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Sample records for plant based antimicrobial

  1. Antimicrobial Resistance and the Alternative Resources with Special Emphasis on Plant-Based Antimicrobials-A Review.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Harish; Bishnoi, Parul; Yadav, Archana; Patni, Babita; Mishra, Abhay Prakash; Nautiyal, Anant Ram

    2017-04-10

    Indiscriminate and irrational use of antibiotics has created an unprecedented challenge for human civilization due to microbe's development of antimicrobial resistance. It is difficult to treat bacterial infection due to bacteria's ability to develop resistance against antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial agents are categorized according to their mechanism of action, i.e., interference with cell wall synthesis, DNA and RNA synthesis, lysis of the bacterial membrane, inhibition of protein synthesis, inhibition of metabolic pathways, etc. Bacteria may become resistant by antibiotic inactivation, target modification, efflux pump and plasmidic efflux. Currently, the clinically available treatment is not effective against the antibiotic resistance developed by some bacterial species. However, plant-based antimicrobials have immense potential to combat bacterial, fungal, protozoal and viral diseases without any known side effects. Such plant metabolites include quinines, alkaloids, lectins, polypeptides, flavones, flavonoids, flavonols, coumarin, terpenoids, essential oils and tannins. The present review focuses on antibiotic resistance, the resistance mechanism in bacteria against antibiotics and the role of plant-active secondary metabolites against microorganisms, which might be useful as an alternative and effective strategy to break the resistance among microbes.

  2. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Tam, James P.; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H.; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  3. Antimicrobial thin films based on ayurvedic plants extracts embedded in a bioactive glass matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floroian, L.; Ristoscu, C.; Candiani, G.; Pastori, N.; Moscatelli, M.; Mihailescu, N.; Negut, I.; Badea, M.; Gilca, M.; Chiesa, R.; Mihailescu, I. N.

    2017-09-01

    Ayurvedic medicine is one of the oldest medical systems. It is an example of a coherent traditional system which has a time-tested and precise algorithm for medicinal plant selection, based on several ethnopharmacophore descriptors which knowledge endows the user to adequately choose the optimal plant for the treatment of certain pathology. This work aims for linking traditional knowledge with biomedical science by using traditional ayurvedic plants extracts with antimicrobial effect in form of thin films for implant protection. We report on the transfer of novel composites from bioactive glass mixed with antimicrobial plants extracts and polymer by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation into uniform thin layers onto stainless steel implant-like surfaces. The comprehensive characterization of the deposited films was performed by complementary analyses: Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy and antimicrobial tests. The results emphasize upon the multifunctionality of these coatings which allow to halt the leakage of metal and metal oxides into the biological fluids and eventually to inner organs (by polymer use), to speed up the osseointegration (due to the bioactive glass use), to exert antimicrobial effects (by ayurvedic plants extracts use) and to decrease the implant price (by cheaper stainless steel use).

  4. Plant-based antimicrobial studies--methods and approaches to study the interaction between natural products.

    PubMed

    van Vuuren, Sandy; Viljoen, Alvaro

    2011-07-01

    The therapeutic value of synergistic interactions has been known since antiquity, and many different cultural healing systems still rely on this principle in the belief that combination therapy may enhance efficacy. This paper intends to provide an overview, from an antimicrobial perspective, on the research undertaken and interactive principles involved in pharmacognosy studies. Methods used to determine antimicrobial interactions include basic combination studies, the sum of the fractional inhibitory concentration index (ΣFIC), isobole interpretations, and death kinetic (time-kill) assays. The various interactions are discussed with reference to molecules, different plant parts or fractions, different plant species, and combinations with nonbotanical antimicrobial agents. It is recommended for future development in the field of phytosynergy that consideration should be given to the selection criteria for the two inhibitors. A more conservative approach should be adopted when classifying synergy. When examining interactions in plant-based studies, antagonistic interactions should not be ignored. Combinations involving more than two test samples should be examined where applicable, and very importantly, the mechanism of action of synergistic interactions should be given precedence. It is encouraging to observe the upsurge in papers exploring the complex interactions of medicinal plants, and undoubtedly this will become increasingly important in our continued quest to understand the mechanism of action of phytotherapy. The scientific validation of efficacious antimicrobial combinations could lead to patentable entities making research in the field of phytosynergy not only academically rewarding but also commercially relevant.

  5. Plant antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Nawrot, Robert; Barylski, Jakub; Nowicki, Grzegorz; Broniarczyk, Justyna; Buchwald, Waldemar; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a component of barrier defense system of plants. They have been isolated from roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves of a wide variety of species and have activities towards phytopathogens, as well as against bacteria pathogenic to humans. Thus, plant AMPs are considered as promising antibiotic compounds with important biotechnological applications. Plant AMPs are grouped into several families and share general features such as positive charge, the presence of disulfide bonds (which stabilize the structure), and the mechanism of action targeting outer membrane structures.

  6. Destruction of Opportunistic Pathogens via Polymer Nanoparticle-Mediated Release of Plant-Based Antimicrobial Payloads

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Dahlia N.; Amato, Douglas V.; Mavrodi, Olga V.; Braasch, Dwaine A.; Walley, Susan E.; Douglas, Jessica R.

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis of antimicrobial thymol/carvacrol-loaded polythioether nanoparticles (NPs) via a one-pot, solvent-free miniemulsion thiol-ene photopolymerization process is reported. The active antimicrobial agents, thymol and carvacrol, are employed as “solvents” for the thiol-ene monomer phase in the miniemulsion to enable facile high capacity loading (≈50% w/w), excellent encapsulation efficiencies (>95%), and elimination of all postpolymerization purification processes. The NPs serve as high capacity reservoirs for slow-release and delivery of thymol/carvacrol-combination payloads that exhibit inhibitory and bactericidal activity (>99.9% kill efficiency at 24 h) against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, including both saprophytic (Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633 and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922) and pathogenic species (E. coli ATCC 43895, Staphylococcus aureus RN6390, and Burkholderia cenocepacia K56-2). This report is among the first to demonstrate antimicrobial efficacy of essential oil-loaded nanoparticles against B. cenocepacia – an innately resistant opportunistic pathogen commonly associated with debilitating respiratory infections in cystic fibrosis. Although a model platform, these results point to promising pathways to particle-based delivery of plant-derived extracts for a range of antimicrobial applications, including active packaging materials, topical antiseptics, and innovative therapeutics. PMID:26946055

  7. Antimicrobial peptide production and plant-based expression systems for medical and agricultural biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Holaskova, Edita; Galuszka, Petr; Frebort, Ivo; Oz, M Tufan

    2015-11-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are vital components of the innate immune system of nearly all living organisms. They generally act in the first line of defense against various pathogenic bacteria, parasites, enveloped viruses and fungi. These low molecular mass peptides are considered prospective therapeutic agents due to their broad-spectrum rapid activity, low cytotoxicity to mammalian cells and unique mode of action which hinders emergence of pathogen resistance. In addition to medical use, AMPs can also be employed for development of innovative approaches for plant protection in agriculture. Conferred disease resistance by AMPs might help us surmount losses in yield, quality and safety of agricultural products due to plant pathogens. Heterologous expression in plant-based systems, also called plant molecular farming, offers cost-effective large-scale production which is regarded as one of the most important factors for clinical or agricultural use of AMPs. This review presents various types of AMPs as well as plant-based platforms ranging from cell suspensions to whole plants employed for peptide production. Although AMP production in plants holds great promises for medicine and agriculture, specific technical limitations regarding product yield, function and stability still remain. Additionally, establishment of particular stable expression systems employing plants or plant tissues generally requires extended time scale for platform development compared to certain other heterologous systems. Therefore, fast and promising tools for evaluation of plant-based expression strategies and assessment of function and stability of the heterologously produced AMPs are critical for molecular farming and plant protection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The impact of plant-based antimicrobials on sensory properties of organic leafy greens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant extracts and essential oils are well known for their antibacterial activity. However, studies concerning their effect on the organoleptic properties of treated foods are limited. The objective was to study the sensory attributes of organic leafy greens treated with plant antimicrobials and ide...

  9. Databank based mining on the track of antimicrobial weapons in plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Belarmino, Luis C; Benko-Iseppon, Ana M

    2010-05-01

    The expressive amount of nucleotide sequences from diverse plant species in databanks enables the use of computational approaches to discovery still unidentified genes and to infer about their function, structure and role in some biological processes. Of special interest are the antimicrobial peptides (AMP), whose functionalities have a very important role in defense against microbial infection in multicellular eukaryotes, being considered less susceptible to bacterial resistance than traditional antibiotics, with potential to develop a new class of therapeutic agents. Recent computational developments have provided various algorithms and resources to profit from the overwhelming information in data banks for biomining such peptides. This review focuses on the computational and bioinformatic approaches so far used for the identification of antimicrobial peptides in plant systems, highlighting alternative means of mining the entire plant peptide space that has recently become available.

  10. Antimicrobial Resistance and the Alternative Resources with Special Emphasis on Plant-Based Antimicrobials—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Harish; Bishnoi, Parul; Yadav, Archana; Patni, Babita; Mishra, Abhay Prakash; Nautiyal, Anant Ram

    2017-01-01

    Indiscriminate and irrational use of antibiotics has created an unprecedented challenge for human civilization due to microbe’s development of antimicrobial resistance. It is difficult to treat bacterial infection due to bacteria’s ability to develop resistance against antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial agents are categorized according to their mechanism of action, i.e., interference with cell wall synthesis, DNA and RNA synthesis, lysis of the bacterial membrane, inhibition of protein synthesis, inhibition of metabolic pathways, etc. Bacteria may become resistant by antibiotic inactivation, target modification, efflux pump and plasmidic efflux. Currently, the clinically available treatment is not effective against the antibiotic resistance developed by some bacterial species. However, plant-based antimicrobials have immense potential to combat bacterial, fungal, protozoal and viral diseases without any known side effects. Such plant metabolites include quinines, alkaloids, lectins, polypeptides, flavones, flavonoids, flavonols, coumarin, terpenoids, essential oils and tannins. The present review focuses on antibiotic resistance, the resistance mechanism in bacteria against antibiotics and the role of plant-active secondary metabolites against microorganisms, which might be useful as an alternative and effective strategy to break the resistance among microbes. PMID:28394295

  11. Plant Products as Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Marjorie Murphy

    1999-01-01

    The use of and search for drugs and dietary supplements derived from plants have accelerated in recent years. Ethnopharmacologists, botanists, microbiologists, and natural-products chemists are combing the Earth for phytochemicals and “leads” which could be developed for treatment of infectious diseases. While 25 to 50% of current pharmaceuticals are derived from plants, none are used as antimicrobials. Traditional healers have long used plants to prevent or cure infectious conditions; Western medicine is trying to duplicate their successes. Plants are rich in a wide variety of secondary metabolites, such as tannins, terpenoids, alkaloids, and flavonoids, which have been found in vitro to have antimicrobial properties. This review attempts to summarize the current status of botanical screening efforts, as well as in vivo studies of their effectiveness and toxicity. The structure and antimicrobial properties of phytochemicals are also addressed. Since many of these compounds are currently available as unregulated botanical preparations and their use by the public is increasing rapidly, clinicians need to consider the consequences of patients self-medicating with these preparations. PMID:10515903

  12. Application of plant-based antimicrobials for the growth inhibition of clostridia in pressed beet pulp silage.

    PubMed

    Emerstorfer, Florian; Hein, Walter; Resch, Reinhard; Poetsch, Erich M; Zitz, Ulrike; Kneifel, Wolfgang

    2011-08-30

    In this study the inhibition of hop beta acids on the growth of clostridia in soil-contaminated pressed sugar beet pulp silages was investigated. Hop beta acids are natural substances which display their effect at low concentrations. Fresh pressed beet pulp material was mixed with soil to artificially contaminate it with clostridia. Laboratory silos were filled with the substrate, stored at 25 °C and opened for sampling at 0, 2, 8, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days. The impact on clostridial growth during silage fermentation was monitored by determination of the pH value and dry matter content, as well as chemical analysis of the fermentation products. Throughout the experiments, the effect of a commercial silage inoculant based on lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and hop-resistant LAB were examined with and without the combination of plant-based antimicrobials. Results indicate that in contaminated silage samples without any additives high butyric acid contents occurred due to clostridial growth. This spoilage could not be suppressed by the application of LAB, whereas the combined application of LAB and hop beta acids significantly improved silage quality, which was reflected by favourable organic acid composition (P < 0.05). The experimental data indicate that the application of hop beta acids improves the preservation effect of LAB in suppressing clostridial growth in silages and thus demonstrates some potential for the combined use of plant-based antimicrobials and LAB. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Antimicrobial activity of Nigerian medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    Anyanwu, Madubuike Umunna; Okoye, Rosemary Chinazam

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is currently one of the major threats facing mankind. The emergence and rapid spread of multi- and pan-drug-resistant organisms (such as vancomycin-, methicillin-, extended-spectrum β-lactam-, carbapenem- and colistin-resistant organisms) has put the world in a dilemma. The health and economic burden associated with AMR on a global scale are dreadful. Available antimicrobials have been misused and are almost ineffective with some of these drugs associated with dangerous side effects in some individuals. Development of new, effective, and safe antimicrobials is one of the ways by which AMR burden can be reduced. The rate at which microorganisms develop AMR mechanisms outpaces the rate at which new antimicrobials are being developed. Medicinal plants are potential sources of new antimicrobial molecules. There is renewed interest in antimicrobial activities of phytochemicals. Nigeria boasts of a huge heritage of medicinal plants and there is avalanche of researches that have been undertaken to screen antimicrobial activities of these plants. Scientific compilation of these studies could provide useful information on the antimicrobial properties of the plants. This information can be useful in the development of new antimicrobial drugs. This paper reviews antimicrobial researches that have been undertaken on Nigerian medicinal plants. PMID:28512606

  14. Antimicrobial agents deriving from indigenous plants.

    PubMed

    Avrelija, Cencic; Walter, Chingwaru

    2010-01-01

    Phytonutrients in many indigenous plants are receiving a lot of attention as they are important in antimicrobial and anticancer therapies. Tropical areas, especially India, South America and Africa, are the main sources of patentable plant products and have indigenous populations with well developed traditional medicinal knowledge. Phytochemicals, including carotenoids, phenolics, alkaloids, nitrogen-containing compounds, and organosulfur compounds, are receiving much attention as they impart important health benefits. This article gives an insight into some important phytochemicals, and analyses the ethical issues on property rights of plant products. Many patent applications have been lodged, and quite a number have been granted. Pharmaceutical industries are engaging in massive speculative bioprospecting on plant based phytochemicals and products, usually resulting in conflicts with indigenous populations. More focus is given here-in to Tylosema esculentum (marama) plant, found in drier parts of Southern Africa and known to contain high quantities of essential phytochemicals. Important phytochemicals in marama include fatty acid (mainly oleic acid, linoleic acid, linolenic acid, behenic acid), protein and phenolic acid components. The marama plant has high potential as a source of medical and cosmetic products. If conflicts surrounding property rights on plant based products are resolved, phytochemicals can be a good source of income for indigenous populations in areas where such plants are found.

  15. [Antimicrobial activity of Calendula L. plants].

    PubMed

    Radioza, S A; Iurchak, L D

    2007-01-01

    The sap of different organs of genus Calendula plant species has been studied for antimicrobial activity. The sap of racemes demonstrated the most expressed antimicrobial effect while that of the roots - the least one. Calendula species inhibited all tested pathogenic microorganisms, especially Pseudomonas syringae, P. fluorescens, Xanthomonas campestris, Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Calendula suffruticosa was the most active to all investigated microorganisms.

  16. Development and Sequential Analysis of a New Multi-Agent, Anti-Acne Formulation Based on Plant-Derived Antimicrobial and Anti-Inflammatory Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Saviuc, Crina; Ciubucă, Bianca; Dincă, Gabriela; Bleotu, Coralia; Drumea, Veronica; Chifiriuc, Mariana-Carmen; Popa, Marcela; Gradisteanu Pircalabioru, Gratiela; Marutescu, Luminita; Lazăr, Veronica

    2017-01-01

    The antibacterial and anti-inflammatory potential of natural, plant-derived compounds has been reported in many studies. Emerging evidence indicates that plant-derived essential oils and/or their major compounds may represent a plausible alternative treatment for acne, a prevalent skin disorder in both adolescent and adult populations. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop and subsequently analyze the antimicrobial activity of a new multi-agent, synergic formulation based on plant-derived antimicrobial compounds (i.e., eugenol, β-pinene, eucalyptol, and limonene) and anti-inflammatory agents for potential use in the topical treatment of acne and other skin infections. The optimal antimicrobial combinations selected in this study were eugenol/β-pinene/salicylic acid and eugenol/β-pinene/2-phenoxyethanol/potassium sorbate. The possible mechanisms of action revealed by flow cytometry were cellular permeabilization and inhibition of efflux pumps activity induced by concentrations corresponding to sub-minimal inhibitory (sub-MIC) values. The most active antimicrobial combination represented by salycilic acid/eugenol/β-pinene/2-phenoxyethanol/potassium sorbate was included in a cream base, which demonstrated thermodynamic stability and optimum microbiological characteristics. PMID:28106736

  17. Development and Sequential Analysis of a New Multi-Agent, Anti-Acne Formulation Based on Plant-Derived Antimicrobial and Anti-Inflammatory Compounds.

    PubMed

    Saviuc, Crina; Ciubucă, Bianca; Dincă, Gabriela; Bleotu, Coralia; Drumea, Veronica; Chifiriuc, Mariana-Carmen; Popa, Marcela; Gradisteanu Pircalabioru, Gratiela; Marutescu, Luminita; Lazăr, Veronica

    2017-01-17

    The antibacterial and anti-inflammatory potential of natural, plant-derived compounds has been reported in many studies. Emerging evidence indicates that plant-derived essential oils and/or their major compounds may represent a plausible alternative treatment for acne, a prevalent skin disorder in both adolescent and adult populations. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop and subsequently analyze the antimicrobial activity of a new multi-agent, synergic formulation based on plant-derived antimicrobial compounds (i.e., eugenol, β-pinene, eucalyptol, and limonene) and anti-inflammatory agents for potential use in the topical treatment of acne and other skin infections. The optimal antimicrobial combinations selected in this study were eugenol/β-pinene/salicylic acid and eugenol/β-pinene/2-phenoxyethanol/potassium sorbate. The possible mechanisms of action revealed by flow cytometry were cellular permeabilization and inhibition of efflux pumps activity induced by concentrations corresponding to sub-minimal inhibitory (sub-MIC) values. The most active antimicrobial combination represented by salycilic acid/eugenol/β-pinene/2-phenoxyethanol/potassium sorbate was included in a cream base, which demonstrated thermodynamic stability and optimum microbiological characteristics.

  18. Potential applications of plant based derivatives as fat replacers, antioxidants and antimicrobials in fresh and processed meat products.

    PubMed

    Hygreeva, Desugari; Pandey, M C; Radhakrishna, K

    2014-09-01

    Growing concern about diet and health has led to development of healthier food products. In general consumer perception towards the intake of meat and meat products is unhealthy because it may increase the risk of diseases like cardiovascular diseases, obesity and cancer, because of its high fat content (especially saturated fat) and added synthetic antioxidants and antimicrobials. Addition of plant derivatives having antioxidant components including vitamins A, C and E, minerals, polyphenols, flavanoids and terpenoids in meat products may decrease the risk of several degenerative diseases. To change consumer attitudes towards meat consumption, the meat industry is undergoing major transformations by addition of nonmeat ingredients as animal fat replacers, natural antioxidants and antimicrobials, preferably derived from plant sources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Plant-based hydrocarbon esters from Tragia involucrata possess antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Samy, Ramar Perumal; Sethi, Gautam; Chow, Vincent T K; Stiles, Bradley G

    2013-04-01

    Antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities of hydrocarbon esters obtained from Tragia involucrata were evaluated by disk-diffusion (250 µg/ml), and broth-dilution (500-7.8 µg/ml), methods against bacteria. Among the compounds, shellsol showed the most potent activity against Burkholderia pseudomallei (KHW), Aeromonas hydrophila, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Interestingly, vinyl hexylether was active against food-spoilage bacteria (Bacillus cereus and Proteus vulgaris), 2, 4-methyl hexane also exerted antimicrobial activity against K. pneumoniae, S. pyogenes, B. pseudomallei, Alcaligens viscolactis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. 2-methylnonane and 2, 6-dimethyl heptane showed only weak activity. For example, shellsol showed bacteriostatic effect (MIC of 7.8 µg/ml) against A. hydrophila, vinyl hexylether (MIC of 15.6 µg/ml) against P. mirabilis, and 2, 4-methyl hexane (MIC of 31.25 µg/ml) on B. pseudomallei. Cytotoxic effects of compounds were assayed in human skin and monkey kidney cells (62.5-2000 µg/ml) by an XTT assay. The vinyl hexylether, 2, 4-dimethyl hexane and shellsol did not show any toxicity up to 1000 µg/ml concentrations. The 2-methylnonane and 2, 6-dimethyl heptane induced morphological changes (e.g. cell disintegration and lysis) of both cell types at a 2000 µg/ml. The vinyl hexylether, 2, 4-dimethyl hexane and shellsol were devoid of toxic effects; however, 2-methylnonane induced weight loss and severe necrosis as evidenced by histopathological and serum biochemical analysis in rats. Interestingly, shellsol showed the maximum inhibition of carrageenan-induced, paw oedema in rats. In conclusion, findings of this study clearly indicate that biologically active hydrocarbon esters, such as shellsol, vinyl hexylether, and 2, 4-dimethyl hexane isolated from T. involucrata, may effectively control the growth of certain food-borne and food

  20. Antimicrobial properties of Honduran medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Lentz, D L; Clark, A M; Hufford, C D; Meurer-Grimes, B; Passreiter, C M; Cordero, J; Ibrahimi, O; Okunade, A L

    1998-12-01

    Ninety-two plants used in the traditional pharmacopoeia of the Pech and neighboring Mestizo peoples of central Honduras are reported. The results of in vitro antimicrobial screens showed that 19 of the extracts from medicinal plants revealed signs of antifungal activity while 22 demonstrated a measurable inhibitory effect on one or more bacterial cultures. Bioassay-guided fractionation of extracts from Mikania micrantha, Neurolaena lobata and Piper aduncum produced weak to moderately active isolates. The broad spectrum of activity of the extracts helps to explain the widespread use of these plants for wound healing and other applications.

  1. An Approach Towards Structure Based Antimicrobial Peptide Design For Use in Development of Transgenic Plants: A Strategy For Plant Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, Humaira; Datta, Aritreyee; Bhunia, Anirban

    2017-01-16

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), also known as host defense peptides (HDPs), are ubiquitous and vital components of innate defense response that present themselves as potential candidates for drug design, aimed to control plant and animal diseases. Though their application for plant disease management has long been studied with natural AMPs, cytotoxicity and stability related shortcomings for the development of transgenic plants limits their usage. Newer technologies like molecular modelling, NMR spectroscopy and combinatorial chemistry allow screening for potent candidates and provide new avenues for the generation of rationally designed synthetic AMPs with multiple biological functions. Such AMPs can be used for control of plant diseases that lead to huge yield losses of agriculturally important crop plants, via generation of transgenic plants. Such approaches have gained significant attention in the past decade as a consequence of increasing antibiotic resistance amongst plant pathogens, and the shortcomings of existing strategies that include environmental contamination and human/animal health hazards amongst others. This review summarizes the recent trends and approaches used for employing AMPs, emphasizing on designed/modified ones, and their applications toward agriculture and food technology.

  2. Plant Antimicrobial Peptides as Potential Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Rodríguez, Jaquelina Julia; López-Gómez, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are part of the innate immune defense mechanism of many organisms and are promising candidates to treat infections caused by pathogenic bacteria to animals and humans. AMPs also display anticancer activities because of their ability to inactivate a wide range of cancer cells. Cancer remains a cause of high morbidity and mortality worldwide. Therefore, the development of methods for its control is desirable. Attractive alternatives include plant AMP thionins, defensins, and cyclotides, which have anticancer activities. Here, we provide an overview of plant AMPs anticancer activities, with an emphasis on their mode of action, their selectivity, and their efficacy. PMID:25815333

  3. Antimicrobial resistance challenged with metal-based antimicrobial macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Abd-El-Aziz, Alaa S; Agatemor, Christian; Etkin, Nola

    2017-02-01

    Antimicrobial resistance threatens the achievements of science and medicine, as it deactivates conventional antimicrobial therapeutics. Scientists respond to the threat by developing new antimicrobial platforms to prevent and treat infections from these resistant strains. Metal-based antimicrobial macromolecules are emerging as an alternative to conventional platforms because they combine multiple mechanisms of action into one platform due to the distinctive properties of metals. For example, metals interact with intracellular proteins and enzymes, and catalyse various intracellular processes. The macromolecular architecture offers a means to enhance antimicrobial activity since several antimicrobial moieties can be conjugated to the scaffold. Further, these macromolecules can be fabricated into antimicrobial materials for contact-killing medical implants, fabrics, and devices. As volatilization or leaching out of the antimicrobial moieties from the macromolecular scaffold is reduced, these medical implants, fabrics, and devices can retain their antimicrobial activity over an extended period. Recent advances demonstrate the potential of metal-based antimicrobial macromolecules as effective platforms that prevent and treat infections from resistant strains. In this review these advances are thoroughly discussed within the context of examples of metal-based antimicrobial macromolecules, their mechanisms of action and biocompatibility.

  4. Biologically active and antimicrobial peptides from plants.

    PubMed

    Salas, Carlos E; Badillo-Corona, Jesus A; Ramírez-Sotelo, Guadalupe; Oliver-Salvador, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive peptides are part of an innate response elicited by most living forms. In plants, they are produced ubiquitously in roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves, highlighting their physiological importance. While most of the bioactive peptides produced in plants possess microbicide properties, there is evidence that they are also involved in cellular signaling. Structurally, there is an overall similarity when comparing them with those derived from animal or insect sources. The biological action of bioactive peptides initiates with the binding to the target membrane followed in most cases by membrane permeabilization and rupture. Here we present an overview of what is currently known about bioactive peptides from plants, focusing on their antimicrobial activity and their role in the plant signaling network and offering perspectives on their potential application.

  5. Biologically Active and Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Carlos E.; Badillo-Corona, Jesus A.; Ramírez-Sotelo, Guadalupe; Oliver-Salvador, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive peptides are part of an innate response elicited by most living forms. In plants, they are produced ubiquitously in roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves, highlighting their physiological importance. While most of the bioactive peptides produced in plants possess microbicide properties, there is evidence that they are also involved in cellular signaling. Structurally, there is an overall similarity when comparing them with those derived from animal or insect sources. The biological action of bioactive peptides initiates with the binding to the target membrane followed in most cases by membrane permeabilization and rupture. Here we present an overview of what is currently known about bioactive peptides from plants, focusing on their antimicrobial activity and their role in the plant signaling network and offering perspectives on their potential application. PMID:25815307

  6. Electrospun Nanofibres Containing Antimicrobial Plant Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wanwei; Ronca, Sara; Mele, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 10 years great research interest has been directed toward nanofibrous architectures produced by electrospinning bioactive plant extracts. The resulting structures possess antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant activity, which are attractive for biomedical applications and food industry. This review describes the diverse approaches that have been developed to produce electrospun nanofibres that are able to deliver naturally-derived chemical compounds in a controlled way and to prevent their degradation. The efficacy of those composite nanofibres as wound dressings, scaffolds for tissue engineering, and active food packaging systems will be discussed. PMID:28336874

  7. Antimicrobial Activity of Bacteriophage Endolysin Produced in Nicotiana benthamiana Plants.

    PubMed

    Kovalskaya, Natalia; Foster-Frey, Juli; Donovan, David M; Bauchan, Gary; Hammond, Rosemarie W

    2016-01-01

    The increasing spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens has raised the interest in alternative antimicrobial treatments. In our study, the functionally active gram-negative bacterium bacteriophage CP933 endolysin was produced in Nicotiana benthamiana plants by a combination of transient expression and vacuole targeting strategies, and its antimicrobial activity was investigated. Expression of the cp933 gene in E. coli led to growth inhibition and lysis of the host cells or production of trace amounts of CP933. Cytoplasmic expression of the cp933 gene in plants using Potato virus X-based transient expression vectors (pP2C2S and pGR107) resulted in death of the apical portion of experimental plants. To protect plants against the toxic effects of the CP933 protein, the cp933 coding region was fused at its Nterminus to an N-terminal signal peptide from the potato proteinase inhibitor I to direct CP933 to the delta-type vacuoles. Plants producing the CP933 fusion protein did not exhibit the severe toxic effects seen with the unfused protein and the level of expression was 0.16 mg/g of plant tissue. Antimicrobial assays revealed that, in contrast to gram-negative bacterium E. coli (BL21(DE3)), the gram-positive plant pathogenic bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis was more susceptible to the plant-produced CP933, showing 18% growth inhibition. The results of our experiments demonstrate that the combination of transient expression and protein targeting to the delta vacuoles is a promising approach to produce functionally active proteins that exhibit toxicity when expressed in plant cells.

  8. Essential oil of Aegle marmelos as a safe plant-based antimicrobial against postharvest microbial infestations and aflatoxin contamination of food commodities.

    PubMed

    Singh, Priyanka; Kumar, Ashok; Dubey, Nawal K; Gupta, Rajesh

    2009-08-01

    The essential oil of Aegle marmelos L. Correa (Rutaceae) showed strong fungitoxicity against some storage fungi-causing contamination of foodstuffs. The oil also showed efficacy as aflatoxin suppressor at 500 microL/L as it completely arrested the aflatoxin B(1) production by the toxigenic strains (Navjot 4NSt and Saktiman 3NSt) of Aspergillus flavus Link. Keeping in view the side effects of synthetic fungicides, A. marmelos oil may be recommended as an antimicrobial of plant origin to enhance the shelf life of stored food commodities by controlling the fungal growth as well as aflatoxin secretion. This is the 1st report on aflatoxin B(1) inhibitory nature of this oil. A. marmelos oil may be recommended as a novel plant-based antimicrobial in food protection over synthetic preservatives, most of which are reported to incite environmental problems because of their nonbiodegradable nature and side effects on mammals. The LD(50) of Aegle oil was found to be 23659.93 mg/kg body weight in mice (Mus musculus L.) when administered for acute oral toxicity showing nonmammalian toxicity of the oil. GC-MS analysis of the oil found DL-Limonene to be major component.

  9. Design of self-processing antimicrobial peptides for plant protection.

    PubMed

    Powell, W A; Catranis, C M; Maynard, C A

    2000-08-01

    Small antimicrobial peptides are excellent candidates for inclusion in self-processing proteins that could be used to confer pathogen resistance in transgenic plants. Antimicrobial peptides as small as 22 amino acids in length have been designed to incorporate the residual amino acids left from protein processing by the tobacco etch virus'(TEVs') NIa protease. Also, by minimizing the length of these peptides and the number of highly hydrophobic residues, haemolytic activity was reduced without affecting the peptide's antimicrobial activity.

  10. Antimicrobial resistance of fecal indicators in municipal wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Łuczkiewicz, A; Jankowska, K; Fudala-Książek, S; Olańczuk-Neyman, K

    2010-09-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of fecal coliforms (n = 153) and enterococci (n = 199) isolates was investigated in municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) based on activated sludge system. The number of fecal indicators (in influent and effluent as well as in the aeration chamber and in return activated sludge mixture) was determined using selective media. Susceptibility of selected strains was tested against 19 (aminoglycosides, aztreonam, carbapenems, cephalosporins, β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitors, fluoroquinolones, penicillines, tetracycline and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole) and 17 (high-level aminoglycosides, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, fluoroquinolones, glycopeptides, linezolid, lincosamides, nitrofuration, streptogramins, tetracycline) antimicrobial agents respectively. Among enterococci the predominant species were Enterococcus faecium (60.8%) and Enterococcus faecalis (22.1%), while remaining isolates belonged to Enterococcus hirae (12.1%), Enterococcus casseliflavus/gallinarum (4.5%), and Enterococcus durans (0.5%). Resistance to nitrofuration and erythromycin was common among enterococci (53% and 44%, respectively), and followed by resistance to ciprofloxacin (29%) and tetracycline (20%). The resistance phenotypes related to glycopeptides (up to 3.2%) and high-level aminoglycosides (up to 5.4%) were also observed. Most frequently, among Escherichia coli isolates the resistance patterns were found for ampicillin (34%), piperacillin (24%) and tetracycline (23%). Extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing E. coli was detected once, in the aeration chamber. In the study the applied wastewater treatment processes considerably reduced the number of fecal indicators. Nevertheless their number in the WWTP effluent was higher than 10(4) CFU per 100 ml and periodically contained 90% of bacteria with antimicrobial resistance patterns. The positive selection of isolates with antimicrobial resistance patterns was observed during the treatment processes

  11. Antimicrobial property of zinc based nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiriac, V.; Stratulat, D. N.; Calin, G.; Nichitus, S.; Burlui, V.; Stadoleanu, C.; Popa, M.; Popa, I. M.

    2016-06-01

    Pathogen bacteria strains with wide spectrum can cause serious infections with drastic damages on humans. There are studies reflecting antibacterial effect of nanoparticles type metal or metal oxides as an alternative or concurrent treatment to the diseases caused by infectious agents. Synthesised nanoparticles using different methods like sol-gel, hydrothermal or plant extraction were tested following well-established protocols with the regard to their antimicrobial activity. It was found that zinc based nanoparticles possess strong synergistic effect with commonly used antibiotics on infection tratment.

  12. Antimicrobial potentials of some plant species of the Bignoniaceae family.

    PubMed

    Binutu, O A; Lajubutu, B A

    1994-09-01

    The methanol extracts of the leaves and stem bark of four Bignoniaceae plants Jacaranda mimosifolia D. Dol., Tecoma stans Linn., Tabebuia rosea (Bertol) D.C., and Crescentia cujete Linn. were studied for their antimicrobial activity using a wide range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. Extracts of both the leaves and stem bark of majority of plant species studied showed variable but remarkable broad spectrum antimicrobial activity. However, methanol extracts of Tecoma stans leaves was found to be effective against only Candida albicans at the concentrations employed. It was observed that the extracts of stem bark generally showed better antimicrobial activity than those of the leaves and some organisms were selectively more sensitive to the extracts than others. Preliminary phytochemical screening of these plants revealed the presence of tannins, flavonoids, alkaloids, quinones and traces of saponins. The antimicrobial activity observed are discussed in relation to the chemical constituents reportedly isolated from these plants and their traditional uses.

  13. Chemical composition, antifungal and antiaflatoxigenic activities of Ocimum sanctum L. essential oil and its safety assessment as plant based antimicrobial.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Shukla, Ravindra; Singh, Priyanka; Dubey, Nawal Kishore

    2010-02-01

    The study deals with the efficacy of Ocimum sanctum essential oil (EO) and its major component, eugenol against the fungi causing biodeterioration of food stuffs during storage. O. sanctum EO and eugenol were found efficacious in checking growth of Aspergillus flavus NKDHV8; and, their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were recorded as 0.3 and 0.2 microl ml(-1), respectively. The O. sanctum EO and eugenol also inhibited the aflatoxin B1 production completely at 0.2 and 0.1 microl ml(-1), respectively. Both of these were found superior over some prevalent synthetic antifungals and exhibited broad fungitoxic spectrum against 12 commonly occurring fungi. The LD50 value of O. sanctum EO on mice was found to be 4571.43 microl kg(-1) suggesting its non-mammalian toxic nature. The findings of present study reveals the possible exploitation of O. sanctum EO and eugenol as plant based safe preservatives against fungal spoilage of food stuffs during storage. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Phytochemical screening and antimicrobial activity of Coccinia cordifolia L. plant.

    PubMed

    Khatun, Shahanaz; Pervin, Farzana; Karim, Mohammad Rezaul; Ashraduzzaman, Mohammad; Rosma, Ahmad

    2012-10-01

    The medicinal plant, Coccinia cordifolia L. was analyzed for its chemical composition. The antimicrobial activities of the methanol, water, ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts of Coccinia cordifolia L. plant were evaluated against some Gram positive bacteria (Sarcina lutea, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus), Gram negative bacteria (Salmonella typhi, Shigella dysenteriae and Escherichia coli) and fungi (Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium notatum). Chemical analysis showed that the plant is rich in nutrients, especially antioxidant compounds such as total phenol, vitamin C and β-carotene. Phytochemical screening showed that the methanolic extract contains the bioactive constituents such as tannins, saponins, phenols, flavonoids and terpenoids. In the methanolic extract of the plant, promising antimicrobial potential was observed against the tested microorganism. Methanolic extract showed highest activity against Shigella dysenteriae, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans compared to the other extracts. Water extract showed less antimicrobial activity as compared to other extractants.

  15. Antimicrobial Cyclic Peptides for Plant Disease Control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Wan; Kim, Beom Seok

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial cyclic peptides derived from microbes bind stably with target sites, have a tolerance to hydrolysis by proteases, and a favorable degradability under field conditions, which make them an attractive proposition for use as agricultural fungicides. Antimicrobial cyclic peptides are classified according to the types of bonds within the ring structure; homodetic, heterodetic, and complex cyclic peptides, which in turn reflect diverse physicochemical features. Most antimicrobial cyclic peptides affect the integrity of the cell envelope. This is achieved through direct interaction with the cell membrane or disturbance of the cell wall and membrane component biosynthesis such as chitin, glucan, and sphingolipid. These are specific and selective targets providing reliable activity and safety for non-target organisms. Synthetic cyclic peptides produced through combinatorial chemistry offer an alternative approach to develop antimicrobials for agricultural uses. Those synthesized so far have been studied for antibacterial activity, however, the recent advancements in powerful technologies now promise to provide novel antimicrobial cyclic peptides that are yet to be discovered from natural resources. PMID:25774105

  16. Mechanisms of antiviral action of plant antimicrobials against murine norovirus.

    PubMed

    Gilling, Damian H; Kitajima, Masaaki; Torrey, Jason R; Bright, Kelly R

    2014-08-01

    Numerous plant compounds have antibacterial or antiviral properties; however, limited research has been conducted with nonenveloped viruses. The efficacies of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral were evaluated against the nonenveloped murine norovirus (MNV), a human norovirus surrogate. The antiviral mechanisms of action were also examined using an RNase I protection assay, a host cell binding assay, and transmission electron microscopy. All three antimicrobials produced significant reductions (P ≤ 0.05) in viral infectivity within 6 h of exposure (0.90 log10 to 1.88 log10). After 24 h, the reductions were 2.74, 3.00, and 3.41 log10 for lemongrass oil, citral, and allspice oil, respectively. The antiviral effect of allspice oil was both time and concentration dependent; the effects of lemongrass oil and citral were time dependent. Based on the RNase I assay, allspice oil appeared to act directly upon the viral capsid and RNA. The capsids enlarged from ≤ 35 nm to up to 75 nm following treatment. MNV adsorption to host cells was not significantly affected. Alternatively, the capsid remained intact following exposure to lemongrass oil and citral, which appeared to coat the capsid, causing nonspecific and nonproductive binding to host cells that did not lead to successful infection. Such contrasting effects between allspice oil and both lemongrass oil and citral suggest that though different plant compounds may yield similar reductions in virus infectivity, the mechanisms of inactivation may be highly varied and specific to the antimicrobial. This study demonstrates the antiviral properties of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral against MNV and thus indicates their potential as natural food and surface sanitizers to control noroviruses. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Mechanisms of Antiviral Action of Plant Antimicrobials against Murine Norovirus

    PubMed Central

    Gilling, Damian H.; Kitajima, Masaaki; Torrey, Jason R.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous plant compounds have antibacterial or antiviral properties; however, limited research has been conducted with nonenveloped viruses. The efficacies of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral were evaluated against the nonenveloped murine norovirus (MNV), a human norovirus surrogate. The antiviral mechanisms of action were also examined using an RNase I protection assay, a host cell binding assay, and transmission electron microscopy. All three antimicrobials produced significant reductions (P ≤ 0.05) in viral infectivity within 6 h of exposure (0.90 log10 to 1.88 log10). After 24 h, the reductions were 2.74, 3.00, and 3.41 log10 for lemongrass oil, citral, and allspice oil, respectively. The antiviral effect of allspice oil was both time and concentration dependent; the effects of lemongrass oil and citral were time dependent. Based on the RNase I assay, allspice oil appeared to act directly upon the viral capsid and RNA. The capsids enlarged from ≤35 nm to up to 75 nm following treatment. MNV adsorption to host cells was not significantly affected. Alternatively, the capsid remained intact following exposure to lemongrass oil and citral, which appeared to coat the capsid, causing nonspecific and nonproductive binding to host cells that did not lead to successful infection. Such contrasting effects between allspice oil and both lemongrass oil and citral suggest that though different plant compounds may yield similar reductions in virus infectivity, the mechanisms of inactivation may be highly varied and specific to the antimicrobial. This study demonstrates the antiviral properties of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral against MNV and thus indicates their potential as natural food and surface sanitizers to control noroviruses. PMID:24907316

  18. Antimicrobial screening of medicinal plants from Baja California Sur, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Encarnación Dimayuga, R; Keer Garcia, S

    1991-02-01

    The ethanolic extracts of 72 plants belonging to 35 different families, and used in traditional medicine in Baja California Sur (México), were tested for antimicrobial activity in vitro using the filter paper disk assay method. Activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Streptococcus faecalis (Gram-positive microorganisms), Escherichia coli (Gram-negative microorganisms) and Candida albicans (yeast) is discussed.

  19. Antimicrobial agents from selected medicinal plants in Libya.

    PubMed

    Muhaisen, Hasan M H; Ab-Mous, Miftah Mailoud; Ddeeb, Fadel A; Rtemi, Aboclaid Ali; Taba, Omer M; Parveen, Mehtab

    2016-03-01

    To test the in vitro antimicrobial efficacy of water and methanol extracts of 23 plant species that are commonly used in Libyan folk medicine. The antimicrobial activity was determined using the well-diffusion method. Four test microorganisms were used namely, Escherichia coli, Salmonella species, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined for the high biologically active crude plant extracts. Among 23 medicinal plants used in the study, only 5 methanolic extracts [Rosmarinus offcinalis L., Carduus marianium L., Lantana camara L., Rhus tripartite (ueria) Grande, and Thymus capitatus (L.) Hoffm (link)] showed the highest antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella species, while 22 methanolic and aqueous extracts showed moderate to weak antimicrobial activity on all tested organisms. However 19 of the extracts showed no activity at all against Gram-ve and Gram +ve microorganisms. MIC was found to be 1.25 mg/mL (Thymus capitatus), 3 mg/mL (Rhus tripartite), 4 mg/mL (Carduus marianium), 5 mg/mL (Rosamarinus officinalis) and 5 mg/mL (Lantana camara), respectively. The present results revealed that, crude methanolic extracts of the investigated Libyan folk medicinal plants exhibited mild to high in vitro antibacterial activities against Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms.

  20. Screening of antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of Panamanian plants.

    PubMed

    González, A G; Moujir, L; Bazzocchi, I L; Correa, M D; Gupta, M P

    1994-09-01

    34 crude extracts of Panamanian plants, representing 4 species of Celastraceae and 5 species of Lamiaceae, have been screened for antimicrobial activity against thirteen bacterial strains and two yeasts. The cytotoxic activity was assayed against HeLa and Hep-2 cell lines. Fifty-three percent were found to have significant antimicrobial activity against at least two of the organisms tested, and 26.5 percent showed an IC(50) < 100 μg/ml against one cell line. Copyright © 1994 Gustav Fischer Verlag, Stuttgart · Jena · New York. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  1. Antimicrobial compounds from mangrove plants: A pharmaceutical prospective.

    PubMed

    Patra, Jayanta Kumar; Mohanta, Yugal Kishore

    2014-04-01

    Mangroves are salt-tolerant forest ecosystem that extends between tropical and subtropical intertidal regions of the world. Mangroves are biochemically unique vegetation that produce wide array of natural products with immense medicinal potential. These plants are the most valuable resources and provide economic and ecological benefits to the coastal people. Natural products from these plants are of great interest as they provide innumerable direct and indirect benefits to human beings for the discovery of novel antimicrobial and other bioactive compounds. They possess active metabolites with some novel chemical structures that belong to diverse chemical classes such as alkaloids, phenol, steroids, terpenoids and tannins. Several mangrove species have been used in traditional medicine or have few applications as insecticide and pesticide. To date, several mangroves, and their associated species and solvent extracts are screened for antimicrobial activity along with the presence of potent bioactive compounds. The present article emphasizes and creates awareness about the potential mangrove plants and their associates as a source of biologically active compounds with potent antimicrobial properties. This paper also elaborates the mechanisms of action and various methods for screening of antimicrobial compounds.

  2. Antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects of Mexican medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Jacobo-Salcedo, Maria del Rosario; Alonso-Castro, Angel Josabad; Salazar-Olivo, Luis A; Carranza-Alvarez, Candy; González-Espíndola, Luis Angel; Domínguez, Fabiola; Maciel-Torres, Sandra Patricia; García-Lujan, Concepción; González-Martínez, Marisela del Rocio; Gómez-Sánchez, Maricela; Estrada-Castillón, Eduardo; Zapata-Bustos, Rocio; Medellin-Milán, Pedro; García-Carrancá, Alejandro

    2011-12-01

    The antimicrobial effects of the Mexican medicinal plants Guazuma ulmifolia, Justicia spicigera, Opuntia joconostle, O. leucotricha, Parkinsonia aculeata, Phoradendron longifolium, P. serotinum, Psittacanthus calyculatus, Tecoma stans and Teucrium cubense were tested against several human multi-drug resistant pathogens, including three Gram (+) and five Gram (-) bacterial species and three fungal species using the disk-diffusion assay. The cytotoxicity of plant extracts on human cancer cell lines and human normal non-cancerous cells was also evaluated using the MTT assay. Phoradendron longifolium, Teucrium cubense, Opuntia joconostle, Tecoma stans and Guazuma ulmifolia showed potent antimicrobial effects against at least one multidrug-resistant microorganism (inhibition zone > 15 mm). Only Justicia spicigera and Phoradendron serotinum extracts exerted active cytotoxic effects on human breast cancer cells (IC50 < or = 30 microg/mL). The results showed that Guazuma ulmifolia produced potent antimicrobial effects against Candida albicans and Acinetobacter lwoffii, whereas Justicia spicigera and Phoradendron serotinum exerted the highest toxic effects on MCF-7 and HeLa, respectively, which are human cancer cell lines. These three plant species may be important sources of antimicrobial and cytotoxic agents.

  3. De-Novo Design of Antimicrobial Peptides for Plant Protection

    PubMed Central

    Zeitler, Benjamin; Herrera Diaz, Areli; Dangel, Alexandra; Thellmann, Martha; Meyer, Helge; Sattler, Michael; Lindermayr, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This work describes the de-novo design of peptides that inhibit a broad range of plant pathogens. Four structurally different groups of peptides were developed that differ in size and position of their charged and hydrophobic clusters and were assayed for their ability to inhibit bacterial growth and fungal spore germination. Several peptides are highly active at concentrations between 0,1 and 1 µg/ml against plant pathogenic bacteria, such as Pseudomonas syringae, Pectobacterium carotovorum, and Xanthomonas vesicatoria. Importantly, no hemolytic activity could be detected for these peptides at concentrations up to 200 µg/ml. Moreover, the peptides are also active after spraying on the plant surface demonstrating a possible way of application. In sum, our designed peptides represent new antimicrobial agents and with the increasing demand for antimicrobial compounds for production of “healthy” food, these peptides might serve as templates for novel antibacterial and antifungal agents. PMID:23951222

  4. The Use of Plant Antimicrobial Compounds for Food Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Hintz, Tana; Matthews, Karl K.

    2015-01-01

    Foodborne disease is a global issue with significant impact on human health. With the growing consumer demand for natural preservatives to replace chemical compounds, plant antimicrobial compounds must be thoroughly investigated for their potential to serve as biopreservatives. This review paper will focus on the plant-derived products as antimicrobial agents for use in food preservation and to control foodborne pathogens in foods. Structure, modes of action, stability, and resistance to these plant compounds will be discussed as well as their application in food industries and possible technologies by which they can be delivered. Benefits as well as challenges, such as the need for further research for implementation and governmental regulation, will be highlighted. PMID:26539472

  5. De-novo design of antimicrobial peptides for plant protection.

    PubMed

    Zeitler, Benjamin; Herrera Diaz, Areli; Dangel, Alexandra; Thellmann, Martha; Meyer, Helge; Sattler, Michael; Lindermayr, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This work describes the de-novo design of peptides that inhibit a broad range of plant pathogens. Four structurally different groups of peptides were developed that differ in size and position of their charged and hydrophobic clusters and were assayed for their ability to inhibit bacterial growth and fungal spore germination. Several peptides are highly active at concentrations between 0,1 and 1 µg/ml against plant pathogenic bacteria, such as Pseudomonas syringae, Pectobacterium carotovorum, and Xanthomonas vesicatoria. Importantly, no hemolytic activity could be detected for these peptides at concentrations up to 200 µg/ml. Moreover, the peptides are also active after spraying on the plant surface demonstrating a possible way of application. In sum, our designed peptides represent new antimicrobial agents and with the increasing demand for antimicrobial compounds for production of "healthy" food, these peptides might serve as templates for novel antibacterial and antifungal agents.

  6. The Use of Plant Antimicrobial Compounds for Food Preservation.

    PubMed

    Hintz, Tana; Matthews, Karl K; Di, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Foodborne disease is a global issue with significant impact on human health. With the growing consumer demand for natural preservatives to replace chemical compounds, plant antimicrobial compounds must be thoroughly investigated for their potential to serve as biopreservatives. This review paper will focus on the plant-derived products as antimicrobial agents for use in food preservation and to control foodborne pathogens in foods. Structure, modes of action, stability, and resistance to these plant compounds will be discussed as well as their application in food industries and possible technologies by which they can be delivered. Benefits as well as challenges, such as the need for further research for implementation and governmental regulation, will be highlighted.

  7. Plant storage proteins with antimicrobial activity: novel insights into plant defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cândido, Elizabete de Souza; Pinto, Michelle Flaviane Soares; Pelegrini, Patrícia Barbosa; Lima, Thais Bergamin; Silva, Osmar Nascimento; Pogue, Robert; Grossi-de-Sá, Maria Fátima; Franco, Octávio Luiz

    2011-10-01

    Storage proteins perform essential roles in plant survival, acting as molecular reserves important for plant growth and maintenance, as well as being involved in defense mechanisms by virtue of their properties as insecticidal and antimicrobial proteins. These proteins accumulate in storage vacuoles inside plant cells, and, in response to determined signals, they may be used by the different plant tissues in response to pathogen attack. To shed some light on these remarkable proteins with dual functions, storage proteins found in germinative tissues, such as seeds and kernels, and in vegetative tissues, such as tubercles and leaves, are extensively discussed here, along with the related mechanisms of protein expression. Among these proteins, we focus on 2S albumins, Kunitz proteinase inhibitors, plant lectins, glycine-rich proteins, vicilins, patatins, tarins, and ocatins. Finally, the potential use of these molecules in development of drugs to combat human and plant pathogens, contributing to the development of new biotechnology-based medications and products for agribusiness, is also presented.

  8. Evaluation of three medicinal plants for anti-microbial activity.

    PubMed

    Pratap, Gowd M J S; Manoj, Kumar M G; Sai, Shankar A J; Sujatha, B; Sreedevi, E

    2012-07-01

    Herbal remedies have a long history of use for gum and tooth problems such as dental caries. The present microbiological study was carried out to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of three medicinal plants (Terminalia chebula Retz., Clitoria ternatea Linn., and Wedelia chinensis (Osbeck.) Merr.) on three pathogenic microorganisms in the oral cavity (Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus casei, and Staphylococcus aureus). Aqueous extract concentrations (5%, 10%, 25%, and 50%) were prepared from the fruits of Terminalia chebula, flowers of Clitoria ternatea, and leaves of Wedelia chinensis. The antimicrobial efficacy of the aqueous extract concentrations of each plant was tested using agar well diffusion method and the size of the inhibition zone was measured in millimeters. The results obtained showed that the diameter of zone of inhibition increased with increase in concentration of extract and the antimicrobial efficacy of the aqueous extracts of the three plants was observed in the increasing order - Wedelia chinensis < Clitoria ternatea < Terminalia chebula. It can be concluded that the tested extracts of all the three plants were effective against dental caries causing bacteria.

  9. Antimicrobial properties of plant secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Wallace, R John

    2004-11-01

    Increasing awareness of hazards associated with the use of antibiotic and chemical feed additives has accelerated investigations into plants and their extracts as feed additives. The present review mainly discusses two classes of plant secondary compounds in this context, i.e. essential oils and saponins. The broader potential of plants and their extracts is illustrated by the progress of an EC Framework 5 project, 'Rumen-up'. Dietary inclusion of a commercial blend of essential oils causes markedly decreased NH3 production from amino acids in rumen fluid taken from sheep and cattle. This effect is mediated partly by the effects on hyper-NH3-producing bacteria and the protein- and starch-fermenting rumen bacterium, Ruminobacter amylophilus. Saponin-containing plants and their extracts suppress the bacteriolytic activity of rumen ciliate protozoa and thereby enhance total microbial protein flow from the rumen. The effects of some saponins are transient, because saponins are hydrolysed by bacteria to their corresponding sapogenin aglycones, which are much less toxic to protozoa. Saponins also have selective antibacterial effects that may prove useful in, for example, controlling starch digestion. The 'Rumen-up' project began with a targetted collection of European plants and their extracts, which partners have tested for their effects on rumen proteolysis, protozoa, methanogenesis and lactate production. A success rate of about 5% in terms of positive hits illustrates that plant secondary compounds, of which essential oils and saponins comprise a small proportion, have great potential as 'natural' manipulators of rumen fermentation to benefit the farmer and the environment in the future.

  10. Anthocyanins as antimicrobial agents of natural plant origin.

    PubMed

    Cisowska, Agnieszka; Wojnicz, Dorota; Hendrich, Andrzej B

    2011-01-01

    Anthocyanins are particularly abundant in different fruits, especially in berries. The beneficial effects of these compounds for human health have been known from at least the 16th century. Despite the great number of papers devoted to the different biological effects exerted by anthocyanins only a limited number of studies is focused on the antimicrobial activity of these compounds. Anthocyanin content of berry fruits varies from 7.5 mg/100 mg fresh fruit in redcurrant (Ribes rubum) up to 460 mg/100 g fresh fruit in chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa). After consumption, anthocyanins are intensively metabolized, mainly in the intestines and liver. Glucorination, methylation and sulfation are the most typical metabolic reactions. Antimicrobial activity of crude extracts of plant phenolic compounds against human pathogens has been intensively studied to characterize and develop new healthy food ingredients as well as medical and pharmaceutical products. However, there is very little information available about the antimicrobial activity of the pure anthocyanins. In the last part of this review we present the collection of papers describing the anthocyanin profiles of different fruits (mainly berries) and the antimicrobial properties of the identified compounds. Generally, anthocyanins are active against different microbes, however Gram-positive bacteria usually are more susceptible to the anthocyanin action than Gram-negative ones. Mechanisms underlying anthocyanin activity include both membrane and intracellular interactions of these compounds. Antimicrobial activity of berries and other anthocyanin-containing fruits is likely to be caused by multiple mechanisms and synergies because they contain various compounds including anthocyanins, weak organic acids, phenolic acids, and their mixtures of different chemical forms. Therefore, the antimicrobial effect of chemically complex compounds has to be critically analyzed.

  11. Antimicrobial Activity of Carbon-Based Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Maleki Dizaj, Solmaz; Mennati, Afsaneh; Jafari, Samira; Khezri, Khadejeh; Adibkia, Khosro

    2015-01-01

    Due to the vast and inappropriate use of the antibiotics, microorganisms have begun to develop resistance to the commonly used antimicrobial agents. So therefore, development of the new and effective antimicrobial agents seems to be necessary. According to some recent reports, carbon-based nanomaterials such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (especially single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)) and graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles show potent antimicrobial properties. In present review, we have briefly summarized the antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature show that the size of carbon nanoparticles plays an important role in the inactivation of the microorganisms. As major mechanism, direct contact of microorganisms with carbon nanostructures seriously affects their cellular membrane integrity, metabolic processes and morphology. The antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanostructures may interestingly be investigated in the near future owing to their high surface/volume ratio, large inner volume and other unique chemical and physical properties. In addition, application of functionalized carbon nanomaterials as carriers for the ordinary antibiotics possibly will decrease the associated resistance, enhance their bioavailability and provide their targeted delivery. PMID:25789215

  12. Antimicrobial plant metabolites: structural diversity and mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Radulović, N S; Blagojević, P D; Stojanović-Radić, Z Z; Stojanović, N M

    2013-01-01

    Microbial infectious diseases continue to be one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. It has been estimated that microbial species comprise about 60% of the Earth's biomass. This, together with the fact that their genetic, metabolic and physiological diversity is extraordinary, makes them a major threat to the health and development of populations across the world. Widespread antibiotic resistance, the emergence of new pathogens in addition to the resurgence of old ones, and the lack of effective new therapeutics exacerbate the problems. Thus, the need to discover and develop new antimicrobial agents is critical to improve mankind's future health. Plant secondary metabolites (PSMs) offer particular promise in this sense. Plant Kingdom could be considered a rich source of the most diverse structures (e.g. there are more than 12,000 known alkaloids, more than 8,000 phenolic compounds and over 25,000 different terpenoids), many of which were proven to possess strong antimicrobial properties (e.g. thymol, eurabienol, etc.). In many instances, PSMs can be easily isolated from the plant matrix, either in pure state or in the form of mixtures of chemically related compounds. What is also important is that the development of bacterial resistance toward natural plant products (that are generally regarded as eco-friendly) has been thus far documented in a very limited number of cases (e.g. for reserpine). Having all of the mentioned advantages of PSMs as potential antimicrobials in mind, a major question arises: why is it that there are still no commercially available or commonly used antibiotics of plant origin? This review tries to give a critical answer to this question by considering potential mechanisms of antimicrobial action of PSMs (inhibition of cell wall or protein synthesis, inducing leakage from the cells by tampering with the function of the membranes, interfering with intermediary metabolisms or DNA/RNA synthesis/function), as well as their

  13. An antimicrobial investigation of plants used traditionally in southern Africa to treat sexually transmitted infections.

    PubMed

    van Vuuren, S F; Naidoo, D

    2010-08-09

    Eighteen plants were assessed for antimicrobial activity against pathogens associated with prevalent urogenital/sexually transmitted infections. Plant selection was based on information obtained from the ethnobotanical literature. Dried plant material was submerged in a 1:1 mixture of methanol and dichloromethane for 24 h. Aqueous extracts were prepared by submerging dried plant material in sterile distilled water for 24 h followed by lyophilization. Essential oils were distilled from the two aromatic plant species (Tarchonanthus camphoratus and Croton gratissimus). Antimicrobial activity was assessed using the micro-well minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay with specific modifications to facilitate fastidious growth of pathogens. Tarchonanthus camphoratus (solvent extract) showed the most significant broad spectrum activity with MIC values ranging between 0.50 and 0.70 mg/ml against five of the six pathogens tested. Other noteworthy activity was found for Hypericum aethiopicum (root) at 0.3 mg/ml (Neisseria gonorrhoeae).Polygala fruticosa and the solvent root extract of Hypericum aethiopicum showed highest sensitivities towards Gardnerella vaginalis at 0.2 mg/ml. Efficacy of the solvent extracts against the pathogen Oligella ureolytica demonstrated antimicrobial activity (MIC values plant species. The highest activity noted against Ureaplasma urealyticum was for Psidium guajava (solvent extract) at 0.8 mg/ml. In general the aqueous extracts displayed mostly poor anti-STI activity. The most noteworthy susceptibility for the aqueous extracts was noted with the plant extract Syzygium cordatum (MIC value 0.1 mg/ml against Candida albicans). The most noteworthy activity for the essential oils was observed for Tarchonanthus camphoratus (0.8 mg/ml) against Oligella ureolytica. Antimicrobial activity was observed for a number of the plant samples against at least one or more pathogen, thus validating the ethnobotanical use as an anti

  14. Antimicrobial peptides incorporating non-natural amino acids as agents for plant protection.

    PubMed

    Ng-Choi, Iteng; Soler, Marta; Güell, Imma; Badosa, Esther; Cabrefiga, Jordi; Bardaji, Eduard; Montesinos, Emilio; Planas, Marta; Feliu, Lidia

    2014-04-01

    The control of plant pathogens is mainly based on copper compounds and antibiotics. However, the use of these compounds has some limitations. They have a high environmental impact and the use of antibiotics is not allowed in several countries. Moreover, resistance has been developed to these pathogens. The identification of new agents able to fight plant pathogenic bacteria and fungi will represent an alternative to currently used antibiotics or pesticides. Antimicrobial peptides are widely recognized as promising candidates, however naturally occurring sequences present drawbacks that limit their development. These include susceptibility to protease degradation and low bioavailability. To overcome these problems, research has focused on the introduction of unnatural amino acids into lead peptide sequences. In particular, we have improved the biological profile of antimicrobial peptides active against plant pathogenic bacteria and fungi by incorporating triazolyl, biaryl and D-amino acids into their sequence. These modifications and their influence on the biological activity are summarized.

  15. Antimicrobial activity of selected South African medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nearly 3,000 plant species are used as medicines in South Africa, with approximately 350 species forming the most commonly traded and used medicinal plants. In the present study, twelve South African medicinal plants were selected and tested for their antimicrobial activities against eight microbial species belonging to fungi, Mycobacteria, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Methods The radiometric respiratory technique using the BACTEC 460 system was used for susceptibility testing against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and the liquid micro-broth dilution was used for other antimicrobial assays. Results The results of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) determinations indicated that the methanol extracts from Acacia karoo, Erythrophleum lasianthum and Salvia africana were able to prevent the growth of all the tested microorganisms. All other samples showed selective activities. MIC values below 100 μg/ml were recorded with A. karoo, C. dentate, E. lasianthum, P. obligun and S. africana on at least one of the nine tested microorganisms. The best activity (MIC value of 39.06 μg/ml) was noted with S. africana against E. coli, S. aureus and M. audouinii, and Knowltonia vesitoria against M. tuberculosis. Conclusion The overall results of the present work provide baseline information for the possible use of the studied South African plant extracts in the treatment of microbial infections. PMID:22704594

  16. Antimicrobial and anti-Quorum Sensing activities of selected medicinal plants of Ethiopia: Implication for development of potent antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Bacha, Ketema; Tariku, Yinebeb; Gebreyesus, Fisseha; Zerihun, Shibru; Mohammed, Ali; Weiland-Bräuer, Nancy; Schmitz, Ruth A; Mulat, Mulugeta

    2016-07-11

    Traditional medicinal plants have been used as an alternative medicine in many parts of the world, including Ethiopia. There are many documented scientific reports on antimicrobial activities of the same. To our knowledge, however, there is no report on the anti-Quorum Sensing (Quorum Quenching, QQ) potential of traditional Ethiopian medicinal plants. As many of the opportunistic pathogenic bacteria depend on Quorum Sensing (QS) systems to coordinate their virulence expression, interference with QS could be a novel approach to control bacterial infections. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate selected medicinal plants from Ethiopia for their antimicrobial activities against bacterial and fungal pathogens; and to assess the interference of these plant extracts with QS of bacteria. Antimicrobial activities of plant extracts (oil, resins and crude extracts) were evaluated following standard agar diffusion technique. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of potent extracts were determined using 96 well micro-titer plates and optical densities were measured using an ELISA Microplate reader. Interference with Quorum Sensing activities of extracts was determined using the recently established E. coli based reporter strain AI1-QQ.1 and signaling molecule N-(ß-ketocaproyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL). Petroleum ether extract of seed of Nigella sativa exhibited the highest activity against both the laboratory isolated Bacillus cereus [inhibition zone (IZ), 44 ± 0.31 mm] and B. cereus ATCC 10987 (IZ, 40 ± 2.33 mm). Similarly, oil extract from mature ripe fruit husk of Aframomum corrorima and mature unripe fruit of A. corrorima revealed promising activities against Candida albicans ATCC 90028 (IZ, 35 ± 1.52 mm) and Staphylococcus aureus DSM 346 (IZ, 25 ± 1.32 mm), respectively. Antimicrobial activities of oil extract from husk of A. corrorima and petroleum ether extract of seed of N. sativa were significantly higher than that of

  17. Insights into animal and plant lectins with antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Dias, Renata de Oliveira; Machado, Leandro Dos Santos; Migliolo, Ludovico; Franco, Octavio Luiz

    2015-01-05

    Lectins are multivalent proteins with the ability to recognize and bind diverse carbohydrate structures. The glyco -binding and diverse molecular structures observed in these protein classes make them a large and heterogeneous group with a wide range of biological activities in microorganisms, animals and plants. Lectins from plants and animals are commonly used in direct defense against pathogens and in immune regulation. This review focuses on sources of animal and plant lectins, describing their functional classification and tridimensional structures, relating these properties with biotechnological purposes, including antimicrobial activities. In summary, this work focuses on structural-functional elucidation of diverse lectin groups, shedding some light on host-pathogen interactions; it also examines their emergence as biotechnological tools through gene manipulation and development of new drugs.

  18. Molecular Characterization and Analysis of Antimicrobial Activity of Endophytic Fungi From Medicinal Plants in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Gashgari, Rukaia; Gherbawy, Youssuf; Ameen, Fuad; Alsharari, Salam

    2016-01-01

    Endophytic fungi, which have been reported in numerous plant species, are important components of the forest community and contribute significantly to the diversity of natural ecosystems. The current study aimed to evaluate and characterize, at the molecular level, the diversity and antimicrobial activities of endophytic fungi from medicinal plants in Saudi Arabia. Fungi growing on plant segments were isolated and identified based on morphological and molecular characteristics. The isolates were grouped into 35 distinct operational taxonomic units, based on the sequence of the internal transcribed spacer regions in the rRNA gene. The colonization frequency and the dominant fungi percentage of these endophytic fungi were calculated. A dual culture technique was adopted to investigate the antifungal activity of these endophytes. Tamarix nilotica showed the highest endophytic diversity with a relative frequency of 27.27%, followed by Cressa cretica with a relative frequency of 19.27%. The most frequently isolated species was Penicillium chrysogenum with an overall colonization rate of 98.57%. Seven out of 35 endophytic fungi exhibited strong antifungal activity to all plant fungal pathogens tested. P. chrysogenum, Fusarium oxysporum, and F. nygamai exhibited the highest inhibition against the human pathogenic bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Aspergillus sydowii, P. chrysogenum, and Eupenicillium crustaceum showed strong antimicrobial activity against Enterococcus faecalis. The antimicrobial activity of these endophytic microorganisms could be exploited in biotechnology, medicine, and agriculture.

  19. Molecular Characterization and Analysis of Antimicrobial Activity of Endophytic Fungi From Medicinal Plants in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Gashgari, Rukaia; Gherbawy, Youssuf; Ameen, Fuad; Alsharari, Salam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endophytic fungi, which have been reported in numerous plant species, are important components of the forest community and contribute significantly to the diversity of natural ecosystems. Objectives: The current study aimed to evaluate and characterize, at the molecular level, the diversity and antimicrobial activities of endophytic fungi from medicinal plants in Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: Fungi growing on plant segments were isolated and identified based on morphological and molecular characteristics. The isolates were grouped into 35 distinct operational taxonomic units, based on the sequence of the internal transcribed spacer regions in the rRNA gene. The colonization frequency and the dominant fungi percentage of these endophytic fungi were calculated. A dual culture technique was adopted to investigate the antifungal activity of these endophytes. Results: Tamarix nilotica showed the highest endophytic diversity with a relative frequency of 27.27%, followed by Cressa cretica with a relative frequency of 19.27%. The most frequently isolated species was Penicillium chrysogenum with an overall colonization rate of 98.57%. Seven out of 35 endophytic fungi exhibited strong antifungal activity to all plant fungal pathogens tested. P. chrysogenum, Fusarium oxysporum, and F. nygamai exhibited the highest inhibition against the human pathogenic bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Aspergillus sydowii, P. chrysogenum, and Eupenicillium crustaceum showed strong antimicrobial activity against Enterococcus faecalis. Conclusions: The antimicrobial activity of these endophytic microorganisms could be exploited in biotechnology, medicine, and agriculture. PMID:27099679

  20. Antimicrobial potential of some plant extracts against Candida species.

    PubMed

    Höfling, J F; Anibal, P C; Obando-Pereda, G A; Peixoto, I A T; Furletti, V F; Foglio, M A; Gonçalves, R B

    2010-11-01

    The increase in the resistance to antimicrobial drugs in use has attracted the attention of the scientific community, and medicinal plants have been extensively studied as alternative agents for the prevention of infections. The Candida genus yeast can become an opportunistic pathogen causing disease in immunosuppressive hosts. The purpose of this study was to evaluate dichloromethane and methanol extracts from Mentha piperita, Rosmarinus officinalis, Arrabidaea chica, Tabebuia avellanedae, Punica granatum and Syzygium cumini against Candida species through the analysis of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC). Results presented activity of these extracts against Candida species, especially the methanol extract.

  1. Nanoparticle-based local antimicrobial drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weiwei; Chen, Yijie; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Qiangzhe; Zhang, Liangfang

    2017-09-20

    Despite the wide success of antibiotics in modern medicine, the treatment of bacterial infections still faces critical challenges, especially due to the rapid emergence of antibiotic resistance. As a result, local antimicrobial treatment aimed at enhancing drug concentration at the site of infection while avoiding systemic exposure is becoming increasingly attractive, as it may alleviate resistance development. Meanwhile, therapeutic nanoparticles, especially liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, dendrimers, and inorganic nanoparticles, are gaining traction to improve the therapeutic efficacy with many applications specifically focused on local antimicrobial treatment. This review highlights topics where nanoparticle-based strategies hold significant potential to advance treatment against local bacterial infections, including (1) promoting antibiotic localization to the pathogen, (2) modulating drug-pathogen interaction against antibiotic resistance, and (3) enabling novel anti-virulence approaches for 'drug-free' antimicrobial activity. In each area, we highlight the innovative antimicrobial strategies tailored for local applications and review the progress made for the treatment of bacterial infections. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Mechanical, barrier, and antimicrobial properties of apple puree edible films containing plant essential oils.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Graü, Maria A; Avena-Bustillos, Roberto J; Friedman, Mendel; Henika, Philip R; Martín-Belloso, Olga; McHugh, Tara H

    2006-11-29

    Edible films, as carriers of antimicrobial compounds, constitute an approach for incorporating plant essential oils (EOs) onto fresh-cut fruit surfaces. The effect against Escherichia coli O157:H7 of oregano, cinnamon, and lemongrass oils in apple puree film-forming solution (APFFS) and in an edible film made from the apple puree solution (APEF) was investigated along with the mechanical and physical properties of the films. Bactericidal activities of APFFS, expressed as BA50 values (BA50 values are defined as the percentage of antimicrobial that killed 50% of the bacteria under the test conditions) ranged from 0.019% for oregano oil to 0.094% for cinnamon oil. Oregano oil in the apple puree and in the film was highly effective against E. coli O157:H7. The data show that (a) the order of antimicrobial activities was oregano oil > lemongrass oil > cinnamon oil and (b) addition of the essential oils into film-forming solution decreased water vapor permeability and increased oxygen permeability, but did not significantly alter the tensile properties of the films. These results show that plant-derived essential oils can be used to prepare apple-based antimicrobial edible films for various food applications.

  3. Distribution and antimicrobial potential of endophytic fungi associated with ethnomedicinal plant Melastoma malabathricum L.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Vineet Kumar; Singh, Garima; Passari, Ajit Kumar; Yadav, Mukesh Kumar; Gupta, Vijai Kumar; Singh, Bhim Pratap

    2016-03-01

    Distributions of endophytic fungi associated with ethnomedicinal plant Melastoma malabathricum L. was studied and 91 isolates belonging to 18 genera were recovered. The isolates were distributed to sordariomycetes (62.63%), dothideomycetes (19.78%), eurotiomycetes (7.69%), zygomycetes (4.19%), agaricomycetes (1.09%), and mycelia sterilia (4.39%). Based on colony morphology and examination of spores, the isolates were classified into 18 taxa, of which Colletotrichum, Phomopsis and Phoma were dominant, their relative frequencies were 23.07%, 17.58% and 12.08% respectively. The colonization rate of endophytic fungi was determined and found to be significantly higher in leaf segments (50.76%), followed by root (41.53%) and stem tissues (27.69%). All the isolates were screened for antimicrobial activity and revealed that 26.37% endophytic fungi were active against one or more pathogens. Twenty four isolates showing significant antimicrobial activity were identified by sequencing the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of rRNA gene. Results indicated that endophytic fungi associated with leaf were functionally versatile as they showed antimicrobial activity against most of the tested pathogens. The endophytic fungi Diaporthe phaseolorum var. meridionalis (KF193982) inhibited all the tested bacterial pathogens, whereas, Penicillium chermesinum (KM405640) displayed most significant antifungal activity. This seems to be the first hand report to understand the distribution and antimicrobial ability of endophytic fungi from ethno-medicinal plant M. malabathricum.

