has been covered in a previous paper, but the expression found still does not converge in some areas of space. In this paper, a new, convergent, expression of the spectrum of cylindrical functions in lossy media is analytically computed and its convergence limits are discussed.

  2. Plane Wave in the System of N Particles with Zero Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meremianin, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    The wave function of the system of N ≥ 3 free particles having zero total angular momentum is considered. This function is defined as the zeroth order multipole coefficient in the expansion of the product of N plane waves over the set of finite rotation matrices (i.e. Wigner D-functions). Several integral representations for that wave-function are obtained. It is demonstrated that the structure of the wave function for arbitrary number of particles remains that of the four-particle case. Special attention is paid to the "in-plane" geometry when particle's momenta vectors (or their conjugated Jacobi vectors) are coplanar.

  3. Analysis for the convergence problem of the plane-wave expansion method for photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Shen, Linfang; He, Sailing

    2002-05-01

    The convergence feature of two types of plane-wave expansion methods commonly used for photonic crystals is analyzed. It is shown that the reason for the slow convergence of these plane-wave expansion methods is not the slow convergence of the Fourier series for the permittivity profile of the photonic crystal but the inappropriate formulation of the eigenproblem. A new formulation of the eigenproblem is presented to improve the convergence in the one-dimensional case.

  4. Non-one-dimensional self-similar solutions with plane waves in gas dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poslavskii, S. A.; Shikin, I. S.

    1986-02-01

    A set of new exact self-similar solutions describing the non-one-dimensional adiabatic motions of an ideal gas with plane waves is presented. The solutions include homogeneous gas expansion in planes perpendicular to the direction of the principal motion. It is shown that for such solutions, the system of gasdynamic equations is reduced to a system of ordinary differental equations.

  5. Interference pattern generation in evanescent electromagnetic waves for nanoscale lithography using waveguide diffraction gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Bezus, E A; Doskolovich, L L; Kazanskii, N L

    2011-08-31

    The generation of interference patterns of evanescent electromagnetic waves with an essentially subwavelength period using dielectric waveguide diffraction gratings is considered. Using simulations within the framework of the electromagnetic theory, the possibility of obtaining high-quality interference patterns due to enhancement of evanescent diffraction orders under resonance conditions is demonstrated. The contrast of the interference patterns in the case of TE polarisation of the incident wave is close to unity. The field intensity in the near-field interference maxima exceeds the intensity of the incident wave by 25-100 times. The possibility of generation of the interference patterns of evanescent waves corresponding to higher diffraction orders is shown. The use of higher orders reduces the requirements to the fabrication technology and allows generation of interference patterns with a high spatial frequency, using diffraction gratings with a low spatial frequency. Examples of generating interference patters with periods six times smaller than those of the used diffraction gratings are presented. (nanolithography)

  6. Ultrasonic elastic modes in solid bars: an application of the plane wave expansion method.

    PubMed

    Manzanares-Martinez, Betsabe; Ramos-Mendieta, Felipe; Baltazar, Arturo

    2010-06-01

    Ultrasonic elastic modes in solid bars are investigated theoretically and experimentally using the plane wave expansion method to calculate the dispersion curves k=k(omega) for longitudinal, torsional, and flexural waves. The plane wave extension method allows to consider rods of circular and square cross sections. The technique, which has received attention in the study of photonic and phononic crystals, is adapted in order to identify the various types of modes. Results are compared with predictions from semi-analytical models. The numerical approximation is validated with the experimental determination of the time-frequency dispersion curves. The technique based on the plane wave expansion method presented here could be a numerical alternative used to determine the wave propagation and modal vibration with high precision in structures like bars and cylinders. Practical applications of this study could include the inspection of long-span engineering systems with bar or cylinder like characteristics.

  7. Feasibility of detecting near-surface feature with Rayleigh-wave diffraction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Nyquist, J.E.; Xu, Y.; Roth, M.J.S.; Miller, R.D.

    2007-01-01

    Detection of near-surfaces features such as voids and faults is challenging due to the complexity of near-surface materials and the limited resolution of geophysical methods. Although multichannel, high-frequency, surface-wave techniques can provide reliable shear (S)-wave velocities in different geological settings, they are not suitable for detecting voids directly based on anomalies of the S-wave velocity because of limitations on the resolution of S-wave velocity profiles inverted from surface-wave phase velocities. Therefore, we studied the feasibility of directly detecting near-surfaces features with surface-wave diffractions. Based on the properties of surface waves, we have derived a Rayleigh-wave diffraction traveltime equation. We also have solved the equation for the depth to the top of a void and an average velocity of Rayleigh waves. Using these equations, the depth to the top of a void/fault can be determined based on traveltime data from a diffraction curve. In practice, only two diffraction times are necessary to define the depth to the top of a void/fault and the average Rayleigh-wave velocity that generates the diffraction curve. We used four two-dimensional square voids to demonstrate the feasibility of detecting a void with Rayleigh-wave diffractions: a 2??m by 2??m with a depth to the top of the void of 2??m, 4??m by 4??m with a depth to the top of the void of 7??m, and 6??m by 6??m with depths to the top of the void 12??m and 17??m. We also modeled surface waves due to a vertical fault. Rayleigh-wave diffractions were recognizable for all these models after FK filtering was applied to the synthetic data. The Rayleigh-wave diffraction traveltime equation was verified by the modeled data. Modeling results suggested that FK filtering is critical to enhance diffracted surface waves. A real-world example is presented to show how to utilize the derived equation of surface-wave diffractions. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Mixing of collinear plane wave pulses in elastic solids with quadratic nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zimu; Tang, Guangxin; Zhao, Youxun; Jacobs, Laurence J; Qu, Jianmin

    2014-11-01

    This paper derives a set of necessary and sufficient conditions for generating resonant waves by two propagating time-harmonic plane waves. It is shown that in collinear mixing, a resonant wave can be generated either by a pair of longitudinal waves, in which case the resonant mixing wave is also a longitudinal wave, or by a pair of longitudinal and transverse waves, in which case the resonant wave is a transverse wave. In addition, the paper obtains closed-form analytical solutions to the resonant waves generated by two collinearly propagating sinusoidal pulses. The results show that amplitude of the resonant pulse is proportional to the mixing zone size, which is determined by the spatial lengths of the input pulses. Finally, numerical simulations based on the finite element method and experimental measurements using one-way mixing are conducted. It is shown that both numerical and experimental results agree well with the analytical solutions. PMID:25373942

  9. Underdetermined system theory applied to qualitative analysis of response caused by attenuating plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Yukio

    1989-05-01

    A qualitative analysis of the mechanical response of rate-dependent media caused by a one-dimensional plane smooth wave front and by a continuous wave front attenuating in the media is performed by an underdetermined system of nonlinear partial differential equations. The analysis reveals that smooth strain, particle velocity, and stress profiles, which the smooth wave front has, are not similar and that the wave front is composed of some partial waves having different properties. The property is represented by a set of strain rate, acceleration, and stress rate. The wave front derived here from the analysis is composed of four different partial waves. The front of the wave front is necessarily a contraction wave in which strain, particle velocity, and stress increase with time, while the rear is a rarefaction wave where they all decrease with time. Between these two wave fronts there are two remaining wave fronts. We call these wave fronts mesocontraction waves I and II. Wave front I is a wave in which stress decreases notwithstanding the increase in strain and particle velocity with time, which is followed by the other, i.e., wave front II, where with time, particle velocity, and stress decrease in spite of the increase in strain. The continuous wave front having continuous and nonsmooth profiles of strain, particle velocity, and stress can also be composed of four waves. These waves possess the same property as the corresponding waves in the smooth wave front mentioned above. The velocities at three boundaries that the waves have are discontinuous. Therefore, these four wave fronts are independent waves, just as a shock wave and a rarefraction wave. Specifically, the front wave, i.e., a contraction wave front is being outrun by a second wave front, the second one is being outrun by a third wave front, and the third is being outrun by a fourth wave front, i.e., a rarefaction wave. We call the second wave front degenerate contraction wave I. We also call the third

  10. Response of a Doppler canceling system to plane gravitational waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caporali, A.

    1982-01-01

    This paper discusses the interaction of long periodic gravitational waves with a three-link microwave system known as the Doppler canceling system. This system, which was developed for a gravitational red-shift experiment, uses one-way and two-way Doppler information to construct the beat signal of two reference oscillators moving with respect to each other. The geometric-optics approximation is used to derive the frequency shift produced on a light signal propagating in a gravitational-wave space-time. The signature left on the Doppler-cancelled beat by bursts and continuous gravitational waves is analyzed. A comparison is made between the response to gravitational waves of the Doppler canceling system and that of a (NASA) Doppler tracking system which employs two-way, round-trip radio waves. A threefold repetition of the gravitational wave form is found to be a common feature of the response functions of both systems. These two functions otherwise exhibit interesting differences.

  11. Fluorescence and diffusive wave diffraction tomographic probes in turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingde

    1998-10-01

    Light transport over long distances in tissue-like highly scattering media is well approximated as a diffusive process. Diffusing photons can be used to detect, localize and characterize non-invasively optical inhomogeneities such as tumors and hematomas embedded in thick biological tissue. Most of the contrast relies on the endogenous optical property differences between the inhomogeneities and the surrounding media. Recently exogenous fluorescent contrast agents have been considered as a means to enhance the sensitivity and specificity for tumor detection. In the first part of the thesis (Chapter 2 and 3), a theoretical basis is established for modeling the transport, of fluorescent photons in highly scattering media. Fluorescent Diffuse Photon Density Waves (FDPDW) are used to describe the transport of fluorescent photons. A detailed analysis based upon a practical signal-to-noise model was used to access the utility of the fluorescent method. The analysis reveals that a small heterogeneity, embedded in deep tissue-like turbid media with biologically relevant parameters, and with a practically achievable 5-fold fluorophore concentration contrast, can be detected and localized when its radius is greater than 0.2 cm, and can be characterized when its radius is greater than 0.7 cm. In vivo and preliminary clinical studies demonstrate the feasibility of using FDPDW's for tumor diagnosis. Optical imaging with diffusing photons is challenging. Many of the imaging algorithms developed so far are either fundamentally incorrect as in the case of back- projection approach, or require a huge amount of computational resources and CPU time. In the second part of the thesis (Chapter 4), a fast, K-space diffraction tomographic imaging algorithm based upon spatial angular spectrum analysis is derived and applied. Absolute optical properties of thin inhomogeneities and relative optical properties of spatially extended inhomogeneities are reconstructed within a sub-second time

  12. The Relativistic Transformation for an Electromagnetic Plane Wave with General Time Dependence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Glenn S.

    2012-01-01

    In special relativity, the transformation between inertial frames for an electromagnetic plane wave is usually derived for the time-harmonic case (the field is a sinusoid of infinite duration), even though all practical waves are of finite duration and may not even contain a dominant sinusoid. This paper presents an alternative derivation in which…

  13. The use of the plane wave fluid-structure interaction loading approximation in NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    The Plane Wave Approximation (PWA) is widely used in finite element analysis to implement the loading generated by an underwater shock wave. The method required to implement the PWA in NASTRAN is presented along with example problems. A theoretical background is provided and the limitations of the PWA are discussed.

  14. Ray invariants, plane wave spectra, and adiabatic modes for tapered dielectric waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, J. M.; Felsen, L. B.

    1984-10-01

    In nonseparable problems resulting from the analysis of wave propagation in longitudinally varying waveguides, such as a wedge-shaped taper, singularities appear in both ray and coupled mode treatments at the local normal mode cutoff transition. A uniformization of the local normal (adiabatic) mode is proposed, using plane wave spectra, which effectively resolves this difficulty.

  15. Travelling wave modes of a plane layered anelastic earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odom, Robert I.

    2016-08-01

    Incorporation of attenuation into the normal mode sum representations of seismic signals is commonly effected by applying perturbation theory. This is fine for weak attenuation, but problematic for stronger attenuation. In this work, modes of the anelastic medium are represented as complex superpositions of elastic eigenfunctions. For the P-SV system, a generalized eigenvalue equation for the complex eigenwavenumbers and complex coefficients used to construct the anelastic eigenfunctions is derived. The generalized eigenvalue problem for the P-SV problem is exactly linear in the eigenwavenumber at the expense of doubling the dimension. The SH problem is exactly linear in the square of the eigenwavenumber. This is in contrast to a similar standing wave problem for the earth free oscillations. Attenuation is commonly incorporated into synthetic seismogram calculations by introduction of complex frequency-dependent elastic moduli. The moduli depend nonlinearly on the frequency. The independent variable in the standing wave free oscillation problem is the frequency, which makes the eigenvalue problem nonlinear. The choice of the wavenumber as the independent variable for the travelling wave problem leads to a linear problem. The Earth model may be transversely isotropic. Compressional waves and both polarizations of shear waves (SV, SH) are treated.

  16. Cylindrical and spherical space equivalents to the plane wave expansion technique of Maxwell's wave equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Robert C.; Alzahrani, Mohammed A.; Jafari, Seyed Hamed

    2015-02-01

    The plane wave expansion (PWM) technique applied to Maxwell's wave equations provides researchers with a supply of information regarding the optical properties of dielectric structures. The technique is well suited for structures that display a linear periodicity. When the focus is directed towards optical resonators and structures that lack linear periodicity the eigen-process can easily exceed computational resources and time constraints. In the case of dielectric structures which display cylindrical or spherical symmetry, a coordinate system specific set of basis functions have been employed to cast Maxwell's wave equations into an eigen-matrix formulation from which the resonator states associated with the dielectric profile can be obtained. As for PWM, the inverse of the dielectric and field components are expanded in the basis functions (Fourier-Fourier-Bessel, FFB, in cylindrical and Fourier- Bessel-Legendre, BLF, in spherical) and orthogonality is employed to form the matrix expressions. The theoretical development details will be presented indicating how certain mathematical complications in the process have been overcome and how the eigen-matrix can be tuned to a specific mode type. The similarities and differences in PWM, FFB and BLF are presented. In the case of structures possessing axial cylindrical symmetry, the inclusion of the z axis component of propagation constant makes the technique applicable to photonic crystal fibers and other waveguide structures. Computational results will be presented for a number of different dielectric geometries including Bragg ring resonators, cylindrical space slot channel waveguides and bottle resonators. Steps to further enhance the computation process will be reported.

  17. Anti-plane transverse waves propagation in nanoscale periodic layered piezoelectric structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, A-Li; Yan, Dong-Jia; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, anti-plane transverse wave propagation in nanoscale periodic layered piezoelectric structures is studied. The localization factor is introduced to characterize the wave propagation behavior. The transfer matrix method based on the nonlocal piezoelectricity continuum theory is used to calculate the localization factor. Additionally, the stiffness matrix method is applied to compute the wave transmission spectra. A cut-off frequency is found, beyond which the elastic waves cannot propagate through the periodic structure. The size effect or the influence of the ratio of the internal to external characteristic lengths on the cut-off frequency and the wave propagation behavior are investigated and discussed. PMID:26518526

  18. Anti-plane transverse waves propagation in nanoscale periodic layered piezoelectric structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, A-Li; Yan, Dong-Jia; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, anti-plane transverse wave propagation in nanoscale periodic layered piezoelectric structures is studied. The localization factor is introduced to characterize the wave propagation behavior. The transfer matrix method based on the nonlocal piezoelectricity continuum theory is used to calculate the localization factor. Additionally, the stiffness matrix method is applied to compute the wave transmission spectra. A cut-off frequency is found, beyond which the elastic waves cannot propagate through the periodic structure. The size effect or the influence of the ratio of the internal to external characteristic lengths on the cut-off frequency and the wave propagation behavior are investigated and discussed.

  19. Plane-wave fluorescence tomography with adaptive finite elements.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Amit; Bangerth, Wolfgang; Hwang, Kildong; Rasmussen, John; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2006-01-15

    We present three-dimensional fluorescence yield tomography of a tissue phantom in a noncontact reflectance imaging setup. The method employs planar illumination with modulated light and frequency domain fluorescence measurements made on the illumination plane. An adaptive finite-element algorithm is used to handle the ill-posed and computationally demanding inverse image reconstruction problem. Tomographic images of fluorescent targets buried at 1-2 cm depths from the illumination surface demonstrate the feasibility of fluorescence tomography from reflectance tomography in clinically relevant tissue volumes.

  20. Scattering of a plane electromagnetic wave by a generalized Luneburg sphere-Part 2: Wave scattering and time-domain scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laven, Philip; Lock, James A.; Adam, John A.

    2015-09-01

    We calculated scattering of an electromagnetic plane wave by a radially inhomogeneous particle and a radially inhomogeneous bubble when the square of the refractive index profile is parabolic as a function of radius. Such a particle or bubble is called a generalized Luneburg lens. A wide variety of scattering phenomena can occur, depending on the value of the two adjustable parameters of the parabola. These phenomena, including transmission rainbows, the weak caustic for near-critical-angle scattering by a bubble, surface orbiting, the interior orbiting paths of morphology-dependent resonances, and the separation of diffraction are studied here using wave theory and time domain scattering. These phenomena are also compared with their appearance or absence for scattering by a homogeneous sphere.

  1. Time-dependent plane-wave spectrum representations for radiation from volume source distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyman, Ehud

    1996-02-01

    A new time-domain spectral theory for radiation from a time-dependent source distribution, is presented. The full spectral representation is based on a Radon transform of the source distribution in the four-dimensional space-time domain and consists of time-dependent plane waves that propagate in all space directions and with all (spectral) propagation speeds vκ. This operation, termed the slant stack transform, involves projection of the time-dependent source distribution along planes normal to the spectral propagation direction and stacking them with a progressive delay corresponding to the spectral propagation speed vκ along this direction. Outside the source domain, this three-fold representation may be contracted into a two-fold representation consisting of time-dependent plane waves that satisfy the spectral constraint vκ=c with c being the medium velocity. In the two-fold representation, however, the complete spectral representation involves both propagating time-dependent plane waves and evanescent time-dependent plane waves. We explore the separate role of these spectral constituents in establishing the causal field, and determine the space-time regions where the field is described only by the propagating spectrum. The spectral theory is presented here for scalar wave fields, but it may readily be extended to vector electromagnetic fields.

  2. Achromatic digital speckle pattern interferometer with constant radial in-plane sensitivity by using a diffractive optical element.

    PubMed

    Viotti, Matias R; Kapp, Walter; Albertazzi G, Armando

    2009-04-20

    We report on a digital speckle pattern interferometer that applies a binary diffractive optical element (DOE) to generate double illumination and radial in-plane sensitivity. The application of the DOE ensures independence on the wavelength of the laser used as an illumination source. Furthermore, in-plane sensitivity only depends on the grating period of the DOE. An experimental setup was built allowing the measurement of a set of radial in-plane displacement fields either using a red laser as a light source or a green one. When displacement fields computed from the measured optical phase maps obtained with a red or a green laser were compared, two main results were observed: (a) deviations between mean values ranged only up to 7 nm and (b) phase maps presented the same amount of fringes. In addition, phase maps measured with the red laser were processed as they were obtained with green light. For this case, deviations have ranged only up to 0.5 nm. On the other hand, a set of measurements performed changing the DOE by a conical mirror showed clearly that radial in-plane sensitivity increased when the red laser was changed by the green one. PMID:19381178

  3. Diffraction loss analysis of a plane-parallel optical cavity with a phase step and a slit aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalviste, Erko

    2012-06-01

    A model for calculating the round trip diffraction loss in a plane-mirror cavity with an intracavity phase step and an infinite slit aperture is developed. The round trip remaining intensity fraction for the low order transverse cavity modes can be calculated for any given location of the slit aperture and the phase step along the cavity and for any given phase delay on the phase step. The diffraction loss on the slit aperture is found to be a periodic function of the phase delay on the phase step. Transformation of the lasing spectrum emitted from a broadband pulsed dye laser on moving the phase step along the oscillator cavity is reproduced theoretically. The lasing spectrum affected by the phase step is interpreted as the wavelength dependence of the remaining intensity fraction for the principal transverse mode.

  4. Three-wave diffraction in damaged epitaxial layers with a wurtzite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyutt, R. N.

    2011-05-01

    Three-wave diffraction of X-rays is measured using the Renninger scheme for a series of GaN epitaxial layers of various thicknesses and degrees of structural perfection. In each 30°-angular interval of azimuthal rotation, all ten three-wave peaks determined by the geometry of diffraction with the 0001 first forbidden reflection and Cu K α radiation are observed. The φ- and θ-scanned diffraction curves are measured for each three-wave combination. The angular FWHM of the diffraction peaks formed in experiments and its relation with the parameters of the two-wave diffraction pattern and the dislocation structure of the layers are analyzed. It is shown that the φ-scan peaks are less sensitive to the degree of structural perfection than the γ-mode peaks. The strongest dependence on the dislocation density for the latter peaks is observed for the (1bar 100)/(bar 1101) and (3bar 2bar 10)/(bar 3211) three-wave combinations with a pure Laue component of secondary radiation, while the (01bar 13)/(0bar 11bar 2) combination with a large Bragg component exhibits the weakest dependence. Splitting of three-wave Renninger peaks associated with the coarse-block structure of some of the layers with rotations of the blocks about the normal to the surface is detected. The total integrated intensity of all three-wave combinations is determined and their ratios are in qualitative agreement with the theory.

  5. Modeling bulk and surface Pt using the "Gaussian and plane wave" density functional theory formalism: validation and comparison to k-point plane wave calculations.

    PubMed

    Santarossa, Gianluca; Vargas, Angelo; Iannuzzi, Marcella; Pignedoli, Carlo A; Passerone, Daniele; Baiker, Alfons

    2008-12-21

    We present a study on structural and electronic properties of bulk platinum and the two surfaces (111) and (100) comparing the Gaussian and plane wave method to standard plane wave schemes, normally employed for density functional theory calculations on metallic systems. The aim of this investigation is the assessment of methods based on the expansion of the Kohn-Sham orbitals into localized basis sets and on the supercell approach, in the description of the metallicity of Pt. Electronic structure calculations performed at Gamma-point only on supercells of different sizes, from 108 up to 864 atoms, are compared to the results obtained for the unit cell of four Pt atoms where the k-point expansion of the wave function over Monkhorst-Pack grids up to (10x10x10) has been employed. The evaluation of the two approaches with respect to bulk properties is done through the calculation of the equilibrium lattice constant, the bulk modulus, and the total and the d-projected density of states. For the Pt(111) and Pt(100) surfaces, we consider the relaxation of the first layers, the surface energies, the work function, the total density of states, as well as the center and filling of the d bands. Our results confirm that the accuracy of two approaches in the description of electronic and structural properties of Pt is equivalent, providing that consistent supercells and k-point meshes are used. Moreover, we estimate the supercell size that can be safely adopted in the Gaussian and plane wave method in order to obtain the same reliability of previous theoretical studies based on well converged plane wave calculations available in literature. The latter studies, in turn, set the level of agreement with experimental data. In particular, we obtain excellent agreement in the evaluation of the density of states for either bulk and surface systems, and our data are also in good agreement with previous works on Pt reported in literature. We conclude that Gaussian and plane wave

  6. Transverse spin and transverse momentum in scattering of plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Sudipta; Singh, Ankit K.; Ray, Subir K.; Banerjee, Ayan; Gupta, Subhasish Dutta; Ghosh, Nirmalya

    2016-10-01

    We study the near field to the far field evolution of spin angular momentum (SAM) density and the Poynting vector of the scattered waves from spherical scatterers. The results show that at the near field, the SAM density and the Poynting vector are dominated by their transverse components. While the former (transverse SAM) is independent of the helicity of the incident circular polarization state, the latter (transverse Poynting vector) depends upon the polarization state. It is further demonstrated that the magnitudes and the spatial extent of the transverse SAM and the transverse momentum components can be controllably enhanced by exploiting the interference of the transverse electric and transverse magnetic scattering modes.

  7. Stacked-Bloch-wave electron diffraction simulations using GPU acceleration.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Robert S; Wang, Feng; Koch, Christoph T

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we discuss the advantages for Bloch-wave simulations performed using graphics processing units (GPUs), based on approximating the matrix exponential directly instead of performing a matrix diagonalization. Our direct matrix-exponential algorithm yields a functionally identical electron scattering matrix to that generated with matrix diagonalization. Using the matrix-exponential scaling-and-squaring method with a Padé approximation, direct GPU-based matrix-exponential double-precision calculations are up to 20× faster than CPU-based calculations and up to approximately 70× faster than matrix diagonalization. We compare precision and runtime of scaling and squaring methods with either the Padé approximation or a Taylor expansion. We also discuss the stacked-Bloch-wave method, and show that our stacked-Bloch-wave implementation yields the same electron scattering matrix as traditional Bloch-wave matrix diagonalization.

  8. Diffraction-resistant scalar beams generated by a parabolic reflector and a source of spherical waves.

    PubMed

    Zamboni-Rached, Michel; de Assis, Mariana Carolina; Ambrosio, Leonardo A

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we propose the generation of diffraction-resistant beams by using a parabolic reflector and a source of spherical waves positioned at a point slightly displaced from its focus (away from the reflector). In our analysis, considering the reflector dimensions much greater than the wavelength, we describe the main characteristics of the resulting beams, showing their properties of resistance to the diffraction effects. Due to its simplicity, this method may be an interesting alternative for the generation of long-range diffraction-resistant waves.

  9. Diffraction-resistant scalar beams generated by a parabolic reflector and a source of spherical waves.

    PubMed

    Zamboni-Rached, Michel; de Assis, Mariana Carolina; Ambrosio, Leonardo A

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we propose the generation of diffraction-resistant beams by using a parabolic reflector and a source of spherical waves positioned at a point slightly displaced from its focus (away from the reflector). In our analysis, considering the reflector dimensions much greater than the wavelength, we describe the main characteristics of the resulting beams, showing their properties of resistance to the diffraction effects. Due to its simplicity, this method may be an interesting alternative for the generation of long-range diffraction-resistant waves. PMID:26193137

  10. Variational solution of Poisson's equation using plane waves in adaptive coordinates.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Jordá, José M

    2014-11-01

    A procedure for solving Poisson's equation using plane waves in adaptive coordinates (u) is described. The method, based on Gygi's work, writes a trial potential ξ as the product of a preselected Coulomb weight μ times a plane-wave expansion depending on u. Then, the Coulomb potential generated by a given density ρ is obtained by variationally optimizing ξ, so that the error in the Coulomb energy is second-order with respect to the error in ξ. The Coulomb weight μ is chosen to provide to each ξ the typical long-range tail of a Coulomb potential, so that calculations on atoms and molecules are made possible without having to resort to the supercell approximation. As a proof of concept, the method is tested on the helium atom and the H_{2} and H_{3}^{+} molecules, where Hartree-Fock energies with better than milli-Hartree accuracy require only a moderate number of plane waves.

  11. PlaneWave Admittance Method- a novel approach for determining the electromagnetic modes in photonic structures.

    PubMed

    Dems, Maciej; Kotynski, Rafal; Panajotov, Krassimir

    2005-05-01

    In this article we present a novel approach for determining the electromagnetic modes of photonic multilayer structures. We combine the plane wave expansion method with the method of lines resulting in a fast and accurate computational technique which we named the plane wave admittance method. In addition, we incorporate perfectly matched layers at the boundaries parallel to the multilayer surfaces which allow for easy determination of leaky modes. The convergence of the method is verified for the case of photonic crystal slab showing very good agreement with the results obtained with full three-dimensional plane wave expansion method while the numerical effort is largely reduced. The numerical implementation of the method will be soon available on the web.

  12. Ground state and the spin precession of the Dirac electron in counterpropagating plane electromagnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzdov, G. N.

    2016-06-01

    The fundamental solution of the Dirac equation for an electron in an electromagnetic field with harmonic dependence on space-time coordinates is obtained. The field is composed of three standing plane harmonic waves with mutually orthogonal phase planes and the same frequency. Each standing wave consists of two eigenwaves with different complex amplitudes and opposite directions of propagation. The fundamental solution is obtained in the form of the projection operator defining the subspace of solutions to the Dirac equation. It is illustrated by the analysis of the ground state and the spin precession of the Dirac electron in the field of two counterpropagating plane waves with left and right circular polarizations. Interrelations between the fundamental solution and approximate partial solutions is discussed and a criterion for evaluating the accuracy of approximate solutions is suggested.

  13. Geometrical Reasoning in Wave Situations: The Case of Light Diffraction and Coherent Illumination Optical Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurines, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    This particular study is part of a research programme on the difficulties encountered by students when learning about wave phenomena in a three-dimensional medium in the absence or presence of obstacles. It focuses on how students reason in situations in which wave optics need to be used: diffraction of light by an aperture, imaging in the…

  14. An algorithm for the calculation of the partial wave expansion of the Coulomb-distorted plane wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornyak, I.; Kruppa, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    The partial wave expansion of the Coulomb-distorted plane wave is determined by the help of the complex generalized hypergeometric function 2F2(a , a ; a + l + 1 , a - l ; z) . An algorithm for the calculation of 2F2(a , a ; a + l + 1 , a - l ; z) is created and it is implemented as a FORTRAN-90 code. The code is fast and its accuracy is 14 significant decimal digits.

  15. Qualitative analysis of response caused by growing plane waves by underdetermined system theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Yukio

    1991-03-01

    A qualitative analysis of the mechanical response of rate-dependent media caused by one-dimensional plane smooth- and continuous-wave fronts with the growing peaks of strain, particle velocity, and stress is performed by an underdetermined system of nonlinear partial differential equations. The response found by the analysis reveals that strain, particle velocity, and stress profiles in the smooth-wave front are not similar and that the front is composed of five partial waves having different properties. The property is represented by the set of strain rate, acceleration, and stress rate as in a previous study. The front of the wave front is necessarily a contraction wave in which strain, particle velocity, and stress increase with time. The second partial wave is another contraction wave. We call the wave a vice-contraction wave. The rear is assumed to be a rarefaction wave where they all decrease with time. Between these two partial waves there are two remaining partial waves. We call these waves mesorarefaction waves I and II. Wave II is a wave in which particle velocity and stress increase, notwithstanding the decrease in strain with time. It is followed by wave I in which the increase in stress with time occurs in spite of the decrease in strain and particle velocity. The continuous-wave front, which has discontinuous-movement velocities at the continuous, but nonsmooth, positions in the profiles of strain, particle velocity, and stress, is composed of five independent waves. These waves are a contraction wave, a vice-contraction wave, evolutional rarefaction waves II and I, and a rarefaction wave which possess the same properties as the corresponding partial waves in the smooth-wave front mentioned above. Both in the smooth-growing-wave front and in the continuous one the peak precedence is in the order of the strain, particle velocity, and stress peaks. The stress-strain path and stress-particle velocity path at a position in a rate-dependent medium which is

  16. Source extension of chorus waves in the equatorial plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayosh, M.; Santolik, O.; Parrot, M.

    2009-04-01

    We use measurements of the Cluster spacecraft and a ray tracing simulation to estimate the location and size of the global source of whistler-mode chorus emissions. In this study we use the data provided simultaneously by the STAFF-SA instruments on the four Cluster spacecraft on 19 August, 2003. To determine the direction of propagation of chorus we calculate Poynting vector whereas a ray-tracing method is used to estimate the chorus source extension. For the first time this analysis has been made along whole particular Cluster orbit in both hemispheres. Our study shows that minimum size of the global chorus source region in the equatorial plane is between 1-3 Earth's radii. The resulting location of the chorus source region is at radial distances between 3 and 8 Earth radii. This result is in agreement with previous analysis of Cluster data by Parrot et al., 2003, 2004 and with the study of Santolik et al., 2005 who analyzed data from the Double Star TC-1 spacecraft.

  17. On the use of evanescent plane waves for low-frequency energy transmission across material interfaces.

    PubMed

    Woods, Daniel C; Bolton, J Stuart; Rhoads, Jeffrey F

    2015-10-01

    The transmission of airborne sound into high-impedance media is of interest in several applications. For example, sonic booms in the atmosphere may impact marine life when incident on the ocean surface, or affect the integrity of existing structures when incident on the ground. Transmission across high impedance-difference interfaces is generally limited by reflection and refraction at the surface, and by the critical angle criterion. However, spatially decaying incident waves, i.e., inhomogeneous or evanescent plane waves, may transmit energy above the critical angle, unlike homogeneous plane waves. The introduction of a decaying component to the incident trace wavenumber creates a nonzero propagating component of the transmitted normal wavenumber, so energy can be transmitted across the interface. A model of evanescent plane waves and their transmission across fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfaces is developed here. Results are presented for both air-water and air-solid interfaces. The effects of the incident wave parameters (including the frequency, decay rate, and incidence angle) and the interfacial properties are investigated. Conditions for which there is no reflection at the air-solid interface, due to impedance matching between the incident and transmitted waves, are also considered and are found to yield substantial transmission increases over homogeneous incident waves. PMID:26520290

  18. On the use of evanescent plane waves for low-frequency energy transmission across material interfaces.

    PubMed

    Woods, Daniel C; Bolton, J Stuart; Rhoads, Jeffrey F

    2015-10-01

    The transmission of airborne sound into high-impedance media is of interest in several applications. For example, sonic booms in the atmosphere may impact marine life when incident on the ocean surface, or affect the integrity of existing structures when incident on the ground. Transmission across high impedance-difference interfaces is generally limited by reflection and refraction at the surface, and by the critical angle criterion. However, spatially decaying incident waves, i.e., inhomogeneous or evanescent plane waves, may transmit energy above the critical angle, unlike homogeneous plane waves. The introduction of a decaying component to the incident trace wavenumber creates a nonzero propagating component of the transmitted normal wavenumber, so energy can be transmitted across the interface. A model of evanescent plane waves and their transmission across fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfaces is developed here. Results are presented for both air-water and air-solid interfaces. The effects of the incident wave parameters (including the frequency, decay rate, and incidence angle) and the interfacial properties are investigated. Conditions for which there is no reflection at the air-solid interface, due to impedance matching between the incident and transmitted waves, are also considered and are found to yield substantial transmission increases over homogeneous incident waves.

  19. Plane-wave decomposition by spherical-convolution microphone array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafaely, Boaz; Park, Munhum

    2001-05-01

    Reverberant sound fields are widely studied, as they have a significant influence on the acoustic performance of enclosures in a variety of applications. For example, the intelligibility of speech in lecture rooms, the quality of music in auditoria, the noise level in offices, and the production of 3D sound in living rooms are all affected by the enclosed sound field. These sound fields are typically studied through frequency response measurements or statistical measures such as reverberation time, which do not provide detailed spatial information. The aim of the work presented in this seminar is the detailed analysis of reverberant sound fields. A measurement and analysis system based on acoustic theory and signal processing, designed around a spherical microphone array, is presented. Detailed analysis is achieved by decomposition of the sound field into waves, using spherical Fourier transform and spherical convolution. The presentation will include theoretical review, simulation studies, and initial experimental results.

  20. Diffraction from sharply peaked waves as an ocean surface scattering mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Glenn A.; Vesecky, John F.; Glazman, Roman E.

    1992-01-01

    The role of sharply peaked waves as a major ocean scattering mechanism for radar is investigated. A prototype three-dimensional wedgelike wave shape was constructed, and its scattering properties were analyzed. Using results from the theory of the statistical geometry of the ocean surface, it is estimated how many such wedges there are per unit area, as a function of sea conditions. Taking into account a directional distribution of the wedges, the total radar cross section due to wedge diffraction effects is estimated. At large incidence angles, wedge diffraction appears to account for a significant amount of the radar cross section on the ocean surface. The wedgelike wave shape used is a more realistic representation of sharplypeaked waves. The scale-size and spatial density of the wedgelike waves are computed directly from the wave-height spectrum.

  1. Vectorial spherical-harmonics representation of an inhomogeneous elliptically polarized plane wave.

    PubMed

    Frezza, F; Mangini, F

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a generalization of the vectorial spherical-harmonics expansion of an inhomogeneous elliptically polarized plane wave is presented. The solution has been achieved using the Legendre functions generalized via hypergeometric and gamma functions, shifting the difficulty to the determination of only expansion coefficients. In order to validate the presented method, a Matlab code has been implemented. To compare the results a Mie scattering by a sphere is considered, then a truncation criterion for the numerical evaluation of the series is proposed, and the Mie scattering coefficients by perfectly conducting and dielectric spheres excited by an inhomogeneous elliptically polarized plane wave are shown. PMID:26367169

  2. Population analysis of plane-wave electronic structure calculations of bulk materials

    SciTech Connect

    Segall, M.D.; Shah, R.; Pickard, C.J.; Payne, M.C.

    1996-12-01

    {ital Ab} {ital initio} plane-wave electronic structure calculations are widely used in the study of bulk materials. A technique for the projection of plane-wave states onto a localized basis set is used to calculate atomic charges and bond populations by means of Mulliken analysis. We analyze a number of simple bulk crystals and find correlations of overlap population with covalency of bonding and bond strength, and effective valence charge with ionicity of bonding. Thus, we show that the techniques described in this paper may be usefully applied in the field of solid state physics. {copyright}{ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  3. Vectorial spherical-harmonics representation of an inhomogeneous elliptically polarized plane wave.

    PubMed

    Frezza, F; Mangini, F

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a generalization of the vectorial spherical-harmonics expansion of an inhomogeneous elliptically polarized plane wave is presented. The solution has been achieved using the Legendre functions generalized via hypergeometric and gamma functions, shifting the difficulty to the determination of only expansion coefficients. In order to validate the presented method, a Matlab code has been implemented. To compare the results a Mie scattering by a sphere is considered, then a truncation criterion for the numerical evaluation of the series is proposed, and the Mie scattering coefficients by perfectly conducting and dielectric spheres excited by an inhomogeneous elliptically polarized plane wave are shown.

  4. Electronic excitation spectra from time-dependent density functional response theory using plane-wave methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doltsinis, Nikos L.; Sprik, Michiel

    2000-11-01

    The time-dependent density functional response theory method for the computation of electronic excitation spectra has been implemented in a plane-wave basis set/pseudo-potential formalism. We compare our test results for N2 and H2CO to literature atomic basis set calculations and find good agreement. We also discuss some of the technical complications specific to the use of plane-wave basis sets. As an application, the thermally broadened photoabsorption spectrum of formamide at room temperature is computed by averaging over a number of vibrational configurations sampled from an ab initio molecular dynamics run and compared to experiment.

  5. Nonlinear Breit-Wheeler process in the collision of a photon with two plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuan-Bin; Xue, She-Sheng

    2014-07-01

    The nonlinear Breit-Wheeler process of electron-positron pair production off a probe photon colliding with a low-frequency and a high-frequency electromagnetic wave that propagate in the same direction is analyzed. We calculate the pair-production probability and the spectra of the created pair in the nonlinear Breit-Wheeler processes of pair production off a probe photon colliding with two plane waves or one of these two plane waves. The differences of these two cases are discussed. We evidently show, in the two-wave case, the possibility of Breit-Wheeler pair production with simultaneous photon emission into the low-frequency wave and the high multiphoton phenomena: (i) Breit-Wheeler pair production by absorption of the probe photon and a large number of photons from the low-frequency wave, in addition to the absorption of one photon from the high-frequency wave; (ii) Breit-Wheeler pair production by absorption of the probe photon and one photon from the high-frequency wave with simultaneous emission of a large number of photons into the low-frequency wave. The phenomenon of photon emission into the wave cannot happen in the one-wave case. Compared with the one-wave case, the contributions from high multiphoton processes are largely enhanced in the two-wave case. The results presented in this article show a possible way to access the observations of the phenomenon of photon emission into the wave and high multiphoton phenomenon in Breit-Wheeler pair production even with the laser-beam intensity of order 1018 W/cm2.

  6. Optical measurements of the mutual reflection of two-plane shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, F.J.; Skews, B.W.

