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Sample records for planetary interiors experiment

  1. Planetary Interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerdt, W. Bruce; Abercrombie, Rachel; Keddie, Susan; Mizutani, Hitoshi; Nagihara, Seiichi; Nakamura, Yosio; Pike, W. Thomas

    1996-01-01

    This report identifies two main themes to guide planetary science in the next two decades: understanding planetary origins, and understanding the constitution and fundamental processes of the planets themselves. Within the latter theme, four specific goals related to interior measurements addressing the theme. These are: (1) Understanding the internal structure and dynamics of at least one solid body, other than the Earth or Moon, that is actively convecting, (2) Determine the characteristics of the magnetic fields of Mercury and the outer planets to provide insight into the generation of planetary magnetic fields, (3) Specify the nature and sources of stress that are responsible for the global tectonics of Mars, Venus, and several icy satellites of the outer planets, and (4) Advance significantly our understanding of crust-mantle structure for all the solid planets. These goals can be addressed almost exclusively by measurements made on the surfaces of planetary bodies.

  2. Frontiers of the Physics of Dense Plasmas and Planetary Interiors: Experiment, Theory, Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fortney, J J; Glenzer, S H; Koenig, M; Brambrink, E; Militzer, B; Saumon, D; Valencia, D

    2008-09-12

    We review recent developments of dynamic x-ray characterization experiments of dense matter, with particular emphasis on conditions relevant to interiors of terrestrial and gas giant planets. These studies include characterization of compressed states of matter in light elements by x-ray scattering and imaging of shocked iron by radiography. We examine several applications of this work. These include the structure of massive 'Super Earth' terrestrial planets around other stars, the 40 known extrasolar gas giants with measured masses and radii, and Jupiter itself, which serves as our benchmark for giant planets. We are now in an era of dramatic improvement in our knowledge of the physics of materials at high density. For light elements, this theoretical and experimental work has many applications, including internal confinement fusion as well as the interiors of gas giant planets. For heavy elements, experiments on silicates and iron at high pressure are helping to better understand the Earth, as well as terrestrial planets as a class of objects. In particular, the discovery of rocky and gaseous planets in other planetary systems has opened our imaginations to planets not found in our own solar system. While the fields of experiments of matter at high densities, first principles calculations of equations of state (EOS), planetary science, and astronomy do progress independently of each other, it is important for there to be communication between fields. For instance, in the realm of planets, physicists can learn of key problems that exist in the area of planetary structure, and how advances in our understanding of input physics could shed new light in this area. Astronomers and planetary scientists can learn where breakthroughs in physics of materials under extreme conditions are occurring, and be ready to apply these findings within their fields.

  3. Planetary seismology and interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoz, M. N.

    1979-01-01

    This report briefly summarizes knowledge gained in the area of planetary seismology in the period 1969-1979. Attention is given to the seismic instruments, the seismic environment (noise, characteristics of seismic wave propagation, etc.), and the seismicity of the moon and Mars as determined by the Apollo missions and Viking Lander experiments, respectively. The models of internal structures of the terrestrial planets are discussed, with the earth used for reference.

  4. Variational Principle for Planetary Interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Li; Jacobsen, Stein B.

    2016-09-01

    In the past few years, the number of confirmed planets has grown above 2000. It is clear that they represent a diversity of structures not seen in our own solar system. In addition to very detailed interior modeling, it is valuable to have a simple analytical framework for describing planetary structures. The variational principle is a fundamental principle in physics, entailing that a physical system follows the trajectory, which minimizes its action. It is alternative to the differential equation formulation of a physical system. Applying the variational principle to the planetary interior can beautifully summarize the set of differential equations into one, which provides us some insight into the problem. From this principle, a universal mass-radius relation, an estimate of the error propagation from the equation of state to the mass-radius relation, and a form of the virial theorem applicable to planetary interiors are derived.

  5. Planetary Interior in the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Chau, R; Bastea, M; Mitchell, A C; Minich, R W; Nellis, W J

    2003-01-31

    In the three years of this project, we have provided a complete database of the electrical conductivity of planetary materials to 180 GPa. The electrical conductivities of these planetary materials now provide a basis for future modeling of planets taking into account full magnetohydrodynamics. By using a full magnetohydrodynamics simulation, the magnetic fields of the planets can then be taken into account. Moreover, the electrical conductivities of the planetary materials have given us insight into the structure and nature of these dense fluids. We showed that simple monoatomic fluids such as hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen at planetary interior conditions undergo a common metallization process which can be explained on a simple basis of their radial charge density distributions. This model also shows that the metallization process is actually rather common and likely to take place in a number of materials such as carbon monoxide which is also present within planetary objects. On the other hand, we have also showed that a simple two component fluid like water and methane take on much different behaviors than say nitrogen due to the chemical interactions within these systems. The dynamics of an even more complex system, ''synthetic Uranus'' are still being analyzed but suggest that on some levels the behavior is very simple, i.e. the electrical conductivity is essentially the same as water, but the local dynamics are very complex. This project has shed much light on the nature of electrical transport within planetary interiors but also has shown that understanding chemical processes in the complex fluids within planetary interiors to be very important. Understanding those local interactions and processes is required to gain further insight into planetary interiors.

  6. Planetary Magnetic Fields: Planetary Interiors and Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazio, T. Joseph W.; Shkolnik, Evgenya; Hallinan, Gregg; Planetary Habitability Study Team

    2016-06-01

    The W. M. Keck Institute for Space Studies (KISS) sponsored the Planetary Magnetic Fields: Planetary Interiors and Habitability Study to review the state of knowledge of extrasolar planetary magnetic fields and the prospects for their detection. There were multiple motivations for this Study. Planetary-scale magnetic fields are a window to a planet's interior and provide shielding of the planet's atmosphere. The Earth, Mercury, Ganymede, and the giant planets of the solar system all contain internal dynamo currents that generate planetary-scale magnetic fields. In turn, these internal dynamo currents arise from differential rotation, convection, compositional dynamics, or a combination of these in objects' interiors. If coupled to an energy source, such as the incident kinetic or magnetic energy from the solar wind or an orbiting satellite, a planet's magnetic field can produce intense electron cyclotron masers in its magnetic polar regions. The most well known example of this process in the solar system is the Jovian decametric emission, but all of the giant planets and the Earth contain similar electron cyclotron masers within their magnetospheres. Extrapolated to extrasolar planets, the remote detection of the magnetic field of an extrasolar planet would provide a means of obtaining constraints on the thermal state, composition, and dynamics of its interior--all of which will be difficult to determine by other means--as well as improved understanding of the basic planetary dynamo process. This report presents the findings from the Study, including potential mission concepts that emerged and future work in both modeling and observations. There was also an identification of that radio wavelength observations would likely be key to making significant progress in this field. The entire Study program would not have been possible without the generous support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. We thank Michele Judd, Tom Prince, and the staff of the W. M. Keck Institute for

  7. Frontier of the physics of dense plasmas and planetary interiors: experiments, theory, applications

    SciTech Connect

    Saumon, Didier; Fortney, Jonathan J; Glenzer, Siegfried H; Koenig, Michel; Brambrink, E; Militzer, Burkhard; Valencia, Diana

    2008-01-01

    Recent developments of dynamic x-ray characterization experiments of dense matter are reviewed, with particular emphasis on conditions relevant to interiors of terrestrial and gas giant planets. These studies include characterization of compressed states of matter in light elements by x-ray scattering and imaging of shocked iron by radiography. Several applications of this work are examined. These include the structure of massive 'super-Earth' terrestrial planets around other stars, the 40 known extrasolar gas giants with measured masses and radii, and Jupiter itself, which serves as the benchmark for giant planets.

  8. Interactive investigations into planetary interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, I.

    2015-12-01

    Many processes in Earth science are difficult to observe or visualize due to the large timescales and lengthscales over which they operate. The dynamics of planetary mantles are particularly challenging as we cannot even look at the rocks involved. As a result, much teaching material on mantle dynamics relies on static images and cartoons, many of which are decades old. Recent improvements in computing power and technology (largely driven by game and web development) have allowed for advances in real-time physics simulations and visualizations, but these have been slow to affect Earth science education.Here I demonstrate a teaching tool for mantle convection and seismology which solves the equations for conservation of mass, momentum, and energy in real time, allowing users make changes to the simulation and immediately see the effects. The user can ask and answer questions about what happens when they add heat in one place, or take it away from another place, or increase the temperature at the base of the mantle. They can also pause the simulation, and while it is paused, create and visualize seismic waves traveling through the mantle. These allow for investigations into and discussions about plate tectonics, earthquakes, hot spot volcanism, and planetary cooling.The simulation is rendered to the screen using OpenGL, and is cross-platform. It can be run as a native application for maximum performance, but it can also be embedded in a web browser for easy deployment and portability.

  9. Planetary deep interiors, geodesy, and habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehant, Veronique

    2014-05-01

    The evolution of planets is driven by the composition, structure, and thermal state of their internal core, mantle, lithosphere, crust, and by interactions with possible ocean and atmosphere. This presentation puts in perspective the fundamental understanding of the relationships and interactions between those different planetary reservoirs and their evolution through time. It emphasizes on the deep interior part of terrestrial planets and moons. The core of a planet, when composed of liquid iron alloy, may provide magnetic field and further interaction with the magnetosphere, ingredients believed to be important for the evolution of an atmosphere and of a planet in general. The deep interior is believed to be of high importance for its habitability. Lander and orbiter, even rover at the surface of planets or moons of the solar system help in determining their interior properties. First of all orbiters feel the gravity of the planet and its variations. In particular, the tidal mass redistribution induces changes in the acceleration of the spacecraft orbiting around a planet. The Love number k2 has been determined for Venus, Mars, and the Earth, as well as for Titan and will be deduced for Mercury and for some of the Galilean satellites from new missions such as JUICE (Jupiter Icy satellite Explorer). The properties of the interior can also be determined from the observation of the rotation of the celestial body. Radar observation from the Earth ground stations of Mercury has allowed Margo et al. (2012, JGR) to determine the moments of inertia of Mercury with an unprecedented accuracy. Rovers such as the MERs (Mars Exploration Rovers) allow as well to obtain the precession and nutation of Mars from which the moments of inertia of the planet and its core can be deduced. Future missions such as the InSIGHT (Interior exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy, and Heat Transport) NASA mission will further help in the determination of Mars interior and evolution

  10. Planetary Interior Structure Revealed by Spin Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margot, J.; Peale, S. J.; Jurgens, R. F.; Slade, M. A.; Holin, I. V.

    2002-12-01

    The spin state of a planet depends on the distribution of mass within the interior, gradual and discrete changes in its moments of inertia, dissipation mechanisms at the surface and below, and external torques. Detailed measurements of the spin dynamics can therefore reveal much about planetary interior structure, interactions at the core-mantle and atmosphere-surface boundaries, and mass redistribution events. Studies of the spin precession, polar wobble, and length of day variations have been used to determine Earth's moments of inertia and rigidity and to study the effects of atmospheric angular momentum changes, post-glacial rebound, and large earthquakes. In planetary investigations the spin measurements are particularly important because other means of constraining interior properties require in-situ or orbiting sensors (e.g. seismometers, magnetometers, and Doppler tracking of spacecraft). Here we describe the successful implementation of a new Earth-based radar technique (Holin, 1992) that provides spin state measurements with unprecedented accuracy. Our first observations were designed to characterize Mercury's core. Peale (1976) showed that the measurement of four quantities (the obliquity of the planet, the amplitude of its longitude librations, and the second-degree gravitational harmonics) are sufficient to determine the size and state of Mercury's core. The existence of a molten core would place strong constraints on the thermal and rotational histories of the planet, with profound implications for the composition and rotation state of the planet at the time of formation. A solid core would have a fundamental impact on theories of planetary magnetic field generation. We observed Mercury with the Goldstone radar and the Green Bank Telescope in May-June 2002. We illuminated the planet with a monochromatic signal, recorded the scattered power at the two antennas, and cross-correlated the echoes in the time domain. We obtained strong correlations which

  11. Investigation of Partial Melting in Planetary Interiors using Electrical Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommier, A.; Evans, R. L.; Leinenweber, K. D.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Partial melting is induced by major processes that shape the interior of terrestrial bodies and contributes to their differentiation, structure, and dynamics. Among the tools used to investigate planetary interiors, electromagnetic (EM) data probe the electrical response of planetary interiors and can detect the presence of partially molten areas. Combined with laboratory experiments on partially molten samples and petrological constraints, electrical measurements help place constraints on the amount, geometry, interconnectivity, and storage conditions of melt. In particular, electrical experiments on partially molten rocks provide a test of the likelihood of a molten lowermost mantle, as suggested for the Moon, and can be used to investigate melt alignment and distribution in active tectonic contexts on Earth. Here, we use two recent electrical conductivity datasets to investigate partially molten zones in the deep Lunar mantle and Earth's asthenosphere. Electrical experiments were performed at high temperature on 1) olivine compacts (Fo77 and Fo90) during melting experiments at 4 and 6 GPa and 2) sheared olivine (+MORB) samples at 3 GPa, with shear strains up to 7.3. All measurements were conducted using the impedance spectroscopy technique with the two-electrode method. Partial melting experiments show that at T> Tsolidus + 75°C, conductivity increases significantly, by a factor of ˜30 to 100, due to a transition from a tube-dominated network to a structure in which melt films and pools become prominent features. At higher T, a plateau suggests that the electrical response of the investigated samples lacks sensitivity to temperature at an advanced stage of melting. Comparison of our results with EM data of the Moon supports the hypothesis of the presence of interconnected melt at the base of the mantle and provides upper bounds on melt fraction. Experiments on sheared samples suggest that the presence of melt in a sheared rock will provide high conductivities

  12. Simulation of the planetary interior differentiation processes in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Fei, Yingwei

    2013-11-15

    A planetary interior is under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions and it has a layered structure. There are two important processes that led to that layered structure, (1) percolation of liquid metal in a solid silicate matrix by planet differentiation, and (2) inner core crystallization by subsequent planet cooling. We conduct high-pressure and high-temperature experiments to simulate both processes in the laboratory. Formation of percolative planetary core depends on the efficiency of melt percolation, which is controlled by the dihedral (wetting) angle. The percolation simulation includes heating the sample at high pressure to a target temperature at which iron-sulfur alloy is molten while the silicate remains solid, and then determining the true dihedral angle to evaluate the style of liquid migration in a crystalline matrix by 3D visualization. The 3D volume rendering is achieved by slicing the recovered sample with a focused ion beam (FIB) and taking SEM image of each slice with a FIB/SEM crossbeam instrument. The second set of experiments is designed to understand the inner core crystallization and element distribution between the liquid outer core and solid inner core by determining the melting temperature and element partitioning at high pressure. The melting experiments are conducted in the multi-anvil apparatus up to 27 GPa and extended to higher pressure in the diamond-anvil cell with laser-heating. We have developed techniques to recover small heated samples by precision FIB milling and obtain high-resolution images of the laser-heated spot that show melting texture at high pressure. By analyzing the chemical compositions of the coexisting liquid and solid phases, we precisely determine the liquidus curve, providing necessary data to understand the inner core crystallization process.

  13. Simulation of the Planetary Interior Differentiation Processes in the Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Yingwei

    2013-01-01

    A planetary interior is under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions and it has a layered structure. There are two important processes that led to that layered structure, (1) percolation of liquid metal in a solid silicate matrix by planet differentiation, and (2) inner core crystallization by subsequent planet cooling. We conduct high-pressure and high-temperature experiments to simulate both processes in the laboratory. Formation of percolative planetary core depends on the efficiency of melt percolation, which is controlled by the dihedral (wetting) angle. The percolation simulation includes heating the sample at high pressure to a target temperature at which iron-sulfur alloy is molten while the silicate remains solid, and then determining the true dihedral angle to evaluate the style of liquid migration in a crystalline matrix by 3D visualization. The 3D volume rendering is achieved by slicing the recovered sample with a focused ion beam (FIB) and taking SEM image of each slice with a FIB/SEM crossbeam instrument. The second set of experiments is designed to understand the inner core crystallization and element distribution between the liquid outer core and solid inner core by determining the melting temperature and element partitioning at high pressure. The melting experiments are conducted in the multi-anvil apparatus up to 27 GPa and extended to higher pressure in the diamond-anvil cell with laser-heating. We have developed techniques to recover small heated samples by precision FIB milling and obtain high-resolution images of the laser-heated spot that show melting texture at high pressure. By analyzing the chemical compositions of the coexisting liquid and solid phases, we precisely determine the liquidus curve, providing necessary data to understand the inner core crystallization process. PMID:24326245

  14. On the magnetic sounding of planetary interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glatzmaier, Gary A.; Roberts, Paul H.

    1996-12-01

    Two ways have been suggested for using the magnetic field of a planet to estimate the radius of its electrically conducting core, assumed spherical and concentric with the planet's surface. In the frozen flux method, the core radius is assumed to have the value rFF for which the integrated unsigned radial magnetic flux, from the sphere of that radius, is most nearly constant in time. In the flat spectrum method, the core radius is assumed to have the value rFS for which the power spectrum of the field, defined as the mean square energy density in the lth spherical harmonic component of the field at that radius, is most nearly independent of l. These two methods are here applied to a new geodynamo integration that is a continuation of a recently published simulation (see Glatzmaier and Roberts, 1995a, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 91: 63-75; Glatzmaier and Roberts, 1995b, Nature, 377: 203-209) and which, like the Earth, maintains a more strongly dipole dominated magnetic field. The rate of change of the unsigned flux was averaged over two different 300 year intervals at a number of radii, r, from the geocenter. The resulting functions of r were found to have zeros at rFF of approximately 3550 km and 3477 km, respectively. This demonstrates how sensitive this method is to the time interval selected for the computation. Even if, as is often done when the flat spectrum method is applied to the Earth, the centered dipole ( l = 1) is excluded, the spectrum of our model could not be made convincingly flat; but a radius rFS at which it is most flat can be defined. The value of rFS is, however, very sensitive to the number of spherical harmonics retained in the spectrum and to a lesser extent is time dependent. On the basis of these studies, and impressed by the lack of a sound physical justification for the flat spectrum method, we conclude that that method provides a less certain way of estimating the radius of a planetary core than does the frozen flux approximation, and

  15. On Dislocation Glide in Planetary Interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, P.; Carrez, P.; Gouriet, K.; Kraych, A.; Ritterbex, S.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of hot planets depends strongly on how heat is transported to their surfaces through large scale convection flows. This is ultimately controlled by the rheology of high-pressure phases under extreme conditions. Whenever solid rocks are concerned, plastic flow results from the propagation of crystal defects (point defects, dislocations, grain boundaries). In this presentation we focus on the role of pressure on dislocation glide which is usually the most efficient strain-producing mechanism. Dislocation glide is assessed through multiscale numerical modeling. First, dislocations are modeled at the atomic scale based on first-principles calculations to incorporate the influence of pressure. Then the mobility law of dislocation at finite temperature is modeled by describing thermally-activated mechanisms for dislocation glide based on the kink-pair model. Then the flow stress at the grain scale is deduced either from application of the Orowan equation or by dislocation dynamics modeling. This approach is applied to wadsleyite, ringwoodite, bridgmanite and post-perovskite. Mechanical properties are either calculated at laboratory strain-rates to be compared with experiments when available or at mantle strain-rate to assess their efficiency under natural conditions.

  16. Planetary Magnetic Fields: Planetary Interiors and Habitability W. M. Keck Institute for Space Studies Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazio, T. Joseph; Shkolnik, Evgenya; Hallinan, Gregg

    2017-05-01

    The W. M. Keck Institute for Space Studies (KISS) sponsored the "Planetary Magnetic Fields: Planetary Interiors and Habitability" study to review the state of knowledge of extrasolar planetary magnetic fields and the prospects for their detection.There were multiple motivations for this Study. Planetary-scale magnetic fields are a window to a planet's interior and provide shielding of the planet's atmosphere. The Earth, Mercury, Ganymede, and the giant planets of the solar system all contain internal dynamo currents that generate planetary-scale magnetic fields. In turn, these internal dynamo currents arise from differential rotation, convection, compositional dynamics, or a combination of these in objects' interiors. If coupled to an energy source, such as the incident kinetic or magnetic energy from the solar wind or an orbiting satellite, a planet's magnetic field can produce intense electron cyclotron masers in its magnetic polar regions. The most well known example of this process in the solar system is the Jovian decametric emission, but all of the giant planets and the Earth contain similar electron cyclotron masers within their magnetospheres. Extrapolated to extrasolar planets, the remote detection of the magnetic field of an extrasolar planet would provide a means of obtaining constraints on the thermal state, composition, and dynamics of its interior--all of which will be difficult to determine by other means--as well as improved understanding of the basic planetary dynamo process.We review the findings from the Study, including potential mission concepts that emerged and recent developments toward one of the mission concepts, a space-based radio wavelength array. There was an identification of that radio wavelength observations would likely be key to making significant progress in this field.We acknowledge ideas and advice from the participants in the "Planetary Magnetic Fields: Planetary Interiors and Habitability" study organized by the W. M. Keck

  17. Planetary entry experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roger A.

    1994-01-01

    The final report summarizes the results from three research areas: (1) window design for the radiometric measurement of the forebody radiative heating experienced by atmospheric entry spaceraft; (2) survey of the current understanding of chemical species on selected solar system bodies and assess the importance of measurements with regard to vehicle environment and with regard to understanding of planetary atmospheres with emphasis on Venus, Mars, and Titan; and (3) measure and analyze the radiation (VUV to near-IR) from the shock heated gas cap of a blunt body in an Ames arc Jet wind-tunnel facility.

  18. Phase relation of C-Mg-Fe-Si-O system under various oxygen fugacity conditions by in situ X-ray diffraction experiments: Implication for planetary interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, S.; Ohtani, E.; Terasaki, H.; Ito, Y.; Funakoshi, K.; Higo, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon is one of the major volatile elements and very important in the Earth, primitive meteorites and some achondrites, such as ureilites. The abundance of carbon has been estimated to be 100 times higher than that in the CI chondrite, in some of the stars with exoplanets, such as the circumstellar gas around Beta Pictoris (Roberge et al., 2006). In such a gas, carbon-enriched planets, "carbon-planet", may be formed. Carbon-planet interior is likely to be composed mainly of Carbon-bearing phase, such as carbide, carbonate, graphite and diamond. Therefore, it is important to investigate phase relations of carbon-rich systems under high pressure conditions. In this study, C-enriched Mg-Si-Fe-O system was investigated at high pressure and temperature in order to understand the internal structure of the carbon-planets. Phase relations were studied based on 2 series of experiments; (I) textural observation and chemical analysis of the sample recovered from high pressure and temperature and (II) in situ X-ray diffraction experiments. We used several different mineral assemblages for the starting materials, as shown below: (i) (Mg1.8,Fe0.2)SiO4 + Fe + SiO2 + C, (ii) (Mg1.8,Fe0.2)SiO4 + Fe + Si + C, (iii) MgO + Fe + SiO2 + C, (iv) MgO + Fe + Si + C. Oxygen fugacity (fO2) of the sample varies depending on these assembleges due to different O amounts in the starting materials. Chemical analyses of the recovered samples were performed using an electron microprobe. In situ X-ray diffraction experiments were conducted at 4 and 15 GPa, and up to 1873 K at BL04B1 beamline, SPring-8 synchrotron facility. Different mineral assemblages were observed depending on the redox condition of the sample. The compositions of metallic melts changes from Fe-C compositions in oxidizing conditions to Fe-Si compositions in the reducing conditions. Based on in situ X-ray diffraction experiments at 4 GPa, FeSi and SiC peaks appeared at 1373 K in the most reducing sample (iv), whereas Fe3C appeared

  19. High pressure cosmochemistry applied to major planetary interiors: Experimental studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, M. F.; Johnson, M.; Boone, S.

    1985-01-01

    The measurement of equilibria in binary fluid-solid systems in diamond anvil cells, represents a major advance of the art of high-pressure experimentation. Vibrational spectroscopy, direct visual observations, and X-ray diffraction crystallography of materials confined in externally heated cells are the primary experimental probes being used. Adiabats in these systems are being measured in order to constrain models of heat flow in these bodies and to detect phase transitions by thermal anomalies. Other studies are directed toward interpreting high pressure reactions in these systems that are suggested by shockwave measurements, and developing methods for reaching high temperatures and high pressures of planetary interest in diamond cells. The overall objective of this project is to determine the properties of the H2-He-H2O-HN3-CH4 system and related small-molecule systems that are needed to constrain theoretical models of the interiors of the major planets.

  20. High pressure cosmochemistry applied to major planetary interiors: Experimental studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, M. F.; Boone, S.; Cynn, H. C.

    1986-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to determine properties of the H-He-C-N-O system, as represented by small molecules composed of these elements, that are needed to constrain theoretical models of the interiors of the major planets. Much of our work now concerns the H2O-NH3 system. This project is the first major effort to measure phase equilibria in binary fluid-solid systems in diamond anvil cells. Vibrational spectroscopy, direct visual observations, and X-ray crystallography of materials confined in externally heated cells are our primary experimental probes. We also are collaborating with the shockwave physics group at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory in studies of the equation of state of a synthetic Uranus fluid and molecular composition of this and other H-C-N-O materials under planetary conditions.

  1. Planetary X ray experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    Design studies for an X-ray experiment using solid state detectors and for an experiment using a proportional counter for investigating Jovian and Saturnian magnetospheres are reported. Background counting rates through the forward aperture and leakage fluxes are discussed for each design. It is concluded that the best choice of instrument appears to have following the characteristics: (1) two separate multiwire proportional counters for redundancy; (2) passive collimation to restrict the field to about 5 deg, wiregrid modulation collimation to about 0.1 deg angular resolution; (3) no active shielding system around the counter body; and (4) light passive shielding around any portion of the counter body exposed to space to absorb most of the cosmic X-ray background.

  2. Exploring the Largest Mass Fraction of the Solar System: the Case for Planetary Interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Draper, D.; Righter, K.; McCubbin, F.; Boyce, J.

    2017-01-01

    Why explore planetary interiors: The typical image that comes to mind for planetary science is that of a planet surface. And while surface data drive our exploration of evolved geologic processes, it is the interiors of planets that hold the key to planetary origins via accretionary and early differentiation processes. It is that initial setting of the bulk planet composition that sets the stage for all geologic processes that follow. But nearly all of the mass of planets is inaccessible to direct examination, making experimentation an absolute necessity for full planetary exploration.

  3. Planetary Dynamos: Magnetic Constraints on the Interior Structure and Evolution of a Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Bob Yunsheng

    Planetary magnetism is a phenomenon that not only protects humanity from the destructive forces of nature, but also provides us with a natural probe into our planet's deep interior. In this dissertation, I will explore some of the insights concerning planetary interiors that can be gained by combining the techniques of interior structure modelling with constraints provided by planetary dynamo theory. Applications to the dynamical history of the Moon, the interior evolution of Jovian planets, and predicted magnetic fields of planets in our solar system and beyond are considered under this framework. The inferred intensity and longevity of the lunar dynamo from paleomagnetic studies has led to the proposition of mechanical stirring, caused by differential rotation of the inner core and the mantle relative to the fluid outer core, as an energy source alternative to convection. Using fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) modelling techniques, I simulated the purported mechanism, and found it to reproduce not only the strength and longevity of the inferred lunar dynamo, but also its precipitous decline later in its history. For the Jovian planets, due to the lack of constraints, there are a wide range of acceptable interior models in the literature. By combining 1-D interior modelling techniques with constraints imposed by theories of the planet's dynamo, I was able to construct improved models of these planets' interior structure. The discrepancy between the pictures of the Neptunian interior suggested by dynamo models and by thermal evolution models motivated improvements on our current theories about multipolar magnetic field generation. Therefore, I determined some predictive scaling laws for the magnetic field morphologies of planets (and exoplanets) using parameter studies of interior structure and dynamo models. These results will aid in our understandings of the link between interior properties and observed magnetic field characteristics for planets

  4. The Future of Planetary Atmospheric, Surface, and Interior Science Using Radio and Laser Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmar, S. W.; Armstrong, J. W.; Atkinson, D. H.; Bell, D. J.; Bird, M. K.; Dehant, V.; Iess, L.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Linscott, I. R.; Mannucci, A. J.; Mazarico, E.; Park, R. S.; Patzold, M.; Preston, R. A.; Simpson, R. A.

    2017-02-01

    Radio science experiments have been conducted on almost every planetary mission in the past five decades and led to numerous discoveries. More science breakthroughs are expected that fit Planetary Vision 2050 themes with described technical advances.

  5. High pressure cosmochemistry applied to major planetary interiors: Experimental studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, M. F.; Johnson, M.; Koumvakalis, A. S.

    1984-01-01

    Progress is reported on a project to determine the properties and boundaries of high pressure phases of the H2-He-H2O-NH3-CH4 system that are needed to constrain theoretical models of the interiors of the major planets. This project is one of the first attempts to measure phase equilibria in binary fluid-solid systems in diamond anvil cells. Vibrational spectroscopy, direct visual observations, and X-ray diffraction crystallography of materials confined in externally heated cells are the primary experimental probes. Adiabats of these materials are also measured in order to constrain models of heat flow in these bodies and to detect phase transitions by thermal anomalies. Initial efforts involve the NH3-H2O binary. This system is especially relevant to models for surface reconstruction of the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. Thermal analysis experiments were completed for the P-X space, p4GPa:0 or = 0.50, near room temperature. The cryostat, sample handling equipment, and optics needed to extend the optical P-T-X work below room temperature was completed.

  6. Planetary science. Shock compression of stishovite and melting of silica at planetary interior conditions.

    PubMed

    Millot, M; Dubrovinskaia, N; Černok, A; Blaha, S; Dubrovinsky, L; Braun, D G; Celliers, P M; Collins, G W; Eggert, J H; Jeanloz, R

    2015-01-23

    Deep inside planets, extreme density, pressure, and temperature strongly modify the properties of the constituent materials. In particular, how much heat solids can sustain before melting under pressure is key to determining a planet's internal structure and evolution. We report laser-driven shock experiments on fused silica, α-quartz, and stishovite yielding equation-of-state and electronic conductivity data at unprecedented conditions and showing that the melting temperature of SiO2 rises to 8300 K at a pressure of 500 gigapascals, comparable to the core-mantle boundary conditions for a 5-Earth mass super-Earth. We show that mantle silicates and core metal have comparable melting temperatures above 500 to 700 gigapascals, which could favor long-lived magma oceans for large terrestrial planets with implications for planetary magnetic-field generation in silicate magma layers deep inside such planets. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Experimental and Numerical Studies of Mechanically- and Convectively-Driven Turbulence in Planetary Interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grannan, Alexander Michael

    2017-08-01

    characteristics of the resulting turbulence are investigated using meridional views to identify the dominate modes and spatial location of the turbulence. For the first time, measurements of the velocity in the equatorial plane are coupled with high resolution numerical simulations of the full flow field in identical geometry to characterize the instability mechanism, energy deposited into the fluid layer, and long-term evolution of the flow. The velocities determined through laboratory and numerical simulations when extrapolated to planets allow me to argue that the dynamics of mechanical forcing in low viscosity fluids may an important role as new and potentially large source of dissipation in planetary interiors. To study convective forcing, I have modified and performed a set of rotating and non-rotating hydrodynamic convection experiments using water as well as rotating and non-rotating magnetohydrodynamic convection in gallium. These studies are performed in a cylindrical geometry representing a model of high latitude planetary core style convection wherein the axis of rotation and gravity are aligned. For the studies using water, the steady columns that are characteristic of rotating convection and present in the dynamo models are likely to destabilize at the more extreme planetary parameters giving way to transitions to more complex styles of rotating turbulent flow. In the studies of liquid metal where the viscosity is lower, the onset of rotating convection occurs through oscillatory columnar convection well below the onset of steady columns. Such oscillatory modes are not represented at the parameters used by current dynamo models. Furthermore a suite of laboratory experiments shows that the imposition of rotational forces and magnetic forces both separately and together generate zeroeth order flow transitions that change the fundamental convective modes and heat transfer. Such regimes are more easily accessible to laboratory experiments then to numerical simulations

  8. Carbon precipitation from heavy hydrocarbon fluid in deep planetary interiors.

    PubMed

    Lobanov, Sergey S; Chen, Pei-Nan; Chen, Xiao-Jia; Zha, Chang-Sheng; Litasov, Konstantin D; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Goncharov, Alexander F

    2013-01-01

    The phase diagram of the carbon-hydrogen system is of great importance to planetary sciences, as hydrocarbons comprise a significant part of icy giant planets and are involved in reduced carbon-oxygen-hydrogen fluid in the deep Earth. Here we use resistively- and laser-heated diamond anvil cells to measure methane melting and chemical reactivity up to 80 GPa and 2,000 K. We show that methane melts congruently below 40 GPa. Hydrogen and elementary carbon appear at temperatures of >1,200 K, whereas heavier alkanes and unsaturated hydrocarbons (>24 GPa) form in melts of >1,500 K. The phase composition of carbon-hydrogen fluid evolves towards heavy hydrocarbons at pressures and temperatures representative of Earth's lower mantle. We argue that reduced mantle fluids precipitate diamond upon re-equilibration to lighter species in the upwelling mantle. Likewise, our findings suggest that geophysical models of Uranus and Neptune require reassessment because chemical reactivity of planetary ices is underestimated.

  9. Study of the Warm Dense Matter with XANES spectroscopy - Applications to planetary interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denoeud, Adrien

    With the recent discovery of many exoplanets, modelling the interior of these celestial bodies is becoming a fascinating scientific challenge. In this context, it is crucial to accurately know the equations of state and the macroscopic and microscopic physical properties of their constituent materials in the Warm Dense Matter regime (WDM). Moreover, planetary models rely almost exclusively on physical properties obtained using first principles simulations based on density functional theory (DFT) predictions. It is thus of paramount importance to validate the basic underlying mechanisms occurring for key planetary constituents (metallization, dissociation, structural modifications, phase transitions, etc....) as pressure and temperature both increase. In this work, we were interested in two materials that can be mainly found in the Earth-like planets: silica, or SiO2, as a model compound of the silicates that constitute the major part of their mantles, and iron, which is found in abundance in their cores. These two materials were compressed and brought to the WDM regime by using strong shock created by laser pulses during various experiments performed on the LULI2000 (Palaiseau, France) and the JLF (Livermore, US) laser facilities and on the LCLS XFEL (Stanford, US). In order to penetrate this dense matter and to have access to its both ionic and electronic structures, we have probed silica and iron with time-resolved X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES). In parallel with these experiments, we performed quantum molecular dynamics simulations based on DFT at conditions representative of the region investigated experimentally so as to extract the interesting physical processes and comprehend the limits of the implemented models. In particular, these works allowed us to highlight the metallization processes of silica in temperature and the structural changes of its liquid in density, as well as to more constrain the melting curve of iron at very high pressures.

  10. Experimental study of planetary gases with applications to planetary interior models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Peter M.; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    1988-01-01

    High-pressure experimental data on planetary materials are critical in developing planetary models and in addressing otherwise insoluble problems of the internal structure of the major planets. Progress in the last five years has been particularly marked. Maximum static pressure of 550 GPa was achieved. For the first time, X-ray diffraction of solidified gases (Ne, Xe) and ices (H2O) were obtained at pressures above one megabar, single-crystal diffraction of ultralight elements (H2, He) were detected up to 25 GPa, pressures over 200 GPa at 77 K were reached in solid hydrogen, including the discovery of a phase transformation in the molecular solid. Advances in instrumentation and new measurements performed during 1983 to 1988 are summarized.

  11. Recreating planetary interiors in the laboratory by laser-driven ramp-compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppari, Federica

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in laser-driven compression now allow to reproduce conditions existing deep inside large planets in the laboratory. Ramp-compression allows to compress matter along a thermodynamic path not accessible through standard shock compression techniques, and opens the way to the exploration of new pressure, density and temperature conditions. By carefully tuning the laser pulse shape we can compress the material to extremely high pressure and keep the temperature relatively low (i.e. below the melting temperature). In this way, we can probe solid states of matter at unprecedented high pressures. This loading technique has been combined with diagnostics generally used in condensed matter physics, such as x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS, Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure, in particular), to provide a complete picture of the behavior of matter in-situ during compression. X-ray diffraction provides a snapshot of the structure and density of the material, while EXAFS has been used to infer the temperature. Simultaneous optical velocimetry measurements using VISAR (Velocity Interferometer for Any Reflector) yield an accurate determination of the pressure history during compression. In this talk I will present some of the results obtained in ramp-compression experiments performed at the Omega Laser Facility (University of Rochester) where the phase maps of planetary relevant materials, such as Fe, FeO and MgO, have been studied to unprecedented high pressures. Our data provide experimental constraints on the equations of state, strength and structure of these materials expected to dominate the interiors of massive rocky extra-solar planets and a benchmark for theoretical simulations. Combination of these new experimental data with models for planetary formation and evolutions is expected to improve our understanding of complex dynamics occurring in the Universe. This work was performed under the auspices of the US Department of

  12. Instrument report: Planetary X-ray experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    Design studies for an X-ray experiment to investigate planetary magnetospheres using solid state detectors, or proportional counters are reported. The detectors, background counting rate, and leakage fluxes are discussed. It is concluded that the best choice of instruments appears to be two separate multiproportional counters for redundancy.

  13. Iron opacity experiments for the solar interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, T.; Bailey, J. E.; Loisel, G.; Rochau, G. A.; Hansen, S. B.; Blancard, C.; Cosse, Ph.; Faussurier, G.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J.-C.; Pradhan, A. K.; Orban, C.; Pinsonneault, M.; Nahar, S. N.; Iglesias, C. A.; Wilson, B.; Colgan, J.; Fontes, C.; Kilcrease, D.; Sherrill, M.; Macfarlane, J. J.; Golovkin, I.; Mancini, R. C.

    2014-10-01

    Iron opacity experiments near solar interior conditions are performed at SNL Z-machine to better constrain solar models. The SNL opacity science platform satisfies the many challenging requirements for opacity measurements and successfully determines iron opacities at multiple conditions. We found that the agreement between the modeled opacity and the measured opacity deteriorates as Te and ne are raised to approach solar interior conditions. While the inaccuracy of the modeled opacity partially resolves the solar abundance problem, the announcement of such discrepancies has a high impact on the astrophysics, atomic physics, and high energy density physics, and thus more scrutiny on the potential experimental flaws is critical. We report the synthetic investigation for potential sources of systematic uncertainties in the experiments. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. Compressibility and planetary interiors. [solid core theory applicable to Earth and Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullen, K. E.

    1972-01-01

    Important confirmations that the Earth's inner core is solid have recently come from analyses of records of free Earth oscillations and from the apparent detection of the seismic phase PKJKP. Corresponding support is given to the theory which supplied the primary evidence for rigidity in the inner core. This theory requires the incompressibility and its gradient with respect to the pressure p to vary fairly smoothly with p inside planets, and supplies a potent restriction on the allowable variations of particular physical properties inside parts of planetary interiors. The theory is at present principally applicable to the Earth and Venus. The paper reviews some of the principal implications.

  15. Plasma Experiment for Planetary Exploration (PEPE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D. T.; Nordholt, J. E.; Burch, J. L.; McComas, D. J.; Bowman, R. P.; Abeyta, R. A.; Alexander, J.; Baldonado, J.; Barker, P.; Black, R. K.; Booker, T. L.; Casey, P. J.; Cope, L.; Crary, F. J.; Cravens, J. P.; Funsten, H. O.; Goldstein, R.; Guerrero, D. R.; Hahn, S. F.; Hanley, J. J.; Henneke, B. P.; Horton, E. F.; Lawrence, D. J.; McCabe, K. P.; Reisenfeld, D.; Salazar, R. P.; Shappirio, M.; Storms, S. A.; Urdiales, C.; Waite, J. H.

    2007-04-01

    The Plasma Experiment for Planetary Exploration (PEPE) flown on Deep Space 1 combines an ion mass spectrometer and an electron spectrometer in a single, low-resource instrument. Among its novel features PEPE incorporates an electrostatically swept field-of-view and a linear electric field time-of-flight mass spectrometer. A significant amount of effort went into developing six novel technologies that helped reduce instrument mass to 5.5 kg and average power to 9.6 W. PEPE’s performance was demonstrated successfully by extensive measurements made in the solar wind and during the DS1 encounter with Comet 19P/Borrelly in September 2001.

  16. Planetary/DOD entry technology flight experiments. Volume 2: Planetary entry flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, H. E.; Krieger, R. J.; Mcneilly, W. R.; Vetter, H. C.

    1976-01-01

    The technical feasibility of launching a high speed, earth entry vehicle from the space shuttle to advance technology for the exploration of the outer planets' atmospheres was established. Disciplines of thermodynamics, orbital mechanics, aerodynamics propulsion, structures, design, electronics and system integration focused on the goal of producing outer planet environments on a probe shaped vehicle during an earth entry. Major aspects of analysis and vehicle design studied include: planetary environments, earth entry environment capability, mission maneuvers, capabilities of shuttle upper stages, a comparison of earth entry planetary environments, experiment design and vehicle design.

  17. Impact-induced shock pressure distribution in a heterogeneous planetary interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkani-Hamed, J.

    2012-12-01

    The shock pressure distribution inside planetary interiors has been investigated on the basis of scaling laws [1,2] and using numerical hydrocode models [2,3]. Here I present a new shock ray formulations derived on the basis of the Hugoniot equations to calculate the impact-induced shock pressure distribution inside heterogeneous terrestrial planets with radially varying physical parameters both in the solid mantle and in the underlying liquid core. Considering a single vertical impact, the formulations are derived in an axi-symmetric spherical coordinate system where the impact is assumed to occur at the north pole. In previous studies the scaling laws of shock pressure distribution [5] have been used to determine the impact heating of the planetary interiors by direct shock waves [2]. Because the main concern was the impact heating of the core, the heating of the antipodal region of the mantle was not investigated. The present study not only considers the impact heating of the entire planetary mantle by direct shock waves but also investigates the effects of the reflected shock waves inside the core. The direct shockwave propagating southward in the core intersects the core mantle boundary in the antipodal region where it partly transmits to the mantle and partly reflects back into the core. Both transmitted and reflected waves converge toward the axis of symmetry and create strong shock pressure near the axis in the antipodal region. Consequently, the antipodal region is significantly heated. In particular, the antipodal region of the core is heated twice, first by the direct shock wave as it propagates southward, and second by the reflected waves which actually increases in intensity close to the axis of symmetry. This feature has been demonstrated by the hydrocode models [3,4] but not by the scaling models based on direct shock wave propagation [1]. The new algorithm is applied to the impact heating of Mars, and the results are compared with those determined

  18. The Mars Plant Growth Experiment and Implications for Planetary Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Heather

    Plants are the ultimate and necessary solution for O2 production at a human base on Mars. Currently it is unknown if seeds can germinate on the Martian surface. The Mars Plant growth experiment (MPX) is a proposal for the first step in the development of a plant- based O2 production system by demonstrating plant germination and growth on the Martian surface. There is currently no planetary protection policy in place that covers plants on the Martian surface. We describe a planetary protection plan in compliance with NASA and COSPAR policy for a closed plant growth chamber on a Mars rover. We divide the plant growth chamber into two categories for planetary protection, the Outside: the outside of the chamber exposed to the Martian environment, and the Inside: the inside of the chamber which is sealed off from Mars atmosphere and contains the plant seeds and ancillary components for seed growth. We will treat outside surfaces of the chamber as other outside surfaces on the rover, wiped with a mixture of isopropyl alcohol and water as per Category IVb planetary protection requirements. All internal components of the MPX except the seeds and camera (including the water system, the plant growth stage and interior surface walls) will be sterilized by autoclave and subjected to sterilizing dry heat at a temperature of 125°C at an absolute humidity corresponding to a relative humidity of less than 25 percent referenced to the standard conditions of 0°C and 760 torr pressure. The seeds and internal compartments of the MPX in contact with the growth media will be assembled and tested to be free of viable microbes. MPX, once assembled, cannot survive Dry Heat Microbial Reduction. The camera with the radiation and CO2 sensors will be sealed in their own container and vented through HEPA filters. The seeds will be vernalized (microbe free) as per current Space Station methods described by Paul et al. 2001. Documentation of the lack of viable microbes on representative seeds

  19. Nature of the interior of Uranus based on studies of planetary ices at high dynamic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, W.J.; Hamilton, D.C.; Holmes, N.C.; Radousky, H.B.; Ree, F.H.; Mitchell, A.C.; Nicol, M.

    1988-05-06

    Data from the Voyager II spacecraft showed that Uranus has a large magnetic field with geometry similar to an offset tilted dipole. To interpret the origin of the magnetic field, measurements were made of electrical conductivity and equation-of-state data of the planetary ices ammonia, methane, and synthetic Uranus at shock pressures and temperatures up to 75 gigapascals and 5000 K. These pressures and temperatures correspond to conditions at the depths at which the surface magnetic field is generated. Above 40 gigapascals the conductivities of synthetic Uranus, water, and ammonia plateau at about 20 (ohm-cm)/sup -1/, providing an upper limit for the electrical conductivity used in kinematic or dynamo calculations. The nature of materials at the extreme conditions in the interior is discussed. 29 references, 3 figures.

  20. Anomalous bulk viscosity of two-phase fluids and implications for planetary interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    The irreversible entropy production is calculated for the imposition of a pressure perturbation on a two-phase medium composed of a dilute suspension of droplets (or snowflakes) and a liquid phase of other materials. An absence of metastability is assumed, allowing the relaxation to be dominated by the solute finite diffusivity. The fluid medium was found to display a behavior suggestive of a bulk viscosity near 10 trillion P, a finding that is significant for studies of dissipation in planetary cores for tidal or seismic disturbances. A minimum quality factor for acoustic or tidal pressure oscillations and the accompanying frequency are calculated. An example is provided in terms of helium rain clouds in the deep interiors of giant planets. Additionally, a tidal quality factor of 10 to the 15th is found necessary to account for Io volcanism and resurfacing on Enceladus.

  1. Probing Planetary Interior Structure And ProcessesWith High-precision Spin Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margot, Jean-Luc

    2011-04-01

    Measurements of planetary rotation provide powerful probes of planetary interior structure and processes. In this talk I will describe results and prospects for Mercury, Venus, and Europa. Observations of radar speckle patterns tied to the rotation of Mercury establish that the planet exhibits periodic variations in length-of-day. The amplitude of the oscillations indicates that the mantle of Mercury is decoupled from a molten outer core. Long-term signatures may reveal core-mantle interactions. Ongoing measurements of Venus show that its spin period is not constant. The variations are compatible with percent-level changes in atmospheric angular momentum transferred to the solid planet. Monitoring these fluctuations can provide key constraints on the atmospheric dynamics and climate of Venus. Several lines of evidence suggest that a subsurface ocean exists beneath an icy shell on Europa. The shell most likely exhibits periodic spin variations that may be detectable from Earth. The amplitude of the oscillations depend on the rheology and thickness of the shell, perhaps the most important determinants of Europa's astrobiological potential.

  2. Shockwave determination of the shear velocity at very high pressures. [for determining properties of planetary interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, O. L.

    1972-01-01

    A shock wave experiment is described for confirming changes in density, from seismic interpretation, for determining the properties of planet interiors. The experiment focuses on the problem of measurements in a pressure region, where the shear velocity tends to vanish, or become very small. Pressure-sensitive lattice stability, and the equations for an atomic model of the NaCl lattice are discussed along with the particle velocity shock technique.

  3. Experiments on planetary ices at UCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindrod, P. M.; Fortes, A. D.; Wood, I. G.; Dobson, D.; Sammonds, P. R.; Stone-Drake, L.; Vocadlo, L.

    2007-08-01

    Using a suite of techniques and equipment, we conduct several different types of experiments on planetary ices at UCL. Samples are prepared in the Ice Physics Laboratory, which consists of a 5 chamber complex of inter-connected cold rooms, controllable from +30 to -30 deg C. Within this laboratory we have a functioning triaxial deformation cell operating at low temperature (down to -90 deg C) and high pressures (300 MPa), an Automatic Ice Fabric Analyser (AIFA) and a low-temperature microscope with CCD output. Polycrystalline samples, 40mm diameter by 100mm long, are compressed in the triaxial rig with a confining pressure; single crystal specimens are compressed in a separate uniaxial creep rig which operates at zero confining pressure for surface studies. A cold stage is also available for study of ice microstructural studies on our new Jeol JSM-6480LV SEM, which also allows tensile, compression and/or bending tests, with load ranges from less than 2N to 5000N. Finally, we also use a cold stage on a new PANalytical, X'pert PRO MPD, high resolution powder diffractometer to study the structure and phase behaviour of icy materials. Recent highlights of our work include: (1) derivation of a manufacturing process for methane clathrate at low temperatures, analysed in the X-Ray Diffraction Laboratory, for future rheological experiments, (2) analysed the growth behaviour of MS11, (3) refurbished and commenced calibration tests on the triaxial deformation cell using ice Ih, and (4) performed creep tests on gypsum and epsomite using the single crystal deformation cell. Further experiments will build on these preliminary results.

  4. High-precision measurements of planetary spin states as probes of interior structure and processes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margot, J.

    2009-12-01

    Profound developments in our understanding of the Earth and Moon have arisen as a direct outcome of rotation studies (e.g., Munk and MacDonald 1960, Lambeck 1980, Wahr 1988, Dickey et al 1994). Measurements of planetary rotation provide powerful probes of planetary interior structure and processes. I will discuss ongoing observations at Mercury, Venus, and Titan, as well as future prospects for other bodies. Observations of radar speckle patterns tied to the rotation of Mercury establish that the planet occupies a Cassini state with obliquity 2.11 +/- 0.1 arcminutes. The measurements show that the planet exhibits librations in longitude that are forced at the 88-day orbital period, as predicted by theory. The amplitude of the oscillations together with spacecraft determinations of the gravitational harmonic coefficient C22 indicates that the mantle of Mercury is decoupled from a core that is at least partially molten. Departures from the exact Cassini state and long-term libration signatures can inform us about core-mantle interactions. New Cassini radar measurements of the spin state of Titan (Stiles et al 2008) can be most readily interpreted as evidence that Titan closely follows a Cassini state. Peale (1969) has shown that, in that state, a clear relationship exists between obliquity and moment of inertia differences. Application of this relationship to Titan in conjunction with measurements of the gravitational harmonic C22 yields a polar moment of inertia that exceeds the 2/5 value for a uniform density sphere, perhaps indicative of a decoupling between core and outer layer, as in Mercury. Libration measurements at Titan require new instrumentation but can provide superb probes of interior structure and dynamical interactions between layers. This also applies to Galilean satellites (Comstock and Bills 2003, Van Hoolst et al 2008). Ongoing measurements of length-of-day variations at Venus are most easily attributed to angular momentum exchange between

  5. Core petrology: Implications for the dynamics and evolution of planetary interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauck, S. A.; Van Orman, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    The Earth, Mercury and Ganymede represent an exclusive group of terrestrial planetary bodies with present-day magnetic fields generated within their metallic cores. Though Mars, possibly the Moon and some meteorite parent bodies hosted active magnetic field generation in the past. Dynamo action requires sources of thermal and/or compositional buoyancy capable of driving sufficient convective motions. Modeling has shown that thermal buoyancy, the result of core cooling, typically is incapable of driving the necessary convection by itself. On Earth, compositional buoyancy is thought to derive from crystallization of the inner core, which produces a light element enriched fluid at the inner core boundary. In smaller bodies the crystallization behavior and resulting compositional buoyancy may be quite different, depending on pressure and the identity of the light alloying component(s) in the core. The last decade has seen an explosion in knowledge of the physical and thermodynamic properties of candidate core forming materials. These advances have led to the recognition of an array of possible core crystallization sequences, each with potentially important consequences for planetary evolution and magnetic field generation. For example, the melting behavior of iron-sulfur alloys at pressures up to ~40 GPa suggests that iron "snow" would precipitate in shallow regions of the cores of Ganymede, Mars and Mercury, if sulfur is the dominant light alloying element. Similarly, experiments on the iron-carbon system also suggest shallow precipitation of iron at some pressures. While shallow precipitation of iron snow can provide a buoyancy source for core convection, it can also lead to compositional gradients capable of modifying the scale of, or even suppressing, convection. Liquid immiscibility could also have an influence on convection and magnetic field generation in planetary cores that contain more than one light alloying element. The modest pressures and temperatures in

  6. The NASA planetary biology internship experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkle, G.; Margulis, L.

    1991-01-01

    By providing students from around the world with the opportunity to work with established scientists in the fields of biogeochemistry, remote sensing, and origins of life, among others, the NASA Planetary Biology Internship (PBI) Program has successfully launched many scientific careers. Each year approximately ten interns participate in research related to planetary biology at NASA Centers, NASA-sponsored research in university laboratories, and private institutions. The PBI program also sponsors three students every year in both the Microbiology and Marine Ecology summer courses at the Marine Biological Laboratory. Other information about the PBI Program is presented including application procedure.

  7. Global MHD simulations of Mercury's magnetosphere with coupled planetary interior: Induction effect of the planetary conducting core on the global interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xianzhe; Slavin, James A.; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Daldorff, Lars K. S.; Toth, Gabor; Holst, Bart

    2015-06-01

    Mercury's comparatively weak intrinsic magnetic field and its close proximity to the Sun lead to a magnetosphere that undergoes more direct space-weathering interactions than other planets. A unique aspect of Mercury's interaction system arises from the large ratio of the scale of the planet to the scale of the magnetosphere and the presence of a large-size core composed of highly conducting material. Consequently, there is strong feedback between the planetary interior and the magnetosphere, especially under conditions of strong external forcing. Understanding the coupled solar wind-magnetosphere-interior interaction at Mercury requires not only analysis of observations but also a modeling framework that is both comprehensive and inclusive. We have developed a new global MHD model for Mercury in which the planetary interior is modeled as layers of different electrical conductivities that electromagnetically couple to the surrounding plasma environment. This new modeling capability allows us to characterize the dynamical response of Mercury to time-varying external conditions in a self-consistent manner. Comparison of our model results with observations by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft shows that the model provides a reasonably good representation of the global magnetosphere. To demonstrate the capability to model induction effects, we have performed idealized simulations in which Mercury's magnetosphere is impacted by a solar wind pressure enhancement. Our results show that due to the induction effect, Mercury's core exerts strong global influences on the way Mercury responds to changes in the external environment, including modifying the global magnetospheric structure and affecting the extent to which the solar wind directly impacts the surface. The global MHD model presented here represents a crucial step toward establishing a modeling framework that enables self-consistent characterization of Mercury

  8. Electrical conductivity of Jupiter's shallow interior and the formation of a resonant of a resonant planetary-ionospheric cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sentman, D. D.

    1990-01-01

    The present consideration of hydrogenic atmospheric reactions on Jupiter, to a depth of 4000 km, notes the primary ion constituents at these depths to be both positive and negative ions of molecular hydrogen contributing less than 20 percent to total electrical conductivity by free electrons. An electrical surface defined by the boundary beneath which the interior is electrically conducting exists at depths which vary according to EM wave frequency, from 1100 km for 1 mHz to 3000 for 1 MHz. The presence of a lower electrical boundary within the shallow interior suggests that a planetary-ionosphere resonant cavity analogous to the earth-ionosphere cavity may exist.

  9. Interior. Plantcrushing and fiberprocessing apparatus used in latexextraction experiments. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior. Plant-crushing and fiber-processing apparatus used in latex-extraction experiments. - Thomas A. Edison Laboratories, Building No. 2, Main Street & Lakeside Avenue, West Orange, Essex County, NJ

  10. Interior. Plantcrushing and fiberprocessing equipment used in latexextraction experiments. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior. Plant-crushing and fiber-processing equipment used in latex-extraction experiments. - Thomas A. Edison Laboratories, Building No. 2, Main Street & Lakeside Avenue, West Orange, Essex County, NJ

  11. Shock compression of stishovite and melting of silica at planetary interior conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millot, M.; Dubrovinskaia, N.; Černok, A.; Blaha, S.; Dubrovinsky, L.; Braun, D. G.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Eggert, J. H.; Jeanloz, R.

    2015-01-01

    Deep inside planets, extreme density, pressure, and temperature strongly modify the properties of the constituent materials. In particular, how much heat solids can sustain before melting under pressure is key to determining a planet’s internal structure and evolution. We report laser-driven shock experiments on fused silica, α-quartz, and stishovite yielding equation-of-state and electronic conductivity data at unprecedented conditions and showing that the melting temperature of SiO2 rises to 8300 K at a pressure of 500 gigapascals, comparable to the core-mantle boundary conditions for a 5-Earth mass super-Earth. We show that mantle silicates and core metal have comparable melting temperatures above 500 to 700 gigapascals, which could favor long-lived magma oceans for large terrestrial planets with implications for planetary magnetic-field generation in silicate magma layers deep inside such planets.

  12. Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) for Planetary Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocanegra Bahamon, Tatiana; Cimo, Giuseppe; Duev, Dmitry; Gurvits, Leonid; Molera Calves, Guifre; Pogrebenko, Sergei

    2015-04-01

    The Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) is a technique that allows the determination of the radial velocity and lateral coordinates of planetary spacecraft with very high accuracy (Duev, 2012). The setup of the experiment consists of several ground stations from the European VLBI Network (EVN) located around the globe, which simultaneously perform Doppler tracking of a spacecraft carrier radio signal, and are subsequently processed in a VLBI-style in phase referencing mode. Because of the accurate examination of the changes in phase and amplitude of the radio signal propagating from the spacecraft to the multiple stations on Earth, the PRIDE technique can be used for several fields of planetary research, among which planetary atmospheric studies, gravimetry and ultra-precise celestial mechanics of planetary systems. In the study at hand the application of this technique for planetary atmospheric investigations is demonstrated. As a test case, radio occultation experiments were conducted with PRIDE having as target ESA's Venus Express, during different observing sessions with multiple ground stations in April 2012 and March 2014. Once each of the stations conducts the observation, the raw data is delivered to the correlation center at the Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe (JIVE) located in the Netherlands. The signals are processed with a high spectral resolution and phase detection software package from which Doppler observables of each station are derived. Subsequently the Doppler corrected signals are correlated to derive the VLBI observables. These two sets of observables are used for precise orbit determination. The reconstructed orbit along with the Doppler observables are used as input for the radio occultation processing software, which consists of mainly two modules, the geometrical optics module and the ray tracing inversion module, from which vertical density profiles, and subsequently, temperature and pressure profiles of Venus

  13. Electronic and magnetic structures of the postperovskite-type Fe2O3 and implications for planetary magnetic records and deep interiors

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Sang-Heon; Bengtson, Amelia; Morgan, Dane; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Catalli, Krystle; Zhao, Jiyong; Lerche, Michael; Prakapenka, Vitali

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that high pressure (P) induces the metallization of the Fe2+–O bonding, the destruction of magnetic ordering in Fe, and the high-spin (HS) to low-spin (LS) transition of Fe in silicate and oxide phases at the deep planetary interiors. Hematite (Fe2O3) is an important magnetic carrier mineral for deciphering planetary magnetism and a proxy for Fe in the planetary interiors. Here, we present synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction combined with ab initio calculations for Fe2O3 revealing the destruction of magnetic ordering at the hematite → Rh2O3-II type (RhII) transition at 70 GPa and 300 K, and then the revival of magnetic ordering at the RhII → postperovskite (PPv) transition after laser heating at 73 GPa. At the latter transition, at least half of Fe3+ ions transform from LS to HS and Fe2O3 changes from a semiconductor to a metal. This result demonstrates that some magnetic carrier minerals may experience a complex sequence of magnetic ordering changes during impact rather than a monotonic demagnetization. Also local Fe enrichment at Earth's core-mantle boundary will lead to changes in the electronic structure and spin state of Fe in silicate PPv. If the ultra-low-velocity zones are composed of Fe-enriched silicate PPv and/or the basaltic materials are accumulated at the lowermost mantle, high electrical conductivity of these regions will play an important role for the electromagnetic coupling between the mantle and the core. PMID:19279204

  14. Electronic and magnetic structures of the postperovskite-type Fe2O3 and implications for planetary magnetic records and deep interiors.