  4. Magnesium Based Materials and their Antimicrobial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Duane Allan

    that nMgO has similar effects. Incorporation of nMgO into a PCL composite was easily achieved and revealed similar, although not identical antimicrobial results. This work has provided a strong foundation and methodology for further evaluation of Mg based materials and their antimicrobial properties.

  5. Antimicrobial Activity of Medicinal Plants Correlates with the Proportion of Antagonistic Endophytes

    PubMed Central

    Egamberdieva, Dilfuza; Wirth, Stephan; Behrendt, Undine; Ahmad, Parvaiz; Berg, Gabriele

    2017-01-01

    Medicinal plants are known to harbor potential endophytic microbes, due to their bioactive compounds. In a first study of ongoing research, endophytic bacteria were isolated from two medicinal plants, Hypericum perforatum and Ziziphora capitata with contrasting antimicrobial activities from the Chatkal Biosphere Reserve of Uzbekistan, and their plant-specific traits involved in biocontrol and plant growth promotion were evaluated. Plant extracts of H. perforatum exhibited a remarkable activity against bacterial and fungal pathogens, whereas extracts of Z. capitata did not exhibit any potential antimicrobial activity. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) was used to identify plant associated culturable endophytic bacteria. The isolated culturable endophytes associated with H. perforatum belong to eight genera (Arthrobacter, Achromobacter, Bacillus, Enterobacter, Erwinia, Pseudomonas, Pantoea, Serratia, and Stenotrophomonas). The endophytic isolates from Z. capitata also contain those genera except Arthrobacter, Serratia, and Stenotrophomonas. H. perforatum with antibacterial activity supported more bacteria with antagonistic activity, as compared to Z. capitata. The antagonistic isolates were able to control tomato root rot caused by Fusarium oxysporum and stimulated plant growth under greenhouse conditions and could thus be a cost-effective source for agro-based biological control agents. PMID:28232827

  6. Antiviral and antimicrobial activities of Colombian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Lopez, A; Hudson, J B; Towers, G H

    2001-10-01

    Strong antiviral and antimicrobial activities were detected in methanolic extracts of 24 plants used medicinally in the treatment of skin infections in four different regions of Colombia. Thirteen extracts displayed activity against herpes simplex virus (HSV) whereas none was active against poliovirus. The antiviral activity was indicated by a total inhibition of viral cytopathic effects (CPE) at a non-cytotoxic concentration of the extract. The most potent extract was obtained from Byrsonima verbascifolia (L.) HBK. which showed anti-HSV activity at a concentration as low as 2.5 microg/ml. Antimicrobial screening was conducted using the disc diffusion assay against Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus faecalis, Mycobacterium phlei, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium and the human pathogenic yeast, Candida albicans. Anti-Candida activity was observed for Piper lanceaefolium HBK. and Juglans neotropica Diels. Twenty-two extracts displayed activity against Gram-positive bacteria whereas none was active against the Gram-negative species. We concluded that these Colombian medicinal plants represent an untapped source of potentially useful antivirals and are worthy of further study.

  7. In vitro antimicrobial activity of plants in Acute Otitis Externa.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Janaina Cândida Rodrigues; Diniz, Margareth de Fátima Melo; Lima, Edeltrudes O

    2008-01-01

    Acute Otitis Externa is an inflammation of the outer auditory meatus, and according to popular saying, medicinal plant extracts can be used in its treatment. to assess the in vitro antimicrobial activity of the following plants: Aleolanthus suaveolens; Caryophyllus aromaticus; Cymbopogon citratus; Matricaria chamomila; Pithecellobium avaremotemo; Plectranthus amboinicus and Ruta graveolens on the germs that cause otitis externa. the minimum inhibitory concentration of extracts and oils from these plants was obtained from otitis externa samples. Staphylococcus aureus in 10 cultures, Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 8, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus together in 5 cultures and Candida albicans and Candida krusei in 4 cultures. P. aeruginosa was resistant to all oils and extracts tested; extracts from A. suaveolens, P. avaremotemo and R. graveolens were inactive; the essential oil from C. aromaticus and M. chamomila were active against 3 strains of S. aureus and the Candida strains; seven of the S. aureus strains were sensitive to the P. amboinicus extract; however, the oil was inactive against 4 S. aureus strains and the Candida strains were sensitive to the R. graveolens essential oil. depending on the etiological agent, some plants presented satisfactory results, however we still need more detailed studies in order to better use these plants.

  8. Antimicrobial activity of medicinal plants against oral microorganisms.

    PubMed

    More, G; Tshikalange, T E; Lall, N; Botha, F; Meyer, J J M

    2008-10-28

    Ethanol extracts of eight plant species used traditionally in South Africa for the treatment of oral diseases were investigated for in vitro antimicrobial activity against oral pathogens namely Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Actinomyces naeslundii, Actinomyces israelii, Candida albicans, Porphyromonus gingivalis, Privotella intermedia and Streptococcus mutans using the disk diffusion method. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of ethanol extracts were determined against these microorganisms using micro dilution. The cytotoxicity and therapeutic index (TI) of selected active extracts were also determined. Out of eight plants, six (Annona senegalensis, Englerophytum magalismontanum, Dicerocarym senecioides, Euclea divinorum, Euclea natalensis, Solanum panduriforme and Parinari curatellifolia) exhibited MIC values ranging from 25.0 mg/ml to 0.8 mg/ml. Gram negative bacteria were found to be more resistant to the plant extracts than Gram positive bacteria, except for Euclea natalensis which inhibited all three Gram negative bacteria tested in this study. All plant extracts showed moderate cytotoxicity on the Vero cell line. The fifty percent inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of all plants tested range from 92.3 to 285.1 microg/ml.

  9. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and plant-derived antimicrobials (PDAms) as an alternative drug line to control infections.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Jatin; Chandra, Harish; Nautiyal, Anant R; Kalra, Swinder J S

    2014-10-01

    Infectious diseases caused by antimicrobial-resistant microbes (ARMs) and the treatment are the serious problems in the field of medical science today world over. The development of alternative drug line to treat such infectious diseases is urgently required. Researches on ARMs revealed the presence of membrane proteins responsible for effusing the antibiotics from the bacterial cells. Such proteins have successfully been treated by plant-derived antimicrobials (PDAms) synergistically along with the commercially available antibiotics. Such synergistic action usually inhibits the efflux pump. The enhanced activity of plant-derived antimicrobials is being researched and is considered as the future treatment strategy to cure the incurable infections. The present paper reviews the advancement made in the researches on antimicrobial resistance along with the discovery and the development of more active PDAms.

  10. Antimicrobial activity of selected plants employed in the Spanish Mediterranean area.

    PubMed

    Ríos, J L; Recio, M C; Villar, A

    1987-11-01

    Eighty-one plants from the Spanish Mediterranean area employed as antimicrobial agents in folk medicine have been identified. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of chloroform and methanol extracts of the plants were studied using the agar dilution method against six selected microorganisms. Thirty extracts had activity against some of the microorganisms tested. Bioautography showed that the antimicrobial activity is probably due to flavonoids, terpenoids and phenolic acids.

  11. Antimicrobial agents from plants: antibacterial activity of plant volatile oils.

    PubMed

    Dorman, H J; Deans, S G

    2000-02-01

    The volatile oils of black pepper [Piper nigrum L. (Piperaceae)], clove [Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. & Perry (Myrtaceae)], geranium [Pelargonium graveolens L'Herit (Geraniaceae)], nutmeg [Myristica fragrans Houtt. (Myristicaceae), oregano [Origanum vulgare ssp. hirtum (Link) Letsw. (Lamiaceae)] and thyme [Thymus vulgaris L. (Lamiaceae)] were assessed for antibacterial activity against 25 different genera of bacteria. These included animal and plant pathogens, food poisoning and spoilage bacteria. The volatile oils exhibited considerable inhibitory effects against all the organisms under test while their major components demonstrated various degrees of growth inhibition.

  12. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils and other plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Hammer, K A; Carson, C F; Riley, T V

    1999-06-01

    The antimicrobial activity of plant oils and extracts has been recognized for many years. However, few investigations have compared large numbers of oils and extracts using methods that are directly comparable. In the present study, 52 plant oils and extracts were investigated for activity against Acinetobacter baumanii, Aeromonas veronii biogroup sobria, Candida albicans, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia col, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype typhimurium, Serratia marcescens and Staphylococcus aureus, using an agar dilution method. Lemongrass, oregano and bay inhibited all organisms at concentrations of < or = 2.0% (v/v). Six oils did not inhibit any organisms at the highest concentration, which was 2.0% (v/v) oil for apricot kernel, evening primrose, macadamia, pumpkin, sage and sweet almond. Variable activity was recorded for the remaining oils. Twenty of the plant oils and extracts were investigated, using a broth microdilution method, for activity against C. albicans, Staph. aureus and E. coli. The lowest minimum inhibitory concentrations were 0.03% (v/v) thyme oil against C. albicans and E. coli and 0.008% (v/v) vetiver oil against Staph. aureus. These results support the notion that plant essential oils and extracts may have a role as pharmaceuticals and preservatives.

  13. Cytotoxic and antimicrobial activity of selected Cameroonian edible plants.

    PubMed

    Dzoyem, Jean Paul; Guru, Santosh Kumar; Pieme, Constant Anatole; Kuete, Victor; Sharma, Akash; Khan, Inshad Ali; Saxena, Ajit Kumar; Vishwakarma, Ram Anuj

    2013-04-08

    In Cameroon, the use of edible plants is an integral part of dietary behavior. However, evidence of the antimicrobial as well as the cytotoxic effects of many of them has not been investigated. In the present study, aqueous and methanol extracts from barks, seeds, leaves and roots of three Cameroonian edible plants namely Garcina lucida, Fagara heitzii and Hymenocardia lyrata were evaluated for their cytotoxic and antimicrobial activities. Antibacterial and antifungal activities were assessed by the broth micro-dilution method meanwhile the cytotoxicity was performed using sulphorhodamine B assay (SRB) against the human leukemia THP-1, the alveolar epithelial A549, prostate cancer PC-3, breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 and cervical cancer HeLa cell lines. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of the seven tested extracts ranged from 62.5 μg/ml to 1000 μg/ml. The methanol (MeOH) extract from the roots of H. lyrata showed the highest antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria S. aureus and S. epidermitis. The best antifungal activity was obtained with the MeOH extract from the leaves of G. lucida against C. tropicalis (MIC value of 62.5 μg/ml). The in vitro antiproliferative activity revealed that, extract from the bark of F. heitzii and extract from H. lyrata roots had significant cytotoxic activity on THP-1 (IC50 8.4 μg/ml) and PC-3 (IC50 9.5 μg/ml) respectively. Our findings suggest that Cameroonian spices herein studied could be potentially useful for the development of therapeutic agents against bacterial infections as well as for prostate and leukemia cancer.

  14. Cytotoxic and antimicrobial activity of selected Cameroonian edible plants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Cameroon, the use of edible plants is an integral part of dietary behavior. However, evidence of the antimicrobial as well as the cytotoxic effects of many of them has not been investigated. In the present study, aqueous and methanol extracts from barks, seeds, leaves and roots of three Cameroonian edible plants namely Garcina lucida, Fagara heitzii and Hymenocardia lyrata were evaluated for their cytotoxic and antimicrobial activities. Methods Antibacterial and antifungal activities were assessed by the broth micro-dilution method meanwhile the cytotoxicity was performed using sulphorhodamine B assay (SRB) against the human leukemia THP-1, the alveolar epithelial A549, prostate cancer PC-3, breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 and cervical cancer HeLa cell lines. Results The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of the seven tested extracts ranged from 62.5 μg/ml to 1000 μg/ml. The methanol (MeOH) extract from the roots of H. lyrata showed the highest antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria S. aureus and S. epidermitis. The best antifungal activity was obtained with the MeOH extract from the leaves of G. lucida against C. tropicalis (MIC value of 62.5 μg/ml). The in vitro antiproliferative activity revealed that, extract from the bark of F. heitzii and extract from H. lyrata roots had significant cytotoxic activity on THP-1 (IC50 8.4 μg/ml) and PC-3 (IC50 9.5 μg/ml) respectively. Conclusion Our findings suggest that Cameroonian spices herein studied could be potentially useful for the development of therapeutic agents against bacterial infections as well as for prostate and leukemia cancer. PMID:23565827

  15. In Vitro Antimicrobial Activity of Extracts from Plants Used Traditionally in South Africa to Treat Tuberculosis and Related Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Madikizela, Balungile; Ndhlala, Ashwell Rungano; Finnie, Jeffrey Franklin; Staden, Johannes Van

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory ailments are major human killers, especially in developing countries. Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease causing a threat to human healthcare. Many South African plants are used in the traditional treatment of TB and related symptoms, but there has not been a sufficient focus on evaluating their antimicrobial properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial properties of plants used traditionally to treat TB and related symptoms against microorganisms (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Mycobacterium aurum A+) associated with respiratory infections using the microdilution assay. Ten plants were selected based on a survey of available literature of medicinal plants used in South Africa for the treatment of TB and related symptoms. The petroleum ether, dichloromethane, 80% ethanol, and water extracts of the selected plants were evaluated for antibacterial activity. Out of 68 extracts tested from different parts of the 10 plant species, 17 showed good antimicrobial activities against at least one or more of the microbial strains tested, with minimum inhibitory concentration ranging from 0.195 to 12.5 mg/mL. The good antimicrobial properties of Abrus precatorius, Terminalia phanerophlebia, Indigofera arrecta, and Pentanisia prunelloides authenticate their traditional use in the treatment of respiratory diseases. Thus, further pharmacological and phytochemical analysis is required. PMID:23533527

  16. Antimicrobial activity of selected Iranian medicinal plants against a broad spectrum of pathogenic and drug multiresistant micro-organisms.

    PubMed

    Abedini, A; Roumy, V; Mahieux, S; Gohari, A; Farimani, M M; Rivière, C; Samaillie, J; Sahpaz, S; Bailleul, F; Neut, C; Hennebelle, T

    2014-10-01

    The antimicrobial activities of 44 methanolic extracts from different parts of Iranian indigenous plant species used in traditional medicines of Iran were tested against a panel of 35 pathogenic and multiresistant bacteria and 1 yeast. The antimicrobial efficacy was determined using Müller-Hinton agar in Petri dishes seeded by a multiple inoculator and minimal inhibition concentration (MIC) method. The 21 most active extracts (MIC < 0·3 mg ml(-1) for one or several micro-organisms) were submitted to a more refined measurement. The best antibacterial activity was obtained by 10 plants. Microdilution assays allowed to determinate the MIC and MBC of the 21 most active extracts. The lowest achieved MIC value was 78 μg ml(-1), with 4 extracts. This work confirms the antimicrobial activity of assayed plants and suggests further examination to identify the chemical structure of their antimicrobial compounds. Significance and impact of the study: This study describes the antimicrobial screening of Iranian plant extracts chosen according to traditional practice against 36 microbial strains, from reference culture collections or recent clinical isolates, and enables to select 4 candidates for further chemical characterization and biological assessment: Dorema ammoniacum, Ferula assa-foetida, Ferulago contracta (seeds) and Perovskia abrotanoides (aerial parts). This may be useful in the development of potential antimicrobial agents, from easily harvested and highly sustainable plant parts. Moreover, the weak extent of cross-resistance between plant extracts and antibiotics warrants further research and may promote a strategy based on less potent but time-trained products. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Edible apple film wraps containing plant antimicrobials inactivate foodborne pathogens on meat and poultry products.

    PubMed

    Ravishankar, Sadhana; Zhu, Libin; Olsen, Carl W; McHugh, Tara H; Friedman, Mendel

    2009-10-01

    Apple-based edible films containing plant antimicrobials were evaluated for their activity against pathogenic bacteria on meat and poultry products. Salmonella enterica or E. coli O157:H7 (10(7) CFU/g) cultures were surface inoculated on chicken breasts and Listeria monocytogenes (10(6) CFU/g) on ham. The inoculated products were then wrapped with edible films containing 3 concentrations (0.5%, 1.5%, and 3%) of cinnamaldehyde or carvacrol. Following incubation at either 23 or 4 degrees C for 72 h, samples were stomached in buffered peptone water, diluted, and plated for enumeration of survivors. The antimicrobial films exhibited concentration-dependent activities against the pathogens tested. At 23 degrees C on chicken breasts, films with 3% antimicrobials showed the highest reductions (4.3 to 6.8 log CFU/g) of both S. enterica and E. coli O157:H7. Films with 1.5% and 0.5% antimicrobials showed 2.4 to 4.3 and 1.6 to 2.8 log reductions, respectively. At 4 degrees C, carvacrol exhibited greater activity than did cinnamaldehyde. Films with 3%, 1.5%, and 0.5% carvacrol reduced the bacterial populations by about 3, 1.6 to 3, and 0.8 to 1 logs, respectively. Films with 3% and 1.5% cinnamaldehyde induced 1.2 to 2.8 and 1.2 to 1.3 log reductions, respectively. For L. monocytogenes on ham, carvacrol films induced greater reductions than did cinnamaldehyde films at all concentrations tested. In general, the reduction of L. monocytogenes on ham at 23 degrees C was greater than at 4 degrees C. Added antimicrobials had minor effects on physical properties of the films. The results suggest that the food industry and consumers could use these films as wrappings to control surface contamination by foodborne pathogenic microorganisms.

  18. Antimicrobial metal-based thiophene derived compounds.

    PubMed

    Yasmeen, Shakeela; Sumrra, Sajjad Hussain; Akram, Muhammad Safwan; Chohan, Zahid H

    2017-12-01

    A novel series of thiophene derived Schiff bases and their transition metal- [Co(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Ni(II)] based compounds are reported. The Schiff bases act as tridentate ligands toward metal ions via azomethine-N, deprotonated-N of ammine substituents and S-atom of thienyl moiety. The synthesized ligands along with their metal complexes were screened for their in vitro antibacterial activity against six bacterial pathogens (Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) and for antifungal activity against six fungal pathogens (Trichophytonlongifusus, Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus, Microsporum canis, Fusarium solani and Candida glabrata). The results of antimicrobial studies revealed the free ligands to possess potential activity which significantly increased upon chelation.

  19. Antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of plants from northeast of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Aranda, Ricardo; Pérez-López, Luis Alejandro; López-Arroyo, Joel; Alanís-Garza, Blanca Alicia; Waksman de Torres, Noemí

    2011-01-01

    Traditional medicine has a key role in health care worldwide. Obtaining scientific information about the efficacy and safety of the plants from our region is one of the goals of our research group. In this report, 17 plants were selected and collected in different localities from northeast Mexico. The dried plants were separated into leaves, flowers, fruit, stems, roots and bark. Each part was extracted with methanol, and 39 crude extracts were prepared. The extracts were tested for their antimicrobial activity using three Gram-negative bacterial strains (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii), three Gram-positive bacterial strains (Enterococcus faecalis and two Staphylococcus aureus strains), and seven clinically isolated yeasts (Candida albicans, C. krusei, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis and C. glabrata); their antioxidant activity was tested using a DPPH free radical assay. No activity against Gram-negative bacteria was observed with any extract up to the maximum concentration tested, 1000 μg ml(-1). We report here for the first time activity of Ceanothus coeruleus against S. aureus (flowers, minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) 125 μg ml(-1)), C. glabrata (MICs 31.25 μg ml(-1)) and C. parapsilosis (MICs between 31.25 and 125 μg ml(-1)); Chrysanctinia mexicana against C. glabrata (MICs 31.25 μg ml(-1)); Colubrina greggii against E. faecalis (MICs 250 μg ml(-1)) and Cordia boissieri against C. glabrata (MIC 125 μg ml(-1)). Furthermore, this is the first report about antioxidant activity of extracts from Ceanothus coeruleus, Chrysanctinia mexicana, Colubrina greggii and Cyperus alternifolius. Some correlation could exist between antioxidant activity and antiyeast activity against yeasts in the species Ceanothus coeruleus, Schinus molle, Colubrina greggii and Cordia boissieri.

  20. Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activities of Plants from Northeast of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Aranda, Ricardo; Pérez-López, Luis Alejandro; López-Arroyo, Joel; Alanís-Garza, Blanca Alicia; Waksman de Torres, Noemí

    2011-01-01

    Traditional medicine has a key role in health care worldwide. Obtaining scientific information about the efficacy and safety of the plants from our region is one of the goals of our research group. In this report, 17 plants were selected and collected in different localities from northeast Mexico. The dried plants were separated into leaves, flowers, fruit, stems, roots and bark. Each part was extracted with methanol, and 39 crude extracts were prepared. The extracts were tested for their antimicrobial activity using three Gram-negative bacterial strains (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii), three Gram-positive bacterial strains (Enterococcus faecalis and two Staphylococcus aureus strains), and seven clinically isolated yeasts (Candida albicans, C. krusei, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis and C. glabrata); their antioxidant activity was tested using a DPPH free radical assay. No activity against Gram-negative bacteria was observed with any extract up to the maximum concentration tested, 1000 μg ml−1. We report here for the first time activity of Ceanothus coeruleus against S. aureus (flowers, minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) 125 μg ml−1), C. glabrata (MICs 31.25 μg ml−1) and C. parapsilosis (MICs between 31.25 and 125 μg ml−1); Chrysanctinia mexicana against C. glabrata (MICs 31.25 μg ml−1); Colubrina greggii against E. faecalis (MICs 250 μg ml−1) and Cordia boissieri against C. glabrata (MIC 125 μg ml−1). Furthermore, this is the first report about antioxidant activity of extracts from Ceanothus coeruleus, Chrysanctinia mexicana, Colubrina greggii and Cyperus alternifolius. Some correlation could exist between antioxidant activity and antiyeast activity against yeasts in the species Ceanothus coeruleus, Schinus molle, Colubrina greggii and Cordia boissieri. PMID:19770266

  1. The Antimicrobial Index: a comprehensive literature-based antimicrobial database and reference work

    PubMed Central

    Amirkia, Vafa David; Qiubao, Pan

    2011-01-01

    Although the ever-growing usage of antimicrobials in the fields of medicine, pharmacology, and microbiology have undoubtedly allowed for unprecedented advances in the scientific world, these advances are nevertheless accompanied by unprecedented challenges. Sharp increases in antibiotic usages have led to inefficient and wasteful usage practices. Bacterial resistances have dramatically increased and therefore hindered the effectiveness of traditional antibiotics, thus forcing many life-science professionals to turn to plant extracts and synthetic chemicals [1]. The Antimicrobial Index (TAMI) seeks to alleviate some of these mounting difficulties through the collection and centralization of relevant antimicrobial susceptibility data from journals. Data compiled for antimicrobials include: method of action, physical properties, resistance genes, side effects, and minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC50, MIC90 and/or ranges). TAMI currently contains data on 960 antimicrobials and over 24,000 microorganisms (3,500 unique strains) which were collected from over 400 pieces of published literature. Volume and scope of the index have been and will continue to increase and it is hoped that such an index will further foster international cooperation and communication of antimicrobial-related knowledge. TAMI can be accessed at: http://antibiotics.toku-e.com/. PMID:21383924

  2. Antimicrobial activity of some plant materials used in Armenian traditional medicine.

    PubMed

    Ginovyan, Mikayel; Petrosyan, Margarit; Trchounian, Armen

    2017-01-17

    Antibiotic resistance has become one of the major problems facing humanity. The need for new antimicrobials has been increased dramatically. Plants are considered as one of the most promising sources for new antimicrobials discovery. Despite relatively small area, Armenia has large diversity of flora with many endemic species. In Armenian folk medicine plant materials have been used to treat various microbial diseases since ancient times. The goal of our research was to evaluate antimicrobial efficiency of different parts of five wild plants species which are commonly used in Armenian traditional medicine. Plant crude extracts were obtained with maceration technique using five solvents separately: distilled water, methanol, chloroform, acetone, and hexane. Agar well diffusion assay was used for initial evaluation of antimicrobial properties of plant materials against five bacterial and two yeast strains. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of the most active plant parts were determined by broth microdilution method. Crude extracts of all five tested plants expressed antimicrobial activity against at least four test strains at 500 μg ml(-1) concentration. Minimum inhibitory and bactericidal/fungicidal concentrations of selected plant parts were determined. Crude acetone and hexane extracts of Hypericum alpestre and acetone extract of Sanguisorba officinalis inhibited the growth of P. aeruginosa even at 64 μg ml(-1) concentration. Chloroform and acetone extracts of Sanguisorba officinalis exhibited cidal activity against P. aeruginosa till 256 μg ml(-1). Acetone was the most effective solvent for solubilizing antimicrobial compounds for almost all tested plant materials. Thus, antimicrobial activity of some medicinal plants used in Armenian traditional medicine was evaluated. Some of the plants had rather low minimum bacteriostatic/bactericidal concentrations and therefore they have prospective for further more inclusive studies.

  3. A review on plants extract mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles for antimicrobial applications: A green expertise

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Shakeel; Ahmad, Mudasir; Swami, Babu Lal; Ikram, Saiqa

    2015-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles are being utilized in every phase of science along with engineering including medical fields and are still charming the scientists to explore new dimensions for their respective worth which is generally attributed to their corresponding small sizes. The up-and-coming researches have proven their antimicrobial significance. Among several noble metal nanoparticles, silver nanoparticles have attained a special focus. Conventionally silver nanoparticles are synthesized by chemical method using chemicals as reducing agents which later on become accountable for various biological risks due to their general toxicity; engendering the serious concern to develop environment friendly processes. Thus, to solve the objective; biological approaches are coming up to fill the void; for instance green syntheses using biological molecules derived from plant sources in the form of extracts exhibiting superiority over chemical and/or biological methods. These plant based biological molecules undergo highly controlled assembly for making them suitable for the metal nanoparticle syntheses. The present review explores the huge plant diversity to be utilized towards rapid and single step protocol preparatory method with green principles over the conventional ones and describes the antimicrobial activities of silver nanoparticles. PMID:26843966

  4. Which Approach Is More Effective in the Selection of Plants with Antimicrobial Activity?

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ana Carolina Oliveira; Santana, Elidiane Fonseca; Saraiva, Antonio Marcos; Coutinho, Felipe Neves; Castro, Ricardo Henrique Acre; Pisciottano, Maria Nelly Caetano; Amorim, Elba Lúcia Cavalcanti; Albuquerque, Ulysses Paulino

    2013-01-01

    The development of the present study was based on selections using random, direct ethnopharmacological, and indirect ethnopharmacological approaches, aiming to evaluate which method is the best for bioprospecting new antimicrobial plant drugs. A crude extract of 53 species of herbaceous plants collected in the semiarid region of Northeast Brazil was tested against 11 microorganisms. Well-agar diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) techniques were used. Ten extracts from direct, six from random, and three from indirect ethnopharmacological selections exhibited activities that ranged from weak to very active against the organisms tested. The strain most susceptible to the evaluated extracts was Staphylococcus aureus. The MIC analysis revealed the best result for the direct ethnopharmacological approach, considering that some species yielded extracts classified as active or moderately active (MICs between 250 and 1000 µg/mL). Furthermore, one species from this approach inhibited the growth of the three Candida strains. Thus, it was concluded that the direct ethnopharmacological approach is the most effective when selecting species for bioprospecting new plant drugs with antimicrobial activities. PMID:23878595

  5. Which approach is more effective in the selection of plants with antimicrobial activity?

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana Carolina Oliveira; Santana, Elidiane Fonseca; Saraiva, Antonio Marcos; Coutinho, Felipe Neves; Castro, Ricardo Henrique Acre; Pisciottano, Maria Nelly Caetano; Amorim, Elba Lúcia Cavalcanti; Albuquerque, Ulysses Paulino

    2013-01-01

    The development of the present study was based on selections using random, direct ethnopharmacological, and indirect ethnopharmacological approaches, aiming to evaluate which method is the best for bioprospecting new antimicrobial plant drugs. A crude extract of 53 species of herbaceous plants collected in the semiarid region of Northeast Brazil was tested against 11 microorganisms. Well-agar diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) techniques were used. Ten extracts from direct, six from random, and three from indirect ethnopharmacological selections exhibited activities that ranged from weak to very active against the organisms tested. The strain most susceptible to the evaluated extracts was Staphylococcus aureus. The MIC analysis revealed the best result for the direct ethnopharmacological approach, considering that some species yielded extracts classified as active or moderately active (MICs between 250 and 1000 µg/mL). Furthermore, one species from this approach inhibited the growth of the three Candida strains. Thus, it was concluded that the direct ethnopharmacological approach is the most effective when selecting species for bioprospecting new plant drugs with antimicrobial activities.

  6. Antimicrobial activity and phytochemical analysis of crude extracts and essential oils from medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Silva, N C C; Barbosa, L; Seito, L N; Fernandes, A

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to establish a phytochemical analysis of the crude extracts and performed GC-MS of the essential oils (EOs) of Eugenia uniflora L. (Myrtaceae) and Asteraceae species Baccharis dracunculifolia DC, Matricaria chamomilla L. and Vernonia polyanthes Less, as well as determining their antimicrobial activity. Establishment of the minimal inhibitory concentrations of the crude extracts and EOs against 16 Staphylococcus aureus and 16 Escherichia coli strains from human specimens was carried out using the dilution method in Mueller-Hinton agar. Some phenolic compounds with antimicrobial properties were established, and all EOs had a higher antimicrobial activity than the extracts. Matricaria chamomilla extract and E. uniflora EO were efficient against S. aureus strains, while E. uniflora and V. polyanthes extracts and V. polyanthes EO showed the best antimicrobial activity against E. coli strains. Staphylococcus aureus strains were more susceptible to the tested plant products than E. coli, but all natural products promoted antimicrobial growth inhibition.

  7. Potential of medicinal plants as antimicrobial and antioxidant agents in food industry: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Ramirez, Luis Alberto; Rodriguez-Garcia, Isela; Leyva, Juan Manuel; Cruz-Valenzuela, Manuel Reynaldo; Silva-Espinoza, Brenda Adriana; Gonzalez-Aguilar, Gustavo A; Siddiqui, Wasim; Ayala-Zavala, Jesus Fernando

    2014-02-01

    Many food preservation strategies can be used for the control of microbial spoilage and oxidation; however, these quality problems are not yet controlled adequately. Although synthetic antimicrobial and antioxidant agents are approved in many countries, the use of natural safe and effective preservatives is a demand of food consumers and producers. This paper proposes medicinal plants, traditionally used to treat health disorders and prevent diseases, as a source of bioactive compounds having food additive properties. Medicinal plants are rich in terpenes and phenolic compounds that present antimicrobial and antioxidant properties; in addition, the literature revealed that these bioactive compounds extracted from other plants have been effective in food systems. In this context, the present hypothesis paper states that bioactive molecules extracted from medicinal plants can be used as antimicrobial and antioxidant additives in the food industry.

  8. Essential Oil Prepared from Cymbopogon citrates Exerted an Antimicrobial Activity Against Plant Pathogenic and Medical Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Mi-Ran; Park, Pyeong Beom; Kim, Dae-Hyuk; Jang, Yong-Suk; Jeong, Han Sol; Choi, Sang-Hoon

    2009-03-01

    Essential oils are mixtures of volatile, lipophilic compounds originating from plants. Some essential oils have useful biological activities including antimicrobial, spasmolytic, antiplasmodial, and insect-repelling activities. In this study, we tested the antimicrobial activity of essential oil prepared from the aromatic plant, Cymbopogon citrates, against three important plant pathogenic and medical microorganisms, Pectobacterium carotovorum, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, and Aspergillus niger. It effectively inhibited the growth of the bacterium, Pectobacterium carotovorum, in a dose-dependent fashion, and 0.5% of the oil inhibited the growth of bacteria completely. Similarly, the essential oil inhibited the growth of plant pathogenic fungus, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, and the addition of 1% of essential oil completely inhibited the growth of fungus even after 5 days of culture. Finally, it effectively inhibited the growth of the medically and industrially important fungal species, Aspergillus spp. These results suggest that the essential oil from Cymbopogon citrates may be an environmentally safe alternative to inhibit antimicrobial agents for various uses.

  9. Amino acid–based surfactants: New antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Pinazo, A; Manresa, M A; Marques, A M; Bustelo, M; Espuny, M J; Pérez, L

    2016-02-01

    The rapid increase of drug resistant bacteria makes necessary the development of new antimicrobial agents. Synthetic amino acid-based surfactants constitute a promising alternative to conventional antimicrobial compounds given that they can be prepared from renewable raw materials. In this review, we discuss the structural features that promote antimicrobial activity of amino acid-based surfactants. Monocatenary, dicatenary and gemini surfactants that contain different amino acids on the polar head and show activity against bacteria are revised. The synthesis and basic physico-chemical properties have also been included.

  10. Extraction methods and bioautography for evaluation of medicinal plant antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Nostro, A; Germanò, M P; D'angelo, V; Marino, A; Cannatelli, M A

    2000-05-01

    A comparative study on the antimicrobial properties of extracts from medicinal plants obtained by two different methods was carried out. The screening of the antimicrobial activity of extracts from six plants was conducted by a disc diffusion test against Gram-positive, -negative and fungal organisms. The most active extracts (inhibition diameter >/=12 mm) were assayed for the minimum inhibitory concentration and submitted to phytochemical screening by thin-layer chromatography and bioautography. The results obtained indicate that the diethyl ether extracts were the most efficient antimicrobial compounds. The activity was more pronounced against Gram-positive and fungal organisms than against Gram-negative bacteria. Bioautography showed that the antimicrobial activity was probably due to flavonoids and terpenes.

  11. Thin-layer chromatographic (TLC) separations and bioassays of plant extracts to identify antimicrobial compounds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A common screen for plant antimicrobial compounds consists of separating plant extracts by paper or thin-layer chromatography (PC or TLC), exposing the chromatograms to microbial suspensions (e.g. fungal spores in nutrient solution or bacteria in liquefied agar), allowing time for the microbes to gr...

  12. Antimicrobial activity of snakin-defensin hybrid protein in tobacco and potato plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To augment plant protection against phytopathogens, we constructed a fusion gene for the simultaneous expression of snakin-1 (SN1) and defensin-1 (PTH1) antimicrobial proteins as a hybrid protein (SAP) in plant cells. Prior to in vivo evaluation of SAP phytoprotective activity, the hybrid protein ex...

  13. Antimicrobial Activity of Seven Essential Oils From Iranian Aromatic Plants Against Common Causes of Oral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Zomorodian, Kamiar; Ghadiri, Pooria; Saharkhiz, Mohammad Jamal; Moein, Mohammad Reza; Mehriar, Peiman; Bahrani, Farideh; Golzar, Tahereh; Pakshir, Keyvan; Fani, Mohammad Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Over the past two decades, there has been a growing trend in using oral hygienic products originating from natural resources such as essential oils (EOs) and plant extracts. Seven aromatic plants used in this study are among popular traditional Iranian medicinal plants with potential application in modern medicine as anti-oral infectious diseases. Objectives: This study was conducted to determine the chemical composition and antimicrobial activities of essential oils from seven medicinal plants against pathogens causing oral infections. Materials and Methods: The chemical compositions of EOs distilled from seven plants were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). These plants included Satureja khuzestanica, S. bachtiarica, Ocimum sanctum, Artemisia sieberi, Zataria multiflora, Carum copticum and Oliveria decumbens. The antimicrobial activity of the essential oils was evaluated by broth micro-dilution in 96 well plates as recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) methods. Results: The tested EOs inhibited the growth of examined oral pathogens at concentrations of 0.015-16 µL/mL. Among the examined oral pathogens, Enterococcus faecalis had the highest Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) and Minimum Microbicidal Concentrations (MMCs). Of the examined EOs, S. khuzestanica, Z. multiflora and S. bachtiarica, showed the highest antimicrobial activities, respectively, while Artemisia sieberi exhibited the lowest antimicrobial activity. Conclusions: The excellent antimicrobial activities of the tested EOs might be due to their major phenolic or alcoholic monoterpenes with known antimicrobial activities. Hence, these EOs can be possibly used as an antimicrobial agent in treatment and control of oral pathogens. PMID:25793100

  14. Constitutive expression of transgenes encoding derivatives of the synthetic antimicrobial peptide BP100: impact on rice host plant fitness

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    example, BP100 based on inverted repeats, have adequate agronomic performance and resistant phenotypes as a result of a complex equilibrium between bp100der toxicity to plant cells, antimicrobial activity and transgene-derived plant stress response. It is likely that these results can be extended to other peptides with similar characteristics. PMID:22947243

  15. Antimicrobial activity of plant extracts against sexually transmitted pathogens.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Nutan; Kulkarni, Sangeeta; Mane, Arati; Kulkarni, Roshan; Palshetker, Aparna; Singh, Kamalinder; Joshi, Swati; Risbud, Arun; Kulkarni, Smita

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive management of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) using vaginal or rectal microbicide-based intervention is one of the strategies for prevention of HIV infection. Herbal products have been used for treating STIs traditionally. Herein, we present in vitro activity of 10 plant extracts and their 34 fractions against three sexually transmitted/reproductive tract pathogens - Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Haemophilus ducreyi and Candida albicans. The plant parts were selected; the extracts/fractions were prepared and screened by disc diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory and minimum cidal concentrations were determined. The qualitative phytochemical analysis of selected extracts/fractions showing activity was performed. Of the extracts/fractions tested, three inhibited C. albicans, ten inhibited N. gonorrhoeae and five inhibited H. ducreyi growth. Our study demonstrated that Terminalia paniculata Roth. extracts/fractions inhibited growth of all three organisms. The ethyl acetate fraction of Syzygium cumini Linn. and Bridelia retusa (L.) Spreng. extracts was found to inhibit N. gonorrhoeae at lowest concentrations.

  16. Effects of plant antimicrobial phenolic compounds on virulence of the genus Pectobacterium.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Janak Raj; Burdman, Saul; Lipsky, Alexander; Yedidia, Iris

    2015-01-01

    Pectobacterium spp. are among the most devastating necrotrophs, attacking more than 50% of angiosperm plant orders. Their virulence strategy is based mainly on the secretion of exoenzymes that degrade the cell walls of their hosts, providing nutrients to the bacteria, but conversely, exposing the bacteria to plant defense compounds. In the present study, we screened plant-derived antimicrobial compounds, mainly phenolic acids and polyphenols, for their ability to affect virulence determinants including motility, biofilm formation and extracellular enzyme activities of different Pectobacteria: Pectobacterium carotovorum, P. brasiliensis, P. atrosepticum and P. aroidearum. In addition, virulence assays were performed on three different plant hosts following exposure of the bacteria to selected phenolic compounds. These experiments showed that cinnamic, coumaric, syringic and salicylic acids and catechol can considerably reduce disease severity, ranging from 20 to 100%. The reduced disease severity was not only the result of reduced bacterial growth, but also of a direct effect of the compounds on important bacterial virulence determinants, including pectolytic and proteolytic exoenzyme activities, that were reduced by 50-100%. This is the first report revealing a direct effect of phenolic compounds on virulence factors in a wide range of Pectobacterium strains. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Therapeutic Potential of Plants as Anti-microbials for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Perumal Samy, Ramar

    2010-01-01

    The uses of traditional medicinal plants for primary health care have steadily increased worldwide in recent years. Scientists are in search of new phytochemicals that could be developed as useful anti-microbials for treatment of infectious diseases. Currently, out of 80% of pharmaceuticals derived from plants, very few are now being used as anti-microbials. Plants are rich in a wide variety of secondary metabolites that have found anti-microbial properties. This review highlights the current status of traditional medicine, its contribution to modern medicine, recent trends in the evaluation of anti-microbials with a special emphasis upon some tribal medicine, in vitro and in vivo experimental design for screening, and therapeutic efficacy in safety and human clinical trails for commercial outlet. Many of these commercially available compounds are crude preparations administered without performing human clinical trials. Recent methods are useful to standardize the extraction for scientific investigation of new phytochemicals and anti-microbials of traditionally used plants. It is concluded that once the local ethnomedical preparations of traditional sources are scientifically evaluated before dispensing they should replace existing drugs commonly used for the therapeutic treatment of infection. This method should be put into practice for future investigations in the field of ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry, ethnobotany and other biological fields for drug discovery. PMID:18955349

  18. Antimicrobial polyurethane thermosets based on undecylenic acid: synthesis and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lluch, Cristina; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; Bordons, Albert; Lligadas, Gerard; Ronda, Juan C; Galià, Marina; Cádiz, Virginia

    2014-08-01

    In the present study, plant oil-derived surface-modifiable polyurethane thermosets are presented. Polyol synthesis is carried out taking advantage of thiol-yne photopolymerization of undecylenic acid derivatives containing methyl ester or hydroxyl moieties. The prepared methyl ester-containing polyurethanes allow surface modification treatment to enhance their hydrophilicity and impart antimicrobial activity through the following two steps: i) grafting poly(propylene glycol) monoamine (Jeffamine M-600) via aminolysis and ii) Jeffamine M-600 layer complexation with iodine. The antimicrobial activity of the iodine-containing polyurethanes is demonstrated by its capacity to inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans in agar media.

  19. Screening for alternative antibiotics: an investigation into the antimicrobial activities of medicinal food plants of Mauritius.

    PubMed

    Mahomoodally, M F; Gurib-Fakim, A; Subratty, A H

    2010-04-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the antimicrobial activities of 2 endemic medicinal plants; Faujasiopsis flexuosa (Asteraceae) (FF) and Pittosporum senacia (Pittosporaceae) (PS) and 2 exotic medicinal plants, Momordica charantia (Cucurbitaceae) (MC) and Ocimum tenuiflorum (Lamiaceae) (OT) that forms part of local pharmacopoeia of Mauritius and correlate any observed activity with its phytochemical profile. Aqueous and organic fractions of the leaves, fruits, and seeds of these plants were subjected to antimicrobial testing by the disc diffusion method against 8 clinical isolates of bacteria and 2 strains of fungus. It was found that MC, OT, and FF possessed antimicrobial properties against the test organisms. The MIC for MC ranged from 0.5 to 9 mg/mL and that of FF from 2 to 10 mg/mL and the lowest MIC value (0.5 mg/mL) was recorded for the unripe fruits of MC against E. coli. On the other hand, higher concentration of the unripe MC fruit extract of 9 mg/mL was needed to be effective against a resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The antimicrobial effect against MRSA was lost upon ripening of the fruits. The methanolic extract of both MC and FF showed highest MIC values compared to the corresponding aqueous extract, which indicates the low efficacy and the need of higher doses of the plant extract. Phytochemical screening of the plants showed the presence of at least tannins, phenols, flavonoids, and alkaloids, which are known antimicrobial phyto-compounds. In conclusion, the observed antimicrobial properties would tend to further validate the medicinal properties of these commonly used endemic medicinal and food plants of Mauritius.

  20. Antimicrobial screening of some Egyptian plants and active flavones from Lagerstroemia indica leaves.

    PubMed

    Diab, Y; Atalla, K; Elbanna, K

    2012-08-01

    One hundred and twenty four plant extracts were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against four pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 8095), Salmonella enteritides (ATCC 13076), Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), and Listeria monocytogenes (ATCC 15313)) and Candida albicans yeast (ATCC 10231) using the disk diffusion and broth microdilution methods. Of the plant extracts, fourteen exhibited antimicrobial activity against two or more of the five microorganisms tested. Only the methanol extract of Lagerstroemia indica leaves exhibited antimicrobial activity against all pathogenic bacteria and C. albicans yeast that were tested. Purification of the methanol extract of L. indica leaves using antimicrobial assay-guided isolation yielded one pure active compound. The chemical structure of the isolated active compound was found to be '4-methoxy apigenin-8-C-β-D-glucopyranoside; cytisoside according to detailed spectroscopic analysis of its nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry data. The compound exhibited antimicrobial activity against C. albicans (minimum lethal concentration (MLC): 32 μg/mL), S. aureus (MLC: 16 μg/mL), S. enteritides (MLC: 16 μg/mL), E. coli (MLC: 16 μg/mL), and L. monocytogenes (MLC: 16 μg/mL). The present study found that the methanol extract of L. indica leaves holds great promise as a potential source of beneficial antimicrobial components for different applications.

  1. Combating Pathogenic Microorganisms Using Plant-Derived Antimicrobials: A Minireview of the Mechanistic Basis

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Indu; Kollanoor-Johny, Anup

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria has led to renewed interest in exploring the potential of plant-derived antimicrobials (PDAs) as an alternative therapeutic strategy to combat microbial infections. Historically, plant extracts have been used as a safe, effective, and natural remedy for ailments and diseases in traditional medicine. Extensive research in the last two decades has identified a plethora of PDAs with a wide spectrum of activity against a variety of fungal and bacterial pathogens causing infections in humans and animals. Active components of many plant extracts have been characterized and are commercially available; however, research delineating the mechanistic basis of their antimicrobial action is scanty. This review highlights the potential of various plant-derived compounds to control pathogenic bacteria, especially the diverse effects exerted by plant compounds on various virulence factors that are critical for pathogenicity inside the host. In addition, the potential effect of PDAs on gut microbiota is discussed. PMID:25298964

  2. Native Brazilian plants against nosocomial infections: a critical review on their potential and the antimicrobial methodology.

    PubMed

    H Moreno, Paulo Roberto; da Costa-Issa, Fabiana Inácio; Rajca-Ferreira, Agnieszka K; Pereira, Marcos A A; Kaneko, Telma M

    2013-01-01

    The growing incidences of drug-resistant pathogens have increased the attention on several medicinal plants and their metabolites for antimicrobial properties. These pathogens are the main cause of nosocomial infections which led to an increasing mortality among hospitalized patients. Taking into consideration those factors, this paper reviews the state-of-the-art of the research on antibacterial agents from native Brazilian plant species related to nosocomial infections as well as the current methods used in the investigations of the antimicrobial activity and points out the differences in techniques employed by the authors. The antimicrobial assays most frequently used were broth microdilution, agar diffusion, agar dilution and bioautography. The broth microdilution method should be the method of choice for testing new antimicrobial agents from plant extracts or isolated compounds due to its advantages. At the moment, only a small part of the rich Brazilian flora has been investigated for antimicrobial activity, mostly with unfractionated extracts presenting a weak or moderate antibacterial activity. The combination of crude extract with conventional antibiotics represents a largely unexploited new form of chemotherapy with novel and multiple mechanisms of action that can overcome microbial resistance that needs to be further investigated. The antibacterial activity of essential oil vapours might also be an interesting alternative treatment of hospital environment due to their ability in preventing biofilm formation. However, in both alternatives more studies should be done on their mode of action and toxicological effects in order to optimize their use.

  3. Antimicrobial Peptides: Insights into Membrane Permeabilization, Lipopolysaccharide Fragmentation and Application in Plant Disease Control

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Aritreyee; Ghosh, Anirban; Airoldi, Cristina; Sperandeo, Paola; Mroue, Kamal H.; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Kundu, Pallob; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Bhunia, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    The recent increase in multidrug resistance against bacterial infections has become a major concern to human health and global food security. Synthetic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have recently received substantial attention as potential alternatives to conventional antibiotics because of their potent broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. These peptides have also been implicated in plant disease control for replacing conventional treatment methods that are polluting and hazardous to the environment and to human health. Here, we report de novo design and antimicrobial studies of VG16, a 16-residue active fragment of Dengue virus fusion peptide. Our results reveal that VG16KRKP, a non-toxic and non-hemolytic analogue of VG16, shows significant antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative E. coli and plant pathogens X. oryzae and X. campestris, as well as against human fungal pathogens C. albicans and C. grubii. VG16KRKP is also capable of inhibiting bacterial disease progression in plants. The solution-NMR structure of VG16KRKP in lipopolysaccharide features a folded conformation with a centrally located turn-type structure stabilized by aromatic-aromatic packing interactions with extended N- and C-termini. The de novo design of VG16KRKP provides valuable insights into the development of more potent antibacterial and antiendotoxic peptides for the treatment of human and plant infections. PMID:26144972

  4. Antimicrobial phenylpropanoids from the Argentinean highland plant Parastrephia lucida (Meyen) Cabrera.

    PubMed

    D'Almeida, Romina E; Alberto, María R; Quispe, Cristina; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo; Isla, María I

    2012-07-13

    The Argentinean highland plant Parastrephia lucida (Meyen) Cabrera is used in traditional medicine as an antiseptic and anti-inflammatory crude drug. To relate the antimicrobial effect of the crude drug with the constituents of the active fractions and traditional use. Assay-guided isolation of the methanol (MeOH) plant extract was carried out using bacteria and yeasts as target organisms. Both ATCC and local strains were included in the study. The antimicrobial fractions and compounds were detected by bioautographic assays. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of each extract and fraction were determined and compared with reference antibiotics. Fractions were analyzed by HPLC-DAD, GC-MS, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR. From the MeOH extract of the plant, assay-guided isolation of the antimicrobial constituents led to 12 phenylpropanoids and two simple phenolics. Most of the compounds occurring in the active fractions were E-caffeoyl or E-cinnamoyl esters including prenyl and phenethyl derivatives. The MIC values of the most active fractions ranged between 12.5 and 200 μg/mL against reference strains and local isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. The antimicrobial effect found in the crude drug was associated with mixtures of phenylpropanoids, including prenyl and phenethyl esters of caffeic and cinnamic acids. The results support at least in part the traditional use of the plant as local antiseptic. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Multitasking antimicrobial peptides, plant development, and host defense against biotic/abiotic stress

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crop losses due to pathogens are a major threat to global food security. Plants employ a multilayer defense system against pathogens including use of physical barriers (cell wall), induction of hypersensitive defense response (HR), resistance (R) proteins, and synthesis of antimicrobial peptides (AM...

  6. Antimicrobial Peptides: Insights into Membrane Permeabilization, Lipopolysaccharide Fragmentation and Application in Plant Disease Control.

    PubMed

    Datta, Aritreyee; Ghosh, Anirban; Airoldi, Cristina; Sperandeo, Paola; Mroue, Kamal H; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Kundu, Pallob; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Bhunia, Anirban

    2015-07-06

    The recent increase in multidrug resistance against bacterial infections has become a major concern to human health and global food security. Synthetic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have recently received substantial attention as potential alternatives to conventional antibiotics because of their potent broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. These peptides have also been implicated in plant disease control for replacing conventional treatment methods that are polluting and hazardous to the environment and to human health. Here, we report de novo design and antimicrobial studies of VG16, a 16-residue active fragment of Dengue virus fusion peptide. Our results reveal that VG16KRKP, a non-toxic and non-hemolytic analogue of VG16, shows significant antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative E. coli and plant pathogens X. oryzae and X. campestris, as well as against human fungal pathogens C. albicans and C. grubii. VG16KRKP is also capable of inhibiting bacterial disease progression in plants. The solution-NMR structure of VG16KRKP in lipopolysaccharide features a folded conformation with a centrally located turn-type structure stabilized by aromatic-aromatic packing interactions with extended N- and C-termini. The de novo design of VG16KRKP provides valuable insights into the development of more potent antibacterial and antiendotoxic peptides for the treatment of human and plant infections.

  7. Antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of two endemic plants from Aksaray in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozusaglam, Meltem Asan; Darilmaz, Derya Onal; Erzengin, Mahmut; Teksen, Mehtap; Erkul, Seher Karaman

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the in vitro antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of the methanol, ethanol, water, n-hexane and dicholoromethane extracts of two Allium species (Allium scabriflorum and Allium tchihatschewii) which are endemic for the flora of Turkey. The antimicrobial efficiency of the plant was evaluated according to disc diffusion and microdilution broth methods. The antimicrobial test results showed that the extracts of A. scabriflorum and A. tchihatschewii showed varying degrees of antimicrobial activity on the tested microorganisms. The extracts were screened for their possible antioxidant activities by three complementary tests; DPPH free radical-scavenging, scavenging of hydrogen peroxide and metal chelating activity assays. All the extracts of A. scabriflorum and A. tchihatschewii exhibited lower DPPH free radical scavenging activity but higher metal chelating activity when compared to standards. The values of scavenging of hydrogen peroxide of the extracts were higher than the standards that of α-tocopherol, BHA, BHT and trolox, but close to that of ascorbic acid. In addition to the antioxidant activity of these plants, the total phenolic compounds and flavonoids were also measured in the extracts. The results presented here may suggest that the extracts of A. scabriflorum and A. tchihatschewii possess antimicrobial and antioxidant properties, and therefore, they can be used as a natural preservative ingredient in food and/or pharmaceutical industry.

  8. Antimicrobial and antioxidative activities in the bark extracts of Sonneratia caseolaris, a mangrove plant.

    PubMed

    Simlai, Aritra; Rai, Archana; Mishra, Saumya; Mukherjee, Kalishankar; Roy, Amit

    2014-01-01

    The present study deals with the phytochemical contents, antimicrobial and antioxidative activities of bark tissue of Sonneratia caseolaris, a mangrove plant from Sundarban estuary, India. Phytochemical analyses revealed the presence of high amounts of phenolics, flavonoids, tannins, alkaloids and saponins. Antimicrobial efficacies of various extracts of S. caseolaris were assessed by disc diffusion method against two Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus coagulans), two Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Proteus vulgaris) bacteria and one fungus (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The methanolic extract among others showed significant minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values. The antioxidant activity as indicated by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activity of the bark tissue extract from the species was found to be quite appreciable. The extracts were found to retain their antimicrobial activities despite pH and thermal treatments, thus indicating the stability of their activity even at extreme conditions. The antioxidant activity was also found to be considerably stable after thermal treatments. The components of the tissue extracts were subjected to separation using thin layer chromatography (TLC). The constituents with antimicrobial and antioxidative properties were identified using TLC-bioautography by agar-overlay and DPPH spraying methods respectively. A number of bioactive constituents with antimicrobial and radical scavenging properties were observed on the developed bioautography plate. The fractions with antimicrobial properties were isolated from the reference TLC plates and subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis for partial characterization and identification of the metabolites that might be responsible for the activities. The study suggests Sonneratia caseolaris bark as a potential source of bioactive compounds with stable antimicrobial and antioxidative properties and can be used as natural

  9. Antimicrobial and antioxidative activities in the bark extracts of Sonneratia caseolaris, a mangrove plant

    PubMed Central

    Simlai, Aritra; Rai, Archana; Mishra, Saumya; Mukherjee, Kalishankar; Roy, Amit

    2014-01-01

    The present study deals with the phytochemical contents, antimicrobial and antioxidative activities of bark tissue of Sonneratia caseolaris, a mangrove plant from Sundarban estuary, India. Phytochemical analyses revealed the presence of high amounts of phenolics, flavonoids, tannins, alkaloids and saponins. Antimicrobial efficacies of various extracts of S. caseolaris were assessed by disc diffusion method against two Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus coagulans), two Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Proteus vulgaris) bacteria and one fungus (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The methanolic extract among others showed significant minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values. The antioxidant activity as indicated by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activity of the bark tissue extract from the species was found to be quite appreciable. The extracts were found to retain their antimicrobial activities despite pH and thermal treatments, thus indicating the stability of their activity even at extreme conditions. The antioxidant activity was also found to be considerably stable after thermal treatments. The components of the tissue extracts were subjected to separation using thin layer chromatography (TLC). The constituents with antimicrobial and antioxidative properties were identified using TLC-bioautography by agar-overlay and DPPH spraying methods respectively. A number of bioactive constituents with antimicrobial and radical scavenging properties were observed on the developed bioautography plate. The fractions with antimicrobial properties were isolated from the reference TLC plates and subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis for partial characterization and identification of the metabolites that might be responsible for the activities. The study suggests Sonneratia caseolaris bark as a potential source of bioactive compounds with stable antimicrobial and antioxidative properties and can be used as natural

  10. An environmentally benign antimicrobial nanoparticle based ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Silver nanoparticles have antibacterial properties but their use has been a cause for concern because they persist in the environment. Here we show that lignin nanoparticles infused with silver ions and coated with a cationic polyelectrolyte layer form a biodegradable and green alternative to silver nanoparticles. The polyelectrolyte layer promotes the adhesion of the particles to bacterial cell membranes and together with silver ions can kill a broad spectrum of bacteria, including Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and quaternary-amine-resistant Ralstonia sp. Ion depletion studies showed that the bioactivity of these nanoparticles is time-limited because of the desorption of silver ions. High-throughput bioactivity screening did not reveal increased toxicity of the particles when compared to an equivalent mass of metallic silver nanoparticles or silver nitrate solution. Our results demonstrate that the application of green chemistry principles may allow the synthesis of nanoparticles with biodegradable cores that have higher antimicrobial activity and smaller environmental impact than metallic silver nanoparticles. Our results demonstrate that the application of green chemistry principles may allow the synthesis of nanoparticles with biodegradable cores that have higher antimicrobial activity and smaller environmental impact than metallic silver nanoparticles

  11. Synergism between plant extract and antimicrobial drugs used on Staphylococcus aureus diseases.

    PubMed

    Betoni, Joyce Elaine Cristina; Mantovani, Rebeca Passarelli; Barbosa, Lidiane Nunes; Di Stasi, Luiz Claudio; Fernandes Junior, Ary

    2006-06-01

    Searches for substances with antimicrobial activity are frequent, and medicinal plants have been considered interesting by some researchers since they are frequently used in popular medicine as remedies for many infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to verify the synergism between 13 antimicrobial drugs and 8 plant extracts--"guaco" (Mikania glomerata), guava (Psidium guajava), clove (Syzygium aromaticum), garlic (Allium sativum), lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus), ginger (Zingiber officinale), "carqueja" (Baccharis trimera), and mint (Mentha piperita)--against Staphylococcus aureus strains, and for this purpose, the disk method was the antimicrobial susceptibility test performed. Petri dishes were prepared with or without dilution of plant extracts at sub-inhibitory concentrations in Mueller-Hinton Agar (MHA), and the inhibitory zones were recorded in millimeters. In vitro anti-Staphylococcus aureus activities of the extracts were confirmed, and synergism was verified for all the extracts; clove, guava, and lemongrass presented the highest synergism rate with antimicrobial drugs, while ginger and garlic showed limited synergistic capacity.

  12. The use of versatile plant antimicrobial peptides in agribusiness and human health.

    PubMed

    de Souza Cândido, Elizabete; e Silva Cardoso, Marlon Henrique; Sousa, Daniel Amaro; Viana, Juliane Cançado; de Oliveira-Júnior, Nelson Gomes; Miranda, Vívian; Franco, Octávio Luiz

    2014-05-01

    Plant immune responses involve a wide diversity of physiological reactions that are induced by the recognition of pathogens, such as hypersensitive responses, cell wall modifications, and the synthesis of antimicrobial molecules including antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). These proteinaceous molecules have been widely studied, presenting peculiar characteristics such as conserved domains and a conserved disulfide bond pattern. Currently, many AMP classes with diverse modes of action are known, having been isolated from a large number of organisms. Plant AMPs comprise an interesting source of studies nowadays, and among these there are reports of different classes, including defensins, albumins, cyclotides, snakins and several others. These peptides have been widely used in works that pursue human disease control, including nosocomial infections, as well as for agricultural purposes. In this context, this review will focus on the relevance of the structural-function relations of AMPs derived from plants and their proper use in applications for human health and agribusiness.

  13. Antimicrobial Activity, Phenolic Content, and Cytotoxicity of Medicinal Plant Extracts Used for Treating Dermatological Diseases and Wound Healing in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Ghuman, Shanaz; Ncube, Bhekumthetho; Finnie, Jeffrey F; McGaw, Lyndy J; Coopoosamy, Roger M; Van Staden, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal plants used for wound healing and skin diseases are the key to unlocking the doors to combating problematic skin diseases as resistance of pathogens to pharmaceuticals and allopathic management continues to increase. The study aimed at investigating the antimicrobial efficacies, phenolic content, and cytotoxicity effects of 11 medicinal plant extracts commonly used for treating skin conditions and wound healing in traditional medicine within KwaZulu-Natal. Eleven plant species were separated into different plant parts (bulbs, roots, leaves) and extracted with different solvents. The extracts were assessed for antimicrobial activity against six Gram-positive and seven Gram-negative bacterial strains and four fungi commonly associated with skin conditions using disc diffusion and microdilution techniques. The aqueous methanolic extracts were screened for phenolic content while cytotoxicity tests were performed on all extracts using the brine shrimp lethality and tetrazolium-based colorimetric (MTT) assays. Extracts from Aloe ferox, A. arborescens, and Hypericum aethiopicum were the most active against almost all of the tested bacterial and fungal strains. All plant species exhibited some degree of antimicrobial activity. Total phenolic levels, flavonoids and tannins were also higher for A. ferox, followed by A. arborescens and H. aethiopicum, respectively. The cytotoxicity results of all plant extracts were in the range of 90-100% survival after 24 h in the brine shrimp assay. Extracts considered lethal would demonstrate >50% shrimp death. The MTT cytotoxicity test yielded LC50 values of >1 mg/mL on all extracts indicating that they are not cytotoxic. The observed antimicrobial efficacy demonstrated by some plant species and the general lack of cytotoxic effects on all the tested extracts presents some promising and beneficial aspects of these medicinal plant extracts in the treatment of skin diseases and wound healing. The two Aloe species and H

  14. Antimicrobial Activity, Phenolic Content, and Cytotoxicity of Medicinal Plant Extracts Used for Treating Dermatological Diseases and Wound Healing in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Ghuman, Shanaz; Ncube, Bhekumthetho; Finnie, Jeffrey F.; McGaw, Lyndy J.; Coopoosamy, Roger M.; Van Staden, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal plants used for wound healing and skin diseases are the key to unlocking the doors to combating problematic skin diseases as resistance of pathogens to pharmaceuticals and allopathic management continues to increase. The study aimed at investigating the antimicrobial efficacies, phenolic content, and cytotoxicity effects of 11 medicinal plant extracts commonly used for treating skin conditions and wound healing in traditional medicine within KwaZulu-Natal. Eleven plant species were separated into different plant parts (bulbs, roots, leaves) and extracted with different solvents. The extracts were assessed for antimicrobial activity against six Gram-positive and seven Gram-negative bacterial strains and four fungi commonly associated with skin conditions using disc diffusion and microdilution techniques. The aqueous methanolic extracts were screened for phenolic content while cytotoxicity tests were performed on all extracts using the brine shrimp lethality and tetrazolium–based colorimetric (MTT) assays. Extracts from Aloe ferox, A. arborescens, and Hypericum aethiopicum were the most active against almost all of the tested bacterial and fungal strains. All plant species exhibited some degree of antimicrobial activity. Total phenolic levels, flavonoids and tannins were also higher for A. ferox, followed by A. arborescens and H. aethiopicum, respectively. The cytotoxicity results of all plant extracts were in the range of 90–100% survival after 24 h in the brine shrimp assay. Extracts considered lethal would demonstrate >50% shrimp death. The MTT cytotoxicity test yielded LC50 values of >1 mg/mL on all extracts indicating that they are not cytotoxic. The observed antimicrobial efficacy demonstrated by some plant species and the general lack of cytotoxic effects on all the tested extracts presents some promising and beneficial aspects of these medicinal plant extracts in the treatment of skin diseases and wound healing. The two Aloe species and H

  15. Biofilm-forming and antimicrobial resistance traits of staphylococci isolated from goat dairy plants.

    PubMed

    Lira, Myrella Cariry; Givisiez, Paricia Emília Naves; De Sousa, Francisca Geovânia Canafístula; Magnani, Marciane; De Souza, Evandro Leite; Spricigo, Denis Augusto; Gebreyes, Wondwossen Abebe; De Oliveira, Celso José Bruno

    2016-09-30

    Biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance is of increasing importance to the maintenance and spread of foodborne pathogens in the food industry. This study aimed to investigate the ability to form biofilm and the antimicrobial resistance of staphylococci contaminating small-scale goat milk dairy plants. Sixty isolates were tested for antimicrobial resistance against 20 drugs by the microdilution method. Biofilm-forming traits were assessed by the microtiter plate method (MtP), Congo red agar method (CRA), and icaD gene detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). High antimicrobial resistance to ampicillin (60/60; 100%), penicillin G (21/60; 35%), and erythromycin (15/60; 25%) was observed, but all isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin/K-clavulanate, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, levofloxacin, linezolid, and moxifloxacin. No resistance to oxacillin or vancomycin was seen among Staphylococcus aureus. Twenty-seven isolates (27/60; 45%) were considered to form biofilm according to MtP, and similar biofilm-producing frequencies were observed in coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) (20/44; 45.4%) and S. aureus (7/16; 43.7%). The icaD gene was observed only in S. aureus isolates. There was no association between biofilm production and antimicrobial resistance. A higher frequency of biofilm-producing staphylococci was found in isolates from bulk tank milk and hand swabs. On the other hand, isolates from pasteurized milk showed lower frequency of biofilm formation. Staphylococci contaminating goat dairy plants are potential biofilm producers. The results suggest no association between the ability to form biofilm and antimicrobial resistance.

  16. Screening of plant extracts for antimicrobial activity against bacteria and yeasts with dermatological relevance.

    PubMed

    Weckesser, S; Engel, K; Simon-Haarhaus, B; Wittmer, A; Pelz, K; Schempp, C M

    2007-08-01

    There is cumulative resistance against antibiotics of many bacteria. Therefore, the development of new antiseptics and antimicrobial agents for the treatment of skin infections is of increasing interest. We have screened six plant extracts and isolated compounds for antimicrobial effects on bacteria and yeasts with dermatological relevance. The following plant extracts have been tested: Gentiana lutea, Harpagophytum procumbens, Boswellia serrata (dry extracts), Usnea barbata, Rosmarinus officinalis and Salvia officinalis (supercritical carbon dioxide [CO2] extracts). Additionally, the following characteristic plant substances were tested: usnic acid, carnosol, carnosic acid, ursolic acid, oleanolic acid, harpagoside, boswellic acid and gentiopicroside. The extracts and compounds were tested against 29 aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and yeasts in the agar dilution test. U. barbata-extract and usnic acid were the most active compounds, especially in anaerobic bacteria. Usnea CO2-extract effectively inhibited the growth of several Gram-positive bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus (including methicillin-resistant strains - MRSA), Propionibacterium acnes and Corynebacterium species. Growth of the dimorphic yeast Malassezia furfur was also inhibited by Usnea-extract. Besides the Usnea-extract, Rosmarinus-, Salvia-, Boswellia- and Harpagophytum-extracts proved to be effective against a panel of bacteria. It is concluded that due to their antimicrobial effects some of the plant extracts may be used for the topical treatment of skin disorders like acne vulgaris and seborrhoic eczema.

  17. Identification and rational design of novel antimicrobial peptides for plant protection.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Jose F; Muñoz, Alberto; Pérez-Payá, Enrique; Misra, Santosh; López-García, Belén

    2008-01-01

    Peptides and small proteins exhibiting antimicrobial activity have been isolated from many organisms ranging from insects to humans, including plants. Their role in defense is established, and their use in agriculture was already being proposed shortly after their discovery. However, some natural peptides have undesirable properties that complicate their application. Advances in peptide synthesis and high-throughput activity screening have made possible the de novo and rational design of novel peptides with improved properties. This review summarizes findings in the identification and design of short antimicrobial peptides with activity against plant pathogens, and will discuss alternatives for their heterologous production suited to plant disease control. Recent studies suggest that peptide antimicrobial action is not due solely to microbe permeation as previously described, but that more subtle factors might account for the specificity and absence of toxicity of some peptides. The elucidation of the mode of action and interaction with microbes will assist the improvement of peptide design with a view to targeting specific problems in agriculture and providing new tools for plant protection.

  18. In vitro antimicrobial and anti-proliferative activities of plant extracts from Spathodea campanulata, Ficus bubu, and Carica papaya.

    PubMed

    Mbosso Teinkela, Jean Emmanuel; Assob Nguedia, Jules Clément; Meyer, Franck; Vouffo Donfack, Erik; Lenta Ndjakou, Bruno; Ngouela, Silvère; Tsamo, Etienne; Adiogo, Dieudonné; Guy Blaise Azebaze, Anatole; Wintjens, René

    2016-01-01

    African medicinal plants represent a prominent source of new active substances. In this context, three plants were selected for biological investigations based on their traditional uses. The antimicrobial and anti-proliferative features of three plants used for medicinal purpose were evaluated. The antimicrobial activities of methanol extracts of Ficus bubu Warb. (Moraceae) stem bark and leaves, of Spathodea campanulata P. Beauv. (Bignoniaceae) flowers, as well as those of Carica papaya Linn. (Caricaceae) latex, were determined using the microbroth dilution method against a set of bacteria and fungi pathogens including: Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, S. saprophyticus, S. epidermididis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Salmonella typhimurium, Candida albicans, and Trichophyton rubrum. The tested concentrations of extracts ranged from 2500.0 to 2.4 μg/mL and MIC values were evaluated after 24 h incubation at 37 °C. Subsequently, MTT assay was used to estimate anti-proliferative activity of these methanol extracts and of F. bubu latex on three human cancer cell lines (U373 glioblastoma, A549 NSCLC, and SKMEL-28 melanoma). The methanol extract of F. bubu stem bark exhibited the highest antimicrobial activity against C. albicans with a MIC value of 9.8 μg/mL, while the F. bubu latex and the methanol extract of F. bubu leaves induced significant anti-proliferative activity against lung (IC50 values of 10 and 14 μg/mL, respectively) and glioma (IC50 values of 13 and 16 μg/mL, respectively) cancer cells. These results indicate that effective drugs could be derived from the three studied plants.

  19. Isolation and Characterization of Antimicrobial Compounds in Plant Extracts against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaki, Yoko; Rabenstein, John D.; Rhea, Joshua; Crouch, Marie-Laure; Mocek, Ulla M.; Kittell, Patricia Emmett; Morgan, Margie A.; Nichols, Wesley Stephen; Van Benschoten, M. M.; Hardy, William David; Liu, George Y.

    2013-01-01

    The number of fully active antibiotic options that treat nosocomial infections due to multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) is extremely limited. Magnolia officinalis, Mahonia bealei, Rabdosia rubescens, Rosa rugosa, Rubus chingii, Scutellaria baicalensis, and Terminalia chebula plant extracts were previously shown to have growth inhibitory activity against a multidrug-resistant clinical strain of A. baumannii. In this study, the compounds responsible for their antimicrobial activity were identified by fractionating each plant extract using high performance liquid chromatography, and determining the antimicrobial activity of each fraction against A. baumannii. The chemical structures of the fractions inhibiting >40% of the bacterial growth were elucidated by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The six most active compounds were identified as: ellagic acid in Rosa rugosa; norwogonin in Scutellaria baicalensis; and chebulagic acid, chebulinic acid, corilagin, and terchebulin in Terminalia chebula. The most potent compound was identified as norwogonin with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 128 µg/mL, and minimum bactericidal concentration of 256 µg/mL against clinically relevant strains of A. baumannii. Combination studies of norwogonin with ten anti-Gram negative bacterial agents demonstrated that norwogonin did not enhance the antimicrobial activity of the synthetic antibiotics chosen for this study. In conclusion, of all identified antimicrobial compounds, norwogonin was the most potent against multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains. Further studies are warranted to ascertain the prophylactic and therapeutic potential of norwogonin for infections due to multidrug-resistant A. baumannii. PMID:23630600

  20. Isolation and characterization of antimicrobial compounds in plant extracts against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Miyasaki, Yoko; Rabenstein, John D; Rhea, Joshua; Crouch, Marie-Laure; Mocek, Ulla M; Kittell, Patricia Emmett; Morgan, Margie A; Nichols, Wesley Stephen; Van Benschoten, M M; Hardy, William David; Liu, George Y

    2013-01-01

    The number of fully active antibiotic options that treat nosocomial infections due to multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) is extremely limited. Magnolia officinalis, Mahonia bealei, Rabdosia rubescens, Rosa rugosa, Rubus chingii, Scutellaria baicalensis, and Terminalia chebula plant extracts were previously shown to have growth inhibitory activity against a multidrug-resistant clinical strain of A. baumannii. In this study, the compounds responsible for their antimicrobial activity were identified by fractionating each plant extract using high performance liquid chromatography, and determining the antimicrobial activity of each fraction against A. baumannii. The chemical structures of the fractions inhibiting >40% of the bacterial growth were elucidated by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The six most active compounds were identified as: ellagic acid in Rosa rugosa; norwogonin in Scutellaria baicalensis; and chebulagic acid, chebulinic acid, corilagin, and terchebulin in Terminalia chebula. The most potent compound was identified as norwogonin with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 128 µg/mL, and minimum bactericidal concentration of 256 µg/mL against clinically relevant strains of A. baumannii. Combination studies of norwogonin with ten anti-Gram negative bacterial agents demonstrated that norwogonin did not enhance the antimicrobial activity of the synthetic antibiotics chosen for this study. In conclusion, of all identified antimicrobial compounds, norwogonin was the most potent against multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains. Further studies are warranted to ascertain the prophylactic and therapeutic potential of norwogonin for infections due to multidrug-resistant A. baumannii.