    1995-12-31

    A bifurcated shock tube is used to create two synchronized waves of equal strength. Essentially a single shock wave is split symmetrically in two, the two waves then are later brought back together at a trailing edge of a wedge to interact, the plane of symmetry acting as an ideal rigid wall. The normal method of studying mach reflections is to allow a plane shock wave to impinge on a wedge, however the boundary layer growth on the wedge surface effectively ensures that the flow direction behind the Mach stem does not have to satisfy the boundary condition of being parallel to the surface of the wedge. Thus the transition from regular to Mach reflection occurs at higher angles of incidence than theory allows. The present experiment was initiated to generate data on the ideal cause of reflection off a plane wall. The advantage of the new system is that like classical theory and computational solutions of the inviscid Euler equations, the boundary layer no slip condition is not imposed at the plane of reflection. Optical methods are used to investigate the post-shock flow, as well as to help explain the complex interactions which occur when the two shock waves are not synchronized. These interactions show many very interesting features and clearly indicate the need for higher resolution measurements such as are obtained using holographic interferometry, and also to extend the work to different wedge angles and Mach numbers.

  7. Active control of fan-generated plane wave noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Nuckolls, William E.; Santamaria, Odillyn L.; Martinson, Scott D.

    1993-08-01

    Subsonic propulsion systems for future aircraft may incorporate ultra-high bypass ratio ducted fan engines whose dominant noise source is the fan with blade passage frequency less than 1000 Hz. This low frequency combines with the requirement of a short nacelle to diminish the effectiveness of passive duct liners. Active noise control is seen as a viable method to augment the conventional passive treatments. An experiment to control ducted fan noise using a time domain active adaptive system is reported. The control sound source consists of loudspeakers arrayed around the fan duct. The error sensor location is in the fan duct. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate that the in-duct error sensor reduces the mode spillover in the far field, thereby increasing the efficiency of the control system. In this first series of tests, the fan is configured so that predominantly zero order circumferential waves are generated. The control system is found to reduce the blade passage frequency tone significantly in the acoustic far field when the mode orders of the noise source and of the control source are the same. The noise reduction is not as great when the mode orders are not the same even though the noise source modes are evanescent, but the control system converges stably and global noise reduction is demonstrated in the far field. Further experimentation is planned in which the performance of the system will be evaluated when higher order radial and spinning modes are generated.

  8. Active control of fan-generated plane wave noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Nuckolls, William E.; Santamaria, Odillyn L.; Martinson, Scott D.

    1993-01-01

    Subsonic propulsion systems for future aircraft may incorporate ultra-high bypass ratio ducted fan engines whose dominant noise source is the fan with blade passage frequency less than 1000 Hz. This low frequency combines with the requirement of a short nacelle to diminish the effectiveness of passive duct liners. Active noise control is seen as a viable method to augment the conventional passive treatments. An experiment to control ducted fan noise using a time domain active adaptive system is reported. The control sound source consists of loudspeakers arrayed around the fan duct. The error sensor location is in the fan duct. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate that the in-duct error sensor reduces the mode spillover in the far field, thereby increasing the efficiency of the control system. In this first series of tests, the fan is configured so that predominantly zero order circumferential waves are generated. The control system is found to reduce the blade passage frequency tone significantly in the acoustic far field when the mode orders of the noise source and of the control source are the same. The noise reduction is not as great when the mode orders are not the same even though the noise source modes are evanescent, but the control system converges stably and global noise reduction is demonstrated in the far field. Further experimentation is planned in which the performance of the system will be evaluated when higher order radial and spinning modes are generated.

  9. From plane waves to local Gaussians for the simulation of correlated periodic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, George H.; Tsatsoulis, Theodoros; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Grüneis, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    We present a simple, robust, and black-box approach to the implementation and use of local, periodic, atom-centered Gaussian basis functions within a plane wave code, in a computationally efficient manner. The procedure outlined is based on the representation of the Gaussians within a finite bandwidth by their underlying plane wave coefficients. The core region is handled within the projected augment wave framework, by pseudizing the Gaussian functions within a cutoff radius around each nucleus, smoothing the functions so that they are faithfully represented by a plane wave basis with only moderate kinetic energy cutoff. To mitigate the effects of the basis set superposition error and incompleteness at the mean-field level introduced by the Gaussian basis, we also propose a hybrid approach, whereby the complete occupied space is first converged within a large plane wave basis, and the Gaussian basis used to construct a complementary virtual space for the application of correlated methods. We demonstrate that these pseudized Gaussians yield compact and systematically improvable spaces with an accuracy comparable to their non-pseudized Gaussian counterparts. A key advantage of the described method is its ability to efficiently capture and describe electronic correlation effects of weakly bound and low-dimensional systems, where plane waves are not sufficiently compact or able to be truncated without unphysical artifacts. We investigate the accuracy of the pseudized Gaussians for the water dimer interaction, neon solid, and water adsorption on a LiH surface, at the level of second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory.

  10. From plane waves to local Gaussians for the simulation of correlated periodic systems.

    PubMed

    Booth, George H; Tsatsoulis, Theodoros; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Grüneis, Andreas

    2016-08-28

    We present a simple, robust, and black-box approach to the implementation and use of local, periodic, atom-centered Gaussian basis functions within a plane wave code, in a computationally efficient manner. The procedure outlined is based on the representation of the Gaussians within a finite bandwidth by their underlying plane wave coefficients. The core region is handled within the projected augment wave framework, by pseudizing the Gaussian functions within a cutoff radius around each nucleus, smoothing the functions so that they are faithfully represented by a plane wave basis with only moderate kinetic energy cutoff. To mitigate the effects of the basis set superposition error and incompleteness at the mean-field level introduced by the Gaussian basis, we also propose a hybrid approach, whereby the complete occupied space is first converged within a large plane wave basis, and the Gaussian basis used to construct a complementary virtual space for the application of correlated methods. We demonstrate that these pseudized Gaussians yield compact and systematically improvable spaces with an accuracy comparable to their non-pseudized Gaussian counterparts. A key advantage of the described method is its ability to efficiently capture and describe electronic correlation effects of weakly bound and low-dimensional systems, where plane waves are not sufficiently compact or able to be truncated without unphysical artifacts. We investigate the accuracy of the pseudized Gaussians for the water dimer interaction, neon solid, and water adsorption on a LiH surface, at the level of second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory.

  11. From plane waves to local Gaussians for the simulation of correlated periodic systems.

    PubMed

    Booth, George H; Tsatsoulis, Theodoros; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Grüneis, Andreas

    2016-08-28

    We present a simple, robust, and black-box approach to the implementation and use of local, periodic, atom-centered Gaussian basis functions within a plane wave code, in a computationally efficient manner. The procedure outlined is based on the representation of the Gaussians within a finite bandwidth by their underlying plane wave coefficients. The core region is handled within the projected augment wave framework, by pseudizing the Gaussian functions within a cutoff radius around each nucleus, smoothing the functions so that they are faithfully represented by a plane wave basis with only moderate kinetic energy cutoff. To mitigate the effects of the basis set superposition error and incompleteness at the mean-field level introduced by the Gaussian basis, we also propose a hybrid approach, whereby the complete occupied space is first converged within a large plane wave basis, and the Gaussian basis used to construct a complementary virtual space for the application of correlated methods. We demonstrate that these pseudized Gaussians yield compact and systematically improvable spaces with an accuracy comparable to their non-pseudized Gaussian counterparts. A key advantage of the described method is its ability to efficiently capture and describe electronic correlation effects of weakly bound and low-dimensional systems, where plane waves are not sufficiently compact or able to be truncated without unphysical artifacts. We investigate the accuracy of the pseudized Gaussians for the water dimer interaction, neon solid, and water adsorption on a LiH surface, at the level of second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory. PMID:27586908

  12. Mid-Wave and Long-Wave Infrared Dualband Megapixel QWIP Focal Plane Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.; Liu, J. K.; Mumolo, J. M.; Hill, C. J.; Ting, D. Z.; Kurth, E.; Woolaway, J.; LeVan, P. D.; Tidrow, M. Z.

    2008-01-01

    Mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) 1024x1024 pixel InGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs based quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) focal planes and a 320x256 pixel dual-band pixel co-registered simultaneous QWIP focal plane array have been demonstrated as pathfinders. In this paper, we discuss the development of 1024x1024 MWIR/LWIR dual-band pixel co-registered simultaneous QWIP focal plane array.

  13. Guided torsional wave generation of a linear in-plane shear piezoelectric array in metallic pipes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wensong; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo; Shi, Tonglu

    2016-02-01

    Cylindrical guided waves based techniques are effective and promising tools for damage detection in long pipes. The essential operations are generation and reception of guided waves in the structures utilizing transducers. A novel in-plane shear (d36 type) PMNT wafer is proposed to generate and receive the guided wave, especially the torsional waves, in metallic pipes. In contrast to the traditional wafer, this wafer will directly introduce in-plane shear deformation when electrical field is conveniently applied through its thickness direction. A single square d36 PMNT wafer is bonded on the surface of the pipe positioned collinearly with its axis, when actuated can predominantly generate torsional (T) waves along the axial direction, circumferential shear horizontal (C-SH) waves along circumferential direction, and other complex cylindrical Lamb-like wave modes along other helical directions simultaneously. While a linear array of finite square size d36 PMNT wafers was equally spaced circumferentially, when actuated simultaneously can nearly uniform axisymmetric torsional waves generate in pipes and non-symmetric wave modes can be suppressed greatly if the number of the d36 PMNT wafer is sufficiently large. This paper first presents the working mechanism of the linear d36 PMNT array from finite element analysis (FEA) by examining the constructive and destructive displacement wavefield phenomena in metallic pipes. Furthermore, since the amplitude of the received fundamental torsional wave signal strongly depends on frequency, a series of experiments are conducted to determine the frequency tuning curve for the torsional wave mode. All results indicate the linear d36 PMNT array has potential for efficiently generating uniform torsional wavefield of the fundamental torsional wave mode, which is more effective in monitoring structural health in metallic pipes. PMID:26548525

  14. Vector-based plane-wave spectrum method for the propagation of cylindrical electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Shi, S; Prather, D W

    1999-11-01

    We present a vector-based plane-wave spectrum (VPWS) method for efficient propagation of cylindrical electromagnetic fields. In comparison with electromagnetic propagation integrals, the VPWS method significantly reduces time of propagation. Numerical results that illustrate the utility of this method are presented.

  15. A beamforming method for plane wave Doppler imaging of high flow velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, Omar; Poepping, Tamie L.; Lacefield, James C.

    2016-04-01

    Plane wave imaging is desirable for its ability to achieve high frame rates, allowing the capture of fast dynamic events, and continuous Doppler data. In most implementations of plane-wave imaging, multiple low resolution image (LRI) frames from different plane wave tilt angles are compounded to form a single high resolution image (HRI) frame, thereby reducing the frame rate. Compounding is a low-pass mean filter that causes attenuation and aliasing to signals with high Doppler shifts. On the other hand, the lateral beam profile and hence the quality of the HRI frames is improved by increasing the number of compounded frames. Therefore, a tradeoff exists between the Doppler limits and beam profile. In this paper, we present a method that eliminates this tradeoff and produces high resolution images without the use of compounding. The method suppresses the off-focus (clutter) signal by spreading its spectrum, while keeping the spectrum of the in-focus signal intact. The spreading is achieved by using a random sequence of tilt angles, as opposed to a linear sweep. Experiments performed using a carotid vessel phantom with constant flow demonstrate that the spread-spectrum method more accurately measures the parabolic flow profile of the vessel and in particular outperforms conventional plane-wave Doppler at higher flow velocities. The spread-spectrum method is expected to be valuable for Doppler applications that require measurement of high velocities at high frame rates.

  16. Plane-wave-spectrum approach for calculations of radiation pattern of junction lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, T.K.; Datta, A.K.; Basuray, A.

    1986-02-01

    An analytical expression for mode-conversion coefficients at a laser-air interface is derived using plane-wave decomposition of the modal fields. Both the mode-conversion coefficients and the radiation pattern are explicitly expressed as function of Fresnel reflection coefficients of the interface and the incident mode spectrum.

  17. Collision between variably polarized plane gravitational wave and a shell of null matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinstein, Alexander; Senovilla, Josém. M.

    1989-06-01

    We construct a solution to the Einstein field equations which describes the collision between a variably polarized gravitational wave and a shell of null dust. Depending on the choice of the parameters the variably polarized wave can have an arbitrarily smooth wavefront. The shell of null dust is followed by a constantly polarized plane gravitational wave. Also Grupo de Física Teórica, Departamento de Física, Ingeniería y Radiología Médica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Salamanca, 37008 Salamanca, Spain.

  18. Sum-frequency diffraction loads on tension-leg platforms in bidirectional waves

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, J.H.; Williams, A.N.

    1995-12-31

    Second-order diffraction theory is utilized to compute the sum-frequency diffraction loads on a deepwater tension-leg platform (TLP) in bidirectional waves. The linear diffraction solution is obtained utilizing a Green`s function approach using higher-order boundary elements. The second-order hydrodynamic loads explicitly due to the second-order potential are computed using the indirect, assisting radiation potential method. An efficient numerical technique is presented to treat the free-surface integral which appears in the second-order load formulation. Numerical results are presented for a stationary ISSC TLP in water of infinite depth. It is found that wave directionality may have a significant influence on the second-order hydrodynamic loads on a TLP and that the assumption of unidirectional waves does not always lead to conservative estimates of the sum-frequency loading.

  19. Irradiance-variance behavior by numerical simulation for plane-wave and spherical-wave optical propagation through strong turbulence

    PubMed

    Flatte; Gerber

    2000-06-01

    We have simulated optical propagation through atmospheric turbulence in which the spectrum near the inner scale follows that of Hill and Clifford [J. Opt. Soc. Am. 68, 892 (1978)] and the turbulence strength puts the propagation into the asymptotic strong-fluctuation regime. Analytic predictions for this regime have the form of power laws as a function of beta0(2), the irradiance variance predicted by weak-fluctuation (Rytov) theory, and l0, the inner scale. The simulations indeed show power laws for both spherical-wave and plane-wave initial conditions, but the power-law indices are dramatically different from the analytic predictions. Let sigmaI(2) - 1 = a(beta0(2)/betac(2))-b(l0/Rf)c, where we take the reference value of beta0(2) to be betac(2) = 60.6, because this is the center of our simulation region. For zero inner scale (for which c = 0), the analytic prediction is b = 0.4 and a = 0.17 (0.37) for a plane (spherical) wave. Our simulations for a plane wave give a = 0.234 +/- 0.007 and b = 0.50 +/- 0.07, and for a spherical wave they give a = 0.58 + /- 0.01 and b = 0.65 +/- 0.05. For finite inner scale the analytic prediction is b = 1/6, c = 7/18 and a = 0.76 (2.07) for a plane (spherical) wave. We find that to a reasonable approximation the behavior with beta0(2) and l0 indeed factorizes as predicted, and each part behaves like a power law. However, our simulations for a plane wave give a = 0.57 +/- 0.03, b = 0.33 +/- 0.03, and c = 0.45 +/- 0.06. For spherical waves we find a = 3.3 +/- 0.3, b = 0.45 +/- 0.05, and c = 0.8 +/- 0.1.

  20. Photonic band structures solved by a plane-wave-based transfer-matrix method.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Yuan; Lin, Lan-Lan

    2003-04-01

    Transfer-matrix methods adopting a plane-wave basis have been routinely used to calculate the scattering of electromagnetic waves by general multilayer gratings and photonic crystal slabs. In this paper we show that this technique, when combined with Bloch's theorem, can be extended to solve the photonic band structure for 2D and 3D photonic crystal structures. Three different eigensolution schemes to solve the traditional band diagrams along high-symmetry lines in the first Brillouin zone of the crystal are discussed. Optimal rules for the Fourier expansion over the dielectric function and electromagnetic fields with discontinuities occurring at the boundary of different material domains have been employed to accelerate the convergence of numerical computation. Application of this method to an important class of 3D layer-by-layer photonic crystals reveals the superior convergency of this different approach over the conventional plane-wave expansion method.

  1. Zonal mean flow excitation due to inertial waves propagating in the meridional plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seelig, T.; Harlander, U.; Borcia, I. D.; Egbers, C.

    2012-04-01

    The large-scale oscillation of the atmosphere and oceans is organized by many processes. Waves are a main part. They transport momentum and transfer this locally to the environment. Slowly variating mean flows come into existence, that influence the variability of weather and climate. The quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) and equatorial deep jets (EDJ) are prominent examples for wave-driven mean flows. The rotation of the earth and associated propagating inertial waves are of main importance for such wave-mean flow interactions. Because of that, we want tho clarify theoretically and later experimentally, wether and how a mean flow will be excitated through inertial waves. We discuss a simple model for the inertial-wave-driven mean flow obtained from the primitive equations. Plumb [1] described the generation of a 'mean zonal motion' due to momentum transport of vertically propagating gravity waves. Based on the mathematical analogy we show that in the meridional plane, propagating inertial waves can transfer their momentum in the same manner to a sheared mean flow. Even an oscillating mean flow can be driven by the inertial waves in close analogy to gravity-wave-driven mean flow variations. [1] Plumb, R. A.: Momentum transport by the thermal tide in the stratosphere of Venus. Quart. J. Roy. Meteor. Soc. 101, 763-776 (1975)

  2. Photoacoustic clutter reduction by inversion of a linear scatter model using plane wave ultrasound measurements.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Hans-Martin; Beckmann, Martin F; Schmitz, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Photoacoustic imaging aims to visualize light absorption properties of biological tissue by receiving a sound wave that is generated inside the observed object as a result of the photoacoustic effect. In clinical applications, the strong light absorption in human skin is a major problem. When high amplitude photoacoustic waves that originate from skin absorption propagate into the tissue, they are reflected back by acoustical scatterers and the reflections contribute to the received signal. The artifacts associated with these reflected waves are referred to as clutter or skin echo and limit the applicability of photoacoustic imaging for medical applications severely. This study seeks to exploit the acoustic tissue information gained by plane wave ultrasound measurements with a linear array in order to correct for reflections in the photoacoustic image. By deriving a theory for clutter waves in k-space and a matching inversion approach, photoacoustic measurements compensated for clutter are shown to be recovered. PMID:27446669

  3. Photoacoustic clutter reduction by inversion of a linear scatter model using plane wave ultrasound measurements.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Hans-Martin; Beckmann, Martin F; Schmitz, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Photoacoustic imaging aims to visualize light absorption properties of biological tissue by receiving a sound wave that is generated inside the observed object as a result of the photoacoustic effect. In clinical applications, the strong light absorption in human skin is a major problem. When high amplitude photoacoustic waves that originate from skin absorption propagate into the tissue, they are reflected back by acoustical scatterers and the reflections contribute to the received signal. The artifacts associated with these reflected waves are referred to as clutter or skin echo and limit the applicability of photoacoustic imaging for medical applications severely. This study seeks to exploit the acoustic tissue information gained by plane wave ultrasound measurements with a linear array in order to correct for reflections in the photoacoustic image. By deriving a theory for clutter waves in k-space and a matching inversion approach, photoacoustic measurements compensated for clutter are shown to be recovered.

  4. Photoacoustic clutter reduction by inversion of a linear scatter model using plane wave ultrasound measurements

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Hans-Martin; Beckmann, Martin F.; Schmitz, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging aims to visualize light absorption properties of biological tissue by receiving a sound wave that is generated inside the observed object as a result of the photoacoustic effect. In clinical applications, the strong light absorption in human skin is a major problem. When high amplitude photoacoustic waves that originate from skin absorption propagate into the tissue, they are reflected back by acoustical scatterers and the reflections contribute to the received signal. The artifacts associated with these reflected waves are referred to as clutter or skin echo and limit the applicability of photoacoustic imaging for medical applications severely. This study seeks to exploit the acoustic tissue information gained by plane wave ultrasound measurements with a linear array in order to correct for reflections in the photoacoustic image. By deriving a theory for clutter waves in k-space and a matching inversion approach, photoacoustic measurements compensated for clutter are shown to be recovered. PMID:27446669

  5. The Exact Formula for an Energy Band Spectrum Gradient within the New Completely Orthogonalized Plane Wave Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syrotyuk, S. V.; Kynash, Yu. E.; Sobchuk, I. S.

    1997-03-01

    The formula for calculating the spectrum gradient gk = gradk E(k) at an arbitrary point k in the Brillouin zone has been derived on the basis of the new completely orthogonalized plane wave formalism (COPW). This important physical quantity has been obtained within the COPW basis for the first time. It displays a true plane wave basis limit.

  6. Conical wave propagation and diffraction in two-dimensional hexagonally packed granular lattices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chong, C.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Ablowitz, M. J.; Ma, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-25

    We explore linear and nonlinear mechanisms for conical wave propagation in two-dimensional lattices in the realm of phononic crystals. As a prototypical example, a statically compressed granular lattice of spherical particles arranged in a hexagonal packing configuration is analyzed. Upon identifying the dispersion relation of the underlying linear problem, the resulting diffraction properties are considered. Analysis both via a heuristic argument for the linear propagation of a wave packet and via asymptotic analysis leading to the derivation of a Dirac system suggests the occurrence of conical diffraction. This analysis is valid for strong precompression, i.e., near the linear regime. Formore » weak precompression, conical wave propagation is still possible, but the resulting expanding circular wave front is of a nonoscillatory nature, resulting from the complex interplay among the discreteness, nonlinearity, and geometry of the packing. Lastly, the transition between these two types of propagation is explored.« less

  7. Conical wave propagation and diffraction in two-dimensional hexagonally packed granular lattices.

    PubMed

    Chong, C; Kevrekidis, P G; Ablowitz, M J; Ma, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear mechanisms for conical wave propagation in two-dimensional lattices are explored in the realm of phononic crystals. As a prototypical example, a statically compressed granular lattice of spherical particles arranged in a hexagonal packing configuration is analyzed. Upon identifying the dispersion relation of the underlying linear problem, the resulting diffraction properties are considered. Analysis both via a heuristic argument for the linear propagation of a wave packet and via asymptotic analysis leading to the derivation of a Dirac system suggests the occurrence of conical diffraction. This analysis is valid for strong precompression, i.e., near the linear regime. For weak precompression, conical wave propagation is still possible, but the resulting expanding circular wave front is of a nonoscillatory nature, resulting from the complex interplay among the discreteness, nonlinearity, and geometry of the packing. The transition between these two types of propagation is explored.

  8. Discontinuity-free edge-diffraction model for characterization of focused wave fields.

    PubMed

    Sedukhin, Andrey G

    2010-03-01

    A model of discontinuity-free edge diffraction is proposed that is valid in the framework of the scalar Debye approximation and describes the formation process and approximate structure of the stationary diffracted field of a monochromatic converging spherical wave of limited angular opening throughout the whole space about the focus. The field is represented semianalytically in terms of the sum of a direct quasi-spherical wave and two edge quasi-conical waves of the zeroth and first order. The angular spectrum amplitudes of all these waves have smooth continuous variations of the real and imaginary parts in polar angle and radius, the separable nonanalytic functions defining the polar-angle variations of the amplitudes being found by optimization techniques. PMID:20208956

  9. Propagation of plane waves in a rotating transversely isotropic two temperature generalized thermoelastic solid half-space with voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijarnia, R.; Singh, B.

    2016-05-01

    The paper is concerned with the propagation of plane waves in a transversely isotropic two temperature generalized thermoelastic solid half-space with voids and rotation. The governing equations are modified in the context of Lord and Shulman theory of generalized thermoelasticity and solved to show the existence of four plane waves in the x - z plane. Reflection of these plane waves from thermally insulated stress free surface is also studied to obtain a system of four non-homogeneous equations. For numerical computations of speed and reflection coefficients, a particular material is modelled as transversely isotropic generalized thermoelastic solid half-space. The speeds of plane waves are computed against the angle of propagation to observe the effects of two temperature and rotation. Reflection coefficients of various reflected waves are also computed against the angle of incidence to observe the effects of various parameters.

  10. Theory of steady-state plane tunneling-assisted impact ionization waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kyuregyan, A. S.

    2013-07-15

    The effect of band-to-band and trap-assisted tunneling on the properties of steady-state plane ionization waves in p{sup +}-n-n{sup +} structures is theoretically analyzed. It is shown that such tunneling-assisted impact ionization waves do not differ in a qualitative sense from ordinary impact ionization waves propagating due to the avalanche multiplication of uniformly distributed seed electrons and holes. The quantitative differences of tunneling-assisted impact ionization waves from impact ionization waves are reduced to a slightly different relation between the wave velocity u and the maximum field strength E{sub M} at the front. It is shown that disregarding impact ionization does not exclude the possibility of the existence of tunneling-assisted ionization waves; however, their structure radically changes, and their velocity strongly decreases for the same E{sub M}. A comparison of the dependences u(E{sub M}) for various ionization-wave types makes it possible to determine the conditions under which one of them is dominant. In conclusion, unresolved problems concerning the theory of tunneling-assisted impact ionization waves are discussed and the directions of further studies are outlined.

  11. In-plane diffraction loss free optical cavity using coated optical fiber and silicon micromachined spherical mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabry, Yasser; Bourouina, Tarik; Saadany, Bassam; Khalil, Diaa

    2013-03-01

    Light trapping in optical cavities has many applications in optical telecommunications, biomedical optics, atomic studies, and chemical analysis. Efficient optical coupling in these cavities is an important engineering problem that affects greatly the cavity performance. One interesting way to form an optical cavity, while simultaneously connected to the rest of the optical systems, is to use an optical fiber surface as one of the cavity mirrors while the second mirror is fabricated by MEMS technology. In this way, cavity tuning with a MEMS actuator is a simple achievable task with low cost in mass production. The main problem in this solution is the high diffraction loss associated with the small spot size at the output of the standard single-mode fiber (SMF). Diffraction loss in the cavity is usually overcome by using an expensive lensed fiber or by inserting a coated lens in the cavity leading to a long cavity with small free spectral range (FSR). In this work, we report a Fabry-Perot cavity formed by a multilayer-coated cleaved-surface SMF inserted into a grove while facing a spherical micromirror; both are fabricated by silicon micromachining. The light is trapped inside the cavity while propagating in-plane of the wafer substrate. The light is injected in and collected from a Corning SMF-28 optical fiber with a coated surface reflectivity of about 98% at 1330 nm (O-band). The silicon mirror surface is aluminum metalized with a reflectivity of about 92%. The measured cavity has a line width of 0.45 nm around 1330 nm with a FSR of 26 nm. The obtained results indicate an almost diffraction-loss free optical cavity with a quality factor close to 3000, limited by the optical surfaces reflectivity that can be improved in future by an optimized mirror fabrication process and better matching of the fiber multilayer coating.

  12. Multi-view horizon-driven sea plane estimation for stereo wave imaging on moving vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamasco, Filippo; Benetazzo, Alvise; Barbariol, Francesco; Carniel, Sandro; Sclavo, Mauro

    2016-10-01

    In the last few years we faced an increased popularity of stereo imaging as an effective tool to investigate wind sea waves at short and medium scales. Given the advances of computer vision techniques, the recovery of a scattered point-cloud from a sea surface area is nowadays a well consolidated technique producing excellent results both in terms of wave data resolution and accuracy. Nevertheless, almost all the subsequent analyses tasks, from the recovery of directional wave spectra to the estimation of significant wave height, are bound to two limiting conditions. First, wave data are required to be aligned to the mean sea plane. Second, a uniform distribution of 3D point samples is assumed. Since the stereo-camera rig is placed tilted with respect to the sea surface, perspective distortion do not allow these conditions to be met. Errors due to this problem are even more challenging if the optical instrumentation is mounted on a moving vessel, so that the mean sea plane cannot be simply obtained by averaging data from multiple subsequent frames. We address the first problem with two main contributions. First, we propose a novel horizon estimation technique to recover the attitude of a moving stereo rig with respect to the sea plane. Second, an effective weighting scheme is described to account for the non-uniform sampling of the scattered data in the estimation of the sea-plane distance. The interplay of the two allows us to provide a precise point cloud alignment without any external positioning sensor or rig viewpoint pre-calibration. The advantages of the proposed technique are evaluated throughout an experimental section spanning both synthetic and real-world scenarios.

  13. Ring-plane traveling-wave tube slow-wave circuit design simulations at V-Band frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    1995-01-01

    The V-Band frequency range of 59-64 GHz is a region of the millimeter-wave spectrum that has been designated for intersatellite communications. As a first effort to develop a high-efficiency V-band TWT, variations on a ring-plane slow-wave circuit were computationally investigated to develop an alternative to the more conventional ferruled coupled-cavity circuit. The ring-plane circuit was chosen because of its high interaction impedance, large beam aperture, and excellent thermal dissipation properties. Despite the high-power capabilities of the ring-plane TWT, disadvantages of low bandwidth and high voltage requirements have until now prevented its acceptance outside the laboratory. In this paper, we use the three-dimensional electromagnetic simulation code MAFIA to investigate methods of increasing the bandwidth and lowering the operating voltage. Dispersion, impedance, and attenuation calculations for various geometric variations and loading distributions were performed. Based on the results of the variations, a circuit termed the finned-ladder TWT slowwave circuit was designed and is compared here to the scaled ring-plane prototype and the conventional ferruled coupled-cavity TWT circuit over the V-band frequency range.

  14. Ring-plane traveling-wave tube slow-wave circuit design simulations at V-Band frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Kory, C.L.; Wilson, J.D.

    1995-06-01

    The V-Band frequency range of 59-64 GHz is a region of the millimeter-wave spectrum that has been designated for intersatellite communications. As a first effort to develop a high-efficiency V-band TWT, variations on a ring-plane slow-wave circuit were computationally investigated to develop an alternative to the more conventional ferruled coupled-cavity circuit. The ring-plane circuit was chosen because of its high interaction impedance, large beam aperture, and excellent thermal dissipation properties. Despite the high-power capabilities of the ring-plane TWT, disadvantages of low bandwidth and high voltage requirements have until now prevented its acceptance outside the laboratory. In this paper, the authors use the three-dimensional electromagnetic simulation code MAFIA to investigate methods of increasing the bandwidth and lowering the operating voltage. Dispersion, impedance, and attenuation calculations for various geometric variations and loading distributions were performed. Based on the results of the variations, a circuit termed the finned-ladder TWT slowwave circuit was designed and is compared here to the scaled ring-plane prototype and the conventional ferruled coupled-cavity TWT circuit over the V-band frequency range.

  15. Student Understanding of the Wave Nature of Matter: Diffraction and Interference of Particles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vokos, Stamatis; Shaffer, Peter S.; Ambrose, Bradley S.; McDermott, Lillian C.

    2000-01-01

    Reports on a study of student understanding of the wave nature of matter in the context of the pattern produced by the diffraction and interference of particles. Errors made by students after standard instruction indicates the presence of similar conceptual and reasoning difficulties at three different educational levels. (Contains over 20…

  16. A new mode of radio wave diffraction via the terrestrial surface plasmon on mountain range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Masafumi

    2016-08-01

    It is shown that a new mode of radio wave diffraction occurs at the peak of mountains mediated via the terrestrial surface plasmon. If mobile electrical charges exist on the Earth's surface, the electromagnetic theory predicts strong coupling between the radio wave and the surface plasmon on the ground. If sufficient amount of electrical charges of the same sign appear on the ground as a consequence of some underground preseismic activity, they will be subject to the electrical repulsive forces. The surface electrical charges will then move toward topographic highs of nearby mountain peaks. Radio waves are then shown to interact with such electrical charges and create collective oscillations of the surface charges to induce a surface plasmon. Here it is clarified with numerical analyses on a massively parallel supercomputer that such interactions occur on the peak of mountains, hence causing peculiar phenomena of random diffraction. Depending on the density of the electrical charges on the ground surface, the interaction becomes strong enough to cause intense and random scattering and diffraction of the radio wave from the rough surface of the mountain topography. Mountain peaks thus act as a secondary source of radio waves; unexpectedly, radio waves are reradiated from the peaks into various directions by the anomalous diffraction and scattering, and the reradiated wave can propagate beyond the line of sight over mountains to reach distant locations. Such effects may arise randomly but concurrently with some preseismic activity in the crustal rocks, of which observation may allow statistical analysis of the critical state of crustal rocks over a broad area of a few hundred kilometers.

  17. Enhanced acoustic transmission into dissipative solid materials through the use of inhomogeneous plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, D. C.; Bolton, J. S.; Rhoads, J. F.

    2016-09-01

    A number of applications, for instance ultrasonic imaging and nondestructive testing, involve the transmission of acoustic energy across fluid-solid interfaces into dissipative solids. However, such transmission is generally hindered by the large impedance mismatch at the interface. In order to address this problem, inhomogeneous plane waves were investigated in this work for the purpose of improving the acoustic energy transmission. To this end, under the assumption of linear hysteretic damping, models for fluid-structure interaction were developed that allow for both homogeneous and inhomogeneous incident waves. For low-loss solids, the results reveal that, at the Rayleigh angle, a unique value of the wave inhomogeneity can be found which minimizes the reflection coefficient, and consequently maximizes the transmission. The results also reveal that with sufficient dissipation levels in the solid material, homogeneous incident waves yield lower reflection values than inhomogeneous waves, due to the large degrees of inhomogeneity inherent in the transmitted waves. Analytical conditions have also been derived which predict the dependence of the optimal incident wave type on the dissipation level and wave speeds in the solid medium. Finally, implications related to the use of acoustic beams of limited spatial extent are discussed.

  18. Evidence of Doppler-shifted Bragg scattering in the vertical plane by ocean surface waves.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Stephen D; D'Spain, Gerald L

    2012-03-01

    A set of narrowband tones (280, 370, 535, and 695 Hz) were transmitted by an acoustic source mounted on the ocean floor in 10 m deep water and received by a 64-element hydrophone line array lying on the ocean bottom 1.25 km away. Beamformer output in the vertical plane for the received acoustic tones shows evidence of Doppler-shifted Bragg scattering of the transmitted acoustic signals by the ocean surface waves. The received, scattered signals show dependence on the ocean surface wave frequencies and wavenumber vectors, as well as on acoustic frequencies and acoustic mode wavenumbers. Sidebands in the beamformer output are offset in frequency by amounts corresponding to ocean surface wave frequencies. Deviations in vertical arrival angle from specular reflection agree with those predicted by the Bragg condition through first-order perturbation theory using measured directional surface wave spectra and acoustic modes measured by the horizontal hydrophone array.

  19. Cavity-based linear polarizer immune to the polarization direction of an incident plane wave.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiang; Shen, Zhongxiang; Gao, Xiang; Wu, Wen

    2016-01-15

    We herein report a linear polarizer based on a 2D array of substrate integrated waveguide cavities, which can convert an arbitrary linearly polarized (LP) incident wave into an outgoing LP wave in a specified polarization direction with constant transmittance. Two orthogonal slots etched on the front surface of the cavity are utilized to couple a wave of arbitrary polarization into the cavity, while another slot on the back side helps to couple the field out along a desired polarization direction. Microwave experiments are performed as a proof of concept. The proposed polarizer exhibits very good performance with stable transmittance as 50% and a polarization extinction ratio over 45 dB. The new polarizer is potentially useful in novel polarization-selective devices that are immune to the polarization direction of an incident plane wave.

  20. Travelling-wave solutions bifurcating from relative periodic orbits in plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Subhandu; Cossu, Carlo; Rincon, François

    2016-06-01

    Travelling-wave solutions are shown to bifurcate from relative periodic orbits in plane Poiseuille flow at Re = 2000 in a saddle-node infinite-period bifurcation. These solutions consist in self-sustaining sinuous quasi-streamwise streaks and quasi-streamwise vortices located in the bulk of the flow. The lower branch travelling-wave solutions evolve into spanwise localized states when the spanwise size Lz of the domain in which they are computed is increased. On the contrary, the upper branch of travelling-wave solutions develops multiple streaks when Lz is increased. Upper-branch travelling-wave solutions can be continued into coherent solutions to the filtered equations used in large-eddy simulations where they represent turbulent coherent large-scale motions.

  1. Relativistic Two-Boson System in Presence of Electromagnetic Plane Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droz-Vincent, Ph.

    2016-09-01

    The relativistic two-body problem is considered for spinless particles subject to an external electromagnetic field. When this field is made of the monochromatic superposition of two counter-propagating plane waves (and provided the mutual interaction between particles is known), it is possible to write down explicitly a pair of coupled wave equations (corresponding to a pair of mass-shell constraints) which takes into account also the field contribution. These equations are manifestly covariant; constants of the motion are exhibited, so one ends up with a reduced problem involving five degrees of freedom.

  2. Limits of the plane wave approximation in the measurement of molecular properties.

    PubMed

    Walters, Zachary B; Tonzani, Stefano; Greene, Chris H

    2008-10-01

    Rescattering electrons offer great potential as probes of molecular properties on ultrafast timescales. The most famous example is molecular tomography, in which high harmonic spectra of oriented molecules are mapped to "tomographic images" of the relevant molecular orbitals. The accuracy of such reconstructions can be greatly affected by the distortion of scattering wave functions from their asymptotic forms due to interactions with the parent ion. We investigate the validity of the commonly used plane wave approximation in molecular tomography, showing how such distortions affect the resulting orbital reconstructions.

  3. S-Wave Dispersion Relations: Exact Left Hand E-Plane Discontinuity from the Born Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bessis, D.; Temkin, A.

    1999-01-01

    We show, for a superposition of Yukawa potentials, that the left hand cut discontinuity in the complex E plane of the (S-wave) scattering amplitude is given exactly, in an interval depending on n, by the discontinuity of the Born series stopped at order n. This also establishes an inverse and unexpected correspondence of the Born series at positive high energies and negative low energies. We can thus construct a viable dispersion relation (DR) for the partial (S-) wave amplitude. The high numerical precision achievable by the DR is demonstrated for the exponential potential at zero scattering energy. We also briefly discuss the extension of our results to Field Theory.

  4. The transmission of acoustic energy by a finite cylindrical shell excited by external plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacciolati, C.; Gotteland, M.; Barbe, M.

    A qualitative method is presented for sensitivity analyses of acoustic coupling between cylindrical shells such as found in aerospace structures. The shells are excited by an exterior plane wave. The analysis is carried out in terms of coupling among the exterior and structural natural modes and the structural and cavity natural modes. Strong coupling is shown to be limited to cases of coincidence of resonance frequencies and when numerous identical incident waves arrive from multiple directions. Coupling will in any case be confined to low frequencies. Limits are defined for the necessary number of frequencies which must be considered when predicting whether or not coupling will occur.

  5. Comparison of finite source and plane wave scattering from corrugated surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    The choice of a plane wave to represent incident radiation in the analysis of scatter from corrugated surfaces was examined. The physical optics solution obtained for the scattered fields due to an incident plane wave was compared with the solution obtained when the incident radiation is produced by a source of finite size and finite distance from the surface. The two solutions are equivalent if the observer is in the far field of the scatterer and the distance from observer to scatterer is large compared to the radius of curvature at the scatter points, condition not easily satisfied with extended scatterers such as rough surfaces. In general, the two solutions have essential differences such as in the location of the scatter points and the dependence of the scattered fields on the surface properties. The implication of these differences to the definition of a meaningful radar cross section was examined.

  6. Acoustic plane waves incident on an oblique clamped panel in a rectangular duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unz, H.; Roskam, J.