    PubMed

    Shim, Sang-Heon; Bengtson, Amelia; Morgan, Dane; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Catalli, Krystle; Zhao, Jiyong; Lerche, Michael; Prakapenka, Vitali

    2009-04-07

    Recent studies have shown that high pressure (P) induces the metallization of the Fe(2+)-O bonding, the destruction of magnetic ordering in Fe, and the high-spin (HS) to low-spin (LS) transition of Fe in silicate and oxide phases at the deep planetary interiors. Hematite (Fe(2)O(3)) is an important magnetic carrier mineral for deciphering planetary magnetism and a proxy for Fe in the planetary interiors. Here, we present synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction combined with ab initio calculations for Fe(2)O(3) revealing the destruction of magnetic ordering at the hematite --> Rh(2)O(3)-II type (RhII) transition at 70 GPa and 300 K, and then the revival of magnetic ordering at the RhII --> postperovskite (PPv) transition after laser heating at 73 GPa. At the latter transition, at least half of Fe(3+) ions transform from LS to HS and Fe(2)O(3) changes from a semiconductor to a metal. This result demonstrates that some magnetic carrier minerals may experience a complex sequence of magnetic ordering changes during impact rather than a monotonic demagnetization. Also local Fe enrichment at Earth's core-mantle boundary will lead to changes in the electronic structure and spin state of Fe in silicate PPv. If the ultra-low-velocity zones are composed of Fe-enriched silicate PPv and/or the basaltic materials are accumulated at the lowermost mantle, high electrical conductivity of these regions will play an important role for the electromagnetic coupling between the mantle and the core.

  15. Planetary Science in Higher Education: Ideas and Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kereszturi, Akos; Hyder, David

    2012-01-01

    The paper investigates how planetary science could be integrated into other courses, specifically geography and astronomy, at two universities in Hungary and the UK. We carried out both a classroom course and an online course over several years. The methods used and the experiences gained, including feedback from students and useful examples for…

  16. Planetary Science in Higher Education: Ideas and Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kereszturi, Akos; Hyder, David

    2012-01-01

    The paper investigates how planetary science could be integrated into other courses, specifically geography and astronomy, at two universities in Hungary and the UK. We carried out both a classroom course and an online course over several years. The methods used and the experiences gained, including feedback from students and useful examples for…

  17. Traverse Planning Experiments for Future Planetary Surface Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Stephen J.; Voels, Stephen A.; Mueller, Robert P.; Lee, Pascal C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation is to evaluate methodology and data requirements for remotely-assisted robotic traverse of extraterrestrial planetary surface to support human exploration program, assess opportunities for in-transit science operations, and validate landing site survey and selection techniques during planetary surface exploration mission analog demonstration at Haughton Crater on Devon Island, Nunavut, Canada. Additionally, 1) identify quality of remote observation data sets (i.e., surface imagery from orbit) required for effective pre-traverse route planning and determine if surface level data (i.e., onboard robotic imagery or other sensor data) is required for a successful traverse, and if additional surface level data can improve traverse efficiency or probability of success (TRPF Experiment). 2) Evaluate feasibility and techniques for conducting opportunistic science investigations during this type of traverse. (OSP Experiment). 3) Assess utility of remotely-assisted robotic vehicle for landing site validation survey. (LSV Experiment).

  18. Planetary Resources and Astroecology. Planetary Microcosm Models of Asteroid and Meteorite Interiors: Electrolyte Solutions and Microbial Growth- Implications for Space Populations and Panspermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mautner, Michael N.

    2002-03-01

    Planetary microcosms were constructed using extracts from meteorites that simulate solutions in the pores of carbonaceous chondrites. The microcosms were found to support the growth of complex algal and microbial populations. Such astroecology experiments demonstrate how a diverse ecosystem could exist in fluids within asteroids, and in meteorites that land on aqueous planets. The microcosm solutions were obtained by extracting nutrient electrolytes under natural conditions from powders of the Allende (CV3) and Murchison (CM2) meteorites at low (0.02 g/ml) and high (10.0 g/ml) solid/solution ratios. The latter solutions contain >3 mol/L electrolytes and about 10 g/L organics, that simulate natural fluids in asteroids during aqueous alteration and in the pores of meteorites, which can help prebiotic synthesis and the survival of early microorganisms. These solutions and wet solids were in fact found to support complex self-sustaining microbial communities with populations of 4 × 105 algae and 6 × 106 bacteria and fungi for long periods (>8 months). The results show that planetary microcosms based on meteorites can: assay the fertilities of planetary materials; identify space bioresources; target astrobiology exploration; and model past and future space-based ecosystems. The results show that bioresources in the carbonaceous asteroids can sustain a biomass of 1018 kg, comprising 1032 microorganisms and a human population of 1014. The results also suggest that protoplanetary nebulae can support and disperse microorganisms and can be therefore effective environments for natural and directed panspermia.

  19. Chemical differentiation of a convecting planetary interior: Consequences for a one-plate planet such as Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmentier, E. M.; Hess, P. C.

    1992-01-01

    Chemically depleted mantle forming a buoyant, refractory layer at the top of the mantle can have important implications for the evolution of the interior and surface. On Venus, the large apparent depths of compensation for surface topographic features might be explained if surface topography were supported by variations in the thickness of a 100-200 km thick chemically buoyant mantle layer or by partial melting in the mantle at the base of such a layer. Long volcanic flows seen on the surface may be explained by deep melting that generates low-viscosity MgO-rich magmas. The presence of a shallow refractory mantle layer may also explain the lack of volcanism associated with rifting. As the depleted layer thickens and cools, it becomes denser than the convecting interior and the portion of it that is hot enough to flow can mix with the convecting mantle. Time dependence of the thickness of a depleted layer may create episodic resurfacing events as needed to explain the observed distribution of impact craters on the venusian surface. We consider a planetary structure consisting of a crust, depleted mantle layer, and a thermally and chemically well-mixed convecting mantle. The thermal evolution of the convecting spherical planetary interior is calculated using energy conservation: the time rate of change of thermal energy in the interior is equated to the difference in the rate of radioactive heat production and the rate of heat transfer across the thermal boundary layer. Heat transfer across the thermal boundary layer is parameterized using a standard Nusselt number-Rayleigh number relationship. The radioactive heat production decreases with time corresponding to decay times for the U, Th, and K. The planetary interior cools by the advection of hot mantle at temperature T interior into the thermal boundary layer where it cools conductively. The crust and depleted mantle layers do not convect in our model so that a linear conductive equilibrium temperature distribution

  20. The role of turbulent dissipation in planetary fluid interiors driven by tidal and librational forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grannan, Alex; Favier, Benjamin; Bills, Bruce; Lemasquerier, Daphne; Le Bars, Michael; Aurnou, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    The turbulent fluid motions generated in the liquid metal cores and oceans of planetary bodies can have profound effects on energy dissipation and magnetic field generation. An important driver of such fluid motions is mechanical forcing from precession, libration, and tidal forcing. On Earth, the dissipation of energy through tidal forcing occurs primarily in the oceans and may be due, in part, to nonlinear tidally forced resonances. However, the role that such nonlinear resonances play are not generally considered for other planetary bodies also possessing oceans and liquid metal cores.Recent laboratory experimental and numerical studies of Grannan et al. 2014 and Favier et al. 2015 have shown that nonlinear fluid resonances generated by sufficiently strong librational forcing can drive turbulent flows in ellipsoidal containers that mimic gravitational deformations. In Grannan et al. 2016, similar results were found for strong tidal forcing. Thus, a generalized scaling law for the turbulent r.m.s. velocity is derived, U~ɛβE-α, where ɛ is the dimensionless amplitude of the tidal or librational forcing, β is the dimensionless tidal deformation of the body, E is the dimensionless Ekman number characterizing the ratio of viscous to Coriolis forces, and α is a varying exponent.Using planetary values for tidal and librational forcing parameters, the turbulent dissipation is estimated for multiple bodies. For the subsurface oceans of Europa and Enceladus, the amount of nonlinear dissipation is comparable to the dissipation generated from linear resonances of the fluid layer and from upper bounding estimates of the tidal dissipation in the solid icy shell. In addition, our estimates of this turbulent dissipation provide bounds for the stratification in these subsurface oceans. Finally we find that dissipation from these nonlinear resonances in the liquid metal cores of the the early and present Earth, Io, and several exoplanets may help drive the dynamos in these

  1. Possibilities to improve the aircraft interior comfort experience.

    PubMed

    Vink, P; Bazley, C; Kamp, I; Blok, M

    2012-03-01

    Comfort plays an increasingly important role in the interior design of airplanes. Although ample research has been conducted on airplane design technology, only a small amount of public scientific information is available addressing the passenger's opinion. In this study, more than 10,000 internet trip reports and 153 passenger interviews were used to gather opinions about aspects which need to be improved in order to design a more comfortable aircraft interior. The results show clear relationships between comfort and legroom, hygiene, crew attention and seat/personal space. Passengers rate the newer planes significantly better than older ones, indicating that attention to design for comfort has proven effective. The study also shows that rude flight attendants and bad hygiene reduce the comfort experience drastically and that a high comfort rating is related to higher "fly again" values. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  2. The nature of the interior of uranus based on studies of planetary ices at high dynamic pressure.

    PubMed

    Nellis, W J; Hamilton, D C; Holmes, N C; Radousky, H B; Ree, F H; Mitchell, A C; Nicol, M

    1988-05-06

    Data from the Voyager II spacecraft showed that Uranus has a large magnetic field with geometry similar to an offset tilted dipole. To interpret the origin of the magnetic field, measurements were made of electrical conductivity and equation-of-state data of the planetary "ices" ammonia, methane, and "synthetic Uranus" at shock pressures and temperatures up to 75 gigapascals and 5000 K. These pressures and temperatures correspond to conditions at the depths at which the surface magnetic field is generated. Above 40 gigapascals the conductivities of synthetic Uranus, water, and ammonia plateau at about 20(ohm-cm)(-1), providing an upper limit for the electrical conductivity used in kinematic or dynamo calculations. The nature of materials at the extreme conditions in the interior is discussed.

  3. Phase Diagram and Physical Properties of H[subscript 2]O at High Pressures and temperatures: Applications to Planetary Interiors

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jung-Fu; Schwegler, Eric; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2007-02-22

    Here we discuss the phase diagram and physical properties of H{sub 2}O under pressure-temperature conditions relevant to planetary interiors. Recent studies show that the melting curve of H{sub 2}O increases rapidly above a recently discovered triple point at approximately 35 to 47 GPa and 1000 K, indicating a large increase in {Delta}V/{Delta}S (volume versus entropy change) and associated changes in the physical properties of H{sub 2}O at high pressures and temperatures. Existence of the triple point is thought to be associated with the formation of a superionic phase, dynamically-disordered ice VII, or extension of the ice VII-ice X phase boundary; although the precise pressure and temperature of the triple point, curvature of the melting line, and nature of the solid-solid transition below the triple point all remain to be further explored. The steep increase in the melting curve of H{sub 2}O at high pressures and temperatures has important implications on our understanding of planetary interiors. Depending on its curvature, the melting line of H{sub 2}O may intersect the isentropes of Neptune and Uranus as well as the geotherm of Earth's lower mantle. Furthermore, if the triple point is due to the occurrence of the theoretically predicted superionic phase, besides leading to significant ionic conductivity, fast proton diffusion would cause enhanced chemical reactivity and formation of complex compounds in these planets. For example, reaction of H{sub 2}O with iron and other metals to form metal hydrides such as FeH{sub x} could provide a mechanism for incorporation of hydrogen as a light element into Earth's core. The equation of state of water is also presented as it pertains to the properties of hydrous fluid and melt phases in the mantle.

  4. Insights Into the Dynamics of Planetary Interiors Through the Study of Global Distribution of Volcanoes: Method Calibration on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canon-Tapia, E.; Mendoza-Borunda, R.

    2013-12-01

    Remote sensing of volcanic vents at a planetary scale can provide clues about the dynamics of planetary interiors through the identification of patterns on their global distribution. Until present, however, studies of this type usually have focused on volcanic features of a specific type, have been made with databases filtered before the main analysis, or have concentrated on relatively small regions. In this work, the description of the distribution of volcanic features observed over the entire surface of the Earth is obtained using the Fisher kernel and an extensive database of submarine and subaereal volcanoes. The analysis uses a series of criteria of geological and statistical nature, and different types of clustering thus obtained are mutually compared. As a result, we designed an automated algorithm capable to identify volcanic groupings that are associated to tectonic features following a hierarchy of statistical significance levels, and requiring a minimum of prior geological information. It is suggested that this algorithm has the potential to complete a similar analysis capable to yield unbiased insights concerning the probable occurrence of tectonic features in other planets.

  5. Contribution of BepiColombo's MORE radio science experiment to the determination of Mercury's interior structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junior Mariani, Mirco; Imperi, Luigi; Iess, Luciano

    2017-04-01

    The Mercury Orbiter Radioscience Experiment (MORE) is one of the instruments on board the BepiColombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO), designed to estimate the Mercury's gravity field and rotational state and to perform a wide set of tests of relativistic gravity. The experiments exploits a highly stable, multi-frequency radio links in X and Ka band. The state-of-the-art microwave equipment enables simultaneous two-way links in X/X (7.2 GHz uplink/8.4 GHz downlink), X/Ka (7.2/32.5 GHz) and Ka/Ka band (34/32.5 GHz), providing range rate accuracies of 3 micron/s (at 1000 s integration time) at nearly all elongation angles. Range observables accurate to 20 cm (two-way) will be attained using a novel, wideband (24 Mcps) ranging system, based upon a pseudo-noise modulation scheme. Non-gravitational acceleration will be provided by a dedicated accelerometer (the Italian Spring Accelerometer, ISA). We present the results of numerical simulations carried out using the latest mission scenario, entailing a launch date in October 2018 with arrival in Mercury in December 2025. We illustrate as the combination of the gravity and rotation measurements expected from BepiColombo can bring a substantial improvement in understanding the interior of the planet. Particularly, we show that MORE can detect planetary-induced librations, allowing to constrain the size of a possible solid inner core inside the outer liquid core.

  6. Trace elements as quantitative probes of differentiation processes in planetary interiors

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, M.J.

    1980-02-01

    Abundances of trace elements in extrusive igneous rocks may be used as petrological and geochemical probes of the source regions of the rocks if differentiation processes, partition coefficients, phase equilibria, and initial concentrations in the source region are known. The characteristic trace element signature that each mineral in the source region imparts on the magma forms the conceptual basis for trace element modeling. The task of the trace element geochemist is to solve mathematically the inverse problem. Given trace element abundances in a magma, what is the ode of its source region. The most successful modeling has been performed for small planetary bodies which underwent relatively simple igneous differentiation events. An example is the eucrite parent body, a planet which produced basals at approx. =4.6 Gy. and has been quiescent ever since. This simple differentiation history permits the calculation of its bulk composition (a feldspathic peridotite) and has led to the tentative identification of asteroid 4 Westa as the eucrite parent body. The differentiation of iron meteorite groups in parent body cores is amenable to similar treatment. The 'anomalous' behavior of Cr, suggests that IIIA, B irons and main group pallasites equilibrated with troilite, spinel, ferromagnesian silicates, or some combination thereof. The moon has undergone more complex differentiation, and quantitative geochemical modeling is correspondingly more difficult. Nevertheless, modeling the two-stage evolution of mare basals raises the possibility that the primordial moon did not have chondritic relative abundances of such refractory elements as Ca, Al, U, and the rare-earth elements. The nonchondritic element ratios are characteristic of planetary, not nebular, fractionation processes and are consistent with the derivation of the moon from a precursor planet, possibly the earth.

  7. Little Earth Experiment: An instrument to model planetary cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aujogue, Kélig; Pothérat, Alban; Bates, Ian; Debray, François; Sreenivasan, Binod

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a new experimental facility, Little Earth Experiment, designed to study the hydrodynamics of liquid planetary cores. The main novelty of this apparatus is that a transparent electrically conducting electrolyte is subject to extremely high magnetic fields (up to 10 T) to produce electromagnetic effects comparable to those produced by moderate magnetic fields in planetary cores. This technique makes it possible to visualise for the first time the coupling between the principal forces in a convection-driven dynamo by means of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a geometry relevant to planets. We first present the technology that enables us to generate these forces and implement PIV in a high magnetic field environment. We then show that the magnetic field drastically changes the structure of convective plumes in a configuration relevant to the tangent cylinder region of the Earth's core.

  8. Experiments in Planetary and Related Sciences and the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald (Editor); Williams, Richard J. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Numerous workshops were held to provide a forum for discussing the full range of possible experiments, their science rationale, and the requirements on the Space Station, should such experiments eventually be flown. During the workshops, subgroups met to discuss areas of common interest. Summaries of each group and abstracts of contributed papers as they developed from a workshop on September 15 to 16, 1986, are included. Topics addressed include: planetary impact experimentation; physics of windblown particles; particle formation and interaction; experimental cosmochemistry in the space station; and an overview of the program to place advanced automation and robotics on the space station.

  9. Planetary resources and astroecology. Planetary microcosm models of asteroid and meteorite interiors: electrolyte solutions and microbial growth--implications for space populations and panspermia.

    PubMed

    Mautner, Michael N

    2002-01-01

    Planetary microcosms were constructed using extracts from meteorites that simulate solutions in the pores of carbonaceous chondrites. The microcosms were found to support the growth of complex algal and microbial populations. Such astroecology experiments demonstrate how a diverse ecosystem could exist in fluids within asteroids, and in meteorites that land on aqueous planets. The microcosm solutions were obtained by extracting nutrient electrolytes under natural conditions from powders of the Allende (CV3) and Murchison (CM2) meteorites at low (0.02 g/ml) and high (10.0 g/ml) solid/solution ratios. The latter solutions contain > 3 mol/L electrolytes and about 10 g/L organics, that simulate natural fluids in asteroids during aqueous alteration and in the pores of meteorites, which can help prebiotic synthesis and the survival of early microorganisms. These solutions and wet solids were in fact found to support complex self-sustaining microbial communities with populations of 4 x 10(5) algae and 6 x 10(6) bacteria and fungi for long periods (> 8 months). The results show that planetary microcosms based on meteorites can: assay the fertilities of planetary materials; identify space bioresources; target astrobiology exploration; and model past and future space-based ecosystems. The results show that bioresources in the carbonaceous asteroids can sustain a biomass of 10(18) kg, comprising 10(32) microorganisms and a human population of 10(14). The results also suggest that protoplanetary nebulae can support and disperse microorganisms and can be therefore effective environments for natural and directed panspermia.

  10. Venus as a laboratory for studying planetary surface, interior, and atmospheric evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smrekar, S. E.; Hensley, S.; Helbert, J.

    2013-12-01

    As Earth's twin, Venus offers a laboratory for understanding what makes our home planet unique in our solar system. The Decadal Survey points to the role of Venus in answering questions such as the supply of water and its role in atmospheric evolution, its availability to support life, and the role of geology and dynamics in controlling volatiles and climate. On Earth, the mechanism of plate tectonics drives the deformation and volcanism that allows volatiles to escape from the interior to the atmosphere and be recycled into the interior. Magellan revealed that Venus lacks plate tectonics. The number and distribution of impact craters lead to the idea Venus resurfaced very rapidly, and inspired numerous models of lithospheric foundering and episodic plate tectonics. However we have no evidence that Venus ever experienced a plate tectonic regime. How is surface deformation affected if no volatiles are recycled into the interior? Although Venus is considered a ';stagnant' lid planet (lacking plate motion) today, we have evidence for recent volcanism. The VIRTIS instrument on Venus Express mapped the southern hemisphere at 1.02 microns, revealing areas likely to be unweathered, recent volcanic flows. Additionally, numerous studies have shown that the crater population is consistent with ongoing, regional resurfacing. How does deformation and volcanism occur in the absence of plates? At what rate is the planet resurfacing and thus outgassing? Does lithospheric recycling occur with plate tectonics? In the 25 years since Magellan, the design of Synthetic Aperture Radar has advanced tremendously, allowing order of magnitude improvements in altimetry and imaging. With these advanced tools, we can explore Venus' past and current tectonic states. Tesserae are highly deformed plateaus, thought to be possible remnants of Venus' earlier tectonic state. How did they form? Are they low in silica, like Earth's continents, indicating the presence of abundant water? Does the plains

  11. OEDIPUS: a new tool to study the dynamics of planetary interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choblet, G.; Cadek, O.; Couturier, F.; Dumoulin, C.

    2006-12-01

    We present a new numerical method to describe the internal dynamics of planetary mantles through the coupling of a dynamical model with the prediction of geoid and surface topography. Our tool is based on the simulation of thermal convection with variable viscosity in a spherical shell with a finite-volume formulation. The grid mesh is based on the `cubed sphere' technique that divides the shell into six identical blocks. An investigation of various numerical advection schemes is proposed: we opted for a high-resolution, flux-limiter method. Benchmarks of thermal convection are then presented on steady-state tetrahedral and cubic solutions and time-dependent cases with a good agreement with the few recent programs developed to solve this problem. A dimensionless framework is proposed for the calculation of geoid and topography introducing two dimensionless numbers: such a formulation provides a good basis for the systematic study of the geoid and surface dynamic topography associated to the convection calculations. The evaluation of geoid and surface dynamic topography from the gridded data is performed in the spectral domain.The flow solver is then tested extensively against a precise spectral program, producing response functions for geoid as well as bottom and surface topographies. For a grid mesh of a reasonable size (6*64*64*64) a very good agreement (~ 1 %) is found up to spherical harmonic degree 15.

  12. Opacity and conductivity measurements in noble gases at conditions of planetary and stellar interiors.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, R Stewart; Dalton, D Allen; Konôpková, Zuzana; Mahmood, Mohammad F; Goncharov, Alexander F

    2015-06-30

    The noble gases are elements of broad importance across science and technology and are primary constituents of planetary and stellar atmospheres, where they segregate into droplets or layers that affect the thermal, chemical, and structural evolution of their host body. We have measured the optical properties of noble gases at relevant high pressures and temperatures in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell, observing insulator-to-conductor transformations in dense helium, neon, argon, and xenon at 4,000-15,000 K and pressures of 15-52 GPa. The thermal activation and frequency dependence of conduction reveal an optical character dominated by electrons of low mobility, as in an amorphous semiconductor or poor metal, rather than free electrons as is often assumed for such wide band gap insulators at high temperatures. White dwarf stars having helium outer atmospheres cool slower and may have different color than if atmospheric opacity were controlled by free electrons. Helium rain in Jupiter and Saturn becomes conducting at conditions well correlated with its increased solubility in metallic hydrogen, whereas a deep layer of insulating neon may inhibit core erosion in Saturn.

  13. Opacity and conductivity measurements in noble gases at conditions of planetary and stellar interiors

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, R. Stewart; Dalton, D. Allen; Konôpková, Zuzana; Mahmood, Mohammad F.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    The noble gases are elements of broad importance across science and technology and are primary constituents of planetary and stellar atmospheres, where they segregate into droplets or layers that affect the thermal, chemical, and structural evolution of their host body. We have measured the optical properties of noble gases at relevant high pressures and temperatures in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell, observing insulator-to-conductor transformations in dense helium, neon, argon, and xenon at 4,000–15,000 K and pressures of 15–52 GPa. The thermal activation and frequency dependence of conduction reveal an optical character dominated by electrons of low mobility, as in an amorphous semiconductor or poor metal, rather than free electrons as is often assumed for such wide band gap insulators at high temperatures. White dwarf stars having helium outer atmospheres cool slower and may have different color than if atmospheric opacity were controlled by free electrons. Helium rain in Jupiter and Saturn becomes conducting at conditions well correlated with its increased solubility in metallic hydrogen, whereas a deep layer of insulating neon may inhibit core erosion in Saturn. PMID:26080401

  14. Effects of Induction and Magnetopause Reconnection on Mercury's Magnetosphere: MESSENGER Observations and Global MHD Simulations with Coupled Planetary Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, X.; Slavin, J. A.; Poh, G.; Toth, G.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2016-12-01

    It has long been suggested that two processes, i.e., erosion of the dayside magnetosphere due to strong magnetopause reconnection and the shielding effect of the induction currents at the planetary core, compete against each other in governing the structure of Mercury's magnetosphere. We have combined analysis of MESSENGER data during extreme solar wind conditions with global MHD simulations to assess the relative importance of the two processes. Following the study of Slavin et al. (2014), we have analyzed an additional set of MESSENGER magnetopause crossings to determine the dependence of the magnetopause standoff distance on solar wind parameters. We have also employed the global MHD model of Jia et al. (2015) that electromagnetically couples Mercury's interior to the surrounding space environment to simulate the response of the system to solar wind forcing for a wide range of solar wind and IMF conditions. We find that while the magnetopause standoff distance decreases with increasing solar wind pressure, just as expected, its dependence on the external pressure follows closely a power-law relationship with an index of -1/6, rather than a steeper power-law falling-off expected for the case with only induction present. Our results suggest that for the external conditions examined, induction and magnetopause reconnection appear to play equally important roles in determining the global configuration of Mercury's magnetosphere, consistent with the finding obtained by Slavin et al. (2014). We also find that the magnetospheric current systems produce magnetic perturbations that are spatially non-uniform in nature, resulting in induced magnetic field at the core that contains significant power in both the dipole and high order moments. Based on the simulation results, we determine how the induced field varies with the solar wind conditions, and provide quantitative constraints on the ability of Mercury's core to shield the planetary surface from direct solar wind

  15. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Viewing the Lunar Interior Through Titanium-Colored Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session"Viewing the Lunar Interior Through Titanium-Colored Glasses" included the following reports:Consequences of High Crystallinity for the Evolution of the Lunar Magma Ocean: Trapped Plagioclase; Low Abundances of Highly Siderophile Elements in the Lunar Mantle: Evidence for Prolonged Late Accretion; Fast Anorthite Dissolution Rates in Lunar Picritic Melts: Petrologic Implications; Searching the Moon for Aluminous Mare Basalts Using Compositional Remote-Sensing Constraints II: Detailed analysis of ROIs; Origin of Lunar High Titanium Ultramafic Glasses: A Hybridized Source?; Ilmenite Solubility in Lunar Basalts as a Function of Temperature and Pressure: Implications for Petrogenesis; Garnet in the Lunar Mantle: Further Evidence from Volcanic Glasses; Preliminary High Pressure Phase Relations of Apollo 15 Green C Glass: Assessment of the Role of Garnet; Oxygen Fugacity of Mare Basalts and the Lunar Mantle. Application of a New Microscale Oxybarometer Based on the Valence State of Vanadium; A Model for the Origin of the Dark Ring at Orientale Basin; Petrology and Geochemistry of LAP 02 205: A New Low-Ti Mare-Basalt Meteorite; Thorium and Samarium in Lunar Pyroclastic Glasses: Insights into the Composition of the Lunar Mantle and Basaltic Magmatism on the Moon; and Eu2+ and REE3+ Diffusion in Enstatite, Diopside, Anorthite, and a Silicate Melt: A Database for Understanding Kinetic Fractionation of REE in the Lunar Mantle and Crust.

  16. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Viewing the Lunar Interior Through Titanium-Colored Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session"Viewing the Lunar Interior Through Titanium-Colored Glasses" included the following reports:Consequences of High Crystallinity for the Evolution of the Lunar Magma Ocean: Trapped Plagioclase; Low Abundances of Highly Siderophile Elements in the Lunar Mantle: Evidence for Prolonged Late Accretion; Fast Anorthite Dissolution Rates in Lunar Picritic Melts: Petrologic Implications; Searching the Moon for Aluminous Mare Basalts Using Compositional Remote-Sensing Constraints II: Detailed analysis of ROIs; Origin of Lunar High Titanium Ultramafic Glasses: A Hybridized Source?; Ilmenite Solubility in Lunar Basalts as a Function of Temperature and Pressure: Implications for Petrogenesis; Garnet in the Lunar Mantle: Further Evidence from Volcanic Glasses; Preliminary High Pressure Phase Relations of Apollo 15 Green C Glass: Assessment of the Role of Garnet; Oxygen Fugacity of Mare Basalts and the Lunar Mantle. Application of a New Microscale Oxybarometer Based on the Valence State of Vanadium; A Model for the Origin of the Dark Ring at Orientale Basin; Petrology and Geochemistry of LAP 02 205: A New Low-Ti Mare-Basalt Meteorite; Thorium and Samarium in Lunar Pyroclastic Glasses: Insights into the Composition of the Lunar Mantle and Basaltic Magmatism on the Moon; and Eu2+ and REE3+ Diffusion in Enstatite, Diopside, Anorthite, and a Silicate Melt: A Database for Understanding Kinetic Fractionation of REE in the Lunar Mantle and Crust.

  17. Laboratory experiments on rain-driven convection: Implications for planetary dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Peter; Landeau, Maylis; Hirsh, Benjamin H.

    2017-01-01

    Compositional convection driven by precipitating solids or immiscible liquids has been invoked as a dynamo mechanism in planets and satellites throughout the solar system, including Mercury, Ganymede, and the Earth. Here we report laboratory experiments on turbulent rain-driven convection, analogs for the flows generated by precipitation within planetary fluid interiors. We subject a two-layer fluid to a uniform intensity rainfall, in which the rain is immiscible in the upper layer and miscible in the lower layer. Rain falls through the upper layer and accumulates as a two-fluid emulsion in the interfacial region between the layers. In experiments where the rain is denser than the lower fluid, rain-injected vortices evolve into small-scale plumes that rapidly coalesce into larger structures, resulting in turbulent convection throughout the lower layer. The turbulent convective velocity in our experiments increases approximately as the cube root of the rain buoyancy flux, implying little or no dependence on viscous and chemical diffusivities. Applying diffusion-free scaling laws for magnetic field generation, we find that precipitation-driven convection can be an effective dynamo mechanism in planetary cores provided the precipitation buoyancy flux is large and the convecting region is deep and nearly adiabatic.

  18. Traverse Planning Experiments for Future Planetary Surface Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, S. J.; Voels, S. A.; Mueller, R. P.; Lee, P. C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a recent (July-August 2010 and July 2011) planetary surface traverse planning experiment. The purpose of this experiment was to gather data relevant to robotically repositioning surface assets used for planetary surface exploration. This is a scenario currently being considered for future human exploration missions to the Moon and Mars. The specific scenario selected was a robotic traverse on the lunar surface from an outpost at Shackleton Crater to the Malapert Massif. As these are exploration scenarios, the route will not have been previously traversed and the only pre-traverse data sets available will be remote (orbital) observations. Devon Island was selected as an analog location where a traverse route of significant length could be planned and then traveled. During the first half of 2010, a team of engineers and scientists who had never been to Devon Island used remote sensing data comparable to that which is likely to be available for the Malapert region (eg., 2-meter/pixel imagery, 10-meter interval topographic maps and associated digital elevation models, etc.) to plan a 17-kilometer (km) traverse. Surface-level imagery data was then gathered on-site that was provided to the planning team. This team then assessed whether the route was actually traversable or not. Lessons learned during the 2010 experiment were then used in a second experiment in 2011 for which a much longer traverse (85 km) was planned and additional surface-level imagery different from that gathered in 2010 was obtained for a comparative analysis. This paper will describe the route planning techniques used, the data sets available to the route planners and the lessons learned from the two traverses planned and carried out on Devon Island.

  19. Melting and Freezing of Metals Under the High Pressures of Planetary Interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geballe, Zachary Michael

    The goal of this thesis is to help improve models of the evolution of cores of the Earth and other planets, and to improve understanding of melting transitions of metals in general. First, I present laboratory studies of high-pressure melting and near-melting phase transitions of two metals. The epsilon-to-B2 phase boundary of FeSi is constrained to 30 +/- 2 GPa with no measurable pressure-dependence from 1200 +/- 200 to 2300 +/- 200 K using x-ray diffraction in laser heated diamond anvil cells. The miscibility of Si in crystalline Fe likely increases at this transition due to the increasing effective ionic radius of Si, evidenced by the coordination change documented here. The result is that silicon is even more miscible in iron in the cores of Mercury and Mars than shown previously. Solid-solid transitions are also documented in AuGa2 from cubic (fluorite-type) to denser phases above 5.5 GPa and 600 K, in close proximity to the reversal in melting curve from negative slope to positive slope, which is also documented here. The change in melting curve therefore seems to be primarily driven by the crystallographic transitions and not the electronic transitions thought to occur at low temperatures. All transitions described here are reversed in the experiments, revealing hysteresis that ranges from 90 K to less than 15 K, and from 7 GPa to less than 2 GPa. This complexity, along with other complexities seen here and in other studies, suggest the need for new experimental techniques to make unambiguous measurements of a variety of equilibrium properties at melting and near melting. To improve future laboratory studies of melting at high pressure, I analyze several varieties of dynamic heating experiments. Laser heating experiments on metals in diamond anvil cells are shown to be at least 5 times less sensitive (and sometimes > 100 times less sensitive) to the latent heat of melting than suggested by published experimental data from pulsed-heating and continuous

  20. Formation of diamonds in laser-compressed hydrocarbons at planetary interior conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Kraus, D.; Vorberger, J.; Pak, A.; ...

    2017-08-21

    The effects of hydrocarbon reactions and diamond precipitation on the internal structure and evolution of icy giant planets such as Neptune and Uranus have been discussed for more than three decades. Inside these celestial bodies, simple hydrocarbons such as methane, which are highly abundant in the atmospheres, are believed to undergo structural transitions that release hydrogen from deeper layers and may lead to compact stratified cores. Indeed, from the surface towards the core, the isentropes of Uranus and Neptune intersect a temperature–pressure regime in which methane first transforms into a mixture of hydrocarbon polymers, whereas, in deeper layers, a phasemore » separation into diamond and hydrogen may be possible. Here in this paper, we show experimental evidence for this phase separation process obtained by in situ X-ray diffraction from polystyrene (C8H8) n samples dynamically compressed to conditions around 150 GPa and 5,000 K; these conditions resemble the environment around 10,000 km below the surfaces of Neptune and Uranus. Our findings demonstrate the necessity of high pressures for initiating carbon–hydrogen separation and imply that diamond precipitation may require pressures about ten times as high as previously indicated by static compression experiments. In conclusion, our results will inform mass–radius relationships of carbon-bearing exoplanets, provide constraints for their internal layer structure and improve evolutionary models of Uranus and Neptune, in which carbon–hydrogen separation could influence the convective heat transport.« less

  1. The phase diagram of NiSi under the conditions of small planetary interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, David P.; Hunt, Simon A.; Ahmed, Jabraan; Lord, Oliver T.; Wann, Elizabeth T. H.; Santangeli, James; Wood, Ian G.; Vočadlo, Lidunka; Walker, Andrew M.; Thomson, Andrew R.; Baron, Marzena A.; Mueller, Hans J.; Lathe, Christian; Whitaker, Matthew; Morard, Guillaume; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2016-12-01

    The phase diagram of NiSi has been determined using in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction multi-anvil experiments to 19 GPa, with further preliminary results in the laser-heated diamond cell reported to 60 GPa. The low-pressure MnP-structured phase transforms to two different high-pressure phases depending on the temperature: the ε-FeSi structure is stable at temperatures above ∼1100 K and a previously reported distorted-CuTi structure (with Pmmn symmetry) is stable at lower temperature. The invariant point is located at 12.8 ± 0.2 GPa and 1100 ± 20 K. At higher pressures, ε-FeSi-structured NiSi transforms to the CsCl structure with CsCl-NiSi as the liquidus phase above 30 GPa. The Clapeyron slope of this transition is -67 MPa/K. The phase boundary between the ε-FeSi and Pmmn structured phases is nearly pressure independent implying there will be a second sub-solidus invariant point between CsCl, ε-FeSi and Pmmn structures at higher pressure than attained in this study. In addition to these stable phases, the MnP structure was observed to spontaneously transform at room temperature to a new orthorhombic structure (also with Pnma symmetry) which had been detailed in previous ab initio simulations. This new phase of NiSi is shown here to be metastable.

  2. Scaling relationships and physics for mixed heating convection in planetary interiors: Isoviscous spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Matthew B.; Lenardic, Adrian; Moore, William B.

    2016-10-01

    We use a suite of 3-D numerical experiments to test and expand 2-D planar isoviscous scaling relationships of Moore (2008) for mixed heating convection in spherical geometry mantles over a range of Rayleigh numbers (Ra). The internal temperature scaling of Moore (2008), when modified to account for spherical geometry, matches our experimental results to a high degree of fit. The heat flux through the boundary layers scale as a linear combination of internal (Q) and basal heating, and the modified theory predictions match our experimental results. Our results indicate that boundary layer thickness and surface heat flux are not controlled by a local boundary layer stability condition (in agreement with the results of Moore (2008)) and are instead strongly influenced by boundary layer interactions. Subadiabatic mantle temperature gradients, in spherical 3-D, are well described by a vertical velocity scaling based on discrete drips as opposed to a scaling based on coherent sinking sheets, which was found to describe 2-D planar results. Root-mean-square (RMS) velocities are asymptotic for both low Q and high Q, with a region of rapid adjustment between asymptotes for moderate Q. RMS velocities are highest in the low Q asymptote and decrease as internal heating is applied. The scaling laws derived by Moore (2008), and extended here, are robust and highlight the importance of differing boundary layer processes acting over variable Q and moderate Ra.

  3. Formation of diamonds in laser-compressed hydrocarbons at planetary interior conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, D.; Vorberger, J.; Pak, A.; Hartley, N. Â. J.; Fletcher, L. Â. B.; Frydrych, S.; Galtier, E.; Gamboa, E. Â. J.; Gericke, D. O.; Glenzer, S. Â. H.; Granados, E.; MacDonald, M. Â. J.; MacKinnon, A. Â. J.; McBride, E. Â. E.; Nam, I.; Neumayer, P.; Roth, M.; Saunders, A. M.; Schuster, A. Â. K.; Sun, P.; van Driel, T.; Döppner, T.; Falcone, R. Â. W.

    2017-09-01

    The effects of hydrocarbon reactions and diamond precipitation on the internal structure and evolution of icy giant planets such as Neptune and Uranus have been discussed for more than three decades1. Inside these celestial bodies, simple hydrocarbons such as methane, which are highly abundant in the atmospheres2, are believed to undergo structural transitions3,4 that release hydrogen from deeper layers and may lead to compact stratified cores5-7. Indeed, from the surface towards the core, the isentropes of Uranus and Neptune intersect a temperature-pressure regime in which methane first transforms into a mixture of hydrocarbon polymers8, whereas, in deeper layers, a phase separation into diamond and hydrogen may be possible. Here we show experimental evidence for this phase separation process obtained by in situ X-ray diffraction from polystyrene (C8H8)n samples dynamically compressed to conditions around 150 GPa and 5,000 K; these conditions resemble the environment around 10,000 km below the surfaces of Neptune and Uranus9. Our findings demonstrate the necessity of high pressures for initiating carbon-hydrogen separation3 and imply that diamond precipitation may require pressures about ten times as high as previously indicated by static compression experiments4,8,10. Our results will inform mass-radius relationships of carbon-bearing exoplanets11, provide constraints for their internal layer structure and improve evolutionary models of Uranus and Neptune, in which carbon-hydrogen separation could influence the convective heat transport7.

  4. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Meteorites: Experiments and Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Meteorites: Experiments and Spectroscopy" included the following reports:The Suitability of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Determining the Compositions of Extraterrestrial Material; Deconvolving Terrestrial Alteration Mineral Spectral Signatures from Meteorite Reflectance Measurements; Impacts of Ions and Micrometeorites on Mineral Surfaces: Reflectance and Chemical Changes Found in Ordinary Chondrites; FT-IR Micro-spectroscopy of Fine-grained Planetary Materials: Further Results; Effusion Cell Measurements of the Vapor Pressure of Cobalt at Temperatures up to 2000K: Comparisons with Iron and Nickel; Kinetics of Fe2+-Mg Order-Disorder in P21/c Pigeonite: Implications for Cooling Rates Calculations; Compressional and Shear Wave Velocities in Meteorites; Chemical and Mineralogical Size Segregation in the Impact Disruption of Anhydrous Stone Meteorites; and Shock Pressures of Impacts vs. Crystallization Pressures of Shock-induced Melt Veins of the chondrites.

  5. Aerodynamic characteristics of the planetary atmosphere experiments test entry probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammonds, R. I.; Kruse, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of the Planetary Atmosphere Experiments Test entry probe were determined experimentally in ballistic range tests over a wide range of Mach and Reynolds numbers, and were compared with full-scale flight results. The ground facility data agreed with the full-scale data within 2 to 3% in drag coefficient, and within 5 to 10% in static stability, at the higher Mach numbers. Comparisons of the flight data with conventional wind-tunnel data indicated a significant disagreement in drag coefficient in the transonic speed range suggestive of important sting or wall interference effects. Variations in drag coefficient with Mach number were very small hypersonically, but variations with Reynolds number were of the order of 15% at a free-stream Mach number of 13 over the Reynolds number range from 10,000 to 1,000,000. Variations in the lift and static-stability curves with Mach number and Reynolds number were also defined.

  6. Planetary entry aerothermodynamics. II - Computational analyses and flight experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olstad, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    Limitations concerning the possibility to simulate all the significant flow and thermal phenomena occurring during the entry of a space vehicle into a planetary atmosphere make it necessary to rely on computational analyses to obtain the required data for the design of the spacecraft needed for the NASA missions planned for the next two decades. 'Benchmark' computer programs concerned with complete, detailed, and accurate computational solutions of entry problems are considered along with programs representing engineering approximations for cases in which the accuracy provided by the benchmark programs is not needed. The information obtainable by computational analysis has to be supplemented by actual flight experience in order to meet the goals of the NASA entry-technology program. The individual space missions planned for the coming years are examined together with the possibilities for obtaining the data needed to satisfy the entry requirements in each case.

  7. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Meteorites: Experiments and Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Meteorites: Experiments and Spectroscopy" included the following reports:The Suitability of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Determining the Compositions of Extraterrestrial Material; Deconvolving Terrestrial Alteration Mineral Spectral Signatures from Meteorite Reflectance Measurements; Impacts of Ions and Micrometeorites on Mineral Surfaces: Reflectance and Chemical Changes Found in Ordinary Chondrites; FT-IR Micro-spectroscopy of Fine-grained Planetary Materials: Further Results; Effusion Cell Measurements of the Vapor Pressure of Cobalt at Temperatures up to 2000K: Comparisons with Iron and Nickel; Kinetics of Fe2+-Mg Order-Disorder in P21/c Pigeonite: Implications for Cooling Rates Calculations; Compressional and Shear Wave Velocities in Meteorites; Chemical and Mineralogical Size Segregation in the Impact Disruption of Anhydrous Stone Meteorites; and Shock Pressures of Impacts vs. Crystallization Pressures of Shock-induced Melt Veins of the chondrites.

  8. Planetary radio astronomy receiver. [experiment on Voyager spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, G. J.; Peltzer, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    The planetary radio astronomy (PRA) experiment on the Voyager spacecraft will measure the amplitude, spectrum, time variations, and polarization of radio emissions over a frequency range of 1.2 kHz to 40.5 MHz with the aid of the PRA receiver (PRAR) and two 10-m orthogonal monopoles. Sensitivity and dynamic range will allow observation of a wide range of Jovian emissions from near earth to encounter. This paper describes the system elements, including the preamp/attenuator/calibrator, the LF polarization discriminator, the four LF-IF amplifier stages, the HF polarization discriminator, the translation LO, the log-IF and detector, the frequency synthesizer, the data processor, control system, power supply, and antennas.

  9. Insights Into the Dynamics of Planetary Interiors Obtained Through the Study of Global Distribution of Volcanoes III: Lessons From Io.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canon-Tapia, E.; Hamilton, C.; Lopes, R. M. C.

    2015-12-01

    Clues concerning dynamic aspects of planetary interiors can be obtained through the characterization of volcano distribution at a global scale. On past years, results obtained from global distribution of volcanism on Earth and Venus have been presented, and compared with each other. In this work, the global distribution of volcanism on Io (the innermost of Jupiter's Galilean satellites and the most volcanically active body in the Solar System) is explored using the same tools. Volcanic centers on Io can be divided in two groups: The first including positive thermal anomalies, or hotspots, and the second formed by volcano-tectonic depressions called paterae. Approximately 20% of the documented patera coincide with hotspots, but not all of Io's current volcanic activity is directly associated to paterae. It is uncertain whether hotspots located outside paterae represent volcanic systems still lacking a caldera-like structure, or they represent an entirely different type of volcanism. To account for this source of uncertainty, the analysis reported here was completed on different databases (hotspots, paterae, patera floor units and a combination of hotspots and paterae referred to as volcanic systems). In addition, the distribution of Io's mountains also was studied. As a result, we show that the main clusters of volcanism on Io support the existence of mantle convection patterns that include a combined heating between the astenosphere and the deep mantle (with the former source being more important, but not necessarily on a 2:1 proportion), takes place at moderate to high Reynolds numbers, and includes some degree of impermeability between the astenosphere and the mantle. We also show that although the long-wavelength volcano distribution is controlled by the patterns of mantle convection, the astenosphere serves as a buffer zone where magma is distributed laterally giving place to volcanic activity away from the zones of influence of the hot mantle isotherms. The

  10. Planetary missions as lab experiments in the introductory classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, G. C.

    2011-12-01

    As is the case at many liberal arts colleges, at Wheaton we require all of our students to take a class in the natural sciences. Our introductory classes must include some type of experimental or laboratory component that allows students to directly experience the scientific cycle of asking a question, collecting data, and analyzing the data to either answer the question or to ask new ones. We want them to use their creativity and deal with ambiguity, so they can break out of the idea that science is something that is already written down in a book. This can be a challenge in planetary science, which draws on so many different disciplines and has so many targets of interest that one could spend the entire semester on background material without getting to the experiment cycle. For the past several years, I have been developing a structure for integrating experimentation into the introductory planetary science classroom, alongside some of the more traditional background material. We spend the first half of the semester getting used to asking questions about planets, and then finding and using simple types of data that have already been collected by spacecraft to answer those questions. Along the way, we track a current planetary mission to examine the questions it was designed to investigate, and how its instruments work together to address those questions. By the second half of the semester, the students are ready for two more challenging group projects. In the first project, the class (36 students) is divided in half, and each group must write a plan for the first day of operations of a robotic rover. The opposite group then goes out to an undisclosed field location and collects the data according to the first group's operations plan. After the field trips, the groups receive the data back from their rovers, still without knowing exactly where they landed, and have to hold a press conference discussing the important scientific discoveries at their landing site

  11. Using a Field Experience to Build Understanding of Planetary Geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higbie, M.; Treiman, A.; Kiefer, W.; Shipp, S.

    2004-12-01

    In the summer of 2004, the Lunar and Planetary Institute hosted 25 middle- and high-school teachers on a week-long field experience in Idaho and Montana. This workshop mixed field work with classroom experiences and provided educators and scientists the opportunity to interact. The educators investigated deposits associated with Glacial Lake Missoula floods and lava flows in the Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve. The participants applied what they learned about Earth-based processes to develop understanding of processes operating on Mars and the most recent results from NASA's missions to Mars. This was the most recent of five field-based experiences that used Earth-planet comparisons as a basis for experiential learning. These field experiences all are designed to strengthen content knowledge of geologic processes and planetary sciences. Learning geology through fieldwork enables participants to take ownership of the content through real-life experience; in essence, the teacher becomes the student. Establishing deeper knowledge of the content increases their confidence in facilitating inquiry-based science in their own classrooms. In addition to content, the educators are immersed in the process of science. Participants make observations, compile notes and illustrations, debate interpretations, draw conclusions, and communicate findings. Care was taken to separate observations and interpretations to help build an understanding of scientific reasoning. Discussions often involved questions without solutions, or with multiple solutions. While some participants expressed discomfort with these aspects of the nature of science, most were more comfortable with open-ended, inquiry based exploration by the close of the workshop. The field work is coupled with discussion and activities in the classroom. Participants reflected on the field sites and placed them in the context of the geologic history of the region. Observations and interpretations at

  12. The SCITEAS experiment: Optical characterizations of sublimating icy planetary analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommerol, A.; Jost, B.; Poch, O.; El-Maarry, M. R.; Vuitel, B.; Thomas, N.

    2015-05-01

    We have designed and built a laboratory facility to investigate the spectro-photometric and morphologic properties of different types of ice-bearing planetary surface analogs and follow their evolution upon exposure to a low pressure and low temperature environment. The results obtained with this experiment are used to verify and improve our interpretations of current optical remote-sensing datasets. They also provide valuable information for the development and operation of future optical instruments. The Simulation Chamber for Imaging the Temporal Evolution of Analogue Samples (SCITEAS) is a small thermal vacuum chamber equipped with a variety of ports and feedthroughs that permit both in-situ and remote characterizations as well as interacting with the sample. A large quartz window located directly above the sample is used to observe its surface from outside with a set of visible and near-infrared cameras. The sample holder can be easily and quickly inserted and removed from the chamber and is compatible with the other measurement facilities of the Laboratory for Outflow Studies of Sublimating Materials (LOSSy) at the University of Bern. We report here on the results of two of the first experiments performed in the SCITEAS chamber. In the first experiment, fine-grained water ice mixed with dark organic and mineral matter was left to sublime in vacuum and at low temperature, simulating the evolution of the surface of a comet nucleus approaching the Sun. We observed and characterized the formation and evolution of a crust of refractory organic and mineral matter at the surface of the sample and linked the evolution of its structure and texture to its spectro-photometric properties. In the second experiment, a frozen soil was prepared by freezing a mixture of smectite mineral and water. The sample was then left to sublime for 6 h to simulate the loss of volatiles from icy soil at high latitudes on Mars. Colour images were produced using the definitions of the

  13. High pressure cosmochemistry of major planetary interiors: Laboratory studies of the water-rich region of the system ammonia-water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, Malcolm; Johnson, Mary; Boone, Steven; Cynn, Hyunchee

    1987-01-01

    Several studies relative to high pressure cosmochemistry of major planetary interiors are summarized. The behavior of gas-ice mixtures at very high pressures, studies of the phase diagram of (NH3) sub x (H2O) sub 1-x at pressures to 5GPa and temperatures from 240 to 370 K, single crystal growth of ammonia dihydrate at room temperature in order to determine their structures by x-ray diffraction, spectroscopy of chemical reactions during shock compression in order to evaluate how the reactions affect the interpretation of equation of state data obtained by shock methods, and temperature and x-ray diffraction measurements made on resistively heated wire in diamond anvil cells in order to obtain phase and structural data relevant to the interiors of terrestrial planets are among the studies discussed.

  14. Infrared experiments for spaceborne planetary atmospheres research. Full report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The role of infrared sensing in atmospheric science is discussed and existing infrared measurement techniques are reviewed. Proposed techniques for measuring planetary atmospheres are criticized and recommended instrument developments for spaceborne investigations are summarized for the following phenomena: global and local radiative budget; radiative flux profiles; winds; temperature; pressure; transient and marginal atmospheres; planetary rotation and global atmospheric activity; abundances of stable constituents; vertical, lateral, and temporal distribution of abundances; composition of clouds and aerosols; radiative properties of clouds and aerosols; cloud microstructure; cloud macrostructure; and non-LTE phenomena.

  15. High-energy density experiments on planetary materials using high-power lasers and X-ray free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Norimasa

    2015-06-01

    Laser-driven dynamic compression allows us to investigate the behavior of planetary and exoplanetary materials at extreme conditions. Our high-energy density (HED) experiments for applications to planetary sciences began over five years ago. We measured the equation-of-state of cryogenic liquid hydrogen under laser-shock compression up to 55 GPa. Since then, various materials constituting the icy giant planets and the Earth-like planets have been studied using laser-driven dynamic compression techniques. Pressure-volume-temperature EOS data and optical property data of water and molecular mixtures were obtained at the planetary/exoplanetary interior conditions. Silicates and oxides data show interesting behaviors in the warm-dense matter regime due to their phase transformations. Most recently the structural changes of iron were observed for understanding the kinetics under the bcc-hcp transformation phenomena on a new HED science platform coupling power-lasers and the X-ray free electron laser (SACLA). This work was performed under the joint research project at the Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University. It was partially supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Grant Nos. 20654042, 22224012, 23540556, and 24103507) and also by grants from the Core-to-Core Program of JSPS on International Alliance for Material Science in Extreme States with High Power Laser and XFEL, and the X-ray Free Electron Laser Priority Strategy Program of MEXT.

  16. Insulator to semiconductor transformation of planetary ice mixtures compressed by laser-driven shock wave and its implication for interior properties of icy giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuchi, T.; Ozaki, N.; Sano, T.; Sakawa, Y.; Kodama, R.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular ices in the universe are consisting of hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen. Such ices containing these elements coalesced to develop into icy giant planets such as Uranus, Neptune, as well as those in some extrasolar planetary systems. Properties of such planetary ices at elevated pressures and temperatures are essential clues for understanding the layering structures and material circulations inside these icy giant planets. In particular, strong magnetic fields are generated in the deep interiors of these planets by thermal convection, so that the planetary ices are expected to be electrically conductive at the relevant pressure and temperature conditions.Here by using high-power nanosecond laser pulses from GEKKO-XII neodymium-doped glass laser system installed at the Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, four distinct chemical types of planetary ices are shock-compressed, and initial appearance and subsequent increase of free electron careers within each chemical type are experimentally observed. The chemical types include (i) H2O, (ii) H2O + carbon, (iii) H2O + nitrogen, and (iv) H2O + carbon + nitrogen. Their hydrogen/oxygen to carbon and hydrogen/oxygen to nitrogen molar ratios reflect that of the cosmic ice, so that our type (iv) corresponds to "synthetic Uranus" used by Nellis and coworkers. The measured conditions include pressures between 50 GPa to 190 GPa and temperatures between 3000 K and 14000 K, which were simultaneously determined with density and optical reflectivity at 532 nm of the solutions using picosecond time-resolved optical diagnostics for shock-compressed state of the materials. A common occurrence of insulator to electronic semiconductor transition was observed for all the chemical types, while the transition pressure conditions are substantially different among these types. Carbon-bearing ices consistently show lower transition pressure and temperature, indicating that electronically semiconducting states inside

  17. Planetary Surface Instruments Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Charles (Editor); Treiman, Allan H. (Editor); Kostiuk, Theodor (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This report on planetary surface investigations and planetary landers covers: (1) the precise chemical analysis of solids; (2) isotopes and evolved gas analyses; (3) planetary interiors; planetary atmospheres from within as measured by landers; (4) mineralogical examination of extraterrestrial bodies; (5) regoliths; and (6) field geology/processes.

  18. Testing the ability of the INSIGHT-SEIS experiment to model Mars deep interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panning, M. P.; Beucler, E.; Mocquet, A.; Drilleau, M.; Lognonne, P. H.; Banerdt, W. B.

    2013-12-01

    In 2016, the SEIS experiment, part of the INSIGHT mission of NASA's Discovery program to Mars, is expected to provide the very first seismic records on this planet. This experiment consists in a single station that will record both short-period and broad-band data. The challenge of obtaining information on the location of seismic sources and on the deep seismic structure of the planet using a single station is tested against Earth analogues recorded at the German Black Forest Observatory (BFO), where the signal to noise ratios of the records are close to the values expected for the SEIS experiment on Mars. Estimates of tectonic activity from mapped fault features and thermal modeling suggest that, in addition to smaller events, it is reasonable to anticipate recording a few events with equivalent Earth moment magnitudes in the range 4.5 - 5, or even larger, within one Martian year (i.e. two Earth years). Taking into account the smaller planetary radius of Mars relative to the Earth and lower anticipated seismic noise, due primarily to the absence of oceans, this may allow for recording of multiple orbit surface waves. Considering geometrical scaling between Mars and the Earth, we take a dataset of Earth events with moment magnitudes between 6 and 6.5, which are just above the threshold for detectability of 3rd orbit fundamental mode Rayleigh waves (R3) on quiet stations, and explore the use of several single station techniques for the estimation of source location (distance and back-azimuth from the station) and interior structure. By using the group arrival times of the first three orbits of the fundamental mode surface waves of these events, we are able to estimate the origin time and epicentral distance of the events within the accuracy of the shortest period used in the analysis (here 40 s). The precision on the estimate of the epicentral distance is about one degree, i.e. approximately 55 km on Mars, while the origin time is estimated with an accuracy of

  19. Planetary Magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.

    2007-01-01

    The chapter on Planetary Magnetism by Connerney describes the magnetic fields of the planets, from Mercury to Neptune, including the large satellites (Moon, Ganymede) that have or once had active dynamos. The chapter describes the spacecraft missions and observations that, along with select remote observations, form the basis of our knowledge of planetary magnetic fields. Connerney describes the methods of analysis used to characterize planetary magnetic fields, and the models used to represent the main field (due to dynamo action in the planet's interior) and/or remnant magnetic fields locked in the planet's crust, where appropriate. These observations provide valuable insights into dynamo generation of magnetic fields, the structure and composition of planetary interiors, and the evolution of planets.

  20. A particle-in-cell method for studying double-diffusive convection in the liquid layers of planetary interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouffard, Mathieu; Labrosse, Stéphane; Choblet, Gaël; Fournier, Alexandre; Aubert, Julien; Tackley, Paul J.

    2017-10-01

    Many planetary bodies contain internal liquid layers in their metallic cores or as buried water oceans. Convection in these layers is usually driven by buoyancy sources of thermal or compositional origin, with very different molecular diffusivities. Such conditions can potentially trigger double-diffusive instabilities and fundamentally affect the convective features. In numerical models, the weak diffusivity of the compositional field requires the use of a semi-Lagrangian description to produce minimal numerical diffusion. We implemented a ;particle-in-cell; (PIC) method into a pre-existing geodynamo code in 3D spherical geometry to describe the compositional field properly. We developed several numerical strategies to solve various problems inherent to the implementation of a PIC method for convection in spherical geometry and coded a hybrid scheme suitable for massively parallel platforms. We tested our new code on two benchmark cases which validate its applicability to the study of double-diffusive convection in the internal liquid layers of planets. As a first application, we study a case of non-magnetic double-diffusive convection at infinite Lewis number. Major differences emerge both in the compositional field and the convective pattern when the compositional diffusivity is neglected.

  1. Uranium solubility in terrestrial planetary cores: Evidence from high pressure and temperature experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xuezhao

    Uranium (U) and thorium (Th) are the most important heat producing elements in the Earth and therefore, understanding their migration and distribution within a planet is very important to understand planetary dynamics and evolution. High pressure (P) and temperature (T) experimental data on U and Th behavior related to the deep Earth and planetary interiors is still scarce. This study has concentrated on the solubility of U in liquid Fe, Fe-10wt% S and Fe-35wt% S by compressing and heating a mixture of peridotite, uraninite and pure Fe, Fe-10wt% S or Fe-35wt% S at pressures of 0-15 GPa and temperatures of 1500--2500°C. The experimental results show that U solubility (DU = U in metal phase/U in silicate) increases with increasing P and T, and for molten silicate, DU is 3-5 times higher than that of solid silicate. In addition, a positive correlation between S and DU has been found. At the same time, Si enters the metal phase in all three groups of metal run products. However, a positive correlation between Si concentration in the metal phase and pressure was only found in the pure Fe group. For the molten silicate experiments, the largest D U value achieved is 0.09 at 8 GPa in pure Fe and 0.135 at 7 GPa in Fe-10wt% S group. For the solid silicate experiments, the largest DU value achieved is 0.036 at 14.5 GPa in pure Fe, 0.04 at 7 GPa in Fe-10wt% S and 0.075 at 7 GPa in Fe-35wt% S. Although the cores of Mercury and Venus may contain no S, However, the trend of DU value increasing with increasing P and T in pure Fe indicates that significant U may have entered their cores. For Earth, based on the model of CI chondritic meteorite building material, and if its core formed from a 700-800 km thick magma ocean (P ˜26 GPa at its base), then 2.4 ppb U may have entered its core if it contains no S, and 10.4 ppb U if its core contains 10wt% S. Alternatively, if Earth's core have formed by percolation, then 1 -- 4.2 ppb U may have entered its core if it core contains no S

  2. Explorations in Teaching Sustainable Design: A Studio Experience in Interior Design/Architecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurel, Meltem O.

    2010-01-01

    This article argues that a design studio can be a dynamic medium to explore the creative potential of the complexity of sustainability from its technological to social ends. The study seeks to determine the impact of an interior design/architecture studio experience that was initiated to teach diverse meanings of sustainability and to engage the…

  3. Explorations in Teaching Sustainable Design: A Studio Experience in Interior Design/Architecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurel, Meltem O.

