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Sample records for plant cell differentiation

  1. Using Tissue Culture To Investigate Plant Cell Differentiation and Dedifferentiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzone, Donna M.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an experimental project that uses plant tissue culture techniques to examine cell differentiation in the carrot. Allows students to gain experience in some important techniques and to explore fundamental questions about cell differentiation. (DDR)

  2. Differential scanning calorimetry of plant cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Liangshiou; Varner, J.E. ); Yuen, H.K. )

    1991-03-15

    High-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry has been used to study the phase transition of cell wall preparations of the elongating and mature regions of soybean hypocotyls and of celery epidermis and collenchyma strands. A step-like transition believed to be glass transition was observed in walls isolated from the elongating region of soybean hypocotyls at 52.9C. Addition of 1 mM CaCl{sub 2} to the cell wall preparation increased the transition temperature to 60.8C and greatly reduced the transition magnitude. In walls from the mature region, the transition was small and occurred at a higher temperature (60.1C). Addition of calcium to the mature region cell wall had little effect on the transition. Based on the known interactions between calcium and pectin, the authors propose that calcium affects the glass transition by binding to the polygalacturonate backbone of wall pectin, resulting in a more rigid wall with a smaller transition at a higher temperature. The mature region either has more calcium in the wall or has more methyl-esterified pectin, making it less responsive to added calcium.

  3. Plant Phosphoglycerolipids: The Gatekeepers of Vascular Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gujas, Bojan; Rodriguez-Villalon, Antia

    2016-01-01

    In higher plants, the plant vascular system has evolved as an inter-organ communication network essential to deliver a wide range of signaling factors among distantly separated organs. To become conductive elements, phloem and xylem cells undergo a drastic differentiation program that involves the degradation of the majority of their organelles. While the molecular mechanisms regulating such complex process remain poorly understood, it is nowadays clear that phosphoglycerolipids display a pivotal role in the regulation of vascular tissue formation. In animal cells, this class of lipids is known to mediate acute responses as signal transducers and also act as constitutive signals that help defining organelle identity. Their rapid turnover, asymmetrical distribution across subcellular compartments as well as their ability to rearrange cytoskeleton fibers make phosphoglycerolipids excellent candidates to regulate complex morphogenetic processes such as vascular differentiation. Therefore, in this review we aim to summarize, emphasize and connect our current understanding about the involvement of phosphoglycerolipids in phloem and xylem differentiation.

  4. Plant Phosphoglycerolipids: The Gatekeepers of Vascular Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gujas, Bojan; Rodriguez-Villalon, Antia

    2016-01-01

    In higher plants, the plant vascular system has evolved as an inter-organ communication network essential to deliver a wide range of signaling factors among distantly separated organs. To become conductive elements, phloem and xylem cells undergo a drastic differentiation program that involves the degradation of the majority of their organelles. While the molecular mechanisms regulating such complex process remain poorly understood, it is nowadays clear that phosphoglycerolipids display a pivotal role in the regulation of vascular tissue formation. In animal cells, this class of lipids is known to mediate acute responses as signal transducers and also act as constitutive signals that help defining organelle identity. Their rapid turnover, asymmetrical distribution across subcellular compartments as well as their ability to rearrange cytoskeleton fibers make phosphoglycerolipids excellent candidates to regulate complex morphogenetic processes such as vascular differentiation. Therefore, in this review we aim to summarize, emphasize and connect our current understanding about the involvement of phosphoglycerolipids in phloem and xylem differentiation. PMID:26904069

  5. How-to-Do-It: Cytokinin Induced Cell Division & Differentiation Using Intact Plants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohnsack, Charles W.

    1989-01-01

    Presents a procedure by which cytokinins are used to induce a population of dividing and differentiating cells on the cut surface of the roots of an intact plant. Includes the method used, results, and suggestions for a variety of variables that may be tested. (RT)

  6. Induction of murine embryonic stem cell differentiation by medicinal plant extracts

    PubMed Central

    Reynertson, Kurt A.; Charlson, Mary E.; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates that diets high in fruits and vegetables provide a measure of cancer chemoprevention due to phytochemical constituents. Natural products are a rich source of cancer chemotherapy drugs, and primarily target rapidly-cycling tumor cells. Increasing evidence indicates that many cancers contain small populations of resistant, stem-like cells that have the capacity to regenerate tumors following chemotherapy and radiation, and have been linked to the initiation of metastases. Our goal is to discover natural product-based clinical or dietary interventions that selectively target cancer stem cells, inducing differentiation. We adapted an alkaline phosphatase (AP) stain to assay plant extracts for the capacity to induce differentiation in embryonic stem (ES) cells. AP is a characteristic marker of undifferentiated ES cells, and this represents a novel approach to screening medicinal plant extracts. Following a survey of approximately 100 fractions obtained from twelve species of ethnomedically utilized plants, we found fractions from three species that induced differentiation, decreasing AP and transcript levels of pluripotency markers (Nanog, Oct-4, Rex-1). These fractions affected proliferation of murine ES, and human embryonal, prostate, and breast carcinoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. Several phytochemical constituents were isolated; the antioxidant phytochemicals ellagic acid and gallic acid were shown to affect viability of cultured breast carcinoma cells. PMID:20955699

  7. Induction of murine embryonic stem cell differentiation by medicinal plant extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Reynertson, Kurt A.; Charlson, Mary E.; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates that diets high in fruits and vegetables provide a measure of cancer chemoprevention due to phytochemical constituents. Natural products are a rich source of cancer chemotherapy drugs, and primarily target rapidly cycling tumor cells. Increasing evidence indicates that many cancers contain small populations of resistant, stem-like cells that have the capacity to regenerate tumors following chemotherapy and radiation, and have been linked to the initiation of metastases. Our goal is to discover natural product-based clinical or dietary interventions that selectively target cancer stem cells, inducing differentiation. We adapted an alkaline phosphatase (AP) stain to assay plant extracts for the capacity to induce differentiation in embryonic stem (ES) cells. AP is a characteristic marker of undifferentiated ES cells, and this represents a novel approach to screening medicinal plant extracts. Following a survey of approximately 100 fractions obtained from 12 species of ethnomedically utilized plants, we found fractions from 3 species that induced differentiation, decreasing AP and transcript levels of pluripotency markers (Nanog, Oct-4, Rex-1). These fractions affected proliferation of murine ES, and human embryonal, prostate, and breast carcinoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. Several phytochemical constituents were isolated; the antioxidant phytochemicals ellagic acid and gallic acid were shown to affect viability of cultured breast carcinoma cells.

  8. Effects of Plants on Osteogenic Differentiation and Mineralization of Periodontal Ligament Cells: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Costa, Cláudio Rodrigues Rezende; Amorim, Bruna Rabelo; de Magalhães, Pérola; De Luca Canto, Graziela; Acevedo, Ana Carolina; Guerra, Eliete Neves Silva

    2016-04-01

    This systematic review aimed to evaluate the effects of plants on osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of human periodontal ligament cells. The included studies were selected using five different electronic databases. The reference list of the included studies was crosschecked, and a partial gray literature search was undertaken using Google Scholar and ProQuest. The methodology of the selected studies was evaluated using GRADE. After a two-step selection process, eight studies were identified. Six different types of plants were reported in the selected studies, which were Morinda citrifolia, Aloe vera, Fructus cnidii, Zanthoxylum schinifolium, Centella asiatica, and Epimedium species. They included five types of isolated plant components: acemannan, osthole, hesperetin, asiaticoside, and icariin. In addition, some active substances of these components were identified as polysaccharides, coumarins, flavonoids, and triterpenes. The studies demonstrated the potential effects of plants on osteogenic differentiation, cell proliferation, mineral deposition, and gene and protein expression. Four studies showed that periodontal ligament cells induce mineral deposition after plant treatment. Although there are few studies on the subject, current evidence suggests that plants are potentially useful for the treatment of periodontal diseases. However, further investigations are required to confirm the promising effect of these plants in regenerative treatments.

  9. Effects of Plants on Osteogenic Differentiation and Mineralization of Periodontal Ligament Cells: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Costa, Cláudio Rodrigues Rezende; Amorim, Bruna Rabelo; de Magalhães, Pérola; De Luca Canto, Graziela; Acevedo, Ana Carolina; Guerra, Eliete Neves Silva

    2016-04-01

    This systematic review aimed to evaluate the effects of plants on osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of human periodontal ligament cells. The included studies were selected using five different electronic databases. The reference list of the included studies was crosschecked, and a partial gray literature search was undertaken using Google Scholar and ProQuest. The methodology of the selected studies was evaluated using GRADE. After a two-step selection process, eight studies were identified. Six different types of plants were reported in the selected studies, which were Morinda citrifolia, Aloe vera, Fructus cnidii, Zanthoxylum schinifolium, Centella asiatica, and Epimedium species. They included five types of isolated plant components: acemannan, osthole, hesperetin, asiaticoside, and icariin. In addition, some active substances of these components were identified as polysaccharides, coumarins, flavonoids, and triterpenes. The studies demonstrated the potential effects of plants on osteogenic differentiation, cell proliferation, mineral deposition, and gene and protein expression. Four studies showed that periodontal ligament cells induce mineral deposition after plant treatment. Although there are few studies on the subject, current evidence suggests that plants are potentially useful for the treatment of periodontal diseases. However, further investigations are required to confirm the promising effect of these plants in regenerative treatments. PMID:26822584

  10. DNA content and differentiation of root apical cells of Brassica rapa plants grown in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Kordyum, E L; Martin, G I; Zaslavsky, V A; Jiao, S; Hilaire, E; Guikema, J A

    1999-07-01

    Root cap is proposed to be a graviperceptive tissue in the plant root, and it is composed of several cell types. One such cell type, the columella cells, are thought to initiate the gravity-induced signal transduction cascade, and these cells arise from the activity of the meristematic zone of the root cap. There is, in fact, a continuum of cells in the central column of the root cap representing the meristematic cells, developing columella cells, mature cells, and those that will soon be sloughed off into the soil. In order to study the functional roles of the root cap cells in gravity-sensing, we compared the ultrastructural organization, differentiation, and DNA content in the meristematic, elongating, and differentiating cells of root tips in Brassica rapa plants grown in space microgravity and at 1g. The experiments were also designed to determine the reactions of root cap cells in both main roots (in which the original root cap was present in an embryonic form within the seed) and lateral roots (in which the root cap formed completely in space after seed germination on orbit) to the space microgravity. This study (ROOTS) was performed in collaboration with the B-PAC experiment on the Space shuttle "Columbia" mission STS-87 (Collaborative US/Ukrainian Experiment (CUE) during November 19-December 5, 1997.

  11. Plastid osmotic stress influences cell differentiation at the plant shoot apex.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Margaret E; Mixdorf, Matthew; Berg, R Howard; Haswell, Elizabeth S

    2016-09-15

    The balance between proliferation and differentiation in the plant shoot apical meristem is controlled by regulatory loops involving the phytohormone cytokinin and stem cell identity genes. Concurrently, cellular differentiation in the developing shoot is coordinated with the environmental and developmental status of plastids within those cells. Here, we employ an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant exhibiting constitutive plastid osmotic stress to investigate the molecular and genetic pathways connecting plastid osmotic stress with cell differentiation at the shoot apex. msl2 msl3 mutants exhibit dramatically enlarged and deformed plastids in the shoot apical meristem, and develop a mass of callus tissue at the shoot apex. Callus production in this mutant requires the cytokinin receptor AHK2 and is characterized by increased cytokinin levels, downregulation of cytokinin signaling inhibitors ARR7 and ARR15, and induction of the stem cell identity gene WUSCHEL Furthermore, plastid stress-induced apical callus production requires elevated plastidic reactive oxygen species, ABA biosynthesis, the retrograde signaling protein GUN1, and ABI4. These results are consistent with a model wherein the cytokinin/WUS pathway and retrograde signaling control cell differentiation at the shoot apex. PMID:27510974

  12. A paradigm for endosymbiotic life: cell differentiation of Rhizobium bacteria provoked by host plant factors.

    PubMed

    Kondorosi, Eva; Mergaert, Peter; Kereszt, Attila

    2013-01-01

    Symbiosis between Rhizobium bacteria and legumes leads to the formation of the root nodule. The endosymbiotic bacteria reside in polyploid host cells as membrane-surrounded vesicles where they reduce atmospheric nitrogen to support plant growth by supplying ammonia in exchange for carbon sources and energy. The morphology and physiology of endosymbionts, despite their common function, are highly divergent in different hosts. In galegoid plants, the endosymbionts are terminally differentiated, uncultivable polyploid cells, with remarkably elongated and even branched Y-shaped cells. Bacteroid differentiation is controlled by host peptides, many of which have antibacterial activity and require the bacterial function of BacA. Although the precise and combined action of several hundred host peptides and BacA has yet to be discovered, similarities, especially to certain insect-bacterium symbioses involving likewise host peptides for manipulation of endosymbionts, suggest convergent evolution. Rhizobium-legume symbiosis provides a rich source of information for understanding host-controlled endosymbiotic life in eukaryotic cells.

  13. Application of atmospheric plasma sources in growth and differentiation of plant and mammalian stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puac, Nevena

    2014-10-01

    The expansion of the plasma medicine and its demand for in-vivo treatments resulted in fast development of various plasma devices that operate at atmospheric pressure. These sources have to fulfill all demands for application on biological samples. One of the sources that meet all the requirements needed for treatment of biological material is plasma needle. Previously, we have used this device for sterilization of planctonic samples of bacteria, MRSA biofilm, for improved differentiation of human periodontal stem cells into osteogenic line and for treatment of plant meristematic cells. It is well known that plasma generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that strongly affect metabolism of living cells. One of the open issues is to correlate external plasma products (electrons, ions, RNS, ROS, photons, strong fields etc.) with the immediate internal response which triggers or induces effects in the living cell. For that purpose we have studied the kinetics of enzymes which are typical indicators of the identity of reactive species from the plasma created environment that can trigger signal transduction in the cell and ensue cell activity. In collaboration with Suzana Zivkovicm, Institute for Biological Research ``Sinisa Stankovic,'' University of Belgrade; Nenad Selakovic, Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade; Milica Milutinovic, Jelena Boljevic, Institute for Biological Research ``Sinisa Stankovic,'' University of Belgrade; and Gordana Malovic, Zoran Lj. Petrovic, Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade. Grants III41011, ON171037 and ON173024, MESTD, Serbia.

  14. Cooperative antiproliferative and differentiation-enhancing activity of medicinal plant extracts in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Zhamanbayeva, Gulzhan T; Aralbayeva, Araylim N; Murzakhmetova, Maira K; Tuleukhanov, Sultan T; Danilenko, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive hematopoietic malignancy with poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) berries, dog rose (Rosa canina) rosehips, and garden sage (Salvia officinalis) and oregano (Origanum vulgare) aerial parts are widely used in traditional medicine and exhibit antitumor effects in preclinical models. However, these plants remain scarcely tested for antileukemic activity. Here, we show that their water-ethanol leaf extracts reduced the growth and viability of AML cells and, at non-cytotoxic doses, potentiated cell differentiation induced by a low concentration of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, the hormonal form of vitamin D, in a cell type-dependent manner. The latter effect was accompanied by upregulation of the vitamin D receptor protein components and its transcriptional activity. Furthermore, at minimally effective doses the extracts cooperated with one another to produce marked cytostatic effects associated with a partial S-phase arrest and a modest induction of apoptosis. In contrast, these combinations only slightly affected the growth and viability of proliferating normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In addition, the extracts strongly inhibited microsomal lipid peroxidation and protected normal erythrocytes against hypoosmotic shock. Our results suggest that further exploration of the enhanced antileukemic effects of the combinations tested here may lead to the development of alternative therapeutic and preventive approaches against AML. PMID:27470342

  15. Traffic monitors at the cell periphery: the role of cell walls during early female reproductive cell differentiation in plants.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Matthew R; Koltunow, Anna M G

    2014-02-01

    The formation of female gametes in plants occurs within the ovule, a floral organ that is also the precursor of the seed. Unlike animals, plants lack a typical germline separated from the soma early in development and rely on positional signals, including phytohormones, mobile mRNAs and sRNAs, to direct diploid somatic precursor cells onto a reproductive program. In addition, signals moving between plant cells must overcome the architectural limitations of a cell wall which surrounds the plasma membrane. Recent studies have addressed the molecular and histological signatures of young ovule cells and indicate that dynamic cell wall changes occur over a short developmental window. These changes in cell wall properties impact signal flow and ovule cell identity, thereby aiding the establishment of boundaries between reproductive and somatic ovule domains.

  16. Differential recognition of plant cell walls by microbial xylan-specific carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    McCartney, Lesley; Blake, Anthony W; Flint, James; Bolam, David N; Boraston, Alisdair B; Gilbert, Harry J; Knox, J Paul

    2006-03-21

    Glycoside hydrolases that degrade plant cell walls have complex molecular architectures in which one or more catalytic modules are appended to noncatalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). CBMs promote binding to polysaccharides and potentiate enzymic hydrolysis. Although there are diverse sequence-based families of xylan-binding CBMs, these modules, in general, recognize both decorated and unsubstituted forms of the target polysaccharide, and thus the evolutionary rationale for this diversity is unclear. Using immunohistochemistry to interrogate the specificity of six xylan-binding CBMs for their target polysaccharides in cell walls has revealed considerable differences in the recognition of plant materials between these protein modules. Family 2b and 15 CBMs bind to xylan in secondary cell walls in a range of dicotyledon species, whereas family 4, 6, and 22 CBMs display a more limited capability to bind to secondary cell walls. A family 35 CBM, which displays more restricted ligand specificity against purified xylans than the other five protein modules, reveals a highly distinctive binding pattern to plant material including the recognition of primary cell walls of certain dicotyledons, a feature shared with CBM15. Differences in the specificity of the CBMs toward walls of wheat grain and maize coleoptiles were also evident. The variation in CBM specificity for ligands located in plant cell walls provides a biological rationale for the repertoire of structurally distinct xylan-binding CBMs present in nature, and points to the utility of these modules in probing the molecular architecture of cell walls.

  17. Plant stem cell niches.

    PubMed

    Aichinger, Ernst; Kornet, Noortje; Friedrich, Thomas; Laux, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Multicellular organisms possess pluripotent stem cells to form new organs, replenish the daily loss of cells, or regenerate organs after injury. Stem cells are maintained in specific environments, the stem cell niches, that provide signals to block differentiation. In plants, stem cell niches are situated in the shoot, root, and vascular meristems-self-perpetuating units of organ formation. Plants' lifelong activity-which, as in the case of trees, can extend over more than a thousand years-requires that a robust regulatory network keep the balance between pluripotent stem cells and differentiating descendants. In this review, we focus on current models in plant stem cell research elaborated during the past two decades, mainly in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We address the roles of mobile signals on transcriptional modules involved in balancing cell fates. In addition, we discuss shared features of and differences between the distinct stem cell niches of Arabidopsis.

  18. Differential Top10 promoter regulation by six tetracycline analogues in plant cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, John; Allen, George C.; Gatz, Christiane; Thompson, William F.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    The effects of five tetracycline analogues, anhydrotetracycline, doxycycline, minocycline, oxytetracycline, and tetracycline, on Top10 promoter activity in NT1 tobacco tissue culture cells have been analysed. The concentration that repressed Top10 promoter activity, the level of transgene repression and the kinetics of transgene de-repression were determined for each analogue, and could not be predicted from in vitro binding affinity to the tetracycline repressor or from comparison with animal cells. Doxycycline had the most potent effect on the Top10 promoter and completely inhibited transgene expression at 4 nmol l(-1). Tetracycline was the most versatile of the analogues tested; tetracycline inhibited the Top10 promoter at 10 nmol l(-1) and was easily washed out to restore Top10-driven expression in 12-24 h. A study was also made of the suitability for plant research of a novel tetracycline analogue, GR33076X. In animal cells, GR33076X de-repressed Top10 promoter activity in the presence of inhibitory concentrations of anhydrotetracycline. In NT1, it is shown that GR 33076X can antagonize repression of the Top10 promoter in the presence of tetracycline, but not of anhydrotetracycline or of doxycycline. Different tetracycline analogues can therefore be used to regulate the Top10 promoter in plant cells and this property may be exploited in planning an optimum course of transgene regulation.

  19. Stomagenesis versus myogenesis: Parallels in intrinsic and extrinsic regulation of transcription factor mediated specialized cell-type differentiation in plants and animals.

    PubMed

    Putarjunan, Aarthi; Torii, Keiko U

    2016-05-01

    Although the last common unicellular ancestor of plants and animals diverged several billion years ago, and while having developed unique developmental programs that facilitate differentiation and proliferation specific to plant and animal systems, there still exists a high degree of conservation in the logic regulating these developmental processes within these two seemingly diverse kingdoms. Stomatal differentiation in plants involves a series of orchestrated cell division events mediated by a family of closely related bHLH transcription factors (TFs) to create a pair of mature guard cells. These TFs are in turn regulated by a number of upstream signaling components that ultimately function to achieve lineage specific differentiation and organized tissue patterning on the plant epidermis. The logic involved in the specification of the myogenic differentiation program in animals is intriguingly similar to stomatal differentiation in plants: Closely-related myogenic bHLHs, known as MRFs (Myogenic Regulatory Factors) provide lineage specificity essential for cell-fate determination. These MRFs, similar to the bHLHs in plants, are regulated by several upstream signaling cascades that succinctly regulate each differentiation step, leading to the production of mature muscle fibers. This review aims at providing a perspective on the emerging parallels in the logic employed by key bHLH transcription factors and their upstream signaling components that function to precisely regulate key cell-state transition events in the stomatal as well as myogenic cell lineages. PMID:27125444

  20. Stomagenesis versus myogenesis: Parallels in intrinsic and extrinsic regulation of transcription factor mediated specialized cell-type differentiation in plants and animals.

    PubMed

    Putarjunan, Aarthi; Torii, Keiko U

    2016-05-01

    Although the last common unicellular ancestor of plants and animals diverged several billion years ago, and while having developed unique developmental programs that facilitate differentiation and proliferation specific to plant and animal systems, there still exists a high degree of conservation in the logic regulating these developmental processes within these two seemingly diverse kingdoms. Stomatal differentiation in plants involves a series of orchestrated cell division events mediated by a family of closely related bHLH transcription factors (TFs) to create a pair of mature guard cells. These TFs are in turn regulated by a number of upstream signaling components that ultimately function to achieve lineage specific differentiation and organized tissue patterning on the plant epidermis. The logic involved in the specification of the myogenic differentiation program in animals is intriguingly similar to stomatal differentiation in plants: Closely-related myogenic bHLHs, known as MRFs (Myogenic Regulatory Factors) provide lineage specificity essential for cell-fate determination. These MRFs, similar to the bHLHs in plants, are regulated by several upstream signaling cascades that succinctly regulate each differentiation step, leading to the production of mature muscle fibers. This review aims at providing a perspective on the emerging parallels in the logic employed by key bHLH transcription factors and their upstream signaling components that function to precisely regulate key cell-state transition events in the stomatal as well as myogenic cell lineages.