  1. In vitro Antimicrobial Activity of Traditional Plant Used in Mestizo Shamanism from the Peruvian Amazon in Case of Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Roumy, Vincent; Gutierrez-Choquevilca, Andréa-Luz; Lopez Mesia, Jean Pierre; Ruiz, Lastenia; Ruiz Macedo, Juan Celidonio; Abedini, Amin; Landoulsi, Ameni; Samaillie, Jennifer; Hennebelle, Thierry; Rivière, Céline; Neut, Christel

    2015-01-01

    Context: Our survey was performed near Iquitos (Peruvian Amazon) and its surroundings and leads us to consider Mestizo ethnomedical practices. The plant species reported here are traditionally used for ailments related to microbial infections. Inhabitants of various ethnic origins were interviewed, and 52 selected plants extracts were evaluated for their antimicrobial properties against a panel of 36 sensitive and multi-resistant bacteria or yeast. The study aimed at providing information on antimicrobial plant extract activities and the ethnomedical context of Mestizo riverine populations from Loreto (Peru). Material and Method: The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the plant crude extracts were carried out using the agar dilution method and ranged between 0.075 and 5.0 mg/ml. Results: Of the 40 plants analyzed, 9 species showed MIC ≤0.3 mg/ml (Anacardium occidentale, Couroupita guianensis, Croton lechleri, Davilla rugosa, Erythrina amazonica, Jacaranda copaia subsp. Spectabilis, Oenocarpus bataua, Peperomia macrostachya, and Phyllanthus urinaria) for one or several of the 36 microorganisms and only 6 drug extracts were inactive. Among the 40 plants, 13 were evaluated for the first time for an antibacterial activity. Conclusion: This evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of 40 plants using an approved standard methodology allowed comparing those activities against various microbes to establish antimicrobial spectra of standardized plant extracts, and give support to the traditional use of these plants. It may also help discovering new chemical classes of antimicrobial agents that could serve against multi-resistant bacteria. SUMMARY This study leads us to consider Mestizo ethnomedical practices near Iquitos (Peruvian Amazon) and its surroundings. The plant species reported here are traditionally used for ailments related to microbial infections. 52 selected plants extracts were evaluated for their antimicrobial properties against a panel of 36

  2. Antimicrobial nanostructured starch based films for packaging.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Ana S; Oliveira, M; de Sá, Arsénio; Rodrigues, Rui M; Cerqueira, Miguel A; Vicente, António A; Machado, A V

    2015-09-20

    Montmorillonite modified with a quaternary ammonium salt C30B/starch nanocomposite (C30B/ST-NC), silver nanoparticles/starch nanocomposite (Ag-NPs/ST-NC) and both silver nanoparticles/C30B/starch nanocomposites (Ag-NPs/C30B/ST-NC) films were produced. The nanoclay (C30B) was dispersed in a starch solution using an ultrasonic probe. Different concentrations of Ag-NPs (0.3, 0.5, 0.8 and 1.0mM) were synthesized directly in starch and in clay/starch solutions via chemical reduction method. Dispersion of C30B silicate layers and Ag-NPs in ST films characterized by X-ray and scanning electron microscopy showed that the presence of Ag-NPs enhanced clay dispersion. Color and opacity measurements, barrier properties (water vapor and oxygen permeabilities), dynamic mechanical analysis and contact angle were evaluated and related with the incorporation of C30B and Ag-NPs. Films presented antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans without significant differences between Ag-NPs concentrations. The migration of components from the nanostructured starch films, assessed by food contact tests, was minor and under the legal limits. These results indicated that the starch films incorporated with C30B and Ag-NPs have potential to be used as packaging nanostructured material. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Nanoparticle-based endodontic antimicrobial photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pagonis, Tom C.; Chen, Judy; Fontana, Carla Raquel; Devalapally, Harikrishna; Ruggiero, Karriann; Song, Xiaoqing; Foschi, Federico; Dunham, Joshua; Skobe, Ziedonis; Yamazaki, Hajime; Kent, Ralph; Tanner, Anne C.R.; Amiji, Mansoor M.; Soukos, Nikolaos S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the in vitro effects of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles loaded with the photosensitizer methylene blue (MB) and light against Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212). Materials and Methods The uptake and distribution of nanoparticles in E. faecalis in suspension was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) after incubation with PLGA complexed with colloidal gold particles for 2.5, 5 and 10 minutes. E. faecalis species were sensitized in planktonic phase and in experimentally infected root canals of human extracted teeth with MB-loaded nanoparticles for 10 minutes followed by exposure to red light at 665 nm. Results The nanoparticles were found to be concentrated mainly on the cell walls of microorganisms at all three time points. The synergism of light and MB-loaded nanoparticles led to approximately 2 and 1 log10 reduction of colony-forming units in planktonic phase and root canals, respectively. In both cases, mean log10 CFU levels were significantly lower than controls and MB-loaded nanoparticles without light. Conclusion The utilization of PLGA nanoparticles encapsulated with photoactive drugs may be a promising adjunct in antimicrobial endodontic treatment. PMID:20113801

  4. Antimicrobial activity of plant essential oils using food model media: efficacy, synergistic potential and interactions with food components.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, J; Barry-Ryan, C; Bourke, P

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to optimise the antimicrobial efficacy of plant essential oils (EOs) for control of Listeria spp. and spoilage bacteria using food model media based on lettuce, meat and milk. The EOs evaluated were lemon balm, marjoram, oregano and thyme and their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined against Enterobacter spp., Listeria spp., Lactobacillus spp., and Pseudomonas spp. using the agar dilution method and/or the absorbance based microplate assay. MICs were significantly lower in lettuce and beef media than in TSB. Listeria strains were more sensitive than spoilage bacteria, and oregano and thyme were the most active EOs. EO combinations were investigated using the checkerboard method and Oregano combined with thyme had additive effects against spoilage organisms. Combining lemon balm with thyme yielded additive activity against Listeria strains. The effect of simple sugars and pH on antimicrobial efficacy of oregano and thyme was assessed in a beef extract and tomato serum model media. EOs retained greater efficacy at pH 5 and 2.32% sugar, but sugar concentrations above 5% did not negatively impact EO efficacy. In addition to proven antimicrobial efficacy, careful selection and investigation of EOs appropriate to the sensory profile of foods and composition of the food system is required. This work shows that EOs might be more effective against food-borne pathogens and spoilage bacteria when applied to foods containing a high protein level at acidic pH, as well as moderate levels of simple sugars.

  5. Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella isolated from two pork processing plants in Alberta, Canada.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Maldonado, Alma Fernanda; Aslam, Mueen; Service, Cara; Narváez-Bravo, Claudia; Avery, Brent P; Johnson, Roger; Jones, Tineke H

    2017-01-16

    This study investigated the frequency of Salmonella serovars on pig carcasses at various processing steps in two commercial pork processing plants in Alberta, Canada and characterized phenotypic and genotypic antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and PFGE patterns of the Salmonella isolates. Over a one year period, 1000 swab samples were collected from randomly selected pigs at two slaughter plants. Sampling points were: carcass swabs after bleeding (CSAB), carcass swabs after de-hairing (CSAD, plant A) or skinning (CSASk, plant B), carcass swabs after evisceration (CSAE), carcass swabs after pasteurization (CSAP, plant A) or washing (CSAW, plants B) and retail pork (RP). For plant A, 87% of CSAB and 8% of CSAE were positive for Salmonella while at plant B, Salmonella was recovered from 94% of CSAB and 10% of CSAE. Salmonella was not recovered from the RP samples at either plant, indicating that the plants used effective control measures. Salmonella enterica serovar Derby was the most common serotype (23%, 29/127) recovered in plant A and plant B (61%, 76/124). For plant A, 35% (45/127) of isolates were resistant to at least one antimicrobial. Five isolates (3.9%), 4 serovar Ohio strains and one serovar I:Rough-O:I,v:-, strain were simultaneously resistant to antimicrobials of very high (Category I), high (Category II), and medium (Category III) importance to human medicine. The 4 S. Ohio isolates were recovered from 3 different steps of pork processing on the same sampling day and displayed resistance to 5-7 antimicrobials, with all of them displaying resistance to ceftiofur and ceftriaxone (Category I). An I:Rough-O:l,v:- isolate, recovered on a different sampling day, was resistant to 7 antimicrobials that included resistance to ampicillin/clavulanic acid, ceftiofur and ceftriaxone (Category I). Salmonella strains isolated from plant A harbored 12 different AMR genes. The most prevalent genes were sul1, sul2, tet(A), tet(B), aadA, strA/strB, aac(3)IV and aphA1. For

  6. Antimicrobial flavonoids isolated from Indian medicinal plant Scutellaria oblonga inhibit biofilms formed by common food pathogens.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Narendran; Subramaniam, Shankar; Christena, Lowrence Rene; Muthuraman, Meenakshi Sundaram; Subramanian, Nagarajan Sai; Pemiah, Brindha; Sivasubramanian, Aravind

    2016-09-01

    Scutellaria oblonga Benth., a hitherto phytochemically unexplored Indian medicinal folklore plant was extracted with acetone and subjected to chromatography to yield nine flavonoids, for the first time from this plant. Antimicrobial assays were performed against 11 foodborne pathogens, and three molecules (Techtochrysin, Negletein and Quercitin-3-glucoside) depicted significant activity. These molecules were assessed for their rate of antibacterial action using time-kill curves which depicted complete inhibition of most of the bacteria within 12-16 h. The significant biofilm-reducing capability exhibited by these three molecules formed a significant finding of the current study. In most of the experiments, a 90-95% reduction in biofilms was observed. Thus, flavonoids as natural molecules from S. oblonga could be further researched to be used as potent antimicrobial and antibiofilm agents.

  7. Antimicrobial activity of Northwestern Mexican plants against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Robles-Zepeda, Ramón E; Velázquez-Contreras, Carlos A; Garibay-Escobar, Adriana; Gálvez-Ruiz, Juan C; Ruiz-Bustos, Eduardo

    2011-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the major etiologic agent of such gastric disorders as chronic active gastritis and gastric carcinoma. Over the past few years, the appearance of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has led to the development of better treatments, such as the use of natural products. This study evaluated the anti-H. pylori activity of 17 Mexican plants used mainly in the northwestern part of Mexico (Sonora) for the empirical treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. The anti-H. pylori activity of methanolic extracts of the plants was determined by using the broth microdilution method. The 50% minimum inhibitory concentrations ranged from less than 200 to 400 μg/mL for Castella tortuosa, Amphipterygium adstringens, Ibervillea sonorae, Pscalium decompositum, Krameria erecta, Selaginella lepidophylla, Pimpinella anisum, Marrubium vulgare, Ambrosia confertiflora, and Couterea latiflora and were greater than 800 μg/mL for Byophyllum pinnatum, Tecoma stans linnaeus, Kohleria deppena, Jatropha cuneata, Chenopodium ambrosoides, and Taxodium macronatum. Only Equisetum gigantum showed no activity against H. pylori. This study suggests the important role that these plants may have in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders caused by H. pylori. The findings set the groundwork for further characterization and elucidation of the active compounds responsible for such activity.

  8. Studies of the in vitro anticancer, antimicrobial and antioxidant potentials of selected Yemeni medicinal plants from the island Soqotra

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent years have witnessed that there is a revival of interest in drug discovery from medicinal plants for the maintenance of health in all parts of the world. The aim of this work was to investigate 26 plants belonging to 17 families collected from a unique place in Yemen (Soqotra Island) for their in vitro anticancer, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. Methods The 26 plants were extracted with methanol and hot water to yield 52 extracts. Evaluation for in vitro anticancer activity was done against three human cancer cell lines (A-427, 5637 and MCF-7) by using an established microtiter plate assay based on cellular staining with crystal violet. Antimicrobial activity was tested against three Gram-positive bacteria, two Gram-negative bacteria, one yeast species and three multiresistant Staphylococcus strains by using an agar diffusion method and the determination of MIC against three Gram-positive bacteria with the broth micro-dilution assay. Antioxidant activity was investigated by measuring the scavenging activity of the DPPH radical. Moreover, a phytochemical screening of the methanolic extracts was done. Results Notable cancer cell growth inhibition was observed for extracts from Ballochia atro-virgata, Eureiandra balfourii and Hypoestes pubescens, with IC50 values ranging between 0.8 and 8.2 μg/ml. The methanol extracts of Acanthospermum hispidum, Boswellia dioscorides, Boswellia socotrana, Commiphora ornifolia and Euphorbia socotrana also showed noticeable antiproliferative potency with IC50 values < 50 μg/ml. The greatest antimicrobial activity was exhibited by extracts from Acacia pennivenia, Boswellia dioscorides, Boswellia socotrana, Commiphora ornifolia, Euclea divinorum, Euphorbia socotrana, Leucas samhaensis, Leucas virgata, Rhus thyrsiflora, and Teucrium sokotranum with inhibition zones > 15 mm and MIC values ≤ 250 μg/ml. In addition, the methanolic extracts of Acacia pennivenia, Boswellia dioscorides, Boswellia socotrana and

  9. Novel mode of action of plant defense peptides: hevein-like antimicrobial peptides from wheat inhibit fungal metalloproteases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The multilayered plant immune system relies on rapid recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns followed by activation of defense-related genes that results in the reinforcement of plant cell walls and production of antimicrobial compounds. To suppress plant defense, fungi secrete effecto...

  10. Comparative Analysis of the Antimicrobial Activities of Plant Defensin-Like and Ultrashort Peptides against Food-Spoiling Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kraszewska, Joanna; Beckett, Michael C.; James, Tharappel C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antimicrobial peptides offer potential as novel therapeutics to combat food spoilage and poisoning caused by pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria. Our previous studies identified the peptide human beta-defensin 3 (HBD3) as a potent antimicrobial agent against a wide range of beer-spoiling bacteria. Thus, HBD3 is an excellent candidate for development as an additive to prevent food and beverage spoilage. To expand the repertoire of peptides with antimicrobial activity against bacteria associated with food spoilage and/or food poisoning, we carried out an in silico discovery pipeline to identify peptides with structure and activity similar to those of HBD3, focusing on peptides of plant origin. Using a standardized assay, we compared the antimicrobial activities of nine defensin-like plant peptides to the activity of HBD3. Only two of the peptides, fabatin-2 and Cp-thionin-2, displayed antimicrobial activity; however, the peptides differed from HBD3 in being sensitive to salt and were thermostable. We also compared the activities of several ultrashort peptides to that of HBD3. One of the peptides, the synthetic tetrapeptide O3TR, displayed biphasic antimicrobial activity but had a narrower host range than HBD3. Finally, to determine if the peptides might act in concert to improve antimicrobial activity, we compared the activities of the peptides in pairwise combinations. The plant defensin-like peptides fabatin-2 and Cp-thionin-2 displayed a synergistic effect with HBD3, while O3TR was antagonistic. Thus, some plant defensin-like peptides are effective antimicrobials and may act in concert with HBD3 to control bacteria associated with food spoilage and food poisoning. IMPORTANCE Food spoilage and food poisoning caused by bacteria can have major health and economic implications for human society. With the rise in resistance to conventional antibiotics, there is a need to identify new antimicrobials to combat these outbreaks in our food supply. Here we

  11. Antimicrobial activity of plant essential oils against bacterial and fungal species involved in food poisoning and/or food decay.

    PubMed

    Lixandru, Brînduşa-Elena; Drăcea, Nicoleta Olguţa; Dragomirescu, Cristiana Cerasella; Drăgulescu, Elena Carmina; Coldea, Ileana Luminiţa; Anton, Liliana; Dobre, Elena; Rovinaru, Camelia; Codiţă, Irina

    2010-01-01

    The currative properties of aromatic and medicinal plants have been recognized since ancient times and, more recently, the antimicrobial activity of plant essential oils has been used in several applications, including food preservation. The purpose of this study was to create directly comparable, quantitative data on the antimicrobial activity of some plant essential oils prepared in the National Institute of Research-Development for Chemistry and Petrochemistry, Bucharest to be used for the further development of food packaging technology, based on their antibacterial and antifungal activity. The essential oils extracted from thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), basil (Ocimum basilicum L.), coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), sage (Salvia officinalis L.), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare L.), spearmint (Mentha spicata L.) and carraway (Carum carvi L.) were investigated for their antimicrobial activity against eleven different bacterial and three fungal strains belonging to species reported to be involved in food poisoning and/or food decay: S. aureus ATCC 25923, S. aureus ATCC 6538, S. aureus ATCC 25913, E. coli ATCC 25922, E. coli ATCC 35218, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Cantacuzino Institute Culture Collection (CICC) 10878, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19112, Bacillus cereus CIP 5127, Bacillus cereus ATCC 11778, Candida albicans ATCC 10231, Aspergillus niger ATCC 16404, Penicillium spp. CICC 251 and two E. coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis clinical isolates. The majority of the tested essential oils exibited considerable inhibitory capacity against all the organisms tested, as supported by growth inhibition zone diameters, MICs and MBC's. Thyme, coriander and basil oils proved the best antibacterial activity, while thyme and spearmint oils better inhibited the fungal species.

  12. Comparative antimicrobial activity of callus and natural plant extracts of Solanum trilobatum L

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, S.M.; Kandasamy, S.; Chinnappa, R.

    2009-01-01

    Comparison of natural plant and callus extracts of Solanum trilobatum L. was studied against two bacteria and fungi, for their antimicrobial activity using cup diffusion method. Various solvents such as chloroform, petroleum ether and ethanol were used. The leaf and stem segments of the plant were culturedon Murashige and S koog basal medium supplemented with various growth regulators. Maximum callus was recorded on medium containing 0.5 mg/lNAA and 0.5 mgj IKinetin. The results reveals that the stem and leaf callus extracts has shown significant activity against the tested microorganisms than the natural sample. PMID:22557312

  13. High-level antimicrobial efficacy of representative Mediterranean natural plant extracts against oral microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Karygianni, Lamprini; Cecere, Manuel; Skaltsounis, Alexios Leandros; Argyropoulou, Aikaterini; Hellwig, Elmar; Aligiannis, Nektarios; Wittmer, Annette; Al-Ahmad, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Nature is an unexplored reservoir of novel phytopharmaceuticals. Since biofilm-related oral diseases often correlate with antibiotic resistance, plant-derived antimicrobial agents could enhance existing treatment options. Therefore, the rationale of the present report was to examine the antimicrobial impact of Mediterranean natural extracts on oral microorganisms. Five different extracts from Olea europaea, mastic gum, and Inula viscosa were tested against ten bacteria and one Candida albicans strain. The extraction protocols were conducted according to established experimental procedures. Two antimicrobial assays--the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) assay--were applied. The screened extracts were found to be active against each of the tested microorganisms. O. europaea presented MIC and MBC ranges of 0.07-10.00 mg mL(-1) and 0.60-10.00 mg mL(-1), respectively. The mean MBC values for mastic gum and I. viscosa were 0.07-10.00 mg mL(-1) and 0.15-10.00 mg mL(-1), respectively. Extracts were less effective against C. albicans and exerted bactericidal effects at a concentration range of 0.07-5.00 mg mL(-1) on strict anaerobic bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Parvimonas micra). Ethyl acetate I. viscosa extract and total mastic extract showed considerable antimicrobial activity against oral microorganisms and could therefore be considered as alternative natural anti-infectious agents.

  14. Diversity of fecal coliforms and their antimicrobial resistance patterns in wastewater treatment model plant.

    PubMed

    Luczkiewicz, A; Fudala-Ksiazek, S; Jankowska, K; Quant, B; Olańczuk-Neyman, K

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of resistance patterns among wastewater fecal coliforms was determined in the study. Susceptibility of the isolates was tested against 19 antimicrobial agents: aminoglycosides, aztreonam, carbapenems, cephalosporines, beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitors, penicillines, tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and fluoroquinolones. Additionally the removal of resistant isolates was evaluated in the laboratory-scale wastewater treatment model plant (M-WWTP), continuously supplied with the wastewater obtained from the full-scale WWTP. Number of fecal coliforms in raw (after mechanical treatment) and treated wastewater, as well as in aerobic chamber effluent was determined using selective medium. The selected strains were identified and examined for antibiotic resistance using Phoenix Automated Microbiology System (BD Biosciences, USA). The strains were identified as Escherichia coli (n=222), Klebsiella pneumoniae ssp. ozaenae (n=9), and Pantoea agglomerans (n=1). The isolate of P. agglomerans as well as 48% of E. coli isolates were sensitive to all antimicrobials tested. The most frequent resistance patterns were found for ampicillin: 100% of K. pneumoniae ssp. ozaenae and 41% of E. coli isolates. Among E. coli isolates 12% was regarded as multiple antimicrobial resistant (MAR). In the studied M-WWTP, the applied activated sludge processes reduced considerably the number of fecal coliforms, but increased the ratio of antimicrobial-resistant E. coli isolates to sensitive ones, especially among strains with MAR patterns.

  15. In vitro antimicrobial activity of ten medicinal plants against clinical isolates of oral cancer cases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Suppression of immune system in treated cancer patients may lead to secondary infections that obviate the need of antibiotics. In the present study, an attempt was made to understand the occurrence of secondary infections in immuno-suppressed patients along with herbal control of these infections with the following objectives to: (a) isolate the microbial species from the treated oral cancer patients along with the estimation of absolute neutrophile counts of patients (b) assess the in vitro antimicrobial activity medicinal plants against the above clinical isolates. Methods Blood and oral swab cultures were taken from 40 oral cancer patients undergoing treatment in the radiotherapy unit of Regional Cancer Institute, Pt. B.D.S. Health University, Rohtak, Haryana. Clinical isolates were identified by following general microbiological, staining and biochemical methods. The absolute neutrophile counts were done by following the standard methods. The medicinal plants selected for antimicrobial activity analysis were Asphodelus tenuifolius Cav., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Balanites aegyptiaca L., Cestrum diurnum L., Cordia dichotoma G. Forst, Eclipta alba L., Murraya koenigii (L.) Spreng. , Pedalium murex L., Ricinus communis L. and Trigonella foenum graecum L. The antimicrobial efficacy of medicinal plants was evaluated by modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. MIC and MFC were investigated by serial two fold microbroth dilution method. Results Prevalent bacterial pathogens isolated were Staphylococcus aureus (23.2%), Escherichia coli (15.62%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (12.5%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (9.37%), Klebsiella pneumonia (7.81%), Proteus mirabilis (3.6%), Proteus vulgaris (4.2%) and the fungal pathogens were Candida albicans (14.6%), Aspergillus fumigatus (9.37%). Out of 40 cases, 35 (87.5%) were observed as neutropenic. Eight medicinal plants (A. tenuifolius, A. racemosus, B. aegyptiaca, E. alba, M. koenigii, P. murex R. communis and T

  16. Antimicrobial activities of skincare preparations from plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Kareru, P G; Keriko, J M; Kenji, G M; Thiong'o, G T; Gachanja, A N; Mukiira, H N

    2010-04-03

    In this study, Tithonia diversifolia Helms. (A Gray), Aloe secundiflora (Miller) and Azadirachta indica (A. Juss) plant extracts were used to make herbal soaps while Thevetia peruviana (Schum) seed oil was used to make a herbal lotion for skincare. The soaps were tested for the growth inhibition of Escherichia coli, and Candida albicans. The lotion was evaluated against Staphylococcus aureus and E.coli. Although Tithonia diversifolia soap exhibited the highest inhibitory effect on the test bacterial strains, it had the least inhibition against C. albicans. Results from this study indicated that the 'Tithonia diversifolia' soap would have superior skin protection against the tested bacteria but would offer the least skin protection against C. albicans. The herbal lotion inhibited S. aureus and E. coli in a concentration dependent manner, however, the inhibitory effect was more pronounced on S. aureus.

  17. Antimicrobials Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drosinos, Eleftherios H.; Skandamis, Panagiotis N.; Mataragas, Marios

    The use of antimicrobials is a common practice for preservation of foods. Incorporation, in a food recipe, of chemical antimicrobials towards inhibition of spoilage and pathogenic micro-organisms results in the compositional modification of food. This treatment is nowadays undesirable for the consumer, who likes natural products. Scientific community reflecting consumers demand for natural antimicrobials has made efforts to investigate the possibility to use natural antimicrobials such us bacteriocins and essential oils of plant origin to inhibit microbial growth.

  18. Antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis and some other medicinal plants commonly used in South-East Asia

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lai Wah; Cheah, Emily LC; Saw, Constance LL; Weng, Wanyu; Heng, Paul WS

    2008-01-01

    Background Eight medicinal plants were tested for their antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. Different extraction methods were also tested for their effects on the bioactivities of the medicinal plants. Methods Eight plants, namely Herba Polygonis Hydropiperis (Laliaocao), Folium Murraya Koenigii (Jialiye), Rhizoma Arachis Hypogea (Huashenggen), Herba Houttuyniae (Yuxingcao), Epipremnum pinnatum (Pashulong), Rhizoma Typhonium Flagelliforme (Laoshuyu), Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis (Houpo) and Rhizoma Imperatae (Baimaogen) were investigated for their potential antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. Results Extracts of Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis had the strongest activities against M. Smegmatis, C. albicans, B. subtilis and S. aureus. Boiled extracts of Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis, Folium Murraya Koenigii, Herba Polygonis Hydropiperis and Herba Houttuyniae demonstrated greater antioxidant activities than other tested medicinal plants. Conclusion Among the eight tested medicinal plants, Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis showed the highest antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. Different methods of extraction yield different spectra of bioactivities. PMID:19038060

  19. Antimicrobial efficacy of alcohol-based hand gels.

    PubMed

    Guilhermetti, M; Marques Wiirzler, L A; Castanheira Facio, B; da Silva Furlan, M; Campo Meschial, W; Bronharo Tognim, M C; Botelho Garcia, L; Luiz Cardoso, C

    2010-03-01

    In recent years, several commercial alcohol-based hand gels have appeared on the market to improve the hand-cleansing compliance of healthcare workers. Although the antimicrobial efficacy of these products has been reported in different countries, few studies have investigated this subject in Brazil. In this study, we assessed the antimicrobial efficacy of 12 alcohol-based hand gels produced in Brazil, containing 70% w/w or v/v ethyl alcohol as the active ingredient, according to the European Standard EN 1500 (EN 1500). The following alcohol gels were tested: Hand Gel, Voga Gel, Solumax Solugel, Doctor Clean, Rio Gel, Clear Gel, Sevengel, Hand CHC, Gel Bac, WBL-50 Gel, Sanigel and Soft Care Gel. In addition, 70% w/w ethyl alcohol and three alcohol-based hand rubs (Sterillium, Sterillium Gel, and Spitaderm), commonly used in Europe and effective according to EN 1500, were also tested. All the products tested, except for two, were approved by the EN 1500 test protocol with a 60s application. The results confirmed the antimicrobial efficacy of the majority of the alcohol gels produced in Brazil for hand hygiene of healthcare workers.

  20. Antimicrobial activity of some medicinal plants from the cerrado of the centralwestern region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Violante, Ivana Maria Póvoa; Hamerski, Lidilhone; Garcez, Walmir Silva; Batista, Ana Lucia; Chang, Marilene Rodrigues; Pott, Vali Joana; Garcez, Fernanda Rodrigues

    2012-10-01

    Ethanol extracts from six selected species from the Cerrado of the Central-Western region of Brazil, which are used in traditional medicine for the treatment of infectious diseases and other medical conditions, namely Erythroxylum suberosum St. Hil. (Erythroxylaceae), Hyptis crenata Pohl. ex Benth. (Lamiaceae), Roupala brasiliensis Klotz. (Proteaceae), Simarouba versicolor St. Hil. (Simaroubaceae), Guazuma ulmifolia Lam. (Sterculiaceae) and Protium heptaphyllum (Aubl.) March. (Burseraceae), as well as fractions resulting from partition of these crude extracts, were screened in vitro for their antifungal and antibacterial properties. The antimicrobial activities were assessed by the broth microdilution assay against six control fungal strains, Candida albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis and Cryptococcus neoformans, and five control Gram-positive and negative bacterial strains, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Toxicity of the extracts and fractions against Artemia salina was also evaluated in this work. All plants investigated showed antimicrobial properties against at least one microorganism and two species were also significantly toxic to brine shrimp larvae. The results tend to support the traditional use of these plants for the treatment of respiratory and gastrointestinal disorders and/or skin diseases, opening the possibility of finding new antimicrobial agents from these natural sources. Among the species investigated, Hyptis crenata, Erythroxylum suberosum and Roupala brasiliensis were considered the most promising candidates for developing of future bioactivity-guided phytochemical investigations.

  1. Antimicrobial activity of some medicinal plants from the cerrado of the centralwestern region of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Violante, Ivana Maria Póvoa; Hamerski, Lidilhone; Garcez, Walmir Silva; Batista, Ana Lucia; Chang, Marilene Rodrigues; Pott, Vali Joana; Garcez, Fernanda Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Ethanol extracts from six selected species from the Cerrado of the Central-Western region of Brazil, which are used in traditional medicine for the treatment of infectious diseases and other medical conditions, namely Erythroxylum suberosum St. Hil. (Erythroxylaceae), Hyptis crenata Pohl. ex Benth. (Lamiaceae), Roupala brasiliensis Klotz. (Proteaceae), Simarouba versicolor St. Hil. (Simaroubaceae), Guazuma ulmifolia Lam. (Sterculiaceae) and Protium heptaphyllum (Aubl.) March. (Burseraceae), as well as fractions resulting from partition of these crude extracts, were screened in vitro for their antifungal and antibacterial properties. The antimicrobial activities were assessed by the broth microdilution assay against six control fungal strains, Candida albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis and Cryptococcus neoformans, and five control Gram-positive and negative bacterial strains, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Toxicity of the extracts and fractions against Artemia salina was also evaluated in this work. All plants investigated showed antimicrobial properties against at least one microorganism and two species were also significantly toxic to brine shrimp larvae. The results tend to support the traditional use of these plants for the treatment of respiratory and gastrointestinal disorders and/or skin diseases, opening the possibility of finding new antimicrobial agents from these natural sources. Among the species investigated, Hyptis crenata, Erythroxylum suberosum and Roupala brasiliensis were considered the most promising candidates for developing of future bioactivity-guided phytochemical investigations. PMID:24031956

  2. The in-vitro antimicrobial activities of some medicinal plants from Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Gangoué-Piéboji, J; Pegnyemb, D E; Niyitegeka, D; Nsangou, A; Eze, N; Minyem, C; Mbing, J Ngo; Ngassam, P; Tih, R Ghogomu; Sodengam, B L; Bodo, B

    2006-04-01

    The antimicrobial activities of 10 plant species (Voacanga africana, Crepis cameroonica, Plagiostyles africana, Crotalaria retusa, Mammea africana, Lophira lanceolata, Ochna afzelii, Ouratea elongata, Ou. flava and Ou. sulcata), each of which is currently used in the traditional medicine of Cameroon, were investigated in vitro. The activities of a methanol extract of each plant were tested, in disc-diffusion assays, against 37 reference or laboratory strains of seven species of microorganism (Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Enterococcus hirae, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans). The minimal inhibitory concentrations of each extract were then estimated, against each of the more susceptible microorganisms (i.e. those giving an inhibition zone measuring at least 9 mm in diameter in the disc-diffusion assays), by agar dilution. Although, in the disc-diffusion assays, each of the 10 methanol extracts investigated displayed some degree of antimicrobial activity against at least one species of microorganism, no activity against the Gram-negative bacteria (Es. coli, K. pneumoniae and Ps. aeruginosa) was observed. The extract with the greatest antimicrobial activity was that of Pl. africana (Euphorbiaceae).

  3. [Transgenic Belarussian-bred potato plants expressing genes for antimicrobial peptides of the cecropin-melittin type].

    PubMed

    Vutto, N L; Gapeeva, T A; Pundik, A N; Tret'iakova, T G; Volotovskiĭ, I D

    2010-12-01

    Binary vectors for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation were constructed to express the genes for antimicrobial peptides (APs) of the cectropin-melittin type under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S RNA promoter in plants. It was shown with Escherichia coli and Agrobacterium tumefaciens cells that the cassettes could be cloned in pB1121-based vectors with deletion of the 3-D-glycuronidase gene only in the orientation opposite to that of the original vector. Transgenic potato plants were obtained using the Belarussian varieties Odyssey, Vetraz, and Scarb. Their cells expressed the MsrA1 or CEMA peptides of the cecropin-melittin type. The expression was shown to confer higher resistance to bacterial (Erwinia carotovora) infection and extremely high resistance to fungal (Phytophtora infestans and Alternarla solani) infections.

  4. Screening of Amazonian plants from the Adolpho Ducke forest reserve, Manaus, state of Amazonas, Brazil, for antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Ana Lúcia Basílio; Teixeira, Maria Francisca Simas; Oliveira, Viviana Maria Araújo de; Fernandes, Ormezinda Celeste Cristo; Cauper, Gláucia Socorro de Barros; Pohlit, Adrian Martin

    2008-02-01

    Tropical forests are species-rich reserves for the discovery and development of antimicrobial drugs. The aim of this work is to investigate the in vitro antimicrobial potential of Amazon plants found within the National Institute on Amazon Research's Adolpho Ducke forest reserve, located in Manaus, state of Amazonas, Brazil. 75 methanol, chloroform and water extracts representing 12 plant species were tested for antimicrobial activity towards strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus oralis, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans using the gel-diffusion method. Active extracts were further evaluated to establish minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and antimicrobial profiles using bioautography on normal-phase thin-layer chromatography plates. Diclinanona calycina presented extracts with good antimicrobial activity and S. oralis and M. smegmatis were the most sensitive bacteria. D. calycina and Lacmellea gracilis presented extracts with the lowest MIC (48.8 microg/ml). D. calycina methanol and chloroform leaf extracts presented the best overall antimicrobial activity. All test organisms were sensitive to D. calycina branch chloroform extract in the bioautography assay. This is the first evaluation of the biological activity of these plant species and significant in vitro antimicrobial activity was detected in extracts and components from two species, D. calycina and L. gracilis.

  5. Study of in vitro antimicrobial and antiproliferative activities of selected Saharan plants.

    PubMed

    Palici, Ionut F; Liktor-Busa, Erika; Zupkó, István; Touzard, Blaise; Chaieb, Mohamed; Urbán, Edit; Hohmann, Judit

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was the evaluation of the antimicrobial and antiproliferative activities of selected Saharan species, which are applied in the traditional medicine but not studied thoroughly from chemical and pharmacological point of view. The studied plants, namely Anthyllis henoniana, Centropodia forskalii, Cornulaca monacantha, Ephedra alata var. alenda, Euphorbia guyoniana, Helianthemum confertum, Henophyton deserti, Moltkiopsis ciliata and Spartidium saharae were collected from remote areas of North Africa, especially from the Tunisian region of Sahara. After drying and applying the appropriate extraction methods, the plant extracts were tested in antimicrobial screening assay, performed on 19 Gram-positive and -negative strains of microbes. The inhibition zones produced by plant extracts were determined by disc-diffusion method. Remarkable antibacterial activities were exhibited by extracts of Ephedra alata var. alenda and Helianthemum confertum against B. subtilis, M. catarrhalis and methicillin-resistant and non-resistant S. aureus. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of these two species were also determined. Antiproliferative effects of the extracts were evaluated against 4 human adherent cell lines (HeLa, A431, A2780 and MCF7). Notable cell growth inhibition was found for extract of Helianthemum confertum and Euphorbia guyoniana. Our results provided data for selection of some plant species for further detailed pharmacological and phytochemical examinations.

  6. Development of pea protein-based bioplastics with antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Perez-Puyana, Víctor; Felix, Manuel; Romero, Alberto; Guerrero, Antonio

    2017-06-01

    In the present work, bioplastics from renewable polymers were studied in order to reduce the huge generation of plastic wastes, causing an environmental problem that continues owing to the increasing demand for plastic products. Bioplastics with much better antimicrobial properties, in particular against Gram-positive bacteria, were obtained with the addition of nisin to the initial protein/plasticizer mixture. However, the addition of nisin produces more rigid but less deformable bioplastics (higher Young's modulus but lower strain at break). The results obtained are useful to demonstrate the antimicrobial properties of pea protein-based bioplastics by adding nisin and make them suitable as potential candidates to replace conventional plastics in food packaging. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Development of antimicrobial active packaging materials based on gluten proteins.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Heincke, Diana; Martínez, Inmaculada; Partal, Pedro; Guerrero, Antonio; Gallegos, Críspulo

    2016-08-01

    The incorporation of natural biocide agents into protein-based bioplastics, a source of biodegradable polymeric materials, manufactured by a thermo-mechanical method is a way to contribute to a sustainable food packaging industry. This study assesses the antimicrobial activity of 10 different biocides incorporated into wheat gluten-based bioplastics. The effect that formulation, processing, and further thermal treatments exert on the thermo-mechanical properties, water absorption characteristics and rheological behaviour of these materials is also studied. Bioplastics containing six of the 10 examined bioactive agents have demonstrated suitable antimicrobial activity at 37 °C after their incorporation into the bioplastic. Moreover, the essential oils are able to create an antimicrobial atmosphere within a Petri dish. Depending on the selected biocide, its addition may alter the bioplastics protein network in a different extent, which leads to materials exhibiting less water uptake and different rheological and thermo-mechanical behaviours. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Insights into the relationship between antimicrobial residues and bacterial populations in a hospital-urban wastewater treatment plant system.

    PubMed

    Varela, Ana Rita; André, Sandra; Nunes, Olga C; Manaia, Célia M

    2014-05-01

    The relationship between antimicrobial residues, antibiotic resistance prevalence and bacterial community composition in hospital effluent and in the receiving wastewater treatment plant was studied. Samples from hospital effluent, raw inflow and final effluent of the receiving wastewater treatment plant were characterized for amoxicillin and ciprofloxacin resistance prevalence, content of heavy metals and antimicrobial residues and bacterial community structure, based on 16S rRNA gene PCR-DGGE analysis. The concentration of fluoroquinolones, arsenic and mercury was in general higher in hospital effluent than in raw inflow, while the opposite was observed for tetracyclines, sulfonamides and penicillin G. The prevalence of ciprofloxacin resistance was significantly higher in hospital effluent than in raw inflow. The concentration of antimicrobial residues was observed to be significantly correlated with the prevalence of antibiotic resistant bacteria and with variations in the bacterial community. Hospital effluent was confirmed as a relevant, although not unique, source of antimicrobial residues and antibiotic resistant bacteria to the wastewater treatment plant. Moreover, given the high loads of antibiotic residues and antibiotic resistant bacteria that may occur in hospital effluents, these wastewater habitats may represent useful models to study and predict the impact of antibiotic residues on bacterial communities.

  9. Antimicrobial activity of various ethanolic plant extracts against pathogenic multi drug resistant Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shaista; Imran, Mohd; Imran, Mohammed; Pindari, Nuzhat

    2017-01-01

    A total of 50 Candida isolates were isolated and identified from clinical specimens and these were tested for resistance to various antifungal drugs. It was observed multi-drug resistance in all candida isolates by 84%, 62%, 60%, 76%, 46, 30%, and 22% against fluconazole, clotrimazole, Amphotericin B, itraconazole, ketoconazole, miconazole and nystatin tested respectively. The isolates, which were found to be resistant to antifungal drugs were selected and subjected to antifungal testing against six ethanolic plants, extract namely Azadiracta indica, Allium sativum, Cordia dichotoma Ocimum sanctum, Syzygium cumini and Trigonella foenum grecum. All the plant extracts tested were found to effective against all MDR Candida isolates with inhibition zone ranging from 10- 18mm in diameter. Ethanolic extract of Allium sativum was observed most effective against the isolates among all the plants extracts tested. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of all ethanolic plant extract was recorded ranging from 1.56-25mg/ml against MDR candida isolates. Phytochemical analysis of the alcoholic plant extracts revealed the presence of alkaloid, flavanoid, glycosoid, phenol; phenol, tannins, saponins in all the plants studied. The present study may be successful in identifying the plants with different antimicrobial activity. These plants containing various phytochemicals may be exploited in the treatment of infectious diseases caused by drug-resistant microorganisms.

  10. Antimicrobial activity of various ethanolic plant extracts against pathogenic multi drug resistant Candida spp.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shaista; Imran, Mohd; Imran, Mohammed; Pindari, Nuzhat

    2017-01-01

    A total of 50 Candida isolates were isolated and identified from clinical specimens and these were tested for resistance to various antifungal drugs. It was observed multi-drug resistance in all candida isolates by 84%, 62%, 60%, 76%, 46, 30%, and 22% against fluconazole, clotrimazole, Amphotericin B, itraconazole, ketoconazole, miconazole and nystatin tested respectively. The isolates, which were found to be resistant to antifungal drugs were selected and subjected to antifungal testing against six ethanolic plants, extract namely Azadiracta indica, Allium sativum, Cordia dichotoma Ocimum sanctum, Syzygium cumini and Trigonella foenum grecum. All the plant extracts tested were found to effective against all MDR Candida isolates with inhibition zone ranging from 10- 18mm in diameter. Ethanolic extract of Allium sativum was observed most effective against the isolates among all the plants extracts tested. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of all ethanolic plant extract was recorded ranging from 1.56-25mg/ml against MDR candida isolates. Phytochemical analysis of the alcoholic plant extracts revealed the presence of alkaloid, flavanoid, glycosoid, phenol; phenol, tannins, saponins in all the plants studied. The present study may be successful in identifying the plants with different antimicrobial activity. These plants containing various phytochemicals may be exploited in the treatment of infectious diseases caused by drug-resistant microorganisms. PMID:28584446

  11. Isolation, abundance and phylogenetic affiliation of endophytic actinomycetes associated with medicinal plants and screening for their in vitro antimicrobial biosynthetic potential

    PubMed Central

    Passari, Ajit K.; Mishra, Vineet K.; Saikia, Ratul; Gupta, Vijai K.; Singh, Bhim P.

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms associated with medicinal plants are of interest as the producers of important bioactive compounds. To date, the diversity of culturable endophytic actinomycetes associated with medicinal plants is in its initial phase of exploration. In this study, 42 endophytic actinomycetes were isolated from different organs of seven selected medicinal plants. The highest number of isolates (n = 22, 52.3%) of actinomycetes was isolated from roots, followed by stems (n = 9, 21.4%), leaves (n = 6, 14.2%), flowers (n = 3, 7.1%), and petioles (n = 2, 4.7%). The genus Streptomyces was the most dominant among the isolates (66.6%) in both the locations (Dampa TRF and Phawngpuii NP, Mizoram, India). From a total of 42 isolates, 22 isolates were selected for further studies based on their ability to inhibit one of the tested human bacterial or fungal pathogen. Selected isolates were identified based on 16S rRNA gene analysis and subsequently the isolates were grouped to four different genera; Streptomyces, Brevibacterium, Microbacterium, and Leifsonia. Antibiotic sensitivity assay was performed to understand the responsible antimicrobials present in the isolates showing the antimicrobial activities and revealed that the isolates were mostly resistant to penicillin G and ampicillin. Further, antimicrobial properties and antibiotic sensitivity assay in combination with the results of amplification of biosynthetic genes polyketide synthase (PKS-I) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) showed that the endophytic actinomycetes associated with the selected medicinal plants have broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. This is the first report of the isolation of Brevibacterium sp., Microbacterium sp., and Leifsonia xyli from endophytic environments of medicinal plants, Mirabilis jalapa and Clerodendrum colebrookianum. Our results emphasize that endophytic actinomycetes associated with medicinal plants are an unexplored resource for the discovery of biologically active

  12. Evaluation of the in vitro anticancer, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of some Yemeni plants used in folk medicine.

    PubMed

    Mothana, R A A; Gruenert, R; Bednarski, P J; Lindequist, U

    2009-04-01

    The present research study deals with the evaluation of sixty four methanolic and aqueous extracts of thirty Yemeni plants used in traditional medicine for their in vitro antiproliferative activity against three human cancer cell lines in a microtiter plate assay based on cellular staining with crystal violet, for their antimicrobial activity against antibiotic susceptible three Gram-positive, three Gram-negative bacterial and one fungal stains and three multiresistant Staphylococcus strains by the agar diffusion method and the determination of MIC against three Gram-positive bacteria with the broth micro-dilution assay, as well as for their antioxidant activity using the DPPH radical scavenging method. Furthermore the chemical composition of the methanolic extracts was determined by using chromatographic methods. As a result of this work, 12 Yemeni herbs namely Centaurothamus maximus, Costus arabicus, Cupressus sempervirens, Dichrocephala integrifolia, Euphorbia schimperi, Gomphocarpus fruticosus, Kanahia laniflora, Meriandera benghalensis, Pulicaria inuloides, Solanum glabratum, Tarconanthus camphoratus and Vernonia leopoldii demonstrated a noteworthy growth inhibitory effect against all cancer cell lines with IC50 values <50 microg/ml. Pronounced antimicrobial activity was observed only against Gram-positive bacteria among them multiresistant bacteria with inhibition zones >15 mm and MIC values <500 microg/ml, by 9 plants especially Centaurothamus maximus, Cupressus sempervirens, Enicostemma verticillare, Meriandera benghalensis, Nepeta deflersiana, Pulicaria inuloides, Tarconanthus camphoratus, Teucrium yemense and Vernonia leopoldii. Moreover, the methanolic extracts of Cupressus sempervirens, Meriandera benghalensis, Pulicaria inuloides and Rhus retinorrhaea showed a remarkable radical scavenging effect at low concentrations.

  13. Antimicrobial efficacy of Cinnamomum javanicum plant extract against Listeria monocytogenes and its application potential with smoked salmon.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wenqian; Lee, Hui Wen; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun

    2017-11-02

    Extracts from medicinal plants have been reported to possess good antimicrobial properties, but a majority of them remain unexplored. This study aimed at identifying a novel plant extract with antimicrobial activity, to validate its efficacy in food model, and to elucidate its composition and antimicrobial mechanism. A total of 125 plant extracts were screened, and Cinnamomum javanicum leaf and stem extract showed potential antimicrobial activity against Listeria monocytogenes (MIC=0.13mg/mL). Total phenolic content of the extract was 78.3mg GAE/g extract and its antioxidant activity was 57.2-326.5mg TE/g extract. When applied on cold smoked salmon, strong strain-dependent antimicrobial effectiveness was observed, with L. monocytogenes LM2 (serotype 4b) and LM8 (serotype 3a) being more resistant compared to SSA81 (serotype 1/2a). High extract concentration (16mg/mL) was needed to inhibit or reduce the growth of L. monocytogenes on smoked salmon, which resulted in surface color change. GC-MS revealed that eucalyptol (25.54 area%) was the most abundant compound in the crude extract. Both crude extract and eucalyptol induced significant membrane damages in treated L. monocytogenes. These results suggest anti-L. monocytogenes activity of C. javanicum plant extract, identified its major volatile components, and elucidated its membrane-damaging antimicrobial mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Antimicrobial salicylaldehyde Schiff bases: synthesis, characterization and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Adeel-Sharif, Hafiz Muhammad; Ahmed, Dildar; Mir, Hira

    2015-03-01

    As the pathogens soon develop resistance to the existing antibiotics, the demand for new and more effective anti-microbial agents is a continuous phenomenon. In this paper we are reporting synthesis and spectral data of eight Schiff bases of salicylaldehyde with different amines, and evaluation of their anti-microbial activities against different bacterial strains. The bases were synthesized by reflux method, and their structures were determined based FT-IR, (1)H-NMR, (13)C-NMR and Mass spectrometric data. The Schiff bases synthesized included 2-{[(Z)-(2-hydroxyphenyl) methylidene] amino}benzoicacid (SB1), 4-{[(Z)-(2-hydroxyphenyl) methylidene] amino} benzoic acid (SB2),2-[(naphthalene-2-ylimino)methyl] phenol(SB3),2-2'-[benzene-1,4-diylbis(nitrilomethylylidene)]diphenol (SB4), 2-2'-[benzene-1,2-diylbis (nitrile-(E)-methylylidene)]diphenol (SB5), 2-[(2-phenylhydrazineylidene)methyl]phenol (SB6), 2-2'-[ethene-1,2-diylbis(iminomethanediyl)]diphenol (SB7) and 2-[(Z)-(phenylimino)methyl]phenol (SB8). The anti-microbial activities of synthesized Schiff bases were determined in terms of zones of inhibition and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). All the bases showed moderate to good activities against all the tested microorganisms. The MICs of most compounds were 100-200βg/mL against different microorganisms. However, it was 50βg/mL for SB1 against P. aeruginosa (1), SB3 against P. aurantiaca, P. aeruginosa (1), E. coli (2), S. typhi (2) and C. freundii, SB4against E. coli (2), S. typhi (1) and S. maltophilia, SB5 against K. pneumoniae and S. typhi (2), SB6 against P. aeruginosa (3) and C. freundii, SB7 against E. cloacae and A. lipoferum, and SB8 against E. coli (2). Considerably active bases may prove to be potential candidates for future antibiotic drugs.

  15. Antimicrobial and toxicological activities of five medicinal plant species from Cameroon Traditional Medicine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Infectious diseases caused by multiresistant microbial strains are on the increase. Fighting these diseases with natural products may be more efficacious. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro antimicrobial activity of methanolic, ethylacetate (EtOAc) and hexanic fractions of five Cameroonian medicinal plants (Piptadeniastum africana, Cissus aralioides, Hileria latifolia, Phyllanthus muellerianus and Gladiolus gregasius) against 10 pathogenic microorganisms of the urogenital and gastrointestinal tracts. Methods The fractions were screened for their chemical composition and in vivo acute toxicity was carried out on the most active extracts in order to assess their inhibitory selectivity. The agar well-diffusion and the micro dilution methods were used for the determination of the inhibition diameters (ID) and Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) respectively on 8 bacterial species including two Gram positive species (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis), and six Gram negative (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhi) and two fungal isolates (Candida albicans, Candida krusei). The chemical composition was done according to Harbone (1976), the acute toxicity evaluation according to WHO protocol and the hepatic as well as serum parameters measured to assess liver and kidney functions. Results The chemical components of each plant's extract varied according to the solvent used, and they were found to contain alkaloids, flavonoids, polyphenols, triterpens, sterols, tannins, coumarins, glycosides, cardiac glycosides and reducing sugars. The methanolic and ethylacetate extracts of Phyllanthus muellerianus and Piptadeniastum africana presented the highest antimicrobial activities against all tested microorganisms with ID varying from 8 to 26 mm and MIC from 2.5 to 0.31 mg/ml. The in vivo acute toxicity study carried out on the methanolic extracts of

  16. Biocompatible cellulose-based superabsorbent hydrogels with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Peng, Na; Wang, Yanfeng; Ye, Qifa; Liang, Lei; An, Yuxing; Li, Qiwei; Chang, Chunyu

    2016-02-10

    Current superabsorbent hydrogels commercially applied in the disposable diapers have disadvantages such as weak mechanical strength, poor biocompatibility, and lack of antimicrobial activity, which may induce skin allergy of body. To overcome these hassles, we have developed novel cellulose based hydrogels via simple chemical cross-linking of quaternized cellulose (QC) and native cellulose in NaOH/urea aqueous solution. The prepared hydrogel showed superabsorbent property, high mechanical strength, good biocompatibility, and excellent antimicrobial efficacy against Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The presence of QC in the hydrogel networks not only improved their swelling ratio via electrostatic repulsion of quaternary ammonium groups, but also endowed their antimicrobial activity by attraction of sections of anionic microbial membrane into internal pores of poly cationic hydrogel leading to the disruption of microbial membrane. Moreover, the swelling properties, mechanical strength, and antibacterial activity of hydrogels strongly depended on the contents of quaternary ammonium groups in hydrogel networks. The obtained data encouraged the use of these hydrogels for hygienic application such as disposable diapers.

  17. Antimicrobial effects of Finnish plant extracts containing flavonoids and other phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Rauha, J P; Remes, S; Heinonen, M; Hopia, A; Kähkönen, M; Kujala, T; Pihlaja, K; Vuorela, H; Vuorela, P

    2000-05-25

    Plant phenolics, especially dietary flavonoids, are currently of growing interest owing to their supposed functional properties in promoting human health. Antimicrobial screening of 13 phenolic substances and 29 extracts prepared from Finnish plant materials against selected microbes was conducted in this study. The tests were carried out using diffusion methods with four to nine microbial species (Aspergillus niger, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus luteus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis). Flavone, quercetin and naringenin were effective in inhibiting the growth of the organisms. The most active plant extracts were purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria L.) against Candida albicans, meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria (L.) Maxim.), willow herb (Epilobium angustifolium L.), cloudberry (Rubus chamaemorus L.) and raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) against bacteria, and white birch (Betula pubescens Ehrh.), pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and potato (Solanum tuberosum. L.) against gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus.

  18. Preparation and Characterization of N-Halamine-based Antimicrobial Fillers

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhuni, Revathi V.; Luo, Jie; Cao, Zhengbing; Sun, Yuyu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that the surface of CaCO3 fillers could be coated with an N-halamine based fatty acid to make the filler surface organophilic and accomplish antibacterial activity simultaneously, rendering the resulting polymer-filler composites antimicrobial. Thus, a new bi-functional compound, 4, 4 -Dimethyl hydantoin-undecanoic acid (DMH-UA), was synthesized by treating the potassium salt of dimethyl hydantoin (DMH) with 11-bromoundecanoic acid (BUA). Upon chlorination treatment with diluted bleach, DMH-UA was transformed into 3-chloro-4, 4-dimethyl hydantoin- undecanoic acid (Cl-DMH-UA). Alternatively, DMH-UA could be coated onto the surface of CaCO3 to obtain the corresponding calcium salt, 4, 4-dimethyl hydantoin-undecanoic acid-calcium carbonate (DMH-UA-CaCO3). In the presence of diluted chlorine bleach, the coated DMH-UA on the surface of CaCO3 was transformed into Cl-DMH-UA, leading to the formation of Cl-DMH-UA-CaCO3. The reactions were characterized with FT-IR, NMR, UV, DSC and SEM analyses. Both Cl-DMH-UA and Cl-DMH-UA-CaCO3 were used as antimicrobial additives for cellulose acetate (CA). The antimicrobial efficacy of the resulting samples was evaluated against both Escherichia coli (Gram-negative bacteria) and Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive bacteria). It was found that with the same additive content, CA samples with Cl-DMH-UA-CaCO3 and Cl-DMH-UA had very similar antimicrobial and biofilm-controlling activity, but the former released less active chlorine into the surrounding environment than the latter. PMID:22942559

  19. Metabolomics reveals the origins of antimicrobial plant resins collected by honey bees.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michael B; Spivak, Marla; Hegeman, Adrian D; Rendahl, Aaron; Cohen, Jerry D

    2013-01-01

    The deposition of antimicrobial plant resins in honey bee, Apis mellifera, nests has important physiological benefits. Resin foraging is difficult to approach experimentally because resin composition is highly variable among and between plant families, the environmental and plant-genotypic effects on resins are unknown, and resin foragers are relatively rare and often forage in unobservable tree canopies. Subsequently, little is known about the botanical origins of resins in many regions or the benefits of specific resins to bees. We used metabolomic methods as a type of environmental forensics to track individual resin forager behavior through comparisons of global resin metabolite patterns. The resin from the corbiculae of a single bee was sufficient to identify that resin's botanical source without prior knowledge of resin composition. Bees from our apiary discriminately foraged for resin from eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides), and balsam poplar (P. balsamifera) among many available, even closely related, resinous plants. Cottonwood and balsam poplar resin composition did not show significant seasonal or regional changes in composition. Metabolomic analysis of resin from 6 North American Populus spp. and 5 hybrids revealed peaks characteristic to taxonomic nodes within Populus, while antimicrobial analysis revealed that resin from different species varied in inhibition of the bee bacterial pathogen, Paenibacillus larvae. We conclude that honey bees make discrete choices among many resinous plant species, even among closely related species. Bees also maintained fidelity to a single source during a foraging trip. Furthermore, the differential inhibition of P. larvae by Populus spp., thought to be preferential for resin collection in temperate regions, suggests that resins from closely related plant species many have different benefits to bees.

  20. Metabolomics Reveals the Origins of Antimicrobial Plant Resins Collected by Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Michael B.; Spivak, Marla; Hegeman, Adrian D.; Rendahl, Aaron; Cohen, Jerry D.

    2013-01-01

    The deposition of antimicrobial plant resins in honey bee, Apis mellifera, nests has important physiological benefits. Resin foraging is difficult to approach experimentally because resin composition is highly variable among and between plant families, the environmental and plant-genotypic effects on resins are unknown, and resin foragers are relatively rare and often forage in unobservable tree canopies. Subsequently, little is known about the botanical origins of resins in many regions or the benefits of specific resins to bees. We used metabolomic methods as a type of environmental forensics to track individual resin forager behavior through comparisons of global resin metabolite patterns. The resin from the corbiculae of a single bee was sufficient to identify that resin's botanical source without prior knowledge of resin composition. Bees from our apiary discriminately foraged for resin from eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides), and balsam poplar (P. balsamifera) among many available, even closely related, resinous plants. Cottonwood and balsam poplar resin composition did not show significant seasonal or regional changes in composition. Metabolomic analysis of resin from 6 North American Populus spp. and 5 hybrids revealed peaks characteristic to taxonomic nodes within Populus, while antimicrobial analysis revealed that resin from different species varied in inhibition of the bee bacterial pathogen, Paenibacillus larvae. We conclude that honey bees make discrete choices among many resinous plant species, even among closely related species. Bees also maintained fidelity to a single source during a foraging trip. Furthermore, the differential inhibition of P. larvae by Populus spp., thought to be preferential for resin collection in temperate regions, suggests that resins from closely related plant species many have different benefits to bees. PMID:24204850

  1. Surveying the potential of secreted antimicrobial peptides to enhance plant disease resistance

    PubMed Central

    Breen, Susan; Solomon, Peter S.; Bedon, Frank; Vincent, Delphine

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are natural products found across diverse taxa as part of the innate immune system against pathogen attacks. Some AMPs are synthesized through the canonical gene expression machinery and are called ribosomal AMPs. Other AMPs are assembled by modular enzymes generating nonribosomal AMPs and harbor unusual structural diversity. Plants synthesize an array of AMPs, yet are still subject to many pathogen invasions. Crop breeding programs struggle to release new cultivars in which complete disease resistance is achieved, and usually such resistance becomes quickly overcome by the targeted pathogens which have a shorter generation time. AMPs could offer a solution by exploring not only plant-derived AMPs, related or unrelated to the crop of interest, but also non-plant AMPs produced by bacteria, fungi, oomycetes or animals. This review highlights some promising candidates within the plant kingdom and elsewhere, and offers some perspectives on how to identify and validate their bioactivities. Technological advances, particularly in mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), have been instrumental in identifying and elucidating the structure of novel AMPs, especially nonribosomal peptides which cannot be identified through genomics approaches. The majority of non-plant AMPs showing potential for plant disease immunity are often tested using in vitro assays. The greatest challenge remains the functional validation of candidate AMPs in plants through transgenic experiments, particularly introducing nonribosomal AMPs into crops. PMID:26579150

  2. Surveying the potential of secreted antimicrobial peptides to enhance plant disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Breen, Susan; Solomon, Peter S; Bedon, Frank; Vincent, Delphine

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are natural products found across diverse taxa as part of the innate immune system against pathogen attacks. Some AMPs are synthesized through the canonical gene expression machinery and are called ribosomal AMPs. Other AMPs are assembled by modular enzymes generating nonribosomal AMPs and harbor unusual structural diversity. Plants synthesize an array of AMPs, yet are still subject to many pathogen invasions. Crop breeding programs struggle to release new cultivars in which complete disease resistance is achieved, and usually such resistance becomes quickly overcome by the targeted pathogens which have a shorter generation time. AMPs could offer a solution by exploring not only plant-derived AMPs, related or unrelated to the crop of interest, but also non-plant AMPs produced by bacteria, fungi, oomycetes or animals. This review highlights some promising candidates within the plant kingdom and elsewhere, and offers some perspectives on how to identify and validate their bioactivities. Technological advances, particularly in mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), have been instrumental in identifying and elucidating the structure of novel AMPs, especially nonribosomal peptides which cannot be identified through genomics approaches. The majority of non-plant AMPs showing potential for plant disease immunity are often tested using in vitro assays. The greatest challenge remains the functional validation of candidate AMPs in plants through transgenic experiments, particularly introducing nonribosomal AMPs into crops.

  3. Antimicrobial Activity of Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Current Status and New Perspectives of Antimicrobial Peptide-Based Therapies.

    PubMed

    Alcayaga-Miranda, Francisca; Cuenca, Jimena; Khoury, Maroun

    2017-01-01

    While mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)-based therapy appears to be promising, there are concerns regarding possible side effects related to the unwanted suppression of antimicrobial immunity leading to an increased risk of infection. Conversely, recent data show that MSCs exert strong antimicrobial effects through indirect and direct mechanisms, partially mediated by the secretion of antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs). In fact, MSCs have been reported to increase bacterial clearance in preclinical models of sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and cystic fibrosis-related infections. This article reviews the current evidence regarding the direct antimicrobial effector function of MSCs, focusing mainly on the role of MSCs-derived AMPs. The strategies that might modulate the expression and secretion of these AMPs, leading to enhanced antimicrobial effect, are highlighted. Furthermore, studies evaluating the presence of AMPs in the cargo of extracellular vesicles (EVs) are underlined as perspective opportunities to develop new drug delivery tools. The antimicrobial potential of MSCs-derived EVs can also be heightened through cell conditioning and/or drug loading. Finally, improving the pharmacokinetics and delivery, in addition to deciphering the multi-target drug status of AMPs, should synergistically lead to key advances against infections caused by drug-resistant strains.

  4. Crystal structures of multidrug binding protein TtgR in complex with antibiotics and plant antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Alguel, Yilmaz; Meng, Cuixiang; Terán, Wilson; Krell, Tino; Ramos, Juan L; Gallegos, María-Trinidad; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2007-06-08

    Antibiotic resistance is a widely spread phenomenon. One major mechanism that underlies antibiotic resistance in bacteria is the active extrusion of toxic compounds through the membrane-bound efflux pumps that are often regulated at the transcriptional level. TtgR represses the transcription of TtgABC, a key efflux pump in Pseudomonas putida, which is highly resistant to antibiotics, solvents and toxic plant secondary products. Previously we showed that TtgR is the only reported repressor that binds to different classes of natural antimicrobial compounds, which are also extruded by the efflux pump. We report here five high-resolution crystal structures of TtgR from the solvent-tolerant strain DOT-T1E, including TtgR in complex with common antibiotics and plant secondary metabolites. We provide structural basis for the unique ligand binding properties of TtgR. We identify two distinct and overlapping ligand binding sites; the first one is broader and consists of mainly hydrophobic residues, whereas the second one is deeper and contains more polar residues including Arg176, a unique residue present in the DOT-T1E strain but not in other Pseudomonas strains. Phloretin, a plant antimicrobial, can bind to both binding sites with distinct binding affinities and stoichiometries. Results on ligand binding properties of native and mutant TtgR proteins using isothermal titration calorimetry confirm the binding affinities and stoichiometries, and suggest a potential positive cooperativity between the two binding sites. The importance of Arg176 in phloretin binding was further confirmed by the reduced ability of phloretin in releasing the mutant TtgR from bound DNA compared to the native protein. The results presented here highlight the importance and versatility of regulatory systems in bacterial antibiotic resistance and open up new avenues for novel antimicrobial development.

  5. Crystal Structures of Multidrug Binding Protein TtgR in Complex with Antibiotics and Plant Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Alguel, Yilmaz; Meng, Cuixiang; Terán, Wilson; Krell, Tino; Ramos, Juan L.; Gallegos, María-Trinidad; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2007-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a widely spread phenomenon. One major mechanism that underlies antibiotic resistance in bacteria is the active extrusion of toxic compounds through the membrane-bound efflux pumps that are often regulated at the transcriptional level. TtgR represses the transcription of TtgABC, a key efflux pump in Pseudomonas putida, which is highly resistant to antibiotics, solvents and toxic plant secondary products. Previously we showed that TtgR is the only reported repressor that binds to different classes of natural antimicrobial compounds, which are also extruded by the efflux pump. We report here five high-resolution crystal structures of TtgR from the solvent-tolerant strain DOT-T1E, including TtgR in complex with common antibiotics and plant secondary metabolites. We provide structural basis for the unique ligand binding properties of TtgR. We identify two distinct and overlapping ligand binding sites; the first one is broader and consists of mainly hydrophobic residues, whereas the second one is deeper and contains more polar residues including Arg176, a unique residue present in the DOT-T1E strain but not in other Pseudomonas strains. Phloretin, a plant antimicrobial, can bind to both binding sites with distinct binding affinities and stoichiometries. Results on ligand binding properties of native and mutant TtgR proteins using isothermal titration calorimetry confirm the binding affinities and stoichiometries, and suggest a potential positive cooperativity between the two binding sites. The importance of Arg176 in phloretin binding was further confirmed by the reduced ability of phloretin in releasing the mutant TtgR from bound DNA compared to the native protein. The results presented here highlight the importance and versatility of regulatory systems in bacterial antibiotic resistance and open up new avenues for novel antimicrobial development. PMID:17466326

  6. [Antimicrobial activities of ant Ponericin W1 against plant pathogens in vitro and the disease resistance in its transgenic Arabidopsis].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong-Fang; Sun, Peng-Wei; Tang, Ding-Zhong

    2013-08-01

    The antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) exhibit a broad antimicrobial spectrum. The application of AMPs from non-plant organisms attracts considerable attention in plant disease resistance engineering. Ponericin W1, isolated from the venom of ant (Pachycondyla goeldii), shows antimicrobial activities against Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria and the budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae); however, it is not clear whether Ponericin W1 is effective against plant pathogens. The results of this study indicated synthesized Ponericin W1 inhibited mycelial growth of Magnaporthe oryzae and Botrytis cinerea, as well as hyphal growth and spore production of Fusarium graminearum. Besides, Ponericin W1 exhibited antibacterial activities against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. After codon optimization, Ponericin W1 gene was constructed into plant expression vector, and transformed into Arabidopsis thaliana by floral dip method. The Ponericin W1 was located in intercellular space of the transgenic plants as expected. Compared with the wild-type plants, there were ungerminated spores and less hyphal, conidia on the leaves of transgenic plants after innoculation with the powdery mildew fungus Golovinomyces cichoracearum. After innoculation with the pathogenic bac-terium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, the baceria in the leaves of transgenic plants was significantly less than the wild-type plants, indicating that the transgenic plants displayed enhanced disease resistance to pathogens. These results demonstrate a potential use of Ponericin W1 in genetic engineering for broad-spectrum plant disease resistance.

  7. Comparison of the antimicrobial effects of semipurified cyclotides from Iranian Viola odorata against some of plant and human pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zarrabi, M; Dalirfardouei, R; Sepehrizade, Z; Kermanshahi, R K

    2013-08-01

    Cyclotides are mini-proteins that are synthesized via the ribosomal pathway. They have a variety of biological activities such as antimicrobial, antitumour, anti-HIV activities. Because of their various bioactivities and unique stability, they are suitable candidate in drug design applications. The main aim of this study was to determine new antimicrobial agents, which can be used instead of chemical antibiotics. For this reason, we compared the antimicrobial effects of semipurified cyclotides against human and plant pathogenic bacteria. The cyclotides were isolated from the Iranian plant Viola odorata by fractionation methods and semipurified on a SPE-C18 column chromatography. Antimicrobial activities of extracted cyclotides were studied by radial diffusion assays (RDAs), minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC). Data analysis showed that MIC of semipurified cyclotides was 1.6 mg ml(-1) against Staphylococcus aureus, gram-positive bacteria. It was also revealed they are the most susceptible among human pathogenic bacteria used in this research. On the other hand, plant pathogenic bacteria are more susceptible than human pathogenic bacteria. The results of the study show that cyclotides from Iranian V. odorata have potent antimicrobial activity against gram-negative, plant pathogenic bacteria. This study is a part of our extended researches on finding new pharmaceutical potentials of plants and on developing new peptides for special purposes in a way that does not have harmful side effects or have the least side effects. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activities of Essential Oils of Some Coniferous Plants Cultivated in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Taghreed A; El-Hela, Atef A; El-Hefnawy, Hala M; Al-Taweel, Areej M; Perveen, Shagufta

    2017-01-01

    Family Cupressaceae is the largest coniferous plant family. Essential oils of many species belonging to family Cupressaceae are known to have several biological activities specially antimicrobial activity. The essential oils from aerial parts of Calocedrus decurrens Torr., Cupressus sempervirens stricta L. and Tetraclinis articulata (Vahl) Mast. were prepared by hydrodistillation. The chemical composition of the essential oils has been elucidated by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analysis. The prepared essential oils were examined against selected species of Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria and Candida species. Broth dilution methods were used to detect minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC). Sixteen compounds were identified in the essential oils of both Calocedrus decurrens and Cupressus sempervirens L. and fifteen compounds were identified in the essential oil of Tetraclinis articulata. δ-3-Carene (43.10%), (+)-Cedrol (74.03%) and Camphor (21.23%) were the major constituents in the essential oils of Calocedrus decurrens, Cupressus sempervirens L. and Tetraclinis articulata, respectively. The essential oils showed strong antimicrobial activities against the selected microorganisms in concentration range 0.02 3- 3.03 µL/mL. This study could contribute to the chemotaxonomic characterization of family Cupressaceae. In addition, it proved that the essential oils under investigation possess potential antimicrobial properties.

  9. Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activities of Essential Oils of Some Coniferous Plants Cultivated in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Taghreed A.; El-Hela, Atef A.; El-Hefnawy, Hala M.; Al-Taweel, Areej M.; Perveen, Shagufta

    2017-01-01

    Family Cupressaceae is the largest coniferous plant family. Essential oils of many species belonging to family Cupressaceae are known to have several biological activities specially antimicrobial activity. The essential oils from aerial parts of Calocedrus decurrens Torr., Cupressus sempervirens stricta L. and Tetraclinis articulata (Vahl) Mast. were prepared by hydrodistillation. The chemical composition of the essential oils has been elucidated by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analysis. The prepared essential oils were examined against selected species of Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria and Candida species. Broth dilution methods were used to detect minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC). Sixteen compounds were identified in the essential oils of both Calocedrus decurrens and Cupressus sempervirens L. and fifteen compounds were identified in the essential oil of Tetraclinis articulata. δ-3-Carene (43.10%), (+)-Cedrol (74.03%) and Camphor (21.23%) were the major constituents in the essential oils of Calocedrus decurrens, Cupressus sempervirens L. and Tetraclinis articulata, respectively. The essential oils showed strong antimicrobial activities against the selected microorganisms in concentration range 0.02 3- 3.03 µL/mL. This study could contribute to the chemotaxonomic characterization of family Cupressaceae. In addition, it proved that the essential oils under investigation possess potential antimicrobial properties. PMID:28496486

  10. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils from Mediterranean aromatic plants against several foodborne and spoilage bacteria.

    PubMed

    Silva, Nuno; Alves, Sofia; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Amaral, Joana S; Poeta, Patrícia

    2013-12-01

    The antimicrobial activity of essential oils extracted from a variety of aromatic plants, often used in the Portuguese gastronomy was studied in vitro by the agar diffusion method. The essential oils of thyme, oregano, rosemary, verbena, basil, peppermint, pennyroyal and mint were tested against Gram-positive (Listeria monocytogenes, Clostridium perfringens, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, and Staphylococcus epidermidis) and Gram-negative strains (Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). For most essential oils examined, S. aureus, was the most susceptible bacteria, while P. aeruginosa showed, in general, least susceptibility. Among the eight essential oils evaluated, thyme, oregano and pennyroyal oils showed the greatest antimicrobial activity, followed by rosemary, peppermint and verbena, while basil and mint showed the weakest antimicrobial activity. Most of the essential oils considered in this study exhibited a significant inhibitory effect. Thyme oil showed a promising inhibitory activity even at low concentration, thus revealing its potential as a natural preservative in food products against several causal agents of foodborne diseases and food spoilage. In general, the results demonstrate that, besides flavoring the food, the use of aromatic herbs in gastronomy can also contribute to a bacteriostatic effect against pathogens.

  11. Antimicrobial Activities of Three Medicinal Plants and Investigation of Flavonoids of Tripleurospermum disciforme

    PubMed Central

    Tofighi, Zahra; Molazem, Maryam; Doostdar, Behnaz; Taban, Parisa; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza; Samadi, Nasrin; Yassa, Narguess

    2015-01-01

    Rosa damascena, Tripleurospermum disciforme and Securigera securidaca were used as disinfectant agents and for treatment of some disease in folk medicine of Iran. The antimicrobial effects of different fractions of seeds extract of S. securidaca, petals extract of R. damascena and aerial parts extract of T. disciforme were examined against some gram positive, gram negative and fungi by cup plate diffusion method. The petroleum ether and chloroform fractions of S. securidaca showed antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, while its methanol fraction had no antibacterial effects. R. damascena petals extract demonstrated antibacterial activities against Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, S. aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. T. disciforme aerial parts extract exhibited antimicrobial effects only against S. aureus and S. epidermidis. None of the fractions had any antifungal activities. Therefore, present study confirmed utility of these plants as disinfectant agents. Six flavonoids were isolated from T. disciforme: Luteolin, Quercetin-7-O-glucoside, Kaempferol, Kaempferol-7-O-glucoside, Apigenin and Apigenin-7-O-glucoside. The flavonoids and the antimicrobial activity of T. disciforme are reported for the first time. PMID:25561928

  12. Characterization of the bioactive metabolites from a plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and their exploitation as antimicrobial and plant growth-promoting agents.