    2010-01-01

    This article argues that a design studio can be a dynamic medium to explore the creative potential of the complexity of sustainability from its technological to social ends. The study seeks to determine the impact of an interior design/architecture studio experience that was initiated to teach diverse meanings of sustainability and to engage the…

  4. An Experience of Science Theatre to Introduce Earth Interior and Natural Hazards to Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musacchio, Gemma; Lanza, Tiziana; D'Addezio, Giuliana

    2015-01-01

    The present paper describes an experience of science theatre addressed to children of primary and secondary school, with the main purpose of making them acquainted with a topic, the interior of the Earth, largely underestimated in compulsory school curricula worldwide. A not less important task was to encourage a positive attitude towards natural…

  5. Mars Pathfinder Microrover - Implementing a Low Cost Planetary Mission Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matijevic, J.

    1995-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder Microrover Flight Experiment (MFEX) is a NASA OACT flight experiment which is planned to be delivered and integrated with the Mars Pathfinder (MFP) lander and spacecraft system for landing on Mars on July 4, 1997. After landing, the MFEX rover is deployed from the lander and begins a 7 sol (1 sol=1 Martian day) mission to conduct technology experiments, deploy an alpha proton x-ray spectrometer (APXS) on rocks and soil, and image the lander as part of the engineering assessment of the mission after landing.

  6. Experiments on reduction of propeller induced interior noise by active control of cylinder vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.; Jones, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of reducing interior noise caused by advanced turbo propellers by controlling the vibration of aircraft fuselages was investigated by performing experiments in an anechoic chamber with an aircraft model test rig and apparatus. It was found that active vibration control provides reasonable global attenuation of interior noise levels for the cases of resonant (at 576 Hz) and forced (at 708 Hz) system response. The controlling mechanism behind the effect is structural-acoustic coupling between the shell and the contained field, termed interface modal filtering.

  7. Mars Pathfinder Microrover- Implementing a Low Cost Planetary Mission Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matijevic, J.

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder Microrover Flight Experiment (MFEX) is a NASA Office of Space Access and Technology (OSAT) flight experiment which has been delivered and integrated with the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) lander and spacecraft system. The total cost of the MFEX mission, including all subsystem design and development, test, integration with the MPF lander and operations on Mars has been capped at $25 M??is paper discusses the process and the implementation scheme which has resulted in the development of this first Mars rover.

  8. Insights into the dynamics of planetary interiors obtained through the study of global distribution of volcanoes II: Tectonic implications from Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañon-Tapia, Edgardo

    2014-06-01

    The distribution of volcanic features is ultimately controlled by processes taking place beneath the surface of a planet. For this reason, characterization of volcano distribution at a global scale can be used to obtain insights concerning dynamic aspects of planetary interiors. Until present, studies of this type commonly have focused on volcanic features of a specific type (e.g., large volcanoes in Venus or hot-spot volcanism on Earth), or have concentrated on relatively small regions (i.e., vent distribution within individual volcanic fields), but no comparison of extensive databases has been made by using the same tools in both planets. In this work, the description of the distribution of volcanic features observed over the entire surface of Venus is made using the same tool used for Earth, and is applied to an extensive database. The analysis is based on density contours obtained with the Fisher kernel. As a result, several groupings of volcanoes are identified refining the already documented concentration of volcanoes on the BAT zone. In particular some doughnut-like patterns are observed that might be related to the action of mantle plumes. The occurrence of such features on Earth, as well as the existence of a uniform distribution of background volcanism on both planets, suggests similarities on their geodynamic behavior that had not been identified previously.

  9. Insights Into the Dynamics of Planetary Interiors Obtained Through the Study of Global Distribution of Volcanoes: Lessons From Earth and Venus.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canon-Tapia, E.

    2014-12-01

    The distribution of volcanic features is ultimately controlled by processes taking place beneath the surface of a planet. For this reason, characterization of volcano distribution at a global scale can be used to obtain insights concerning dynamic aspects of planetary interiors. In this work, description of the distribution of volcanic features observed on Earth and Venus is completed using density contours obtained with the Fisher kernel. Attention is focused on similar features observed in both planets. In particular two features are examined with more detail: First, a pattern of groups of clusters defining the boundaries of elliptical regions that tentatively can be associated to large mantle plumes. Second, the existence of a uniform distribution of background volcanism. The former pattern is considered to constitute the first order convective pattern of the mantle in Venus, and although it is present on Earth, it is not as prominent. In contrast, the persistent occurrence of volcanic clusters at a lower significance level, suggests the occurrence of a different scale of mantle convection that controls a more uniformly distributed volcanism. Both, the first order related to large mantle-plumes and the background volcanism are superimposed on Earth to the volcanism controlled by plate tectonics. Consequently, the global distribution of volcanism in both planets reveals that at least three types of mantle convection can take place in the terrestrial planets, and that such types of mantle convection can coexist simultaneously in one given planet, although in each case, a dominant mode is different.

  10. The solubility of carbon monoxide in silicate melts at high pressures and its effect on silicate phase relations. [in terrestrial and other planetary interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggler, D. H.; Mysen, B. O.; Hoering, T. C.; Holloway, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Autoradiographic analysis and gas chromatography were used to measure the solubility in silicate melts of CO-CO2 vapors (30 to 40% CO by thermodynamic calculation) in equilibrium with graphite at temperatures up to 1700 deg C and pressures to 30 kbar. At near-liquidus temperatures CO-CO2 vapors were found to be slightly more soluble than CO2 alone. As a result of the apparently negative temperature dependence of CO solubility, the solubility of CO-CO2 at superliquidus temperatures is less than that of CO2. Melting points of two silicates were depressed more by CO than by CO2. Phase boundary orientations suggest that CO/CO + CO2 is greater in the liquid than in the vapor. The effect of the presence of CO on periodotite phase relations was investigated, and it was found that melts containing both CO and CO2 are nearly as polymerized as those containing only CO2. These results suggest that crystallization processes in planetary interiors can be expected to be about the same, whether the melts contain CO2 alone or CO2 and CO.

  11. Experiments with a small behaviour controlled planetary rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David P.; Desai, Rajiv S.; Gat, Erann; Ivlev, Robert; Loch, John

    1993-01-01

    A series of experiments that were performed on the Rocky 3 robot is described. Rocky 3 is a small autonomous rover capable of navigating through rough outdoor terrain to a predesignated area, searching that area for soft soil, acquiring a soil sample, and depositing the sample in a container at its home base. The robot is programmed according to a reactive behavior control paradigm using the ALFA programming language. This style of programming produces robust autonomous performance while requiring significantly less computational resources than more traditional mobile robot control systems. The code for Rocky 3 runs on an eight bit processor and uses about ten k of memory.

  12. Experiments with a small behaviour controlled planetary rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David P.; Desai, Rajiv S.; Gat, Erann; Ivlev, Robert; Loch, John

    1993-01-01

    A series of experiments that were performed on the Rocky 3 robot is described. Rocky 3 is a small autonomous rover capable of navigating through rough outdoor terrain to a predesignated area, searching that area for soft soil, acquiring a soil sample, and depositing the sample in a container at its home base. The robot is programmed according to a reactive behavior control paradigm using the ALFA programming language. This style of programming produces robust autonomous performance while requiring significantly less computational resources than more traditional mobile robot control systems. The code for Rocky 3 runs on an eight bit processor and uses about ten k of memory.

  13. The Potassium-Argon Laser Experiment (KARLE): In Situ Geochronology for Planetary Robotic Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, B. A.; Devismes, D.; Miller, J. S.; Swindle, T. D.

    2014-01-01

    Isotopic dating is an essential tool to establish an absolute chronology for geological events, including crystallization history, magmatic evolution, and alteration events. The capability for in situ geochronology will open up the ability for geochronology to be accomplished as part of lander or rover complement, on multiple samples rather than just those returned. An in situ geochronology package can also complement sample return missions by identifying the most interesting rocks to cache or return to Earth. The K-Ar Laser Experiment (KArLE) brings together a novel combination of several flight-proven components to provide precise measurements of potassium (K) and argon (Ar) that will enable accurate isochron dating of planetary rocks. KArLE will ablate a rock sample, measure the K in the plasma state using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), measure the liberated Ar using mass spectrometry (MS), and relate the two by measuring the volume of the ablated pit by optical imaging. Our work indicates that the KArLE instrument is capable of determining the age of planetary samples with sufficient accuracy to address a wide range of geochronology problems in planetary science. Additional benefits derive from the fact that each KArLE component achieves analyses useful for most planetary surface missions.

  14. Planetary Surface Instruments Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Charles; Treiman, Allanh; Kostiuk, Theodor,

    1996-01-01

    This report on planetary surface investigations an d planetary landers covers: (1) the precise chemic al analysis of solids; (2) isotopes and evolved ga s analyses; (3) planetary interiors; planetary atm ospheres from within as measured by landers; (4) m ineralogical examination of extraterrestrial bodie s; (5) regoliths; and (6) field geology/processes . For individual titles, see N96-34812 through N96-34819. (Derived from text.)

  15. Simulation experiments for gamma-ray mapping of planetary surfaces: Scattering of high-energy neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, J.; Englert, P.; Reedy, R. C.; Waenke, H.

    1986-01-01

    The concentration and distribution of certain elements in surface layers of planetary objects specify constraints on models of their origin and evolution. This information can be obtained by means of remote sensing gamma-ray spectroscopy, as planned for a number of future space missions, i.e., Mars, Moon, asteroids, and comets. To investigate the gamma-rays made by interactions of neutrons with matter, thin targets of different composition were placed between a neutron-source and a high-resolution germanium spectrometer. Gamma-rays in the range of 0.1 to 8 MeV were accumulated. In one set of experiments a 14-MeV neutron generator using the T(d,n) reaction as neutron-source was placed in a small room. Scattering in surrounding walls produced a spectrum of neutron energies from 14 MeV down to thermal. This complex neutron-source induced mainly neutron-capture lines and only a few scattering lines. As a result of the set-up, there was a considerable background of discrete lines from surrounding materials. A similar situation exists under planetary exploration conditions: gamma-rays are induced in the planetary surface as well as in the spacecraft. To investigate the contribution of neutrons with higher energies, an experiment for the measurement of prompt gamma radiation was set up at the end of a beam-line of an isochronous cyclotron.

  16. The Potassium-Argon Laser Experiment (KArLE): In Situ Geochronology for Planetary Robotic Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The Potassium (K) - Argon (Ar) Laser Experiment (KArLE) will make in situ noble-gas geochronology measurements aboard planetary robotic landers and roverss. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is used to measure the K abun-dance in a sample and to release its noble gases; the evolved Ar is measured by mass spectrometry (MS); and rela-tive K content is related to absolute Ar abundance by sample mass, determined by optical measurement of the ablated volume. KArLE measures a whole-rock K-Ar age to 10% or better for rocks 2 Ga or older, sufficient to resolve the absolute age of many planetary samples. The LIBS-MS approach is attractive because the analytical components have been flight proven, do not require further technical development, and provide complementary measurements as well as in situ geochronology.

  17. The Rotation and Interior Structure Experiment (RISE) on the Mars Geophysical Monitoring and Sounding (GEMS) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkner, W. M.; Asmar, S. W.; Dehant, V. M.; Banerdt, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Geophysical Monitoring and Sounding (GEMS) mission provides unique and critical information about the fundamental processes of terrestrial planet formation and evolutions. GEMS begins the geophysical exploration of the Martian interior using seismic and thermal measurements and rotational dynamics, providing information about the initial accretion of the planet, the formation and differentiation of its core and crust, and the subsequent evolution of the interior. One of the mission's investigations is the Rotation and Interior Structure Experiment (RISE), which uses the spacecraft X-band communication link to receive Doppler and ranging observables. The objective of RISE is to determine the mineralogy, temperature, and state of the deep interior of Mars, complementing information provided by seismology. The mineralogy and temperature of the deep interior will provide key information on the accretion of the planet, and can be used to test theories of terrestrial planet accretion and thermal evolution. The interior structure will be inferred by the effect on variations in the orientation of Mars with respect to inertial space. The precession, nutation, and polar motion of Mars result from the interaction of the interior mass distribution with the gravity of the Sun. RISE will provide improved estimates of Mars' precession and nutation, polar motion, and length-of-day variations by monitoring the Doppler shift due to the rotation of Mars on the radio signal between the spacecraft and tracking stations. RISE will reduce the uncertainty in the precession rate and therefore also in the moment of inertia by a factor of ten or more. The moment of inertia can be used as a constraint on the core size and density, core temperature and mineralogy. The improved accuracy of the moment of inertia can constraint the core size and eliminate many, if not most, possible composition ratios. In addition, the measurements of the nutation of Mars will determine whether the Martian

  18. Phenomenology of Neptune's radio emissions observed by the Voyager planetary radio astronomy experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, B. M.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Aubier, M. G.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Neptune flyby in 1989 added a new planet to the known number of magnetized planets generating nonthermal radio emissions. We review the Neptunian radio emission morphology as observed by the planetary radio astronomy experiment on board Voyager 2 during a few weeks before and after closest approach. We present the characteristics of the two observed recurrent main components of the Neptunian kilometric radiation, i.e., the 'smooth' and the 'bursty' emissions, and we describe the many specific features of the radio spectrum during closest approach.

  19. Sulfur-controlled iron isotope fractionation experiments of core formation in planetary bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahar, A.; Hillgren, V. J.; Horan, M. F.; Mesa-Garcia, J.; Kaufman, L. A.; Mock, T. D.

    2015-02-01

    A series of high pressure and temperature experiments were conducted to better constrain the Fe isotope fractionation during core-mantle differentiation in planetesimal and planetary bodies. Synthetic mixtures of oxides and metal having varying amounts of sulfur, approximating terrestrial and Martian compositions, were melted at 1-2 GPa and 1650 °C. Iron isotopic equilibrium between the resulting metal and glass run products was verified for all experiments using the three-isotope technique. Purified Fe from metal and glass was analyzed by multiple-collector ICP-MS in high resolution mode. Iron alloy and silicate glass show a well-resolved Δ57Femetal-silicate of +0.12 ± 0.04‰ in a sulfur-free system. Isotope fractionation increases with sulfur content to +0.43 ± 0.03‰ at 18 wt.% sulfur in the metal. These results cannot be easily interpreted within the context of known Fe isotope ratios in most natural samples of planetary and asteroidal mantles and therefore suggest more complex processes affected the Fe isotope fractionation therein. However, to reconcile Martian meteorite iron isotopic signatures with geophysical models using this new experimental data requires a smaller amount of sulfur in the Martian core than previous estimates, with an upper limit of ∼8 wt.%.

  20. Social Media and Student Engagement in a Microgravity Planetary Science Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, S. S.; Lai, K.; Hoover, B.; Whitaker, A.; Tiller, C.; Benjamin, S.; Dove, A.; Colwell, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Collisional Accretion Experiment (CATE) is a planetary science experiment funded by NASA's Undergraduate Instrumentation Program (USIP). CATE is a microgravity experiment to study low-velocity collisions between cm-sized particles and 0.1-1.0 mm-sized particles in vacuum to better understand the conditions for accretion in the protoplanetary disk as well as collisions in planetary ring systems. CATE flew on three parabolic airplane flights in July, 2014, using NASA's "Weightless Wonder VI" aircraft. A significant part of the project was documenting the experience of designing, building, testing, and flying spaceflight hardware from the perspective of the undergraduates working on the experiment. The outreach effort was aimed at providing high schools students interested in STEM careers with a first-person view of hands-on student research at the university level. We also targeted undergraduates at the University of Central Florida to make them aware of space research on campus. The CATE team pursued multiple outlets, from social media to presentations at local schools, to connect with the public and with younger students. We created a website which hosted a blog, links to media publications that ran our story, videos, and galleries of images from work in the lab throughout the year. In addition the project had Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram accounts. These social media outlets had much more traffic than the website except during the flight week when photos posted on the blog generated significant traffic. The most effective means of communicating the project to the target audience, however, was through face-to-face presentations in classrooms. We saw a large increase in followers on Twitter and Instagram as the flight campaign got closer and while we were there. The main source of followers came after we presented to local high school students. These presentations were made by the undergraduate student team and the faculty mentors (Colwell and Dove).

  1. High Temperature, Controlled-Atmosphere Aerodynamic Levitation Experiments with Applications in Planetary Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macris, C. A.; Badro, J.; Eiler, J. M.; Stolper, E. M.

    2016-12-01

    The aerodynamic levitation laser apparatus is an instrument in which spherical samples are freely floated on top of a stream of gas while being heated with a CO2laser to temperatures up to about 3500 °C. Laser heated samples, ranging in size from 0.5 to 3.5 mm diameter, can be levitated in a variety of chemically active or inert atmospheres in a gas-mixing chamber (e.g., Hennet et al. 2006; Pack et al. 2010). This allows for containerless, controlled-atmosphere, high temperature experiments with potential for applications in earth and planetary science. A relatively new technique, aerodynamic levitation has been used mostly for studies of the physical properties of liquids at high temperatures (Kohara et al. 2011), crystallization behavior of silicates and oxides (Arai et al. 2004), and to prepare glasses from compositions known to crystallize upon quenching (Tangeman et al. 2001). More recently, however, aerodynamic levitation with laser heating has been used as an experimental technique to simulate planetary processes. Pack et al. (2010) used levitation and melting experiments to simulate chondrule formation by using Ar-H2 as the flow gas, thus imposing a reducing atmosphere, resulting in reduction of FeO, Fe2O3, and NiO to metal alloys. Macris et al. (2015) used laser heating with aerodynamic levitation to reproduce the textures and diffusion profiles of major and minor elements observed in impact ejecta from the Australasian strewn field, by melting a powdered natural tektite mixed with 60-100 μm quartz grains on a flow of pure Ar gas. These experiments resulted in quantitative modeling of Si and Al diffusion, which allowed for interpretations regarding the thermal histories of natural tektites and their interactions with the surrounding impact vapor plume. Future experiments will employ gas mixing (CO, CO2, H2, O, Ar) in a controlled atmosphere levitation chamber to explore the range of fO2applicable to melt-forming impacts on other rocky planetary bodies

  2. A soil flowing characteristics monitoring method in planetary drilling and coring verification experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Junyue; Quan, Qiquan; Jiang, Shengyuan; Chen, Chongbin; Yuan, Fengpei; Deng, Zongquan

    2017-03-01

    Some type of piercing into the subsurface formation is required in future planetary explorations to enhance the understanding of early stars' geological evolution and the origin of life. Compared with other technical methods, drilling & coring, only utilizing the compound locomotion of rotation and penetration, can sample the subsurface soil relatively efficient and convenient. However, given the uncertain mechanical properties of planetary soil, drilling state signals should be monitored online to improve the robustness of drilling system and avoid potential drilling faults. Since the flowing characteristics of interacted soil, such as removal volume, coring height, removal velocity and accumulation angle, directly reveal the drilling conditions, they are enhancing resources to comprehend the sampling phenomenon and can be used to help control the drill tool. This paper proposed a novel soil flowing characteristics (SFC) monitoring method by applying an industrial camera to record the flowing characteristics of removed cuttings and by utilizing an ultrasonic sensor into the hollow auger to monitor the sampled core. Experiments in one typical lunar regolith simulant indicate that the monitored SFC accurately reflects the interaction between the drill tool and soil.

  3. Principal component analysis of Birkeland currents determined by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milan, S. E.; Carter, J. A.; Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Principal component analysis is performed on Birkeland or field-aligned current (FAC) measurements from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment. Principal component analysis (PCA) identifies the patterns in the FACs that respond coherently to different aspects of geomagnetic activity. The regions 1 and 2 current system is shown to be the most reproducible feature of the currents, followed by cusp currents associated with magnetic tension forces on newly reconnected field lines. The cusp currents are strongly modulated by season, indicating that their strength is regulated by the ionospheric conductance at the foot of the field lines. PCA does not identify a pattern that is clearly characteristic of a substorm current wedge. Rather, a superposed epoch analysis of the currents associated with substorms demonstrates that there is not a single mode of response, but a complicated and subtle mixture of different patterns.

  4. Principle Component Analysis of Birkeland Currents Determined by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milan, S. E.; Carter, J. A.; Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Principle Component Analysis is performed on northern and southern hemisphere Birkeland or field-aligned current (FAC) measurements from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE). PCA identifies the patterns in the FACs that respond coherently to different aspects of geomagnetic activity. The region 1 and 2 current system is shown to be the most reproducible feature of the currents, followed by cusp currents associated with magnetic tension forces on newly-reconnected field lines. The cusp currents are strongly modulated by season, indicating that their strength is regulated by the ionospheric conductance at the foot of the field lines. PCA does not identify a pattern that is clearly characteristic of a substorm current wedge. Rather, a superposed epoch analysis of the currents associated with substorms demonstrates that there is not a single mode of response, but a complicated and subtle mixture of different patterns. Other interhemispheric differences are discussed.

  5. The Development of Preferred Pathways in Lava Flow Interiors: Insights from Analog Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, S. W.; McColley, S.; Fink, J. H.

    2002-12-01

    We examined the development of preferred pathways in lava flow interiors using a unique experimental procedure. Various colors of an analog fluid, polyethylene glycol (PEG), were sequentially extruded from a point source into a tank containing a cold sucrose solution to better image the internal structure of the flows. The setup was videotaped from the top, side and bottom to provide time-lapse views of the developing flow. The top- and side-mounted cameras showed the development of the surface morphology, and the bottom-mounted camera captured the interaction of the different PEG colors in the flow interior. We conducted 20 experimental runs under various emplacement conditions, and these clearly show the development of interior flow pathways as a function of extrusion rate, cooling rate and time. Analysis of the videotapes also shows the relationships between surface flow morphology and interior pathway development. High effusion rate combined with slow cooling rate produced flows with little or no surface crust. Interior flow outward from the point source was generally radial early in the experimental run, with this radial flow breaking into smaller broad fronts as the run proceeded. We suggest that fluid instabilities within the flow interior are responsible for the breakdown of radial flow with time. Where crusts developed on some of these flows late in the experimental run, interior instabilities became more pronounced and were visible on the flow surface as well. Lower effusion rates and higher cooling rates produced crusted flows with highly complex interior pathways that developed early in the experimental run. These crusted flows grew as fluid migrated through narrow fronts and tubes, lifting the crust and inflating the flow. Occasional breakouts of interior material onto the crusted flow surface were observed, and were typically comprised of flow material that had resided in the interior for some time, rather than the hotter, most recently injected fluid

  6. Life in the Universe - Astronomy and Planetary Science Research Experience for Undergraduates at the SETI Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiar, J.; Phillips, C. B.; Rudolph, A.; Bonaccorsi, R.; Tarter, J.; Harp, G.; Caldwell, D. A.; DeVore, E. K.

    2016-12-01

    The SETI Institute hosts an Astrobiology Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program. Beginning in 2013, we partnered with the Physics and Astronomy Dept. at Cal Poly Pomona, a Hispanic-serving university, to recruit underserved students. Over 11 years, we have served 155 students. We focus on Astrobiology since the Institute's mission is to explore, understand and explain the origin, nature and prevalence of life in the universe. Our REU students work with mentors at the Institute - a non-profit organization located in California's Silicon Valley-and at the nearby NASA Ames Research Center. Projects span research on survival of microbes under extreme conditions, planetary geology, astronomy, the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI), extrasolar planets and more. The REU program begins with an introductory lectures by Institute scientists covering the diverse astrobiology subfields. A week-long field trip to the SETI Institute's Allen Telescope Array (Hat Creek Radio Astronomy Observatory in Northern California) and field experiences at hydrothermal systems at nearby Lassen Volcanic National Park immerses students in radio astronomy and SETI, and extremophile environments that are research sites for astrobiologists. Field trips expose students to diverse environments and allow them to investigate planetary analogs as our scientists do. Students also participate in local trips to the California Academy of Sciences and other nearby locations of scientific interest, and attend the weekly scientific colloquium hosted by the SETI Institute at Microsoft, other seminars and lectures at SETI Institute and NASA Ames. The students meet and present at a weekly journal club where they hone their presentation skills, as well as share their research progress. At the end of the summer, the REU interns present their research projects at a session of the Institute's colloquium. As a final project, students prepare a 2-page formal abstract and 15-minute

  7. Planetary rover robotics experiment in education: carbonate rock collecting experiment of the Husar-5 rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalay, Kristóf; Lang, Ágota; Horváth, Tamás; Prajczer, Péter; Bérczi, Szaniszló

    2013-04-01

    Introduction: The new experiment for the Husar-5 educational space probe rover consists of steps of the technology of procedure of finding carbonate speci-mens among the rocks on the field. 3 main steps were robotized: 1) identification of carbonate by acid test, 2) measuring the gases liberated by acid, and 3) magnetic test. Construction of the experiment: The basis of the robotic realization of the experiment is a romote-controlled rover which can move on the field. Onto this rover the mechanism of the experiments were built from Technics LEGO elements and we used LEGO-motors for making move these experiments. The operation was coordinated by an NXT-brick which was suitable to programming. Fort he acetic-test the drops should be passed to the selected area. Passing a drop to a locality: From the small holder of the acid using densified gas we pump some drop onto the selected rock. We promote this process by pumpig the atmospheric gas into another small gas-container, so we have another higher pressure gas there. This is pumped into the acid-holder. The effect of the reaction is observed by a wireless onboard camera In the next step we can identify the the liberated gas by the gas sensor. Using it we can confirm the liberation of the CO2 gas without outer observer. The third step is the controll of the paramagnetic properties.. In measuring this feature a LEGO-compass is our instrumentation. We use a electric current gener-ated magnet. During the measurements both the coil and the gas-sensor should be positioned to be near to the surface. This means, that a lowering and an uplifting machinery should be constructed. Summary: The sequence of the measurement is the following. 1) the camera - after giving panorama images - turns toward the soil surface, 2) the dropping onto the rock surface 3) at the same time the gas-sensor starts to move down above the rock 4) the compass sensor also moves down on the arm which holds both the gas-sensor and the compass-sensor 5

  8. Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) technique: A test case of the Mars Express Phobos fly-by

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duev, D. A.; Pogrebenko, S. V.; Cimò, G.; Molera Calvés, G.; Bocanegra Bahamón, T. M.; Gurvits, L. I.; Kettenis, M. M.; Kania, J.; Tudose, V.; Rosenblatt, P.; Marty, J.-C.; Lainey, V.; de Vicente, P.; Quick, J.; Nickola, M.; Neidhardt, A.; Kronschnabl, G.; Ploetz, C.; Haas, R.; Lindqvist, M.; Orlati, A.; Ipatov, A. V.; Kharinov, M. A.; Mikhailov, A. G.; Lovell, J. E. J.; McCallum, J. N.; Stevens, J.; Gulyaev, S. A.; Natush, T.; Weston, S.; Wang, W. H.; Xia, B.; Yang, W. J.; Hao, L.-F.; Kallunki, J.; Witasse, O.

    2016-09-01

    Context. The closest ever fly-by of the Martian moon Phobos, performed by the European Space Agency's Mars Express spacecraft, gives a unique opportunity to sharpen and test the Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiments (PRIDE) technique in the interest of studying planet-satellite systems. Aims: The aim of this work is to demonstrate a technique of providing high precision positional and Doppler measurements of planetary spacecraft using the Mars Express spacecraft. The technique will be used in the framework of Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiments in various planetary missions, in particular in fly-by mode. Methods: We advanced a novel approach to spacecraft data processing using the techniques of Doppler and phase-referenced very long baseline interferometry spacecraft tracking. Results: We achieved, on average, mHz precision (30 μm/s at a 10 s integration time) for radial three-way Doppler estimates and sub-nanoradian precision for lateral position measurements, which in a linear measure (at a distance of 1.4 AU) corresponds to ~50 m.

  9. High Pressure Cosmochemistry of Major Planetary Interiors: Laboratory Studies of the Water-rich Region of the System Ammonia-water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, M.; Johnson, M.; Koumvakalis, A. S.

    1985-01-01

    The behavior of gas-ice mixtures in major planets at very high pressures was studied. Some relevant pressure-temperature-composition (P-T-X) regions of the hydrogen (H2)-helium (He)-water (H2O-ammonia (NH3)-methane (CH4) phase diagram were determined. The studies, and theoretical model, of the relevant phases, are needed to interpret the compositions of ice-gas systems at conditions of planetary interest. The compositions and structures of a multiphase, multicomponent system at very high pressures care characterized, and the goal is to characterize this system over a wide range of low and high temperatures. The NH3-H2O compositions that are relevant to planetary problems yet are easy to prepare were applied. The P-T surface of water was examined and the corresponding surface for NH3 was determined. The T-X diagram of ammonia-water at atmospheric pressure was studied and two water-rich phases were found, NH3-2H2O (ammonia dihydrate), which melts incongruently, and NH3.H2O (ammonia monohydrate), which is nonstoichiometric and melts at a higher temperature than the dihydrate. It is suggested that a P-T surface at approximately the monohydrate composition and the P-X surface at room temperature is determined.

  10. High Pressure Cosmochemistry of Major Planetary Interiors: Laboratory Studies of the Water-rich Region of the System Ammonia-water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, M.; Johnson, M.; Koumvakalis, A. S.

    1985-01-01

    The behavior of gas-ice mixtures in major planets at very high pressures was studied. Some relevant pressure-temperature-composition (P-T-X) regions of the hydrogen (H2)-helium (He)-water (H2O-ammonia (NH3)-methane (CH4) phase diagram were determined. The studies, and theoretical model, of the relevant phases, are needed to interpret the compositions of ice-gas systems at conditions of planetary interest. The compositions and structures of a multiphase, multicomponent system at very high pressures care characterized, and the goal is to characterize this system over a wide range of low and high temperatures. The NH3-H2O compositions that are relevant to planetary problems yet are easy to prepare were applied. The P-T surface of water was examined and the corresponding surface for NH3 was determined. The T-X diagram of ammonia-water at atmospheric pressure was studied and two water-rich phases were found, NH3-2H2O (ammonia dihydrate), which melts incongruently, and NH3.H2O (ammonia monohydrate), which is nonstoichiometric and melts at a higher temperature than the dihydrate. It is suggested that a P-T surface at approximately the monohydrate composition and the P-X surface at room temperature is determined.

  11. Detection of dust impacts by the Voyager planetary radio astronomy experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, David R.

    1993-01-01

    The Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) instrument detected large numbers of dust particles during the Voyager 2 encounter with Neptune. The signatures of these impacts are analyzed in some detail. The major conclusions are described. PRA detects impacts from all over the spacecraft body, not just the PRA antennas. The signatures of individual impacts last substantially longer than was expected from complementary Plasma Wave Subsystem (PWS) data acquired by another Voyager experiment. The signatures of individual impacts demonstrate very rapid fluctuations in signal strength, so fast that the data are limited by the speed of response of the instrument. The PRA detects events at a rate consistently lower than does the Plasma Wave subsystem. Even so, the impact rate is so great near the inbound crossing of the ring plane that no reliable estimate of impact rate can be made for this period. The data are consistent with the presence of electrons accelerated by ions within an expanding plasma cloud from the point of impact. An ancillary conclusion is that the anomalous appearance of data acquired at 900 kHz appears to be due to an error in processing the PRA data prior to their delivery rather than due to overload of the PRA instrument.

  12. Planetary gear modal vibration experiments and correlation against lumped-parameter and finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ericson, Tristan M.; Parker, Robert G.

    2013-04-01

    Experimental modal analysis techniques are applied to characterize the planar dynamic behavior of two spur planetary gears. Rotational and translational vibrations of the sun gear, carrier, and planet gears are measured. Experimentally obtained natural frequencies, mode shapes, and dynamic response are compared to the results from lumped-parameter and finite element models. Two qualitatively different classes of mode shapes in distinct frequency ranges are observed in the experiments and confirmed by the lumped-parameter model, which considers the accessory shafts and fixtures in the system to capture all of the natural frequencies and modes. The finite element model estimates the high-frequency modes that have significant tooth mesh deflection without considering the shafts and fixtures. The lumped-parameter and finite element models accurately predict the natural frequencies and modal properties established by experimentation. Rotational, translational, and planet mode types presented in published mathematical studies are confirmed experimentally. The number and types of modes in the low-frequency and high-frequency bands depend on the degrees of freedom in the central members and planet gears, respectively. The accuracy of natural frequency prediction is improved when the planet bearings have differing stiffnesses in the tangential and radial directions, consistent with the bearing load direction.

  13. The Genesis of Atlantic Lows Experiment: The Planetary-Boundary-Layer Subprogram of GALE.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Sethu; Riordan, Allen J.

    1988-02-01

    The Genesis of Atlantic Lows Experiment (GALE), focused an intensive data-gathering effort along the mid-Atlantic coast of the United States from 15 January through 15 March 1986. Here, the general objectives and experimental layout are described with special emphasis on the planetary-boundary-layer (PBL) component of GALE.Instrumentation is described for buoys, ships, research aircraft, and towers. The networks of the cross-chain long range aid to navigation (LORAN) atmospheric sounding system (CLASS) and the portable automated mesonet (PAM II) are described and their impact on the operation of GALE is outlined. Special use of dual-Doppler radar to obtain detailed wind measurements in the PBL is discussed.Preliminary analyses for a selected observational period are given. Detailed observations of the offshore coastal front reveal direct mesoscale circulations imbedded in the frontal zone. Later in the period, during an intense cold-air outbreak, sensible-heat and latent-heat fluxes over the coastal ocean each attain values of about 500 W · m2. Coordinated aircraft operations are outlined for this case and a few early findings are given.

  14. Planning Science Experiments According to the Multihierarchical Structural System of Planetary Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérczi, Sz.

    2017-02-01

    The Multihierarchical Structural System of Planetary Objects is a synchronous view of materials to be measured, technologies, research activities arranged by structural hierarchy of the matter: giving benefits for both scientists and engineers.

  15. Dynamic regims and evolution of planetary mantles: insights from laboratory experiments with complex rheology fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davaille, A.; Di Giuseppe, E.; Mittelstaedt, E.

    2012-04-01

    Planetary long-term cooling, as well as surface phenomena such as plate tectonics, volcanoes and earthquakes, are mainly controlled by the existence and patterns of convective motions inside the planets solid-state mantles. The planets in the solar system present very different dynamic regims: plate tectonics (Earth), episodic complete (Venus?) or partial (Moon, Europa ?) resurfacing, intense volcanism (Io), stagnant lid convection (Mars), etc... A key ingredient to produce this diversity is probably the complex rheology of mantle's material, but this relationship is still not very well understood. We report here new laboratory experiments on mantle convection using a fluid, whose rheology varies from brittle to visco-plastic to purely viscous when its water content and its temperature change. So as an analogy to cooling from above, the fluid is dryed from above, its surface being kept at a constant humidity. It is also heated from below to produce active upwellings. Humidity, temperature, fluid thickness and rheological properties were systematically varied. As the fluid dries at the surface, a thermo-chemical boundary layer (CBL) develops, constituted of a thin brittle film on top of a more ductile layer. Folds and cracks are visible on the surface film. Depending on the intensity of convection, the presence of hot upwellings and the rheology variation across the top CBL, the different regims encountered on planets are observed. These are classified in a regime diagram. The existence of a brittle film seems necessary to observe asymmetric subduction. Moreover, the experiments demonstrate that a planet does not stay in the same regime throughout the geological times, but evolves through a suite of different regimes.

  16. Continued Development of in Situ Geochronology for Planetary Using KArLE (Potassium-Argon Laser Experiment)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devismes, D.; Cohen, B. A.

    2016-01-01

    Geochronology is a fundamental measurement for planetary samples, providing the ability to establish an absolute chronology for geological events, including crystallization history, magmatic evolution, and alteration events, and providing global and solar system context for such events. The capability for in situ geochronology will open up the ability for geochronology to be accomplished as part of lander or rover complement, on multiple samples rather than just those returned. An in situ geochronology package can also complement sample return missions by identifying the most interesting rocks to cache or return to Earth. The K-Ar radiometric dating approach to in situ dating has been validated by the Curiosity rover on Mars as well as several laboratories on Earth. Several independent projects developing in situ rock dating for planetary samples, based on the K-Ar method, are giving promising results. Among them, the Potassium (K)-Argon Laser Experiment (KArLE) at MSFC is based on techniques already in use for in planetary exploration, specifically, Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS, used on the Curiosity Chemcam), mass spectroscopy (used on multiple planetary missions, including Curiosity, ExoMars, and Rosetta), and optical imaging (used on most missions).

  17. Planetary Seismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Renee C.

    2015-01-01

    Of the many geophysical means that can be used to probe a planet's interior, seismology remains the most direct. In addition to Earth, seismometers have been installed on Venus, Mars, and the Moon. Given that the seismic data gathered on the Moon (now over 40 years ago) revolutionized our understanding of the Moon and are still being used today to produce new insight into the state of the lunar interior, it is no wonder that many future missions, both real and conceptual, plan to take seismometers to other planets. To best facilitate the return of high-quality data from these instruments, as well as to further our understanding of the dynamic processes that modify a planet's interior, various modeling approaches are used to quantify parameters such as the amount and distribution of seismicity, tidal deformation, and seismic structure of the terrestrial planets. In addition, recent advances in wavefield modeling have permitted a renewed look at seismic energy transmission and the effects of attenuation and scattering, as well as the presence and effect of a core, on recorded seismograms. In this talk I will discuss some of these methods and review the history of planetary seismology.

  18. Initial Results from the Experimental Measurement Campaign (XMC) for Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) Instrument Assessment (XPIA) Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, W. A.; Choukulkar, A.; Sandberg, S.; Weickmann, A.; Lundquist, J.; Iungo, V.; Newsom, R.; Delgado, R.

    2016-06-01

    The Experimental Measurement Campaign (XMC) for Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) Instrument Assessment (XPIA) is a DOE funded study to develop and validate methods of making three dimensional measurements of wind fields. These techniques are of interest to study wind farm inflows and wake flows using remote sensing instrumentation. The portion of the experiment described in this presentation utilizes observations from multiple Doppler wind lidars, soundings, and an instrumented 300m tower, the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) in Erie, Colorado.

  19. Using Space Weather Forecast Tools for Understanding Planetary Magnetospheres: MESSENGER Experience Applied to MAVEN Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel N.; Dewey, R. M.; Brain, D. A.; Jakosky, Bruce; Halekas, Jasper; Connerney, Jack; Odstrcil, Dusan; Mays, M. Leila; Luhmann, Janet

    2015-04-01

    The Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA)-ENLIL solar wind modeling tool has been used to calculate the values of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) strength (B), solar wind speed (V), density (n), ram pressure (~nV2), cross-magnetosphere electric field (VxB), Alfvén Mach number (MA), and other derived quantities of relevance for space weather purposes at Earth. Such parameters as solar wind dynamic pressure can be key for estimating the magnetopause standoff distance, as just one example. The interplanetary electric field drives many magnetospheric dynamical processes and can be compared with general magnetic activity indices and with the occurrence of energetic particle bursts within the Earth’s magnetosphere. Such parameters also serve as input to the global magnetohydrodynamic and kinetic magnetosphere models that are used to forecast magnetospheric and ionospheric processes. Such modeling done for Earth space weather forecasting has helped assess near-real-time magnetospheric behavior for MESSENGER at Mercury (as well as other mission analysis and Mercury ground-based observational campaigns). This solar-wind forcing knowledge has provided a crucial continuing step toward bringing heliospheric science expertise to bear on solar-planetary interaction studies. The experience gained from MESSENGER at Mercury is now being applied to the new observations from the MAVEN (Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution) mission at Mars. We compare the continuous WSA-ENLIL results derived from modeling to the MAVEN SWIA and MAG data from mid-December 2014 to the present time. This provides a broader contextual view of solar wind forcing at Mars and also allows a broader validation of the ENLIL model results throughout the inner heliosphere.

  20. NanoRocks: A Long-Term Microgravity Experiment to Stydy Planet Formation and Planetary Ring Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisset, J.; Colwell, J. E.; Dove, A.; Maukonen, D.; Brown, N.; Lai, K.; Hoover, B.

    2015-12-01

    We report on the results of the NanoRocks experiment on the International Space Station (ISS), which simulates collisions that occur in protoplanetary disks and planetary ring systems. A critical stage of the process of early planet formation is the growth of solid bodies from mm-sized chondrules and aggregates to km-sized planetesimals. To characterize the collision behavior of dust in protoplanetary conditions, experimental data is required, working hand in hand with models and numerical simulations. In addition, the collisional evolution of planetary rings takes place in the same collisional regime. The objective of the NanoRocks experiment is to study low-energy collisions of mm-sized particles of different shapes and materials. An aluminum tray (~8x8x2cm) divided into eight sample cells holding different types of particles gets shaken every 60 s providing particles with initial velocities of a few cm/s. In September 2014, NanoRocks reached ISS and 220 video files, each covering one shaking cycle, have already been downloaded from Station. The data analysis is focused on the dynamical evolution of the multi-particle systems and on the formation of cluster. We track the particles down to mean relative velocities less than 1 mm/s where we observe cluster formation. The mean velocity evolution after each shaking event allows for a determination of the mean coefficient of restitution for each particle set. These values can be used as input into protoplanetary disk and planetary rings simulations. In addition, the cluster analysis allows for a determination of the mean final cluster size and the average particle velocity of clustering onset. The size and shape of these particle clumps is crucial to understand the first stages of planet formation inside protoplanetary disks as well as many a feature of Saturn's rings. We report on the results from the ensemble of these collision experiments and discuss applications to planetesimal formation and planetary ring

  1. Planetary magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1981-01-01

    A synoptic view of early and recent data on the planetary magnetism of Mercury, Venus, the moon, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn is presented. The data on Mercury from Mariner 10 are synthesized with various other sources, while data for Venus obtained from 120 orbits of Pioneer Venus give the upper limit of the magnetic dipole. Explorer 35 Lunar Orbiter data provided the first evidence of lunar magnetization, but it was the Apollo subsatellite data that measured accurately the magnetic dipole of the moon. A complete magnetic survey of Mars is still needed, and only some preliminary data are given on the magnetic dipole of the planet. Figures on the magnetic dipoles of Jupiter and Saturn are also suggested. It is concluded that if the magnetic field data are to be used to infer the interior properties of the planets, good measures of the multiple harmonics in the field are needed, which may be obtained only through low altitude polar orbits.

  2. Planetary magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1981-01-01

    A synoptic view of early and recent data on the planetary magnetism of Mercury, Venus, the moon, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn is presented. The data on Mercury from Mariner 10 are synthesized with various other sources, while data for Venus obtained from 120 orbits of Pioneer Venus give the upper limit of the magnetic dipole. Explorer 35 Lunar Orbiter data provided the first evidence of lunar magnetization, but it was the Apollo subsatellite data that measured accurately the magnetic dipole of the moon. A complete magnetic survey of Mars is still needed, and only some preliminary data are given on the magnetic dipole of the planet. Figures on the magnetic dipoles of Jupiter and Saturn are also suggested. It is concluded that if the magnetic field data are to be used to infer the interior properties of the planets, good measures of the multiple harmonics in the field are needed, which may be obtained only through low altitude polar orbits.

  3. Computational experience with a dense column feature for interior-point methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, M.; Czyzyk, J.; Wright, S.

    1997-08-01

    Most software that implements interior-point methods for linear programming formulates the linear algebra at each iteration as a system of normal equations. This approach can be extremely inefficient when the constraint matrix has dense columns, because the density of the normal equations matrix is much greater than the constraint matrix and the system is expensive to solve. In this report the authors describe a more efficient approach for this case, that involves handling the dense columns by using a Schur-complement method and conjugate gradient interaction. The authors report numerical results with the code PCx, into which the technique now has been incorporated.

  4. Radar Sounding for Planetary Subsurface Exploration: Translating the Mars Experience to Jupiter's Icy Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaut, J.

    2015-12-01

    Exploration of the subsurface of Mars using radar sounding began with MARSIS (Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding) on Mars Express in 2005 and continued with SHARAD (Shallow Radar) on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter in 2006. These instruments have been operating continuously since, providing a rich legacy of science return and observational experience in the highly variable environments and target sets at Mars. New missions to the icy moons of Jupiter, ESA's JUICE (Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer) and NASA's Europa Mission, will both carry radar sounders to probe the subsurface of several of the icy moons (Ganymede, Europa and Callisto by JUICE; Europa by the Europa Mission). The success of the Mars sounders demonstrated the scientific value of the technique and provided confidence that sounding of the icy moons is a promising endeavor. Icy targets at Mars have proven especially amenable to penetration by radar sounding. The polar layered deposits of Mars have been probed to their base (2-4 km deep) by MARSIS, operating at frequencies of 1.3-5.5 MHz. SHARAD, operating with a wider bandwidth at 15-25 MHz, provides higher vertical resolution that allows detection and imaging of fine details of interior layering in the ice deposits. The sounder planned for the Europa mission, REASON (Radar for Europa Assessment and Sounding, Ocean to Near-Surface), will utilize simultaneous dual frequency signals to obtain complementary deep sounding and high-vertical-resolution shallow observations. Co-located observations by MARSIS and SHARAD also demonstrate that high surface roughness (relative to the radar wavelength) affects the strength of the penetrating signals, and thus the capability to detect deep or low-contrast subsurface interfaces. The icy moon sounders' wavelengths were selected, in part, to mitigate against this degradation of signals by the anticipated rough surfaces of Jupiter's moons. This paper will discusss these and other examples of lessons

  5. Resistance of Bacterial Endospores to Outer Space for Planetary Protection Purposes—Experiment PROTECT of the EXPOSE-E Mission

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Ralf; Cadet, Jean; Douki, Thierry; Mancinelli, Rocco L.; Nicholson, Wayne L.; Panitz, Corinna; Rabbow, Elke; Rettberg, Petra; Spry, Andrew; Stackebrandt, Erko; Vaishampayan, Parag; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Spore-forming bacteria are of particular concern in the context of planetary protection because their tough endospores may withstand certain sterilization procedures as well as the harsh environments of outer space or planetary surfaces. To test their hardiness on a hypothetical mission to Mars, spores of Bacillus subtilis 168 and Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 were exposed for 1.5 years to selected parameters of space in the experiment PROTECT during the EXPOSE-E mission on board the International Space Station. Mounted as dry layers on spacecraft-qualified aluminum coupons, the “trip to Mars” spores experienced space vacuum, cosmic and extraterrestrial solar radiation, and temperature fluctuations, whereas the “stay on Mars” spores were subjected to a simulated martian environment that included atmospheric pressure and composition, and UV and cosmic radiation. The survival of spores from both assays was determined after retrieval. It was clearly shown that solar extraterrestrial UV radiation (λ≥110 nm) as well as the martian UV spectrum (λ≥200 nm) was the most deleterious factor applied; in some samples only a few survivors were recovered from spores exposed in monolayers. Spores in multilayers survived better by several orders of magnitude. All other environmental parameters encountered by the “trip to Mars” or “stay on Mars” spores did little harm to the spores, which showed about 50% survival or more. The data demonstrate the high chance of survival of spores on a Mars mission, if protected against solar irradiation. These results will have implications for planetary protection considerations. Key Words: Planetary protection—Bacterial spores—Space experiment—Simulated Mars mission. Astrobiology 12, 445–456. PMID:22680691

  6. Pool fire-ventilation crossflow experiments in a simulated aircraft cabin interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankston, C. P.; Back, L. H.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental facility has been built to study pool fire dynamics and flame spread behavior in a 1/3-scale simulated aircraft interior; attention is presently given to pool fire ventilation crossflow using a 'channel' pool fire subjected to crossflow velocities that replicate postcrash conditions in a wide body aircraft. Crossflow velocity is noted to have a strong effect on visible flame geometry, tilting the flame over sharply. A reverse flow ceiling jet of hot gases was also present in all tests, however, and extended far upstream of the fire, so that despite the appearance of the visible flame, the vertical momentum of the plume was strong enough to establish the reverse flow layer and spread smoke and toxic gases upstream against a significant ventilating flow.

  7. Interior landscapes of mental disorder: visual representations of the experience of madness.

    PubMed

    Schoeneman, Thomas J; Henderson, Carly M; Weathers, Vaunne M

    2005-04-01

    The authors surveyed 38 textbooks of abnormal psychology and found 673 pictures of the inner experience of mental disorder. Textbook authors use these pictures to demonstrate diagnostic features of individuals and groups, to make a connection between mental disorder and artistic talent, and to suggest what it is like to experience mental disorder. To fulfill these functions, many of the pictures in the sample use the incongruities and distortions of expressionist, surrealist, and naive techniques.

  8. The study of minerals under simulated planetary conditions: Experiments of hydrated sulphates at environmental conditions of martian surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto-Ballesteros, O.; Mateo-Martí, E.; Fernández-Remolar, D.

    2007-08-01

    Minerals on planetary surfaces are usually identified comparing remote infrared spectral data to laboratory mineral databases obtained under terrestrial conditions. However, environmental conditions at other planetary surfaces could produce alterations on the standard mineral spectra. Spectroscopic signals of hydrated magnesium, calcium and hydroxlated iron sulphates have been recently detected on surface of Mars. Some experiments using environmental conditions at the martian surface (temperature and pressure ranges; atmospheric composition, including water vapor content; and ultraviolet radiation) of different sulphates have been performed in order to both, constrain the stability of the hydrated phases and detect any possible modification in their spectra. Experiments have been done in a simulation chamber located in Centro de Astrobiologia, Madrid. The equipment has been developed for a wide range of simulation conditions, including a range of irradiation sources, and the implementation of analytical techniques, including IR and UV spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The equipment consists of a main vacuum chamber with dimensions of 50 cm long x 40 cm diameter, a second internal chamber connected by differential pumping with the main one, and a third side chamber for the gases analysis using a mass spectrometer. Chambers pressures are monitorized by different pirani-penning gauges. A liquid nitrogen cooling system is connected to the sample holder, and a gas system allows the mixing of gases and water.

  9. Planetary Sciences practical experiences at the Master level with small telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Perez-Hoyos, S.; del Rio-Gaztelurrutia, T.; Hueso, R.; Ordonez Etxeberria, I.; Rojas, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    The Master in Space Science and Technology of the Basque Country University UPV/EHU in Bilbao (Spain) has been taught during 7 years (A. Sanchez-Lavega et al., Eur. J. of Eng. Education. 2014). Along the different courses, a series of practical observations and studies of planetary sciences have been conducted with Master students, using telescopes with diameters in the range 28-50 cm pertaining to the Aula EspaZio Gela Observatory (http://www.ehu.eus/aula-espazio/presentacion.html). Simple instrumentation (cameras and a spectrograph) have been employed to study planetary atmospheres (dynamics and cloud structure) and orbital mechanics using the Galilean satellites. Here we present a sample of these studies, which have lead to publications in refereed journals and have been presented at different meetings with the coauthoring of the students. Plans for the future include involving the master students in high-resolution observations of Solar System planets using a remote controlled 36 cm telescope at the Calar Alto observatory in Southern Spain (separated 1000 km from the teaching facilities in Bilbao).

  10. Resistance of bacterial endospores to outer space for planetary protection purposes--experiment PROTECT of the EXPOSE-E mission.

    PubMed

    Horneck, Gerda; Moeller, Ralf; Cadet, Jean; Douki, Thierry; Mancinelli, Rocco L; Nicholson, Wayne L; Panitz, Corinna; Rabbow, Elke; Rettberg, Petra; Spry, Andrew; Stackebrandt, Erko; Vaishampayan, Parag; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J

    2012-05-01

    Spore-forming bacteria are of particular concern in the context of planetary protection because their tough endospores may withstand certain sterilization procedures as well as the harsh environments of outer space or planetary surfaces. To test their hardiness on a hypothetical mission to Mars, spores of Bacillus subtilis 168 and Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 were exposed for 1.5 years to selected parameters of space in the experiment PROTECT during the EXPOSE-E mission on board the International Space Station. Mounted as dry layers on spacecraft-qualified aluminum coupons, the "trip to Mars" spores experienced space vacuum, cosmic and extraterrestrial solar radiation, and temperature fluctuations, whereas the "stay on Mars" spores were subjected to a simulated martian environment that included atmospheric pressure and composition, and UV and cosmic radiation. The survival of spores from both assays was determined after retrieval. It was clearly shown that solar extraterrestrial UV radiation (λ≥110 nm) as well as the martian UV spectrum (λ≥200 nm) was the most deleterious factor applied; in some samples only a few survivors were recovered from spores exposed in monolayers. Spores in multilayers survived better by several orders of magnitude. All other environmental parameters encountered by the "trip to Mars" or "stay on Mars" spores did little harm to the spores, which showed about 50% survival or more. The data demonstrate the high chance of survival of spores on a Mars mission, if protected against solar irradiation. These results will have implications for planetary protection considerations.

  11. Model of the accumulation process in the formation of planetary systems. I. Numerical experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Eneev, T.M.; Kozlov, N.N.

    1981-04-01

    This work considers the evolution of a plane protoplanetary nebula consisting of a large number of bodies (protoplanets), which interact gravitationally, combine on contact, and move in the field of a massive central body (the sun or a planet). It is assumed that the gravitational interaction between bodies occurs only during their binary close approach. It is also assumed that the bodies move in Keplerian orbits between close approaches and that the orbits of all the bodies are circular at the initial time of evolution of the cloud. The so-called limit model of the accumulation process, in which each close approach of bodies is terminated by their combining, is considered. It is shown that in the course of evolution of such a model there appear annular zones of material condensation whose subsequent development leads to the formation of planets with predominantly direct rotation about their axes. The principal numerical results are obtained by computer simulation of the planetary accumulation process.

  12. The Potassium-Argon Laser Experiment (karle): In Situ Geochronology for Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, B. A.

    2016-01-01

    Isotopic dating is an essential tool to establish an absolute chronology for geological events. It enables a planet's crystallization history, magmatic evolution, and alteration to be placed into the framework of solar system history. The capability for in situ geochronology will open up the ability for this crucial measurement to be accomplished as part of lander or rover complement. An in situ geochronology package can also complement sample return missions by identifying the most interesting rocks to cache or return to Earth. Appropriate application of in situ dating will enable geochronology on more terrains than can be reached with sample-return missions to the Moon, Mars, asteroids, outer planetary satellites, and other bodies that contain rocky components. The capability of flight instruments to conduct in situ geochronology is called out in the NASA Planetary Science Decadal Survey and the NASA Technology Roadmap as needing development to serve the community's needs. Beagle 2 is the only mission launched to date with the explicit aim to perform in situ K-Ar isotopic dating [1], but it failed to communicate and was lost. The first in situ K-Ar date on Mars, using SAM and APXS measurements on the Cumberland mudstone [2], yielded an age of 4.21 +/- 0.35 Ga and validated the idea of K-Ar dating on other planets, though the Curiosity method is not purpose-built for dating and requires many assumptions that degrade its precision. To get more precise and meaningful ages, multiple groups are developing dedicated in situ dating instruments.

  13. Photochemistry of Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yung, Y. L.

    2005-12-01

    The Space Age started half a century ago. Today, with the completion of a fairly detailed study of the planets of the Solar System, we have begun studying exoplanets (or extrasolar planets). The overriding question in is to ask whether an exoplanet is habitable and harbors life, and if so, what the biosignatures ought to be. This forces us to confront the fundamental question of what controls the composition of an atmosphere. The composition of a planetary atmosphere reflects a balance between thermodynamic equilibrium chemistry (as in the interior of giant planets) and photochemistry (as in the atmosphere of Mars). The terrestrial atmosphere has additional influence from life (biochemistry). The bulk of photochemistry in planetary atmospheres is driven by UV radiation. Photosynthesis may be considered an extension of photochemistry by inventing a molecule (chlorophyll) that can harvest visible light. Perhaps the most remarkable feature of photochemistry is catalytic chemistry, the ability of trace amounts of gases to profoundly affect the composition of the atmosphere. Notable examples include HOx (H, OH and HO2) chemistry on Mars and chlorine chemistry on Earth and Venus. Another remarkable feature of photochemistry is organic synthesis in the outer solar system. The best example is the atmosphere of Titan. Photolysis of methane results in the synthesis of more complex hydrocarbons. The hydrocarbon chemistry inevitably leads to the formation of high molecular weight products, giving rise to aerosols when the ambient atmosphere is cool enough for them to condense. These results are supported by the findings of the recent Cassini mission. Lastly, photochemistry leaves a distinctive isotopic signature that can be used to trace back the evolutionary history of the atmosphere. Examples include nitrogen isotopes on Mars and sulfur isotopes on Earth. Returning to the question of biosignatures on an exoplanet, our Solar System experience tells us to look for speciation

  14. On the generation of sound by turbulent convection. I - A numerical experiment. [in solar interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdan, Thomas J.; Cattaneo, Fausto; Malagoli, Andrea

    1993-01-01

    Motivated by the problem of the origin of the solar p-modes, we study the generation of acoustic waves by turbulent convection. Our approach uses the results of high-resolution 3D simulations as the experimental basis for our investigation. The numerical experiment describes the evolution of a horizontally periodic layer of vigorously convecting fluid. The sound is measured by a procedure, based on a suitable linearization of the equations of compressible convection that allows the amplitude of the acoustic field to be determined. Through this procedure we identify unambiguously some 400 acoustic modes. The total energy of the acoustic field is found to be a fraction of a percent of the kinetic energy of the convection. The amplitudes of the observed modes depend weakly on (horizontal) wavenumber but strongly on frequency. The line widths of the observed modes typically exceed the natural linewidths of the modes as inferred from linear theory. This broadening appears to be related to the (stochastic) interaction between the modes and the underlying turbulence which causes abrupt, episodic events during which the phase coherence of the modes is lost.

  15. On the generation of sound by turbulent convection. I - A numerical experiment. [in solar interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdan, Thomas J.; Cattaneo, Fausto; Malagoli, Andrea

    1993-01-01

    Motivated by the problem of the origin of the solar p-modes, we study the generation of acoustic waves by turbulent convection. Our approach uses the results of high-resolution 3D simulations as the experimental basis for our investigation. The numerical experiment describes the evolution of a horizontally periodic layer of vigorously convecting fluid. The sound is measured by a procedure, based on a suitable linearization of the equations of compressible convection that allows the amplitude of the acoustic field to be determined. Through this procedure we identify unambiguously some 400 acoustic modes. The total energy of the acoustic field is found to be a fraction of a percent of the kinetic energy of the convection. The amplitudes of the observed modes depend weakly on (horizontal) wavenumber but strongly on frequency. The line widths of the observed modes typically exceed the natural linewidths of the modes as inferred from linear theory. This broadening appears to be related to the (stochastic) interaction between the modes and the underlying turbulence which causes abrupt, episodic events during which the phase coherence of the modes is lost.

  16. Development of large-scale Birkeland currents determined from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Waters, C. L.; ...

    2014-05-07

    The Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment uses magnetic field data from the Iridium constellation to derive the global Birkeland current distribution every 10 min. We examine cases in which the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) rotated from northward to southward resulting in onsets of the Birkeland currents. Dayside Region 1/2 currents, totaling ~25% of the final current, appear within 20 min of the IMF southward turning and remain steady. In the onset of nightside currents occurs 40 to 70 min after the dayside currents appear. Afterwards, the currents intensify at dawn, dusk, and on the dayside, yielding a fullymore » formed Region 1/2 system ~30 min after the nightside onset. Our results imply that the dayside Birkeland currents are driven by magnetopause reconnection, and the remainder of the system forms as magnetospheric return flows start and progress sunward, ultimately closing the Dungey convection cycle.« less

  17. Development of large-scale Birkeland currents determined from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Waters, C. L.; Green, D. L.; Merkin, V. G.; Barnes, R. J.; Dyrud, L. P.

    2014-05-07

    The Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment uses magnetic field data from the Iridium constellation to derive the global Birkeland current distribution every 10 min. We examine cases in which the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) rotated from northward to southward resulting in onsets of the Birkeland currents. Dayside Region 1/2 currents, totaling ~25% of the final current, appear within 20 min of the IMF southward turning and remain steady. In the onset of nightside currents occurs 40 to 70 min after the dayside currents appear. Afterwards, the currents intensify at dawn, dusk, and on the dayside, yielding a fully formed Region 1/2 system ~30 min after the nightside onset. Our results imply that the dayside Birkeland currents are driven by magnetopause reconnection, and the remainder of the system forms as magnetospheric return flows start and progress sunward, ultimately closing the Dungey convection cycle.

  18. STELLAR WIND INFLUENCE ON PLANETARY DYNAMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Heyner, Daniel; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Schmitt, Dieter

    2012-05-10

    We examine the possible influence of early stellar wind conditions on the evolution of planetary dynamo action. In our model, the dynamo operates within a significant ambient magnetospheric magnetic field generated by the interaction between the stellar wind and the planetary magnetic field. This provides a negative feedback mechanism which quenches the dynamo growth. The external magnetic field magnitude which the dynamo experiences, and thus the strength of the quenching, depends on the stellar wind dynamic pressure. As this pressure significantly changes during stellar evolution, we argue that under early stellar system conditions the coupling between the stellar wind and the interior dynamics of a planet is much more important than has been thought up to now. We demonstrate the effects of the feedback coupling in the course of stellar evolution with a planet at a similar distance to the central star as Mercury is to the Sun.