  1. Effect of microgravity environment on cell wall regeneration, cell divisions, growth, and differentiation of plants from protoplasts (7-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, Ole

    1992-01-01

    The primary goal of this project is to investigate if microgravity has any influence on growth and differentiation of protoplasts. Formation of new cell walls on rapeseed protoplasts takes place within the first 24 hours after isolation. Cell division can be observed after 2-4 days and formation of cell aggregates after 5-7 days. Therefore, it is possible during the 7 day IML-1 Mission to investigate if cell wall formation, cell division, and cell differentiation are influenced by microgravity. Protoplasts of rapeseeds and carrot will be prepared shortly before launch and injected into 0.6 ml polyethylene bags. Eight bags are placed in an aluminum block inside the ESA Type 1 container. The containers are placed at 4 C in PTCU's and transferred to orbiter mid-deck. At 4 C all cell processes are slowed down, including cell wall formation. Latest access to the shuttle will be 12 hours before launch. In orbit the containers will be transferred from the PTC box to the 22 C Biorack incubator. The installation of a 1 g centrifuge in Biorack will make it possible to distinguish between effects of near weightlessness and effects caused by cosmic radiation and other space flight factors including vibrations. Parallel control experiments will be carried out on the ground. Other aspects of the experiment are discussed.

  2. Marine- and plant-derived ω-3 fatty acids differentially regulate prostate cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    ESER, PINAR O.; VANDEN HEUVEL, JOHN P.; ARAUJO, JOHN; THOMPSON, JERRY T.

    2013-01-01

    Fish oil contains the marine ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) docosahexaenoic (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). The consumption of diets rich in these fatty acids is associated with a decreased incidence of prostate cancer. However, there is limited knowledge regarding the non-marine ω-3 PUFA α-linolenic acid (ALA). To study which ω-3 PUFAs are more effective in prostate cancer prevention, and whether the mechanisms of action are conserved between them, we investigated the effect of DHA, EPA and ALA on the human prostate cancer cell lines PC-3 and LNCaP. Different trends of inhibition of PC-3 cell proliferation were observed for the three ω-3 PUFA, with DHA having the most pronounced effects on cell proliferation, while ALA had the minimum effects of the three ω-3 PUFAs. All the ω-3 PUFAs decreased fatty acid synthase (FASN) mRNA. Concerning genes involved in inflammation, cell cycle and apoptosis, DHA regulated the most genes in all categories, followed by EPA and then ALA. In addition, DHA and EPA increased the gene expression of the pro-apoptotic protein activating transcription factor 3 mRNA. Moreover, these two fatty acids significantly induced apoptosis. In conclusion, while some mechanisms of cancer cell inhibition are conserved among ω-3 PUFA, the extent, magnitude, and duration of transcriptional changes vary for each individual fatty acid. PMID:24649190

  3. Plant Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Greb, Thomas; Lohmann, Jan U

    2016-09-12

    Among the trending topics in the life sciences, stem cells have received a fair share of attention in the public debate - mostly in connection with their potential for biomedical application and therapies. While the promise of organ regeneration and the end of cancer have captured our imagination, it has gone almost unnoticed that plant stem cells represent the ultimate origin of much of the food we eat, the oxygen we breathe, as well the fuels we burn. Thus, plant stem cells may be ranked among the most important cells for human well-being. Research by many labs in the last decades has uncovered a set of independent stem cell systems that fulfill the specialized needs of plant development and growth in four dimensions. Surprisingly, the cellular and molecular design of these systems is remarkably similar, even across diverse species. In some long-lived plants, such as trees, plant stem cells remain active over hundreds or even thousands of years, revealing the exquisite precision in the underlying control of proliferation, self-renewal and differentiation. In this minireview, we introduce the basic features of the three major plant stem cell systems building on these facts, highlight their modular design at the level of cellular layout and regulatory underpinnings and briefly compare them with their animal counterparts. PMID:27623267

  4. Genetically Engineered Plant Viral Nanoparticles Direct Neural Cells Differentiation and Orientation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Sheng; Lu, Lin; Zan, Xingjie; Wu, Yehong; Lin, Yuan; Wang, Qian

    2015-09-01

    An important aim of tissue engineering is to design biomimetic materials with specific cell binding motifs and precisely controlled structural organization, thereby providing biochemical and physical cues for desired cellular behaviors. Previously, our group generated genetically modified tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) displaying integrin binding motifs, RGD1, RGD7, PSHRN3, P15, and DGEA. The resulting rod-like virus particles displaying integrin binding motifs were biocompatible with Neuro 2A (N2a), a mouse neural crest-derived cell line, and could promote the neurite outgrowth of N2a. The genetically modified viruses could be assembled with aligned orientation in the capillary by applying a shear force. The resulting aligned substrates were able to dictate directional neurite outgrowth of N2a cells. Therefore, this method could be potentially applied for neural tissue engineering, as a neural conduit for repairing peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:26247572

  5. ATP-competitive mTOR kinase inhibitors delay plant growth by triggering early differentiation of meristematic cells but no developmental patterning change

    PubMed Central

    Menand, Benoît

    2013-01-01

    The TOR (target of rapamycin) protein, a large phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like protein kinase (PIKK) that is conserved in eukaryotes and is a central regulator of growth and metabolism. The analysis of function of TOR in plant growth and development has been limited by the fact that plants are very poorly sensitive to rapamycin. As the kinase domain of TOR is highly conserved, this study analysed the dose-dependent effect of three sets of first- and second-generation ATP-competitive inhibitors (called asTORis for active-site TOR inhibitors) recently developed for the human TOR kinase on Arabidopsis thaliana growth. All six asTORis inhibited plant root growth in a dose-dependent manner, with 50% growth inhibitory doses (GI50) of <10 μM and <1 μM for the first- and second-generation inhibitors, respectively, similarly to the values in mammalian cells. A genetic approach further demonstrated that only asTORis inhibited root growth in an AtTOR gene-dosage-dependent manner. AsTORis decreased the length of: (i) the meristematic zone (MZ); (ii) the division zone in the MZ; (iii) epidermal cells in the elongation zone; and (iv) root hair cells. Whereas meristematic cells committed to early differentiation, the pattern of cell differentiation was not affected per se. AsTORis-induced root hair growth phenotype was shown to be specific by using other growth inhibitors blocking the cell cycle or translation. AsTORis dose-dependent inhibition of growth and root hairs was also observed in diverse groups of flowering plants, indicating that asTORis can be used to study the TOR pathway in other angiosperms, including crop plants. PMID:23963679

  6. ATP-competitive mTOR kinase inhibitors delay plant growth by triggering early differentiation of meristematic cells but no developmental patterning change.

    PubMed

    Montané, Marie-Hélène; Menand, Benoît

    2013-11-01

    The TOR (target of rapamycin) protein, a large phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like protein kinase (PIKK) that is conserved in eukaryotes and is a central regulator of growth and metabolism. The analysis of function of TOR in plant growth and development has been limited by the fact that plants are very poorly sensitive to rapamycin. As the kinase domain of TOR is highly conserved, this study analysed the dose-dependent effect of three sets of first- and second-generation ATP-competitive inhibitors (called asTORis for active-site TOR inhibitors) recently developed for the human TOR kinase on Arabidopsis thaliana growth. All six asTORis inhibited plant root growth in a dose-dependent manner, with 50% growth inhibitory doses (GI50) of <10 μM and <1 μM for the first- and second-generation inhibitors, respectively, similarly to the values in mammalian cells. A genetic approach further demonstrated that only asTORis inhibited root growth in an AtTOR gene-dosage-dependent manner. AsTORis decreased the length of: (i) the meristematic zone (MZ); (ii) the division zone in the MZ; (iii) epidermal cells in the elongation zone; and (iv) root hair cells. Whereas meristematic cells committed to early differentiation, the pattern of cell differentiation was not affected per se. AsTORis-induced root hair growth phenotype was shown to be specific by using other growth inhibitors blocking the cell cycle or translation. AsTORis dose-dependent inhibition of growth and root hairs was also observed in diverse groups of flowering plants, indicating that asTORis can be used to study the TOR pathway in other angiosperms, including crop plants.

  7. The PLASTID DIVISION1 and 2 components of the chloroplast division machinery determine the rate of chloroplast division in land plant cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Kumiko; Kabeya, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Kenji; Mori, Toshiyuki; Ichikawa, Takanari; Matsui, Minami; Nakanishi, Hiromitsu; Miyagishima, Shin-Ya

    2009-06-01

    In most algae, the chloroplast division rate is held constant to maintain the proper number of chloroplasts per cell. By contrast, land plants evolved cell and chloroplast differentiation systems in which the size and number of chloroplasts change along with their respective cellular function by regulation of the division rate. Here, we show that PLASTID DIVISION (PDV) proteins, land plant-specific components of the division apparatus, determine the rate of chloroplast division. Overexpression of PDV proteins in the angiosperm Arabidopsis thaliana and the moss Physcomitrella patens increased the number but decreased the size of chloroplasts; reduction of PDV levels resulted in the opposite effect. The level of PDV proteins, but not other division components, decreased during leaf development, during which the chloroplast division rate also decreased. Exogenous cytokinins or overexpression of the cytokinin-responsive transcription factor CYTOKININ RESPONSE FACTOR2 increased the chloroplast division rate, where PDV proteins, but not other components of the division apparatus, were upregulated. These results suggest that the integration of PDV proteins into the division machinery enabled land plant cells to change chloroplast size and number in accord with the fate of cell differentiation.

  8. Differential localisation of GFP fusions to cytoskeleton-binding proteins in animal, plant, and yeast cells. Green-fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Timmers, A C J; Niebel, A; Balagué, C; Dagkesamanskaya, A

    2002-10-01

    The structure and functioning of the cytoskeleton is controlled and regulated by cytoskeleton-associated proteins. Fused to the green-fluorescent protein (GFP), these proteins can be used as tools to monitor changes in the organisation of the cytoskeleton in living cells and tissues in different organisms. Since the localisation of a specific cytoskeleton protein may indicate a particular function for the associated cytoskeletal element, studies of cytoskeleton-binding proteins fused to GFP may provide insight into the organisation and functioning of the cytoskeleton. In this article, we focused on two animal proteins, human T-plastin and bovine tau, and studied the distribution of their respective GFP fusions in animal COS cells, plant epidermal cells (Allium cepa), and yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Plastin-GFP localised preferentially to membrane ruffles, lamellipodia and focal adhesion points in COS cells, to the actin filament cytoskeleton within cytoplasmic strands in onion epidermal cells, and to cortical actin patches in yeast cells. Thus, in these 3 very different types of cells plastin-GFP associated with mobile structures in which there are high rates of actin turnover. Chemical fixation was found to drastically alter the distribution of plastin-GFP. Tau-GFP bound to microtubules in COS cells and onion epidermal cells but failed to bind to yeast microtubules. Thus, animal and plant microtubules appear to have a common tau binding site which is absent in yeast. We conclude that the study of the distribution patterns of microtubule- and actin-filament-binding proteins fused to GFP in heterologous systems should be a valuable tool in furthering our knowledge about cytoskeleton function in eukaryotic cells. PMID:12417938

  9. Rethinking differentiation: Stem cells, regeneration, and plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2014-01-01

    Cell differentiation is an essential process for the development, growth, reproduction and longevity of all multicellular organisms, and its regulation has been the focus of intense investigation for the past 4 decades. The study of natural and induced stem cells has ushered an age of re-examination of what it means to be a stem or a differentiated cell. Past and recent discoveries in plants and animals, as well as novel experimental manipulations are beginning to erode many of these established concepts, and are forcing a re-evaluation of the experimental systems and paradigms presently being used to explore these and other biological process. PMID:24679530

  10. Plant vascular development: from early specification to differentiation.

    PubMed

    De Rybel, Bert; Mähönen, Ari Pekka; Helariutta, Yrjö; Weijers, Dolf

    2016-01-01

    Vascular tissues in plants are crucial to provide physical support and to transport water, sugars and hormones and other small signalling molecules throughout the plant. Recent genetic and molecular studies have identified interconnections among some of the major signalling networks that regulate plant vascular development. Using Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system, these studies enable the description of vascular development from the earliest tissue specification events during embryogenesis to the differentiation of phloem and xylem tissues. Moreover, we propose a model for how oriented cell divisions give rise to a three-dimensional vascular bundle within the root meristem.

  11. Communication is key: Reducing DEK1 activity reveals a link between cell-cell contacts and epidermal cell differentiation status.

    PubMed

    Galletti, Roberta; Ingram, Gwyneth C

    2015-01-01

    Plant epidermis development requires not only the initial acquisition of tissue identity, but also the ability to differentiate specific cell types over time and to maintain these differentiated states throughout the plant life. To set-up and maintain differentiation, plants activate specific transcriptional programs. Interfering with these programs can prevent differentiation and/or force differentiated cells to lose their identity and re-enter a proliferative state. We have recently shown that the Arabidopsis Defective Kernel 1 (DEK1) protein is required both for the differentiation of epidermal cells and for the maintenance of their fully differentiated state. Defects in DEK1 activity lead to a deregulation of the expression of epidermis-specific differentiation-promoting HD-ZIP IV transcription factors. Here we propose a working model in which DEK1, by maintaining cell-cell contacts, and thus communication between neighboring cells, influences HD-ZIP IV gene expression and epidermis differentiation. PMID:27064205

  12. Plant cell technologies in space: Background, strategies and prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkorian, A. D.; Scheld, H. W.

    1987-01-01

    An attempt is made to summarize work in plant cell technologies in space. The evolution of concepts and the general principles of plant tissue culture are discussed. The potential for production of high value secondary products by plant cells and differentiated tissue in automated, precisely controlled bioreactors is discussed. The general course of the development of the literature on plant tissue culture is highlighted.

  13. Measurement of Total Site Mercury Emissions from a Chlor-Alkali Plant Using Ultraviolet Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy and Cell Room Roof-Vent Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mercury-cell chlor-alkali plants can emit significant quantities of fugitive elemental mercury vapor to the air as part of production operations and maintenance activities. In the fall of 2006, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted a measurement project at a ch...

  14. Minimal model for stem-cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Yusuke; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2013-09-01

    To explain the differentiation of stem cells in terms of dynamical systems theory, models of interacting cells with intracellular protein expression dynamics are analyzed and simulated. Simulations were carried out for all possible protein expression networks consisting of two genes under cell-cell interactions mediated by the diffusion of a protein. Networks that show cell differentiation are extracted and two forms of symmetric differentiation based on Turing's mechanism and asymmetric differentiation are identified. In the latter network, the intracellular protein levels show oscillatory dynamics at a single-cell level, while cell-to-cell synchronicity of the oscillation is lost with an increase in the number of cells. Differentiation to a fixed-point-type behavior follows with a further increase in the number of cells. The cell type with oscillatory dynamics corresponds to a stem cell that can both proliferate and differentiate, while the latter fixed-point type only proliferates. This differentiation is analyzed as a saddle-node bifurcation on an invariant circle, while the number ratio of each cell type is shown to be robust against perturbations due to self-consistent determination of the effective bifurcation parameter as a result of the cell-cell interaction. Complex cell differentiation is designed by combing these simple two-gene networks. The generality of the present differentiation mechanism, as well as its biological relevance, is discussed.

  15. Nuclear Mechanics and Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xinjian; Gavara, Nuria; Song, Guanbin

    2015-12-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation potential. Stem cell differentiation is a prerequisite for the application of stem cells in regenerative medicine and clinical therapy. In addition to chemical stimulation, mechanical cues play a significant role in regulating stem cell differentiation. The integrity of mechanical sensors is necessary for the ability of cells to respond to mechanical signals. The nucleus, the largest and stiffest cellular organelle, interacts with the cytoskeleton as a key mediator of cell mechanics. Nuclear mechanics are involved in the complicated interactions of lamins, chromatin and nucleoskeleton-related proteins. Thus, stem cell differentiation is intimately associated with nuclear mechanics due to its indispensable role in mechanotransduction and mechanical response. This paper reviews several main contributions of nuclear mechanics, highlights the hallmarks of the nuclear mechanics of stem cells, and provides insight into the relationship between nuclear mechanics and stem cell differentiation, which may guide clinical applications in the future.

  16. Differential growth inhibitory effects of highly oxygenated guaianolides isolated from the Middle Eastern indigenous plant Achillea falcata in HCT-116 colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tohme, Rita; Al Aaraj, Lamis; Ghaddar, Tarek; Gali-Muhtasib, Hala; Saliba, Najat A; Darwiche, Nadine

    2013-01-01

    Medicinal plants play a crucial role in traditional medicine and in the maintenance of human health worldwide. Sesquiterpene lactones represent an interesting group of plant-derived compounds that are currently being tested as lead drugs in cancer clinical trials. Achillea falcata is a medicinal plant indigenous to the Middle Eastern region and belongs to the Asteraceae family, which is known to be rich in sesquiterpene lactones. We subjected Achillea falcata extracts to bioassay-guided fractionation against the growth of HCT-116 colorectal cancer cells and identified four secotanapartholides, namely 3-β-methoxy-isosecotanapartholide (1), isosecotanapartholide (2), tanaphallin (3), and 8-hydroxy-3-methoxyisosecotanapartholide (4). Three highly oxygenated guaianolides were isolated for the first time from Achillea falcata, namely rupin A (5), chrysartemin B (6), and 1β, 2β-epoxy-3β,4α,10α-trihydroxyguaian-6α,12-olide (7). These sesquiterpene lactones showed no or minor cytotoxicity while exhibiting promising anticancer effects against HCT-116 cells. Further structure-activity relationship studies related the bioactivity of the tested compounds to their skeleton, their lipophilicity, and to the type of functional groups neighboring the main alkylating center of the molecule. PMID:23860275

  17. Cell cycle stage-specific differential expression of topoisomerase I in tobacco BY-2 cells and its ectopic overexpression and knockdown unravels its crucial role in plant morphogenesis and development.

    PubMed

    Singh, Badri Nath; Mudgil, Yashwanti; John, Riffat; Achary, V Mohan Murali; Tripathy, Manas Kumar; Sopory, Sudhir K; Reddy, Malireddy K; Kaul, Tanushri

    2015-11-01

    DNA topoisomerases catalyze the inter-conversion of different topological forms of DNA. Cell cycle coupled differential accumulation of topoisomerase I (Topo I) revealed biphasic expression maximum at S-phase and M/G1-phase of cultured synchronized tobacco BY-2 cells. This suggested its active role in resolving topological constrains during DNA replication (S-phase) and chromosome decondensation (M/G1 phase). Immuno-localization revealed high concentrations of Topo I in nucleolus. Propidium iodide staining and Br-UTP incorporation patterns revealed direct correlation between immunofluorescence intensity and rRNA transcription activity within nucleolus. Immuno-stained chromosomes during metaphase and anaphase suggested possible role of Topo I in resolving topological constrains during mitotic chromosome condensation. Inhibitor studies showed that in comparison to Topo I, Topo II was essential in resolving topological constrains during chromosome condensation. Probably, Topo II substituted Topo I functioning to certain extent during chromosome condensation, but not vice-versa. Transgenic Topo I tobacco lines revealed morphological abnormalities and highlighted its crucial role in plant morphogenesis and development.

  18. Mesoderm Differentiation from hiPS Cells.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Hiroyuki; Era, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cells are very attractive tools for modeling diseases and regenerative medicine. However, to achieve them, the efficient differentiation methods of hiPS cells into aimed cell type in vitro are necessary. Because mesoderm cells are useful in particular, we have developed the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells into mesoderm cells previously. In this time, these methods were improved for hiPS cells and now human mesoderm cells are able to be obtained efficiently. It is certain that the new methods are applicable to various studies and therapies.

  19. Regulation of cell division in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, T.W.

    1992-01-01

    Cell division is arguably the most fundamental of all developmental processes. In higher plants, mitotic activity is largely confined to foci of patterned cell divisions called meristems. From these perpetually embryonic tissues arise the plant's essential organs of light capture, support, protection and reproduction. Once an adequate understanding of plant cell mitotic regulation is attained, unprecedented opportunities will ensue for analyzing and genetically controlling diverse aspects of development, including plant architecture, leaf shape, plant height, and root depth. The mitotic cycle in a variety of model eukaryotic systems in under the control of a regulatory network of striking evolutionary conservation. Homologues of the yeast cdc2 gene, its catalytic product, p34, and the cyclin regulatory subunits of the MPF complex have emerged as ubiquitous mitotic regulators. We have cloned cdc2-like and cyclin genes from pea. As in other eukaryotic model systems, p34 of Pisum sativum is a subunit of a high molecular weight complex which binds the fission yeast p13 protein and displays histone H1 kinase activity in vitro. Our primary objective in this study is to gain baseline information about the regulation of this higher plant cell division control complex in non-dividing, differentiated cells as well as in synchronous and asynchronous mitotic cells. We are investigating cdc2 and cyclin expression at the levels of protein abundance, protein phosphorylation and quaternary associations.

  20. Nrf2 promotes neuronal cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fei; Wu, Tongde; Lau, Alexandria; Jiang, Tao; Huang, Zheping; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Chen, Weimin; Wong, Pak Kin; Zhang, Donna D.