    PubMed

    George, Emrin; Kumar, S Nishanth; Jacob, Jubi; Bommasani, Bhaskara; Lankalapalli, Ravi S; Morang, P; Kumar, B S Dileep

    2015-05-01

    A plant growth-promoting bacterial strain, PM 105, isolated from a tea plantation soil from the North Eastern region of India was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa through classical and 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) gene sequencing. Further studies with this strain confirmed broad spectrum antifungal activity against ten human and plant pathogenic fungal pathogens viz. Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus tubingensis, Candida albicans, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Fusarium oxysporum, Pencillium expansum, Rhizoctonia solani, Trichophyton rubrum besides growth-promoting property in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) and pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan). However, no antibacterial property was exhibited by this strain against the four test bacterial pathogens tested in agar overlay method. The crude bioactive metabolites produced by this strain were isolated with three different solvents that exhibited significant antimicrobial and plant growth-promoting activity. Chloroform extract recorded significant antimicrobial and plant growth-promoting activity. Three major compounds viz. 1-hydroxyphenazine, pyocyanin, and phenazine-1-carboxamide were purified and characterized from crude extracts of this strain by various spectral data. The purified compounds recorded prominent antimicrobial activity but failed to establish the plant growth promotion activity in test crop plants under gnotobiotic conditions. Pyocyanin recorded significant antimicrobial activity, and best activity was recorded against T. rubrum (29 mm), followed by P. expansum (28 mm). These results suggest the use of PM 105 as plant growth-promoting agent in crop plants after successful field trials.

  13. High-Level Antimicrobial Efficacy of Representative Mediterranean Natural Plant Extracts against Oral Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Cecere, Manuel; Skaltsounis, Alexios Leandros; Argyropoulou, Aikaterini; Hellwig, Elmar; Aligiannis, Nektarios

    2014-01-01

    Nature is an unexplored reservoir of novel phytopharmaceuticals. Since biofilm-related oral diseases often correlate with antibiotic resistance, plant-derived antimicrobial agents could enhance existing treatment options. Therefore, the rationale of the present report was to examine the antimicrobial impact of Mediterranean natural extracts on oral microorganisms. Five different extracts from Olea europaea, mastic gum, and Inula viscosa were tested against ten bacteria and one Candida albicans strain. The extraction protocols were conducted according to established experimental procedures. Two antimicrobial assays—the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) assay—were applied. The screened extracts were found to be active against each of the tested microorganisms. O. europaea presented MIC and MBC ranges of 0.07–10.00 mg mL−1 and 0.60–10.00 mg mL−1, respectively. The mean MBC values for mastic gum and I. viscosa were 0.07–10.00 mg mL−1 and 0.15–10.00 mg mL−1, respectively. Extracts were less effective against C. albicans and exerted bactericidal effects at a concentration range of 0.07–5.00 mg mL−1 on strict anaerobic bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Parvimonas micra). Ethyl acetate I. viscosa extract and total mastic extract showed considerable antimicrobial activity against oral microorganisms and could therefore be considered as alternative natural anti-infectious agents. PMID:25054150

  14. Production of Phytotoxic Cationic α-Helical Antimicrobial Peptides in Plant Cells Using Inducible Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Company, Nuri; Nadal, Anna; Ruiz, Cristina; Pla, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic linear antimicrobial peptides with cationic α-helical structures, such as BP100, have potent and specific activities against economically important plant pathogenic bacteria. They are also recognized as valuable therapeutics and preservatives. However, highly active BP100 derivatives are often phytotoxic when expressed at high levels as recombinant peptides in plants. Here we demonstrate that production of recombinant phytotoxic peptides in transgenic plants is possible by strictly limiting transgene expression to certain tissues and conditions, and specifically that minimization of this expression during transformation and regeneration of transgenic plants is essential to obtain viable plant biofactories. On the basis of whole-genome transcriptomic data available online, we identified the Os.hsp82 promoter that fulfilled this requirement and was highly induced in response to heat shock. Using this strategy, we generated transgenic rice lines producing moderate yields of severely phytotoxic BP100 derivatives on exposure to high temperature. In addition, a threshold for gene expression in selected tissues and stages was experimentally established, below which the corresponding promoters should be suitable for driving the expression of recombinant phytotoxic proteins in genetically modified plants. In view of the growing transcriptomics data available, this approach is of interest to assist promoter selection for specific purposes. PMID:25387106

  15. Multitasking antimicrobial peptides in plant development and host defense against biotic/abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Ravinder K; Mattoo, Autar K

    2014-11-01

    Crop losses due to pathogens are a major threat to global food security. Plants employ a multilayer defense against a pathogen including the use of physical barriers (cell wall), induction of hypersensitive defense response (HR), resistance (R) proteins, and synthesis of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Unlike a complex R gene-mediated immunity, AMPs directly target diverse microbial pathogens. Many a times, R-mediated immunity breaks down and plant defense is compromised. Although R-gene dependent pathogen resistance has been well studied, comparatively little is known about the interactions of AMPs with host defense and physiology. AMPs are ubiquitous, low molecular weight peptides that display broad spectrum resistance against bacteria, fungi and viruses. In plants, AMPs are mainly classified into cyclotides, defensins, thionins, lipid transfer proteins, snakins, and hevein-like vicilin-like and knottins. Genetic distance lineages suggest their conservation with minimal effect of speciation events during evolution. AMPs provide durable resistance in plants through a combination of membrane lysis and cellular toxicity of the pathogen. Plant hormones - gibberellins, ethylene, jasmonates, and salicylic acid, are among the physiological regulators that regulate the expression of AMPs. Transgenically produced AMP-plants have become a means showing that AMPs are able to mitigate host defense responses while providing durable resistance against pathogens.

  16. Production of phytotoxic cationic α-helical antimicrobial peptides in plant cells using inducible promoters.

    PubMed

    Company, Nuri; Nadal, Anna; Ruiz, Cristina; Pla, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic linear antimicrobial peptides with cationic α-helical structures, such as BP100, have potent and specific activities against economically important plant pathogenic bacteria. They are also recognized as valuable therapeutics and preservatives. However, highly active BP100 derivatives are often phytotoxic when expressed at high levels as recombinant peptides in plants. Here we demonstrate that production of recombinant phytotoxic peptides in transgenic plants is possible by strictly limiting transgene expression to certain tissues and conditions, and specifically that minimization of this expression during transformation and regeneration of transgenic plants is essential to obtain viable plant biofactories. On the basis of whole-genome transcriptomic data available online, we identified the Os.hsp82 promoter that fulfilled this requirement and was highly induced in response to heat shock. Using this strategy, we generated transgenic rice lines producing moderate yields of severely phytotoxic BP100 derivatives on exposure to high temperature. In addition, a threshold for gene expression in selected tissues and stages was experimentally established, below which the corresponding promoters should be suitable for driving the expression of recombinant phytotoxic proteins in genetically modified plants. In view of the growing transcriptomics data available, this approach is of interest to assist promoter selection for specific purposes.

  17. The potency of plant extracts as antimicrobials for the skin or hide preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suparno, Ono; Afifah, Amalia; Panandita, Tania; Marimin, Purnawati, Rini

    2017-03-01

    Preservation of skin or hide uses antimicrobial that will be disposed in wastewater in the skin or hide processing resulting in the environmental pollution. Extracts of some types of plants contain some antimicrobial substances which are potential to be used as biocides for the preservation of skin or hide and are more environmentally friendly. The objectives of this study were to determine the phytochemical contents of moringa, cucumber tree or wuluh starfruit, cherry, and white leadtree or lamtoro leaves and to analyse the antibacterial activities of the plant extracts against microorganisms that cause spoilage of skin or hide. Phytochemical constituents of the dried plant leaves were extracted by 70% ethanol. The resulting extracts were analysed their phytochemical contents and antimicrobial activities against gram negative and gram positive bacteria (inhibition zone test) by well diffusion method, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). Phytochemical test showed that the four leaf extracts contained alkaloids, saponins, tannins, flavonoids, steroids, and glycosides. The inhibition zones of the extracts against Escherichia coli were 5 mm for moringa leaf, 6 mm for cucumber tree leaf, 12 mm for cherry leaf, and 17 mm for white leadtree leaf. Inhibition zone of the extracts against Staphylococcus aureus were 2.5 mm for moringa leaf, 7 mm for cucumber tree leaf, 7.3 mm for cherry leaf, and 13 mm for white leadtree leaf. Inhibition zones of the extracts against Bacillus subtilis were 8 mm for moringa leaf, 9 mm for cucumber tree starfruit leaf, 14 mm for cherry leaf, and 15 mm for white leadtree leaf. The best MIC and MBC tests were demonstrated by white leadtree leaf extract against E. coli found at concentration of 1500 µg/ml, against S. aureus at concentration of 3000 µg/ml, and against B. subtilis at concentration of 3000 µg/ml. The ethanol extract of white leadtree leaf had the best antibacterial activity

  18. The use of ECAS in plant protection: a green and efficient antimicrobial approach that primes selected defense genes.

    PubMed

    Zarattini, Marco; De Bastiani, Morena; Bernacchia, Giovanni; Ferro, Sergio; De Battisti, Achille

    2015-11-01

    The use of highly polluting chemicals for plant and crop protection is one of the components of the negative environmental impact of agricultural activities. In the present paper, an environmentally friendly alternative to pesticide application has been studied, based on the so-called electrochemically activated solutions (ECAS). Experiments have been carried out, by applying ECAS having different contents of active ingredients, on tobacco plants at a laboratory scale and on apple trees at fruit garden scale. The results, accumulated during a couple of years, have shown that properly selected dilute solutions of chlorides, once activated by an electrochemical treatment, exhibit a very effective protecting action of plants, irrespective of their nature. Extension of the research has shown that the observed effect is the result of two distinct factors: the expected anti-microbial action of the electrochemically synthesized oxidants, and an unexpected priming of immune plant defenses, which is clearly due to the treatment with ECAS. Interestingly, the repetition of ECAS application triggers an even stronger activation of defense genes. No oxidative damages, due to the use of the activated solutions, could be detected.

  19. Screening of plants used in Argentine folk medicine for antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Anesini, C; Perez, C

    1993-06-01

    Screening of 132 extracts from Argentine folk-medicinal plants for antimicrobial activity has been conducted using a penicillin G resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Aspergillus niger as test microorganisms. Cephazolin, ampicillin and miconazole were used as standard antibiotics and concentration-response curves were obtained using the agar-well diffusion method. Boiling water extracts of plant materials were tested and 12 species were active against Staphylococcus aureus, whereas 10 were effective against Escherichia coli and 4 against Aspergillus niger. Tabebuia impetiginosa bark, Achyrocline sp. aerials parts, Larrea divaricata leaves, Rosa borboniana flowers, Punica granatum fruit pericarp, Psidium guineense fruit pericarp, Lithrea ternifolia leaves and Allium sativum bulbs produced some of the more active extracts.

  20. Tragacanth gum as a natural polymeric wall for producing antimicrobial nanocapsules loaded with plant extract.

    PubMed

    Ghayempour, Soraya; Montazer, Majid; Mahmoudi Rad, Mahnaz

    2015-11-01

    Tragacanth gum as a biocompatible and biodegradable polymer with good properties including emulsifying, viscosity and cross-linking ability can be used as the wall material in encapsulation of different compounds, specifically plant extracts. In this paper, for the first time, Tragacanth gum was used to produce nanocapsules containing plant extract through microemulsion method. The effect of different parameters on the average size of prepared nanocapsules in presence of aluminum and calcium chloride through ultrasonic and magnetic stirrer was investigated. The high efficient nanocapsules were prepared with spherical shape and smooth surface. The average size of nanocapsules prepared through ultrasonic using aluminum chloride (22nm) was smaller than other products. The structure of prepared nanocapsules was studied by FT-IR spectroscopy. Antimicrobial activity of different nanocapsules against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans was investigated by shake flask method during their release showed 100% microbial reduction after 12h stirring.

  1. In vitro cytotoxic, antiprotozoal and antimicrobial activities of medicinal plants from Vanuatu.

    PubMed

    Bradacs, Gesine; Maes, Louis; Heilmann, Jörg

    2010-06-01

    Sixty-three extracts obtained from 18 plants traditionally used in the South Pacific archipelago Vanuatu for the treatment of infectious diseases were screened for antimicrobial and antiprotozoal activities. In addition, the extracts were subjected to a detailed analysis on cytotoxic effects toward a panel of human cancer cell lines, designed as a smaller version of the NCI60 screen. Intriguingly, 15 plant extracts exhibited strong cytotoxic effects specific for only one cancer cell line. Extracts of the leaves of Acalypha grandis Benth. significantly affected Plasmodium falciparum without showing obvious effects against the other protozoa tested. The leaves of Gyrocarpus americanus Jacq. displayed significant activity against Trypanosoma b. brucei and the leaves of Tabernaemontana pandacaqui Lam. I as well as the stems of Macropiper latifolium (L.f.) against Trypanosoma cruzi. In contrast none of the extracts showed relevant antibacterial or antifungal activity.

  2. Biodiversity of genes encoding anti-microbial traits within plant associated microbes

    PubMed Central

    Mousa, Walaa K.; Raizada, Manish N.

    2015-01-01

    The plant is an attractive versatile home for diverse associated microbes. A subset of these microbes produces a diversity of anti-microbial natural products including polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, terpenoids, heterocylic nitrogenous compounds, volatile compounds, bacteriocins, and lytic enzymes. In recent years, detailed molecular analysis has led to a better understanding of the underlying genetic mechanisms. New genomic and bioinformatic tools have permitted comparisons of orthologous genes between species, leading to predictions of the associated evolutionary mechanisms responsible for diversification at the genetic and corresponding biochemical levels. The purpose of this review is to describe the biodiversity of biosynthetic genes of plant-associated bacteria and fungi that encode selected examples of antimicrobial natural products. For each compound, the target pathogen and biochemical mode of action are described, in order to draw attention to the complexity of these phenomena. We review recent information of the underlying molecular diversity and draw lessons through comparative genomic analysis of the orthologous coding sequences (CDS). We conclude by discussing emerging themes and gaps, discuss the metabolic pathways in the context of the phylogeny and ecology of their microbial hosts, and discuss potential evolutionary mechanisms that led to the diversification of biosynthetic gene clusters. PMID:25914708

  3. Antimicrobial, Antioxidant and Cytotoxic Activities and Phytochemical Screening of Some Yemeni Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Abdo, Salah A. A.; Hasson, Sidgi; Althawab, Faisal M. N.; Alaghbari, Sama A. Z.; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2010-01-01

    The traditional medicine still plays an important role in the primary health care in Yemen. The current study represents the investigation of 16 selected plants, which were collected from different localities of Yemen. The plants were dried and extracted with two different solvents (methanol and hot water) to yield 34 crude extracts. The obtained extracts were tested for their antimicrobial activity against three Gram-positive bacteria, two Gram-negative bacteria, one yeast species and three multiresistant Staphylococcus strains using agar diffusion method, for their antioxidant activity using scavenging activity of DPPH radical method and for their cytotoxic activity using the neutral red uptake assay. In addition, a phytochemical screening of the methanolic extracts was done. Antibacterial activity was shown only against Gram-positive bacteria, among them multiresistant bacteria. The highest antimicrobial activity was exhibited by the methanolic extracts of Acalypha fruticosa, Centaurea pseudosinaica, Dodonaea viscosa, Jatropha variegata, Lippia citriodora, Plectranthus hadiensis, Tragia pungens and Verbascum bottae. Six methanolic extracts especially those of A. fruticosa, Actiniopteris semiflabellata, D. viscosa, P. hadiensis, T. pungens and V. bottae showed high free radical scavenging activity. Moreover, remarkable cytotoxic activity against FL-cells was found for the methanolic extracts of A. fruticosa, Iris albicans, L. citriodora and T. pungens. The phytochemical screening demonstrated the presence of different types of compounds like flavonoids, terpenoids and others, which could be responsible for the obtained activities. PMID:18955315

  4. Antimicrobial potential of 27 plants consumed by chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus Blumenbach) in Ivory Coast.

    PubMed

    Ahoua, Angora Rémi Constant; Konan, Amoin Georgette; Bonfoh, Bassirou; Koné, Mamidou Witabouna

    2015-10-23

    Due to their genetic proximity, chimpanzees share with human several diseases including bacterial, fungal and viral infections, such as candidiasis, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), Ebola virus disease. However, in its natural environment, chimpanzees are tolerant to several pathogens including simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), virus related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that contribute to the emergence of opportunistic diseases such as microbial infections. Twenty seven species of plants consumed by chimpanzees were evaluated for their antimicrobial potential against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis and Candida glabrata using the agar diffusion technique and micro-dilution in 96-well plates. In total 132 extracts (33 dichloromethane, 33 methanol, 33 ethyl acetate and 33 aqueous) were tested. The results showed that 24 extracts (18 %) showed activity against bacteria and 6 extracts (5 %) were active against yeasts. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) values of active extracts ranged between 23 and 750 μg/ml for bacteria and between 188 and 1500 μg/ml for yeasts. Tristemma coronatum was the most promising on the studied microorganisms followed by Beilschmiedia mannii. The extracts of the two plants indicated by chimpanzees have potential for antimicrobial use in human.

  5. Antimicrobial activity of plant extracts on Candida albicans: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Doddanna, Sunitha Jagalur; Patel, Shilpa; Sundarrao, Madhusudan Astekar; Veerabhadrappa, Ravindra Setru

    2013-01-01

    Plants as sources of medicinal compounds have continued to play a predominant role in the maintenance of human health since ancient times. Even though several effective antifungal agents are available for oral candida infections, the failure is not uncommon because isolates of Candida albicans may exhibits resistance to the drug during therapy. The present study was conducted to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of few plant extracts on Candida albicans. An additional objective was to identify an alternative, inexpensive, simple, and effective method of preventing and controlling Candida albicans. Fine texture powder or paste form of leaves was soaked in sterile distilled water and 100% ethyl alcohol, which were kept in refrigerator at 4°C for 24 h. Then filtrates were prepared and kept in a hot air oven to get a black shining crystal powder/paste form. Stock solutions of plant extracts were inoculated on petri plates containing species of Candida albicans and incubated at 25 ± 2°C for 72 h. Alcoholic curry leaves showed the maximum zone of inhibition on Candida albicans followed by aqueous tea leaves. The other plant extracts like alcoholic onion leaves, alcoholic tea leaves, alcoholic onion bulb, alcoholic aloe vera, and alcoholic mint leaves also inhibited the growth of Candida albicans but lesser extent. The present study renders few medicinal plants as an alternative medicines to the field of dentistry which can be used adjunct to conventional therapy of oral candidasis.

  6. Antimicrobial activities of therapeutic herbal plants against Listeria monocytogenes and the herbal plant cytotoxicity on Caco-2 cell.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Y; Choi, K-H

    2012-07-01

    This study investigated the antimicrobial effect of various therapeutic herbal plants on Listeria monocytogenes, and their cytotoxicity effect on mammalian cells. The extracts from 69 therapeutic herbal plants were used to investigate the effect on the growth inhibition of L. monocytogenes, and their minimal inhibition concentrations and minimal bactericidal concentrations were determined. Among the plants, Psoraleae semen L. (Bogolji) and Sophorae radix L. (Gosam) extracts, which showed obvious antilisterial activity, were examined for the stability to heat, NaCl and acidic condition. Moreover, cytotoxicities of Bogolji and Gosam were tested, using Caco-2 cells. L. monocytogenes growth was completely inhibited by Bogolji and Gosam extracts at 3.2-6.3 and 50-100 AU ml(-1), respectively, and heat, NaCl and acidic condition did not affect the antilisterial activity of Bogolji and Gosam. Cytotoxic activities were observed only at high concentration (50 AU ml(-1)) of Bogolji extract. Bogolji and Gosam could be considered as potential phytochemicals to control L. monocytogenes. Use of therapeutic herbal plants should be useful in controlling L. monocytogenes, because most consumers have better acceptance for phytochemicals than synthetic chemicals. © 2012 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Pyrene Schiff base: photophysics, aggregation induced emission, and antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Kathiravan, Arunkumar; Sundaravel, Karuppasamy; Jaccob, Madhavan; Dhinagaran, Ganesan; Rameshkumar, Angappan; Arul Ananth, Devanesan; Sivasudha, Thilagar

    2014-11-26

    Pyrene containing Schiff base molecule, namely 4-[(pyren-1-ylmethylene)amino]phenol (KB-1), was successfully synthesized and well characterized by using (1)H, (13)C NMR, FT-IR, and EI-MS spectrometry. UV-visible absorption, steady-state fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence, and transient absorption spectroscopic techniques have been employed to elucidate the photophysical processes of KB-1. It has been demonstrated that the absorption characteristics of KB-1 have been bathochromatically tuned to the visible region by extending the π-conjugation. The extended π-conjugation is evidently confirmed by DFT calculations and reveals that π→π* transition is the major factor responsible for electronic absorption of KB-1. The photophysical property of KB-1 was carefully examined in different organic solvents at different concentrations and the results show that the fluorescence of this molecule is completely quenched due to photoinduced electron transfer. Intriguingly, the fluorescence intensity of KB-1 increases enormously by the gradual addition of water up to 90% with concomitant increase in fluorescence lifetime. This clearly signifies that this molecule has aggregation-induced emission (AIE) property. The mechanism of AIE of this molecule is suppression of photoinduced electron transfer (PET) due to hydrogen bonding interaction of imine donor with water. A direct evidence of PET process has been presented by using nanosecond transient absorption measurements. Further, KB-1 was successfully used for antimicrobial and bioimaging studies. The antimicrobial studies were carried out through disc diffusion method. KB-1 is used against both Gram-positive (Rhodococcus rhodochrous and Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacterial species and also fungal species (Candida albicans). The result shows KB-1 can act as an excellent antimicrobial agent and as a photolabeling agent. S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, and C. albicans

  8. Phytochemical Constituents and Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activity of Selected Plants Used Traditionally as a Source of Food.

    PubMed

    Tabit, Frederick Tawi; Komolafe, Naomi Tope; Tshikalange, Thilivhali Emmanuel; Nyila, Monde Alfred

    2016-03-01

    Many indigenous plants have also been used as a source of food and medicine in many African rural communities in the past. The study investigated the antimicrobial activity, phytochemical constituent, and antioxidant activity of selected traditional plants used traditionally as a source of food and medicine. The methanol and water extracts of different plant parts were analyzed for phytochemicals using standard phytochemical screening reagents while the broth microdilution assays were used to analyze antimicrobial activities. Alkaloids, phenols, flavonoids, saponins, tannins, and terpenes were found in one or more of the plant extracts, and all the plant extracts demonstrated scavenging activities. The back extracts of Sclerocarya birrea and the leaf extracts of Garcinia livingstonei exhibit the best antioxidant activities, while the water and methanol back extracts of S. birrea and G. livingstonei were the most active against all the tested foodborne bacteria.

  9. Evolutionary history of synthesis pathway genes for phloroglucinol and cyanide antimicrobials in plant-associated fluorescent pseudomonads.

    PubMed

    Frapolli, Michele; Pothier, Joël F; Défago, Geneviève; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan

    2012-06-01

    Plant-beneficial fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. play important ecological roles. Here, their evolutionary history was investigated by a multilocus approach targeting genes involved in synthesis of secondary antimicrobial metabolites implicated in biocontrol of phytopathogens. Some of these genes were proposed to be ancestral, and this was investigated using a worldwide collection of 30 plant-colonizing fluorescent pseudomonads, based on phylogenetic analysis of 14 loci involved in production of 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (phlACBDE, phlF, intergenic locus phlA/phlF), hydrogen cyanide (hcnABC, anr) or global regulation of secondary metabolism (gacA, gacS, rsmZ). The 10 housekeeping loci rrs, dsbA, gyrB, rpoD, fdxA, recA, rpoB, rpsL, rpsG, and fusA served as controls. Each strain was readily distinguished from the others when considering allelic combinations for these 14 biocontrol-relevant loci. Topology comparisons based on Shimodaira-Hasegawa tests showed extensive incongruence when comparing single-locus phylogenetic trees with one another, but less when comparing (after sequence concatenation) trees inferred for genes involved in 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol synthesis, hydrogen cyanide synthesis, or secondary metabolism global regulation with trees for housekeeping genes. The 14 loci displayed linkage disequilibrium, as housekeeping loci did, and all 12 protein-coding loci were subjected to purifying selection except for one positively-selected site in HcnA. Overall, the evolutionary history of Pseudomonas genes involved in synthesis of secondary antimicrobial metabolites important for biocontrol functions is in fact similar to that of housekeeping genes, and results suggest that they are ancestral in pseudomonads producing hydrogen cyanide and 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  11. Anticancer and Antimicrobial Activities of Some Antioxidant-Rich Cameroonian Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Tamokou, Jean de Dieu; Chouna, Jean Rodolphe; Fischer-Fodor, Eva; Chereches, Gabriela; Barbos, Otilia; Damian, Grigore; Benedec, Daniela; Duma, Mihaela; Efouet, Alango Pépin Nkeng; Wabo, Hippolyte Kamdem; Kuiate, Jules Roger; Mot, Augustin; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu

    2013-01-01

    Traditional remedies have a long-standing history in Cameroon and continue to provide useful and applicable tools for treating ailments. Here, the anticancer, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of ten antioxidant-rich Cameroonian medicinal plants and of some of their isolated compounds are evaluated.The plant extracts were prepared by maceration in organic solvents. Fractionation of plant extract was performed by column chromatography and the structures of isolated compounds (emodin, 3-geranyloxyemodin, 2-geranylemodin) were confirmed spectroscopically. The antioxidant activity (AOA) was determined using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) bleaching method, the trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), and the hemoglobin ascorbate peroxidase activity inhibition (HAPX) assays. The anticancer activity was evaluated against A431 squamous epidermal carcinoma, WM35 melanoma, A2780 ovary carcinoma and cisplatin-resistant A2780cis cells, using a direct colorimetric assay. The total phenolic content in the extracts was determined spectrophotometrically by the Folin–Ciocalteu method. Rumex abyssinicus showed the best AOA among the three assays employed. The AOA of emodin was significantly higher than that of 3-geranyloxyemodin and 2-geranylemodin for both TEAC and HAPX methods. The lowest IC50 values (i.e., highest cytotoxicity) were found for the extracts of Vismia laurentii, Psorospermum febrifugum, Pentadesma butyracea and Ficus asperifolia. The Ficus asperifolia and Psorospermum febrifugum extracts are selective against A2780cis ovary cells, a cell line which is resistant to the standard anticancer drug cisplatin. Emodin is more toxic compared to the whole extract, 3-geranyloxyemodin and 2-geranylemodin. Its selectivity against the platinum-resistant A2780cis cell line is highest. All of the extracts display antimicrobial activity, in some cases comparable to that of gentamycin. PMID:23409075

  12. Anticancer and antimicrobial activities of some antioxidant-rich cameroonian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Tamokou, Jean de Dieu; Chouna, Jean Rodolphe; Fischer-Fodor, Eva; Chereches, Gabriela; Barbos, Otilia; Damian, Grigore; Benedec, Daniela; Duma, Mihaela; Efouet, Alango Pépin Nkeng; Wabo, Hippolyte Kamdem; Kuiate, Jules Roger; Mot, Augustin; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu

    2013-01-01

    Traditional remedies have a long-standing history in Cameroon and continue to provide useful and applicable tools for treating ailments. Here, the anticancer, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of ten antioxidant-rich Cameroonian medicinal plants and of some of their isolated compounds are evaluated.The plant extracts were prepared by maceration in organic solvents. Fractionation of plant extract was performed by column chromatography and the structures of isolated compounds (emodin, 3-geranyloxyemodin, 2-geranylemodin) were confirmed spectroscopically. The antioxidant activity (AOA) was determined using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) bleaching method, the trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), and the hemoglobin ascorbate peroxidase activity inhibition (HAPX) assays. The anticancer activity was evaluated against A431 squamous epidermal carcinoma, WM35 melanoma, A2780 ovary carcinoma and cisplatin-resistant A2780cis cells, using a direct colorimetric assay. The total phenolic content in the extracts was determined spectrophotometrically by the Folin-Ciocalteu method. Rumex abyssinicus showed the best AOA among the three assays employed. The AOA of emodin was significantly higher than that of 3-geranyloxyemodin and 2-geranylemodin for both TEAC and HAPX methods. The lowest IC(50) values (i.e., highest cytotoxicity) were found for the extracts of Vismia laurentii, Psorospermum febrifugum, Pentadesma butyracea and Ficus asperifolia. The Ficus asperifolia and Psorospermum febrifugum extracts are selective against A2780cis ovary cells, a cell line which is resistant to the standard anticancer drug cisplatin. Emodin is more toxic compared to the whole extract, 3-geranyloxyemodin and 2-geranylemodin. Its selectivity against the platinum-resistant A2780cis cell line is highest. All of the extracts display antimicrobial activity, in some cases comparable to that of gentamycin.

  13. Antimicrobial activity of sodium hypochlorite-based irrigating solutions.

    PubMed

    Poggio, Claudio; Arciola, Carla Renata; Dagna, Alberto; Chiesa, Marco; Sforza, Dario; Visai, Livia

    2010-09-01

    The objective of the present study was the in vitro evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of three different NaOCl-based endodontic irrigating solutions: a 5.25% conventional sodium hypochlorite solution; and two new irrigating solutions, a 5.25% sodium hypochlorite solution with the addition of a proteolytic enzyme and a surfactant; and a 5.25% sodium hypochlorite gel with inorganic silicate. Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus mutans strains were selected to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of the endodontic irrigating solutions by the agar disc diffusion test. Paper disks were saturated with each one of the tested solutions (at room temperature and pre-warmed at 45°C) and placed onto culture agar-plates pre-adsorbed with bacterial cells and further incubated for 24 h at 37°C. The growth inhibition zones around each irrigating solution were recorded and compared for each bacterial strain. The results were significantly different among the tested irrigating solutions: 5.25% sodium hypochlorite solution produced the highest inhibition areas; 5.25% sodium hypochlorite solution with a proteolytic enzyme and a surfactant, and 5.25% sodium hypochlorite gel with inorganic silicate showed the lowest zones of inhibition. Even if all tested irrigating solution possessed antibacterial activity versus all tested bacterial strains, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite solution with a proteolytic enzyme and a surfactant, and 5.25% sodium hypochlorite gel with inorganic silicate showed lower in vitro efficacy than 5.25% conventional sodium hypochlorite solution.

  14. Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Natural products of higher plants may possess a new source of antimicrobial agents with possibly novel mechanisms of action. They are effective in the treatment of infectious diseases while simultaneously mitigating many of the side effects that are often associated with conventional antimicrobials. A method using scanning electron microscope (SEM) to study the morphology of the bacterial and fungal microbes and thus determining antimicrobial activity is presented in the chapter.

  15. PvD1 defensin, a plant antimicrobial peptide with inhibitory activity against Leishmania amazonensis

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Viviane V.; Mello, Érica de O.; Carvalho, Laís P.; de Melo, Edésio J.T.; Carvalho, André de O.; Fernandes, Katia V.S.; Gomes, Valdirene M.

    2015-01-01

    Plant defensins are small cysteine-rich peptides and exhibit antimicrobial activity against a variety of both plant and human pathogens. Despite the broad inhibitory activity that plant defensins exhibit against different micro-organisms, little is known about their activity against protozoa. In a previous study, we isolated a plant defensin named PvD1 from Phaseolus vulgaris (cv. Pérola) seeds, which was seen to be deleterious against different yeast cells and filamentous fungi. It exerted its effects by causing an increase in the endogenous production of ROS (reactive oxygen species) and NO (nitric oxide), plasma membrane permeabilization and the inhibition of medium acidification. In the present study, we investigated whether PvD1 could act against the protozoan Leishmania amazonensis. Our results show that, besides inhibiting the proliferation of L. amazonensis promastigotes, the PvD1 defensin was able to cause cytoplasmic fragmentation, formation of multiple cytoplasmic vacuoles and membrane permeabilization in the cells of this organism. Furthermore, we show, for the first time, that PvD1 defensin was located within the L. amazonensis cells, suggesting the existence of a possible intracellular target. PMID:26285803

  16. PvD1 defensin, a plant antimicrobial peptide with inhibitory activity against Leishmania amazonensis.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Viviane V; Mello, Érica de O; Carvalho, Laís P; de Melo, Edésio J T; Carvalho, André de O; Fernandes, Katia V S; Gomes, Valdirene M

    2015-08-18

    Plant defensins are small cysteine-rich peptides and exhibit antimicrobial activity against a variety of both plant and human pathogens. Despite the broad inhibitory activity that plant defensins exhibit against different micro-organisms, little is known about their activity against protozoa. In a previous study, we isolated a plant defensin named PvD1 from Phaseolus vulgaris (cv. Pérola) seeds, which was seen to be deleterious against different yeast cells and filamentous fungi. It exerted its effects by causing an increase in the endogenous production of ROS (reactive oxygen species) and NO (nitric oxide), plasma membrane permeabilization and the inhibition of medium acidification. In the present study, we investigated whether PvD1 could act against the protozoan Leishmania amazonensis. Our results show that, besides inhibiting the proliferation of L. amazonensis promastigotes, the PvD1 defensin was able to cause cytoplasmic fragmentation, formation of multiple cytoplasmic vacuoles and membrane permeabilization in the cells of this organism. Furthermore, we show, for the first time, that PvD1 defensin was located within the L. amazonensis cells, suggesting the existence of a possible intracellular target.

  17. Antimicrobial activity of {gamma}-thionin-like soybean SE60 in E. coli and tobacco plants

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yeonhee Choi, Yang Do; Lee, Jong Seob

    2008-10-17

    The SE60, a low molecular weight, sulfur-rich protein in soybean, is known to be homologous to wheat {gamma}-purothionin. To elucidate the functional role of SE60, we expressed SE60 cDNA in Escherichia coli and in tobacco plants. A single protein band was detected by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) after anti-FLAG affinity purification of the protein from transformed E. coli. While the control E. coli cells harboring pFLAG-1 showed standard growth with Isopropyl {beta}-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction, E. coli cells expressing the SE60 fusion protein did not grow at all, suggesting that SE60 has toxic effects on E. coli growth. Genomic integration and the expression of transgene in the transgenic tobacco plants were confirmed by Southern and Northern blot analysis, respectively. The transgenic plants demonstrated enhanced resistance against the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that SE60 has antimicrobial activity and play a role in the defense mechanism in soybean plants.

  18. A Fourier transformation based method to mine peptide space for antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Vijayaraj; Kaushik, Navodit; Murali, Beddhu; Zhang, Chaoyang; Lakhera, Sanyogita; Elasri, Mohamed O; Deng, Youping

    2006-09-26

    Naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides are currently being explored as potential candidate peptide drugs. Since antimicrobial peptides are part of the innate immune system of every living organism, it is possible to discover new candidate peptides using the available genomic and proteomic data. High throughput computational techniques could also be used to virtually scan the entire peptide space for discovering out new candidate antimicrobial peptides. We have identified a unique indexing method based on biologically distinct characteristic features of known antimicrobial peptides. Analysis of the entries in the antimicrobial peptide databases, based on our indexing method, using Fourier transformation technique revealed a distinct peak in their power spectrum. We have developed a method to mine the genomic and proteomic data, for the presence of peptides with potential antimicrobial activity, by looking for this distinct peak. We also used the Euclidean metric to rank the potential antimicrobial peptides activity. We have parallelized our method so that virtually any given protein space could be data mined, in search of antimicrobial peptides. The results show that the Fourier transform based method with the property based coding strategy could be used to scan the peptide space for discovering new potential antimicrobial peptides.

  19. Characterization of κ-carrageenan films incorporated plant essential oils with improved antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Shojaee-Aliabadi, Saeedeh; Hosseini, Hedayat; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin; Mohammadi, Abdorreza; Ghasemlou, Mehran; Hosseini, Seyede Marzieh; Khaksar, Ramin

    2014-01-30

    Antioxidant and antimicrobial kappa-carrageenan-based films containing different concentrations of Zataria multiflora Boiss (ZEO) and Mentha pulegium (MEO) essential oils were developed, and their water vapor permeability (WVP), optical, microstructure, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties were characterized. ZEO and MEO decreased the WVP of the emulsified films; for example, 3% ZEO reduced WVP by around 80%. Increasing the content of ZEO or MEO from 1% to 3% (v/v) increased values for elongation at break from 37.43% to 44.74% and from 36.09% to 41.25% respectively. Carrageenan-composite films were less resistant to breakage, more flexible and more opaque with lower gloss. These properties were related to the film's microstructure as analyzed by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. ZEO affected the antioxidant properties of the films more markedly than MEO, e.g., ZEO containing films showed DPPH radical scavenging of 80.6% which were two-fold higher than those having MEO. The films' antimicrobial activities were increased by incorporating essential oils, particularly ZEO, which were more effective against the bacteria in the direct-contact method than a vapor phase. S. aureus was found to be the most sensitive bacterium to either ZEO or MEO, followed by B. cereus and E. coli. A highest inhibition zone of 544.05 mm(2) was observed for S. aureus around the films incorporated with 3% (v/v) ZEO. The total inhibitory zone of 3% (v/v) MEO formulated films was 20.43 for S. typhimurium and 10.15 mm(2) for P. aeruginosa. These results revealed that ZEO and MEO have good potential to be incorporated into κ-carrageenan to make antimicrobial and antioxidant edible films for food applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A PEGylated Fibrin-Based Wound Dressing with Antimicrobial and Angiogenic Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-13

    mitigated by topical application of antibacterial / antimicrobial agents. Wound dressings currently used have been designed using biocompatible polymers or...composites incorporating the desired antibacterial agents [30]. Chitosan -based carrier systems, ranging from micro- spheres to nanospheres, have been...A PEGylated fibrin-based wound dressing with antimicrobial and angiogenic activity Shanmuganathan Seetharaman a,c,1, Shanmugasundaram Natesan a,c,1

  1. Prediction of Leymus arenarius (L.) antimicrobial peptides based on de novo transcriptome assembly.

    PubMed

    Slavokhotova, Anna A; Shelenkov, Andrey A; Odintsova, Tatyana I

    2015-10-01

    Leymus arenarius is a unique wild growing Poaceae plant exhibiting extreme tolerance to environmental conditions. In this study we for the first time performed whole-transcriptome sequencing of lymegrass seedlings using Illumina platform followed by de novo transcriptome assembly and functional annotation. Our goal was to identify transcripts encoding antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), one of the key components of plant innate immunity. Using the custom software developed for this study that predicted AMPs and classified them into families, we revealed more than 160 putative AMPs in lymegrass seedlings. We classified them into 7 families based on their cysteine motifs and sequence similarity. The families included defensins, thionins, hevein-like peptides, snakins, cyclotide, alfa-hairpinins and LTPs. This is the first communication about the presence of almost all known AMP families in trascriptomic data of a single plant species. Additionally, cysteine-rich peptides that potentially represent novel families of AMPs were revealed. We have confirmed by RT-PCR validation the presence of 30 transcripts encoding selected AMPs in lymegrass seedlings. In summary, the presented method of pAMP prediction developed by us can be applied for relatively fast and simple screening of novel components of plant immunity system and is well suited for whole-transcriptome or genome analysis of uncharacterized plants.

  2. Antimicrobial and plant growth-promoting properties of the cacao endophyte Bacillus subtilis ALB629.

    PubMed

    Falcäo, L L; Silva-Werneck, J O; Vilarinho, B R; da Silva, J P; Pomella, A W V; Marcellino, L H

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the effects of the endophyte Bacillus subtilisALB629 on the growth of cacao seedlings at early developmental stage and to evaluate its antimicrobial properties. Germinating cacao seeds were inoculated with ALB629, and seedlings growth was evaluated 30 days later. Significant increase (P < 0·05) was observed in the root system (up to 30%), leaf area (14%) and stem height (7·6%). ALB629 colonized the entire plant, prevailing over indigenous micro-organisms. In addition, it was tested in vitro, by pairing assays, and showed antagonistic effect against the phytopathogenic fungi Moniliophthora perniciosa, Colletotrichum sp. and C. gossypii. When tested in cacao-grafting procedure in the field, ALB629 increased the grafting success rate (24%), indicating its protective effect. In addition, this Bacillus secretes an antagonist compound, as shown by the antifungal activity of the cell-free culture. Bacillus subtilisALB629 promotes cacao root growth, besides promoting growth of the aerial part of cacao seedlings. It has antimicrobial properties and produces an antifungal compound. ALB629 presented beneficial characteristics for cacao cultivation, being a good biological control agent candidate. Furthermore, it is a potential source of antifungal compound with potential for commercial exploitation. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Antimicrobial, Antioxidant, and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Essential Oils of Selected Aromatic Plants from Tajikistan

    PubMed Central

    Sharopov, Farukh; Braun, Markus Santhosh; Gulmurodov, Isomiddin; Khalifaev, Davlat; Isupov, Salomiddin; Wink, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities of the essential oils of 18 plant species from Tajikistan (Central Asia) were investigated. The essential oil of Origanum tyttanthum showed a strong antibacterial activity with both minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values of 312.5 µg/mL for E. coli, 625 µg/mL (MIC) and 1250 µg/mL (MBC) for MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), respectively. The essential oil of Galagania fragrantissima was highly active against MRSA at concentrations as low as 39.1 µg/mL and 78.2 µg/mL for MIC and MBC, respectively. Origanum tyttanthum essential oil showed the highest antioxidant activity with IC50 values of 0.12 mg/mL for ABTS (2,2′-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)) and 0.28 mg/mL for DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl). Galagania fragrantissima and Origanum tyttanthum essential oils showed the highest anti-inflammatory activity; IC50 values of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) inhibition were 7.34 and 14.78 µg/mL, respectively. In conclusion, essential oils of Origanum tyttanthum and Galagania fragrantissima exhibit substantial antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. They are interesting candidates in phytotherapy. PMID:28231227

  4. Purification and characterization of a plant antimicrobial peptide expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Harrison, S J; McManus, A M; Marcus, J P; Goulter, K C; Green, J L; Nielsen, K J; Craik, D J; Maclean, D J; Manners, J M

    1999-03-01

    MiAMP1 is a low-molecular-weight, cysteine-rich, antimicrobial peptide isolated from the nut kernel of Macadamia integrifolia. A DNA sequence encoding MiAMP1 with an additional ATG start codon was cloned into a modified pET vector under the control of the T7 RNA polymerase promoter. The pET vector was cotransformed together with the vector pSB161, which expresses a rare arginine tRNA. The peptide was readily isolated in high yield from the insoluble fraction of the Escherichia coli extract. The purified peptide was shown to have an identical molecular weight to the native peptide by mass spectroscopy indicating that the N-terminal methionine had been cleaved. Analysis by NMR spectroscopy indicated that the refolded recombinant peptide had a similar overall three-dimensional structure to that of the native peptide. The peptide inhibited the growth of phytopathogenic fungi in vitro in a similar manner to the native peptide. To our knowledge, MiAMP1 is the first antimicrobial peptide from plants to be functionally expressed in E. coli. This will permit a detailed structure-function analysis of the peptide and studies of its mode of action on phytopathogens. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  5. Antimicrobial activity of plant compounds against Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 in ground pork and the influence of heat and storage on the antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cynthia H; Ravishankar, Sadhana; Marchello, John; Friedman, Mendel

    2013-07-01

    Salmonella enterica is a predominant foodborne pathogen that causes diarrheal illness worldwide. A potential method of inhibiting pathogenic bacterial growth in meat is through the introduction of plant-derived antimicrobials. The objectives of this study were to investigate the influence of heat (70°C for 5 min) and subsequent cold storage (4°C up to 7 days) on the effectiveness of oregano and cinnamon essential oils and powdered olive and apple extracts against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 in ground pork and to evaluate the activity of the most effective antimicrobials (cinnamon oil and olive extract) at higher concentrations in heated ground pork. The surviving Salmonella populations in two groups (heated and unheated) of antimicrobial-treated pork were compared. Higher concentrations of the most effective compounds were then tested (cinnamon oil at 0.5 to 1.0% and olive extract at 3, 4, and 5%) against Salmonella Typhimurium in heated ground pork. Samples were stored at 4°C and taken on days 0, 3, 5, and 7 for enumeration of survivors. The heating process did not affect the activity of antimicrobials. Significant 1.3- and 3-log reductions were observed with 1.0% cinnamon oil and 5% olive extract, respectively, on day 7. The minimum concentration required to achieve . 1-log reduction in Salmonella population was 0.8% cinnamon oil or 4% olive extract. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of these antimicrobials against multidrug-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium in ground pork and their stability during heating and cold storage. The most active formulations have the potential to enhance the microbial safety of ground pork.

  6. Development of chitosan-based antimicrobial leather coatings.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Isabel P; Amaral, Joana S; Pinto, Vera; Ferreira, Maria José; Barreiro, Maria Filomena

    2013-10-15

    The development of antimicrobial coatings for footwear components is of great interest both from industry and consumer's point of view. In this work, antimicrobial leather materials were developed taking advantage of chitosan intrinsic antimicrobial activity and film forming capacity. Considering the specificities of the leather tanning industry, different coating technologies, namely drum, calender and spray, were tested, being the best results achieved with the drum. This last approach was further investigated to assess the effect of chitosan content, type of solubilizing acid, and impregnation time on the achieved antimicrobial capacity. Considering chitosan price (economic reasons) and the obtained results (antimicrobial activity and coating effectiveness, as inspected by SEM), the impregnation in the drum using a chitosan content of 1% (w/v) in a formic acid solution during 2h, is proposed as the best option for obtaining leather with antimicrobial capacity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus polymyxa YC0573, a Plant Growth–Promoting Rhizobacterium with Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hu; Wang, Chengqiang; Li, Yuhuan; Liu, Kai; Hou, Qihui; Xu, Wenfeng; Fan, Lingchao; Zhao, Jian; Gou, Jianyu

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Paenibacillus polymyxa strain YC0573 is a plant growth–promoting rhizobacterium with antimicrobial activity, which was isolated from tobacco rhizosphere. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of P. polymyxa YC0573. Antifungal and antibacterial genes were discovered. PMID:28183775

  8. Prevalence, Serotype, and Antimicrobial Resistance of Salmonella on Broiler Carcasses Postpick and Postchill in 20 U. S. Processing Plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to measure the effect of broiler processing on the prevalence, serotype and antimicrobial resistance profiles of salmonellae. Twenty US commercial processing plants representing eight integrators in thirteen states were included in the survey. In each of four replic...

  9. The diversity and antimicrobial activity of endophytic fungi associated with medicinal plant Baccharis trimera (Asteraceae) from the Brazilian savannah.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Mariana L A; Johann, Susana; Hughes, Frederic M; Rosa, Carlos A; Rosa, Luiz H

    2014-12-01

    The fungal endophyte community associated with Baccharis trimera, a Brazilian medicinal plant, was characterized and screened for its ability to present antimicrobial activity. By using molecular methods, we identified and classified the endophytic fungi obtained into 25 different taxa from the phyla Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. The most abundant species were closely related to Diaporthe phaseolorum, Pestalotiopsis sp. 1, and Preussia pseudominima. The differences observed in endophytic assemblages from different B. trimera specimens might be associated with their crude extract activities. Plants that had higher α-biodiversity were also those that contributed more to the regional (γ) diversity. All fungal isolates were cultured and their crude extracts screened to examine the antimicrobial activities. Twenty-three extracts (12.8%) displayed antimicrobial activities against at least one target microorganism. Among these extracts, those obtained from Epicoccum sp., Pestalotiopsis sp. 1, Cochliobolus lunatus, and Nigrospora sp. presented the best minimum inhibitory concentration values. Our results show that the endophytic fungal community associated with the medicinal plant B. trimera included few dominant bioactive taxa, which may represent sources of compounds with antifungal activity. Additionally, the discovery of these bioactive fungi in association with B. trimera suggests that Brazilian plants used as folk medicine may shelter a rich fungal diversity as well as taxa able to produce bioactive metabolites with antimicrobial activities.

  10. Lipid-Based Liquid Crystals As Carriers for Antimicrobial Peptides: Phase Behavior and Antimicrobial Effect.

    PubMed

    Boge, Lukas; Bysell, Helena; Ringstad, Lovisa; Wennman, David; Umerska, Anita; Cassisa, Viviane; Eriksson, Jonny; Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure; Edwards, Katarina; Andersson, Martin

    2016-05-03

    The number of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is increasing worldwide, and the demand for novel antimicrobials is constantly growing. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) could be an important part of future treatment strategies of various bacterial infection diseases. However, AMPs have relatively low stability, because of proteolytic and chemical degradation. As a consequence, carrier systems protecting the AMPs are greatly needed, to achieve efficient treatments. In addition, the carrier system also must administrate the peptide in a controlled manner to match the therapeutic dose window. In this work, lyotropic liquid crystalline (LC) structures consisting of cubic glycerol monooleate/water and hexagonal glycerol monooleate/oleic acid/water have been examined as carriers for AMPs. These LC structures have the capability of solubilizing both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substances, as well as being biocompatible and biodegradable. Both bulk gels and discrete dispersed structures (i.e., cubosomes and hexosomes) have been studied. Three AMPs have been investigated with respect to phase stability of the LC structures and antimicrobial effect: AP114, DPK-060, and LL-37. Characterization of the LC structures was performed using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), dynamic light scattering, ζ-potential, and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM) and peptide loading efficacy by ultra performance liquid chromatography. The antimicrobial effect of the LCNPs was investigated in vitro using minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and time-kill assay. The most hydrophobic peptide (AP114) was shown to induce an increase in negative curvature of the cubic LC system. The most polar peptide (DPK-060) induced a decrease in negative curvature while LL-37 did not change the LC phase at all. The hexagonal LC phase was not affected by any of the AMPs. Moreover, cubosomes loaded with peptides AP114 and DPK-060 showed preserved antimicrobial activity, whereas particles loaded

  11. Genetic analysis of plant endophytic Pseudomonas putida BP25 and chemo-profiling of its antimicrobial volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Sheoran, Neelam; Valiya Nadakkakath, Agisha; Munjal, Vibhuti; Kundu, Aditi; Subaharan, Kesavan; Venugopal, Vibina; Rajamma, Suseelabhai; Eapen, Santhosh J; Kumar, Aundy

    2015-04-01

    Black pepper associated bacterium BP25 was isolated from root endosphere of apparently healthy cultivar Panniyur-5 that protected black pepper against Phytophthora capsici and Radopholus similis - the major production constraints. The bacterium was characterized and mechanisms of its antagonistic action against major pathogens are elucidated. The polyphasic phenotypic analysis revealed its identity as Pseudomonas putida. Multi locus sequence typing revealed that the bacterium shared gene sequences with several other isolates representing diverse habitats. Tissue localization assays exploiting green fluorescence protein expression clearly indicated that PpBP25 endophytically colonized not only its host plant - black pepper, but also other distantly related plants such as ginger and arabidopsis. PpBP25 colonies could be enumerated from internal tissues of plants four weeks post inoculation indicated its stable establishment and persistence in the plant system. The bacterium inhibited broad range of pathogens such as Phytophthora capsici, Pythium myriotylum, Giberella moniliformis, Rhizoctonia solani, Athelia rolfsii, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and plant parasitic nematode, Radopholus similis by its volatile substances. GC/MS based chemical profiling revealed presence of Heneicosane; Tetratetracontane; Pyrrolo [1,2-a] pyrazine-1,4-dione, hexahydro-3-(2-methylpropyl); Tetracosyl heptafluorobutyrate; 1-3-Eicosene, (E)-; 1-Heneicosanol; Octadecyl trifluoroacetate and 1-Pentadecene in PpBP25 metabolite. Dynamic head space GC/MS analysis of airborne volatiles indicated the presence of aromatic compounds such as 1-Undecene;Disulfide dimethyl; Pyrazine, methyl-Pyrazine, 2,5-dimethyl-; Isoamyl alcohol; Pyrazine, methyl-; Dimethyl trisulfide, etc. The work paved way for profiling of broad spectrum antimicrobial VOCs in endophytic PpBP25 for crop protection.

  12. Zinc pyrithione in alcohol-based products for skin antisepsis: persistence of antimicrobial effects.

    PubMed

    Guthery, Eugene; Seal, Lawton A; Anderson, Edward L

    2005-02-01

    Alcohol-based products for skin antisepsis have a long history of safety and efficacy in the United States and abroad. However, alcohol alone lacks the required antimicrobial persistence to provide for the sustained periods of skin antisepsis desired in the clinical environment. Therefore, alcohol-based products must have a preservative agent such as iodine/iodophor compounds, chlorhexidine gluconate, or zinc pyrithione, to extend its antimicrobial effects. Iodine, iodophors, and chlorhexidine gluconate are well-characterized antimicrobials and preservatives. The thrust of our effort was to examine the characteristics of the lesser-known zinc pyrithione and to evaluate its utility as a preservative in the formulation of alcohol-based products for skin antisepsis. This work includes a literature review of current zinc pyrithione applications in drugs and cosmetics, a safety and toxicity evaluation, consideration of the proposed mechanisms of antimicrobial action, in vitro and in vivo efficacy data, and a discussion of the mechanisms that confer the desired antimicrobial persistence. In addition, alcohol-based, zinc pyrithione-preserved, commercially available products of skin antisepsis are compared with other commercially available antimicrobials used for skin antisepsis and with additional alcohol-based products with different preservatives. The authors' conclusion is that zinc pyrithione is not only a safe and effective antimicrobial but that its use in certain alcohol-based formulations results in antimicrobial efficacy exceeding that of iodine and chlorhexidine gluconate.

  13. Isolation and antimicrobial activities of actinobacteria closely associated with liquorice plants Glycyrrhiza glabra L. and Glycyrrhiza inflate BAT. in Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ke; Zhao, Chong; Liao, Ping; Zhang, Qin; Li, Yanbing; Liu, Maoke; Ao, Xiaoling; Gu, Yunfu; Liao, Decong; Xu, Kaiwei; Yu, Xiumei; Xiang, Quanju; Huang, Chengyi; Chen, Qiang; Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Xiaoping; Penttinen, Petri

    2016-07-01

    A total of 218 actinobacteria strains were isolated from wild perennial liquorice plants Glycyrrhiza glabra L. and Glycyrrhiza. inflate BAT. Based on morphological characteristics, 45 and 32 strains from G. inflate and G. glabra, respectively, were selected for further analyses. According to 16S rRNA sequence analysis, most of the strains belonged to genus Streptomyces and a few strains represented the rare actinobacteria Micromonospora, Rhodococcus and Tsukamurella. A total of 39 strains from G. inflate and 27 strains from G. glabra showed antimicrobial activity against at least one indicator organism. The range of the antimicrobial activity of the strains isolated from G. glabra and G. inflate was similar. A total of 34 strains from G. inflate and 29 strains from G. glabra carried at least one of the genes encoding polyketide synthases, non-ribosomal peptide synthetase and FADH2-dependent halogenase. In the type II polyketide synthase KSα gene phylogenetic analysis, the strains were divided into two major clades: one included known spore pigment production-linked KSα sequences and other sequences were linked to the production of different types of aromatic polyketide antibiotics. Based on the antimicrobial range, the isolates that carried different KSα types were not separated from each other or from the isolates that did not carry KSα. The incongruent phylogenies of 16S rRNA and KSα genes indicated that the KSα genes were possibly horizontally transferred. In all, the liquorice plants were a rich source of biocontrol agents that may produce novel bioactive compounds.

  14. Global expression profile of biofilm resistance to antimicrobial compounds in the plant-pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa reveals evidence of persister cells.

    PubMed

    Muranaka, Lígia S; Takita, Marco A; Olivato, Jacqueline C; Kishi, Luciano T; de Souza, Alessandra A

    2012-09-01

    Investigations of biofilm resistance response rarely focus on plant-pathogenic bacteria. Since Xylella fastidiosa is a multihost plant-pathogenic bacterium that forms biofilm in the xylem, the behavior of its biofilm in response to antimicrobial compounds needs to be better investigated. We analyzed here the transcriptional profile of X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca in response to inhibitory and subinhibitory concentrations of copper and tetracycline. Copper-based products are routinely used to control citrus diseases in the field, while antibiotics are more widely used for bacterial control in mammals. The use of antimicrobial compounds triggers specific responses to each compound, such as biofilm formation and phage activity for copper. Common changes in expression responses comprise the repression of genes associated with metabolic functions and movement and the induction of toxin-antitoxin systems, which have been associated with the formation of persister cells. Our results also show that these cells were found in the population at a ca. 0.05% density under inhibitory conditions for both antimicrobial compounds and that pretreatment with subinhibitory concentration of copper increases this number. No previous report has detected the presence of these cells in X. fastidiosa population, suggesting that this could lead to a multidrug tolerance response in the biofilm under a stressed environment. This is a mechanism that has recently become the focus of studies on resistance of human-pathogenic bacteria to antibiotics and, based on our data, it seems to be more broadly applicable.

  15. In vitro antimicrobial activity of peroxide-based bleaching agents.

    PubMed

    Napimoga, Marcelo Henrique; de Oliveira, Rogério; Reis, André Figueiredo; Gonçalves, Reginaldo Bruno; Giannini, Marcelo

    2007-06-01

    Antibacterial activity of 4 commercial bleaching agents (Day White, Colgate Platinum, Whiteness 10% and 16%) on 6 oral pathogens (Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Streptococcus sanguinis, Candida albicans, Lactobacillus casei, and Lactobacillus acidophilus) and Staphylococcus aureus were evaluated. A chlorhexidine solution was used as a positive control, while distilled water was the negative control. Bleaching agents and control materials were inserted in sterilized stainless-steel cylinders that were positioned under inoculated agar plate (n = 4). After incubation according to the appropriate period of time for each microorganism, the inhibition zones were measured. Data were analyzed by 2-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (a = 0.05). All bleaching agents and the chlorhexidine solution produced antibacterial inhibition zones. Antimicrobial activity was dependent on peroxide-based bleaching agents. For most microorganisms evaluated, bleaching agents produced inhibition zones similar to or larger than that observed for chlorhexidine. C albicans, L casei, and L acidophilus were the most resistant microorganisms.

  16. Thin-layer chromatographic (TLC) separations and bioassays of plant extracts to identify antimicrobial compounds.

    PubMed

    Kagan, Isabelle A; Flythe, Michael D

    2014-03-27

    A common screen for plant antimicrobial compounds consists of separating plant extracts by paper or thin-layer chromatography (PC or TLC), exposing the chromatograms to microbial suspensions (e.g. fungi or bacteria in broth or agar), allowing time for the microbes to grow in a humid environment, and visualizing zones with no microbial growth. The effectiveness of this screening method, known as bioautography, depends on both the quality of the chromatographic separation and the care taken with microbial culture conditions. This paper describes standard protocols for TLC and contact bioautography with a novel application to amino acid-fermenting bacteria. The extract is separated on flexible (aluminum-backed) silica TLC plates, and bands are visualized under ultraviolet (UV) light. Zones are cut out and incubated face down onto agar inoculated with the test microorganism. Inhibitory bands are visualized by staining the agar plates with tetrazolium red. The method is applied to the separation of red clover (Trifolium pratense cv. Kenland) phenolic compounds and their screening for activity against Clostridium sticklandii, a hyper ammonia-producing bacterium (HAB) that is native to the bovine rumen. The TLC methods apply to many types of plant extracts and other bacterial species (aerobic or anaerobic), as well as fungi, can be used as test organisms if culture conditions are modified to fit the growth requirements of the species.

  17. Antimicrobial biosynthetic potential and genetic diversity of endophytic actinomycetes associated with medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Gohain, Anwesha; Gogoi, Animesh; Debnath, Rajal; Yadav, Archana; Singh, Bhim P; Gupta, Vijai K; Sharma, Rajeev; Saikia, Ratul

    2015-10-01

    Endophytic actinomycetes are one of the primary groups that share symbiotic relationships with medicinal plants and are key reservoir of biologically active compounds. In this study, six selective medicinal plants were targeted for the first time for endophytic actinomycetes isolation from Gibbon Wild Life Sanctuary, Assam, India, during winter and summer and 76 isolates were obtained. The isolates were found to be prevalent in roots followed by stem and leaves. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed 16 genera, including rare genera, Verrucosispora, Isoptericola and Kytococcus, which have never been previously reported as endophytic. The genus Streptomyces (66%) was dominant in both seasons. Shannon's diversity index showed that Azadirachta indica (1.49), Rauwolfia serpentina (1.43) and Emblica officinalis (1.24) were relatively good habitat for endophytic actinomycetes. Antimicrobial strains showed prevalence of polyketide synthase (PKS) type-II (85%) followed by PKS type-I (14%) encoded in the genomes. Expression studies showed 12-fold upregulation of PKSII gene in seventh day of incubation for Streptomyces antibioticus (EAAG90). Our results emphasize that the actinomycetes assemblages within plant tissue exhibited biosynthetic systems encoding for important biologically active compounds.

  18. Thin-layer Chromatographic (TLC) Separations and Bioassays of Plant Extracts to Identify Antimicrobial Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Kagan, Isabelle A.; Flythe, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    A common screen for plant antimicrobial compounds consists of separating plant extracts by paper or thin-layer chromatography (PC or TLC), exposing the chromatograms to microbial suspensions (e.g. fungi or bacteria in broth or agar), allowing time for the microbes to grow in a humid environment, and visualizing zones with no microbial growth. The effectiveness of this screening method, known as bioautography, depends on both the quality of the chromatographic separation and the care taken with microbial culture conditions. This paper describes standard protocols for TLC and contact bioautography with a novel application to amino acid-fermenting bacteria. The extract is separated on flexible (aluminum-backed) silica TLC plates, and bands are visualized under ultraviolet (UV) light. Zones are cut out and incubated face down onto agar inoculated with the test microorganism. Inhibitory bands are visualized by staining the agar plates with tetrazolium red. The method is applied to the separation of red clover (Trifolium pratense cv. Kenland) phenolic compounds and their screening for activity against Clostridium sticklandii, a hyper ammonia-producing bacterium (HAB) that is native to the bovine rumen. The TLC methods apply to many types of plant extracts and other bacterial species (aerobic or anaerobic), as well as fungi, can be used as test organisms if culture conditions are modified to fit the growth requirements of the species. PMID:24747583

  19. Preliminary screening of some traditional zulu medicinal plants for anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial activities.

    PubMed

    Lin, J; Opoku, A R; Geheeb-Keller, M; Hutchings, A D; Terblanche, S E; Jäger, A K; van Staden, J

    1999-12-15

    Aqueous and methanolic extracts from different parts of nine traditional Zulu medicinal plants, of the Vitaceae from KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa were evaluated for therapeutic potential as anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial agents. Of the twenty-nine crude extracts assayed for prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors, only five methanolic extracts of Cyphostemma natalitium-root, Rhoicissus digitata-leaf, R. rhomboidea-root, R. tomentosa-leaf/stem and R. tridentata-root showed significant inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase (COX-1). The extracts of R. digitata-leaf and of R. rhomboidea-root exhibited the highest inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis with 53 and 56%, respectively. The results suggest that Rhoicissus digitata leaves and of Rhoicissus rhomboidea roots may have the potential to be used as anti-inflammatory agents. All the screened plant extracts showed some degrees of anti-microbial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms. The methanolic extracts of C. natalitium-stem and root, R. rhomboidea-root, and R. tomentosa-leaf/stem, showed different anti-microbial activities against almost all micro-organisms tested. Generally, these plant extracts inhibited the gram-positive micro-organisms more than the gram-negative ones. Several plant extracts inhibited the growth of Candida albicans while only one plant extract showed inhibitory activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae. All the plant extracts which demonstrated good anti-inflammatory activities also showed better inhibitory activity against Candida albicans.

  20. Further evaluation of Rwandan medicinal plant extracts for their antimicrobial and antiviral activities.

    PubMed

    Cos, P; Hermans, N; De Bruyne, T; Apers, S; Sindambiwe, J B; Vanden Berghe, D; Pieters, L; Vlietinck, A J

    2002-02-01

    A total of 45 Rwandan plant extracts, belonging to 37 different plant species out of 21 families, were investigated for their antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral properties. The plants were selected on the base of their ethnomedicinal use against infections and autoimmune diseases. From all the plant extracts tested, only Clematis hirsuta (leaves) showed a pronounced antifungal activity against Candida albicans and the dermatophytes Trichophyton rubrum, Epidermophyton floccosum, and Microsporum canis. Seven plant extracts showed a high antiviral activity against the DNA-virus Herpes simplex type 1, while five and three plant extracts were highly active against the RNA-viruses Coxsackie and Polio, respectively. Only Macaranga kilimandscharica (leaves) showed an interesting anti-measles activity, whereas Eriosema montanum (leaves) and Entada abyssinica (leaves) were highly active against Semliki forest virus. Some plant extracts showed an antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria and Mycobacterium fortuitum, but none of them were active against the Gram-negative bacteria tested.

  1. Concurrent release of admixed antimicrobials and salicylic acid from salicylate-based poly(anhydride-esters)

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Michelle L.; Uhrich, Kathryn E.

    2008-01-01

    A polymer blend consisting of antimicrobials (chlorhexidine, clindamycin, and minocycline) physically admixed at 10% by weight into a salicylic acid-based poly (anhydride-ester) (SA-based PAE) was developed as an adjunct treatment for periodontal disease. The SA-based PAE/antimicrobial blends were characterized by multiple methods, including contact angle measurements and differential scanning calorimetry. Static contact angle measurements showed no significant differences in hydrophobicity between the polymer and antimicrobial matrix surfaces. Notable decreases in the polymer glass transition temperature (Tg) and the antimicrobials' melting points (Tm) were observed indicating that the antimicrobials act as plasticizers within the polymer matrix. In vitro drug release of salicylic acid from the polymer matrix and for each physically admixed antimicrobial was concurrently monitored by high pressure liquid chromatography during the course of polymer degradation and erosion. Although the polymer/antimicrobial blends were immiscible, the initial 24 h of drug release correlated to the erosion profiles. The SA-based PAE/antimicrobial blends are being investigated as an improvement on current localized drug therapies used to treat periodontal disease. PMID:19180627

  2. Molecular characterization by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and antimicrobial potential of endophytic fungi isolated from Luehea divaricata (Malvaceae) against plant pathogenic fungi and pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bernardi-Wenzel, J; Garcia, A; Azevedo, J L; Pamphile, J A

    2013-10-29

    Luehea divaricata is an important plant in popular medicine; it is used for its depurative, anti-inflammatory, and other therapeutic activities. We evaluated the antimicrobial activity of endophytic fungi isolated from leaves of L. divaricata against phytopathogens and pathogenic bacteria, and characterized the isolates based on amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). The in vitro antagonistic activity of these endophytes against the phytopathogen Alternaria alternata was assayed by dual culture technique. Based on this evaluation of antimicrobial activity, we extracted secondary metabolites from nine endophytic fungi by partitioning in ethyl acetate and methanol. These were tested against the phytopathogens A. alternata, Colletotrichum sp and Moniliophthora perniciosa, and against the human pathogenic bacteria Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Molecular characterization by ARDRA technique was used for phylogenetic analysis, based on comparison with sequences in GenBank. The endophytes had varied effects on A. alternata. One isolate produced an inhibition halo against M. perniciosa and against E. coli. This antibiosis activity indicates a role in the protection of the plant against microbial pathogens in nature, with potential for pharmaceutical and agricultural applications. Based on ARDRA, the 13 isolates were grouped. We found three different haplotypes of Phomopsis sp, showing interspecific variability. It appears that examination of the microbial community associated with medicinal plants of tropical regions has potential as a useful strategy to look for species with biotechnological applications.

  3. Ethnobotanical and antimicrobial study of some selected medicinal plants used in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK) as a potential source to cure infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Present investigation deals with antimicrobial screening of ten medicinally important plants used by the inhabitants of district Haripur, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK) for different infectious diseases. Methods Aqueous, n-hexane and ethanolic extracts of each plant were tested for their antimicrobial activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative strains of bacteria, as well as strain of yeast. Agar well diffusion and broth dilution methods were used to determine the antimicrobial activity of different plant extracts. Results The results indicated that all plants exhibited antimicrobial activity against one or more test pathogens. Interestingly, extracts of three plants showed strong and broad spectrum activity as compared to rest of the extracts which demonstrated the moderate activity. On the whole ethanolic extracts exhibited maximum antimicrobial effect than their corresponding aqueous and n-hexane extracts, when compared with standard antibiotics i.e., Streptomycin and Tetracycline. Among various extracts, only ethanloic extract of Azadirachta indica and aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Eucalyptus globulus and Bergenia ciliata and ethanolic extract of Punica granatum were found to have potentially promising activity against test microorganisms. Conclusion Different plant extracts show promising antimicrobial activity justifying their usage in traditional medicines. This study will be continued to identify more plants with potential antimicrobial components. PMID:24708514

  4. Ceragenins: cholic acid-based mimics of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xin-Zhong; Feng, Yanshu; Pollard, Jacob; Chin, Judy N; Rybak, Michael J; Bucki, Robert; Epand, Raquel F; Epand, Richard M; Savage, Paul B

    2008-10-01

    The prevalence of drug-resistant bacteria drives the quest for new antimicrobials, including those that are not expected to readily engender resistance. One option is to mimic Nature's most ubiquitous means of controlling bacterial growth, antimicrobial peptides, which have evolved over eons. In general, bacteria remain susceptible to these peptides. Human antimicrobial peptides play a central role in innate immunity, and deficiencies in these peptides have been tied to increased rates of infection. However, clinical use of antimicrobial peptides is hampered by issues of cost and stability. The development of nonpeptide mimics of antimicrobial peptides may provide the best of both worlds: a means of using the same mechanism chosen by Nature to control bacterial growth without the problems associated with peptide therapeutics. The ceragenins were developed to mimic the cationic, facially amphiphilic structures of most antimicrobial peptides. These compounds reproduce the required morphology using a bile-acid scaffolding and appended amine groups. The resulting compounds are actively bactericidal against both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms, including drug-resistant bacteria. This antimicrobial activity originates from selective association of the ceragenins with negatively charged bacterial membrane components. Association has been studied with synthetic models of bacterial membrane components, with bacterial lipopolysaccharide, with vesicles derived from bacterial phospholipids, and with whole cells. Comparisons of the antimicrobial activities of ceragenins and representative antimicrobial peptides suggest that these classes of compounds share a mechanism of action. Rapid membrane depolarization is caused by both classes as well as blebbing of bacterial membranes. Bacteria express the same genes in response to both classes of compounds. On the basis of the antibacterial activities of ceragenins and preliminary in vivo studies, we expect these compounds to

  5. Novel mode of action of plant defense peptides - hevein-like antimicrobial peptides from wheat inhibit fungal metalloproteases.

    PubMed

    Slavokhotova, Anna A; Naumann, Todd A; Price, Neil P J; Rogozhin, Eugene A; Andreev, Yaroslav A; Vassilevski, Alexander A; Odintsova, Tatyana I

    2014-10-01

    The multilayered plant immune system relies on rapid recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns followed by activation of defense-related genes, resulting in the reinforcement of plant cell walls and the production of antimicrobial compounds. To suppress plant defense, fungi secrete effectors, including a recently discovered Zn-metalloproteinase from Fusarium verticillioides, named fungalysin Fv-cmp. This proteinase cleaves class IV chitinases, which are plant defense proteins that bind and degrade chitin of fungal cell walls. In this study, we investigated plant responses to such pathogen invasion, and discovered novel inhibitors of fungalysin. We produced several recombinant hevein-like antimicrobial peptides named wheat antimicrobial peptides (WAMPs) containing different amino acids (Ala, Lys, Glu, and Asn) at the nonconserved position 34. An additional Ser at the site of fungalysin proteolysis makes the peptides resistant to the protease. Moreover, an equal molar concentration of WAMP-1b or WAMP-2 to chitinase was sufficient to block the fungalysin activity, keeping the chitinase intact. Thus, WAMPs represent novel protease inhibitors that are active against fungal metalloproteases. According to in vitro antifungal assays WAMPs directly inhibited hyphal elongation, suggesting that fungalysin plays an important role in fungal development. A novel molecular mechanism of dynamic interplay between host defense molecules and fungal virulence factors is suggested. © 2014 FEBS.

  6. Evaluation of Phenolic Content Variability along with Antioxidant, Antimicrobial, and Cytotoxic Potential of Selected Traditional Medicinal Plants from India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Garima; Passsari, Ajit K.; Leo, Vincent V.; Mishra, Vineet K.; Subbarayan, Sarathbabu; Singh, Bhim P.; Kumar, Brijesh; Kumar, Sunil; Gupta, Vijai K.; Lalhlenmawia, Hauzel; Nachimuthu, Senthil K.

    2016-01-01

    Plants have been used since ancient times as an important source of biologically active substances. The aim of the present study was to investigate the phytochemical constituents (flavonoids and phenolics), antioxidant potential, cytotoxicity against HepG2 (human hepato carcinoma) cancer cell lines, and the antimicrobial activity of the methanol extract of selected traditional medicinal plants collected from Mizoram, India. A number of phenolic compounds were detected using HPLC-DAD-ESI-TOF-MS, mainly Luteolin, Kaempferol, Myricetin, Gallic Acid, Quercetin and Rutin, some of which have been described for the first time in the selected plants. The total phenolic and flavonoid contents showed high variation ranging from 4.44 to 181.91 μg of Gallic Acid equivalent per milligram DW (GAE/mg DW) and 3.17 to 102.2 μg of Quercetin/mg, respectively. The antioxidant capacity was determined by DPPH (IC50 values ranges from 34.22 to 131.4 μg/mL), ABTS (IC50 values ranges from 24.08 to 513.4 μg/mL), and reducing power assays. Antimicrobial activity was assayed against gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus), gram negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa), and yeast (Candida albicans) demonstrating that the methanol extracts of some plants were efficacious antimicrobial agents. Additionally, cytotoxicity was assessed on human hepato carcinoma (HepG2) cancer cell lines and found that the extracts of Albizia lebbeck, Dillenia indica, and Bombax ceiba significantly decreased the cell viability at low concentrations with IC50 values of 24.03, 25.09, and 29.66 μg/mL, respectively. This is the first report of detection of phenolic compounds along with antimicrobial, antioxidant and cytotoxic potential of selected medicinal plants from India, which indicates that these plants might be valuable source for human and animal health. PMID:27066046

  7. Plants used to treat skin diseases in northern Maputaland, South Africa: antimicrobial activity and in vitro permeability studies.