  19. Interior Renovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes notable interior renovations of educational facilities, including the educational context and design goals. Includes information on architects, suppliers, and cost, as well as photographs. (EV)

  20. Interior Renovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes notable interior renovations of educational facilities, including the educational context and design goals. Includes information on architects, suppliers, and cost, as well as photographs. (EV)

  1. Planetary Geophysics and Tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmentier, E. M.

    1997-01-01

    Research supported by grant NAGW-1928 has addressed a variety of problems related to planetary evolution. One important focus has been on questions related to the role of chemical buoyancy in planetary evolution with application to both Venus and the Moon. We have developed a model for the evolution of the Moon (Hess and Parmentier, 1995) in which dense, highly radioactive, late stage magma ocean cumulates sink forming a core. This core heats the overlying, chemically layered mantle giving rise to a heated, chemically well-mixed layer that thickens with time. This Mixed layer eventually becomes hot enough and thick enough that its top begins to melt at a pressure low enough that melt is buoyant, thus creating mare basalts from a high pressure source of the correct composition and at an appropriate time in lunar evolution. In work completed during the last year, numerical experiments on convection in a chemically stably stratified fluid layer heated from below have been completed. These results show us how to calculate the evolution of a mixed layer in the Moon, depending on the heat production in the ilmenite- cumulate core and the chemical stratification of the overlying mantle. Chemical stratification of the mantle after its initial differentiation is would trap heat in the deep interior and prevent the rapid rise of plumes with accompanying volcanism. This trapping of heat in the interior can explain the thickness of the lunar lithosphere as a function of time as well as the magmatic evolution. We show that heat transported to the base of the lithosphere at a rate determined by current estimates of radioactivity in the Moon would not satisfy constraints on elastic lithosphere thickness from tectonic feature associated with basin loading. Trapping heat at depth by a chemically stratified mantle may also explain the absence of global compressional features on the surface that previous models predict for an initially hot lunar interior. For Venus, we developed a

  2. "Seeing" and "feeling" architecture: how bodily self-consciousness alters architectonic experience and affects the perception of interiors.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, Isabella; Llobera, Joan; Blanke, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Over the centuries architectural theory evolved several notions of embodiment, proposing in the nineteenth and twentieth century that architectonic experience is related to physiological responses of the observer. Recent advances in the cognitive neuroscience of embodiment (or bodily self-consciousness) enable empirical studies of architectonic embodiment. Here, we investigated how architecture modulates bodily self-consciousness by adapting a video-based virtual reality (VR) setup previously used to investigate visuo-tactile mechanisms of bodily self-consciousness. While standing in two different interiors, participants were filmed from behind and watched their own virtual body online on a head-mounted display (HMD). Visuo-tactile strokes were applied in synchronous or asynchronous mode to the participants and their virtual body. Two interiors were simulated in the laboratory by placing the sidewalls either far or near from the participants, generating a large and narrow room. We tested if bodily self-consciousness was differently modulated when participants were exposed to both rooms and whether these changes depend on visuo-tactile stimulation. We measured illusory touch, self-identification, and performed length estimations. Our data show that synchronous stroking of the physical and the virtual body induces illusory touch and self-identification with the virtual body, independent of room-size. Moreover, in the narrow room we observed weak feelings of illusory touch with the sidewalls and of approaching walls. These subjective changes were complemented by a stroking-dependent modulation of length estimation only in the narrow room with participants judging the room-size more accurately during conditions of illusory self-identification. We discuss our findings and previous notions of architectonic embodiment in the context of the cognitive neuroscience of bodily self-consciousness and propose an empirical framework grounded in architecture, cognitive

  3. Interior Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This document contains teacher's materials for an eight-unit secondary education vocational home economics course on interior design. The units cover period styles of interiors, furniture and accessories, surface treatments and lighting, appliances and equipment, design and space planning in home and business settings, occupant needs, acquisition…

  4. Planetary GIS interfaces and links with the Planetary Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, A. P.; Baumann, P.; Beccati, A.; Cecconi, B.; Erard, S.; Marmo, C.

    2014-04-01

    Planetary data with a strong geographic component constitute a large portion of all those collected over planets and moons [e.g. 1]. The variety of Solar System bodies imaged and their geometry is large and cartographic standards have been set [e.g. 2]. Linking and making broadly accessible the growing amount of data in planetary archives of the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS) [3, 4] and ESA Planetary Science Archive (PSA) [5], derived datasets from experiment teams, group and individual scientists is a tremendous challenge. In order to tackle this, Virtual Observatory (VO) techniques and tools applied to Planetary Science data have been developed [6, 7].

  5. Interiors and atmospheres of the outer planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.

    1991-01-01

    This theoretical/observational project constrains structure of outer planet atmospheres and interiors through observational data. The primary observation tool is through observations of occultations of stars by outer solar system objects, which yield information about atmospheric temperatures and dynamics, and planetary dimensions and oblateness. The theoretical work relates the data to interior structures in a variety of ways.

  6. Planetary data definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-10-01

    Planetary data include all of those data which have resulted from measurements made by the instruments carried aboard planetary exploration spacecraft, and (for our purposes) exclude observations of Moon and Earth. The working, planetary data base is envisioned to contain not only these data, but also a wide range of supporting measurements such as calibration files, navigation parameters, spacecraft engineering states, and the various Earth-based and laboratory measurements which provide the planetary research scientist with historical and comparative data. No convention exists across the disciplines of the planetary community for defining or naming the various levels through which data pass in the progression from a sensed impulse at the spacecraft to a reduced, calibrated, and/or analyzed element in a planetary data set. Terms such as EDR (experiment data record), RDR (reduced data record), and SEDR (supplementary experiment data record) imply different meanings depending on the data set under consideration. The development of standard terminology for the general levels of planetary data is necessary.

  7. Impact Cratering Experiment for a Course in Lunar and Planetary Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Eugene; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Described is an inexpensive and safe laboratory experiment that accurately duplicates the shapes and structures of simple impact craters using fireplace ash, finely ground charcoal, and an air gun. (Author/DS)

  8. Impact Cratering Experiment for a Course in Lunar and Planetary Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Eugene; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Described is an inexpensive and safe laboratory experiment that accurately duplicates the shapes and structures of simple impact craters using fireplace ash, finely ground charcoal, and an air gun. (Author/DS)

  9. Strata-1: A Planetary Science Experiment on the Behavior of Asteroid Regolith in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, K. K.; Abell, P.; Brisset, J.; Britt, D.; Colwell, J.; Durda, D.; Dove, A.; Fries, M.; Graham, L.; Hartzell, C.; Leonard, M.; Love, S.; Sanchez, D. P.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2016-10-01

    Strata-1 is an experiment studying asteroid regolith in the microgravity environment of ISS. The prolonged microgravity and vibrational conditions of ISS are analogous to those on small Solar System bodies.

  10. Continued development of the Combined Pulsed Neutron Experiment (CPNE) for lunar and planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandler, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Current progress is reported on the inelastic scattering, capture, and activation gamma ray portions of the Combined Pulsed Neutron Experiment (CPNE). Experiments are described which have enabled a reduction in weight of the experimental probe to 7.3 kg. Parametric studies are described which enabled the optimization of experimental parameters (e.g., gate time settings, neutron pulse rate, etc.). Estimated detection sensitivities using this light weight probe and the optimized experimental parameters are discussed.

  11. Estimation of Planetary Wave Parameters from the Data of the 1981 Ocean Acoustic Tomography Experiment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    i* Kf V16 Spiesberger et al. (1980) and Spindel and Spiesberger (1981) in preliminary experiments. The 1981 experiment was the first field test...should consult Spiesberger et al. (1980) for ray identifications. Ugincius (1970) solved the eikonal equation using the method of -. characteristics...Cornuelle B., C. Wunsch, D. Behringer, T. Birdsall, M. Brown, R. Heinmiller, R. Knox, K. Metzger, W. Munk, J. Spiesberger , R. Spindel, D. Webb, P. Worcester

  12. Interior structure of Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, W.B.

    1984-10-01

    Key measurements are discussed which are diagnostic of Uranus interior structure and evolutionary history, and reviews their present status. Typical interior models have chondritic cores, but have the bulk of their mass in an envelope consisting of ice component, principally H2O. The total amount of free H2 in the planet cannot exceed approximately 1 to 2 earth masses. Measurements of the gravitational moments of Uranus are beginning to be accurate enough to constrain models, but are limited in utility by uncertainty in the rotation period. Discussed is evidence that the outermost planetary layers have a gravitationally significant quantity of denser material (ice component) in addition to H2 and He. The He/H ratio and the deuterium abundance in the atmosphere may be diagnostic of the planet's previous evolutionary history. It is argued that the planet's interior is likely to now be at a temperature approximately 10(3) deg K. Uranus interior with Neptune's in a number of ways, considering heat flow, degree of internal differentiation, and possible magnetic field.

  13. Planetary Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neish, Catherine D.; Carter, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of planetary radar, and the primary scientific discoveries that have been made using this technique. The chapter starts by describing the different types of radar systems and how they are used to acquire images and accurate topography of planetary surfaces and probe their subsurface structure. It then explains how these products can be used to understand the properties of the target being investigated. Several examples of discoveries made with planetary radar are then summarized, covering solar system objects from Mercury to Saturn. Finally, opportunities for future discoveries in planetary radar are outlined and discussed.

  14. Planetary Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neish, Catherine D.; Carter, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of planetary radar, and the primary scientific discoveries that have been made using this technique. The chapter starts by describing the different types of radar systems and how they are used to acquire images and accurate topography of planetary surfaces and probe their subsurface structure. It then explains how these products can be used to understand the properties of the target being investigated. Several examples of discoveries made with planetary radar are then summarized, covering solar system objects from Mercury to Saturn. Finally, opportunities for future discoveries in planetary radar are outlined and discussed.

  15. Solar Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, J.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The interior of the Sun is hidden from our sight, because it is opaque to electromagnetic waves: the radiation we receive from it on Earth is emitted in the outermost layers. Our knowledge of the solar interior is based solely on theoretical models which are built with some assumptions about the physical conditions and processes that are likely to prevail there, and on helioseismology, a very pow...

  16. Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mixson, John S.; Wilby, John F.

    1991-01-01

    The generation and control of flight vehicle interior noise is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of transmission through airborne and structure-borne paths and the control of cabin noise by path modification. Techniques for identifying the relative contributions of the various source-path combinations are also discussed along with methods for the prediction of aircraft interior noise such as those based on the general modal theory and statistical energy analysis.

  17. Laboratory experiments on planetary and stellar convection performed on Spacelab 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, J. E.; Toomre, J.; Deane, A. E.; Hurlburt, N. E.; Glatzmaier, G. A.; Fichtl, G. H.; Leslie, F.; Fowlis, W. W.; Gilman, P. A.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments on thermal convection in a rotating, differentially heated hemispherical shell with a radial buoyancy force were conducted in an orbiting microgravity laboratory. A variety of convective structures, or planforms, were observed, depending on the magnitude of the rotation and the nature of the imposed heating distribution. The results are compared with numerical simulations that can be conducted at the more modest heating rates, and suggest possible regimes of motion in rotating planets and stars.

  18. Observing Dynamics in Large-Scale Birkeland Currents with the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Waters, C. L.; Barnes, R. J.; Olson, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) provides continuous global observations of the magnetic perturbations that predominantly reflect Birkeland currents. The data are acquired by avionics magnetometers of the Iridium satellites and allow measurements from 66 satellites in near-polar circular, low altitude orbits. The configuration of the Iridium satellite constellation determines the longitude sampling spacing of ~ 2 hours and the re-sampling cadence of the system which is 9 minutes. From 2008 to 2013 the AMPERE system was developed which included new flight software on the Iridium satellites to allow telemetry of higher rate data to the ground and the Science Data Center to derive Birkeland current perturbations from the data and invert these signals to derive the global distributions of the currents using data windows of ten minutes. There were many challenges in developing AMPERE including automating inter-calibration between satellites and the baseline determination and removals. The results of AMPERE provide stunning confirmation of many of the statistical estimates for the distribution of currents but more significantly open a new window to understand their instantaneous distribution and dynamics. Examples of new features of the currents and their dynamics revealed by AMPERE are presented. In addition, prospects for new data products and increased data quality anticipated from AMPERE-NEXT to be implemented on the Iridium-NEXT generation of satellites are discussed.

  19. Classroom virtual lab experiments as teaching tools for explaining how we understand planetary processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, C. N.; Schools, H.; Research Team Members

    2012-12-01

    This presentation will report on a classroom pilot study in which we teamed with school teachers in four middle school classes to develop and deploy course modules that connect the real-world to virtual forms of laboratory experiments.The broad goal is to help students realize that seemingly complex Earth system processes can be connected to basic properties of the planet and that this can be illustrated through idealized experiment. Specifically the presentation will describe virtual modules based on on-demand cloud computing technologies that allow students to test the notion that pole equator gradients in radiative forcing together with rotation can explain characteristic patterns of flow in the atmosphere. The module developed aligns with new Massachusetts science standard requirements regarding understanding of weather and climate processes. These new standards emphasize an appreciation of differential solar heating and a qualitative understanding of the significance of rotation. In our preliminary classroom pilot studies we employed pre and post evaluation tests to establish that the modules had increased student knowledge of phenomenology and terms. We will describe the results of these tests as well as results from anecdotal measures of student response. This pilot study suggests that one way to help make Earth science concepts more tractable to a wider audience is through virtual experiments that distill phenomena down, but still retain enough detail that students can see the connection to the real world. Modern computer technology and developments in research models appear to provide an opportunity for more work in this area. We will describe some follow-up possibilities that we envisage.

  20. An Experiment for Simulated Detection of Earth-Size Planetary Transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, D.; Borucki, W.; Dunham, E.; Jenkins, J.; Witteborn, F.

    1999-05-01

    The concept for detection of Earth-size planets by looking for transits has been described by Borucki and Summers (1984). A space mission for detecting hundreds of Earth-size planets has been described by Koch, et al. (1998). The method depends on reliably detecting a relative change in brightness of order 8x10(-5) . Prior laboratory measurements have demonstrated this level of relative precision using CCDs (Robinson, et al., 1995, Jenkins, et al., 1997). A higher fidelity experiment is now being constructed to detect simulated Earth-size transits using a flight-type CCD. In addition, the experiment incorporates many of the major confounding factors which could affect the detection capability including: spacecraft jitter, a realistic star background, thermal changes, stellar variability, cosmic-ray hits, etc. Details of the experiment are presented including the method for producing the equivalent of earth-size transit signals. Borucki, W. J. and Summers, A.L., Icarus 58, 121 (1984) Jenkins, J. M., Borucki, W. J., Dunham, E. W. and McDonald, J. S., High Precision Photometry with Back-Illuminated CCDs, In Proceedings of the Planets Beyond Our Solar System and Next Generation Space Telescope, ASP Conf Ser ,119, 227-280 (1997) Koch, D., Borucki, W., Webster, L., Dunham, E. , Jenkins, J., Marriott, J. and Reitsema, H., SPIE 3356, Space Telescopes and Instruments V, 599-607, March (1998) Robinson, L. B, M. Z. Wei, W. J. Borucki, E.W. Dunham, C. H. Ford, and A. F. Granados. PASP 107, 1094-1098 (1995)

  1. Reports of planetary geology program, 1976 - 1977. [abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, R. (Compiler); Wahmann, R. (Compiler); Howard, J. H., III

    1977-01-01

    One hundred seventeen investigations undertaken in the NASA Planetary Geology Program in 1976-1977 are reported in abstract form. Topics discussed include solar system formation; planetary interiors; planetary evolution; asteroids, comets and moons; cratering; volcanic, eolian, fluvial and mass wasting processes; volatiles and the Martian regolith; mapping; and instrument development and techniques. An author index is provided.

  2. A model for eastward and westward jets in laboratory experiments and planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, P. S.; Lee, C.

    1998-06-01

    the wave and vortex behavior in the experiments including the locking of the vortex chains of the eastward jet. The simulations and new model contradict the predictions of a competing, older model of the laboratory flow that is based on a Bickley jet; this raises concerns about previous calculations of Lagrangian mixing in the laboratory experiments that used the Bickley model for the fluid velocity. The new model, simulations and laboratory experiments all show that jets can be formed by the mixing and homogenization of q. The relevance of this to the jets of Jupiter is discussed.

  3. Impact into the earth's ocean floor - Preliminary experiments, a planetary model, and possibilities for detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinnon, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    Impact processes and plate tectonics are invoked in an experimental study of craters larger than 100 km in diameter on the ocean floor. Although the results obtained from 22-caliber (383 m/sec) ammunition experiments using dense, saturated sand as a target medium cannot be directly scaled to large events, the phenomenology exhibited is that expected of actual craters on the ocean floor: steep, mixed ejecta plume, gravitational adjustment of the crater to form a shallow basin, and extensive reworking of the ejecta, rim, and floor materials by violent collapse of the transient water cavity. Excavation into the mantle is predicted, although asthenospheric influence on outer ring formation is not. The clearest geophysical signature of such a crater is not topography; detection should instead be based on gravity and geoid anomalies due to uplift of the Moho, magnetic anomalies, and seismic resolution of the Moho uplift and crater formation fault planes.

  4. Sangamon field experiments: observations of the diurnal evolution of the planetary boundary layer over land

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, B.B.; Hess, G.D.; Wesely, M.L.; Yamada, T.; Frenzen, P.; Hart, R.L.; Sisterson, D.L.; Hess, P.E.; Kulhanek, F.C.; Lipschutz, R.C.; Zerbe, G.A.

    1981-09-01

    Two complementary experimental studies of the evolving structure of the lower 2 km of the atmosphere, conducted over farmlands in central Illinois during essentially the same mid-summer weeks of two successive years, are described. The first experiment (21 July - 13 August 1975) investigated the early morning break up of the nocturnal stable layer and the rapid growth of the mixed layer before noon; the second (16 to 30 July 1976) examined the decline of the mixed layer through the late afternoon and evening, and the formation and intensification of the ground-based inversion before midnight. Methods of observation and data reduction are summarized in some detail, and the data obtained in the form of hourly wind and temperature profiles, plus sufficient surface flux information to characterize the lower boundary conditions, are tabulated in a series of appendices. These results constitute complete data sets which may be used to test models of the diurnal evolution of the lower atmosphere.

  5. Monitoring Floods with NASA's ST6 Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment: Implications on Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ip, Felipe; Dohm, J. M.; Baker, V. R.; Castano, B.; Chien, S.; Cichy, B.; Davies, A. G.; Doggett, T.; Greeley, R.; Sherwood, R.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's New Millennium Program (NMP) Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment (ASE) [1-3] has been successfully demonstrated in Earth-orbit. NASA has identified the development of an autonomously operating spacecraft as a necessity for an expanded program of missions exploring the Solar System. The versatile ASE spacecraft command and control, image formation, and science processing software was uploaded to the Earth Observer 1 (EO-1) spacecraft in early 2004 and has been undergoing onboard testing since May 2004 for the near real-time detection of surface modification related to transient geological and hydrological processes such as volcanism [4], ice formation and retreat [5], and flooding [6]. Space autonomy technology developed as part of ASE creates the new capability to autonomously detect, assess, react to, and monitor dynamic events such as flooding. Part of the challenge has been the difficulty to observe flooding in real time at sufficient temporal resolutions; more importantly, it is the large spatial extent of most drainage networks coupled with the size of the data sets necessary to be downlinked from satellites that make it difficult to monitor flooding from space. Below is a description of the algorithms (referred to as ASE Flood water Classifiers) used in tandem with the Hyperion spectrometer instrument on EO-1 to identify flooding and some of the test results.

  6. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry

    2014-03-01

    Preface: a personal view of planetary rings; 1. Introduction: the allure of the ringed planets; 2. Studies of planetary rings 1610-2013; 3. Diversity of planetary rings; 4. Individual ring particles and their collisions; 5. Large-scale ring evolution; 6. Moons confine and sculpt rings; 7. Explaining ring phenomena; 8. N-body simulations; 9. Stochastic models; 10. Age and evolution of rings; 11. Saturn's mysterious F ring; 12. Uranus' rings and moons; 13. Neptune's partial rings; 14. Jupiter's ring-moon system after Galileo and New Horizons; 15. Ring photometry; 16. Dusty rings; 17. Concluding remarks; Afterword; Glossary; References; Index.

  7. Planetary maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1992-01-01

    An important goal of the USGS planetary mapping program is to systematically map the geology of the Moon, Mars, Venus, and Mercury, and the satellites of the outer planets. These geologic maps are published in the USGS Miscellaneous Investigations (I) Series. Planetary maps on sale at the USGS include shaded-relief maps, topographic maps, geologic maps, and controlled photomosaics. Controlled photomosaics are assembled from two or more photographs or images using a network of points of known latitude and longitude. The images used for most of these planetary maps are electronic images, obtained from orbiting television cameras, various optical-mechanical systems. Photographic film was only used to map Earth's Moon.

  8. Planetary transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Nerstad, K.A.; Windish, W.E.

    1987-04-21

    A planetary transmission is described comprising: an input shaft; a first planetary gear set having a first sun gear driven by the input shaft, a first planet carrier serving as the output, a first ring gear, and first brake means for selectively holding the fist ring gear stationary; a second planetary gear set having a second sun gear driven by the input shaft, a second planet carrier connected for joint rotation to the first ring gear, a second ring gear, and second brake means for selectively holding the second ring gear stationary; a third planetary gear set having a third sun gear connected for joint rotation to the second planet carrier, a third planet carrier connected for joint rotation to the second ring gear, a third ring gear, and third brake means for selectively holding the third ring gear stationary; and clutch means for connecting the third sun gear to the input shaft and providing a direct drive mode of operation.

  9. The Planetary Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pataki, Louis P.

    2016-06-01

    This poster presentation presents the Planetary Project, a multi-week simulated research experience for college non-science majors. Students work in research teams of three to investigate the properties of a fictitious planetary system (the “Planetary System”) created each semester by the instructor. The students write team and individual papers in which they use the available data to draw conclusions about planets, other objects or general properties of the Planetary System and in which they compare, contrast and explain the similarities between the objects in the Planetary System and comparable objects in the Solar System.Data about the orbital and physical properties of the planets in the Planetary System are released at the start of the project. Each week the teams request data from a changing pool of available data. For example, in week one pictures of the planets are available. Each team picks one planet and the data (pictures) on that planet are released only to that team. Different data are available in subsequent weeks. Occasionally a news release to all groups reports an unusual occurrence - e.g. the appearance of a comet.Each student acts as principal author for one of the group paper which must contain a description of the week’s data, conclusions derived from that data about the Planetary System and a comparison with the Solar System. Each students writes a final, individual paper on a topic of their choice dealing with the Planetary System in which they follow the same data, conclusion, comparison format. Students “publish” their papers on a class-only restricted website and present their discoveries in class talks. Data are released to all on the website as the related papers are “published.” Additional papers commenting on the published work and released data are encouraged.The successes and problems of the method are presented.

  10. Degassing of reduced carbon from planetary basalts

    PubMed Central

    Wetzel, Diane T.; Rutherford, Malcolm J.; Jacobsen, Steven D.; Hauri, Erik H.; Saal, Alberto E.

    2013-01-01

    Degassing of planetary interiors through surface volcanism plays an important role in the evolution of planetary bodies and atmospheres. On Earth, carbon dioxide and water are the primary volatile species in magmas. However, little is known about the speciation and degassing of carbon in magmas formed on other planets (i.e., Moon, Mars, Mercury), where the mantle oxidation state [oxygen fugacity (fO2)] is different from that of the Earth. Using experiments on a lunar basalt composition, we confirm that carbon dissolves as carbonate at an fO2 higher than -0.55 relative to the iron wustite oxygen buffer (IW-0.55), whereas at a lower fO2, we discover that carbon is present mainly as iron pentacarbonyl and in smaller amounts as methane in the melt. The transition of carbon speciation in mantle-derived melts at fO2 less than IW-0.55 is associated with a decrease in carbon solubility by a factor of 2. Thus, the fO2 controls carbon speciation and solubility in mantle-derived melts even more than previous data indicate, and the degassing of reduced carbon from Fe-rich basalts on planetary bodies would produce methane-bearing, CO-rich early atmospheres with a strong greenhouse potential. PMID:23569260

  11. Degassing of reduced carbon from planetary basalts.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Diane T; Rutherford, Malcolm J; Jacobsen, Steven D; Hauri, Erik H; Saal, Alberto E

    2013-05-14

    Degassing of planetary interiors through surface volcanism plays an important role in the evolution of planetary bodies and atmospheres. On Earth, carbon dioxide and water are the primary volatile species in magmas. However, little is known about the speciation and degassing of carbon in magmas formed on other planets (i.e., Moon, Mars, Mercury), where the mantle oxidation state [oxygen fugacity (fO2)] is different from that of the Earth. Using experiments on a lunar basalt composition, we confirm that carbon dissolves as carbonate at an fO2 higher than -0.55 relative to the iron wustite oxygen buffer (IW-0.55), whereas at a lower fO2, we discover that carbon is present mainly as iron pentacarbonyl and in smaller amounts as methane in the melt. The transition of carbon speciation in mantle-derived melts at fO2 less than IW-0.55 is associated with a decrease in carbon solubility by a factor of 2. Thus, the fO2 controls carbon speciation and solubility in mantle-derived melts even more than previous data indicate, and the degassing of reduced carbon from Fe-rich basalts on planetary bodies would produce methane-bearing, CO-rich early atmospheres with a strong greenhouse potential.

  12. Chemical Experiments Measuring ph and Gases on "Planetary" Soil by the HUSAR-5 NXT-based Rover Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Agota; Bérczi, Szaniszló; Erdélyi, Soma; Nickl, Istvan; Kiss, Daniel; Erdősi, Ferenc; Panyi, Tamas; Szalay, Kristof

    2010-05-01

    program. II: For detecting the gases: We use CZGCO type gas-sensor for the detection of the liberated carbon monoxide or methane. This is a semiconductor based sensor which is heated up to working temperature (ca. 400 °C). The gas is measured as a resistance change signal lead into the NXT. The measured values are observed on the NXT as well as on the "terrestrial control" computer. Construction of the rover in the second mission: the skeleton of the rover was a field-rovering car model. We constructed two arms and a pump from LEGO elements. On the first arm we placed a wireless camera, which could rotate 360°, and also could bend down. The role of the second arm was to stretch and place the indicator ribbon to the surface and move it along a distance to contact with the wet soil. The role of the pump was to pour water on the soil surface. The main idea behind our solution is that water dissolves important chemical components from the soil and the indicator ribbon reports the main chemical characteristics of this chemistry, starting with the pH of the soil. Conclusion: Even the basic experiments can be interesting in the high school's chemistry teaching process if everyday materials are studied. It can be easily connected to planetary surface chemistry, where the soil, the rocks and the atmospheric gases form a common platform with their counterparts on the Earth. Both the experiment and the rover building was a big task for high school students, but they enjoyed the work and learned a lot.

  13. Planetary volcanism

    SciTech Connect

    Cattermole, P.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents studies of the volcanic features of individual planets. Bring together the most recently acquired data on selected regions of individual planets and discusses in detail the volcanic processes at work. Begins with a discussion of theoretical considerations and a survey of volcanism on earth. Continues with a comparative approach to planetary volcanism, looking at the volcanic features of different planets. Draws conclusions about planetary development based on the characteristic volcanic features of the different planets.

  14. Planetary Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Batson, Raymond M.

    2007-02-01

    Preface; List of contributors; 1. Introduction R. Greeley and R. M. Batson; 2. History of planetary cartography R. M. Batson, E. A. Whitaker and D. E. Wilhelms; 3. Cartography R. M. Batson; 4. Planetary nomenclature M. E. Strobell and H. Masursky; 5. Geodetic control M. E. Davies; 6. Topographic mapping S. S. C. Wu and F. J. Doyle; 7. Geologic mapping D. E. Wilhelms; Appendices R. M. Batson and J. L. Inge; Index.

  15. Europlanet-RI IDIS - A Data Network in Support of Planetary Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Walter; Capria, Maria Teresa; Chanteur, Gérard

    2010-05-01

    The "Europlanet Research Infrastructure - Europlanet RI", supported by the European Commission's Framework Program 7, aims at integrating major parts of the distributed European Planetary Research infrastructure with as diverse components as space exploration, ground-based observations, laboratory experiments and numerical modeling teams. A central part of Europlanet RI is the "Integrated and Distributed Information Service" (IDIS), a network of data and information access facilities in Europe via which information relevant for planetary research can be easily found and retrieved. This covers the wide range from contact addresses of possible research partners, laboratories and test facilities to the access of data collected with space missions or during laboratory or simulation tests and to model software useful for their interpretation. During the following three years the capabilities of the network will be extended to allow the combination of many different data sources for comperative studies including the results of modeling calculations and simulations of instrument observations. Together with the access to complex databases for spectra of atmospheric molecules and planetary surface material IDIS will offer a versatile working environment for making the scientific exploitation of the resources put into planetary research in the past and future more effective. Many of the mentioned capabilities are already available now. List of contact web-sites: Technical node for support and management aspects: http://www.idis.europlanet-ri.eu/ Planetary Surfaces and Interiors node: http://www.idis-interiors.europlanet-ri.eu/ Planetary Plasma node: http://www.idis-plasma.europlanet-ri.eu/ Planetary Atmospheres node: http://www.idis-atmos.europlanet-ri.eu/ Small Bodies and Dust node: http://www.idis-sbdn.europlanet-ri.eu/ Planetary Dynamics and Extraterrestrial Matter node: http://www.idis-dyn.europlanet-ri.eu/

  16. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.

    2011-07-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction: the allure of ringed planets; 2. Studies of planetary rings 1610-2004; 3. Diversity of planetary rings; 4. Individual ring particles and their collisions; 5. Large-scale ring evolution; 6. Moons confine and sculpt rings; 7. Explaining ring phenomena; 8. N-Body simulations; 9. Stochastic models; 10. Age and evolution of rings; 11. Saturn's mysterious F ring; 12. Neptune's partial rings; 13. Jupiter's ring-moon system after Galileo; 14. Ring photometry; 15. Dusty rings; 16. Cassini observations; 17. Summary: the big questions; Glossary; References; Index.

  17. Planetary astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, David; Hunten, Donald; Ahearn, Michael F.; Belton, Michael J. S.; Black, David; Brown, Robert A.; Brown, Robert Hamilton; Cochran, Anita L.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Depater, Imke

    1991-01-01

    The authors profile the field of astronomy, identify some of the key scientific questions that can be addressed during the decade of the 1990's, and recommend several facilities that are critically important for answering these questions. Scientific opportunities for the 1990' are discussed. Areas discussed include protoplanetary disks, an inventory of the solar system, primitive material in the solar system, the dynamics of planetary atmospheres, planetary rings and ring dynamics, the composition and structure of the atmospheres of giant planets, the volcanoes of IO, and the mineralogy of the Martian surface. Critical technology developments, proposed projects and facilities, and recommendations for research and facilities are discussed.

  18. Planetary magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1980-01-01

    Planetary spacecraft have now probed the magnetic fields of all the terrestrial planets, the moon, Jupiter, and Saturn. These measurements reveal that dynamos are active in at least four of the planets, Mercury, the earth, Jupiter, and Saturn but that Venus and Mars appear to have at most only very weak planetary magnetic fields. The moon may have once possessed an internal dynamo, for the surface rocks are magnetized. The large satellites of the outer solar system are candidates for dynamo action in addition to the large planets themselves. Of these satellites the one most likely to generate its own internal magnetic field is Io.

  19. Planetary Magnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, C.T.

    1980-02-01

    Planetary spacecraft have now probed the magnetic fields of all the terrestrial planets, the moon, Jupiter, and Saturn. These measurements reveal that dynamos are active in at least four of the planets, Mercury, the earth, Jupiter, and Saturn but that Venus and Mars appear to have at most only very weak planetary magnetic fields. The moon may have once possessed an internal dynamo, for the surface rocks are magnetized. The large satellites of the outer solar system are candidates for dynamo action in addition to the large planets themselves. Of these satellites the one most likely to generate its own internal magnetic field is Io.

  20. Planetary magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1980-01-01

    Planetary spacecraft have now probed the magnetic fields of all the terrestrial planets, the moon, Jupiter, and Saturn. These measurements reveal that dynamos are active in at least four of the planets, Mercury, the earth, Jupiter, and Saturn but that Venus and Mars appear to have at most only very weak planetary magnetic fields. The moon may have once possessed an internal dynamo, for the surface rocks are magnetized. The large satellites of the outer solar system are candidates for dynamo action in addition to the large planets themselves. Of these satellites the one most likely to generate its own internal magnetic field is Io.

  1. Planetary surface weathering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The weathering of planetary surfaces is treated. Both physical and chemical weathering (reactions between minerals or mineraloids and planetary volatiles through oxidation, hydration, carbonation, or solution processes) are discussed. Venus, earth, and Mars all possess permanent atmospheres such that weathering should be expected to significantly affect their respective surfaces. In contrast, Mercury and the moon lack permanent atmospheres but conceivably could experience surface weathering in response to transient atmospheres generated by volcanic or impact cratering events. Weathering processes can be postulated for other rocky objects including Io, Titan, asteroids, and comets.

  2. Planetary System Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peale, S. J.

    2002-01-01

    Contents include a summary of publications followed by their abstracts titeled: 1. On microlensing rates and optical depth toward the Galactic center. 2. Newly discovered brown dwarfs not seen in microlensing timescale frequency distribution? 3. Origin and evolution of the natural satellites. 4. Probing the structure of the galaxy with microlensing. 5. Tides, Encyclopedia of Astronomy and Astrophysics. 6. The Puzzle of the Titan-Hyperion 4:3 Orbital Resonance. 7. On the Validity of the Coagulation Equation and the Nature of Runaway Growth. 8. Making Hyperion. 9. The MESSENGER mission to Mercury: Scientific objectives and implementation. 10. A Survey of Numerical Solutions to the Coagulation. 11. Probability of detecting a planetary companion during a microlensing event. 12. Dynamics and origin of the 2:l orbital resonances of the GJ876 planets. 13. Planetary Interior Structure Revealed by Spin Dynamics. 14. A primordial origin of the Laplace relation among the Galilean Satellites. 15. A procedure for determining the nature of Mercury's core. 16. Secular evolution of hierarchical planetary systems. 17. Tidally induced volcanism. 18. Extrasolar planets and mean motion resonances. 19. Comparison of a ground-based microlensing search for planets with a search from space.

  3. Librational Response of Enceladus to Its Interior Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambaux, N.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Williams, J. G.; Karatekin, O.

    2010-03-01

    We will present the rotational motion of Enceladus perturbed by planetary perturbations and tidal torques and describe the main librations and short librations at 1.37 days amplitude for various interior models (computed with the Andrade model).

  4. Scientific Objectives and operational Scheme of the Planetary Underground Tool (Pluto) Experiment on the Beagle 2 Mars Lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, L.; Gromov, V.; Kochan, H.; Kosacki, K.; Tokano, T.

    2003-04-01

    The payload of the Beagle 2 lander of ESA's Mars Express mission includes a regolith-penetrating, tethered "Mole" intended for acquisition of several subsurface soil samples from depths between about 10 cm and approximately 1.5 m. These samples will then be analysed by the Gas Analysis Package (GAP) instrument on the lander, primarily with regard to isotopic composition and organic molecules. In addition, a share of each sample can be deposited onto the lander structure to be investigated with instruments mounted on the lander's PAW instrument carrier, such as the Mössbauer and X-ray fluorescence spectrometers and the optical microscope. After giving a brief overview of the experiment design, this paper focuses on the various science objectives addressed by the Beagle 2 Mole system, also referred to as the PLanetary Underground TOol (PLUTO). Apart from its capability to make subsurface regolith samples available to lander-based experiments for the first time on a Mars landing mission, PLUTO will be capable of performing scientific measurements of its own which utilize the Mole's soil penetration process and its temporary residence within the regolith: while it penetrates into the Martian soil by way of soil displacement through the action of an internal hammering mechanism, the Mole will allow mechanical properties of the regolith to be inferred and additionally, a temperature sensor mounted on the Mole will support investigations of soil thermophysical properties and measurements of the subsurface temperature profile. Using a Mole soil penetration theory calibrated by ground-based experiments, regolith bulk density, cohesion, and internal friction angle can be constrained as a function of depth using the Mole penetration path (and retrieval path) vs. time which is measured by a sensor indicating the amount of tether extracted by the PLUTO Mole. The obtained depth profiles of these quantities should provide insight into the depositional history and stratigraphy of

  5. Planetary Geomorphology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Victor R.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses various topics related to planetary geomorphology, including: research techniques; such geomorphic processes as impact, volcanic, degradational, eolian, and hillslope/mass movement processes; and channels and valleys. Indicates that the subject should be taught as a series of scientific questions rather than scientific results of…

  6. Planetary Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1994-01-01

    Just over two decades ago, Jim Pollack made a critical contribution to our understanding of planetary ring particle properties, and resolved a major apparent paradox between radar reflection and radio emission observations. At the time, particle properties were about all there were to study about planetary rings, and the fundamental questions were, why is Saturn the only planet with rings, how big are the particles, and what are they made of? Since then, we have received an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems into the complex webs of structure that we now know them to display. Insights gained from studies of these giant dynamical analogs have carried over into improved understanding of the formation of the planets themselves from particle disks, a subject very close to Jim's heart. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is ark emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system

  7. Planetary quarantine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The overall objective is to identify those areas of future missions which will be impacted by planetary quarantine (PQ) constraints. The objective of the phase being described was to develop an approach for using decision theory in performing a PQ analysis for a Mariner Jupiter Uranus Mission and to compare it with the traditional approach used for other missions.

  8. Planetary radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The radar astronomy activities supported by the Deep Space Network during June, July, and August 1980 are reported. The planetary bodies observed were Venus, Mercury, and the asteroid Toro. Data were obtained at both S and X band, and the observations were considered successful.

  9. Planetary quarantine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Developed methodologies and procedures for the reduction of microbial burden on an assembled spacecraft at the time of encapsulation or terminal sterilization are reported. This technology is required for reducing excessive microbial burden on spacecraft components for the purposes of either decreasing planetary contamination probabilities for an orbiter or minimizing the duration of a sterilization process for a lander.

  10. Planetary Geomorphology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Victor R.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses various topics related to planetary geomorphology, including: research techniques; such geomorphic processes as impact, volcanic, degradational, eolian, and hillslope/mass movement processes; and channels and valleys. Indicates that the subject should be taught as a series of scientific questions rather than scientific results of…

  11. Planetary Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1994-01-01

    Just over two decades ago, Jim Pollack made a critical contribution to our understanding of planetary ring particle properties, and resolved a major apparent paradox between radar reflection and radio emission observations. At the time, particle properties were about all there were to study about planetary rings, and the fundamental questions were, why is Saturn the only planet with rings, how big are the particles, and what are they made of? Since then, we have received an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems into the complex webs of structure that we now know them to display. Insights gained from studies of these giant dynamical analogs have carried over into improved understanding of the formation of the planets themselves from particle disks, a subject very close to Jim's heart. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is ark emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system

  12. Preparation of a skin equivalent phantom with interior micron-scale vessel structures for optical imaging experiments

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Klämpfl, Florian; Knipfer, Christian; Riemann, Max; Kanawade, Rajesh; Stelzle, Florian; Schmidt, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A popular alternative of preparing multilayer or microfluidic chip based phantoms could have helped to simulate the subsurface vascular network, but brought inevitable problems. In this work, we describe the preparation method of a single layer skin equivalent tissue phantom containing interior vessel channels, which mimick the superficial microvascular structure. The fabrication method does not disturb the optical properties of the turbiding matrix material. The diameter of the channels reaches a value of 50 μm. The size, as well as the geometry of the generated vessel structures are investigated by using the SD-OCT system. Our preliminary results confirm that fabrication of such a phantom is achievable and reproducible. Prospectively, this phantom is used to calibrate the optical angiographic imaging approaches. PMID:25401027

  13. Preparation of a skin equivalent phantom with interior micron-scale vessel structures for optical imaging experiments.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Klämpfl, Florian; Knipfer, Christian; Riemann, Max; Kanawade, Rajesh; Stelzle, Florian; Schmidt, Michael

    2014-09-01

    A popular alternative of preparing multilayer or microfluidic chip based phantoms could have helped to simulate the subsurface vascular network, but brought inevitable problems. In this work, we describe the preparation method of a single layer skin equivalent tissue phantom containing interior vessel channels, which mimick the superficial microvascular structure. The fabrication method does not disturb the optical properties of the turbiding matrix material. The diameter of the channels reaches a value of 50 μm. The size, as well as the geometry of the generated vessel structures are investigated by using the SD-OCT system. Our preliminary results confirm that fabrication of such a phantom is achievable and reproducible. Prospectively, this phantom is used to calibrate the optical angiographic imaging approaches.

  14. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiscareno, Matthew S.

    Planetary rings are the only nearby astrophysical disks and the only disks that have been investigated by spacecraft (especially the Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn). Although there are significant differences between rings and other disks, chiefly the large planet/ring mass ratio that greatly enhances the flatness of rings (aspect ratios as small as 10- 7), understanding of disks in general can be enhanced by understanding the dynamical processes observed at close range and in real time in planetary rings.We review the known ring systems of the four giant planets, as well as the prospects for ring systems yet to be discovered. We then review planetary rings by type. The A, B, and C rings of Saturn, plus the Cassini Division, comprise our solar system's only dense broad disk and host many phenomena of general application to disks including spiral waves, gap formation, self-gravity wakes, viscous overstability and normal modes, impact clouds, and orbital evolution of embedded moons. Dense narrow rings are found both at Uranus (where they comprise the main rings entirely) and at Saturn (where they are embedded in the broad disk) and are the primary natural laboratory for understanding shepherding and self-stability. Narrow dusty rings, likely generated by embedded source bodies, are surprisingly found to sport azimuthally confined arcs at Neptune, Saturn, and Jupiter. Finally, every known ring system includes a substantial component of diffuse dusty rings.Planetary rings have shown themselves to be useful as detectors of planetary processes around them, including the planetary magnetic field and interplanetary impactors as well as the gravity of nearby perturbing moons. Experimental rings science has made great progress in recent decades, especially numerical simulations of self-gravity wakes and other processes but also laboratory investigations of coefficient of restitution and spectroscopic ground truth. The age of self-sustained ring systems is a matter of

  15. Understanding Jupiter's interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Militzer, Burkhard; Soubiran, François; Wahl, Sean M.; Hubbard, William

    2016-09-01

    This article provides an overview of how models of giant planet interiors are constructed. We review measurements from past space missions that provided constraints for the interior structure of Jupiter. We discuss typical three-layer interior models that consist of a dense central core and an inner metallic and an outer molecular hydrogen-helium layer. These models rely heavily on experiments, analytical theory, and first-principles computer simulations of hydrogen and helium to understand their behavior up to the extreme pressures ˜10 Mbar and temperatures ˜10,000 K. We review the various equations of state used in Jupiter models and compare them with shock wave experiments. We discuss the possibility that helium rain, core erosion, and double diffusive convection have affected the structure and evolution of giant planets. In July 2016 the Juno spacecraft entered orbit around Jupiter, promising high-precision measurements of the gravitational field that will allow us to test our understanding of gas giant interiors better than ever before.

  16. Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Encrenaz, T.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Planetary atmospheres are the external gaseous envelopes which surround the planets. In the case of the telluric planets, they represent only a negligible fraction of their mass, but they play an essential role in the energy balance between the surfaces and the Sun. In the case of the GIANT PLANETS, which are mostly gaseous, they account for a large fraction of their total mass and constitute the...

  17. Planetary quarantine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Those areas of future missions which will be impacted by planetary quarantine (PQ) constraints were identified. The specific objectives for this reporting period were (1) to perform an analysis of the effects of PQ on an outer planet atmospheric probe, and (2) to prepare a quantitative illustration of spacecraft microbial reduction resulting from exposure to space environments. The Jupiter Orbiter Probe mission was used as a model for both of these efforts.

  18. Planetary Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray and Louis Friedman founded the non-profit Planetary Society in 1979 to advance the exploration of the solar system and to continue the search for extraterrestrial life. The Society has its headquarters in Pasadena, California, but is international in scope, with 100 000 members worldwide, making it the largest space interest group in the world. The Society funds a var...

  19. A bibliography of planetary geology principal investigators and their associates, 1976-1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    This bibliography cites publications submitted by 484 principal investigators and their associates who were supported through NASA's Office of Space Sciences Planetary Geology Program. Subject classifications include: solar system formation, comets, and asteroids; planetary satellites, planetary interiors, geological and geochemical constraints on planetary evolution; impact crater studies, volcanism, eolian studies, fluvian studies, Mars geological mapping; Mercury geological mapping; planetary cartography; and instrument development and techniques. An author/editor index is provided.

  20. Planetary engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, James B.; Sagan, Carl

    1991-01-01

    Assuming commercial fusion power, heavy lift vehicles and major advances in genetic engineering, the authors survey possible late-21st century methods of working major transformations in planetary environments. Much more Earthlike climates may be produced on Mars by generating low freezing point greenhouse gases from indigenous materials; on Venus by biological conversion of CO2 to graphite, by canceling the greenhouse effect with high-altitude absorbing fine particles, or by a sunshield at the first Lagrangian point; and on Titan by greenhouses and/or fusion warming. However, in our present state of ignorance we cannot guarantee a stable endstate or exclude unanticipated climatic feedbacks or other unintended consequences. Moreover, as the authors illustrate by several examples, many conceivable modes of planetary engineering are so wasteful of scarce solar system resources and so destructive of important scientific information as to raise profound ethical issues, even if they were economically feasible, which they are not. Global warming on Earth may lead to calls for mitigation by planetary engineering, e.g., emplacement and replenishment of anti-greenhouse layers at high altitudes, or sunshields in space. But here especially we must be concerned about precision, stability, and inadvertent side-effects. The safest and most cost-effective means of countering global warming - beyond, e.g., improved energy efficiency, CFC bans and alternative energy sources - is the continuing reforestation of approximately 2 times 107 sq km of the Earth's surface. This can be accomplished with present technology and probably at the least cost.

  1. Planetary engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, James B.; Sagan, Carl

    Assuming commercial fusion power, heavy lift vehicles and major advances in genetic engineering, the authors survey possible late-21st century methods of working major transformations in planetary environments. Much more Earthlike climates may be produced on Mars by generating low freezing point greenhouse gases from indigenous materials; on Venus by biological conversion of CO2 to graphite, by canceling the greenhouse effect with high-altitude absorbing fine particles, or by a sunshield at the first Lagrangian point; and on Titan by greenhouses and/or fusion warming. However, in our present state of ignorance we cannot guarantee a stable endstate or exclude unanticipated climatic feedbacks or other unintended consequences. Moreover, as the authors illustrate by several examples, many conceivable modes of planetary engineering are so wasteful of scarce solar system resources and so destructive of important scientific information as to raise profound ethical issues, even if they were economically feasible, which they are not. Global warming on Earth may lead to calls for mitigation by planetary engineering, e.g., emplacement and replenishment of anti-greenhouse layers at high altitudes, or sunshields in space. But here especially we must be concerned about precision, stability, and inadvertent side-effects. The safest and most cost-effective means of countering global warming - beyond, e.g., improved energy efficiency, CFC bans and alternative energy sources - is the continuing reforestation of approximately 2 times 107 sq km of the Earth's surface. This can be accomplished with present technology and probably at the least cost.

  2. The Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment. Planetary and Low-Luminosity Object Transits in the Carina Fields of the Galactic Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udalski, A.; Szewczyk, O.; Zebrun, K.; Pietrzynski, G.; Szymanski, M.; Kubiak, M.; Soszynski, I.; Wyrzykowski, L.

    2002-12-01

    We present results of the second "planetary and low-luminosity object transit" campaign conducted by the OGLE-III survey. Three fields (35' X 35' each) located in the Carina regions of the Galactic disk (l ≈ 290°) were monitored continuously in February-May 2002. About 1150 epochs were collected for each field. The search for low depth transits was conducted on about 103 000 stars with photometry better than 15 mmag. In total, we discovered 62 objects with shallow depth (≤ 0.08 mag) flat-bottomed transits. For each of these objects several individual transits were detected and photometric elements were determined. Also lower limits on radii of the primary and companion were calculated. The 2002 OGLE sample of stars with transiting companions contains considerably more objects that may be Jupiter-sized (R < 1.6 R_Jup) compared to our 2001 sample. There is a group of planetary candidates with the orbital periods close to or shorter than one day. If confirmed as planets, they would be the shortest period extrasolar planetary systems. In general, the transiting objects may be extrasolar planets, brown dwarfs, or M-type dwarfs. One should be, however, aware that in some cases unresolved blends of regular eclipsing stars can mimic transits. Future spectral analysis and eventual determination of the amplitude of radial velocity should allow final classification. High resolution spectroscopic follow-up observations are, therefore, strongly encouraged. All photometric data are available to the astronomical community from the OGLE INTERNET archive.

  3. If It Has a Magnetic Field We Want to Measure It: Planetary Magnetometry of the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espley, J. R.

    2017-02-01

    Measuring magnetic fields helps us understand planetary magnetospheres, interior structures like aquifers and oceans, and interior geophysics like dynamos. A variety of missions with magnetometry could be accomplished in the coming decades.

  4. Planetary Doppler Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, N.; Jefferies, S.; Hart, M.; Hubbard, W. B.; Showman, A. P.; Hernandez, G.; Rudd, L.

    2014-12-01

    Determining the internal structure of the solar system's gas and ice giant planets is key to understanding their formation and evolution (Hubbard et al., 1999, 2002, Guillot 2005), and in turn the formation and evolution of the solar system. While internal structure can be constrained theoretically, measurements of internal density distributions are needed to uncover the details of the deep interior where significant ambiguities exist. To date the interiors of giant planets have been probed by measuring gravitational moments using spacecraft passing close to, or in orbit around the planet. Gravity measurements are effective in determining structure in the outer envelope of a planet, and also probing dynamics (e.g. the Cassini and Juno missions), but are less effective in probing deep structure or the presence of discrete boundaries. A promising technique for overcoming this limitation is planetary seismology (analogous to helioseismology in the solar case), postulated by Vorontsov, 1976. Using trapped pressure waves to probe giant planet interiors allows insight into the density and temperature distribution (via the sound speed) down to the planetary core, and is also sensitive to sharp boundaries, for example at the molecular to metallic hydrogen transition or at the core-envelope interface. Detecting such boundaries is not only important in understanding the overall structure of the planet, but also has implications for our understanding of the basic properties of matter at extreme pressures. Recent Doppler measurements of Jupiter by Gaulme et al (2011) claimed a promising detection of trapped oscillations, while Hedman and Nicholson (2013) have shown that trapped waves in Saturn cause detectable perturbations in Saturn's C ring. Both these papers have fueled interest in using seismology as a tool for studying the solar system's giant planets. To fully exploit planetary seismology as a tool for understanding giant planet structure, measurements need to be made

  5. New Interface for Accessing Archived European Space Agency Planetary Science Data, Such as the New Venus Express Atmospheric Drag Experiment Data Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotheer, E.; Barbarisi, I.; Rios, C.; Macfarlane, A. J.; Docasal, R.; Arviset, C.; Besse, S.; Heather, D.; Gonzalez, J.; De Marchi, G.; Martinez, S.; Lim, T.; Fraga, D.

    2015-12-01

    All Venus Express (VEX) instruments delivered their data products according to the Planetary Data System version 3 (PDS3) standard, and the atmospheric drag experiment (ADE) data was no exception. The European Space Agency's (ESA) Planetary Science Archive (PSA), which can be accessed at www.rssd.esa.int/PSA, is being upgraded to make PDS4 data available from newer missions such as ExoMars and BepiColombo. Thus, the PSA development team has been working to ensure that the legacy PDS3 data will be accessible via the new interface as well. We will preview some of the new methods of accessing legacy VEX data via the new interface, with a focus being placed on the ADE data set. We will show how the ADE data can be accessed using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and our plans for making this and other data sets compatible with the Virtual European Solar and Planetary Access (VESPA) project for creating a virtual observatory. From February 2010 through March 2014, ESA's Venus Express mission conducted 11 ADE campaigns. During these observation campaigns, VEX's pericenter was in the range of 165 to 190 km, while the spacecraft was near Venus' North pole, and the entire spacecraft was used to make in situ measurements of the atmospheric density. This was done by rotating the solar panels in a manner that somewhat resembles a windmill. Also, VEX 's attitude and orbit control system was tasked with maintaining the spacecraft in a 3-axis stabilized mode during these pericenter passes. The torques that the reaction wheels had to exert to maintain this attitude were then analyzed to yield density readings.

  6. Planetary atlases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batson, R. M.; Inge, J. L.; Morgan, H. F.

    1991-01-01

    Two kinds of planetary map atlases are in production. Atlases of the first kind contain reduced-scale versions of maps in hard-bound books with dimensions of 11 x 14 inches. These new atlases are intended to: (1) provide concise but comprehensive references to the geography of the planets needed by planetary scientists and others; and (2) allow inexpensive access to the planetary map dataset without requiring acquisition and examination of tens or hundreds of full-size map sheets. Two such atlases have been published and a third is in press. Work was begun of an Atlas of the Satellite of the Outer Planets. The second kind of atlas is a popular or semi-technical version designed for commercial publication and distribution. The first edition, The Atlas of the Solar System, is nearly ready for publication. New funding and contracting constraints now make it unlikely that the atlas can be published in the format originally planned. Currently, the possibility of publishing the maps through the U.S. Geological Survey as a series of folios in the I-map series is being explored. The maps are global views of each solid-surface body of the Solar System. Each map shows airbrushed relief, albedo, and, where available, topography. A set of simplified geologic maps is also included. All of the maps are on equal-area projections. Scales are 1:40,000,000 for the Earth and Venus; 1:2,000,000 for the Saturnian satellites Mimas and Enceladus and the Uranian satellite Miranda; 1:100,000 for the Martian satellites, Phobos and Deimos; and 1:10,000,000 for all other bodies.

  7. Planetary Volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonenko, I.; Head, J. W.; Pieters, C. W.

    1998-01-01

    The final report consists of 10 journal articles concerning Planetary Volcanism. The articles discuss the following topics: (1) lunar stratigraphy; (2) cryptomare thickness measurements; (3) spherical harmonic spectra; (4) late stage activity of volcanoes on Venus; (5) stresses and calderas on Mars; (6) magma reservoir failure; (7) lunar mare basalt volcanism; (8) impact and volcanic glasses in the 79001/2 Core; (9) geology of the lunar regional dark mantle deposits; and (10) factors controlling the depths and sizes of magma reservoirs in Martian volcanoes.

  8. Planetary Dynamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busse, F. H.

    1985-01-01

    The MAGSAT-program has added significantly to our knowledge of planetary magnetism. The accuracy of observations has been improved such that a reliable extrapolation of the magnetic field to the core surface is now much more feasible than it has been before, and the prospect of further MAGSAT missions raises the expectation that the time dependence of the geomagnetic field will be known with similar accuracy in the future. In the research support it has been attempted to develop dynamo theory with these applications in mind.

  9. Planetary magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, D. P.; Ness, N. F.

    1981-01-01

    A concise overview is presented of our understanding of planetary magnetospheres (and in particular, of that of the Earth), as of the end of 1981. Emphasis is placed on processes of astrophysical interest, e.g., on particle acceleration, collision-free shocks, particle motion, parallel electric fields, magnetic merging, substorms, and large scale plasma flows. The general morphology and topology of the Earth's magnetosphere are discussed, and important results are given about the magnetospheres of Jupiter, Saturn and Mercury, including those derived from the Voyager 1 and 2 missions and those related to Jupiter's satellite Io. About 160 references are cited, including many reviews from which additional details can be obtained.

  10. Planetary astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Harlan J.

    1991-01-01

    Lunar-based astronomy offers major prospects for solar system research in the coming century. In addition to active advocacy of both ground-based and Lunar-based astronomy, a workshop on the value of asteroids as a resource for man is being organized. The following subject areas are also covered: (1) astrophysics from the Moon (composition and structure of planetary atmospheres); (2) a decade of cost-reduction in Very Large Telescopes (the SST as prototype of special-purpose telescopes); and (3) a plan for development of lunar astronomy.

  11. Simulation of large scale motions and small scale structures in planetary atmospheres and oceans: From laboratory to space experiments on ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egbers, Christoph; Futterer, Birgit; Zaussinger, Florian; Harlander, Uwe

    2014-05-01

    Baroclinic waves are responsible for the transport of heat and momentum in the oceans, in the Earth's atmosphere as well as in other planetary atmospheres. The talk will give an overview on possibilities to simulate such large scale as well as co-existing small scale structures with the help of well defined laboratory experiments like the baroclinic wave tank (annulus experiment). The analogy between the Earth's atmosphere and the rotating cylindrical annulus experiment only driven by rotation and differential heating between polar and equatorial regions is obvious. From the Gulf stream single vortices seperate from time to time. The same dynamics and the co-existence of small and large scale structures and their separation can be also observed in laboratory experiments as in the rotating cylindrical annulus experiment. This experiment represents the mid latitude dynamics quite well and is part as a central reference experiment in the German-wide DFG priority research programme ("METSTRÖM", SPP 1276) yielding as a benchmark for lot of different numerical methods. On the other hand, those laboratory experiments in cylindrical geometry are limited due to the fact, that the surface and real interaction between polar and equatorial region and their different dynamics can not be really studied. Therefore, I demonstrate how to use the very successful Geoflow I and Geoflow II space experiment hardware on ISS with future modifications for simulations of small and large scale planetary atmospheric motion in spherical geometry with differential heating between inner and outer spheres as well as between the polar and equatorial regions. References: Harlander, U., Wenzel, J., Wang, Y., Alexandrov, K. & Egbers, Ch., 2012, Simultaneous PIV- and thermography measurements of partially blocked flow in a heated rotating annulus, Exp. in Fluids, 52 (4), 1077-1087 Futterer, B., Krebs, A., Plesa, A.-C., Zaussinger, F., Hollerbach, R., Breuer, D. & Egbers, Ch., 2013, Sheet-like and

  12. Planetary Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, S. Alan

    1998-01-01

    This 1-year project was an augmentation grant to my NASA Planetary Astronomy grant. With the awarded funding, we accomplished the following tasks: (1) Conducted two NVK imaging runs in conjunction with the ILAW (International Lunar Atmosphere Week) Observing Campaigns in 1995 and 1997. In the first run, we obtained repeated imaging sequences of lunar Na D-line emission to better quantify the temporal variations detected in earlier runs. In the second run we obtained extremely high resolution (R=960.000) Na line profiles using the 4m AAT in Australia. These data are being analyzed under our new 3-year Planetary Astronomy grant. (2) Reduced, analyzed, and published our March 1995 spectroscopic dataset to detect (or set stringent upper limits on) Rb. Cs, Mg. Al. Fe, Ba, Ba. OH, and several other species. These results were reported in a talk at the LPSC and in two papers: (1) A Spectroscopic Survey of Metallic Abundances in the Lunar Atmosphere. and (2) A Search for Magnesium in the Lunar Atmosphere. Both reprints are attached. Wrote up an extensive, invited Reviews of Geophysics review article on advances in the study of the lunar atmosphere. This 70-page article, which is expected to appear in print in 1999, is also attached.

  13. Planetary Habitability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasting, James F.

    1997-01-01

    This grant was entitled 'Planetary Habitability' and the work performed under it related to elucidating the conditions that lead to habitable, i.e. Earth-like, planets. Below are listed publications for the past two and a half years that came out of this work. The main thrusts of the research involved: (1) showing under what conditions atmospheric O2 and O3 can be considered as evidence for life on a planet's surface; (2) determining whether CH4 may have played a role in warming early Mars; (3) studying the effect of varying UV levels on Earth-like planets around different types of stars to see whether this would pose a threat to habitability; and (4) studying the effect of chaotic obliquity variations on planetary climates and determining whether planets that experienced such variations might still be habitable. Several of these topics involve ongoing research that has been carried out under a new grant number, but which continues to be funded by NASA's Exobiology program.