    1980-01-01

    The theory of acoustic plane waves incident on an oblique clamped panel in a rectangular duct was developed from basic theoretical concepts. The coupling theory between the elastic vibrations of the panel (plate) and the oblique incident acoustic plane wave in infinite space was considered in detail, and was used for the oblique clamped panel in the rectangular duct. The partial differential equation which governs the vibrations of the clamped panel (plate) was modified by adding to it stiffness (spring) forces and damping forces. The Transmission Loss coefficient and the Noise Reduction coefficient for oblique incidence were defined and derived in detail. The resonance frequencies excited by the free vibrations of the oblique finite clamped panel (plate) were derived and calculated in detail for the present case.

  7. A standing wave linear ultrasonic motor operating in in-plane expanding and bending modes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhijiang; Li, Xiaotian; Ci, Penghong; Liu, Guoxi; Dong, Shuxiang

    2015-03-01

    A novel standing wave linear ultrasonic motor operating in in-plane expanding and bending modes was proposed in this study. The stator (or actuator) of the linear motor was made of a simple single Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) ceramic square plate (15 × 15 × 2 mm(3)) with a circular hole (D = 6.7 mm) in the center. The geometric parameters of the stator were computed with the finite element analysis to produce in-plane bi-mode standing wave vibration. The calculated results predicted that a driving tip attached at midpoint of one edge of the stator can produce two orthogonal, approximate straight-line trajectories, which can be used to move a slider in linear motion via frictional forces in forward or reverse direction. The investigations showed that the proposed linear motor can produce a six times higher power density than that of a previously reported square plate motor.

  8. A standing wave linear ultrasonic motor operating in in-plane expanding and bending modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhijiang; Li, Xiaotian; Ci, Penghong; Liu, Guoxi; Dong, Shuxiang

    2015-03-01

    A novel standing wave linear ultrasonic motor operating in in-plane expanding and bending modes was proposed in this study. The stator (or actuator) of the linear motor was made of a simple single Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) ceramic square plate (15 × 15 × 2 mm3) with a circular hole (D = 6.7 mm) in the center. The geometric parameters of the stator were computed with the finite element analysis to produce in-plane bi-mode standing wave vibration. The calculated results predicted that a driving tip attached at midpoint of one edge of the stator can produce two orthogonal, approximate straight-line trajectories, which can be used to move a slider in linear motion via frictional forces in forward or reverse direction. The investigations showed that the proposed linear motor can produce a six times higher power density than that of a previously reported square plate motor.

  9. Analysis of surface modes in photonic crystals by a plane-wave transfer-matrix method.

    PubMed

    Che, Ming; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2008-09-01

    We have developed a plane-wave transfer-matrix method (PWTMM) with the aid of the interpolation technique to analyze the dispersion relation of surface modes in photonic crystal or photonic crystal surface waveguide. The proposed approach has been applied to several surface structures in two-dimensional photonic crystals. The calculated dispersion relation of the surface modes is in good agreement with the result obtained by the conventional plane-wave expansion method in combination with the supercell technique. The developed PWTMM needs to handle only a single unit-cell layer domain and is therefore numerically friendly. The proposed approach can become an efficient and accurate numerical tool to understand and design surface modes in different two-dimensional and three-dimensional photonic crystals with complex geometries.

  10. Extracting the spectral function of 4He from a relativistic plane-wave treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Raddad, L. J.; Piekarewicz, J.

    2001-12-01

    The spectral function of 4He is extracted from a plane-wave approximation to the (e,e'p) reaction using a fully relativistic formalism. We take advantage of both an algebraic ``trick'' and a general relativistic formalism for quasifree processes developed earlier to arrive at transparent, analytical expressions for all quasifree (e,e'p) observables. An observable is identified for the clean and model-independent extraction of the spectral function. Our simple relativistic plane-wave calculations provide baseline predictions for the recently measured, but not yet fully analyzed, momentum distribution of 4He by the A1 Collaboration from Mainz. Yet in spite of its simplicity, our approach predicts momentum distributions for 4He that rival some of the best nonrelativistic calculations to date. Finally, we highlight some of the challenges and opportunities that remain, both theoretically and experimentally, in the extraction of quasifree observables.

  11. Extracting the spectral function of He-4 from a relativistic plane-wave treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Raddad, Laith; Piekarewicz, Jorge

    2001-10-01

    The spectral function of He-4 is extracted from a plane-wave approximation to the (e,e'p) reaction using a fully relativistic formalism. We take advantage of both an algebraic ``trick'' and a general relativistic formalism for quasifree processes developed earlier to arrive at transparent, analytical expressions for all quasifree (e,e'p) observables. An observable is identified for the clean and model-independent extraction of the spectral function. Our simple relativistic plane-wave calculations provide baseline predictions for the recently measured, but not yet fully analyzed, momentum distribution of He-4 by the A1-collaboration from Mainz. Yet in spite of its simplicity, our approach predicts momentum distributions for He-4 that rival some of the best nonrelativistic calculations to date. Finally, we highlight some of the challenges and opportunities that remain, both theoretically and experimentally, in the extraction of quasifree observables.

  12. Refinement of a discontinuity-free edge-diffraction model describing focused wave fields.

    PubMed

    Sedukhin, Andrey G

    2010-03-01

    Two equivalent forms of a refined discontinuity-free edge-diffraction model describing the structure of a stationary focused wave field are presented that are valid in the framework of the scalar Debye integral representation for a diffracted rotationally symmetric converging spherical wave of a limited yet not-too-low angular opening. The first form describes the field as the sum of a direct quasi-spherical wave and a plurality of edge quasi-conical waves of different orders, the optimum discontinuity-free angular spectrum functions of all the waves being dependent on the polar angle only. According to the second form, the focused field is fully characterized by only three components--the same quasi-spherical wave and two edge quasi-conical waves of the zero and first order, of which the optimum discontinuity-free angular spectrum functions are dependent on both the polar angle and the polar radius counted from the geometrical focus. PMID:20208957

  13. Scattering from cylinders using the two-dimensional vector plane wave spectrum: addendum.

    PubMed

    Pawliuk, Peter; Yedlin, Matthew

    2012-03-01

    The solution for the vector plane wave spectrum scattering from multiple cylinders by Pawliuk and Yedlin [J. Opt. Soc. A28, 1177 (2011)] only provided the single scattering coefficients for the TM polarization case. The TE solution is similar except for the form of the single scattering coefficients. Here we describe the single scattering coefficients for both polarizations and three types of cylinders: dielectrics, perfect electric conductors, and perfect magnetic conductors.

  14. A nonperturbative definition of N = 4 Super Yang-Mills by the plane wave matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Shimasaki, Shinji

    2008-11-23

    We propose a nonperturbative definition of N = 4 Super Yang-Mills(SYM). We realize N = 4 SYM on RxS{sup 3} as the theory around a vacuum of the plane wave matrix model. Our regularization preserves 16 supersymmetries and the gauge symmetry. We perform the one-loop calculation to give evidence that in the continuum limit the superconformal symmetry is restored.

  15. Description of arbitrary shaped beams in elliptical cylinder coordinates, by using a plane wave spectrum approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouesbet, Gérard; Mees, Loic; Gréhan, Gérard; Ren, Kuan Fang

    1999-03-01

    The description of arbitrary shaped beams in elliptical cylinder coordinates is presented by using a plane wave spectrum approach. It is demonstrated and exemplified that this approach is equivalent to a formally more rigorous approach in terms of distributions. Beam shape coefficients are evaluated by using quadratures. The behavior of these quadratures is discussed in the case of a first-order Davis beam which does not exactly satisfy Maxwell's equations.

  16. Spectral responses of gyrotropic chiral sculptured thin films to obliquely incident plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickett, Matthew D.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Polo, John A., Jr.

    Gyrotropic chiral sculptured thin films (STFs) exhibit optical activity due to their structural chirality, local anisotropy, and magneto-optic gyrotropy. We adapted two algorithms for nongyrotopic chiral STFs to investigate the circular-polarization-sensitivity of gyrotropic chiral STFs to incident plane waves. The impacts of gyrotropy and oblique angles of incidence on the reflectances and the transmittances were examined, and several conclusions drawn. In particular, we found that the incorporation of gyrotropy results in a blueshift of the Bragg regime.

  17. Radiated Susceptibility of a Twisted-Wire Pair Illuminated by a Random Plane-Wave Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spadacini, Giordano; Pignari, Sergio A.

    This work presents a statistical model for the radiated susceptibility (RS) of an unshielded twisted-wire pair (TWP) running above ground, illuminated by a random electromagnetic field. The incident field is modeled as a superposition of elemental plane waves with random angular density, phase, and polarization. The statistical properties of both the differential-mode (DM) and the common-mode (CM) noise voltages induced across the terminal loads are derived and discussed.

  18. On the convergence of the coupled-wave approach for lamellar diffraction gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Lifeng; Haggans, Charles W.

    1992-01-01

    Among the many existing rigorous methods for analyzing diffraction of electromagnetic waves by diffraction gratings, the coupled-wave approach stands out because of its versatility and simplicity. It can be applied to volume gratings and surface relief gratings, and its numerical implementation is much simpler than others. In addition, its predictions were experimentally validated in several cases. These facts explain the popularity of the coupled-wave approach among many optical engineers in the field of diffractive optics. However, a comprehensive analysis of the convergence of the model predictions has never been presented, although several authors have recently reported convergence difficulties with the model when it is used for metallic gratings in TM polarization. Herein, three points are made: (1) in the TM case, the coupled-wave approach converges much slower than the modal approach of Botten et al; (2) the slow convergence is caused by the use of Fourier expansions for the permittivity and the fields in the grating region; and (3) is manifested by the slow convergence of the eigenvalues and the associated modal fields. The reader is assumed to be familiar with the mathematical formulations of the coupled-wave approach and the modal approach.

  19. Time-domain effects of rigid sphere scattering on measurement of transient plane waves.

    PubMed

    Muhlestein, Michael B; Thomas, Derek C; Gee, Kent L

    2014-07-01

    Transient waves, like all other acoustic waves, will diffract around solid objects, such as measurement instrumentation. A derivation of an impulse response function on the surface of a rigid sphere, based on linear, classical scattering theory, is presented. The theoretical impulse response function is validated using an experiment with blast noise. An application of the impulse response function to a rocket noise measurement is discussed. The impulse response function shows that the presence of the rigid sphere significantly affects the measurement and estimation of rocket-noise waveforms, power spectral densities, and statistical measures. PMID:24993191

  20. Regimes of the interactions of high-intensity plane electromagnetic waves with electron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shiryaev, O. B.

    2008-01-15

    A set of fully nonlinear equations is derived from the Maxwell equations and the electron and ion fluid dynamics in one-dimensional geometry as a model of the interactions of extremely intense plane electromagnetic waves with cold locally non-neutral electron-ion plasmas. The problem is solved for phase velocities close to the speed of light numerically and with the help of asymptotic techniques. Depending on the field magnitudes, three nonlinear regimes are found to occur in the system. At plane-wave intensities inducing relativistic electron fluid dynamics but insufficient to cause significant ion motions, the model reverts to the classic Akhiezer-Polovin problem and yields its solutions describing the nonlinear self-modulation of the electromagnetic fields in plasmas. The types of regimes sustained at field strengths entailing substantial ion dynamics are the self-modulation with a splitting of the plane-wave field spectrum into a set of closely spaced bands, and the harmonics generation with a spectrum comprising broadly distanced bands. The latter two regimes correspond to a subcritical and an overcritical range of the plasma longitudinal field potentials.

  1. Ground-coupled air waves and diffracted infrasound from the Arequipa earthquake of June 23, 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pichon, A.; Guilbert, J.; Vega, A.; Garcés, M.; Brachet, N.

    2002-09-01

    On June 23, 2001, a strong earthquake measuring Mw 8.4 occurred along the coast of south-central Peru. Coherent infrasonic waves were detected over a period of one hour by the IS08 infrasound station in Bolivia. Analysis of the ground-coupled air waves shows that the rupture propagated from the northwestern to the southeastern part of the fault with a rupture velocity of 3.3 km/s. The azimuth variation of the infrasonic waves is attributed to a distribution of secondary sources along the highest mountain ranges, which excite infrasonic waves that are diffracted to the ground. The predominant source of infrasound is likely distributed along the Andean Cordillera. Using the azimuth and arrival time determination, the horizontal scale size of the distant source regions of infrasonic waves is reconstructed over distances greater than 400 km.

  2. Geometrical configurations of unphased diffraction-limited antennas in passive millimetre-wave imaging systems for concealed weapon detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serenelli, Roberto

    2004-12-01

    This paper analyzes simple imaging configurations to scan a human body, suitable as passive or active millimetre-wave imaging systems for concealed weapon detection (CWD). The first cylindrical configuration allows a 360 degrees scan: N unphased diffraction-limited antennas each of size L are placed on a circular support surrounding the subject (allowing scanning in the horizontal plane with N non-overlapping independent beams), and this circle is mechanically displaced over the whole body height. An analytical formula gives the maximum obtainable spatial resolution for different dimensions of the circular scanning device and operating frequencies, and the number of receivers achieving this optimal resolution. Constraints to be taken into account are diffraction, the usable total length of the circle, and the full coverage by the N beams over the subject, which is modelled as a cylinder with variable radius, coaxial with the scanning circle. Numerical calculations of system resolution are shown for different operating microwave (MW) and millimetre-wave (MMW) frequencies; in order to study off-axis performances, situations where the subject is not coaxial with the scanning device are also considered. For the case of a parallelepiped to be imaged instead of a cylinder, a linear array configuration is analyzed similarly to the circular one. A theoretical study is carried out to design other curved arrays, filled with unphased diffraction-limited antennas, for the imaging of linear subjects with finer resolution. Finally, the application of such configurations is considered for the design of active imaging systems, and different system architectures are discussed.

  3. Properties of electrons scattered by a strong plane electromagnetic wave with a linear polarization: Semiclassical treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, O. V.; Kazinski, P. O.

    2015-02-01

    The problem of scattering of ultrarelativistic electrons by a strong plane electromagnetic wave of a low (optical) frequency and linear polarization is solved in the semiclassical approximation, when the electron wave packet size is much smaller than the wavelength of electromagnetic wave. The exit momenta of ultrarelativistic electrons scattered are found using the exact solutions to the equations of motion with radiation reaction included (the Landau-Lifshitz equation). It is found that the momentum components of electrons traversed the electromagnetic wave depend weakly on the initial values of momenta. These electrons are mostly scattered at small angles to the propagation direction of the electromagnetic wave. The maximum Lorentz factor of electrons crossed the electromagnetic wave is proportional to the work done by the electromagnetic field and is independent of the initial momentum. The momentum component parallel to the electric field vector of the electromagnetic wave is determined solely by the laser beam diameter measured in the units of the classical electron radius. As for the reflected electrons, they for the most part lose the energy, but remain relativistic. A reflection law that relates the incident and reflection angles and is independent of any parameters is found.

  4. Acoustic backscattering and radiation force on a rigid elliptical cylinder in plane progressive waves.

    PubMed

    Mitri, F G

    2016-03-01

    This work proposes a formal analytical theory using the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in cylindrical coordinates, to calculate the acoustic backscattering form function as well as the radiation force-per-length on an infinitely long elliptical (non-circular) cylinder in plane progressive waves. The major (or minor) semi-axis of the ellipse coincides with the direction of the incident waves. The scattering coefficients for the rigid elliptical cylinder are determined by imposing the Neumann boundary condition for an immovable surface and solving a resulting system of linear equations by matrix inversion. The present method, which utilizes standard cylindrical (Bessel and Hankel) wave functions, presents an advantage over the solution for the scattering that is ordinarily expressed in a basis of elliptical Mathieu functions (which are generally non-orthogonal). Furthermore, an integral equation showing the direct connection of the radiation force function with the square of the scattering form function in the far-field from the scatterer (applicable for plane waves only), is noted and discussed. An important application of this integral equation is the adequate evaluation of the radiation force function from a bistatic measurement (i.e., in the polar plane) of the far-field scattering from any 2D object of arbitrary shape. Numerical predictions are evaluated for the acoustic backscattering form function and the radiation force function, which is the radiation force per unit length, per characteristic energy density, and per unit cross-sectional surface of the ellipse, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio a/b, where a and b are the semi-axes, as well as the dimensionless size parameter kb, without the restriction to a particular range of frequencies. The results are particularly relevant in acoustic levitation, acousto-fluidics and particle dynamics applications. PMID:26726146

  5. Acoustic backscattering and radiation force on a rigid elliptical cylinder in plane progressive waves.

    PubMed

    Mitri, F G

    2016-03-01

    This work proposes a formal analytical theory using the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in cylindrical coordinates, to calculate the acoustic backscattering form function as well as the radiation force-per-length on an infinitely long elliptical (non-circular) cylinder in plane progressive waves. The major (or minor) semi-axis of the ellipse coincides with the direction of the incident waves. The scattering coefficients for the rigid elliptical cylinder are determined by imposing the Neumann boundary condition for an immovable surface and solving a resulting system of linear equations by matrix inversion. The present method, which utilizes standard cylindrical (Bessel and Hankel) wave functions, presents an advantage over the solution for the scattering that is ordinarily expressed in a basis of elliptical Mathieu functions (which are generally non-orthogonal). Furthermore, an integral equation showing the direct connection of the radiation force function with the square of the scattering form function in the far-field from the scatterer (applicable for plane waves only), is noted and discussed. An important application of this integral equation is the adequate evaluation of the radiation force function from a bistatic measurement (i.e., in the polar plane) of the far-field scattering from any 2D object of arbitrary shape. Numerical predictions are evaluated for the acoustic backscattering form function and the radiation force function, which is the radiation force per unit length, per characteristic energy density, and per unit cross-sectional surface of the ellipse, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio a/b, where a and b are the semi-axes, as well as the dimensionless size parameter kb, without the restriction to a particular range of frequencies. The results are particularly relevant in acoustic levitation, acousto-fluidics and particle dynamics applications.

  6. Dynamic stress around a cylindrical nano-inhomogeneity with an interface in a half-plane under anti-plane shear waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xue-Qian; Zhang, Le-Le; Liu, Jin-Xi

    2012-03-01

    Taking into account the size of the nanostructure, the effect of surface/interface stiffness on the dynamic stress around a cylindrical nano-inhomogeneity embedded in an elastic half-plane subjected to anti-plane shear waves is investigated. The boundary condition at the straight edge of the half-plane is traction free, which is satisfied by the image method. The analytical solutions of displacement fields are expressed by employing a wave function expansion method. The addition theorem for a cylindrical wave function is applied to accomplish the superposition of wave fields in the two half-planes. Analyses show that the effect of the interface properties on the dynamic stress is significantly related to the nano-scale distance between the straight edge and the center of the cylindrical nano-inhomogeneity. The frequency and incident angle of incident waves and the shear modulus ratio of the nano-inhomogeneity to matrix also show different effect on the dynamic stress distribution when the inhomogeneity shrinks to nano-scale. Comparison with the existing results is also given.

  7. Out-of-plane propagation of elastic waves in two-dimensional phononic band-gap materials.

    PubMed

    Wilm, M; Khelif, A; Ballandras, S; Laude, V; Djafari-Rouhani, B

    2003-06-01

    We have used a plane-wave-expansion model to study the out-of-plane propagation of elastic waves in a two-dimensional phononic band-gap material. The case of quartz rods embedded in an epoxy matrix has been computed. Band gaps for nonzero values of the wave-vector component parallel to the rods are shown to exist and are investigated. For wavelengths smaller than the period of the structure, modes are found that are localized in the epoxy intersites, and propagate perpendicularly to the plane of the structure.

  8. Plane-wave superpositions defined by orthonormal scalar functions on two- and three-dimensional manifolds

    PubMed

    Borzdov

    2000-04-01

    Vector plane-wave superpositions defined by a given set of orthonormal scalar functions on a two- or three-dimensional manifold-beam manifold-are treated. We present a technique for composing orthonormal beams and some other specific types of fields such as three-dimensional standing waves, moving and evolving whirls. It can be used for any linear fields, in particular, electromagnetic fields in complex media and elastic fields in crystals. For electromagnetic waves in an isotropic medium or free space, unique families of exact solutions of Maxwell's equations are obtained. The solutions are illustrated by calculating fields, energy densities, and energy fluxes of beams defined by the spherical harmonics. It is shown that the obtained results can be used for a transition from the plane-wave approximation to more accurate models of real incident beams in free-space techniques for characterizing complex media. A mathematical formalism convenient for the treatment of various beams defined by the spherical harmonics is presented.

  9. Monochromatic plane-fronted waves in conformal gravity are pure gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbri, Luca; Paranjape, M. B.

    2011-05-01

    We consider plane-fronted, monochromatic gravitational waves on a Minkowski background, in a conformally invariant theory of general relativity. By this we mean waves of the form: gμν=ημν+γμνF(k·x), where γμν is a constant polarization tensor, and kμ is a lightlike vector. We also assume the coordinate gauge condition |g|-1/4∂τ(|g|1/4gστ)=0 which is the conformal analog of the harmonic gauge condition gμνΓμνσ=-|g|-1/2∂τ(|g|1/2gστ)=0, where det⁡[gμν]≡g. Requiring additionally the conformal gauge condition g=-1 surprisingly implies that the waves are both transverse and traceless. Although the ansatz for the metric is eminently reasonable when considering perturbative gravitational waves, we show that the metric is reducible to the metric of Minkowski space-time via a sequence of coordinate transformations which respect the gauge conditions, without any perturbative approximation that γμν be small. This implies that we have, in fact, exact plane-wave solutions; however, they are simply coordinate/conformal artifacts. As a consequence, they carry no energy. Our result does not imply that conformal gravity does not have gravitational wave phenomena. A different, more generalized ansatz for the deviation, taking into account the fourth-order nature of the field equation, which has the form gμν=ημν+Bμν(n·x)G(k·x), indeed yields waves which carry energy and momentum [P. D. Mannheim, Gen. Relativ. Gravit.GRGVA80001-7701 43, 703 (2010)10.1007/s10714-010-1088-z]. It is just surprising that transverse, traceless, plane-fronted gravitational waves, those that would be used in any standard, perturbative, quantum analysis of the theory, simply do not exist.

  10. 45∘ Relative Orientations of Planes of Polarizations States of Gravitational Waves and the Graviton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoukian, E. B.

    2016-07-01

    The recent detection of gravitational waves calls for, not just in words or by plausible arguments, of an explicit derivation of polarization aspects of gravitational waves with emphasis, especially, on the non-trivial aspect of the relative 45∘ orientations of the planes of polarization states of gravitation in the same way as has been done over the years for the far simpler case involving electromagnetic wave propagation with the well known relative 90∘ between its polarization states. The purpose of this communication is to carry out in a covariant description as well as by giving special attention to the underlying gauge problem these polarization aspects via a direct consideration of the graviton propagator in a quantum field theory setting from which fundamental properties of polarizations are readily extracted.

  11. Acoustic multipath arrivals in the horizontal plane due to approaching nonlinear internal waves.

    PubMed

    Badiey, Mohsen; Katsnelson, Boris G; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Lynch, James F

    2011-04-01

    Simultaneous measurements of acoustic wave transmissions and a nonlinear internal wave packet approaching an along-shelf acoustic path during the Shallow Water 2006 experiment are reported. The incoming internal wave packet acts as a moving frontal layer reflecting (or refracting) sound in the horizontal plane. Received acoustic signals are filtered into acoustic normal mode arrivals. It is shown that a horizontal multipath interference is produced. This has previously been called a horizontal Lloyd's mirror. The interference between the direct path and the refracted path depends on the mode number and frequency of the acoustic signal. A mechanism for the multipath interference is shown. Preliminary modeling results of this dynamic interaction using vertical modes and horizontal parabolic equation models are in good agreement with the observed data.

  12. Impact of wave front and coherence optimization in coherent diffractive imaging.

    PubMed

    Ge, X; Boutu, W; Gauthier, D; Wang, F; Borta, A; Barbrel, B; Ducousso, M; Gonzalez, A I; Carré, B; Guillaumet, D; Perdrix, M; Gobert, O; Gautier, J; Lambert, G; Maia, F R N C; Hajdu, J; Zeitoun, P; Merdji, H

    2013-05-01

    We present single shot nanoscale imaging using a table-top femtosecond soft X-ray laser harmonic source at a wavelength of 32 nm. We show that the phase retrieval process in coherent diffractive imaging critically depends on beam quality. Coherence and image fidelity are measured from single-shot coherent diffraction patterns of isolated nano-patterned slits. Impact of flux, wave front and coherence of the soft X-ray beam on the phase retrieval process and the image quality are discussed. After beam improvements, a final image reconstruction is presented with a spatial resolution of 78 nm (half period) in a single 20 fs laser harmonic shot.

  13. Liquid-Crystal Point-Diffraction Interferometer for Wave-Front Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Creath, Katherine

    1996-01-01

    A new instrument, the liquid-crystal point-diffraction interferometer (LCPDI), is developed for the measurement of phase objects. This instrument maintains the compact, robust design of Linnik's point-diffraction interferometer and adds to it a phase-stepping capability for quantitative interferogram analysis. The result is a compact, simple to align, environmentally insensitive interferometer capable of accurately measuring optical wave fronts with very high data density and with automated data reduction. We describe the theory and design of the LCPDI. A focus shift was measured with the LCPDI, and the results are compared with theoretical results,

  14. Rossby wave radiation by an eddy on a beta-plane: Experiments with laboratory altimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Afanasyev, Y. D.

    2015-07-15

    Results from the laboratory experiments on the evolution of vortices (eddies) generated in a rotating tank with topographic β-effect are presented. The focus of the experiments is on the far-field flow which contains Rossby waves emitted by travelling vortices. The surface elevation and velocity fields are measured by the altimetric imaging velocimetry. The experiments are supplemented by shallow water numerical simulations as well as a linear theory which describes the Rossby wave radiation by travelling vortices. The cyclonic vortices observed in the experiments travel to the northwest and continuously radiate Rossby waves. Measurements show that initially axisymmetric vortices develop a dipolar component which enables them to perform translational motion. A pattern of alternating zonal jets to the west of the vortex is created by Rossby waves with approximately zonal crests. Energy spectra of the flows in the wavenumber space indicate that a wavenumber similar to that introduced by Rhines for turbulent flows on the β-plane can be introduced here. The wavenumber is based on the translational speed of a vortex rather than on the root-mean-square velocity of a turbulent flow. The comparison between the experiments and numerical simulations demonstrates that evolving vortices also emit inertial waves. While these essentially three-dimensional non-hydrostatic waves can be observed in the altimetric data, they are not accounted for in the shallow water simulations.

  15. Transient axial solution for plane and axisymmetric waves focused by a paraboloidal reflector.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Te; Zhu, Jinying; Haberman, Michael R

    2013-04-01

    A time domain analytical solution is presented to calculate the pressure response along the axis of a paraboloidal reflector for a normally incident plane wave. This work is inspired by Hamilton's axial solution for an ellipsoidal mirror and the same methodology is employed in this paper. Behavior of the reflected waves along reflector axis is studied, and special interest is placed on focusing gain obtained at the focal point. This analytical solution indicates that the focusing gain is affected by reflector geometry and the time derivative of the input signal. In addition, focused pressure response in the focal zone given by various reflector geometries and input frequencies are also investigated. This information is useful for selecting appropriate reflector geometry in a specific working environment to achieve the best signal enhancement. Numerical simulation employing the finite element method is used to validate the analytical solution, and visualize the wave field to provide a better understanding of the propagation of reflected waves. This analytical solution can be modified to apply to non-planar incident waves with axisymmetric wavefront and non-uniform pressure distribution. An example of incident waves with conical-shaped wavefront is presented.

  16. Development of a low frequency shear horizontal piezoelectric transducer for the generation of plane SH waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, Guillaume; Viens, Martin; Belanger, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    The shear horizontal guided wave fundamental mode (SH0) has the particularity of being the only non-dispersive plate guided wave mode. This characteristic makes this ultrasonic guided wave mode very attractive in non-destructive testing, facilitating signal processing for long range inspections. It is, however, difficult to generate only a single guided wave mode when using piezoelectric transduction. This work aims to develop a piezoelectric transducer capable of generating a virtually pure plane zeroth order shear horizontal wave. The chosen material was the PZT-5H for its dominant d15 piezoelectric constant, which makes it a perfect candidate for SH-wave generation. The transducer dimensions were optimised using an analytical model based on the Huygens' principle of superposition and the dipole pattern of a shear point source. A 3D multiphysics finite element model was then used to validate the analytical model results. Experimental validation was finally conducted with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) system. Excellent agreement between the analytical model, finite element model and experimental validation was seen.

  17. Streaking images that appear only in the plane of diffraction in undoped GaAs single crystals: Diffraction imaging (topography) by monochromatic synchrotron radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuriyama, Masao; Steiner, Bruce; Dobbyn, Ronald C.; Laor, Uri; Larson, David; Brown, Margaret

    1988-01-01

    Streaking images restricted to the direction of the diffraction (scattering) vector have been observed on transmission through undoped GaAs. These disruption images (caused by the reduction of diffraction in the direction of observation) appear both in the forward and in Bragg diffracted directions in monochromatic synchrontron radiation diffraction imaging. This previously unobserved phenomenon can be explained in terms of planar defects (interfaces) or platelets which affects the absorption coefficient in anomalous transmission. Such regions of the crystal look perfect despite the presence of imperfections when the scattering vector is not perpendicular to the normal of the platelets. The observed crystallographic orientation of these interfaces strongly indicates that they are antiphase boundaries.

  18. The Effects Of Finite Electron Temperature And Diffraction On Lowere Hybrid Wave Propagation

    SciTech Connect

    White, J. C.; Bertelli, M.

    2014-02-24

    In this paper we show that the commonly used cold plasma dispersion relation for plasma waves in the lower hybrid range of frequencies (LHRF) produces a wave trajectory that is notably different than when thermal corrections to the Hermitian part of the dielectric tensor are retained. This is in contrast to the common implementation in LH simulation codes in which thermal effects are retained only for the anti-Hermitian part of the dielectric tensor used for damping calculations. We show which term is the critical one to retain in the dielectric tensor and discuss implications for modeling of LHRF waves in present day and future devices. We conclude with some observations on the effects of diffraction that may be isolated once thermal effects are retained in both ray tracing and full-wave approaches.

  19. On plane-wave relativistic electrodynamics in plasmas and in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiore, Gaetano

    2014-06-01

    We revisit the exact microscopic equations (in differential, and equivalent integral form) ruling a relativistic cold plasma after the plane-wave Ansatz, without customary approximations. We show that in the Eulerian description the motion of a very diluted plasma initially at rest and excited by an arbitrary transverse plane electromagnetic travelling-wave has a very simple and explicit dependence on the transverse electromagnetic potential; for a non-zero density plasma the above motion is a good approximation of the real one as long as the back-reaction of the charges on the electromagnetic field can be neglected, i.e. for a time lapse decreasing with the plasma density, and can be used as initial step in an iterative resolution scheme. As one of many possible applications, we use these results to describe how the ponderomotive force of a very intense and short plane laser pulse hitting normally the surface of a plasma boosts the surface electrons into the ion background. In response to this penetration, the electrons are pulled back by the electric force exerted by the ions and the other displaced electrons and may leave the plasma with high energy in the direction opposite to that of propagation of the pulse ‘slingshot effect’ (Fiore G et al 2013 arXiv:1309.1400).

  20. Three-wave X-ray diffraction in distorted epitaxial structures

    PubMed Central

    Kyutt, Reginald; Scheglov, Mikhail

    2013-01-01

    Three-wave diffraction has been measured for a set of GaN, AlN, AlGaN and ZnO epitaxial layers grown on c-sapphire. A Renninger scan for the primary forbidden 0001 reflection was used. For each of the three-wave combinations, θ-scan curves were measured. The intensity and angular width of both ϕ- and θ-scan three-wave peaks were analyzed. The experimental data were used to determine properties of the multiple diffraction pattern in highly distorted layers. It is shown that the FWHM of θ scans is highly sensitive to the structural perfection and strongly depends on the type of three-wave combination. The narrowest peaks are observed for multiple combinations with the largest l index of the secondary hkl reflection. An influence of the type of the dislocation structure on the θ-scan broadening was revealed. These experimental facts are interpreted by considering the scanning geometry in the reciprocal space and taking into account the disc-shaped reciprocal-lattice points. The total integrated intensities of all the three-wave combinations were determined and their ratios were found to be in only a qualitative agreement with the theory. For AlGaN layers, the presence of the nonzero 0001 reflection was revealed, in contrast to AlN and GaN films. PMID:24046489

  1. Multifrequency measurements of core-diffracted P waves (Pdiff) for global waveform tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Kasra; Sigloch, Karin

    2015-10-01

    The lower third of the mantle is sampled extensively by body waves that diffract around the earth's core (Pdiff and Sdiff phases), which could deliver highly resolved tomographic images of this poorly understood region. But core-diffracted waves-especially Pdiff waves-are not often used in tomography because they are difficult to model adequately. Our aim is to make core-diffracted body waves usable for global waveform tomography, across their entire frequency range. Here we present the data processing part of this effort. A method is demonstrated that routinely calculates finite-frequency traveltimes of Pdiff waves by cross-correlating large quantities of waveform data with synthetic seismograms, in frequency passbands ranging from 30.0 to 2.7 s dominant period. Green's functions for 1857 earthquakes, typically comprising thousands of seismograms, are calculated by theoretically exact wave propagation through a spherically symmetric earth model, up to 1 Hz dominant period. Out of 418 226 candidates, 165 651 (39.6 per cent) source-receiver pairs yielded at least one successful passband measurement of a Pdiff traveltime anomaly, for a total of 479 559 traveltimes in the eight passbands considered. Measurements of teleseismic P waves yielded 448 178 usable source-receiver paths from 613 057 candidates (73.1 per cent success rate), for a total of 2 306 755 usable teleseismic dT in eight passbands. Observed and predicted characteristics of Pdiff traveltimes are discussed and compared to teleseismic P for this very large data set. Pdiff measurements are noise-limited due to severe wave attenuation with epicentral distance and frequency. Measurement success drops from 40-60 per cent at 80° distance, to 5-10 per cent at 140°. Frequency has a 2-3 times stronger influence on measurement success for Pdiff than for P. The fewest usable dT measurements are obtained in the microseismic noise band, whereas the fewest usable teleseismic P measurements occur at the highest

  2. MnO spin-wave dispersion curves from neutron powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, Andrew L.; Dove, Martin T.; Tucker, Matthew G.; Keen, David A.

    2007-02-15

    We describe a model-independent approach for the extraction of spin-wave dispersion curves from powder neutron total scattering data. Our approach is based on a statistical analysis of real-space spin configurations to calculate spin-dynamical quantities. The RMCPROFILE implementation of the reverse Monte Carlo refinement process is used to generate a large ensemble of supercell spin configurations from MnO powder diffraction data collected at 100 K. Our analysis of these configurations gives spin-wave dispersion curves for MnO that agree well with those determined independently using neutron triple-axis spectroscopic techniques.

  3. A numerical study of shock wave diffraction by a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.-Y.; Liu, Y.; Lomax, H.

    1986-01-01

    The nonstationary shock wave diffraction patterns generated by a blast wave impinging on a circular cylinder are numerically simulated using a second-order hybrid upwind method for solving the two-dimensional inviscid compressible Euler equations of gasdynamics. The complete diffraction patterns, including the transition from regular to Mach reflection, trajectory of the Mach triple point and the complex shock-on-shock interaction at the wake region resulting from the Mach shocks collision behind the cylinder are reported in detail. Pressure-time history and various contour plots are also included. Comparison between the work of Bryson and Gross (1961) which included both experimental schlieren pictures and theoretical calculations using Whitham's ray-shock theory and results of the present finite difference computation indicate good agreement in every aspect except for some nonideal gas and viscous effects which are not accounted for by the Euler equations.

  4. Wave-optical analysis of parallax-image generation based on multiple diffraction gratings.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jae-Young; Ser, Jang-Il; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2013-06-01

    We propose an approach to generate as many parallax images (PIs) having different viewpoints of a 3-D object as required by use of multiple diffraction gratings (MDG) and confirm its feasibility through theoretical analysis and optical experiments. Here, the PIs generated from the MDG are derived as a convolution integral between the scaled object intensity and each δ-function array of m number of diffraction gratings based on wave-optics, which means the total number of PIs and viewpoints to be generated with the MDG may increase with the mth power of that generated with the single diffraction grating. In addition, optical experiments show that the number of PIs for the case of m=2 has been increased up to the second power of that for the case of m=1, which may validate the theoretical analysis and confirm its feasibility in the practical application.

  5. Demonstration of 1Kx1K long-wave and mid-wave superlattice infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Ting, D. Z.; Hill, C. J.; Nguyen, J.; Soibel, A.; Rafol, S. B.; Keo, S. A.; Mumolo, J. M.; Lee, M. C.; Liu, J. K.; Yang, B.; Liao, A.

    2010-09-01

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory is actively developing the III-V based infrared detector and focal plane arrays (FPAs) for remote sensing and imaging applications. Currently, we are working on Superlattice detectors, multi-band Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors (QWIPs), and Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetector (QDIPs) technologies suitable for high pixel-pixel uniformity and high pixel operability large area imaging arrays. In this paper, we will discuss the demonstration of long-wavelength 1Kx1K QDIP FPA, 1Kx1K QWIP FPA, the first demonstration of the megapixelsimultaneously- readable and pixel-co-registered dual-band QWIP FPA, and demonstration of the first mid-wave and long-wave 1Kx1K superlattice FPA. In addition, we will discuss the advantages of III-V material system in the context of large format infrared FPAs.

  6. The radiation of sound by the instability waves of a compressible plane turbulent shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, C. K. W.; Morris, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of acoustic radiation generated by instability waves of a compressible plane turbulent shear layer is solved. The solution provided is valid up to the acoustic far-field region. It represents a significant improvement over the solution obtained by classical hydrodynamic-stability theory which is essentially a local solution with the acoustic radiation suppressed. The basic instability-wave solution which is valid in the shear layer and the near-field region is constructed in terms of an asymptotic expansion using the method of multiple scales. This solution accounts for the effects of the slightly divergent mean flow. It is shown that the multiple-scales asymptotic expansion is not uniformly valid far from the shear layer. Continuation of this solution into the entire upper half-plane is described. The extended solution enables the near- and far-field pressure fluctuations associated with the instability wave to be determined. Numerical results show that the directivity pattern of acoustic radiation into the stationary medium peaks at 20 degrees to the axis of the shear layer in the downstream direction for supersonic flows. This agrees qualitatively with the observed noise-directivity patterns of supersonic jets.

  7. Quantum Larmor Radiation from a Moving Charge in AN Electromagnetic Plane Wave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Gen; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2012-09-01

    We extend our previous work [Phys. Rev. D83, 045030 (2011)], which investigated the first-order quantum effect in the Larmor radiation from a moving charge in a spatially homogeneous time-dependent electric field. Specifically, we investigate the quantum Larmor radiation from a moving charge in a monochromatic electromagnetic plane wave background based on the scalar quantum electrodynamics at the lowest order of the perturbation theory. Using the in-in formalism, we derive the theoretical formula of the total radiation energy from a charged particle in the initial states being at rest and being in a relativistic motion. Expanding the theoretical formula in terms of the Planck constant ℏ, we obtain the first-order quantum effect on the Larmor radiation. The quantum effect generally suppresses the total radiation energy compared with the prediction of the classical Larmor formula, which is a contrast to the previous work. The reason is explained by the fact that the radiation from a moving charge in a monochromatic electromagnetic plane wave is expressed in terms of the inelastic collisions between an electron and photons of the background electromagnetic waves.

  8. Radiation of de-excited electrons at large times in a strong electromagnetic plane wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazinski, P. O.