    PubMed

    Nciki, Sibongile; Vuuren, Sandy; van Eyk, Armorel; de Wet, Helene

    2016-11-01

    Ethnobotanical claims of medicinal plants used in northern Maputaland are limited. Objectives To establish scientific validity for a selection of the plants used in Maputaland to treat skin diseases. Aqueous and dichloromethane-methanol extracts were prepared from 37 plant species which were collected from four rural communities in Maputaland. Antimicrobial screening was performed on extracts against 12 dermatological relevant pathogens using the micro-titre plate dilution assay. Their combined effect was evaluated by determining the sum of the fractional inhibitory concentrations (ΣFICs). Chemical analysis was undertaken using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and investigated in vitro across excised intact porcine skin using the ILC07 automated system. The organic extract of Garcinia livingstonei T. Anderson (Clusiaceae) was found to be the most antimicrobially active displaying an average broad-spectrum MIC value of 270 μg/mL. The combination of Sclerocarya birrea (A. Rich.) Hotsch. (Anacardaceae) with Syzygium cordatum Hochst. ex C. Krauss (Myrtaceae) displayed synergistic effects. The four antimicrobially active organic extracts were found to possess mainly anthraquinones, flavonoids, tannins and saponins. The organic extracts of Kigelia africana (Lam.) Benth. (Bignoniaceae) and S. cordatum were found to have more compounds capable of permeating intact skin after 10 min of exposure. More than 80% of the organic extracts tested displayed a correlation between the antimicrobial efficacy and the reported traditional uses of the plants. Furthermore, the traditional use of topically applied plant preparations is validated as some compounds from the active plants are capable of permeating the skin in vitro.

  8. Evaluation of Phenolic Content Variability along with Antioxidant, Antimicrobial, and Cytotoxic Potential of Selected Traditional Medicinal Plants from India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Garima; Passsari, Ajit K; Leo, Vincent V; Mishra, Vineet K; Subbarayan, Sarathbabu; Singh, Bhim P; Kumar, Brijesh; Kumar, Sunil; Gupta, Vijai K; Lalhlenmawia, Hauzel; Nachimuthu, Senthil K

    2016-01-01

    Plants have been used since ancient times as an important source of biologically active substances. The aim of the present study was to investigate the phytochemical constituents (flavonoids and phenolics), antioxidant potential, cytotoxicity against HepG2 (human hepato carcinoma) cancer cell lines, and the antimicrobial activity of the methanol extract of selected traditional medicinal plants collected from Mizoram, India. A number of phenolic compounds were detected using HPLC-DAD-ESI-TOF-MS, mainly Luteolin, Kaempferol, Myricetin, Gallic Acid, Quercetin and Rutin, some of which have been described for the first time in the selected plants. The total phenolic and flavonoid contents showed high variation ranging from 4.44 to 181.91 μg of Gallic Acid equivalent per milligram DW (GAE/mg DW) and 3.17 to 102.2 μg of Quercetin/mg, respectively. The antioxidant capacity was determined by DPPH (IC50 values ranges from 34.22 to 131.4 μg/mL), ABTS (IC50 values ranges from 24.08 to 513.4 μg/mL), and reducing power assays. Antimicrobial activity was assayed against gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus), gram negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa), and yeast (Candida albicans) demonstrating that the methanol extracts of some plants were efficacious antimicrobial agents. Additionally, cytotoxicity was assessed on human hepato carcinoma (HepG2) cancer cell lines and found that the extracts of Albizia lebbeck, Dillenia indica, and Bombax ceiba significantly decreased the cell viability at low concentrations with IC50 values of 24.03, 25.09, and 29.66 μg/mL, respectively. This is the first report of detection of phenolic compounds along with antimicrobial, antioxidant and cytotoxic potential of selected medicinal plants from India, which indicates that these plants might be valuable source for human and animal health.

  9. The production of recombinant cationic α-helical antimicrobial peptides in plant cells induces the formation of protein bodies derived from the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Company, Nuri; Nadal, Anna; La Paz, José-Luis; Martínez, Sílvia; Rasche, Stefan; Schillberg, Stefan; Montesinos, Emilio; Pla, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic linear antimicrobial peptides with cationic α-helical structures, such as BP100, are valuable as novel therapeutics and preservatives. However, they tend to be toxic when expressed at high levels as recombinant peptides in plants, and they can be difficult to detect and isolate from complex plant tissues because they are strongly cationic and display low extinction coefficient and extremely limited immunogenicity. We therefore expressed BP100 with a C-terminal tag which preserved its antimicrobial activity and demonstrated significant accumulation in plant cells. We used a fluorescent tag to trace BP100 following transiently expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves and showed that it accumulated in large vesicles derived from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) along with typical ER luminal proteins. Interestingly, the formation of these vesicles was induced by BP100. Similar vesicles formed in stably transformed Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings, but the recombinant peptide was toxic to the host during latter developmental stages. This was avoided by selecting active BP100 derivatives based on their low haemolytic activity even though the selected peptides remained toxic to plant cells when applied exogenously at high doses. Using this strategy, we generated transgenic rice lines producing active BP100 derivatives with a yield of up to 0.5% total soluble protein. © 2013 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Antimicrobial and antimalarial properties of medicinal plants used by the indigenous tribes of Andaman and Nicobar Islands, India.

    PubMed

    Chander, M Punnam; Pillai, C R; Sunish, I P; Vijayachari, P

    2016-07-01

    In this study, methanol extracts of six medicinal plants (Alstonia macrophylla, Claoxylon indicum, Dillenia andamanica, Jasminum syringifolium, Miliusia andamanica and Pedilanthus tithymaloides) traditionally used by Nicobarese tribes of Andaman and Nicobar Islands were studied for antimicrobial and antimalarial activities as well as preliminary photochemical analysis. Plants were collected from Car Nicobar of Andaman and Nicobar Islands and the ethnobotanical data were gathered from traditional healers who inhabit the study area. The methanol extracts were obtained by cold percolation method and the antimicrobial activity was found using agar well diffusion method. Among the plants tested, J. syringifolium, D. andamanica, C. indicum were most active. The antimalarial activity was evaluated against Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine-sensitive MRC-2 isolate. The crude extract of M. andamanica showed excellent antimalarial activity followed by extracts of P. tithymaloides, J. syringifolium and D. andamanica. The chemical injury to erythrocytes was also carried out and it showed that, there were no morphological changes in erythrocytes by the methanol crude extracts. The in vitro antimicrobial and antimalarial activity might be due to the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, triterpenes, sterols, tannins and saponins in the methanol extracts of tested plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. In vitro antimicrobial activity of plants used in traditional medicine in Gurage and Silti Zones, south central Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Teka, Alemtshay; Rondevaldova, Johana; Asfaw, Zemede; Demissew, Sebsebe; Van Damme, Patrick; Kokoska, Ladislav; Vanhove, Wouter

    2015-08-18

    To overcome the escalating problems associated with infectious diseases and drug resistance, discovery of new antimicrobials is crucial. The present study aimed to carry out in vitro antimicrobial analysis of 15 medicinal plant species selected according to their traditional medicinal uses in Gurage and Silti Zones, south central Ethiopia. Ethanol extracts of various plant parts were investigated for their antimicrobial activity against 20 bacterial and one yeast strains. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by broth microdilution method. Asparagus africanus, Guizotia schimperi, Lippia adoensis var. adoensis and Premna schimperi were active against Candida albicans, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus at a concentration of 512 μg/ml or lower. Strong antibacterial activity (MIC≥128 μg/ml) was observed for G. schimperi extract against 17 resistant and sensitive Staphylococcus strains, at a concentration comparable to standard antibiotics. Moreover, this extract showed higher antibacterial activity for the test against S. aureus ATCC 33591, ATCC 33592, SA3 and SA5 strains (128-256 μg/ml) than oxacillin (512 μg/ml). The study revealed in vitro antibacterial activity of plants used in folk medicine in south central Ethiopia. The usefulness of these plants, in particular of G. schimperi, should be confirmed through further phytochemical and toxicity analyses.

  12. Partial purification and characterization of an antimicrobial activity from the wood extract of mangrove plant Ceriops decandra

    PubMed Central

    Simlai, Aritra; Mukherjee, Kalishankar; Mandal, Anurup; Bhattacharya, Kashinath; Samanta, Amalesh; Roy, Amit

    2016-01-01

    The development of resistance towards the antibiotics in use today has been a source of growing concern in the modern healthcare system around the world. To counter this major threat, there is an urgent need for discovery of new antimicrobials. Many plants, like mangroves, possess highly diversified list of natural phytochemicals which are known to have wide range of bioactivities. These phytochemicals can be good sources for the discovery of new drugs. In this study, we report the partial phytochemical characterization and antimicrobial activities of a semi-purified fraction isolated from the wood tissue of Ceriops decandra, a mangrove plant. This fraction named CD-3PM was chromatographically separated from C. decandra wood extract and was subjected to different spectral analyses to determine its partial chemical nature. The structural investigation indicates the presence of two diterpenoids, i) 3β, 13β-Dihydroxy-8-abietaen-7-one and ii) 3β-Hydroxy-8,13-abietadien-7-one in the CD-3PM fraction. The antimicrobial potential of this fraction was evaluated by microdilution-MTT assay against several organisms. Among the nine microorganisms found to be sensitive to the CD-3PM fraction, six organisms are reported to be pathogenic in nature. The CD-3PM fraction with broad spectrum antimicrobial efficacy revealed the presence of two diterpenoids and possesses potential applications in drug discovery process and food processing industries. PMID:27065777

  13. Partial purification and characterization of an antimicrobial activity from the wood extract of mangrove plant Ceriops decandra.

    PubMed

    Simlai, Aritra; Mukherjee, Kalishankar; Mandal, Anurup; Bhattacharya, Kashinath; Samanta, Amalesh; Roy, Amit

    2016-01-01

    The development of resistance towards the antibiotics in use today has been a source of growing concern in the modern healthcare system around the world. To counter this major threat, there is an urgent need for discovery of new antimicrobials. Many plants, like mangroves, possess highly diversified list of natural phytochemicals which are known to have wide range of bioactivities. These phytochemicals can be good sources for the discovery of new drugs. In this study, we report the partial phytochemical characterization and antimicrobial activities of a semi-purified fraction isolated from the wood tissue of Ceriops decandra, a mangrove plant. This fraction named CD-3PM was chromatographically separated from C. decandra wood extract and was subjected to different spectral analyses to determine its partial chemical nature. The structural investigation indicates the presence of two diterpenoids, i) 3β, 13β-Dihydroxy-8-abietaen-7-one and ii) 3β-Hydroxy-8,13-abietadien-7-one in the CD-3PM fraction. The antimicrobial potential of this fraction was evaluated by microdilution-MTT assay against several organisms. Among the nine microorganisms found to be sensitive to the CD-3PM fraction, six organisms are reported to be pathogenic in nature. The CD-3PM fraction with broad spectrum antimicrobial efficacy revealed the presence of two diterpenoids and possesses potential applications in drug discovery process and food processing industries.

  14. Phenolic characterization and antimicrobial activity of folk medicinal plant extracts for their applications in olive production.

    PubMed

    Boiteux, Joana; Soto Vargas, Carolina; Pizzuolo, Pablo; Lucero, Gabriela; Silva, María Fernanda

    2014-06-01

    Phytophthora spp is important in plant pathology due to the importance of the diseases it causes. In olive trees, severe damages are caused by the disease known as "dry branch" occasioned by Phytophthora nicotianae, P. citrophthora and P. palmivora. Much effort has been made to find efficient methods of control, with a low negative impact on environment. In this regard, treatment with plant extracts is a valid strategy. The aims of the present study are (i) to determine the polyphenol composition of extracts of Thymus vulgaris, Origanum vulgare, Matricaria recutita, and Larrea divaricata by CZE, (ii) correlate the analytical composition of these extracts with the inhibition on the mycelial growth, and (iii) determine the individual antimicrobial activity of the most active ingredients. A simple methodology was developed for the determination of catechin, naringenin, cinnamic acid, syringic acid, chlorogenic acid, apigenin, vanillic acid, luteolin, quercetin, and caffeic acid in plant extracts by CZE. The extraction of phenolic compounds in extract was performed by a miniaturized solid phase extraction using a home-made minicolumn packed with suitable filtering material (C18 , 50 mg). The optimized analyses conditions were: 30 mM boric acid buffer, pH 9.50; capillary, 57 cm full length, 50 cm effective length, 75 μm id, hydrodynamic injection 30 mbar, 2 s; 25 kV; 25°C, detection by UV absorbance at 290 nm. Sample results suggest that phenolic composition seems to have a great influence on inhibition of pathogens. The highest inhibitions of mycelial growth were observed for cinnamic acid and naringenin. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Antimicrobial, cytotoxicity and phytochemical screening of Jordanian plants used in traditional medicine.

    PubMed

    Talib, Wamidh H; Mahasneh, Adel M

    2010-03-12

    Antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity of fifty one extracts of different parts of 14 plants were studied. Ethanol, methanol, aqueous, butanol, and n-hexane extracts were tested against three gram negative, two gram positive bacteria, and two fungi. Cytotoxicity and phytochemical screening were determined using MTT and TLC assays, respectively. Of the fifty one extracts, twenty two showed activities against different microorganisms with MICs ranging from 62.5 to 1000 microg/mL. The highest activity (100% inhibition) was for a butanol extract of Rosa damascena receptacles against Salmonella typhimurium and Bacillus cereus (MIC of 62.5 and 250 microg/mL) respectively. Butanol extract of Narcissus tazetta aerial parts and aqueous extract of Rosa damascena receptacles were both active against Candida albicans (MIC of 125 microg/mL). Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was inhibited by butanol, aqueous extracts of Rosa damascena receptacles and butanol extract of Inula viscosa flowers (MIC of 500, 500, and 250 microg/mL) respectively. Rosa damascena receptacles and Verbascum sinaiticum flowers ethanol extract showed lowest cytotoxicity against Vero cell line (IC50 of 454.11 and 367.11). Most toxic was the ethanol extract of Ononis hirta aerial parts (IC50 72.50 microg/mL). Flavonoids and terpenoids were present in all plants. Ononis hirta and Narcissus tazetta contained alkaloids. The results validate the use of these plants and report for the first time bioactivity of Rosa damascena receptacles and further justifies the use of such screening programs in the quest for new drugs.

  16. Medicinal Plants Based Products Tested on Pathogens Isolated from Mastitis Milk.

    PubMed

    Pașca, Claudia; Mărghitaș, Liviu; Dezmirean, Daniel; Bobiș, Otilia; Bonta, Victorița; Chirilă, Flore; Matei, Ioana; Fiț, Nicodim

    2017-09-04

    Bovine mastitis a major disease that is commonly associated with bacterial infection. The common treatment is with antibiotics administered intramammary into infected quarters of the udder. The excessive use of antibiotics leads to multidrug resistance and associated risks for human health. In this context, the search for alternative drugs based on plants has become a priority in livestock medicine. These products have a low manufacturing cost and no reports of antimicrobial resistance to these have been documented. In this context, the main objective of this study was to determine the antimicrobial effect of extracts and products of several indigenous, or acclimatized plants on pathogens isolated from bovine mastitis. A total of eleven plant alcoholic extracts and eight plant-derived products were tested against 32 microorganisms isolated from milk. The obtained results have shown an inhibition of bacterial growth for all tested plants, with better results for Everniaprunastri, Artemisiaabsinthium, and Lavandulaangustifolia. Moreover, E.prunastri, Populus nigra, and L. angustifolia presented small averages of minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations. Among the plant-derived products, three out of eight have shown a strong anti-microbial effect comparable with the effect of florfenicol and enrofloxacin, and better than individual plant extracts possibly due to synergism. These results suggest an important anti-microbial effect of these products on pathogens isolated from bovine mastitis with a possible applicability in this disease.

  17. Assessing the antimicrobial activity of polyisoprene based surfaces.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Hope; Brunellière, Jérôme; Veryaskina, Marina; Brotons, Guillaume; Sablé, Sophie; Lanneluc, Isabelle; Lambert, Kelly; Marmey, Pascal; Milsted, Amy; Cutright, Teresa; Nourry, Arnaud; Mouget, Jean-Luc; Pasetto, Pamela

    2015-02-19

    There has been an intense research effort in the last decades in the field of biofouling prevention as it concerns many aspects of everyday life and causes problems to devices, the environment, and human health. Many different antifouling and antimicrobial materials have been developed to struggle against bacteria and other micro- and macro-organism attachment to different surfaces. However the "miracle solution" has still to be found. The research presented here concerns the synthesis of bio-based polymeric materials and the biological tests that showed their antifouling and, at the same time, antibacterial activity. The raw material used for the coating synthesis was natural rubber. The polyisoprene chains were fragmented to obtain oligomers, which had reactive chemical groups at their chain ends, therefore they could be modified to insert polymerizable and biocidal groups. Films were obtained by radical photopolymerization of the natural rubber derived oligomers and their structure was altered, in order to understand the mechanism of attachment inhibition and to increase the efficiency of the anti-biofouling action. The adhesion of three species of pathogenic bacteria and six strains of marine bacteria was studied. The coatings were able to inhibit bacterial attachment by contact, as it was verified that no detectable leaching of toxic molecules occurred.

  18. Assessing the Antimicrobial Activity of Polyisoprene Based Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Badawy, Hope; Brunellière, Jérôme; Veryaskina, Marina; Brotons, Guillaume; Sablé, Sophie; Lanneluc, Isabelle; Lambert, Kelly; Marmey, Pascal; Milsted, Amy; Cutright, Teresa; Nourry, Arnaud; Mouget, Jean-Luc; Pasetto, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    There has been an intense research effort in the last decades in the field of biofouling prevention as it concerns many aspects of everyday life and causes problems to devices, the environment, and human health. Many different antifouling and antimicrobial materials have been developed to struggle against bacteria and other micro- and macro-organism attachment to different surfaces. However the “miracle solution” has still to be found. The research presented here concerns the synthesis of bio-based polymeric materials and the biological tests that showed their antifouling and, at the same time, antibacterial activity. The raw material used for the coating synthesis was natural rubber. The polyisoprene chains were fragmented to obtain oligomers, which had reactive chemical groups at their chain ends, therefore they could be modified to insert polymerizable and biocidal groups. Films were obtained by radical photopolymerization of the natural rubber derived oligomers and their structure was altered, in order to understand the mechanism of attachment inhibition and to increase the efficiency of the anti-biofouling action. The adhesion of three species of pathogenic bacteria and six strains of marine bacteria was studied. The coatings were able to inhibit bacterial attachment by contact, as it was verified that no detectable leaching of toxic molecules occurred. PMID:25706513

  19. The agar microdilution method - a new method for antimicrobial susceptibility testing for essential oils and plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Golus, J; Sawicki, R; Widelski, J; Ginalska, G

    2016-11-01

    To develop a new agar microdilution technique suitable for the assessment of the antimicrobial activity of natural plant products such as essential oils or plant extracts as well as to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of several essential oils and plant extracts. The proposed agar microdilution method was evolved on the basis of the CLSI agar dilution method, approved for conventional antimicrobials. However, this new method combines convenience and time/cost effectiveness typical for microtitre methods with the advantages of the agar dilution of hydrophobic or coloured substances. Different concentrations of the tested agents were added to Eppendorf tubes with molten Mueller-Hinton agar, vortexed and dispensed into the 96-well microplate in a small volume of 100 μl per well which allows for rapid, easy and economical preparation of samples as well as providing a uniform and stable dispersion without separation of the oil-water phases which occurs in methods with liquid medium. Next, the agar microdilution plates were inoculated with four reference bacterial strains. The results of our study demonstrated that the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were successfully determined using the agar microdilution method even with hydrophobic essential oils or strongly coloured plant extracts. The new agar microdilution method avoids the problems associated with testing of water insoluble, oily or strongly coloured plant natural products. Moreover, it enables the reliable, cheap and easy MIC determination of such agents. In the era of increasing antibiotic resistance high hopes are associated with new drugs of plant origin. However, the lack of standardized and reliable testing methods for assessing antibacterial activity of plant natural products causes impediment to research into this area. This study demonstrated that the agar microdilution method can be used successfully for testing oily and coloured substances. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Transgenic Brassica juncea plants expressing MsrA1, a synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptide, exhibit resistance to fungal phytopathogens.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Anjana; Kumar, Deepak; Shekhar, Shashi; Yusuf, Mohd Aslam; Misra, Santosh; Sarin, Neera Bhalla

    2014-06-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs) have shown potential against broad spectrum of phytopathogens. Synthetic versions with desirable properties have been modeled on these natural peptides. MsrA1 is a synthetic chimera of cecropin A and melittin CAPs with antimicrobial properties. We generated transgenic Brassica juncea plants expressing the msrA1 gene aimed at conferring fungal resistance. Five independent transgenic lines were evaluated for resistance to Alternaria brassicae and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, two of the most devastating pathogens of B. juncea crops. In vitro assays showed inhibition by MsrA1 of Alternaria hyphae growth by 44-62 %. As assessed by the number and size of lesions and time taken for complete leaf necrosis, the Alternaria infection was delayed and restricted in the transgenic plants with the protection varying from 69 to 85 % in different transgenic lines. In case of S. sclerotiorum infection, the lesions were more severe and spread profusely in untransformed control compared with transgenic plants. The sclerotia formed in the stem of untransformed control plants were significantly more in number and larger in size than those present in the transgenic plants where disease protection of 56-71.5 % was obtained. We discuss the potential of engineering broad spectrum biotic stress tolerance by transgenic expression of CAPs in crop plants.

  1. EVALUATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL AND CYTOTOXIC ACTIVITIES OF PLANT EXTRACTS FROM SOUTHERN MINAS GERAIS CERRADO

    PubMed Central

    Chavasco, Juliana Moscardini; Prado E Feliphe, Bárbara Helena Muniz; Cerdeira, Claudio Daniel; Leandro, Fabrício Damasceno; Coelho, Luiz Felipe Leomil; da Silva, Jéferson Junior; Chavasco, Jorge Kleber; Dias, Amanda Latercia Tranches

    2014-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of plant hidroethanolic extracts on bacteria Gram positive, Gram negative, yeasts, Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37 and Mycobacterium bovis was evaluated by using the technique of Agar diffusion and microdilution in broth. Among the extracts evaluated by Agar diffusion, the extract of Bidens pilosa leaf presented the most expressive average of haloes of growth inhibition to the microorganisms, followed by the extract of B. pilosa flower, of Eugenia pyriformis' leaf and seed, of Plinia cauliflora leaf which statistically presented the same average of haloes inhibitory formation on bacteria Gram positive, Gram negative and yeasts. The extracts of Heliconia rostrata did not present activity. Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37 and Mycobacterium bovis (BCG) appeared resistant to all the extracts. The susceptibility profile of Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae fungi were compared to one another and to the Gram positive Bacillus subtilis, Enterococcus faecalis and the Gram negative Salmonella typhimurium bacteria (p > 0.05). The evaluation of cytotoxicity was carried out on C6-36 larvae cells of the Aedes albopictus mosquito. The extracts of stem and flower of Heliconia rostrata, leaf and stem of Plinia cauliflora, seed of Anonna crassiflora and stem, flower and root of B. pilosa did not present toxicity in the analyzed concentrations. The highest rates of selectivity appeared in the extracts of stem of A. crassiflora and flower of B. pilosa to Staphylococcus aureus, presenting potential for future studies about a new drug development. PMID:24553603

  2. Efficacy of Plant-Derived Antimicrobials in Controlling Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Virulence In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Sangeetha Ananda; Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Nair, Meera Surendran; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a major foodborne pathogen that can cause serious human illness characterized by hemorrhagic diarrhea and kidney failure. The pathology of enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 (EHEC) infection is primarily mediated by verotoxins, which bind to the globotriaosylceramide receptor on host cells. Antibiotics are contraindicated for treating EHEC infection because they lead to increased verotoxin release, thereby increasing the risk of renal failure and death in patients. Thus, alternative strategies are needed for controlling EHEC infections in humans. This study investigated the effect of subinhibitory concentrations of five plant-derived antimicrobial agents (PDAs) that are generally considered as safe, i.e., trans-cinnamaldehyde, eugenol, carvacrol, thymol, and β-resorcylic acid, on EHEC motility, adhesion to human intestinal epithelial cells, verotoxin production, and virulence gene expression. All tested PDAs reduced EHEC motility and attachment to human intestinal epithelial cells (P < 0.05) and decreased verotoxin synthesis by EHEC. The reverse transcription real-time PCR data revealed that PDAs decreased the expression of critical virulence genes in EHEC (P < 0.05). The results collectively suggest that these PDAs could be used to reduce EHEC virulence, but follow-up studies in animal models are necessary to validate these findings.

  3. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil from the edible aromatic plant Aristolochia delavayi.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Jian; Njateng, Guy S S; He, Wen-Jia; Zhang, Hong-Xia; Gu, Jian-Long; Chen, Shan-Na; Du, Zhi-Zhi

    2013-11-01

    The essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation from the aerial parts of Aristolochia delavayi Franch. (Aristolochiaceae), a unique edible aromatic plant consumed by the Nakhi (Naxi) people in Yunnan, China, was investigated using GC/MS analysis. In total, 95 components, representing more than 95% of the oil composition, were identified, and the main constituents found were (E)-dec-2-enal (52.0%), (E)-dodec-2-enal (6.8%), dodecanal (3.35%), heptanal (2.88%), and decanal (2.63%). The essential oil showed strong inhibitory activity (96% reduction) of the production of bacterial volatile sulfide compounds (VSC) by Klebsiella pneumoniae, an effect that was comparable with that of the reference compound citral (91% reduction). Moreover, the antimicrobial activity of the essential oil and the isolated major compound against eight bacterial and six fungal strains were evaluated. The essential oil showed significant antibacterial activity against Providencia stuartii and Escherichia coli, with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ranging from 3.9 to 62.5 μg/ml. The oil also showed strong inhibitory activity against the fungal strains Trichophyton ajelloi, Trichophyton terrestre, Candida glabrata, Candida guilliermondii, and Cryptococcus neoformans, with MIC values ranging from 3.9 to 31.25 μg/ml, while (E)-dec-2-enal presented a lower antifungal activity than the essential oil.

  4. Evaluation of antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of plant extracts from southern Minas Gerais cerrado.

    PubMed

    Chavasco, Juliana Moscardini; Prado E Feliphe, Bárbara Helena Muniz; Cerdeira, Claudio Daniel; Leandro, Fabrício Damasceno; Coelho, Luiz Felipe Leomil; Silva, Jéferson Junior da; Chavasco, Jorge Kleber; Dias, Amanda Latercia Tranches

    2014-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of plant hidroethanolic extracts on bacteria Gram positive, Gram negative, yeasts, Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37 and Mycobacterium bovis was evaluated by using the technique of Agar diffusion and microdilution in broth. Among the extracts evaluated by Agar diffusion, the extract of Bidens pilosa leaf presented the most expressive average of haloes of growth inhibition to the microorganisms, followed by the extract of B. pilosa flower, of Eugenia pyriformis' leaf and seed, of Plinia cauliflora leaf which statistically presented the same average of haloes inhibitory formation on bacteria Gram positive, Gram negative and yeasts. The extracts of Heliconia rostrata did not present activity. Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37 and Mycobacterium bovis (BCG) appeared resistant to all the extracts. The susceptibility profile of Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae fungi were compared to one another and to the Gram positive Bacillus subtilis, Enterococcus faecalis and the Gram negative Salmonella typhimurium bacteria (p > 0.05). The evaluation of cytotoxicity was carried out on C6-36 larvae cells of the Aedes albopictus mosquito. The extracts of stem and flower of Heliconia rostrata, leaf and stem of Plinia cauliflora, seed of Anonna crassiflora and stem, flower and root of B. pilosa did not present toxicity in the analyzed concentrations. The highest rates of selectivity appeared in the extracts of stem of A. crassiflora and flower of B. pilosa to Staphylococcus aureus, presenting potential for future studies about a new drug development.

  5. Efficacy of plant-derived antimicrobials as antimicrobial wash treatments for reducing enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 on apples.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Sangeetha Ananda; Upadhyay, Abhinav; Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Upadhyaya, Indu; Mooyottu, Shankumar; Roshni Amalaradjou, Mary Anne; Schreiber, David; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of 3 GRAS-status, plant-derived antimicrobials (PDAs), trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC), carvacrol (CR), and β-resorcylic acid (BR) applied as an antimicrobial wash for killing Escherichia coli O157:H7 on apples. "Red delicious" apples inoculated with a 5 strain mixture of E. coli O157:H7 were subjected to washing in sterile deionized water containing 0% PDA (control), 0.15% TC, 0.35% TC, 0.15% CR, 0.30% CR, 0.5% BR, or 1% BR for 1, 3, and 5 min at 23 °C in the presence and absence of 1% soil, and surviving pathogen populations on apples were enumerated at each specified time. All PDAs were more effective in reducing E. coli O157:H7 compared to the water wash treatment (P < 0.05) and reduced the pathogen by 4- to 5-log CFU/apple in 5 min. Chlorine (1%) was the most effective treatment reducing the pathogen on apples to undetectable levels in 1 min (P < 0.05). Moreover, the antimicrobial effect of CR and BR was not affected by the presence of soil, whereas the efficacy of TC and BR was decreased in the presence of soil. Further, no bacteria were detected in the wash solution containing CR and BR; however, E. coli O157:H7 was recovered in the control wash water and treatment solutions containing TC and chlorine, in the presence of 1% soil (P < 0.05). Results suggest that the aforementioned PDAs, especially CR and BR could be used effectively to kill E. coli O157:H7 on apples when used as a wash treatment. Studies on the sensory and quality characteristics of apples treated with PDAs are needed before recommending their usage. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. Rapid inactivation of Salmonella Enteritidis on shell eggs by plant-derived antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Indu; Upadhyay, Abhinav; Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Baskaran, Sangeetha Ananda; Mooyottu, Shankumar; Darre, Michael J; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is a common foodborne pathogen transmitted to humans largely by consumption of contaminated eggs. The external surface of eggs becomes contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis from various sources on farms, the main sources being hens' droppings and contaminated litter. Therefore, effective egg surface disinfection is critical to reduce pathogens on eggs and potentially control egg-borne disease outbreaks. This study investigated the efficacy of GRAS (generally recognized as safe) status, plant-derived antimicrobials (PDA), namely trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC), carvacrol (CR), and eugenol (EUG), as an antimicrobial wash for rapidly killing Salmonella Enteritidis on shell eggs in the presence or absence of chicken droppings. White-shelled eggs inoculated with a 5-strain mixture of nalidixic acid (NA) resistant Salmonella Enteritidis (8.0 log cfu/mL) were washed in sterile deionized water containing each PDA (0.0, 0.25, 0.5, or 0.75%) or chlorine (200 mg/kg) at 32 or 42°C for 30 s, 3 min, or 5 min. Approximately 6.0 log cfu/mL of Salmonella Enteritidis was recovered from inoculated and unwashed eggs. The wash water control and chlorine control decreased Salmonella Enteritidis on eggs by only 2.0 log cfu/mL even after washing for 5 min. The PDA were highly effective in killing Salmonella Enteritidis on eggs compared with controls (P < 0.05). All treatments containing CR and EUG reduced Salmonella Enteritidis to undetectable levels as rapidly as within 30 s of washing, whereas TC (0.75%) completely inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis on eggs washed at 42°C for 30 s (P < 0.05). No Salmonella Enteritidis was detected in any PDA or chlorine wash solution; however, substantial pathogen populations (~4.0 log cfu/mL) survived in the antibacterial-free control wash water (P < 0.05). The CR and EUG were also able to eliminate Salmonella Enteritidis on eggs to undetectable levels in the presence of 3% chicken droppings at 32°C (P < 0.05). This study

  7. Assessment of the impact of the addition of antimicrobial plant extracts to wine: volatile and phenolic composition.

    PubMed

    García-Ruiz, Almudena; Rodríguez-Bencomo, Juan José; Garrido, Ignacio; Martín-Álvarez, Pedro J; Moreno-Arribas, M Victoria; Bartolomé, Begoña

    2013-08-15

    Antimicrobial plant phenolic-rich extracts have been proposed as alternative to sulfites in the control of the malolactic fermentation (MLF) during winemaking. This addition may affect wine organoleptic properties. In this paper, we have investigated the changes in wine volatile and phenolic composition, after MLF, of a red wine treated with antimicrobial extracts from eucalyptus leaves and almond skins. Although addition of both extracts led to statistically significant changes (P < 0.05) in the concentration of several esters, alcohols, C13 nor-isoprenoids and volatile phenols, only few of these volatile compounds showed values of odour activity > 1 aroma unit; that is to say, whose concentrations were higher than their corresponding odour thresholds. With regard to phenolic compounds, the addition of both extracts did not significantly modify the content of anthocyanins, which predicts minor changes in wine colour. However, the content of non-anthocyanin phenolics was significantly higher in the wines treated with antimicrobial extracts, especially for flavonols, being the dose-over-taste factor for these wines significantly higher. Finally, principal component analysis showed that wines were mainly differentiated on the basis of whether MLF was conducted or not, and its method of performance (inoculated/spontaneous). Addition of antimicrobial extracts leads to some compositional changes in the wine, whose relevance needs to be addressed in future experiments, including wine sensorial analysis. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. High CO2 concentration as an inductor agent to drive production of recombinant phytotoxic antimicrobial peptides in plant biofactories.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Cristina; Pla, Maria; Company, Nuri; Riudavets, Jordi; Nadal, Anna

    2016-03-01

    Cationic α-helical antimicrobial peptides such as BP100 are of increasing interest for developing novel phytosanitary or therapeutic agents and products with industrial applications. Biotechnological production of these peptides in plants can be severely impaired due to the toxicity exerted on the host by high-level expression. This can be overcome by using inducible promoters with extremely low activity throughout plant development, although the yields are limited. We examined the use of modified atmospheres using the increased levels of [CO2], commonly used in the food industry, as the inductor agent to biotechnologically produce phytotoxic compounds with higher yields. Here we show that 30% [CO2] triggered a profound transcriptional response in rice leaves, including a change in the energy provision from photosynthesis to glycolysis, and the activation of stress defense mechanisms. Five genes with central roles in up-regulated pathways were initially selected and their promoters successfully used to drive the expression of phytotoxic BP100 in genetically modified (GM) rice. GM plants had a normal phenotype on development and seed production in non-induction conditions. Treatment with 30 % [CO2] led to recombinant peptide accumulation of up to 1 % total soluble protein when the Os.hb2 promoter was used. This is within the range of biotechnological production of other peptides in plants. Using BP100 as a proof-of-concept we demonstrate that very high [CO2] can be considered an economically viable strategy to drive production of recombinant phytotoxic antimicrobial peptides in plant biofactories.

  9. Antimicrobial activities of some Thai traditional medical longevity formulations from plants and antibacterial compounds from Ficus foveolata.

    PubMed

    Meerungrueang, W; Panichayupakaranant, P

    2014-09-01

    Medicinal plants involved in traditional Thai longevity formulations are potential sources of antimicrobial compounds. To evaluate the antimicrobial activities of some extracts from medicinal plants used in traditional Thai longevity formulations against some oral pathogens, including Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus mutans, and Candida albicans. An extract that possessed the strongest antimicrobial activity was fractionated to isolate and identify the active compounds. Methanol and ethyl acetate extracts of 25 medicinal plants used as Thai longevity formulations were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity using disc diffusion (5 mg/disc) and broth microdilution (1.2-2500 µg/mL) methods. The ethyl acetate extract of Ficus foveolata Wall. (Moraceae) stems that exhibited the strongest antibacterial activity was fractionated to isolate the active compounds by an antibacterial assay-guided isolation process. The ethyl acetate extract of F. foveolata showed the strongest antibacterial activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values of 19.5-39.0 and 39.0-156.2 µg/mL, respectively. On the basis of an antibacterial assay-guided isolation, seven antibacterial compounds, including 2,6-dimethoxy-1,4-benzoquinone (1), syringaldehyde (2), sinapaldehyde (3), coniferaldehyde (4), 3β-hydroxystigmast-5-en-7-one (5), umbelliferone (6), and scopoletin (7), were purified. Among these isolated compounds, 2,6-dimethoxy-1,4-benzoquinone (1) exhibited the strongest antibacterial activities against S. pyogenes, S. mitis, and S. mutans with MIC values of 7.8, 7.8, and 15.6 µg/mL, and MBC values of 7.8, 7.8, and 31.2 µg/mL, respectively. In addition, this is the first report of these antibacterial compounds in the stems of F. foveolata.

  10. Antimicrobial nanocomposites based on natural modified materials: a review of carbons and clays.

    PubMed

    Martynková, Grazyna Simha; Valásková, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The review is focused on the recent research and development of antimicrobial nanocomposites based on selected carbon nanomaterials and natural nanoclay minerals. The nanocomposites comprised of two or several components, where at least one presents antimicrobial properties, are discussed. Yet the most popular agent remains silver as nanoparticle or in ionic form. Second, broadly studied group, are organics as additives or polymeric matrices. Both carbons and clays in certain forms possess antimicrobial properties. A lot of interest is put on to research graphene oxide. The low-environmental impact technologies-based on sustainable biopolymers have been studied. Testing of antimicrobial properties of nanomaterials is performed most frequently on E. coli and S. aureus bacterias.

  11. Potential development of a new cotton-based antimicrobial wipe

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The adsorption of alkyl-dimethyl-benzyl-ammonium chloride (ADBAC), a cationic surfactant commonly employed as an antimicrobial agent, on greige and bleached nonwoven cotton fabrics was investigated using UV/visible spectroscopy. Initial results have shown that greige cotton adsorbs roughly three tim...

  12. Stacking of antimicrobial genes in potato transgenic plants confers increased resistance to bacterial and fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Mercedes; Furman, Nicolás; Mencacci, Nicolás; Picca, Pablo; Toum, Laila; Lentz, Ezequiel; Bravo-Almonacid, Fernando; Mentaberry, Alejandro

    2012-01-20

    Solanum tuberosum plants were transformed with three genetic constructions expressing the Nicotiana tabacum AP24 osmotine, Phyllomedusa sauvagii dermaseptin and Gallus gallus lysozyme, and with a double-transgene construction expressing the AP24 and lysozyme sequences. Re-transformation of dermaseptin-transformed plants with the AP24/lysozyme construction allowed selection of plants simultaneously expressing the three transgenes. Potato lines expressing individual transgenes or double- and triple-transgene combinations were assayed for resistance to Erwinia carotovora using whole-plant and tuber infection assays. Resistance levels for both infection tests compared consistently for most potato lines and allowed selection of highly resistant phenotypes. Higher resistance levels were found in lines carrying the dermaseptin and lysozyme sequences, indicating that theses proteins are the major contributors to antibacterial activity. Similar results were obtained in tuber infection tests conducted with Streptomyces scabies. Plant lines showing the higher resistance to bacterial infections were challenged with Phytophthora infestans, Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium solani. Considerable levels of resistance to each of these pathogens were evidenced employing semi-quantitative tests based in detached-leaf inoculation, fungal growth inhibition and in vitro plant inoculation. On the basis of these results, we propose that stacking of these transgenes is a promising approach to achieve resistance to both bacterial and fungal pathogens.

  13. Antimicrobial and inhibitory enzyme activity of N-(benzyl) and quaternary N-(benzyl) chitosan derivatives on plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Mohamed E I; Rabea, Entsar I; Taktak, Nehad E M

    2014-10-13

    Chemical modification of a biopolymer chitosan by introducing quaternary ammonium moieties into the polymer backbone enhances its antimicrobial activity. In the present study, a series of quaternary N-(benzyl) chitosan derivatives were synthesized and characterized by (1)H-NMR, FT-IR and UV spectroscopic techniques. The antimicrobial activity against crop-threatening bacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Erwinia carotovora and fungi Botrytis cinerea, Botryodiplodia theobromae, Fusarium oxysporum and Phytophthora infestans were evaluated. The results proved that the grafting of benzyl moiety or quaternization of the derivatives onto chitosan molecule was successful in inhibiting the microbial growth. Moreover, increase water-solubility of the compounds by quaternization significantly increased the activity against bacteria and fungi. Exocellular enzymes including polygalacturonase (PGase), pectin-lyase (PLase), polyphenol oxidase (PPOase) and cellulase were also affected at 1000 mg/L. These compounds especially quaternary-based chitosan derivatives that have good inhibitory effect should be potentially used as antimicrobial agents in crop protection.

  14. PenBase, the shrimp antimicrobial peptide penaeidin database: sequence-based classification and recommended nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Gueguen, Yannick; Garnier, Julien; Robert, Lorenne; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Mougenot, Isabelle; de Lorgeril, Julien; Janech, Michael; Gross, Paul S; Warr, Gregory W; Cuthbertson, Brandon; Barracco, Margherita A; Bulet, Philippe; Aumelas, André; Yang, Yinshan; Bo, Dong; Xiang, Jianhai; Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Piquemal, David; Bachère, Evelyne

    2006-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides play a major role in innate immunity. The penaeidins, initially characterized from the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei, are a family of antimicrobial peptides that appear to be expressed in all penaeid shrimps. As of recent, a large number of penaeid nucleotide sequences have been identified from a variety of penaeid shrimp species and these sequences currently reside in several databases under unique identifiers with no nomenclatural continuity. To facilitate research in this field and avoid potential confusion due to a diverse number of nomenclatural designations, we have made a systematic effort to collect, analyse, and classify all the penaeidin sequences available in every database. We have identified a common penaeidin signature and subsequently established a classification based on amino acid sequences. In order to clarify the naming process, we have introduced a 'penaeidin nomenclature' that can be applied to all extant and future penaeidins. A specialized database, PenBase, which is freely available at , has been developed for the penaeidin family of antimicrobial peptides, to provide comprehensive information about their properties, diversity and nomenclature.

  15. Inhibition of Bacterial Pathogens in Medium and on Spinach Leaf Surfaces using Plant-Derived Antimicrobials Loaded in Surfactant Micelles.

    PubMed

    Ruengvisesh, Songsirin; Loquercio, Andre; Castell-Perez, Elena; Taylor, T Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Encapsulation of hydrophobic plant essential oil components (EOC) into surfactant micelles can assist the decontamination of fresh produce surfaces from bacterial pathogens during postharvest washing. Loading of eugenol and carvacrol into surfactant micelles of polysorbate 20 (Tween 20), Surfynol® 485W, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and CytoGuard® LA 20 (CG20) was determined by identification of the EOC/surfactant-specific maximum additive concentration (MAC). Rheological behavior of dilute EOC-containing micelles was then tested to determine micelle tolerance to shearing. Antimicrobial efficacy of EOC micelles against Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serotype Saintpaul was first evaluated by the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). Pathogen-inoculated spinach was treated with eugenol-containing micelles applied via spraying or immersion methods. SDS micelles produced the highest MACs for EOCs, while Tween 20 loaded the lowest amount of EOCs. Micelles demonstrated Newtonian behavior in response to shearing. SDS and CG20-derived micelles containing EOCs produced the lowest MICs and MBCs for pathogens. E. coli O157:H7 and S. Saintpaul were reduced on spinach surfaces by application of eugenol micelles, though no differences in numbers of surviving pathogens were observed when methods of antimicrobial micelle application (spraying, immersion) was compared (P ≥ 0.05). Data suggest eugenol in SDS and CG20 micelles may be useful for produce surface decontamination from bacterial pathogens during postharvest washing. Antimicrobial essential oil component (EOC)-containing micelles assist the delivery of natural food antimicrobials to food surfaces, including fresh produce, for decontamination of microbial foodborne pathogens. Antimicrobial EOC-loaded micelles were able to inhibit the enteric pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Saintpaul in liquid medium and on spinach surfaces. However

  16. Effect of glycounits on the antimicrobial properties and toxicity behavior of polymers based on quaternized DMAEMA.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Paino, Marta; Muñoz-Bonilla, Alexandra; López-Fabal, Fátima; Gómez-Garcés, José L; Heuts, Johan P A; Fernández-García, Marta

    2015-01-12

    Polymers with quaternary ammonium groups such as quaternized poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMAQ) have been used as antimicrobial agents because of their demonstrated good antimicrobial activities against a huge number and types of microbes, although their cytotoxicity is also well-known. In this work block copolymers based on PDMAEMAQ were synthesized containing hydrophobic segments of poly(butyl methacrylate) to improve the antimicrobial activity and glycomonomer units with the aim of decreasing the cytotoxicity of the polymers. Hydrophobic butyl methacrylate (BMA) blocks were chain extended by statistical and block copolymers of DMAEMA and 2-{[(d-glucosamin-2-N-yl)carbonylethyl methacrylate (HEMAGl) glycomonomer of different compositions. In order to find the balance between antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity, the selectivity index of each polymer was obtained from minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and white and red blood cells toxicity measurements.

  17. Studies of the in vitro cytotoxic, antioxidant, lipase inhibitory and antimicrobial activities of selected Thai medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Traditional folk medicinal plants have recently become popular and are widely used for primary health care. Since Thailand has a great diversity of indigenous (medicinal) plant species, this research investigated 52 traditionally used species of Thai medicinal plants for their in vitro cytotoxic, antioxidant, lipase inhibitory and antimicrobial activities. Methods The 55 dried samples, derived from the medicinally used parts of the 52 plant species were sequentially extracted by hexane, dichloromethane, ethanol and water. These 220 extracts were then screened for in vitro (i) cytotoxicity against four cell lines, derived from human lung (A549), breast (MDA-MB-231), cervical (KB3-1) and colon (SW480) cancers, using the MTT cytotoxicity assay; (ii) antioxidant activity, analyzed by measuring the scavenging activity of DPPH radicals; (iii) lipase inhibitory activity, determined from the hydrolytic reaction of p-nitrophenyllaurate with pancreatic lipase; and (iv) antimicrobial activity against three Gram-positive and two Gram-negative bacteria species plus one strain of yeast using the disc-diffusion method and determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration by the broth micro-dilution assay. Results The crude dichloromethane and/or ethanol extracts from four plant species showed an effective in vitro cytotoxic activity against the human cancer cell lines that was broadly similar to that of the specific chemotherapy drugs (etoposide, doxorubicin, vinblastine and oxaliplatin). In particular, this is the first report of the strong in vitro cytotoxic activity of Bauhinia strychnifolia vines. The tested tissue parts of only six plant species (Allium sativum, Cocoloba uvifera, Dolichandrone spathacea, Lumnitzera littorea, Sonneratia alba and Sonneratia caseolaris) showed promising potential antioxidant activity, whereas lipase inhibitory activity was only found in the ethanol extract from Coscinum fenestratum and this was weak at 17-fold lower than Orlistat

  18. An Environmentally Benign Antimicrobial Coating Based on a Protein Supramolecular Assembly.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jin; Su, Yajuan; Liu, Peng; Li, Peng; Yang, Peng

    2017-01-11

    The use of antimicrobial materials, for example, silver nanoparticles, has been a cause for concern because they often exert an adverse effect on environmental and safety during their preparation and use. In this study, we report a class of green antimicrobial coating based on a supramolecular assembly of a protein extracted from daily food, without the addition of any other hazardous agents. It is found that a self-assembled nanofilm by mere hen egg white lysozyme has durable in vitro and in vivo broad-spectrum antimicrobial efficacy against Gram-positive/negative and fungi. Such enhanced antimicrobial capability over native lysozyme is attributed to a synergistic combination of positive charge and hydrophobic amino acid residues enriched on polymeric aggregates in the lysozyme nanofilm. Accompanied with high antimicrobial activity, this protein-based PTL material simultaneously exhibits the integration of multiple functions including antifouling, antibiofilm, blood compatibility, and low cytotoxicity due to the existence of surface hydration effect. Moreover, the bioinspired adhesion mediated by the amyloid structure contained in the nanofilm induces robust transfer and self-adhesion of the material onto virtually arbitrary substrates by a simple one-step aqueous coating or solvent-free printing in 1 min, thereby allowing an ultrafast route into practical implications for surface-functionalized commodity and biomedical devices. Our results demonstrate that the application of pure proteinaceous substance may afford a cost-effective green biomaterial that has high antimicrobial activity and low environmental impact.

  19. Changes in antimicrobial resistance in fecal bacteria associated with pig transit and holding times at slaughter plants.

    PubMed Central

    Molitoris, E; Fagerberg, D J; Quarles, C L; Krichevsky, M I

    1987-01-01

    Fecal coliforms, fecal streptococci, and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) associated with various pig transit and holding times were investigated at slaughter plants. Changes in the relative abundance of two biotypes of Streptococcus faecium were associated with transit and holding of pigs, although approximately 20% of the isolates were unidentified. The greatest variety of coliforms was isolated from porcine feces after short transit (2 h) or holding (3 h) times and was qualitatively similar to those from pigs on farms. Isolates from pigs with longer average transit or holding times were almost all Escherichia coli (four biotypes). Streptococcal resistance to most antimicrobial agents was significantly greater (P less than 0.05) in isolates from live pigs at slaughter plants than in those from pigs at farms and was apparent after a short transit time (2 h). Streptococci from pigs held an average of 15 h were less resistant to most antimicrobial agents than those from pigs held 3 or 43 h. When compared with short transit times, moderate transit times (6 h) were associated with significantly decreased (P less than 0.05) coliform resistance and decreased resistance transfer but a greater diversity of AMR patterns. Holding pigs overnight (14 h) was associated with lowered coliform resistance to several antimicrobial agents, compared with the resistance of isolates from pigs held 3 or 39 h. A substantial increase (18 to 48%) in the ability to transfer streptomycin resistance was demonstrated in coliforms from pigs held 39 h, when compared with those from pigs held 3 h.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3606107

  20. Antimicrobial, antioxidant and anti-tyrosinase properties of extracts of the Mediterranean parasitic plant Cytinus hypocistis.

    PubMed

    Zucca, Paolo; Pintus, Manuela; Manzo, Giorgia; Nieddu, Mariella; Steri, Daniela; Rinaldi, Andrea C

    2015-10-13

    Cytinus is an endophytic parasitic plant occurring in South Africa, Madagascar, and in the Mediterranean region. We have extracted the inflorescences (the only visible part of the plant, emerging from the host roots at the time of blossom) of Cytinus hypocistis collected in Sardinia, Italy, and explored the antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-tyrosinase, and cytotoxic activities of the extracts. Extracts from C. hypocistis were prepared using increasing polarity solvents: cyclohexane, ethanol, and water. Phenolic composition were determined through spectrophotometric assays, and antioxidant activity with both electron-transfer and hydrogen-atom assays. Nine different bacterial strains, including clinical isolate methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, were used in agar diffusion method. Cytotoxicity was tested using against the B16F10 melanoma cell line. While cyclohexane extracts where biologically inactive, ethanolic and aqueous extracts displayed an intriguing activity against several Gram-positive bacterial strains, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, and against the Gram-negative Acinetobacter baumanii. Compared to the conventional antibiotics like cloxacillin, ampicillin, and oxytetracycline, C. hypocistis extracts were less active in absolute terms, but displayed a wider spectrum (notably, cloxacillin and ampicillin were inactive against methicillin-resistant S. aureus). The ethanolic extract of C. hypocistis was found to be particularly rich in polyphenols, in most part hydrolysable tannins. The antioxidant activity of extracts, tested with several methodologies, resulted to be particularly high in the case of ethanolic extracts, in accordance with the composition in phenolics. In detail, ethanol extracts presented about a twofold higher activity than the water sample when tested through the oxygen radical absorbance capacity-pyrogallol red (ORAC-PYR) assay. Cytotoxicity analysis against the B16F10 melanoma cell line showed that both extracts have

  1. Gram-stain-based antimicrobial selection reduces cost and overuse compared with Japanese guidelines.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro; Tsuha, Sanefumi; Shiiki, Soichi; Narita, Masashi

    2015-10-26

    The Gram stain has been used as an essential tool for antimicrobial stewardship in our hospital since the 1970s. The objective of this study was to clarify the difference in the targeted therapies selected based on the Gram stain and simulated empirical therapies based on the antimicrobial guidelines used in Japan. A referral-hospital-based prospective descriptive study was undertaken between May 2013 and April 2014 in Okinawa, Japan. All enrolled patients were adults who had been admitted to the Division of Infectious Diseases through the emergency room with suspected bacterial infection at one of three sites: respiratory system, urinary tract, or skin and soft tissues. The study outcomes were the types and effectiveness of the antibiotics initially selected, and their total costs. Two hundred eight patients were enrolled in the study. The median age was 80 years. A significantly narrower spectrum of antibiotics was selected based on the Gram stain than was selected based on the Japanese guidelines. The treatments based on the Gram stain and on the guidelines were estimated to be equally highly effective. The total cost of antimicrobials after Gram-stain testing was less than half the cost after the guidelines were followed. Compared with the Japanese guidelines, the Gram stain dramatically reduced the overuse of broad-spectrum antimicrobials without affecting the effectiveness of the treatment. Drug costs were reduced by half when the Gram stain was used. The Gram stain should be included in all antimicrobial stewardship programs.

  2. Time-Dependent Antimicrobial Activity of Filtering Nonwovens with Gemini Surfactant-Based Biocides.

    PubMed

    Majchrzycka, Katarzyna; Okrasa, Małgorzata; Szulc, Justyna; Brycki, Bogumił; Gutarowska, Beata

    2017-09-27

    Previous studies on nonwovens used for respiratory protective devices (RPDs) were related to equipment intended for short-term use. There is only limited research on the development of biocidal nonwoven fabrics for reusable RPDs that could be used safely in an industrial work environment where there is a risk of microbial growth. Moreover, a new group of biocides with high antimicrobial activity-gemini surfactants, has never been explored for textile's application in previous studies. The aim of this study was to develop high-efficiency melt-blown nonwovens containing gemini surfactants with time-dependent biocidal activity, and to validate their antimicrobial properties under conditions simulating their use at a plant biomass-processing unit. A set of porous biocidal structures (SPBS) was prepared and applied to the melt-blown polypropylene (PP) nonwovens. The biocidal properties of the structures were triggered by humidity and had different activation rates. Scanning electron microscopy was used to undertake structural studies of the modified PP/SPBS nonwovens. In addition, simulation of plant biomass dust deposition on the nonwovens was performed. The biocidal activity of PP/SPBS nonwovens was evaluated following incubation with Escherichia coli and Aspergillus niger from the American Type Culture Collection, and with Pseudomonas fluorescens and Penicillium chrysogenum isolated from the biomass. PP/SPBS nonwovens exhibited antimicrobial activity to varying levels. Higher antimicrobial activity was noted for bacteria (R = 87.85-97.46%) and lower for moulds (R = 80.11-94.53%).

  3. Antimicrobial Biomaterials based on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslan, Seyma

    Biomaterials that inactivate bacteria are needed to eliminate medical device infections. We investigate the antimicrobial nature of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) incorporated within biomedical polymers. In the first part, we focus on SWNT dispersed in the common biomedical polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) as a potential antimicrobial biomaterial. We find Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus epidermidis viability and metabolic activity to be significantly diminished in the presence of SWNT-PLGA, and to correlate with SWNT length and concentration. Up to 98 % of bacteria die within one hour of SWNT-PLGA versus 15-20% on pure PLGA. Shorter SWNT are found to be more toxic, possibly due to an increased density of open tube ends. In the second part, we investigate the antimicrobial activity of SWNT layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled with the polyelectrolytes poly(L-lysine) (PLL) and poly(L-glutamic acid) (PGA). The dispersibility of SWNT in aqueous solution is significantly improved via the biocompatible nonionic surfactant polyoxyethylene(20)sorbitan monolaurate (Tween 20) and the amphiphilic polymer phospholipid-poly(ethylene glycol) (PL-PEG). Absorbance spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) show SWNT with either Tween 20 or PL-PEG in aqueous solution to be well dispersed. Quartz crystal microgravimetry with dissipation (QCMD) measurements show both SWNT-Tween and SWNT-PL-PEG to LbL assemble with PLL and PGA into multilayer films, with the PL-PEG system yielding the greater final SWNT content. Bacterial inactivation rates are significantly higher (up to 90%) upon 24 hour incubation with SWNT containing films, compared to control films (ca. 20%). In the third part, we study the influence of bundling on the LbL assembly of SWNT with charged polymers, and on the antimicrobial properties of the assembled film. QCMD measurements show the bundled SWNT system to adsorb in an unusually strong fashion—to an extent three times greater than that

  4. Turning Waste into Value: Nanosized Natural Plant Materials of Solanum incanum L. and Pterocarpus erinaceus Poir with Promising Antimicrobial Activities

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Sharoon; Tittikpina, Nassifatou Koko; Al-marby, Adel; Alkhayer, Reem; Denezhkin, Polina; Witek, Karolina; Gbogbo, Koffi Apeti; Batawila, Komlan; Duval, Raphaël Emmanuel; Nasim, Muhammad Jawad; Awadh-Ali, Nasser A.; Kirsch, Gilbert; Chaimbault, Patrick; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert; Keck, Cornelia M.; Handzlik, Jadwiga; Jacob, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Numerous plants are known to exhibit considerable biological activities in the fields of medicine and agriculture, yet access to their active ingredients is often complicated, cumbersome and expensive. As a consequence, many plants harbouring potential drugs or green phyto-protectants go largely unnoticed, especially in poorer countries which, at the same time, are in desperate need of antimicrobial agents. As in the case of plants such as the Jericho tomato, Solanum incanum, and the common African tree Pterocarpus erinaceus, nanosizing of original plant materials may provide an interesting alternative to extensive extraction and isolation procedures. Indeed, it is straightforward to obtain considerable amounts of such common, often weed-like plants, and to mill the dried material to more or less uniform particles of microscopic and nanoscopic size. These particles exhibit activity against Steinernema feltiae or Escherichia coli, which is comparable to the ones seen for processed extracts of the same, respective plants. As S. feltiae is used as a model nematode indicative of possible phyto-protective uses in the agricultural arena, these findings also showcase the potential of nanosizing of crude “waste” plant materials for specific practical applications, especially—but not exclusively—in developing countries lacking a more sophisticated industrial infrastructure. PMID:27104554

  5. Turning Waste into Value: Nanosized Natural Plant Materials of Solanum incanum L. and Pterocarpus erinaceus Poir with Promising Antimicrobial Activities.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Sharoon; Tittikpina, Nassifatou Koko; Al-Marby, Adel; Alkhayer, Reem; Denezhkin, Polina; Witek, Karolina; Gbogbo, Koffi Apeti; Batawila, Komlan; Duval, Raphaël Emmanuel; Nasim, Muhammad Jawad; Awadh-Ali, Nasser A; Kirsch, Gilbert; Chaimbault, Patrick; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert; Keck, Cornelia M; Handzlik, Jadwiga; Jacob, Claus

    2016-04-19

    Numerous plants are known to exhibit considerable biological activities in the fields of medicine and agriculture, yet access to their active ingredients is often complicated, cumbersome and expensive. As a consequence, many plants harbouring potential drugs or green phyto-protectants go largely unnoticed, especially in poorer countries which, at the same time, are in desperate need of antimicrobial agents. As in the case of plants such as the Jericho tomato, Solanum incanum, and the common African tree Pterocarpus erinaceus, nanosizing of original plant materials may provide an interesting alternative to extensive extraction and isolation procedures. Indeed, it is straightforward to obtain considerable amounts of such common, often weed-like plants, and to mill the dried material to more or less uniform particles of microscopic and nanoscopic size. These particles exhibit activity against Steinernema feltiae or Escherichia coli, which is comparable to the ones seen for processed extracts of the same, respective plants. As S. feltiae is used as a model nematode indicative of possible phyto-protective uses in the agricultural arena, these findings also showcase the potential of nanosizing of crude "waste" plant materials for specific practical applications, especially-but not exclusively-in developing countries lacking a more sophisticated industrial infrastructure.

  6. Total Phenolic, Flavonoid, Tomatine, and Tomatidine Contents and Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of Extracts of Tomato Plant.

    PubMed

    Silva-Beltrán, Norma Patricia; Ruiz-Cruz, Saul; Cira-Chávez, Luis Alberto; Estrada-Alvarado, María Isabel; Ornelas-Paz, José de Jesús; López-Mata, Marco Antonio; Del-Toro-Sánchez, Carmen Lizette; Ayala-Zavala, J Fernando; Márquez-Ríos, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of extracts of different fractions of two tomato plant cultivars. The stems, roots, leaves, and whole-plant fractions were evaluated. Tomatine and tomatidine were identified by HPLC-DAD. The leaf extracts from the two varieties showed the highest flavonoids, chlorophyll, carotenoids, and total phenolics contents and the highest antioxidant activity determined by DPPH, ABTS, and ORAC. A positive correlation was observed between the antioxidant capacities of the extracts and the total phenolic, flavonoid, and chlorophyll contents. The Pitenza variety extracts inhibited the growth of pathogens such as E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria ivanovii, yielding inhibition halos of 8.0 to 12.9 mm in diameter and MIC values of 12.5 to 3.125 mg/mL. These results suggest that tomato plant shows well potential as sources of various bioactive compounds, antioxidants, and antimicrobials.

  7. Total Phenolic, Flavonoid, Tomatine, and Tomatidine Contents and Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of Extracts of Tomato Plant

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Beltrán, Norma Patricia; Ruiz-Cruz, Saul; Cira-Chávez, Luis Alberto; Estrada-Alvarado, María Isabel; Ornelas-Paz, José de Jesús; López-Mata, Marco Antonio; Del-Toro-Sánchez, Carmen Lizette; Ayala-Zavala, J. Fernando; Márquez-Ríos, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of extracts of different fractions of two tomato plant cultivars. The stems, roots, leaves, and whole-plant fractions were evaluated. Tomatine and tomatidine were identified by HPLC-DAD. The leaf extracts from the two varieties showed the highest flavonoids, chlorophyll, carotenoids, and total phenolics contents and the highest antioxidant activity determined by DPPH, ABTS, and ORAC. A positive correlation was observed between the antioxidant capacities of the extracts and the total phenolic, flavonoid, and chlorophyll contents. The Pitenza variety extracts inhibited the growth of pathogens such as E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria ivanovii, yielding inhibition halos of 8.0 to 12.9 mm in diameter and MIC values of 12.5 to 3.125 mg/mL. These results suggest that tomato plant shows well potential as sources of various bioactive compounds, antioxidants, and antimicrobials. PMID:26609308

  8. Insight into the plasmid metagenome of wastewater treatment plant bacteria showing reduced susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs analysed by the 454-pyrosequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Szczepanowski, Rafael; Bekel, Thomas; Goesmann, Alexander; Krause, Lutz; Krömeke, Holger; Kaiser, Olaf; Eichler, Wolfgang; Pühler, Alfred; Schlüter, Andreas

    2008-08-31

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are a reservoir for bacteria harbouring antibiotic resistance plasmids. To get a comprehensive overview on the plasmid metagenome of WWTP bacteria showing reduced susceptibility to certain antimicrobial drugs an ultrafast sequencing approach applying the 454-technology was carried out. One run on the GS 20 System yielded 346,427 reads with an average read length of 104 bases resulting in a total of 36,071,493 bases sequence data. The obtained plasmid metagenome was analysed and functionally annotated by means of the Sequence Analysis and Management System (SAMS) software package. Known plasmid genes could be identified within the WWTP plasmid metagenome data set by BLAST searches using the NCBI Plasmid Database. Most abundant hits represent genes involved in plasmid replication, stability, mobility and transposition. Mapping of plasmid metagenome reads to completely sequenced plasmids revealed that many sequences could be assigned to the cryptic pAsa plasmids previously identified in Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida and to the accessory modules of the conjugative IncU resistance plasmid pFBAOT6 of Aeromonas punctata. Matches of sequence reads to antibiotic resistance genes indicate that plasmids from WWTP bacteria encode resistances to all major classes of antimicrobial drugs. Plasmid metagenome sequence reads could be assembled into 605 contigs with a minimum length of 500 bases. Contigs predominantly encode plasmid survival functions and transposition enzymes.

  9. Optical and dielectric sensors based on antimicrobial peptides for microorganism diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Rafael R.; Avelino, Karen Y. P. S.; Ribeiro, Kalline L.; Franco, Octavio L.; Oliveira, Maria D. L.; Andrade, Cesar A. S.

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are natural compounds isolated from a wide variety of organisms that include microorganisms, insects, amphibians, plants, and humans. These biomolecules are considered as part of the innate immune system and are known as natural antibiotics, presenting a broad spectrum of activities against bacteria, fungi, and/or viruses. Technological innovations have enabled AMPs to be utilized for the development of novel biodetection devices. Advances in nanotechnology, such as the synthesis of nanocomposites, nanoparticles, and nanotubes have permitted the development of nanostructured platforms with biocompatibility and greater surface areas for the immobilization of biocomponents, arising as additional tools for obtaining more efficient biosensors. Diverse AMPs have been used as biological recognition elements for obtaining biosensors with more specificity and lower detection limits, whose analytical response can be evaluated through electrochemical impedance and fluorescence spectroscopies. AMP-based biosensors have shown potential for applications such as supplementary tools for conventional diagnosis methods of microorganisms. In this review, conventional methods for microorganism diagnosis as well new strategies using AMPs for the development of impedimetric and fluorescent biosensors are highlighted. AMP-based biosensors show promise as methods for diagnosing infections and bacterial contaminations as well as applications in quality control for clinical analyses and microbiological laboratories. PMID:25191319

  10. Optical and dielectric sensors based on antimicrobial peptides for microorganism diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rafael R; Avelino, Karen Y P S; Ribeiro, Kalline L; Franco, Octavio L; Oliveira, Maria D L; Andrade, Cesar A S

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are natural compounds isolated from a wide variety of organisms that include microorganisms, insects, amphibians, plants, and humans. These biomolecules are considered as part of the innate immune system and are known as natural antibiotics, presenting a broad spectrum of activities against bacteria, fungi, and/or viruses. Technological innovations have enabled AMPs to be utilized for the development of novel biodetection devices. Advances in nanotechnology, such as the synthesis of nanocomposites, nanoparticles, and nanotubes have permitted the development of nanostructured platforms with biocompatibility and greater surface areas for the immobilization of biocomponents, arising as additional tools for obtaining more efficient biosensors. Diverse AMPs have been used as biological recognition elements for obtaining biosensors with more specificity and lower detection limits, whose analytical response can be evaluated through electrochemical impedance and fluorescence spectroscopies. AMP-based biosensors have shown potential for applications such as supplementary tools for conventional diagnosis methods of microorganisms. In this review, conventional methods for microorganism diagnosis as well new strategies using AMPs for the development of impedimetric and fluorescent biosensors are highlighted. AMP-based biosensors show promise as methods for diagnosing infections and bacterial contaminations as well as applications in quality control for clinical analyses and microbiological laboratories.

  11. Antimicrobial and antitumor activity and diversity of endophytic fungi from traditional Chinese medicinal plant Cephalotaxus hainanensis Li.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y-H; Hu, X-P; Li, W; Cao, X-Y; Yang, H-R; Lin, S-T; Xu, C-B; Liu, S-X; Li, C-F

    2016-05-13

    Endophytes from Cephalotaxus hainanensis Li, an important source of anti-leukemia drugs, have not been widely explored. In this study, 265 endophytic fungal isolates from C. hainanensis Li were screened for antimicrobial activities against tilapia, banana, rice, and rape and for antitumor activities against human leukemia cell lines (K562, NB4, and HL-60). Diversity was also analyzed. The results showed that 17.7% of the endophytic fungi had antimicrobial activities against at least three different test microbes, and activity against Fusarium oxysporum RKY102 was the highest at 15.8%. Cytotoxicity against at least one tumor cell line tested was observed in 18.5% of the endophytic fungi; with the highest value of 10.6% against K562. The endophytic fungal strains also showed relatively high activities against K562, NB4, and HL-60 while relatively fewer strains were cytotoxic against the human hepatic Hep-G2 and colon LoVo cancer cell lines. Thirty endophytic fungal strains showed both high antimicrobial and antitumor activities. Moreover, the analyses of the diversity of the 30 highly active strains showed they belonged to 20 species from 14 genera, and this is the first report of endophytic fungi Albonectria rigidiuscula, Colletotrichum magnisporum, and Nemania diffusa being isolated from Cephalotaxus plants. These findings suggest that natural antibacterial products for humans and tilapia; antifungal compounds for rice, rape, and banana; and antitumor compounds for leukemia therapy could be isolated from fungal strains derived from C. hainanensis Li.

  12. Development of a novel antimicrobial seaweed extract-based hydrogel wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shiau Pin; McLoughlin, Peter; O'Sullivan, Laurie; Prieto, Maria Luz; Gardiner, Gillian E; Lawlor, Peadar G; Hughes, Helen

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a novel antimicrobial seaweed wound dressing. The seaweed extract was active against nine clinically-relevant wound pathogens. A hydrogel formulation was prepared using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), followed by addition of 1% seaweed extract. The antimicrobial properties of the novel dressing were tested using agar diffusion assays, with release-profiles examined using gel leaching and gel transfer assays. The dressing was found to be effective against the same microbial strains as the seaweed extract, with similar efficacy to the commonly used silver-based dressing, Acticoat(®). Antimicrobial release-profile assays revealed that the dressing was effective in inhibiting 70-90% of the bacterial population within the first 30 min, followed by a long, sustained released up to 97 h, without leaving a residue following five subsequent transfers of the dressing. Antimicrobial activity was stable for up to 6 months of storage at 4 °C, but activity was reduced slightly after 15 weeks. Following autoclave sterilization, the dressing displayed a slower release profile compared to a non-autoclaved counterpart. Hence, the seaweed dressing may have commercial applications, potentially competing with silver-based dressings at a lower cost per-application. This is the first report of development of a seaweed-based antimicrobial dressing.

  13. Finding Novel Antibiotic Substances from Medicinal PlantsAntimicrobial Properties of Nigella Sativa Directed against Multidrug-resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bakal, Seher Nancy; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M.

    2017-01-01

    The progressive rise in multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial strains poses serious problems in the treatment of infectious diseases. While the number of newly developed antimicrobial compounds has greatly fallen, the resistance of pathogens against commonly prescribed drugs is further increasing. This rise in resistance illustrates the need for developing novel therapeutic and preventive antimicrobial options. The medicinal herb Nigella sativa and its derivatives constitute promising candidates. In a comprehensive literature survey (using the PubMed data base), we searched for publications on the antimicrobial effects of N. sativa particularly directed against MDR bacterial strains. In vitro studies published between 2000 and 2015 revealed that N. sativa exerted potent antibacterial effects against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative species including resistant strains. For instance, N. sativa inhibited the growth of bacteria causing significant gastrointestinal morbidity such as Salmonella, Helicobacter pylori, and Escherichia coli. However, Listeria monocytogenes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa displayed resistance against black cumin seed extracts. In conclusion, our literature survey revealed potent antimicrobial properties of N. sativa against MDR strains in vitro that should be further investigated in order to develop novel therapeutic perspectives for combating infectious diseases particularly caused by MDR strains. PMID:28386474

  14. Finding Novel Antibiotic Substances from Medicinal Plants - Antimicrobial Properties of Nigella Sativa Directed against Multidrug-resistant Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bakal, Seher Nancy; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M

    2017-03-01

    The progressive rise in multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial strains poses serious problems in the treatment of infectious diseases. While the number of newly developed antimicrobial compounds has greatly fallen, the resistance of pathogens against commonly prescribed drugs is further increasing. This rise in resistance illustrates the need for developing novel therapeutic and preventive antimicrobial options. The medicinal herb Nigella sativa and its derivatives constitute promising candidates. In a comprehensive literature survey (using the PubMed data base), we searched for publications on the antimicrobial effects of N. sativa particularly directed against MDR bacterial strains. In vitro studies published between 2000 and 2015 revealed that N. sativa exerted potent antibacterial effects against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative species including resistant strains. For instance, N. sativa inhibited the growth of bacteria causing significant gastrointestinal morbidity such as Salmonella, Helicobacter pylori, and Escherichia coli. However, Listeria monocytogenes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa displayed resistance against black cumin seed extracts. In conclusion, our literature survey revealed potent antimicrobial properties of N. sativa against MDR strains in vitro that should be further investigated in order to develop novel therapeutic perspectives for combating infectious diseases particularly caused by MDR strains.