  14. Dynamical measurements of the interior structure of exoplanets

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Juliette C.; Batygin, Konstantin

    2013-12-01

    Giant gaseous planets often reside on orbits in sufficient proximity to their host stars for the planetary quadrupole gravitational field to become non-negligible. In presence of an additional planetary companion, a precise characterization of the system's orbital state can yield meaningful constraints on the transiting planet's interior structure. However, such methods can require a very specific type of system. This paper explores the dynamic range of applicability of these methods and shows that interior structure calculations are possible for a wide array of orbital architectures. The HAT-P-13 system is used as a case study, and the implications of perturbations arising from a third distant companion on the feasibility of an interior calculation are discussed. We find that the method discussed here is likely to be useful in studying other planetary systems, allowing the possibility of an expanded survey of the interiors of exoplanets.

  15. Advanced planetary analyses. [for planetary mission planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The results are summarized of research accomplished during this period concerning planetary mission planning are summarized. The tasks reported include the cost estimations research, planetary missions handbook, and advanced planning activities.

  16. Non-planetary Science from Planetary Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvis, M.; Rabe, K.; Daniels, K.

    2015-12-01

    Planetary science is naturally focussed on the issues of the origin and history of solar systems, especially our own. The implications of an early turbulent history of our solar system reach into many areas including the origin of Earth's oceans, of ores in the Earth's crust and possibly the seeding of life. There are however other areas of science that stand to be developed greatly by planetary missions, primarily to small solar system bodies. The physics of granular materials has been well-studied in Earth's gravity, but lacks a general theory. Because of the compacting effects of gravity, some experiments desired for testing these theories remain impossible on Earth. Studying the behavior of a micro-gravity rubble pile -- such as many asteroids are believed to be -- could provide a new route towards exploring general principles of granular physics. These same studies would also prove valuable for planning missions to sample these same bodies, as techniques for anchoring and deep sampling are difficult to plan in the absence of such knowledge. In materials physics, first-principles total-energy calculations for compounds of a given stoichiometry have identified metastable, or even stable, structures distinct from known structures obtained by synthesis under laboratory conditions. The conditions in the proto-planetary nebula, in the slowly cooling cores of planetesimals, and in the high speed collisions of planetesimals and their derivatives, are all conditions that cannot be achieved in the laboratory. Large samples from comets and asteroids offer the chance to find crystals with these as-yet unobserved structures as well as more exotic materials. Some of these could have unusual properties important for materials science. Meteorites give us a glimpse of these exotic materials, several dozen of which are known that are unique to meteorites. But samples retrieved directly from small bodies in space will not have been affected by atmospheric entry, warmth or

  17. Planetary geosciences, 1989-1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuber, Maria T. (Editor); James, Odette B. (Editor); Lunine, Jonathan I. (Editor); Macpherson, Glenn J. (Editor); Phillips, Roger J. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    NASA's Planetary Geosciences Programs (the Planetary Geology and Geophysics and the Planetary Material and Geochemistry Programs) provide support and an organizational framework for scientific research on solid bodies of the solar system. These research and analysis programs support scientific research aimed at increasing our understanding of the physical, chemical, and dynamic nature of the solid bodies of the solar system: the Moon, the terrestrial planets, the satellites of the outer planets, the rings, the asteroids, and the comets. This research is conducted using a variety of methods: laboratory experiments, theoretical approaches, data analysis, and Earth analog techniques. Through research supported by these programs, we are expanding our understanding of the origin and evolution of the solar system. This document is intended to provide an overview of the more significant scientific findings and discoveries made this year by scientists supported by the Planetary Geosciences Program. To a large degree, these results and discoveries are the measure of success of the programs.

  18. High pressure studies of planetary matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M.

    1989-06-01

    Those materials which are of greatest interest to the physics of the deep planetary interiors are Fe, H/sub 2/, He and the Ices. These are sufficiently diverse and intensively studied to offer an overview of present day high pressure research. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Planetary ecology

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, D.E.; Brierley, C.L.; Brierley, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Over 100 top scientists contribute their knowledge to this study of the cycling of matter in our environment. It introduces the concept of biogeochemistry - an association of geochemical and biological forces which has led to a concept of planetary and biological co-evolution, and to a natural history ruled by inanimate and animate forces. Based on a symposium held in 1983, this volume compiled important research findings generated in 11 countries. It merges many scientific disciplines to promote an awareness that life is a universal, ubiquitous, and versatile geological force. Scientists working in microbiology, geology, atmospheric chemistry, paleoecology, geochemistry, soil chemistry, and environmental science will find data important to their work in this compendium.

  20. Enabling Planetary Geodesy With the Deep Space Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, R. S.; Asmar, S. W.; Armstrong, J. W.; Buccino, D.; Folkner, W. M.; Iess, L.; Konopliv, A. S.; Lazio, J.

    2015-12-01

    For five decades of planetary exploration, missions have carried out Radio Science experiments that led to numerous discoveries in planetary geodesy. The interior structures of many planets, large moons, asteroids and comet nuclei have been modeled based on their gravitational fields and dynamical parameters derived from precision Doppler and range measurements, often called radio metrics. Advanced instrumentation has resulted in the high level of data quality that enabled scientific breakthroughs. This instrumentation scheme, however, is distributed between elements on the spacecraft and others at the stations of the Deep Space Network (DSN), making the DSN a world-class science instrument. The design and performance of the DSN stations directly determines the quality of the science observables and radio link-based planetary geodesy observations are established by methodologies and capabilities of the DSN. In this paper, we summarize major recent discoveries in planetary geodesy at the rocky planets and the Moon, Saturnian and Jovian satellites, Phobos, and Vesta; experiments and analysis in progress at Ceres and Pluto; upcoming experiments at Jupiter, Saturn and Mars (InSight), and the long-term outlook for approved future missions with geodesy objectives. The DSN's role will be described along the technical advancements in DSN transmitters, receivers, atomic clocks, and other specialized instrumentation, such as the Advanced Water Vapor Radiometer, Advanced Ranging Instrument, as well as relevant mechanical and electrical components. Advanced techniques for calibrations of known noise sources and Earth's troposphere, ionosphere, and interplanetary plasma are also presented. A typical error budget will be presented to aid future investigations in carrying out trade-off studies in the end-to-end system performance.

  1. Planetary Dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Cao, H.

    2013-05-01

    The highly electrically conducting fluid interiors of the Earth, Jupiter and Saturn are effective heat engines that do work in the form of producing a magnetic envelope around the planet while transferring heat from their interiors to their surfaces where it radiates to space. This magnetic envelope can shield the atmosphere of the planet, act to transfer momentum from the rotating planet to its moons, and tap the energy of the solar wind to produce aurora. The presence of a core, interior to and not mixed with the conducting fluid, can play a significant role in the nature of the magnetic field produced. For example, it could become magnetized and act as a memory of the average magnetic state of the interior if it is big enough. Its size also controls the geometry of the dynamo region. A result of this control on the Earth is independent temporal variations above the two poles. A more subtle effect is the creation of field minimum at the core-mantle boundary over both poles. The saturnian magnetic field is in stark contrast to the terrestrial field. It is extremely symmetric with respect to the spin-axis which appears to violate the Cowling's theorem. Further, no secular variation has yet been detected at Saturn. The geometry of the field, when viewed at the dynamo surface, shows a poleward flux concentration. This poleward flux concentration is reconcilable when two conditions are satisfied: 1) the core size of Saturn is smaller than 0.2 Saturn radii; 2) "strong" zonal wind present in the equatorial dynamo region. While we might expect Saturn to have cooled significantly since formation, its heat flux appears to be surprisingly strong. This has been attributed to the differentiation of helium and hydrogen, called helium rain. Jupiter, however, has a very strong magnetic field, rich in harmonic structure like that of the Earth. Jupiter too does not show secular variations over the few decades since its first exploration. This is surprising since zonal flows on the

  2. Origin and evolution of planetary and satellite atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Atreya, S.K.; Pollack, J.B.; Matthews, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    The present volume on the origin and evolution of planet and satellite atmospheres discusses the chemistry of interstellar gas and grains, planetary accretion, cometary composition, the inventories of asteroid volatiles, key similarities and differences among the terrestrial planets' atmospheric compositions, and planets' atmospheric escape and water loss. Also discussed are planetary atmosphere-planetary interior evolutionary coupling, the atmospheric composition of the outer planets, the structure and composition of giant planet interiors, the tenuous atmosphere of Io, the sources of the atmospheres of the outer solar system's satellites, the present state and chemical evolution of the Titan, Triton, and Pluto atmospheres, and the thermal structure and heat balance of the outer planets.

  3. “Seeing” and “feeling” architecture: how bodily self-consciousness alters architectonic experience and affects the perception of interiors

    PubMed Central

    Pasqualini, Isabella; Llobera, Joan; Blanke, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Over the centuries architectural theory evolved several notions of embodiment, proposing in the nineteenth and twentieth century that architectonic experience is related to physiological responses of the observer. Recent advances in the cognitive neuroscience of embodiment (or bodily self-consciousness) enable empirical studies of architectonic embodiment. Here, we investigated how architecture modulates bodily self-consciousness by adapting a video-based virtual reality (VR) setup previously used to investigate visuo-tactile mechanisms of bodily self-consciousness. While standing in two different interiors, participants were filmed from behind and watched their own virtual body online on a head-mounted display (HMD). Visuo-tactile strokes were applied in synchronous or asynchronous mode to the participants and their virtual body. Two interiors were simulated in the laboratory by placing the sidewalls either far or near from the participants, generating a large and narrow room. We tested if bodily self-consciousness was differently modulated when participants were exposed to both rooms and whether these changes depend on visuo-tactile stimulation. We measured illusory touch, self-identification, and performed length estimations. Our data show that synchronous stroking of the physical and the virtual body induces illusory touch and self-identification with the virtual body, independent of room-size. Moreover, in the narrow room we observed weak feelings of illusory touch with the sidewalls and of approaching walls. These subjective changes were complemented by a stroking-dependent modulation of length estimation only in the narrow room with participants judging the room-size more accurately during conditions of illusory self-identification. We discuss our findings and previous notions of architectonic embodiment in the context of the cognitive neuroscience of bodily self-consciousness and propose an empirical framework grounded in architecture, cognitive

  4. Orbital resonances and planetary formation sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torbett, M.; Smoluchowski, R.; Greenberg, R.

    1982-01-01

    A cascaded resonance structure where planetesimal growth was accelerated at 2:1 interior and 1:2 exterior resonances, with an early-formed Jupiter producing runaway growth of planetary embryos, is hypothesized in a solar system formation model. The planetary embryos produce their own resonances, and these in turn lead to additional embryos in a process that successively propagates inwardly and outwardly to generate a resonant configuration of embryos. The early presence of Jupiter would in this way have imposed a harmonic structure on the accumulating planetesimal swarm. The positions of the planetary embryos can be moved into a degree of agreement with most of the present planetary positions which is comparable to that given by the Titius-Bode law, for the case of an accretion disk whose surface density obeys a power law of index -1.2.

  5. Planetary science at APL.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, A. F.

    1999-12-01

    Planetary science at APL did not begin with the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) mission, although NEAR, as the first planetary mission ever implemented by a non-NASA center, is what brought the Laboratory into the main arena of planetary exploration. This is the story of how that happened, how planetary science developed at APL, and what lies ahead.

  6. INTERIOR MODELS OF URANUS AND NEPTUNE

    SciTech Connect

    Helled, Ravit; Schubert, Gerald; Anderson, John D.; Podolak, Morris E-mail: schubert@ucla.edu E-mail: morris@tau.ac.il

    2011-01-01

    'Empirical' models (pressure versus density) of Uranus and Neptune interiors constrained by the gravitational coefficients J{sub 2}, J{sub 4}, the planetary radii and masses, and Voyager solid-body rotation periods are presented. The empirical pressure-density profiles are then interpreted in terms of physical equations of state of hydrogen, helium, ice (H{sub 2}O), and rock (SiO{sub 2}) to test the physical plausibility of the models. The compositions of Uranus and Neptune are found to be similar with somewhat different distributions of the high-Z material. The big difference between the two planets is that Neptune requires a non-solar envelope, while Uranus is best matched with a solar composition envelope. Our analysis suggests that the heavier elements in both Uranus' and Neptune's interior might increase gradually toward the planetary centers. Indeed it is possible to fit the gravitational moments without sharp compositional transitions.

  7. Planetary nomenclature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strobell, M. E.; Masursky, Harold

    1987-01-01

    In fiscal 1986, names were chosen for prominent features on the five previously known Uranian satellites and for features on the largest of the 10 satellites discovered by Voyager 2. The names of the five large satellites are taken mostly from Shakespeare, and most are spirits; therefore, Shakespearean and spirit themes were used to choose names for topographic features on the satellites. Crater names and most other feature names on Miranda, Oberon, and Titania are from Shakespeare; features on Ariel are named for bright spirits and those on Umbriel for dark, all taken from universal mythology. Preliminary coordinates for these features are derived from shaded relief maps of the satellites to be published in 1987. Orbital elements have been established for the 10 new satellites, and a paper describing this work is in progress; satellite positions are under review by Commission 16 of the IAU. The moon 1985 U1 is informally designated Puck. The nine small satellites discovered in 1986 are to be named for Shakespearean heroines; these names are to be listed in the 1987 edition of the Annual Gazetteer of Planetary Nomenclature.

  8. Planetary nomenclature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobell, M. E.; Masursky, Harold

    1987-05-01

    In fiscal 1986, names were chosen for prominent features on the five previously known Uranian satellites and for features on the largest of the 10 satellites discovered by Voyager 2. The names of the five large satellites are taken mostly from Shakespeare, and most are spirits; therefore, Shakespearean and spirit themes were used to choose names for topographic features on the satellites. Crater names and most other feature names on Miranda, Oberon, and Titania are from Shakespeare; features on Ariel are named for bright spirits and those on Umbriel for dark, all taken from universal mythology. Preliminary coordinates for these features are derived from shaded relief maps of the satellites to be published in 1987. Orbital elements have been established for the 10 new satellites, and a paper describing this work is in progress; satellite positions are under review by Commission 16 of the IAU. The moon 1985 U1 is informally designated Puck. The nine small satellites discovered in 1986 are to be named for Shakespearean heroines; these names are to be listed in the 1987 edition of the Annual Gazetteer of Planetary Nomenclature.

  9. Proceedings of the 38th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The sessions in the conference include: Titan, Mars Volcanism, Mars Polar Layered Deposits, Early Solar System Isotopes, SPECIAL SESSION: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter: New Ways of Studying the Red Planet, Achondrites: Exploring Oxygen Isotopes and Parent-Body Processes, Solar System Formation and Evolution, SPECIAL SESSION: SMART-1, . Impact Cratering: Observations and Experiments, SPECIAL SESSION: Volcanism and Tectonism on Saturnian Satellites, Solar Nebula Composition, Mars Fluvial Geomorphology, Asteroid Observations: Spectra, Mostly, Mars Sediments and Geochemistry: View from the Surface, Mars Tectonics and Crustal Dichotomy, Stardust: Wild-2 Revealed, Impact Cratering from Observations and Interpretations, Mars Sediments and Geochemistry: The Map View, Chondrules and Their Formation, Enceladus, Asteroids and Deep Impact: Structure, Dynamics, and Experiments, Mars Surface Process and Evolution, Martian Meteorites: Nakhlites, Experiments, and the Great Shergottite Age Debate, Stardust: Mainly Mineralogy, Astrobiology, Wind-Surface Interactions on Mars and Earth, Icy Satellite Surfaces, Venus, Lunar Remote Sensing, Space Weathering, and Impact Effects, Interplanetary Dust/Genesis, Mars Cratering: Counts and Catastrophes?, Chondrites: Secondary Processes, Mars Sediments and Geochemistry: Atmosphere, Soils, Brines, and Minerals, Lunar Interior and Differentiation, Mars Magnetics and Atmosphere: Core to Ionosphere, Metal-rich Chondrites, Organics in Chondrites, Lunar Impacts and Meteorites, Presolar/Solar Grains, Topics for Print Only papers are: Outer Planets/Satellites, Early Solar System, Interplanetary Dust, Comets and Kuiper Belt Objects, Asteroids and Meteoroids, Chondrites, Achondrites, Meteorite Related, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars, Astrobiology, Planetary Differentiation, Impacts, Mercury, Lunar Samples and Modeling, Venus, Missions and Instruments, Global Warming, Education and Public Outreach, Poster sessions are: Asteroids/Kuiper Belt Objects

  10. Proceedings of the 38th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The sessions in the conference include: Titan, Mars Volcanism, Mars Polar Layered Deposits, Early Solar System Isotopes, SPECIAL SESSION: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter: New Ways of Studying the Red Planet, Achondrites: Exploring Oxygen Isotopes and Parent-Body Processes, Solar System Formation and Evolution, SPECIAL SESSION: SMART-1, . Impact Cratering: Observations and Experiments, SPECIAL SESSION: Volcanism and Tectonism on Saturnian Satellites, Solar Nebula Composition, Mars Fluvial Geomorphology, Asteroid Observations: Spectra, Mostly, Mars Sediments and Geochemistry: View from the Surface, Mars Tectonics and Crustal Dichotomy, Stardust: Wild-2 Revealed, Impact Cratering from Observations and Interpretations, Mars Sediments and Geochemistry: The Map View, Chondrules and Their Formation, Enceladus, Asteroids and Deep Impact: Structure, Dynamics, and Experiments, Mars Surface Process and Evolution, Martian Meteorites: Nakhlites, Experiments, and the Great Shergottite Age Debate, Stardust: Mainly Mineralogy, Astrobiology, Wind-Surface Interactions on Mars and Earth, Icy Satellite Surfaces, Venus, Lunar Remote Sensing, Space Weathering, and Impact Effects, Interplanetary Dust/Genesis, Mars Cratering: Counts and Catastrophes?, Chondrites: Secondary Processes, Mars Sediments and Geochemistry: Atmosphere, Soils, Brines, and Minerals, Lunar Interior and Differentiation, Mars Magnetics and Atmosphere: Core to Ionosphere, Metal-rich Chondrites, Organics in Chondrites, Lunar Impacts and Meteorites, Presolar/Solar Grains, Topics for Print Only papers are: Outer Planets/Satellites, Early Solar System, Interplanetary Dust, Comets and Kuiper Belt Objects, Asteroids and Meteoroids, Chondrites, Achondrites, Meteorite Related, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars, Astrobiology, Planetary Differentiation, Impacts, Mercury, Lunar Samples and Modeling, Venus, Missions and Instruments, Global Warming, Education and Public Outreach, Poster sessions are: Asteroids/Kuiper Belt Objects

  11. Exobiological implications of dust aggregation in planetary atmospheres: An experiment for the gas-grain simulation facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntington, J. L.; Schwartz, D. E.; Marshall, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    The Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF) will provide a microgravity environment where undesirable environmental effects are reduced, and thus, experiments involving interactions between small particles and grains can be more suitably performed. Slated for flight aboard the Shuttle in 1992, the ESA glovebox will serve as a scientific and technological testbed for GGSF exobiology experiments as well as generating some basic scientific data. Initial glovebox experiments will test a method of generating a stable, mono-dispersed cloud of fine particles using a vibrating sprinkler system. In the absence of gravity and atmospheric turbulence, it will be possible to determine the influence of interparticle forces in controlling the rate and mode of aggregation. The experimental chamber can be purged of suspended matter to enable multiple repetitions of the experiments. Of particular interest will be the number of particles per unit volume of the chamber, because it is suspected that aggregation will occur extremely rapidly if the number exceeds a critical value. All aggregation events will be recorded on high-resolution video film. Changes in the experimental procedure as a result of surprise events will be accompanied by real-time interaction with the mission specialist during the Shuttle flight.

  12. Validation of the Land-Surface Energy Budget and Planetary Boundary Layer for Several Intensive field Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Schubert, Siegfried; Molod, Andrea; Houser, Paul R.

    1999-01-01

    Land-surface processes in a data assimilation system influence the lower troposphere and must be properly represented. With the recent incorporation of the Mosaic Land-surface Model (LSM) into the GEOS Data Assimilation System (DAS), the detailed land-surface processes require strict validation. While global data sources can identify large-scale systematic biases at the monthly timescale, the diurnal cycle is difficult to validate. Moreover, global data sets rarely include variables such as evaporation, sensible heat and soil water. Intensive field experiments, on the other hand, can provide high temporal resolution energy budget and vertical profile data for sufficiently long periods, without global coverage. Here, we evaluate the GEOS DAS against several intensive field experiments. The field experiments are First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE, Kansas, summer 1987), Cabauw (as used in PILPS, Netherlands, summer 1987), Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM, Southern Great Plains, winter and summer 1998) and the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA, Arctic ice sheet, winter and summer 1998). The sites provide complete surface energy budget data for periods of at least one year, and some periods of vertical profiles. This comparison provides a detailed validation of the Mosaic LSM within the GEOS DAS for a variety of climatologic and geographic conditions.

  13. Exploring Asteroid Interiors: The Deep Interior Mission Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asphaug, E.; Belton, M. J. S.; Cangahuala, A.; Keith, L.; Klaasen, K.; McFadden, L.; Neumann, G.; Ostro, S. J.; Reinert, R.; Safaeinili, A.

    2003-01-01

    Deep Interior is a mission to determine the geophysical properties of near-Earth objects, including the first volumetric image of the interior of an asteroid. Radio reflection tomography will image the 3D distribution of complex dielectric properties within the 1 km rendezvous target and hence map structural, density or compositional variations. Laser altimetry and visible imaging will provide high-resolution surface topography. Smart surface pods culminating in blast experiments, imaged by the high frame rate camera and scanned by lidar, will characterize active mechanical behavior and structure of surface materials, expose unweathered surface for NIR analysis, and may enable some characterization of bulk seismic response. Multiple flybys en route to this target will characterize a diversity of asteroids, probing their interiors with non-tomographic radar reflectance experiments. Deep Interior is a natural follow-up to the NEARShoemaker mission and will provide essential guidance for future in situ asteroid and comet exploration. While our goal is to learn the interior geology of small bodies and how their surfaces behave, the resulting science will enable pragmatic technologies required of hazard mitigation and resource utilization.

  14. Planetary protection: lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perek, L.

    Planetary protection is a very wide subject because of the variety of physical conditions on individual planets and their moons. At present, we have good photographs or imagery, as well as other evidence, from most planets and from a selection of their moons. The most important factor is the presence or absence of any form of life. Material samples are available from the Moon and possibly, in the form of a few meteorites, from Mars. The danger of contamination has been recognized in the past and it became clear that some measures would have to be taken. The adoption of measures will have to be universal in mssions to planets and their moons because for an undesirablei contamination to occur, one failed measure of protection may be enough. The question is, if we can learn from experience gained in the last forty years in adopting laws, rules or unbinding recommendations for space activities. Several examples will be discussed, such as the amount of knowledge at a time when international treaties on space law were adopted, the consequences of the failed discussion at the United Nations on the definition of outer space, or of the break-up of Cosmos 954. Special attention will be devoted to the ongoing discussion of space debris in the UN Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space and its relevance for planetary protection, to the general compliance with the Registration Convention and to the experience gained with the recommendation to re-orbit geostationary satellites.

  15. Planetary protection: lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perek, L.

    2004-01-01

    Planetary protection is a very wide subject because of the variety of physical conditions on individual planets and their moons. At present, we have good photographs or imagery, as well as other evidence, from most planets and from a selection of their moons. The most important factor is the presence or absence of any form of life. Material samples are available from the Moon and possibly, in the form of a few meteorites, from Mars. The danger of contamination has been recognized in the past and it became clear that some measures would have to be taken. The adoption of measures will have to be universal in missions to planets and their moons because for an undesirable contamination to occur, one failed measure of protection may be enough. The question is, if we can learn from experience gained in the last forty years in adopting laws, rules or unbinding recommendations for space activities. Several examples will be discussed, such as the amount of knowledge at a time when international treaties on space law were adopted, the consequences of the failed discussion at the United Nations on the definition of outer space, or of the break-up of Cosmos 954. Special attention will be devoted to the ongoing discussion of space debris in the UN Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space and its relevance for planetary protection, to the general compliance with the Registration Convention and to the experience gained with the recommendation to re-orbit geostationary satellites.

  16. Resistance of spacecraft isolates to outer space for planetary protection purposes -first results of the experiment PROTECT of the EXPOSE-E mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horneck, Gerda; Moeller, Ralf

    Spore-forming microbes are of particular concern in the context of planetary protection, be-cause their endospores are highly resistant to a variety of environmental extremes, including certain sterilization procedures and the harsh environment of outer space or planetary sur-faces (Nicholson et al., 2000; Horneck et al. 2009). Furthermore, isolates from space craft and space craft assembly facilities have been identified that form spores of an elevated resistance to various physical and chemical conditions, such as ionizing and UV radiation, desiccation and oxidative stress (La Duc et al., 2007). This observation led to the supposition that the spe-cial conditions of ultraclean spacecraft assembly facilities and the applied spacecraft cleaning and decontamination measures cause a selection of the most resistant organisms as survivors. To test this hypothesis, spores of B. pumilus SAFR-032 isolated from these environments as well as spores of the laboratory strain B. subtilis 168 were subjected to selected parameters of space in the experiment PROTECT during the EXPOSE-E mission (February 7, 2008 -September 12, 2009), attached to the EuTEF platform outside of the Columbus module of the International Space Station. The spores were mounted as dry layers onto spacecraft-qualified material (aluminum coupons) and exposed to the following parameters of space, applied sep-arately or in selected combinations: (i) space vacuum, (ii) solar extraterrestrial UV radiation including vacuum-UV, (iii) simulated Mars atmosphere and UV radiation climate, and (iv) galactic cosmic radiation. After recovery, visual inspection showed color changes of the sun-exposed spore samples from white to brownish demonstrating photochemical damage caused by solar extraterrestrial UV radiation. On-going analyses include studies of viability and capabil-ity of repair of damage, mutagenic spectrum, e.g. trp-revertants, rifampicin-resistant mutants, DNA lesion, global gene expression, and genomic and

  17. Planetary systems in star clusters .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouwenhoven, M. B. N.; Shu, Qi; Cai, Maxwell Xu; Spurzem, Rainer

    Thousands of confirmed and candidate exoplanets have been identified in recent years. Consequently, theoretical research on the formation and dynamical evolution of planetary systems has seen a boost, and the processes of planet-planet scattering, secular evolution, and interaction between planets and gas/debris disks have been well-studied. Almost all of this work has focused on the formation and evolution of isolated planetary systems, and neglect the effect of external influences, such as the gravitational interaction with neighbouring stars. Most stars, however, form in clustered environments that either quickly disperse, or evolve into open clusters. Under these conditions, young planetary systems experience frequent close encounters with other stars, at least during the first 106-107 years, which affects planets orbiting at any period range, as well as their debris structures.

  18. Using Vulcan to Recreate Planetary Cores

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, G.W.; Celliers, P.M.; Hicks, D.G.; Mackinnon, A.J.; Moon, S.J.; Cauble, R.; DaSilva, L.B.; Koening, M.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Huser, G.; Jeanloz, R.; Lee, K.M.; Benedetti, L.R.; Henry, E.; Batani, D.; Willi, O.; Pasley, J.; Gessner, H.; Neely, D.; Notley, M.; Danson, C.

    2001-08-15

    An accurate equation of state (EOS) for planetary constituents at extreme conditions is the key to any credible model of planets or low mass stars. However, experimental validation has been carried out on at high pressure (>few Mbar), and then only on the principal Hugoniot. For planetary and stellar interiors, compression occurs from gravitational force so that material states follow a line of isentropic compression (ignoring phase separation) to ultra-high densities. An example of the predicted states for water along the isentrope for Neptune is shown in a figure. The cutaway figure on the left is from Hubbard, and the phase diagram on the right is from Cavazzoni et al. Clearly these states lie at quite a bit lower temperature and higher density than single shock Hugoniot states but they are at higher temperature than can be achieved with accurate diamond anvil experiments. At extreme densities, material states are predicted to have quite unearthly properties such as high temperature superconductivity and low temperature fusion. High density experiments on Earth are achieved with either static compression techniques (i.e.diamond anvil cells) or dynamic compression techniques using large laser facilities, gas guns, or explosives. A major thrust of this work is to develop techniques to create and characterize material states that exists primarily at the core of giant planets and brown dwarf stars. Typically, models used to construct planetary isentropes are constrained by only the planet radius, outer atmospheric spectroscopy, and space probe gravitational moment and magnetic field data. Thus any data, which provide rigid constraints for these models will have a significant impact on a broad community of planetary and condensed matter scientists. Recent laser shock wave experiments have made great strides in recreating material states that exist in the outer 25% (in radius) of the Jovian planets and at the exterior of low-mass stars. Large laser facilities have

  19. Planetary science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, John R.; Bridges, Frank; Gault, Donald; Greeley, Ronald; Houpis, Harry; Lin, Douglas; Weidenschilling, Stuart

    1987-01-01

    The following types of experiments for a proposed Space Station Microgravity Particle Research Facility are described: (1) low velocity collisions between fragile particles; (2) low velocity collisions of ice particles; (3) plasma-dust interaction; and (4) aggregation of finely-comminuted geological materials. The required capabilities and desired hardware for the facility are detailed.

  20. Advances in planetary geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronow, A. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    This second issue in a new series intended to serve the planetary geology community with a form for quick and thorough communications includes (1) a catalog of terrestrial craterform structures for northern Europe; (2) abstracts of results of the Planetary Geology Program, and (3) a list of the photographic holdings of regional planetary image facilities.

  1. Interior prospect and refuge.

    PubMed

    Stamps, Arthur E

    2006-12-01

    Prospect and refuge theory has usually been applied to landscapes but recent work suggests that it could also be applied to interiors. This article reports two experiments, covering 14 environments and 97 respondents, in which five hypotheses regarding prospect, refuge, and comfort were tested: H1: the transition from small, dark, and low to large, light, and high and vice-versa; H2: the transition from dark to light vs vice-versa; H3: the transition from low to high vs vice-versa; H4: the transition from small to big horizontally vs vice-versa; and H5: width. Results varied. The effect of width on comfort was substantial (r = .35); effects for the other hypotheses were either subtle or contrary to expectations.

  2. Carbon substitution for oxygen in silicates in planetary interiors

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Sabyasachi; Widgeon, Scarlett J.; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Mera, Gabriela; Tavakoli, Amir; Ionescu, Emanuel; Riedel, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous silicon oxycarbide polymer-derived ceramics (PDCs), synthesized from organometallic precursors, contain carbon- and silica-rich nanodomains, the latter with extensive substitution of carbon for oxygen, linking Si-centered SiOxC4-x tetrahedra. Calorimetric studies demonstrated these PDCs to be thermodynamically more stable than a mixture of SiO2, C, and silicon carbide. Here, we show by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy that substitution of C for O is also attained in PDCs with depolymerized silica-rich domains containing lithium, associated with SiOxC4-x tetrahedra with nonbridging oxygen. We suggest that significant (several percent) substitution of C for O could occur in more complex geological silicate melts/glasses in contact with graphite at moderate pressure and high temperature and may be thermodynamically far more accessible than C for Si substitution. Carbon incorporation will change the local structure and may affect physical properties, such as viscosity. Analogous carbon substitution at grain boundaries, at defect sites, or as equilibrium states in nominally acarbonaceous crystalline silicates, even if present at levels at 10–100 ppm, might form an extensive and hitherto hidden reservoir of carbon in the lower crust and mantle. PMID:24043830

  3. Carbon substitution for oxygen in silicates in planetary interiors.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sabyasachi; Widgeon, Scarlett J; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Mera, Gabriela; Tavakoli, Amir; Ionescu, Emanuel; Riedel, Ralf

    2013-10-01

    Amorphous silicon oxycarbide polymer-derived ceramics (PDCs), synthesized from organometallic precursors, contain carbon- and silica-rich nanodomains, the latter with extensive substitution of carbon for oxygen, linking Si-centered SiO(x)C(4-x) tetrahedra. Calorimetric studies demonstrated these PDCs to be thermodynamically more stable than a mixture of SiO2, C, and silicon carbide. Here, we show by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy that substitution of C for O is also attained in PDCs with depolymerized silica-rich domains containing lithium, associated with SiO(x)C(4-x) tetrahedra with nonbridging oxygen. We suggest that significant (several percent) substitution of C for O could occur in more complex geological silicate melts/glasses in contact with graphite at moderate pressure and high temperature and may be thermodynamically far more accessible than C for Si substitution. Carbon incorporation will change the local structure and may affect physical properties, such as viscosity. Analogous carbon substitution at grain boundaries, at defect sites, or as equilibrium states in nominally acarbonaceous crystalline silicates, even if present at levels at 10-100 ppm, might form an extensive and hitherto hidden reservoir of carbon in the lower crust and mantle.

  4. Planetary magnetism and the interiors of the moon and Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassen, P.

    1977-01-01

    Various theories regarding lunar and Mercurian magnetic properties are discussed in terms of the thermal evolutions of these bodies. In particular, the extinct dynamo, the primordial field of external origin, local mechanisms, and the active dynamo hypotheses are reviewed. The theory involving magnetization by an internal dynamo is applied to Mercury, noting that it implies the existence of a molten metallic core, or shell. Possible sources of the energy required for core differentiation are discussed, including accretional heating, long-lived radioactive isotopes, and other radioactive heat sources. Thermal processes which might keep the core molten are suggested along with processes permitting the flow of heat through the mantle. Conclusions suggested by the dynamo hypothesis are reviewed in terms of current models of the thermal evolution of Mercury and the moon.

  5. Planetary magnetism and the interiors of the moon and Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassen, P.

    1977-01-01

    Various theories regarding lunar and Mercurian magnetic properties are discussed in terms of the thermal evolutions of these bodies. In particular, the extinct dynamo, the primordial field of external origin, local mechanisms, and the active dynamo hypotheses are reviewed. The theory involving magnetization by an internal dynamo is applied to Mercury, noting that it implies the existence of a molten metallic core, or shell. Possible sources of the energy required for core differentiation are discussed, including accretional heating, long-lived radioactive isotopes, and other radioactive heat sources. Thermal processes which might keep the core molten are suggested along with processes permitting the flow of heat through the mantle. Conclusions suggested by the dynamo hypothesis are reviewed in terms of current models of the thermal evolution of Mercury and the moon.

  6. Short-Term Research Experiences with Teachers in Earth and Planetary Sciences and a Model for Integrating Research into Classroom Inquiry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, P.; Bloom, J. W.

    2006-12-01

    For the past three summers, we have worked with in-service teachers on image processing, planetary geology, and earthquake and volcano content modules using inquiry methods that ended with mini-research experiences. Although almost all were science teachers, very few could give a reasonable definition of science at the start of the modules, and very few had a basic grasp of the processes of scientific research and could not include substantive scientific inquiry into their lessons. To build research understanding and confidence, an instructor-student interaction model was used in the modules. Studies have shown that children who participate in classrooms as learning and inquiry communities develop more complex understandings. The same patterns of complex understandings have resulted in similarly structured professional communities of teachers. The model is based on professional communities, emphasizing from the beginning that inquiry is a form of research. Although the actual "research" component of the modules was short, the teachers were identified as professionals and researchers from the start. Research/inquiry participation is therefore an excellent example by which to allow their teachers to learn. Initially the teachers were very reluctant to pose questions. As they were encouraged to share, collaborate, and support each other, the role of the instructor became less of a leader and more of a facilitator, and the confidence of the teachers as professionals and researchers grew. One teacher even remarked, "This is how we should be teaching our kids!' Towards the end of the modules the teachers were ready for their mini- research projects and collaborated in teams of 2-4. They selected their own research topics, but were guided toward research questions that required data collection (from existing studies), some data manipulation, interpretation, and drawing conclusions with respect to the original question. The teachers were enthusiastic about all of their

  7. Continuing Studies of Planetary Atmospheres Associated with Experiments on the Galileo Jupiter Probe and Infrared Observations of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragent, Boris

    1998-01-01

    The results of the nephelometer experiment conducted aboard the Probe of the Galileo mission to Jupiter are presented. The tenuous clouds and sparse particulate matter in the relatively particle-free 5-micron "hot spot" region of the Probe's descent were documented from about 0.46 bars to about 12 bars. Three regions of apparent coherent structure were noted, in addition to many indications of extremely small particle concentrations along the descent path. From the first valid measurement at about 0.46 bars down to about 0.55 bars a feeble decaying lower portion of a cloud, corresponding with the predicted ammonia particle cloud, was encountered. A denser, but still very modest, particle structure was present in the pressure regime extending from about 0.76 to a distinctive base at 1.34 bars, and is compatible with the expected ammonium hydrosulfide cloud. No massive water cloud was encountered, although below the second structure, a small, vertically thin layer at about 1.65 bars may be detached from the cloud above, but may also be water condensation, compatible with reported measurements of water abundance from other Galileo Mission experiments. A third small signal region, extending from about 1.9 to 4.5 bars, exhibited quite weak but still distinctive structure, and, although the identification of the light scatterers in this region is uncertain, may also be a water cloud perhaps associated with lateral atmospheric motion and/or reduced to a small mass density by atmospheric subsidence or other explanations. Rough descriptions of the particle size distributions and cloud properties in these regions have been derived, although they may be imprecise because of the small signals and experimental difficulties. These descriptions document the small number densities of particles, the moderate particle sizes, generally in the slightly submicron to few micron range, and the resulting small optical depths, mass densities due to particles, column particle number loading

  8. Continuing Studies of Planetary Atmospheres Associated With Experiments on the Galileo Jupiter Probe and Infrared Observations of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman,Jindra; Ragent, Boris

    1998-01-01

    The results of the nephelometer experiment conducted aboard the Probe of the Galileo mission to Jupiter are presented. The tenuous clouds and sparse particulate matter in the relatively particle-free 5-micron "hot spot" region of the Probe's descent were documented from about 0.46 bars to about 12 bars. Three regions of apparent coherent structure were noted, in addition to many indications of extremely small particle concentrations along the descent path. From the first valid measurement at about 0.46 bars down to about 0.55 bars a feeble decaying lower portion of a cloud, corresponding with the predicted ammonia particle cloud, was encountered. A denser, but still very modest, particle structure was present in the pressure regime extending from about 0.76 to a distinctive base at 1.34 bars, and is compatible with the expected ammonium hydrosulfide cloud. No massive water cloud was encountered, although below the second structure, a small, vertically thin layer at about 1.65 bars may be detached from the cloud above, but may also be water condensation, compatible with reported measurements of water abundance from other Galileo Mission experiments. A third small signal region, extending from about 1.9 to 4.5 bars, exhibited quite weak but still distinctive structure, and, although the identification of the light scatterers in this region is uncertain, may also be a water cloud perhaps associated with lateral atmospheric motion and/or reduced to a small mass density by atmospheric subsidence or other explanations. Rough descriptions of the particle size distributions and cloud properties in these regions have been derived, although they may be imprecise because of the small signals and experimental difficulties. These descriptions document the small number densities of particles, the moderate particle sizes, generally in the slightly submicron to few micron range, and the resulting small optical depths, mass densities due to particles, column particle number loading

  9. Interior Cornice Profile, Interior Pilaster Profile, Lions Head Roof Scupper, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior Cornice Profile, Interior Pilaster Profile, Lions Head Roof Scupper, and Interior Panel Moulding - Flanders Field American Cemetery & Memorial, Chapel, Wortegemseweg 117, Waregem, West Flanders (Belgium)

  10. Effects of simulated space radiation on immunoassay components for life-detection experiments in planetary exploration missions.

    PubMed

    Derveni, Mariliza; Hands, Alex; Allen, Marjorie; Sims, Mark R; Cullen, David C

    2012-08-01

    The Life Marker Chip (LMC) instrument is part of the proposed payload on the ESA ExoMars rover that is scheduled for launch in 2018. The LMC will use antibody-based assays to detect molecular signatures of life in samples obtained from the shallow subsurface of Mars. For the LMC antibodies, the ability to resist inactivation due to space particle radiation (both in transit and on the surface of Mars) will therefore be a prerequisite. The proton and neutron components of the mission radiation environment are those that are expected to have the dominant effect on the operation of the LMC. Modeling of the radiation environment for a mission to Mars led to the calculation of nominal mission fluences for proton and neutron radiation. Various combinations and multiples of these values were used to demonstrate the effects of radiation on antibody activity, primarily at the radiation levels envisaged for the ExoMars mission as well as at much higher levels. Five antibodies were freeze-dried in a variety of protective molecular matrices and were exposed to various radiation conditions generated at a cyclotron facility. After exposure, the antibodies' ability to bind to their respective antigens was assessed and found to be unaffected by ExoMars mission level radiation doses. These experiments indicated that the expected radiation environment of a Mars mission does not pose a significant risk to antibodies packaged in the form anticipated for the LMC instrument.

  11. Smart Ultrasound Remote Guidance Experiment (SURGE)- Concept of Operations Evaluation for Using Remote Guidance Ultrasound for Planetary Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurst, Victor, IV; Peterson, Sean; Garcia, Kathleen; Sargsyan, Ashot; Ebert, Douglas; Ham, David; Amponsah, David; Dulchavsky, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Use of remote guidance (RG) techniques aboard the International Space Station (ISS) has enabled astronauts to collect diagnostic-level ultrasound images. Exploration class missions will require this cohort of (typically) non-formally trained sonographers to operate with greater autonomy given the longer communication delays (2 seconds for ISS vs. >6 seconds for missions beyond the Moon) and communication blackouts. To determine the feasibility and training requirements for autonomous ultrasound image collection by non-expert ultrasound operators, ultrasound images were collected from a similar cohort using three different image collection protocols: RG only, RG with a computer-based learning tool (LT), and autonomous image collection with LT. The groups were assessed for both image quality and time to collect the images. Methods Subjects were randomized into three groups: RG only, RG with LT, and autonomous with LT. Each subject received 10 minutes of standardized training before the experiment. The subjects were tasked with making the following ultrasound assessments: 1) bone fracture and 2) focused assessment with sonography in trauma (FAST) to assess a patient s abdomen. Human factors-related questionnaire data were collected immediately after the assessments. Results The autonomous group did not out-perform the two groups that received RG. The mean time for the autonomous group to collect images was less than the RG groups, however the mean image quality for the autonomous group was less compared to both RG groups. Discussion Remote guidance continues to produce higher quality ultrasound images than autonomous ultrasound operation. This is likely due to near-instant feedback on image quality from the remote guider. Expansion in communication time delays, however, diminishes the capability to provide this feedback, thus requiring more autonomous ultrasound operation. The LT has the potential to be an excellent training and coaching component for

  12. Phase Equilibrium Investigations of Planetary Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, T. L.

    1997-01-01

    This grant provided funds to carry out experimental studies designed to illuminate the conditions of melting and chemical differentiation that has occurred in planetary interiors. Studies focused on the conditions of mare basalt generation in the moon's interior and on processes that led to core formation in the Shergottite Parent Body (Mars). Studies also examined physical processes that could lead to the segregation of metal-rich sulfide melts in an olivine-rich solid matrix. The major results of each paper are discussed below and copies of the papers are attached as Appendix I.

  13. Precise radio Doppler and interferometric tracking of spacecraft in service of planetary science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duev, Dmitry; PRIDE Team

    2016-10-01

    The Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiments (PRIDE) project is designed as a multi-purpose, multidisciplinary enhancement of the space missions science return by means of Doppler and phase-referenced Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) tracking of spacecraft. These measurements can be used in a multitude of scientific applications, both fundamental and applied, where an accurate estimate of the spacecraft state vector is essential. In particular, the gravitational field of planetary moons can be sampled with close spacecraft flybys, allowing to probe the moons' interior.In this presentation, we will describe the principles of PRIDE data collection, processing, and analysis. We will present the results of demonstrational observations of a Phobos flyby conducted by ESA's Mars Express spacecraft.

  14. Exploring Venus interior structure with infrasonic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimoun, David; Garcia, Raphael; Cadu, Alexandre; Cutts, Jim; Komjathy, Attila; Pauken, Mike; Kedar, Sharon; Jackson, Jennifer; Stevenson, Dave

    2017-04-01

    Radar images have revealed a surface of Venus that is much younger than expected, as well as a variety of enigmatic features linked to the tectonic activity. If probing the interior structure of Venus is a formidable challenge, it is still of primary importance for understanding Venus itself, its relationship to Earth and more generally the evolution of Earth-like planets. Conventional long period seismology uses very broadband seismic sensors that require to be in contact with the planetary surface, like for the Apollo missions and for the Mars Insight mission; this approach is in the short term impractical for Venus because of its extreme temperature and pressure surface conditions. Russian probes such as Venera 13-14 have only lasted a few tens of minutes, when the required duration of the seismic measurements, based on a rough estimate of the Venus tectonic activity, is at least of a few months. We propose as a possible way forward to use the very conditions at the surface of Venus to record the signal in a more suitable environment: as acoustic and infrasonic waves resulting from seismic activity are coupled much more efficiently than on Earth in the dense carbon dioxide atmosphere, a string of micro-barometers deployed on a tether by a balloon platform at Venus over the cloud layer would record this infrasonic counterpart. Such an experiment could encompass a wide range of scientific objectives, from the characterization of the infrasonic background of Venus to the ability to record, and possibly discriminate, signatures from volcanic events, storm activity, and meteor impacts. We will discuss our proposed Venus experiment, as well as the experimental validation effort that takes place on Earth to validate the idea and possibly record infrasonic seismic counterparts

  15. Interior of Mars from InSight geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehant, V.; Folkner, W.; Asmar, S.; Rivoldini, A.; Van Hoolst, T.; Banerdt, B.

    2012-04-01

    Within the INSIGHT mission, the radioscience experiment aims at obtaining the rotation and interior structure of Mars. It is called for that reason RISE (Rotation and Interior Structure Experiment). It does not uses an instrument stricto sensus but uses the spacecraft X-band communication system. The parameters that will be determined from the rotation and orientation observation (i.e. from length-of-day variations, precession (long-term changes in the rotational orientation), and nutations (periodic changes in the rotational orientation)) are the angular momentum of the atmosphere, the moments of inertia of the whole planet and of the core. This will allow to constrain the interior models of Mars. The Doppler effect on the radio signal is related to the variations of the rotation and orientation of the planet Mars. When measured for a time longer than the seasonal timescale, the observation can provide values for the moments of inertia. The mean moment of inertia is a strong constraint on the core size and density, core temperature and mantle mineralogy. The size of the core has major consequences for internal structure and planetary evolution. For example, a large core makes a perovskite-bearing lower mantle impossible, due to insufficient pressure at the base of the mantle. The endothermic phase transition spinel-perovskite has a strong effect on mantle convection. The size and composition of the core are also important in the history of the magnetic dynamo, which in turn has important consequences for the retention of the atmosphere and the possible habitability of the surface early in Mars' history.

  16. Multi-speed planetary transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Quick, D.C.; Mc Cormik, S.J.; Ballendux, G.M.

    1987-02-03

    This patent describes a single axis planetary change speed transmission comprising: a stationary housing having wall means defining a hollow interior chamber including interior walls at opposite ends of the chamber defining a pair of axially spaced circular apertures disposed on the axis, a rotatable housing having wall means defining an interior cavity and presenting hollow cylindrical end portions at its opposite ends and in constant rotation therewith, a pair of bearing means rotatably mounting the end portions in the apertures, respectively, the end portions presenting openings, respectively, aligned on the axis, an input shaft coaxial with and extending through the opening in one of the end portions of the rotatable housing, first, second and third coaxial and axially spaced epicyclic gear sets operatively arranged in sequence within the cavity each including a ring gear component, a sun gear component and a planet carrier component rotatably supporting planet gears meshing with the ring and sun gear components, and a first quill shaft encompassing the input shaft and having a central portion extending through the opening in the one of the end portions and presenting an axially inner end connected for rotation with a first of the components of the first gear set.

  17. Orbits and Interiors of Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batygin, Konstantin

    2012-05-01

    The focus of this thesis is a collection of problems of timely interest in orbital dynamics and interior structure of planetary bodies. The first three chapters are dedicated to understanding the interior structure of close-in, gaseous extrasolar planets (hot Jupiters). In order to resolve a long-standing problem of anomalously large hot Jupiter radii, we proposed a novel magnetohydrodynamic mechanism responsible for inflation. The mechanism relies on the electro-magnetic interactions between fast atmospheric flows and the planetary magnetic field in a thermally ionized atmosphere, to induce electrical currents that flow throughout the planet. The resulting Ohmic dissipation acts to maintain the interior entropies, and by extension the radii of hot Jupiters at an enhanced level. Using self-consistent calculations of thermal evolution of hot Jupiters under Ohmic dissipation, we demonstrated a clear tendency towards inflated radii for effective temperatures that give rise to significant ionization of K and Na in the atmosphere, a trend fully consistent with the observational data. Furthermore, we found that in absence of massive cores, low-mass hot Jupiters can over-flow their Roche-lobes and evaporate on Gyr time-scales, possibly leaving behind small rocky cores. Chapters four through six focus on the improvement and implications of a model for orbital evolution of the solar system, driven by dynamical instability (termed the "Nice" model). Hydrodynamical studies of the orbital evolution of planets embedded in protoplanetary disks suggest that giant planets have a tendency to assemble into multi-resonant configurations. Following this argument, we used analytical methods as well as self-consistent numerical N-body simulations to identify fully-resonant primordial states of the outer solar system, whose dynamical evolutions give rise to orbital architectures that resemble the current solar system. We found a total of only eight such initial conditions, providing

  18. Planning Bepicolombo MPO Science Operations to study Mercury Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Fuente, Sara; Carasa, Angela; Ortiz, Iñaki; Rodriguez, Pedro; Casale, Mauro; Benkhoff, Johannes; Zender, Joe

    2017-04-01

    BepiColombo is an Interdisciplinary Cornerstone ESA-JAXA Mission to Mercury, with two orbiters, the ESA Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) and the JAXA Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO) dedicated to study of the planet and its magnetosphere. The MPO, is a three-axis-stabilized, nadir-pointing spacecraft which will be placed in a polar orbit, providing excellent spatial resolution over the entire planet surface. The MPO's scientific payload comprises 11 instrument packages, including laser altimeter, cameras and the radio science experiment that will be dedicated to the study of Mercury's interior: structure, composition, formation and evolution. The planning of the science operations to be carried out by the Mercury's interior scientific instruments will be done by the SGS located at the European Space Astronomy Centre (ESAC), in conjunction with the scientific instrument teams. The process will always consider the complete nominal mission duration, such that the contribution of the scheduled science operations to the science objectives, the total data volume generated, and the seasonal interdependency, can be tracked. The heart of the science operations planning process is the Observations Catalogue (OC), a web-accessed database to collect and analyse all science operations requests. From the OC, the SGS will first determine all science opportunity windows compatible with the spacecraft operational constraints. Secondly, only those compatible with the resources (power and data volume) and pointing constraints will be chosen, including slew feasibility.

  19. HUBBLE'S PLANETARY NEBULA GALLERY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [Top left] - IC 3568 lies in the constellation Camelopardalis at a distance of about 9,000 light-years, and has a diameter of about 0.4 light-years (or about 800 times the diameter of our solar system). It is an example of a round planetary nebula. Note the bright inner shell and fainter, smooth, circular outer envelope. Credits: Howard Bond (Space Telescope Science Institute), Robin Ciardullo (Pennsylvania State University) and NASA [Top center] - NGC 6826's eye-like appearance is marred by two sets of blood-red 'fliers' that lie horizontally across the image. The surrounding faint green 'white' of the eye is believed to be gas that made up almost half of the star's mass for most of its life. The hot remnant star (in the center of the green oval) drives a fast wind into older material, forming a hot interior bubble which pushes the older gas ahead of it to form a bright rim. (The star is one of the brightest stars in any planetary.) NGC 6826 is 2,200 light- years away in the constellation Cygnus. The Hubble telescope observation was taken Jan. 27, 1996 with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. Credits: Bruce Balick (University of Washington), Jason Alexander (University of Washington), Arsen Hajian (U.S. Naval Observatory), Yervant Terzian (Cornell University), Mario Perinotto (University of Florence, Italy), Patrizio Patriarchi (Arcetri Observatory, Italy) and NASA [Top right ] - NGC 3918 is in the constellation Centaurus and is about 3,000 light-years from us. Its diameter is about 0.3 light-year. It shows a roughly spherical outer envelope but an elongated inner balloon inflated by a fast wind from the hot central star, which is starting to break out of the spherical envelope at the top and bottom of the image. Credits: Howard Bond (Space Telescope Science Institute), Robin Ciardullo (Pennsylvania State University) and NASA [Bottom left] - Hubble 5 is a striking example of a 'butterfly' or bipolar (two-lobed) nebula. The heat generated by fast winds causes

  20. HUBBLE'S PLANETARY NEBULA GALLERY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [Top left] - IC 3568 lies in the constellation Camelopardalis at a distance of about 9,000 light-years, and has a diameter of about 0.4 light-years (or about 800 times the diameter of our solar system). It is an example of a round planetary nebula. Note the bright inner shell and fainter, smooth, circular outer envelope. Credits: Howard Bond (Space Telescope Science Institute), Robin Ciardullo (Pennsylvania State University) and NASA [Top center] - NGC 6826's eye-like appearance is marred by two sets of blood-red 'fliers' that lie horizontally across the image. The surrounding faint green 'white' of the eye is believed to be gas that made up almost half of the star's mass for most of its life. The hot remnant star (in the center of the green oval) drives a fast wind into older material, forming a hot interior bubble which pushes the older gas ahead of it to form a bright rim. (The star is one of the brightest stars in any planetary.) NGC 6826 is 2,200 light- years away in the constellation Cygnus. The Hubble telescope observation was taken Jan. 27, 1996 with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. Credits: Bruce Balick (University of Washington), Jason Alexander (University of Washington), Arsen Hajian (U.S. Naval Observatory), Yervant Terzian (Cornell University), Mario Perinotto (University of Florence, Italy), Patrizio Patriarchi (Arcetri Observatory, Italy) and NASA [Top right ] - NGC 3918 is in the constellation Centaurus and is about 3,000 light-years from us. Its diameter is about 0.3 light-year. It shows a roughly spherical outer envelope but an elongated inner balloon inflated by a fast wind from the hot central star, which is starting to break out of the spherical envelope at the top and bottom of the image. Credits: Howard Bond (Space Telescope Science Institute), Robin Ciardullo (Pennsylvania State University) and NASA [Bottom left] - Hubble 5 is a striking example of a 'butterfly' or bipolar (two-lobed) nebula. The heat generated by fast winds causes

  1. Interior Design Students Perceptions of Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Johnnie; Park, Jin Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This longitudinal study assessed student perceptions of sustainable design issues in the context of an accredited interior design program. Although literature exists documenting the integration of sustainable strategies into interior design curriculum, more analysis is needed to determine the impact of program experiences on students'…

  2. Interior Design Students Perceptions of Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Johnnie; Park, Jin Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This longitudinal study assessed student perceptions of sustainable design issues in the context of an accredited interior design program. Although literature exists documenting the integration of sustainable strategies into interior design curriculum, more analysis is needed to determine the impact of program experiences on students'…

  3. Interior intrusion detection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.R.; Matter, J.C. ); Dry, B. )

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this NUREG is to present technical information that should be useful to NRC licensees in designing interior intrusion detection systems. Interior intrusion sensors are discussed according to their primary application: boundary-penetration detection, volumetric detection, and point protection. Information necessary for implementation of an effective interior intrusion detection system is presented, including principles of operation, performance characteristics and guidelines for design, procurement, installation, testing, and maintenance. A glossary of sensor data terms is included. 36 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Rheology of planetary ices

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, W.B.; Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A.

    1996-04-24

    The brittle and ductile rheology of ices of water, ammonia, methane, and other volatiles, in combination with rock particles and each other, have a primary influence of the evolution and ongoing tectonics of icy moons of the outer solar system. Laboratory experiments help constrain the rheology of solar system ices. Standard experimental techniques can be used because the physical conditions under which most solar system ices exist are within reach of conventional rock mechanics testing machines, adapted to the low subsolidus temperatures of the materials in question. The purpose of this review is to summarize the results of a decade-long experimental deformation program and to provide some background in deformation physics in order to lend some appreciation to the application of these measurements to the planetary setting.

  5. Significant achievements in the Planetary Geology Program. [geologic processes, comparative planetology, and solar system evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, J. W. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    Developments reported at a meeting of principal investigators for NASA's planetology geology program are summarized. Topics covered include: constraints on solar system formation; asteriods, comets, and satellites; constraints on planetary interiors; volatiles and regoliths; instrument development techniques; planetary cartography; geological and geochemical constraints on planetary evolution; fluvial processes and channel formation; volcanic processes; Eolian processes; radar studies of planetary surfaces; cratering as a process, landform, and dating method; and the Tharsis region of Mars. Activities at a planetary geology field conference on Eolian processes are reported and techniques recommended for the presentation and analysis of crater size-frequency data are included.

  6. Optically measuring interior cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Gary Franklin

    2008-12-21

    A method of measuring the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of an interior cavity includes the steps of collecting a first optical slice of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, collecting additional optical slices of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, and combining the first optical slice of data and the additional optical slices of data to calculate of the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity.

  7. Visualizing Planetary Magnetic Fields (and Why You Should Care)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillingim, M.; Brain, D.; Peticolas, L.; Yan, D.; Fricke, K.

    2012-08-01

    Since they are invisible to our eyes, planetary magnetic fields are difficult to visualize. However, we can learn much about a planet, its interior, and its history from studying its magnetic field. A challenge, then, is how can we effectively communicate the structure of planetary magnetic fields to the public, i.e., how can we help the public visualize planetary magnetic fields. An additional challenge is how can we effectively communicate the importance of studying planetary magnetic fields to the public, or why should they care. We address these challenges by developing a series of presentations about magnetic fields and their importance given on visually engaging spherical displays. We are also creating scientifically accurate three-dimensional models of planetary magnetic fields.

  8. Virtual reality and planetary exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgreevy, Michael W.

    1992-01-01

    Exploring planetary environments is central to NASA's missions and goals. A new computing technology called Virtual Reality has much to offer in support of planetary exploration. This technology augments and extends human presence within computer-generated and remote spatial environments. Historically, NASA has been a leader in many of the fundamental concepts and technologies that comprise Virtual Reality. Indeed, Ames Research Center has a central role in the development of this rapidly emerging approach to using computers. This ground breaking work has inspired researchers in academia, industry, and the military. Further, NASA's leadership in this technology has spun off new businesses, has caught the attention of the international business community, and has generated several years of positive international media coverage. In the future, Virtual Reality technology will enable greatly improved human-machine interactions for more productive planetary surface exploration. Perhaps more importantly, Virtual Reality technology will democratize the experience of planetary exploration and thereby broaden understanding of, and support for, this historic enterprise.

  9. Virtual reality and planetary exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgreevy, Michael W.

    1992-01-01

    Exploring planetary environments is central to NASA's missions and goals. A new computing technology called Virtual Reality has much to offer in support of planetary exploration. This technology augments and extends human presence within computer-generated and remote spatial environments. Historically, NASA has been a leader in many of the fundamental concepts and technologies that comprise Virtual Reality. Indeed, Ames Research Center has a central role in the development of this rapidly emerging approach to using computers. This ground breaking work has inspired researchers in academia, industry, and the military. Further, NASA's leadership in this technology has spun off new businesses, has caught the attention of the international business community, and has generated several years of positive international media coverage. In the future, Virtual Reality technology will enable greatly improved human-machine interactions for more productive planetary surface exploration. Perhaps more importantly, Virtual Reality technology will democratize the experience of planetary exploration and thereby broaden understanding of, and support for, this historic enterprise.

  10. Virtual reality and planetary exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGreevy, Michael W.

    Exploring planetary environments is central to NASA's missions and goals. A new computing technology called Virtual Reality has much to offer in support of planetary exploration. This technology augments and extends human presence within computer-generated and remote spatial environments. Historically, NASA has been a leader in many of the fundamental concepts and technologies that comprise Virtual Reality. Indeed, Ames Research Center has a central role in the development of this rapidly emerging approach to using computers. This ground breaking work has inspired researchers in academia, industry, and the military. Further, NASA's leadership in this technology has spun off new businesses, has caught the attention of the international business community, and has generated several years of positive international media coverage. In the future, Virtual Reality technology will enable greatly improved human-machine interactions for more productive planetary surface exploration. Perhaps more importantly, Virtual Reality technology will democratize the experience of planetary exploration and thereby broaden understanding of, and support for, this historic enterprise.