    2009-01-01

    The transcription factor Nrf2 has emerged as a master regulator for the endogenous antioxidant response, which is critical in defending cells against environmental insults and in maintaining intracellular redox balance. However, whether Nrf2 has any role in neuronal cell differentiation is largely unknown. In this report, we have examined the effects of Nrf2 on cell differentiation using a neuroblastoma cell line, SH-SY5Y. Retinoic acid (RA) and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), two well-studied inducers for neuronal differentiation, are able to induce Nrf2 and its target gene NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) in a dose- and time- dependent manner. RA-induced Nrf2 up-regulation is accompanied by neurite outgrowth and an induction of two neuronal differentiation markers, neurofilament-M (NF-M) and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2). Overexpression of Nrf2 in SH-SY5Y cells promotes neuronal differentiation whereas inhibition of endogenous Nrf2 expression inhibited neuronal differentiation. More remarkably, the positive role of Nrf2 in neuronal differentiation was verified ex vivo in primary neuron culture. Primary neurons isolated from Nrf2-null mice showed a retarded progress in differentiation, compared to that from wild-type mice. Collectively, our data demonstrate a novel role for Nrf2 in promoting neuronal cell differentiation, which will open new perspectives for therapeutic uses of Nrf2 activators in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19573594

  1. Neurogenic differentiation of amniotic fluid stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rosner, M; Mikula, M; Preitschopf, A; Feichtinger, M; Schipany, K; Hengstschläger, M

    2012-05-01

    In 2003, human amniotic fluid has been shown to contain stem cells expressing Oct-4, a marker for pluripotency. This finding initiated a rapidly growing and very promising new stem cell research field. Since then, amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells have been demonstrated to harbour the potential to differentiate into any of the three germ layers and to form three-dimensional aggregates, so-called embryoid bodies, known as the principal step in the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. Marker selection and minimal dilution approaches allow the establishment of monoclonal AFS cell lineages with high proliferation potential. AFS cells have a lower risk for tumour development and do not raise the ethical issues of embryonic stem cells. Compared to induced pluripotent stem cells, AFS cells do not need exogenic treatment to induce pluripotency, are chromosomal stable and do not harbour the epigenetic memory and accumulated somatic mutations of specific differentiated source cells. Compared to adult stem cells, AFS can be grown in larger quantities and show higher differentiation potential. Accordingly, in the recent past, AFS became increasingly accepted as an optimal tool for basic research and probably also for specific cell-based therapies. Here, we review the current knowledge on the neurogenic differentiation potential of AFS cells.

  2. Plant and animal stem cells: similar yet different.

    PubMed

    Heidstra, Renze; Sabatini, Sabrina

    2014-05-01

    The astonishingly long lives of plants and their regeneration capacity depend on the activity of plant stem cells. As in animals, stem cells reside in stem cell niches, which produce signals that regulate the balance between self-renewal and the generation of daughter cells that differentiate into new tissues. Plant stem cell niches are located within the meristems, which are organized structures that are responsible for most post-embryonic development. The continuous organ production that is characteristic of plant growth requires a robust regulatory network to keep the balance between pluripotent stem cells and differentiating progeny. Components of this network have now been elucidated and provide a unique opportunity for comparing strategies that were developed in the animal and plant kingdoms, which underlie the logic of stem cell behaviour.

  3. Opioids and differentiation in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zagon, Ian S; McLaughlin, Patricia J

    2005-10-01

    This study was designed to examine the role of opioids on cell differentiation, with an emphasis on the mechanism of opioid growth factor (OGF, [Met5]-enkephalin)-dependent growth inhibition. Three human cancer cell lines (SK-N-SH neuroblastoma and SCC-1 and CAL-27 squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck), along with OGF and the opioid antagonist naltrexone (NTX) at a dosage (10(-6) M) known to repress or increase, respectively, cell replication, were utilized. The effects on differentiation (neurite formation, process lengths, betaIII-tubulin, involucrin) were investigated in cells exposed to OGF or NTX for up to 6 days. In addition, the influence of a variety of other natural and synthetic opioids on differentiation was examined. OGF, NTX, naloxone, [D-Pen2,5]-enkephalin, dynorphin A1-8, beta-endorphin, endomorphin-1 and -2, [D-Ala2, MePhe4, Glycol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO), morphine, and U69,593 at concentrations of 10(-6) M did not alter cell differentiation of any cancer cell line. In NTX-treated SK-N-SH cells, cellular area was increased 23%, and nuclear area was decreased 17%, from control levels; no changes in cell or nuclear area were recorded in OGF-exposed cells. F-actin concentration was increased 40% from control values in SK-N-SH cells subjected to NTX, whereas alpha-tubulin was decreased 53% in OGF-treated cells. These results indicate that the inhibitory or stimulatory actions of OGF and NTX, respectively, on cell growth in tissue culture are not due to alterations in differentiation pathways. However, exposure to OGF and NTX modified some aspects of cell structure, but this was independent of differentiation. The absence of effects on cancer cell differentiation by a variety of other opioids supports the previously reported lack of growth effects of these compounds.

  4. Cell division, differentiation and dynamic clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko; Yomo, Tetsuya

    1994-08-01

    A novel mechanism for cell differentiation is proposed, based on the dynamic clustering in a globally coupled nonlinear system. A simple model with metabolic reaction, active transport of chemicals from media, and cell division is found to show three successive stages with the growth of the number of cells; coherent growth, dynamic clustering, and fixed cell differentiation. At the last stage, disparity in activities, germ line segregation, somatic cell differentiation, and homeochaotic stability against external perturbation are found. Our results, providing a simple interpretation of the experiments of the preceding paper, imply that cell differentiation can occur without a spatial pattern. From dynamical systems viewpoint, the new concept of “open chaos” is proposed, as a novel and general scenario for systems with growing numbers of elements, also seen in economics and sociology.

  5. Stem cell differentiation and human liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen-Li; Medine, Claire N; Zhu, Liang; Hay, David C

    2012-01-01

    Human stem cells are scalable cell populations capable of cellular differentiation. This makes them a very attractive in vitro cellular resource and in theory provides unlimited amounts of primary cells. Such an approach has the potential to improve our understanding of human biology and treating disease. In the future it may be possible to deploy novel stem cell-based approaches to treat human liver diseases. In recent years, efficient hepatic differentiation from human stem cells has been achieved by several research groups including our own. In this review we provide an overview of the field and discuss the future potential and limitations of stem cell technology. PMID:22563188

  6. Alternative splicing regulation and cell lineage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; He, Ling; Tang, Liling

    2012-11-01

    The alternative splicing of precursor mRNA is an essential mechanism for protein diversity. It plays important biological roles, such as proliferation, differentiation and development of cells. Furthermore, alternative splicing participates in the pathogenesis of diseases, including cancer. Thus, in-depth understanding of splicing regulation is of great significance. Regulation of alternative splicing is an extraordinary complicated process in which several signal molecules are at work. Besides the cis-elements and trans-factors, several lines of evidences suggest that other molecules, structures or process also regulate splicing, such as RNA structures, transcription and transcription factors, chromatin and protein. Meanwhile, increasing body of evidence shows that alternative splicing correlated closely to stem cell lineage differentiation. It means that there is a fundamental role for splicing in controlling regulatory program required for cell lineage differentiation. This review systematically sums up the regulation of alternative splicing and summarizes the splicing events during cell lineage differentiation of stem cells.

  7. Cisplatin Induces Differentiation of Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakaran, Praseetha; Hassiotou, Foteini; Blancafort, Pilar; Filgueira, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Breast tumors are heterogeneous including cells with stem cell properties and more differentiated cells. This heterogeneity is reflected into the molecular breast cancer subtypes. Breast cancer stem cells are resistant to chemotherapy, thus recent efforts are focusing on identifying treatments that shift them toward a more differentiated phenotype, making them more susceptible to chemotherapy. We examined whether the drug cisplatin induces differentiation in breast cancer cell lines that represent different breast cancer subtypes. We used three cell lines representing triple-negative breast cancers, BT-549 and MDA-MB-231 (claudin-low), and MDA-MB-468 (basal-like), along with estrogen and progesterone receptor positive MCF-7 cells (luminal). Cisplatin was applied at 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 μM, and cell viability and proliferation were measured using MTS and BrdU assays, respectively. The effect of cisplatin on the cellular hierarchy was examined by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and qRT-PCR. Cisplatin treatment of 10 and 20 μM reduced cell viability by 36–51% and proliferation capacity by 36–67%. Treatment with cisplatin resulted in 12–67% down-regulation of stem cell markers (CD49f, SSEA4) and 10–130% up-regulation of differentiation markers (CK18, SMA, β-tubulin). At the mRNA level, CD49f was down-regulated whilst β-tubulin was up-regulated in the claudin-low cell lines. SSEA4 protein expression decreased upon cisplatin treatment, but SSEA4 mRNA expression increased indicating a differential regulation of cisplatin at the post-transcriptional level. It is concluded that cisplatin reduces breast cancer cell survival and induces differentiation of stem/progenitor cell subpopulations within breast cancer cell lines. These effects indicate the potential of this drug to target specific chemotherapy-resistant cells within a tumor. PMID:23761858

  8. DNA repair in murine embryonic stem cells and differentiated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tichy, Elisia D. Stambrook, Peter J.

    2008-06-10

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are rapidly proliferating, self-renewing cells that have the capacity to differentiate into all three germ layers to form the embryo proper. Since these cells are critical for embryo formation, they must have robust prophylactic mechanisms to ensure that their genomic integrity is preserved. Indeed, several studies have suggested that ES cells are hypersensitive to DNA damaging agents and readily undergo apoptosis to eliminate damaged cells from the population. Other evidence suggests that DNA damage can cause premature differentiation in these cells. Several laboratories have also begun to investigate the role of DNA repair in the maintenance of ES cell genomic integrity. It does appear that ES cells differ in their capacity to repair damaged DNA compared to differentiated cells. This minireview focuses on repair mechanisms ES cells may use to help preserve genomic integrity and compares available data regarding these mechanisms with those utilized by differentiated cells.

  9. Prenylation is required for polar cell elongation, cell adhesion, and differentiation in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Thole, Julie M; Perroud, Pierre-Francois; Quatrano, Ralph S; Running, Mark P

    2014-05-01

    Protein prenylation is required for a variety of growth and developmental processes in flowering plants. Here we report the consequences of loss of function of all known prenylation subunits in the moss Physcomitrella patens. As in Arabidopsis, protein farnesyltransferase and protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I are not required for viability. However, protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I activity is required for cell adhesion, polar cell elongation, and cell differentiation. Loss of protein geranylgeranyltransferase activity results in colonies of round, single-celled organisms that resemble unicellular algae. The loss of protein farnesylation is not as severe but also results in polar cell elongation and differentiation defects. The complete loss of Rab geranylgeranyltransferase activity appears to be lethal in P. patens. Labeling with antibodies to cell wall components support the lack of polarity establishment and the undifferentiated state of geranylgeranyltransferase type I mutant plants. Our results show that prenylated proteins play key roles in P. patens development and differentiation processes.

  10. [EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT CLASSES OF PLANT HORMONES ON MAMMALIAN CELLS].

    PubMed

    Vildanova, M S; Smirnova, E A

    2016-01-01

    Plant hormones are signal molecules of different chemical structure, secreted by plant cells and acting at low concentrations as regulators of plant growth and differentiation. Certain plant hormones are similar to animal hormones or can be produced by animal cells. A number of studies show that the effect of biologically active components of plant origin including plant/phytohormones is much wider than was previously thought, but so far there are no objective criteria for assessing the influence of phytohormones on the physiological state of animal cells. Presented in the survey data show that plant hormones, which have different effects on plant growth and development (jasmonic, abscisic and gibberellic acids), are not neutral to the cells of animal origin, and animal cells response to them may be either positive or negative. PMID:27220246

  11. Chromatin States Accurately Classify Cell Differentiation Stages

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Jessica L.; Yuan, Guo-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression is controlled by the concerted interactions between transcription factors and chromatin regulators. While recent studies have identified global chromatin state changes across cell-types, it remains unclear to what extent these changes are co-regulated during cell-differentiation. Here we present a comprehensive computational analysis by assembling a large dataset containing genome-wide occupancy information of 5 histone modifications in 27 human cell lines (including 24 normal and 3 cancer cell lines) obtained from the public domain, followed by independent analysis at three different representations. We classified the differentiation stage of a cell-type based on its genome-wide pattern of chromatin states, and found that our method was able to identify normal cell lines with nearly 100% accuracy. We then applied our model to classify the cancer cell lines and found that each can be unequivocally classified as differentiated cells. The differences can be in part explained by the differential activities of three regulatory modules associated with embryonic stem cells. We also found that the “hotspot” genes, whose chromatin states change dynamically in accordance to the differentiation stage, are not randomly distributed across the genome but tend to be embedded in multi-gene chromatin domains, and that specialized gene clusters tend to be embedded in stably occupied domains. PMID:22363642

  12. Cell proliferation and differentiation in chemical leukemogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irons, R. D.; Stillman, W. S.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    In tissues such as bone marrow with normally high rates of cell division, proliferation is tightly coordinated with cell differentiation. Survival, proliferation and differentiation of early hematopoietic progenitor cells depend on the growth factors, interleukin 3 (IL-3) and/or granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and their synergism with other cytokines. We provide evidence that a characteristic shared by a diverse group of compounds with demonstrated leukemogenic potential is the ability to act synergistically with GM-CSF. This results in an increase in recruitment of a resting population of hematopoietic progenitor cells normally unresponsive to the cytokine and a twofold increase in the size of the proliferating cell population normally regarded to be at risk of transformation in leukemogenesis. These findings support the possibility that transient alterations in hematopoietic progenitor cell differentiation may be an important factor in the early stages of development of leukemia secondary to chemical or drug exposure.

  13. Differential geometry meets the cell.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Wallace F

    2013-07-18

    A new study by Terasaki et al. highlights the role of physical forces in biological form by showing that connections between stacked endoplasmic reticulum cisternae have a shape well known in classical differential geometry, the helicoid, and that this shape is a predictable consequence of membrane physics.

  14. Hepatic Differentiation from Human Ips Cells Using M15 Cells.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Kahoko; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Kume, Shoen

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a procedure of human iPS cells differentiation into the definitive endoderm, further into albumin-expressing and albumin-secreting hepatocyte, using M15, a mesonephros- derived cell line. Approximately 90 % of human iPS cells differentiated into SOX17-positive definitive endoderm then approximately 50 % of cells became albumin-positive cells, and secreted ALB protein. This M15 feeder system for endoderm and hepatic differentiation is a simple and efficient method, and useful for elucidating molecular mechanisms for hepatic fate decision, and could represent an attractive approach for a surrogate cell source for pharmaceutical studies.

  15. Controlled, scalable embryonic stem cell differentiation culture.

    PubMed

    Dang, Stephen M; Gerecht-Nir, Sharon; Chen, Jinny; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Zandstra, Peter W

    2004-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are of significant interest as a renewable source of therapeutically useful cells. ES cell aggregation is important for both human and mouse embryoid body (EB) formation and the subsequent generation of ES cell derivatives. Aggregation between EBs (agglomeration), however, inhibits cell growth and differentiation in stirred or high-cell-density static cultures. We demonstrate that the agglomeration of two EBs is initiated by E-cadherin-mediated cell attachment and followed by active cell migration. We report the development of a technology capable of controlling cell-cell interactions in scalable culture by the mass encapsulation of ES cells in size-specified agarose capsules. When placed in stirred-suspension bioreactors, encapsulated ES cells can be used to produce scalable quantities of hematopoietic progenitor cells in a controlled environment.

  16. Plant cell walls to ethanol.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conversion of plant cell walls to ethanol constitutes generation 2 bioethanol production. The process consists of several steps: biomass selection/genetic modification, physiochemical pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, fermentation, and separation. Ultimately, it is desired to combine as man...

  17. Optimal design of proportional-integral controllers for stand-alone solid oxide fuel cell power plant using differential evolution algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ashik; Ullah, Md Shahid

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes the application of differential evolution (DE) algorithm for the optimal tuning of proportional-integral (PI) controller designed to improve the small signal dynamic response of a stand-alone solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system. The small signal model of the study system is derived and considered for the controller design as the target here is to track small variations in SOFC load current. Two PI controllers are incorporated in the feedback loops of hydrogen and oxygen partial pressures with an aim to improve the small signal dynamic responses. The controller design problem is formulated as the minimization of an eigenvalue based objective function where the target is to find out the optimal gains of the PI controllers in such a way that the discrepancy of the obtained and desired eigenvalues are minimized. Eigenvalue and time domain simulations are presented for both open-loop and closed loop systems. To test the efficacy of DE over other optimization tools, the results obtained with DE are compared with those obtained by particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm and invasive weed optimization (IWO) algorithm. Three different types of load disturbances are considered for the time domain based results to investigate the performances of different optimizers under different sorts of load variations. Moreover, non-parametric statistical analyses, namely, one sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test and paired sample t test are used to identify the statistical advantage of one optimizer over the other for the problem under study. The presented results suggest the supremacy of DE over PSO and IWO in finding the optimal solution. PMID:27066389

  18. Optimal design of proportional-integral controllers for stand-alone solid oxide fuel cell power plant using differential evolution algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ashik; Ullah, Md Shahid

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes the application of differential evolution (DE) algorithm for the optimal tuning of proportional-integral (PI) controller designed to improve the small signal dynamic response of a stand-alone solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system. The small signal model of the study system is derived and considered for the controller design as the target here is to track small variations in SOFC load current. Two PI controllers are incorporated in the feedback loops of hydrogen and oxygen partial pressures with an aim to improve the small signal dynamic responses. The controller design problem is formulated as the minimization of an eigenvalue based objective function where the target is to find out the optimal gains of the PI controllers in such a way that the discrepancy of the obtained and desired eigenvalues are minimized. Eigenvalue and time domain simulations are presented for both open-loop and closed loop systems. To test the efficacy of DE over other optimization tools, the results obtained with DE are compared with those obtained by particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm and invasive weed optimization (IWO) algorithm. Three different types of load disturbances are considered for the time domain based results to investigate the performances of different optimizers under different sorts of load variations. Moreover, non-parametric statistical analyses, namely, one sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test and paired sample t test are used to identify the statistical advantage of one optimizer over the other for the problem under study. The presented results suggest the supremacy of DE over PSO and IWO in finding the optimal solution.

  19. Mapping microscopic order in plant and mammalian cells and tissues: novel differential polarization attachment for new generation confocal microscopes (DP-LSM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, G.; Pawlak, K.; Pomozi, I.; Tóth, E. A.; Molnár, A.; Matkó, J.; Garab, G.

    2014-03-01

    Elucidation of the molecular architecture of complex, highly organized molecular macro-assemblies is an important, basic task for biology. Differential polarization (DP) measurements, such as linear (LD) and circular dichroism (CD) or the anisotropy of the fluorescence emission (r), which can be carried out in a dichrograph or spectrofluorimeter, respectively, carry unique, spatially averaged information about the molecular organization of the sample. For inhomogeneous samples—e.g. cells and tissues—measurements on macroscopic scale are not satisfactory, and in some cases not feasible, thus microscopic techniques must be applied. The microscopic DP-imaging technique, when based on confocal laser scanning microscope (LSM), allows the pixel by pixel mapping of anisotropy of a sample in 2D and 3D. The first DP-LSM configuration, which, in fluorescence mode, allowed confocal imaging of different DP quantities in real-time, without interfering with the ‘conventional’ imaging, was built on a Zeiss LSM410. It was demonstrated to be capable of determining non-confocally the linear birefringence (LB) or LD of a sample and, confocally, its FDLD (fluorescence detected LD), the degree of polarization (P) and the anisotropy of the fluorescence emission (r), following polarized and non-polarized excitation, respectively (Steinbach et al 2009 Acta Histochem.111 316-25). This DP-LSM configuration, however, cannot simply be adopted to new generation microscopes with considerably more compact structures. As shown here, for an Olympus FV500, we designed an easy-to-install DP attachment to determine LB, LD, FDLD and r, in new-generation confocal microscopes, which, in principle, can be complemented with a P-imaging unit, but specifically to the brand and type of LSM.

  20. A novel system for xylem cell differentiation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yuki; Fujita, Takashi; Sugiyama, Munetaka; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2015-04-01

    During vascular development, procambial and cambial cells give rise to xylem and phloem cells. Because the vascular tissue is deeply embedded, it has been difficult to analyze the processes of vascular development in detail. Here, we establish a novel in vitro experimental system in which vascular development is induced in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf-disk cultures using bikinin, an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase 3 proteins. Transcriptome analysis reveals that mesophyll cells in leaf disks synchronously turn into procambial cells and then differentiate into tracheary elements. Leaf-disk cultures from plants expressing the procambial cell markers TDR(pro):GUS and TDR(pro):YFP can be used for spatiotemporal visualization of procambial cell formation. Further analysis with the tdr mutant and TDIF (tracheary element differentiation inhibitory factor) indicates that the key signaling TDIF-TDR-GSK3s regulates xylem differentiation in leaf-disk cultures. This new culture system can be combined with analysis using the rich material resources for Arabidopsis including cell-marker lines and mutants, thus offering a powerful tool for analyzing xylem cell differentiation.

  1. A novel system for xylem cell differentiation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yuki; Fujita, Takashi; Sugiyama, Munetaka; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2015-04-01

    During vascular development, procambial and cambial cells give rise to xylem and phloem cells. Because the vascular tissue is deeply embedded, it has been difficult to analyze the processes of vascular development in detail. Here, we establish a novel in vitro experimental system in which vascular development is induced in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf-disk cultures using bikinin, an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase 3 proteins. Transcriptome analysis reveals that mesophyll cells in leaf disks synchronously turn into procambial cells and then differentiate into tracheary elements. Leaf-disk cultures from plants expressing the procambial cell markers TDR(pro):GUS and TDR(pro):YFP can be used for spatiotemporal visualization of procambial cell formation. Further analysis with the tdr mutant and TDIF (tracheary element differentiation inhibitory factor) indicates that the key signaling TDIF-TDR-GSK3s regulates xylem differentiation in leaf-disk cultures. This new culture system can be combined with analysis using the rich material resources for Arabidopsis including cell-marker lines and mutants, thus offering a powerful tool for analyzing xylem cell differentiation. PMID:25624147

  2. Physcomitrella patens: a model for tip cell growth and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Vidali, Luis; Bezanilla, Magdalena

    2012-12-01

    The moss Physcomitrella patens has emerged as an excellent model system owing to its amenability to reverse genetics. The moss gametophyte has three filamentous tissues that grow by tip growth: chloronemata, caulonemata, and rhizoids. Because establishment of the moss plant relies on this form of growth, it is particularly suited for dissecting the molecular basis of tip growth. Recent studies demonstrate that a core set of actin cytoskeletal proteins is essential for tip growth. Additional actin cytoskeletal components are required for modulating growth to produce caulonemata and rhizoids. Differentiation into these cell types has previously been linked to auxin, light and nutrients. Recent studies have identified that core auxin signaling components as well as transcription factors that respond to auxin or nutrient levels are required for tip-growing cell differentiation. Future studies may establish a connection between the actin cytoskeleton and auxin or nutrient-induced cell differentiation.