  15. Antimicrobial efficacy of alcohol-based hand gels with a 30-s application.

    PubMed

    do Prado, M F; Coelho, A C C; de Brito, J P B; Ferreira, D O; Junior, A W; Menecucci, C da Silva; de Queiroz, A B; Garcia, L B; Cardoso, C L; Tognim, M C B

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the antimicrobial efficacy of alcohol-based hand gels according to European Norm 1500 (EN 1500). We assessed the antimicrobial efficacy of 12 alcohol-based hand gels produced in Brazil, containing 70% w/w or v/v ethyl alcohol as the active ingredient, according to EN 1500, with a 30-s application. In addition, 70% w/w ethyl alcohol and three alcohol-based hand rubs commonly used in Europe and effective according to EN 1500 were also tested. Eight of 12 (67%) alcohol-based hand gels produced in Brazil failed by EN 1500. In contrast, 70% w/w ethyl alcohol and European alcohol-based hand rubs were approved by EN 1500. In this study, the majority of Brazilian alcohol-based hand gels showed limited efficacy on hand hygiene within 30 s. The findings of this study may be used as an important argument to motivate Brazilian manufacturers to improve the antimicrobial efficacy of alcohol-based hand gels, because it is prudent to suppose that alcohol-based hand gels can be recommended for use in healthcare settings only if they show antimicrobial activity at least similar to that of alcohol-based liquid preparations, including the traditional 70% w/w ethyl alcohol. © 2012 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Nanoparticle-Based Antimicrobials: Surface Functionality is Critical

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Akash; Landis, Ryan F.; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infections cause 300 million cases of severe illness each year worldwide. Rapidly accelerating drug resistance further exacerbates this threat to human health. While dispersed (planktonic) bacteria represent a therapeutic challenge, bacterial biofilms present major hurdles for both diagnosis and treatment. Nanoparticles have emerged recently as tools for fighting drug-resistant planktonic bacteria and biofilms. In this review, we present the use of nanoparticles as active antimicrobial agents and drug delivery vehicles for antibacterial therapeutics. We further focus on how surface functionality of nanomaterials can be used to target both planktonic bacteria and biofilms. PMID:27006760

  17. Ecological and mechanistic insights into the direct and indirect antimicrobial properties of Bacillus subtilis lipopeptides on plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Falardeau, J; Wise, C; Novitsky, L; Avis, T J

    2013-07-01

    Members of the genus Bacillus produce a wide variety of antimicrobial compounds. Cyclic lipopeptides (CLP) produced by Bacillus subtilis strains have been shown to protect host plants from a numbers of pathogens. The representative families of these CLP (surfactins, fengycins, and iturins) share a polypeptide ring linked to a lipid tail of varying length. CLP provide plant protection through a variety of unique mechanisms. Members of the surfactin and fengycin families elicit induced systemic resistance in certain host plants, and they also function by directly affecting the biological membranes of bacterial and fungal pathogens, mainly resulting in membrane pore formation. Specific pore forming mechanisms differ between CLP families, causing differential activities. CLP also may aid in enhanced B. subtilis colonization of the plant environment in addition to potentially preventing the adhesion of competitive microorganisms. Several recent studies have highlighted the control of plant pathogens by CLP-producing B. subtilis strains. Strong ecological advantages through multifaceted activities of CLP provide these strains with immense promise in controlling pathogens in a variety of plant ecosystems.

  18. Edible antimicrobial films based on microencapsulated lemongrass oil.

    PubMed

    Bustos C, Rubén O; Alberti R, Francesca V; Matiacevich, Silvia B

    2016-01-01

    Edible films and coatings have been proposed as viable alternatives for the preservation of fresh food such as fruit, meat, fish and cheese. They can be designed to contain natural antioxidants, vitamins and antimicrobials in order to extend shelf life of the product keeping the natural sensorial properties. Essential oils have been targeted as potential active principles for edible films and coatings given their well-recognized antioxidant, antimicrobial and sensory properties. In the present work, lemongrass oil (LMO) microcapsules were prepared by the emulsification-separation method using sodium caseinate as wall material. Microcapsules had an average size of 22 μm and contained over 51 % oil in their nucleus. The release kinetics of the LMO components was studied for both, microcapsules and microcapsule containing films. Experimental data for the controlled release of LMO components showed good correlation with Peppas and Weibull models. The effect of the alginate matrix on the release parameters of the mathematical models could be detected by the modification of the b constant of the Weibull equation which changed from 0.167 for the microcapsules to 0.351 for the films. Films containing LMO at concentrations of 1250, 2500 and 5000 ppm were able to inhibit growth of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Listeria monocytogenes ISP 65-08 in liquid cultures. A possible future application of these films for shelf life extension of fresh food is discussed.

  19. Design of nanoemulsion-based delivery systems of natural antimicrobials: effect of the emulsifier.

    PubMed

    Donsì, Francesco; Annunziata, Marianna; Vincensi, Mariarosaria; Ferrari, Giovanna

    2012-06-30

    This work aims at investigating the effect of the nanoemulsion delivery systems on the antimicrobial activity of different essential oil components. Carvacrol, limonene and cinnamaldehyde were encapsulated in the sunflower oil droplets of nanoemulsions prepared by high pressure homogenization and stabilized by different emulsifiers: (a) lecithin, (b) pea proteins, (c) sugar ester and (d) a combination of Tween 20 and glycerol monooleate. The antimicrobial activity was measured against three different microorganisms, such as Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The measured antimicrobial activity was significantly affected by the formulation of the nanoemulsion, where the different bioactive compounds were encapsulated. In particular, the effect of the delivery systems on the antimicrobial activity was correlated to the concentration of the essential oil components in the aqueous phase in equilibrium with the nanoemulsion droplets, suggesting that the ability of the active molecules to interact with cell membranes is associated to their dissolution in the aqueous phase. These considerations can lead to a more rational design of the nanoemulsion-based delivery systems for essential oils, based on the opportune choice of the emulsifiers in dependence of the desired function of the antimicrobials within the food system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of MAST: A Microscopy-Based Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing Platform.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kenneth P; Richmond, David L; Brennan-Krohn, Thea; Elliott, Hunter L; Kirby, James E

    2017-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance is compromising our ability to treat bacterial infections. Clinical microbiology laboratories guide appropriate treatment through antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of patient bacterial isolates. However, increasingly, pathogens are developing resistance to a broad range of antimicrobials, requiring AST of alternative agents for which no commercially available testing methods are available. Therefore, there exists a significant AST testing gap in which current methodologies cannot adequately address the need for rapid results in the face of unpredictable susceptibility profiles. To address this gap, we developed a multicomponent, microscopy-based AST (MAST) platform capable of AST determinations after only a 2 h incubation. MAST consists of a solid-phase microwell growth surface in a 384-well plate format, inkjet printing-based application of both antimicrobials and bacteria at any desired concentrations, automated microscopic imaging of bacterial replication, and a deep learning approach for automated image classification and determination of antimicrobial minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs). In evaluating a susceptible strain set, 95.8% were within ±1 and 99.4% were within ±2, twofold dilutions, respectively, of reference broth microdilution MIC values. Most (98.3%) of the results were in categorical agreement. We conclude that MAST offers promise for rapid, accurate, and flexible AST to help address the antimicrobial testing gap.

  1. Antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus species isolated from Lebanese dairy-based products.

    PubMed

    Zouhairi, O; Saleh, I; Alwan, N; Toufeili, I; Barbour, E; Harakeh, S

    2012-12-04

    The study evaluated the antimicrobial resistance of molecularly characterized strains of Staphylococcus aureus and S. saprophyticus isolated from 3 Lebanese dairy-based food products that are sometimes consumed raw: kishk, shanklish and baladi cheese. Suspected Staphylococcus isolates were identified initially using standard biochemical tests, then strains that were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (29 S. aureus and 17 S. saprophyticus) were evaluated for their susceptibility to different antimicrobials. The highest levels of contamination with staphylococci were in baladi cheese. Resistance rates ranged from 67% to gentamicin to 94% to oxacillin and clindamycin. The results suggest that these locally made dairy-based foods may act as vehicles for the transmission of antimicrobial-resistant Staphylococcus spp.

  2. Antimicrobial evaluation of plants used for the treatment of diarrhoea in a rural community in northern Maputaland, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    van Vuuren, Sandy F; Nkwanyana, Mduduzi N; de Wet, Helene

    2015-03-10

    Zulu people living in the rural area of Maputaland (KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa) rely heavily on medicinal plants for the treatment of diarrhoea. Abundant availability of medicinal plants in the study area offers low cost health care, but scientific validation is needed in order to lend credibility to the traditional use against many ailments including diarrhoeal infections. With this in mind a study was designed to test the in vitro antimicrobial efficacy of 23 plant species which are used for the treatment of diarrhoea in rural Maputaland. Four 1:1 plant combinations were also evaluated to determine their interactive effects against seven diarrhoea-related bacterial pathogens. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays were undertaken on dichloromethane-methanol (CH2Cl2: MeOH) and aqueous crude extracts. The following micro-organisms were selected for this study and were tested based on their association with stomach ailments and diarrhoea; Bacillus cereus (ATCC 11778), Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212), Escherichia coli (ATCC 8739), Proteus vulgaris (ATCC 33420), Salmonella typhimurium (ATCC 14028), Shigella flexneri (ATCC 25875) and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 12600). The fractional inhibitory concentration index (ΣFIC) was determined for plants traditionally used in combination. Shigella flexneri proved to be the most susceptible pathogen, where the organic extract of Terminalia sericea showed the most prominent noteworthy antibacterial activity (mean MIC value of 0.04 mg/mL). The aqueous extracts generally showed poorer antimicrobial activity with some exceptions i.e. Acacia burkei, Brachylaena transvaalensis against B. cereus and B. transvaalensis against S. flexneri. In the combination studies, synergy was predominant with mean (across all pathogens) ΣFIC values of 0.30 for Acanthospermum glabratum with Krauseola mosambicina; ΣFIC values of 0.46 for A. glabratum with Psidium guajava; ΣFIC values of 0.39 for B. transvaalensis with P. guajava and

  3. Physicochemical, nutritional, and antimicrobial properties of wine grape (cv. Merlot) pomace extract-based films.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qian; Zhao, Yanyun

    2011-04-01

    Wine grape pomace (WGP) (cv. Merlot) extract-based films were studied in terms of their physicochemical, mechanical, water barrier, nutritional, and antibacterial properties. Pomace extract (PE) was obtained by hot water extraction and had a total soluble solid of 3.6% and pH 3.65. Plant-based polysaccharides, low methoxyl pectin (LMP, 0.75% w/w), sodium alginate (SA, 0.3% w/w), or Ticafilm (TF, 2% w/w), was added into PE for film formation, respectively. Elongation at break and tensile strength were 23% and 4.04 MPa for TF-PE film, 25% and 1.12 MPa for SA-PE film, and 9.89% and 1.56 MPa for LMP-PE film. Water vapor permeability of LMP-PE and SA-PE films was 63 and 60 g mm m(-2) d(-1) kPa, respectively, lower than that of TF-PE film (70 g mm m(-2) d(-1) kPa) (P<0.05). LMP-PE film had higher water solubility, indicated by the haze percentage of water after 24 h of film immersion (52.8%) than that of TF-PE (25.7%) and SA-PE (15.9%) films, and also had higher amount of released phenolics (96.6%) than that of TF-PE (93.8%) and SA-PE (80.5%) films. PE films showed antibacterial activity against both Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua, in which approximate 5-log reductions in E. coli and 1.7- to 3.0-log reductions in L. innocua were observed at the end of 24 h incubation test compared with control. This study demonstrated the possibility of utilizing WGP extracts as natural, antimicrobial, and antioxidant promoting film-forming material for various food applications.   WGP extract-based edible films with the addition of a small amount of commercial polysaccharides showed attractive color and comparable mechanical and water barrier properties to other edible films. The films also demonstrated their potential antioxidant and antimicrobial functions. Hence, they may be used as colorful wraps or coatings for food, pharmaceutical, or other similar applications.

  4. Comparative Study of Composition, Antioxidant, and Antimicrobial Activities of Essential Oils of Selected Aromatic Plants from Balkan Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Stanković, Nemanja; Mihajilov-Krstev, Tatjana; Zlatković, Bojan; Matejić, Jelena; Stankov Jovanović, Vesna; Kocić, Branislava; Čomić, Ljiljana

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the present study to perform a comparative analysis of the chemical composition, antioxidant, and antimicrobial activities of the essential oils of plant species Hyssopus officinalis, Achillea grandifolia, Achillea crithmifolia, Tanacetum parthenium, Laserpitium latifolium, and Artemisia absinthium from Balkan Peninsula. The chemical analysis of essential oils was performed by using gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Monoterpenes were dominant among the recorded components, with camphor in T. parthenium, A. grandifolia, and A. crithmifolia (51.4, 45.4, and 25.4 %, respectively), 1,8-cineole in H. officinalis, A. grandifolia, and A. crithmifolia (49.1, 16.4, and 14.8 %, respectively), and sabinene in L. latifolium and A. absinthium (47.8 and 21.5 %). The antiradical and antioxidant activities were determined by using 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging methods. The essential oil of A. grandifolia has shown the highest antioxidant activity [IC50 of 33.575 ± 0.069 mg/mL for 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and 2.510 ± 0.036 mg vitamin C/g for the 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) assay]. The antimicrobial activity against 16 multiresistant pathogenic bacteria isolated from human source material was tested by the broth microdilution assay. The resulting minimum inhibitory concentration/minimum bactericidal concentration values ranged from 4.72 to 93.2 mg/mL. Therefore, the essential oils of the plant species included in this study may be considered to be prospective natural sources of antimicrobial substances, and may contribute as effective agents in the battle against bacterial multiresistance.

  5. Antimicrobial activity of aqueous and organic extracts of a Saudi medicinal plant: Rumex nervosus

    PubMed Central

    Al-Asmari, Abdul Rahman K.; Siddiqui, Yunus M.; Athar, Md. Tanwir; Al-Buraidi, Ahmed; Al-Eid, A. S.; Horaib, Ghalib B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The antimicrobial effect of aerial part of Rumex nervosus obtained from the Southern region of Saudi Arabia was evaluated on bacterial strains Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin resistant S. aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas Aeruginosa, and fungal strain Candida albicans. Materials and Methods: The solvents used for the extraction were aqueous, hexane, and methanol. The in vitro antimicrobial activity was performed by agar diffusion and disk diffusion methods and the confirmation of this activity was done by the enumeration of colony forming units (CFU). Results: The aqueous extract showed the growth inhibitory effect on Gram-positive bacteria while the Gram-negative P. aeruginosa was the most sensitive microorganism as determined by the agar diffusion technique. Surprisingly, the extract showed little antibacterial activity on other Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli) by this technique. Ethanolic extract was also found to be inhibitory to the growth of microorganisms. Hexane extract was relatively low in antimicrobial activity on Gram-negative E. coli and P. aeruginosa, while both the organic extracts were inhibitory to the growth of the fungus, C. albicans. Hexane gave no conclusive results with agar or disk diffusion methods, but showed the microbial growth inhibition in CFU enumeration. The antibacterial activity of active extracts was compared with vancomycin while antifungal activity of was compared with amphotericin B. Conclusion: The results obtained in the present study suggest that R. nervosus showed a marked antimicrobial activity with the test organisms. PMID:26681888

  6. Antimicrobial activity of coupled hydroxyanthracenones isolated from plants of the genus Karwinskia.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Ricardo; Rivas, Verónica; González, Gloria; Waksman, Noemí

    2006-07-01

    The in vitro activity of some isolated hydroxyanthracenones belonging to the genus Karwinskia against four bacteria, six filamentous fungi and four yeast are reported. These hydroxyanthracenones were found to possess antimicrobial activity, particularly against Streptococcus pyogenes, Candida albicans, C. boidinii, C. glabrata and Cryptococcus neoformans; minimal inhibitory concentrations range between 16 and 2 microg/ml.

  7. Antimicrobial Properties of Plant Essential Oils against Human Pathogens and Their Mode of Action: An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of medicinal and aromatic plants (MAPs) have been explored for their essential oils in the past few decades. Essential oils are complex volatile compounds, synthesized naturally in different plant parts during the process of secondary metabolism. Essential oils have great potential in the field of biomedicine as they effectively destroy several bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens. The presence of different types of aldehydes, phenolics, terpenes, and other antimicrobial compounds means that the essential oils are effective against a diverse range of pathogens. The reactivity of essential oil depends upon the nature, composition, and orientation of its functional groups. The aim of this article is to review the antimicrobial potential of essential oils secreted from MAPs and their possible mechanisms of action against human pathogens. This comprehensive review will benefit researchers who wish to explore the potential of essential oils in the development of novel broad-spectrum key molecules against a broad range of drug-resistant pathogenic microbes. PMID:28090211

  8. Antimicrobial resistance of integron-harboring Escherichia coli isolates from clinical samples, wastewater treatment plant and river water.

    PubMed

    Koczura, Ryszard; Mokracka, Joanna; Jabłońska, Lucyna; Gozdecka, Edyta; Kubek, Martyna; Kaznowski, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The presence and persistence of antibiotic resistant bacteria in the environment is thought to be a growing threat to public health. The route of the spread of multiresistant bacteria from human communities to aquatic environment may lead through wastewater treatment plants that release treated wastewater to a water reservoir. In this study we used multiplex PCR assay to determine the frequency of integron presence in Escherichia coli isolates cultured from wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) (integrons were detected in 11% of E. coli isolates), river water upstream (6%) and downstream (14%) the discharge of WWTP, and clinical specimens (56%). Antimicrobial resistance of the integron-positive isolates, determined by disk diffusion method, varied between E. coli of different origin. Isolates from the downstream river, compared to those cultured from upstream river, were more frequently resistant to kanamycin, cephalotin, co-trimoxazole, trimethoprim, and fluoroquinolones. Moreover, they displayed broader resistance ranges, expressed as the number of classes of antimicrobials to which they were resistant. The results may suggest that WWTP effluent contributes to increased frequency of integron-positive E. coli isolates in the river downstream the WWTP and to their elevated resistance level.

  9. Differential antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles to bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli, and toxicity to crop plant Zea mays and beneficial B. subtilis-inoculated Z. mays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doody, Michael A.; Wang, Dengjun; Bais, Harsh P.; Jin, Yan

    2016-10-01

    As silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have become increasingly used in commercial antimicrobial agents and industrial and military products, concerns are increasing over their broad environmental and health impacts and risks because they are finding their way to the environment. This study was designed to quantify the antimicrobial activity of citrate-coated AgNPs (c-AgNPs; transmission electron microscope size of 44.9 ± 7.2 nm) to two species of bacteria, i.e., Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli, and toxicity to a major crop plant Zea mays and beneficial bacteria-inoculated plant (i.e., B. subtilis-inoculated Z. mays symbiont). Our results reveal that the exposure of c-AgNPs significantly inhibited bacteria growth and altered their growth kinetics. Z. mays experienced significant sublethal effects including reduced root length and biomass, and hyper-accumulation of Ag in roots. The beneficial interactions between B. subtilis and Z. mays were weakened as well because both species suffered sublethal effects. Potential mechanisms leading to the antimicrobial activity and toxicity of c-AgNPs to the bacteria, plant, and plant-bacteria symbiont examined in this study were discussed. Taken together, our findings advance the current knowledge of AgNPs antimicrobial property or toxicity to bacteria, crop plant, and beneficial plant-bacteria symbiotic interaction, which is a critical component for NPs environmental impact and risk assessment.

  10. Systematic screening of plant extracts from the Brazilian Pantanal with antimicrobial activity against bacteria with cariogenic relevance.

    PubMed

    Brighenti, F L; Salvador, M J; Delbem, Alberto Carlos Botazzo; Delbem, Ádina Cleia Bottazzo; Oliveira, M A C; Soares, C P; Freitas, L S F; Koga-Ito, C Y

    2014-01-01

    This study proposes a bioprospection methodology regarding the antimicrobial potential of plant extracts against bacteria with cariogenic relevance. Sixty extracts were obtained from ten plants--(1) Jatropha weddelliana, (2) Attalea phalerata, (3) Buchenavia tomentosa, (4) Croton doctoris, (5) Mouriri elliptica, (6) Mascagnia benthamiana, (7) Senna aculeata, (8) Unonopsis guatterioides, (9) Allagoptera leucocalyx and (10) Bactris glaucescens--using different extraction methods - (A) 70° ethanol 72 h/25°C, (B) water 5 min/100°C, (C) water 1 h/55°C, (D) water 72 h/25°C, (E) hexane 72 h/25°C and (F) 90° ethanol 72 h/25°C. The plants were screened for antibacterial activity at 50 mg/ml using the agar well diffusion test against Actinomyces naeslundii ATCC 19039, Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356, Streptococcus gordonii ATCC 10558, Streptococcus mutans ATCC 35688, Streptococcus sanguinis ATCC 10556, Streptococcus sobrinus ATCC 33478 and Streptococcus mitis ATCC 9811. The active extracts were tested to determine their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC), cytotoxicity and chemical characterization. Forty-seven extracts (78%) were active against at least one microorganism. Extract 4A demonstrated the lowest MIC and MBC for all microorganisms except S. gordonii and the extract at MIC concentration was non-cytotoxic. The concentrated extracts were slightly cytotoxic. Electrospray ionization with tandem mass spectrometry analyses demonstrated that the extract constituents coincided with the mass of the terpenoids and phenolics. Overall, the best results were obtained for extraction methods A, B and C. The present work proved the antimicrobial activity of several plants. Particularly, extracts from C. doctoris were the most active against bacteria involved in dental caries disease.

  11. Antimicrobial properties and phenolic contents of medicinal plants used by the Venda people for conditions related to venereal diseases.

    PubMed

    Mulaudzi, R B; Ndhlala, A R; Kulkarni, M G; Finnie, J F; Van Staden, J

    2011-05-17

    Many people are infected by venereal diseases and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in rural areas. Sexual transmitted diseases are considered a disgrace in the community because of the stigmas attached to them. Indigenous people tend to use several medicinal plants to treat these infectious diseases rather than western medicines. This study was aimed to evaluate the antibacterial, antifungal, antigonococcal, HIV-type 1 reverse transcriptase (RT) and to determine phenolic content of twelve medicinal plants used by the Venda people to treat venereal diseases. The dried plant materials of twelve medicinal plants were extracted with petroleum ether (PE), dichloromethane (DCM), 80% ethanol (EtOH) and water. The extracts were evaluated for their antimicrobial properties against two Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus), three Gram-negative (Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae) bacteria and a fungus Candida albicans. The phenolic contents including total phenolics, flavonoids, gallotannins and condensed tannins of the methanolic extracts of the same plants were also determined. DCM and EtOH extracts of Bolusanthus speciosus bark and stems exhibited good activity (<0.1mg/ml) against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus with MIC values ranging from 0.098 to 0.012 mg/ml. The DCM extracts of Bolusanthus speciosus bark showed the best activity against Candida albicans with MIC and MFC values of 0.012 mg/ml. Water and 50% methanol extracts of Acacia karroo bark, Bolusanthus speciosus stems and Ximenia caffra roots and leaves showed good RT inhibition percentages (>70%) at 1mg/ml. All tested extracts exhibited dose dependent IC(50) values ranging from (0.1 to 0.6 mg/ml). Almost all plant species investigated contained phenolic compounds, which were greater than 5mg/g with the exception of Adansonia digitata bark and Aloe chabaudii roots. The highest level of flavonoids (11.9 μg/g) were detected in Ximenia caffra

  12. Antimicrobial peptide-based treatment for endodontic infections--biotechnological innovation in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Lima, Stella Maris de Freitas; de Pádua, Gabriela Martins; Sousa, Maurício Gonçalves da Costa; Freire, Mirna de Souza; Franco, Octávio Luiz; Rezende, Taia Maria Berto

    2015-01-01

    The presence/persistence of microorganisms in the pulp and periapical area corresponds to the maintenance of an exacerbated immune response that leads to the start of periradicular bone resorption and its perpetuation. In endodontic treatment, the available intracanal medications do not have all the desirable properties in the context of endodontic infection and apical periodontitis; they need to include not only strong antimicrobial performance but also an immunomodulatory and reparative activity, without host damage. In addition, there are various levels of resistance to root canal medications. Thus, antimicrobial agents that effectively eliminate resistant species in root canals could potentially improve endodontic treatment. In the emergence of new therapies, an increasing number of studies on antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been seen over the past few years. AMPs are defense biomolecules produced in response to infection, and they have a wide spectrum of action against many oral microorganisms. There are some studies that correlate peptides and oral infections, including oral peptides, neuropeptides, and bacterial, fish, bovine and synthetic peptides. So far, there are around 120 published studies correlating endodontic microbiota with AMPs but, according to our knowledge, there are no registered patents in the American patent database. There are a considerable number of AMPs that exhibit excellent antimicrobial activity against endodontic microbiota at a small inhibitory concentration and modulate an exacerbated immune response, down-regulating bone resorption. All these reasons indicate the antimicrobial peptide-based endodontic treatment as an emerging and promising option. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Distribution and Relationships of Antimicrobial Resistance Determinants among Extended-Spectrum-Cephalosporin-Resistant or Carbapenem-Resistant Escherichia coli Isolates from Rivers and Sewage Treatment Plants in India

    PubMed Central

    Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Yamashita, Akifumi; Kuroda, Makoto; Fujii, Yuki; Murata, Misato; Lee, Ken-ichi; Joshua, Derrick Ian; Balakrishna, Keshava; Bairy, Indira; Subramanian, Kaushik; Krishnan, Padma; Munuswamy, Natesan; Sinha, Ravindra K.; Iwata, Taketoshi; Kusumoto, Masahiro; Guruge, Keerthi S.

    2016-01-01

    To determine the distribution and relationship of antimicrobial resistance determinants among extended-spectrum-cephalosporin (ESC)-resistant or carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from the aquatic environment in India, water samples were collected from rivers or sewage treatment plants in five Indian states. A total of 446 E. coli isolates were randomly obtained. Resistance to ESC and/or carbapenem was observed in 169 (37.9%) E. coli isolates, which were further analyzed. These isolates showed resistance to numerous antimicrobials; more than half of the isolates exhibited resistance to eight or more antimicrobials. The blaNDM gene was detected in 14/21 carbapenem-resistant E. coli isolates: blaNDM-1 in 2 isolates, blaNDM-5 in 7 isolates, and blaNDM-7 in 5 isolates. The blaCTX-M gene was detected in 112 isolates (66.3%): blaCTX-M-15 in 108 isolates and blaCTX-M-55 in 4 isolates. We extracted 49 plasmids from selected isolates, and their whole-genome sequences were determined. Fifty resistance genes were detected, and 11 different combinations of replicon types were observed among the 49 plasmids. The network analysis results suggested that the plasmids sharing replicon types tended to form a community, which is based on the predicted gene similarity among the plasmids. Four communities each containing from 4 to 17 plasmids were observed. Three of the four communities contained plasmids detected in different Indian states, suggesting that the interstate dissemination of ancestor plasmids has already occurred. Comparison of the DNA sequences of the blaNDM-positive plasmids detected in this study with known sequences of related plasmids suggested that various mutation events facilitated the evolution of the plasmids and that plasmids with similar genetic backgrounds have widely disseminated in India. PMID:26953207

  14. Distribution and Relationships of Antimicrobial Resistance Determinants among Extended-Spectrum-Cephalosporin-Resistant or Carbapenem-Resistant Escherichia coli Isolates from Rivers and Sewage Treatment Plants in India.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Masato; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Yamashita, Akifumi; Kuroda, Makoto; Fujii, Yuki; Murata, Misato; Lee, Ken-Ichi; Joshua, Derrick Ian; Balakrishna, Keshava; Bairy, Indira; Subramanian, Kaushik; Krishnan, Padma; Munuswamy, Natesan; Sinha, Ravindra K; Iwata, Taketoshi; Kusumoto, Masahiro; Guruge, Keerthi S

    2016-05-01

    To determine the distribution and relationship of antimicrobial resistance determinants among extended-spectrum-cephalosporin (ESC)-resistant or carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from the aquatic environment in India, water samples were collected from rivers or sewage treatment plants in five Indian states. A total of 446 E. coli isolates were randomly obtained. Resistance to ESC and/or carbapenem was observed in 169 (37.9%) E. coli isolates, which were further analyzed. These isolates showed resistance to numerous antimicrobials; more than half of the isolates exhibited resistance to eight or more antimicrobials. The blaNDM gene was detected in 14/21 carbapenem-resistant E. coli isolates: blaNDM-1 in 2 isolates, blaNDM-5 in 7 isolates, and blaNDM-7 in 5 isolates. The blaCTX-M gene was detected in 112 isolates (66.3%): blaCTX-M-15 in 108 isolates and blaCTX-M-55 in 4 isolates. We extracted 49 plasmids from selected isolates, and their whole-genome sequences were determined. Fifty resistance genes were detected, and 11 different combinations of replicon types were observed among the 49 plasmids. The network analysis results suggested that the plasmids sharing replicon types tended to form a community, which is based on the predicted gene similarity among the plasmids. Four communities each containing from 4 to 17 plasmids were observed. Three of the four communities contained plasmids detected in different Indian states, suggesting that the interstate dissemination of ancestor plasmids has already occurred. Comparison of the DNA sequences of the blaNDM-positive plasmids detected in this study with known sequences of related plasmids suggested that various mutation events facilitated the evolution of the plasmids and that plasmids with similar genetic backgrounds have widely disseminated in India. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Antimicrobial clay-based materials for wound care.

    PubMed

    Gaskell, Elsie E; Hamilton, Ashley R

    2014-04-01

    The historical use of clay minerals for the treatment of wounds and other skin ailments is well documented and continues within numerous human cultures the world over. However, a more scientific inquiry into the chemistry and properties of clay minerals emerged in the 19th century with work investigating their role within health gathering pace since the second half of the 20th century. This review gives an overview of clay minerals and how their properties can be manipulated to facilitate the treatment of infected wounds. Evidence of the antimicrobial and healing effects of some natural clay minerals is presented alongside a range of chemical modifications including metal-ion exchange, the formation of clay-drug composites and the development of various polymer-clay systems. While the evidence for applying these materials to infected wounds is limited, we contextualize and discuss the future of this research.

  16. Aqueous based synthesis of antimicrobial-decorated graphene.

    PubMed

    Wahid, M Haniff; Stroeher, Uwe H; Eroglu, Ela; Chen, Xianjue; Vimalanathan, Kasturi; Raston, Colin L; Boulos, Ramiz A

    2015-04-01

    Ramizol® (1,3,5-tris[(1E)-2'-(4'-benzoic acid)vinyl]benzene) is a potent amphiphilic anti-microbial agent. It is essentially a planar molecule and can interact with the surface of graphene via extended π-π interactions. Herein we demonstrate the utility of Ramizol® in potentially acting as a molecular 'wedge' to exfoliate graphene and stabilise it in water. The non-covalent attachment of Ramizol® on the graphene surface enables release of Ramizol® by altering the pH of the solution. Furthermore, the stabilised composite material demonstrates antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus which leads to potential in biomedical applications with graphene acting as a drug carrier as well as enhancing the structural strength of the composite material. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cellulose acetate-based composites with antimicrobial properties from embedded molybdenum trioxide particles.

    PubMed

    Shafaei, S; Dörrstein, J; Guggenbichler, J P; Zollfrank, C

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop novel cellulose acetate (biopolymer) composite materials with an excellent antimicrobial activity by embedding molybdenum trioxide particles with unique high specific surface area. High surface area molybdenum trioxide particles were prepared from freshly precipitated molybdenum trioxide dihydrate (MoO3 ·2H2 O) and subsequent calcination at 340°C under H2 /N2 gas. Microbiological evaluation against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were performed applying a roll-on test and excellent antimicrobial activities were determined for composites with embedded anhydrous molybdenum trioxide with a high specific surface area. Cellulose acetate composites comprising MoO3 particles can eliminate three harmful bacteria as a result of the release of protons from the material and surface enlargement of the molybdenum trioxide particles. The findings support a proposed antimicrobial mechanism based on local acidity increase due to large specific surface areas.

  18. Efficacy of plant essential oils against foodborne pathogens and spoilage bacteria associated with ready-to-eat vegetables: antimicrobial and sensory screening.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Jorge; Rodriguez, Gabriel; Barry-Ryan, Catherine; Bourke, Paula

    2008-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of plant essential oils (EOs) against foodborne pathogens and key spoilage bacteria pertinent to ready-to-eat vegetables and to screen the selected EOs for sensory acceptability. The EOs basil, caraway, fennel, lemon balm, marjoram, nutmeg, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage, and thyme were evaluated. The bacteria evaluated were Listeria spp., Staphylococcus aureus, Lactobacillus spp., Bacillus cereus, Salmonella, Enterobacter spp., Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas spp. Quantitative antimicrobial analyses were performed using an absorbance-based microplate assay. Efficacy was compared using MIC, the half maximum inhibitory concentration, and the increase in lag phase. Generally, gram-positive bacteria were more sensitive to EOs than were gram-negative bacteria, and Listeria monocytogenes strains were among the most sensitive. Of the spoilage organisms, Pseudomonas spp. were the most resistant. Oregano and thyme EOs had the highest activity against all the tested bacteria. Marjoram and basil EOs had selectively high activity against B. cereus, Enterobacter aerogenes, E. coli, and Salmonella, and lemon balm and sage EOs had adequate activity against L. monocytogenes and S. aureus. Within bacterial species, EO efficacy was dependent on strain and in some cases the origin of the strain. On a carrot model product, basil, lemon balm, marjoram, oregano, and thyme EOs were deemed organoleptically acceptable, but only oregano and marjoram EOs were deemed acceptable for lettuce. Selected EOs may be useful as natural and safe additives for promoting the safety and quality of ready-to-eat vegetables.

  19. Effect of Plant Antimicrobial Agents Containing Marinades on Storage Stability and Microbiological Quality of Broiler Chicken Cuts Packed with Modified Atmosphere Packaging.

    PubMed

    Alakomi, H-L; Maukonen, J; Honkapää, K; Storgårds, E; Quirin, K-W; Yang, B; Saarela, M

    2017-10-01

    The food industry, including the meat industry, is currently looking for natural preservatives to prevent the growth of harmful microbes in foods. The potential of plant-derived antimicrobial extracts to increase the shelf life and to delay the microbiological spoilage of marinated broiler chicken cuts in modified atmosphere packages during cold storage was investigated in this study. We evaluated the impact of aqueous ethanolic extracts of Finnish sea buckthorn berries and lingonberries and supercritical CO2-extracted herbal extracts from an antimicrobial blend and oregano leaves on the shelf life of broiler meat. The commercial antimicrobial blend extract and the oregano extract inhibited the growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and Brochothrix thermosphacta in the marinated samples. The antimicrobial blend extract also reduced the growth of psychrotrophic aerobic bacteria, whereas the sea buckthorn and lingonberry extracts did not. Only minor antimicrobial activity against Enterobacteriaceae by all the extracts was observed. Plate count analysis, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and quantitative real-time PCR indicated that LAB, which are the major spoilage group in marinated modified atmosphere-packaged poultry products, were not significantly affected by the berry extracts studied. During this shelf-life study, LAB isolates of Lactobacillus and Leuconostoc were identified in the marinated samples. Antimicrobial blends and oregano leaf extracts can act as antimicrobial agents in marinade blends, although tailoring of the dose is needed because of their strong taste. Further studies for exploiting synergistic effects of plant extracts could contribute to the development of potential and more effective antimicrobial blends. Studies are needed in meat matrices and in product applications to demonstrate the efficacy of these compounds.

  20. Synthesis in plants and plant extracts of silver nanoparticles with potent antimicrobial properties: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Mashwani, Zia-ur-Rehman; Khan, Tariq; Khan, Mubarak Ali; Nadhman, Akhtar

    2015-12-01

    Synthesis of silver nanoparticles by plants and plant extracts (green synthesis) has been developed into an important innovative biotechnology, especially in the application of such particles in the control of pathogenic bacteria. This is a safer technology, biologically and environmentally, than synthesis of silver nanoparticles by chemical or physical methods. Plants are preferable to microbes as agents for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles because plants do not need to be maintained in cell culture. The antibacterial activity of bionanoparticles has been extensively explored during the past decade. This review examines studies published in the last decade that deal with the synthesis of silver nanoparticles in plants and their antibacterial activity.

  1. Phytochemical screening and antimicrobial activities of plant extract of Lantana camara.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, B Vishwanath; Tejaswini, M; Nishal, P; Pardhu, G; Shylaja, S; Kumar, Kranthi Ch

    2013-05-01

    Natural products continue to play an important role in the discovery and development of new pharmaceuticals. Several chemical compounds have been extracted and identified from its species known as Lantana camara (L .camara). The present study was designed for phytochemical analysis of L. camara and extraction of bioactive compound by HPLC. This also included the antimicrobial activity of the bioactive compound obtained by crude extract and the column extract. The study showed the presence of the bioactive component parthenin extracted from the HPLC analysis at a peak height of 10.3807 and it was showing antimicrobial activity against E. coli, P. aeruginosa, B. subtilis and E. fecalis, crude (6.8 to 8.1 mm ) and column (4.0 to 6.2 mm) zone of inhibition.

  2. Antimicrobial and physical-mechanical properties of agar-based films incorporated with grapefruit seed extract.

    PubMed

    Kanmani, Paulraj; Rhim, Jong-Whan

    2014-02-15

    The use of synthetic petroleum based packaging films caused serious environmental problems due to their difficulty in recycling and poor biodegradability. Therefore, present study was aimed to develop natural biopolymer-based antimicrobial packaging films as an alternative for the synthetic packaging films. As a natural antimicrobial agent, grapefruit seed extract (GSE) has been incorporated into agar to prepare antimicrobial packaging film. The films with different concentrations of GSE were prepared by a solvent casting method and the resulting composite films were examined physically and mechanically. In addition, the films were characterized by FE-SEM, XRD, FT-IR and TGA. The incorporation of GSE caused increase in color, UV barrier, moisture content, water solubility and water vapor permeability, while decrease in surface hydrophobicity, tensile strength and elastic modulus of the films. As the concentration of GSE increased from 0.6 to 13.3 μg/mL, the physical and mechanical properties of the films were affected significantly. The addition of GSE changed film microstructure of the film, but did not influence the crystallinity of agar and thermal stability of the agar-based films. The agar/GSE films exhibited distinctive antimicrobial activity against three test food pathogens, such as Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli. These results suggest that agar/GSE films have potential to be used in an active food packaging systems for maintaining food safety and extending the shelf-life of the packaged food.

  3. Evaluation of anti-leishmanial activity of selected Indian plants known to have antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Umakant; Velpandian, Thirumurthy; Sharma, Pawan; Singh, Sarman

    2009-10-01

    The severe toxicity, exorbitant cost and the emerging resistance of Leishmania spp. against most of the currently used drugs led to the urgent need for exploiting our traditional Ayurvedic knowledge to treat visceral leishmaniasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro anti-leishmanial activity of various extracts from ten traditionally used Indian medicinal plants. The methanolic extract from only two plants, Withania somnifera Dunal (ashwagandha) and Allium sativum Linn. (garlic), showed appreciable activity against Leishmania donovani. Further active compounds from these two plants were isolated and purified based on bioactivity-guided fractionation. HPLC-purified fraction A6 of ashwagandha and G3 of garlic showed consistently high activity with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 12.5 +/- 4 and 18.6 +/- 3 microg/ml against promastigotes whereas IC(50) of 9.5 +/- 3 and 13.5 +/- 2 microg/ml against amastigote form, respectively. The fraction A6 of ashwagandha was identified as withaferin A while fraction G3 of garlic is yet to be identified, and the work is in progress. Cytotoxic effects of the promising fractions and compounds were further evaluated in the murine macrophage (J774G8) model and were found to be safe. These compounds showed negligible cytotoxicity against J774G8 macrophages. The results indicate that fraction A6 of ashwagandha and fraction G3 of garlic might be potential sources of new anti-leishmanial compounds. The in vivo efficacy study and further optimization of these active compounds are in progress.

  4. Antimicrobial potential of actinobacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of the Caatinga biome plant Caesalpinia pyramidalis Tul.

    PubMed

    Silva-Lacerda, G R; Santana, R C F; Vicalvi-Costa, M C V; Solidônio, E G; Sena, K X F R; Lima, G M S; Araújo, J M

    2016-03-04

    Actinobacteria are known to produce various secondary metabolites having antibiotic effects. This study assessed the antimicrobial potential of actinobacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of Caesalpinia pyramidalis Tul. from the Caatinga biome. Sixty-eight actinobacteria isolates were evaluated for antimicrobial activity against different microorganisms by disk diffusion and submerged fermentation, using different culture media, followed by determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and chemical prospecting of the crude extract. Of the isolates studied, 52.9% of those isolated at 37°C and 47.05% of those isolated at 45°C had activity against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), Fusarium moniliforme, and Candida albicans. When compared with others actinobacteria, the isolate C1.129 stood out with better activity and was identified by 16S rDNA gene analysis as Streptomyces parvulus. The crude ethanol extract showed an MIC of 0.97 μg/mL for MRSA and B. subtilis, while the ethyl acetate extract showed MIC of 3.9 μg/mL for S. aureus and MRSA, showing the greatest potential among the metabolites produced. Chemical prospecting revealed the presence of mono/sesquiterpenes, proanthocyanidin, triterpenes, and steroids in both crude extracts. This study evaluates S. parvulus activity against multi-resistant microorganisms such as MRSA. Thus, it proves that low-fertility soil, as is found in the Caatinga, may contain important microorganisms for the development of new antimicrobial drugs.

  5. Population-Based Surveillance of Neisseria meningitidis Antimicrobial Resistance in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Harcourt, Brian H.; Anderson, Raydel D.; Wu, Henry M.; Cohn, Amanda C.; MacNeil, Jessica R.; Taylor, Thomas H.; Wang, Xin; Clark, Thomas A.; Messonnier, Nancy E.; Mayer, Leonard W.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Antimicrobial treatment and chemoprophylaxis of patients and their close contacts is critical to reduce the morbidity and mortality and prevent secondary cases of meningococcal disease. Through the 1990's, the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance to commonly used antimicrobials among Neisseria meningitidis was low in the United States. Susceptibility testing was performed to ascertain whether the proportions of isolates with reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials commonly used for N meningitidis have increased since 2004 in the United States. Methods. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by broth microdilution on 466 isolates of N meningitidis collected in 2004, 2008, 2010, and 2011 from an active, population-based surveillance system for susceptibility to ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, penicillin G, rifampin, and azithromycin. The molecular mechanism of reduced susceptibility was investigated for isolates with intermediate or resistant phenotypes. Results. All isolates were susceptible to ceftriaxone and azithromycin, 10.3% were penicillin G intermediate (range, 8% in 2008–16.7% in 2010), and <1% were ciprofloxacin, rifampin, or penicillin G resistant. Of the penicillin G intermediate or resistant isolates, 63% contained mutations in the penA gene associated with reduced susceptibility to penicillin G. All ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates contained mutations in the gyrA gene associated with reduced susceptibility. Conclusions. Resistance of N meningitidis to antimicrobials used for empirical treatment of meningitis in the United States has not been detected, and resistance to penicillin G and chemoprophylaxis agents remains uncommon. Therapeutic agent recommendations remain valid. Although periodic surveillance is warranted to monitor trends in susceptibility, routine clinical testing may be of little use. PMID:26357666

  6. Silver-nanoparticle-embedded antimicrobial paints based on vegetable oil.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashavani; Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Ajayan, Pulickel M; John, George

    2008-03-01

    Developing bactericidal coatings using simple green chemical methods could be a promising route to potential environmentally friendly applications. Here, we describe an environmentally friendly chemistry approach to synthesize metal-nanoparticle (MNP)-embedded paint, in a single step, from common household paint. The naturally occurring oxidative drying process in oils, involving free-radical exchange, was used as the fundamental mechanism for reducing metal salts and dispersing MNPs in the oil media, without the use of any external reducing or stabilizing agents. These well-dispersed MNP-in-oil dispersions can be used directly, akin to commercially available paints, on nearly all kinds of surface such as wood, glass, steel and different polymers. The surfaces coated with silver-nanoparticle paint showed excellent antimicrobial properties by killing both Gram-positive human pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli). The process we have developed here is quite general and can be applied in the synthesis of a variety of MNP-in-oil systems.

  7. Silver-nanoparticle-embedded antimicrobial paints based on vegetable oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashavani; Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; John, George

    2008-03-01

    Developing bactericidal coatings using simple green chemical methods could be a promising route to potential environmentally friendly applications. Here, we describe an environmentally friendly chemistry approach to synthesize metal-nanoparticle (MNP)-embedded paint, in a single step, from common household paint. The naturally occurring oxidative drying process in oils, involving free-radical exchange, was used as the fundamental mechanism for reducing metal salts and dispersing MNPs in the oil media, without the use of any external reducing or stabilizing agents. These well-dispersed MNP-in-oil dispersions can be used directly, akin to commercially available paints, on nearly all kinds of surface such as wood, glass, steel and different polymers. The surfaces coated with silver-nanoparticle paint showed excellent antimicrobial properties by killing both Gram-positive human pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli). The process we have developed here is quite general and can be applied in the synthesis of a variety of MNP-in-oil systems.

  8. Approaches for quantifying antimicrobial consumption per animal species based on national sales data: a Swiss example, 2006 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Carmo, Luís P; Schüpbach-Regula, Gertraud; Müntener, Cedric; Chevance, Anne; Moulin, Gérard; Magouras, Ioannis

    2017-02-09

    Antimicrobial use in animals is known to contribute to the global burden of antimicrobial resistance. Therefore, it is critical to monitor antimicrobial sales for livestock and pets. Despite the availability of veterinary antimicrobial sales data in most European countries, surveillance currently lacks consumption monitoring at the animal species level. In this study, alternative methods were investigated for stratifying antimicrobial sales per species using Swiss data (2006-2013). Three approaches were considered: (i) Equal Distribution (ED) allocated antimicrobial sales evenly across all species each product was licensed for; (ii) Biomass Distribution (BMD) stratified antimicrobial consumption, weighting the representativeness of each species' total biomass; and (iii) Longitudinal Study Extrapolation (LSE) assigned antimicrobial sales per species based on a field study describing prescription patterns in Switzerland. LSE is expected to provide the best estimates because it relies on field data. Given the Swiss example, BMD appears to be a reliable method when prescription data are not available, whereas ED seems to underestimate consumption in species with larger populations and higher treatment intensity. These methods represent a valuable tool for improving the monitoring systems of veterinary antimicrobial consumption across Europe. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2017.

  9. Approaches for quantifying antimicrobial consumption per animal species based on national sales data: a Swiss example, 2006 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Carmo, Luís P; Schüpbach-Regula, Gertraud; Müntener, Cedric; Chevance, Anne; Moulin, Gérard; Magouras, Ioannis

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial use in animals is known to contribute to the global burden of antimicrobial resistance. Therefore, it is critical to monitor antimicrobial sales for livestock and pets. Despite the availability of veterinary antimicrobial sales data in most European countries, surveillance currently lacks consumption monitoring at the animal species level. In this study, alternative methods were investigated for stratifying antimicrobial sales per species using Swiss data (2006−2013). Three approaches were considered: (i) Equal Distribution (ED) allocated antimicrobial sales evenly across all species each product was licensed for; (ii) Biomass Distribution (BMD) stratified antimicrobial consumption, weighting the representativeness of each species' total biomass; and (iii) Longitudinal Study Extrapolation (LSE) assigned antimicrobial sales per species based on a field study describing prescription patterns in Switzerland. LSE is expected to provide the best estimates because it relies on field data. Given the Swiss example, BMD appears to be a reliable method when prescription data are not available, whereas ED seems to underestimate consumption in species with larger populations and higher treatment intensity. These methods represent a valuable tool for improving the monitoring systems of veterinary antimicrobial consumption across Europe. PMID:28205504

  10. In vitro antibacterial activity of medicinal plant extracts against Escherichia coli strains from human clinical specimens and interactions with antimicrobial drugs.

    PubMed

    Ushimaru, P I; Barbosa, L N; Fernandes, A A H; Di Stasi, L C; Fernandes, A

    2012-01-01

    The biological properties of medicinal plants have been documented worldwide for many centuries. We aimed to evaluate interactions between crude extracts from Psidium guajava, Zingiber officinale, Cymbopogon citratus, Caryophyllus aromaticus, Mikania glomerata and Allium sativum samples and antimicrobial drugs against Escherichia coli strains. The susceptibility test performed was disc diffusion, and crude extracts were diluted (%v/v) into Müller-Hinton agar (MHA) at one quarter of the minimal inhibitory concentration for 90% (MIC(90%)) of E. coli strains found previously. Synergistic interactions were observed between C. citratus and polymyxin, and A. sativum extracts and gentamicin. The crude A. sativum extract was the only one that did not show any antagonism with the antimicrobial drugs. The results thus showed the potential use of these medicinal plants against E. coli strains, although antagonism with antimicrobial drugs is a negative aspect in the combined therapy of infectious diseases caused by E. coli.

  11. Chemical Diversity and Antimicrobial Activity of Volatile Compounds from Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides Lam. according to Compound Classes, Plant Organs and Senegalese Sample Locations.

    PubMed

    Tine, Yoro; Diop, Abdoulaye; Diatta, William; Desjobert, Jean-Marie; Boye, Cheikh Saad Bouh; Costa, Jean; Wélé, Alassane; Paolini, Julien

    2017-01-01

    The chemical diversity of Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides growing wild in Senegal was studied according to volatile compound classes, plant organs and sample locations. The composition of fruit essential oil was investigated using an original targeted approach based on the combination of gas chromatography (GC) and liquid chromatography (LC) both coupled with mass spectrometry (MS). The volatile composition of Z. zanthoxyloides fruits exhibited relative high amounts of hydrocarbon monoterpenes (24.3 - 55.8%) and non-terpenic oxygenated compounds (34.5 - 63.1%). The main components were (E)-β-ocimene (12.1 - 39%), octyl acetate (11.6 - 21.8%) and decanol (9.7 - 15.4%). The GC and GC/MS profiling of fruit essential oils showed a chemical variability according to geographical locations of plant material. The LC/MS/MS analysis of fruit oils allowed the detection of seven coumarins in trace content. The chemical composition of fruit essential oils was compared with volatile fractions of leaves and barks (root and trunk) from the same plant station. Hexadecanoic acid, germacrene D and decanal were identified as the major constituents of leaves whereas the barks (root and trunk) were dominated by pellitorine (85.8% and 57%, respectively), an atypic linear compound with amide group. The fruit essential oil exhibited interesting antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans, particularly the alcohol fraction of the oil.

  12. A Cell Phone-Based Microphotometric System for Rapid Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing.

    PubMed

    Kadlec, Meichei Wang; You, David; Liao, Joseph C; Wong, Pak Kin

    2014-06-01

    This study demonstrates a low-cost, portable diagnostic system for rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing in resource-limited settings. To determine the antimicrobial resistance phenotypically, the growth of pathogens in microwell arrays is detected under different antibiotic conditions. The use of a colorimetric cell viability reagent is shown to significantly improve the sensitivity of the assay compared with standard absorbance spectroscopy. Gas-permeable microwell arrays are incorporated for facilitating rapid bacterial growth and eliminating the requirement of bulky supporting equipment. Antibiotics can also be precoated in the microwell array to simplify the assay protocol toward point-of-care applications. Furthermore, a low-cost cell phone-based microphotometric system is developed for detecting the bacterial growth in the microwell array. By optimizing the operating conditions, the system allows antimicrobial susceptibility testing for samples with initial concentrations from 10(1) to 10(6) cfu/mL. Using urinary tract infection as the model system, we demonstrate rapid antimicrobial resistance profiling for uropathogens in both culture media and urine. With its simplicity and cost-effectiveness, the cell phone-based microphotometric system is anticipated to have broad applicability in resource-limited settings toward the management of infectious diseases caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens. © 2013 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  13. Starch-based Antimicrobial Films Incorporated with Lauric Acid and Chitosan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salleh, E.; Muhamad, I. I.

    2010-03-01

    Antimicrobial (AM) packaging is one of the most promising active packaging systems. Starch-based film is considered an economical material for antimicrobial packaging. This study aimed at the development of food packaging based on wheat starch incorporated with lauric acid and chitosan as antimicrobial agents. The purpose is to restrain or inhibit the growth of spoilage and/or pathogenic microorganisms that are contaminating foods. The antimicrobial effect was tested on B. substilis and E. coli. Inhibition of bacterial growth was examined using two methods, i.e. zone of inhibition test on solid media and liquid culture test (optical density measurements). The control and AM films (incorporated with chitosan and lauric acid) were produced by casting method. From the observations, AM films exhibited inhibitory zones. Interestingly, a wide clear zone on solid media was observed for B. substilis growth inhibition whereas inhibition for E. coli was not as effective as B. substilis. From the liquid culture test, the AM films clearly demonstrated a better inhibition against B. substilis than E. coli.

  14. Growing pioneer plants for a lunar base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrovska, N. O.; Lutvynenko, T. L.; Korniichuk, O. S.; Kovalchuk, M. V.; Voznyuk, T. M.; Kononuchenko, O.; Zaetz, I.; Rogutskyy, I. S.; Mytrokhyn, O. V.; Mashkovska, S. P.; Foing, B. H.; Kordyum, V. A.

    A precursory scenario of cultivating the first plants in a lunar greenhouse was elaborated in frames of a conceptual study to grow plants for a permanently manned lunar base. A prototype plant growth system represents an ornamental plant Tagetes patula L. for growing in a lunar rock anorthosite as a substrate. Microbial community anticipated to be in use to support a growth and development of the plant in a substrate of low bioavailability and provide an acceptable growth and blossoming of T. patula under growth limiting conditions.

  15. Antimicrobial peptide inhibition of fungalysin proteases that target plant type 19 Family IV defense chitinases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cereal crops and other plants produce secreted seed chitinases that reduce pathogenic infection, most likely by targeting the fungal chitinous cell wall. We have shown that corn (Zea mays) produces three GH family 19, plant class IV chitinases, that help in protecting the plant against Fusarium and ...

  16. Antimicrobial activity of food-compatible plant extracts and chitosan against naturally occurring micro-organisms in tomato juice.

    PubMed

    Giner, Manuel J; Vegara, Salud; Funes, Lorena; Martí, Nuria; Saura, Domingo; Micol, Vicente; Valero, Manuel

    2012-07-01

    Chitosan (AC) and five hydroalcoholic extracts from Lithospermum erythrorhizon (SE), Rheum palmatum (RE), Thymus vulgaris (AT), Lippia citriodora (PLX) and a mixture of Rosmarinus officinalis, Salvia lavandulifolia and Thymus mastichina (LA) were tested for antimicrobial activity against bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi using two broth dilution methods. The effects of adding single extracts on naturally occurring micro-organisms and sensory qualities of raw tomato juice were also evaluated. SE extract exhibited the strongest activity, with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 100-400 µg mL⁻¹ for Gram-positive and 1600-3200 µg mL⁻¹ for Gram-negative bacteria. Enterobacter aerogenes showed the greatest susceptibility to AC (MIC 1600 µg mL⁻¹). Lethal effects of extracts and AC were achieved at a minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC)/MIC ratio of 2 in 88% of assays. SE and RE extracts and AC also exhibited antifungal effect against yeasts, but they had no activity on filamentous fungi. Control and 100 mg L⁻¹ SE-added tomato juices did not differ in acceptance, but this SE concentration was not effective in the control of microbial load throughout cold storage. Results confirm the antimicrobial potential of the plant extracts, but additional research is needed until the agents responsible for the activities have been determined in order to use them as natural constituents of multiple-barrier food preservation systems. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Diversity and antimicrobial activity of endophytic fungi isolated from Cephalotaxus hainanensis Li, a well-known medicinal plant in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, H R; Hu, X P; Jiang, C J; Qi, J; Wu, Y C; Li, W; Zeng, Y J; Li, C F; Liu, S X

    2015-11-01

    About 1051 endophytic fungi were isolated from leaves, branches, barks and stems of Cephalotaxus hainanensis Li from four sites in Hainan, China. The fungi were identified as 21 genera by morphology and ITS sequences. One dominant species was Phomopsis quercella in Hainan Tropical Botanical Garden and Bawangling Nature Reserve, with relative frequency of 42·06 and 34·88% respectively. Another dominant species was Colletotrichum boninense in Wuzhishan and Jianfengling Nature Reserves, with relative frequency of 36·84 and 46·97% respectively. Among the selected 21 endophytic fungi, 17 strains (80·95%) had activity against at least one pathogenic bacteria, and 14 strains (66·67%) exhibited activity against at least one fungal pathogens. Neonectria macroconidialis showed strong inhibition against Staphylococcus aureus (inhibition zone being 20 mm), Bacillus subtilis (14 mm) and Streptococcus agalactiae (28 mm). Xylaria sp. showed strong inhibition against Escherichia coli (20 mm), Rhizoctonia solani (20 mm) and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (17 mm). Verticillium bulbillosum showed great activity against Strep. agalactiae (32 mm) and Fusarium oxysporum (22 mm). These endophytic fungi showed potentials in medicine development. Endophytic fungi from medicinal plants are an important source of novel and viable drugs. Cephalotaxus hainanensis Li is well known for leukaemia treatment and its endophytic fungi were isolated to investigate the diversity and antimicrobial activity. It was found that Ce. hainanensis Li had rich endophytic fungi, and some fungi showed strong antimicrobial activity against certain pathogens. These fungi can be used in medicine development. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. In vitro-Scientific evaluation on antimicrobial, antioxidant, cytotoxic properties and phytochemical constituents of traditional coastal medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Santhiyagu; Ramasubburayan, Ramasamy; Ramkumar, Vijayan Sri; Kannapiran, Ethiraj; Palavesam, Arunachalam; Immanuel, Grasian

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, evaluation of antimicrobial, antioxidant, phytochemical constituents and toxicological properties of six coastal medicinal plants (CMP's) such as Ipomea biloba, Cantharanthus roseus, Cymbopogon citratus, Vitex negundo, Thespesia populnea and Pandanus tectorius was done. The maximum antimicrobial activity was recorded by methanolic extracts of V. negundo and T. populnea against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Similarly, methanolic extracts of V. negundo and T. populnea evidenced highest antioxidant properties. The extract of T. populnea showed the maximum cytotoxicity against Artemia salina with the LC50 value of 478.11μg/ml. The hemolytic property of CMP's extracts was V. negundo (8.91%), T. populnea (21%) and C. citratus (64%) also the hemolytic index did not show any hemolysis of human erythrocytes. Furthermore, the TLC separation of V. negundo and T. populnea extracts exhibited the presence of Flavonoids (Rf-0.74) and Terpenoids (Rf-0.64). The present findings propose the promising clinical applications of selected CMP's. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. An antimicrobial evaluation of plants used for the treatment of respiratory infections in rural Maputaland, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    York, T; van Vuuren, S F; de Wet, H

    2012-10-31

    Abundant availability of medicinal plants in the study area offers low cost health care, but scientific validation is needed in order to lend credibility to the traditional use against respiratory infections. This study focussed on determining the antimicrobial efficacies of 30 plant species (independently and in various combinations) used for respiratory related infections in rural Maputaland. In vitro minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays were undertaken on dichloromethane-methanol (CH(2)Cl(2): MeOH) and aqueous extracts, as well as the hydro-distilled essential oils (for aromatic plants). Selected plant parts were assessed for antimicrobial activity against a range of respiratory pathogens i.e. Cryptococcus neoformans (ATCC 14116), Klebsiella pneumoniae (ATCC 13883), Moraxella catarrhalis (ATCC 23246), Mycobacterium smegmatis (ATCC 14468) and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538). The sum of the fractional inhibitory concentrations (∑FIC) was determined for plants traditionally used in combination. Isobolograms represent MIC values for a selection of interactions where two plants were combined in various ratios. The most antimicrobially active aqueous extracts were that of Ozoroa obovata and Sclerocarya birrea (0.10 mg/ml) while organic extracts from Parinari capensis subsp. incohata and Tetradenia riparia demonstrated the most noteworthy (0.03 mg/ml) activity. Although both Lippia javanica and Eucalyptus grandis were by far the most popular plants traditionally used for respiratory infections, the antimicrobial activity was mostly only moderate. Furthermore, the traditional use in a 1:1 combination did not display strong antimicrobial interactions, but isobolograms demonstrate (against some test organisms) that when combined in various ratios, predominant additive interactions are evident where E. grandis was present in larger proportions. The combination of E. grandis with O. obovata demonstrated synergism against both C. neoformans and K. pneumoniae

  20. Phenotypic and genomic characterization of the antimicrobial producer Rheinheimera sp. EpRS3 isolated from the medicinal plant Echinacea purpurea: insights into its biotechnological relevance.

    PubMed

    Presta, Luana; Bosi, Emanuele; Fondi, Marco; Maida, Isabel; Perrin, Elena; Miceli, Elisangela; Maggini, Valentina; Bogani, Patrizia; Firenzuoli, Fabio; Di Pilato, Vincenzo; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Mengoni, Alessio; Fani, Renato

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in plant microbiota; however, despite medicinal plant relevance, very little is known about their highly complex endophytic communities. In this work, we report on the genomic and phenotypic characterization of the antimicrobial compound producer Rheinheimera sp. EpRS3, a bacterial strain isolated from the rhizospheric soil of the medicinal plant Echinacea purpurea. In particular, EpRS3 is able to inhibit growth of different bacterial pathogens (Bcc, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Klebsiella pneumoniae) which might be related to the presence of gene clusters involved in the biosynthesis of different types of secondary metabolites. The outcomes presented in this work highlight the fact that the strain possesses huge biotechnological potential; indeed, it also shows antimicrobial effects upon well-described multidrug-resistant (MDR) human pathogens, and it affects plant root elongation and morphology, mimicking indole acetic acid (IAA) action.

  1. Characteristics and antimicrobial activity of copper-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bowen

    In this study, copper vermiculite was synthesized, and the characteristics, antimicrobial effects, and chemical stability of copper vermiculite were investigated. Two types of copper vermiculite materials, micron-sized copper vermiculite (MCV) and exfoliated copper vermiculite (MECV), are selected for this research. Since most of the functional fillers used in industry products, such as plastics, paints, rubbers, papers, and textiles prefer micron-scaled particles, micron-sized copper vermiculite was prepared by jet-milling vermiculite. Meanwhile, since the exfoliated vermiculite has very unique properties, such as high porosity, specific surface area, high aspect ratio of laminates, and low density, and has been extensively utilized as a functional additives, exfoliated copper vermiculite also was synthesized and investigated. The antibacterial efficiency of copper vermiculite was qualitatively evaluated by the diffusion methods (both liquid diffusion and solid diffusion) against the most common pathogenic species: Escherichia coli (E. coli), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae). The result showed that the release velocity of copper from copper vermiculite is very slow. However, copper vermiculite clearly has excellent antibacterial efficiency to S. aureus, K. pneumoniae and E. coli. The strongest antibacterial ability of copper vermiculite is its action on S. aureus. The antibacterial efficiency of copper vermiculite was also quantitatively evaluated by determining the reduction rate (death rate) of E. coli versus various levels of copper vermiculite. 10 ppm of copper vermiculite in solution is sufficient to reduce the cell population of E. coli, while the untreated vermiculite had no antibacterial activity. The slow release of copper revealed that the antimicrobial effect of copper vermiculite was due to the strong interactions between copper ions and bacteria cells. Exfoliated copper vermiculite has even stronger

  2. Impact of wastewater from different sources on the prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli in sewage treatment plants in South India.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Masato; Senba, Hironobu; Otagiri, Haruna; Prabhasankar, Valipparambil P; Taniyasu, Sachi; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Lee, Ken-ichi; Yamamoto, Takehisa; Tsutsui, Toshiyuki; Ian Joshua, Derrick; Balakrishna, Keshava; Bairy, Indira; Iwata, Taketoshi; Kusumoto, Masahiro; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Guruge, Keerthi S

    2015-05-01

    The sewage treatment plant (STP) is one of the most important interfaces between the human population and the aquatic environment, leading to contamination of the latter by antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. To identify factors affecting the prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria, water samples were collected from three different STPs in South India. STP1 exclusively treats sewage generated by a domestic population. STP2 predominantly treats sewage generated by a domestic population with a mix of hospital effluent. STP3 treats effluents generated exclusively by a hospital. The water samples were collected between three intermediate treatment steps including equalization, aeration, and clarification, in addition to the outlet to assess the removal rates of bacteria as the effluent passed through the treatment plant. The samples were collected in three different seasons to study the effect of seasonal variation. Escherichia coli isolated from the water samples were tested for susceptibility to 12 antimicrobials. The results of logistic regression analysis suggest that the hospital wastewater inflow significantly increased the prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant E. coli, whereas the treatment processes and sampling seasons did not affect the prevalence of these isolates. A bias in the genotype distribution of E. coli was observed among the isolates obtained from STP3. In conclusion, hospital wastewaters should be carefully treated to prevent the contamination of Indian environment with antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Role of Aromatic Amino Acids in Lipopolysaccharide and Membrane Interactions of Antimicrobial Peptides for Use in Plant Disease Control.

    PubMed

    Datta, Aritreyee; Bhattacharyya, Dipita; Singh, Shalini; Ghosh, Anirban; Schmidtchen, Artur; Malmsten, Martin; Bhunia, Anirban

    2016-06-17

    KYE28 (KYEITTIHNLFRKLTHRLFRRNFGYT-LR), the representative sequence of helix D of heparin co-factor II, was demonstrated to be potent against agronomically important Gram-negative plant pathogens Xanthomonas vesicatoria and Xanthomonas oryzae, capable of inhibiting disease symptoms in detached tomato leaves. NMR studies in the presence of lipopolysaccharide provided structural insights into the mechanisms underlying this, notably in relationship to outer membrane permeabilization. The three-dimensional solution structure of KYE28 in LPS is characterized by an N-terminal helical segment, an intermediate loop followed by another short helical stretch, and an extended C terminus. The two termini are in close proximity to each other via aromatic packing interactions, whereas the positively charged residues form an exterior polar shell. To further demonstrate the importance of the aromatic residues for this, a mutant peptide KYE28A, with Ala substitutions at Phe(11), Phe(19), Phe(23), and Tyr(25) was designed, which showed attenuated antimicrobial activity at high salt concentrations, as well as lower membrane disruption and LPS binding abilities compared with KYE28. In contrast to KYE28, KYE28A adopted an extended helical structure in LPS with extended N and C termini. Aromatic packing interactions were completely lost, although hydrophobic interaction between the side chains of hydrophobic residues were still partly retained, imparting an amphipathic character and explaining its residual antimicrobial activity and LPS binding as observed from ellipsometry and isothermal titration calorimetry. We thus present key structural aspects of KYE28, constituting an aromatic zipper, of potential importance for the development of novel plant protection agents and therapeutic agents. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Synthesis and Complete Antimicrobial Characterization of CEOBACTER, an Ag-Based Nanocomposite

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez-Peña, M.; Raymond-Herrera, O.; Villavicencio-García, H.; Petranovskii, V.; Vazquez-Duhalt, R.; Huerta-Saquero, A.

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is currently used as an alternative disinfectant with diverse applications, ranging from decontamination of aquatic environments to disinfection of medical devices and instrumentation. However, incorporation of AgNPs to the environment causes collateral damage that should be avoided. In this work, a novel Ag-based nanocomposite (CEOBACTER) was successfully synthetized. It showed excellent antimicrobial properties without the spread of AgNPs into the environment. The complete CEOBACTER antimicrobial characterization protocol is presented herein. It is straightforward and reproducible and could be considered for the systematic characterization of antimicrobial nanomaterials. CEOBACTER showed minimal bactericidal concentration of 3 μg/ml, bactericidal action time of 2 hours and re-use capacity of at least five times against E. coli cultures. The bactericidal mechanism is the release of Ag ions. CEOBACTER displays potent bactericidal properties, long lifetime, high stability and re-use capacity, and it does not dissolve in the solution. These characteristics point to its potential use as a bactericidal agent for decontamination of aqueous environments. PMID:27824932

  5. Modeling the Response of a Biofilm to Silver-Based Antimicrobial

    PubMed Central

    Stine, A.E.; Nassar, D.; Miller, J.K.; Clemons, C.B.; Wilber, J.P.; Young, G.W.; Yun, Y.H.; Cannon, C.L.; Leid, J.G.; Youngs, W.J.; Milsted, A.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are found within the lungs of patients with chronic pulmonary infections, in particular patients with cystic fibrosis, and are the major cause of morbidity and mortality for these patients. The work presented here is part of a large interdisciplinary effort to develop an effective drug delivery system and treatment strategy to kill biofilms growing in the lung. The treatment strategy exploits silver-based antimicrobials, in particular, silver carbene complexes (SCC). This manuscript presents a mathematical model describing the growth of a biofilm and predicts the response of a biofilm to several basic treatment strategies. The continuum model is composed of a set of reaction-diffusion equations for the transport of soluble components (nutrient and antimicrobial), coupled to a set of reaction-advection equations for the particulate components (living, inert, and persister bacteria, extracellular polymeric substance, and void). We explore the efficacy of delivering SCC both in an aqueous solution and in biodegradable polymer nanoparticles. Minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) levels of antimicrobial in both free and nanoparticle-encapsulated forms are estimated. Antimicrobial treatment demonstrates a biphasic killing phenomenon, where the active bacterial population is killed quickly followed by a slower killing rate, which indicates the presence of a persister population. Finally, our results suggest that a biofilm with a ready supply of nutrient throughout its depth has fewer persister bacteria and hence may be easier to treat than one with less nutrient. PMID:23628237

  6. Synthesis and Complete Antimicrobial Characterization of CEOBACTER, an Ag-Based Nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Jaime-Acuña, O E; Meza-Villezcas, A; Vasquez-Peña, M; Raymond-Herrera, O; Villavicencio-García, H; Petranovskii, V; Vazquez-Duhalt, R; Huerta-Saquero, A

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is currently used as an alternative disinfectant with diverse applications, ranging from decontamination of aquatic environments to disinfection of medical devices and instrumentation. However, incorporation of AgNPs to the environment causes collateral damage that should be avoided. In this work, a novel Ag-based nanocomposite (CEOBACTER) was successfully synthetized. It showed excellent antimicrobial properties without the spread of AgNPs into the environment. The complete CEOBACTER antimicrobial characterization protocol is presented herein. It is straightforward and reproducible and could be considered for the systematic characterization of antimicrobial nanomaterials. CEOBACTER showed minimal bactericidal concentration of 3 μg/ml, bactericidal action time of 2 hours and re-use capacity of at least five times against E. coli cultures. The bactericidal mechanism is the release of Ag ions. CEOBACTER displays potent bactericidal properties, long lifetime, high stability and re-use capacity, and it does not dissolve in the solution. These characteristics point to its potential use as a bactericidal agent for decontamination of aqueous environments.

  7. Characterization and antimicrobial activity of sweetpotato starch-based edible film containing origanum (Thymus capitatus) oil.

    PubMed

    Ehivet, Fabienne E; Min, Byungjin; Park, Mi-Kyung; Oh, Jun-Hyun

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to characterize the mechanical and barrier properties of sweetpotato starch (SPS)-based film (SPSF) and to investigate the antimicrobial activity of SPSF containing origanum oil (OG) against foodborne pathogenic bacteria. The SPSF was fabricated with the SPS extracted from commercial sweetpotato roots. Tensile strength (TS), percent elongation at break (E), and water vapor permeability (WVP) were determined to characterize the SPSF fabricated with selected SPS concentrations, plasticizers, and the concentrations of plasticizers. The agar diffusion assay was used to determine the antimicrobial activity of SPSF containing selective concentrations of OG against Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes. The SPSF fabricated with 2.5% SPS exhibited the greatest TS (4.58 MPa). The TS, E, and WVP of SPSF plasticized with 40% sorbitol exhibited 7.96 MPa, 77.92%, 0.212 ng m/m(2) S Pa, respectively. Therefore, the SPSF fabricated with 2.5% SPS and 40% sorbitol was determined as the optimum film. The antimicrobial activity of the SPSF containing OG increased as the concentration of OG increased. And the SPSF containing OG exhibited greater inhibitory effects against the gram-negative bacteria such as S. Enteritidis and E. coli O157:H7 than the gram-positive L. monocytogenes. The greatest antimicrobial activity was observed against S. Enteritidis when the SPSF containing 2% OG was applied, and the maximum square of zone width was 18.43 mm(2).

  8. Isolation, Diversity, and Antimicrobial Activity of Rare Actinobacteria from Medicinal Plants of Tropical Rain Forests in Xishuangbanna, China▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Sheng; Li, Jie; Chen, Hua-Hong; Zhao, Guo-Zhen; Zhu, Wen-Yong; Jiang, Cheng-Lin; Xu, Li-Hua; Li, Wen-Jun

    2009-01-01

    Endophytic actinobacteria are relatively unexplored as potential sources of novel species and novel natural products for medical and commercial exploitation. Xishuangbanna is recognized throughout the world for its diverse flora, especially the rain forest plants, many of which have indigenous pharmaceutical histories. However, little is known about the endophytic actinobacteria of this tropical area. In this work, we studied the diversity of actinobacteria isolated from medicinal plants collected from tropical rain forests in Xishuangbanna. By the use of different selective isolation media and methods, a total of 2,174 actinobacteria were isolated. Forty-six isolates were selected on the basis of their morphologies on different media and were further characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The results showed an unexpected level of diversity, with 32 different genera. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the isolation of Saccharopolyspora, Dietzia, Blastococcus, Dactylosporangium, Promicromonospora, Oerskovia, Actinocorallia, and Jiangella species from endophytic environments. At least 19 isolates are considered novel taxa by our current research. In addition, all 46 isolates were tested for antimicrobial activity and were screened for the presence of genes encoding polyketide synthetases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases. The results confirm that the medicinal plants of Xishuangbanna represent an extremely rich reservoir for the isolation of a significant diversity of actinobacteria, including novel species, that are potential sources for the discovery of biologically active compounds. PMID:19648362

  9. Antimicrobial behavior of Cu-bearing Zr-based bulk metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Fozo, Elizabeth M; Zhang, Tao; Liaw, Peter K; He, Wei

    2014-06-01

    The antimicrobial behavior of Cu-bearing Zr-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) was investigated for the first time against the Gram positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus to evaluate their potential applications in healthcare settings. Despite their lack of bacteria-killing effect under a relatively severe experimental setting of dynamic immersion, the biocidal potency of the two Zr-based BMGs was demonstrated via a moist contact assay. There was a significant reduction in viable bacterial populations after 4h of contact on the Zr-based BMGs, which was evidenced by the pronounced reduction in viable bacterial populations. To understand the mechanism of cell death, a direct relationship was established between the killing efficiency and the ability of the substrate to release Cu ions. Findings in this study will direct the future design of antimicrobial BMGs with enhanced killing efficacy. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Diversity of root associated microorganisms of selected medicinal plants and influence of rhizomicroorganisms on the antimicrobial property of Coriandrum sativum.