  11. Advanced planetary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Results of planetary advanced studies and planning support provided by Science Applications, Inc. staff members to Earth and Planetary Exploration Division, OSSA/NASA, for the period 1 February 1981 to 30 April 1982 are summarized. The scope of analyses includes cost estimation, planetary missions performance, solar system exploration committee support, Mars program planning, Galilean satellite mission concepts, and advanced propulsion data base. The work covers 80 man-months of research. Study reports and related publications are included in a bibliography section.

  12. Interior structure of neptune: comparison with uranus.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, W B; Nellis, W J; Mitchell, A C; Holmes, N C; Limaye, S S; McCandless, P C

    1991-08-09

    Measurements of rotation rates and gravitational harmonics of Neptune made with the Voyager 2 spacecraft allow tighter constraints on models of the planet's interior. Shock measurements of material that may match the composition of Neptune, the so-calied planetary ;;ice,'' have been carried out to pressures exceeding 200 gigapascals (2 megabars). Comparison of shock data with inferred pressure-density profiles for both Uranus and Neptune shows substantial similarity through most of the mass of both planets. Analysis of the effect of Neptune's strong differential rotation on its gravitational harmonics indicates that differential rotation involves only the outermost few percent of Neptune's mass.

  13. Interior structure of Neptune: Comparison with Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, W.B. ); Nellis, W.J.; Mitchell, A.C.; Holmes, N.C.; McCandless, P.C. ); Limaye, S.S. )

    1991-08-09

    Measurements of rotation rates and gravitational harmonics of Neptune made with the Voyager 2 spacecraft allow tighter constraints on models of the planet's interior. Shock measurements of material that may match the composition of Neptune, the so-called planetary ice, have been carried out to pressures exceeding 200 gigapascals (2 megabars). Comparison of shock data with inferred pressure-density profiles for both Uranus and Neptune shows substantial similarity through most of the mass of both planets. Analysis of the effect of Neptune's strong differential rotation on its gravitational harmonics indicates that differential rotation involves only the outermost few percent of Neptune's mass.

  14. Interior structure of Neptune - Comparison with Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.; Nellis, W. J.; Mitchell, A. C.; Holmes, N. C.; Mccandless, P. C.; Limaye, S. S.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of rotation rates and gravitational harmonics of Neptune made with the Voyager 2 spacecraft allow tighter constraints on models of the planet's interior. Shock measurements of material that may match the composition of Neptune, the so-called planetary 'ice', have been carried out to pressures exceeding 200 gigapascals (2 megabars). Comparison of shock data with inferred pressure-density profiles for both Uranus and Neptune shows substantial similarity through most of the mass of both planets. Analysis of the effect of Neptune's strong differential rotation on its gravitational harmonics indicates that differential rotation involves only the outermost few percent of Neptune's mass.

  15. SPACE AND PLANETARY ENVIRONMENTS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES, PLUTO (PLANET), SATURN(PLANET), SOLAR RADIATION, SOLAR WIND, SPECTROGRAPHY, STARS, SUN, TERRAIN, GEOMAGNETISM, ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION, URANUS(PLANET), VAN ALLEN RADIATION BELT, VENUS(PLANET).

  16. Planetary geosciences, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuber, Maria T. (Editor); Plescia, Jeff L. (Editor); James, Odette B. (Editor); Macpherson, Glenn (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Research topics within the NASA Planetary Geosciences Program are presented. Activity in the fields of planetary geology, geophysics, materials, and geochemistry is covered. The investigator's current research efforts, the importance of that work in understanding a particular planetary geoscience problem, the context of that research, and the broader planetary geoscience effort is described. As an example, theoretical modelling of the stability of water ice within the Martian regolith, the applicability of that work to understanding Martian volatiles in general, and the geologic history of Mars is discussed.

  17. Europa Clipper Mission Concept Preliminary Planetary Protection Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Melissa; Schubert, Wayne; Newlin, Laura; Cooper, Moogega; Chen, Fei; Kazarians, Gayane; Ellyin, Raymond; Vaishampayan, Parag; Crum, Ray

    2016-07-01

    The science objectives of the proposed Europa Clipper mission consist of remotely characterizing any water within and beneath Europa's ice shell, investigating the chemistry of the surface and ocean, and evaluating geological processes that may permit Europa's ocean to possess the chemical energy necessary for life. The selected payload supporting the science objectives includes: Plasma Instrument for Magnetic Sounding (PIMS), Interior Characterization of Europa using Magnetometry (ICEMAG), Mapping Imaging Spectrometer for Europa (MISE), Europa Imaging System (EIS), Radar for Europa Assessment and Sounding: Ocean to Near-surface (REASON), Europa Thermal Emission Imaging System (E-THEMIS), MAss SPectrometer for Planetary EXploration/Europa (MASPEX), Ultraviolet Spectrograph/Europa (UVS), and SUrface DUst Mass Analyzer (SUDA). Launch is currently baselined as 2022. Pending the yet to be selected launch vehicle, the spacecraft would either arrive to the Jovian system on a direct trajectory in 2025 or an Earth-Venus-Earth-Earth gravity assist interplanetary trajectory arriving in 2030. The operational concept consists of multiple low-altitude flybys of Europa to obtain globally distributed regional coverage of the Europan surface. According to COSPAR Policy, it is currently anticipated that the Europa Clipper mission would be classified as a Category III mission. That is, the mission is to a body "of significant interest relative to the process of chemical evolution and/or the origin of life or for which scientific opinion provides a significant chance of contamination which could jeopardize a future biological experiment." Therefore, the expected driving planetary protection requirement for the mission is that the probability of inadvertent contamination of an ocean or other liquid water body shall be less than 1x10-4 per mission. This requirement applies until final disposition of the spacecraft, however in practice, would only apply until the spacecraft is

  18. Discovery Planetary Mission Operations Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffin, R.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Discovery Program of small planetary missions will provide opportunities to continue scientific exploration of the solar system in today's cost-constrained environment. Using a multidisciplinary team, JPL has developed plans to provide mission operations within the financial parameters established by the Discovery Program. This paper describes experiences and methods that show promise of allowing the Discovery Missions to operate within the program cost constraints while maintaining low mission risk, high data quality, and reponsive operations.

  19. Planetary geology in the 1980s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veverka, J.

    1984-01-01

    The geologic aspects of solar system studies are defined and the goals of planetary geology are discussed. Planetary geology is the study of the origin, evolution, and distribution of matter condensed in the form of planets, satellites, asteroids, and comets. It is a multidisciplinary effort involving investigators with backgrounds in geology, chemistry, physics, astronomy, geodesy, cartography, and other disciplines concerned with the solid planets. The report is primarily restricted to the kinds of experiments and observations made through unmanned missions.

  20. Spin of Planetary Probes in Atmospheric Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R. D.

    Probes that enter planetary atmospheres are often spun during entry or descent for a variety of reasons. Their spin rate histories are influenced by often subtle effects. The spin requirements, control methods and flight experience from planetary and earth entry missions are reviewed. An interaction of the probe aerodynamic wake with a drogue parachute, observed in Gemini wind tunnel tests, is discussed in connection with the anomalous spin behaviour of the Huygens probe.

  1. Historical Planetary Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockey, T. A.

    1995-12-01

    Historical planetary astronomy refers to attempts to use archival physical descriptions and depictions of the Moon and planets to help solve modern problems in planetary science. These data are usually qualitative in nature, most often coming to us in the form of telescopic observers' reports and drawings made in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. For this reason, such data must be treated differently from more-modern photographic and digital imagery. Most useful historical records come from the telescopic (but pre-photographic) era. However, the eyewitness account, in the year 1178, of what may have been a large, crater-producing impact on the Moon, dates as the earliest historical datum applied to lunar science. The studies of lunar transient phenomena (LTPs), and of the "ashen light" on Venus, also benefit from a body of historical records. Other examples that I will discuss include attempts to determine if a periodicity exists in the appearance of major dust storms on Mars and attempts to understand the seeming periodicity of the appearance of large, white spots in the northern latitudes of Saturn. I also will discuss my own attempts to use the historical record to search for past jovian features similar to those produced by the collision of comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9 and Jupiter in 1994. I will conclude by listing a number of "filters" through which historical data necessarily pass before becoming of use to modern astronomers. These considerations are: 1) resolution, 2) instrumentation, 3) observing conditions, 4) observing technique, 5) observers' experience, 6) observers' purpose, 7) language, and 8) observer objectivity. Recognition of them is necessary to assess the quality of historical records and their applicability to a given astronomical problem. These "filters" will be illustrated by applying them to the example problems described above.

  2. Planetary heat flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Hagermann, Axel

    2005-12-15

    The year 2005 marks the 35th anniversary of the Apollo 13 mission, probably the most successful failure in the history of manned spaceflight. Naturally, Apollo 13's scientific payload is far less known than the spectacular accident and subsequent rescue of its crew. Among other instruments, it carried the first instrument designed to measure the flux of heat on a planetary body other than Earth. The year 2005 also should have marked the launch of the Japanese LUNAR-A mission, and ESA's Rosetta mission is slowly approaching comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Both missions carry penetrators to study the heat flow from their target bodies. What is so interesting about planetary heat flow? What can we learn from it and how do we measure it?Not only the Sun, but all planets in the Solar System are essentially heat engines. Various heat sources or heat reservoirs drive intrinsic and surface processes, causing 'dead balls of rock, ice or gas' to evolve dynamically over time, driving convection that powers tectonic processes and spawns magnetic fields. The heat flow constrains models of the thermal evolution of a planet and also its composition because it provides an upper limit for the bulk abundance of radioactive elements. On Earth, the global variation of heat flow also reflects the tectonic activity: heat flow increases towards the young ocean ridges, whereas it is rather low on the old continental shields. It is not surprising that surface heat flow measurements, or even estimates, where performed, contributed greatly to our understanding of what happens inside the planets. In this article, I will review the results and the methods used in past heat flow measurements and speculate on the targets and design of future experiments.

  3. From Planetary Intelligence to Planetary Wisdom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, S. C.

    2016-12-01

    "Planetary intelligence" - when understood as an input into the processes of "managing" Earth - hints at an instrumental understanding of scientific information. At minimum it is a call for useful data of political (and even military) value; at best it speaks to an ability to collect, integrate and apply such information. In this sense, 21st century society has more "intelligence" than any generation of humans before, begging the question whether just more or better "planetary intelligence" will do anything at all to move us off the path of planetary destruction (i.e., beyond planetary boundaries) that it has been on for decades if not centuries. Social scientists have argued that there are at least four shortcomings in this way of thinking that - if addressed - could open up 1) what is being researched; 2) what is considered socially robust knowledge; 3) how science interacts with policy-makers and other "planet managers"; and 4) what is being done in practice with the "intelligence" given to those positioned at the levers of change. To the extent "planetary management" continues to be approached from a scientistic paradigm alone, there is little hope that Earth's future will remain in a safe operating space in this or coming centuries.

  4. Mpo - the Bepicolombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkhoff, J.

    2008-09-01

    proximity of the Sun Since and considering that the advance Mercury's perihelion was explained in terms of relativistic spacetime curvature. MPO Scientific Instruments BepiColombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter's and Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter's instruments were selected in November 2004, by ESA and JAXA respectively. The MPO will carry a highly sophisticated suit of eleven scientific instruments, ten of which will be provided by Principal Investigators through national funding by ESA Member States and one from Russia: BepiColombo Laser Altimeter (BELA) will characterise the topography and surface morphology of Mercury. It will also provide a digital terrain model that, compared with the data from the MORE instrument, will allow to obtain information about the internal structure, the geology, the tectonics, and the age of the planet's surface. The objectives of the Italian Spring Accelerometer (ISA) are strongly connected with those of the MORE experiment. Together the experiments can give information on Mercury's interior structure as well as test Einstein's theory of the General Relativity. Mercury Magnetometer (MPO-MAG) will provide measurements that will lead to the detailed description of Mercury's planetary magnetic field and its source, to better understand the origin, evolution and current state of the planetary interior , as well as the interaction between Mercury's magnetosphere with the planet's itself and with the solar wind. Mercury Thermal Infrared Spectrometer (MERTIS) will provide detailed information about the mineralogical composition of Mercury's surface layer with a high spectral resolution, crucial for selecting the valid model for origin and evolution of the planet. Mercury Gamma ray and Neutron Spectrometer (MGNS) will determine the elemental compositions of the surface and subsurface of Mercury, and will determine the regional distribution of volatile depositions on the polar areas which are permanently shadowed from the Sun. Mercury Imaging X

  5. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXVI, Part 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: A Fast, Non-Destructive Method for Classifying Ordinary Chondrite Falls Using Density and Magnetic Susceptibility. An Update on Results from the Magnetic Properties Experiments on the Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity. Measurement Protocols for In Situ Analysis of Organic Compounds at Mars and Comets. Piping Structures on Earth and Possibly Mars: Astrobiological Implications. Uranium and Lead in the Early Planetary Core Formation: New Insights Given by High Pressure and Temperature Experiments. The Mast Cameras and Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) for the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory. MGS MOC: First Views of Mars at Sub-Meter Resolution from Orbit. Analysis of Candor Chasma Interior Layered Deposits from OMEGA/MEX Spectra. Analysis of Valley Networks on Valles Marineris Plateau Using HRSC/MEX Data. Solar Abundance of Elements from Neutron-Capture Cross Sections. Preliminary Evaluation of the Secondary Ion/Accelerator Mass Spectrometer, MegaSIMS. Equilibrium Landforms in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica: Implications for Landscape Evolution and Climate Change on Mars. Continued Study of Ba Isotopic Compositions of Presolar Silicon Carbide Grains from Supernovae. Paleoenviromental Evolution of the Holden-Uzboi Area. Stability of Magnesium Sulfate Minerals in Martian Environments. Tungsten Isotopic Constraints on the Formation and Evolution of Iron Meteorite Parent Bodies. Migration of Dust Particles and Volatiles Delivery to the Inner Planets. On the Sitting of Trapped Noble Gases in Insoluble Organic Matter of Primitive Meteorites. Trapping of Xenon Upon Evaporation-Condensation of Organic Matter Under UV Irradiation: Isotopic Fractionation and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Analysis. Stability of Water on Mars. A Didactic Activity. Analysis of Coronae in the Parga Chasma Region, Venus. Photometric and Compositional Surface Properties of the Gusev Crater Region, Mars, as Derived from Multi-Angle, Multi-Spectral Investigation of

  6. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXVI, Part 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: A Fast, Non-Destructive Method for Classifying Ordinary Chondrite Falls Using Density and Magnetic Susceptibility. An Update on Results from the Magnetic Properties Experiments on the Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity. Measurement Protocols for In Situ Analysis of Organic Compounds at Mars and Comets. Piping Structures on Earth and Possibly Mars: Astrobiological Implications. Uranium and Lead in the Early Planetary Core Formation: New Insights Given by High Pressure and Temperature Experiments. The Mast Cameras and Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) for the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory. MGS MOC: First Views of Mars at Sub-Meter Resolution from Orbit. Analysis of Candor Chasma Interior Layered Deposits from OMEGA/MEX Spectra. Analysis of Valley Networks on Valles Marineris Plateau Using HRSC/MEX Data. Solar Abundance of Elements from Neutron-Capture Cross Sections. Preliminary Evaluation of the Secondary Ion/Accelerator Mass Spectrometer, MegaSIMS. Equilibrium Landforms in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica: Implications for Landscape Evolution and Climate Change on Mars. Continued Study of Ba Isotopic Compositions of Presolar Silicon Carbide Grains from Supernovae. Paleoenviromental Evolution of the Holden-Uzboi Area. Stability of Magnesium Sulfate Minerals in Martian Environments. Tungsten Isotopic Constraints on the Formation and Evolution of Iron Meteorite Parent Bodies. Migration of Dust Particles and Volatiles Delivery to the Inner Planets. On the Sitting of Trapped Noble Gases in Insoluble Organic Matter of Primitive Meteorites. Trapping of Xenon Upon Evaporation-Condensation of Organic Matter Under UV Irradiation: Isotopic Fractionation and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Analysis. Stability of Water on Mars. A Didactic Activity. Analysis of Coronae in the Parga Chasma Region, Venus. Photometric and Compositional Surface Properties of the Gusev Crater Region, Mars, as Derived from Multi-Angle, Multi-Spectral Investigation of

  7. Advanced planetary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Results of planetary advanced studies and planning support are summarized. The scope of analyses includes cost estimation research, planetary mission performance, penetrator mission concepts for airless planets/satellites, geology orbiter payload adaptability, lunar mission performance, and advanced planning activities. Study reports and related publications are included in a bibliography section.

  8. Advances in Planetary Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronow, A. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Advances in Planetary Geology is a new series intended to serve the planetary geology community with a form for quick and thorough communications. There are no set lists of acceptable topics or formats, and submitted manuscripts will not undergo a formal review. All submissions should be in a camera ready form, preferably spaced, and submitted to the editor.

  9. Advanced planetary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Results of planetary advanced studies and planning support are summarized. The scope of analyses includes cost estimation research, planetary mission performance, penetrator advanced studies, Mercury mission transport requirements, definition of super solar electric propulsion/solar sail mission discriminators, and advanced planning activities.

  10. Planetary Exploration in ESA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwehm, Gerhard H.

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on planetary exploration in the European Space Agency is shown. The topics include: 1) History of the Solar System Material; 2) ROSETTA: The Comet Mission; 3) A New Name For The Lander: PHILAE; 4) The Rosetta Mission; 5) Lander: Design Characteristics; 6) SMART-1 Mission; 7) MARS Express VENUS Express; 8) Planetary Exploration in ESA The Future.

  11. Multistage Planetary Power Transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, G. B.; Dyba, G. J.; Ragen, M. A.; Kleckner, R. J.; Sheynin, L.

    1986-01-01

    PLANETSYS simulates thermomechanical performance of multistage planetary performance of multistage planetary power transmission. Two versions of code developed, SKF version and NASA version. Major function of program: compute performance characteristics of planet bearing for any of six kinematic inversions. PLANETSYS solves heat-balance equations for either steadystate or transient thermal conditions, and produces temperature maps for mechanical system.

  12. Interiors of the giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.

    1988-01-01

    This theoretical/observational project constrains interior structure of Jovian planets through observational data. Researchers continue to concentrate on Neptune in support of the 1989 Voyager encounter. Occultations of stars by Neptune are observed from the Tucson area and from Chile to obtain information about Neptune's atmosphere and to continue to search for Neptune arcs. Occultations by other solar system objects are also observed as part of collaborative efforts from time to time. New results on the structure of scintillations in the central flash occultation by Neptune on 20 August 1985 were derived. Analysis shows that scintillations are present throughout the lightcurve, both near the half-intensity points (at a pressure of 1 microbar) and near the central flash (at 0.4 mbar). Near the planetary limb, the scintillations are extended parallel to the limb; near the shadow center, they are extended parallel to the limb; near the shadow center, they are extended in a radial direction. Researchers collaborated with Ramesh Narayan to derive a theory relating the scintillations to density fluctuations in Neptune's atmosphere. The theory will ultimately enable researchers to test whether the scintillations are caused by internal gravity waves in Neptune's upper atmosphere.

  13. Department of the Interior

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Indians Other Interior Offices Priorities American Energy Climate Change Jobs Regulatory Reform Stewardship Tribal Nations Join Jobs ... Secretary Bureaus For Employees Our Priorities American Energy Climate Change Jobs Regulatory Reform Stewardship Tribal Nations Resources Cobell / ...

  14. Studies in Interior Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environ Planning Design, 1970

    1970-01-01

    Floor plans and photographs illustrate a description of the Samuel C. Williams Library at Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, N.J. The unusual interior design allows students to take full advantage of the library's resources. (JW)

  15. Planetary Seismometers: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapmeyer, M.; Akito, A.; Bampasidis, G.; Banerdt, W. B.; Coustenis, A.; Fouch, M. J.; Garnero, E. J.; Khavroshkin, O.; Kobayashi, N.; Moussas, X.; Pike, W. T.; Seidensticker, K. J.; Solomonidou, A.; Yu, H.; Zakharov, A.

    2012-04-01

    Seismometers were part of lander payloads since the launch of Ranger 3 in early 1962, which was the first attempt to deliver scientific instruments to the surface of another celestial body. Since then, active and passive seismic experiments were conducted with great success on the Moon, and to a lesser extent on Mars and Venus. Proposals have been made or are in preparation for new experiments with single instruments or instrument networks on Venus, Moon, Mars, Phobos, Titan, Europa, and other bodies. One instrument (CASSE, sensitive for acoustic frequencies >= 30Hz) is currently flying to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on board of the Rosetta Mission. We give an overview of seismometers for use in planetary missions, including instruments of past and future missions. The focus is on the current developments as represented by the authors of the presentation. These encompass a Micro-Electromechanic System, several piezoelectric transducers that are able to resist strong decelerations, as well as new developments based on laser-interferometric sensing or hydrodynamic flow of electrolytic liquids.

  16. 76. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, WING 1200 WEST, INTERIOR DEPARTMENT MUSEUM, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    76. INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, WING 1200 WEST, INTERIOR DEPARTMENT MUSEUM, LOBBY, BRONZE GRILL (4' x 5' negative; 8' x 10' print) - U.S. Department of the Interior, Eighteenth & C Streets Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  17. 2nd International Planetary Probe Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Martinez, Ed; Arcadi, Marla

    2005-01-01

    Included are presentations from the 2nd International Planetary Probe Workshop. The purpose of the second workshop was to continue to unite the community of planetary scientists, spacecraft engineers and mission designers and planners; whose expertise, experience and interests are in the areas of entry probe trajectory and attitude determination, and the aerodynamics/aerothermodynamics of planetary entry vehicles. Mars lander missions and the first probe mission to Titan made 2004 an exciting year for planetary exploration. The Workshop addressed entry probe science, engineering challenges, mission design and instruments, along with the challenges of reconstruction of the entry, descent and landing or the aerocapture phases. Topics addressed included methods, technologies, and algorithms currently employed; techniques and results from the rich history of entry probe science such as PAET, Venera/Vega, Pioneer Venus, Viking, Galileo, Mars Pathfinder and Mars MER; upcoming missions such as the imminent entry of Huygens and future Mars entry probes; and new and novel instrumentation and methodologies.

  18. On the stability of circumbinary planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, E. A.; Shevchenko, I. I.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of circumbinary planetary systems (the systems in which the planets orbit a central binary) with a small binary mass ratio discovered to date is considered. The domains of chaotic motion have been revealed in the "pericentric distance-eccentricity" plane of initial conditions for the planetary orbits through numerical experiments. Based on an analytical criterion for the chaoticity of planetary orbits in binary star systems, we have constructed theoretical curves that describe the global boundary of the chaotic zone around the central binary for each of the systems. In addition, based on Mardling's theory describing the separate resonance "teeth" (corresponding to integer resonances between the orbital periods of a planet and the binary), we have constructed the local boundaries of chaos. Both theoretical models are shown to describe adequately the boundaries of chaos on the numerically constructed stability diagrams, suggesting that these theories are efficient in providing analytical criteria for the chaoticity of planetary orbits.

  19. InSight Planetary Protection Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benardini, James; La Duc, Myron; Willis, Jason

    The NASA Discovery Program’s next mission, Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSIght), consists of a single spacecraft that will be launched aboard an Atlas V 401 rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base (Space Launch Complex 3E) during the March 2016 timeframe. The overarching mission goal is to illuminate the fundamentals of formation and evolution of terrestrial planets by investigating the interior structure and processes of Mars. The flight system consists of a heritage cruise stage, aeroshell (heatshield and backshell), and Lander from the 2008 Phoenix mission. Included in the lander payload are various cameras, a seismometer, an auxiliary sensor suite to measure wind, temperature, and pressure, and a mole to penetrate the regolith (<5 meters) and assess the subsurface geothermal gradient of Mars. Being a Mars lander mission without life detection instruments, InSight has been designated a PP Category Iva mission. As such, planetary protection bioburden requirements apply which require microbial reduction procedures and biological burden reporting. The InSight project is current with required PP documentation, having completed an approved Planetary Protection Plan, Subsidiary PP Plans, and a PP Implementation Plan. The InSight mission’s early planetary protection campaign has commenced, coinciding with the fabrication and assembly of payload and flight system hardware and the baseline analysis of existing flight spares. A report on the status of InSight PP activities will be provided.

  20. Reports of Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, H. E. (Compiler); Watters, T. R. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Topics include outer planets and satellites; asteroids and comets; Venus; lunar origin and solar dynamics; cratering process; planetary interiors, petrology, and geochemistry; volcanic processes; aeolian processes and landforms; fluvial processes; geomorphology; periglacial and permafrost processes; remote sensing and regolith studies; structure, tectonics, and stratigraphy; geological mapping, cartography, and geodesy; and radar applications.

  1. Workshop on Mercury: Space Environment, Surface, and Interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the Workshop on Mercury: Space Environment, Surface, and Interior, October 4-5, 2001. The Scientific Organizing Committee consisted of Mark Robinson (Northwestern University), Marty Slade (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), Jim Slavin (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center), Sean Solomon (Carnegie Institution), Ann Sprague (University of Arizona), Paul Spudis (Lunar and Planetary Institute), G. Jeffrey Taylor (University of Hawai'i), Faith Vilas (NASA Johnson Space Center), Meenakshi Wadhwa (The Field Museum), and Thomas Watters (National Air and Space Museum). Logistics, administrative, and publications support were provided by the Publications and Program Services Departments of the Lunar and Planetary Institute.

  2. Interior Tomography With Continuous Singular Value Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Katsevich, Alexander; Yu, Hengyong; Wang, Ge; Li, Liang; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2013-01-01

    The long-standing interior problem has important mathematical and practical implications. The recently developed interior tomography methods have produced encouraging results. A particular scenario for theoretically exact interior reconstruction from truncated projections is that there is a known subregion in the region of interest (ROI). In this paper, we improve a novel continuous singular value decomposition (SVD) method for interior reconstruction assuming a known subregion. First, two sets of orthogonal eigen-functions are calculated for the Hilbert and image spaces respectively. Then, after the interior Hilbert data are calculated from projection data through the ROI, they are projected onto the eigen-functions in the Hilbert space, and an interior image is recovered by a linear combination of the eigen-functions with the resulting coefficients. Finally, the interior image is compensated for the ambiguity due to the null space utilizing the prior subregion knowledge. Experiments with simulated and real data demonstrate the advantages of our approach relative to the projection onto convex set type interior reconstructions. PMID:22907966

  3. Planetary landscape: a new synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargitai, H.

    The elements that build up a landscape on Earth consists of natural (biogenic and abiogenic - lithologic, atmospheric, hydrologic) and artificial (antropogenic) factors. Landscape is a complex system of these different elements, which interact with one another. For example the same lithology makes different landscapes under different climatic conditions. If the same conditions are present, the same landscape type will appear. The mosaic of ecotopes (topical) units, which are the system of homogenous caharacteristic areas of various geotopes makes up different level geochores (chorical unit). Geochores build up a hierarchic system and cover the whole surface.On Earth, landscapes can be qualified according to their characteristics: relief forms (morphology), and its potential economic value. Aesthetic and subjective parameters can also be considered especially when speaking of a residental area. We now propose the determination of "planetary landscape sets" which can potentially occur on the solid surface of a planetary body during its lifetime. This naturally includes landscapes of the present state of planetary bodies and also paleolandscapes from the past of planets, including Earth. Landscapes occur in the boundary of the planets solid and not solid sphere that is on the solid-vacuum, the solid - gas and on the solid - liquid boundary. Thinking this way a landscape can occurs on the ocean floor as well. We found that for the determination of a planetary landscape system, we can use the experiences from the making of the terminology and nomenclature system of Earth undersea topography. [1] The nomenclature system and the terminology used by astrogeologists could be revised. Common names of features should be defined (nova, tessera, volcano, tholus, lobate ejecta crater etc) with a type example for each. A well defined hierarchy for landscape types should be defined. The Moon is the best example, since it uses many names that originates from the 17th century, mixed

  4. Chemical exchange in the interior of water-rich exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobie, G.; Choblet, G.; Grasset, O.

    2015-10-01

    Since the discovery of the first exoplanet in 1995 [1], the number of detected exoplanets has grown nearly exponentially [2]. We have learnt from the existing dataset that our Solar System is rather unusual. Exoplanet surveys revealed notably that exoplanets intermediate between Earth and Neptune are surprisingly common, while notably absent in the Solar System [3]. Model mass-radius relationships indicate a great diversity of interior composition and atmospheric extent for the Super-Earth/Mini- Neptune-planet class [e.g. 4]. The observed continuum between Earth-sized and Neptune-sized planets challenges our understanding of planet formation and evolution, which has been biased for many years by our vision of the Solar System. Planetary worlds are probably much more diverse than originally thought, with a wide range of water and other volatile content. In the Solar System, there is a strong dichotomy between the inner system with dry planetary objects having a very small volatile fraction (<0.1 %), and the outer solar system where water ice constitutes a large fraction of solid phase (> 20%). The volatile contents among other systems likely vary more gradually, and a large fraction of exoplanets with sizes intermediate between Earth and Neptune may have a water content exceeding several percents. The existence of massive water envelops around these planets may significantly affect the internal evolution and chemical exchanges between the deep interior and the atmosphere [e.g. 5]. Due to the very high-pressure expected inside these water-rich planets, especially for the the most massive ones, most of the water will be in the form of a high-pressure ice phase (ice VII) [6,7], the presence of liquid water being limited only to the first kilometres. The thermal structure and dynamics of these thick icy mantles are expected to control the heat and chemical transport from the silicate-rich interior to the surface [8,9], in a way analogous to the internal processes

  5. Europlanet - Joining the European Planetary Research Information Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capria, M. T.; Chanteur, G.; Schmidt, W.

    2009-04-01

    The "Europlanet Research Infrastructure - Europlanet RI", supported by the European Commission's Framework Program 7, aims at integrating major parts of the distributed European Planetary Research infrastructure with as diverse components as space exploration, ground-based observations, laboratory experiments and numerical model-ling teams. A central part of Europlanet RI is the "Integrated and Distributed Information Service" or Europlanet-IDIS which intends to provide easy Web-based access to information about scientists and teams working in related fields, observatories or laboratories with capabilities possibly beneficial to planetary research, modelling expertise useful for planetary science and observations from space-based, ground-based or laboratory measurements. As far as the type of data and their access methods allow, IDIS will provide Virtual Observatory (VO) like access to a variety of data from distributed sources and tools to compare and integrate this information to further data analysis and re-search. IDIS itself is providing a platform for information and data sharing and for data mining. It is structured as a network of thematic nodes each concentrating on a sub-set of research areas in planetary sciences. But the most important elements of IDIS and the whole Europlanet RI are the single scientists, institutes, laboratories, observatories and mission project teams. Without them the whole effort would remain an empty shell. How can an interested individual or team join this activity and what are the benefits to be expected from the related effort? The poster gives detailed answers to these questions. Here some highlights: 1. Locate from the Europlanet web pages (addresses see below) the thematic node best related to the own field of expertise. This might be more than one. 2. Define which services you want to offer to the community: just the contact address, field of competence, off-line access to data on request or even on-line searchable access

  6. Dust in Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, H.; Graps, A.

    2007-01-01

    The workshop 'Dust in Planetary Systems' was held in Kauai'i/Hawaii from September 26 to 30, 2005, following the tradition of holding meetings in the field of Interplanetary Dust Research at regular intervals of a few years. The series of meetings started in Honolulu, Hawaii (USA) in 1967, followed by Heidelberg (Germany) in 1975, Ottawa (Canada) in 1979, Marseilles (France) in 1984, Kyoto (Japan) in 1990, Gainesville, Florida (USA) in 1995, with the last being held in Canterbury, (U.K.) in 2000. The Kauai'i workshop in 2005 was attended by 150 scientists from 20 countries who actively discussed recent progress made through remote observations from the ground and from space, in-situ measurements, as well as from theory and laboratory experiments. Since the last meeting in Canterbury, numerous space missions provided significant progress in various fields of cosmic dust research. For studies of comet nuclei, scientists in our field were involved in three space missions. In 2001, the Deep Space 1 spacecraft flew by comet Borelly. In 2004, Stardust flew by comet Wild 2, with many exciting results from the Stardust return capsule still to come. In 2005, the Deep Impact probe collided with comet Tempel 1. In addition, the comet dust community made large strides forward when Rosetta was launched to begin its 10-year voyage towards comet Churyumov-Gerasimenkov. Saturn's environment also provides a natural laboratory for cosmic dust researchers. The Saturn ring system with its spokes has been the prime motivator for dusty plasma studies since the time of the Voyager spacecraft twenty years ago. The Cassini spacecraft in orbit around Saturn since 2004 is well-placed to not only continue those studies, but to start new studies provided by Saturn's enigmatic moon Enceladus. Jupiter's dusty environment has not been neglected by spacecraft in these last five years either. While the Galileo mission was terminated in 2003 after the spacecraft's 7-year orbital tour about Jupiter

  7. Lunar & Planetary Science, 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geotimes, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presents a summary of each paper presented at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference at the Johnson Space Center, Houston in March 1980. Topics relate to Venus, Jupiter, Mars, asteroids, meteorites, regoliths, achondrites, remote sensing, and cratering studies. (SA)

  8. Lunar & Planetary Science, 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geotimes, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presents a summary of each paper presented at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference at the Johnson Space Center, Houston in March 1980. Topics relate to Venus, Jupiter, Mars, asteroids, meteorites, regoliths, achondrites, remote sensing, and cratering studies. (SA)

  9. Lunar & Planetary Science Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Jeffrey L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Summaries of different topics discussed at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference are presented to provide updated information to nonplanetologists. Some topics include Venus, isotopes, chondrites, creation science, cosmic dust, cratering, moons and rings, igneous rocks, and lunar soil. (DC)

  10. Lunar & Planetary Science Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Jeffrey L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Summaries of different topics discussed at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference are presented to provide updated information to nonplanetologists. Some topics include Venus, isotopes, chondrites, creation science, cosmic dust, cratering, moons and rings, igneous rocks, and lunar soil. (DC)

  11. Meaning of Interior Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ge; Yu, Hengyong

    2013-01-01

    The classic imaging geometry for computed tomography is for collection of un-truncated projections and reconstruction of a global image, with the Fourier transform as the theoretical foundation that is intrinsically non-local. Recently, interior tomography research has led to theoretically exact relationships between localities in the projection and image spaces and practically promising reconstruction algorithms. Initially, interior tomography was developed for x-ray computed tomography. Then, it has been elevated as a general imaging principle. Finally, a novel framework known as “omni-tomography” is being developed for grand fusion of multiple imaging modalities, allowing tomographic synchrony of diversified features. PMID:23912256

  12. Interior design for dentistry.

    PubMed

    Unthank, M; True, G

    1999-11-01

    In the increasingly complex, competitive and stressful field of dentistry, effectively designed dental offices can offer significant benefits. Esthetic, functional and life-cycle cost issues to be considered when developing your interior design scheme include color, finishes, lighting, furnishings, art and accessories. An appropriately designed dental office serves as a valuable marketing tool for your practice, as well as a safe and enjoyable work environment. Qualified interior design professionals can help you make design decisions that can yield optimum results within your budget.

  13. Low-Velocity Aggregate Collisions Simulating Planetary Ring Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, A.; Colwell, J. E.; Bradley, E. T.; Vamos, C.

    2012-12-01

    Proto-planetary and planetary ring system evolution is driven by collisions between small particles and aggregates that may be composed of dust, water ice, or a combination of materials. In these collisional systems, impacts between objects can occur at very low velocities, much less than 1 m/s. Low-velocity impacts can have competing effects: at the lowest velocities, collisions may play a critical role in growth into larger aggregates; at slightly higher velocities, collisions can cause break-up and release of material. In the Saturnian ring system, for instance, particles are excited to such "higher" velocities (10's of cm/s) in regions where density waves enhance particle concentrations. These conditions are present in the A ring, and it has been hypothesized that collisions have an additional effect of modifying the spectral properties of the ring particles, which are composed of a mix of ice and dust (Nicholson et al., 2008). This modification may occur when collisions cause ejection of material with different spectral characteristics, or by breaking particles apart to reveal more pristine interiors. We have designed and built an apparatus to simulate low-velocity collisions between aggregates in a laboratory vacuum environment. In our experiment, two aggregates are launched towards each other; the resulting impact velocities are controlled by the initial spring launch velocity, the masses of the aggregates, and timing of the collisions. Initially, we use lunar regolith simulant to create the aggregates; the simulant can be packed to different densities to control the mass and porosity of the impactors. We also create aggregates that are mixtures of materials, including icy components. A high-speed digital video camera is used to record the impacts to observe the behavior of both impactors and the resulting ejecta material. We observe over a range of velocities to identify the conditions under which aggregates shed only some material from the surface, or

  14. Demographics of Planetary Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagenal, F.; White, S.

    2011-10-01

    A survey was sent out to university departments around the US that were thought to include faculty involved in planetary science research and/or offer planetary science undergraduate or graduate degrees. This is Part A of a study of the demographics of planetary science carried out by the American Institute of Physics (AIP) and sponsored by NASA's Planetary Science Division. Part B will be a survey of the planetary scientists with PhDs working in the US, to be carried out by the AIP in mid-2011. Starting on December 8th 2010 surveys were sent out by email to department chairs. A total of 48 departments responded between December 9th and April 8th . There is only U of Arizona that has a department that is called planetary sciences - the rest are combined with Earth sciences (14), astronomy (15), geology/geophysics (8), physics (7), atmospheric science (5), something else or combinations thereof. We present statistics from these 48 departments on faculty, researchers, graduate and undergraduate students.

  15. Control technique for planetary rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakatani, Ichiro; Kubota, Takashi; Adachi, Tadashi; Saitou, Hiroaki; Okamoto, Sinya

    1994-01-01

    Beginning next century, several schemes for sending a planetary rover to the moon or Mars are being planned. As part of the development program, autonomous navigation technology is being studied to allow the rover the ability to move autonomously over a long range of unknown planetary surface. In the previous study, we ran the autonomous navigation experiment on an outdoor test terrain by using a rover test-bed that was controlled by a conventional sense-plan-act method. In some cases during the experiment, a problem occurred with the rover moving into untraversable areas. To improve this situation, a new control technique has been developed that gives the rover the ability of reacting to the outputs of the proximity sensors, a reaction behavior if you will. We have developed a new rover test-bed system on which an autonomous navigation experiment was performed using the newly developed control technique. In this outdoor experiment, the new control technique effectively produced the control command for the rover to avoid obstacles and be guided to the goal point safely.

  16. Basaltic Volcanism and Ancient Planetary Crusts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shervais, John W.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to decipher the origin of rocks which form the ancient lunar crust. Our goal is to better understand how the moon evolved chemically and, more generally, the processes involved in the chemical fractionation of terrestrial planetoids. This research has implications for other planetary bodies besides the Moon, especially smaller planetoids which evolved early in the history of the solar system and are now thermally stable. The three main areas focused on in our work (lunar mare basalts, KREEP basalts, and plutonic rocks of the lunar highlands) provide complementary information on the lunar interior and the processes that formed it.

  17. Trends in Interior Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovey, Robyn

    2000-01-01

    Examines how an understanding of interior design trends can help planners address their present and future furniture needs. Examines how new types of construction and their associated concerns are requiring new approaches from the facility designers and manufacturers of product solutions. (GR)

  18. Interiors That Stand Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2008

    2008-01-01

    "It's what's on the inside that counts"--at least when it comes to "American School & University's" (AS&U's) annual Educational Interiors Showcase competition. Each May, "AS&U" assembles at its Overland Park, Kansas headquarters a jury made up of education and architectural professionals from across the country to pore over an array of exceptional…

  19. Interior Design in Architectural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurel, Meltem O.; Potthoff, Joy K.

    2006-01-01

    The domain of interiors constitutes a point of tension between practicing architects and interior designers. Design of interior spaces is a significant part of architectural profession. Yet, to what extent does architectural education keep pace with changing demands in rendering topics that are identified as pertinent to the design of interiors?…

  20. Interior Design in Architectural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurel, Meltem O.; Potthoff, Joy K.

    2006-01-01

    The domain of interiors constitutes a point of tension between practicing architects and interior designers. Design of interior spaces is a significant part of architectural profession. Yet, to what extent does architectural education keep pace with changing demands in rendering topics that are identified as pertinent to the design of interiors?…

  1. Impact-induced devolatilization and hydrogen isotopic fractionation of serpentine: implications for planetary accretion.

    PubMed

    Tyburczy, J A; Krishnamurthy, R V; Epstein, S; Ahrens, T J

    1990-05-01

    The degree of impact-induced devolatilization of nonporous serpentine, porous serpentine, and deuterium-enriched serpentine was investigated using two independent experimental methods, the gas recovery method and the solid recovery method, yielding consistent results. The gas recovery method enables determination of the chemical and hydrogen isotopic composition of the recovered gases. Experiments on deuterium-enriched serpentine unambiguously identify the samples as the source of the recovered gases, as opposed to other possible contaminants. For shock pressures near incipient devolatilization (Pinitial = 5.0 GPa), the hydrogen isotopic composition of the evolved gas is similar to that of the starting material. For higher shock pressures the bulk evolved gas is significantly lower in deuterium than the starting material. There is also significant reduction of H2O to H2 in gases recovered at higher shock pressures, probably caused by reaction of evolved H2O with the metal gas recovery fixture. The hydrogen isotopic fractionation between the evolved gas and the residual solid indicates nonequilibrium, kinetic control of gas-solid isotopic ratios. In contrast, gaseous H2O-H2 isotopic fractionation suggests high temperature (800-1300 K) isotopic equilibrium between the gaseous species, indicating initiation of devolatilization at sites of greater than average energy deposition (i.e., shear bands). Impact-induced hydrogen isotopic fractionation of hydrous silicates during accretion can affect the distribution of hydrogen isotopes of planetary bodies during accretion, leaving the interiors enriched in deuterium. The significance of this process for planetary development depends on the models used for extrapolation of the observed isotopic fractionation to devolatilizations greater than those investigated experimentally and assumptions about timing and rates of protoatmosphere loss, frequency of multiple impacts, and rates of gas-solid or gas-melt isotopic re

  2. Phobos interior structure from its gravity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Maistre, S.; Rosenblatt, P.; Rivoldini, A.

    2015-10-01

    Phobos origin remains mysterious. It could be a captured asteroid, or an in-situ object co-accreted with Mars or formed by accretion from a disk of impact ejecta.Although it is not straightforward to relate its interior properties to its origin, it is easy to agree that the interior properties of any body has to be accounted for to explain its life's history. What event could explain such an internal structure? Where should this object formed to present such interior characteristics and composition? We perform here numerical simulations to assess the ability of a gravity experiment to constrain the interior structure of the martian moon Phobos, which could in turn allow distinguishing among the competing scenarios for the moon's origin.

  3. NASA Planetary Visualization Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, P.; Kim, R.

    2004-12-01

    NASA World Wind allows one to zoom from satellite altitude into any place on Earth, leveraging the combination of high resolution LandSat imagery and SRTM elevation data to experience Earth in visually rich 3D, just as if they were really there. NASA World Wind combines LandSat 7 imagery with Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) elevation data, for a dramatic view of the Earth at eye level. Users can literally fly across the world's terrain from any location in any direction. Particular focus was put into the ease of usability so people of all ages can enjoy World Wind. All one needs to control World Wind is a two button mouse. Additional guides and features can be accessed though a simplified menu. Navigation is automated with single clicks of a mouse as well as the ability to type in any location and automatically zoom to it. NASA World Wind was designed to run on recent PC hardware with the same technology used by today's 3D video games. NASA World Wind delivers the NASA Blue Marble, spectacular true-color imagery of the entire Earth at 1-kilometer-per-pixel. Using NASA World Wind, you can continue to zoom past Blue Marble resolution to seamlessly experience the extremely detailed mosaic of LandSat 7 data at an impressive 15-meters-per-pixel resolution. NASA World Wind also delivers other color bands such as the infrared spectrum. The NASA Scientific Visualization Studio at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has produced a set of visually intense animations that demonstrate a variety of subjects such as hurricane dynamics and seasonal changes across the globe. NASA World Wind takes these animations and plays them directly on the world. The NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) produces a set of time relevant planetary imagery that's updated every day. MODIS catalogs fires, floods, dust, smoke, storms and volcanic activity. NASA World Wind produces an easily customized view of this information and marks them directly on the globe. When one

  4. Interior of Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Cutaway view of the possible internal structure of Callisto. The surface of the satellite is a mosaic of images obtained in 1979 by NASA's Voyager spacecraft. The interior characteristics are inferred from gravity field and magnetic field measurements by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. Callisto's radius is 2403 km, larger than our Moon's radius. Callisto's interior is shown as a relatively uniform mixture of comparable amounts of ice and rock. The surface layer of Callisto is shown as white to indicate that it may differ from the underlying ice/rock layer in a variety of ways including, for example, the percentage of rock it contains.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  5. Statistical Interior Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiong; Wang, Ge; Sieren, Jered; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical interior tomography (SIT) approach making use of compressed sensing (CS) theory. With the projection data modeled by the Poisson distribution, an objective function with a total variation (TV) regularization term is formulated in the maximization of a posteriori (MAP) framework to solve the interior problem. An alternating minimization method is used to optimize the objective function with an initial image from the direct inversion of the truncated Hilbert transform. The proposed SIT approach is extensively evaluated with both numerical and real datasets. The results demonstrate that SIT is robust with respect to data noise and down-sampling, and has better resolution and less bias than its deterministic counterpart in the case of low count data. PMID:21233044

  6. Modeling of interior explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, Y. V.; Fedorova, N. N.; Fedorov, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    The results of numerical simulation of an interior explosion are presented. The main purpose of the work is an investigation of shock-wave structure caused by explosion and estimation of pressure level on building walls. The numerical simulation was carried out by means of ANSYS AUTODYN software at normal atmospheric conditions with different mass of charge and internal geometry of room. The effect of mass charge and presence of vent area were shown. The calculation results are compared with published experimental data.

  7. Mars Interior Artist Concept

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-20

    Artist rendition of the formation of rocky bodies in the solar system -- how they form and differentiate and evolve into terrestrial planets. Note: After thorough examination, NASA managers have decided to suspend the planned March 2016 launch of the Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSight) mission. The decision follows unsuccessful attempts to repair a leak in a section of the prime instrument in the science payload. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA16078

  8. The lunar interior.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.; Kovach, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    For materials thought to be important in the lunar interior, compressional velocities are estimated and compared with lunar seismic data. The results obtained support the conclusion that the moon is an extremely well differentiated body. This is consistent with thermal history calculations which suggest that the moon was close to or in excess of melting (solidus) temperatures throughout most of its volume early in its history.

  9. Foundations of planetary quarantine.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, L. B.; Lyle, R. G.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of some of the problems in microbiology and engineering involved in the implementation of planetary quarantine. It is shown that the solutions require new knowledge in both disciplines for success at low cost in terms of both monetary outlay and man's further exploration of the planets. A related problem exists in that engineers are not accustomed to the wide variation of biological data and microbiologists must learn to work and think in more exact terms. Those responsible for formulating or influencing national and international policies must walk a tightrope with delicate balance between unnecessarily stringent requirements for planetary quarantine on the one hand and prevention of contamination on the other. The success of planetary quarantine measures can be assured only by rigorous measures, each checked, rechecked, and triple-checked to make sure that no errors have been made and that no factor has been overlooked.

  10. Planetary noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    An overview of the history and current status of research on planetary noble gases is presented. The discovery that neon and argon are vastly more abundant on Venus than on earth points to the solar wind rather than condensation as the fundamental process for placing noble gases in the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets; however, solar wind implantation may not be able to fully reproduce the observed gradient, nor does it obviously account for similar planetary Ne/Ar ratios and dissimilar planetary Ar/Kr ratios. More recent studies have emphasized escape rather than accretion. Hydrodynamic escape, which is fractionating, readily accounts for the difference between atmospheric neon and isotopically light mantle neon. Atmospheric cratering, which is nearly nonfractionating, can account for the extreme scarcity of nonradiogenic noble gases (and other volatiles) on Mars.

  11. Extrasolar planetary systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, S.-S.

    1973-01-01

    The terms 'planet' and 'planet-like objects' are defined. The observational search for extrasolar planetary systems is described, as performable by earthbound optical telescopes, by space probes, by long baseline radio interferometry, and finally by inference from the reception of signals sent by intelligent beings in other worlds. It is shown that any planetary system must be preceded by a rotating disk of gas and dust around a central mass. A brief review of the theories of the formation of the solar system is given, along with a proposed scheme for classification of these theories. The evidence for magnetic activity in the early stages of stellar evolution is presented. The magnetic braking theories of solar and stellar rotation are discussed, and an estimate is made for the frequency of occurrence of planetary systems in the universe.

  12. Foundations of planetary quarantine.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, L. B.; Lyle, R. G.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of some of the problems in microbiology and engineering involved in the implementation of planetary quarantine. It is shown that the solutions require new knowledge in both disciplines for success at low cost in terms of both monetary outlay and man's further exploration of the planets. A related problem exists in that engineers are not accustomed to the wide variation of biological data and microbiologists must learn to work and think in more exact terms. Those responsible for formulating or influencing national and international policies must walk a tightrope with delicate balance between unnecessarily stringent requirements for planetary quarantine on the one hand and prevention of contamination on the other. The success of planetary quarantine measures can be assured only by rigorous measures, each checked, rechecked, and triple-checked to make sure that no errors have been made and that no factor has been overlooked.

  13. First-principles modelling of Earth and planetary materials at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillan, M. J.; Alfè, D.; Brodholt, J.; Vocadlo, L.; Price, G. D.

    2006-08-01

    Atomic-scale materials modelling based on first-principles quantum mechanics is playing an important role in the science of the Earth and the other planets. We outline the basic theory of this kind of modelling and explain how it can be applied in a variety of different ways to probe the thermodynamics, structure and transport properties of both solids and liquids under extreme conditions. After a summary of the density functional formulation of quantum mechanics and its practical implementation through pseudopotentials, we outline the simplest way of applying first-principles modelling, namely static zero-temperature calculations. We show how calculations of this kind can be compared with static compression experiments to demonstrate the accuracy of first-principles modelling at pressures reached in planetary interiors. Noting that virtually all problems concerning planetary interiors require an understanding of materials at high temperatures as well as high pressures, we then describe how first-principles lattice dynamics gives a powerful way of investigating solids at temperatures not too close to the melting line. We show how such calculations have contributed to important progress, including the recent discovery of the post-perovskite phase of MgSiO3 in the D'' layer at the base of the Earth's mantle. A range of applications of first-principles molecular dynamics are then reviewed, including the properties of metallic hydrogen in Jupiter and Saturn, of water, ammonia and methane in Uranus and Neptune, and of oxides and silicates and solid and liquid iron and its alloys in the Earth's deep interior. Recognizing the importance of phase equilibria throughout the planetary sciences, we review recently developed techniques for the first-principles calculation of solid and liquid free energies, melting curves and chemical potentials of alloys. We show how such calculations have contributed to an improved understanding of the temperature distribution and the chemical

  14. Planetary quarantine: Supporting research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, D. M.

    1975-01-01

    Planetary quarantine strategies for advanced missions are described, along with natural space environment studies and post launch recontamination studies. Spacecraft cleaning and decontamination techniques and assay activities are reviewed. Teflon ribbon experiments and pyrolsis gas-liquid chromatography study are also considered.

  15. INTERIOR OF AIRLOCK FROM INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF AIRLOCK FROM INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  16. Credit BG. Interior view of Building 4318, displaying interior structure ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit BG. Interior view of Building 4318, displaying interior structure and finish at northeast end of building - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Warehouse, Second & C Streets, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. 3. INTERIOR VIEW OF PARTITIONS IN DRESSING ROOM; INTERIOR HALLWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. INTERIOR VIEW OF PARTITIONS IN DRESSING ROOM; INTERIOR HALLWAY FOR HYDROTHERAPY AREA AT RIGHT - Fort McCoy, Building No. T-1054, South side of South Tenth Avenue, Block 10, Sparta, Monroe County, WI

  18. 28. Interior view of telegrapher's bay, east wall, showing interior ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Interior view of telegrapher's bay, east wall, showing interior finishes, framing, and furring over stonework - Bend Railroad Depot, 1160 Northeast Divion Street (At foot of Kearny Street), Bend, Deschutes County, OR

  19. Interior view of interior upstairs loft corner, north portion; camera ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of interior upstairs loft corner, north portion; camera facing east. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Ordnance Warehouse, Blake Avenue, northeast corner of Blake Avenue & Railroad Avenue, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  20. 49. INTERIOR OF GILLEY ROOM: Interior view towards southeast of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. INTERIOR OF GILLEY ROOM: Interior view towards southeast of the Gilley Room on the second floor of the powerhouse and ear barn. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  1. Airships for Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing an airship for planetary atmospheric exploration was assessed. The environmental conditions of the planets and moons within our solar system were evaluated to determine their applicability for airship flight. A station-keeping mission of 50 days in length was used as the baseline mission. Airship sizing was performed utilizing both solar power and isotope power to meet the baseline mission goal at the selected planetary location. The results show that an isotope-powered airship is feasible within the lower atmosphere of Venus and Saturn s moon Titan.

  2. Cubesat Application for Planetary Entry Missions (CAPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esper, Jaime; Baumann, Jean-Pierre; Herdrich, Georg

    2013-01-01

    The Cubesat Application for Planetary Entry Missions (CAPE) concept describes a high-performing Cubesat system which includes a propulsion module and miniaturized technologies capable of surviving atmospheric entry heating, while reliably transmitting scientific and engineering data. The Micro Return Capsule 2 (MIRKA2) is CAPE’s first planetary entry probe flight prototype. Within this context, this paper summarizes CAPE’s configuration and typical operational scenario. It also summarizes MIRKA2’s design and basic aerodynamic characteristics, and discusses potential challenges drawn from the experience of missions such as Stardust and MUSES-C. CAPE not only opens the door to new planetary mission capabilities, it also offers relatively low-cost opportunities especially suitable to university participation.

  3. Planetary science comes to Nantes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Robert

    2011-12-01

    MEETING REPORT Robert Massey reports on highlights of the first joint meeting of the European Planetary Science Congress (EPSC) and the AAS Division of Planetary Scientists (DPS) in Nantes in October.

  4. Unified parameterization of the planetary boundary layer and shallow convection with a higher-order turbulence closure in the community atmosphere model: single column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogenschutz, P. A.; Gettelman, A.; Morrison, H.; Larson, V. E.; Schanen, D. P.; Meyer, N. R.; Craig, C.

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the coupling of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) version 5 with a unified multi-variate probability density function (PDF) parameterization, Cloud Layers Unified by Binormals (CLUBB). CLUBB replaces the planetary boundary layer (PBL), shallow convection, and cloud macrophysics schemes in CAM5 with a higher-order turbulence closure based on an assumed PDF. Comparisons of single-column versions of CAM5 and CAM-CLUBB are provided in this paper for several boundary layer regimes. As compared to Large Eddy Simulations (LES), CAM-CLUBB and CAM5 simulate marine stratocumulus regimes with similar accuracy. For shallow convective regimes, CAM-CLUBB improves the representation of cloud cover and liquid water path (LWP). In addition, for shallow convection CAM-CLUBB offers better fidelity for sub-grid scale vertical velocity, which is an important input for aerosol activation. Finally, CAM-CLUBB results are more robust to changes in vertical and temporal resolution when compared to CAM5.

  5. Unified parameterization of the planetary boundary layer and shallow convection with a higher-order turbulence closure in the Community Atmosphere Model: single-column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogenschutz, P. A.; Gettelman, A.; Morrison, H.; Larson, V. E.; Schanen, D. P.; Meyer, N. R.; Craig, C.

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes the coupling of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) version 5 with a unified multi-variate probability density function (PDF) parameterization, Cloud Layers Unified by Binormals (CLUBB). CLUBB replaces the planetary boundary layer (PBL), shallow convection, and cloud macrophysics schemes in CAM5 with a higher-order turbulence closure based on an assumed PDF. Comparisons of single-column versions of CAM5 and CAM-CLUBB are provided in this paper for several boundary layer regimes. As compared to large eddy simulations (LESs), CAM-CLUBB and CAM5 simulate marine stratocumulus regimes with similar accuracy. For shallow convective regimes, CAM-CLUBB improves the representation of cloud cover and liquid water path (LWP). In addition, for shallow convection CAM-CLUBB offers better fidelity for subgrid-scale vertical velocity, which is an important input for aerosol activation. Finally, CAM-CLUBB results are more robust to changes in vertical and temporal resolution when compared to CAM5.

  6. The Role of Planetary System Architecture in Planetary Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, R.; Jackson, B.; Raymond, S.; Greenberg, R.

    2009-12-01

    Traditionally, the habitable zone is defined as the region around a star in which liquid water can be stable on a planetary surface. At first these calculations considered planets on circular orbits [1]. More recent investigations into nonzero orbital eccentricities found that the limits of the habitable zone should reflect the orbit-averaged flux a planet receives [2]. However, those studies assumed the potentially habitable planet is isolated. If additional planets are in the system, gravitational interactions between planets can cause eccentricity oscillations on timescales of 103 - 106 years. Furthermore, the known multi-planet systems (generally consisting of giant planets) appear to undergo large amplitude eccentricity oscillations [3]. If rocky exoplanets also experience such large variations, then the orbit-averaged flux may change significantly, impacting habitability. We show that plausible architectures of rocky planet systems can indeed lead to orbits with large eccentricity cycles. Moreover, some planets could cross either the inner or outer habitable zone boundaries due to these oscillations. We therefore suggest that the shape of actual habitable zones depends critically on the configuration (orbits and masses) of the entire planetary system. [1] Kasting, J.F. et al. 1993, Icarus, 101, 108. [2] Williams, D.M. & Pollard, D. 2002, I. J. AsBio, 2, 1. [3] Barnes, R., & Greenberg, R. 2006, Astrophys. J., 652, L53.

  7. Schematic of Mars Interior

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-10-14

    The interior of Mars is simply modeled as a core and mantle with a thin crust, similar to Earth. Mars' size and total mass have been determined by previous missions. Given four parameters, the core size and mass, and mantle size and mass can be determined. The combination of Pathfinder Doppler data with earlier data from the Viking landers has determined a third parameter, the moment of inertia, through measurement of Mars' precession rate. A fourth measurement is needed to complete the interior model. This may be achieved through future Doppler tracking of Pathfinder, since the presence of a fluid core may be detectable through its effect on Mars' nutation. The determination of the moment of inertia is a significant constraint on possible models for Mars' interior. If the core is as dense as possible (i.e. completely iron) and the mantle is similar to Earth's (or similar to the SNC meteorites thought to originate on Mars) then the minimum core radius is about 1300 km. If the core is made of less-dense material (i.e. a mixture of iron and sulfur) then the core radius is probably no more than 2000 km. Sojourner spent 83 days of a planned seven-day mission exploring the Martian terrain, acquiring images, and taking chemical, atmospheric and other measurements. The final data transmission received from Pathfinder was at 10:23 UTC on September 27, 1997. Although mission managers tried to restore full communications during the following five months, the successful mission was terminated on March 10, 1998. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00974

  8. Conference on Planetary Volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrametz, K.; Kofler, L.

    1982-01-01

    Initial and present volatile inventories and distributions in the Earth, other planets, meteorites, and comets; observational evidence on the time history of volatile transfer among reservoirs; and volatiles in planetary bodies, their mechanisms of transport, and their relation to thermal, chemical, geological and biological evolution were addressed.

  9. Planetary quarantine computer applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rafenstein, M.

    1973-01-01

    The computer programs are identified pertaining to planetary quarantine activities within the Project Engineering Division, both at the Air Force Eastern Test Range and on site at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. A brief description of each program and program inputs are given and typical program outputs are shown.

  10. Advances in planetary geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A wide variety of topics on planetary geology are presented. Subjects include stratigraphy and geomorphology of Copernicus, the Mamers valle region, and other selected regions of Mars and the Moon. Crater density and distribution are discussed for Callisto and the lunar surface. Spectroscopic analysis is described for Europa and Ganymede.

  11. Conference on Planetary Volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, R. O. (Compiler); Oconnell, R. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    Initial and present volatile inventories and distributions in the Earth, other planets, meteorites, and comets; observational evidence on the time history of volatile transfer among reservoirs; and volatiles in planetary bodies, their mechanisms of transport, and their relation to thermal, chemical, geological and biological evolution are addressed.