  3. Biophysical regulation of stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Govey, Peter M; Loiselle, Alayna E; Donahue, Henry J

    2013-06-01

    Bone adaptation to its mechanical environment, from embryonic through adult life, is thought to be the product of increased osteoblastic differentiation from mesenchymal stem cells. In parallel with tissue-scale loading, these heterogeneous populations of multipotent stem cells are subject to a variety of biophysical cues within their native microenvironments. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells-the most broadly studied source of osteoblastic progenitors-undergo osteoblastic differentiation in vitro in response to biophysical signals, including hydrostatic pressure, fluid flow and accompanying shear stress, substrate strain and stiffness, substrate topography, and electromagnetic fields. Furthermore, stem cells may be subject to indirect regulation by mechano-sensing osteocytes positioned to more readily detect these same loading-induced signals within the bone matrix. Such paracrine and juxtacrine regulation of differentiation by osteocytes occurs in vitro. Further studies are needed to confirm both direct and indirect mechanisms of biophysical regulation within the in vivo stem cell niche.

  4. Exploring the cell signalling in hepatocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Vasconcellos, Rebecca; Alvarenga, Érika C; Parreira, Ricardo C; Lima, Swiany S; Resende, Rodrigo R

    2016-11-01

    The liver is the second largest organ in the human body and is responsible for several functions that directly contribute to homeostasis. Hepatocytes are the main parenchymal liver cells that regulate multiple biochemical and metabolic functions and the synthesis of substances important to the body. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a group of stem cells derived from the mesoderm, which can be obtained from various tissues. Under certain conditions, MSCs can differentiate into several cell types, including hepatocytes. Post-transcriptional regulations of liver development signalling and hepatocyte differentiation have been demonstrated. At the post-transcriptional level, microRNAs have emerged as precursors for determining cell fate during differentiation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. They can determine the stem cell fate by repressing the translation of target mRNAs. In this review, we outline signalling pathways involved in stem cell differentiation to hepatocytes and its interplay with liver development. Hepatic differentiation models in two-dimensional and three-dimensional cultures used to analyse signalling mechanisms will be described. We also highlight the possible miRNAs involved in this process and the transdifferentiation signalling mechanisms present in hepatocytes.

  5. Exploring the cell signalling in hepatocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Vasconcellos, Rebecca; Alvarenga, Érika C; Parreira, Ricardo C; Lima, Swiany S; Resende, Rodrigo R

    2016-11-01

    The liver is the second largest organ in the human body and is responsible for several functions that directly contribute to homeostasis. Hepatocytes are the main parenchymal liver cells that regulate multiple biochemical and metabolic functions and the synthesis of substances important to the body. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a group of stem cells derived from the mesoderm, which can be obtained from various tissues. Under certain conditions, MSCs can differentiate into several cell types, including hepatocytes. Post-transcriptional regulations of liver development signalling and hepatocyte differentiation have been demonstrated. At the post-transcriptional level, microRNAs have emerged as precursors for determining cell fate during differentiation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. They can determine the stem cell fate by repressing the translation of target mRNAs. In this review, we outline signalling pathways involved in stem cell differentiation to hepatocytes and its interplay with liver development. Hepatic differentiation models in two-dimensional and three-dimensional cultures used to analyse signalling mechanisms will be described. We also highlight the possible miRNAs involved in this process and the transdifferentiation signalling mechanisms present in hepatocytes. PMID:27555287

  6. A paired comparison between glioblastoma "stem cells" and differentiated cells.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Matthias; Ströbele, Stephanie; Nonnenmacher, Lisa; Siegelin, Markus D; Tepper, Melanie; Stroh, Sebastien; Hasslacher, Sebastian; Enzenmüller, Stefanie; Strauss, Gudrun; Baumann, Bernd; Karpel-Massler, Georg; Westhoff, Mike-Andrew; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Halatsch, Marc-Eric

    2016-04-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) have been postulated to be responsible for the key features of a malignancy and its maintenances, as well as therapy resistance, while differentiated cells are believed to make up the rapidly growing tumour bulk. It is therefore important to understand the characteristics of those two distinct cell populations in order to devise treatment strategies which effectively target both cohorts, in particular with respect to cancers, such as glioblastoma. Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain tumour in adults, with a mean patient survival of 12-15 months. Importantly, therapeutic improvements have not been forthcoming in the last decade. In this study we compare key features of three pairs of glioblastoma cell populations, each pair consisting of stem cell-like and differentiated cells derived from an individual patient. Our data suggest that while growth rates and expression of key survival- and apoptosis-mediating proteins are more similar according to differentiation status than genetic similarity, we found no intrinsic differences in response to standard therapeutic interventions, namely exposure to radiation or the alkylating agent temozolomide. Interestingly, we could demonstrate that both stem cell-like and differentiated cells possess the ability to form stem cell-containing tumours in immunocompromised mice and that differentiated cells could potentially be dedifferentiated to potential stem cells. Taken together our data suggest that the differences between tumour stem cell and differentiated cell are particular fluent in glioblastoma. PMID:26519239

  7. Tinospora cordifolia Induces Differentiation and Senescence Pathways in Neuroblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Rachana; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2015-08-01

    Children diagnosed with neuroblastomas often suffer from severe side as well as late effects of conventional treatments like chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recent advances in understanding of molecular pathways involved in cellular differentiation and apoptosis have helped in the development of new therapeutic approach based on differentiation-based therapy of malignant tumours. Natural medicines with their holistic therapeutic approach are known to selectively eliminate cancer cells thus provide a better substitute for the conventional treatment modes. The current study was aimed to investigate the anti-cancer potential of aqueous ethanolic extract of Tinospora cordifolia (TCE) using IMR-32 human neuroblastoma cell line as a model system. TCE is highly recommended in Ayurveda for its general body and metal health-promoting properties. TCE treatment was seen to arrest the majority of cells in G0/G1 phase and modulated the expression of DNA clamp sliding protein (PCNA) and cyclin D1. Further, TCE-treated cells showed differentiation as revealed by their morphology and the expression of neuronal cell specific differentiation markers NF200, MAP-2 and NeuN in neuroblastoma cells. The differentiated phenotype was associated with induction of senescence and pro-apoptosis pathways by enhancing expression of senescence marker mortalin and Rel A subunit of nuclear factor kappa beta (NFkB) along with decreased expression of anti-apoptotic marker, Bcl-xl. TCE exhibited anti-metastatic activity and significantly reduced cell migration in the scratched area along with downregulation of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) polysialylation and secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Our data suggest that crude extract or active phytochemicals from this plant may be a potential candidate for differentiation-based therapy of malignant neuroblastoma cells. PMID:25280667

  8. Differential effects of lenalidomide during plasma cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jourdan, Michel; Cren, Maïlys; Schafer, Peter; Robert, Nicolas; Duperray, Christophe; Vincent, Laure; Ceballos, Patrice; Cartron, Guillaume; Rossi, Jean-François; Moreaux, Jérôme; Chopra, Rajesh; Klein, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Thalidomide, lenalidomide and pomalidomide have greatly improved the outcome of patients with multiple myeloma. However, their effects on plasma cells, the healthy counterpart of myeloma cells, are unknown. Here, we investigated lenalidomide effects on normal human plasma cell generation using an in vitro model. Lenalidomide inhibited the generation of pre-plasmablasts and early plasma cells, while it moderately affected plasmablast production. It also reduced the expression level of Ikaros, Aiolos, and IRF4 transcription factors, in plasmablasts and early plasma cells. This suggests that their differential sensitivity to lenalidomide is not due to a difference in Ikaros or Aiolos degradation. Lenalidomide also inhibited long-lived plasma cell generation, but did not impair their long-term survival once generated. This last observation is in agreement with the finding that lenalidomide treatment for 3-18 months did not affect the bone marrow healthy plasma cell count in allografted patients with multiple myeloma. Our findings should prompt to investigate whether lenalidomide resistance in patients with multiple myeloma could be associated with the emergence of malignant plasmablasts or long-lived plasma cells that are less sensitive to lenalidomide. PMID:27057635

  9. Hypoxic Tumor Microenvironment and Cancer Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yuri; Lin, Qun; Glazer, Peter M.; Yun, Zhong

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia or oxygen deficiency is a salient feature of solid tumors. Hypoxic tumors are often resistant to conventional cancer therapies, and tumor hypoxia correlates with advanced stages of malignancy. Hypoxic tumors appear to be poorly differentiated. Increasing evidence suggests that hypoxia has the potential to inhibit tumor cell differentiation and thus plays a direct role in the maintenance of cancer stem cells. Studies have also shown that hypoxia blocks differentiation of mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells, a potential source of tumor-associated stromal cells. It is therefore likely that hypoxia may have a profound impact on the evolution of the tumor stromal microenvironment. These observations have led to the emergence of a novel paradigm for a role of hypoxia in facilitating tumor progression. Hypoxia may help create a microenvironment enriched in poorly differentiated tumor cells and undifferentiated stromal cells. Such an undifferentiated hypoxic microenvironment may provide essential cellular interactions and environmental signals for the preferential maintenance of cancer stem cells. This hypothesis suggests that effectively targeting hypoxic cancer stem cells is a key to successful tumor control. PMID:19519400

  10. Transcriptional Regulation of Th17 Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Ivaylo I.; Zhou, Liang; Littman, Dan R.

    2009-01-01

    The paradigm of effector T helper cell differentiation into either Th1 or Th2 lineages has been profoundly shaken by the discovery of T cells that secrete IL-17 and other inflammatory cytokines. This subset, referred to as Th17, is centrally involved in autoimmune disease and is important in host defense at mucosal surfaces. In mouse, a series of cytokines, including IL-6, IL-21, IL-23, and TGF-β, function sequentially or synergistically to induce the Th17 lineage. Other cytokines, including IL-2, IL-4, IFNγ, and IL-27, inhibit differentiation of this lineage. Here we review how the nuclear orphan receptor RORγt functions to coordinate the diverse cytokine-induced signals and thus control Th17 cell differentiation. PMID:18053739

  11. Signal transduction and Th17 cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    O’Shea, John J.; Steward-Tharp, Scott M.; Laurence, Arian; Watford, Wendy T.; Wei, Lai; Adamson, Adewole S.; Fan, Samuel

    2009-01-01

    The paradigm of effector T helper cell differentiation into either Th1 or Th2 lineages has been notably shaken by the discovery of a third lineage of cells that selectively produce interleukin (IL)-17. Characterization of this new subset, referred to as Th17, has provided exciting new insights into immunoregulation, host defense and the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Additionally, the discovery of this T cell subset has offered a fresh look at such concepts as lineage commitment and terminal differentiation. The transcriptional regulatory events and epigenetic modifications that control these processes are diverse and complex, and despite the rapid pace at which data continues to accumulate, many questions remain to be answered. Here we review our current understanding of the signaling pathways, molecular interactions and transcriptional events that lead to Th17 differentiation and effector function, as well as the epigenetic modifications that accompany them. PMID:19379825

  12. Synchronized Cell Cycle Arrest Promotes Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Minsuk; Kim, Jin-Man; Lee, Kyunghee; Park, So-Young; Lim, Hyun-Sook; Kim, Taesoo; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclast progenitors undergo cell cycle arrest before differentiation into osteoclasts, induced by exposure to macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). The role of such cell cycle arrest in osteoclast differentiation has remained unclear, however. We here examined the effect of synchronized cell cycle arrest on osteoclast formation. Osteoclast progenitors deprived of M-CSF in culture adopted a uniform morphology and exhibited cell cycle arrest at the G0–G1 phase in association with both down-regulation of cyclins A and D1 as well as up-regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1. Such M-CSF deprivation also promoted the differentiation of osteoclast progenitors into multinucleated osteoclasts expressing high levels of osteoclast marker proteins such as NFATc1, c-Fos, Atp6v0d2, cathepsin K, and integrin β3 on subsequent exposure to M-CSF and RANKL. Our results suggest that synchronized arrest and reprogramming of osteoclast progenitors renders them poised to respond to inducers of osteoclast formation. Further characterization of such effects may facilitate induction of the differentiation of heterogeneous and multipotent cells into desired cell lineages. PMID:27517906

  13. Synchronized Cell Cycle Arrest Promotes Osteoclast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Minsuk; Kim, Jin-Man; Lee, Kyunghee; Park, So-Young; Lim, Hyun-Sook; Kim, Taesoo; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclast progenitors undergo cell cycle arrest before differentiation into osteoclasts, induced by exposure to macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). The role of such cell cycle arrest in osteoclast differentiation has remained unclear, however. We here examined the effect of synchronized cell cycle arrest on osteoclast formation. Osteoclast progenitors deprived of M-CSF in culture adopted a uniform morphology and exhibited cell cycle arrest at the G₀-G₁ phase in association with both down-regulation of cyclins A and D1 as well as up-regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(Kip1). Such M-CSF deprivation also promoted the differentiation of osteoclast progenitors into multinucleated osteoclasts expressing high levels of osteoclast marker proteins such as NFATc1, c-Fos, Atp6v0d2, cathepsin K, and integrin β3 on subsequent exposure to M-CSF and RANKL. Our results suggest that synchronized arrest and reprogramming of osteoclast progenitors renders them poised to respond to inducers of osteoclast formation. Further characterization of such effects may facilitate induction of the differentiation of heterogeneous and multipotent cells into desired cell lineages. PMID:27517906

  14. Bioprinting and Differentiation of Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Scott A; Venkatraman, Subbu S

    2016-01-01

    The 3D bioprinting of stem cells directly into scaffolds offers great potential for the development of regenerative therapies; in particular for the fabrication of organ and tissue substitutes. For this to be achieved; the lineage fate of bioprinted stem cell must be controllable. Bioprinting can be neutral; allowing culture conditions to trigger differentiation or alternatively; the technique can be designed to be stimulatory. Such factors as the particular bioprinting technique; bioink polymers; polymer cross-linking mechanism; bioink additives; and mechanical properties are considered. In addition; it is discussed that the stimulation of stem cell differentiation by bioprinting may lead to the remodeling and modification of the scaffold over time matching the concept of 4D bioprinting. The ability to tune bioprinting properties as an approach to fabricate stem cell bearing scaffolds and to also harness the benefits of the cells multipotency is of considerable relevance to the field of biomaterials and bioengineering. PMID:27617991

  15. Sonic Hedgehog regulates thymic epithelial cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Saldaña, José Ignacio; Solanki, Anisha; Lau, Ching-In; Sahni, Hemant; Ross, Susan; Furmanski, Anna L.; Ono, Masahiro; Holländer, Georg; Crompton, Tessa

    2016-01-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the thymus, where it regulates T cell development. Here we investigated the influence of Shh on thymic epithelial cell (TEC) development. Components of the Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway were expressed by TEC, and use of a Gli Binding Site-green fluorescence protein (GFP) transgenic reporter mouse demonstrated active Hh-dependent transcription in TEC in the foetal and adult thymus. Analysis of Shh-deficient foetal thymus organ cultures (FTOC) showed that Shh is required for normal TEC differentiation. Shh-deficient foetal thymus contained fewer TEC than wild type (WT), the proportion of medullary TEC was reduced relative to cortical TEC, and cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules was increased on both cortical and medullary TEC populations. In contrast, the Gli3-deficient thymus, which shows increased Hh-dependent transcription in thymic stroma, had increased numbers of TEC, but decreased cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on both cortical and medullary TEC. Neutralisation of endogenous Hh proteins in WT FTOC led to a reduction in TEC numbers, and in the proportion of mature Aire-expressing medullary TEC, but an increase in cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on medullary TEC. Likewise, conditional deletion of Shh from TEC in the adult thymus resulted in alterations in TEC differentiation and consequent changes in T cell development. TEC numbers, and the proportion of mature Aire-expressing medullary TEC were reduced, and cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on medullary TEC was increased. Differentiation of mature CD4 and CD8 single positive thymocytes was increased, demonstrating the regulatory role of Shh production by TEC on T cell development. Treatment of human thymus explants with recombinant Shh or neutralising anti-Shh antibody indicated that the Hedgehog pathway is also involved in regulation of differentiation from DP to mature SP T cells in the human thymus. PMID

  16. Signaling involved in stem cell reprogramming and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Shihori

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell differentiation is regulated by multiple signaling events. Recent technical advances have revealed that differentiated cells can be reprogrammed into stem cells. The signals involved in stem cell programming are of major interest in stem cell research. The signaling mechanisms involved in regulating stem cell reprogramming and differentiation are the subject of intense study in the field of life sciences. In this review, the molecular interactions and signaling pathways related to stem cell differentiation are discussed. PMID:26328015

  17. Stem cell regulation: Implications when differentiated cells regulate symmetric stem cell division.

    PubMed

    Høyem, Marte Rørvik; Måløy, Frode; Jakobsen, Per; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2015-09-01

    We use a mathematical model to show that if symmetric stem cell division is regulated by differentiated cells, then changes in the population dynamics of the differentiated cells can lead to changes in the population dynamics of the stem cells. More precisely, the relative fitness of the stem cells can be affected by modifying the death rate of the differentiated cells. This result is interesting because stem cells are less sensitive than differentiated cells to environmental factors, such as medical therapy. Our result implies that stem cells can be manipulated indirectly by medical treatments that target the differentiated cells. PMID:25997796

  18. Antigen presenting cells - diversity, differentiation, and regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Schook, L.B. ); Tew, J.G. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 35 papers. Some of the titles are: DNA-mediated gene transfer as a tool for analyzing Ia structure-function relationships and antigen presentation; Regulation of immune-associated genes during macrophage differentiation; Presentation of arsonate-tyrosine to cloned T-cells by L-Cells transfected with class II genes; and The duration of class II MHC glycoprotein expression by mononuclear phagocytes is regulated by the Bcg gene.

  19. Chromatin dynamics during cellular differentiation in the female reproductive lineage of flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Baroux, Célia; Autran, Daphné

    2015-07-01

    Sexual reproduction in flowering plants offers a number of remarkable aspects to developmental biologists. First, the spore mother cells - precursors of the plant reproductive lineage - are specified late in development, as opposed to precocious germline isolation during embryogenesis in most animals. Second, unlike in most animals where meiosis directly produces gametes, plant meiosis entails the differentiation of a multicellular, haploid gametophyte, within which gametic as well as non-gametic accessory cells are formed. These observations raise the question of the factors inducing and modus operandi of cell fate transitions that originate in floral tissues and gametophytes, respectively. Cell fate transitions in the reproductive lineage imply cellular reprogramming operating at the physiological, cytological and transcriptome level, but also at the chromatin level. A number of observations point to large-scale chromatin reorganization events associated with cellular differentiation of the female spore mother cells and of the female gametes. These include a reorganization of the heterochromatin compartment, the genome-wide alteration of the histone modification landscape, and the remodeling of nucleosome composition. The dynamic expression of DNA methyltransferases and actors of small RNA pathways also suggest additional, global epigenetic alterations that remain to be characterized. Are these events a cause or a consequence of cellular differentiation, and how do they contribute to cell fate transition? Does chromatin dynamics induce competence for immediate cellular functions (meiosis, fertilization), or does it also contribute long-term effects in cellular identity and developmental competence of the reproductive lineage? This review attempts to review these fascinating questions. PMID:26031902

  20. BCOR regulates myeloid cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Q; Gearhart, M D; Gery, S; Shojaee, S; Yang, H; Sun, H; Lin, D-C; Bai, J-W; Mead, M; Zhao, Z; Chen, Q; Chien, W-W; Alkan, S; Alpermann, T; Haferlach, T; Müschen, M; Bardwell, V J; Koeffler, H P

    2016-05-01

    BCOR is a component of a variant Polycomb group repressive complex 1 (PRC1). Recently, we and others reported recurrent somatic BCOR loss-of-function mutations in myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). However, the role of BCOR in normal hematopoiesis is largely unknown. Here, we explored the function of BCOR in myeloid cells using myeloid murine models with Bcor conditional loss-of-function or overexpression alleles. Bcor mutant bone marrow cells showed significantly higher proliferation and differentiation rates with upregulated expression of Hox genes. Mutation of Bcor reduced protein levels of RING1B, an H2A ubiquitin ligase subunit of PRC1 family complexes and reduced H2AK119ub upstream of upregulated HoxA genes. Global RNA expression profiling in murine cells and AML patient samples with BCOR loss-of-function mutation suggested that loss of BCOR expression is associated with enhanced cell proliferation and myeloid differentiation. Our results strongly suggest that BCOR plays an indispensable role in hematopoiesis by inhibiting myeloid cell proliferation and differentiation and offer a mechanistic explanation for how BCOR regulates gene expression such as Hox genes. PMID:26847029

  1. Measurement of Total Site Mercury Emissions from Chlor-Alkali Plant Using Ultraviolet Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy and Cell Room Roof-Vent Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technical note describes a United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) measurement project to determine elemental mercury (Hg0) emissions from a mercury cell chlor-alkali (MCCA) facility in the southeastern U.S. during a 53-day monitoring campaign in the fall of...

  2. Replication of prions in differentiated muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Allen; Aiken, Judd M; McKenzie, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated that prions accumulate to high levels in non-proliferative C2C12 myotubes. C2C12 cells replicate as myoblasts but can be differentiated into myotubes. Earlier studies indicated that C2C12 myoblasts are not competent for prion replication. (1) We confirmed that observation and demonstrated, for the first time, that while replicative myoblasts do not accumulate PrP(Sc), differentiated post-mitotic myotube cultures replicate prions robustly. Here we extend our observations and describe the implication and utility of this system for replicating prions.

  3. Epigenetic Mechanisms Regulating Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Campo, Flor M.; Riancho, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs) have emerged in the last few years as one of the most promising therapeutic cell sources and, in particular, as an important tool for regenerative medicine of skeletal tissues. Although they present a more restricted potency than Embryonic Stem (ES) cells, the use of hMCS in regenerative medicine avoids many of the drawbacks characteristic of ES cells or induced pluripotent stem cells. The challenge in using these cells lies into developing precise protocols for directing cellular differentiation to generate a specific cell lineage. In order to achieve this goal, it is of the upmost importance to be able to control de process of fate decision and lineage commitment. This process requires the coordinate regulation of different molecular layers at transcriptional, posttranscriptional and translational levels. At the transcriptional level, switching on and off different sets of genes is achieved not only through transcriptional regulators, but also through their interplay with epigenetic modifiers. It is now well known that epigenetic changes take place in an orderly way through development and are critical in the determination of lineage-specific differentiation. More importantly, alteration of these epigenetic changes would, in many cases, lead to disease generation and even tumour formation. Therefore, it is crucial to elucidate how epigenetic factors, through their interplay with transcriptional regulators, control lineage commitment in hMSCs. PMID:27019612

  4. Differential white cell count by centrifugal microfluidics.

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, Gregory Jon; Tentori, Augusto M.; Schaff, Ulrich Y.