    PubMed

    Tamilarasi, S; Nanthakumar, K; Karthikeyan, K; Lakshmanaperumalsamy, P

    2008-01-01

    The total heterotrophic bacteria, actinomycetes and fungus were enumerated from the rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere soil of 50 selected locally available medicinal plants in and around Bharathiar University. In all the plants, population of microorganism were higher in the rhizosphere soil than in the non rhizosphere soil. Among the microorganisms, bacterial population was higher in number followed by fungus and actinomycetes. Of the medicinal plants, the maximum rhizosphere effect was observed in Annona squamosa and the minimum effect was seen in Eclipta alba and Cassia auriculata. Among the bacteria the dominant species was Bacillus followed by Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Corynebacterium, Micrococcus and Serratia. The Streptomyces species was found to be dominant followed by Deuteromycetes and Frankia among the actinomycetes. Among the fungal isolates Rhizopus was found to be higher in number followed by Aspergillus, Penicillium, Mucor and Fusarium. About 70.96% of the bacterial isolates were found to be nitrate reducers and 90.60% of the bacteria solubilised phosphate. The rhizosphere bacterial isolates were also capable of hydrolyzing starch, cellulose, casein, urea and gelatin. The isolates of bacteria, actinomycetes and fungus were also able to produce phytohormone Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). The maximum IAA production was recorded by Fusarium sp (5.8 mg/l). The rhizosphere bacterial isolates showed resistance to 14 commercially used antibiotics. In an attempt to check the influence of these plant growth promoting microorganisms on the antimicrobial property of Coriandrum sativum against Escherichia coli MTCC-443 and Aeromonas hydrophila MTCC-646, the results observed was not encouraging since the inoculants did not influence the antibacterial property. However extensive and in depth study is required to find out the influence of rhizomicroorganisms on the antibacterial property of medicinal plants. The other results clearly indicated that the rhizosphere

  11. Antimicrobial activity of Terminalia arjuna Wight & Arn.: an ethnomedicinal plant against pathogens causing ear infection.

    PubMed

    Aneja, Kamal Rai; Sharma, Chetan; Joshi, Radhika

    2012-02-01

    Ear infection is one of the common diseases occurring throughout the world. Different etiological agents are responsible for ear infections. To assess the antimicrobial potential of Terminalia arjuna leaves and bark extracts against Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter sp., Proteus mirabilis, Escherchia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans, pathogens causing ear infections and their comparison with locally available ear drops. Methanol, ethanol, acetone, aqueous (hot and cold) extracts from the leaves and bark of T. arjuna were tested for their antimicrobial activity. Of the three organic solvents evaluated, acetonic leaf extract was found to be best against S. aureus. Organic bark extract showed almost equal inhibition of all tested Gram negative bacteria except P. aeruginosa. However, aqueous extract of T. arjuna bark exhibited good activity against S. aureus. All the extracts were unable to exhibit any antifungal activity. Organic extract obtained from the T. arjuna bark and leaves may be used to treat the bacterial ear pathogens especially S. aureus, which has shown greater inhibition zones than the herbal drops, however, we still need more detailed studies as in vivo testing and pharmacokinetics properties for their therapeutic utility in treating ear infections.

  12. In vitro antimicrobial activity of essential oils from aromatic plants against selected foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Rota, C; Carramiñana, J J; Burillo, J; Herrera, A

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of selected essential oils for the control of growth and survival of pathogenic microorganisms of significant importance in food hygiene and to determine whether the antimicrobial effect was due to the major compounds of the oils. MIC and MBC were determined by the tube dilution method. Essential oils from Thymus vulgaris from Spain and France, Salvia sclarea, Salvia officinalis, Salvia lavandulifolia, Lavandula latifolia, Lavandula angustifolia, three hybrids of Lavandula latifolia x Lavandula angustifolia (Lavandin 'Super', Lavandin 'Abrialis', and Lavandin 'Grosso'), Rosmarinus officinalis, Hissopus officinalis, and Satureja montana were evaluated. Inhibition ranged from the strong activity of Satureja montana and Thymus vulgaris (France) to no inhibition with Salvia sclarea and Hissopus officinalis for each of the test strains: Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Typhimurium, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Yersinia enterocolitica, Shigella flexneri, Listeria monocytogenes serovar 4b, and Staphylococcus aureus. Because some of the essential oils were highly inhibitory in small quantities to selected pathogenic microorganisms, they may provide alternatives to conventional antimicrobial additives in foods.

  13. Antimicrobial and Insecticidal: Cyclic Lipopeptides and Hydrogen Cyanide Produced by Plant-Beneficial Pseudomonas Strains CHA0, CMR12a, and PCL1391 Contribute to Insect Killing.

    PubMed

    Flury, Pascale; Vesga, Pilar; Péchy-Tarr, Maria; Aellen, Nora; Dennert, Francesca; Hofer, Nicolas; Kupferschmied, Karent P; Kupferschmied, Peter; Metla, Zane; Ma, Zongwang; Siegfried, Sandra; de Weert, Sandra; Bloemberg, Guido; Höfte, Monica; Keel, Christoph J; Maurhofer, Monika

    2017-01-01

    Particular groups of plant-beneficial fluorescent pseudomonads are not only root colonizers that provide plant disease suppression, but in addition are able to infect and kill insect larvae. The mechanisms by which the bacteria manage to infest this alternative host, to overcome its immune system, and to ultimately kill the insect are still largely unknown. However, the investigation of the few virulence factors discovered so far, points to a highly multifactorial nature of insecticidal activity. Antimicrobial compounds produced by fluorescent pseudomonads are effective weapons against a vast diversity of organisms such as fungi, oomycetes, nematodes, and protozoa. Here, we investigated whether these compounds also contribute to insecticidal activity. We tested mutants of the highly insecticidal strains Pseudomonas protegens CHA0, Pseudomonas chlororaphis PCL1391, and Pseudomonas sp. CMR12a, defective for individual or multiple antimicrobial compounds, for injectable and oral activity against lepidopteran insect larvae. Moreover, we studied expression of biosynthesis genes for these antimicrobial compounds for the first time in insects. Our survey revealed that hydrogen cyanide and different types of cyclic lipopeptides contribute to insecticidal activity. Hydrogen cyanide was essential to full virulence of CHA0 and PCL1391 directly injected into the hemolymph. The cyclic lipopeptide orfamide produced by CHA0 and CMR12a was mainly important in oral infections. Mutants of CMR12a and PCL1391 impaired in the production of the cyclic lipopeptides sessilin and clp1391, respectively, showed reduced virulence in injection and feeding experiments. Although virulence of mutants lacking one or several of the other antimicrobial compounds, i.e., 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol, phenazines, pyrrolnitrin, or pyoluteorin, was not reduced, these metabolites might still play a role in an insect background since all investigated biosynthetic genes for antimicrobial compounds of strain

  14. Study on the Antimicrobial Properties of Citrate-Based Biodegradable Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Su, Lee-Chun; Xie, Zhiwei; Zhang, Yi; Nguyen, Kytai Truong; Yang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Citrate-based polymers possess unique advantages for various biomedical applications since citric acid is a natural metabolism product, which is biocompatible and antimicrobial. In polymer synthesis, citric acid also provides multiple functional groups to control the crosslinking of polymers and active binding sites for further conjugation of biomolecules. Our group recently developed a number of citrate-based polymers for various biomedical applications by taking advantage of their controllable chemical, mechanical, and biological characteristics. In this study, various citric acid derived biodegradable polymers were synthesized and investigated for their physicochemical and antimicrobial properties. Results indicate that citric acid derived polymers reduced bacterial proliferation to different degrees based on their chemical composition. Among the studied polymers, poly(octamethylene citrate) showed ~70–80% suppression to microbe proliferation, owing to its relatively higher ratio of citric acid contents. Crosslinked urethane-doped polyester elastomers and biodegradable photoluminescent polymers also exhibited significant bacteria reduction of ~20 and ~50% for Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, respectively. Thus, the intrinsic antibacterial properties in citrate-based polymers enable them to inhibit bacteria growth without incorporation of antibiotics, silver nanoparticles, and other traditional bacteria-killing agents suggesting that the citrate-based polymers are unique beneficial materials for wound dressing, tissue engineering, and other potential medical applications where antimicrobial property is desired. PMID:25023605

  15. A new rapid resazurin-based microdilution assay for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Foerster, Sunniva; Desilvestro, Valentino; Hathaway, Lucy J; Althaus, Christian L; Unemo, Magnus

    2017-07-01

    Rapid, cost-effective and objective methods for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Neisseria gonorrhoeae would greatly enhance surveillance of antimicrobial resistance. Etest, disc diffusion and agar dilution methods are subjective, mostly laborious for large-scale testing and take ∼24 h. We aimed to develop a rapid broth microdilution assay using resazurin (blue), which is converted into resorufin (pink fluorescence) in the presence of viable bacteria. The resazurin-based broth microdilution assay was established using 132 N. gonorrhoeae strains and the antimicrobials ceftriaxone, cefixime, azithromycin, spectinomycin, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline and penicillin. A regression model was used to estimate the MICs. Assay results were obtained in ∼7.5 h. The EC 50 of the dose-response curves correlated well with Etest MIC values (Pearson's r  = 0.93). Minor errors resulting from misclassifications of intermediate strains were found for 9% of the samples. Major errors (susceptible strains misclassified as resistant) occurred for ceftriaxone (4.6%), cefixime (3.3%), azithromycin (0.6%) and tetracycline (0.2%). Only one very major error was found (a ceftriaxone-resistant strain misclassified as susceptible). Overall the sensitivity of the assay was 97.1% (95% CI 95.2-98.4) and the specificity 78.5% (95% CI 74.5-82.9). A rapid, objective, high-throughput, quantitative and cost-effective broth microdilution assay was established for gonococci. For use in routine diagnostics without confirmatory testing, the specificity might remain suboptimal for ceftriaxone and cefixime. However, the assay is an effective low-cost method to evaluate novel antimicrobials and for high-throughput screening, and expands the currently available methodologies for surveillance of antimicrobial resistance in gonococci.

  16. Strategies for controlling plant diseases and mycotoxin contamination using antimicrobial synthetic peptides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Development of disease-resistant transgenic crops is very difficult due to the fact that host plant-pathogen interaction is a very complex phenomenon and it is often crop/variety or pathogen/strain-specific. Synthetic peptides are useful in controlling a broad spectrum of plant pathogens including ...

  17. Principles for ecologically based invasive plant management

    Treesearch

    Jeremy J. James; Brenda S. Smith; Edward A. Vasquez; Roger L. Sheley

    2010-01-01

    Land managers have long identified a critical need for a practical and effective framework for designing restoration strategies, especially where invasive plants dominate. A holistic, ecologically based, invasive plant management (EBIPM) framework that integrates ecosystem health assessment, knowledge of ecological processes, and adaptive management into a successional...

  18. Synthesis, antimicrobial activity of Schiff base compounds of cinnamaldehyde and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Yuan, Haijian; Li, Shujun; Li, Zhuo; Jiang, Mingyue

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to synthesize hydrophilic cinnamaldehyde Schiff base compounds and investigate those bioactivity. A total of 24 Schiff base compounds were synthesized using a simple approach with 3 cinnamaldehyde derivates and 8 amino acids as raw materials. The structures of synthesized compounds were confirmed using FTIR, (1)HNMR, HRMS purity and melting point. The antimicrobial activities of new compounds were evaluated with fluconazole and ciprofloxacin as the control against Aspergillus niger, Penicillium citrinum, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Findings show that major compounds exhibited significant bioactivity. Results from the structure-activity relationship suggest that both -p-Cl on benzene ring of cinnamaldehyde and the number of -COOK of amino acid salts significantly contributed to antimicrobial activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Volatile analysis and antimicrobial screening of the parasitic plant Cuscuta reflexa Roxb. from Nepal.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Prajwal; Satyal, Prabodh; Maharjan, Samjhana; Shrestha, Nawal; Setzer, William N

    2014-01-01

    The essential oil from the parasitic vine Cuscuta reflexa Roxb., collected from Kirtipur, Kathmandu, Nepal, was obtained by hydrodistillation and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. From a total of 62 peaks, 61 compounds were identified in the oil, accounting for 99.6% of the oil. The majority of the essential oil was dominated by the relatively rare component cis-3-butyl-4-vinylcyclopentane (26.4%). The oil also contained substantial amounts of limonene (5.1%) and (E)-nerolidol (9.5%). Biological screening for antimicrobial activities did not show appreciable activity against either Gram-positive (Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus) or Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria. However, marginal activity against Aspergillus niger was observed (minimum inhibitory concentration = 313 μg/mL).

  20. Screening of hundred Rwandese medicinal plants for antimicrobial and antiviral properties.

    PubMed

    Vlietinck, A J; Van Hoof, L; Totté, J; Lasure, A; Vanden Berghe, D; Rwangabo, P C; Mvukiyumwami, J

    1995-04-01

    A series of 100 Rwandese medicinal plants (267 plant extracts), used by traditional healers to treat infections, were screened for antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral properties. The results of the testing showed that 45% were active against Staphylococcus aureus, 2% against Escherichia coli, 16% against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 7% against Candida albicans, 80% against Microsporum canis and 60% against Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Not less than 27% of the plant species exhibited prominent antiviral properties against one or more test viruses, more specifically 12% against poliomyelitis, 16% against coxsackie, 3% against Semliki forest, 2% against measles and 8% against herpes simplex virus.

  1. Screening of medicinal plants from Trinidad and Tobago for antimicrobial and insecticidal properties.

    PubMed

    Chariandy, C M; Seaforth, C E; Phelps, R H; Pollard, G V; Khambay, B P

    1999-03-01

    Antibacterial activity in 51 extracts from 29 plant species currently used in traditional medicine in Trinidad and the neighbouring Caribbean islands was tested for by the agar dilution streak method using six bacteria: Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Salmonella tophimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Enterococcus faecalis. The extracts from eight of the plants tested showed significant activity against one or more micro-organisms and the most susceptible bacterium was Staphylococcus aureus. In the bioassays for toxicity towards the Aedes aegypti mosquito the most effective plant extracts were from Justicia pectoralis, Manihot utilissima and Stachytarpheta jamaicensis.

  2. Novel silver-based nanoclay as an antimicrobial in polylactic acid food packaging coatings.

    PubMed

    Busolo, Maria A; Fernandez, Patricia; Ocio, Maria J; Lagaron, Jose M

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive performance study of polylactic acid (PLA) biocomposites, obtained by solvent casting, containing a novel silver-based antimicrobial layered silicate additive for use in active food packaging applications. The silver-based nanoclay showed strong antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative Salmonella spp. Despite the fact that no exfoliation of the silver-based nanoclay in PLA was observed, as suggested by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) experiments, the additive dispersed nicely throughout the PLA matrix to a nanoscale, yielding nanobiocomposites. The films were highly transparent with enhanced water barrier and strong biocidal properties. Silver migration from the films to a slightly acidified water medium, considered an aggressive food simulant, was measured by stripping voltammetry. Silver migration accelerated after 6 days of exposure. Nevertheless, the study suggests that migration levels of silver, within the specific migration levels referenced by the European Food Safety Agency (EFSA), exhibit antimicrobial activity, supporting the potential application of this biocidal additive in active food-packaging applications to improve food quality and safety.

  3. [Plant-based diets: a review].

    PubMed

    Szabó, Zoltán; Erdélyi, Attila; Gubicskóné Kisbenedek, Andrea; Ungár, Tamás; Lászlóné Polyák, Éva; Szekeresné Szabó, Szilvia; Kovács, Réka Erika; Raposa, László Bence; Figler, Mária

    2016-11-01

    Plant-based diet is an old-new trend in nutrition. In this review based on a historical context, we wish to introduce this popular nutritional trend. Our aim is to present plant-based diet as a primary measure for prevention. We intend to critically analyse some past stereotypes related to plant-based diet - whose main components include fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts and seeds - according to the literature (e.g. protein, vitamin B12, folic acid, and iron intake) by doing so we wish to create an adequate conceptual basis for its interpretation. We discuss positive physiological effects of plant-based diet and its possible role in diseases risk reduction. Cardiovascular and metabolic diseases developing due to obesity could be prevented by a properly compiled plant-based diet. For patients with cancer minimizing the intake of foods of animal origin - as opposed to plant-based ones - has proved to have positive effects. Our review suggests this diet can be used in a number of diseases and it also provides long-term sustainable solutions for the health care challenges of the newest era. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(47), 1859-1865.

  4. Fate of flame retardants and the antimicrobial agent triclosan in planted and unplanted biosolid-amended soils.

    PubMed

    Davis, Elizabeth F; Gunsch, Claudia K; Stapleton, Heather M

    2015-05-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the fate of contaminant-laden biosolids is needed to fully evaluate the environmental impacts of biosolid land application. The present study examined the fate of several flame retardants and triclosan in biosolid-amended soil in a 90-d greenhouse experiment. Objectives included evaluating the persistence of these compounds in soil, their phytoaccumulation potential by alfalfa (Medicago sativa), and potential degradation reactions. Concentrations of the polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners BDE-47 and BDE-209 and the antimicrobial triclosan declined significantly over time in biosolid-amended soil planted with alfalfa and then reached a steady state by day 28. In contrast, no significant losses of those analytes were observed from soil in nonvegetated pots. The amount of an analyte lost from vegetated soil ranged from 43% for the flame retardant di(2-ethylhexyl)-2,3,4,5-tetrabromophthalate to 61% for triclosan and was significantly and negatively related to the log octanol-water partition coefficient. Alfalfa roots and shoots were monitored for the compounds, but no clear evidence of phytoaccumulation was observed. Methyl triclosan formation was observed in the biosolid-amended soils during the study period, indicating in situ biotransformation of triclosan. The present study demonstrates that, although they are highly recalcitrant, PBDEs, selected alternate brominated flame retardants, and triclosan are capable of undergoing dissipation from biosolid-amended soils in the presence of plants.

  5. Screening of seven selected Rwandan medicinal plants for antimicrobial and antiviral activities.

    PubMed

    Sindambiwe, J B; Calomme, M; Cos, P; Totté, J; Pieters, L; Vlietinck, A; Vanden Berghe, D

    1999-04-01

    Aqueous EtOH (80%) extracts of seven plants used by Rwandan traditional healers to treat infections, were screened for antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral activities. Only two of the selected plants showed a true antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1, while all of them exhibited virucidal properties against several enveloped viruses including herpes simplex, measles, Semliki forest, and vesicular stomatitis viruses. Four plants were diversely active against gram-positive bacteria, two of these showing bactericidal effect against the acid-fast Mycobacterium fortuitum. None of the selected plants was active against gram-negative bacteria or the yeast Candida albicans. From a bioassay-guided fractionation procedure using herpes simplex virus type I as the target model, a virucidal mixture, the maesasaponin mixture A, was isolated from the MeOH extract of Maesa lanceolata. The maesasaponin mixture A exhibited a virucidal activity against herpes simplex types 1 and 2, and vesicular stomatitis viruses.

  6. Aphid-proof plants: biotechnology-based approaches for aphid control.

    PubMed

    Will, Torsten; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Aphids are economically significant agricultural pests that are responsible for large yield losses in many different crops. Because the use of insecticides is restricted in the context of integrated pest management and aphids develop resistance against them rapidly, new biotechnology-based approaches are required for aphid control. These approaches focus on the development of genetically modified aphid-resistant plants that express protease inhibitors, dsRNA, antimicrobial peptides, or repellents, thus addressing different levels of aphid-plant interactions. However, a common goal is to disturb host plant acceptance by aphids and to disrupt their ability to take nutrition from plants. The defense agents negatively affect different fitness-associated parameters such as growth, reproduction, and survival, which therefore reduce the impact of infestations. The results from several different studies suggest that biotechnology-based approaches offer a promising strategy for aphid control.

  7. Pyrazole-based compounds in chitosan liposomal emulsion for antimicrobial cotton fabrics.

    PubMed

    Nada, Ahmed; Al-Moghazy, Marwa; Soliman, Ahmed A F; Rashwan, Gehan M T; Eldawy, Taghreed Hosny Ahmed; Hassan, Ashraf Abd Elhakim; Sayed, Galal Hosni

    2017-09-13

    The chemistry of pyrazoles has gained increasing attention due to its diverse pharmacological properties such as antiviral, antagonist, antimicrobial, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anti-prostate cancer, herbicidal, acaricidal and insecticidal activities. 1-Phenyl pyrazole-3, 5-diamine, 4-[2-(4-methylphenyl) diazenyl] and 1H- pyrazole-3 (1), 5-diamine, 4-[2-(4-methylphenyl) diazenyl] (2) were synthesized, characterized and encapsulated into liposomal chitosan emulsions for textile finishing. The chemical modifications of cotton fabrics were demonstrated by infrared analysis. Retention of the fabric mechanical properties was investigated by reporting the tensile strength values. Synthesized pyrazole-based compounds were screened for cytotoxicity against skin fibroblast cell line and showed very limited toxicity for both compounds. Antimicrobial potentials of the treated cotton fabrics were tested against bacterial strains E. coli ATCC 8379 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Smart Dressings Based on Nanostructured Fibers Containing Natural Origin Antimicrobial, Anti-Inflammatory, and Regenerative Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Andreu, Vanesa; Mendoza, Gracia; Arruebo, Manuel; Irusta, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    A fast and effective wound healing process would substantially decrease medical costs, wound care supplies, and hospitalization significantly improving the patients’ quality of life. The search for effective therapeutic approaches seems to be imperative in order to avoid the aggravation of chronic wounds. In spite of all the efforts that have been made during the recent years towards the development of artificial wound dressings, none of the currently available options combine all the requirements necessary for quick and optimal cutaneous regeneration. Therefore, technological advances in the area of temporary and permanent smart dressings for wound care are required. The development of nanoscience and nanotechnology can improve the materials and designs used in topical wound care in order to efficiently release antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and regenerative compounds speeding up the endogenous healing process. Nanostructured dressings can overcome the limitations of the current coverings and, separately, natural origin components can also overcome the drawbacks of current antibiotics and antiseptics (mainly cytotoxicity, antibiotic resistance, and allergies). The combination of natural origin components with demonstrated antibiotic, regenerative, or anti-inflammatory properties together with nanostructured materials is a promising approach to fulfil all the requirements needed for the next generation of bioactive wound dressings. Microbially compromised wounds have been treated with different essential oils, honey, cationic peptides, aloe vera, plant extracts, and other natural origin occurring antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and regenerative components but the available evidence is limited and insufficient to be able to draw reliable conclusions and to extrapolate those findings to the clinical practice. The evidence and some promising preliminary results indicate that future comparative studies are justified but instead of talking about the beneficial or

  9. Smart Dressings Based on Nanostructured Fibers Containing Natural Origin Antimicrobial, Anti-Inflammatory, and Regenerative Compounds.

    PubMed

    Andreu, Vanesa; Mendoza, Gracia; Arruebo, Manuel; Irusta, Silvia

    2015-08-11

    A fast and effective wound healing process would substantially decrease medical costs, wound care supplies, and hospitalization significantly improving the patients' quality of life. The search for effective therapeutic approaches seems to be imperative in order to avoid the aggravation of chronic wounds. In spite of all the efforts that have been made during the recent years towards the development of artificial wound dressings, none of the currently available options combine all the requirements necessary for quick and optimal cutaneous regeneration. Therefore, technological advances in the area of temporary and permanent smart dressings for wound care are required. The development of nanoscience and nanotechnology can improve the materials and designs used in topical wound care in order to efficiently release antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and regenerative compounds speeding up the endogenous healing process. Nanostructured dressings can overcome the limitations of the current coverings and, separately, natural origin components can also overcome the drawbacks of current antibiotics and antiseptics (mainly cytotoxicity, antibiotic resistance, and allergies). The combination of natural origin components with demonstrated antibiotic, regenerative, or anti-inflammatory properties together with nanostructured materials is a promising approach to fulfil all the requirements needed for the next generation of bioactive wound dressings. Microbially compromised wounds have been treated with different essential oils, honey, cationic peptides, aloe vera, plant extracts, and other natural origin occurring antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and regenerative components but the available evidence is limited and insufficient to be able to draw reliable conclusions and to extrapolate those findings to the clinical practice. The evidence and some promising preliminary results indicate that future comparative studies are justified but instead of talking about the beneficial or

  10. Neomycin Sulfate Improves the Antimicrobial Activity of Mupirocin-Based Antibacterial Ointments

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Catlyn; Brooks, Lauren; Beckley, Andrew; Colquhoun, Jennifer; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    In the midst of the current antimicrobial pipeline void, alternative approaches are needed to reduce the incidence of infection and decrease reliance on last-resort antibiotics for the therapeutic intervention of bacterial pathogens. In that regard, mupirocin ointment-based decolonization and wound maintenance practices have proven effective in reducing Staphylococcus aureus transmission and mitigating invasive disease. However, the emergence of mupirocin-resistant strains has compromised the agent's efficacy, necessitating new strategies for the prevention of staphylococcal infections. Herein, we set out to improve the performance of mupirocin-based ointments. A screen of a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug library revealed that the antibiotic neomycin sulfate potentiates the antimicrobial activity of mupirocin, whereas other library antibiotics did not. Preliminary mechanism of action studies indicate that neomycin's potentiating activity may be mediated by inhibition of the organism's RNase P function, an enzyme that is believed to participate in the tRNA processing pathway immediately upstream of the primary target of mupirocin. The improved antimicrobial activity of neomycin and mupirocin was maintained in ointment formulations and reduced S. aureus bacterial burden in murine models of nasal colonization and wound site infections. Combination therapy improved upon the effects of either agent alone and was effective in the treatment of contemporary methicillin-susceptible, methicillin-resistant, and high-level mupirocin-resistant S. aureus strains. From these perspectives, combination mupirocin-and-neomycin ointments appear to be superior to that of mupirocin alone and warrant further development. PMID:26596945

  11. Antimicrobial activity of plants used as medicinals on an indigenous reserve in Rio das Cobras, Paraná, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Moura-Costa, Gislaine F; Nocchi, Samara R; Ceole, Ligia F; de Mello, João Carlos P; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Dias Filho, Benedito Prado; Temponi, Livia G; Ueda-Nakamura, Tania

    2012-09-28

    A considerable percentage of global biodiversity is located in Brazil, a country that also has rich cultural and ethnic diversity. In the community of Rio das Cobras, Paraná, plants are still widely used in the health care not only by indigenous people but also by the non-indigenous population that inhabits the region. The investigation of the efficacy and safety of these plants in the treatment of infectious diseases provides insights for future studies of these species allowing the appropriated use by the indigenous people, since few or none study has been conducted so far. Evaluate the antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity of some plants used as medicinal on an indigenous reserve in Rio das Cobras, Paraná, Brazil. The aqueous extracts were obtained by decoction and the 50% and 70% hydroalcoholic extracts by turbo extraction. The extracts were tested against strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis, Leishmania amazonensis, Poliovirus and HSV-1. Cytotoxicity assay using VERO cells were also performed. None of the extracts had a selectivity index (SI)>1 for any of the tested bacteria. Only Campomanesia eugenioides and Schinus terebinthifolius had an SI>1.0 for all of the tested Candida species. The best anti-Leishmania activity was obtained with Zanthoxylum rhoifolium and Schinus terebinthifolius. Extracts of Cordia americana were the most effective against herpes simplex virus type 1. Zanthoxylum rhoifolium was the most effective against Poliovirus, and Ocimum gratissimum was effective against both Poliovirus and Herpes Simplex virus. Among the plants investigated in the present study, Zanthoxylum rhoifolium had the fewest cytotoxic effect. The plants investigated in the present study exhibited potential for future pharmacological uses, but additional studies, especially with regard to in vivo toxicity, must be conducted. The results of this

  12. Plant-based vaccines for animal health.

    PubMed

    Streatfield, S J

    2005-04-01

    Plant-based vaccines are recombinant protein subunit vaccines. Ideally, the choice of plant species used to produce the selected antigen should allow for oral delivery in the form of an edible vaccine. These vaccines are well suited to combat diseases where there is a clear antigen candidate, and where the costs of production or delivery for any current vaccine are prohibitive. Several academic and industrial research groups are currently investigating the use of plant-based vaccines in both humans and animals. To date, the most advanced human vaccine projects have successfully completed phase I clinical trials, and animal vaccine projects have given promising data in early phase trials targeting specific animal species. In this article the advantages offered by plant-based vaccines will be presented, progress on the most advanced vaccine candidates will be summarised, and the path ahead will be outlined. Although the focus of this paper is on the application of plant-based vaccines in the field of animal health, principally their use in domestic livestock, examples of the use of plant-based vaccines in the field of human health will also be discussed.

  13. Antimicrobial activity of aqueous extracts from four plants on bacterial isolates from periodontitis patients.

    PubMed

    Arbia, Leila; Chikhi-Chorfi, Nassima; Betatache, Ilhem; Pham-Huy, Chuong; Zenia, Selma; Mameri, Nabil; Drouiche, Nadjib; Lounici, Hakim

    2017-04-06

    Four aqueous extracts of different plant organs are the following: Artemisia herba-alba, Opuntia ficus-indica, Camellia sinensis and Phlomis crinita were evaluated against two bacterial strains: Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia, which are implicated in periodontal diseases. By using a disc method, these plant extracts demonstrated powerful bacterial activity against these Gram-negative strains. The minimum inhibitory concentration values of the four plant extracts varied between 0.03 and 590.82 mg/ml for the microbes. Another assay using commercial antibiotics and antibacterials as positive controls was also conducted. Values obtained after statistical analysis of inhibition diameters of all plant extracts demonstrated that for P. gingivalis, the aqueous extracts of A. herba-alba and O. ficus-indica were most effective, followed by those of C. sinensis and P. crinita. For P. intermedia, aqueous extracts of O. ficus-indica and C. sinensis appeared to be more efficient with significantly different (P > 0.05) inhibition diameters, followed by those of O. ficus-indica and P. crinita. In summary, the statistical results reveal that these plant extracts exert stronger antibacterial activity on P. intermedia germ as compared to P. gingivalis.

  14. Involvement of the smeAB multidrug efflux pump in resistance to plant antimicrobials and contribution to nodulation competitiveness in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Eda, Shima; Mitsui, Hisayuki; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2011-05-01

    The contributions of multicomponent-type multidrug efflux pumps to antimicrobial resistance and nodulation ability in Sinorhizobium meliloti were comprehensively analyzed. Computational searches identified genes in the S. meliloti strain 1021 genome encoding 1 pump from the ATP-binding cassette family, 3 pumps from the major facilitator superfamily, and 10 pumps from the resistance-nodulation-cell division family, and subsequently, these genes were deleted either individually or simultaneously. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests demonstrated that deletion of the smeAB pump genes resulted in increased susceptibility to a range of antibiotics, dyes, detergents, and plant-derived compounds and, further, that specific deletion of the smeCD or smeEF genes in a ΔsmeAB background caused a further increase in susceptibility to certain antibiotics. Competitive nodulation experiments revealed that the smeAB mutant was defective in competing with the wild-type strain for nodulation. The introduction of a plasmid carrying smeAB into the smeAB mutant restored antimicrobial resistance and nodulation competitiveness. These findings suggest that the SmeAB pump, which is a major multidrug efflux system of S. meliloti, plays an important role in nodulation competitiveness by mediating resistance toward antimicrobial compounds produced by the host plant.

  15. Involvement of the SmeAB Multidrug Efflux Pump in Resistance to Plant Antimicrobials and Contribution to Nodulation Competitiveness in Sinorhizobium meliloti▿†

    PubMed Central

    Eda, Shima; Mitsui, Hisayuki; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2011-01-01

    The contributions of multicomponent-type multidrug efflux pumps to antimicrobial resistance and nodulation ability in Sinorhizobium meliloti were comprehensively analyzed. Computational searches identified genes in the S. meliloti strain 1021 genome encoding 1 pump from the ATP-binding cassette family, 3 pumps from the major facilitator superfamily, and 10 pumps from the resistance-nodulation-cell division family, and subsequently, these genes were deleted either individually or simultaneously. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests demonstrated that deletion of the smeAB pump genes resulted in increased susceptibility to a range of antibiotics, dyes, detergents, and plant-derived compounds and, further, that specific deletion of the smeCD or smeEF genes in a ΔsmeAB background caused a further increase in susceptibility to certain antibiotics. Competitive nodulation experiments revealed that the smeAB mutant was defective in competing with the wild-type strain for nodulation. The introduction of a plasmid carrying smeAB into the smeAB mutant restored antimicrobial resistance and nodulation competitiveness. These findings suggest that the SmeAB pump, which is a major multidrug efflux system of S. meliloti, plays an important role in nodulation competitiveness by mediating resistance toward antimicrobial compounds produced by the host plant. PMID:21398477

  16. Expression of an Engineered Heterologous Antimicrobial Peptide in Potato Alters Plant Development and Mitigates Normal Abiotic and Biotic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Ravinder K.; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Mattoo, Autar K.; Misra, Santosh

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial cationic peptides (AMPs) are ubiquitous small proteins used by living cells to defend against a wide spectrum of pathogens. Their amphipathic property helps their interaction with negatively charged cellular membrane of the pathogen causing cell lysis and death. AMPs also modulate signaling pathway(s) and cellular processes in animal models; however, little is known of cellular processes other than the pathogen-lysis phenomenon modulated by AMPs in plants. An engineered heterologous AMP, msrA3, expressed in potato was previously shown to cause resistance of the transgenic plants against selected fungal and bacterial pathogens. These lines together with the wild type were studied for growth habits, and for inducible defense responses during challenge with biotic (necrotroph Fusarium solani) and abiotic stressors (dark-induced senescence, wounding and temperature stress). msrA3-expression not only conferred protection against F. solani but also delayed development of floral buds and prolonged vegetative phase. Analysis of select gene transcript profiles showed that the transgenic potato plants were suppressed in the hypersensitive (HR) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) responses to both biotic and abiotic stressors. Also, the transgenic leaves accumulated lesser amounts of the defense hormone jasmonic acid upon wounding with only a slight change in salicylic acid as compared to the wild type. Thus, normal host defense responses to the pathogen and abiotic stressors were mitigated by msrA3 expression suggesting MSRA3 regulates a common step(s) of these response pathways. The stemming of the pathogen growth and mitigating stress response pathways likely contributes to resource reallocation for higher tuber yield. PMID:24147012

  17. Nematicidal and antimicrobial activities of methanol extracts of 17 plants, of importance in ethnopharmacology, obtained from the Arabian Peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Al-Marby, Adel; Ejike, Chukwunonso ECC; Nasim, Muhammad Jawad; Awadh-Ali, Nasser A; Al-badani, Rwaida A; Alghamdi, Ghanem MA; Jacob, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Aim/Background: The development of resistance to synthetic drugs by target organisms is a major challenge facing medicine, yet locked within plants are phytochemicals used in herbal medicine (especially in the Arabian Peninsula) that may find application in this regard. In pursuit of unlocking these “hidden treasures,” the methanol extracts of leaves, aerial parts, fruits, and resins of 17 plants used in the Arabian Peninsula were screened for antimicrobial activities. Materials and Methods: The nematicidal, antibacterial, and antifungal activities were determined using appropriate assays. Steinernema feltiae, Staphylococcus carnosus, Escherichia coli, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were used as test organisms. Concentrations of the extracts ranging from 0.5 to 20 mg/ml were tested and appropriate statistical tests performed on the data generated. Results: The results show that extracts from Solanum incanum, Chenopodium murale, Commiphora myrrha, Anthemis nobilis, and Achillea biebersteinii were the most active and had very high activities against two or more of the test organisms at low concentrations. Extracts of the leaves of S. incanum and resins of Ferula asafoetida were the most active nematicides, with significant activity at 0.5 mg/ml. Extracts of C. myrrha and C. murale had the most active antibacterial activity with inhibition zones of 12-15 mm and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 2.5 mg/ml for both bacteria. Extracts of the leaves of A. biebersteinii were the most active fungicide, giving an MIC of 1.5 mg/ml. Conclusion: The results validate the use of these plants in ethnopharmacology, and open new vistas of opportunities for the development of cheap but effective agents that may be useful against infectious diseases. PMID:27104031

  18. An Evidence-Based Antimicrobial Stewardship Smartphone App for Hospital Outpatients: Survey-based Needs Assessment Among Patients

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Monsey; Castro-Sánchez, Enrique; Gharbi, Myriam; Charani, Esmita; Moore, Luke SP; Gilchrist, Mark; Husson, Fran; Costelloe, Ceire; Holmes, Alison H

    2016-01-01

    Background Current advances in modern technology have enabled the development and utilization of electronic medical software apps for both mobile and desktop computing devices. A range of apps on a large variety of clinical conditions for patients and the public are available, but very few target antimicrobials or infections. Objective We sought to explore the use of different antimicrobial information resources with a focus on electronic platforms, including apps for portable devices, by outpatients at two large, geographically distinct National Health Service (NHS) teaching hospital trusts in England. We wanted to determine whether there is demand for an evidence-based app for patients, to garner their perceptions around infections/antimicrobial prescribing, and to describe patients’ experiences of their interactions with health care professionals in relation to this topic. Methods A cross-sectional survey design was used to investigate aspects of antimicrobial prescribing and electronic devices experienced by patients at four hospitals in London and a teaching hospital in the East of England. Results A total of 99 surveys were completed and analyzed. A total of 82% (80/98) of respondents had recently been prescribed antimicrobials; 87% (85/98) of respondents were prescribed an antimicrobial by a hospital doctor or through their general practitioner (GP) in primary care. Respondents wanted information on the etiology (42/65, 65%) and prevention and/or management (32/65, 49%) of their infections, with the infections reported being upper and lower respiratory tract, urinary tract, oral, and skin and soft tissue infections. All patients (92/92, 100%) desired specific information on the antimicrobial prescribed. Approximately half (52/95, 55%) stated it was “fine” for doctors to use a mobile phone/tablet computer during the consultation while 13% (12/95) did not support the idea of doctors accessing health care information in this way. Although only 30% (27

  19. New type of antimicrobial protein produced by the plant pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhanliang; Ma, Ping; Holtsmark, Ingrid; Skaugen, Morten; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Brurberg, May B

    2013-09-01

    It has previously been shown that the tomato pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis secretes a 14-kDa protein, C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis AMP-I (CmmAMP-I), that inhibits growth of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus, the causal agent of bacterial ring rot of potato. Using sequences obtained from tryptic fragments, we have identified the gene encoding CmmAMP-I and we have recombinantly produced the protein with an N-terminal intein tag. The gene sequence showed that CmmAMP-I contains a typical N-terminal signal peptide for Sec-dependent secretion. The recombinant protein was highly active, with 50% growth inhibition (IC50) of approximately 10 pmol, but was not toxic to potato leaves or tubers. CmmAMP-I does not resemble any known protein and thus represents a completely new type of bacteriocin. Due to its high antimicrobial activity and its very narrow inhibitory spectrum, CmmAMP-1 may be of interest in combating potato ring rot disease.

  20. New Type of Antimicrobial Protein Produced by the Plant Pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhanliang; Ma, Ping; Holtsmark, Ingrid; Skaugen, Morten; Eijsink, Vincent G. H.

    2013-01-01

    It has previously been shown that the tomato pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis secretes a 14-kDa protein, C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis AMP-I (CmmAMP-I), that inhibits growth of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus, the causal agent of bacterial ring rot of potato. Using sequences obtained from tryptic fragments, we have identified the gene encoding CmmAMP-I and we have recombinantly produced the protein with an N-terminal intein tag. The gene sequence showed that CmmAMP-I contains a typical N-terminal signal peptide for Sec-dependent secretion. The recombinant protein was highly active, with 50% growth inhibition (IC50) of approximately 10 pmol, but was not toxic to potato leaves or tubers. CmmAMP-I does not resemble any known protein and thus represents a completely new type of bacteriocin. Due to its high antimicrobial activity and its very narrow inhibitory spectrum, CmmAMP-1 may be of interest in combating potato ring rot disease. PMID:23851100

  1. Comparative Analysis of the Bacterial Membrane Disruption Effect of Two Natural Plant Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Attila; Maróti, Gergely; Kereszt, Attila; Kondorosi, Éva

    2017-01-01

    In the Medicago truncatula genome about 700 genes code for nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) small peptides that are expressed in the symbiotic organ, the root nodule, where they control terminal differentiation of the endosymbiotic rhizobium bacteria to nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. Cationic NCR peptides were predicted to have antimicrobial activities. Here antibacterial activities of NCR247, NCR335, polymyxin B (PMB), and streptomycin were investigated and compared on two foodborne pathogens Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes as representatives of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The integrity of the bacterial membrane was seriously compromised by these NCR peptides. Different localization was observed for NCR247 and NCR335 in the treated bacteria, the peptides mostly accumulated in the cytosol in S. enterica while they remained in the bacterial membrane in L. monocytogenes. Scanning electron microscopy revealed distinct membrane morphology of the peptide-treated bacteria. Complete cell disruption was induced by PMB and NCR335 in S. enterica while NCR247 treatment resulted in extensive budding observed on the cell surface of Salmonella. PMB had no effect on L. monocytogenes while NCR335 and NCR247 provoked morphological changes on this bacterium, the whole Listeria cell content was released in response to NCR335 treatment. PMID:28167938

  2. Direct synthesis of antimicrobial coatings based on tailored bi-elemental nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetti, Giulio; Cavaliere, Emanuele; Canteri, Adalberto; Landini, Giulia; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Pallecchi, Lucia; Chiodi, Mirco; Van Bael, Margriet J.; Winckelmans, Naomi; Bals, Sara; Gavioli, Luca

    2017-03-01

    Ultrathin coatings based on bi-elemental nanoparticles (NPs) are very promising to limit the surface-related spread of bacterial pathogens, particularly in nosocomial environments. However, tailoring the synthesis, composition, adhesion to substrate, and antimicrobial spectrum of the coating is an open challenge. Herein, we report on a radically new nanostructured coating, obtained by a one-step gas-phase deposition technique, and composed of bi-elemental Janus type Ag/Ti NPs. The NPs are characterized by a cluster-in-cluster mixing phase with metallic Ag nano-crystals embedded in amorphous TiO2 and present a promising antimicrobial activity including also multidrug resistant strains. We demonstrate the flexibility of the method to tune the embedded Ag nano-crystals dimension, the total relative composition of the coating, and the substrate type, opening the possibility of tailoring the dimension, composition, antimicrobial spectrum, and other physical/chemical properties of such multi-elemental systems. This work is expected to significantly spread the range of applications of NPs coatings, not only as an effective tool in the prevention of healthcare-associated infections but also in other technologically relevant fields like sensors or nano-/micro joining.

  3. In vitro antimicrobial activity of an experimental dentifrice based on Ricinus communis.

    PubMed

    Leite, Vanessa Maria Fagundes; Pinheiro, Juliana Barchelli; Pisani, Marina Xavier; Watanabe, Evandro; de Souza, Raphael Freitas; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira; Lovato-Silva, Cláudia Helena

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of a Ricinus communis-based experimental dentifrice for denture hygiene against the following standard strains: Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus mutans, Enterococcus faecalis, Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay was performed with R. communis in pure oil at 2.5%. Only E. coli was not inhibited by R. communis, but the MIC (0.0781%) was effective against the other microorganisms. From these results it was determined the R. communis concentrations for experimental dentifrices, 1, 2, 5 and 10%, which were evaluated by the test-well diffusion in agar. The commercial dentifrices Colgate, Trihydral and Corega Brite were tested for comparative purposes. The diameter of the zones of bacterial growth inhibition produced around the wells was measured (in mm) with a rule under reflected light. Data were analyzed statistically by analysis of variance and Tukey's post-hoc test (α=0.05). Neither the commercial nor the experimental dentifrices were effective against E. coli. The experimental dentifrices containing R. communis at 2, 5 and 10% presented action against S. mutans, S. aureaus and E. faecallis. The experimental dentifrices showed no antimicrobial activity against Candida spp. and E. coli in any of the tested concentrations. Trihydral was the most effective. Comparing the experimental dentifrices, the product with 10% R. communis produced the largest zones of bacterial growth inhibition and had similar antimicrobial activity to the commercial dentifrices, except against S. aureus.

  4. Antimicrobial screening of plants used for traditional medicine in the state of Perak, Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Wiart, C; Mogana, S; Khalifah, S; Mahan, M; Ismail, S; Buckle, M; Narayana, A K; Sulaiman, M

    2004-01-01

    Seventy-two extracts (methanol) obtained from the leaves, barks, and roots of 50 plant species used in the traditional medicine of Perak, Peninsular Malaysia, have been screened for antibacterial and antifungal activities. Peristrophe tinctoria, Polyalthia lateriflora, Knema malayana, Solanum torvum, Celosia argentea, Eclipta prostrata, Ancistrocladus tectorius, Dillenia suffruticosa, Piper stylosum and Rafflesia hasseltii displayed the broadest spectrum of activity.

  5. Comparative antimicrobial activity of tannin extracts from perennial plants on mastitis pathogens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Three strains of pathogenic bacteria were treated with condensed tannins (CT) purified from eight different woody plant species to investigate their inhibition effect on the growth of these bacteria in vitro. Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus were tested against low...

  6. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles from stem bark of Cochlospermum religiosum (L.) Alston: an important medicinal plant and evaluation of their antimicrobial efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasikala, A.; Linga Rao, M.; Savithramma, N.; Prasad, T. N. V. K. V.

    2014-11-01

    The use of different parts of plants for the synthesis of nanoparticles is considered as a green technology as it does not involve any harmful chemicals. Herein, we report on rapid biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (SNPs) from aqueous stem bark extract of Cochlospermum religiosum a medicinal plant. The reduced silver nanoparticles were characterized by using UV-Visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis, atomic force microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR). The UV-Visible spectrum of the aqueous medium containing silver nanoparticles showed an absorption peak at around 445 nm, XRD showed that the particles are crystalline in nature, with a face-centered cubic structure and the SEM images showed that the spherical-shaped silver nanoparticles were observed and the size range was found to be 20-35 nm. FT-IR spectroscopy analysis revealed that carbohydrate, polyphenols, and protein molecules were involved in the synthesis and capping of silver nanoparticles. These phytosynthesized SNPs were tested for their antimicrobial activity and it analyzed by measuring the inhibitory zone. Cochlospermum religiosum aqueous stem bark extract of SNPs showed highest toxicity to Staphylococcus followed by Pseudomonas, Escherichia coli and Bacillus and lowest toxicity towards Proteus. Whereas in fungal species highest inhibition zone against Aspergillus flavus followed by Rhizopus, Fusarium, and Curvularia, and minimum inhibition zone was observed against Aspergillus niger species. The outcome of this study could be useful for the development of value added products from indigenous medicinal plants of India for nanotechnology-based biomedical applications.

  7. Lunar base agriculture: Soils for plant growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W. (Editor); Henninger, Donald L. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    This work provides information on research and experimentation concerning various aspects of food production in space and particularly on the moon. Options for human settlement of the moon and Mars and strategies for a lunar base are discussed. The lunar environment, including the mineralogical and chemical properties of lunar regolith are investigated and chemical and physical considerations for a lunar-derived soil are considered. It is noted that biological considerations for such a soil include controlled-environment crop production, both hydroponic and lunar regolith-based; microorganisms and the growth of higher plants in lunar-derived soils; and the role of microbes to condition lunar regolith for plant cultivation. Current research in the controlled ecological life support system (CELSS) project is presented in detail and future research areas, such as the growth of higher research plants in CELSS are considered. Optimum plant and microbiological considerations for lunar derived soils are examined.

  8. Lunar base agriculture: Soils for plant growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W. (Editor); Henninger, Donald L. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    This work provides information on research and experimentation concerning various aspects of food production in space and particularly on the moon. Options for human settlement of the moon and Mars and strategies for a lunar base are discussed. The lunar environment, including the mineralogical and chemical properties of lunar regolith are investigated and chemical and physical considerations for a lunar-derived soil are considered. It is noted that biological considerations for such a soil include controlled-environment crop production, both hydroponic and lunar regolith-based; microorganisms and the growth of higher plants in lunar-derived soils; and the role of microbes to condition lunar regolith for plant cultivation. Current research in the controlled ecological life support system (CELSS) project is presented in detail and future research areas, such as the growth of higher research plants in CELSS are considered. Optimum plant and microbiological considerations for lunar derived soils are examined.

  9. The mode of action of the plant antimicrobial peptide MiAMP1 differs from that of its structural homologue, the yeast killer toxin WmKT.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Camilla; Kazan, Kemal; Goulter, Ken C; Maclean, Donald J; Manners, John M

    2005-02-01

    The plant antimicrobial peptide MiAMP1 from Macadamia integrifolia and the yeast killer toxin peptide WmKT from Williopsis mrakii are structural homologues. Comparative studies of yeast mutants were performed to test their sensitivity to these two antimicrobial peptides. No differences in susceptibility to MiAMP1 were detected between wild-type and several WmKT-resistant mutant yeast strains. A yeast mutant MT1, resistant to MiAMP1 but unaffected in its susceptibility to plant defensins and hydrogen peroxide, also did not show enhanced tolerance towards WmKT. It is therefore probable that the Greek key beta-barrel structure shared by MiAMP1 and WmKT provides a robust structural framework ensuring stability for the two proteins but that the specific action of the peptides depends on other motifs.

  10. Rapid Bead-Based Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing by Optical Diffusometry

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chih-Yao; Wang, Jhih-Cheng; Chuang, Han-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    This study combined optical diffusometry and bead-based immunoassays to develop a novel technique for quantifying the growth of specific microorganisms and achieving rapid AST. Diffusivity rises when live bacteria attach to particles, resulting in additional energy from motile microorganisms. However, when UV-sterilized (dead) bacteria attach to particles, diffusivity declines. The experimental data are consistent with the theoretical model predicted according to the equivalent volume diameter. Using this diffusometric platform, the susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to the antibiotic gentamicin was tested. The result suggests that the proliferation of bacteria is effectively controlled by gentamicin. This study demonstrated a sensitive (one bacterium on single particles) and time-saving (within 2 h) platform with a small sample volume (~0.5 μL) and a low initial bacteria count (50 CFU per droplet ~ 105 CFU/mL) for quantifying the growth of microorganisms depending on Brownian motion. The technique can be applied further to other bacterial strains and increase the success of treatments against infectious diseases in the near future. PMID:26863001

  11. Synthesis, characterization and antimicrobial studies of Schiff base complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, Hina; Ahmad, Anis; Khan, Asad U.; Khan, Tahir Ali

    2015-10-01

    The Schiff base complexes, MLCl2 [M = Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II)] have been synthesized by the template reaction of respective metal ions with 2-acetylpyrrole and 1,3-diaminopropane in 1:2:1 M ratio. The complexes have been characterized by elemental analyses, ESI - mass, NMR (1H and 13C), IR, XRD, electronic and EPR spectral studies, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductance measurements. These studies show that all the complexes have octahedral arrangement around the metal ions. The molar conductance measurements of all the complexes in DMSO indicate their non-electrolytic nature. The complexes were screened for their antibacterial activity in vitro against Gram-positive (Streptococcus pyogenes) and Gram-negative (Klebsiella pneumoniae) bacteria. Among the metal complexes studied the copper complex [CuLCl2], showed highest antibacterial activity nearly equal to standard drug ciprofloxacin. Other complexes also showed considerable antibacterial activity. The relative order of activity against S. Pyogenes is as Cu(II) > Zn(II) > Co(II) = Fe(II) > Ni(II) and with K. Pneumonia is as Cu(II) > Co(II) > Zn(II) > Fe(II) > Ni(II).

  12. Synthesis, potentiometric and antimicrobial studies on metal complexes of isoxazole Schiff bases.

    PubMed

    Prashanthi, Y; Kiranmai, K; Subhashini, N J P; Shivaraj

    2008-06-01

    The metal complexes of Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) with Schiff bases of 3-(2-hydroxy-3-ethoxybenzylideneamino)-5-methyl isoxazole [HEBMI] and 3-(2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzylidene amino)-5-methyl isoxazole [HNBMI] which were obtained by the condensation of 3-amino-5-methyl isoxazole with substituted salicylaldehydes have been synthesized. Schiff bases and their complexes have been characterized on the basis of elemental analysis, magnetic moments, molar conductivity, thermal analysis and spectral (IR, UV, NMR and Mass) studies. The spectral data show that these ligands act in a monovalent bidentate fashion, co-ordinating through phenolic oxygen and azomethine nitrogen atoms. Chelates of Co(II), Ni(II) appear to be octahedral and Cu(II) appears to be distorted octahedral. To investigate the relationship between formation constants of binary complexes and antimicrobial activity, the dissociation constants of Schiff bases and stability constants of their binary metal complexes have been determined potentiometrically in aqueous solution at 30+/-1 degrees C and at 0.1 M KNO3 ionic strength and discussed. Antimicrobial activities of the Schiff bases and their complexes were screened. The structure-activity correlation in Schiff bases and their metal(II) complexes are discussed, based on the effect of their stability constants. It is observed that the activity enhances upon complexation and the order of activity is in accordance with stability order of metal ions.

  13. Comparison of essential oils from three plants for enhancement of antimicrobial activity of nitrofurantoin against enterobacteria.

    PubMed

    Rafii, Fatemeh; Shahverdi, Ahmad R

    2007-01-01

    Piperitone from plant essential oils enhancesbactericidal activities of nitrofurantoin and furazolidone against bacteria from the family Enterobacteriaceae. In this study, the essential oils of spearmint (Mentha spicata L.), dill (Anethum graveolens L.) and peppermint (Mentha piperita L.)were screened for augmentation of nitrofurantoin activity and the most active components were determined. The effects of essential oils and their components on the bactericidal activity of nitrofurantoin against Enterobacter cloacae were studied using disk-diffusion and agar-dilution methods. The composition of essential oils was studied using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. M. spicata and A. graveolens oils exhibited the highest effects. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis showed that the oils of these two plants contained 40.12 and 20.32% carvone, respectively. Pure carvone and piperitone equally increased the bactericidal activity of nitrofurantoin. Other ingredients of essential oils, including camphor, limonene and menthone, were less effective. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Evaluation of Antimicrobial Activity of the Methanol Extracts from 8 Traditional Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chang-Geun; Hah, Dae-Sik; Kim, Chung-Hui; Kim, Young-Hwan; Kim, Euikyung

    2011-01-01

    The methanol extract of 12 medicinal plants were evaluated for its antibacterial activity against Gram-positive (5 strains) and Gram-negative bacteria (10 strains) by assay for minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bacterial concentration (MBC) . The antibacterial activity was determined by an agar dilution method (according to the guidelines of Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute) . All the compounds (12 extracts) of the 8 medicinal plants (leaf or root) were active against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Gram-negative showed a more potent action than Gram positive bacteria. The MIC concentrations were various ranged from 0.6 μg/ml to 5000 μg/ml. The lowest MIC (0.6 μg/ml) and MBC (1.22 μg/ml) values were obtained with extract on 4 and 3 of the 15 microorganisms tested, respectively. PMID:24278548

  15. Antibody-based resistance to plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Schillberg, S; Zimmermann, S; Zhang, M Y; Fischer, R

    2001-01-01

    Plant diseases are a major threat to the world food supply, as up to 15% of production is lost to pathogens. In the past, disease control and the generation of resistant plant lines protected against viral, bacterial or fungal pathogens, was achieved using conventional breeding based on crossings, mutant screenings and backcrossing. Many approaches in this field have failed or the resistance obtained has been rapidly broken by the pathogens. Recent advances in molecular biotechnology have made it possible to obtain and to modify genes that are useful for generating disease resistant crops. Several strategies, including expression of pathogen-derived sequences or anti-pathogenic agents, have been developed to engineer improved pathogen resistance in transgenic plants. Antibody-based resistance is a novel strategy for generating transgenic plants resistant to pathogens. Decades ago it was shown that polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies can neutralize viruses, bacteria and selected fungi. This approach has been improved recently by the development of recombinant antibodies (rAbs). Crop resistance can be engineered by the expression of pathogen-specific antibodies, antibody fragments or antibody fusion proteins. The advantages of this approach are that rAbs can be engineered against almost any target molecule, and it has been demonstrated that expression of functional pathogen-specific rAbs in plants confers effective pathogen protection. The efficacy of antibody-based resistance was first shown for plant viruses and its application to other plant pathogens is becoming more established. However, successful use of antibodies to generate plant pathogen resistance relies on appropriate target selection, careful antibody design, efficient antibody expression, stability and targeting to appropriate cellular compartments.

  16. Plants traditionally used individually and in combination to treat sexually transmitted infections in northern Maputaland, South Africa: antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, D; van Vuuren, S F; van Zyl, R L; de Wet, H

    2013-10-07

    Although medicinal plants are used extensively to treat sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in rural northern Maputaland, KwaZulu-Natal, the efficacy and safety of these plants have not previously been evaluated. A study was designed to investigate the in vitro antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity profiles of a selection (individual plants and selected combinations) of traditionally used plants in this study area. Aqueous and organic (dichloromethane: methanol, 1:1) extracts were prepared. Antimicrobial activity was assessed using the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay against the STI associated pathogens; Candida albicans ATCC 10231, Ureaplasma urealyticum clinical strain, Oligella ureolytica ATCC 43534, Trichomonas vaginalis clinical strain, Gardnerella vaginalis ATCC 14018 and Neisseria gonorrhoeae ATCC 19424. For the combination study, interactions were assessed using the fractional inhibitory concentration (ΣFIC). The plant species were assessed for safety using the 3-[4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazol-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) cellular viability assay on the human embryonic kidney epithelial (Graham, HEK-293) cell line. For the antimicrobial studies, U. urealyticum was the most sensitive of the six test organisms, with the aqueous extract of Ranunculus multifidus (0.02mg/ml) and the organic extract of Peltophorum africanum (0.04mg/ml) being the most antimicrobially active plant species studied. Sclerocarya birrea was found to have the broadest spectrum of activity (mean MIC of 0.89mg/ml). The only plant species to exhibit some degree of cytotoxicity against the kidney epithelial cell line was Kigelia africana (100µg/ml), with 22% and 16% cell death for the aqueous and organic extracts, respectively. Of the 13 combinations studied, several synergistic combinations were evident, the most prominent being the combination of Albizia adianthifolia and Trichilia dregeana (aqueous extract) with an ΣFIC value of 0.15 against O. ureolytica

  17. Latent Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity in Nonantifreeze Proteins: Ca2+-Activated Plant Lectins and Cation-Activated Antimicrobial Peptides.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Daniel E; Gibson, Matthew I

    2015-10-12

    Organisms living in polar regions have evolved a series of antifreeze (glyco) proteins (AFGPs) to enable them to survive by modulating the structure of ice. These proteins have huge potential for use in cellular cryopreservation, ice-resistant surfaces, frozen food, and cryosurgery, but they are limited by their relatively low availability and questions regarding their mode of action. This has triggered the search for biomimetic materials capable of reproducing this function. The identification of new structures and sequences capable of inhibiting ice growth is crucial to aid our understanding of these proteins. Here, we show that plant c-type lectins, which have similar biological function to human c-type lectins (glycan recognition) but no sequence homology to AFPs, display calcium-dependent ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activity. This IRI activity can be switched on/off by changing the Ca2+ concentration. To show that more (nonantifreeze) proteins may exist with the potential to display IRI, a second motif was considered, amphipathicity. All known AFPs have defined hydrophobic/hydrophilic domains, rationalizing this choice. The cheap, and widely used, antimicrobial Nisin was found to have cation-dependent IRI activity, controlled by either acid or addition of histidine-binding ions such as zinc or nickel, which promote its amphipathic structure. These results demonstrate a new approach in the identification of antifreeze protein mimetic macromolecules and may help in the development of synthetic mimics of AFPs.

  18. Latent Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity in Nonantifreeze Proteins: Ca2+-Activated Plant Lectins and Cation-Activated Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Organisms living in polar regions have evolved a series of antifreeze (glyco) proteins (AFGPs) to enable them to survive by modulating the structure of ice. These proteins have huge potential for use in cellular cryopreservation, ice-resistant surfaces, frozen food, and cryosurgery, but they are limited by their relatively low availability and questions regarding their mode of action. This has triggered the search for biomimetic materials capable of reproducing this function. The identification of new structures and sequences capable of inhibiting ice growth is crucial to aid our understanding of these proteins. Here, we show that plant c-type lectins, which have similar biological function to human c-type lectins (glycan recognition) but no sequence homology to AFPs, display calcium-dependent ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activity. This IRI activity can be switched on/off by changing the Ca2+ concentration. To show that more (nonantifreeze) proteins may exist with the potential to display IRI, a second motif was considered, amphipathicity. All known AFPs have defined hydrophobic/hydrophilic domains, rationalizing this choice. The cheap, and widely used, antimicrobial Nisin was found to have cation-dependent IRI activity, controlled by either acid or addition of histidine-binding ions such as zinc or nickel, which promote its amphipathic structure. These results demonstrate a new approach in the identification of antifreeze protein mimetic macromolecules and may help in the development of synthetic mimics of AFPs. PMID:26407233

  19. Characterization and evaluation of antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects of Streptomyces sp. HUST012 isolated from medicinal plant Dracaena cochinchinensis Lour.

    PubMed Central

    Khieu, Thi-Nhan; Liu, Min-Jiao; Nimaichand, Salam; Quach, Ngoc-Tung; Chu-Ky, Son; Phi, Quyet-Tien; Vu, Thu-Trang; Nguyen, Tien-Dat; Xiong, Zhi; Prabhu, Deene M.; Li, Wen-Jun

    2015-01-01

    A highly potent secondary metabolite producing endophytic strain, Streptomyces sp. HUST012 was isolated from the stems of the medicinal plant Dracaena cochinchinensis Lour. Strain HUST012 showed antimicrobial and antitumor activities which were significantly much higher than those of dragon's blood extracted from D. cochinchinensis Lour. On further analysis, the strain was found to produce two metabolites, SPE-B11.8 (elucidated to be a novel metabolite (Z)-tridec-7-ene-1,2,13-tricarboxylic acid) and SPE-B5.4 (elucidated as Actinomycin-D). The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration values of SPE-B11.8 against a set of test bacterial organisms (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermis ATCC 35984, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, and Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883) ranged between 15.63 and 62.5 μg/ml while that for SPE-B5.4 ranged between 0.04 and 2.24 μg/ml. The compound SPE-B11.8 showed cytotoxic effect at 41.63 and 29.54 μg/ml IC50-values against Hep G2 and MCF-7, respectively, while the compound SPE-B5.4 exhibited stronger activities against them at 0.23 and 0.18 μg/ml IC50-values. PMID:26106377

  20. Development of shampoo, soap and ointment formulated by green synthesised silver nanoparticles functionalised with antimicrobial plants oils in veterinary dermatology: treatment and prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Bansod, Sunita Dashrath; Bawaskar, Manisha Subrashrao; Gade, Aniket Krishnarao; Rai, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Many scientists have focused their research on the role of nanotechnology for the control of human pathogens, but there are also many topical pathogens present in animals, which infect animals and transfer to humans. Topical therapy is extremely important for the management of dermatological condition in animals. Therefore, the present study aims to evaluate the efficacy of biogenic silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in combination with herbal oils against animal skin infections which may be responsible for causing infections in human beings. Here, the authors synthesised and characterised the AgNPs from Azadirachta indica. The oils were extracted from medicinal plants including Cymbopogon citratus, Cymbopogon martini, Eucalyptus globules, A. indica and Ocimum sanctum and the antifungal and antibacterial activity of plant oils along with AgNPs were evaluated. An excision wound model was used for the study of wound healing activity in rabbits. AgNPs functionalised oil has demonstrated remarkable antimicrobial activity against pathogens present on the skin of animals. The nano-functionalised antimicrobial oils were used in the formulation of shampoo, soap and ointment for veterinary dermatology. Antimicrobial products of plant origin with AgNPs are valuable, safe and have a specific role in controlling diseases. The authors believe that this approach will be a good alternative therapy to solve the continuous antibiotic resistance developed by many bacterial pathogens and will be utilised in various animal contacting areas in medicine.

  1. Assessment of the antimicrobial effect of three plants used for therapy of community-acquired urinary tract infection in Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil).

    PubMed

    Vogel, N W; Taschetto, A P D; Dall'agnol, R; Weidlich, L; Ethur, E M

    2011-10-11

    The urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the infectious diseases of bacterial origin most commonly diagnosed, and may result in a significant mortality. The microorganisms most frequently involved in community-acquired infections are Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, both Gram-negative bacillus of the Enterobacteriaceae family. In southern Brazil, it is common the treatment of UTI using herbs and teas, a tradition inherited from the ancient indigenous people. Nevertheless, there is still poor scientific information about the action of these plants. Tests included the determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) by microdilution method at concentrations of 5000-156.25 μg/μL, and evaluation of antimicrobial activity by agar disc diffusion method at concentrations 500-12.5 μg/μL, against the microorganisms Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. In the tests for MIC and antimicrobial activity by disc diffusion method in agar, the growth of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates were not inhibited by extracts from Piptochaetium montevidense, Bulbostylis capillaris and Juncus capillaceus employed in the study. Despite the popular use of the plants used in this study, there is no relation between the use and the expected antimicrobial activity. Prolonged use of these plants may worsen the disease and lead to kidney involvement, and in severe cases, lead to death. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Antimicrobial assays of three native British plants used in Anglo-Saxon medicine for wound healing formulations in 10th century England.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Frances; Pendry, Barbara; Sanchez-Medina, Alberto; Corcoran, Olivia

    2012-11-21

    Three important Anglo-Saxon medical texts from the 10th century contain herbal formulations for over 250 plant species, many of which have yet to be evaluated for their phytochemical and/or pharmacological properties. In this study, three native British plants were selected to determine antimicrobial activity relevant to treating bacterial infections and wounds. Several preparations of Agrimonia eupatoria L., Arctium minus (Hill) Bernh. and Potentilla reptans L. were screened for antimicrobial activity against selected Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria of relevance in wounds using a 96 well plate microdilution method (200, 40 and 8μg/mL). Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined for the most potent extracts from 2 to 0.004mg/mL and HPLC chromatograms examined by multivariate analysis. Principle components analysis (PCA) was used to identify chemical differences between antimicrobial activity of the crude extracts. The HPLC-PCA score plots attributed HPLC peaks to the antimicrobial activity with all three plants inhibiting growth of Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus by >50% in four or more extracts. The first two principal components (PC) represented 87% of the dataset variance. The P. reptans 75% ethanol root extract exhibited the greatest range of activity with MIC(50) at 31.25μg/mL to a total MIC that was also the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) at 1mg/mL. Additionally, the root of P. reptans, inhibited growth of Gram-negative bacteria with the 75% ethanol extract having a MIC(50) at 1mg/mL against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the decoction a MIC(50) at 3.9μg/mL against Escherichia coli. The results indicate a moderate antimicrobial activity against common wound pathogens for P. reptans suggesting it may well have been effective for treating wound and bacterial infections. Anglo-Saxon literary heritage may provide a credible basis for researching new antimicrobial formulations. Our approach encompassing advanced analytical

  3. A Plant-Based Nutrition Program.

    PubMed

    Evans, Joanne; Magee, Alexandra; Dickman, Kathy; Sutter, Rebecca; Sutter, Caroline

    2017-03-01

    : Proper nutrition is an important but often overlooked component of preventive care and disease management. Following a plant-based diet in particular has been shown to have dramatic effects on health and well-being in a relatively short period of time. For this reason, nurses at three faculty-led community health clinics participated in a nutrition educational program, following a plant-based diet for 21 days. They sought to improve their knowledge of plant-based nutrition and experience firsthand the benefits of such a diet. The authors conclude that this type of program, with its experiential component and beneficial personal health results, has the potential to influence a larger nursing audience as participants apply their knowledge and experience to patient care and to classroom discussions with nursing students.

  4. Biochemical analysis of a multifunctional cytochrome P450 (CYP51) enzyme required for synthesis of antimicrobial triterpenes in plants

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Katrin; Hughes, Richard K.; Sainsbury, Frank; Lomonossoff, George P.; Rejzek, Martin; Fairhurst, Shirley; Olsen, Carl-Erik; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Melton, Rachel E.; Hemmings, Andrew M.; Bak, Søren; Osbourn, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Members of the cytochromes P450 superfamily (P450s) catalyze a huge variety of oxidation reactions in microbes and higher organisms. Most P450 families are highly divergent, but in contrast the cytochrome P450 14α-sterol demethylase (CYP51) family is one of the most ancient and conserved, catalyzing sterol 14α-demethylase reactions required for essential sterol synthesis across the fungal, animal, and plant kingdoms. Oats (Avena spp.) produce antimicrobial compounds, avenacins, that provide protection against disease. Avenacins are synthesized from the simple triterpene, β-amyrin. Previously we identified a gene encoding a member of the CYP51 family of cytochromes P450, AsCyp51H10 (also known as Saponin-deficient 2, Sad2), that is required for avenacin synthesis in a forward screen for avenacin-deficient oat mutants. sad2 mutants accumulate β-amyrin, suggesting that they are blocked early in the pathway. Here, using a transient plant expression system, we show that AsCYP51H10 is a multifunctional P450 capable of modifying both the C and D rings of the pentacyclic triterpene scaffold to give 12,13β-epoxy-3β,16β-dihydroxy-oleanane (12,13β-epoxy-16β-hydroxy-β-amyrin). Molecular modeling and docking experiments indicate that C16 hydroxylation is likely to precede C12,13 epoxidation. Our computational modeling, in combination with analysis of a suite of sad2 mutants, provides insights into the unusual catalytic behavior of AsCYP51H10 and its active site mutants. Fungal bioassays show that the C12,13 epoxy group is an important determinant of antifungal activity. Accordingly, the oat AsCYP51H10 enzyme has been recruited from primary metabolism and has acquired a different function compared to other characterized members of the plant CYP51 family—as a multifunctional stereo- and regio-specific hydroxylase in plant specialized metabolism. PMID:23940321

  5. The antimicrobial action of resveratrol against Listeria monocytogenes in food-based models and its antibiofilm properties.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Susana; Domingues, Fernanda

    2016-10-01

    Resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) is a natural phytoalexin synthesized by plants in response to stress. This compound has several beneficial documented properties, namely anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, neuroprotective and antimicrobial activities. In this study the antimicrobial activity of resveratrol against Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua was investigated. Resveratrol had a minimum inhibitory concentration of 200 µg mL(-1) for the tested strains, with time-kill curves demonstrating bacteriostatic activity. Inhibition of biofilm formation was also assessed, with resveratrol strongly inhibiting biofilm formation by both species even at subinhibitory concentrations. Overall, resveratrol showed antimicrobial properties on planktonic cells and on biofilm formation ability. Considering the potential use of resveratrol as a food preservative, the antimicrobial efficacy of resveratrol in food was studied in milk, lettuce leaf model and chicken juice. Resveratrol retained greater efficacy in both lettuce leaf model and chicken juice, but milk had a negative impact on its antilisterial activity, indicating a possible reduction of resveratrol availability in milk. This study reinforces resveratrol as an antimicrobial agent, pointing out its antibiofilm activity and its potential use as preservative in some food matrices. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Antimicrobial activity of the carnivorous plant Dionaea muscipula against food-related pathogenic and putrefactive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ogihara, Hirokazu; Endou, Fumiko; Furukawa, Soichi; Matsufuji, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Kouichi; Anzai, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Solvent extracts from the carnivorous plant Dionaea muscipula (Venus flytrap) were prepared using eight different organic solvents, and examined for antibacterial activity against food-related pathogenic and putrefactive bacteria. All solvent extracts showed higher antibacterial activity against gram positive bacteria than against gram negative bacteria. The TLC-bioautography analysis of the extracts revealed that a yellow spot was detected at Rf value of 0.85, which showed strong antibacterial activity. The UV, MS, and NMR analyses revealed that the antibacterial compound was plumbagin.

  7. Plant-Based Diets: A Physician's Guide.

    PubMed

    Hever, Julieanna

    2016-01-01

    Because of the ever-increasing body of evidence in support of the health advantages of plant-based nutrition, there is a need for guidance on implementing its practice. This article provides physicians and other health care practitioners an overview of the myriad benefits of a plant-based diet as well as details on how best to achieve a well-balanced, nutrient-dense meal plan. It also defines notable nutrient sources, describes how to get started, and offers suggestions on how health care practitioners can encourage their patients to achieve goals, adhere to the plan, and experience success.

  8. 35S Promoter Methylation in Kanamycin-Resistant Kalanchoe (Kalanchoe pinnata L.) Plants Expressing the Antimicrobial Peptide Cecropin P1 Transgene.