  12. Planetary Quarantine Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The activities of the Planetary Quarantine Department at Sandia Laboratories during the period April 1965 through June 1972 are summarized. Included are the rationale, the methods, and the results of modeling and experimentation used in dry heat, radiation, thermoradiation, and chemical sterilization studies. Publications describing these activities and accounts of closely related research are also furnished.

  13. The Planetary Science Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manaud, N.; Zender, J.; Heather, D.; Barthelemy, M.; Vazquez, J. L.; Trautner, R.; Ortiz, I.; Dowson, J.; Arviset, C.; Parilla, E.

    2007-08-01

    Scientific and engineering data from ESA's planetary missions are made accessible to the world-wide scientific community via the Planetary Science Archive (PSA). The PSA consists of online services incorporating search, preview, download, notification and shopping basket functionality. Besides data from the Giotto spacecraft and several ground-based cometary observations, the PSA contains data from the Mars Express, Smart-1 and Huygens spacecraft. In spring 2007 the PSA will provide the science and engineering data collected by Rosetta until July 2006 and data collected by Venus Express until November 2005. The main goal of the archive initiative is to contribute to the maximum scientific exploitation of the data. The PSA provides a broad range of query possibilities. User can search the database by targets, planetary features, observation geometry, dataset characteristics and time information. Primary emphasis of the archive is on long-term data and knowledge preservation. All data sets are peer reviewed and must undergo an additional PSA internal validation procedure. The PSA continuously discusses with the community and the instrument teams the definition of derived parameters useful for data identification via cross-discipline or cross-instrument searches. As the PSA supports the concept of users and groups, proprietary data are protected from unauthorized users. All data are compatible to the Planetary Data System Standard and the PSA staff work in close collaboration with the PDS.

  14. Asteroidal and planetary analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, W. K.

    1975-01-01

    Photometric, spectrophotometric, and radiometric investigations of asteroids and planets are reported. Profiles of the planetary disk were used to study the physical structure of the Uranus atmosphere, and thermal and photographic properties of Saturn rings were theoretically modelled. Ground-based Mars observations were made for long-term comparison with Mariner 9 results.

  15. Advanced planetary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Eleven study tasks are described and key results are discussed for the following: advanced planning activity; cost estimation research; planetary missions performance handbooks-revisions; multiple discipline science assessment; asteroid workshop; galilean lander mission strategies; asteroid exploration study; ion drive transport capabilities; Mars strategy study; Venus surface sample return; and ion drive/solar sail assessment study.

  16. Contemporary Planetary Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belton, Michael J. S.; Levy, Eugene H.

    1982-01-01

    Presents an overview of planetary science and the United States program for exploration of the planets, examining the program's scientific objectives, its current activities, and the diversity of its methods. Also discusses the program's lack of continuity, especially in personnel. (Author/JN)

  17. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The 35th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference covered topics on Mars, planetary origins, planetary analog studies, education,chondrite studies, and meteorite composition. Over 1000 reports were presented at the conference in over 100 sessions. Each session, and presentations,was processed separately for the database.

  18. Turboprop interior noise studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, E. H.

    1979-01-01

    The modal theory of acoustoelasticity is applied to the determination of the sound levels caused by a prescribed external sound excitation which is transmitted through a cylindrical shell. A circumferential traveling pressure wave excitation is studied as representative of a propeller sound field. It is shown how other excitations such as point mechanical loading, plane wave and reverberation random may be synthesized by superposition of circumferential waves. Representative numerical results illustrate the importance of structural and acoustic frequency matching in the determination of interior sound levels and clarify the role of the cylindrical shell ring frequency. An exploratory study of a double wall geometry is conducted.

  19. Interior of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Renee C.

    2013-01-01

    A variety of geophysical measurements made from Earth, from spacecraft in orbit around the Moon, and by astronauts on the lunar surface allow us to probe beyond the lunar surface to learn about its interior. Similarly to the Earth, the Moon is thought to consist of a distinct crust, mantle, and core. The crust is globally asymmetric in thickness, the mantle is largely homogeneous, and the core is probably layered, with evidence for molten material. This chapter will review a range of methods used to infer the Moon's internal structure, and briefly discuss the implications for the Moon's formation and evolution.

  20. Interior of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, David J.

    1992-01-01

    General principles of Titan formation and evolution are addressed. Attention is focused on the volatile reservoir (defined as all constituents more volatile than water) of Titan's interior. Volatile poor models, in which Titan is like Granymede or Callisto with a thin (observed) volatile veneer are discussed and discarded. Volatile rich models in which the present Titan consists of a methane clathrate shell overlying a deep water ammonia ocean and solid ammonia hydrate are discussed. Titan has a central core of rock which is about one half of the total mass, and a superficial hydrocarbon 'ocean' stored in subsurface caverns and pore space.

  1. Planetary systems in binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Genya

    In this thesis we investigate the orbital evolution of planets in binaries. Unlike our own Solar System, at least one out of five planetary systems known to date is associated with additional stellar companions. Despite their large distances from the planetary systems, these stellar companions play an important role in significantly altering the planetary architecture over very long timescales. Most of the planets in binaries are found in hierarchical configurations in which a planet orbits around a component of a wide stellar binary. The evolution of such hierarchical triples has been analytically understood through the framework of the Kozai mechanism, in which the orbital eccentricity of a planet secularly grows through angular momentum exchange with the stellar companion. The aim of our first study is to investigate the global effect of stellar companions in exciting planetary eccentricities through the Kozai mechanism, using synthetic eccentricity distributions computed numerically from various initial assumptions motivated by observational studies. As inferred from observations and theoretical planet formation simulations, newly formed planetary systems are more likely to be oligarchic, containing multiple giant planets. However, the long-term evolution of gravitationally coupled planets perturbed by a stellar companion has been little understood in the previous studies. From a large ensemble of numerical integrations of double-planet systems in binaries, we have found that there are various evolutionary classes of multiple planets in binaries compared to simple hierarchical triple systems containing only one planet. Using the Kozai mechanism and the Laplace-Lagrange secular theory, we also provide analytic criteria that can readily predict the secular evolutionary behavior of a pair of planetary orbits in binaries. In the last part of this thesis we discuss an alternative channel of planetary migration induced by a combined effect of dissipative tidal forces

  2. 11. Detail of the interior, looking through an interior doorway ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Detail of the interior, looking through an interior doorway toward the front and east window. Note: This photograph shows that the building had been converted to a residence following its use as a school. In addition, the hazardous condition of the structure's interior is evident. Two ceilings which are visible in the photograph, (the upper, probably original plastered ceiling, and a secondary, adapted ceiling) as well as ceiling joists in the southernmost rooms have collapsed. Because of the dangerous condition of the interior of the building, additional interior photography was not attempted at this time. - Perry Township School No. 3, Middle Mount Vernon & Eickhoff Roads, Evansville, Vanderburgh County, IN

  3. Can Porphyritic Chondrules Form in Planetary Embryo Bow Shocks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, A. M.; Desch, S. J.; Schrader, D. L.; Till, C. B.

    2017-05-01

    This work investigates the validity of planetary embryo bow shocks as a possible chondrule formation mechanism. We have conducted experiments to test whether cooling rates > 3000 K/hr can yield porphyritic textures.

  4. Public Participation in Planetary Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Louis

    2000-07-01

    In the past several years The Planetary Society has created several innovative opportunities for general public participation in the exploration of the solar system and the search for extraterrestrial life. The conduct of such exploration has traditionally been the province of a few thousand, at most, of professionally involved scientists and engineers. Yet the rationale for spending resources required by broad and far-reaching exploration involves a greater societal interest - it frequently being noted that the rationale cannot rely on science alone. This paper reports on the more notable of the opportunities for general public participation, in particular: 1) Visions of Mars: a CD containing the works of science fiction about Mars, designed to be placed on Mars as the first library to be found by eventual human explorers; 2) MAPEX: a Microelectronics And Photonics Experiment, measuring the radiation environment for future human explorers of Mars, and containing a electron beam lithograph of names of all the members of The Planetary Society at a particular time; 3) Naming of spacecraft: Involvement in the naming of spacecraft: Magellan, Sojourner; 4) The Mars Microphone: the first privately funded instrument to be sent to another world; 5) Red Rover Goes to Mars: the first commercial-education partnership on a planetary mission; 6) Student designed nanoexperiments: to fly on a Mars lander; and 7) SETI@home: a tool permitting millions to contribute to research and data processing in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. A brief description of each of the projects will be given, and the opportunity it provided for public participation described. The evolving complexity of these projects suggest that more opportunities will be found, and that the role of public participation can increase at the same time as making substantive contributions to the flight missions. It will be suggested that these projects presage the day that planetary exploration will be truly

  5. Seismology and the Interior of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerdt, William

    2012-07-01

    In addition to its intrinsic interest, Mars is particularly well-suited for studying the full range of processes and phenomena related to early terrestrial planet evolution, from initial differentiation to the start of plate tectonics. It is large and complex enough to have undergone most of the processes that affected early Earth but, unlike the Earth, has apparently not undergone extensive plate tectonics or other major reworking that erased the imprint of early events (as evidenced by the presence of cratered surfaces older than 4 Ga). The martian mantle should have Earth-like polymorphic phase transitions and may even support a perovskite layer near the core (depending on the actual core radius), a characteristic that would have major implications for core cooling and mantle convection. Thus even the most basic measurements of planetary structure, such as crustal thickness, core radius, density and state (solid/liquid), and gross mantle velocity structure would provide invaluable constraints on models of early planetary evolution. The most effective means of making these measurements is seismology, as has been shown by its long and successful use on the Earth and the key discoveries it has made possible on the Moon. However, despite a wide recognition of its value to planetary science, the seismic investigation of Mars has remained tantalizingly out of reach for the past two decades, largely due to the relatively high cost of landing multiple long-lived spacecraft on Mars to comprise a seismic network for traditional body-wave travel-time analysis. In order to initiate a long-overdue mapping of the interior structure of Mars it appears necessary to begin with a single geophysical station, using methods that can derive interior information from a single seismometer. Fortunately many such methods exist, including source location through P-S and back-azimuth, receiver functions, identification of later phases (PcP, PKP, etc.), surface wave dispersion, and normal

  6. The lunar interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.; Kovach, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    The compressional velocities are estimated for materials in the lunar interior and compared with lunar seismic results. The lower crust has velocities appropriate for basalts or anorthosites. The high velocities associated with the uppermost mantle imply high densities and a change in composition to a lighter assemblage at depths of the order of 120 km. Calcium and aluminum are probably important components of the upper mantle and are deficient in the lower mantle. Much of the moon may have accreted from material similar in composition to eucrites. The important mineral of the upper mantle is garnet; possible accessory minerals are kyanite, spinel, and rutile. If the seismic results stand up, the high velocity layer in the moon is more likely to be a high pressure form of anorthosite than eclogite, pyroxenite, or dunite. The thickness of the layer is of the order of 50 km. Cosmic abundances can be maintained if the lower mantle is ferromagnesium silicate with minimal amounts of calcium and aluminum. Achondrites such as eucrites and howardites have more of the required characteristics of the lunar interior than carbonaceous chondrites. A density inversion in the moon is a strong possibility.

  7. Planetary Image Geometry Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert C.; Pariser, Oleg

    2010-01-01

    The Planetary Image Geometry (PIG) library is a multi-mission library used for projecting images (EDRs, or Experiment Data Records) and managing their geometry for in-situ missions. A collection of models describes cameras and their articulation, allowing application programs such as mosaickers, terrain generators, and pointing correction tools to be written in a multi-mission manner, without any knowledge of parameters specific to the supported missions. Camera model objects allow transformation of image coordinates to and from view vectors in XYZ space. Pointing models, specific to each mission, describe how to orient the camera models based on telemetry or other information. Surface models describe the surface in general terms. Coordinate system objects manage the various coordinate systems involved in most missions. File objects manage access to metadata (labels, including telemetry information) in the input EDRs and RDRs (Reduced Data Records). Label models manage metadata information in output files. Site objects keep track of different locations where the spacecraft might be at a given time. Radiometry models allow correction of radiometry for an image. Mission objects contain basic mission parameters. Pointing adjustment ("nav") files allow pointing to be corrected. The object-oriented structure (C++) makes it easy to subclass just the pieces of the library that are truly mission-specific. Typically, this involves just the pointing model and coordinate systems, and parts of the file model. Once the library was developed (initially for Mars Polar Lander, MPL), adding new missions ranged from two days to a few months, resulting in significant cost savings as compared to rewriting all the application programs for each mission. Currently supported missions include Mars Pathfinder (MPF), MPL, Mars Exploration Rover (MER), Phoenix, and Mars Science Lab (MSL). Applications based on this library create the majority of operational image RDRs for those missions. A

  8. Mars, Moon, Mercury: Magnetometry Constrains Planetary Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerney, John E. P.

    2015-04-01

    We have long appreciated that magnetic measurements obtained about a magnetized planet are of great value in probing the deep interior. The existence of a substantial planetary magnetic field implies dynamo action requiring an electrically conducting, fluid core in convective motion and a source of energy to maintain it. Application of the well-known Lowe's spectrum may in some cases identify the dynamo outer radius; where secular variation can be measured, the outer radius can be estimated using the frozen flux approximation. Magnetic induction may be used to probe the electrical conductivity of the mantle and crust. These are useful constraints that together with gravity and/or other observables we may infer the state of the interior and gain insight into planetary evolution. But only recently has it become clear that space magnetometry can do much more, particularly about a planet that once sustained a dynamo that has since disappeared. Mars is the best example of this class: the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft globally mapped a remanent crustal field left behind after the demise of the dynamo. This map is a magnetic record of the planet's evolution. I will argue that this map may be interpreted to constrain the era of dynamo activity within Mars; to establish the reversal history of the Mars dynamo; to infer the magnetization intensity of Mars crustal rock and the depth of the magnetized crustal layer; and to establish that plate tectonics is not unique to planet Earth, as has so often been claimed. The Lunar magnetic record is in contrast one of weakly magnetized and scattered sources, not easily interpreted as yet in terms of the interior. Magnetometry about Mercury is more difficult to interpret owing to the relatively weak field and proximity to the sun, but MESSENGER (and ultimately Beppi Columbo) may yet map crustal anomalies (induced and/or remanent).

  9. Interior Studies with BepiColombo's MPO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkhoff, Johannes; Zender, Joe

    2017-04-01

    NASA's MESSENGER mission has fundamentally changed our view of the innermost planet. Mercury is in many ways a very different planet from what we were expecting. Now BepiColombo has to follow up on answering the fundamental questions that MESSENGER raised and go beyond. BepiColombo is a joint project between ESA and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The Mission consists of two orbiters, the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) and the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO). The mission scenario foresees a launch of both spacecraft with an ARIANE V in October 2018 and an arrival at Mercury in 2025. From their dedicated orbits the two spacecraft will be studying the planet and its environment. The MPO scientific payload comprises eleven instruments/instrument packages; several of them dedicated to the study of the interior. Together, these instruments will perform measurements to enhance our knowledge of the planets figure and internal structure and composition. Expected results will provide further clues to the origin and evolution of a planet close to its parent star. In this presentation we will give an overview on the expected science return of BepiColombo with respect to the interior. In addition we give a brief update on the latest development status of the mission. All scientific instruments have been integrated into the spacecraft and both spacecraft are now under final acceptance testing.

  10. Exploration of the Moon to Enable Lunar and Planetary Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Moon represents an enabling Solar System exploration asset because of its proximity, resources, and size. Its location has facilitated robotic missions from 5 different space agencies this century. The proximity of the Moon has stimulated commercial space activity, which is critical for sustainable space exploration. Since 2000, a new view of the Moon is coming into focus, which is very different from that of the 20th century. The documented presence of volatiles on the lunar surface, coupled with mature ilmenite-rich regolith locations, represent known resources that could be used for life support on the lunar surface for extended human stays, as well as fuel for robotic and human exploration deeper into the Solar System. The Moon also represents a natural laboratory to explore the terrestrial planets and Solar System processes. For example, it is an end-member in terrestrial planetary body differentiation. Ever since the return of the first lunar samples by Apollo 11, the magma ocean concept was developed and has been applied to both Earth and Mars. Because of the small size of the Moon, planetary differentiation was halted at an early (primary?) stage. However, we still know very little about the lunar interior, despite the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments, and to understand the structure of the Moon will require establishing a global lunar geophysical network, something Apollo did not achieve. Also, constraining the impact chronology of the Moon allows the surfaces of other terrestrial planets to be dated and the cratering history of the inner Solar System to be constrained. The Moon also represents a natural laboratory to study space weathering of airless bodies. It is apparent, then, that human and robotic missions to the Moon will enable both science and exploration. For example, the next step in resource exploration is prospecting on the surface those deposits identified from orbit to understand the yield that can be expected. Such prospecting will also

  11. Application of shock wave data to earth and planetary science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    It is pointed out that shock wave data for: (1) low temperature condensable gases H2 and He, (2) H2O, CH4, NH3, CO, CO2, and N2 ices, and (3) silicates, metals, oxides and sulfides have many applications in geophysics and planetary science. The present paper is concerned with such applications. The composition of planetary interiors is discussed, taking into account the division of the major constituent of the planets in three groups on the basis of 'cosmic abundance' arguments, the H-He mixtures in the case of Jupiter and Saturn, shock wave data for hydrogen, and constraints on the internal structure of Uranus and Neptune. Attention is also given to the earth's mantle, shock wave data for mantle materials, the earth's core, impacts on planetary surfaces, elastic wave velocities as a function of pressure along the Hugoniot of iron, and reactions which yield the CO2 bearing atmospheres for Venus, earth, and Mars.

  12. In situ methods for measuring thermal properties and heat flux on planetary bodies.

    PubMed

    Kömle, Norbert I; Hütter, Erika S; Macher, Wolfgang; Kaufmann, Erika; Kargl, Günter; Knollenberg, Jörg; Grott, Matthias; Spohn, Tilman; Wawrzaszek, Roman; Banaszkiewicz, Marek; Seweryn, Karoly; Hagermann, Axel

    2011-06-01

    The thermo-mechanical properties of planetary surface and subsurface layers control to a high extent in which way a body interacts with its environment, in particular how it responds to solar irradiation and how it interacts with a potentially existing atmosphere. Furthermore, if the natural temperature profile over a certain depth can be measured in situ, this gives important information about the heat flux from the interior and thus about the thermal evolution of the body. Therefore, in most of the recent and planned planetary lander missions experiment packages for determining thermo-mechanical properties are part of the payload. Examples are the experiment MUPUS on Rosetta's comet lander Philae, the TECP instrument aboard NASA's Mars polar lander Phoenix, and the mole-type instrument HP(3) currently developed for use on upcoming lunar and Mars missions. In this review we describe several methods applied for measuring thermal conductivity and heat flux and discuss the particular difficulties faced when these properties have to be measured in a low pressure and low temperature environment. We point out the abilities and disadvantages of the different instruments and outline the evaluation procedures necessary to extract reliable thermal conductivity and heat flux data from in situ measurements.

  13. In situ methods for measuring thermal properties and heat flux on planetary bodies

    PubMed Central

    Kömle, Norbert I.; Hütter, Erika S.; Macher, Wolfgang; Kaufmann, Erika; Kargl, Günter; Knollenberg, Jörg; Grott, Matthias; Spohn, Tilman; Wawrzaszek, Roman; Banaszkiewicz, Marek; Seweryn, Karoly; Hagermann, Axel

    2011-01-01

    The thermo-mechanical properties of planetary surface and subsurface layers control to a high extent in which way a body interacts with its environment, in particular how it responds to solar irradiation and how it interacts with a potentially existing atmosphere. Furthermore, if the natural temperature profile over a certain depth can be measured in situ, this gives important information about the heat flux from the interior and thus about the thermal evolution of the body. Therefore, in most of the recent and planned planetary lander missions experiment packages for determining thermo-mechanical properties are part of the payload. Examples are the experiment MUPUS on Rosetta's comet lander Philae, the TECP instrument aboard NASA's Mars polar lander Phoenix, and the mole-type instrument HP3 currently developed for use on upcoming lunar and Mars missions. In this review we describe several methods applied for measuring thermal conductivity and heat flux and discuss the particular difficulties faced when these properties have to be measured in a low pressure and low temperature environment. We point out the abilities and disadvantages of the different instruments and outline the evaluation procedures necessary to extract reliable thermal conductivity and heat flux data from in situ measurements. PMID:21760643

  14. The activities and prospect of planetary protection research in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming

    2016-07-01

    Planetary protection is an important activities and responsibilities for space exploration. In Chinese manned missions, micro-organism research and protection has been developed in Shenzhou-9, Shenzhou-10 and Tiangong-2 missions. In the experiment facility of Lunar Palace-1, the micro-organism pollution and protection/control technology has been studied. In the lunar sample recovery mission and China Mars mission, the planetary protection has become an important issue. This paper introduced the research about planetary protection in China. The planetary protection activities, strategy and procedures have been suggested for future space exploration program to meet the requirement for planetary protection, such as cabin pollution isolation, pollutant detection, and so on.

  15. Proceedings of the 39th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Sessions with oral presentations include: A SPECIAL SESSION: MESSENGER at Mercury, Mars: Pingos, Polygons, and Other Puzzles, Solar Wind and Genesis: Measurements and Interpretation, Asteroids, Comets, and Small Bodies, Mars: Ice On the Ground and In the Ground, SPECIAL SESSION: Results from Kaguya (SELENE) Mission to the Moon, Outer Planet Satellites: Not Titan, Not Enceladus, SPECIAL SESSION: Lunar Science: Past, Present, and Future, Mars: North Pole, South Pole - Structure and Evolution, Refractory Inclusions, Impact Events: Modeling, Experiments, and Observations, Mars Sedimentary Processes from Victoria Crater to the Columbia Hills, Formation and Alteration of Carbonaceous Chondrites, New Achondrite GRA 06128/GRA 06129 - Origins Unknown, The Science Behind Lunar Missions, Mars Volcanics and Tectonics, From Dust to Planets (Planetary Formation and Planetesimals):When, Where, and Kaboom! Astrobiology: Biosignatures, Impacts, Habitability, Excavating a Comet, Mars Interior Dynamics to Exterior Impacts, Achondrites, Lunar Remote Sensing, Mars Aeolian Processes and Gully Formation Mechanisms, Solar Nebula Shake and Bake: Mixing and Isotopes, Lunar Geophysics, Meteorites from Mars: Shergottite and Nakhlite Invasion, Mars Fluvial Geomorphology, Chondrules and Chondrule Formation, Lunar Samples: Chronology, Geochemistry, and Petrology, Enceladus, Venus: Resurfacing and Topography (with Pancakes!), Overview of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Mission, Mars Sulfates, Phyllosilicates, and Their Aqueous Sources, Ordinary and Enstatite Chondrites, Impact Calibration and Effects, Comparative Planetology, Analogs: Environments and Materials, Mars: The Orbital View of Sediments and Aqueous Mineralogy, Planetary Differentiation, Titan, Presolar Grains: Still More Isotopes Out of This World, Poster sessions include: Education and Public Outreach Programs, Early Solar System and Planet Formation, Solar Wind and Genesis, Asteroids, Comets, and Small Bodies, Carbonaceous

  16. Interior of Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Cutaway view of the possible internal structure of Io The surface of the satellite is a mosaic of images obtained in 1979 by NASA's Voyager spacecraft The interior characteristics are inferred from gravity field and magnetic field measurements by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. Io's radius is 1821 km, similar to the 1738 km radius of our Moon; Io has a metallic (iron, nickel) core (shown in gray) drawn to the correct relative size. The core is surrounded by a rock shell (shown in brown). Io's rock or silicate shell extends to the surface.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  17. The effect of carbon monoxide on planetary haze formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hörst, S. M.; Tolbert, M. A

    2014-01-20

    Organic haze plays a key role in many planetary processes ranging from influencing the radiation budget of an atmosphere to serving as a source of prebiotic molecules on the surface. Numerous experiments have investigated the aerosols produced by exposing mixtures of N{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} to a variety of energy sources. However, many N{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} atmospheres in both our solar system and extrasolar planetary systems also contain carbon monoxide (CO). We have conducted a series of atmosphere simulation experiments to investigate the effect of CO on the formation and particle size of planetary haze analogues for a range of CO mixing ratios using two different energy sources, spark discharge and UV. We find that CO strongly affects both number density and particle size of the aerosols produced in our experiments and indicates that CO may play an important, previously unexplored, role in aerosol chemistry in planetary atmospheres.

  18. Strongly Interacting Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Both ground-based Doppler surveys and NASA's Kepler mission have discovered a diversity of planetary system architectures that challenge theories of planet formation. Systems of tightly-packed or near-resonant planets are particularly useful for constraining theories of orbital migration and the excitation of orbital eccentricities and inclinations. In particular, transit timing variations (TTVs) provide a powerful tool to characterize the masses and orbits of dozens of small planets, including many planets at orbital periods beyond the reach of both current Doppler surveys and photoevaporation-induced atmospheric loss. Dynamical modeling of these systems has identified some ``supper-puffy'' planets, i.e., low mass planets with surprisingly large radii and low densities. I will describe a few particularly interesting planetary systems and discuss the implications for the formation of planets ranging from gaseous super-Earth-size planets to rocky planets the size of Mars.

  19. Planetary gear unit

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, S.

    1986-10-07

    This patent describes a planetary gear unit for the transmission of a motor vehicle, comprising: a first planetary gear unit which includes a pinion shaft, a planet pinion rotatably mounted on the pinion shaft, a sun gear engaging the planet pinion, and an arm member supporting the pinion shaft and having an extending portion extending to a point adjacent the sun gear; a thrust washer contacting the arm member, the thrust washer having radiating conduit means formed on a contacting surface thereof so as to communicate an inner circumference of the extending portion of the arm member with the pinion shaft, the pinion shaft having a conduit formed therein so as to communicate with the radiating conduit means with an inner surface of the planet pinion wherein the radiating conduit means further comprises uniform spaced bevel surfaces and grooves in communication with the bevel surfaces.

  20. NASA Planetary Rover Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavery, David; Bedard, Roger J., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Planetary Rover Project was initiated in 1989. The emphasis of the work to date has been on development of autonomous navigation technology within the context of a high mobility wheeled vehicle at the JPL and an innovative legged locomotion concept at Carnegie Mellon University. The status and accomplishments of these two efforts are discussed. First, however, background information is given on the three rover types required for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) whose objective is a manned mission to Mars.

  1. Galactic planetary science

    PubMed Central

    Tinetti, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Planetary science beyond the boundaries of our Solar System is today in its infancy. Until a couple of decades ago, the detailed investigation of the planetary properties was restricted to objects orbiting inside the Kuiper Belt. Today, we cannot ignore that the number of known planets has increased by two orders of magnitude nor that these planets resemble anything but the objects present in our own Solar System. Whether this fact is the result of a selection bias induced by the kind of techniques used to discover new planets—mainly radial velocity and transit—or simply the proof that the Solar System is a rarity in the Milky Way, we do not know yet. What is clear, though, is that the Solar System has failed to be the paradigm not only in our Galaxy but even ‘just’ in the solar neighbourhood. This finding, although unsettling, forces us to reconsider our knowledge of planets under a different light and perhaps question a few of the theoretical pillars on which we base our current ‘understanding’. The next decade will be critical to advance in what we should perhaps call Galactic planetary science. In this paper, I review highlights and pitfalls of our current knowledge of this topic and elaborate on how this knowledge might arguably evolve in the next decade. More critically, I identify what should be the mandatory scientific and technical steps to be taken in this fascinating journey of remote exploration of planets in our Galaxy. PMID:24664916

  2. Galactic planetary science.

    PubMed

    Tinetti, Giovanna

    2014-04-28

    Planetary science beyond the boundaries of our Solar System is today in its infancy. Until a couple of decades ago, the detailed investigation of the planetary properties was restricted to objects orbiting inside the Kuiper Belt. Today, we cannot ignore that the number of known planets has increased by two orders of magnitude nor that these planets resemble anything but the objects present in our own Solar System. Whether this fact is the result of a selection bias induced by the kind of techniques used to discover new planets--mainly radial velocity and transit--or simply the proof that the Solar System is a rarity in the Milky Way, we do not know yet. What is clear, though, is that the Solar System has failed to be the paradigm not only in our Galaxy but even 'just' in the solar neighbourhood. This finding, although unsettling, forces us to reconsider our knowledge of planets under a different light and perhaps question a few of the theoretical pillars on which we base our current 'understanding'. The next decade will be critical to advance in what we should perhaps call Galactic planetary science. In this paper, I review highlights and pitfalls of our current knowledge of this topic and elaborate on how this knowledge might arguably evolve in the next decade. More critically, I identify what should be the mandatory scientific and technical steps to be taken in this fascinating journey of remote exploration of planets in our Galaxy.

  3. Planetary gear train

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraiwa, K.

    1988-10-04

    A planetary gear train is described comprising: an input member; an output member; a first planetary gear set including a first sun gear, a first ring gear, and a first pinion carrier rotatably supporting first planet pinions; a secondary planetary gear set including a second sun gear, and second ring gear and a second pinion carrier rotatably supporting second planet pinions; first drive means for connecting the input member with the first ring gear; second drive means for connecting the input member with the first sun gear; third drive means for constantly connecting the first sun gear with the second sun gear and establishing a force transmitting positive drive from the first sun gear to the second sun gear, whereby the first sun gear rotates at a speed different from the second sun gear; first brake means for braking the second sun gear; second brake means for braking the second pinion carrier; fourth drive means for connecting the second ring gear with the output member and providing a first speed ratio therebetween; and fifth drive means for connecting the first pinion carrier with the output member and providing a second speed ratio therebetween, the second speed ratio being different from the first speed ratio.

  4. Halos around planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewitt, D. C.; Danielson, G. E.; Kupferman, P. N.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary results of a CCD survey designed to detect and investigate faint halos around planetary nebulae are reported. A TI 800 x 800 pixel CCD was used to take deep exposures of 44 planetary nebulae. The exposures were obtained through an H-alpha filter at the Cassegrain focus of the Palomar 1.5 m telescope. Spatial resolutions of 1 to 2 arcsec were obtained across 400 arcsec wide fields. The images, which are in many cases considerably deeper than any previously taken, reveal numerous planetary nebula halos. About two-thirds of the studied nebulae possess extensive outer halos, here defined as any extended emission beyond the 10 percent isophote. Ionized sulphur electron density measurements show that in some nebulae, the mass in the halo is comparable to the mass contained in the primary H II region. The data have been used to place constraints on the mode of origin of the halos. It is likely that the halos originate either by dynamical separation of a single ejected shell of gas or by the ejection of two or more such shells from the central star. It is possible but less likely that the halos are caused by excitation of the preplanetary stellar wind and improbable that the halos represent reflection nebulae.

  5. Resonance Trapping in Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pour, Nader H.

    1998-09-01

    We study dynamics of a planetary system that consists of a star and two planets taking into account dynamical friction. Numerical integrations of a restricted planar circular three body model of this system indicate resonance capture. The main purpose of this paper is to present the results of an extensive numerical experiment performed on this model and also to present analytical arguments for the observed resonance trapping and its consequences. The equations of motion are written in terms of Delaunay variables and the recently developed method of partial averaging near resonance* is employed in order to account for the behavior of the system at resonance. * C.Chicone, B.Mashhoon and D.Retzloff, Ann.Inst.Henri Poincare, Vol.64, no 1, 1996, p.87-125.

  6. Dust and Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Muddassir

    ABSTRACT Space is not empty it has comic radiations (CMBR), dust etc. Cosmic dust is that type of dust which is composed of particles in space which vary from few molecules to 0.1micro metres in size. This type of dust is made up of heavier atoms born in the heart of stars and supernova. Mainly it contains dust grains and when these dust grains starts compacting then it turns to dense clouds, planetary ring dust and circumstellar dust. Dust grains are mainly silicate particles. Dust plays a major role in our solar system, for example in zodiacal light, Saturn's B ring spokes, planetary rings at Jovian planets and comets. Observations and measurements of cosmic dust in different regions of universe provide an important insight into the Universe's recycling processes. Astronomers consider dust in its most recycled state. Cosmic dust have radiative properties by which they can be detected. Cosmic dusts are classified as intergalactic dusts, interstellar dusts and planetary rings. A planetary ring is a ring of cosmic dust and other small particles orbiting around a planet in flat disc shape. All of the Jovian planets in our solar system have rings. But the most notable one is the Saturn's ring which is the brightest one. In March 2008 a report suggested that the Saturn's moon Rhea may have its own tenuous ring system. The ring swirling around Saturn consists of chunks of ice and dust. Most rings were thought to be unstable and to dissipate over course of tens or hundreds of millions of years but it now appears that Saturn's rings might be older than that. The dust particles in the ring collide with each other and are subjected to forces other than gravity of its own planet. Such collisions and extra forces tend to spread out the rings. Pluto is not known to have any ring system but some Astronomers believe that New Horizons probe might find a ring system when it visits in 2015.It is also predicted that Phobos, a moon of Mars will break up and form into a planetary ring

  7. Modeling Needs for Advancing Solar System Exploration: Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Atmosphere-Surface-Interior Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daldorff, L. K. S.; Glocer, A.; Cohen, O.

    2017-02-01

    Models of planetary systems are key to understanding how these environments evolve and the implications for the origin and evolution of life. To do this, we need models that couple every aspect of the system from the Sun all the way to the interior.

  8. Water in the Earth's Interior: Distribution and Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peslier, Anne H.; Schönbächler, Maria; Busemann, Henner; Karato, Shun-Ichiro

    2017-08-01

    The concentration and distribution of water in the Earth has influenced its evolution throughout its history. Even at the trace levels contained in the planet's deep interior (mantle and core), water affects Earth's thermal, deformational, melting, electrical and seismic properties, that control differentiation, plate tectonics and volcanism. These in turn influenced the development of Earth's atmosphere, oceans, and life. In addition to the ubiquitous presence of water in the hydrosphere, most of Earth's "water" actually occurs as trace amounts of hydrogen incorporated in the rock-forming silicate minerals that constitute the planet's crust and mantle, and may also be stored in the metallic core. The heterogeneous distribution of water in the Earth is the result of early planetary differentiation into crust, mantle and core, followed by remixing of lithosphere into the mantle after plate-tectonics started. The Earth's total water content is estimated at 18_{-15}^{+81} times the equivalent mass of the oceans (or a concentration of 3900_{-3300}^{+32700} ppm weight H2O). Uncertainties in this estimate arise primarily from the less-well-known concentrations for the lower mantle and core, since samples for water analyses are only available from the crust, the upper mantle and very rarely from the mantle transition zone (410-670 km depth). For the lower mantle (670-2900 km) and core (2900-4500 km), the estimates rely on laboratory experiments and indirect geophysical techniques (electrical conductivity and seismology). The Earth's accretion likely started relatively dry because it mainly acquired material from the inner part of the proto-planetary disk, where temperatures were too high for the formation and accretion of water ice. Combined evidence from several radionuclide systems (Pd-Ag, Mn-Cr, Rb-Sr, U-Pb) suggests that water was not incorporated in the Earth in significant quantities until the planet had grown to ˜60-90% of its current size, while core formation

  9. Fluorine-Rich Planetary Environments as Possible Habitats for Life

    PubMed Central

    Budisa, Nediljko; Kubyshkin, Vladimir; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    In polar aprotic organic solvents, fluorine might be an element of choice for life that uses selected fluorinated building blocks as monomers of choice for self-assembling of its catalytic polymers. Organofluorine compounds are extremely rare in the chemistry of life as we know it. Biomolecules, when fluorinated such as peptides or proteins, exhibit a “fluorous effect”, i.e., they are fluorophilic (neither hydrophilic nor lipophilic). Such polymers, capable of creating self-sorting assemblies, resist denaturation by organic solvents by exclusion of fluorocarbon side chains from the organic phase. Fluorous cores consist of a compact interior, which is shielded from the surrounding solvent. Thus, we can anticipate that fluorine-containing “teflon”-like or “non-sticking” building blocks might be monomers of choice for the synthesis of organized polymeric structures in fluorine-rich planetary environments. Although no fluorine-rich planetary environment is known, theoretical considerations might help us to define chemistries that might support life in such environments. For example, one scenario is that all molecular oxygen may be used up by oxidation reactions on a planetary surface and fluorine gas could be released from F-rich magma later in the history of a planetary body to result in a fluorine-rich planetary environment. PMID:25370378

  10. NASA Planetary Science Summer School: Longitudinal Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giron, Jennie M.; Sohus, A.

    2006-12-01

    NASA’s Planetary Science Summer School is a program designed to prepare the next generation of scientists and engineers to participate in future missions of solar system exploration. The opportunity is advertised to science and engineering post-doctoral and graduate students with a strong interest in careers in planetary exploration. Preference is given to U.S. citizens. The “school” consists of a one-week intensive team exercise learning the process of developing a robotic mission concept into reality through concurrent engineering, working with JPL’s Advanced Project Design Team (Team X). This program benefits the students by providing them with skills, knowledge and the experience of collaborating with a concept mission design. A longitudinal study was conducted to assess the impact of the program on the past participants of the program. Data collected included their current contact information, if they are currently part of the planetary exploration community, if participation in the program contributed to any career choices, if the program benefited their career paths, etc. Approximately 37% of 250 past participants responded to the online survey. Of these, 83% indicated that they are actively involved in planetary exploration or aerospace in general; 78% said they had been able to apply what they learned in the program to their current job or professional career; 100% said they would recommend this program to a colleague.

  11. Planetary surface research with acoustic sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, C.; Seidensticker, K. J.

    2007-08-01

    Planetary space missions like Rosetta and ExoMars put more and more emphasis on the in-situ investigation of planetary surfaces. The use of mechanical vibrations in the audible frequency range provide a new means to study the structure and properties of the surface layers of terrestrial planets and minor bodies like comets. As the first of this new type of instruments, the Comet Acoustic Surface Sounding Experiment (CASSE) on the Rosetta Lander Philae intends to determine elastic parameters and the structure of the surface layer of the target comet. One drawback of CASSE is unknown possibly weak coupling to the cometary surface. A DFG project is being conducted at the DLR - Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt - to test the applicability of planetary penetration instruments like PLUTO, planetary sampling tool, developed for the Mars Express lander Beagle 2, or MUPUS, a heat probe instrument also on Philae, as stronger acoustic sources as well as to develop new methods for the analysis of acoustic data. From the analysis of the polarisation of the recorded acoustic signals it is possible to separate the mixture of different propagating wave types. These identified waves can be used for the determination of mechanical soil properties and near-surface layering. We also will present how acoustic receivers can be used to locate acoustic penetrators or nearby seismic sources using the travel time and/or the polarisation of the acoustic waves.

  12. Interior of Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Cutaway view of the possible internal structure of Europa The surface of the satellite is a mosaic of images obtained in 1979 by NASA's Voyager spacecraft. The interior characteristics are inferred from gravity field and magnetic field measurements by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. Europa's radius is 1565 km, not too much smaller than our Moon's radius. Europa has a metallic (iron, nickel) core (shown in gray) drawn to the correct relative size. The core is surrounded by a rock shell (shown in brown). The rock layer of Europa (drawn to correct relative scale) is in turn surrounded by a shell of water in ice or liquid form (shown in blue and white and drawn to the correct relative scale). The surface layer of Europa is shown as white to indicate that it may differ from the underlying layers. Galileo images of Europa suggest that a liquid water ocean might now underlie a surface ice layer several to ten kilometers thick. However, this evidence is also consistent with the existence of a liquid water ocean in the past. It is not certain if there is a liquid water ocean on Europa at present.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  13. Martian impact craters - Correlations of ejecta and interior morphologies with diameter, latitude, and terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, Nadine G.; Bradley, Tracy L.

    1990-01-01

    An effort is made to establish the ability of a correlation between crater morphology and latitude, diameter, and terrain, to discriminate among the effects of impact energy, atmosphere, and subsurface volatiles in 3819 larger-than-8 km diameter craters distributed over the Martian surface. It is noted that changes in ejecta and interior morphology correlate with increases in crater diameter, and that while many of the interior structures exhibit distributions interpretable as terrain-dependent, central peak and peak ring interior morphologies exhibit minimal relationships with planetary properties.

  14. Online Planetary Science Courses at Athabasca University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, M. G.; Bredeson, C.; Munyikwa, K.

    2014-12-01

    Athabasca University offers distance education courses in science, at freshman and higher levels. It has a number of geology courses, and recently opened a planetary science course as the first upper division astronomy course after many years of offering freshman astronomy. Astronomy 310, Planetary Science, focuses on the physics of the Solar System and allows the study of planetary astronomy in a deeper way than what is offered in a freshman course. With a mathematically based approach, it looks at the planets and smaller bodies such as meteoroids, asteroids and comets found in our own solar neighbourhood. It provides an understanding of the basic physics and equations needed for studies of planetary science and looks at the formation of the principal bodies in the Solar System. It investigates the interiors of planets and planetary surface phenomena such as cratering, volcanism and tectonics, and examines the atmospheres of planets, including how they originated and whether planets can keep an atmosphere. As a new course, it has grown rapidly.Geology 415, Earth's Origin and Early Evolution, explores the evidence for the various processes, events, and materials involved in the formation and evolution of Earth. The course provides an overview of objects in the Solar System, including the Sun, the planets, asteroids, comets, and meteoroids. Earth's place in the Solar System is examined and physical laws that govern the motion of objects in the universe are looked at. Various geochemical tools and techniques used by geologists to reveal and interpret the evidence for the formation and evolution of bodies in the Solar System as well as the age of Earth are also explored. After looking at lines of evidence used to reconstruct the evolution of the Solar System, processes involved in the formation of planets and stars are examined. The course concludes with a look at the origin and nature of Earth's internal structure. GEOL415 is a senior undergraduate course and enrols

  15. The Role of Planetary Data System Archive Standards in International Planetary Data Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinness, Edward; Slavney, Susan; Beebe, Reta; Crichton, Daniel

    A major objective of NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) is to efficiently archive and make accessible digital data produced by NASA's planetary missions, research programs, and data analysis programs. The PDS is comprised of a federation of groups known as nodes, with each node focused on archiving and managing planetary data from a given science discipline. PDS nodes include Atmospheres, Geosciences, Small Bodies (asteroids, comets, and dust), Rings, Planetary Plasma Interactions, and Imaging. There are also support nodes for engineering, radio science, and ancillary data, such as geometry information. The PDS archives include space-borne, ground-based, and laboratory experiment data from several decades of NASA exploration of comets, asteroids, moons, and planets. PDS archives are peer-reviewed, welldocumented, and accessible online via web sites, catalogs, and other user-interfaces that provide search and retrieval capabilities. Current holdings within the PDS online repositories total approximately 50 TB of data. Over the next few years, the PDS is planning for a rapid expansion in the volume of data being delivered to its archives. The archive standards developed by the PDS are crucial elements for producing planetary data archives that are consistent across missions and planetary science disciplines and that yield archives that are useable by the planetary research community. These standards encompass the full range of archiving needs. They include standards for the format of data products and the metadata needed to detail how observations were made. They also specify how data products and ancillary information such as documentation, calibration, and geometric information are packaged into data sets. The PDS standards are documented in its Planetary Science Data Dictionary and in its Standards Reference Document and Archive Preparation Guide. The PDS standards are being used to design and implement data archives for current and future NASA planetary missions

  16. 15. Interior view, greenhouse, from the northwest. The greenhouse interior ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Interior view, greenhouse, from the northwest. The greenhouse interior was quite modest, the space between the floor of the lower level and the joists carrying the loft floor is only five-and-one-half feet. - John Bartram House & Garden, Greenhouse, 54th Street & LIndbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  17. 46. INTERIOR VIEW TO SOUTH ON SECOND FLOOR: Interior view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. INTERIOR VIEW TO SOUTH ON SECOND FLOOR: Interior view looking south along the east wall on the second floor of the powerhouse and car barn. Note the cable car truck in the foreground. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  18. 45. INTERIOR VIEW TO SOUTHWEST ON SECOND FLOOR: Interior view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. INTERIOR VIEW TO SOUTHWEST ON SECOND FLOOR: Interior view towards southwest on second floor of main portion of the powerhouse and car barn. This space is used for repair and storage of cable cars. Note wooden trussed roof. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  19. 44. SECOND FLOOR 'ANNEX' INTERIOR VIEW TO SOUTHWEST: Interior ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. SECOND FLOOR 'ANNEX' - INTERIOR VIEW TO SOUTHWEST: Interior view towards southwest on second floor of the powerhouse 'annex.' Note the steel column and beam construction and the old shunt car formerly used to move cable cars around the yard. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  20. Hangar no. 2 interior detail of roof structures and interior ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Hangar no. 2 interior detail of roof structures and interior work spaces. Note concrete piers and cross bracing. Seen at trusses no. 42, 43, & 44. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Southern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Near intersection of Windmill Road & Johnson Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  1. Cosmological Effects in Planetary Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blume, H. J.; Wilson, T. L.

    2010-01-01

    In an earlier discussion of the planetary flyby anomaly, a preliminary assessment of cosmological effects upon planetary orbits exhibiting the flyby anomaly was made. A more comprehensive investigation has since been published, although it was directed at the Pioneer anomaly and possible effects of universal rotation. The general subject of Solar System anomalies will be examined here from the point of view of planetary science.

  2. Universal planetary tectonics (supertectonics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2009-04-01

    Universal planetary tectonics (supertectonics) G. Kochemasov IGEM of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia, kochem.36@mail.ru The wave planetology [1-3 & others] proceeds from the following: "planetary structures are made by orbits and rotations". A uniform reason makes uniform structures. Inertia-gravity waves arising in planetary bodies due to their movements in Keplerian elliptical orbits with periodically changing accelerations warp these bodies in such way that they acquire polyhedron shapes (after interference of standing waves of four directions). Strong Newtonian gravity makes bodies larger than ~400 to 500 km in diameter globular and polyhedra are rarely seen. Only geomorphologic, geologic and geophysical mapping can develop these hidden structures. But small bodies, normally less than ~ 300 to 400 km in diameter, often show parts of the polyhedra, rarely fully developed forms (the asteroid Steins and satellite Amalthea present rather perfect forms of "diamond"). Depending on warping wavelengths (they make harmonics) various Plato's figures superimposed on each other can be distinguished. The fundamental wave 1 produces a tetrahedron, intrinsically dichotomic figure in which a vertex (contraction) always is opposed to a face (expansion). From the recent examples the best is the saturnian northern hexagon (a face) opposed to the southern hurricane (a vertex). The first overtone wave 2 is responsible for creation of structural octahedra. Whole ‘diamonds" and their parts are known [4, 5]. Other overtones produce less developed (because of smaller wave amplitudes) planetary shapes complicating main forms. Thus, the first common structural peculiarity of planetary bodies is their polyhedron nature. Not less important is the second common structural peculiarity. As all globular or smaller more or less isometric bodies rotate, they have an angular momentum. It is inevitably different in tropic and extra-tropic belts having uneven radii or distances to

  3. Effects of dispersed particulates on the rheology of water ice at planetary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, William B.; Kirby, Stephen H.; Stern, Laura A.

    1992-01-01

    Effects of the initial grain size and the hard particulate impurities on the transient and the steady state flows of water ice I were investigated under laboratory conditions selected as appropriate for simulating those of the surfaces and interiors of large moons. The samples were molded with particulate volume fraction, phi, of 0.001 to 0.56 and particle sizes of 1 to 150 microns; deformation experiments were conducted at constant shortening rates of 4.4 x 10 exp -7 to 4.9 x 10 exp -4 per sec at pressures of 50 and 100 MPa and temperatures 77 to 223 K. The results obtained suggest that viscous drag occurs in the ice as it flows around hard particulates. Mixed-phase ice was found to be tougher than pure ice, extending the range of bulk plastic deformation vs. faulting to lower temperatures and higher strain rates. It is suggested that bulk planetary compositions of ice + rock (phi = 0.4-0.5) are roughly 2 orders of magnitude more viscous than pure ice, leading to thermal instability inside giant icy moons and possibly explaining the retention of crater topography on icy planetary surfaces.

  4. Effects of dispersed particulates on the rheology of water ice at planetary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, William B.; Kirby, Stephen H.; Stern, Laura A.

    1992-01-01

    Effects of the initial grain size and the hard particulate impurities on the transient and the steady state flows of water ice I were investigated under laboratory conditions selected as appropriate for simulating those of the surfaces and interiors of large moons. The samples were molded with particulate volume fraction, phi, of 0.001 to 0.56 and particle sizes of 1 to 150 microns; deformation experiments were conducted at constant shortening rates of 4.4 x 10 exp -7 to 4.9 x 10 exp -4 per sec at pressures of 50 and 100 MPa and temperatures 77 to 223 K. The results obtained suggest that viscous drag occurs in the ice as it flows around hard particulates. Mixed-phase ice was found to be tougher than pure ice, extending the range of bulk plastic deformation vs. faulting to lower temperatures and higher strain rates. It is suggested that bulk planetary compositions of ice + rock (phi = 0.4-0.5) are roughly 2 orders of magnitude more viscous than pure ice, leading to thermal instability inside giant icy moons and possibly explaining the retention of crater topography on icy planetary surfaces.

  5. Thermal Modeling on Planetary Regoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, A. S.; Hapke, B.W.

    2002-01-01

    The thermal region of the spectrum is one of special interest in planetary science as it is the only region where planetary emission is significant. Studying how planetary surfaces emit in the thermal infrared can tell us about their physical makeup and chemical composition, as well as their temperature profile with depth. This abstract will discuss a model of thermal energy transfer in planetary regoliths on airless bodies which includes both conductive and radiative processes while including the time dependence of the solar input function.

  6. Thermal Modeling on Planetary Regoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, A. S.; Hapke, B.W.

    2002-01-01

    The thermal region of the spectrum is one of special interest in planetary science as it is the only region where planetary emission is significant. Studying how planetary surfaces emit in the thermal infrared can tell us about their physical makeup and chemical composition, as well as their temperature profile with depth. This abstract will discuss a model of thermal energy transfer in planetary regoliths on airless bodies which includes both conductive and radiative processes while including the time dependence of the solar input function.

  7. The Geophysics of Mercury: Shape, Interior Structure and Thermal Evolution from MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuber, M. T.; Phillips, R. J.; Smith, D. E.; Solomon, S. C.; Hauck, S. A.; Head, J. W.; Lemoine, F. G.; Neumann, G. A.; Peale, S. J.; Margot, J.; Johnson, C. L.; Oberst, J.; Purucker, M. E.; Mazarico, E.; Perry, M. E.; Barnouin, O. S.; McNutt, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    The surface and interior of Mercury preserve collectively the record of processes that contributed to the planet's thermal evolution: accretion, differentiation, orbital, rotational and internal dynamics, impact cratering, tectonics and volcanism. Reconstructing Mercury's evolution requires relating internal structure and planetary dynamics to topography, chemistry and surface geology. Observations from the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) and Radio Science (RS) experiments from the flyby and orbital phases of the MESSENGER mission are being analyzed in support of that goal. The MLA obtains returns from the surface at slant ranges <1500 km and has yielded a geodetically-referenced model of northern hemisphere topography. Elevations in the northern hemisphere exhibit a symmetric, unimodal distribution with short tails and a dynamic range of 9.6 km. A spherical harmonic fit of low-latitude topography confirms the ellipsoidal shape and orientation of the equator and a 0.015o downward to east slope indicative of an offset between the center of mass and center of figure in the equatorial plane. This distinctive feature of the planetary shape reflects an east-west hemispheric difference in internal structure that could potentially arise from crustal thickness or crustal density variations, large-scale mantle density variations, or topography along the Mercury's core-mantle boundary. The floor of the major impact basin Caloris has been significantly modified, with the northern sections rising above the basin rim. The north polar region shows an irregular topographic depression of 2-4 km depth centered on the north pole. The feature may have migrated to the pole due to reorientation of the planet's inertia axes. The depression could represent a non-hydrostatic contribution to the planetary flattening that must be isolated and removed prior to interpreting the flattening in the context of the radial distribution of interior mass. Analysis of X-band Doppler tracking of

  8. Mixtures of planetary ices at extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mal-Soon; Scandolo, Sandro

    2011-02-08

    The interiors of Neptune and Uranus are believed to be primarily composed of a fluid mixture of methane and water. The mixture is subjected to pressures up to several hundred gigapascal, causing the ionization of water. Laboratory and simulation studies so far have focused on the properties of the individual components. Here we show, using first-principle molecular dynamic simulations, that the properties of the mixed fluid are qualitatively different with respect to those of its components at the same conditions. We observe a pressure-induced softening of the methane-water intermolecular repulsion that points to an enhancement of mixing under extreme conditions. Ionized water causes the progressive ionization of methane and the mixture becomes electronically conductive at milder conditions than pure water, indicating that the planetary magnetic field of Uranus and Neptune may originate at shallower depths than currently assumed.

  9. Small Satellites Embedded in Dense Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, J. M.

    2005-08-01

    A small satellite that inhabits a narrow gap in an dense planetary ring, such as Pan, will excite wakes at the gap edges, as well as spiral waves deeper in the ring. As the satellite disturbs the ring, it also draws angular momentum from the ring matter that orbits just interior to the satellite, while depositing that angular momentum among the ring particles that orbit just exterior. This outward transport of angular momentum causes the orbits of the nearby ring particles to slowly shrink, dragging along with them the satellite in its gap. This inward motion is of course type II migration that is familiar from planet formation theory. The significance of type II migration, if any, will also be assessed for the small satellites that orbit within Saturn's rings.

  10. X-Ray Observations of Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, M. A.; Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R. A.

    2004-07-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) are an exciting addition to the zoo of X-ray sources. Recent Chandra and XMM-Newton observations have detected diffuse X-ray emission from shocked fast winds in PN interiors as well as bow-shocks of fast collimated outflows impinging on the nebular envelope. Point X-ray sources associated with PN central stars are also detected, with the soft X-ray (<0.5 keV) emission originating from the photospheres of stars hotter than ˜100,000 K, and the hard X-ray (≫0.5 keV) emission from instability shocks in the fast stellar wind itself or from a low-mass companion's coronal activity. X-ray observations of PNe offer a unique opportunity to directly examine the dynamic effects of fast stellar winds and collimated outflows, and help us understand the formation and evolution of PNe.

  11. Planetary Sciences: American and Soviet Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, Thomas M. (Editor); Trivers, Kathleen Kearney (Editor); Abramson, David M. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Papers presented at the US-USSR Workshop on Planetary Sciences are compiled. The purpose of the workshop was to examine the current state of theoretical understanding of how the planets were formed and how they evolved to their present state. The workshop assessed the types of observations and experiments that are needed to advance understanding of the formation and evolution of the solar system based on the current theoretical framework.

  12. Detection techniques for tenuous planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenig, S. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    Electrostatic charging of dust and its effect on planetary atmospheres is discussed, along with its applications to Martian atmosphere. Laboratory and field experiments in dust storms indicate that the major atmospheric parameters on Mars include: (1) pressure, temperature, and relative humidity; (2) wind velocity and direction; (3) particulate size and composition; and (4) electrostatic charge and field gradient. Various instrumentation techniques adapted for a Mars Lander are briefly reviewed. The effect of exoelectron emission on surface catalysis is studied.

  13. The Program of ``EXOMARS'' Mission Planetary Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamidullina, N.; Novikova, Nataliya; Deshevaya, Elena; Orlov, Oleg; Aleksashkin, Sergey; Kalashnikov, Viktor; Trofimov, Vladislav

    The main purpose of “Exomars” interplanetary mission is landing of Descent Module onto the Mars surface and investigation of Martian environment, including implementation of biological experiments on the search for possible life forms by Rover. According to COSPАR classification the Descent Module is related to category IVa and the Rover is related to category IVb. The report contains main provisions of the program on planetary protection of Mars which will be implemented in the process of the mission preparation.

  14. Planetary atmospheric physics and solar physics research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    An overview is presented on current and planned research activities in the major areas of solar physics, planetary atmospheres, and space astronomy. The approach to these unsolved problems involves experimental techniques, theoretical analysis, and the use of computers to analyze the data from space experiments. The point is made that the research program is characterized by each activity interacting with the other activities in the laboratory.

  15. Dynamics of planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, S.

    1991-02-01

    The modeling of the dynamics of particle collisions within planetary rings is discussed. Particles in the rings collide with one another because they have small random motions in addition to their orbital velocity. The orbital speed is roughly 10 km/s, while the random motions have an average speed of about a tenth of a millimeter per second. As a result, the particle collisions are very gentle. Numerical analysis and simulation of the ring dynamics, performed with the aid of a supercomputer, is outlined.

  16. Planetary cratering mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okeefe, John D.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1992-01-01

    To obtain a quantitative understanding of the cratering process over a broad range of conditions, we have numerically computed the evolution of impact induced flow fields and calculated the time histories of the major measures of crater geometry (e.g., depth diameter, lip height ...) for variations in planetary gravity (0 to 10 exp 9 cm/sq seconds), material strength (0 to 140 kbar), thermodynamic properties, and impactor radius (0.05 to 5000 km). These results were fit into the framework of the scaling relations of Holsapple and Schmidt (1987). We describe the impact process in terms of four regimes: (1) penetration; (2) inertial; (3) terminal; and (4) relaxation.

  17. Robotic Planetary Drill Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Brian J.; Thompson, S.; Paulsen, G.

    2010-01-01

    Several proposed or planned planetary science missions to Mars and other Solar System bodies over the next decade require subsurface access by drilling. This paper discusses the problems of remote robotic drilling, an automation and control architecture based loosely on observed human behaviors in drilling on Earth, and an overview of robotic drilling field test results using this architecture since 2005. Both rotary-drag and rotary-percussive drills are targeted. A hybrid diagnostic approach incorporates heuristics, model-based reasoning and vibration monitoring with neural nets. Ongoing work leads to flight-ready drilling software.

  18. Planetary Spatial Analyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keely, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    This is a status report for the project entitled Planetary Spatial Analyst (PSA). This report covers activities from the project inception on October 1, 2007 to June 1, 2008. Originally a three year proposal, PSA was awarded funding for one year and required a revised work statement and budget. At the time of this writing the project is well on track both for completion of work as well as budget. The revised project focused on two objectives: build a solid connection with the target community and implement a prototype software application that provides 3D visualization and spatial analysis technologies for that community. Progress has been made for both of these objectives.

  19. Volcanoes. A planetary perspective.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, P.

    In this book, the author gives an account of the familiar violent aspects of volcanoes and the various forms that eruptions can take. He explores why volcanoes exist at all, why volcanoes occur where they do, and how examples of major historical eruptions can be interpreted in terms of physical processes. Throughout he attempts to place volcanism in a planetary perspective, exploring the pre-eminent role of submarine volcanism on Earth and the stunning range of volcanic phenomena revealed by spacecraft exploration of the solar system.

  20. Planetary geological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Rosaly M. C.; Solomonidou, Anezina

    2014-11-01

    In this introduction to planetary geology, we review the major geologic processes affecting the solid bodies of the solar system, namely volcanism, tectonism, impact cratering, and erosion. We illustrate the interplay of these processes in different worlds, briefly reviewing how they affect the surfaces of the Earth's Moon, Mercury, Venus and Mars, then focusing on two very different worlds: Jupiter's moon Io, the most volcanically active object in the solar system, and Saturn's moon Titan, where the interaction between a dense atmosphere and the surface make for remarkably earth-like landscapes despite the great differences in surface temperature and composition.

  1. Designing fire safe interiors.

    PubMed

    Belles, D W

    1992-01-01

    Any product that causes a fire to grow large is deficient in fire safety performance. A large fire in any building represents a serious hazard. Multiple-death fires almost always are linked to fires that grow quickly to a large size. Interior finishes have large, continuous surfaces over which fire can spread. They are regulated to slow initial fire growth, and must be qualified for use on the basis of fire tests. To obtain meaningful results, specimens must be representative of actual installation. Variables--such as the substrate, the adhesive, and product thickness and density--can affect product performance. The tunnel test may not adequately evaluate some products, such as foam plastics or textile wall coverings, thermoplastic materials, or materials of minimal mass. Where questions exist, products should be evaluated on a full-scale basis. Curtains and draperies are examples of products that ignite easily and spread flames readily. The present method for testing curtains and draperies evaluates one fabric at a time. Although a fabric tested alone may perform well, fabrics that meet test standards individually sometimes perform poorly when tested in combination. Contents and furnishings constitute the major fuels in many fires. Contents may involve paper products and other lightweight materials that are easily ignited and capable of fast fire growth. Similarly, a small source may ignite many items of furniture that are capable of sustained fire growth. Upholstered furniture can reach peak burning rates in less than 5 minutes. Furnishings have been associated with many multiple-death fires.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Vibrational-Rotational Spectroscopy For Planetary Atmospheres, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, M. J. (Editor); Fox, K. (Editor); Hornstein, J. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Comprehensive information on the composition and dynamics of the varied planetary atmospheres is summarized. New observations resulted in new demands for supporting laboratory studies. Spectra observed from spacecraft used to interpret planetary atmospheric structure measurements, to aid in greenhouse and cloud physics calculations, and to plan future experiments are discussed. Current findings and new ideas of physicists, chemists, and planetry astronomers relating to the knowledge of the structure of things large and small, of planets and of molecules are summarized.