    2010-07-01

    We present a method for counting white blood cells that is uniquely compatible with centrifugation based microfluidics. Blood is deposited on top of one or more layers of density media within a microfluidic disk. Spinning the disk causes the cell populations within whole blood to settle through the media, reaching an equilibrium based on the density of each cell type. Separation and fluorescence measurement of cell types stained with a DNA dye is demonstrated using this technique. The integrated signal from bands of fluorescent microspheres is shown to be proportional to their initial concentration in suspension. Among the current generation of medical diagnostics are devices based on the principle of centrifuging a CD sized disk functionalized with microfluidics. These portable 'lab on a disk' devices are capable of conducting multiple assays directly from a blood sample, embodied by platforms developed by Gyros, Samsung, and Abaxis. [1,2] However, no centrifugal platform to date includes a differential white blood cell count, which is an important metric complimentary to diagnostic assays. Measuring the differential white blood cell count (the relative fraction of granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes) is a standard medical diagnostic technique useful for identifying sepsis, leukemia, AIDS, radiation exposure, and a host of other conditions that affect the immune system. Several methods exist for measuring the relative white blood cell count including flow cytometry, electrical impedance, and visual identification from a stained drop of blood under a microscope. However, none of these methods is easily incorporated into a centrifugal microfluidic diagnostic platform.

  5. 21 CFR 864.5220 - Automated differential cell counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated differential cell counter. 864.5220... § 864.5220 Automated differential cell counter. (a) Identification. An automated differential cell... have the capability to flag, count, or classify immature or abnormal hematopoietic cells of the...

  6. 21 CFR 864.5220 - Automated differential cell counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Automated differential cell counter. 864.5220... § 864.5220 Automated differential cell counter. (a) Identification. An automated differential cell... have the capability to flag, count, or classify immature or abnormal hematopoietic cells of the...

  7. 21 CFR 864.5220 - Automated differential cell counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Automated differential cell counter. 864.5220... § 864.5220 Automated differential cell counter. (a) Identification. An automated differential cell... have the capability to flag, count, or classify immature or abnormal hematopoietic cells of the...

  8. 21 CFR 864.5220 - Automated differential cell counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Automated differential cell counter. 864.5220... § 864.5220 Automated differential cell counter. (a) Identification. An automated differential cell... have the capability to flag, count, or classify immature or abnormal hematopoietic cells of the...

  9. 21 CFR 864.5220 - Automated differential cell counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Automated differential cell counter. 864.5220... § 864.5220 Automated differential cell counter. (a) Identification. An automated differential cell... have the capability to flag, count, or classify immature or abnormal hematopoietic cells of the...

  10. GATA2 regulates dendritic cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Koichi; Fujiwara, Tohru; Onishi, Yasushi; Itoh-Nakadai, Ari; Okitsu, Yoko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Shimizu, Ritsuko; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are critical immune response regulators; however, the mechanism of DC differentiation is not fully understood. Heterozygous germ line GATA2 mutations induce GATA2-deficiency syndrome, characterized by monocytopenia, a predisposition to myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia, and a profoundly reduced DC population, which is associated with increased susceptibility to viral infections, impaired phagocytosis, and decreased cytokine production. To define the role of GATA2 in DC differentiation and function, we studied Gata2 conditional knockout and haploinsufficient mice. Gata2 conditional deficiency significantly reduced the DC count, whereas Gata2 haploinsufficiency did not affect this population. GATA2 was required for the in vitro generation of DCs from Lin−Sca-1+Kit+ cells, common myeloid-restricted progenitors, and common dendritic cell precursors, but not common lymphoid-restricted progenitors or granulocyte-macrophage progenitors, suggesting that GATA2 functions in the myeloid pathway of DC differentiation. Moreover, expression profiling demonstrated reduced expression of myeloid-related genes, including mafb, and increased expression of T-lymphocyte–related genes, including Gata3 and Tcf7, in Gata2-deficient DC progenitors. In addition, GATA2 was found to bind an enhancer element 190-kb downstream region of Gata3, and a reporter assay exhibited significantly reduced luciferase activity after adding this enhancer region to the Gata3 promoter, which was recovered by GATA sequence deletion within Gata3 +190. These results suggest that GATA2 plays an important role in cell-fate specification toward the myeloid vs T-lymphocyte lineage by regulating lineage-specific transcription factors in DC progenitors, thereby contributing to DC differentiation. PMID:27259979

  11. The epigenomics of embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kraushaar, Daniel C; Zhao, Keji

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) possess an open and highly dynamic chromatin landscape, which underlies their plasticity and ultimately maintains ESC pluripotency. The ESC epigenome must not only maintain the transcription of pluripotency-associated genes but must also, through gene priming, facilitate rapid and cell type-specific activation of developmental genes upon lineage commitment. Trans-generational inheritance ensures that the ESC chromatin state is stably transmitted from one generation to the next; yet at the same time, epigenetic marks are highly dynamic, reversible and responsive to extracellular cues. Once committed to differentiation, the ESC epigenome is remodeled and resolves into a more compact chromatin state. A thorough understanding of the role of chromatin modifiers in ESC fate and differentiation will be important if they are to be used for therapeutic purposes. Recent technical advances, particularly in next-generation sequencing technologies, have provided a genome-scale view of epigenetic marks and chromatin modifiers. More affordable and faster sequencing platforms have led to a comprehensive characterization of the ESC epigenome and epigenomes of differentiated cell types. In this review, we summarize and discuss the recent progress that has highlighted the central role of histone modifications, histone variants, DNA methylation and chromatin modifiers in ESC pluripotency and ESC fate. We provide a detailed and comprehensive discussion of genome-wide studies that are pertinent to our understanding of mammalian development.

  12. Regulation of Water in Plant Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowles, Richard V.

    2010-01-01

    Cell water relationships are important topics to be included in cell biology courses. Differences exist in the control of water relationships in plant cells relative to control in animal cells. One important reason for these differences is that turgor pressure is a consideration in plant cells. Diffusion and osmosis are the underlying factors…

  13. [Human pluripotent stem cell and neural differentiation].

    PubMed

    Wataya, Takafumi; Muguruma, Keiko; Sasai, Yoshiki

    2008-10-01

    Recovery of lost brain function is an important issue in medical studies because neurons of the central nervous system (CNS) have poor potential for regeneration. Since few CNS diseases can be treated completely by medicines, regenerative therapy by using stem cells should be studied as a new type of therapeutic intervention. The efficacy of cell replacement therapy in Parkinson's disease has been well investigated. Several studies on fetal tissue transplantation have revealed that quantity and purity of transplanted cells are necessary for recovery of symptoms. SFEB (Serum-free floating culture of embryoid body-like aggregates) method is capable of inducing multi-potential CNS progenitors that can be steered to differentiate into region-specific tissues. On the basis of the existing knowledge of embryology, we have succeeded in the generating of various types of neurons such as telencephalic, cerebeller (Purkinje and granule cells), retinal (photoreceptor cells) and hypothalamic neurons. Application of this culture method to human ES (hES) cells is necessary for clinical purpose: however, poor survival of hES cells in SFEB culture might limit the possibility of using these cells for future medical applications. We found that a selective Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, Y-27632, markedly diminished the dissociation-induced apoptosis of hES cells and enabled the cells to form aggregates in SFEB culture. For both mouse and human ES cells, SFEB culture is a favorable method that can generate large amounts of region-specific neurons. However, stem cell-based therapy continues to face several obstacles. It is important that researchers in the basic sciences and clinical medicine should discuss these problems together to overcome both scientific and ethical issues related to stem cells.

  14. Regio- and stereoselectivities in plant cell biotransformation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, H.

    1995-12-01

    The ability of plant cultured cells to convert foreign substrates into more useful substances is of considerable interest. Therefore I have studied biotransformation of foreign substrate by plant cell suspension cultures. In this presentation, I report regio- and stereoselectivities in biotransformation of steroids and indole alkaloids and taxol by plant (tobacco, periwinkle, moss, orchid) cell suspension cultures.

  15. Selection for niche differentiation in plant communities increases biodiversity effects.

    PubMed

    Zuppinger-Dingley, Debra; Schmid, Bernhard; Petermann, Jana S; Yadav, Varuna; De Deyn, Gerlinde B; Flynn, Dan F B

    2014-11-01

    In experimental plant communities, relationships between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning have been found to strengthen over time, a fact often attributed to increased resource complementarity between species in mixtures and negative plant-soil feedbacks in monocultures. Here we show that selection for niche differentiation between species can drive this increasing biodiversity effect. Growing 12 grassland species in test monocultures and mixtures, we found character displacement between species and increased biodiversity effects when plants had been selected over 8 years in species mixtures rather than in monocultures. When grown in mixtures, relative differences in height and specific leaf area between plant species selected in mixtures (mixture types) were greater than between species selected in monocultures (monoculture types). Furthermore, net biodiversity and complementarity effects were greater in mixtures of mixture types than in mixtures of monoculture types. Our study demonstrates a novel mechanism for the increase in biodiversity effects: selection for increased niche differentiation through character displacement. Selection in diverse mixtures may therefore increase species coexistence and ecosystem functioning in natural communities and may also allow increased mixture yields in agriculture or forestry. However, loss of biodiversity and prolonged selection of crops in monoculture may compromise this potential for selection in the longer term.

  16. IMPAN cells: a pancreatic model for differentiation into endocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Klein, T; Frandsen, U; Heller, R S; Serup, P

    2001-11-15

    It is currently believed that pancreatic progenitor or stem cells exist in the ductal cell population and that these cells have the ability to be grown and differentiated into endocrine cells for the treatment of diabetes. In this study, we have examined this potential in IMPAN (Immortalized Pancreatic) cells. These cells are derived from the adult H-2K(b)-tsA58 transgenic mouse. We observed an increased mRNA expression of insulin, proendocrine gene neurogenin 3, and beta-cell transcription factor Pdx1 when the cells were grown on bovine collagen I gels. The induction profile of these three genes was similar under the tested conditions. No glucagon or other endocrine-specific transcription factors were detectable. Application of GIP, GLP-1 derivative NN2211, and activin-A/betacellulin to IMPAN cells in normal culture did not lead to endocrine differentiation. In conclusion, it appears that the ability of IMPAN cells to mature to endocrine cells is limited. PMID:11697865

  17. Role of proline in cell wall synthesis and plant development and its implications in plant ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Kavi Kishor, Polavarapu B; Hima Kumari, P; Sunita, M S L; Sreenivasulu, Nese

    2015-01-01

    Proline is a proteogenic amino acid and accumulates both under stress and non-stress conditions as a beneficial solute in plants. Recent discoveries point out that proline plays an important role in plant growth and differentiation across life cycle. It is a key determinant of many cell wall proteins that plays important roles in plant development. The role of extensins, arabinogalactan proteins and hydroxyproline- and proline-rich proteins as important components of cell wall proteins that play pivotal roles in cell wall signal transduction cascades, plant development and stress tolerance is discussed in this review. Molecular insights are also provided here into the plausible roles of proline transporters modulating key events in plant development. In addition, the roles of proline during seed developmental transitions including storage protein synthesis are discussed. PMID:26257754

  18. Role of proline in cell wall synthesis and plant development and its implications in plant ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Kavi Kishor, Polavarapu B.; Hima Kumari, P.; Sunita, M. S. L.; Sreenivasulu, Nese

    2015-01-01

    Proline is a proteogenic amino acid and accumulates both under stress and non-stress conditions as a beneficial solute in plants. Recent discoveries point out that proline plays an important role in plant growth and differentiation across life cycle. It is a key determinant of many cell wall proteins that plays important roles in plant development. The role of extensins, arabinogalactan proteins and hydroxyproline- and proline-rich proteins as important components of cell wall proteins that play pivotal roles in cell wall signal transduction cascades, plant development and stress tolerance is discussed in this review. Molecular insights are also provided here into the plausible roles of proline transporters modulating key events in plant development. In addition, the roles of proline during seed developmental transitions including storage protein synthesis are discussed. PMID:26257754

  19. Differential Effect of Plant Lipids on Membrane Organization

    PubMed Central

    Grosjean, Kevin; Mongrand, Sébastien; Beney, Laurent; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Gerbeau-Pissot, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The high diversity of the plant lipid mixture raises the question of their respective involvement in the definition of membrane organization. This is particularly the case for plant plasma membrane, which is enriched in specific lipids, such as free and conjugated forms of phytosterols and typical phytosphingolipids, such as glycosylinositolphosphoceramides. This question was here addressed extensively by characterizing the order level of membrane from vesicles prepared using various plant lipid mixtures and labeled with an environment-sensitive probe. Fluorescence spectroscopy experiments showed that among major phytosterols, campesterol exhibits a stronger ability than β-sitosterol and stigmasterol to order model membranes. Multispectral confocal microscopy, allowing spatial analysis of membrane organization, demonstrated accordingly the strong ability of campesterol to promote ordered domain formation and to organize their spatial distribution at the membrane surface. Conjugated sterol forms, alone and in synergy with free sterols, exhibit a striking ability to order membrane. Plant sphingolipids, particularly glycosylinositolphosphoceramides, enhanced the sterol-induced ordering effect, emphasizing the formation and increasing the size of sterol-dependent ordered domains. Altogether, our results support a differential involvement of free and conjugated phytosterols in the formation of ordered domains and suggest that the diversity of plant lipids, allowing various local combinations of lipid species, could be a major contributor to membrane organization in particular through the formation of sphingolipid-sterol interacting domains. PMID:25575593

  20. Embryogenic plant cells in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krikorian, Abraham D.

    1991-01-01

    In view of circumstantial evidence for the role of gravity (g) in shaping the embryo environment, normal embryo development may not occur reliably and efficiently in the microgravity environment of space. Attention must accordingly be given to those aspects of higher plant reproductive biology in space environments required for the production of viable embryos in a 'seed to seed to seed' experiment. It is suggested that cultured cells can be grown to be morphogenetically competent, and can be evaluated as to their ability to simulate embryogenic events usually associated with fertilized eggs in the embryo sac of the ovule in the ovary.

  1. Pathogen Tactics to Manipulate Plant Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Mukhtar, M Shahid; McCormack, Maggie E; Argueso, Cristiana T; Pajerowska-Mukhtar, Karolina M

    2016-07-11

    Cell death is a vital process for multicellular organisms. Programmed cell death (PCD) functions in a variety of processes including growth, development, and immune responses for homeostasis maintenance. In particular, plants and animals utilize PCD to control pathogen invasion and infected cell populations. Despite some similarity, there are a number of key differences between how these organisms initiate and regulate cell death. In contrast to animals, plants are sessile, lack a circulatory system, and have additional cellular structures, including cell walls and chloroplasts. Plant cells have the autonomous ability to induce localized cell death using conserved eukaryotic pathways as well as unique plant-specific pathways. Thus, in order to successfully infect host cells, pathogens must subvert immune responses and avoid detection to prevent PCD and allow infection. Here we discuss the roles of cell death in plant immune responses and the tactics pathogens utilize to avert cell death. PMID:27404256

  2. Plant Cell Adaptive Responses to Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordyum, Elizabeth; Kozeko, Liudmyla; Talalaev, Alexandr

    Microgravity is an abnormal environmental condition that plays no role in the functioning of biosphere. Nevertheless, the chronic effect of microgravity in space flight as an unfamiliar factor does not prevent the development of adaptive reactions at the cellular level. In real microgravity in space flight under the more or less optimal conditions for plant growing, namely temperature, humidity, CO2, light intensity and directivity in the hardware angiosperm plants perform an “reproductive imperative”, i.e. they flower, fruit and yield viable seeds. It is known that cells of a multicellular organism not only take part on reactions of the organism but also carry out processes that maintain their integrity. In light of these principles, the problem of the identification of biochemical, physiological and structural patterns that can have adaptive significance at the cellular and subcellular level in real and simulated microgravity is considered. Cytological studies of plants developing in real and simulated microgravity made it possible to establish that the processes of mitosis, cytokinesis, and tissue differentiation of vegetative and generative organs are largely normal. At the same time, under microgravity, essential reconstruction in the structural and functional organization of cell organelles and cytoskeleton, as well as changes in cell metabolism and homeostasis have been described. In addition, new interesting data concerning the influence of altered gravity on lipid peroxidation intensity, the level of reactive oxygen species, and antioxidant system activity, just like on the level of gene expression and synthesis of low-molecular and high-molecular heat shock proteins were recently obtained. So, altered gravity caused time-dependent increasing of the HSP70 and HSP90 levels in cells, that may indicate temporary strengthening of their functional loads that is necessary for re-establish a new cellular homeostasis. Relative qPCR results showed that

  3. Directed Differentiation of Pluripotent Stem Cells to Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Albert Q.; Freedman, Benjamin S.; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Regenerative medicine affords a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease. Nephron progenitor cell populations exist only during embryonic kidney development. Understanding the mechanisms by which these populations arise and differentiate is integral to the challenge of generating new nephrons for therapeutic purposes. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), comprising embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from adults, have the potential to generate functional kidney cells and tissue. Studies in mouse and human PSCs have identified specific approaches to the addition of growth factors, including Wnt and fibroblast growth factor, that can induce PSC differentiation into cells with phenotypic characteristics of nephron progenitor populations with the capacity to form kidney-like structures. Although significant progress has been made, further studies are necessary to confirm the production of functional kidney cells and to promote their three-dimensional organization into bona fide kidney tissue. Human PSCs have been generated from patients with kidney diseases, including polycystic kidney disease, Alport syndrome, and Wilms tumor, and may be used to better understand phenotypic consequences of naturally occurring genetic mutations and to conduct “clinical trials in a dish”. The capability to generate human kidney cells from PSCs has significant translational applications, including the bioengineering of functional kidney tissue, use in drug development to test compounds for efficacy and toxicity, and in vitro disease modeling. PMID:25217273

  4. Directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells to kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Lam, Albert Q; Freedman, Benjamin S; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2014-07-01

    Regenerative medicine affords a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease. Nephron progenitor cell populations exist only during embryonic kidney development. Understanding the mechanisms by which these populations arise and differentiate is integral to the challenge of generating new nephrons for therapeutic purposes. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), comprising embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from adults, have the potential to generate functional kidney cells and tissue. Studies in mouse and human PSCs have identified specific approaches to the addition of growth factors, including Wnt and fibroblast growth factor, that can induce PSC differentiation into cells with phenotypic characteristics of nephron progenitor populations with the capacity to form kidney-like structures. Although significant progress has been made, further studies are necessary to confirm the production of functional kidney cells and to promote their three-dimensional organization into bona fide kidney tissue. Human PSCs have been generated from patients with kidney diseases, including polycystic kidney disease, Alport syndrome, and Wilms tumor, and may be used to better understand phenotypic consequences of naturally occurring genetic mutations and to conduct "clinical trials in a dish". The capability to generate human kidney cells from PSCs has significant translational applications, including the bioengineering of functional kidney tissue, use in drug development to test compounds for efficacy and toxicity, and in vitro disease modeling.

  5. Studies on the differentiation inducers of myeloid leukemic cells from Citrus species.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, S; Umehara, K; Kuroyanagi, M; Ueno, A; Taki, T

    1993-04-01

    An attempt was made to isolate differentiation inducers from Aurantii Nobilis Pericarpium and the fruit peel of Citrus reticulata Blanco (Rutaceae). Twenty-seven kinds of flavones, including five new flavones, were isolated after repeated chromatography from methanol extracts of these plants and their structures were established, from their physicochemical data, to be highly methoxylated flavones. Each compound, except for two flavone glucosides, showed the differentiation inducing activity toward mouse myeloid leukemia cells (M1), and the cells came to have phagocytic activity. Furthermore, differentiation inducing activity was tested using human acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line (HL-60). PMID:8508474

  6. Differentiated cells are more efficient than adult stem cells for cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Sung, Li-Ying; Gao, Shaorong; Shen, Hongmei; Yu, Hui; Song, Yifang; Smith, Sadie L; Chang, Ching-Chien; Inoue, Kimiko; Kuo, Lynn; Lian, Jin; Li, Ao; Tian, X Cindy; Tuck, David P; Weissman, Sherman M; Yang, Xiangzhong; Cheng, Tao

    2006-11-01

    Since the creation of Dolly via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), more than a dozen species of mammals have been cloned using this technology. One hypothesis for the limited success of cloning via SCNT (1%-5%) is that the clones are likely to be derived from adult stem cells. Support for this hypothesis comes from the findings that the reproductive cloning efficiency for embryonic stem cells is five to ten times higher than that for somatic cells as donors and that cloned pups cannot be produced directly from cloned embryos derived from differentiated B and T cells or neuronal cells. The question remains as to whether SCNT-derived animal clones can be derived from truly differentiated somatic cells. We tested this hypothesis with mouse hematopoietic cells at different differentiation stages: hematopoietic stem cells, progenitor cells and granulocytes. We found that cloning efficiency increases over the differentiation hierarchy, and terminally differentiated postmitotic granulocytes yield cloned pups with the greatest cloning efficiency.