    PubMed

    Shevchuk, T V; Zakharchenko, N S; Tarlachkov, S V; Furs, O V; Dyachenko, O V; Buryanov, Y I

    2016-09-01

    Transgenic kalanchoe plants (Kalanchoe pinnata L.) expressing the antimicrobial peptide cecropin P1 gene (cecP1) under the control of the 35S cauliflower mosaic virus 35S RNA promoter and the selective neomycin phosphotransferase II (nptII) gene under the control of the nopaline synthase gene promoter were studied. The 35S promoter methylation and the cecropin P1 biosynthesis levels were compared in plants growing on media with and without kanamycin. The low level of active 35S promoter methylation further decreases upon cultivation on kanamycin-containing medium, while cecropin P1 synthesis increases.

  9. Antimicrobial activity of conventional and plant-extract disinfectant solutions on microbial biofilms on a maxillofacial polymer surface.

    PubMed

    Guiotti, Aimée Maria; Cunha, Bruno Guandalini; Paulini, Marcela Borghi; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Duque, Cristiane; Caiaffa, Karina Sampaio; Brandini, Daniela Atili; Narciso de Oliveira, Derly Tescaro; Brizzotti, Natália Seron; Gottardo de Almeida, Margarete Teresa

    2016-07-01

    Dentists often note problems with infection in patients with maxillofacial prostheses. Conventional disinfection protocols are not always effective and may alter the properties of the polymer used in the prosthesis. Thus, the search for improved disinfection methods is important. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the antimicrobial activity of conventional disinfectant solutions (water and neutral soap and 4% chlorhexidine) and plant extracts (Cymbopogon nardus and Hydrastis canadensis) on specimens of maxillofacial silicone contaminated with Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. Seventy-two silicone (MDX4-4210) specimens were fabricated (5×2 mm) and sterilized. Thirty-six were contaminated with C albicans (10(6) cells/mL) and 36 with S aureus (10(8) cells/mL) to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of the cleaning protocols. After incubation (37°C/72 hours), the specimens were divided into 5 groups: not disinfected (positive control), soaking in saline solution for 10 minutes, soaking in 4% chlorhexidine for 10 minutes, soaking in C nardus for 10 minutes, soaking in H canadensis for 10 minutes, and washing by hand with water and neutral soap for 30 seconds. The viability of cells was evaluated by XTT (2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide) assay and by scanning electron microscope analysis. The results were analyzed by ANOVA and the Tukey HSD test (α=.05). All disinfection solutions provided a statistically significant reduction in biofilm viability compared with the control group for both microorganisms (P<.05). Washing with water and neutral soap was significantly more effective in reducing biofilm viability than immersion in the disinfection solutions, with persistence of viable microorganisms between 1.05% for C albicans and 0.62% for S aureus after this cleaning protocol. Photomicrographs revealed that 4% chlorhexidine altered the surface of the polymer. Within the limitations of

  10. Antimicrobial activity of pharmaceutical cocktails in sewage treatment plant effluent - An experimental and predictive approach to mixture risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Menz, Jakob; Baginska, Ewelina; Arrhenius, Åsa; Haiß, Annette; Backhaus, Thomas; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2017-09-26

    Municipal wastewater contains multi-component mixtures of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). This could shape microbial communities in sewage treatment plants (STPs) and the effluent-receiving ecosystems. In this paper we assess the risk of antimicrobial effects in STPs and the aquatic environment for a mixture of 18 APIs that was previously detected in the effluent of a European municipal STP. Effects on microbial consortia (collected from a separate STP) were determined using respirometry, enumeration of culturable microorganisms and community-level physiological profiling. The mixture toxicity against selected bacteria was assessed using assays with Pseudomonas putida and Vibrio fischeri. Additional data on the toxicity to environmental bacteria were compiled from literature in order to assess the individual and expected joint bacterial toxicity of the pharmaceuticals in the mixture. The reported effluent concentration of the mixture was 15.4 nmol/l and the lowest experimentally obtained effect concentrations (EC10) were 242 nmol/l for microbial consortia in STPs, 225 nmol/l for P. putida and 73 nmol/l for V. fischeri. The lowest published effect concentrations (EC50) of the individual antibiotics in the mixture range between 15 and 150 nmol/l, whereas 0.9-190 μmol/l was the range of bacterial EC50 values found for the non-antibiotic mixture components. Pharmaceutical cocktails could shape microbial communities at concentrations relevant to STPs and the effluent receiving aquatic environment. The risk of antimicrobial mixture effects was completely dominated by the presence of antibiotics, whereas other pharmaceutical classes contributed only negligibly to the mixture toxicity. The joint bacterial toxicity can be accurately predicted from the individual toxicity of the mixture components, provided that standardized data on representative bacterial strains becomes available for all relevant compounds. These findings argue for a more sophisticated

  11. Synthesis and antimicrobial evaluation of some new cyclooctanones and cyclooctane-based heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Ali, Korany A; Hosni, Hanaa M; Ragab, Eman A; El-Moez, Sherein I Abd

    2012-03-01

    The versatile synthon (E)-2-((dimethyl amino)methylene)cyclooctanone (2) was used as a key intermediate for the synthesis of cyclooctanones and cyclooctane-based heterocycles with pyrazole, isoxazole, pyrimidine, pyrazolopyrimidine, triazolopyrimidine and imidazopyrimidine derivatives via its reactions with several nitrogen nucleophiles. The newly synthesized compounds were screened in vitro for their antimicrobial activity against pathogenic microorganisms (Listeria monocytogenes, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans). Most of the tested compounds showed moderate to high antibacterial and antifungal effects against the tested pathogenic microorganisms. Among the synthesized compounds, 2-((p-sulfonamidophenyl)methylene)cyclooctanone (5) showed excellent activity against Listeria monocytogenes.

  12. Conjugated-polymer-based energy-transfer systems for antimicrobial and anticancer applications.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Huanxiang; Wang, Bing; Lv, Fengting; Liu, Libing; Wang, Shu

    2014-10-29

    Conjugated polymers (CPs) attract a lot of attention in sensing, imaging, and biomedical applications because of recent achievements that are highlighted in this Research News article. A brief review of recent progress in the application of CP-based energy-transfer systems in antimicrobial and anticancer treatments is provided. The transfer of excitation energy from CPs to photosensitizers leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are able to efficiently kill pathogenic microorganisms and cancer cells in the surroundings. Both fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and bioluminescence energy transfer (BRET) modes are discussed. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Redefining plant functional types for forests based on plant traits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, L.; Xu, C.; Christoffersen, B. O.; McDowell, N. G.; Zhou, H.

    2016-12-01

    Our ability to predict forest mortality is limited by the simple plant functional types (PFTs) in current generations of Earth System models (ESMs). For example, forests were formerly separated into PFTs only based on leaf form and phenology across different regions (arctic, temperate, and tropic areas) in the Community Earth System Model (CESM). This definition of PFTs ignored the large variation in vulnerability of species to drought and shade tolerance within each PFT. We redefined the PFTs for global forests based on plant traits including phenology, wood density, leaf mass per area, xylem-specific conductivity, and xylem pressure at 50% loss of conductivity. Species with similar survival strategies were grouped into the same PFT. New PFTs highlighted variation in vulnerability and physiological adaptation to drought and shade. New PFTs were better clustered than old ones in the two-dimensional plane of the first two principle components in a principle component analysis. We expect that the new PFTs will strengthen ESMs' ability on predicting drought-induced mortality in the future.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of plant extracts against the honeybee pathogens, Paenibacillus larvae and Ascosphaera apis and their topical toxicity to Apis mellifera adults.

    PubMed

    Chaimanee, Veeranan; Thongtue, Ubonwan; Sornmai, Nantaporn; Songsri, Sineenard; Pettis, Jeffery S

    2017-09-04

    To explore alternative non-chemical control measures against two honeybee pathogens, Paenibacillus larvae and Ascosphaera apis, thirty-seven plant species were screened for antimicrobial activity. The activity of selected plant extracts was screened using a in vitro disk diffusion assay and the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by the broth microdilution method. The results showed that thirty-six plant extracts had some antibacterial activity on P. larvae by disk diffusion assay. Chromolaena odorata showed the greatest antibacterial activity against P. larvae (MIC 16-64 μg/ml). Out of 37 tested plants, only seven species, Amomum krervanh, Allium sativum, Cinnamomum spp., Piper betle, Piper ribesioides, Piper sarmentosum and Syzygium aromaticum had inhibitory effects on A. apis (MICs of 32-64 μg/ml). The results demonstrated that promising plant extracts were not toxic to adult bees at the concentrations used in this study. The results demonstrate the potential antimicrobial activity of natural products against honeybee diseases caused by P. larvae and A. apis. Chromolaena odorata in particular showed high bioactivity against P. larvae. Further study is recommended to develop these non-chemical treatments against American foulbrood and chalkbrood in honeybees. This work proposes new natural products for the control of American foulbrood and chalkbrood in honeybees. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of an antimicrobial material based on a nanocomposite cellulose acetate film for active food packaging.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Francisco J; Torres, Alejandra; Peñaloza, Ángela; Sepúlveda, Hugo; Galotto, María J; Guarda, Abel; Bruna, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Nanocomposites based on biopolymers have been recognised as potential materials for the development of new ecofriendly food packaging. In addition, if these materials incorporate active substances in their structure, the potential applications are much higher. Therefore, this work was oriented to develop nanocomposites with antimicrobial activity based on cellulose acetate (CA), a commercial organoclay Cloisite30B (C30B), thymol (T) as natural antimicrobial component and tri-ethyl citrate (TEC) as plasticiser. Nanocomposites were prepared by a solvent casting method and consisted of 5% (w/w) of C30B, 5% (w/w) of TEC and variable content of T (0%, 0.5% and 2% w/w). To evaluate the effect of C30B into the CA matrix, CA films without this organoclay but with T were also prepared. All nanocomposites showed the intercalation of CA into the organoclay structure; furthermore this intercalation was favoured when 2% (w/w) of T was added to the nanocomposite. In spite of the observed intercalation, the presence of C30B inside the CA matrices increased the opacity of the films significantly. On the other hand, T showed a plasticiser effect on the thermal properties of CA nanocomposites decreasing glass transition, melting temperature and melting enthalpy. The presence of T in CA nanocomposites also allowed the control de Listeria innocua growth when these materials were placed in contact with this Gram-positive bacterium. Interestingly, antimicrobial activity was increased with the presence of C30B. Finally, studies on T release showed that the clay structure inside the CA matrix did not affect its release rate; however, this nanofiller affected the partition coefficient KP/FS which was higher to CA nanocomposites films than in CA films without organoclay. The results obtained in the present study are really promising to be applied in the manufacture of food packaging materials.

  16. Neomycin Sulfate Improves the Antimicrobial Activity of Mupirocin-Based Antibacterial Ointments.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Catlyn; Brooks, Lauren; Beckley, Andrew; Colquhoun, Jennifer; Dewhurst, Stephen; Dunman, Paul M

    2016-02-01

    In the midst of the current antimicrobial pipeline void, alternative approaches are needed to reduce the incidence of infection and decrease reliance on last-resort antibiotics for the therapeutic intervention of bacterial pathogens. In that regard, mupirocin ointment-based decolonization and wound maintenance practices have proven effective in reducing Staphylococcus aureus transmission and mitigating invasive disease. However, the emergence of mupirocin-resistant strains has compromised the agent's efficacy, necessitating new strategies for the prevention of staphylococcal infections. Herein, we set out to improve the performance of mupirocin-based ointments. A screen of a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug library revealed that the antibiotic neomycin sulfate potentiates the antimicrobial activity of mupirocin, whereas other library antibiotics did not. Preliminary mechanism of action studies indicate that neomycin's potentiating activity may be mediated by inhibition of the organism's RNase P function, an enzyme that is believed to participate in the tRNA processing pathway immediately upstream of the primary target of mupirocin. The improved antimicrobial activity of neomycin and mupirocin was maintained in ointment formulations and reduced S. aureus bacterial burden in murine models of nasal colonization and wound site infections. Combination therapy improved upon the effects of either agent alone and was effective in the treatment of contemporary methicillin-susceptible, methicillin-resistant, and high-level mupirocin-resistant S. aureus strains. From these perspectives, combination mupirocin-and-neomycin ointments appear to be superior to that of mupirocin alone and warrant further development. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. In vitro evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of a new resin-based endodontic sealer against endodontic pathogens.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Yoshiyuki; Kamaguchi, Arihide; Saito, Takashi

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the antimicrobial activities of a new resin-based SuperBond (SB) Sealer and five other sealers/cements against endodontic pathogens. The antimicrobial activities of SB Sealer, Sealapex, AH plus, Roeko Seal Automix, Canals N, and ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) were examined using a double-layered method. The microorganisms Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Candida albicans, Streptococcus mutans, and Streptococcus sanguinis were used. Live microorganisms were stained using triphenyltetrazolium chloride, and the zones of inhibition of microorganism growth were measured. The antimicrobial activity of SB Sealer was significantly lower than that of the other sealers, except for Pro Root MTA, against S. aureus, C. albicans, S. mutans, and S. sanguinis, but no activity against E. faecalis was detected. On the other hand, AH plus exhibited the highest antimicrobial activity. Pro Root MTA showed no antimicrobial activity against any of the microorganisms tested. SB Sealer offered no antimicrobial advantage over the other sealers tested except for Pro Root MTA.

  18. Antimicrobial and Insecticidal: Cyclic Lipopeptides and Hydrogen Cyanide Produced by Plant-Beneficial Pseudomonas Strains CHA0, CMR12a, and PCL1391 Contribute to Insect Killing

    PubMed Central

    Flury, Pascale; Vesga, Pilar; Péchy-Tarr, Maria; Aellen, Nora; Dennert, Francesca; Hofer, Nicolas; Kupferschmied, Karent P.; Kupferschmied, Peter; Metla, Zane; Ma, Zongwang; Siegfried, Sandra; de Weert, Sandra; Bloemberg, Guido; Höfte, Monica; Keel, Christoph J.; Maurhofer, Monika

    2017-01-01

    Particular groups of plant-beneficial fluorescent pseudomonads are not only root colonizers that provide plant disease suppression, but in addition are able to infect and kill insect larvae. The mechanisms by which the bacteria manage to infest this alternative host, to overcome its immune system, and to ultimately kill the insect are still largely unknown. However, the investigation of the few virulence factors discovered so far, points to a highly multifactorial nature of insecticidal activity. Antimicrobial compounds produced by fluorescent pseudomonads are effective weapons against a vast diversity of organisms such as fungi, oomycetes, nematodes, and protozoa. Here, we investigated whether these compounds also contribute to insecticidal activity. We tested mutants of the highly insecticidal strains Pseudomonas protegens CHA0, Pseudomonas chlororaphis PCL1391, and Pseudomonas sp. CMR12a, defective for individual or multiple antimicrobial compounds, for injectable and oral activity against lepidopteran insect larvae. Moreover, we studied expression of biosynthesis genes for these antimicrobial compounds for the first time in insects. Our survey revealed that hydrogen cyanide and different types of cyclic lipopeptides contribute to insecticidal activity. Hydrogen cyanide was essential to full virulence of CHA0 and PCL1391 directly injected into the hemolymph. The cyclic lipopeptide orfamide produced by CHA0 and CMR12a was mainly important in oral infections. Mutants of CMR12a and PCL1391 impaired in the production of the cyclic lipopeptides sessilin and clp1391, respectively, showed reduced virulence in injection and feeding experiments. Although virulence of mutants lacking one or several of the other antimicrobial compounds, i.e., 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol, phenazines, pyrrolnitrin, or pyoluteorin, was not reduced, these metabolites might still play a role in an insect background since all investigated biosynthetic genes for antimicrobial compounds of strain

  19. Investigation of medicinal plants of togo for antiviral and antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Anani, K; Hudson, J B; de Souza, C; Akpagana, K; Tower, G H; Arnason, J T; Gbeassor, M

    2000-01-01

    Methanol extracts were prepared from 19 medicinal plants of Togo and, by means of standard laboratory tests, were analysed for antiviral and antibiotic activities. Ten of the 19 showed significant antiviral activity and all but two displayed antibiotic activity. Extracts of three species, Adansonia digitata (the most potent), Conyza aegyptiaca and Palisota hirsuta , were active against all three test viruses (herpes simplex, Sindbis and poliovirus). The other seven, however, were more selective, showing activity against only one or two viruses. The antibiotic profiles varied considerably. The observation that each extract showed a distinctive permutation of target organisms suggests that different bioactive phytochemicals are present in each species. Only two of the extracts were devoid of bioactivity.

  20. [Antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgery].

    PubMed

    Cisneros, José Miguel; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Mensa, José; Trilla, Antoni; Cainzos, Miguel

    2002-01-01

    Antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgery refers to a very brief course of an antimicrobial agent initiated just before the start of the procedure. The efficacy of antimicrobials to prevent postoperative infection at the site of surgery (incisional superficial, incisional deep, or organ/space infection) has been demonstrated for many surgical procedures. Nevertheless, the majority of studies centering on the quality of preoperative prophylaxis have found that a high percentage of the antimicrobials used are inappropriate for this purpose. This work discusses the scientific basis for antimicrobial prophylaxis, provides general recommendations for its correct use and specific recommendations for various types of surgery. The guidelines for surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis are based on results from well-designed studies, whenever possible. These guidelines are focussed on reducing the incidence of infection at the surgical site while minimizing the contribution of preoperative administration of antimicrobials to the development of bacterial resistance.

  1. Bioinspired helical microswimmers based on vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Feng, Xiaomiao; Pei, Allen; Kane, Christopher R; Tam, Ryan; Hennessy, Camille; Wang, Joseph

    2014-01-08

    Plant-based bioinspired magnetically propelled helical microswimmers are described. The helical microstructures are derived from spiral water-conducting vessels of different plants, harnessing the intrinsic biological structures of nature. Geometric variables of the spiral vessels, such as the helix diameter and pitch, can be controlled by mechanical stretching for the precise fabrication and consistent performance of helical microswimmers. Xylem vessels of a wide variety of different plants have been evaluated for the consistency and reproducibility of their helical parameters. Sequential deposition of thin Ti and Ni layers directly on the spiral vessels, followed by dicing, leads to an extremely simple and cost-efficient mass-production of functional helical microswimmers. The resulting plant-based magnetic microswimmers display efficient propulsion, with a speed of over 250 μm/s, as well as powerful locomotion in biological media such as human serum. The influence of actuation frequencies on the swimming velocity is investigated. Such use of plant vessels results in significant savings in the processing costs and provides an extremely simple, cost-effective fabrication route for the large-scale production of helical magnetic swimmers.

  2. Antimicrobial efficacy of soap and water hand washing versus an alcohol-based hand cleanser.

    PubMed

    Holton, Ronald H; Huber, Michaell A; Terezhalmy, Geza T

    2009-12-01

    The emergence of alcohol-based hand cleansers may represent an alternative to soap and water in the clinical dental setting. In this study, the antimicrobial efficacy of traditional hand washing vs. a unique alcohol-based hand cleanser with persistence was evaluated. Two experienced dentists participated over a 10-day period. On days 1-5, each clinician used an antibacterial liquid soap (Dial, Dial Corporation, Scottsdale, AZ). Days 6-10, an alcohol-based hand cleanser (Triseptin Water Optional, Healthpoint Surgical, Fort Worth, TX) was used. Sampling was by modified glove juice technique. The results indicate that the alcohol-based hand cleanser dramatically outperforms the traditional hand washing agent in the general dental setting.

  3. Antimicrobial Drugs in Fighting against Antimicrobial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Guyue; Dai, Menghong; Ahmed, Saeed; Hao, Haihong; Wang, Xu; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    The outbreak of antimicrobial resistance, together with the lack of newly developed antimicrobial drugs, represents an alarming signal for both human and animal healthcare worldwide. Selection of rational dosage regimens for traditional antimicrobial drugs based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic principles as well as development of novel antimicrobials targeting new bacterial targets or resistance mechanisms are key approaches in tackling AMR. In addition to the cellular level resistance (i.e., mutation and horizontal gene transfer of resistance determinants), the community level resistance (i.e., bilofilms and persisters) is also an issue causing antimicrobial therapy difficulties. Therefore, anti-resistance and antibiofilm strategies have currently become research hotspot to combat antimicrobial resistance. Although metallic nanoparticles can both kill bacteria and inhibit biofilm formation, the toxicity is still a big challenge for their clinical applications. In conclusion, rational use of the existing antimicrobials and combinational use of new strategies fighting against antimicrobial resistance are powerful warranties to preserve potent antimicrobial drugs for both humans and animals. PMID:27092125

  4. Anti-microbial principles of selected remedial plants from Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Tirupathi, Rao G; Suresh, Babu K; Ujwal, Kumar J; Sujana, P; Raoa, A Veerabhadr; Sreedhar, AS

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine the anti-bacterial activity of leaf extracts of Morus alba L. (Moraceae) and Piper betel L. (Piperaceae), and seed extracts of Bombax ceiba L. (Borabacaceae). Methods We have partially purified plant extracts by solvent extraction method, and evaluated the effect of individual fractions on bacterial growth using Escherichia coli (E. coli), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacterial strains. Results Compared with Morus and Bombax fractions, Piper fractions showed significant growth inhibition on all the three types of bacteria studied. The EtOAc-hexane fractions of Piper leaves exhibited significant anti-bacterial activity with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 50 µg/mL culture against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The EtOAc-fractions I, II, and IV inhibited bacterial colony formation on soft agar in addition to growth inhibition. A combination treatment of piper fractions with ampicillin resulted in significant growth inhibition in E. coli and P. aeruginosa, and combination with anticancer drug geldanamycin (2µg/mL) showed selective growth inhibition against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. Three major compounds, i.e., eugenol, 3-hexene-ol and stigmasterol, were primarily identified from Piper betel leaf extractions. Among the individual compounds, eugenol treatment showed improved growth inhibition compared with stigmasterol and 3-hexene-ol. Conclusions We are reporting potential anti-bacterial compounds from Piper betel against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria either alone or in combination with drug treatment. PMID:23569779

  5. Antimicrobial properties of a chitosan dextran-based hydrogel for surgical use.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Manal A; Cabral, Jaydee D; Brooks, Heather J L; Moratti, Stephen C; Hanton, Lyall R

    2012-01-01

    A chitosan dextran-based (CD) hydrogel, developed for use in endoscopic sinus surgery, was tested for antimicrobial activity in vitro against a range of pathogenic microorganisms. The microdilution technique was used to determine minimum inhibitory, minimum bactericidal, and minimum fungicidal concentrations. In addition, the time-kill efficacy of CD hydrogel was determined for two bacterial species. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy were carried out to elucidate the antimicrobial mechanism of this compound. CD hydrogel was found to be effective against Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Escherichia coli, and Clostridium perfringens at its surgical concentration of 50,000 mg/liter. Minimum bactericidal concentrations ranged from 2,000 to 50,000 mg/liter. Dextran aldehyde (DA) was found to be the antimicrobial component of the CD hydrogel with MBC ranging from 2,000 to 32,000 mg/liter. S. aureus appeared to be killed at a slightly faster rate than E. coli. Candida albicans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were more resistant to CD hydrogel and DA. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy of E. coli and S. aureus incubated with CD hydrogel and DA alone revealed morphological damage, disrupted cell walls, and loss of cytosolic contents, compatible with the proposed mode of action involving binding to cell wall proteins and disruption of peptide bonds. Motility and chemotaxis tests showed E. coli to be inhibited when incubated with DA. The antibacterial activity of CD hydrogel may make it a useful postsurgical aid at other body sites, especially where there is a risk of Gram-positive infections.

  6. Poly(vinyl alcohol)-based film potentially suitable for antimicrobial packaging applications.

    PubMed

    Musetti, Alessandro; Paderni, Katia; Fabbri, Paola; Pulvirenti, Andrea; Al-Moghazy, Marwa; Fava, Patrizia

    2014-04-01

    This work aimed at developing a thin and water-resistant food-grade poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVOH)-based matrix able to swell when in contact with high moisture content food products without rupturing to release antimicrobial agents onto the food surface. This film was prepared by blending PVOH and 7.20% (wt/wt of PVOH) of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) with citric acid as crosslinking agent. The film-forming solution was then casted onto a flat surface and the obtained film was 60 μm in thickness and showed a good transparency (close to T = 100%) in the visible region (400 to 700 nm). After immersion in water for 72 h at room temperature, the crosslinked matrix loses only 19.2% of its original weight (the percentage includes the amount of unreacted crosslinking agent, antimicrobial in itself). Water content, degree of swelling, and crosslinking density of the film prove that the presence of PEG diminishes the hydrophilic behavior of the material. Also the mechanical properties of the wet and dry film were assessed. Alongside this, 2.5% (wt/wt of dry film) of grapefruit seed extract (GSE), an antimicrobial agent, was added to the film-forming solution just before casting and the ability of the plastic matrix to release the additive was then evaluated in vitro against 2 GSE-susceptible microorganisms, Salmonella enteritidis and Listeria innocua. The results indicate that the developed matrix may be a promising food-grade material for the incorporation of active substances.

  7. Optimization of a nanotechnology based antimicrobial platform for food safety applications using Engineered Water Nanostructures (EWNS)

    PubMed Central

    Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Vedantam, Pallavi; Cirenza, Caroline; McDevitt, James; Eleftheriadou, Mary; Leonard, Stephen S.; Demokritou, Philip

    2016-01-01

    A chemical free, nanotechnology-based, antimicrobial platform using Engineered Water Nanostructures (EWNS) was recently developed. EWNS have high surface charge, are loaded with reactive oxygen species (ROS), and can interact-with, and inactivate an array of microorganisms, including foodborne pathogens. Here, it was demonstrated that their properties during synthesis can be fine tuned and optimized to further enhance their antimicrobial potential. A lab based EWNS platform was developed to enable fine-tuning of EWNS properties by modifying synthesis parameters. Characterization of EWNS properties (charge, size and ROS content) was performed using state-of-the art analytical methods. Further their microbial inactivation potential was evaluated with food related microorganisms such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria innocua, Mycobacterium parafortuitum, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae inoculated onto the surface of organic grape tomatoes. The results presented here indicate that EWNS properties can be fine-tuned during synthesis resulting in a multifold increase of the inactivation efficacy. More specifically, the surface charge quadrupled and the ROS content increased. Microbial removal rates were microorganism dependent and ranged between 1.0 to 3.8 logs after 45 mins of exposure to an EWNS aerosol dose of 40,000 #/cm3. PMID:26875817

  8. Optimization of a nanotechnology based antimicrobial platform for food safety applications using Engineered Water Nanostructures (EWNS).

    PubMed

    Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Vedantam, Pallavi; Cirenza, Caroline; McDevitt, James; Eleftheriadou, Mary; Leonard, Stephen S; Demokritou, Philip

    2016-02-15

    A chemical free, nanotechnology-based, antimicrobial platform using Engineered Water Nanostructures (EWNS) was recently developed. EWNS have high surface charge, are loaded with reactive oxygen species (ROS), and can interact-with, and inactivate an array of microorganisms, including foodborne pathogens. Here, it was demonstrated that their properties during synthesis can be fine tuned and optimized to further enhance their antimicrobial potential. A lab based EWNS platform was developed to enable fine-tuning of EWNS properties by modifying synthesis parameters. Characterization of EWNS properties (charge, size and ROS content) was performed using state-of-the art analytical methods. Further their microbial inactivation potential was evaluated with food related microorganisms such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria innocua, Mycobacterium parafortuitum, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae inoculated onto the surface of organic grape tomatoes. The results presented here indicate that EWNS properties can be fine-tuned during synthesis resulting in a multifold increase of the inactivation efficacy. More specifically, the surface charge quadrupled and the ROS content increased. Microbial removal rates were microorganism dependent and ranged between 1.0 to 3.8 logs after 45 mins of exposure to an EWNS aerosol dose of 40,000 #/cm(3).

  9. Optimization of a nanotechnology based antimicrobial platform for food safety applications using Engineered Water Nanostructures (EWNS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Vedantam, Pallavi; Cirenza, Caroline; McDevitt, James; Eleftheriadou, Mary; Leonard, Stephen S.; Demokritou, Philip

    2016-02-01

    A chemical free, nanotechnology-based, antimicrobial platform using Engineered Water Nanostructures (EWNS) was recently developed. EWNS have high surface charge, are loaded with reactive oxygen species (ROS), and can interact-with, and inactivate an array of microorganisms, including foodborne pathogens. Here, it was demonstrated that their properties during synthesis can be fine tuned and optimized to further enhance their antimicrobial potential. A lab based EWNS platform was developed to enable fine-tuning of EWNS properties by modifying synthesis parameters. Characterization of EWNS properties (charge, size and ROS content) was performed using state-of-the art analytical methods. Further their microbial inactivation potential was evaluated with food related microorganisms such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria innocua, Mycobacterium parafortuitum, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae inoculated onto the surface of organic grape tomatoes. The results presented here indicate that EWNS properties can be fine-tuned during synthesis resulting in a multifold increase of the inactivation efficacy. More specifically, the surface charge quadrupled and the ROS content increased. Microbial removal rates were microorganism dependent and ranged between 1.0 to 3.8 logs after 45 mins of exposure to an EWNS aerosol dose of 40,000 #/cm3.

  10. Apple, carrot, and hibiscus edible films containing the plant antimicrobials carvacrol and cinnamaldehyde inactivate Salmonella Newport on organic leafy greens in sealed plastic bags

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial effects of carvacrol and cinnamaldehyde incorporated into apple, carrot and hibiscus based edible films against Salmonella Newport in contaminated organic leafy greens. The leafy greens tested included romaine and iceberg lettuce, and ...

  11. Molecular characterization of forest soil based Paenibacillus elgii and optimization of various culture conditions for its improved antimicrobial activity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S. N.; Jacob, Jubi; Reshma, U. R.; Rajesh, R. O.; Kumar, B. S. D.

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms have provided a bounty of bioactive secondary metabolites with very exciting biological activities such as antibacterial, antifungal antiviral, and anticancer, etc. The present study aims at the optimization of culture conditions for improved antimicrobial production of Paenibacillus elgii obtained from Wayanad forest of Western Ghats region of Kerala, India. A bacterial strain isolated from the Western Ghats forest soil of Wayanad, Kerala, India was identified as P. elgii by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. P. elgii recorded significant board spectrum activity against all human and plant pathogenic microorganism tested except Candida albicans. It has been well known that even minor variations in the fermentation medium may impact not only the quantity of desired bioactive metabolites but also the general metabolic profile of the producing microorganisms. Thus, further studies were carried out to assess the impact of medium components on the antimicrobial production of P. elgii and to optimize an ideal fermentation medium to maximize its antimicrobial production. Out of three media [nutrient broth (NA), Luria broth (LB) and Trypticase soy broth (TSB)] used for fermentation, TSB medium recorded significant activity. Glucose and meat peptone were identified as the best carbon and nitrogen sources, which significantly affected the antibiotic production when supplemented with TSB medium. Next the effect of various fermentation conditions such as temperature, pH, and incubation time on the production of antimicrobial compounds was studied on TSB + glucose + meat peptone and an initial pH of 7 and a temperature of 30°C for 3 days were found to be optimum for maximum antimicrobial production. The results indicate that medium composition in the fermentation media along with cultural parameters plays a vital role in the enhanced production of antimicrobial substances. PMID:26539188

  12. Secondary Metabolites from Plants Inhibiting ABC Transporters and Reversing Resistance of Cancer Cells and Microbes to Cytotoxic and Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wink, Michael; Ashour, Mohamed L.; El-Readi, Mahmoud Zaki

    2012-01-01

    Fungal, bacterial, and cancer cells can develop resistance against antifungal, antibacterial, or anticancer agents. Mechanisms of resistance are complex and often multifactorial. Mechanisms include: (1) Activation of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, such as P-gp, which pump out lipophilic compounds that have entered a cell, (2) Activation of cytochrome p450 oxidases which can oxidize lipophilic agents to make them more hydrophilic and accessible for conjugation reaction with glucuronic acid, sulfate, or amino acids, and (3) Activation of glutathione transferase, which can conjugate xenobiotics. This review summarizes the evidence that secondary metabolites (SM) of plants, such as alkaloids, phenolics, and terpenoids can interfere with ABC transporters in cancer cells, parasites, bacteria, and fungi. Among the active natural products several lipophilic terpenoids [monoterpenes, diterpenes, triterpenes (including saponins), steroids (including cardiac glycosides), and tetraterpenes] but also some alkaloids (isoquinoline, protoberberine, quinoline, indole, monoterpene indole, and steroidal alkaloids) function probably as competitive inhibitors of P-gp, multiple resistance-associated protein 1, and Breast cancer resistance protein in cancer cells, or efflux pumps in bacteria (NorA) and fungi. More polar phenolics (phenolic acids, flavonoids, catechins, chalcones, xanthones, stilbenes, anthocyanins, tannins, anthraquinones, and naphthoquinones) directly inhibit proteins forming several hydrogen and ionic bonds and thus disturbing the 3D structure of the transporters. The natural products may be interesting in medicine or agriculture as they can enhance the activity of active chemotherapeutics or pesticides or even reverse multidrug resistance, at least partially, of adapted and resistant cells. If these SM are applied in combination with a cytotoxic or antimicrobial agent, they may reverse resistance in a synergistic fashion. PMID:22536197

  13. A novel antimicrobial protein for plant protection consisting of a Xanthomonas oryzae harpin and active domains of cecropin A and melittin

    PubMed Central

    Che, Yi‐Zhou; Li, Yu‐Rong; Zou, Hua‐Song; Zou, Li‐Fang; Zhang, Bing; Chen, Gong‐You

    2011-01-01

    Summary Discoveries about antimicrobial peptides and plant defence activators have made possible the de novo and rational design of novel peptides for use in crop protection. Here we report a novel chimeric protein, Hcm1, which was made by linking the active domains of cecropin A and melittin to the hypersensitive response (HR)‐elicitor Hpa1 of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola, the causal agent of rice bacterial leaf streak. The resulting chimeric protein maintained not only the HR‐inducing property of the harpin, but also the antimicrobial activity of the cecropin A‐melittin hybrid. Hcm1 was purified from engineered Escherichia coli and evaluated in terms of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the 50% effective dose (ED50) against important plant pathogenic bacteria and fungi. Importantly, the protein acted as a potential pesticide by inducing disease resistance for viral, bacterial and fungal pathogens. This designed drug can be considered as a lead compound for use in plant protection, either for the development of new broad‐spectrum pesticides or for expression in transgenic plants. PMID:21895994

  14. Assessing the Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oils from Brazilian Plants-Eremanthus erythropappus (Asteraceae), Plectrantuns barbatus, and P. amboinicus (Lamiaceae).

    PubMed

    Santos, Nara O Dos; Mariane, Bruna; Lago, João Henrique G; Sartorelli, Patricia; Rosa, Welton; Soares, Marisi G; da Silva, Adalberto M; Lorenzi, Harri; Vallim, Marcelo A; Pascon, Renata C

    2015-05-11

    The chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of essential oils obtained from three Brazilian plant species-leaves and branches of Eremanthus erythropappus (Asteraceae), leaves of Plectranthus barbatus, and leaves of P. amboinicus (Lamiaceae)-were determined. Analysis by GC/MS and determination of Kovats indexes both indicated δ-elemene (leaves-42.61% and branches-23.41%) as well as (-)-α-bisabolol (leaves-24.80% and stem bark-66.16%) as major constituents of E. erythropappus essential oils. The main components of leaves of P. barbatus were identified as (Z)-caryophyllene (17.98%), germacrene D (17.35%), and viridiflorol (14.13%); whereas those of leaves of P. amboinicus were characterized as p-cymene (12.01%), γ-terpinene (14.74%), carvacrol (37.70%), and (Z)-caryophyllene (14.07%). The antimicrobial activity against yeasts and bacteria was assessed in broth microdilution assays to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) necessary to inhibit microbial growth. In addition, the crude oil of branches of E. erythropappus was subjected to chromatographic separation procedures to afford purified (-)-α-bisabolol. This compound displayed biological activity against pathogenic yeasts, thus suggesting that the antimicrobial effect observed with crude oils of E. erythropappus leaves and branches may be related to the occurrence of (-)-α-bisabolol as their main component. Our results showed that crude oils of Brazilian plants, specifically E. erythropappus, P. barbatus, and P. amboinicus and its components, could be used as a tool for the developing novel and more efficacious antimicrobial agents.

  15. Plant parameters for plant functional groups of western rangelands to enable process-based simulation modeling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Regional environmental assessments with process-based models require realistic estimates of plant parameters for the primary plant functional groups in the region. “Functional group” in this context is an operational term, based on similarities in plant type and in plant parameter values. Likewise...

  16. Development of a chitosan-based wound dressing with improved hemostatic and antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Ong, Shin-Yeu; Wu, Jian; Moochhala, Shabbir M; Tan, Mui-Hong; Lu, Jia

    2008-11-01

    Hemorrhage remains a leading cause of early death after trauma, and infectious complications in combat wounds continue to challenge caregivers. Although chitosan dressings have been developed to address these problems, they are not always effective in controlling bleeding or killing bacteria. We aimed to refine the chitosan dressing by incorporating a procoagulant (polyphosphate) and an antimicrobial (silver). Chitosan containing different amounts and types of polyphosphate polymers was fabricated, and their hemostatic efficacies evaluated in vitro. The optimal chitosan-polyphosphate formulation (ChiPP) accelerated blood clotting (p = 0.011), increased platelet adhesion (p=0.002), generated thrombin faster (p = 0.002), and absorbed more blood than chitosan (p < 0.001). Silver-loaded ChiPP exhibited significantly greater bactericidal activity than ChiPP in vitro, achieving a complete kill of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and a > 99.99% kill of Staphylococcus aureus consistently. The silver dressing also significantly reduced mortality from 90% to 14.3% in a P. aeruginosa wound infection model in mice. Although the dressing exerted severe cytotoxicity against cultured fibroblasts, wound healing was not inhibited. This study demonstrated for the first time, the application of polyphosphate as a hemostatic adjuvant, and developed a new chitosan-based composite with potent hemostatic and antimicrobial properties.

  17. Antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity of piperazinium- and guanidinium-based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Zhang, Shanshan; Dai, Yitong; Lu, Xiaoxing; Lei, Qunfang; Fang, Wenjun

    2016-04-15

    Twelve piperazinium- and guanidinium-based ionic liquids (ILs) were synthesized, and characterized by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), thermal gravimetric analyzer (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity have been investigated to provide the information whether the newly synthesized ILs are toxic or not. The antimicrobial effects of these ILs on gram negative and gram positive bacteria are evaluated on the basis of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measurements. The membrane damages of bacteria in the presence of ILs are observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cytotoxicity data of the ILs on HEK-293 and C6 cells are obtained by MTT cell viability assay. The disruption of cell cycle is analyzed by the flow cytometry. The results show that most of the ILs exhibit low toxicity, and the ILs with tetrafluoroborate anion and with benzene ring on cation are the species with relatively high toxicity among the studied ILs. The fundamental data and results can provide some useful information for the further studies and applications of the ILs.

  18. Hyperosmolar metabolic acidosis in burn patients exposed to glycol based topical antimicrobials-A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Leibson, Tom; Davies, Paige; Nickel, Cheri; Koren, Gideon

    2017-08-07

    The well documented susceptibility of burn patients to acquired infections via damaged skin mandates application of antimicrobial agents. These agents are dissolved in various vehicles that augment skin absorption thus allowing greater efficacy. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) and Propylene glycol (PropG) are among the most commonly used vehicles, and both have been used in numerous medications and cosmetic products over the past few decades. Rarely, burn patients treated with agents containing these glycols present with a life threatening systemic toxidrome of hyperosmolar metabolic acidosis. We present a systematic review of outcomes in burn patients treated with similar agents. Relevant studies were identified through systematic searches conducted in MEDLINE (Ovid), Embase (Ovid), CENTRAL (Ovid), and Web of Science (Thomson Reuters), from database inception to August 4th, 2016. All publications of clinical burn patient studies included at least one arm receiving a glycol based topical therapy. A total of 61 studies involving 10,282 patients and 4 different antimicrobial medications fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Nine burn patients (0.09%) were documented to present with hyperosmolar metabolic acidosis during topical silver sulfadiazine treatment. Propylene glycol isolated from their blood accounted for the high osmole gap. This first systematic review found very few cases of documented hyperosmolar metabolic acidosis, all within one study that had set to specifically explore this toxidrome. High index of suspicion with frequent osmolar gap monitoring may help identify future toxicities in a timely manner. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  19. An N-halamine-based rechargeable antimicrobial and biofilm controlling polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xinbo; Cao, Zhengbing; Porteous, Nuala; Sun, Yuyu

    2012-04-01

    An N-halamine precursor, 5,5-dimethylhydantoin (DMH), was covalently linked to the surface of polyurethane (PU) with 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) as the coupling agent. The reaction pathways were investigated using propyl isocyanate (PI) as a model compound. The results suggested that the imide and amide groups of DMH have very similar reactivities toward the isocyanate groups on PU surfaces activated with HDI. After bleach treatment the covalently bound DMH moieties were transformed into N-halamines. The new N-halamine-based PU provided potent antimicrobial effects against Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive bacterium), Escherichia coli (Gram-negative bacterium), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, drug-resistant Gram-positive bacterium), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE, drug-resistant Gram-positive bacterium), and Candida albicans (fungus), and successfully prevented bacterial and fungal biofilm formation. The antimicrobial and biofilm controlling effects were stable for longer than 6 months under normal storage in open air. Furthermore, if the functions were lost due to prolonged use they could be recharged by another chlorination treatment. The recharging could be repeated as needed to achieve long-term protection against microbial contamination and biofilm formation.

  20. N-halamine-based rechargeable antimicrobial and biofilm-controlling polyurethane

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xinbo; Cao, Zhengbing; Porteous, Nuala; Sun, Yuyu

    2012-01-01

    An N-halamine precursor, 5, 5-dimethyl hydantoin (DMH), was covalently linked to the surface of polyurethane (PU) with 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) as a coupling agent. The reaction pathways were investigated using propyl isocyanate (PI) as a model compound, and the results suggested that the imide and amide groups of DMH had very similar reactivity toward the isocyanate groups on PU surfaces activated with HDI. After bleach treatment, the covalently bound DMH moieties were transformed into N-halamines. The new N-halmaine-based PU provided potent antimicrobial effects against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus, Gram-positive), Escherichia coli (E. coli, Gram-negative), methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, drug resistant Gram-positive bacteria), vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE, drug resistant Gram-positive bacteria), and Candida albicans (C. ablicans, fungi), and successfully prevented bacterial and fungal biofilm formation. The antimicrobial and biofilm-controlling effects were stable for longer than 6 months under normal storage in open air. Furthermore, if the functions were lost due to prolonged use, they could be recharged by another chlorination treatment. The recharging could be repeated as needed to achieve long-term protection against microbial contamination and biofilm-formation. PMID:22244984

  1. Antimicrobial and cytotoxic constituents from native Cameroonian medicinal plant Hypericum riparium.

    PubMed

    Tala, Michel Feussi; Talontsi, Ferdinand Mouafo; Zeng, Guang-Zhi; Wabo, Hippolyte Kamdem; Tan, Ning-Hua; Spiteller, Michael; Tane, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Bioassay guided fractionation of Hypericum riparium leaves extract has resulted in the isolation and characterization of three new compounds namely chipericumin E (1), hyperenone C (3), and hyperixanthone (5), together with twenty known compounds. Their structures were elucidated based on comprehensive interpretation of spectroscopic and spectrometric data. Compounds 1-4, and 6-8 displayed moderate antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and cytotoxic effects on the human gastric cell line BGC-823 with IC50 values ranging from 6.54 to 18.50μM.

  2. In vivo biocompatibility and pacing function study of silver ion-based antimicrobial surface technology applied to cardiac pacemakers

    PubMed Central

    Shawcross, James; Bakhai, Ameet; Ansaripour, Ali; Armstrong, James; Lewis, David; Agg, Philip; De Godoy, Roberta; Blunn, Gordon

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Evidence suggests that the rate of cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) infections is increasing more rapidly than the rates of CIED implantation and is associated with considerable mortality, morbidity and health economic impact. Antimicrobial surface treatments are being developed for CIEDs to reduce the risk of postimplantation infection within the subcutaneous implant pocket. Methods and analysis The feasibility of processing cardiac pacemakers with the Agluna antimicrobial silver ion surface technology and in vivo biocompatibility were evaluated. Antimicrobially processed (n=6) and control pacemakers (n=6) were implanted into subcutaneous pockets and connected to a part of the sacrospinalis muscle using an ovine model for 12 weeks. Pacemaker function was monitored preimplantation and postimplantation. Results Neither local infection nor systemic toxicity were detected in antimicrobial or control devices, and surrounding tissues showed no abnormal pathology or over-reactivity. Semiquantitative scores of membrane formation, cellular orientation and vascularity were applied over five regions of the pacemaker capsule and average scores compared. Results showed no significant difference between antimicrobially processed and control pacemakers. Silver analysis of whole blood at 7 days found that levels were a maximum of 10 parts per billion (ppb) for one sample, more typically ≤2 ppb, compared with <<2 ppb for preimplantation levels, well below reported toxic levels. Conclusions There was no evidence of adverse or abnormal pathology in tissue surrounding antimicrobially processed pacemakers, or deleterious effect on basic pacing capabilities and parameters at 12 weeks. This proof of concept study provides evidence of basic biocompatibility and feasibility of applying this silver ion-based antimicrobial surface to a titanium pacemaker surface. PMID:28674615

  3. Genotyping using whole-genome sequencing is a realistic alternative to surveillance based on phenotypic antimicrobial susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    Zankari, Ea; Hasman, Henrik; Kaas, Rolf Sommer; Seyfarth, Anne Mette; Agersø, Yvonne; Lund, Ole; Larsen, Mette Voldby; Aarestrup, Frank M

    2013-04-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bacterial isolates is essential for clinical diagnosis, to detect emerging problems and to guide empirical treatment. Current phenotypic procedures are sometimes associated with mistakes and may require further genetic testing. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) may soon be within reach even for routine surveillance and clinical diagnostics. The aim of this study was to evaluate WGS as a routine tool for surveillance of antimicrobial resistance compared with current phenotypic procedures. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed on 200 isolates originating from Danish pigs, covering four bacterial species. Genomic DNA was purified from all isolates and sequenced as paired-end reads on the Illumina platform. The web servers ResFinder and MLST (www.genomicepidemiology.org) were used to identify acquired antimicrobial resistance genes and MLST types (where MLST stands for multilocus sequence typing). ResFinder results were compared with phenotypic antimicrobial susceptibility testing results using EUCAST epidemiological cut-off values and MLST types. A total of 3051 different phenotypic tests were performed; 482 led to the categorizing of isolates as resistant and 2569 as susceptible. Seven cases of disagreement between tested and predicted susceptibility were observed, six of which were related to spectinomycin resistance in Escherichia coli. Correlation between MLST type and resistance profiles was only observed in Salmonella Typhimurium, where isolates belonging to sequence type (ST) 34 were more resistant than ST19 isolates. High concordance (99.74%) between phenotypic and predicted antimicrobial susceptibility was observed. Thus, antimicrobial resistance testing based on WGS is an alternative to conventional phenotypic methods.

  4. Screening for antimicrobial activity of ten medicinal plants used in Colombian folkloric medicine: A possible alternative in the treatment of non-nosocomial infections

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Jhon J; Ochoa, Veronica J; Ocampo, Saul A; Muñoz, John F

    2006-01-01

    Background The antimicrobial activity and Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of the extracts of Bidens pilosa L., Bixa orellana L., Cecropia peltata L., Cinchona officinalis L., Gliricidia sepium H.B. & K, Jacaranda mimosifolia D.Don, Justicia secunda Vahl., Piper pulchrum C.DC, P. paniculata L. and Spilanthes americana Hieron were evaluated against five bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus β hemolític, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli), and one yeast (Candida albicans). These plants are used in Colombian folk medicine to treat infections of microbial origin. Methods Plants were collected by farmers and traditional healers. The ethanol, hexane and water extracts were obtained by standard methods. The antimicrobial activity was found by using a modified agar well diffusion method. All microorganisms were obtained from the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC). MIC was determined in the plant extracts that showed some efficacy against the tested microorganisms. Gentamycin sulfate (1.0 μg/ml), clindamycin (0.3 μg/ml) and nystatin (1.0 μg/ml) were used as positive controls. Results The water extracts of Bidens pilosa L., Jacaranda mimosifolia D.Don, and Piper pulchrum C.DC showed a higher activity against Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli than gentamycin sulfate. Similarly, the ethanol extracts of all species were active against Staphylococcus aureus except for Justicia secunda. Furthermore, Bixa orellana L, Justicia secunda Vahl. and Piper pulchrum C.DC presented the lowest MICs against Escherichia coli (0.8, 0.6 and 0.6 μg/ml, respectively) compared to gentamycin sulfate (0.9 8g/ml). Likewise, Justicia secunda and Piper pulchrum C.DC showed an analogous MIC against Candida albicans (0.5 and 0.6 μg/ml, respectively) compared to nystatin (0.6 μg/ml). Bixa orellana L, exhibited a better MIC against Bacillus cereus (0.2 μg/ml) than gentamycin sulfate (0.5 μg/ml). Conclusion This in vitro study corroborated the

  5. Developments of Polysorbate (Tween) based microemulsions: Preclinical drug delivery, toxicity and antimicrobial applications.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Mehta, S K

    2017-08-30

    The present review deals with the progress of Polysorbates (Tween) based microemulsions in drug delivery. PEGylated Sorbitan Fatty Acid Esters (Tweens/Polysorbates) are one of the most used non-ionic surfactants. Particularly, Polysorbates based microemulsion has been widely used for enhancing solubilization of poorly soluble drugs. This article deals with underlying the preclinical factors which affect the solubilization efficacy of Tween formulations, implication of pharmaceutically accepted vectors in terms of absorption, bioavailability, biological fate and potential toxicity. Antimicrobial activity of Tween microemulsion formulations has also been addressed emphasising the role of Tween. The review contains comprehensive knowledge/literature related to physicochemical parameters and biological fate of different Polysorbates and takes into account all the parameters and observations that make Tween a very convenient and safe choice for the use as pharmaceutical excipient for microemulsion formulations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Modified in situ antimicrobial susceptibility testing method based on cyanobacteria chlorophyll a fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Heliopoulos, Nikolaos S; Galeou, Angeliki; Papageorgiou, Sergios K; Favvas, Evangelos P; Katsaros, Fotios K; Stamatakis, Kostas

    2016-02-01

    The chlorophyll a fluorescence based antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) method presented in a previous work was based on the measurement of Chl a fluorescence of the gram(-) cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942. Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 as a gram(-) bacterium is affected by antibacterial agents via mechanisms affecting all gram(-) bacteria, however, as an exclusively phototrophic organism it would also be affected by photosynthesis inhibitory action of an agent that otherwise has no antibacterial properties. In this report, the method is modified by replacing the exclusively phototrophic Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 with the Synechocystis sp. PCC 6714, capable of both phototrophic and heterotrophic growth in order to add versatility and better reflect the antibacterial effects of surfaces under study towards nonphotosynthetic bacteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Oxazoline-based antimicrobial oligomers: synthesis by CROP using supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Correia, Vanessa G; Bonifácio, Vasco D B; Raje, Vivek P; Casimiro, Teresa; Moutinho, Guilhermina; da Silva, Cláudia Lobato; Pinho, Mariana G; Aguiar-Ricardo, Ana

    2011-08-11

    A method using supercritical CO(2) to obtain biocompatible 2-oxazoline-based oligomers quaternized with different amines is described. The synthesized oligo(2-oxazoline)s display partial carbamic-acid insertion at one end. The syntheses of quaternary oligo(2-bisoxazoline)s and linear oligoethylenimine hydrochlorides are reported. Oligo(2-methyl-2-oxazoline) and oligo(2-bisoxazoline) quaternized with N,N-dimethyldodecylamine are the most efficient biocidal agents showing fast killing rates against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Linear oligoethylenimine hydrochloride shows the lowest MIC values but higher killing times against both bacteria. Based on the antimicrobial activity studies, a cooperative action of carbamic acid with the ammonium end group is proposed.

  8. Synthesis of copper nanostructures on silica-based particles for antimicrobial organic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palza, Humberto; Delgado, Katherine; Curotto, Nicolás

    2015-12-01

    Sol-gel based silica nanoparticles of 100 nm were used to interact with copper ions from the dissolution of CuCl2 allowing the synthesis of paratacamite (Cu2(OH)3Cl) nanocrystals of around 20 nm. The method produced well dispersed copper nanostructures directly supported on the surface of the SiO2 particles and was generalized by using a natural zeolite microparticle as support with similar results. These hybrid Cu based nanoparticles released copper ions when immersed in water explaining their antimicrobial behavior against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus as measured by the minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MIC and MBC). Noteworthy, when these nanostructured particles were mixed with an organic coating the resulting film eliminated until a 99% of both bacteria at concentrations as low as 0.01 wt%.

  9. A World Wide Web-based antimicrobial stewardship program improves efficiency, communication, and user satisfaction and reduces cost in a tertiary care pediatric medical center.

    PubMed

    Agwu, Allison L; Lee, Carlton K K; Jain, Sanjay K; Murray, Kara L; Topolski, Jason; Miller, Robert E; Townsend, Timothy; Lehmann, Christoph U

    2008-09-15

    Antimicrobial stewardship programs aim to reduce inappropriate hospital antimicrobial use. At the Johns Hopkins Children's Medical and Surgical Center (Baltimore, MD), we implemented a World Wide Web-based antimicrobial restriction program to address problems with the existing restriction program. A user survey identified opportunities for improvement of an existing antimicrobial restriction program and resulted in subsequent design, implementation, and evaluation of a World Wide Web-based antimicrobial restriction program at a 175-bed, tertiary care pediatric teaching hospital. The program provided automated clinical decision support, facilitated approval, and enhanced real-time communication among prescribers, pharmacists, and pediatric infectious diseases fellows. Approval status, duration, and rationale; missing request notifications; and expiring approvals were stored in a database that is accessible via a secure Intranet site. Before and after implementation of the program, user satisfaction, reports of missed and/or delayed doses, antimicrobial dispensing times, and cost were evaluated. After implementation of the program, there was a $370,069 reduction in projected annual cost associated with restricted antimicrobial use and an 11.6% reduction in the number of dispensed doses. User satisfaction increased from 22% to 68% and from 13% to 69% among prescribers and pharmacists, respectively. There were 21% and 32% reductions in the number of prescriber reports of missed and delayed doses, respectively, and there was a 37% reduction in the number of pharmacist reports of delayed approvals; measured dispensing times were unchanged (P = .24). In addition, 40% fewer restricted antimicrobial-related phone calls were noted by the pharmacy. The World Wide Web-based antimicrobial approval program led to improved communication, more-efficient antimicrobial administration, increased user satisfaction, and significant cost savings. Integrated tools, such as this World

  10. Effect of Antimicrobial Denture Base Resin on Multi-Species Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Keke; Ren, Biao; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin H K; Chen, Yu; Han, Qi; Li, Bolei; Weir, Michael D; Li, Mingyun; Feng, Mingye; Cheng, Lei

    2016-06-29

    Our aims of the research were to study the antimicrobial effect of dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM) modified denture base resin on multi-species biofilms and the biocompatibility of this modified dental material. Candida albicans (C. albicans), Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), Streptococcus sanguinis (S. sanguinis), as well as Actinomyces naeslundii (A. naeslundii) were used for biofilm formation on denture base resin. Colony forming unit (CFU) counts, microbial viability staining, and 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) array were used to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of DMADDM. C. albicans staining and Real-time PCR were used to analyze the morphology and expression of virulence genes of C. albicans in biofilm. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) array and Real-time PCR were conducted to examine the results after biofilm co-cultured with epithelial cell. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining followed by histological evaluation were used to study the biocompatibility of this modified material. We found that DMADDM containing groups reduced both biomass and metabolic activity of the biofilm significantly. DMADDM can also inhibit the virulence of C. albicans by means of inhibiting the hyphal development and downregulation of two virulence related genes. DMADDM significantly reduced the cell damage caused by multi-species biofilm according to the LDH activity and reduced the expression of IL-18 gene of the cells simultaneously. The in vivo histological evaluation proved that the addition of DMADDM less than 6.6% in denture material did not increase the inflammatory response (p > 0.05). Therefore, we proposed that the novel denture base resin containing DMADDM may be considered as a new promising therapeutic system against problems caused by microbes on denture base such as denture stomatitis.

  11. Effect of Antimicrobial Denture Base Resin on Multi-Species Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Keke; Ren, Biao; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin H. K.; Chen, Yu; Han, Qi; Li, Bolei; Weir, Michael D.; Li, Mingyun; Feng, Mingye; Cheng, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Our aims of the research were to study the antimicrobial effect of dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM) modified denture base resin on multi-species biofilms and the biocompatibility of this modified dental material. Candida albicans (C. albicans), Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), Streptococcus sanguinis (S. sanguinis), as well as Actinomyces naeslundii (A. naeslundii) were used for biofilm formation on denture base resin. Colony forming unit (CFU) counts, microbial viability staining, and 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) array were used to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of DMADDM. C. albicans staining and Real-time PCR were used to analyze the morphology and expression of virulence genes of C. albicans in biofilm. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) array and Real-time PCR were conducted to examine the results after biofilm co-cultured with epithelial cell. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining followed by histological evaluation were used to study the biocompatibility of this modified material. We found that DMADDM containing groups reduced both biomass and metabolic activity of the biofilm significantly. DMADDM can also inhibit the virulence of C. albicans by means of inhibiting the hyphal development and downregulation of two virulence related genes. DMADDM significantly reduced the cell damage caused by multi-species biofilm according to the LDH activity and reduced the expression of IL-18 gene of the cells simultaneously. The in vivo histological evaluation proved that the addition of DMADDM less than 6.6% in denture material did not increase the inflammatory response (p > 0.05). Therefore, we proposed that the novel denture base resin containing DMADDM may be considered as a new promising therapeutic system against problems caused by microbes on denture base such as denture stomatitis. PMID:27367683

  12. Antimicrobial Activity and Chemical Composition of Three Essential Oils Extracted from Mediterranean Aromatic Plants.

    PubMed

    Elshafie, Hazem S; Sakr, Shimaa; Mang, Stefania M; Belviso, Sandra; De Feo, Vincenzo; Camele, Ippolito

    2016-11-01

    There is a growing interest in essential oils (EOs) as possible alternatives for traditional chemical pesticides. This study was carried out to characterize the chemical composition of the three EOs extracted from Verbena officinalis, Majorana hortensis, and Salvia officinalis using gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and to evaluate in vitro their efficacy against some phyto or human pathogens. The antifungal activity was investigated against Colletotrichum acutatum and Botrytis cinerea in comparison with Azoxystrobin as a large spectrum fungicide. Antibacterial activity was evaluated against Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus mojavensis, and Clavibacter michiganensis (G+ve) and Escherichia coli, Xanthomonas campestris, Pseudomonas savastanoi, and P. syringae pv. phaseolicola (G-ve) compared to a synthetic antibiotic tetracycline. Minimum inhibitory concentration was evaluated against the above tested fungi using 96-well microplate method. Results showed that the chemical structure of the three studied EOs was mainly composed of monoterpene compounds and all oils belong to the chemotype carvacrol/thymol. Results of GC analysis identified 64 compounds, which were identified based on their mass to charge ratio. Furthermore, the different concentrations of studied EOs inhibited the growth of tested microorganism in a dose-dependent manner.

  13. The antimicrobial effect of spice-based marinades against Campylobacter jejuni on contaminated fresh broiler wings.

    PubMed

    Zakarienė, Gintarė; Rokaitytė, Anita; Ramonaitė, Sigita; Novoslavskij, Aleksandr; Mulkytė, Kristina; Zaborskienė, Gintarė; Malakauskas, Mindaugas

    2015-03-01

    The antimicrobial effect of spice-based marinades against Campylobacter jejuni on inoculated fresh broiler wings was investigated. Experiments were carried out with 1 strain of C. jejuni and 6 marinades. Four experimental marinades were composed for the study and contained spices (thyme, rosemary, basil, marjoram, and so on) and different combination of bioactive compounds. Two marinades were commercial and contained spices (black pepper, sweet red pepper, and so on) and chemical additives (monosodium glutamate, sodium diacetate, calcium lactate), 1 commercial marinade was also enriched with bioactive compounds (linalool, cinnamaldehyde, lactic acid). Total aerobic bacterial count was examined to estimate the possible effect of tested marinades on the shelf-life of marinated broiler wings. Study revealed that thyme-based marinade was the most effective against C. jejuni on broiler wings and reduced the numbers of campylobacters by 1.04 log colony forming unit (CFU)/g (P ≤ 0.05) during storage for 168 h at 4 °C temperature. Moreover, it was more effective against C. jejuni than commercial marinade with 0.47 log CFU/g (P ≤ 0.05) reduction effect. Both experimental and commercial marinades had very similar effect on the total aerobic bacterial count. Although experimental and commercial marinades had different effect on pH of broiler wings, this parameter did not show a major impact on the antimicrobial effect of tested marinades (P ≥ 0.05). Our study shows that experimental natural thyme-based marinade can reduce numbers of C. jejuni more effectively than tested commercial marinades. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  14. Antimicrobial Stewardship

    PubMed Central

    Doron, Shira; Davidson, Lisa E.

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is increasing; however, antimicrobial drug development is slowing. Now more than ever before, antimicrobial stewardship is of the utmost importance as a way to optimize the use of antimicrobials to prevent the development of resistance and improve patient outcomes. This review describes the why, what, who, how, when, and where of antimicrobial stewardship. Techniques of stewardship are summarized, and a plan for implementation of a stewardship program is outlined. PMID:22033257

  15. Identification of novel human immunodeficiency virus type 1-inhibitory peptides based on the antimicrobial peptide database.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangshun; Watson, Karen M; Peterkofsky, Alan; Buckheit, Robert W

    2010-03-01

    To identify novel anti-HIV-1 peptides based on the antimicrobial peptide database (APD; http://aps.unmc.edu/AP/main.php), we have screened 30 candidates and found 11 peptides with 50% effective concentrations (EC(50)) of <10 microM and therapeutic indices (TI) of up to 17. Furthermore, among the eight peptides (with identical amino acid compositions but different sequences) generated by shuffling the sequence of an aurein 1.2 analog, two had a TI twice that of the original sequence. Because antiviral peptides in the database have an arginine/lysine (R/K) ratio of >1, increases in the Arg contents of amphibian maximin H5 and dermaseptin S9 peptides and the database-derived GLK-19 peptide improved the TIs. These examples demonstrate that the APD is a rich resource and a useful tool for developing novel HIV-1-inhibitory peptides.

  16. Antimicrobial activity of biodegradable polysaccharide and protein-based films containing active agents.

    PubMed

    Kuorwel, Kuorwel K; Cran, Marlene J; Sonneveld, Kees; Miltz, Joseph; Bigger, Stephen W

    2011-04-01

    Significant interest has emerged in the introduction of food packaging materials manufactured from biodegradable polymers that have the potential to reduce the environmental impacts associated with conventional packaging materials. Current technologies in active packaging enable effective antimicrobial (AM) packaging films to be prepared from biodegradable materials that have been modified and/or blended with different compatible materials and/or plasticisers. A wide range of AM films prepared from modified biodegradable materials have the potential to be used for packaging of various food products. This review examines biodegradable polymers derived from polysaccharides and protein-based materials for their potential use in packaging systems designed for the protection of food products from microbial contamination. A comprehensive table that systematically analyses and categorizes much of the current literature in this area is included in the review.

  17. Preparation and characterization of antimicrobial wound dressings based on silver, gellan, PVA and borax.

    PubMed

    Cencetti, C; Bellini, D; Pavesio, A; Senigaglia, D; Passariello, C; Virga, A; Matricardi, P

    2012-10-15

    Silver-loaded dressings are designed to provide the same antimicrobial activity of topical silver, with the advantages of a sustained silver release and a reduced number of dressing changes. Moreover, such type of dressing must provide a moist environment, avoiding fiber shedding, dehydration and adherence to the wound site. Here we describe the preparation of a novel silver-loaded dressing based on a Gellan/Hyaff(®) (Ge-H) non woven, treated with a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/borax system capable to enhance the entrapment of silver in the dressing and to modulate its release. The new hydrophilic non woven dressings show enhanced water uptake capability and slow dehydration rates. A sustained silver release is also achieved. The antibacterial activity was confirmed on Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of binaphthyl-based, functionalized oxazole and thiazole peptidomimetics.

    PubMed

    Wales, Steven M; Hammer, Katherine A; Somphol, Kittiya; Kemker, Isabell; Schröder, David C; Tague, Andrew J; Brkic, Zinka; King, Amy M; Lyras, Dena; Riley, Thomas V; Bremner, John B; Keller, Paul A; Pyne, Stephen G

    2015-11-28

    Thirty two new binaphthyl-based, functionalized oxazole and thiazole peptidomimetics and over thirty five novel leucine-containing intermediate oxazoles and thiazoles were prepared in this study. This includes the first examples of the direct C-5 arylation of an amino acid dipeptide-derived oxazole. Moderate to excellent antibacterial activity was observed for all new compounds across Gram positive isolates with MICs ranging from 1-16 μg mL(-1). Results for Gram negative E. coli and A. baumannii were more variable, but MICs as low as 4 μg mL(-1) were returned for two examples. Significantly, the in vitro results with a fluoromethyl-oxazole derivative collectively represent the best obtained to date for a member of our binaphthyl peptide antimicrobials.

  19. Synthesis, Characterization and Antimicrobial Activities of Some New Heterocyclic Schiff Bases Derived from Thiocarbohydrazide.

    PubMed

    El-Mahdy, Kamelia; El-Kazak, Azza; Abdel-Megid, Mohamed; Seada, Magdyand; Farouk, Osama

    2016-01-01

    The reaction of prazolobenzothienopyrimidine-3-carbaldehyde 1 with thiocarbohydrazide afforded the Schiff's base 3. The latter compound reacted with some electrophilic reagents to give 1,2,4-triazoles 4-6 and 1,2,4-triazines 7-9. Treatment of compound 3 with 2-cyano-3,3-bis(methylthio)acrylonitrile gave the corresponding 5-amino-4-cyano-3-methylthiopyrazole derivative 11. The reaction of pyrazole 11 with carbon disulfide afforded dithioxopyrazolopyrimidine 12. Acylation of compound 11 by using acetic anhydride yielded acetamide 13. On the other hand, the cyclocondensation of pyrazole 11 with acetic anhydride in pyridine yielded pyrazolopyrimidine derivative 14. The reactivity of compound 11 towards formamide and phenylisothiocyanate to give the pyrazolopyrimidines 15 and 16 was studied. The newly synthesized compounds were screened for their antimicrobial activity.

  20. Mineralized agar-based nanocomposite films: Potential food packaging materials with antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Malagurski, Ivana; Levic, Steva; Nesic, Aleksandra; Mitric, Miodrag; Pavlovic, Vladimir; Dimitrijevic-Brankovic, Suzana

    2017-11-01

    New mineralized, agar-based nanocomposite films (Zn-carbonate and Zn-phosphate/agar) were produced by a combination of in situ precipitation and a casting method. The presence of minerals significantly influenced the morphology, properties and functionality of the obtained nanocomposites. Reinforcement with the Zn-mineral phase improved the mechanical properties of the carbonate-mineralized films, but had a negligible effect on the phosphate-mineralized samples. Both nanocomposites showed improved optical and thermal properties, better Zn(II) release potential in a slightly acidic environment and exhibited antimicrobial activity against S. aureus. These results suggest that Zn-mineralized agar nanocomposite films could be potentially used as affordable, eco-friendly and active food packaging materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Gene therapy based in antimicrobial peptides and proinflammatory cytokine prevents reactivation of experimental latent tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Espinosa, Octavio; Hernández-Bazán, Sujhey; Francisco-Cruz, Alejandro; Mata-Espinosa, Dulce; Barrios-Payán, Jorge; Marquina-Castillo, Brenda; López-Casillas, Fernando; Carretero, Marta; Del Río, Marcela; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio

    2016-10-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) latent infection can lead to reactivation. The design of new strategies to prevent it is an important subject. B6D2F1 mice were infected intratracheally with a low dose of Mtb H37Rv to induce chronic infection. After 7 months, mice were treated with one dose of recombinant adenoviruses encoding TNFα, β defensin-3 and LL37. Immunosupression was induced 1 month later with corticosterone. In comparison with the control group, mice treated with adenoviruses showed significantly less bacterial load and pneumonia, the adenoviruses encoding TNFα and LL37 being the most efficient. Gene therapy based in a proinflammatory cytokine or antimicrobial peptides is a potentially useful system to prevent reactivation of latent tuberculosis.

  2. [Transgenics - Plant-Based Drugs (PBD)].

    PubMed

    Rocha, Daniele Rachidi da; Marin, Victor Augustus

    2011-07-01

    Plant-Based Drugs - PBD - represent the 4(th) generation of genetically-modified plants and in this case the technology is used to develop and produce pharmaceuticals vaccines and/or products from transgenic seeds. This technology, like all scientific innovations, has inherent risks. However, the current knowledge available about the use of this technology means that no firm conclusions can be drawn about the nature of the risks involved, as well as their significance and the likelihood of causing serious damage or not. Risk analysis should be the starting premise prior to any implementation of techno-scientific innovations. The parameters must be evaluated and precautions taken and research must be conducted in a detailed and broad-ranging manner with respect to the potential risks of any innovation. This article analyzed the applicability of this new technology, as well as risk management and containment in order to guarantee safe use, handling and consumption by human beings.

  3. Consumption-based approach for predicting environmental risk in Greece due to the presence of antimicrobials in domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Iatrou, Evangelia I; Stasinakis, Athanasios S; Thomaidis, Nikolaos S

    2014-11-01

    The main objective of the current study was to estimate the potential environmental risks associated with human consumption of antimicrobials in Greece. Consumption data was collected for the 24 most often used antimicrobials for the years 2008-2010, and their predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) in raw and treated wastewater were calculated using mass balances and literature data on human excretion and elimination efficiency during wastewater treatment. The ecotoxicological risk was estimated by calculating the ratio of PEC to predicted no-effect concentration (PNEC) for three categories of aquatic organisms (algae, daphnids, and fish). PNEC values were calculated based on experimental ecotoxicity data and data originated from the Ecological Structure Activity Relationship (ECOSAR). PEC values in raw sewage ranged between 0.02 μg L(-1) (erythromycin) and 27 μg L(-1) (amoxicillin), while in treated wastewater, the highest concentration was predicted for cefuroxime axetil (6.6 μg L(-1)). Based on acute toxicity data for algae, risk quotient (RQ) values higher than 1 were obtained for 7 out of the 24 target antimicrobials in raw and treated wastewater, while no significant risk was estimated for daphnids and fish. Regarding the possible risk due to the chronic toxicity of antimicrobials, RQ values higher than 80 were obtained for amoxicillin and clarithromycin in algae. The use of baseline toxicity data from ECOSAR showed that the environmental risk from exposure to mixtures of antimicrobials was low for all three aquatic species. However, further studies on toxicity of mixtures should be performed as calculation of toxicity ratio (TR) values showed that 90 % of the target antimicrobials seem to exhibit a specific mode of toxic action when present in mixtures rather than baseline toxicity. As a result, an underestimation of toxicity based on the ECOSAR model is possible for the mixture of target antimicrobials. For Greek rivers where low (dilution factor

  4. Evaluation of cytotoxicity, antimicrobial activity and physicochemical properties of a calcium aluminate-based endodontic material

    PubMed Central

    SILVA, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal; HERRERA, Daniel Rodrigo; ROSA, Tiago Pereira; DUQUE, Thais Mageste; JACINTO, Rogério Castilho; GOMES, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida; ZAIA, Alexandre Augusto

    2014-01-01

    A calcium aluminate-based endodontic material, EndoBinder, has been developed in order to reduce MTA negative characteristics, preserving its biological properties and clinical applications. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity, antimicrobial activity, pH, solubility and water sorption of EndoBinder and to compare them with those of white MTA (WMTA). Material and Methods Cytotoxicity was assessed through a multiparametric analysis employing 3T3 cells. Antimicrobial activity against Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212), Staphylococcus aureus. (ATCC 25923) and Candida albicans (ATCC 10556) was determined by the agar diffusion method. pH was measured at periods of 3, 24, 72 and 168 hours. Solubility and water sorption evaluation were performed following ISO requirements. Data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey`s test with a significance level of 5%. Results EndoBinder and WMTA were non-cytotoxic in all tested periods and with the different cell viability parameters. There was no statistical differences between both materials (P>.05). All tested materials were inhibitory by direct contact against all microbial strains tested. EndoBinder and WMTA presented alkaline pH in all tested times with higher values of pH for WMTA (P<.05). Both materials showed values complying with the solubility minimum requirements. However, EndoBinder showed lower solubility than WMTA (P<.05). No statistical differences were observed regarding water sorption (P>.05). Conclusion Under these experimental conditions, we concluded that the calcium aluminate-based endodontic material EndoBinder demonstrated suitable biological and physicochemical properties, so it can be suggested as a material of choice in root resorption, perforations and root-end filling. PMID:24626250