  3. Laboratory Models of Librationally-Driven Flow in Planetary Core and Sub-Surface Oceans.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noir, Jerome; Hemmerlin, F.; Wicht, J.; Baca, S. M.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2008-09-01

    Many planetary bodies, including Mercury, Titan, Europa and the Earth's moon, undergo forced longitudinal librations. In this study, we investigate experimentally how longitudinal librations of a planet viscously couples with its interior fluid dynamics. We focus on libration frequencies less than or equal to the planetary rotation frequency, moderate Ekman numbers (E=10-2 to 10-5) and Rossby numbers between 0.03 and 5. In addition, we model flow in three different core geometry: full sphere, rinner 0.6 router and rinner 0.9 router. Direct flow visualizations in the experiment allows us to identify 3 distinct flow regimes, the onsets of which are governed by a critical boundary layer Reynolds number, Re, and are independent of the inner core size. For Re<20; the flow remains stable in the entire volume of fluid; coupled numerical simulations show that the flow is dominated by inertial modes. For 20Interior flow visualizations have shown that the longitudinal roll instability remains confined to a layer of fluid near the outer wall. For Re<120; the flow in the vicinity of the outer boundary becomes turbulent. In addition, we observe in the turbulent regime a net westward (retrograde) zonal flow in the bulk of the fluid. We estimate the boundary layer Reynolds number for the Earth's moon, Mercury, Titan and Europa to be Re=80, 450, 700 and 1200, respectively. Thus, librationaly driven turbulence may exist below Mercury's core-mantle boundary (CMB) and Titan and Europa ice-shell. In the Earth's moon, we argue that the flow below the CMB is in the laminar longitudinal roll regime. The authors wish to the thank NASA's PG&G and PME Programs for reasearch funding (NNG0697G).

  4. Atmospheric Excitation of Planetary Normal Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanimoto, Toshiro

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) understand the phenomenon of continuous free oscillations of the Earth and (2) examine the idea of using this phenomenon for planetary seismology. We first describe the results on (1) and present our evaluations of the idea (2) in the final section. In 1997, after almost forty years since the initial attempt by Benioff et al, continuous free oscillations of the Earth were discovered. Spheroidal fundamental modes between 2 and 7 millihertz are excited continuously with acceleration amplitudes of about 0.3-0.5 nanogals. The signal is now commonly found in virtually all data recorded by STS-1 type broadband seismometers at quiet sites. Seasonal variation in amplitude and the existence of two coupled modes between the atmosphere and the solid Earth support that these oscillations are excited by the atmosphere. Stochastic excitation due to atmospheric turbulence is a favored mechanism, providing a good match between theory and data. The atmosphere has ample energy to support this theory because excitation of these modes require only 500-10000 W whereas the atmosphere contains about 117 W of kinetic energy. An application of this phenomenon includes planetary seismology, because other planets may be oscillating due to atmospheric excitation. The interior structure of planets could be learned by determining the eigenfrequencies in the continuous free oscillations. It is especially attractive to pursue this idea for tectonically quiet planets, since quakes may be too infrequent to be recorded by seismic instruments.

  5. InSight Planetary Protection Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benardini, James; Vaishampayan, Parag; Chen, Fei; Kazarians, Gayane; Willis, Jason; Witte, Joe; Hendrickson, Ryan

    2016-07-01

    The InSight Project is a Discovery mission that consists of a single spacecraft with an overarching mission goal of illuminating the fundamentals of formation and evolution of terrestrial planets by investigating the interior structure and processes of Mars. The flight system is comprised of a 2008 Phoenix mission heritage cruise stage, aeroshell (heatshield and backshell), and lander. The lander payload contains cameras, a seismometer, a mole to penetrate the regolith (≤5 meters) to measure the geothermal gradient of Mars, and an auxiliary payload sensor suite to measure wind, temperature, and pressure. As a Mars lander mission without life detection instruments, the InSight mission has been designated PP Category IVa. Therefore, planetary protection bioburden requirements are applicable to this mission and require microbial reduction procedures and biological burden reports. Due to primary payload technical issues, InSight's 2016 launch has been delayed by NASA. The mission is currently under a re-planning phase. InSight has completed an approved Planetary Protection Plan, Subsidiary PP Plans, PP Implementation Documentation, and ~50% of the PPO verification biological assays. The flight system and additional payloads were assembled and being readied for launch at the launch site at the time of the project stand-down and has since been secured for storage. The status of the PP activities will be reported.

  6. Coupled evolution of the atmospheres and interiors of planets and satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Turcotte, D. L.; Solomon, S. C.; Sleep, N. H.

    1989-01-01

    The evolution of a planetary atmosphere can be powerfully influenced by the planetary interior's function as both a source and a sink of atmospheric constituents; the interior can in turn be strongly influenced by the atmosphere because the mechanism of interior heat loss depends on a volatile content for which the atmosphere can serve both as sink and source. The dependence of mantle rheology on volatile content could furnish a feedback mechanism tending to keep regassing/degassing in balance, thereby maintaining a relatively constant atmospheric mass. Consideration of the abundances of radiogenic and nonradiogenic noble gases in the earth's atmosphere, and of the fluxes of these gases from the mantle, support a large degassing event early on, followed by a decrease in degassing efficiency with time and relatively inefficient outgassing over most of geologic time.

  7. Testing Carbon Monoxide Self-Shielding Model with Laboratory Experiment and Its Implications for the Early Solar System's Oxygen Isotope Evolution Planetary Major Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Qing-zhu

    We propose a laboratory experiment designed to test the carbon monoxide self-shielding (COSS) model to explain the oxygen isotope distribution in the early Solar System materials, arguably one of the most fundamental problems in cosmochemistry today (Wiens et al. 1999; Burnett et al., 2003; 2011; McKeegan and Leshin, 2001; Yin 2004; Young 2007; McKeegan et al. 2011; Marty et al. 2011). Specifically, we propose to experimentally verify if the carbon monoxide (CO) photodissociation at vacuum- ultraviolet (VUV) wavelengths (90-110 nm) would produce the expected mass independent oxygen isotope fractionation as predicted in the recently revived self- shielding model (Clayton 2002; Yurimoto and Kuramoto, 2004; Lyons and Young, 2005). This model has been invoked to explain the peculiar oxygen isotope distribution observed in early solar system materials and has a specific prediction for the Sun's oxygen isotope composition, a top science priority of NASA's GENESIS Discovery Mission (Burnett et al., 2003; 2011). We have developed an experimental set-up and procedures, namely an ultra high-resolution two VUV Laser Photodissociation Photoionization Time-of-flight Mass Spectrometry (2VUV-LPP-TOF-MS), that would ensure the experimental conditions are reflective of the solar nebular photochemistry of CO. We describe our design concept and demonstrate our unique capability to perform this timely experiment on all major bands, with data obtained from the 105.17mn band (Band 31) as an example. The proposed experiment will be performed in VUV wavelength range (90-110 nm). An ultra-high resolution VUV laser will be sent across two separated molecular beams in sequence, the first one is for attenuation of light ("shielding") by CO absorption, and the second one is for fragmentation of CO by photodissociation. Following photodissociation of CO, all isotopic photo-fragments will be detected by another spatially overlapped but temporally slightly delayed photoionization VUV laser

  8. Testing Carbon Monoxide Self-Shielding Model with Laboratory Experiment and Its Implications for the Early Solar System's Oxygen Isotope Evolution - Planetary Major Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Qing-zhu

    We propose a laboratory experiment designed to test the carbon monoxide self-shielding (COSS) model to explain the oxygen isotope distribution in the early Solar System materials, arguably one of the most fundamental problems in cosmochemistry today (Wiens et al. 1999; Burnett et al., 2003; 2011; McKeegan and Leshin, 2001; Yin 2004; Young 2007; McKeegan et al. 2011; Marty et al. 2011). Specifically, we propose to experimentally verify if the carbon monoxide (CO) photodissociation at vacuum- ultraviolet (VUV) wavelengths (90-110 nm) would produce the expected mass independent oxygen isotope fractionation as predicted in the recently revived self- shielding model (Clayton 2002; Yurimoto and Kuramoto, 2004; Lyons and Young, 2005). This model has been invoked to explain the peculiar oxygen isotope distribution observed in early solar system materials and has a specific prediction for the Sun's oxygen isotope composition, a top science priority of NASA's GENESIS Discovery Mission (Burnett et al., 2003; 2011). We have developed an experimental set-up and procedures, namely an ultra high-resolution two VUV Laser Photodissociation Photoionization Time-of-flight Mass Spectrometry (2VUV-LPP-TOF-MS), that would ensure the experimental conditions are reflective of the solar nebular photochemistry of CO. We describe our design concept and demonstrate our unique capability to perform this timely experiment on all major bands, with data obtained from the 105.17mn band (Band 31) as an example. The proposed experiment will be performed in VUV wavelength range (90-110 nm). An ultra-high resolution VUV laser will be sent across two separated molecular beams in sequence, the first one is for attenuation of light ("shielding") by CO absorption, and the second one is for fragmentation of CO by photodissociation. Following photodissociation of CO, all isotopic photo-fragments will be detected by another spatially overlapped but temporally slightly delayed photoionization VUV laser

  9. Planetary image conversion task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, M. D.; Stanley, C. L.; Laughlin, G.

    1985-01-01

    The Planetary Image Conversion Task group processed 12,500 magnetic tapes containing raw imaging data from JPL planetary missions and produced an image data base in consistent format on 1200 fully packed 6250-bpi tapes. The output tapes will remain at JPL. A copy of the entire tape set was delivered to US Geological Survey, Flagstaff, Ariz. A secondary task converted computer datalogs, which had been stored in project specific MARK IV File Management System data types and structures, to flat-file, text format that is processable on any modern computer system. The conversion processing took place at JPL's Image Processing Laboratory on an IBM 370-158 with existing software modified slightly to meet the needs of the conversion task. More than 99% of the original digital image data was successfully recovered by the conversion task. However, processing data tapes recorded before 1975 was destructive. This discovery is of critical importance to facilities responsible for maintaining digital archives since normal periodic random sampling techniques would be unlikely to detect this phenomenon, and entire data sets could be wiped out in the act of generating seemingly positive sampling results. Reccomended follow-on activities are also included.

  10. Planetary Ringmoon Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The last decade has seen an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Much of the structure revealed was thoroughly puzzling and fired the imagination of workers in a variety of disciplines. Consequently, we have also seen steady progress in our understanding of these systems as our intuitions (and our computers) catch up with the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems (refs 1-5). The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems and families of regular satellites are invariably found together, and there is an emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system.

  11. Saturn PRobe Interior and aTmosphere Explorer (SPRITE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Amy; Banfield, D.; Atkinson, D.; Atreya, S.; Brinckerhoff, W.; Colaprete, A.; Coustenis, A.; Fletcher, L.; Guillot, T.; Hofstadter, M.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Vision and Voyages Planetary Decadal Survey identified a Saturn Probe mission as one of the high priority New Frontiers mission targets[1]. Many aspects of the Saturn system will not have been fully investigated at the end of the Cassini mission, because of limitations in its implementation and science instrumentation. Fundamental measurements of the interior structure and noble gas abundances of Saturn are needed to better constrain models of Solar System formation, as well as to provide an improved context for exoplanet systems. The SPRITE mission will fulfill the scientific goals of the Decadal Survey Saturn probe mission. It will also provide ground truth for quantities constrained by Cassini and conduct new investigations that improve our understanding of Saturn's interior structure and composition, and by proxy, those of extrasolar giant planets.

  12. Fourier spectroscopy and planetary research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanel, R. A.; Kunde, V. G.

    1974-01-01

    The application of Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (FTS) to planetary research is reviewed. The survey includes FTS observations of the sun, all the planets except Uranus and Pluto, the Galilean satellites and Saturn's rings. Instrumentation and scientific results are considered and the prospects and limitations of FTS for planetary research in the forthcoming years are discussed.

  13. Circumstellar disks and planetary formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huélamo, N.

    2017-03-01

    Circumstellar disks are very common around young intermediate-, low-mass stars, and brown dwarfs. They are the cradle of planetary systems, although the mechanism to form planets is still unknown. In this text I review some advances in the field of circumstellar disks and planetary formation coming from observations.

  14. Reports of planetary astronomy, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A collection is presented of summaries designed to provide information about scientific research projects conducted in the Planetary Astronomy Program in 1990 and 1991, and to facilitate communication and coordination among concerned scientists and interested persons in universities, government, and industry. Highlights of recent accomplishments in planetary astronomy are included.

  15. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The 34th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference was held March 17-21, 2003. Topics included planetary exploration, crater research on Mars, Earth, Moon, and other planets or satellites, imaging techniques and image analysis, age determination, albedo studies, petrographic studies, isotope composition studies, instrument design, sampling methods, landform analysis, asteroids, impact analysis, impact melts, and related research.

  16. The Birth of Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    1997-01-01

    Models of planet formation and of the orbital stability of planetary systems are described and used to discuss possible characteristics of undiscovered planetary systems. Modern theories of star and planet formation, which are based upon observations of the Solar System and of young stars and their environments, predict that rocky planets should form in orbit about most single stars. It is uncertain whether or not gas giant planet formation is common, because most protoplanetary disks may dissipate before solid planetary cores can grow large- enough to gravitationally trap substantial quantities of gas. Another potential hazard to planetary systems is radial decay of planetary orbits resulting from interactions with material within the disk. Planets more massive than Earth have the potential to decay the fastest, and may be able to sweep up smaller planets in their path. The implications of the giant planets found in recent radial velocity searches for the abundances of habitable planets are discussed.

  17. The International Planetary Data Alliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkissian, A.; Crichton, D. J.; Hughes, J. S.; Heather, D.; Martinez, S.; Beebe, R.; Neakrase, L. D. V.; Yamamoto, Y.; Capria, M. T.; Krishna, B. G.

    2013-09-01

    The International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA) is an international collaboration of space agencies with a mission of providing access to scientific data returned from solar system missions archived at international data centers. In order to improve access and share scientific data, the IPDA was founded to develop data and software standards. The IPDA has focused on promoting standards that drive common methods for collecting and describing planetary science data. An initial starting point for developing such a standard has been the internationalization of NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) standard, which has become the de-facto archival data standard. Given the demands of supporting more capable and international missions and collaborations, the Planetary Data System, in partnership with the IPDA, has embarked on developing a next generation data standard and system called PDS4. Significant progress has been made on PDS4 and early adopters are beginning to use the emerging standard on new planetary science missions.

  18. The Birth of Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    1997-01-01

    Models of planet formation and of the orbital stability of planetary systems are described and used to discuss possible characteristics of undiscovered planetary systems. Modern theories of star and planet formation, which are based upon observations of the Solar System and of young stars and their environments, predict that rocky planets should form in orbit about most single stars. It is uncertain whether or not gas giant planet formation is common, because most protoplanetary disks may dissipate before solid planetary cores can grow large- enough to gravitationally trap substantial quantities of gas. Another potential hazard to planetary systems is radial decay of planetary orbits resulting from interactions with material within the disk. Planets more massive than Earth have the potential to decay the fastest, and may be able to sweep up smaller planets in their path. The implications of the giant planets found in recent radial velocity searches for the abundances of habitable planets are discussed.

  19. The universal response of fluid interiors to end-member models of mechanical forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grannan, A. M.; Favier, B.; Ribeiro, A.; Le Bars, M.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Turbulence generated in electrically conductive liquid interiors of planetary bodies may be due, in part, to mechanical forcing through geophysically relevant mechanisms of precession/nutation, librations, tidal forcing, and collisions. Using experimental particle image velocimetry techniques accompanied by selected high-resolution numerical simulations, we show, for the first time, the generation of bulk-filling turbulence driven by high frequency tidal forcing. The transition to sustained turbulence is characterized by a succession of resonances first between the tidally forced ellipsoidal base flow with two primary inertial modes and subsequently between secondary inertial modes and the primary inertial modes. Furthermore, deviations in the amplitude of the time-averaged retrograde zonal flow suggest an as yet unseen secondary flow transition that may promote additional turbulence. The turbulence generated by high frequency, low amplitude tidal forcing is similar to the libration-driven turbulent flows studied by Grannan et al. [2014] and Favier et al. [2015]. These works reveal the universal fluid response to elliptical instability driven by separate models that correspond, in geophysical terms, to two end member types of mechanical forcing. In the first, non-synchronous satellites possess elastically deformable boundaries such that shape of the distortion has a non-zero mean motion. In the second, the core-mantle boundary of a body possesses an inherently rigid or tidally frozen-in ellipsoidal shape in a synchronous orbit such that the mean motion of the elliptically deformed boundary is zero. Although the strength of the mechanical forcing is much weaker at planetary settings, the corresponding viscous dissipation is also weaker and thus may still permit the generation of the same turbulent flow found in both experiments and numerical simulations. The efficacy of such turbulent flows in magnetic field generation and dissipation is currently being pursued

  20. The Evolution and Disruption of Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Gregory; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Planetary systems that encounter passing stars can experience severe orbital disruption, and the efficiency of this process is greatly enhanced when the impinging systems are binary pairs rather than single stars. Using a Monte Carlo approach, we have performed nearly half a million numerical experiments to examine the long term ramifications of planetary scattering on planetary systems. We have concluded that systems which form in dense environments such as Orion's Trapezium cluster have roughly a ten percent chance of being seriously disrupted. We have also used our programs to explore the long-term prospects for our own Solar system. Given the current interstellar environment, we have computed the odds that Earth will find its orbit seriously disrupted prior to the emergence of a runaway greenhouse effect driven by the Sun's increasing luminosity. This estimate includes both direct disruption events and scattering processes that seriously alter the orbits of the Jovian planets, which then force severe changes upon the Earth's orbit. We then explore the consequences of the Earth being thrown into deep space. The surface biosphere would rapidly shut down under conditions of zero insolation, but the Earth's radioactive heat is capable of maintaining life deep underground, and perhaps in hydrothermal vent communities, for some time to come. Although unlikely for the Earth, this scenario may be common throughout the universe, since many environments where liquid water could exist (e.g., Europa and Callisto) must derive their energy from internal (rather than external) heating.

  1. The Evolution and Disruption of Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Gregory; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Planetary systems that encounter passing stars can experience severe orbital disruption, and the efficiency of this process is greatly enhanced when the impinging systems are binary pairs rather than single stars. Using a Monte Carlo approach, we have performed nearly half a million numerical experiments to examine the long term ramifications of planetary scattering on planetary systems. We have concluded that systems which form in dense environments such as Orion's Trapezium cluster have roughly a ten percent chance of being seriously disrupted. We have also used our programs to explore the long-term prospects for our own Solar system. Given the current interstellar environment, we have computed the odds that Earth will find its orbit seriously disrupted prior to the emergence of a runaway greenhouse effect driven by the Sun's increasing luminosity. This estimate includes both direct disruption events and scattering processes that seriously alter the orbits of the Jovian planets, which then force severe changes upon the Earth's orbit. We then explore the consequences of the Earth being thrown into deep space. The surface biosphere would rapidly shut down under conditions of zero insolation, but the Earth's radioactive heat is capable of maintaining life deep underground, and perhaps in hydrothermal vent communities, for some time to come. Although unlikely for the Earth, this scenario may be common throughout the universe, since many environments where liquid water could exist (e.g., Europa and Callisto) must derive their energy from internal (rather than external) heating.

  2. 22. INTERIOR VIEW WITH INTERIOR VIEW OF MOLDING SANDS CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. INTERIOR VIEW WITH INTERIOR VIEW OF MOLDING SANDS CONTROL AND TEST LAB FOR UNIT NO. 2 GREY IRON DISAMATIC. SAND CASTING TECHNICIAN, ROY BATES, TESTS THE WEIGHT OF THE SAND, DRYS IT, AND WEIGHT IT AGAINST STANDARDS TO CALCULATE THE CORRECT MOISTURE NEEDED FOR DIFFERENT MOLDS. THE SAND MIX VARY WITH THE SIZE AND COMPOSITION OF THE CASTING. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  3. Technology for return of planetary samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The problem of returning a Mars sample to Earth was considered. The model ecosystem concept was advanced as the most reliable, sensitive method for assessing the biohazard from the Mars sample before it is permitted on Earth. Two approaches to ecosystem development were studied. In the first approach, the Mars sample would be introduced into the ecosystem and exposed to conditions which are as similar to the Martian environment as the constitutent terrestrial organisms can tolerate. In the second approach, the Mars sample would be tested to determine its effects on important terrestrial cellular functions. In addition, efforts were directed toward establishing design considerations for a Mars Planetary Receiving Laboratory. The problems encountered with the Lunar Receiving Laboratory were evaluated in this context. A questionnaire was developed to obtain information regarding important experiments to be conducted in the Planetary Receiving Laboratory.

  4. Neutron-gamma techniques for planetary exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. G.; Evans, L. G.; Trombka, J. I.

    1979-01-01

    Chemical analysis of planetary surfaces is necessary for the understanding of the origin and evolutionary processes of the solar system. Orbital lunar geochemical experiments performed during the Apollo 15 and 16 demonstrated that even with a low neutron flux (fast and thermal), reliable results could be extracted. The possibility of using a compact 14 MeV neutron generator for geochemical analysis of planetary surfaces, comets and asteroids is currently studied. This method allows the determination of bulk chemical composition, even in the presence of an atmosphere. This would be possible on the surface of Venus, for example, where alternate methods such as sample return are impractical. This method can be used for continuous monitoring of elemental abundances from a roving vehicle, for example, on the surface of Mars.

  5. Decision-Theoretic Control of Planetary Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilberstein, Shlomo; Washington, Richard; Bernstein, Daniel S.; Mouaddib, Abdel-Illah; Morris, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Planetary rovers are small unmanned vehicles equipped with cameras and a variety of sensors used for scientific experiments. They must operate under tight constraints over such resources as operation time, power, storage capacity, and communication bandwidth. Moreover, the limited computational resources of the rover limit the complexity of on-line planning and scheduling. We describe two decision-theoretic approaches to maximize the productivity of planetary rovers: one based on adaptive planning and the other on hierarchical reinforcement learning. Both approaches map the problem into a Markov decision problem and attempt to solve a large part of the problem off-line, exploiting the structure of the plan and independence between plan components. We examine the advantages and limitations of these techniques and their scalability.

  6. Distributed science operations for JPL planetary missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Richard D.; Kahn, Peter B.

    1993-01-01

    Advances in spacecraft, flight instruments, and ground systems provide an impetus and an opportunity for scientific investigation teams to take direct control of their instruments' operations and data collection while at the same time, providing a cost effective and flexible approach in support of increasingly complex science missions. Operations of science instruments have generally been integrated into planetary flight and ground systems at a very detailed level. That approach has been successful, but the cost of incorporating instrument expertise into the central mission operations system has been high. This paper discusses an approach to simplify planetary science operations by distributing instrument computing and data management tasks from the central mission operations system to each investigator's home center of observational expertise. Some early results of this operations concept will be presented based on the Mars Observer (MO) Project experience and Cassini Project plans.

  7. Self-Directed Cooperative Planetary Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilberstein, Shlomo; Morris, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The project is concerned with the development of decision-theoretic techniques to optimize the scientific return of planetary rovers. Planetary rovers are small unmanned vehicles equipped with cameras and a variety of sensors used for scientific experiments. They must operate under tight constraints over such resources as operation time, power, storage capacity, and communication bandwidth. Moreover, the limited computational resources of the rover limit the complexity of on-line planning and scheduling. We have developed a comprehensive solution to this problem that involves high-level tools to describe a mission; a compiler that maps a mission description and additional probabilistic models of the components of the rover into a Markov decision problem; and algorithms for solving the rover control problem that are sensitive to the limited computational resources and high-level of uncertainty in this domain.

  8. U.S. planetary protection program - Implementation highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barengoltz, J.; Stabekis, P. D.

    1983-01-01

    The implementation of the United States planetary protection program, intended to prevent the contamination of the celestial bodies in the solar system during their exploration, in recent interplanetary projects is reviewed. The shift in planetary protection policy from that of absolute sterilization to a probabilistic approach is noted. Attention is then given to the use of microbiological assay, organic materials inventory, microbial burden reduction, contamination control, trajectory biasing and the analysis and identification of contaminating processes for purposed of planetary protection for the Pioneer 10 and 11, Viking and Voyager projects. The success of these measures, as demonstrated by the prevention of accidental planetary impact and the failure to detect terrestrial organisms by the Viking life detection experiments, is pointed out.

  9. Measuring and interpreting X-ray fluorescence from planetary surfaces.

    PubMed

    Owens, Alan; Beckhoff, Burkhard; Fraser, George; Kolbe, Michael; Krumrey, Michael; Mantero, Alfonso; Mantler, Michael; Peacock, Anthony; Pia, Maria-Grazia; Pullan, Derek; Schneider, Uwe G; Ulm, Gerhard

    2008-11-15

    As part of a comprehensive study of X-ray emission from planetary surfaces and in particular the planet Mercury, we have measured fluorescent radiation from a number of planetary analog rock samples using monochromatized synchrotron radiation provided by the BESSY II electron storage ring. The experiments were carried out using a purpose built X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer chamber developed by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany's national metrology institute. The XRF instrumentation is absolutely calibrated and allows for reference-free quantitation of rock sample composition, taking into account secondary photon- and electron-induced enhancement effects. The fluorescence data, in turn, have been used to validate a planetary fluorescence simulation tool based on the GEANT4 transport code. This simulation can be used as a mission analysis tool to predict the time-dependent orbital XRF spectral distributions from planetary surfaces throughout the mapping phase.

  10. Planetary Moon Cycler Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Ryan P.; Strange, Nathan J.

    2007-01-01

    Free-return cycler trajectories repeatedly shuttle a spacecraft between two bodies using little or no fuel. Here, the cycler architecture is proposed as a complementary and alternative method for designing planetary moon tours. Previously applied enumerative cycler search and optimization techniques are generalized and specifically implemented in the Jovian and Saturnian moon systems. In addition, the algorithms are tested for general use to find non-Earth heliocentric cyclers. Overall, hundreds of ideal model ballistic cycler geometries are found and several representative cases are documented and discussed. Many of the ideal model solutions are found to remain ballistic in a zero radius sphere of influence patched conic ephemeris model, and preliminary work in a high-fidelity fully integrated model demonstrates near-ballistic cycles for several example cases.

  11. Planetary exploration sensor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    Most of the instruments that have been used in planetary exploration have been either spectrometers or imaging devices. Instruments of these types are being developed for the Galileo and VOIR (Venus Orbiting Imaging Radar) missions. Galileo will take advantage of new CCD (charge-coupled device) technology, and VOIR will use techniques of synthetic aperture radar developed for Seasat. For determining the macrostructure of mineral resources, the best approach is believed to involve acoustic imaging, essentially a seismic data processing technique. Determinations of microstructure would require a light microscope and an electron microscope. For determining the nature and form of volatiles, a differential scanning calorimeter could be used. To determine the mineral composition, an electron beam microprobe with X-ray fluorescence and spectroscopy would be used.

  12. Future planetary television cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, D. D.; Landauer, F. P.

    1976-01-01

    The evolution of planetary slow-scan vidicon cameras started with the exploratory flyby mission to Mars in 1965, and has continued through the planned launch of the Mariner Jupiter/Saturn 1977 Mission. To date, the camera performance has been constrained by limited spacecraft capabilities rather than driven by desires of experimenters. The paper traces this evolution for a generation of camera using charge-coupled device (CCD) sensors, which have greater capability within spacecraft weight and power constraints. Projections are given of scientific objectives for the CCD cameras, and it is shown how these objectives will drive the camera performance, data rates, on-board processing, pointing accuracy, and other spacecraft system parameters.

  13. Photochemistry in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.; Graedel, T. E.

    1981-01-01

    Widely varying paths of evolutionary history, atmospheric processes, solar fluxes, and temperatures have produced vastly different planetary atmospheres. The similarities and differences between the earth atmosphere and those of the terrestrial planets (Venus and Mars) and of the Jovian planets are discussed in detail; consideration is also given to the photochemistry of Saturn, Uranus, Pluto, Neptune, Titan, and Triton. Changes in the earth's ancient atmosphere are described, and problems of interest in the earth's present troposphere are discussed, including the down wind effect, plume interactions, aerosol nucleation and growth, acid rain, and the fate of terpenes. Temperature fluctuations in the four principal layers of the earth's atmosphere, predicted decreases in the ozone concentration as a function of time, and spectra of particles in the earth's upper atmosphere are also presented. Finally, the vertical structure of the Venus cloud system and the thermal structure of the Jovian planets are shown graphically.

  14. Planetary Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grande, M.

    2012-04-01

    Invited Talk - Space weather at other planets While discussion of space weather effects has so far largely been confined to the near-Earth environment, there are significant present and future applications to the locations beyond, and to other planets. Most obviously, perhaps, are the radiation hazards experienced by astronauts on the way to, and on the surface of, the Moon and Mars. Indeed, the environment experienced by planetary spacecraft in transit and at their destinations is of course critical to their design and successful operation. The case of forthcoming missions to Jupiter and Europa is an exreme example. Moreover, such craft can provide information which in turn increases our understanding of geospace. Indeed, space weather may be a significant factor in the habitability of other solar system and extrasolar planets, and the ability of life to travel between them.

  15. Formation of Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    An overview of current theories of star and planet formation is presented. These models are based upon observations of the Solar System and of young stars and their environments. They predict that rocky planets should form around most single stars, although it is possible that in some cases such planets are lost to orbital decay within the protoplanetary disk. The frequency of formation of gas giant planets is more difficult to predict theoretically. Terrestrial planets are believed to grow via pairwise accretion until the spacing of planetary orbits becomes large enough that the configuration is stable for the age of the system. Giant planets begin their growth like terrestrial planets, but they become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates.

  16. Deciphering Kepler's Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lithwick, Yoram

    The theory for how planetary systems form and achieve their final configuration remains highly uncertain. Until now, theories could only be tested against a single system -- the solar system. The Kepler mission, with its abundance of planetary systems, will likely prove to be a Rosetta stone. However, much remains to be deciphered. To help realize the potential of the Kepler mission, we propose to pursue the complementary tasks of characterizing the properties of the Kepler systems and developing theories to explain these properties: 1) Characterizing Kepler systems. We will characterize these planets using the transit-time-variation (TTV) signatures obtained by the mission. We have recently derived a simple expression for the TTV, and used it to derive the masses and eccentricities of a couple dozen Kepler planets. We will extend that work by applying it to many more planets, and by deriving higher-order TTV effects that will allow us to obtain more accurate measurements by breaking degeneracies. We will also use the TTV signals, as well as other observables, to infer the intrinsic orbital architecture of Kepler planets. This will form the basis for the following study. 2) Assembling Kepler systems. Informed by our above analysis, we will try to uncover how the Kepler planets were assembled onto their current orbits. Our recent work on the resonant repulsion mechanism suggests that the final assembly was shaped by a dissipative process, and we will explore that mechanism further. We will also run simulations to test the conjecture that planetesimals were the dissipative agent responsible for final assembly -- just as they are thought to be responsible for the assembly of the planets in the outer solar system

  17. Physics of planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkavyi, N.

    2007-08-01

    It is difficult to enumerate all the surprises presented by the planetary rings. The Saturnian rings are stratified into thousands of ringlets and the Uranian rings are compressed into narrow streams, which for some reason or other differ from circular orbits like the wheel of an old bicycle. The edge of the rings is jagged and the rings themselves are pegged down under the gravitational pressure of the satellites, bending like a ship's wake. There are spiral waves, elliptical rings, strange interlacing of narrow ringlets, and to cap it all one has observed in the Neptunian ring system three dense, bright arcs - like bunches of sausages on a transparent string. For celestial mechanics this is a spectacle as unnatural as a bear's tooth in the necklace of the English queen. In the dynamics of planetary rings the physics of collective interaction was supplemented by taking collisions between particles into account. One was led to study a kinetic equation with a rather complex collision integral - because the collisions are inelastic - which later on made it possible, both by using the Chapman-Enskog method and by using the solution of the kinetic equation for a plasma in a magnetic field, to reduce it to a closed set of (hydrodynamical) moment equations [1]. The hydrodynamical instabilities lead to the growth of short-wavelength waves and large-scale structures of the Saturnian rings [1]. We have shown that the formation of the existing dense Uranian rings is connected with the capture of positively drifting ring particles in inner Lindblad resonances which arrest this drift [1]. After the formation of dense rings at the positions of satellite resonances the collective interaction between resonant particles is amplified and the rings can leave the resonance and drift away from the planet and the parent resonance. We can expect in the C ring an appreciable positive ballistic particle drift caused by the erosion of the B ring by micrometeorites. It is therefore natural

  18. Europlanet Research Infrastructure: Planetary Simulation Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, G. R.; Mason, N. J.; Green, S.; Gómez, F.; Prieto, O.; Helbert, J.; Colangeli, L.; Srama, R.; Grande, M.; Merrison, J.

    2008-09-01

    . Potential phenomena for study include dust charging, dust magentosphere interactions, dust impact flashes and the possibility of obtaining compositional measurements of impact plasma plumes. Mars surface simulation Laboratory, Aberystwyth University. A Planetary Analogue Terrain Laboratory facilitates comprehensive mission operations emulation experiments designed to interpret and maximise scientific data return from robotic instruments. This facility includes Mars Soil Simulant and `science target' rocks that have been fully characterised. The terrain also has an area for sub-surface sampling. An Access Grid Node allows simulation of remote control operation and diminishes the need for direct onsite attendance. PAT Lab has a large selection of software tools for rover, robot arm and instrument modelling and simulation, and for the processing and visualisation of captured instrument data. Instrument motion is measured using a Vicon motion capture system with a resolution < 0.1 mm. Dusty wind tunnel at Aarhus University, Denmark The Aarhus wind tunnel simulates wind driven dust exposure on Mars. This allows study into analogue materials, dust/surface processes, meteorological condition and microbiological survival under Martian conditions. The multipurpose facility is used to quantify dust deposition (i.e. on optical surfaces, electrical or mechanical components) and examine the operation of instrumentation in dusty/windy environment under Martian conditions (pressure, gas composition & temperature). This includes calibration of wind flow instrumentation and dust sensors.

  19. How Technology Influences Interior Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDavitt, Tish

    1999-01-01

    Examines telecommunication technology's influences on interior school design and effective learning, and discusses how to implement this technology into the school. Building the infrastructure to support telecommunications in an educational setting and the importance of effective lighting are discussed. (GR)

  20. Fourth Aircraft Interior Noise Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, David G. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    The fourth in a series of NASA/SAE Interior Noise Workshops was held on May 19 and 20, 1992. The theme of the workshop was new technology and applications for aircraft noise with emphasis on source noise prediction; cabin noise prediction; cabin noise control, including active and passive methods; and cabin interior noise procedures. This report is a compilation of the presentations made at the meeting which addressed the above issues.

  1. Interior View of the Orbital Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This photograph is an interior view of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) upper level looking from the airlock hatch, showing the octagonal opening that separated the workshop's two levels. The trash airlock can be seen at center. The lower level of the OWS provided crew accommodations for sleeping, food preparation and consumption, hygiene, waste processing and disposal, and performance of certain experiments. The upper level consisted of a large work area and housed water storage tanks, a food freezer, storage vaults for film, scientific airlocks, mobility and stability experiment equipment, and other experimental equipment.

  2. Planetary Landscape Geography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargitai, H.

    INTRODUCTION Landscape is one of the most often used category in physical ge- ography. The term "landshap" was introduced by Dutch painters in the 15-16th cen- tury. [1] The elements that build up a landscape (or environment) on Earth consists of natural (biogenic and abiogenic - lithologic, atmospheric, hydrologic) and artificial (antropogenic) factors. Landscape is a complex system of these different elements. The same lithology makes different landscapes under different climatic conditions. If the same conditions are present, the same landscape type will appear. Landscapes build up a hierarchic system and cover the whole surface. On Earth, landscapes can be classified and qualified according to their characteristics: relief forms (morphology), and its potential economic value. Aesthetic and subjective parameters can also be considered. Using the data from landers and data from orbiters we can now classify planetary landscapes (these can be used as geologic mapping units as well). By looking at a unknown landscape, we can determine the processes that created it and its development history. This was the case in the Pathfinder/Sojourner panoramas. [2]. DISCUSSION Planetary landscape evolution. We can draw a raw landscape develop- ment history by adding the different landscape building elements to each other. This has a strong connection with the planet's thermal evolution (age of the planet or the present surface materials) and with orbital parameters (distance from the central star, orbit excentricity etc). This way we can build a complex system in which we use differ- ent evolutional stages of lithologic, atmospheric, hydrologic and biogenic conditions which determine the given - Solar System or exoplanetary - landscape. Landscape elements. "Simple" landscapes can be found on asteroids: no linear horizon is present (not differentiated body, only impact structures), no atmosphere (therefore no atmospheric scattering - black sky as part of the landscape) and no

  3. What maintains the zonal circulation in planetary atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Mayr, H.G.; Chan, K.L.; Harris, I.; Schatten, K. )

    1991-01-01

    The latest Voyager observations have shown large zonal velocities in Neptune's atmosphere, with some indication of alternating jets. Similar wind velocities have also been observed on Venus and are characteristic of planetary atmospheres in general, which is remarkable considering that the available solar or internal heating varies by more than a factor of 1000. A simplified model of the planetary circulation which provides some qualitative understanding is discussed. The basic assumption is that the source driving the circulation is also generating the dissipating eddies which are simulated by diffusion. Thus, the magnitude and structure of the zonal circulation are independent both of the source and the dissipation rate. The zonal velocities are related to the speed of sound and are of comparable magnitude in different atmospheres; although the available heating varies by a large factor, and the planetary parameters vary over a wide range. The alternating jets are described by a convective eigenmode which develops when energy transport out of the planetary interior is important, as is the case on Jupiter, Neptune, and Saturn. 26 refs.

  4. What maintains the zonal circulation in planetary atmospheres?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Chan, K. L.; Harris, I.; Schatten, K.

    1991-01-01

    The latest Voyager observations have shown large zonal velocities in Neptune's atmosphere, with some indication of alternating jets. Similar wind velocities have also been observed on Venus and are characteristic of planetary atmospheres in general, which is remarkable considering that the available solar or internal heating varies by more than a factor of 1000. A simplified model of the planetary circulation which provides some qualitative understanding is discussed. The basic assumption is that the source driving the circulation is also generating the dissipating eddies which are simulated by diffusion. Thus, the magnitude and structure of the zonal circulation are independent both of the source and the dissipation rate. The zonal velocities are related to the speed of sound and are of comparable magnitude in different atmospheres; although the available heating varies by a large factor, and the planetary parameters vary over a wide range. The alternating jets are described by a convective eigenmode which develops when energy transport out of the planetary interior is important, as is the case on Jupiter, Neptune, and Saturn.

  5. Planetary Gravity Fields and Their Impact on a Spacecraft Trajectory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinwurm, G.; Weber, R.

    2005-01-01

    The present work touches an interdisciplinary aspect of space exploration: the improvement of spacecraft navigation by means of enhanced planetary interior model derivation. The better the bodies in our solar system are known and modelled, the more accurately (and safely) a spacecraft can be navigated. In addition, the information about the internal structure of a planet, moon or any other planetary body can be used in arguments for different theories of solar system evolution. The focus of the work lies in a new approach for modelling the gravity field of small planetary bodies: the implementation of complex ellipsoidal coordinates (figure 1, [4]) for irregularly shaped bodies that cannot be represented well by a straightforward spheroidal approach. In order to carry out the required calculations the computer programme GRASP (Gravity Field of a Planetary Body and its Influence on a Spacecraft Trajectory) has been developed [5]. The programme furthermore allows deriving the impact of the body s gravity field on a spacecraft trajectory and thus permits predictions for future space mission flybys.

  6. The Explicit Planetary Isentropic-Coordinate (EPIC) Atmospheric Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, T. E.; Fischer, A. S.; Gierasch, P. J.; Harrington, J.; LeBeau, R. P.; Santori, C. M.

    1998-04-01

    We describe a new general circulation model (GCM) designed for planetary atmospheric studies called the EPIC model. This is a finite-difference model based on the isentropic-coordinate scheme of Hsu and Arakawa (1990.Mon. Wea. Rev.118, 1933-1959). We report on previously undocumented modifications, additions, and key practical issues that experience running the model has revealed to be important. The model integrates the hydrostatic primitive equations, which are valid for large-scale atmospheric dynamics and include gravity waves (buoyancy waves), planetary waves (Rossby waves), and horizontally propagating sound waves (Lamb waves), but not vertically propagating sound waves because of the hydrostatic approximation. The vertical coordinate is entropy in the form of potential temperature, which coincides with material surfaces for adiabatic motion. This means that there is no vertical velocity except where there is heating, which improves accuracy and helps the model maintain conservation properties over long integrations. An isentropic vertical coordinate is natural for the atmospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, which are believed to have essentially adiabatic interiors that match up with the bottom of the model and is also excellent for middle-atmosphere studies on any planet. Radiative processes are parameterized by Newtonian cooling, and the latent heat of ortho-para hydrogen conversion is included when appropriate, with a suitably defined mean potential temperature. The model is written with general map factors that make it easy to configure in oblate spherical, cylindrical, or Cartesian coordinates. The code includes optional Message Passing Interface (MPI) library calls and hence runs on any Unix-based parallel computer or network cluster. An optional graphical user interface to commercial visualization software facilitates control of the model and analysis of output. Memory is allocated dynamically such that the user does not recompile to

  7. To See the Unseen: A History of Planetary Radar Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butrica, Andrew J.

    1996-01-01

    This book relates the history of planetary radar astronomy from its origins in radar to the present day and secondarily to bring to light that history as a case of 'Big Equipment but not Big Science'. Chapter One sketches the emergence of radar astronomy as an ongoing scientific activity at Jodrell Bank, where radar research revealed that meteors were part of the solar system. The chief Big Science driving early radar astronomy experiments was ionospheric research. Chapter Two links the Cold War and the Space Race to the first radar experiments attempted on planetary targets, while recounting the initial achievements of planetary radar, namely, the refinement of the astronomical unit and the rotational rate and direction of Venus. Chapter Three discusses early attempts to organize radar astronomy and the efforts at MIT's Lincoln Laboratory, in conjunction with Harvard radio astronomers, to acquire antenna time unfettered by military priorities. Here, the chief Big Science influencing the development of planetary radar astronomy was radio astronomy. Chapter Four spotlights the evolution of planetary radar astronomy at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a NASA facility, at Cornell University's Arecibo Observatory, and at Jodrell Bank. A congeries of funding from the military, the National Science Foundation, and finally NASA marked that evolution, which culminated in planetary radar astronomy finding a single Big Science patron, NASA. Chapter Five analyzes planetary radar astronomy as a science using the theoretical framework provided by philosopher of science Thomas Kuhn. Chapter Six explores the shift in planetary radar astronomy beginning in the 1970s that resulted from its financial and institutional relationship with NASA Big Science. Chapter Seven addresses the Magellan mission and its relation to the evolution of planetary radar astronomy from a ground-based to a space-based activity. Chapters Eight and Nine discuss the research carried out at ground

  8. Spatial Query for Planetary Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Khawaja S.; Crockett, Thomas M.; Powell, Mark W.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Fox, Jason M.

    2011-01-01

    Science investigators need to quickly and effectively assess past observations of specific locations on a planetary surface. This innovation involves a location-based search technology that was adapted and applied to planetary science data to support a spatial query capability for mission operations software. High-performance location-based searching requires the use of spatial data structures for database organization. Spatial data structures are designed to organize datasets based on their coordinates in a way that is optimized for location-based retrieval. The particular spatial data structure that was adapted for planetary data search is the R+ tree.

  9. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXVI, Part 19

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The topics include: 1) The abundances of Iron-60 in Pyroxene Chondrules from Unequilibrated Ordinary Chondrites; 2) LL-Ordinary Chondrite Impact on the Moon: Results from the 3.9 Ga Impact Melt at the Landing Site of Appolo 17; 3) Evaluation of Chemical Methods for Projectile Identification in Terrestrial and Lunar Impactites; 4) Impact Cratering Experiments in Microgravity Environment; 5) New Achondrites with High-Calcium Pyroxene and Its implication for Igneous Differentiation of Asteroids; 6) Climate History of the Polar Regions of Mars Deduced form Geologic Mapping Results; 7) The crater Production Function for Mars: A-2 Cumulative Power-Law Slope for Pristine Craters Greater than 5 km in Diameter Based on Crater Distribution for Northern Plains Materials; 8) High Resolution Al-26 Chronology: Resolved Time Interval Between Rim and Interior of a Highly Fractionated Compact Type a CAI from Efremovka; 9) Assessing Aqueous Alteration on Mars Using Global Distributions of K and Th; 10) FeNi Metal Grains in LaPaz Mare Basalt Meteorites and Appolo 12 Basalts; 11) Unique Properties of Lunar Soil for In Situ Resource Utilization on the Moon; 12) U-Pb Systematics of Phosphates in Nakhlites; 13) Measurements of Sound Speed in Granular Materials Simulated Regolith; 14) The Effects of Oxygen, Sulphur and Silicon on the Dihedral Angles Between Fe-rich Liquid Metal and Olivine, Ringwoodite and Silicate Perovskite: Implications for Planetary Core Formation; 15) Seismic Shaking Removal of Craters 0.2-0.5 km in Diameter on Asteroid 433 Eros; 16) Focused Ion Beam Microscoopy of ALH84001 Carbonate Disks; 17) Simulating Micro-Gravity in the Laboratory; 18) Mars Atmospheric Sample Return Instrument Development; 19) Combined Remote LIBS and Raman Spectroscopy Measurements; 20) Unusual Radar Backscatter Properties Along the Northern Rim of Imbrium Basin; 21) The Mars Express/NASAS Project at JPL; 22) The Geology of the Viking 2 Lander Site Revisited; 23) An Impact Genesis for Loki

  10. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXVI, Part 19

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The topics include: 1) The abundances of Iron-60 in Pyroxene Chondrules from Unequilibrated Ordinary Chondrites; 2) LL-Ordinary Chondrite Impact on the Moon: Results from the 3.9 Ga Impact Melt at the Landing Site of Appolo 17; 3) Evaluation of Chemical Methods for Projectile Identification in Terrestrial and Lunar Impactites; 4) Impact Cratering Experiments in Microgravity Environment; 5) New Achondrites with High-Calcium Pyroxene and Its implication for Igneous Differentiation of Asteroids; 6) Climate History of the Polar Regions of Mars Deduced form Geologic Mapping Results; 7) The crater Production Function for Mars: A-2 Cumulative Power-Law Slope for Pristine Craters Greater than 5 km in Diameter Based on Crater Distribution for Northern Plains Materials; 8) High Resolution Al-26 Chronology: Resolved Time Interval Between Rim and Interior of a Highly Fractionated Compact Type a CAI from Efremovka; 9) Assessing Aqueous Alteration on Mars Using Global Distributions of K and Th; 10) FeNi Metal Grains in LaPaz Mare Basalt Meteorites and Appolo 12 Basalts; 11) Unique Properties of Lunar Soil for In Situ Resource Utilization on the Moon; 12) U-Pb Systematics of Phosphates in Nakhlites; 13) Measurements of Sound Speed in Granular Materials Simulated Regolith; 14) The Effects of Oxygen, Sulphur and Silicon on the Dihedral Angles Between Fe-rich Liquid Metal and Olivine, Ringwoodite and Silicate Perovskite: Implications for Planetary Core Formation; 15) Seismic Shaking Removal of Craters 0.2-0.5 km in Diameter on Asteroid 433 Eros; 16) Focused Ion Beam Microscoopy of ALH84001 Carbonate Disks; 17) Simulating Micro-Gravity in the Laboratory; 18) Mars Atmospheric Sample Return Instrument Development; 19) Combined Remote LIBS and Raman Spectroscopy Measurements; 20) Unusual Radar Backscatter Properties Along the Northern Rim of Imbrium Basin; 21) The Mars Express/NASAS Project at JPL; 22) The Geology of the Viking 2 Lander Site Revisited; 23) An Impact Genesis for Loki

  11. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Origin of Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session"Origin of Planetary Systems" presented the following reports:Planetary Formation in the the Gamma Cephei System by Core:Accretion; Accretion and Heating of Particles by Supersonic Planetesimals; Planetesimal Accretion in Close Binary Systems; Collisions, Gas Flow, and the Formation of Planetesimals; Hydrodynamic Escape of a Proto-Atmosphere Just After a Giant Impact; X-Ray Flare Induced Shock Waves and Chondrule Formation in Upper Solar Nebula; and Making Water Worlds: The Role of 26Al.

  12. Planetary cratering mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keefe, John D.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1993-09-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain a quantitative understanding of the cratering process over a broad range of conditions. Our approach was to numerically compute the evolution of impact induced flow fields and calculate the time histories of the key measures of crater geometry (e.g., depth, diameter, lip height) for variations in planetary gravity (0 to 109 cm/s2), material strength (0 to 2400 kbar), and impactor radius (0.05 to 5000 km). These results were used to establish the values of the open parameters in the scaling laws of Holsapple and Schmidt (1987). We describe the impact process in terms of four regimes: (1) penetration, (2) inertial, (3) terminal, and (4) relaxation. During the penetration regime, the depth of impactor penetration grows linearly for dimensionless times τ=(Ut/a)<5.1. Here, U is projectile velocity, t is time, and a is projectile radius. In the inertial regime, τ>5.1, the crater grows at a slower rate until it is arrested by either strength or gravitational forces. In this regime, the increase of crater depth, d, and diameter, D, normalized by projectile radius is given by d/a=1.3 (Ut/a)0.36 and D/a=2.0(Ut/a)0.36. For strength-dominated craters, growth stops at the end of the inertial regime, which occurs at τ=0.33 (Yeff/ρU2)-0.78, where Yeff is the effective planetary crustal strength. The effective strength can be reduced from the ambient strength by fracturing and shear band melting (e.g., formation of pseudo-tachylites). In gravity-dominated craters, growth stops when the gravitational forces dominate over the inertial forces, which occurs at τ=0.92 (ga/U2)-0.61. In the strength and gravity regimes, the maximum depth of penetration is dp/a=0.84 (Y/ρ U2)-0.28 and dp/a=1.2 (ga/U2)-0.22, respectively. The transition from simple bowl-shaped craters to complex-shaped craters occurs when gravity starts to dominate over strength in the cratering process. The diameter for this transition to occur is given by Dt=9.0 Y/ρg, and

  13. Planetary Produced Axionlike Particles and Gamma-Ray Flashes

    SciTech Connect

    Liolios, Anastasios

    2008-12-24

    Axion-like particles could be created in nuclear disintegrations and deexitations of natural radionuclides present in the interior of the planets. For the Earth and the other planets with a surrounding magnetosphere, axion production could result to gamma and X-ray emission, originating from axion to photon conversion in the planetary magnetic fields. The estimated planetary axion fluxes as well as the related gamma ray fluxes from Earth and the giant planets of our solar system are given along with the axion coupling to ordinary matter. A possible connection with the enigmatic Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) discovered in 1994 by CGRO/BATSE and also detected with the RHESSI satellite, is also discussed.

  14. The Origin of Planetary Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, T.; Niemann, H.; Mahaffy, P.; Atreya, S.

    2006-01-01

    The nitrogen found today in planetary atmospheres appears to come from two sources: N2 and condensed, nitrogen-containing compounds. On Jupiter and thus presumably on the other giant planets, the nitrogen is present mainly as ammonia but was apparently delivered primarily in the form of N2, whereas on the inner planets and Titan, the nitrogen is present as N2 but was delivered as condensed compounds, dominated by ammonia. This analysis is consistent with abundance data from the Interstellar Medium and models for the solar nebula. For Jupiter and the inner planets, it is substantiated by measurements of N-l5/N-14 and is supported by investigations of comets and meteorites, soon to be supplemented by solar wind data from the Genesis Mission. The Cassini-Huygens Mission may be able to constrain models for Saturn s ammonia abundance that could test the proportion of N2 captured by the planet. The Titan story is less direct, depending on studies of noble gases. These studies in turn suggest an evolutionary stage of the early Earth s atmosphere that included the ammonia and methane postulated by S. L. Miller (1953) in his classical experiments on the production of biogenic compounds.

  15. The Origin of Planetary Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, T.; Niemann, H.; Mahaffy, P.; Atreya, S.

    2006-01-01

    The nitrogen found today in planetary atmospheres appears to come from two sources: N2 and condensed, nitrogen-containing compounds. On Jupiter and thus presumably on the other giant planets, the nitrogen is present mainly as ammonia but was apparently delivered primarily in the form of N2, whereas on the inner planets and Titan, the nitrogen is present as N2 but was delivered as condensed compounds, dominated by ammonia. This analysis is consistent with abundance data from the Interstellar Medium and models for the solar nebula. For Jupiter and the inner planets, it is substantiated by measurements of N-l5/N-14 and is supported by investigations of comets and meteorites, soon to be supplemented by solar wind data from the Genesis Mission. The Cassini-Huygens Mission may be able to constrain models for Saturn s ammonia abundance that could test the proportion of N2 captured by the planet. The Titan story is less direct, depending on studies of noble gases. These studies in turn suggest an evolutionary stage of the early Earth s atmosphere that included the ammonia and methane postulated by S. L. Miller (1953) in his classical experiments on the production of biogenic compounds.

  16. Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, 14th, Houston, TX, March 14-18, 1983, Proceedings. Part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynton, W. V.; Schubert, G.

    1983-11-01

    Various topics in the areas of planetary composition and differentiation, planetary surfaces and interiors, lunar rocks, lunar regoliths, and meteorites and tektites are discussed and some experimental studies are presented. Individual subjects addressed include: Stillwater anorthosites, origin of palimpsests and anomalous pit craters on Ganymede and Callisto, the chemistry of the Apollo 11 Highland component, and many others. For individual items see A84-18453 to A84-18486

  17. Formation of Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Stars are observed to be forming within cold regions of the galaxy called molecular clouds. A clump of gas and dust within a molecular cloud can collapse into a rotationally- supported disk orbiting the pre s sure -supported star. Such a disk has the same initial elemental composition as the growing star. At sufficient distances from the central star, it is cool enough for approx. 1 - 2% of this material to be in solid form, either remnant interstellar grains or condensates formed within the disk. During the infall stage, the disk is very active and probably highly turbulent. When the infall slows substantially or stops, the disk becomes more quiescent. The dust grows from micron-sized dust to kilometer-sized planetesimals by physical collisions, possibly aided by collective gravity. The dynamics of larger solid bodies within protoplanetary disks are better characterized. The primary perturbations on the orbits of kilometer-sized and larger planetesimals in protoplanetary disks are mutual gravitational interactions and physical collisions. These interactions lead to accretion (and in some cases erosion and fragmentation) of planetesimals. The most massive planets have the largest gravitationally-enhanced collision cross-sections, and accrete almost everything with which they collide. The size distribution of solid bodies becomes quite skewed, with a few large bodies growing much faster than the rest of the swarm, until they have accumulated most of the small bodies within their gravitational reach. Slower growth continues (at least for solid, earth-like planets) as the eccentricities of planetary embryos are pumped up by long-range mutual gravitational perturbations. As planetary masses increase, they become more efficient at stirring random velocities of neighboring bodies. If sufficiently massive and dense planets exist far enough from the star, they can eject material into interstellar space. In most models, giant planets begin their growth like terrestrial

  18. Formation of Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Stars are observed to be forming within cold regions of the galaxy called molecular clouds. A clump of gas and dust within a molecular cloud can collapse into a rotationally- supported disk orbiting the pre s sure -supported star. Such a disk has the same initial elemental composition as the growing star. At sufficient distances from the central star, it is cool enough for approx. 1 - 2% of this material to be in solid form, either remnant interstellar grains or condensates formed within the disk. During the infall stage, the disk is very active and probably highly turbulent. When the infall slows substantially or stops, the disk becomes more quiescent. The dust grows from micron-sized dust to kilometer-sized planetesimals by physical collisions, possibly aided by collective gravity. The dynamics of larger solid bodies within protoplanetary disks are better characterized. The primary perturbations on the orbits of kilometer-sized and larger planetesimals in protoplanetary disks are mutual gravitational interactions and physical collisions. These interactions lead to accretion (and in some cases erosion and fragmentation) of planetesimals. The most massive planets have the largest gravitationally-enhanced collision cross-sections, and accrete almost everything with which they collide. The size distribution of solid bodies becomes quite skewed, with a few large bodies growing much faster than the rest of the swarm, until they have accumulated most of the small bodies within their gravitational reach. Slower growth continues (at least for solid, earth-like planets) as the eccentricities of planetary embryos are pumped up by long-range mutual gravitational perturbations. As planetary masses increase, they become more efficient at stirring random velocities of neighboring bodies. If sufficiently massive and dense planets exist far enough from the star, they can eject material into interstellar space. In most models, giant planets begin their growth like terrestrial

  19. Planetary protection - assaying new methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellen, J.; Rettberg, P.; Horneck, G.

    Space age began in 1957 when the USSR launched the first satellite into earth orbit. In response to this new challenge the International Council for Science, formerly know as International Council of Scientific Unions (ICSU), established the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) in 1958. The role of COSPAR was to channel the international scientific research in space and establish an international forum. Through COSPAR the scientific community agreed on the need for screening interplanetary probes for forward (contamination of foreign planets) and backward (contamination of earth by returned samples/probes) contamination. To prevent both forms of contamination a set of rules, as a guideline was established. Nowadays the standard implementation of the planetary protection rules is based on the experience gained during NASA's Viking project in 1975/76. Since then the evaluation-methods for microbial contamination of spacecrafts have been changed or updated just slowly. In this study the standard method of sample taking will be evaluated. New methods for examination of those samples, based on the identification of life on the molecular level, will be reviewed and checked for their feasibility as microbial detection systems. The methods will be examined for their qualitative (detection and verification of different organisms) and quantitative (detection limit and concentration verification) qualities. Amongst the methods analyzed will be i.e. real-time / PCR (poly-chain-reaction), using specific primer-sets for the amplification of highly conserved rRNA or DNA regions. Measurement of intrinsic fluorescence, i.e ATP using luciferin-luciferase reagents. The use of FAME (fatty acid methyl esters) and microchips for microbial identification purposes. The methods will be chosen to give a good overall coverage of different possible molecular markers and approaches. The most promising methods shall then be lab-tested and evaluated for their use under spacecraft assembly

  20. Planetary Cores Flows Driven by Mantle Libration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noir, J.; Aurnou, J.; Wicht, J.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate, via a set of laboratory and numerical experiments, the flow induced inside a spherical fluid cavity by torsional oscillation of the outer shell. Our goal is to produce models of libration-driven flows within planetary cores and subsurface oceans. Such models will improve our understanding of a number of planetary bodies including Mercury, Europa, Io, Callisto, Ganymede and the Earth's Moon. Here we focus on the case of a spherical shell with either a small inner core or no inner core; moderate planetary rotation rate (Ekman number E = 10- 4); and libration frequency equal to the planetary rotation frequency ("synchronous libration"). We vary only the non-dimensional amplitude of libration α, defined as α=Δ φ (2 π flib) / Ømega, where Δ φ is the total angular displacement, flib is the libration frequency and Ømega is the background angular rotation rate. Different core flow regimes are observed as α is increased. For a small amplitude of libration (α \\ll 1)), the oscillatory motion of the outer boundary drives laminar flows that are well described as inertial modes and waves. For α ~ 0.5, azimuthal roll instabilities periodically develop and decay along the outer shell boundary during each libration cycle. These instabilities tend to develop when the outer shell is decelerating and decay when it is accelerating. By further increasing α, the flow pattern transitions from axisymmetric rolls (m=0) to wavy rolls (m ≠ 0), and then to turbulent flow. Extrapolating our present results to Mercury suggests that mantle libration can drive large-scale instabilities in its liquid metal core. The authors wish to the thank NASA's PG&G and PME Programs for reasearch funding under grant #NNG0697G.