  7. Piper and Vismia species from Colombian Amazonia differentially affect cell proliferation of hepatocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lizcano, Leandro J; Siles, Maite; Trepiana, Jenifer; Hernández, M Luisa; Navarro, Rosaura; Ruiz-Larrea, M Begoña; Ruiz-Sanz, José Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing interest to identify plant-derived natural products with antitumor activities. In this work, we have studied the effects of aqueous leaf extracts from Amazonian Vismia and Piper species on human hepatocarcinoma cell toxicity. Results showed that, depending on the cell type, the plants displayed differential effects; thus, Vismia baccifera induced the selective killing of HepG2, while increasing cell growth of PLC-PRF and SK-HEP-1. In contrast, these two last cell lines were sensitive to the toxicity by Piper krukoffii and Piper putumayoense, while the Piperaceae did not affect HepG2 growth. All the extracts induced cytotoxicity to rat hepatoma McA-RH7777, but were innocuous (V. baccifera at concentrations < 75 µg/mL) or even protected cells from basal death (P. putumayoense) in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. In every case, cytotoxicity was accompanied by an intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These results provide evidence for the anticancer activities of the studied plants on specific cell lines and suggest that cell killing could be mediated by ROS, thus involving mechanisms independent of the plants free radical scavenging activities. Results also support the use of these extracts of the Vismia and Piper genera with opposite effects as a model system to study the mechanisms of the antitumoral activity against different types of hepatocarcinoma. PMID:25558904

  8. Soft matrix supports osteogenic differentiation of human dental follicle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Viale-Bouroncle, Sandra; Voellner, Florian; Moehl, Christoph; Kuepper, Kevin; Brockhoff, Gero; Reichert, Torsten E.; Schmalz, Gottfried; Morsczeck, Christian

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Rigid stiffness supports osteogenic differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). {yields} Our study examined stiffness and differentiation of dental follicle cells (DFCs). {yields} Soft ECMs have a superior capacity to support the osteogenic differentiation of DFCs. {yields} DFCs and MSCs react contrarily to soft and rigid surface stiffness. -- Abstract: The differentiation of stem cells can be directed by the grade of stiffness of the developed tissue cells. For example a rigid extracellular matrix supports the osteogenic differentiation in bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). However, less is known about the relation of extracellular matrix stiffness and cell differentiation of ectomesenchymal dental precursor cells. Our study examined for the first time the influence of the surface stiffness on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human dental follicle cells (DFCs). Cell proliferation of DFCs was only slightly decreased on cell culture surfaces with a bone-like stiffness. The osteogenic differentiation in DFCs could only be initiated with a dexamethasone based differentiation medium after using varying stiffness. Here, the softest surface improved the induction of osteogenic differentiation in comparison to that with the highest stiffness. In conclusion, different to bone marrow derived MSCs, soft ECMs have a superior capacity to support the osteogenic differentiation of DFCs.

  9. Chromatin dynamics during cellular differentiation in the female reproductive lineage of flowering plants

    PubMed Central

    Baroux, Célia; Autran, Daphné

    2015-01-01

    Sexual reproduction in flowering plants offers a number of remarkable aspects to developmental biologists. First, the spore mother cells – precursors of the plant reproductive lineage – are specified late in development, as opposed to precocious germline isolation during embryogenesis in most animals. Second, unlike in most animals where meiosis directly produces gametes, plant meiosis entails the differentiation of a multicellular, haploid gametophyte, within which gametic as well as non-gametic accessory cells are formed. These observations raise the question of the factors inducing and modus operandi of cell fate transitions that originate in floral tissues and gametophytes, respectively. Cell fate transitions in the reproductive lineage imply cellular reprogramming operating at the physiological, cytological and transcriptome level, but also at the chromatin level. A number of observations point to large-scale chromatin reorganization events associated with cellular differentiation of the female spore mother cells and of the female gametes. These include a reorganization of the heterochromatin compartment, the genome-wide alteration of the histone modification landscape, and the remodeling of nucleosome composition. The dynamic expression of DNA methyltransferases and actors of small RNA pathways also suggest additional, global epigenetic alterations that remain to be characterized. Are these events a cause or a consequence of cellular differentiation, and how do they contribute to cell fate transition? Does chromatin dynamics induce competence for immediate cellular functions (meiosis, fertilization), or does it also contribute long-term effects in cellular identity and developmental competence of the reproductive lineage? This review attempts to review these fascinating questions. PMID:26031902

  10. Regulation of cell division in higher plants. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, T.W.

    1992-07-01

    Cell division is arguably the most fundamental of all developmental processes. In higher plants, mitotic activity is largely confined to foci of patterned cell divisions called meristems. From these perpetually embryonic tissues arise the plant`s essential organs of light capture, support, protection and reproduction. Once an adequate understanding of plant cell mitotic regulation is attained, unprecedented opportunities will ensue for analyzing and genetically controlling diverse aspects of development, including plant architecture, leaf shape, plant height, and root depth. The mitotic cycle in a variety of model eukaryotic systems in under the control of a regulatory network of striking evolutionary conservation. Homologues of the yeast cdc2 gene, its catalytic product, p34, and the cyclin regulatory subunits of the MPF complex have emerged as ubiquitous mitotic regulators. We have cloned cdc2-like and cyclin genes from pea. As in other eukaryotic model systems, p34 of Pisum sativum is a subunit of a high molecular weight complex which binds the fission yeast p13 protein and displays histone H1 kinase activity in vitro. Our primary objective in this study is to gain baseline information about the regulation of this higher plant cell division control complex in non-dividing, differentiated cells as well as in synchronous and asynchronous mitotic cells. We are investigating cdc2 and cyclin expression at the levels of protein abundance, protein phosphorylation and quaternary associations.

  11. (Study of plant cells and tumors): Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    Studies of the cell and molecular biology of animal cell tumors has long been recognized as a fertile and productive area for obtaining new and fundamental insights into mechanisms regulating the growth and differentiation of animal cells. As a novel approach to studying similar phenomena in plant cells, we have isolated a number of tumors in the small cruciferous plant Arabidopsis thaliana and have begun to characterize these at the cellular and molecular levels. Studies at the cellular level should lead to new insights into the relationships between hormones, cell growth and cell differentiation, while studies at the molecular level may reveal and allow us to isolate genes involved either in the hormone response, or in other important aspects of the cells' growth regulatory network. Tumors were induced on the plant by irradiation of seed or seedlings with Co-60 gamma rays. When placed in culture, these tumors were able to grow on hormone-free medium, in contrast to normal plant tissues which requires both an auxin and a cytokinin for growth. In the first phase of this project, we have concentrated on characterizing the growth, general phenotype, and hormonal sensitivity of the tumors. These studies will lead into a molecular analysis of the changes expressed in each tumor which may be responsible for the altered phenotype. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  12. Dystroglycan depletion inhibits the functions of differentiated HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Zárate, Alma Delia; Martínez-Vieyra, Ivette; Alonso-Rangel, Lea; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Winder, Steve J; Cerecedo, Doris

    2014-06-01

    Dystroglycan has recently been characterized in blood tissue cells, as part of the dystrophin glycoprotein complex but to date nothing is known of its role in the differentiation process of neutrophils. We have investigated the role of dystroglycan in the human promyelocytic leukemic cell line HL-60 differentiated to neutrophils. Depletion of dystroglycan by RNAi resulted in altered morphology and reduced properties of differentiated HL-60 cells, including chemotaxis, respiratory burst, phagocytic activities and expression of markers of differentiation. These findings strongly implicate dystroglycan as a key membrane adhesion protein involved in the differentiation process in HL-60 cells.

  13. Natural Paradigms of Plant Cell Wall Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, H.; Xu, Q.; Taylor, L. E.; Baker, J. O.; Tucker, M. P.; Ding, S. Y.

    2009-01-01

    Natural processes of recycling carbon from plant cell walls are slow but very efficient, generally involving microbial communities and their secreted enzymes. Efficient combinations of microbial communities and enzymes act in a sequential and synergistic manner to degrade plant cell walls. Recent understanding of plant cell wall ultra-structure, as well as the carbon metabolism, ATP production, and ecology of participating microbial communities, and the biochemical properties of their cellulolytic enzymes have led to new perspectives on saccharification of biomass. Microbial communities are dynamic functions of the chemical and structural compositions of plant cell wall components. The primitive 'multicellularity' exhibited by certain cellulolytic microorganisms may play a role in facilitating cell-cell communication and cell-plant cell wall-substrate interaction.

  14. Plant cell gravisensitivity and adaptation to microgravity.

    PubMed

    Kordyum, E L

    2014-01-01

    A short overview on the effects of real and simulated microgravity on certain cell components and processes, including new information obtained recently, is presented. Attention is focused on the influence of real and simulated microgravity on plant cells that are not specialised to gravity perception and on seed formation. The paper considers the possibility of full adaptation of plants to microgravity, and suggests some questions for future plant research in order to make decisions on fundamental and applied problems of plant space biology.

  15. Specification of epidermal cell fate in plant shoots.

    PubMed

    Takada, Shinobu; Iida, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Land plants have evolved a single layer of epidermal cells, which are characterized by mostly anticlinal cell division patterns, formation of a waterproof coat called cuticle, and unique cell types such as stomatal guard cells and trichomes. The shoot epidermis plays important roles not only to protect plants from dehydration and pathogens but also to ensure their proper organogenesis and growth control. Extensive molecular genetic studies in Arabidopsis and maize have identified a number of genes that are required for epidermal cell differentiation. However, the mechanism that specifies shoot epidermal cell fate during plant organogenesis remains largely unknown. Particularly, little is known regarding positional information that should restrict epidermal cell fate to the outermost cell layer of the developing organs. Recent studies suggested that certain members of the HD-ZIP class IV homeobox genes are possible master regulators of shoot epidermal cell fate. Here, we summarize the roles of the regulatory genes that are involved in epidermal cell fate specification and discuss the possible mechanisms that limit the expression and/or activity of the master transcriptional regulators to the outermost cell layer in plant shoots. PMID:24616724

  16. Refractive index of plant cell walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Allen, W. A.; Escobar, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    Air was replaced with media of higher refractive indices by vacuum infiltration in leaves of cucumber, blackeye pea, tomato, and string bean plants, and reflectance of noninfiltrated and infiltrated leaves was spectrophotometrically measured. Infiltrated leaves reflected less light than noninfiltrated leaves over the 500-2500-nm wavelength interval because cell wall-air interfaces were partly eliminated. Minimal reflectance should occur when the average refractive index of plant cell walls was matched by the infiltrating fluid. Although refractive indices that resulted in minimal reflectance differed among the four plant genera, an average value of 1.425 approximates the refractive index of plant cell walls for the four plant genera.

  17. Integument cell differentiation in dandelions (Taraxacum, Asteraceae, Lactuceae) with special attention paid to plasmodesmata.

    PubMed

    Płachno, Bartosz J; Kurczyńska, Ewa; Świątek, Piotr

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the paper is to determine what happens with plasmodesmata when mucilage is secreted into the periplasmic space in plant cells. Ultrastructural analysis of the periendothelial zone mucilage cells was performed on examples of the ovule tissues of several sexual and apomictic Taraxacum species. The cytoplasm of the periendothelial zone cells was dense, filled by numerous organelles and profiles of rough endoplasmic reticulum and active Golgi dictyosomes with vesicles that contained fibrillar material. At the beginning of the differentiation process of the periendothelial zone, the cells were connected by primary plasmodesmata. However, during the differentiation and the thickening of the cell walls (mucilage deposition), the plasmodesmata become elongated and associated with cytoplasmic bridges. The cytoplasmic bridges may connect the protoplast to the plasmodesmata through the mucilage layers in order to maintain cell-to-cell communication during the differentiation of the periendothelial zone cells. PMID:26454638

  18. Integument cell differentiation in dandelions (Taraxacum, Asteraceae, Lactuceae) with special attention paid to plasmodesmata.

    PubMed

    Płachno, Bartosz J; Kurczyńska, Ewa; Świątek, Piotr

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the paper is to determine what happens with plasmodesmata when mucilage is secreted into the periplasmic space in plant cells. Ultrastructural analysis of the periendothelial zone mucilage cells was performed on examples of the ovule tissues of several sexual and apomictic Taraxacum species. The cytoplasm of the periendothelial zone cells was dense, filled by numerous organelles and profiles of rough endoplasmic reticulum and active Golgi dictyosomes with vesicles that contained fibrillar material. At the beginning of the differentiation process of the periendothelial zone, the cells were connected by primary plasmodesmata. However, during the differentiation and the thickening of the cell walls (mucilage deposition), the plasmodesmata become elongated and associated with cytoplasmic bridges. The cytoplasmic bridges may connect the protoplast to the plasmodesmata through the mucilage layers in order to maintain cell-to-cell communication during the differentiation of the periendothelial zone cells.

  19. What can plants do for cell biology?

    PubMed Central

    Bezanilla, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Historically, cell biologists studied organisms that represented a reasonable sampling of life's diversity, whereas recently research has narrowed into a few model systems. As a result, the cells of plants have been relatively neglected. Here I choose three examples to illustrate how plants have been informative and could be even more so. Owing to their ease of imaging and genetic tractability, multicellular plant model systems provide a unique opportunity to address long-standing questions in cell biology. PMID:23943803

  20. Directed Differentiation of Pluripotent Stem Cells into Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Morizane, Ryuji; Lam, Albert Q

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), including embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), represent an ideal substrate for regenerating kidney cells and tissue lost through injury and disease. Recent studies have demonstrated the ability to differentiate PSCs into populations of nephron progenitor cells that can organize into kidney epithelial structures in three-dimensional contexts. While these findings are highly encouraging, further studies need to be performed to improve the efficiency and specificity of kidney differentiation. The identification of specific markers of the differentiation process is critical to the development of protocols that effectively recapitulate nephrogenesis in vitro. In this review, we summarize the current studies describing the differentiation of ESCs and iPSCs into cells of the kidney lineage. We also present an analysis of the markers relevant to the stages of kidney development and differentiation and propose a new roadmap for the directed differentiation of PSCs into nephron progenitor cells of the metanephric mesenchyme. PMID:26417199

  1. Transplantation and differentiation of donor cells in the cloned pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Arata; Tomii, Ryo; Kano, Koichiro; Nagashima, Hiroshi . E-mail: hnagas@isc.meiji.ac.jp

    2006-06-02

    The application of nuclear transfer technology is an interesting approach to investigate stem and progenitor cell transplantation therapy. If stem cells are used as a nuclear donor, donor cells can engraft into cloned animals without histocompatible problems. However, it is still uncertain whether donor cells can engraft to cloned animal and differentiate in vivo. To address this problem, we transplanted donor cells to dermal tissues of cloned pigs developed by using preadipocytes as donor cells. Preadipocytes are adipocytic progenitor which can differentiate to mature adipocytes in vitro. We showed that the donor preadipocytes were successfully transplanted into the cloned pigs without immune rejection and they differentiated into mature adipocytes in vivo 3 weeks after transplantation. In contrast, allogenic control preadipocytes, which can differentiate in vitro, did not differentiate in vivo. These results indicate that donor progenitor cells can differentiate in cloned animal.

  2. Plant cell walls to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Douglas B; Bowman, Michael J; Braker, Jay D; Dien, Bruce S; Hector, Ronald E; Lee, Charles C; Mertens, Jeffrey A; Wagschal, Kurt

    2012-03-01

    Conversion of plant cell walls to ethanol constitutes second generation bioethanol production. The process consists of several steps: biomass selection/genetic modification, physiochemical pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, fermentation and separation. Ultimately, it is desirable to combine as many of the biochemical steps as possible in a single organism to achieve CBP (consolidated bioprocessing). A commercially ready CBP organism is currently unreported. Production of second generation bioethanol is hindered by economics, particularly in the cost of pretreatment (including waste management and solvent recovery), the cost of saccharification enzymes (particularly exocellulases and endocellulases displaying kcat ~1 s-1 on crystalline cellulose), and the inefficiency of co-fermentation of 5- and 6-carbon monosaccharides (owing in part to redox cofactor imbalances in Saccharomyces cerevisiae). PMID:22329798

  3. Plant cell walls to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Douglas B; Bowman, Michael J; Braker, Jay D; Dien, Bruce S; Hector, Ronald E; Lee, Charles C; Mertens, Jeffrey A; Wagschal, Kurt

    2012-03-01

    Conversion of plant cell walls to ethanol constitutes second generation bioethanol production. The process consists of several steps: biomass selection/genetic modification, physiochemical pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, fermentation and separation. Ultimately, it is desirable to combine as many of the biochemical steps as possible in a single organism to achieve CBP (consolidated bioprocessing). A commercially ready CBP organism is currently unreported. Production of second generation bioethanol is hindered by economics, particularly in the cost of pretreatment (including waste management and solvent recovery), the cost of saccharification enzymes (particularly exocellulases and endocellulases displaying kcat ~1 s-1 on crystalline cellulose), and the inefficiency of co-fermentation of 5- and 6-carbon monosaccharides (owing in part to redox cofactor imbalances in Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

  4. Notch as a Possible Cell Differentiation Factor in Pleomorphic Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Takamine, Keisuke; Ueda, Yukiko; Nakano, Keisuke; Ochiai, Takanaga; Sugita, Yoshihiko; Kubo, Katsutoshi; Maeda, Hatsuhiko; Hasegawa, Hiromasa; Kawakami, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    The expression of Notch in 30 cases of pleomorphic adenoma was examined by immunohistochemistry. Comparing the results of our study with previous literatures, from the partial CK7 expression and substantial Notch expression in ductal epithelial cells as well as the Notch expression in solid tumor nests, it can be inferred that Notch is involved in cell differentiation. CK13 expression was observed in cells undergoing squamous metaplasia and Notch expression was seen in the nucleus of basal and squamous cells. The intense Notch expression in basal cells and weak expression in squamous cells suggests that Notch is involved in the differentiation from basal to squamous cell. Moreover, the loss of nuclear expression on the inner layer would signify that differentiation is about to end or has been terminated. Notch was expressed in the cytoplasm of cartilage cells and in the cell membrane of mucous cells but not in the nucleus indicating that differentiation has been concluded. Notch involvement is suspected in cell differentiation in areas showing ductal structures and squamous metaplasia. In summary, Notch is involved in cell differentiation of ductal cells in PA. Nuclear expression was shown in tumor cells in solid nests and surrounding structures. Moreover, Notch is expressed by basal cells undergoing squamous metaplasia suggesting the participation of Notch in cell differentiation in PA. PMID:26516303

  5. Mitochondrial respiration regulates adipogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanmin; Marsboom, Glenn; Toth, Peter T; Rehman, Jalees

    2013-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult multipotent stem cells which can be isolated from bone marrow, adipose tissue as well as other tissues and have the capacity to differentiate into a variety of mesenchymal cell types such as adipocytes, osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Differentiation of stem cells into mature cell types is guided by growth factors and hormones, but recent studies suggest that metabolic shifts occur during differentiation and can modulate the differentiation process. We therefore investigated mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial respiration and the mitochondrial membrane potential during adipogenic differentiation of human MSCs. In addition, we inhibited mitochondrial function to assess its effects on adipogenic differentiation. Our data show that mitochondrial biogenesis and oxygen consumption increase markedly during adipogenic differentiation, and that reducing mitochondrial respiration by hypoxia or by inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain significantly suppresses adipogenic differentiation. Furthermore, we used a novel approach to suppress mitochondrial activity using a specific siRNA-based knockdown of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), which also resulted in an inhibition of adipogenic differentiation. Taken together, our data demonstrates that increased mitochondrial activity is a prerequisite for MSC differentiation into adipocytes. These findings suggest that metabolic modulation of adult stem cells can maintain stem cell pluripotency or direct adult stem cell differentiation.

  6. Cell-to-cell communication in plants, animals, and fungi: a comparative review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemendal, Sandra; Kück, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Cell-to-cell communication is a prerequisite for differentiation and development in multicellular organisms. This communication has to be tightly regulated to ensure that cellular components such as organelles, macromolecules, hormones, or viruses leave the cell in a precisely organized way. During evolution, plants, animals, and fungi have developed similar ways of responding to this biological challenge. For example, in higher plants, plasmodesmata connect adjacent cells and allow communication to regulate differentiation and development. In animals, two main general structures that enable short- and long-range intercellular communication are known, namely gap junctions and tunneling nanotubes, respectively. Finally, filamentous fungi have also developed specialized structures called septal pores that allow intercellular communication via cytoplasmic flow. This review summarizes the underlying mechanisms for intercellular communication in these three eukaryotic groups and discusses its consequences for the regulation of differentiation and developmental processes.

  7. Cell-to-cell communication in plants, animals, and fungi: a comparative review.

    PubMed

    Bloemendal, Sandra; Kück, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Cell-to-cell communication is a prerequisite for differentiation and development in multicellular organisms. This communication has to be tightly regulated to ensure that cellular components such as organelles, macromolecules, hormones, or viruses leave the cell in a precisely organized way. During evolution, plants, animals, and fungi have developed similar ways of responding to this biological challenge. For example, in higher plants, plasmodesmata connect adjacent cells and allow communication to regulate differentiation and development. In animals, two main general structures that enable short- and long-range intercellular communication are known, namely gap junctions and tunneling nanotubes, respectively. Finally, filamentous fungi have also developed specialized structures called septal pores that allow intercellular communication via cytoplasmic flow. This review summarizes the underlying mechanisms for intercellular communication in these three eukaryotic groups and discusses its consequences for the regulation of differentiation and developmental processes.

  8. Gravity, chromosomes, and organized development in aseptically cultured plant cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krikorian, Abraham D.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of the PCR experiment are: to test the hypothesis that microgravity will in fact affect the pattern and developmental progression of embryogenically competent plant cells from one well-defined, critical stage to another; to determine the effects of microgravity in growth and differentiation of embryogenic carrot cells grown in cell culture; to determine whether microgravity or the space environment fosters an instability of the differentiated state; and to determine whether mitosis and chromosome behavior are adversely affected by microgravity. The methods employed will consist of the following: special embryogenically competent carrot cell cultures will be grown in cell culture chambers provided by NASDA; four cell culture chambers will be used to grow cells in liquid medium; two dishes (plant cell culture dishes) will be used to grow cells on a semi-solid agar support; progression to later embryonic stages will be induced in space via crew intervention and by media manipulation in the case of liquid grown cell cultures; progression to later stages in case of semi-solid cultures will not need crew intervention; embryo stages will be fixed at a specific interval (day 6) in flight only in the case of liquid-grown cultures; and some living cells and somatic embryos will be returned for continued post-flight development and 'grown-out.' These will derive from the semi-solid grown cultures.

  9. Plant stem cells as innovation in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Moruś, Martyna; Baran, Monika; Rost-Roszkowska, Magdalena; Skotnicka-Graca, Urszula

    2014-01-01

    The stem cells thanks to their ability of unlimited division number or transformation into different cell types creating organs, are responsible for regeneration processes. Depending on the organism in which the stem cells exists, they divide to the plant or animal ones. The later group includes the stem cells existing in both embryo's and adult human's organs. It includes, among others, epidermal stem cells, located in the hair follicle relieves and also in its basal layers, and responsible for permanent regeneration of the epidermis. Temporary science looks for method suitable for stimulation of the epidermis stem cells, amongst the other by delivery of e.g., growth factors for proliferation that decrease with the age. One of the methods is the use of the plant cell culture technology, including a number of methods that should ensure growth of plant cells, issues or organs in the environment with the microorganism-free medium. It uses abilities of the different plant cells to dedifferentiation into stem cells and coming back to the pluripotent status. The extracts obtained this way from the plant stem cells are currently used for production of both common or professional care cosmetics. This work describes exactly impact of the plant stem cell extract, coming from one type of the common apple tree (Uttwiler Spätlauber) to human skin as one of the first plant sorts, which are used in cosmetology and esthetic dermatology.