    2013-12-01

    The late time asymptotics of the physical solutions to the Lorentz-Dirac equation in the electromagnetic external fields of simple configurations-the constant homogeneous field, the linearly polarized plane wave (in particular, the constant uniform crossed field), and the circularly polarized plane wave-are found. The solutions to the Landau-Lifshitz equation for the external electromagnetic fields admitting a two-parametric symmetry group, which include as a particular case the above mentioned field configurations, are obtained. Some general properties of the total radiation power of a charged particle are established. In particular, for a circularly polarized wave and constant uniform crossed fields, the total radiation power in the asymptotic regime is independent of the charge and the external field strength, when expressed in terms of the proper-time, and equals a half the rest energy of a charged particle divided by its proper-time. The spectral densities of the radiation power formed on the late time asymptotics are derived for a charged particle moving in the external electromagnetic fields of the simple configurations pointed above. This provides a simple method to verify experimentally that the charged particle has reached the asymptotic regime.

  9. Discrete mathematical model of wave diffraction on pre-fractal impedance strips. TM mode case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvit, K. V.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper a transverse magnetic (TM) wave diffraction problem on pre-fractal impedance strips is considered. The overall aim of this work is to develop a discrete mathematical model of the boundary integral equations (IEs) with the help of special quadrature formulas with the nodes in the zeros of Chebyshev polynomials and to perform a numerical experiments with the help of an efficient discrete singularities method (DSM).

  10. Inertial effects on thin-film wave structures with imposed surface shear on an inclined plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivapuratharasu, M.; Hibberd, S.; Hubbard, M. E.; Power, H.

    2016-06-01

    This study provides an extended approach to the mathematical simulation of thin-film flow on a flat inclined plane relevant to flows subject to high surface shear. Motivated by modelling thin-film structures within an industrial context, wave structures are investigated for flows with moderate inertial effects and small film depth aspect ratio ε. Approximations are made assuming a Reynolds number, Re ∼ O(ε-1) and depth-averaging used to simplify the governing Navier-Stokes equations. A parallel Stokes flow is expected in the absence of any wave disturbance and a generalisation for the flow is based on a local quadratic profile. This approach provides a more general system which includes inertial effects and is solved numerically. Flow structures are compared with studies for Stokes flow in the limit of negligible inertial effects. Both two-tier and three-tier wave disturbances are used to study film profile evolution. A parametric study is provided for wave disturbances with increasing film Reynolds number. An evaluation of standing wave and transient film profiles is undertaken and identifies new profiles not previously predicted when inertial effects are neglected.

  11. Aircraft noise propagation. [sound diffraction by wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, W. J.; Pierce, A. D.

    1978-01-01

    Sound diffraction experiments conducted at NASA Langley Research Center to study the acoustical implications of the engine over wing configuration (noise-shielding by wing) and to provide a data base for assessing various theoretical approaches to the problem of aircraft noise reduction are described. Topics explored include the theory of sound diffraction around screens and wedges; the scattering of spherical waves by rectangular patches; plane wave diffraction by a wedge with finite impedence; and the effects of ambient flow and distribution sources.

  12. Dipole-exchange spin waves in nanotubes composed of uniaxial ferromagnets with "easy-plane" and "easy-axis" anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorobets, Yu. I.; Kulish, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    Dipole-exchange spin waves in nanotubes composed of uniaxial ferromagnets are studied. An equation for the magnetic potential of linear spin waves in uniaxial "easy plane" ferromagnets is obtained in the magnetostatic approximation taking into account magnetic dipole-dipole interactions, exchange interactions, and anisotropy effects. A solution is found for this equation and a dispersion relation for these types of spin waves is obtained. The dependence of the spin wave frequency on the total wave number is found for the case of a thin nanotube. An expression is derived for the transverse wave number spectrum.

  13. Scattering-induced changes in the degree of polarization of a stochastic electromagnetic plane-wave pulse.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chaoliang; Cai, Yangjian; Zhang, Yongtao; Pan, Liuzhan

    2012-06-01

    The scattering of a stochastic electromagnetic plane-wave pulse on a deterministic spherical medium is investigated. An analytical formula for the degree of polarization (DOP) of the scattered field in the far zone is derived. Letting pulse duration T(0) → ∞, our formula can be applied to study the scattering of a stationary stochastic electromagnetic light wave. Numerical results show that the DOP of the far zone field is closely determined by the size of the spherical medium when the incident field is a stochastic electromagnetic plane-wave pulse. This is much different from the case when the incident field is a stationary stochastic electromagnetic light wave, where the DOP of the far zone field is independent of the size of the medium. One may obtain the information of the spherical medium by measuring the scattering-induced changes in the DOP of a stochastic electromagnetic plane-wave pulse.

  14. On the angle between the average interplanetary magnetic field and the propagation direction of plane large amplitude Alfven waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenstein, B. R.; Sonett, C. P.

    1979-01-01

    The paper shows that the experimentally observed close alignment of magnetic field minimum variance direction with the average magnetic field for Alfven waves in the solar wind is consistent with theoretically predicted properties of plane large amplitude Alfven waves in the MHD approximation. The theoretical properties of these Alfven waves constrain the time averaged magnetic field to cluster around the direction of minimum variance, which is aligned with the wave normal. Thus, spacecraft magnetometer observations in the solar wind of minimum variance directions strongly peaked about the average magnetic field direction are consistent with plane large amplitude Alfven waves which have wave normals aligned with the directions of minimum variance. This does not imply that geometrical hydromagnetic calculations for Alfven wave propagation direction in the solar wind are incorrect, but there is a discrepancy between geometrical hydromagnetics theory and observations that IMF minimum variance directions tend to be aligned with the ideal Parker spiral instead of the radial direction.

  15. Diffraction and Dissipation of Atmospheric Waves in the Vicinity of Caustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, O. A.

    2015-12-01

    A large and increasing number of ground-based and satellite-borne instruments has been demonstrated to reliably reveal ionospheric manifestations of natural hazards such as large earthquakes, strong tsunamis, and powerful tornadoes. To transition from detection of ionospheric manifestations of natural hazards to characterization of the hazards for the purposes of improving early warning systems and contributing to disaster recovery, it is necessary to relate quantitatively characteristics of the observed ionospheric disturbances and the underlying natural hazard and, in particular, accurately model propagation of atmospheric waves from the ground or ocean surface to the ionosphere. The ray theory has been used extensively to model propagation of atmospheric waves and proved to be very efficient in elucidating the effects of atmospheric variability on ionospheric signatures of natural hazards. However, the ray theory predicts unphysical, divergent values of the wave amplitude and needs to be modified in the vicinity of caustics. This paper presents an asymptotic theory that describes diffraction, focusing and increased dissipation of acoustic-gravity waves in the vicinity of caustics and turning points. Air temperature, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and wind velocity are assumed to vary gradually with height and horizontal coordinates, and slowness of these variations determines the large parameter of the problem. Uniform asymptotics of the wave field are expressed in terms of Airy functions and their derivatives. The geometrical, or Berry, phase, which arises in the consistent WKB approximation for acoustic-gravity waves, plays an important role in the caustic asymptotics. In addition to the wave field in the vicinity of the caustic, these asymptotics describe wave reflection from the caustic and the evanescent wave field beyond the caustic. The evanescent wave field is found to play an important role in ionospheric manifestations of tsunamis.

  16. Plane-wave ultrasound beamforming using a nonuniform fast Fourier transform.

    PubMed

    Kruizinga, Pieter; Mastik, Frits; de Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Antonius F W; van Soest, Gijs

    2012-12-01

    Beamforming of plane-wave ultrasound echo signals in the Fourier domain provides fast and accurate image reconstruction. Conventional implementations perform a k-space interpolation from the uniform sampled grid to a nonuniform acoustic dispersion grid. In this paper, we demonstrate that this step can be replaced by a nonuniform Fourier transform. We study the performance of the nonuniform fast Fourier transform (NUFFT) in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and computational cost, and show that the NUFFT offers an advantage in the trade-off between speed and accuracy, compared with other frequency-domain beamforming strategies.

  17. Exact soliton-on-plane-wave solutions for two-component Bose-Einstein condensates.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Malomed, Boris A; Mihalache, Dumitru; Liu, W M

    2006-06-01

    By means of the Darboux transformation, we obtain analytical solutions for a soliton set on top of a plane-wave background in coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations describing a binary Bose-Einstein condensate. We consider basic properties of the solutions with and without the cross interaction [cross phase modulation (XPM)] between the two components of the background. In the absence of the XPM, this solutions maintain properties of one-component condensates, such as the modulation instability (MI); in the presence of the cross interaction, the solutions exhibit different properties, such as restriction of the MI and soliton splitting.

  18. Plane-Wave Compounding in Automated Breast Volume Scanning: A Phantom-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Holländer, Branislav; Hendriks, Gijs A G M; Mann, Ritse M; Hansen, Hendrik H G; de Korte, Chris L

    2016-10-01

    The goal of this study was to assess whether it is viable to implement plane-wave imaging in the Automated Breast Volume Scanner (ABVS) to speed up the acquisition process. This would allow breath-hold examinations, thus reducing breathing artifacts without loss of imaging quality. A calibration phantom was scanned in an Automated Breast Volume Scanner-mimicking setup using both dynamic receive focusing with a fixed transmit focus and unfocused plane-wave compounding. Contrast-to-noise ratio and lateral resolution were compared using two beamforming schemes, delay-and-sum and Stolt's f-k algorithm. Plane-wave compounding using only 11 compounding angles and Stolt's f-k algorithm provided image quality similar to that of focused transmission with dynamic receive focusing (contrast-to-noise ratios = 10.3 and 10.8 dB for Stolt's f-k migration with Hann apodization and focused transmission, respectively; full width at half-maximum = 0.38 and 0.4 mm, respectively; all at 30-mm depth with transmit focus at 30 mm) with a higher signal-to-noise ratio at all depths. Furthermore, a full 3-D volume of a breast-mimicking phantom was scanned using this optimal set of compounding angles and different speeds (10, 20 and 50 mm/s) to assess the impact of scanning time on image quality. Only minor differences in contrast-to-noise ratio were found (cyst 1: 6.0 ± 0.3 dB, cyst 2: 5.5 ± 0.2 dB, cyst 3: 5.7 ± 0.5 dB). These differences could not be correlated to the movement speeds, indicating that acquisition speed does not significantly affect image quality. Our results suggest that plane-wave imaging will enable breath-hold automated breast volume scanning examinations, eliminating breathing artifacts while otherwise preserving similar image quality.

  19. A full 3D plane-wave-expansion model for 1-3 piezoelectric composite structures.

    PubMed

    Wilm, Mikaël; Ballandras, Sylvain; Laude, Vincent; Pastureaud, Thomas

    2002-09-01

    The plane-wave-expansion (PWE) approach dedicated to the simulation of periodic devices has been extended to 1-3 connectivity piezoelectric composite structures. The case of simple but actual piezoelectric composite structures is addressed, taking piezoelectricity, acoustic losses, and electrical excitation conditions rigorously into account. The material distribution is represented by using a bidimensional Fourier series and the electromechanical response is simulated using a Bloch-Floquet expansion together with the Fahmy-Adler formulation of the Christoffel problem. Application of the model to 1-3 connectivity piezoelectric composites is reported and compared to previously published analyses of this problem.

  20. Force on a heated sphere in a horizontal plane acoustic standing wave field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, E. W.; Wang, T. G.

    1985-01-01

    The force on a heated sphere in a horizontal plane acoustic standing wave field is the subject of this investigation. The heated sphere produces a thermal gradient in the resonance chamber. The force on the sphere in a direction perpendicular to that of gravity is measured. This force is enhanced in the region near the pressure node, and is weakened in the region near the pressure antinode. Measurements of the force on a heated sphere with sound pressure levels between 148 and 156 dB are presented.

  1. Extracting chemical information from plane wave calculations by a 3D 'fuzzy atoms' analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakó, I.; Stirling, A.; Seitsonen, A. P.; Mayer, I.

    2013-03-01

    Bond order and valence indices have been calculated by the method of the three-dimensional 'fuzzy atoms' analysis, using the numerical molecular orbitals obtained from plane wave DFT calculations, i.e., without introducing any external atom-centered functions. Weight functions of both Hirshfeld and Becke types have been applied. The results are rather close to the similar 'fuzzy atoms' ones obtained by using atom-centered basis sets and agree well with the chemical expectations, stressing the power of the genuine chemical concepts.

  2. Complex band structure under plane-wave nonlocal pseudopotential Hamiltonian of metallic wires and electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chao

    2009-07-17

    We present a practical approach to calculate the complex band structure of an electrode for quantum transport calculations. This method is designed for plane wave based Hamiltonian with nonlocal pseudopotentials and the auxiliary periodic boundary condition transport calculation approach. Currently there is no direct method to calculate all the evanescent states for a given energy for systems with nonlocal pseudopotentials. On the other hand, in the auxiliary periodic boundary condition transport calculation, there is no need for all the evanescent states at a given energy. The current method fills this niche. The method has been used to study copper and gold nanowires and bulk electrodes.

  3. Open strings in the plane wave background II: superalgebras and spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skenderis, Kostas; Taylor, Marika

    2003-07-01

    In hep-th/0211011 we started a systematic investigation of open strings in the plane wave background. In this paper we continue the analysis by discussing the superalgebras of conserved charges, the spectra of open strings, and the spectra of DBI fluctuations around D-brane embeddings. We also derive the gluing conditions for corresponding boundary states and analyze their symmetries. All results are consistent with each other, and confirm the existence of additional supersymmetries as previously discussed. We further show that for every symmetry current one can construct a (countably) infinite number of related currents that contain more worldsheet derivatives, and discuss non-local symmetries.

  4. Debye series of normally incident plane-wave scattering by an infinite multilayered cylinder.

    PubMed

    Li, Renxian; Han, Xiang'e; Jiang, Huifen; Ren, Kuan Fang

    2006-08-20

    We derive the formula of the Debye-series decomposition for normally incident plane-wave scattering by an infinite multilayered cylinder. A comparison of the scattering diagrams calculated by the Debye series and Mie theory for a graded-index polymer optical fiber is given and the agreement is found to be satisfied. This approach permits us to simulate the rainbow intensity distribution of any single order and the interference of several orders, which is of good use to the study of the scattering characteristics of an inhomogeneous cylinder and to the measurement of the refractive index profile of an inhomogeneous cylinder. PMID:16892131

  5. Radiation reaction from QED: Lightfront perturbation theory in a plane wave background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilderton, Anton; Torgrimsson, Greger

    2013-07-01

    We derive dynamical, real time radiation reaction effects from lightfront QED. Combining the Hamiltonian formalism with a plane wave background field, the calculation is performed in the Furry picture for which the background is treated exactly while interactions between quantum fields are treated in perturbation theory as normal. We work to a fixed order in perturbation theory, but no other approximation is made. The literature contains many proposals for the correct classical equation describing a radiating particle; we take the classical limit of our results and identify which equations are consistent with QED.

  6. An Exact Transfer Matrix Formulation of Plane Sound Wave Transmission in Inhomogeneous Ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dockumaci, E.

    1998-11-01

    The impedance, or the reflection coefficient, of plane sound waves in inhomogeneous ducts satisfies a Riccati equation. The present paper shows that the duct impedance matrix, or the scattering matrix, can be related explicitly to the solutions of the associated linear equation of the Riccati equation for duct impedance, or reflection coefficient, respectively. New exact analytical scattering matrix solutions, which follow as consequences of this connection, are given for two significant duct acoustics problems, namely, the sound transmission in non-uniform ducts carrying an incompressible subsonic low Mach number mean flow transmission of sound in uniform ducts with a full quadratic axial mean temperature gradient.

  7. Scattering of a plane electromagnetic wave by a generalized Luneburg sphere-Part 1: Ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lock, James A.; Laven, Philip; Adam, John A.

    2015-09-01

    We calculated scattering of an electromagnetic plane wave by both a radially-inhomogeneous particle and bubble, the square of whose refractive index profile is parabolic as a function of radius. Depending on the value of the two adjustable parameters of the parabola, the particle or bubble can have either a refractive index discontinuity at its surface, or the refractive index can smoothly merge into that of the exterior medium. Scattering was analyzed in ray theory, and various novel features of the scattering, including the details of the curved ray paths, transmission rainbows, and near-critical-angle scattering were apparent and were contrasted with their behavior for scattering by a homogeneous sphere.

  8. Scattering of pulsed plane wave from a symmetrical groove doublet configuration.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lan; Liu, Jinsong; Wang, Dong; Wang, Kejia

    2010-12-20

    We have provided theoretical study on the spectral and temporal properties of the scattering of pulsed plane wave from a symmetrical groove doublet configuration. Based on the numerical calculation results, we show that the spectrum and the waveform of the scattered field are sensitive to the shape of the rectangular grooves when the grooves are deep enough. In both spectral and temporal domain, a damped oscillatory behavior occurs when the groove spacing increases. Furthermore, the spectral and temporal dependences of the angular distribution are consisted of interference-like fringe patterns. These patterns are sensitive to the size of the groove width and spacing rather than the groove shape when the depth is small enough. Our study takes the analysis of pulse scattering by finite grooves a step further on the theoretical side, and offers opportunities for the control of spectral and temporal properties of pulsed scattered wave in low frequency regime such as THz and microwave domain.

  9. PARTICLE DISPLACEMENTS ON THE WALL OF A BOREHOLE FROM INCIDENT PLANE WAVES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.

    1987-01-01

    Particle displacements from incident plane waves at the wall of a fluid-filled borehole are formulated by applying the seismic reciprocity theorem to far-field displacement fields. Such displacement fields are due to point forces acting on a fluid-filled borehole under the assumption of long wavelengths. The displacement fields are analyzed to examine the effect of the borehole on seismic wave propagation, particularly for vertical seismic profiling (VSP) measurements. When the shortest wavelength of interest is approximately 25 times longer than the borehole's diameter, the scattered displacements are proportional to the first power of incident frequency and borehole diameter. When the shortest wavelength of interest is about 40 times longer than the borehole's diameter, borehole effects on VSP measurements using a wall-locking geophone are negligible.

  10. Transverse instability of a plane front of fast impact ionization waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kyuregyan, A. S.

    2012-05-15

    The transverse instability of a plane front of fast impact ionization waves in p{sup +}-n-n{sup +} semiconductor structures with a finite concentration of donors N in the n layer has been theoretically analyzed. It is assumed that the high velocity u of impact ionization waves is ensured owing to the avalanche multiplication of the uniform background of electrons and holes whose concentration {sigma}{sub b} ahead of the front is high enough for the continuum approximation to be applicable. The problem of the calculation of the growth rate s of a small harmonic perturbation with wavenumber k is reduced to the eigenvalue problem for a specific homogeneous Volterra equation of the second kind containing the sum of double and triple integrals of an unknown eigenfunction. This problem has been solved by the method of successive approximations. It has been shown that the function s(k) for small k values increases monotonically in agreement with the analytical theory reported in Thermal Engineering 58 (13), 1119 (2011), reaches a maximum s{sub M} at k = k{sub M}, then decreases, and becomes negative at k > k{sub 01}. This behavior of the function s(k) for short-wavelength perturbations is due to a decrease in the distortion of the field owing to a finite thickness of the space charge region of the front and 'smearing' of perturbation of concentrations owing to the transverse transport of charge carriers. The similarity laws for perturbations with k Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To k{sub M} have been established: at fixed {sigma}{sub b} values and the maximum field strength on the front E{sub 0M}, the growth rate s depends only on the ratio k/N and the boundary wavenumber k{sub 01} {proportional_to} N. The parameters s{sub M}, k{sub M}, and k{sub 01}, which determine the perturbation growth dynamics and the upper boundary of the instability region for impact ionization waves, have been presented as functions of E{sub 0M}. These dependences indicate that the model of a plane

  11. Method for locating underground anomalies by diffraction of electromagnetic waves passing between spaced boreholes

    DOEpatents

    Lytle, R. Jeffrey; Lager, Darrel L.; Laine, Edwin F.; Davis, Donald T.

    1979-01-01

    Underground anomalies or discontinuities, such as holes, tunnels, and caverns, are located by lowering an electromagnetic signal transmitting antenna down one borehole and a receiving antenna down another, the ground to be surveyed for anomalies being situated between the boreholes. Electronic transmitting and receiving equipment associated with the antennas is activated and the antennas are lowered in unison at the same rate down their respective boreholes a plurality of times, each time with the receiving antenna at a different level with respect to the transmitting antenna. The transmitted electromagnetic waves diffract at each edge of an anomaly. This causes minimal signal reception at the receiving antenna. Triangulation of the straight lines between the antennas for the depths at which the signal minimums are detected precisely locates the anomaly. Alternatively, phase shifts of the transmitted waves may be detected to locate an anomaly, the phase shift being distinctive for the waves directed at the anomaly.

  12. Ground-coupled air waves and diffracted infrasounds from the Arequipa earthquake of June 23, 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepichon, A.; Guilbert, J.; Van de Walle, M.

    2001-12-01

    On June 23, 2001, a strong earthquake measuring Ms 8.2 occurred along the coast of south-central Peru. This event was detected by the IS08 infrasound station of Bolivia operating for the CTBTO(Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization). Coherent infrasonic waves have been detected over a period of one hour. In the first part of the signals, the analysis of the seismic coupled-air waves shows clearly that the rupture propagates from the northwertern to the southeastern part of the fault. The Doppler effect allows us to fixe the velocity of the rupture equal to 3.4 +/- 0.5 km.s-1. In the second part of the signals, the azimuth variation is interpreted as a distribution of secondary sources along the highest mountain ranges generating distant air-coupled waves in the atmosphere. The predominant source mechanism of the earthquake and two main aftershocks is likely diffracted pressure waves radiated along the Eastern Andean Cordillera from the southwest of the station to the coastline near Pamana. From the wave azimuth and arrival time determination, the horizontal scale size of the distant source regions remote from the epicenters is reconstructed over distances greater than 400 km. The generation of pressure waves associated with offshore source regions is also considered.

  13. Influence of acoustic diffraction on laser-induced stress wave effects in absorbing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paltauf, Guenther; Frenz, Martin; Schmidt-Kloiber, Heinz

    1996-05-01

    Short pulses of laser radiation are capable of producing strong stress transients in absorbing materials. If the stress waves contain negative components, material can be fractured or even ablated. This study investigates the propagation of thermoelastic stress waves and in particular the occurrence of tensile stresses due to acoustic diffraction in front of a submerged optical fiber. Pulses with a duration of 6 ns from an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) were transmitted through optical quartz fibers into aqueous dye solution or gelatin. The absorption of the samples could be widely varied by tuning the wavelength of the OPO. Stress wave propagation and tensile stress induced cavitation were observed by use of a time gated video camera. Depending on the absorption of the sample, tensile stress induced cavitation could be observed either outside (at high absorption) or inside the laser irradiated volume (at low absorption) in front a submerged fiber tip, the latter at temperatures calculated to be below the boiling point. The experimental findings together with theoretical calculations demonstrate that the limited size of the stress wave source, leading to diffraction of the wave is the reason for the occurrence of tensile stress waves. This was further supported by the results obtained from the comparison of cavitation bubble formation at a rigid boundary (fiber submerged) and at a free boundary (fiber outside the liquid). In medical applications where fiber-transmitted laser pulses are applied, tensile stress can weaken the mechanical strength of the tissue. This may facilitate the onset of tissue ablation but might also cause unwanted side effects, which can occur even far outside the optically heated zone.

  14. Underdetermined system theory applied to quantitative analysis of responses caused by unsteady smooth-plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Yukio

    1993-01-01

    The mechanical responses of rate-dependent media caused by unsteady smooth-plane waves are quantitatively analyzed by an underdetermined system of equations without using any constitutive relation of the media; that is, by using the particle velocity field expressed by an algebraic equation that is derived from the mass conservation equation, and the stress field expressed by an algebraic equation that is derived from the momentum conservation equation. First of all, this approach for analyzing unsteady wave motion is justified by the verification of various inferences such as the existence of the nonindependent elementary waves by Sano [J. Appl. Phys. 65, 3857(1989)] and the degradation process by Sano [J. Appl. Phys. 67, 4072(1990)]. Second, the situation under which a spike arises in particle velocity-time and stress-time profiles, and the reason for the arising are clarified. Third, the influence of the spike on stress-particle velocity and stress-strain paths is examined. The spike induced in the profiles by a growing wave greatly influences the paths near the impacted surface. Finally, calculated particle velocity-time profiles are compared with experimental data.

  15. Investigation of the Attenuation of Plane Shock Waves Moving over very Rough Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Paul W.; McFarland, Donald R.; Levine, Philip

    1953-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the attenuation of plane shock waves moving over rough walls have been made in a shock tube. Measurements of the boundary-layer characteristics, including thickness and velocity distribution behind the shock, have also been made with the aid of new cal techniques which provide direct information on the local boundary-layer conditions at the rough walls. Measurements of shock speed and shock pressure ratio are presented for both smooth-wall and rough-wall flow over lengths of machined-smooth and rough strips which lined all four walls of the shock tube. A simplified theory based on Von Karman's expression for skin-friction coefficient for flow over rough walls, along with a wave-model concept and extensions to include time effects, is presented. In this theory, the shock-tube flow is assumed to be one-dimensional at all times and the wave-model concept is used to relate the local layer growth to decreases in shock strength. This concept assumes that local boundary-layer growths act as local mass-flow sinks, which give rise to expansion waves which, in turn, overtake the shock and lower its mass flow accordingly.

  16. Survey of the ULF wave Poynting vector near the Earth's magnetic equatorial plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartinger, M.; Moldwin, M.; Takahashi, K.; Bonnell, J. W.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2013-12-01

    Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves transfer energy in the Earth's magnetosphere through a variety of mechanisms that impact the Earth's ionosphere, radiation belts, and other plasma populations. Measurements of the electromagnetic portion of the energy transfer rate are an important source of information for assessing the importance of ULF waves relative to other energy transfer mechanisms and as a diagnostic for studying the behavior of ULF waves. Using THEMIS satellite data, we examine the time averaged electromagnetic energy transfer rate, or Poynting vector, as a function of frequency (3-50 mHz) and region of the magnetosphere. This study extends earlier work focused on narrower frequency ranges or specific regions of the magnetosphere; here, we consider the Pc5 to Pc3 frequency range, all local time sectors, radial distances from 3 to 13 Re, and magnetic latitudes close to the equatorial plane. We measure time averaged Poynting vectors that range from ~10^-11 to 10^-5 W/m^2, with larger Poynting vector magnitudes occurring at larger radial distances and smaller frequencies. In every spatial region and frequency we examined, we found a large degree of scatter in both the Poynting vector magnitude and direction. The Poynting vector tends to be anisotropic at all frequencies, with more energy transferred along rather than across the background magnetic field. This preference for parallel energy transfer near the magnetic equator suggests that the ionosphere is the largest sink of wave energy in the magnetosphere.

  17. Full waveform inversion of marine reflection data in the plane-wave domain

    SciTech Connect

    Minkoff, S.E.; Symes, W.W.

    1997-03-01

    Full waveform inversion of a p-{tau} marine data set from the Gulf of Mexico provides estimates of the long-wavelength P-wave background velocity, anisotropic seismic source, and three high-frequency elastic parameter reflectivities that explain 70% of the total seismic data and 90% of the data in an interval around the gas sand target. The forward simulator is based on a plane-wave viscoelastic model for P-wave propagation and primary reflections in a layered earth. Differential semblance optimization, a variant of output least-squares inversion, successfully estimates the nonlinear P-wave background velocity and linear reflectivities. Once an accurate velocity is estimated, output least-squares inversion reestimates the reflectivities and an anisotropic seismic source simultaneously. The viscoelastic model predicts the amplitude-versus-angle trend in the data more accurately than does an elastic model. Simultaneous inversion for reflectivities and source explains substantially more of the actual data than does inversion for reflectivities with fixed source from an air-gun modeler. The best reflectivity estimates conform to widely accepted lithologic relationships and closely match the filtered well logs.

  18. Reconstruction of nonstationary sound fields based on the time domain plane wave superposition method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Zheng; Thomas, Jean-Hugh; Bi, Chuan-Xing; Pascal, Jean-Claude

    2012-10-01

    A time-domain plane wave superposition method is proposed to reconstruct nonstationary sound fields. In this method, the sound field is expressed as a superposition of time convolutions between the estimated time-wavenumber spectrum of the sound pressure on a virtual source plane and the time-domain propagation kernel at each wavenumber. By discretizing the time convolutions directly, the reconstruction can be carried out iteratively in the time domain, thus providing the advantage of continuously reconstructing time-dependent pressure signals. In the reconstruction process, the Tikhonov regularization is introduced at each time step to obtain a relevant estimate of the time-wavenumber spectrum on the virtual source plane. Because the double infinite integral of the two-dimensional spatial Fourier transform is discretized directly in the wavenumber domain in the proposed method, it does not need to perform the two-dimensional spatial fast Fourier transform that is generally used in time domain holography and real-time near-field acoustic holography, and therefore it avoids some errors associated with the two-dimensional spatial fast Fourier transform in theory and makes possible to use an irregular microphone array. The feasibility of the proposed method is demonstrated by numerical simulations and an experiment with two speakers.

  19. Fast solution of elliptic partial differential equations using linear combinations of plane waves.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Jordá, José M

    2016-02-01

    Given an arbitrary elliptic partial differential equation (PDE), a procedure for obtaining its solution is proposed based on the method of Ritz: the solution is written as a linear combination of plane waves and the coefficients are obtained by variational minimization. The PDE to be solved is cast as a system of linear equations Ax=b, where the matrix A is not sparse, which prevents the straightforward application of standard iterative methods in order to solve it. This sparseness problem can be circumvented by means of a recursive bisection approach based on the fast Fourier transform, which makes it possible to implement fast versions of some stationary iterative methods (such as Gauss-Seidel) consuming O(NlogN) memory and executing an iteration in O(Nlog(2)N) time, N being the number of plane waves used. In a similar way, fast versions of Krylov subspace methods and multigrid methods can also be implemented. These procedures are tested on Poisson's equation expressed in adaptive coordinates. It is found that the best results are obtained with the GMRES method using a multigrid preconditioner with Gauss-Seidel relaxation steps. PMID:26986436

  20. 2, Pulse-mode expansions and refractive indices in plane-wave propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.; Sacks, R.; Karr, T.; Morris, J.; Paisner, J.A.

    1987-06-20

    This memo presents basic background theory for treating simultaneous propagation of electromagnetic pulses of various colors, directed along a common ray, through a molecular vapor. The memo discusses some techniques for expanding the positive frequency part of the transverse electric field into pulse modes, characterized by carrier frequencies within a modulated envelope. We discuss, in the approximation of plane waves with slowly varying envelopes, a set of uncoupled envelope equations in which a polarization mode-envelope acts as a source for an electric-field envelope. These equations, when taken with a prescription for the polarization field, are the basic equations of plane-wave pulse propagation through a molecular medium. We discuss two ways of treating dispersive media, one based upon expansions in the frequency domain and the other based in the time domain. In both cases we find envelope equations that involve group velocities. This memo represents a portion of a more extensive treatment of propagation to be presented separately. Many of the equations presented here have been described in various books and articles. They are collected and described here as a summary and review of contemporary theory.

  1. Whole body exposure at 2100 MHz induced by plane wave of random incidences in a population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conil, Emmanuelle; Hadjem, Abdelhamid; El Habachi, Aimad; Wiart, J.

    2010-11-01

    In this article, the whole body exposure induced by plane wave coming from a random direction of arrival is analyzed at 2100 MHz. This work completes previous studies on the influence of different parameters on the whole body exposure (such as morphology, frequency or usage in near field). The Visible Human phantom has been used to build a surrogate model to predict the whole body exposure depending on the highlighted surface of the phantom and on the direction of arrival of the incident plane wave. For the Visible Human, the error on the whole body averaged Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) is on average 4%. The surrogate model is applied to other 3D anthropomorphic phantoms for a frontal incidence with an averaged error of 10%. The great interest of the surrogate model is the possibility to apply a Monte Carlo process to assess probability distribution function of a population. A recent French anthropometric database of more than 3500 adults is used to build the probability distribution function of the whole body SAR for a random direction of arrival.

  2. Interaction of a plane progressive sound wave with a functionally graded spherical shell.

    PubMed

    Hasheminejad, Seyyed M; Maleki, M

    2006-12-01

    An exact analysis is carried out to study interaction of a time-harmonic plane progressive sound field with a radially inhomogeneous thick-walled elastic isotropic spherical shell suspended in and filled with compressible ideal fluid mediums. Using the laminated approximation method, a modal state equation with variable coefficients is set up in terms of appropriate displacement and stress functions and their spherical harmonics. Taylor's expansion theorem is then employed to obtain the solution to the modal state equation ultimately leading to calculation of a global transfer matrix. Numerical example is given for a water-submerged/air-filled Aluminum/Zirconia elastic spherical sandwich shell containing a functionally graded interlayer and subjected to an incident progressive plane sound wave. The mechanical properties of the interlayer are assumed to vary smoothly and continuously across the thickness with the change of volume concentration of its constituents. The effect of incident wave frequency, thickness and compositional gradient of the interlayer on the form function amplitude and the average radiation force acting on the composite shell are examined. Limiting cases are considered and fair agreements with well-known solutions are established.

  3. Scaled plane-wave Born cross sections for atoms and molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, H.; Brunger, M. J.; Campbell, L.; Kato, H.; Hoshino, M.; Rau, A. R. P.

    2016-04-01

    Integral cross sections for optically allowed electronic-state excitations of atoms and molecules by electron impact, by applying scaled plane-wave Born models, are reviewed. Over 40 years ago, Inokuti presented an influential review of charged-particle scattering, based on the theory pioneered by Bethe forty years earlier, which emphasized the importance of reliable cross-section data from low eV energies to high keV energies that are needed in many areas of radiation science with applications to astronomy, plasmas, and medicine. Yet, with a couple of possible exceptions, most computational methods in electron-atom scattering do not, in general, overlap each other's validity range in the region from threshold up to 300 eV and, in particular, in the intermediate region from 30 to 300 eV. This is even more so for electron-molecule scattering. In fact this entire energy range is of great importance and, to bridge the gap between the two regions of low and high energy, scaled plane-wave Born models were developed to provide reliable, comprehensive, and absolute integral cross sections, first for ionization by Kim and Rudd and then extended to optically allowed electronic-state excitation by Kim. These and other scaling models in a broad, general application to electron scattering from atoms and molecules, their theoretical basis, and their results for cross sections along with comparison to experimental measurements are reviewed. Where possible, these data are also compared to results from other computational approaches.

  4. Ioffe-Regel crossover for plane-wave vibrational excitations in vitreous silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taraskin, S. N.; Elliott, S. R.

    2000-05-01

    The first Ioffe-Regel crossover for vibrational plane waves (when wavelength and mean free path are comparable) has been investigated theoretically for models of vitreous silica (v-SiO2) constructed by molecular dynamics. The crossover is found to be from a state of weak scattering to one of strong scattering, not vibrational localization. Three methods have been used to investigate the crossover: an analysis of the time evolution of a vibrational plane wave, a spectral-density analysis in frequency space, and an analysis of the final scattered state in momentum space. The first Ioffe-Regel crossover frequency is found by all three methods to be ~1 THz for v-SiO2, for both longitudinal and transverse polarizations. A second Ioffe-Regel crossover occurs at ~6 THz for v-SiO2, corresponding to the frequency at which the mean free path is minimal (comparable to the interatomic spacing), and the spectral-density width is maximal (comparable to the frequency range of the vibrational density of states).

  5. Fast inhomogeneous plane wave algorithm for the analysis of electromagnetic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bin; Chew, Weng Cho; Velamparambil, Sanjay

    2001-01-01

    The fast inhomogeneous plane wave algorithm has been developed to accelerate the solution of three-dimensional electromagnetic scattering problems in free space. By expanding the kernel of the Green's function using the Weyl identity and choosing a proper steepest descent path, the diagonalization of the translation matrix is achieved after the interpolation and extrapolation techniques are applied. The proposed algorithm is implemented on top of the scalable multipole engine, a portable implementation of the dynamic multilevel fast multipole algorithm for distributed-memory computers. The computational time per matrix vector multiplication is reduced to O(NlogN) and the memory requirement is reduced to O(N), where N is the number of unknowns in the discretized integral equation. The algorithm is validated by applying it to the solution of the electromagnetic scattering from the perfect electric conducting scatterers. This approach can be easily extended to more general problems with complicated Green's function expressed in terms of the plane wave spectral integrals, such as the ones encountered in the multilayered medium studies.

  6. Parallel Implementation of Gamma-Point Pseudopotential Plane-Wave DFT with Exact Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Bylaska, Eric J.; Tsemekhman, Kiril L.; Baden, Scott B.; Weare, John H.; Jonsson, Hannes

    2011-01-15

    One of the more persistent failures of conventional density functional theory (DFT) methods has been their failure to yield localized charge states such as polarons, excitons and solitons in solid-state and extended systems. It has been suggested that conventional DFT functionals, which are not self-interaction free, tend to favor delocalized electronic states since self-interaction creates a Coulomb barrier to charge localization. Pragmatic approaches in which the exchange correlation functionals are augmented with small amount of exact exchange (hybrid-DFT, e.g. B3LYP and PBE0) have shown promise in localizing charge states and predicting accurate band gaps and reaction barriers. We have developed a parallel algorithm for implementing exact exchange into pseudopotential plane-wave density functional theory and we have implemented it in the NWChem program package. The technique developed can readily be employed in plane-wave DFT programs. Furthermore, atomic forces and stresses are straightforward to implement, making it applicable to both confined and extended systems, as well as to Car-Parrinello ab initio molecular dynamic simulations. This method has been applied to several systems for which conventional DFT methods do not work well, including calculations for band gaps in oxides and the electronic structure of a charge trapped state in the Fe(II) containing mica, annite.

  7. Scaling of plane-wave functions in statistically optimized near-field acoustic holography.

    PubMed

    Hald, Jørgen

    2014-11-01

    Statistically Optimized Near-field Acoustic Holography (SONAH) is a Patch Holography method, meaning that it can be applied in cases where the measurement area covers only part of the source surface. The method performs projections directly in the spatial domain, avoiding the use of spatial discrete Fourier transforms and the associated errors. First, an inverse problem is solved using regularization. For each calculation point a multiplication must then be performed with two transfer vectors--one to get the sound pressure and the other to get the particle velocity. Considering SONAH based on sound pressure measurements, existing derivations consider only pressure reconstruction when setting up the inverse problem, so the evanescent wave amplification associated with the calculation of particle velocity is not taken into account in the regularized solution of the inverse problem. The present paper introduces a scaling of the applied plane wave functions that takes the amplification into account, and it is shown that the previously published virtual source-plane retraction has almost the same effect. The effectiveness of the different solutions is verified through a set of simulated measurements. PMID:25373969

  8. Combined perfusion and doppler imaging using plane-wave nonlinear detection and microbubble contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Tremblay-Darveau, Charles; Williams, Ross; Milot, Laurent; Bruce, Matthew; Burns, Peter N

    2014-12-01

    Plane-wave imaging offers image acquisition rates at the pulse repetition frequency, effectively increasing the imaging frame rates by up to two orders of magnitude over conventional line-by-line imaging. This form of acquisition can be used to achieve very long ensemble lengths in nonlinear modes such as pulse inversion Doppler, which enables new imaging trade-offs that were previously unattainable. We first demonstrate in this paper that the coherence of microbubble signals under repeated exposure to acoustic pulses of low mechanical index can be as high as 204 ± 5 pulses, which is long enough to allow an accurate power Doppler measurement. We then show that external factors, such as tissue acceleration, restrict the detection of perfusion at the capillary level with linear Doppler, even if long Doppler ensembles are considered. Hence, perfusion at the capillary level can only be detected with ultrasound through combined microbubbles and Doppler imaging. Finally, plane-wave contrast-enhanced power and color Doppler are performed on a rabbit kidney in vivo as a proof of principle. We establish that long pulse-inversion Doppler sequences and conventional wall-filters can create an image that simultaneously resolves both the vascular morphology of veins and arteries, and perfusion at the capillary level with frame rates above 100 Hz.