  10. Side Effects of Culture Media Antibiotics on Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Llobet, Laura; Montoya, Julio; López-Gallardo, Ester; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    Besides the advance in scientific knowledge and the production of different compounds, cell culture can now be used to obtain cells for regenerative medicine. To avoid microbial contamination, antibiotics were usually incorporated into culture media. However, these compounds affect cell biochemistry and may modify the differentiation potential of cultured cells. To check this possibility, we grew human adipose tissue-derived stem cells and differentiated them to adipocyte with or without antibiotics commonly used in these culture protocols, such as a penicillin-streptomycin-amphotericin mix or gentamicin. We show that these antibiotics affect cell differentiation. Therefore, antibiotics should not be used in cell culture because aseptic techniques make these compounds unnecessary.

  11. Structural Studies of Complex Carbohydrates of Plant Cell Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Darvill, Alan; Hahn, Michael G.; O'Neill, Malcolm A.; York, William S.

    2015-02-17

    Most of the solar energy captured by land plants is converted into the polysaccharides (cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin) that are the predominant components of the cell wall. These walls, which account for the bulk of plant biomass, have numerous roles in the growth and development of plants. Moreover, these walls have a major impact on human life as they are a renewable source of biomass, a source of diverse commercially useful polymers, a major component of wood, and a source of nutrition for humans and livestock. Thus, understanding the molecular mechanisms that lead to wall assembly and how cell walls and their component polysaccharides contribute to plant growth and development is essential to improve and extend the productivity and value of plant materials. The proposed research will develop and apply advanced analytical and immunological techniques to study specific changes in the structures and interactions of the hemicellulosic and pectic polysaccharides that occur during differentiation and in response to genetic modification and chemical treatments that affect wall biosynthesis. These new techniques will make it possible to accurately characterize minute amounts of cell wall polysaccharides so that subtle changes in structure that occur in individual cell types can be identified and correlated to the physiological or developmental state of the plant. Successful implementation of this research will reveal fundamental relationships between polysaccharide structure, cell wall architecture, and cell wall functions.

  12. Successful differentiation to T cells, but unsuccessful B-cell generation, from B-cell-derived induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wada, Haruka; Kojo, Satoshi; Kusama, Chie; Okamoto, Naoki; Sato, Yorino; Ishizuka, Bunpei; Seino, Ken-ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Forced expression of certain transcription factors in somatic cells results in generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, which differentiate into various cell types. We investigated T-cell and B-cell lineage differentiation from iPS cells in vitro. To evaluate the impact of iPS cell source, murine splenic B-cell-derived iPS (B-iPS) cells were generated after retroviral transduction of four transcription factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc). B-iPS cells were identical to embryonic stem (ES) cells and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF)-derived iPS cells in morphology, ES cell marker expression as well as teratoma and chimera mouse formation. Both B-iPS and MEF-derived iPS cells differentiated into lymphocytes in OP9 co-culture systems. Both efficiently differentiated into T-cell lineage that produced IFN-γ on T-cell receptor stimulation. However, iPS cells including B-iPS cells were relatively resistant to B-cell lineage differentiation. One of the reasons of the failure of B-cell lineage differentiation seemed due to a defect of Pax5 expression in the differentiated cells. Therefore, current in vitro differentiation systems using iPS cells are sufficient for inducing T-cell but not B-cell lineage. PMID:21135032

  13. Physalis angulata induces in vitro differentiation of murine bone marrow cells into macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The bone marrow is a hematopoietic tissue that, in the presence of cytokines and growth factors, generates all of the circulating blood cells. These cells are important for protecting the organism against pathogens and for establishing an effective immune response. Previous studies have shown immunomodulatory effects of different products isolated from plant extracts. This study aimed to evaluate the immunomodulatory properties of aqueous Physalis angulata (AEPa) extract on the differentiation of bone marrow cells. Results Increased cellular area, higher spreading ability and several cytoplasmatic projections were observed in the treated cells, using optical microscopy, suggesting cell differentiation. Furthermore, AEPa did not promote the proliferation of lymphocytes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, however promotes increased the number of macrophages in the culture. The ultrastructural analysis by Transmission Electron Microscopy of treated cells showed spreading ability, high number of cytoplasmatic projections and increase of autophagic vacuoles. Moreover, a high level of LC3b expression by treated cells was detected by flow cytometry, suggesting an autophagic process. Cell surface expression of F4/80 and CD11b also indicated that AEPa may stimulate differentiation of bone marrow cells mainly into macrophages. In addition, AEPa did not differentiate cells into dendritic cells, as assessed by CD11c analysis. Furthermore, no cytotoxic effects were observed in the cells treated with AEPa. Conclusion Results demonstrate that AEPa promotes the differentiation of bone marrow cells, particularly into macrophages and may hold promise as an immunomodulating agent. PMID:25281406

  14. Plant Response to Differential Soil Water Content and Salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, A. B.; Dara, A.; Kamai, T.; Ngo, A.; Walker, R.; Hopmans, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Root-zone soil water content is extremely dynamic, governed by complex and coupled processes such as root uptake, irrigation, evaporation, and leaching. Root uptake of water and nutrients is influenced by these conditions and the processes involved. Plant roots are living and functioning in a dynamic environment that is subjected to extreme changes over relatively short time and small distances. In order to better manage our agricultural resources and cope with increasing constraints of water limitation, environmental concerns and climate change, it is vital to understand plants responses to these changes in their environment. We grew chick pea (Cicer arietinum) plants, in boxes of 30 x 25 x 1 cm dimensions filled with fine sand. Layers of coarse sand (1.5 cm thick) were embedded in the fine-sand media to divide the root growth environment into sections that were hydraulically disconnected from each other. This way, each section could be independently treated with differential levels of water and salinity. The root growth and distribution in the soil was monitored on daily bases using neutron radiography. Daily water uptake was measured by weighing the containers. Changes of soil water content in each section of the containers were calculated from the neutron radiographs. Plants that part of their root system was stressed with drought or salinity showed no change in their daily water uptake rate. The roots in the stressed sections stayed turgid during the stress period and looked healthy in the neutron images. However the uptake rate was severely affected when the soil in the non-stressed section started to dry. The plants were then fully irrigated with water and the water uptake rate recovered to its initial rate shortly after irrigation. The neutron radiographs clearly illustrated the shrinkage and recovery of the roots under stress and the subsequent relief. This cycle was repeated a few times and the same trend could be reproduced. Our results show that plants

  15. Differential expression of Ran GTPase during HMBA-induced differentiation in murine erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Vanegas, N; García-Sacristán, A; López-Fernández, L A; Párraga, M; del Mazo, J; Hernández, P; Schvartzman, J B; Krimer, D B

    2003-07-01

    Murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells undergo erythroid differentiation in vitro when treated with hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA). To identify genes involved in the commitment of MEL cells to differentiate, we screened a cDNA library constructed from HMBA-induced cells by differential hybridization and isolated GTPase Ran as a down-regulated gene. We observed that Ran was expressed in a biphasic mode. Following a decrease in mRNA level during the initial hours of induction, Ran re-expressed at 24-48 h, and gradually declined again. To investigate the role of Ran during MEL differentiation we constructed MEL transfectants capable to express or block Ran mRNA production constitutively. No effects were observed on cell growth and proliferation. Blockage of Ran, however, interfered with MEL cell differentiation resulting in a decrease of cell survival in the committed population.

  16. Differential Expression of Proteins and mRNAs from Border Cells and Root Tips of Pea.

    PubMed

    Brigham, L. A.; Woo, H. H.; Nicoll, S. M.; Hawes, M. C.

    1995-10-01

    Many plants release large numbers of metabolically active root border cells into the rhizosphere. We have proposed that border cells, cells produced by the root cap meristem that separate from the rest of the root upon reaching the periphery of the cap, are a singularly differentiated part of the root system that modulates the environment of the plant root by producing specific substances to be released into the rhizosphere. Proteins synthesized in border cells exhibit profiles that are very distinct from those of the root tip (root cap, root meristem, and adjacent cells). In vivo-labeling experiments demonstrate that 13% of the proteins that are abundant in preparations from border cells are undetectable in root tip preparations. Twenty-five percent of the proteins synthesized by border cells in a 1-h period are rapidly excreted into the incubation medium. Quantitative variation in levels of specific marker proteins, including glutamine synthetase, heat-shock protein 70, and isoflavone reductase, also occurs between border cells and cells in the root tip. mRNA differential-display assays demonstrate that these large qualitative and quantitative differences in protein expression are correlated with similarly distinct patterns of gene expression. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that a major switch in gene expression accompanies differentiation into root border cells, as expected for cells with specialized functions in plant development.

  17. Differential Expression of Proteins and mRNAs from Border Cells and Root Tips of Pea.

    PubMed Central

    Brigham, L. A.; Woo, H. H.; Nicoll, S. M.; Hawes, M. C.

    1995-01-01

    Many plants release large numbers of metabolically active root border cells into the rhizosphere. We have proposed that border cells, cells produced by the root cap meristem that separate from the rest of the root upon reaching the periphery of the cap, are a singularly differentiated part of the root system that modulates the environment of the plant root by producing specific substances to be released into the rhizosphere. Proteins synthesized in border cells exhibit profiles that are very distinct from those of the root tip (root cap, root meristem, and adjacent cells). In vivo-labeling experiments demonstrate that 13% of the proteins that are abundant in preparations from border cells are undetectable in root tip preparations. Twenty-five percent of the proteins synthesized by border cells in a 1-h period are rapidly excreted into the incubation medium. Quantitative variation in levels of specific marker proteins, including glutamine synthetase, heat-shock protein 70, and isoflavone reductase, also occurs between border cells and cells in the root tip. mRNA differential-display assays demonstrate that these large qualitative and quantitative differences in protein expression are correlated with similarly distinct patterns of gene expression. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that a major switch in gene expression accompanies differentiation into root border cells, as expected for cells with specialized functions in plant development. PMID:12228604

  18. [Genetic regulation of plant shoot stem cells].

    PubMed

    Al'bert, E V; Ezhova, T A

    2013-02-01

    This article describes the main features of plant stem cells and summarizes the results of studies of the genetic control of stem cell maintenance in the apical meristem of the shoot. It is demonstrated that the WUS-CLV gene system plays a key role in the maintenance of shoot apical stem cells and the formation of adventitious buds and somatic embryos. Unconventional concepts of plant stem cells are considered.

  19. The cell biology of lignification in higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Jaime; Serk, Henrik; Granlund, Irene; Pesquet, Edouard

    2015-01-01

    Background Lignin is a polyphenolic polymer that strengthens and waterproofs the cell wall of specialized plant cell types. Lignification is part of the normal differentiation programme and functioning of specific cell types, but can also be triggered as a response to various biotic and abiotic stresses in cells that would not otherwise be lignifying. Scope Cell wall lignification exhibits specific characteristics depending on the cell type being considered. These characteristics include the timing of lignification during cell differentiation, the palette of associated enzymes and substrates, the sub-cellular deposition sites, the monomeric composition and the cellular autonomy for lignin monomer production. This review provides an overview of the current understanding of lignin biosynthesis and polymerization at the cell biology level. Conclusions The lignification process ranges from full autonomy to complete co-operation depending on the cell type. The different roles of lignin for the function of each specific plant cell type are clearly illustrated by the multiple phenotypic defects exhibited by knock-out mutants in lignin synthesis, which may explain why no general mechanism for lignification has yet been defined. The range of phenotypic effects observed include altered xylem sap transport, loss of mechanical support, reduced seed protection and dispersion, and/or increased pest and disease susceptibility. PMID:25878140

  20. Polarity establishment, morphogenesis, and cultured plant cells in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krikorian, Abraham D.

    1989-01-01

    Plant development entails an orderly progression of cellular events both in terms of time and geometry. There is only circumstantial evidence that, in the controlled environment of the higher plant embryo sac, gravity may play a role in embryo development. It is still not known whether or not normal embryo development and differentiation in higher plants can be expected to take place reliably and efficiently in the micro g space environment. It seems essential that more attention be given to studying aspects of reproductive biology in order to be confident that plants will survive seed to seed to seed in a space environment. Until the time arrives when successive generations of plants can be grown, the best that can be done is utilize the most appropriate systems and begin, piece meal, to accumulate information on important aspects of plant reproduction. Cultured plant cells can play an important role in these activities since they can be grown so as to be morphogenetically competent, and thus can simulate those embryogenic events more usually identified with fertilized eggs in the embryo sac of the ovule in the ovary. Also, they can be manipulated with relative ease. The extreme plasticity of such demonstrably totipotent cell systems provides a means to test environmental effects such as micro g on a potentially free-running entity. The successful manipulation and management of plant cells and propagules in space also has significance for exploitation of biotechnologies in space since such systems, perforce, are an important vehicle whereby many genetic engineering manipulations are achieved.

  1. Differentiation of chicken umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells into beta-like pancreatic islet cells.

    PubMed

    Bai, Chunyu; Gao, Yuhua; Li, Qian; Feng, Yuan; Yu, Yanze; Meng, Gentong; Zhang, Minghai; Guan, Weijun

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we explored the possibility of using in vitro differentiation to create functional beta-like islet cells from chicken umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs). Passaged UCMSCs were induced to differentiate into pancreatic beta-like islet cells. Differentiated cells were observed through dithizone staining, and Pdx1 and insulin expressed in differentiated cells were detected with immunofluorescence. Insulin and C-peptide production from differentiated cells were analyzed using ELISA and western blotting. Differentiated cells were found to not only express Pdx1, insulin, and C-peptide, but also to display a glucose-responsive secretion of these hormones. PMID:24303870

  2. Directed Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells into Neural Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Banda, Erin; Grabel, Laura

    2016-01-01

    A variety of protocols have been used to produce neural progenitors from human embryonic stem cells. We have focused on a monolayer culture approach that generates neural rosettes. To initiate differentiation, cells are plated in a serum-free nutrient-poor medium in the presence of a BMP inhibitor. Depending on the cell line used, additional growth factor inhibitors may be required to promote neural differentiation. Long-term culture and addition of the Notch inhibitor DAPT can promote terminal neuronal differentiation. Extent of differentiation is monitored using immunocytochemistry for cell type-specific markers.

  3. Phenazopyridine induces and synchronizes neuronal differentiation of embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Suter, David M; Preynat-Seauve, Olivier; Tirefort, Diderik; Feki, Anis; Krause, Karl-Heinz

    2009-09-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are powerful tools to understand mechanisms of neuronal differentiation and to engineer neurons for in vitro studies and cell therapy. We developed a screening approach to identify small organic molecules driving neuronal differentiation of ES cells. For this purpose, we used a lentivector carrying a dual luciferase reporter system to engineer an ES cell line which allowed us to screen for small organic molecules enhancing neuronal differentiation. One of them, phenazopyridine, was further analysed in human ES cells. Phenazopyridine: (i) enhanced neuronal differentiation, (ii) increased cell survival, (iii) decreased the amount of non-neuronal and undifferentiated cells and (iv) synchronized the cellular differentiation state. Phenazopyridine allowed the development of a differentiation protocol compatible with the generation of clinical grade neural precursors, which were able differentiate into different neuronal subtypes, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. In summary, we describe a powerful approach to identify small molecules directing stem cell differentiation. This led to the establishment of a new application for an old drug and the development of a novel clinical grade protocol for neuronal differentiation of ES cells.

  4. The concept of radiation-enhanced stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mieloch, Adam A.; Suchorska, Wiktoria M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Efficient stem cell differentiation is considered to be the holy grail of regenerative medicine. Pursuing the most productive method of directed differentiation has been the subject of numerous studies, resulting in the development of many effective protocols. However, the necessity for further improvement in differentiation efficiency remains. This review contains a description of molecular processes underlying the response of stem cells to ionizing radiation, indicating its potential application in differentiation procedures. In the first part, the radiation-induced damage response in various types of stem cells is described. Second, the role of the p53 protein in embryonic and adult stem cells is highlighted. Last, the hypothesis on the mitochondrial involvement in stem cell development including its response to ionizing radiation is presented. Conclusions In summary, despite the many threats of ionizing radiation concerning genomic instability, subjecting cells to the appropriate dosage of ionizing radiation may become a useful method for enhancing directed differentiation in certain stem cell types. PMID:26401125

  5. Pathological modifications of plant stem cell destiny

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In higher plants, the shoot apex contains undifferentiated stem cells that give rise to various tissues and organs. The fate of these stem cells determines the pattern of plant growth as well as reproduction; and such fate is genetically preprogrammed. We found that a bacterial infection can derai...

  6. Identification of differentially expressed non-coding RNAs in embryonic stem cell neural differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Skreka, Konstantinia; Schafferer, Simon; Nat, Irina-Roxanna; Zywicki, Marek; Salti, Ahmad; Apostolova, Galina; Griehl, Matthias; Rederstorff, Mathieu; Dechant, Georg; Hüttenhofer, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Protein-coding genes, guiding differentiation of ES cells into neural cells, have extensively been studied in the past. However, for the class of ncRNAs only the involvement of some specific microRNAs (miRNAs) has been described. Thus, to characterize the entire small non-coding RNA (ncRNA) transcriptome, involved in the differentiation of mouse ES cells into neural cells, we have generated three specialized ribonucleo-protein particle (RNP)-derived cDNA libraries, i.e. from pluripotent ES cells, neural progenitors and differentiated neural cells, respectively. By high-throughput sequencing and transcriptional profiling we identified several novel miRNAs to be involved in ES cell differentiation, as well as seven small nucleolar RNAs. In addition, expression of 7SL, 7SK and vault-2 RNAs was significantly up-regulated during ES cell differentiation. About half of ncRNA sequences from the three cDNA libraries mapped to intergenic or intragenic regions, designated as interRNAs and intraRNAs, respectively. Thereby, novel ncRNA candidates exhibited a predominant size of 18–30 nt, thus resembling miRNA species, but, with few exceptions, lacking canonical miRNA features. Additionally, these novel intraRNAs and interRNAs were not only found to be differentially expressed in stem-cell derivatives, but also in primary cultures of hippocampal neurons and astrocytes, strengthening their potential function in neural ES cell differentiation. PMID:22492625

  7. Identification of differentially expressed non-coding RNAs in embryonic stem cell neural differentiation.

    PubMed

    Skreka, Konstantinia; Schafferer, Simon; Nat, Irina-Roxanna; Zywicki, Marek; Salti, Ahmad; Apostolova, Galina; Griehl, Matthias; Rederstorff, Mathieu; Dechant, Georg; Hüttenhofer, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Protein-coding genes, guiding differentiation of ES cells into neural cells, have extensively been studied in the past. However, for the class of ncRNAs only the involvement of some specific microRNAs (miRNAs) has been described. Thus, to characterize the entire small non-coding RNA (ncRNA) transcriptome, involved in the differentiation of mouse ES cells into neural cells, we have generated three specialized ribonucleo-protein particle (RNP)-derived cDNA libraries, i.e. from pluripotent ES cells, neural progenitors and differentiated neural cells, respectively. By high-throughput sequencing and transcriptional profiling we identified several novel miRNAs to be involved in ES cell differentiation, as well as seven small nucleolar RNAs. In addition, expression of 7SL, 7SK and vault-2 RNAs was significantly up-regulated during ES cell differentiation. About half of ncRNA sequences from the three cDNA libraries mapped to intergenic or intragenic regions, designated as interRNAs and intraRNAs, respectively. Thereby, novel ncRNA candidates exhibited a predominant size of 18-30 nt, thus resembling miRNA species, but, with few exceptions, lacking canonical miRNA features. Additionally, these novel intraRNAs and interRNAs were not only found to be differentially expressed in stem-cell derivatives, but also in primary cultures of hippocampal neurons and astrocytes, strengthening their potential function in neural ES cell differentiation. PMID:22492625

  8. Regulation of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation and insulin secretion by differential expression of Pdx-1.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Huijuan; Liu, Hongmei; Tian, Rui; Li, Jie; Zhao, Zhigang

    2012-07-01

    In recent years, major effort has been made to differentiate embryonic stem cells, pancreatic ductal epithelial multipotent progenitor cells, and bone marrow stem cells into insulin secreting cells. Our previous work has also demonstrated the feasibility of inducing mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to insulin secreting cells through overexpression of Pdx-1, a pancreas and islet-specific transcription factor that plays a major role in differentiation of islet β-cells during development (Yuan et al. in Mol Biol Rep 37:4023-4031, 2010). However, the levels of insulin secretion among these differentiated MSC were quite variable. The purpose of this study is to address the issue whether the insulin secretion level from the differentiated MSC lines are determined by the expression level of the Pdx-1 transgene. To do so, we have generated several differentiated MSC lines with stable transfection of the Pdx-1 gene. Using RT-PCR analysis and insulin secretion assay, we have analyzed Pdx-1 mRNA levels and insulin secretion from these stable MSC lines. Our results showed that Pdx-1 expression is absolutely required for the differentiation of MSC lines to insulin secreting cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the level of Pdx-1 expression is closely correlated with level of insulin mRNA and insulin secretion level in differentiated MSC stable cell lines. These findings suggest that the level of Pdx-1 expression plays a key role in induction of MSCs to insulin secreting cells.

  9. SETD7 Regulates the Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Castaño, Julio; Morera, Cristina; Sesé, Borja; Boue, Stephanie; Bonet-Costa, Carles; Martí, Merce; Roque, Alicia; Jordan, Albert; Barrero, Maria J

    2016-01-01

    The successful use of specialized cells in regenerative medicine requires an optimization in the differentiation protocols that are currently used. Understanding the molecular events that take place during the differentiation of human pluripotent cells is essential for the improvement of these protocols and the generation of high quality differentiated cells. In an effort to understand the molecular mechanisms that govern differentiation we identify the methyltransferase SETD7 as highly induced during the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells and differentially expressed between induced pluripotent cells and somatic cells. Knock-down of SETD7 causes differentiation defects in human embryonic stem cell including delay in both the silencing of pluripotency-related genes and the induction of differentiation genes. We show that SETD7 methylates linker histone H1 in vitro causing conformational changes in H1. These effects correlate with a decrease in the recruitment of H1 to the pluripotency genes OCT4 and NANOG during differentiation in the SETD7 knock down that might affect the proper silencing of these genes during differentiation.

  10. SETD7 Regulates the Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Castaño, Julio; Morera, Cristina; Sesé, Borja; Boue, Stephanie; Bonet-Costa, Carles; Martí, Merce; Roque, Alicia; Jordan, Albert; Barrero, Maria J.