  9. Fast solution of elliptic partial differential equations using linear combinations of plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Jordá, José M.

    2016-02-01

    Given an arbitrary elliptic partial differential equation (PDE), a procedure for obtaining its solution is proposed based on the method of Ritz: the solution is written as a linear combination of plane waves and the coefficients are obtained by variational minimization. The PDE to be solved is cast as a system of linear equations A x =b , where the matrix A is not sparse, which prevents the straightforward application of standard iterative methods in order to solve it. This sparseness problem can be circumvented by means of a recursive bisection approach based on the fast Fourier transform, which makes it possible to implement fast versions of some stationary iterative methods (such as Gauss-Seidel) consuming O (N logN ) memory and executing an iteration in O (N log2N ) time, N being the number of plane waves used. In a similar way, fast versions of Krylov subspace methods and multigrid methods can also be implemented. These procedures are tested on Poisson's equation expressed in adaptive coordinates. It is found that the best results are obtained with the GMRES method using a multigrid preconditioner with Gauss-Seidel relaxation steps.

  10. IDO Scheme for Accurate Computation of Seismic Waves I. Plane-Wave Response of a Vertically Heterogeneous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkawauchi, K.; Takenaka, H.

    2006-12-01

    We propose a new method for the calculation of seismic wave propagation using the interpolated differential operator (IDO, Aoki,1997) which is a numerical method for solving the partial differential equations and is based on a high accurate interpolation of the profile for the independent variables over a local area. It improves the accuracy of wave computation with high accuracy because the local interpolation can represent high order behavior of wave field between grid points. In addition, locality of this approach makes possible treatment of boundary conditions exactly. In this study, we address computation of plane-wave responses of vertically heterogeneous structure models. We then solve the elastodynamic equation for plane wave derived by Tanaka and Takenaka (2005). The equations to be solved in our method are not only velocity-stress equations but also the corresponding ones integrated over each cell between adjacent grid points. We use two staggered-grid systems which can be non-uniform, and then discretize the governing equations using a finite-difference scheme of second-order accurate in time, and the second-order Hermite interpolation in space. In this method, the second-order Hermite interpolation of particle velocity or stress is obtained from the values at the adjacent two grid points and the integration value at the cell between the grid points. The time marching of the original and integrated quantities are proceeded, and in the following time step the quantities are computed on the alternative grid system to that used in the current time step. In implementation of a free-surface boundary condition, all field quantities locate just on the free surface. Their computational accuracy is the same order as those in the other spatial domain. We also implement the interface condition in a similarly way to the free surface condition. We used some simple models to test the scheme. The results showed that the waveforms calculated by our method fit the

  11. Plane waves at or near grazing incidence in the parabolic approximation. [acoustic equations of motion for sound fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaninch, G. L.; Myers, M. K.

    1980-01-01

    The parabolic approximation for the acoustic equations of motion is applied to the study of the sound field generated by a plane wave at or near grazing incidence to a finite impedance boundary. It is shown how this approximation accounts for effects neglected in the usual plane wave reflection analysis which, at grazing incidence, erroneously predicts complete cancellation of the incident field by the reflected field. Examples are presented which illustrate that the solution obtained by the parabolic approximation contains several of the physical phenomena known to occur in wave propagation near an absorbing boundary.

  12. Analytical expressions for the log-amplitude correlation function for plane wave propagation in anisotropic non-Kolmogorov refractive turbulence.

    PubMed

    Gudimetla, V S Rao; Holmes, Richard B; Riker, Jim F

    2012-12-01

    An analytical expression for the log-amplitude correlation function for plane wave propagation through anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulent atmosphere is derived. The closed-form analytic results are based on the Rytov approximation. These results agree well with wave optics simulation based on the more general Fresnel approximation as well as with numerical evaluations, for low-to-moderate strengths of turbulence. The new expression reduces correctly to the previously published analytic expressions for the cases of plane wave propagation through both nonisotropic Kolmogorov turbulence and isotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence cases. These results are useful for understanding the potential impact of deviations from the standard isotropic Kolmogorov spectrum.

  13. A MILLIMETER-WAVE GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY WITH THE BICEP POLARIMETER

    SciTech Connect

    Bierman, E. M.; Keating, B. G.; Barron, D.; Kaufman, J. P.; Matsumura, T.; Dowell, C. D.; Bock, J. J.; Chiang, H. C.; Culverhouse, T. L.; Hristov, V. V.; Kovac, J. M.; Lange, A. E.; Ade, P.; Barkats, D.; Battle, J. O.; Leitch, E. M.; Duband, L.; Hivon, E. F.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Kuo, C. L.

    2011-11-10

    In order to study inflationary cosmology and the Milky Way Galaxy's composition and magnetic field structure, Stokes I, Q, and U maps of the Galactic plane covering the Galactic longitude range 260 Degree-Sign < l < 340 Degree-Sign in three atmospheric transmission windows centered on 100, 150, and 220 GHz are presented. The maps sample an optical depth 1 {approx}< A{sub V} {approx}< 30, and are consistent with previous characterizations of the Galactic millimeter-wave frequency spectrum and the large-scale magnetic field structure permeating the interstellar medium. The polarization angles in all three bands are generally perpendicular to those measured by starlight polarimetry as expected and show changes in the structure of the Galactic magnetic field on the scale of 60 Degree-Sign . The frequency spectrum of degree-scale Galactic emission is plotted between 23 and 220 GHz (including WMAP data) and is fit to a two-component (synchrotron and dust) model showing that the higher frequency BICEP data are necessary to tightly constrain the amplitude and spectral index of Galactic dust. Polarized emission is detected over the entire region within two degrees of the Galactic plane, indicating the large-scale magnetic field is oriented parallel to the plane of the Galaxy. A trend of decreasing polarization fraction with increasing total intensity is observed, ruling out the simplest model of a constant Galactic magnetic field orientation along the line of sight in the Galactic plane. A generally increasing trend of polarization fraction with electromagnetic frequency is found, varying from 0.5%-1.5% at frequencies below 50 GHz to 2.5%-3.5% above 90 GHz. The effort to extend the capabilities of BICEP by installing 220 GHz band hardware is described along with analysis of the new band.

  14. Significance of accurate diffraction corrections for the second harmonic wave in determining the acoustic nonlinearity parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Zhang, Shuzeng; Li, Xiongbing; Barnard, Dan

    2015-09-15

    The accurate measurement of acoustic nonlinearity parameter β for fluids or solids generally requires making corrections for diffraction effects due to finite size geometry of transmitter and receiver. These effects are well known in linear acoustics, while those for second harmonic waves have not been well addressed and therefore not properly considered in previous studies. In this work, we explicitly define the attenuation and diffraction corrections using the multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) equations which were developed from the quasilinear solutions of the KZK equation. The effects of making these corrections are examined through the simulation of β determination in water. Diffraction corrections are found to have more significant effects than attenuation corrections, and the β values of water can be estimated experimentally with less than 5% errors when the exact second harmonic diffraction corrections are used together with the negligible attenuation correction effects on the basis of linear frequency dependence between attenuation coefficients, α{sub 2} ≃ 2α{sub 1}.

  15. X-ray diffraction effect from surface acoustic waves traveling on a deposited multilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Jun; Qi Jianxia; Miao Runcai

    2010-04-10

    We investigate the x-ray diffraction effects from surface acoustic waves (SAW) traveling along a multilayer. The diffraction intensity distribution depends on the incidence angle and the multilayer SAW (MLSAW) amplitude. Particularly, a small departure deviating from the Bragg incidence angle at a certain amplitude will produce a larger variation of the intensity distribution. This shows that the diffraction intensity from MLSAW has an extremely high sensitivity to the Bragg incidence angle, which is different from a SAW traveling along a solid surface without deposited layers. By carefully analyzing the relationship between the intensity distribution I and the incidence angle {theta}, the corresponding analytic expression of the intensity distribution is theoretically derived. Our theoretical prediction is in great agreement with the experimental results previously obtained. A theoretical model that can be applied to study the x-ray diffraction effect from MLSAW is developed. The extremely high sensitivity to the Bragg angle will help us in acousto-optic instrument research with MLSAW.

  16. Role of long waves in the stability of the plane wake.

    PubMed

    Scarsoglio, Stefania; Tordella, Daniela; Criminale, William O

    2010-03-01

    This work is directed toward investigating the fate of three-dimensional long perturbation waves in a plane incompressible wake. The analysis is posed as an initial-value problem in space. More specifically, input is made at an initial location in the downstream direction and then tracing the resulting behavior further downstream subject to the restriction of finite kinetic energy. This presentation follows the outline given by Criminale and Drazin [W. O. Criminale and P. G. Drazin, Stud. Appl. Math. 83, 123 (1990)] that describes the system in terms of perturbation vorticity and velocity. The analysis is based on large scale waves and expansions using multiscales and multitimes for the partial differential equations. The multiscaling is based on an approach where the small parameter is linked to the perturbation property independently from the flow control parameter. Solutions of the perturbative equations are determined numerically after the introduction of a regular perturbation scheme analytically deduced up to the second order. Numerically, the complete linear system is also integrated. Since the results relevant to the complete problem are in very good agreement with the results of the first-order analysis, the numerical solution at the second order was deemed not necessary. The use for an arbitrary initial-value problem will be shown to contain a wealth of information for the different transient behaviors associated to the symmetry, angle of obliquity, and spatial decay of the long waves. The amplification factor of transversal perturbations never presents the trend--a growth followed by a long damping--usually seen in waves with wave number of order one or less. Asymptotical instability is always observed.

  17. The strain in the array is mainly in the plane (waves below ~1 Hz)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.; Pavlis, G.; Bodin, P.

    1999-01-01

    We compare geodetic and single-station methods of measuring dynamic deformations and characterize their causes in the frequency bands 0.5-1.0 Hz and 4.0-8.0 Hz. The geodetic approach utilizes data from small-aperture seismic arrays, applying techniques from geodesy. It requires relatively few assumptions and a priori information. The single-station method uses ground velocities recorded at isolated or single stations and assumes all the deformation is due to plane-wave propagation. It also requires knowledge of the azimuth and horizontal velocity of waves arriving at the recording station. Data employed come from a small-aperture, dense seismic array deployed in Geyokcha, Turkmenistan, and include seismograms recorded by broadband STS2 and short-period L28 sensors. Poor agreement between geodetic and single-station estimates in the 4.0-8.0 Hz passband indicates that the displacement field may vary nonlinearly with distance over distances of ~50 m. STS2 geodetic estimates provide a robust standard in the 0.5-1.0 Hz passband because they appear to be computationally stable and require fewer assumptions than single-station estimates. The agreement between STS2 geodetic estimates and single-station L28 estimates is surprisingly good for the S-wave and early surface waves, suggesting that the single-station analysis should be useful with commonly available data. These results indicate that, in the 0.5 to 1.0 Hz passband, the primary source of dynamic deformation is plane-wave propagation along great-circle source-receiver paths. For later arriving energy, the effects of scattering become important. The local structure beneath the array exerts a strong control on the geometry of the dynamic deformation, implying that it may be difficult to infer source characteristics of modern or paleoearthquakes from indicators of dynamic deformations. However, strong site control also suggests that the dynamic deformations may be predictable, which would be useful for engineering

  18. Expressions for Form Factors for Inelastic Scattering and Charge Exchange in Plane-Wave, Distorted-Wave, and Coupled-Channels Reaction Formalisms

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, F S

    2006-09-25

    This document is intended to facilitate calculation of inelastic scattering and charge-exchange cross sections in a variety of reaction models, including the plane-wave and distorted-wave approximations and the full coupled-channels treatments. Expressions are given for the coupling potentials between the relevant channels in both coordinate and momentum space. In particular, it is expected that the plane-wave calculations should be useful as a check on the correctness of coupled-channels calculations. The Fourier transform methods used to calculate the plane-wave approximation cross sections are also intended to be used to generate the transition potentials for coupled-channels codes, using a folding model with local effective interactions. Specific expressions are given for calculating transition densities for the folding model in the random phase approximation (RPA).

  19. DIFFRACTION, REFRACTION, AND REFLECTION OF AN EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET WAVE OBSERVED DURING ITS INTERACTIONS WITH REMOTE ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu; Zhao Ruijuan; Tian Zhanjun; Su Jiangtao; Li Hui; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2013-08-20

    We present observations of the diffraction, refraction, and reflection of a global extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave propagating in the solar corona. These intriguing phenomena are observed when the wave interacts with two remote active regions, and together they exhibit properties of an EUV wave. When the wave approached AR11465, it became weaker and finally disappeared in the active region, but a few minutes later a new wavefront appeared behind the active region, and it was not concentric with the incoming wave. In addition, a reflected wave was also simultaneously observed on the wave incoming side. When the wave approached AR11459, it transmitted through the active region directly and without reflection. The formation of the new wavefront and the transmission could be explained with diffraction and refraction effects, respectively. We propose that the different behaviors observed during the interactions may be caused by different speed gradients at the boundaries of the two active regions. We find that the EUV wave formed ahead of a group of expanding loops a few minutes after the start of the loops' expansion, which represents the initiation of the associated coronal mass ejection (CME). Based on these results, we conclude that the EUV wave should be a nonlinear magnetosonic wave or shock driven by the associated CME, which propagated faster than the ambient fast mode speed and gradually slowed down to an ordinary linear wave. Our observations support the hybrid model that includes both fast wave and slow non-wave components.

  20. Reflection and transmission of plane SH-waves in an initially stressed inhomogeneous anisotropic magnetoelastic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majhi, S.; Pal, P. C.; Kumar, S.

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the reflection and transmission of plane SH-waves in two semi-infinite anisotropic magnetoelastic media. The lower half-space is considered as initially stressed and inhomogeneous. The density of lower half-space is taken exponentially varying with depth. The solutions for half-spaces are obtained analytically. The expressions for reflection and transmission coefficient are obtained in the closed form subject to continuity conditions at the interfaces of anisotropic magnetoelastic half-spaces and the Snell's law. It is found that these coefficients depend on the initial stress, inhomogeneity parameter, the magnetoelastic coupling parameter, and the angle at which wave crosses the magnetic field of the half-spaces. Numerical computations are performed for these coefficients for a specific model of two different anisotropic magnetoelastic half-spaces. The numerical results are illustrated by the graph of reflection and transmission coefficient versus the angle of incidence. In general, as the initial stress increases the reflection and transmission coefficient increases, the affect is more prominent for more than 10 GPa. Inhomogeneity in the density of the material also increases the reflection and transmission coefficient. The anisotropic magnetoelastic parameter and the angle at which the wave crosses the magnetic field for both the half-spaces have a quite significant effect on the reflection and transmission coefficient.

  1. Plane wave scattering from a plasmonic nanowire array spacer-separated from a plasmonic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Arun; Trivedi, Rahul; Dhawan, Anuj

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present a theoretical analysis of the electromagnetic response of a plasmonic nanowire–spacer–plasmonic film system. The analytical solution presented in this paper is a full-wave solution, which is used to compute the fields scattered by the plasmonic nanostructure system on illumination by a plane electromagnetic wave. The physical structure comprises of an array of plasmonic nanowires made of a plasmonic metal such as gold or silver placed over a plasmonic film of the same material and separated from it by a dielectric spacer such as silica or alumina. Such a nanostructure exhibits a spectrum that is extremely sensitive to various geometric and electromagnetic parameters such as spacer thickness and spacer refractive index, which makes it favourable for various sensing applications such as chemical and biological sensing, strain sensing, position sensing, vibration sensing, and thickness sensing. We report a comparison of our analytical solution with a numerical rigorous coupled wave analysis of the same structure with the plasmonic medium being treated as local in nature.

  2. Ground motions around a semicircular canyon with a dipping edge under SH plane wave incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kao-Hao; Tsaur, Deng-How; Wang, Jeen-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore the spatial distribution and temporal variation of ground motions near a semicircular canyon with a dipping edge, a simplified mathematical model is constructed. Based on the region-matching technique, a Fourier-Bessel series solution for the plane SH-wave excitation is derived and then applied to theoretically simulate the seismic response of the canyon. The use of the adequate wavefunctions and a newly derived Graf's addition formula can solve the unknown expansion coefficients. Parametric analyses with respect to the frequency of input motion, angle of incidence, and canyon geometry are illustrated. Both frequency- and time-domain computations are presented. The canonical case, a completed semicircular canyon, which has the exact analytical solution, and the horizontally truncated case analyzed in previous works are considered as particular cases of the proposed general model. Comparisons with boundary-element solutions show good agreement. Steady-state results show that the phenomenon of wave focusing tends to be significant when the incident angle bends toward the horizontal ground surface. Propagation and attenuation of scattered waves that originated from the surficial anomaly are exhibited in transient-state simulations.

  3. Plane wave scattering from a plasmonic nanowire array spacer-separated from a plasmonic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Arun; Trivedi, Rahul; Dhawan, Anuj

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present a theoretical analysis of the electromagnetic response of a plasmonic nanowire-spacer-plasmonic film system. The analytical solution presented in this paper is a full-wave solution, which is used to compute the fields scattered by the plasmonic nanostructure system on illumination by a plane electromagnetic wave. The physical structure comprises of an array of plasmonic nanowires made of a plasmonic metal such as gold or silver placed over a plasmonic film of the same material and separated from it by a dielectric spacer such as silica or alumina. Such a nanostructure exhibits a spectrum that is extremely sensitive to various geometric and electromagnetic parameters such as spacer thickness and spacer refractive index, which makes it favourable for various sensing applications such as chemical and biological sensing, strain sensing, position sensing, vibration sensing, and thickness sensing. We report a comparison of our analytical solution with a numerical rigorous coupled wave analysis of the same structure with the plasmonic medium being treated as local in nature.

  4. Calculation of the diffraction efficiency on concave gratings based on Fresnel-Kirchhoff's diffraction formula.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanshen; Li, Ting; Xu, Banglian; Hong, Ruijin; Tao, Chunxian; Ling, Jinzhong; Li, Baicheng; Zhang, Dawei; Ni, Zhengji; Zhuang, Songlin

    2013-02-10

    Fraunhofer diffraction formula cannot be applied to calculate the diffraction wave energy distribution of concave gratings like plane gratings because their grooves are distributed on a concave spherical surface. In this paper, a method based on the Kirchhoff diffraction theory is proposed to calculate the diffraction efficiency on concave gratings by considering the curvature of the whole concave spherical surface. According to this approach, each groove surface is divided into several limited small planes, on which the Kirchhoff diffraction field distribution is calculated, and then the diffraction field of whole concave grating can be obtained by superimposition. Formulas to calculate the diffraction efficiency of Rowland-type and flat-field concave gratings are deduced from practical applications. Experimental results showed strong agreement with theoretical computations. With the proposed method, light energy can be optimized to the expected diffraction wave range while implementing aberration-corrected design of concave gratings, particularly for the concave blazed gratings.

  5. Optimization of a surface wave elastography method through diffraction and guided waves effects characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinspan, G. A.; Aguiar, S.; Benech, N.

    2016-04-01

    Soft biological tissue elasticity is a parameter whose reliable measure is relevant to many applications in fields as diverse as medicine and the agrifood industry. The ultrasonic elastography methods are often unviable to be applied to provide such solutions. In this way, the surface wave elastography (SWE) appears as a viable alternative, due its low cost, easy to use, non-invasive-destructive character as well as its ability to provide in vivo estimates. Previous studies have described a good correlation between the overall behavior of ultrasonic elastography and SWE, although the latter overestimates the elasticity values compared to the first. It has been suggested that this is due to the influence of certain physical effects related to the exclusive use of low frequency waves, as well as by characteristics of the experimental setup and/or medium. In this work we confirm the influence of such effects and discuss different strategies to make independent the estimations thereof. This allows achieving a good agreement between the ultrasonic reference method and SWE. Thus, SWE becomes a reliable method to estimate soft biological tissue elasticity.

  6. Hand-held forward-looking focused array mine detection with plane wave excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappaport, Carey M.; Azevedo, Stephen G.; Rosenbury, Tom; Gough, Jamie; Jin, Dongping

    2000-08-01

    A novel handheld time-domain array GPR antipersonnel mine detection system prototype has been developed. Using an offset paraboloidal reflector antenna to collimate rays form an ultra-wideband feed, the transmitted microwave impulse is concentrated forward, in front of the antenna structure. The resulting wave is a non-uniform plane wave over the portion of ground be investigated, and is incident at 45 degrees to normal. As such, much of the ground reflect wave is directed further forward, away from the operator, the reflector, and the receiving antennas, thereby reducing clutter. However, the wave transmitted into the ground, which interacts with the target, tends to have significant backscatter returning toward the receiving antennas. These receiving antennas are configured in a 2 by 2 array to provide spatial focusing in both along and cross-track directions. This is accomplished by measuring and comparing the backscattered signal at each receiver in the narrow time window between the times when the ground reflected wave passes the receiver and before this wave re-reflects from the reflector components. 2D FDTD simulation of this parabolic reflector transmitter indicates that it generates a beam with a non-uniform planar wavefront, which scatters form rough ground primarily in the forward direction. The wave transmitted into the ground is also planar, propagating at the angle of refraction, and scattering fairly isotropically from a small penetrable target. This system has been built and tested at LLNL, using a very narrow pulse shape. LLNL's Micro-Impulse Radar (MIR) and custom-built wideband antenna elements operate in the 1.5 to 5 GHz range. One particular advantage of using the MIR module is its low cost: an important feature for mine detectors used in developing countries. Preliminary measured data indicates that the surface clutter is indeed reduced relative to the target signal, and that small non-metallic anti-personnel mines can be reliably detected at

  7. Nonlinear focusing of ultrasonic waves by an axisymmetric diffraction grating embedded in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, N.; Romero-García, V.; Picó, R.; Garcia-Raffi, L. M.; Staliunas, K.

    2015-11-01

    We report the nonlinear focusing of ultrasonic waves by an axisymmetric diffraction grating immersed in water. In the linear regime, the system presents high focal gain (32 dB), with a narrow beam-width and intense side lobes as it is common in focusing by Fresnel-like lenses. Activating the nonlinearity of the host medium by using high amplitude incident waves, the focusing properties of the lens dramatically change. Theoretical predictions show that the focal gain of the system extraordinary increases in the strongly nonlinear regime (Mach number of 6.1 × 10-4). Particularly, the harmonic generation is locally activated at the focal spot, and the second harmonic beam is characterized by strongly reduced side-lobes and an excellent beam profile as experiments show in agreement with theory. The results can motivate applications in medical therapy or second harmonic imaging.

  8. Scattering of a Young’s diffractive electromagnetic light wave by quasi-homogeneous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Wu, Pinghui; Chang, Liping; Wu, Zhefu

    2015-09-01

    While remaining accurate under the first-order Born approximation and the paraxial assumption, the scattering of a Young’s diffractive electromagnetic light wave by a quasi-homogeneous (QH) medium is specifically addressed in this study. Analytical expressions are derived for spectral density as well as the spectral degree of coherence of the scattered field. As long as the components of the complex amplitude of incident waves are proportional to each other, the resultant scattered light in the far field is proven to satisfy two reciprocity relations, namely, that the spectral density is proportional to the spatial Fourier transformation of the normalized correlation coefficient of the scattering potential, while the spectral degree of coherence is dependent only on the spatial Fourier transformation of the strength of the scattering potential.

  9. Scalar diffraction modeling in optical disk recording using wave function assembling.

    PubMed

    Yin, Bin; Coene, Wim M J; Hekstra, Andries P

    2007-08-10

    A new scalar diffraction modeling method for simulating the readout signal of optical disks is described. The information layer is discretized into pixels that are grouped in specific ways to form written and unwritten areas. A set of 2D wave functions resulting from these pixels at the detection aperture is established. A readout signal is obtained via the assembly of wave functions from this set according to the content under the scanning spot. The method allows efficient simulation of jitter noise due to edge deformation of recorded marks, which is important at high densities. It is also capable of simulating a physically irregular mark, thereby helping to understand and optimize the recording process.

  10. Nonlinear focusing of ultrasonic waves by an axisymmetric diffraction grating embedded in water

    SciTech Connect

    Jiménez, N.; Picó, R.; Romero-García, V.; Garcia-Raffi, L. M.

    2015-11-16

    We report the nonlinear focusing of ultrasonic waves by an axisymmetric diffraction grating immersed in water. In the linear regime, the system presents high focal gain (32 dB), with a narrow beam-width and intense side lobes as it is common in focusing by Fresnel-like lenses. Activating the nonlinearity of the host medium by using high amplitude incident waves, the focusing properties of the lens dramatically change. Theoretical predictions show that the focal gain of the system extraordinary increases in the strongly nonlinear regime (Mach number of 6.1 × 10{sup −4}). Particularly, the harmonic generation is locally activated at the focal spot, and the second harmonic beam is characterized by strongly reduced side-lobes and an excellent beam profile as experiments show in agreement with theory. The results can motivate applications in medical therapy or second harmonic imaging.

  11. Gain and Loss Factor for Conical Horns, and Impact of Ground Plane Edge Diffractions on Radiation Patterns of Uncoated and Coated Circular Aperture Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboserwal, Nafati Abdasallam

    Horn antennas have been used for over a hundred years. They have a wide variety of uses where they are a basic and popular microwave antenna for many practical applications, such as feed elements for communication reflector dishes on satellite or point-to-point relay antennas. They are also widely utilized as gain standards for calibration and gain measurement of other antennas. The gain and loss factor of conical horns are revisited in this dissertation based on spherical and quadratic aperture phase distributions. The gain is compared with published classical data in an attempt to confirm their validity and accuracy and to determine whether they were derived based on spherical or quadratic aperture phase distributions. In this work, it is demonstrated that the gain of a conical horn antenna obtained by using a spherical phase distribution is in close agreement with published classical data. Moreover, more accurate expressions for the loss factor, to account for amplitude and phase tapers over the horn aperture, are derived. New formulas for the design of optimum gain conical horns, based on the more accurate spherical aperture phase distribution, are derived. To better understand the impact of edge diffractions on aperture antenna performance, an extensive investigation of the edge diffractions impact is undertaken in this dissertation for commercial aperture antennas. The impact of finite uncoated and coated PEC ground plane edge diffractions on the amplitude patterns in the principal planes of circular apertures is intensively examined. Similarly, aperture edge diffractions of aperture antennas without ground planes are examined. Computational results obtained by the analytical model are compared with experimental and HFSS-simulated results for all cases studied. In addition, the impact of the ground plane size, coating thickness, and relative permittivity of the dielectric layer on the radiation amplitude in the back region has been examined. This

  12. Acoustic radiation force on a rigid elliptical cylinder in plane (quasi)standing waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-12-01

    The acoustic radiation force on a 2D elliptical (non-circular) cylinder centered on the axis of wave propagation of plane quasi-standing and standing waves is derived, based on the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in cylindrical coordinates. A non-dimensional acoustic radiation force function, which is the radiation force per unit length, per characteristic energy density and per unit cross-sectional surface of the ellipse, is defined in terms of the scattering coefficients that are determined by applying the Neumann boundary condition for an immovable surface. A system of linear equations involving a single numerical integration procedure is solved by matrix inversion. Numerical simulations showing the transition from the quasi-standing to the (equi-amplitude) standing wave behaviour are performed with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio a/b, where a and b are the ellipse semi-axes, as well as the dimensionless size parameter kb (where k is the wavenumber), without the restriction to a particular range of frequencies. It is found that at high kb values > 1, the radiation force per length with broadside incidence is larger, whereas the opposite situation occurs in the long-wavelength limit (i.e., kb < 1). The results are particularly relevant in acoustic levitation of elliptical cylinders, the acoustic stabilization of liquid columns in a host medium, acousto-fluidics devices, and other particle dynamics applications to name a few. Moreover, the formalism presented here may be effectively applied to compute the acoustic radiation force on other 2D surfaces of arbitrary shape such as super-ellipses, Chebyshev cylindrical particles, or other non-circular geometries.

  13. Acoustic radiation force on a rigid elliptical cylinder in plane (quasi)standing waves

    SciTech Connect

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-12-07

    The acoustic radiation force on a 2D elliptical (non-circular) cylinder centered on the axis of wave propagation of plane quasi-standing and standing waves is derived, based on the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in cylindrical coordinates. A non-dimensional acoustic radiation force function, which is the radiation force per unit length, per characteristic energy density and per unit cross-sectional surface of the ellipse, is defined in terms of the scattering coefficients that are determined by applying the Neumann boundary condition for an immovable surface. A system of linear equations involving a single numerical integration procedure is solved by matrix inversion. Numerical simulations showing the transition from the quasi-standing to the (equi-amplitude) standing wave behaviour are performed with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio a/b, where a and b are the ellipse semi-axes, as well as the dimensionless size parameter kb (where k is the wavenumber), without the restriction to a particular range of frequencies. It is found that at high kb values > 1, the radiation force per length with broadside incidence is larger, whereas the opposite situation occurs in the long-wavelength limit (i.e., kb < 1). The results are particularly relevant in acoustic levitation of elliptical cylinders, the acoustic stabilization of liquid columns in a host medium, acousto-fluidics devices, and other particle dynamics applications to name a few. Moreover, the formalism presented here may be effectively applied to compute the acoustic radiation force on other 2D surfaces of arbitrary shape such as super-ellipses, Chebyshev cylindrical particles, or other non-circular geometries.

  14. Microwave radiation force and torque on a disk resonator excited by a circularly polarized plane wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, S.; Kulkarni, S.

    2004-05-01

    A numerical simulation method [S. Makarov and S. Kulkarni, Appl. Phys. Lett. 84, 1600 (2004)] is used in order to determine the radiation force and radiation torque on a parallel-plate disk resonator, whose size is comparable to wavelength. The method is based on the MOM solution of the electric-field integral equation, accurate calculation of the near field, and removal of the self-interaction terms responsible for the pinch effect. The local force/torque distribution at the normal incidence of a circularly polarized plane wave is found. It is observed that, at the resonance, the individual disks are subject to unexpectedly large local force densities, despite the fact that the net radiation force on the resonator remains very small. On the other hand, the total axial torque on the disk resonator also increases at the resonance.

  15. Scattering from cylinders using the two-dimensional vector plane wave spectrum.

    PubMed

    Pawliuk, Peter; Yedlin, Matthew

    2011-06-01

    The two-dimensional vector plane wave spectrum (VPWS) is scattered from parallel circular cylinders using a boundary value solution with the T-matrix formalism. The VPWS allows us to define the incident, two-dimensional electromagnetic field with an arbitrary distribution and polarization, including both radiative and evanescent components. Using the fast Fourier transform, we can quickly compute the multiple scattering of fields that have any particular functional or numerical form. We perform numerical simulations to investigate a grating of cylinders that is capable of converting an evanescent field into a set of propagating beams. The direction of propagation of each beam is directly related to a spatial frequency component of the incident evanescent field.

  16. Pulsed plane wave analytic solutions for generic shapes and the validation of Maxwell's equations solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarrow, Maurice; Vastano, John A.; Lomax, Harvard

    1992-01-01

    Generic shapes are subjected to pulsed plane waves of arbitrary shape. The resulting scattered electromagnetic fields are determined analytically. These fields are then computed efficiently at field locations for which numerically determined EM fields are required. Of particular interest are the pulsed waveform shapes typically utilized by radar systems. The results can be used to validate the accuracy of finite difference time domain Maxwell's equations solvers. A two-dimensional solver which is second- and fourth-order accurate in space and fourth-order accurate in time is examined. Dielectric media properties are modeled by a ramping technique which simplifies the associated gridding of body shapes. The attributes of the ramping technique are evaluated by comparison with the analytic solutions.

  17. On the Propagation of Plane Acoustic Waves in a Duct With Flexible and Impedance Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Vu, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) discusses the harmonic and random plane acoustic waves propagating from inside a duct to its surroundings. Various duct surfaces are considered, such as rigid, flexible, and impedance. In addition, the effects of a mean flow are studied when the duct alone is considered. Results show a significant reduction in overall sound pressure levels downstream of the impedance wall for both mean flow and no mean flow cases and for a narrow duct. When a wider duct is used, the overall sound pressure level (OSPL) reduction downstream of the impedance wall is much smaller. In the far field, the directivity is such that the overall sound pressure level is reduced by about 5 decibels (dB) on the side of the impedance wall. When a flexible surface is used, the far field directivity becomes asymmetric with an increase in the OSPL on the side of the flexible surface of about 7 dB.

  18. Fast plane wave density functional theory molecular dynamics calculations on multi-GPU machines

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Weile; Fu, Jiyun; Cao, Zongyan; Wang, Long; Chi, Xuebin; Gao, Weiguo; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2013-10-15

    Plane wave pseudopotential (PWP) density functional theory (DFT) calculation is the most widely used method for material simulations, but its absolute speed stagnated due to the inability to use large scale CPU based computers. By a drastic redesign of the algorithm, and moving all the major computation parts into GPU, we have reached a speed of 12 s per molecular dynamics (MD) step for a 512 atom system using 256 GPU cards. This is about 20 times faster than the CPU version of the code regardless of the number of CPU cores used. Our tests and analysis on different GPU platforms and configurations shed lights on the optimal GPU deployments for PWP-DFT calculations. An 1800 step MD simulation is used to study the liquid phase properties of GaInP.

  19. Integrable open spin chain in super Yang-Mills and the plane-wave/SYM duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Wu, Yong-Shi

    2004-02-01

    We investigate the integrable structures in an Script N = 2 superconformal Sp(N) Yang-Mills theory with matter, which is dual to an open+closed string system. We restrict ourselves to the BMN operators that correspond to free string states. In the closed string sector, an integrable structure is inherited from its parent theory, Script N = 4 SYM. For the open string sector, the planar one-loop mixing matrix for gauge invariant holomorphic scalar operators is identified with the hamiltonian of an integrable SU(3) open spin chain. Using the K-matrix formalism we identify the integrable open-chain boundary conditions that correspond to string boundary conditions. The solutions to the algebraic Bethe ansatz equations (ABAE) with a few impurities are shown to recover the anomalous dimensions that exactly match the spectrum of free open string in the plane-wave background. We also discuss the properties of the solutions of ABAE beyond the BMN regime.

  20. Harmonic analysis of lossy, piezoelectric composite transducers using the plane wave expansion method.

    PubMed

    Orr, Leigh-Ann; Mulholland, Anthony J; O'Leary, Richard L; Hayward, Gordon

    2008-12-01

    Periodic composite ultrasonic transducers offer many advantages but the periodic pillar architecture can give rise to unwanted modes of vibration which interfere with the piston like motion of the fundamental thickness mode. In this paper, viscoelastic loss is incorporated into a three-dimensional plane wave expansion model (PWE) of these transducers. A comparison with experimental and finite element data is conducted and a design to damp out these lateral modes is investigated. Scaling and regularisation techniques are introduced to the PWE method to reduce ill-conditioning in the large matrices which can arise. The identification of the modes of vibration is aided by examining profiles of the displacements, electrical potential and Poynting vector. The dispersive behaviour of a 2-2 composite transducer with high shear attenuation in the passive phase is examined. The model shows that the use of a high shear attenuation filler material improves the frequency band gap surrounding the fundamental thickness mode.

  1. Kinetic theory of electromagnetic plane wave obliquely incident on bounded plasma slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, J. R.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Smolyakov, A. I.

    2010-10-01

    The effects of electromagnetic plane waves obliquely incident on a warm bounded plasma slab of finite length L are studied by solving the coupled Vlasov-Maxwell set of equations. It is shown that the solution can be greatly simplified in the limit where thermal effects are most important by expanding in small parameters and introducing self-similar variables. These solutions reveal that the coupling of thermal effects with the angle of incidence is negligible in the region of bounce resonance and anomalous skin effect. In the region of the anomalous skin effect, the heating is shown to scale linearly with the anomalous skin depth δa when δa≪L, in agreement with previous authors. Furthermore, for δa≫L, the heating is shown to decay with 1/δa3. The transmission is found to be exponentially larger than that predicted from a local theory in the appropriate region of the anomalous skin effect.

  2. LOBSTER: A tool to extract chemical bonding from plane-wave based DFT.

    PubMed

    Maintz, Stefan; Deringer, Volker L; Tchougréeff, Andrei L; Dronskowski, Richard

    2016-04-30

    The computer program LOBSTER (Local Orbital Basis Suite Towards Electronic-Structure Reconstruction) enables chemical-bonding analysis based on periodic plane-wave (PAW) density-functional theory (DFT) output and is applicable to a wide range of first-principles simulations in solid-state and materials chemistry. LOBSTER incorporates analytic projection routines described previously in this very journal [J. Comput. Chem. 2013, 34, 2557] and offers improved functionality. It calculates, among others, atom-projected densities of states (pDOS), projected crystal orbital Hamilton population (pCOHP) curves, and the recently introduced bond-weighted distribution function (BWDF). The software is offered free-of-charge for non-commercial research. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Plane wave spectrum treatment of microwave scattering by hydrometeors on an Earth-satellite link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haworth, D. P.

    1980-08-01

    For satellites operating at frequencies above 10 GHz, the effects of propagation through atmospheric hydrometeors are of major importance. In particular, the hydrometeors attenuate, cross polarize and scatter signals causing respectively: a loss in signal level, a decrease in the efficiency of dual polarized channels and station to station interference. For large Earth station antennas operating at high frequencies, the near or Fresnel region of the antenna can extend several kilometers from the antenna and consequently, during disturbed weather, a significant proportion of the hydrometeors affecting propagation are in the near or Fresnel region of the antenna. Previous treatment of propagation through hydrometeors in the Fresnel region of an antenna has proved unsatisfactory and the plane wave spectrum technique was used to accurately characterize antenna scatterer interaction in both the near and far fields of an antenna. The Van de Hulst refractive formula for the coherent propagation and the basis of the radiative transfer equation for the incoherent scattering are derived.

  4. Spectral domain analysis of electromagnetic wave scattering by an infinite plane metallic grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Kazunori; Noda, Takeaki; Matsunaga, Toshiaki

    1987-01-01

    A new method, based on the spectral domain analysis, is presented for solving the electromagnetic wave scattering by an infinite plane metallic grating. The key point of the present method is discretization of spectral formulation in terms of the sampling theorem. Two different polarizations, transverse magnetic and transverse electric excitations, are considered here. The accuracy of the present method is examined numerically by comparison with the rigorous Wiener-Hopf solutions which are applicable only to a special case. Since the end effect of a conducting strip is taken into account analytically, final results show enough convergence to evaluate the near fields as well as the far fields with small matrix calculations. Some numerical examples are shown mainly for surface current distributions to clarify the differences between the two different polarizations.

  5. Plane-wave DFT-LDA calculation of the electronic structure and absorption spectrum of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, Andrea; Onida, Giovanni; del Sole, Rodolfo

    2001-11-01

    We present an accurate, first-principles study of the electronic structure and absorption spectrum of bulk copper within density functional theory in the local density approximation, including the study of intraband transitions. We construct norm-conserving pseudopotentials (PP's) including the 3d shell (and optionally the underlying 3s and 3p shells) in the valence and requiring a relatively small plane-wave basis (60 and 140 Ry cutoff, respectively). As a consequence, these PP's are strongly nonlocal, yielding macroscopically wrong results in the absorption spectrum when momentum matrix elements are computed naively. Our results are compared with experimental photoemission, absorption, and electron energy loss data, and suggest nontrivial self-energy effects in the quasiparticle spectrum of Cu.

  6. Pixelated spectral filter for integrated focal plane array in the long-wave IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemme, S. A.; Boye, R. R.; Cruz-Cabrera, A. A.; Briggs, R. D.; Carter, T. R.; Samora, S.

    2010-04-01

    We present the design, fabrication, and characterization of a pixelated, hyperspectral arrayed component for Focal Plane Array (FPA) integration in the Long-Wave IR. This device contains tens of pixels within a single super-pixel which is tiled across the extent of the FPA. Each spectral pixel maps to a single FPA pixel with a spectral FWHM of 200nm. With this arrayed approach, remote sensing data may be accumulated with a non-scanning, "snapshot" imaging system. This technology is flexible with respect to individual pixel center wavelength and to pixel position within the array. Moreover, the entire pixel area has a single wavelength response, not the integrated linear response of a graded cavity thickness design. These requirements bar tilted, linear array technologies where the cavity length monotonically increases across the device.

  7. LOBSTER: A tool to extract chemical bonding from plane-wave based DFT.

    PubMed

    Maintz, Stefan; Deringer, Volker L; Tchougréeff, Andrei L; Dronskowski, Richard

    2016-04-30

    The computer program LOBSTER (Local Orbital Basis Suite Towards Electronic-Structure Reconstruction) enables chemical-bonding analysis based on periodic plane-wave (PAW) density-functional theory (DFT) output and is applicable to a wide range of first-principles simulations in solid-state and materials chemistry. LOBSTER incorporates analytic projection routines described previously in this very journal [J. Comput. Chem. 2013, 34, 2557] and offers improved functionality. It calculates, among others, atom-projected densities of states (pDOS), projected crystal orbital Hamilton population (pCOHP) curves, and the recently introduced bond-weighted distribution function (BWDF). The software is offered free-of-charge for non-commercial research. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26914535

  8. Scattering of an electromagnetic plane wave by a Luneburg lens. I. Ray theory.

    PubMed

    Lock, James A

    2008-12-01

    For a plane wave incident on either a Luneburg lens or a modified Luneburg lens, the magnitude and phase of the transmitted electric field are calculated as a function of the scattering angle in the context of ray theory. It is found that the ray trajectory and the scattered intensity are not uniformly convergent in the vicinity of edge ray incidence on a Luneburg lens, which corresponds to the semiclassical phenomenon of orbiting. In addition, it is found that rays transmitted through a large-focal-length modified Luneburg lens participate in a far-zone rainbow, the details of which are exactly analytically soluble in ray theory. Using these results, the Airy theory of the modified Luneburg lens is derived and compared with the Airy theory of the rainbows of a homogeneous sphere. PMID:19037388

  9. Probing liquid surface waves, liquid properties and liquid films with light diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, Tarun Kr; Chaudhuri, Partha Roy; Roy, Anushree; Kar, Sayan

    2006-06-01

    Surface waves on liquids act as a dynamical phase grating for incident light. In this paper, we revisit the classical method of probing such waves (wavelengths of the order of mm) as well as inherent properties of liquids and liquid films on liquids, using optical diffraction. A combination of simulation and experiment is proposed to trace out the surface wave profiles in various situations (e.g. for one or more vertical, slightly immersed, electrically driven exciters). Subsequently, the surface tension and the spatial damping coefficient (related to viscosity) of a variety of liquids are measured carefully in order to gauge the efficiency of measuring liquid properties using this optical probe. The final set of results deal with liquid films where dispersion relations, surface and interface modes, interfacial tension and related issues are investigated in some detail, both theoretically and experimentally. On the whole, our observations and analysis seem to support the claim that this simple, low cost apparatus is capable of providing a wealth of information on liquids and liquid surface waves in a non-destructive way.

  10. The wave energy flux of high frequency diffracting beams in complex geometrical optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maj, Omar; Mariani, Alberto; Poli, Emanuele; Farina, Daniela

    2013-04-01

    We consider the construction of asymptotic solutions of Maxwell's equations for a diffracting wave beam in the high frequency limit and address the description of the wave energy flux transported by the beam. With this aim, the complex eikonal method is applied. That is a generalization of the standard geometrical optics method in which the phase function is assumed to be complex valued, with the non-negative imaginary part accounting for the finite width of the beam cross section. In this framework, we propose an argument which simplifies significantly the analysis of the transport equation for the wave field amplitude and allows us to derive the wave energy flux. The theoretical analysis is illustrated numerically for the case of electron cyclotron beams in tokamak plasmas by using the GRAY code [D. Farina, Fusion Sci. Technol. 52, 154 (2007)], which is based upon the complex eikonal theory. The results are compared to those of the paraxial beam tracing code TORBEAM [E. Poli et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 136, 90 (2001)], which provides an independent calculation of the energy flow.

  11. Axisymmetric diffraction of a cylindrical transverse wave by a viscoelastic spherical inclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Benjamin L.; Liu, Yifei; Royston, Thomas J.; Magin, Richard L.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the scattering and diffraction of a cylindrical transverse shear wave in a viscoelastic isotropic medium by a spherical heterogeneity is analytically solved. The waves are generated by the harmonic longitudinal oscillations of the cylinder walls. The spherical inclusion is located at the radial center of the cylinder and differs from the cylindrical material only in its complex shear modulus. Small amplitude motion is assumed, such that linear system theory is valid. By employing multi-pole expansions, the incident and scattered wave fields are each defined in both cylindrical and spherical coordinates allowing for the satisfaction of the boundary conditions at the surfaces of these multiply connected bodies. The solution involves an infinite sum of improper integrals, which are evaluated numerically. The wave field is determined for a hydrogel (alginate) bead suspended in a different hydrogel (agarose) that fills a glass test tube. Numerical examples showing the effect on displacement fields of varying the stiffness of the inclusion are presented. This solution is further validated with a finite element simulation showing excellent agreement with the analytic results.

  12. Plane-wave spectrum approach for the calculation of electromagnetic absorption under near-field exposure conditions.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, I; Gandhi, O P; Hagmann, M J; Riazi, A

    1980-01-01

    The exposure of humans to electromagnetic near fields has not been sufficiently emphasized by researcher. We have used the plane-wave-spectrum approach to evaluate the electromagnetic field and determine the energy deposited in a lossy, homogeneous, semi-infinite slab placed in the near field of a source leaking radiation. Values of the fields and absorbed energy in the target are obtained by vector summation of the contributions of all the plane waves into which the prescribed field is decomposed. Use of a fast Fourier transform algorithm contributes to the high efficiency of the computations. The numerical results show that, for field distributions that are nearly constant over a physical extent of at least a free-space wavelength, the energy coupled into the target is approximately equal to the resulting from plane-wave exposed.

  13. Plane-wave spectrum approach for the calculation of electromagnetic absorption under near-field exposure conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, I.; Gandhi, O.P.; Hagmann, M.J.; Riazi, A.

    1980-01-01

    The exposure of humans to electromagnetic near fields has not been sufficiently emphasized by researcher. We have used the plane-wave-spectrum approach to evaluate the electromagnetic field and determine the energy deposited in a lossy, homogeneous, semi-infinite slab placed in the near field of a source leaking radiation. Values of the fields and absorbed energy in the target are obtained by vector summation of the contributions of all the plane waves into which the prescribed field is decomposed. Use of a fast Fourier transform algorithm contributes to the high efficiency of the computations. The numerical results show that, for field distributions that are nearly constant over a physical extent of at least a free-space wavelength, the energy coupled into the target is approximately equal to the resulting from plane-wave exposed.

  14. Radiation of de-excited electrons at large times in a strong electromagnetic plane wave

    SciTech Connect

    Kazinski, P.O.

    2013-12-15

    The late time asymptotics of the physical solutions to the Lorentz–Dirac equation in the electromagnetic external fields of simple configurations–the constant homogeneous field, the linearly polarized plane wave (in particular, the constant uniform crossed field), and the circularly polarized plane wave–are found. The solutions to the Landau–Lifshitz equation for the external electromagnetic fields admitting a two-parametric symmetry group, which include as a particular case the above mentioned field configurations, are obtained. Some general properties of the total radiation power of a charged particle are established. In particular, for a circularly polarized wave and constant uniform crossed fields, the total radiation power in the asymptotic regime is independent of the charge and the external field strength, when expressed in terms of the proper-time, and equals a half the rest energy of a charged particle divided by its proper-time. The spectral densities of the radiation power formed on the late time asymptotics are derived for a charged particle moving in the external electromagnetic fields of the simple configurations pointed above. This provides a simple method to verify experimentally that the charged particle has reached the asymptotic regime. -- Highlights: •Late time asymptotics of the solutions to the Lorentz–Dirac equation are studied. •General properties of the total radiation power of electrons are established. •The total radiation power equals a half the rest energy divided by the proper-time. •Spectral densities of radiation formed on the late time asymptotics are derived. •Possible experimental verification of the results is proposed.

  15. Near-field coupling model between PCB and grounded transmission line based on plane wave spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leseigneur, Christelle; Baudry, David; Ravelo, Blaise; Louis, Anne

    2013-10-01

    This article presents an explicit model of electromagnetic (EM) coupling between electronic circuits and metallic wire placed above the ground plane. The model is based on the interaction between the EM near-field (NF) that has been treated with plane wave spectrum (PWS) and the Taylor model. The routine process illustrating the methodology is addressed is this article. The practicability of the model developed was upheld with different analytical and real demonstrators. First, the NF coupling between a straight transmission line (TL) and 1 GHz Wilkinson power divider (PWD) designed and implemented in planar technology was provided. Subsequently, simulations with a powerful commercial tool and measurements from 0.2 GHz to 2 GHz revealed a good agreement between the coupling voltages from the proposed model. As a second proof of concept, a printed circuit board incorporating a 40 MHz RF oscillator was placed 5 mm above the grounded TL. Once again, coupling voltages matched measurements were observed with magnitude relative difference lower than 5 dB. The hereby model presents huge benefits not only in terms of flexibility in the design process but it can also be run with very less computation time compared to the existing standard simulators. The model can be potentially a good candidate for investigating complex systems EMC engineering.

  16. Plane-wave spectrum approach for the AC thermal analysis of vertical thermal resistance on sample surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossel, Philippe; Depasse, Françoise; Gomès, Séverine

    1999-08-01

    The perturbation caused by a vertical thermal resistance to the alternating current temperature field in a homogeneous sample is analysed by using a plane-wave spectrum for which the reference plane is perpendicular to the crack. This unusual Fourier analysis gives rapid access to the temperature field in the frequency domain at any place in the sample. This can thus furnish the source term for a complete thermoelastic local response and complete the available surface temperature data.

  17. Diffraction of picosecond bulk longitudinal and shear waves in micron thick films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audoin, B.; Perton, M.; Chigarev, N.; Rossignol, C.

    2008-01-01

    Investigation of thin metallic film properties by means of picosecond ultrasonics [C. Thomsen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 53, 989 (1984)] has been under the scope of several studies. Generation of longitudinal and shear waves [T. Pézeril et al., Phys. Rev. B 73, 132301 (2006); O. Matsuda et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 095501 (2004)] with a wave vector normal to the film free surface has been demonstrated. Such measurements cannot provide complete information about properties of anisotropic films. Extreme focusing of a laser pump beam (≈0.5 μm) on the sample surface has recently allowed us to provide evidence of picosecond acoustic diffraction in thin metallic films (≈1 μm) [C. Rossignol et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 166106 (2005)]. The resulting longitudinal and shear wavefronts propagate at group velocity through the bulk of the film. To interpret the received signals, source directivity diagrams are calculated taking into account material anisotropy, optical penetration, and laser beam width on the sample surface. It is shown that acoustic diffraction increases with optical penetration, so competing with the increasing of directivity caused by beam width. Reflection with mode conversion at the film-substrate interface is discussed.

  18. The impedance problem of wave diffraction by a strip with higher order boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, L. P.; Simões, A. M.

    2013-10-17

    This work is devoted to analyse an impedance boundary-transmission problem for the Helmholtz equation originated by a problem of wave diffraction by an infinite strip with higher order imperfect boundary conditions. A constructive approach of operator relations is built, which allows a transparent interpretation of the problem in an operator theory framework. In particular, different types of operator relations are exhibited for different types of operators acting between Lebesgue and Sobolev spaces on a finite interval and the positive half-line. All this has consequences in the understanding of the structure of this type of problems. In particular, a Fredholm characterization of the problem is obtained in terms of the initial space order parameters. At the request of the author and the Proceedings Editor the above article has been replaced with a corrected version. The original PDF file supplied to AIP Publishing contained an error in the title of the article. The original title appeared as: 'The Impedance Problem of Wave Diffraction by a trip with Higher Order Boundary Conditions.' This article has been replaced and the title now appears correctly online. The corrected article was published on 8 November 2013.

  19. Radiation Characteristics of Cavity Backed Aperture Antennas in Finite Ground Plane Using the Hybrid FEM/MoM Technique and Geometrical Theory of Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. J.; Deshpande, M. D.; Cockrell, C. R.; Beck, F. B.

    1996-01-01

    A technique using hybrid Finite Element Method (FEM)/Method of Moments (MoM), and Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) is presented to analyze the radiation characteristics of cavity fed aperture antennas in a finite ground plane. The cavity which excites the aperture is assumed to be fed by a cylindrical transmission line. The electromagnetic (EM) fields inside the cavity are obtained using FEM. The EM fields and their normal derivatives required for FEM solution are obtained using (1) the modal expansion in the feed region and (2) the MoM for the radiating aperture region(assuming an infinite ground plane). The finiteness of the ground plane is taken into account using GTD. The input admittance of open ended circular, rectangular, and coaxial line radiating into free space through an infinite ground plane are computed and compared with earlier published results. Radiation characteristics of a coaxial cavity fed circular aperture in a finite rectangular ground plane are verified with experimental results.

  20. Unmitigated numerical solution to the diffraction term in the parabolic nonlinear ultrasound wave equation.

    PubMed

    Hasani, Mojtaba H; Gharibzadeh, Shahriar; Farjami, Yaghoub; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2013-09-01

    Various numerical algorithms have been developed to solve the Khokhlov-Kuznetsov-Zabolotskaya (KZK) parabolic nonlinear wave equation. In this work, a generalized time-domain numerical algorithm is proposed to solve the diffraction term of the KZK equation. This algorithm solves the transverse Laplacian operator of the KZK equation in three-dimensional (3D) Cartesian coordinates using a finite-difference method based on the five-point implicit backward finite difference and the five-point Crank-Nicolson finite difference discretization techniques. This leads to a more uniform discretization of the Laplacian operator which in turn results in fewer calculation gridding nodes without compromising accuracy in the diffraction term. In addition, a new empirical algorithm based on the LU decomposition technique is proposed to solve the system of linear equations obtained from this discretization. The proposed empirical algorithm improves the calculation speed and memory usage, while the order of computational complexity remains linear in calculation of the diffraction term in the KZK equation. For evaluating the accuracy of the proposed algorithm, two previously published algorithms are used as comparison references: the conventional 2D Texas code and its generalization for 3D geometries. The results show that the accuracy/efficiency performance of the proposed algorithm is comparable with the established time-domain methods.

  1. Generalized Debye series expansion of electromagnetic plane wave scattering by an infinite multilayered cylinder at oblique incidence.

    PubMed

    Li, Renxian; Han, Xiang'e; Ren, Kuan Fang

    2009-03-01

    The Debye series expansion expresses the Mie scattering coefficients into a series of Fresnel coefficients and gives physical interpretation of different scattering modes, but when an infinite multilayered cylinder is obliquely illuminated by electromagnetic plane waves, the scattering process becomes very complicated because of cross polarization. Based on the relation of boundary conditions between global scattering process and local scattering processes, the generalized Debye series expansion of plane wave scattering by an infinite multilayered cylinder at oblique incidence is derived in this paper. The formula and the code are verified by the comparison of the results with that of Lorenz-Mie theory in special cases and those presented in the literatures.

  2. Formulation of the Augmented Plane-Wave and Muffin-Tin Orbital Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotani, Takao; Kino, Hiori; Akai, Hisazumu

    2015-03-01

    The augmented plane waves and the muffin-tin orbitals method (the PMT method) was proposed by Kotani and van Schilfgaarde in Phys. Rev. B 81, 125117 (2010). It is a mixed basis all-electron full-potential method, which uses two types of augmented waves simultaneously, in addition to the local orbitals. In this paper, this mixed basis method is reformulated on the basis of a new formalism named as the 3-component formalism, which is a mathematically transparent version of the additive augmentation originally proposed by Soler and Williams in Phys. Rev. B 47, 6784 (1993). Atomic forces are easily derived systematically. We discuss some problems in the mixed basis method and ways to manage them. In addition, we compare the method with the PAW method on the same footing. This PMT method is the basis for our new development of the quasiparticle self-consistent GW method in J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 83, 094711 (2014), available as the ecalj package at github.

  3. A wideband fast multipole boundary element method for half-space/plane-symmetric acoustic wave problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chang-Jun; Chen, Hai-Bo; Chen, Lei-Lei

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a novel wideband fast multipole boundary element approach to 3D half-space/plane-symmetric acoustic wave problems. The half-space fundamental solution is employed in the boundary integral equations so that the tree structure required in the fast multipole algorithm is constructed for the boundary elements in the real domain only. Moreover, a set of symmetric relations between the multipole expansion coefficients of the real and image domains are derived, and the half-space fundamental solution is modified for the purpose of applying such relations to avoid calculating, translating and saving the multipole/local expansion coefficients of the image domain. The wideband adaptive multilevel fast multipole algorithm associated with the iterative solver GMRES is employed so that the present method is accurate and efficient for both lowand high-frequency acoustic wave problems. As for exterior acoustic problems, the Burton-Miller method is adopted to tackle the fictitious eigenfrequency problem involved in the conventional boundary integral equation method. Details on the implementation of the present method are described, and numerical examples are given to demonstrate its accuracy and efficiency.

  4. Rigorous 3-D coupled wave diffraction analysis of multiple superposed gratings in anisotropic media.

    PubMed

    Glytsis, E N; Gaylord, T K

    1989-06-15

    The diffraction by two planar slanted fringe gratings superposed in the same volume of an anisotropic medium is treated using rigorous 3-D vector coupled wave analysis. Arbitrary angle of incidence and polarization are included. Both phase and/or amplitude slanted gratings in anisotropic media are treated in the analysis. The external boundary regions can be either isotropic (for bulk applications) or uniaxial anisotropic (for integrated applications). Both forward- and backward-diffracted orders are characterized by a number pair (i(l),i(2)), where i(l) and i(2) are integers. The Floquet condition is discussed for the case of two superposed gratings. When the external regions are anisotropic, each diffracted order has an ordinary (O), and an extraordinary (E) component. The analysis is also generalized for an arbitrary number of superposed gratings. The numerical complexity is discussed. In the case of equal grating periodicities along the boundaries, the diffracted orders become degenerate in the external regions. In this case, an alternative analysis that utilizes a cascaded stack of unslanted gratings can be used. Limiting cases are also presented. The various Bragg conditions are identified and quantified. Sample calculations presented include the quantification of the crosstalk between two superposed gratings, the evaluation of the effects of coupled Bragg conditions in beam combining applications, design and analysis of a beam splitter and a beam combiner, demonstration of the use of a cascaded stack of unslanted gratings of constant modulation to represent two superposed gratings that have the same periodicity along the boundaries, and finally evaluation of the effect of the phase difference between two gratings. The same analysis applies in the limiting cases of isotropic materials, single slanted gratings, etc. Applications of this analysis include optical storage, optical digital truth table look-up processing, neural nets, optical interconnects, beam

  5. ABINIT: Plane-Wave-Based Density-Functional Theory on High Performance Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrent, Marc

    2014-03-01

    For several years, a continuous effort has been produced to adapt electronic structure codes based on Density-Functional Theory to the future computing architectures. Among these codes, ABINIT is based on a plane-wave description of the wave functions which allows to treat systems of any kind. Porting such a code on petascale architectures pose difficulties related to the many-body nature of the DFT equations. To improve the performances of ABINIT - especially for what concerns standard LDA/GGA ground-state and response-function calculations - several strategies have been followed: A full multi-level parallelisation MPI scheme has been implemented, exploiting all possible levels and distributing both computation and memory. It allows to increase the number of distributed processes and could not be achieved without a strong restructuring of the code. The core algorithm used to solve the eigen problem (``Locally Optimal Blocked Congugate Gradient''), a Blocked-Davidson-like algorithm, is based on a distribution of processes combining plane-waves and bands. In addition to the distributed memory parallelization, a full hybrid scheme has been implemented, using standard shared-memory directives (openMP/openACC) or porting some comsuming code sections to Graphics Processing Units (GPU). As no simple performance model exists, the complexity of use has been increased; the code efficiency strongly depends on the distribution of processes among the numerous levels. ABINIT is able to predict the performances of several process distributions and automatically choose the most favourable one. On the other hand, a big effort has been carried out to analyse the performances of the code on petascale architectures, showing which sections of codes have to be improved; they all are related to Matrix Algebra (diagonalisation, orthogonalisation). The different strategies employed to improve the code scalability will be described. They are based on an exploration of new diagonalization

  6. Investigation of damping and radiation using full plane wave decomposition in ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, Sabry; Åbom, Mats

    2006-05-01

    A general plane wave decomposition procedure that determines both the wave amplitudes (or the reflection coefficient) and the wavenumbers is proposed for in-duct measurements. To improve the quality of the procedure, overdetermination and a nonlinear least-squares procedure is used. The procedure has been tested using a six microphone array, and used for accurate measurements of the radiation from an open unflanged pipe with flow. The experimental results for the reflection coefficient magnitude and the end correction have been compared with the theory of Munt. The agreement is very good if the maximum speed rather than the average is used to compare measurements and theory. This result is the first complete experimental validation of the theory of Munt [Acoustic transmission properties of a jet pipe with subsonic jet flow, I: the cold jet reflection coefficient, Journal of Sound and Vibration 142(3) (1990) 413-436]. The damping of the plane wave (the imaginary part of the wavenumber) could also be obtained from the experimental data. It is found that the damping increases strongly, compared with the damping for a quiescent fluid, when the acoustic boundary layer becomes thicker than the viscous sublayer. This finding is in agreement with a few earlier measurements and is also in agreement with a theoretical model proposed by Howe [The damping of sound by wall turbulent sheer layers, Journal of Acoustic Society of America 98(3) (1995) 1723-1730]. The results reported here are the first experimental verifications of Howe's model. It is found that the model works well typically up to a normalized acoustic boundary layer thickness δA+ of 30-40. For values of a δA+ less than 10, corresponding to higher frequencies or lower flow speeds, the model proposed by Dokumaci [A note on transmission of sound in a wide pipe with mean flow and viscothermal attenuation, Journal of Sound and Vibration 208(4) (1997) 653-655] is also in good agreement with the experimental data.

  7. Producing acoustic 'Frozen Waves': simulated experiments with diffraction/attenuation resistant beams in lossy media.

    PubMed

    Prego-Borges, José L; Zamboni-Rached, Michel; Recami, Erasmo; Costa, Eduardo Tavares

    2014-08-01

    The so-called Localized Waves (LW), and the "Frozen Waves" (FW), have raised significant attention in the areas of Optics and Ultrasound, because of their surprising energy localization properties. The LWs resist the effects of diffraction for large distances, and possess an interesting self-reconstruction -self-healing- property (after obstacles with size smaller than the antenna's); while the FWs, a sub-class of LWs, offer the possibility of arbitrarily modeling the longitudinal field intensity pattern inside a prefixed interval, for instance 0⩽z⩽L, of the wave propagation axis. More specifically, the FWs are localized fields "at rest", that is, with a static envelope (within which only the carrier wave propagates), and can be endowed moreover with a high transverse localization. In this paper we investigate, by simulated experiments, various cases of generation of ultrasonic FW fields, with the frequency of f0=1 MHz in a water-like medium, taking account of the effects of attenuation. We present results of FWs for distances up to L=80 mm, in attenuating media with absorption coefficient α in the range 70⩽α⩽170 dB/m. Such simulated FW fields are constructed by using a procedure developed by us, via appropriate finite superpositions of monochromatic ultrasonic Bessel beams. We pay due attention to the selection of the FW parameters, constrained by the rather tight restrictions imposed by experimental Acoustics, as well as to some practical implications of the transducer design. The energy localization properties of the Frozen Waves can find application even in many medical apparatus, such as bistouries or acoustic tweezers, as well as for treatment of diseased tissues (in particular, for the destruction of tumor cells, without affecting the surrounding tissues; also for kidney stone shuttering, etc.).

  8. Process e/sup -/. -->. e/sup -/(. nu. nu-bar) in the field of a circularly polarized plane wave

    SciTech Connect

    Skobelev, V.V.

    1987-12-01

    The e/sup -/..-->..e/sup -/(..nu..nu-bar) process in the field of a circularly polarized plane wave is studied in the framework of the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model. General expressions for the probability of creation of neutrino pairs are obtained, and the case of a low-intensity wave is studied in detail. The effects of asymmetry of emission of electron and muon neutrinos are estimated, and comparison with previous results is performed.

  9. Uphill diffusion, zero-flux planes and transient chemical solitary waves in garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vielzeuf, D.; Saúl, A.

    2011-05-01

    Diffusion profiles in minerals are increasingly used to determine the duration of geological events. For this purpose, the distinction between growth and diffusion zoning is critical; it requires the understanding of complex features associated with multicomponent diffusion. Seed-overgrowth interdiffusion experiments carried out in the range 1,050-1,250°C at 1.3 GPa have been designed to quantify and better understand Fe-Mg-Ca interdiffusion in garnet. Some of the diffusion profiles measured by analytical transmission electron microscope show characteristic features of multicomponent diffusion such as uphill diffusion, chemical solitary waves, zero-flux planes and complex diffusion paths. We implemented three different methods to calculate the interdiffusion coefficients of the D matrix from the experimental penetration curves and determined that with Ca as the dependent component, the crossed coefficients of the D matrix are negative. Experiments and numerical simulations indicate that: (1) uphill diffusion in garnet can be observed indifferently on the three components Fe, Mg and Ca, (2) it takes the form of complementary depletion/repletion waves and (3) chemical waves occur preferentially on initially flat concentration profiles. Derived D matrices are used to simulate the fate of chemical waves in time, in finite crystals. These examples show that the flow of atoms in multicomponent systems is not necessarily unidirectional for all components; it can change both in space along the diffusion profile and in time. Moving zero-flux planes in finite crystals are transitory features that allow flux reversals of atoms in the diffusion zone. Interdiffusion coefficients of the D matrices are also analyzed in terms of eigenvalues and eigenvectors. This analysis and the experimental results show that depending on the composition of the diffusion couple, (1) the shape of chemical waves and diffusion paths changes; (2) the width of the diffusion zone for each component

  10. Theoretical study of the light pressure force acting on a spherical dielectric particle of an arbitrary size in the interference field of two plane monochromatic electromagnetic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Guzatov, D V; Gaida, L S; Afanas'ev, Anatolii A

    2008-12-31

    The light pressure force acting on a spherical dielectric particle in the interference field of two plane monochromatic electromagnetic waves is studied in detail for different particle radii and angles of incidence of waves. (light pressure)

  11. Strong scintillations of a plane wave in a medium with a spectrum of Gaussian-type irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishov, V. I.

    The solution of an equation for the fourth moment of the field of a plane wave propagating in a statistically irregular medium is investigated analytically. Particular emphasis is placed on the strong-focusing regime. Asymptotic expressions are obtained for the scintillation spectrum and index in the regimes of strong focusing and scintillation saturation.

  12. A projection-free method for representing plane-wave DFT results in an atom-centered basis

    SciTech Connect

    Dunnington, Benjamin D.; Schmidt, J. R.

    2015-09-14

    Plane wave density functional theory (DFT) is a powerful tool for gaining accurate, atomic level insight into bulk and surface structures. Yet, the delocalized nature of the plane wave basis set hinders the application of many powerful post-computation analysis approaches, many of which rely on localized atom-centered basis sets. Traditionally, this gap has been bridged via projection-based techniques from a plane wave to atom-centered basis. We instead propose an alternative projection-free approach utilizing direct calculation of matrix elements of the converged plane wave DFT Hamiltonian in an atom-centered basis. This projection-free approach yields a number of compelling advantages, including strict orthonormality of the resulting bands without artificial band mixing and access to the Hamiltonian matrix elements, while faithfully preserving the underlying DFT band structure. The resulting atomic orbital representation of the Kohn-Sham wavefunction and Hamiltonian provides a gateway to a wide variety of analysis approaches. We demonstrate the utility of the approach for a diverse set of chemical systems and example analysis approaches.

  13. Effect of deviation from plane wave conditions on the Doppler spectrum from an ultrasonic blood flow detector.

    PubMed

    Ata, O W; Fish, P J

    1991-09-01

    Deviation from plane wave conditions within the ultrasound beam of a Doppler blood flow detector leads to a non-linear relationship between the phase angle of the back-scattered signal and the scatterer position. This in turn leads to frequency modulation of the Doppler signal and an increase in the Doppler spectrum width. The relationship between the ultrasound beam and the observed signal spectrum has been investigated by employing a computer-based model of the ultrasound field which enabled the calculation of: 1, pressure (amplitude and phase angle) field distributions from plane disc and focused transducers with unapodized and apodized aperture field distributions; 2, the Doppler signal from a scatterer moving through the field; and 3, the spectrum of this signal. The increase in spectral width resulting from deviations from plane wave conditions was calculated by comparing this spectrum with that of the signal from which frequency modulation had been removed.

  14. Scattering of an electromagnetic plane wave by a homogeneous sphere made of an orthorhombic dielectric-magnetic material.

    PubMed

    Ulfat Jafri, A D; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2014-01-01

    An exact transition matrix was formulated for electromagnetic scattering by an orthorhombic dielectric-magnetic sphere whose permeability dyadic is a scalar multiple of its permittivity dyadic. Calculations were made for plane waves incident on the sphere. As the size parameter increases, the role of anisotropy evolves; multiple lobes appear in the plots of the differential scattering efficiency in any scattering plane; the total scattering, extinction, and forward-scattering efficiencies exhibit a prominent maximum each; and the absorption efficiency generally increases with weak undulations. Certain orientations of the sphere with respect to the directions of propagation and the electric field of the incident plane wave make it highly susceptible to detection in a monostatic configuration, whereas other orientations make it much less vulnerable to detection. Impedance match to the ambient free space decreases backscattering efficiency significantly, although anisotropy prevents null backscattering. PMID:24561944

  15. Scattering of an electromagnetic plane wave by a homogeneous sphere made of an orthorhombic dielectric-magnetic material.

    PubMed

    Ulfat Jafri, A D; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2014-01-01

    An exact transition matrix was formulated for electromagnetic scattering by an orthorhombic dielectric-magnetic sphere whose permeability dyadic is a scalar multiple of its permittivity dyadic. Calculations were made for plane waves incident on the sphere. As the size parameter increases, the role of anisotropy evolves; multiple lobes appear in the plots of the differential scattering efficiency in any scattering plane; the total scattering, extinction, and forward-scattering efficiencies exhibit a prominent maximum each; and the absorption efficiency generally increases with weak undulations. Certain orientations of the sphere with respect to the directions of propagation and the electric field of the incident plane wave make it highly susceptible to detection in a monostatic configuration, whereas other orientations make it much less vulnerable to detection. Impedance match to the ambient free space decreases backscattering efficiency significantly, although anisotropy prevents null backscattering.

  16. Catastrophe optics of sharp-edge diffraction.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Riccardo

    2016-07-01

    A classical problem of diffraction theory, namely plane wave diffraction by sharp-edge apertures, is here reformulated from the viewpoint of the fairly new subject of catastrophe optics. On using purely geometrical arguments, properly embedded into a wave optics context, uniform analytical estimates of the diffracted wavefield at points close to fold caustics are obtained, within paraxial approximation, in terms of the Airy function and its first derivative. Diffraction from parabolic apertures is proposed to test reliability and accuracy of our theoretical predictions.

  17. Transition operators in electromagnetic-wave diffraction theory. II - Applications to optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, G. E.

    1993-01-01

    The theory developed by Hahne (1992) for the diffraction of time-harmonic electromagnetic waves from fixed obstacles is briefly summarized and extended. Applications of the theory are considered which comprise, first, a spherical harmonic expansion of the so-called radiation impedance operator in the theory, for a spherical surface, and second, a reconsideration of familiar short-wavelength approximation from the new standpoint, including a derivation of the so-called physical optics method on the basis of quasi-planar approximation to the radiation impedance operator, augmented by the method of stationary phase. The latter includes a rederivation of the geometrical optics approximation for the complete Green's function for the electromagnetic field in the presence of a smooth- and a convex-surfaced perfectly electrically conductive obstacle.

  18. Numerical study on surface plasmon polariton behaviors in periodic metal-dielectric structures using a plane-wave-assisted boundary integral-equation method.

    PubMed

    Kiang, Yean-Woei; Wang, Jyh-Yang; Yang, C C

    2007-07-01

    A novel hybrid technique based on the boundary integral-equation method is proposed for studying the surface plasmon polariton behaviors in two-dimensional periodic structures. Considering the periodicity property of the problem, we use the plane-wave expansion concept and the periodic boundary condition instead of using the periodic Green's function. The diffraction efficiency can then be readily calculated once the equivalent electric and magnetic currents are solved that avoids invoking the numerical calculation of the radiation integral. The numerical validity is verified with the cases of highly conducting materials and practical metals. Numerical convergence can be easily achieved even in the case of a large incident angle as 80o. Based on the numerical scheme, a metal-dielectric wavy structure is designed for enhancing the transmittance of optical signal through the structure. The excitation of the coupled surface plasmon polaritons for the high transmission is demonstrated.

  19. Toward efficient light diffraction and intensity variations by using wide bandwidth surface acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Ok; Chen, Fu; Lee, Kee Keun

    2016-06-01

    We have developed acoustic-optic (AO) based display units for implementing a handheld hologram display by modulating light deflection through wide bandwidth surface acoustic wave (SAW). The developed AO device consists of a metal layer, a ZnS waveguide layer, SAW inter digital transducers (IDTs), and a screen for display. When RF power with a particular resonant frequency was applied to IDTs, SAW was radiated and interfered with confined beam propagating along ZnS waveguide layer. The AO interacted beam was deflected laterally toward a certain direction depending on Bragg diffraction condition, exited out of the waveguide layer and then directed to the viewing screen placed at a certain distance from the device to form a single pixel. The deflected angles was adjusted by modulating the center frequency of the SAW IDT (SAW grating), the RF power of SAW, and the angles between propagating light beam path along waveguide and radiating SAW. The diffraction efficiency was also characterized in terms of waveguide thickness, SAW RF input power, and aperture length. Coupling of mode (COM) modeling was fulfilled to find optimal device parameters prior to fabrication. All the parameters affecting the deflection angle and efficiency to form a pixel for a three-dimensional (3D) hologram image were characterized and then discussed.

  20. Influence of orbital symmetry on diffraction imaging with rescattering electron wave packets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pullen, M. G.; Wolter, B.; Le, A. -T.; Baudisch, M.; Sclafani, M.; Pires, H.; Schroter, C. D.; Ullrich, J.; Moshammer, R.; Pfeifer, T.; et al

    2016-06-22

    The ability to directly follow and time-resolve the rearrangement of the nuclei within molecules is a frontier of science that requires atomic spatial and few-femtosecond temporal resolutions. While laser-induced electron diffraction can meet these requirements, it was recently concluded that molecules with particular orbital symmetries (such as pg) cannot be imaged using purely backscattering electron wave packets without molecular alignment. Here, we demonstrate, in direct contradiction to these findings, that the orientation and shape of molecular orbitals presents no impediment for retrieving molecular structure with adequate sampling of the momentum transfer space. We overcome previous issues by showcasing retrieval ofmore » the structure of randomly oriented O2 and C2H2 molecules, with πg and πu symmetries, respectively, and where their ionization probabilities do not maximize along their molecular axes. As a result, while this removes a serious bottleneck for laser-induced diffraction imaging, we find unexpectedly strong backscattering contributions from low-Z atoms.« less

  1. Influence of orbital symmetry on diffraction imaging with rescattering electron wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullen, M. G.; Wolter, B.; Le, A.-T.; Baudisch, M.; Sclafani, M.; Pires, H.; Schröter, C. D.; Ullrich, J.; Moshammer, R.; Pfeifer, T.; Lin, C. D.; Biegert, J.

    2016-06-01

    The ability to directly follow and time-resolve the rearrangement of the nuclei within molecules is a frontier of science that requires atomic spatial and few-femtosecond temporal resolutions. While laser-induced electron diffraction can meet these requirements, it was recently concluded that molecules with particular orbital symmetries (such as πg) cannot be imaged using purely backscattering electron wave packets without molecular alignment. Here, we demonstrate, in direct contradiction to these findings, that the orientation and shape of molecular orbitals presents no impediment for retrieving molecular structure with adequate sampling of the momentum transfer space. We overcome previous issues by showcasing retrieval of the structure of randomly oriented O2 and C2H2 molecules, with πg and πu symmetries, respectively, and where their ionization probabilities do not maximize along their molecular axes. While this removes a serious bottleneck for laser-induced diffraction imaging, we find unexpectedly strong backscattering contributions from low-Z atoms.

  2. Influence of orbital symmetry on diffraction imaging with rescattering electron wave packets.

    PubMed

    Pullen, M G; Wolter, B; Le, A-T; Baudisch, M; Sclafani, M; Pires, H; Schröter, C D; Ullrich, J; Moshammer, R; Pfeifer, T; Lin, C D; Biegert, J

    2016-01-01

    The ability to directly follow and time-resolve the rearrangement of the nuclei within molecules is a frontier of science that requires atomic spatial and few-femtosecond temporal resolutions. While laser-induced electron diffraction can meet these requirements, it was recently concluded that molecules with particular orbital symmetries (such as πg) cannot be imaged using purely backscattering electron wave packets without molecular alignment. Here, we demonstrate, in direct contradiction to these findings, that the orientation and shape of molecular orbitals presents no impediment for retrieving molecular structure with adequate sampling of the momentum transfer space. We overcome previous issues by showcasing retrieval of the structure of randomly oriented O2 and C2H2 molecules, with πg and πu symmetries, respectively, and where their ionization probabilities do not maximize along their molecular axes. While this removes a serious bottleneck for laser-induced diffraction imaging, we find unexpectedly strong backscattering contributions from low-Z atoms. PMID:27329236

  3. Spin-wave spectra and stability of the in-plane vortex state in two-dimensional magnetic nanorings

    SciTech Connect

    Mamica, S.

    2013-12-21

    We study theoretically two-dimensional nanorings assumed to have the in-plane vortex magnetic configuration. Using a discrete dipole model we examine the spectrum of normal spin-wave modes vs. the dipolar-to-exchange interaction ratio. We systematize the spin-wave excitations by their azimuthal and radial wave numbers. The lowest-frequency mode, the fundamental (quasiuniform) mode, and the mode hybridization are analyzed; the discussion of the influence of effective pinning at the ring boundaries is provided as well. We study the stability of the in-plane vortex state and discuss the role of the size of the ring and the type of lattice arrangement of the magnetic moments within it. To facilitate comparison with our results we provide the relationships between microscopic parameters, used in our model, and those used in the case of continuous medium.

  4. Plane wave propagation in a rotating anisotropic medium with voids under the action of a uniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Narottam; Barik, S. P.; Chaudhuri, P. K.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, plane wave propagation in a rotating anisotropic material of general nature under the action of a magnetic field of constant magnitude has been investigated. The material is supposed to be porous in nature and contains voids. Following the concept of [Cowin S. C. and Nunziato, J. W. [1983] “Linear elastic materials with voids,” J. Elasticity 13, 125-147.] the governing equations of motion have been written in tensor notation taking account of rotation, magnetic field effect and presence of voids in the medium and the possibility of plane wave propagation has been examined. A number of particular cases have been derived from our general results to match with previously obtained results in this area. Effects of various parameters on the velocity of wave propagation have been presented graphically.

  5. Spin-wave spectra and stability of the in-plane vortex state in two-dimensional magnetic nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamica, S.

    2013-12-01

    We study theoretically two-dimensional nanorings assumed to have the in-plane vortex magnetic configuration. Using a discrete dipole model we examine the spectrum of normal spin-wave modes vs. the dipolar-to-exchange interaction ratio. We systematize the spin-wave excitations by their azimuthal and radial wave numbers. The lowest-frequency mode, the fundamental (quasiuniform) mode, and the mode hybridization are analyzed; the discussion of the influence of effective pinning at the ring boundaries is provided as well. We study the stability of the in-plane vortex state and discuss the role of the size of the ring and the type of lattice arrangement of the magnetic moments within it. To facilitate comparison with our results we provide the relationships between microscopic parameters, used in our model, and those used in the case of continuous medium.

  6. Trajectories of electrons with large longitudinal momenta in the phase plane during surfatron acceleration by an electromagnetic wave

    SciTech Connect

    Mkrtichyan, G. S.

    2015-07-15

    The trajectories of electrons with large longitudinal momenta in the phase plane in the course of their surfatron acceleration by an electromagnetic wave propagating in space plasma across the external magnetic field are analyzed. Electrons with large longitudinal momenta are trapped immediately if the initial wave phase Ψ(0) on the particle trajectory is positive. For negative values of Ψ(0), no electrons trapping by the wave is observed over the available computational times. According to numerical calculations, the trajectories of trapped particles in the phase plane have a singular point of the stable focus type and the behavior of the trajectory corresponds to the motion in a complex nonstationary effective potential well. For some initial phases, electrons are confined in the region of the accelerating electric field for relatively short time, the energy gain being about 50–130% and more.

  7. Plane Wave First-principles Materials Science Codes on Multicore Supercomputer Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canning, Andrew; Deslippe, Jack; Louie, Steven. G.; Scidac Team

    2014-03-01

    Plane wave first-principles codes based on 3D FFTs are one of the largest users of supercomputer cycles in the world. Modern supercomputer architectures are constructed from chips having many CPU cores with nodes containing multiple chips. Designs for future supercomputers are projected to have even more cores per chip. I will present new developments for hybrid MPI/OpenMP PW codes focusing on a specialized 3D FFTs that gives greatly improved scaling over a pure MPI version on multicore machines. Scaling results will be presented for the full electronic structure codes PARATEC and BerkeleyGW. using the new hybrid 3D FFTs, threaded libraries and OpenMP to gain greatly improved scaling to very large core count on Cray and IBM machines. Support for this work was provided through the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program funded by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (and Basic Energy Sciences).

  8. Shirley Reduced Basis DFT: plane-wave generality and accuracy at reduced computational cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, Maxwell; Prendergast, David

    2014-03-01

    The Shirley Reduced Basis (SRB) provides a means for performing density functional theory electronic structure calculations with plane-wave accuracy and generality in a basis of significantly reduced size. The SRB is comprised of linear combinations of periodic Bloch functions sampled coarsely over the Brillouin zone (BZ) and selected for maximal information content using proper orthogonal decomposition [E. Shirley, Phys. Rev. B 54, 464 (1996)]. A basis produced from only order 10 samples, lying on the BZ boundary, is able to reproduce energies and stresses to sub meV and kbar accuracy, respectively, with order 10 basis functions per electronic band. Unlike other electronic structure bases of similar sizes, the SRB is adaptive and automatic, making no model assumptions beyond the use of pseudopotentials. We provide the first self-consistent implementation of this approach, enabling both relaxations and molecular dynamics. We demonstrate the usefulness of the method on a variety of physical systems, from crystalline solids to reduced dimensional systems under periodic boundary conditions, realizing order of magnitude performance improvements while kept within physically relevant error tolerances. M.H. acknowledges support from the DoE CSGF Program, Grant No. DE-FG02-97ER25308. Work by D.P. was performed at the Molecular Foundry, supported by the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DoE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  9. Plane-wave transverse oscillation for high-frame-rate 2-D vector flow imaging.

    PubMed

    Lenge, Matteo; Ramalli, Alessandro; Tortoli, Piero; Cachard, Christian; Liebgott, Hervé

    2015-12-01

    Transverse oscillation (TO) methods introduce oscillations in the pulse-echo field (PEF) along the direction transverse to the ultrasound propagation direction. This may be exploited to extend flow investigations toward multidimensional estimates. In this paper, the TOs are coupled with the transmission of plane waves (PWs) to reconstruct high-framerate RF images with bidirectional oscillations in the pulse-echo field. Such RF images are then processed by a 2-D phase-based displacement estimator to produce 2-D vector flow maps at thousands of frames per second. First, the capability of generating TOs after PW transmissions was thoroughly investigated by varying the lateral wavelength, the burst length, and the transmission frequency. Over the entire region of interest, the generated lateral wavelengths, compared with the designed ones, presented bias and standard deviation of -3.3 ± 5.7% and 10.6 ± 7.4% in simulations and experiments, respectively. The performance of the ultrafast vector flow mapping method was also assessed by evaluating the differences between the estimated velocities and the expected ones. Both simulations and experiments show overall biases lower than 20% when varying the beam-to-flow angle, the peak velocity, and the depth of interest. In vivo applications of the method on the common carotid and the brachial arteries are also presented. PMID:26670852

  10. Kinetic theory of electromagnetic plane wave obliquely incident on bounded plasma slab

    SciTech Connect

    Angus, J. R.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Smolyakov, A. I.

    2010-10-15

    The effects of electromagnetic plane waves obliquely incident on a warm bounded plasma slab of finite length L are studied by solving the coupled Vlasov-Maxwell set of equations. It is shown that the solution can be greatly simplified in the limit where thermal effects are most important by expanding in small parameters and introducing self-similar variables. These solutions reveal that the coupling of thermal effects with the angle of incidence is negligible in the region of bounce resonance and anomalous skin effect. In the region of the anomalous skin effect, the heating is shown to scale linearly with the anomalous skin depth {delta}{sub a} when {delta}{sub a}<>L, the heating is shown to decay with 1/{delta}{sub a}{sup 3}. The transmission is found to be exponentially larger than that predicted from a local theory in the appropriate region of the anomalous skin effect.

  11. Performance bounds for passive sensor arrays operating in a turbulent medium: plane-wave analysis.

    PubMed

    Collier, S L; Wilson, D K

    2003-05-01

    The performance bounds of a passive acoustic array operating in a turbulent medium with fluctuations described by a von Kármán spectrum are investigated. This treatment considers a single, monochromatic, plane-wave source at near-normal incidence. A line-of-sight propagation path is assumed. The primary interests are in calculating the Cramer-Rao lower bounds of the azimuthal and elevational angles of arrival and in observing how these bounds change with the introduction of additional unknowns, such as the propagation distance, turbulence parameters, and signal-to-noise ratio. In both two and three dimensions, it is found that for large values of the index-of-refraction variance, the Cramer-Rao lower bounds of the angles of arrival increase significantly at large values of the normalized propagation distance. For small values of the index-of-refraction variance and normalized propagation distance, the signal-to-noise ratio is found to be the limiting factor. In the two-dimensional treatment, it is found that the estimate of the angle of arrival will decouple from the estimates of the other parameters with the appropriate choice of array geometry. In three dimensions, again with an appropriate choice of array geometry, the estimates of the azimuth and elevation will decouple from the estimates of the other parameters, but due to the constraints of the model, will remain coupled to one another.

  12. Simultaneous quantification of flow and tissue velocities based on multi-angle plane wave imaging.

    PubMed

    Ekroll, Ingvild Kinn; Swillens, Abigail; Segers, Patrick; Dahl, Torbjørn; Torp, Hans; Lovstakken, Lasse

    2013-04-01

    A quantitative angle-independent 2-D modality for flow and tissue imaging based on multi-angle plane wave acquisition was evaluated. Simulations of realistic flow in a carotid artery bifurcation were used to assess the accuracy of the vector Doppler (VD) technique. Reduction in root mean square deviation from 27 cm/s to 6 cm/s and 7 cm/s to 2 cm/s was found for the lateral (vx) and axial (vz) velocity components, respectively, when the ensemble size was increased from 8 to 50. Simulations of a Couette flow phantom (vmax = 2.7 cm/s) gave promising results for imaging of slowly moving tissue, with root mean square deviation of 4.4 mm/s and 1.6 mm/s for the x- and z-components, respectively. A packet acquisition scheme providing both B-mode and vector Doppler RF data was implemented on a research scanner, and beamforming and further post-processing was done offline. In vivo results of healthy volunteers were in accordance with simulations and gave promising results for flow and tissue vector velocity imaging. The technique was also tested in patients with carotid artery disease. Using the high ensemble vector Doppler technique, blood flow through stenoses and secondary flow patterns were better visualized than in ordinary color Doppler. Additionally, the full velocity spectrum could be obtained retrospectively for arbitrary points in the image.

  13. Ab initio Sternheimer-GW method for quasiparticle calculations using plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Henry; Giustino, Feliciano

    2013-08-01

    We report on the extension and implementation of the Sternheimer-GW method introduced by Giustino [Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.81.115105 81, 115105 (2010)] to the case of first-principles pseudopotential calculations based on a plane-waves basis. The Sternheimer-GW method consists of calculating the GW self-energy operator without resorting to the standard expansion over unoccupied Kohn-Sham electronic states. The Green's function is calculated by solving linear systems for frequencies along the real axis. The screened Coulomb interaction is calculated for frequencies along the imaginary axis by using the Sternheimer equation. Analytic continuation to the real axis is performed using Padé approximants. The generalized plasmon-pole approximation is avoided by performing explicit calculations at multiple frequencies using Frommer's multishift solver. We demonstrate our methodology by reporting tests on common insulators and semiconductors, including Si, diamond, LiCl, and SiC. Our calculated quasiparticle energies are in agreement with the results of fully converged calculations based on the sum-over-states approach. As the Sternheimer-GW method yields the complete self-energy Σ(r,r',ω) and not only its expectation values on Kohn-Sham states, this work opens the way to nonperturbative GW calculations and to direct calculations of spectral functions for angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. As an example of the capabilities of the method we calculate the G0W0 spectral functions of silicon and diamond.

  14. A Plane-Wave Implementation of Quasiparticle Self-Consistent GW (QSGW)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigil Currey, Derek; Deslippe, Jack; Louie, Steven G.

    2011-03-01

    The use of GW techniques in calculating the quasiparticle properties of certain classes of materials, e.g. complex oxides, is sometimes hindered by the poor mean-field starting point that density functional theory (DFT) within standard Kohn-Sham implementations provides. There has been considerable effort in the community to improve upon the mean-field starting point for a broad range of materials. A recently proposed method, the quasiparticle self-consistent GW (QSGW) method, employs a process in which a mean-field exchange-correlation potential is approximated from and updated self-consistently using the self-energy operator from previous iteration GW calculations. We present an implementation of this method in a plane-wave basis, and discuss its accuracy, computational cost, and physical implications for a variety of semiconducting materials. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR10-1006184 and U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources were provided by NERSC. Derek Vigil Currey acknowledges funding from UC-Berkeley through the Chancellor's Fellowship.

  15. Plane wave expansion method used to engineer photonic crystal sensors with high efficiency.

    PubMed

    Antos, Roman; Vozda, Vojtech; Veis, Martin

    2014-02-10

    A photonic crystal waveguide (PhC-WG) was reported to be usable as an optical sensor highly sensitive to various material parameters, which can be detected via changes in transmission through the PhC-WG caused by small changes of the refractive index of the medium filling its holes. To monitor these changes accurately, a precise optical model is required, for which the plane wave expansion (PWE) method is convenient. We here demonstrate the revision of the PWE method by employing the complex Fourier factorization approach, which enables the calculation of dispersion diagrams with fast convergence, i.e., with high precision in relatively short time. The PhC-WG is proposed as a line defect in a hexagonal array of cylindrical holes periodically arranged in bulk silicon, filled with a variable medium. The method of monitoring the refractive index changes is based on observing cutoff wavelengths in the PhC-WG dispersion diagrams. The PWE results are also compared with finite-difference time-domain calculations of transmittance carried out on a PhC-WG with finite dimensions. PMID:24663549

  16. Plane wave expansion method used to engineer photonic crystal sensors with high efficiency.

    PubMed

    Antos, Roman; Vozda, Vojtech; Veis, Martin

    2014-02-10

    A photonic crystal waveguide (PhC-WG) was reported to be usable as an optical sensor highly sensitive to various material parameters, which can be detected via changes in transmission through the PhC-WG caused by small changes of the refractive index of the medium filling its holes. To monitor these changes accurately, a precise optical model is required, for which the plane wave expansion (PWE) method is convenient. We here demonstrate the revision of the PWE method by employing the complex Fourier factorization approach, which enables the calculation of dispersion diagrams with fast convergence, i.e., with high precision in relatively short time. The PhC-WG is proposed as a line defect in a hexagonal array of cylindrical holes periodically arranged in bulk silicon, filled with a variable medium. The method of monitoring the refractive index changes is based on observing cutoff wavelengths in the PhC-WG dispersion diagrams. The PWE results are also compared with finite-difference time-domain calculations of transmittance carried out on a PhC-WG with finite dimensions.

  17. On the formation of shocks of electromagnetic plane waves in non-linear crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christodoulou, Demetrios; Perez, Daniel Raoul

    2016-08-01

    An influential result of F. John states that no genuinely non-linear strictly hyperbolic quasi-linear first order system of partial differential equations in two variables has a global C2-solution for small enough initial data. Inspired by recent work of D. Christodoulou, we revisit John's original proof and extract a more precise description of the behaviour of solutions at the time of shock. We show that John's singular first order quantity, when expressed in characteristic coordinates, remains bounded until the final time, which is then characterised by an inverse density of characteristics tending to zero in one point. Moreover, we study the derivatives of second order, showing again their boundedness when expressed in appropriate coordinates. We also recover John's upper bound for the time of shock formation and complement it with a lower bound. Finally, we apply these results to electromagnetic plane waves in a crystal with no magnetic properties and cubic electric non-linearity in the energy density, assuming no dispersion.

  18. Numerical modeling of undersea acoustics using a partition of unity method with plane waves enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hospital-Bravo, Raúl; Sarrate, Josep; Díez, Pedro

    2016-05-01

    A new 2D numerical model to predict the underwater acoustic propagation is obtained by exploring the potential of the Partition of Unity Method (PUM) enriched with plane waves. The aim of the work is to obtain sound pressure level distributions when multiple operational noise sources are present, in order to assess the acoustic impact over the marine fauna. The model takes advantage of the suitability of the PUM for solving the Helmholtz equation, especially for the practical case of large domains and medium frequencies. The seawater acoustic absorption and the acoustic reflectance of the sea surface and sea bottom are explicitly considered, and perfectly matched layers (PML) are placed at the lateral artificial boundaries to avoid spurious reflexions. The model includes semi-analytical integration rules which are adapted to highly oscillatory integrands with the aim of reducing the computational cost of the integration step. In addition, we develop a novel strategy to mitigate the ill-conditioning of the elemental and global system matrices. Specifically, we compute a low-rank approximation of the local space of solutions, which in turn reduces the number of degrees of freedom, the CPU time and the memory footprint. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the model and to assess its accuracy.

  19. Dynamical cluster approximation within an augmented plane wave framework: Spectral properties of SrVO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hunpyo; Foyevtsova, Kateryna; Ferber, Johannes; Aichhorn, Markus; Jeschke, Harald O.; Valentí, Roser

    2012-04-01

    We present a combination of local-density approximation (LDA) with the dynamical cluster approximation (LDA+DCA) in the framework of the full-potential linear augmented plane wave method, and compare our LDA+DCA results for SrVO3 to LDA with the dynamical mean-field theory (LDA+DMFT) calculations as well as experimental observations on SrVO3. We find a qualitative agreement of the momentum resolved spectral function with angle-resolved photoemission spectra (ARPES) and former LDA+DMFT results. As a correction to LDA+DMFT, we observe more pronounced coherent peaks below the Fermi level, as indicated by ARPES experiments. In addition, we resolve the spectral functions in the K0=(0,0,0) and K1=(π,π,π) sectors of DCA, where band insulating and metallic phases coexist. Our approach can be applied to correlated compounds where not only local quantum fluctuations but also spatial fluctuations are important.

  20. Performance bounds for passive sensor arrays operating in a turbulent medium: Plane-wave analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, S. L.; Wilson, D. K.

    2003-05-01

    The performance bounds of a passive acoustic array operating in a turbulent medium with fluctuations described by a von Kármán spectrum are investigated. This treatment considers a single, monochromatic, plane-wave source at near-normal incidence. A line-of-sight propagation path is assumed. The primary interests are in calculating the Cramer-Rao lower bounds of the azimuthal and elevational angles of arrival and in observing how these bounds change with the introduction of additional unknowns, such as the propagation distance, turbulence parameters, and signal-to-noise ratio. In both two and three dimensions, it is found that for large values of the index-of-refraction variance, the Cramer-Rao lower bounds of the angles of arrival increase significantly at large values of the normalized propagation distance. For small values of the index-of-refraction variance and normalized propagation distance, the signal-to-noise ratio is found to be the limiting factor. In the two-dimensional treatment, it is found that the estimate of the angle of arrival will decouple from the estimates of the other parameters with the appropriate choice of array geometry. In three dimensions, again with an appropriate choice of array geometry, the estimates of the azimuth and elevation will decouple from the estimates of the other parameters, but due to the constraints of the model, will remain coupled to one another.

  1. Plane-wave transverse oscillation for high-frame-rate 2-D vector flow imaging.

    PubMed

    Lenge, Matteo; Ramalli, Alessandro; Tortoli, Piero; Cachard, Christian; Liebgott, Hervé

    2015-12-01

    Transverse oscillation (TO) methods introduce oscillations in the pulse-echo field (PEF) along the direction transverse to the ultrasound propagation direction. This may be exploited to extend flow investigations toward multidimensional estimates. In this paper, the TOs are coupled with the transmission of plane waves (PWs) to reconstruct high-framerate RF images with bidirectional oscillations in the pulse-echo field. Such RF images are then processed by a 2-D phase-based displacement estimator to produce 2-D vector flow maps at thousands of frames per second. First, the capability of generating TOs after PW transmissions was thoroughly investigated by varying the lateral wavelength, the burst length, and the transmission frequency. Over the entire region of interest, the generated lateral wavelengths, compared with the designed ones, presented bias and standard deviation of -3.3 ± 5.7% and 10.6 ± 7.4% in simulations and experiments, respectively. The performance of the ultrafast vector flow mapping method was also assessed by evaluating the differences between the estimated velocities and the expected ones. Both simulations and experiments show overall biases lower than 20% when varying the beam-to-flow angle, the peak velocity, and the depth of interest. In vivo applications of the method on the common carotid and the brachial arteries are also presented.

  2. A physical optics based plane wave spectrum approach to the analysis of finite planar antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Mueller, Pablo L.; Roederer, Antoine G.

    1992-08-01

    An efficient physical optics based method of analysis of antennas over finite ground planes is presented. The far field radiated by the current on the finite ground plane is expressed as the convolution integral of the far field of the antenna above the infinite ground plane with the Fourier transform of the polygonal ground plane shape. The convolution integral is simplified applying the sampling theorem.

  3. The microscopic structure of charge density waves in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6.54 revealed by x-ray diffraction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    E. M. Forgan; Huecker, M.; Blackburn, E.; Holmes, A. T.; Briffa, A. K. R.; Chang, J.; Bouchenoire, L.; Brown, S. D.; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D.; et al

    2015-12-09

    Charge density wave (CDW) order appears throughout the underdoped high-temperature cuprate superconductors, but the underlying symmetry breaking and the origin of the CDW remain unclear. We use X-ray diffraction to determine the microscopic structure of the CDWs in an archetypical cuprate YBa2Cu3O6.54 at its superconducting transition temperature ~60 K. We find that the CDWs in this material break the mirror symmetry of the CuO2 bilayers. The ionic displacements in the CDWs have two components, which are perpendicular and parallel to the CuO2 planes, and are out of phase with each other. The planar oxygen atoms have the largest displacements, perpendicularmore » to the CuO2 planes. Our results allow many electronic properties of the underdoped cuprates to be understood. For example, the CDWs will lead to local variations in the electronic structure, giving an explicit explanation of density-wave states with broken symmetry observed in scanning tunnelling microscopy and soft X-ray measurements.« less

  4. The microscopic structure of charge density waves in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6.54 revealed by X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgan, E. M.; Blackburn, E.; Holmes, A. T.; Briffa, A. K. R.; Chang, J.; Bouchenoire, L.; Brown, S. D.; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D.; Hardy, W. N.; Christensen, N. B.; Zimmermann, M. V.; Hücker, M.; Hayden, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Charge density wave (CDW) order appears throughout the underdoped high-temperature cuprate superconductors, but the underlying symmetry breaking and the origin of the CDW remain unclear. We use X-ray diffraction to determine the microscopic structure of the CDWs in an archetypical cuprate YBa2Cu3O6.54 at its superconducting transition temperature ~60 K. We find that the CDWs in this material break the mirror symmetry of the CuO2 bilayers. The ionic displacements in the CDWs have two components, which are perpendicular and parallel to the CuO2 planes, and are out of phase with each other. The planar oxygen atoms have the largest displacements, perpendicular to the CuO2 planes. Our results allow many electronic properties of the underdoped cuprates to be understood. For instance, the CDWs will lead to local variations in the electronic structure, giving an explicit explanation of density-wave states with broken symmetry observed in scanning tunnelling microscopy and soft X-ray measurements.

  5. The microscopic structure of charge density waves in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6.54 revealed by X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Forgan, E M; Blackburn, E; Holmes, A T; Briffa, A K R; Chang, J; Bouchenoire, L; Brown, S D; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D; Hardy, W N; Christensen, N B; Zimmermann, M V; Hücker, M; Hayden, S M

    2015-12-09

    Charge density wave (CDW) order appears throughout the underdoped high-temperature cuprate superconductors, but the underlying symmetry breaking and the origin of the CDW remain unclear. We use X-ray diffraction to determine the microscopic structure of the CDWs in an archetypical cuprate YBa2Cu3O6.54 at its superconducting transition temperature ∼ 60 K. We find that the CDWs in this material break the mirror symmetry of the CuO2 bilayers. The ionic displacements in the CDWs have two components, which are perpendicular and parallel to the CuO2 planes, and are out of phase with each other. The planar oxygen atoms have the largest displacements, perpendicular to the CuO2 planes. Our results allow many electronic properties of the underdoped cuprates to be understood. For instance, the CDWs will lead to local variations in the electronic structure, giving an explicit explanation of density-wave states with broken symmetry observed in scanning tunnelling microscopy and soft X-ray measurements.

  6. Quasi-plane shear wave propagation induced by acoustic radiation force with a focal line region: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Min; Abbott, Derek; Lu, Minhua; Liu, Huafeng

    2016-03-01

    Shear wave propagation speed has been regarded as an attractive indicator for quantitatively measuring the intrinsic mechanical properties of soft tissues. While most existing techniques use acoustic radiation force (ARF) excitation with focal spot region based on linear array transducers, we try to employ a special ARF with a focal line region and apply it to viscoelastic materials to create shear waves. First, a two-dimensional capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer with 64 × 128 fully controllable elements is realised and simulated to generate this special ARF. Then three-dimensional finite element models are developed to simulate the resulting shear wave propagation through tissue phantom materials. Three different phantoms are explored in our simulation study using: (a) an isotropic viscoelastic medium, (b) within a cylindrical inclusion, and (c) a transverse isotropic viscoelastic medium. For each phantom, the ARF creates a quasi-plane shear wave which has a preferential propagation direction perpendicular to the focal line excitation. The propagation of the quasi-plane shear wave is investigated and then used to reconstruct shear moduli sequentially after the estimation of shear wave speed. In the phantom with a transverse isotropic viscoelastic medium, the anisotropy results in maximum speed parallel to the fiber direction and minimum speed perpendicular to the fiber direction. The simulation results show that the line excitation extends the displacement field to obtain a large imaging field in comparison with spot excitation, and demonstrate its potential usage in measuring the mechanical properties of anisotropic tissues. PMID:26768475

  7. Resonance reflection of elastic waves at the interface between two crystals with sliding contact: II. Plane waves and acoustic beams in structures with hexagonal symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Alshits, V.I.; Darinskii, A.N.; Radovich, A.

    1995-05-01

    The specific features of acoustic wave reflection are analyzed at the interface between two hexagonal crystals with a sliding contact between them. Attention is focused on the angles of incidence corresponding to excitation of the leaky wave. The conditions supporting the existence of leaky waves are found. The expressions illustrating the behavior of plane wave transformation coefficients for reflection, refraction, and excitation of interfacial oscillations are found in analytic form. In addition, the features of nonmirror reflection are studied for a slightly diverging acoustic beam having initially a rectangular profile. The study deals with the case when the tangential projection of the {open_quotes}mean{close_quotes} wavevector for the beam is close to or coincides with the real part of the wavevector of the leaky wave. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  8. The Hagen-Poiseuille, Plane Couette and Poiseuille Flows Linear Instability and Rogue Waves Excitation Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chefranov, Sergey; Chefranov, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Linear hydrodynamic stability theory for the Hagen-Poiseuille (HP) flow yields a conclusion of infinitely large threshold Reynolds number, Re, value. This contradiction to the observation data is bypassed using assumption of the HP flow instability having hard type and possible for sufficiently high-amplitude disturbances. HP flow disturbance evolution is considered by nonlinear hydrodynamic stability theory. Similar is the case of the plane Couette (PC) flow. For the plane Poiseuille (PP) flow, linear theory just quantitatively does not agree with experimental data defining the threshold Reynolds number Re= 5772 ( S. A. Orszag, 1971), more than five-fold exceeding however the value observed, Re=1080 (S. J. Davies, C. M. White, 1928). In the present work, we show that the linear stability theory conclusions for the HP and PC on stability for any Reynolds number and evidently too high threshold Reynolds number estimate for the PP flow are related with the traditional use of the disturbance representation assuming the possibility of separation of the longitudinal (along the flow direction) variable from the other spatial variables. We show that if to refuse from this traditional form, conclusions on the linear instability for the HP and PC flows may be obtained for finite Reynolds numbers (for the HP flow, for Re>704, and for the PC flow, for Re>139). Also, we fit the linear stability theory conclusion on the PP flow to the experimental data by getting an estimate of the minimal threshold Reynolds number as Re=1040. We also get agreement of the minimal threshold Reynolds number estimate for PC with the experimental data of S. Bottin, et.al., 1997, where the laminar PC flow stability threshold is Re = 150. Rogue waves excitation mechanism in oppositely directed currents due to the PC flow linear instability is discussed. Results of the new linear hydrodynamic stability theory for the HP, PP, and PC flows are published in the following papers: 1. S.G. Chefranov, A

  9. Vector diffraction analysis of optical disk readout.

    PubMed

    Cheng, X; Jia, H; Xu, D

    2000-12-01

    The optical disk readout signals from ROM disks are presented by use of a rigorous three-dimensional vector diffraction method. The optical disk is modeled as a crossed metal grating without restriction on the form of the information marks, and the permittivity of the metal is taken into account. The diffracted field from the disk is obtained by means of decomposing the focused incident beam into a spectrum of plane waves and then calculating the diffracted plane waves for each respective incident component. The readout signal is obtained by integration of the energy-flux density of the diffracted field according to the detection scheme of the optical disk system. A typical digital versatile disk (DVD) system is applied with this theory, and the result is far from that of scalar diffraction theory. PMID:18354657

  10. Robust angle-independent blood velocity estimation based on dual-angle plane wave imaging.

    PubMed

    Fadnes, Solveig; Ekroll, Ingvild Kinn; Nyrnes, Siri Ann; Torp, Hans; Lovstakken, Lasse

    2015-10-01

    Two-dimensional blood velocity estimation has shown potential to solve the angle-dependency of conventional ultrasound flow imaging. Clutter filtering, however, remains a major challenge for large beam-to-flow angles, leading to signal drop-outs and corrupted velocity estimates. This work presents and evaluates a compounding speckle tracking (ST) algorithm to obtain robust angle-independent 2-D blood velocity estimates for all beam-to-flow angles. A dual-angle plane wave imaging setup with full parallel receive beamforming is utilized to achieve high-frame-rate speckle tracking estimates from two scan angles, which may be compounded to obtain velocity estimates of increased robustness. The acquisition also allows direct comparison with vector Doppler (VD) imaging. Absolute velocity bias and root-mean-square (RMS) error of the compounding ST estimations were investigated using simulations of a rotating flow phantom with low velocities ranging from 0 to 20 cm/s. In a challenging region where the estimates were influenced by clutter filtering, the bias and RMS error for the compounding ST estimates were 11% and 2 cm/s, a significant reduction compared with conventional single-angle ST (22% and 4 cm/s) and VD (36% and 6 cm/s). The method was also tested in vivo for vascular and neonatal cardiac imaging. In a carotid artery bifurcation, the obtained blood velocity estimates showed that the compounded ST method was less influenced by clutter filtering than conventional ST and VD methods. In the cardiac case, it was observed that ST velocity estimation is more affected by low signal-to-noise (SNR) than VD. However, with sufficient SNR the in vivo results indicated that a more robust angle-independent blood velocity estimator is obtained using compounded speckle tracking compared with conventional ST and VD methods. PMID:26470038

  11. Robust angle-independent blood velocity estimation based on dual-angle plane wave imaging.

    PubMed

    Fadnes, Solveig; Ekroll, Ingvild Kinn; Nyrnes, Siri Ann; Torp, Hans; Lovstakken, Lasse

    2015-10-01

    Two-dimensional blood velocity estimation has shown potential to solve the angle-dependency of conventional ultrasound flow imaging. Clutter filtering, however, remains a major challenge for large beam-to-flow angles, leading to signal drop-outs and corrupted velocity estimates. This work presents and evaluates a compounding speckle tracking (ST) algorithm to obtain robust angle-independent 2-D blood velocity estimates for all beam-to-flow angles. A dual-angle plane wave imaging setup with full parallel receive beamforming is utilized to achieve high-frame-rate speckle tracking estimates from two scan angles, which may be compounded to obtain velocity estimates of increased robustness. The acquisition also allows direct comparison with vector Doppler (VD) imaging. Absolute velocity bias and root-mean-square (RMS) error of the compounding ST estimations were investigated using simulations of a rotating flow phantom with low velocities ranging from 0 to 20 cm/s. In a challenging region where the estimates were influenced by clutter filtering, the bias and RMS error for the compounding ST estimates were 11% and 2 cm/s, a significant reduction compared with conventional single-angle ST (22% and 4 cm/s) and VD (36% and 6 cm/s). The method was also tested in vivo for vascular and neonatal cardiac imaging. In a carotid artery bifurcation, the obtained blood velocity estimates showed that the compounded ST method was less influenced by clutter filtering than conventional ST and VD methods. In the cardiac case, it was observed that ST velocity estimation is more affected by low signal-to-noise (SNR) than VD. However, with sufficient SNR the in vivo results indicated that a more robust angle-independent blood velocity estimator is obtained using compounded speckle tracking compared with conventional ST and VD methods.

  12. Diffractive propagation and recovery of modulated (including chaotic) electromagnetic waves through uniform atmosphere and modified von Karman phase turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Monish R.; Mohamed, Fathi H. A.

    2016-05-01

    In a parallel approach to recently-used transfer function formalism, a study involving diffraction of modulated electromagnetic (EM) waves through uniform and phase-turbulent atmospheres is reported in this paper. Specifically, the input wave is treated as a modulated optical carrier, represented by use of a sinusoidal phasor with a slowly timevarying envelope. Using phasors and (spatial) Fourier transforms, the complex phasor wave is transmitted across a uniform or turbulent medium using the Kirchhoff-Fresnel integral and the random phase screen. Some preliminary results are presented comparing non-chaotic and chaotic information transmission through turbulence, outlining possible improvement in performance utilizing the robust features of chaos.

  13. Determining the sputter yields of molybdenum in low-index crystal planes via electron backscattered diffraction, focused ion beam and atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.S.; Chiu, C.H.; Hong, I.T.; Tung, H.C.; Chien, F.S.-S.

    2013-09-15

    Previous literature has used several monocrystalline sputtering targets with various crystalline planes, respectively, to investigate the variations of the sputter yield of materials in different crystalline orientations. This study presents a method to measure the sputtered yields of Mo for the three low-index planes (100), (110), and (111), through using an easily made polycrystalline target. The procedure was firstly to use electron backscattered diffraction to identify the grain positions of the three crystalline planes, and then use a focused ion beam to perform the micro-milling of each identified grain, and finally the sputter yields were calculated from the removed volumes, which were measured by atomic force microscope. Experimental results showed that the sputter yield of the primary orientations for Mo varied as Y{sub (110)} > Y{sub (100)} > Y{sub (111)}, coincidental with the ranking of their planar atomic packing densities. The concept of transparency of ion in the crystalline substance was applied to elucidate these results. In addition, the result of (110) orientation exhibiting higher sputter yield is helpful for us to develop a Mo target with a higher deposition rate for use in industry. By changing the deformation process from straight rolling to cross rolling, the (110) texture intensity of the Mo target was significantly improved, and thus enhanced the deposition rate. - Highlights: • We used EBSD, FIB and AFM to measure the sputter yields of Mo in low-index planes. • The sputter yield of the primary orientations for Mo varied as Y{sub (110)} > Y{sub (100)} > Y{sub (111)}. • The transparency of ion was used to elucidate the differences in the sputter yield. • We improved the sputter rate of polycrystalline Mo target by adjusting its texture.

  14. Terahertz Wide-Angle Imaging and Analysis on Plane-wave Criteria Based on Inverse Synthetic Aperture Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jing Kun; Qin, Yu Liang; Deng, Bin; Wang, Hong Qiang; Li, Jin; Li, Xiang

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents two parts of work around terahertz imaging applications. The first part aims at solving the problems occurred with the increasing of the rotation angle. To compensate for the nonlinearity of terahertz radar systems, a calibration signal acquired from a bright target is always used. Generally, this compensation inserts an extra linear phase term in the intermediate frequency (IF) echo signal which is not expected in large-rotation angle imaging applications. We carried out a detailed theoretical analysis on this problem, and a minimum entropy criterion was employed to estimate and compensate for the linear-phase errors. In the second part, the effects of spherical wave on terahertz inverse synthetic aperture imaging are analyzed. Analytic criteria of plane-wave approximation were derived in the cases of different rotation angles. Experimental results of corner reflectors and an aircraft model based on a 330-GHz linear frequency-modulated continuous wave (LFMCW) radar system validated the necessity and effectiveness of the proposed compensation. By comparing the experimental images obtained under plane-wave assumption and spherical-wave correction, it also showed to be highly consistent with the analytic criteria we derived.

  15. Ground- and excited-state properties of DNA base molecules from plane-wave calculations using ultrasoft pseudopotentials.

    PubMed

    Preuss, M; Schmidt, W G; Seino, K; Furthmüller, J; Bechstedt, F

    2004-01-15

    We present equilibrium geometries, vibrational modes, dipole moments, ionization energies, electron affinities, and optical absorption spectra of the DNA base molecules adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine calculated from first principles. The comparison of our results with experimental data and results obtained by using quantum chemistry methods show that in specific cases gradient-corrected density-functional theory (DFT-GGA) calculations using ultrasoft pseudopotentials and a plane-wave basis may be a numerically efficient and accurate alternative to methods employing localized orbitals for the expansion of the electron wave functions.

  16. Liquid Water through Density-Functional Molecular Dynamics: Plane-Wave vs Atomic-Orbital Basis Sets.

    PubMed

    Miceli, Giacomo; Hutter, Jürg; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2016-08-01

    We determine and compare structural, dynamical, and electronic properties of liquid water at near ambient conditions through density-functional molecular dynamics simulations, when using either plane-wave or atomic-orbital basis sets. In both frameworks, the electronic structure and the atomic forces are self-consistently determined within the same theoretical scheme based on a nonlocal density functional accounting for van der Waals interactions. The overall properties of liquid water achieved within the two frameworks are in excellent agreement with each other. Thus, our study supports that implementations with plane-wave or atomic-orbital basis sets yield equivalent results and can be used indiscriminately in study of liquid water or aqueous solutions.

  17. Liquid Water through Density-Functional Molecular Dynamics: Plane-Wave vs Atomic-Orbital Basis Sets.

    PubMed

    Miceli, Giacomo; Hutter, Jürg; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2016-08-01

    We determine and compare structural, dynamical, and electronic properties of liquid water at near ambient conditions through density-functional molecular dynamics simulations, when using either plane-wave or atomic-orbital basis sets. In both frameworks, the electronic structure and the atomic forces are self-consistently determined within the same theoretical scheme based on a nonlocal density functional accounting for van der Waals interactions. The overall properties of liquid water achieved within the two frameworks are in excellent agreement with each other. Thus, our study supports that implementations with plane-wave or atomic-orbital basis sets yield equivalent results and can be used indiscriminately in study of liquid water or aqueous solutions. PMID:27434607

  18. Transformations of spherical beam shape coefficients in generalized Lorenz-Mie theories through rotations of coordinate systems. IV. Plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouesbet, G.; Wang, J. J.; Han, Y. P.; G. Grehan

    2010-09-01

    This paper is the fourth of a series devoted to the transformation of beam shape coefficients through rotations of coordinate systems. These coefficients are required to express electromagnetic fields of laser beams in expanded forms, for instance for use in some generalized Lorenz-Mie theories. The main result of Part I has been the theorem of transformation of beam shape coefficients under rotations. Part II dealt with the special case of on-axis axisymmetric beams. Part III dealt with other special cases, namely when the Euler angles specifying the rotation are given some special values. The present Part IV studies another special case, namely the one of plane waves viewed as special on-axis axisymmetric beams, and can therefore be viewed as a special case of Part II. Unexpectedly, it is found that, in general, although plane waves are fairly trivial, their expansions require using non trivial beam shape coefficients, exactly as required when dealing with arbitrary shaped beams.

  19. Relativistically intense plane electromagnetic waves in electron-positron plasmas: Nonlinear self-modulation and harmonics generation regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Shiryaev, O. B.

    2006-11-15

    A fully nonlinear one-dimensional problem describing the interactions of relativistically intense plane electromagnetic waves and cold locally non-neutral electron-positron plasmas is derived from Maxwell and fluid dynamics equations. Numerical and asymptotic solutions to this problem for phase velocities close to the speed of light are presented. Depending on the magnitude of the plasma longitudinal electric-field potential, the system considered is found to support two distinct regimes of plane electromagnetic wave propagation: a nonlinear self-modulation one with the coupling of a fast transversely polarized electromagnetic field to a slow longitudinal plasma field, and a harmonics generation one with both of these fields oscillating with comparable frequencies. In the former case, a splitting of the electromagnetic field spectrum into a series of closely located bands occurs, whereas in the latter one the propagating field spectrum is a set of radiation harmonics.

  20. Spectra of coupled magnetoelastic waves and peculiarities of phase transitions in easy-plane ferromagnets under mechanical boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsai, Yu. N.; Fridman, Yu. A.; Kozhemyako, O. V.; Eingorn, B. L.

    1998-04-01

    Possible types of phase transitions as well as the spectra of coupled magnetoelastic waves are studied in an easy-plane ferromagnet with a rigidly fixed face. It is shown that the presence of such mechanical boundary conditions leads to a change in the type of phase transition. The dynamic properties of the system become most interesting at the point of absolute instability of the system rather than at the phase transition point.

  1. Systematic Determination of Earthquake Rupture Directivity and Fault Planes From Analysis of Long-Period P-Wave Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, L. M.; Shearer, P. M.

    2003-12-01

    If an earthquake has a primarily unilateral rupture, the pulse width observed on seismograms will vary depending on the angle between the rupture direction and the takeoff vector to the station. We have developed a method to estimate the amount of pulse broadening from the spectrum and apply it to a long-period database of large, globally-distributed earthquakes that occurred between 1988 and 2000. We select vertical-component P waves at epicentral distances of 20o--98o. We compute the spectrum from a 64-s-long window around each P wave arrival. Each spectrum is the product of source, receiver, and propagation response functions as well as local source- and receiver-side effects. Since there are multiple receivers for each source and multiple sources for each receiver, we can estimate and remove the source- and receiver-side terms by stacking the appropriate P log spectra. For earthquakes deeper than ˜200~km, directivity effects dominate the residual spectra. We use our pulse-width estimates to determine the best rupture direction and to identify which nodal plane of the Harvard CMT solution is most consistent with this rupture direction for 66~events. In about 40% of the cases, one of the two nodal planes produces a much better fit to the data and can be identified as the true fault plane. Our results show good agreement with the known rupture directions and slip planes of recent earthquakes.

  2. Determination of the in-plane components of motion in a Lamb wave from single-axis laser vibrometry.

    PubMed

    Rajic, Nik; Rosalie, Cedric; Norman, Patrick; Davis, Claire

    2014-06-01

    A method is proposed for determining in-plane components of motion in a Lamb wave from laser vibrometer measurements of surface motion out of plane. The approach relies on a frequency domain transformation that assumes knowledge only of the plate thickness and the bulk wave speeds. An outline of the relevant theory is followed by several validation case studies that generally affirm a useful level of accuracy and robust performance across a relatively wide frequency-thickness product range. In a comparison to the two-angle vibrometry approach, the proposed method is shown to be simpler to implement and to yield estimates with a consistently higher signal to noise ratio. The approach is then used to furnish estimates of the in-plane strains in Lamb waves propagating in an aluminum plate at frequencies below the first cut-off. These estimates are compared to strain measurements obtained from an adhesively bonded fiber Bragg grating. The agreement is shown to be excellent overall with an average discrepancy of less than 6%; however, systematic errors of twice that amount were recorded in the low-frequency-thickness product regime. These low-frequency discrepancies are not consistent with known sources of experimental error and cannot be explained by shear-lag theory. PMID:24907808

  3. A study of stratospheric vacillations and sudden warmings on a beta-plane. I - Single wave-mean flow interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, M. R.

    1983-01-01

    A beta-plane model of the stratosphere is used to investigate the planetary-wave amplitude vacillations first reported by Holton and Mass (1976). This model differs from theirs in allowing more horizontal modes. For low surface wave amplitudes, a new class of solutions is found which exhibits a stationary, partially reflecting critical line at steady state. The critical line equilibrates at lower altitudes as the wave forcing is increased. Vacillating solutions occur when the steady state critical line occurs near the lower boundary. The maximum wave amplitude and the maximum steady-state wave amplitude found in the model are in the ratio of 2:1, in good agreement with theoretical predictions. The maximum wave amplitude never exceeds 2200 gpm which is quite close to the saturation limit predicted by Schoeberl (1982). An analysis of the statistics of slowly and rapidly vacillating flows shows that both the wave and zonal mean variances are important in determining the time mean, zonal mean dynamics of the upper stratosphere.

  4. Applications of diffraction theory to aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, D. L.; Chen-Huei, L.; Norum, T. D.

    1979-01-01

    A review is given of the fundamentals of diffraction theory and the application of the theory to several problems of aircraft noise generation, propagation, and measurement. The general acoustic diffraction problem is defined and the governing equations set down. Diffraction phenomena are illustrated using the classical problem of the diffraction of a plane wave by a half-plane. Infinite series and geometric acoustic methods for solving diffraction problems are described. Four applications of diffraction theory are discussed: the selection of an appropriate shape for a microphone, the use of aircraft wings to shield the community from engine noise, the reflection of engine noise from an aircraft fuselage and the radiation of trailing edge noise.

  5. Explaining Electromagnetic Plane Waves in a Vacuum at the Introductory Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allred, Clark L.; Della-Rose, Devin J.; Flusche, Brian M.; Kiziah, Rex R.; Lee, David J.

    2010-01-01

    A typical introduction to electromagnetic waves in vacuum is illustrated by the following quote from an introductory physics text: "Maxwell's equations predict that an electromagnetic wave consists of oscillating electric and magnetic fields. The changing fields induce each other, which maintains the propagation of the wave; a changing electric…

  6. Determining distributed source waveforms in causal, lossy, dispersive, plane-wave (CLDP) materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, R. Joseph

    This thesis presents and employs novel mathematics for the inversion of linear, first-kind Fredholm integral equations (IEs) which have a time t dependent response signal, a space z dependent source waveform, and a kernel with time dependence (at each z) corresponding to the impulse response of a thickness z slab of c_ausal, l_ossy, d_ispersive, homogeneous material through which p_lanar disturbances propagate according to the wave equation. These materials are called CLDP materials; these IEs are called CLDP IEs. These novel mathematics are applicable to the PESAW (aka PEA) charge recovery method. The proposed inversion method recognizes that the (temporal) Fourier transform of a CLDP IE's response signal can be interpreted as the values of the (spatial) Laplace transform of that IE's source waveform along a Laplace plane path determined by the material's propagation wavenumber k_ (f ). Executing the Laplace transform inversion integral along this CLDP path yields an inverse CLDP IE which recovers the true source waveform provided that source waveform is real, causal, Fourier-transformable, and also satisfies the proposed k_(f )- dependent `CLDP criterion'. The forward and inverse CLDP IEs corresponding to a particular CLDP material model k_( f ) therefore comprise a particular integral transform relationship applicable to waveforms satisfying the CLDP criterion for that material. The CLDP transform relationship for a lossless/dispersionless material reduces to the (unilateral) Fourier transform. Even without noise, the `'inverse CLDP'- recovered waveform gleaned from an abruptly bandlimited CLDP response signal requires regularization-a generalized Gibbs-Dirichlet kernel dubbed `the Darrell' comes into effect. The measured (time sampled) PESAW signal is necessarily bandlimited; this thesis investigates regularization via lowpass filtering of the measured signal. Both synthetic and experimental examples are investigated. The focus is on MHz-range signals

  7. The propagation of the shock wave from a strong explosion in a plane-parallel stratified medium: the Kompaneets approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olano, C. A.

    2009-11-01

    Context: Using certain simplifications, Kompaneets derived a partial differential equation that states the local geometrical and kinematical conditions that each surface element of a shock wave, created by a point blast in a stratified gaseous medium, must satisfy. Kompaneets could solve his equation analytically for the case of a wave propagating in an exponentially stratified medium, obtaining the form of the shock front at progressive evolutionary stages. Complete analytical solutions of the Kompaneets equation for shock wave motion in further plane-parallel stratified media were not found, except for radially stratified media. Aims: We aim to analytically solve the Kompaneets equation for the motion of a shock wave in different plane-parallel stratified media that can reflect a wide variety of astrophysical contexts. We were particularly interested in solving the Kompaneets equation for a strong explosion in the interstellar medium of the Galactic disk, in which, due to intense winds and explosions of stars, gigantic gaseous structures known as superbubbles and supershells are formed. Methods: Using the Kompaneets approximation, we derived a pair of equations that we call adapted Kompaneets equations, that govern the propagation of a shock wave in a stratified medium and that permit us to obtain solutions in parametric form. The solutions provided by the system of adapted Kompaneets equations are equivalent to those of the Kompaneets equation. We solved the adapted Kompaneets equations for shock wave propagation in a generic stratified medium by means of a power-series method. Results: Using the series solution for a shock wave in a generic medium, we obtained the series solutions for four specific media whose respective density distributions in the direction perpendicular to the stratification plane are of an exponential, power-law type (one with exponent k=-1 and the other with k =-2) and a quadratic hyperbolic-secant. From these series solutions, we deduced

  8. A high frequency analysis of electromagnetic plane wave scattering by perfectly-conducting semi-infinite parallel plate and rectangular waveguides with absorber coated inner walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noh, H. M.; Pathak, P. H.

    1986-01-01

    An approximate but sufficiently accurate high frequency solution which combines the uniform geometrical theory of diffraction (UTD) and the aperture integration (AI) method is developed for analyzing the problem of electromagnetic (EM) plane wave scattering by an open-ended, perfectly-conducting, semi-infinite hollow rectangular waveguide (or duct) with a thin, uniform layer of lossy or absorbing material on its inner wall, and with a planar termination inside. In addition, a high frequency solution for the EM scattering by a two dimensional (2-D), semi-infinite parallel plate waveguide with a absorber coating on the inner walls is also developed as a first step before analyzing the open-ended semi-infinite three dimensional (3-D) rectangular waveguide geometry. The total field scattered by the semi-infinite waveguide consists firstly of the fields scattered from the edges of the aperture at the open-end, and secondly of the fields which are coupled into the waveguide from the open-end and then reflected back from the interior termination to radiate out of the open-end. The first contribution to the scattered field can be found directly via the UTD ray method. The second contribution is found via the AI method which employs rays to describe the fields in the aperture that arrive there after reflecting from the interior termination. It is assumed that the direction of the incident plane wave and the direction of observation lie well inside the forward half space tht exists outside the half space containing the semi-infinite waveguide geometry. Also, the medium exterior to the waveguide is assumed to be free space.

  9. Phase and direction dependence of photorefraction in a low-frequency strong circular-polarized plane wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong-Sheng; Wang, Nai-Yan; Tang, Xiu-Zhang

    2015-05-01

    Contrary to the superposition principle, it is well known that photorefraction exists in the vacuum with the presence of a strong static field, a laser field, or a rotational magnetic field. Different from the classical optical crystals, the refractive index also depends on the phase of the strong electromagnetic field. We obtain the phase and direction dependence of the refractive index of a probe wave incident in the strong field of a circular-polarized plane wave by solving the Maxwell equations corrected by the effective Lagrangian. It may provide a valuable theoretical basis to calculate the polarization evolution of waves in the strong electromagnetic circumstances of pulsar or neutron stars. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB808104) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11105233).

  10. Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Medecki, Hector

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a point diffraction interferometer for evaluating the quality of a test optic. In operation, the point diffraction interferometer includes a source of radiation, the test optic, a beam divider, a reference wave pinhole located at an image plane downstream from the test optic, and a detector for detecting an interference pattern produced between a reference wave emitted by the pinhole and a test wave emitted from the test optic. The beam divider produces separate reference and test beams which focus at different laterally separated positions on the image plane. The reference wave pinhole is placed at a region of high intensity (e.g., the focal point) for the reference beam. This allows reference wave to be produced at a relatively high intensity. Also, the beam divider may include elements for phase shifting one or both of the reference and test beams.

  11. Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Medecki, H.

    1998-11-10

    Disclosed is a point diffraction interferometer for evaluating the quality of a test optic. In operation, the point diffraction interferometer includes a source of radiation, the test optic, a beam divider, a reference wave pinhole located at an image plane downstream from the test optic, and a detector for detecting an interference pattern produced between a reference wave emitted by the pinhole and a test wave emitted from the test optic. The beam divider produces separate reference and test beams which focus at different laterally separated positions on the image plane. The reference wave pinhole is placed at a region of high intensity (e.g., the focal point) for the reference beam. This allows reference wave to be produced at a relatively high intensity. Also, the beam divider may include elements for phase shifting one or both of the reference and test beams. 8 figs.

  12. Overcoming the diffraction limit in wave physics using a time-reversal mirror and a novel acoustic sink.

    PubMed

    de Rosny, J; Fink, M

    2002-09-16

    In recent years, time-reversal (TR) mirrors have been developed that create TR waves for ultrasonic transient fields propagating through complex media. A TR wave back propagates and refocuses exactly at its initial source. However, because of diffraction, even if the source is pointlike the wave refocuses on a spot size that cannot be smaller than half a wavelength. Here, by using a TR interpretation of this limit, we show that this latter limitation can be overcome if the source is replaced by its TR image. This new device acts as an acoustic sink that absorbs the TR wave. Here we report the first experimental result obtained with an acoustic sink where a focal spot size of less than 1/14th of one wavelength is recorded.

  13. Long-Wave Runup on a Plane Beach: An Experimental and Numerical Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vater, Stefan; Drähne, Ulrike; Goseberg, Nils; Beisiegel, Nicole; Behrens, Jörn

    2016-04-01

    In this study the runup generated by leading depression single sinusoidal waves as a very basic representation of a tsunami is investigated through physical and numerical experiments. The results are compared against existing analytical expressions for the long-wave runup of periodic sinusoidal waves. It can be shown that shallow water theory is applicable for the investigated type of waves. Furthermore, we demonstrate how such a comparative, inter-methodological work contributes to the understanding of shoreline motion of long waves. The produced data set may serve as a novel benchmark for leading depression sinusoidal waves. The experimental study was conducted using an innovative pump-driven wave generator that is capable of generating arbitrarily long waves which might even exceed the length of the wave flume. Due to the complex control problem for the chosen type of wave generator, spurious over-riding small-scale waves were unavoidable in some of the experiments. The numerical simulations were carried out with a one-dimensional Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin (RKDG) non-linear shallow water model. It incorporates a high fidelity wetting and drying scheme. The sinusoidal waves are generated in a constant depth section attached to a linearly sloping beach, have periods between 20 and 100 seconds and surf similarity parameters between 4.4 and 15.6. In a first qualitative analysis the evolution of the runup elevation and velocity is compared. In order to quantify analytical, numerical and experimental data, the wave similarity measured by the Brier score, maximum run-up and run-down height, as well as run-up/run-down velocities are utilized as metrics. As a starting point, periodic and non-periodic clean sinusoidal waves are compared numerically to rule out differences due to the single sinusoidal wave generation in the wave flume. On further analysis, significant differences in experimental and analytically expected values are observed. However, with the

  14. Pressure-induced quenching of the charge-density-wave state observed by x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sacchetti, A.

    2010-05-03

    We report an x-ray diffraction study on the charge-density-wave (CDW) LaTe{sub 3} and CeTe{sub 3} compounds as a function of pressure. We extract the lattice constants and the CDW modulation wave-vector, and provide direct evidence for a pressure-induced quenching of the CDW phase. We observe subtle differences between the chemical and mechanical compression of the lattice. We account for these with a scenario where the effective dimensionality in these CDW systems is dependent on the type of lattice compression and has a direct impact on the degree of Fermi surface nesting and on the strength of fluctuation effects.

  15. Experimental and numerical confirmation of composite diffracted evasnescent-wave (CDEW) model for enhanced transmission of subwavelength apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lezec, Henri J.; Thio, Tineke

    2006-03-01

    When a subwavelength aperture in an opaque film is surrounded by periodic surface corrugations, its optical transmission can be enhanced or suppressed with respect to that of an identical aperture without surface corrugations. We have proposed a model in which the subwavelength surface structure scatters the incident light into evanescent waves: The total, or composite, diffracted evanescent waves (CDEWs) travel along the surface and their interference with the light directly falling on the aperture leads to the transmission modulation. The CDEW model is valid for metallic as well as non-metallic surfaces, and thus differs qualitatively from the surface plasmon model, which requires a metallic surface. We show that the optical transmission of an embedded periodic array of dots, where the surface is absent altogether, is related to the transmission of hole arrays by Babinet’s principle, underscoring the importance of diffraction. Furthermore, numerical calculations on small- area corrugations verify the functional form of the CDEWs.

  16. Basis set effects on frontier molecular orbital energies and energy gaps: a comparative study between plane waves and localized basis functions in molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Matus, Myrna H; Garza, Jorge; Galván, Marcelo

    2004-06-01

    In order to study the Kohn-Sham frontier molecular orbital energies in the complete basis limit, a comparative study between localized functions and plane waves, obtained with the local density approximation exchange-correlation functional is made. The analyzed systems are ethylene and butadiene, since they are theoretical and experimentally well characterized. The localized basis sets used are those developed by Dunning. For the plane-waves method, the pseudopotential approximation is employed. The results obtained by the localized basis sets suggest that it is possible to get an estimation of the orbital energies in the limit of the complete basis set, when the basis set size is large. It is shown that the frontier molecular orbital energies and the energy gaps obtained with plane waves are similar to those obtained with a large localized basis set, when the size of the supercell and the plane-wave expansion have been appropriately calibrated.

  17. Calculations of Lamb wave band gaps and dispersions for piezoelectric phononic plates using mindlin's theory-based plane wave expansion method.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jin-Chen; Wu, Tsung-Tsong

    2008-02-01

    Based on Mindlin's piezoelectric plate theory and the plane wave expansion method, a formulation is proposed to study the frequency band gaps and dispersion relations of the lower-order Lamb waves in two-dimensional piezoelectric phononic plates. The method is applied to analyze the phononic plates composed of solid-solid and airsolid constituents with square and triangular lattices, respectively. Factors that influence the opening and width of the complete Lamb wave gaps are identified and discussed. For solid/solid phononic plates, it is suggested that the filling material be chosen with larger mass density, proper stiffness, and weak anisotropic factor embedded in a soft matrix in order to obtain wider complete band gaps of the lower-order Lamb waves. By comparing to the calculated results without considering the piezoelectricity, the influences of piezoelectric effect on Lamb waves are analyzed as well. On the other hand, for air/solid phononic plates, a background material itself with proper anisotropy and a high filling fraction of air may favor the opening of the complete Lamb wave gaps.

  18. Correction of the near threshold behavior of electron collisional excitation cross-sections in the plane-wave Born approximation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kilcrease, D. P.; Brookes, S.

    2013-08-19

    The modeling of NLTE plasmas requires the solution of population rate equations to determine the populations of the various atomic levels relevant to a particular problem. The equations require many cross sections for excitation, de-excitation, ionization and recombination. Additionally, a simple and computational fast way to calculate electron collisional excitation cross-sections for ions is by using the plane-wave Born approximation. This is essentially a high-energy approximation and the cross section suffers from the unphysical problem of going to zero near threshold. Various remedies for this problem have been employed with varying degrees of success. We present a correction procedure formore » the Born cross-sections that employs the Elwert–Sommerfeld factor to correct for the use of plane waves instead of Coulomb waves in an attempt to produce a cross-section similar to that from using the more time consuming Coulomb Born approximation. We compare this new approximation with other, often employed correction procedures. Furthermore, we also look at some further modifications to our Born Elwert procedure and its combination with Y.K. Kim's correction of the Coulomb Born approximation for singly charged ions that more accurately approximate convergent close coupling calculations.« less

  19. Homodyne-detected ferromagnetic resonance of in-plane magnetized nanocontacts: Composite spin-wave resonances and their excitation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazlali, Masoumeh; Dvornik, Mykola; Iacocca, Ezio; Dürrenfeld, Philipp; Haidar, Mohammad; Åkerman, Johan; Dumas, Randy K.

    2016-04-01

    This work provides a detailed investigation of the measured in-plane field-swept homodyne-detected ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectra of an extended Co/Cu/NiFe pseudo-spin-valve stack using a nanocontact (NC) geometry. The magnetodynamics are generated by a pulse-modulated microwave current, and the resulting rectified dc mixing voltage, which appears across the NC at resonance, is detected using a lock-in amplifier. Most notably, we find that the measured spectra of the NiFe layer are composite in nature and highly asymmetric, consistent with the broadband excitation of multiple modes. Additionally, the data must be fit with two Lorentzian functions in order to extract a reasonable value for the Gilbert damping of the NiFe. Aided by micromagnetic simulations, we conclude that (i) for in-plane fields the rf Oersted field in the vicinity of the NC plays the dominant role in generating the observed spectra, (ii) in addition to the FMR mode, exchange-dominated spin waves are also generated, and (iii) the NC diameter sets the mean wave vector of the exchange-dominated spin wave, in good agreement with the dispersion relation.

  20. Correction of the near threshold behavior of electron collisional excitation cross-sections in the plane-wave Born approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Kilcrease, D. P.; Brookes, S.

    2013-08-19

    The modeling of NLTE plasmas requires the solution of population rate equations to determine the populations of the various atomic levels relevant to a particular problem. The equations require many cross sections for excitation, de-excitation, ionization and recombination. Additionally, a simple and computational fast way to calculate electron collisional excitation cross-sections for ions is by using the plane-wave Born approximation. This is essentially a high-energy approximation and the cross section suffers from the unphysical problem of going to zero near threshold. Various remedies for this problem have been employed with varying degrees of success. We present a correction procedure for the Born cross-sections that employs the Elwert–Sommerfeld factor to correct for the use of plane waves instead of Coulomb waves in an attempt to produce a cross-section similar to that from using the more time consuming Coulomb Born approximation. We compare this new approximation with other, often employed correction procedures. Furthermore, we also look at some further modifications to our Born Elwert procedure and its combination with Y.K. Kim's correction of the Coulomb Born approximation for singly charged ions that more accurately approximate convergent close coupling calculations.

  1. Strong reduction of the coercivity by a surface acoustic wave in an out-of-plane magnetized epilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thevenard, L.; Camara, I. S.; Prieur, J.-Y.; Rovillain, P.; Lemaître, A.; Gourdon, C.; Duquesne, J.-Y.

    2016-04-01

    Inverse magnetostriction is the effect by which magnetization can be changed upon application of stress/strain. A strain modulation may be created electrically by exciting interdigitated transducers to generate surface acoustic waves (SAWs). Hence SAWs appear as a possible route towards induction-free undulatory magnetic data manipulation. Here we demonstrate experimentally on an out-of-plane magnetostrictive layer a reduction of the coercive field of up to 60 % by a SAW, over millimetric distances. A simple model shows that this spectacular effect can be partly explained by the periodic lowering of the strain-dependent domain nucleation energy by the SAW. This proof of concept was done on (Ga,Mn)(As,P), a magnetic semiconductor in which the out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy can be made very weak by epitaxial growth; it should guide material engineering for all-acoustic magnetization switching.

  2. Plane-wave expansion method for calculating band structure of photonic crystal slabs with perfectly matched layers.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shouyuan; Chen, Caihua; Prather, Dennis W

    2004-09-01

    We present a new algorithm for calculation of the band structure of photonic crystal slabs. This algorithm combines the plane-wave expansion method with perfectly matched layers for the termination of the computational region in the direction out of the plane. In addition, the effective-medium tensor is applied to improve convergence. A general complex eigenvalue problem is then obtained. Two criteria are presented to distinguish the guided modes from the PML modes. As such, this scheme can accurately determine the band structure both above and below the light cone. The convergence of the algorithm presented has been studied. The results obtained by using this algorithm have been compared with those obtained by the finite-difference time-domain method and found to agree very well.

  3. Dispersive-to-nondispersive transition and phase-velocity transient for linear waves in plane wake and channel flows.

    PubMed

    De Santi, Francesca; Fraternale, Federico; Tordella, Daniela

    2016-03-01

    In this study we analyze the phase and group velocity of three-dimensional linear traveling waves in two sheared flows: the plane channel and the wake flows. This was carried out by varying the wave number over a large interval of values at a given Reynolds number inside the ranges 20-100, 1000-8000, for the wake and channel flow, respectively. Evidence is given about the possible presence of both dispersive and nondispersive effects which are associated with the long and short ranges of wavelength. We solved the Orr-Sommerfeld and Squire eigenvalue problem and observed the least stable mode. It is evident that, at low wave numbers, the least stable eigenmodes in the left branch of the spectrum behave in a dispersive manner. By contrast, if the wave number is above a specific threshold, a sharp dispersive-to-nondispersive transition can be observed. Beyond this transition, the dominant mode belongs to the right branch of the spectrum. The transient behavior of the phase velocity of small three-dimensional traveling waves was also considered. Having chosen the initial conditions, we then show that the shape of the transient highly depends on the transition wavelength threshold value. We show that the phase velocity can oscillate with a frequency which is equal to the frequency width of the eigenvalue spectrum. Furthermore, evidence of intermediate self-similarity is given for the perturbation field. PMID:27078456

  4. Dispersive-to-nondispersive transition and phase-velocity transient for linear waves in plane wake and channel flows.

    PubMed

    De Santi, Francesca; Fraternale, Federico; Tordella, Daniela

    2016-03-01

    In this study we analyze the phase and group velocity of three-dimensional linear traveling waves in two sheared flows: the plane channel and the wake flows. This was carried out by varying the wave number over a large interval of values at a given Reynolds number inside the ranges 20-100, 1000-8000, for the wake and channel flow, respectively. Evidence is given about the possible presence of both dispersive and nondispersive effects which are associated with the long and short ranges of wavelength. We solved the Orr-Sommerfeld and Squire eigenvalue problem and observed the least stable mode. It is evident that, at low wave numbers, the least stable eigenmodes in the left branch of the spectrum behave in a dispersive manner. By contrast, if the wave number is above a specific threshold, a sharp dispersive-to-nondispersive transition can be observed. Beyond this transition, the dominant mode belongs to the right branch of the spectrum. The transient behavior of the phase velocity of small three-dimensional traveling waves was also considered. Having chosen the initial conditions, we then show that the shape of the transient highly depends on the transition wavelength threshold value. We show that the phase velocity can oscillate with a frequency which is equal to the frequency width of the eigenvalue spectrum. Furthermore, evidence of intermediate self-similarity is given for the perturbation field.

  5. A comparative study of diffraction of shallow-water waves by high-level IGN and GN equations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, B.B.; Ertekin, R.C.; Duan, W.Y.

    2015-02-15

    This work is on the nonlinear diffraction analysis of shallow-water waves, impinging on submerged obstacles, by two related theories, namely the classical Green–Naghdi (GN) equations and the Irrotational Green–Naghdi (IGN) equations, both sets of equations being at high levels and derived for incompressible and inviscid flows. Recently, the high-level Green–Naghdi equations have been applied to some wave transformation problems. The high-level IGN equations have also been used in the last decade to study certain wave propagation problems. However, past works on these theories used different numerical methods to solve these nonlinear and unsteady sets of differential equations and at different levels. Moreover, different physical problems have been solved in the past. Therefore, it has not been possible to understand the differences produced by these two sets of theories and their range of applicability so far. We are thus motivated to make a direct comparison of the results produced by these theories by use of the same numerical method to solve physically the same wave diffraction problems. We focus on comparing these two theories by using similar codes; only the equations used are different but other parts of the codes, such as the wave-maker, damping zone, discretion method, matrix solver, etc., are exactly the same. This way, we eliminate many potential sources of differences that could be produced by the solution of different equations. The physical problems include the presence of various submerged obstacles that can be used for example as breakwaters or to represent the continental shelf. A numerical wave tank is created by placing a wavemaker on one end and a wave absorbing beach on the other. The nonlinear and unsteady sets of differential equations are solved by the finite-difference method. The results are compared with different equations as well as with the available experimental data.

  6. The influence of the plane wave spectrum of A source on measurements of the transmission coefficient of a panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphrey, V. F.

    1986-07-01

    The transmission coefficient of a panel immersed in a fluid, as measured by a circular projector, is considered. An integral expression for the measured coefficient is derived, with account taken of the non-planar nature of the wavefield and the finite size of the receiver. Numerical integration of this expression shows that the measured transmission coefficient can deviate significantly from the value predicted for a plane wave. The theoretical predictions are compared with experimental measurements of the insertion loss at normal incidence of two Perspex (polymethylmethacrylate) panels 1·4 mm and 3·1 mm thick. These measurements, which were recorded as a function of frequency and transducer separation, were concentrated in the frequency bands where the panels were approximately half a compressional wavelength thick (i.e., for frequency-panel thickness products of the order of 1·35×10 3 Hzm). In this region the measured insertion loss varied rapidly with frequency and was observed to deviate significantly from the slowly varying loss predicted for plane waves. Such deviations were observed when a small hydrophone was used as the receiver and also when another transducer of the same radius as the projector was used as the receiver. For measurements made outside the "nearfield" of the transducer combination the results were in very good agreement with the predictions of the theoretical expression. At closer ranges the poorer quantitative agreement was attributed to the transducers not behaving as ideal pistons. The results and theoretical calculations show that the plane wave spectrum of a source can have a significant effect on the measured transmission coefficient of a panel, particularly at frequencies where the transmission coefficient changes rapidly with angle of incidence.

  7. In-plane angular dependence of the spin-wave nonreciprocity of an ultrathin film with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Vanessa Li; Di, Kai; Lim, Hock Siah; Ng, Ser Choon; Kuok, Meng Hau; Yu, Jiawei; Yoon, Jungbum; Qiu, Xuepeng; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2015-07-13

    The nonreciprocal propagation of spin waves in an ultrathin Pt/Co/Ni film has been measured by Brillouin light scattering. The frequency nonreciprocity, due to the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI), has a sinusoidal dependence on the in-plane angle between the magnon wavevector and the applied magnetic field. The results, which are in good agreement with analytical predictions reported earlier, yield a value of the DMI constant which is the same as that obtained previously from a study of the magnon dispersion relations. We have demonstrated that our magnon-dynamics based method can experimentally ascertain the DMI constant of multilayer thin films.

  8. Extending the size-parameter range for plane-wave light scattering from infinite homogeneous circular cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Hau-Riege, S

    2005-04-12

    We have developed an algorithm that extends the possible size-parameter range for the calculation of plane-wave light scattering from infinite homogeneous circular cylinders using a Mie-type analysis. Our algorithm is based on the calculation of the ratios of Bessel functions instead of calculating the Bessel functions or their logarithmic derivatives directly. We have found that this algorithm agrees with existing methods (when those methods converge). We have also found that our algorithm converges in cases of very large size parameters, in which case other algorithms often do not.

  9. On the description of electromagnetic arbitrary shaped beams: The relationship between beam shape coefficients and plane wave spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouesbet, Gérard; Lock, James A.

    2015-09-01

    A strong effort has been devoted during the last three decades, and more, to the study of electromagnetic scattering of arbitrary shaped beams by particles. For this topic, the most important issue concerns the description of the illuminating beam as an expansion over a basis of functions. There are essentially two kinds of expansions that have been used: (i) a discrete expansion involving beam shape coefficients and (ii) a continuous expansion in terms of plane wave spectra. In this paper, we provide a formal relationship between these two kinds of expansions.

  10. Plane-wave and common-translation-factor treatments of He sup 2+ +H collisions at high velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Errea, L.F. ); Harel, C.; Jouin, H. ); Maidagan, J.M.; Mendez, L. ); Pons, B. ); Riera, A. )

    1992-11-01

    We complement previous work that showed that the molecular approach, modified with plane-wave translation factors, is able to reproduce the fall of charge-exchange cross sections in He{sup 2+}+H collisions, by presenting the molecular data, and studying the corresponding mechanism. We test the accuracy of simplifications of the method that have been employed in the literature, and that lead to very simple calculations. We show that the common-translation-factor method is also successful at high nuclear velocities, provided that sufficiently excited states are included in the basis; moreover, it yields a simple picture of the mechanism and a description of ionization processes at high velocities.

  11. Comparison of designs of off-axis Gregorian telescopes for millimeter-wave large focal-plane arrays.

    PubMed

    Hanany, Shaul; Marrone, Daniel P

    2002-08-01

    We compare the diffraction-limited field of view (FOV) provided by four types of off-axis Gregorian telescopes: the classical Gregorian, the aplanatic Gregorian, and the designs that cancel astigmatism and both astigmatism and coma. The analysis is carried out with telescope parameters that are appropriate for satellite and balloonborne millimeter- and submillimeter-wave astrophysics. We find that the design that cancels both coma and astigmatism provides the largest flat FOV, approximately 21 square deg. We also find that the FOV can be increased by approximately 15% by means of optimizing the shape and location of the focal surface. PMID:12153101

  12. Comparison of designs of off-axis Gregorian telescopes for millimeter-wave large focal-plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanany, Shaul; Marrone, Daniel P.

    2002-08-01

    We compare the diffraction-limited field of view (FOV) provided by four types of off-axis Gregorian telescopes: the classical Gregorian, the aplanatic Gregorian, and the designs that cancel astigmatism and both astigmatism and coma. The analysis is carried out with telescope parameters that are appropriate for satellite and balloonborne millimeter- and submillimeter-wave astrophysics. We find that the design that cancels both coma and astigmatism provides the largest flat FOV, approx21 square deg. We also find that the FOV can be increased by approx15% by means of optimizing the shape and location of the focal surface.

  13. Comparison of designs of off-axis Gregorian telescopes for millimeter-wave large focal-plane arrays.

    PubMed

    Hanany, Shaul; Marrone, Daniel P

    2002-08-01

    We compare the diffraction-limited field of view (FOV) provided by four types of off-axis Gregorian telescopes: the classical Gregorian, the aplanatic Gregorian, and the designs that cancel astigmatism and both astigmatism and coma. The analysis is carried out with telescope parameters that are appropriate for satellite and balloonborne millimeter- and submillimeter-wave astrophysics. We find that the design that cancels both coma and astigmatism provides the largest flat FOV, approximately 21 square deg. We also find that the FOV can be increased by approximately 15% by means of optimizing the shape and location of the focal surface.

  14. Coherent quantum states of a relativistic particle in an electromagnetic plane wave and a parallel magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Colavita, E.; Hacyan, S.

    2014-03-15

    We analyze the solutions of the Klein–Gordon and Dirac equations describing a charged particle in an electromagnetic plane wave combined with a magnetic field parallel to the direction of propagation of the wave. It is shown that the Klein–Gordon equation admits coherent states as solutions, while the corresponding solutions of the Dirac equation are superpositions of coherent and displaced-number states. Particular attention is paid to the resonant case in which the motion of the particle is unbounded. -- Highlights: •We study a relativistic electron in a particular electromagnetic field configuration. •New exact solutions of the Klein–Gordon and Dirac equations are obtained. •Coherent and displaced number states can describe a relativistic particle.

  15. Exact off-resonance near fields of small-size extended hemielliptic 2-D lenses illuminated by plane waves.

    PubMed

    Boriskin, Artem V; Sauleau, Ronan; Nosich, Alexander I

    2009-02-01

    The near fields of small-size extended hemielliptic lenses made of rexolite and isotropic quartz and illuminated by E- and H-polarized plane waves are studied. Variations in the focal domain size, shape, and location are reported versus the angle of incidence of the incoming wave. The problem is solved numerically in a two-dimensional formulation. The accuracy of results is guaranteed by using a highly efficient numerical algorithm based on the combination of the Muller boundary integral equations, the method of analytical regularization, and the trigonometric Galerkin discretization scheme. The analysis fully accounts for the finite size of the lens as well as its curvature and thus can be considered as a reference solution for other electromagnetic solvers. Moreover, the trusted description of the focusing ability of a finite-size hemielliptic lens can be useful in the design of antenna receivers.

  16. Traveling Wave Solutions of the Gardner Equation and Motion of Plane Curves Governed by the mKdV Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Vassilev, V. M.; Djondjorov, P. A.; Hadzhilazova, M. Ts.; Mladenov, I. M.

    2011-11-29

    The Gardner equation is well-known in the mathematical literature since the late sixties of 20th century. Initially, it appeared in the context of the construction of local conservation laws admitted by the KdV equation. Later on, the Gardner equation was generalized and found to be applicable in various branches of physics (solid-state and plasma physics, fluid dynamics and quantum field theory). In this paper, we examine the travelling wave solutions of the Gardner equation and derive the full set of solutions to the corresponding reduced equation in terms of Weierstrass and Jacobi elliptic functions. Then, we use the travelling wave solutions of the focusing mKdV equation and obtain in explicit analytic form exact solutions of a special type of plane curve flow, known as the mKdV flow.

  17. Wave propagation and phase retrieval in Fresnel diffraction by a distorted-object approach

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Xianghui; Shen Qun

    2005-07-15

    An extension of the far-field x-ray diffraction theory is presented by the introduction of a distorted object for calculation of coherent diffraction patterns in the near-field Fresnel regime. It embeds a Fresnel-zone construction on an original object to form a phase-chirped distorted object, which is then Fourier transformed to form a diffraction image. This approach extends the applicability of Fourier-based iterative phasing algorithms into the near-field holographic regime where phase retrieval had been difficult. Simulated numerical examples of this near-field phase retrieval approach indicate its potential applications in high-resolution structural investigations of noncrystalline materials.

  18. Finite-frequency measurements of conventional and core-diffracted P-waves (P and Pdiff) for waveform tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Kasra; Sigloch, Karin; Staehler, Simon C.

    2014-05-01

    In its lowermost 200-300 km, the mantle has a complex structure resulting from accumulations of downwellings (subducted slabs), upwellings (LLSVPs and plumes), and probably phase transitions; seismic velocities and density show large variations but are not tightly constrained. Core-diffracted body waves are the seismic phases that sample the lowermost mantle extensively and are prime candidates to be used in tomography for enhancing resolution in this depth range. Since they are diffracted along the core-mantle boundary, their behavior is highly dispersive and cannot be modeled satisfactory using ray theory, nor early versions of finite-frequency modeling. Hence they have rarely been used for tomography so far, and where they have been, large imaging blur can be expected. We present a processing scheme to measure finite-frequency travel-time anomalies of arbitrary seismic body-wave phases in a fully automated way, with an initial focus on core-diffracted P waves. The aim is to extract a maximum of information from observed broadband seismograms using multi-frequency techniques. Using a matched-filtering approach, predicted and observed waveforms are compared in a cross-correlation sense in eight overlapping frequency passbands, with dominant periods ranging between 30 and 2.7sec. This method was applied to a global data set of ≡2000 teleseismic events in our waveform archive, which resulted in 1,616,184 P and 536,190 Pdiff usable multi-frequency measurements of high cross-correlation coefficient (≥ 0.8). The measurements are analyzed statistically in terms of goodness of fit, effects of epicentral distance, and frequency-dependent behavior of P and Pdiff phases. The results for Pdiff waves are displayed by projecting the measured travel time anomalies onto the phase's nominal grazing segments along the core-mantle boundary.

  19. Near-field focusing of an optical wave by diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geints, Yu E.; Zemlyanov, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    We report the investigation results for spatially-localised light structures (photonic nanojets) under near-field optical radiation scattering on phase diffraction gratings. Main parameters of photonic nanojets from gratings with sawtooth, rectangular and hemispherical groove profiles are obtained by numerical electrodynamic simulation. It is found that by varying a period, degree of filling, groove shape and parameters of optically contrast coating of the diffraction grating one can control the characteristics of the produced photonic jets in a wide range.

  20. Dynamic interaction of twin vertically overlapping lined tunnels in an elastic half space subjected to incident plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongxian; Wang, Yirui; Liang, Jianwen

    2016-06-01

    The scattering of plane harmonic P and SV waves by a pair of vertically overlapping lined tunnels buried in an elastic half space is solved using a semi-analytic indirect boundary integration equation method. Then the effect of the distance between the two tunnels, the stiffness and density of the lining material, and the incident frequency on the seismic response of the tunnels is investigated. Numerical results demonstrate that the dynamic interaction between the twin tunnels cannot be ignored and the lower tunnel has a significant shielding effect on the upper tunnel for high-frequency incident waves, resulting in great decrease of the dynamic hoop stress in the upper tunnel; for the low-frequency incident waves, in contrast, the lower tunnel can lead to amplification effect on the upper tunnel. It also reveals that the frequency-spectrum characteristics of dynamic stress of the lower tunnel are significantly different from those of the upper tunnel. In addition, for incident P waves in low-frequency region, the soft lining tunnels have significant amplification effect on the surface displacement amplitude, which is slightly larger than that of the corresponding single tunnel.