    2016-01-01

    The successful use of specialized cells in regenerative medicine requires an optimization in the differentiation protocols that are currently used. Understanding the molecular events that take place during the differentiation of human pluripotent cells is essential for the improvement of these protocols and the generation of high quality differentiated cells. In an effort to understand the molecular mechanisms that govern differentiation we identify the methyltransferase SETD7 as highly induced during the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells and differentially expressed between induced pluripotent cells and somatic cells. Knock-down of SETD7 causes differentiation defects in human embryonic stem cell including delay in both the silencing of pluripotency-related genes and the induction of differentiation genes. We show that SETD7 methylates linker histone H1 in vitro causing conformational changes in H1. These effects correlate with a decrease in the recruitment of H1 to the pluripotency genes OCT4 and NANOG during differentiation in the SETD7 knock down that might affect the proper silencing of these genes during differentiation. PMID:26890252

  11. Caspase activity mediates the differentiation of embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Jun; Crane, Ana M.; Souza, Marlon K.; Dejosez, Marion; Kyba, Michael; Flavell, Richard A.; Thomson, James A.; Zwaka, Thomas P.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Embryonic stem (ES) cells are capable of indefinite self-renewal while retaining the ability to differentiate to any of the three germ layers that give rise to all somatic cell types. An emerging view is that a core set of transcription factors, including Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog, form a robust autoregulatory circuit that maintains ES cells in a self-renewing state. To accommodate the capacity of such cells to undergo germ layer-specific differentiation, we predicted a post-translational mechanism that could negatively regulate these core self-renewal factors. Here we report caspase-induced cleavage of Nanog in differentiating ES cells. Stem cells lacking the Casp3 gene showed marked defects in differentiation, while forced expression of a caspase cleavage-resistant Nanog mutant in ES cells strongly promoted self-renewal. These results link a major component of the programmed cell death pathway to the regulation of ES cell development. PMID:18522852

  12. Non-genetic heterogeneity, criticality and cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Mainak; Ghosh, Sayantari; Bose, Indrani

    2015-02-01

    The different cell types in a living organism acquire their identity through the process of cell differentiation in which multipotent progenitor cells differentiate into distinct cell types. Experimental evidence and analysis of large-scale microarray data establish the key role played by a two-gene motif in cell differentiation in a number of cell systems. The two genes express transcription factors which repress each other's expression and autoactivate their own production. A number of theoretical models have recently been proposed based on the two-gene motif to provide a physical understanding of how cell differentiation occurs. In this paper, we study a simple model of cell differentiation which assumes no cooperativity in the regulation of gene expression by the transcription factors. The latter repress each other's activity directly through DNA binding and indirectly through the formation of heterodimers. We specifically investigate how deterministic processes combined with stochasticity contribute in bringing about cell differentiation. The deterministic dynamics of our model give rise to a supercritical pitchfork bifurcation from an undifferentiated stable steady state to two differentiated stable steady states. The stochastic dynamics of our model are studied using the approaches based on the Langevin equations and the linear noise approximation. The simulation results provide a new physical understanding of recent experimental observations. We further propose experimental measurements of quantities like the variance and the lag-1 autocorrelation function in protein fluctuations as the early signatures of an approaching bifurcation point in the cell differentiation process.

  13. Cell wall, cytoskeleton, and cell expansion in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Bashline, Logan; Lei, Lei; Li, Shundai; Gu, Ying

    2014-04-01

    To accommodate two seemingly contradictory biological roles in plant physiology, providing both the rigid structural support of plant cells and the adjustable elasticity needed for cell expansion, the composition of the plant cell wall has evolved to become an intricate network of cellulosic, hemicellulosic, and pectic polysaccharides and protein. Due to its complexity, many aspects of the cell wall influence plant cell expansion, and many new and insightful observations and technologies are forthcoming. The biosynthesis of cell wall polymers and the roles of the variety of proteins involved in polysaccharide synthesis continue to be characterized. The interactions within the cell wall polymer network and the modification of these interactions provide insight into how the plant cell wall provides its dual function. The complex cell wall architecture is controlled and organized in part by the dynamic intracellular cytoskeleton and by diverse trafficking pathways of the cell wall polymers and cell wall-related machinery. Meanwhile, the cell wall is continually influenced by hormonal and integrity sensing stimuli that are perceived by the cell. These many processes cooperate to construct, maintain, and manipulate the intricate plant cell wall--an essential structure for the sustaining of the plant stature, growth, and life.

  14. Chemically induced bidirectional differentiation of embryonal carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Speers, W. C.; Birdwell, C. R.; Dixon, F. J.

    1979-01-01

    N,N-dimethylacetamide, hexamethylene bisacetamide, and Polybrene induced rapid and extensive differentiation in vitro in an otherwise slowly differentiating subline of embryonal carcinoma cells. The type of differentiated cell induced was dependent on the spatial organization of the stem cells during drug treatment. In monalayer culture "epithelial" cells were produced exclusively. However, treatment of aggregated suspension cultures yielded predominantly "fibroblast-like" cells. The undifferentiated embryonal carcinoma cells and the two differentiated cell types were morphologically distinct when examined by light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy; and they had differences in cell surface antigens. Both differential cell types produced large amounts of fibronectin, whereas the embryonal carcinoma cells produced only minimal amounts. This system provides a convenient way to induce relatively synchronous differentiation of embryonal carcinoma cells into specific differentiated cell types. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:507191

  15. Symbiotic Cell Differentiation and Cooperative Growth in Multicellular Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Jumpei F; Saito, Nen; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2016-01-01

    As cells grow and divide under a given environment, they become crowded and resources are limited, as seen in bacterial biofilms and multicellular aggregates. These cells often show strong interactions through exchanging chemicals, as evident in quorum sensing, to achieve mutualism and division of labor. Here, to achieve stable division of labor, three characteristics are required. First, isogenous cells differentiate into several types. Second, this aggregate of distinct cell types shows better growth than that of isolated cells without interaction and differentiation, by achieving division of labor. Third, this cell aggregate is robust with respect to the number distribution of differentiated cell types. Indeed, theoretical studies have thus far considered how such cooperation is achieved when the ability of cell differentiation is presumed. Here, we address how cells acquire the ability of cell differentiation and division of labor simultaneously, which is also connected with the robustness of a cell society. For this purpose, we developed a dynamical-systems model of cells consisting of chemical components with intracellular catalytic reaction dynamics. The reactions convert external nutrients into internal components for cellular growth, and the divided cells interact through chemical diffusion. We found that cells sharing an identical catalytic network spontaneously differentiate via induction from cell-cell interactions, and then achieve division of labor, enabling a higher growth rate than that in the unicellular case. This symbiotic differentiation emerged for a class of reaction networks under the condition of nutrient limitation and strong cell-cell interactions. Then, robustness in the cell type distribution was achieved, while instability of collective growth could emerge even among the cooperative cells when the internal reserves of products were dominant. The present mechanism is simple and general as a natural consequence of interacting cells with

  16. Graphene Oxide promotes embryonic stem cell differentiation to haematopoietic lineage

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Alegria, Eva; Iluit, Maria; Stefanska, Monika; Silva, Claudio; Heeg, Sebastian; Kimber, Susan J.; Kouskoff, Valerie; Lacaud, Georges; Vijayaraghavan, Aravind; Batta, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells represent a promising source of differentiated tissue-specific stem and multipotent progenitor cells for regenerative medicine and drug testing. The realisation of this potential relies on the establishment of robust and reproducible protocols of differentiation. Several reports have highlighted the importance of biomaterials in assisting directed differentiation. Graphene oxide (GO) is a novel material that has attracted increasing interest in the field of biomedicine. In this study, we demonstrate that GO coated substrates significantly enhance the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells to both primitive and definitive haematopoietic cells. GO does not affect cell proliferation or survival of differentiated cells but rather enhances the transition of haemangioblasts to haemogenic endothelial cells, a key step during haematopoietic specification. Importantly, GO also improves, in addition to murine, human ES cell differentiation to blood cells. Taken together, our study reveals a positive role for GO in haematopoietic differentiation and suggests that further functionalization of GO could represent a valid strategy for the generation of large numbers of functional blood cells. Producing these cells would accelerate haematopoietic drug toxicity testing and treatment of patients with blood disorders or malignancies. PMID:27197878

  17. Gene expression in TGFbeta-induced epithelial cell differentiation in a three-dimensional intestinal epithelial cell differentiation model

    PubMed Central

    Juuti-Uusitalo, Kati M; Kaukinen, Katri; Mäki, Markku; Tuimala, Jarno; Kainulainen, Heikki

    2006-01-01

    Background The TGFβ1-induced signal transduction processes involved in growth and differentiation are only partly known. The three-dimensional epithelial differentiation model, in which T84 epithelial cells are induced to differentiate either with TGFβ1 or IMR-90 mesenchymal cell-secreted soluble factors, is previously shown to model epithelial cell differentiation seen in intestine. That model has not been used for large scale gene expression studies, such as microarray method. Therefore the gene expression changes were studied in undifferentiated and differentiated three-dimensional T84 cultures with cDNA microarray method in order to study the molecular changes and find new players in epithelial cell differentiation. Results The expression of 372 genes out of 5188 arrayed sequences was significantly altered, and 47 of them were altered by both mediators. The data were validated and the altered genes are presented in ontology classes. For the genes tested the expressions in protein level were in accordance with the mRNA results. We also found 194 genes with no known function to be potentially important in epithelial cell differentiation. The mRNA expression changes induced by TGFβ1 were bigger than changes induced by soluble factors secreted by IMR-90 mesenchymal cells. The gene expression data was depicted in already known signaling pathway routes. Conclusion Our results reveal potential new signaling pathways and several new genes affected by TGFβ in epithelial cell differentiation. The differentiation induced by TGFβ1 appears to be more potent than the differentiation induced by mesenchymal cells. This study indicates that our cell culture model is a suitable tool in studying regulatory mechanisms during epithelial cell differentiation in intestine. Furthermore the present results indicate that our model is a good tool for finding new players acting in the differentiation of epithelial cells. PMID:17074098

  18. Reprogramming of plant cells induced by 6b oncoproteins from the plant pathogen Agrobacterium.

    PubMed

    Ito, Masaki; Machida, Yasunori

    2015-05-01

    Reprogramming of plant cells is an event characterized by dedifferentiation, reacquisition of totipotency, and enhanced cell proliferation, and is typically observed during formation of the callus, which is dependent on plant hormones. The callus-like cell mass, called a crown gall tumor, is induced at the sites of infection by Agrobacterium species through the expression of hormone-synthesizing genes encoded in the T-DNA region, which probably involves a similar reprogramming process. One of the T-DNA genes, 6b, can also by itself induce reprogramming of differentiated cells to generate tumors and is therefore recognized as an oncogene acting in plant cells. The 6b genes belong to a group of Agrobacterium T-DNA genes, which include rolB, rolC, and orf13. These genes encode proteins with weakly conserved sequences and may be derived from a common evolutionary origin. Most of these members can modify plant growth and morphogenesis in various ways, in most cases without affecting the levels of plant hormones. Recent studies have suggested that the molecular function of 6b might be to modify the patterns of transcription in the host nuclei, particularly by directly targeting the host transcription factors or by changing the epigenetic status of the host chromatin through intrinsic histone chaperone activity. In light of the recent findings on zygotic resetting of nucleosomal histone variants in Arabidopsis thaliana, one attractive idea is that acquisition of totipotency might be facilitated by global changes of epigenetic status, which might be induced by replacement of histone variants in the zygote after fertilization and in differentiated cells upon stimulation by plant hormones as well as by expression of the 6b gene. PMID:25694001

  19. Differentiation of Mucilage Secretory Cells of the Arabidopsis Seed Coat1

    PubMed Central

    Western, Tamara L.; Skinner, Debra J.; Haughn, George W.

    2000-01-01

    In some plant species, including Arabidopsis, fertilization induces the epidermal cells of the outer ovule integument to differentiate into a specialized seed coat cell type with a unique morphology and containing large quantities of polysaccharide mucilage (pectin). Such seed coat mucilage cells are necessary for neither viability nor germination under normal laboratory conditions. Thus, the Arabidopsis seed coat offers a unique system with which to use genetics to identify genes controlling cell morphogenesis and complex polysaccharide biosynthesis and secretion. As a first step in the application of this system, we have used microscopy to investigate the structure and differentiation of Arabidopsis seed coat mucilage cells, including cell morphogenesis and the synthesis, secretion, and extrusion of mucilage. During seed coat development in Arabidopsis, the epidermal cells of the outer ovule integument grow and differentiate into cells that produce large quantities of mucilage between the primary cell wall and plasma membrane. Concurrent with mucilage production, the cytoplasm is shaped into a column in the center of the cell. Following mucilage secretion the cytoplasmic column is surrounded by a secondary cell wall to form a structure known as the columella. Thus, differentiation of the seed coat mucilage cells involves a highly regulated series of events including growth, morphogenesis, mucilage biosynthesis and secretion, and secondary cell wall synthesis. PMID:10677428

  20. Electrical Property Characterization of Neural Stem Cells in Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, He; Chen, Deyong; Li, Zhaohui; Fan, Beiyuan; George, Julian; Xue, Chengcheng; Cui, Zhanfeng; Wang, Junbo

    2016-01-01

    Electrical property characterization of stem cells could be utilized as a potential label-free biophysical approach to evaluate the differentiation process. However, there has been a lack of technology or tools that can quantify the intrinsic cellular electrical markers (e.g., specific membrane capacitance (Cspecific membrane) and cytoplasm conductivity (σcytoplasm)) for a large amount of stem cells or differentiated cells. In this paper, a microfluidic platform enabling the high-throughput quantification of Cspecific membrane and σcytoplasm from hundreds of single neural stem cells undergoing differentiation was developed to explore the feasibility to characterize the neural stem cell differentiation process without biochemical staining. Experimental quantification using biochemical markers (e.g., Nestin, Tubulin and GFAP) of neural stem cells confirmed the initiation of the differentiation process featured with gradual loss in cellular stemness and increased cell markers for neurons and glial cells. The recorded electrical properties of neural stem cells undergoing differentiation showed distinctive and unique patterns: 1) in the suspension culture before inducing differentiation, a large distribution and difference in σcytoplasm among individual neural stem cells was noticed, which indicated heterogeneity that may result from the nature of suspension culture of neurospheres; and 2) during the differentiation in adhering monolayer culture, significant changes and a large difference in Cspecific membrane were located indicating different expressions of membrane proteins during the differentiation process, and a small distribution difference in σcytoplasm was less significant that indicated the relatively consistent properties of cytoplasm during the culture. In summary, significant differences in Cspecific membrane and σcytoplasm were observed during the neural stem cell differentiation process, which may potentially be used as label-free biophysical markers

  1. A conversation across generations: soma-germ cell crosstalk in plants.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaoqi; Zilberman, Daniel; Dickinson, Hugh

    2013-02-11

    Plants undergo alternation of generation in which reproductive cells develop in the plant body ("sporophytic generation") and then differentiate into a multicellular gamete-forming "gametophytic generation." Different populations of helper cells assist in this transgenerational journey, with somatic tissues supporting early development and single nurse cells supporting gametogenesis. New data reveal a two-way relationship between early reproductive cells and their helpers involving complex epigenetic and signaling networks determining cell number and fate. Later, the egg cell plays a central role in specifying accessory cells, whereas in both gametophytes, companion cells contribute non-cell-autonomously to the epigenetic landscape of the gamete genomes.

  2. The culture of single plant cells: a historical view.

    PubMed

    Pennazio, Sergio

    2002-01-01

    Plant tissue culture, introduced unsuccessfully at the beginning of the twentieth century by Haberlandt, received full confirmation in the late Thirties by the works of Gautheret and Nobécourt, thanks to the discovery of auxin. A further special improvement--the free cell culture--, already fore-told by Haberlandt, was successfully achieved towards the mid-1950s by several physiologists thanks to coconut milk (cytokinin). The English physiologist Frederick Steward (who grouped an excellent American team of research during his twenty years stay at the Cornell University in Ithaca) was able to obtain complete cell differentiation from single cells cultured in vitro and demonstrate the totipotence of plant cells at any stage of development. The historical meaning of the research of Steward's team, accomplished between 1958 and 1970, rests on the concept of plant hormones as regulators of gene activity. In other terms, organogenesis was conceived as an epigenetically controlled series of events in which plant genes were "switched on" or "switched off" by special biomolecules. Steward's research paved the way for molecular plant physiology and inspired future research on the relation between cell receptors and specific hormones. PMID:12680309

  3. Nitric oxide-cyclic GMP signaling in stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mujoo, Kalpana; Krumenacker, Joshua S.; Murad, Ferid

    2011-01-01

    The nitric oxide-cyclic GMP (NO-cGMP) pathway mediates important physiological functions associated with various integrative body systems including the cardiovascular and nervous systems. Furthermore, NO regulates cell growth, survival, apoptosis, proliferation and differentiation at the cellular level. To understand the significance of the NO-cGMP pathway in development and differentiation, studies have been conducted both in developing embryos and stem cells. Manipulation of the NO-cGMP pathway by employing activators and inhibitors as pharmacological probes and/or genetic manipulation of NO signaling components has implicated the involvement of this pathway in regulation of stem cell differentiation. This review will focus on some of the work pertaining to the role of NO-cGMP in differentiation of stem cells into cells of various lineages particularly into myocardial cells and stem cell based therapy. PMID:22019632

  4. Effects of THAP11 on Erythroid Differentiation and Megakaryocytic Differentiation of K562 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiang-Zhen; Yin, Rong-Hua; Ning, Hong-Mei; Zheng, Wei-Wei; Dong, Xiao-Ming; Yang, Yang; Xu, Fei-Fei; Li, Jian-Jie; Zhan, Yi-Qun; Yu, Miao; Ge, Chang-Hui; Zhang, Jian-Hong; Chen, Hui; Li, Chang-Yan; Yang, Xiao-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoiesis is a complex process regulated by sets of transcription factors in a stage-specific and context-dependent manner. THAP11 is a transcription factor involved in cell growth, ES cell pluripotency, and embryogenesis. Here we showed that THAP11 was down-regulated during erythroid differentiation but up-regulated during megakaryocytic differentiation of cord blood CD34+ cells. Overexpression of THAP11 in K562 cells inhibited the erythroid differentiation induced by hemin with decreased numbers of benzidine-positive cells and decreased mRNA levels of α-globin (HBA) and glycophorin A (GPA), and knockdown of THAP11 enhanced the erythroid differentiation. Conversely, THAP11 overexpression accelerated the megakaryocytic differentiation induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) with increased percentage of CD41+ cells, increased numbers of 4N cells, and elevated CD61 mRNA levels, and THAP11 knockdown attenuated the megakaryocytic differentiation. The expression levels of transcription factors such as c-Myc, c-Myb, GATA-2, and Fli1 were changed by THAP11 overexpression. In this way, our results suggested that THAP11 reversibly regulated erythroid and megakaryocytic differentiation. PMID:24637716

  5. Parvalbumin-Positive Basket Cells Differentiate Among Hippocampal Pyramidal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hun; Marchionni, Ivan; Bezaire, Marianne; Varga, Csaba; Danielson, Nathan; Lovett-Barron, Matthew; Losonczy, Attila; Soltesz, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Summary CA1 pyramidal cells (PCs) are not homogeneous, but rather can be grouped by molecular, morphological, and functional properties. However, less is known about synaptic sources differentiating PCs. Using paired recordings in vitro, 2-photon Ca2+ imaging in vivo and computational modeling, we found that parvalbumin-expressing basket cells (PVBCs) evoked greater inhibition in CA1 PCs located in the deep compared to superficial layer of stratum pyramidale. In turn, analysis of reciprocal connectivity revealed more frequent excitatory inputs to PVBCs by superficial PCs, demonstrating bias in target selection by both the excitatory and inhibitory local connections in CA1. Additionally, PVBCs further segregated among deep PCs, preferentially innervating the amygdala-projecting PCs but receiving preferential excitation from the prefrontal cortex-projecting PCs, thus revealing distinct perisomatic inhibitory interactions between separate output channels. These results demonstrate the presence of heterogeneous PVBC-PC microcircuits, potentially contributing to the sparse and distributed structure of hippocampal network activity. PMID:24836505

  6. Regulation of root hair cell differentiation by R3 MYB transcription factors in tomato and Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Tominaga-Wada, Rumi; Wada, Takuji

    2014-01-01

    CAPRICE (CPC) encodes a small protein with an R3 MYB motif and regulates root hair and trichome cell differentiation in Arabidopsis thaliana. Six additional CPC-like MYB proteins including TRIPTYCHON (TRY), ENHANCER OF TRY AND CPC1 (ETC1), ENHANCER OF TRY AND CPC2 (ETC2), ENHANCER OF TRY AND CPC3/CPC-LIKE MYB3 (ETC3/CPL3), TRICHOMELESS1 (TCL1), and TRICHOMELESS2/CPC-LIKE MYB4 (TCL2/CPL4) also have the ability to regulate root hair and/or trichome cell differentiation in Arabidopsis. In this review, we describe our latest findings on how CPC-like MYB transcription factors regulate root hair cell differentiation. Recently, we identified the tomato SlTRY gene as an ortholog of the Arabidopsis TRY gene. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants harboring SlTRY produced more root hairs, a phenotype similar to that of 35S::CPC transgenic plants. CPC is also known to be involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis. Anthocyanin accumulation was repressed in the SlTRY transgenic plants, suggesting that SlTRY can also influence anthocyanin biosynthesis. We concluded that tomato and Arabidopsis partially use similar transcription factors for root hair cell differentiation, and that a CPC-like R3 MYB may be a key common regulator of plant root-hair development. PMID:24659995

  7. Crucial Genes and Pathways in Chicken Germ Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhentao; Elsayed, Ahmed Kamel; Shi, Qingqing; Zhang, Yani; Zuo, Qisheng; Li, Dong; Lian, Chao; Tang, Beibei; Xiao, Tianrong; Xu, Qi; Chang, Guobin; Chen, Guohong; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Kehua; Wang, Yingjie; Jin, Kai; Wang, Yilin; Song, Jiuzhou; Cui, Hengmi; Li, Bichun

    2015-01-01

    Male germ cell differentiation is a subtle and complex regulatory process. Currently, its regulatory mechanism is still not fully understood. In our experiment, we performed the first comprehensive genome and transcriptome-wide analyses of the crucial genes and signaling pathways in three kinds of crucial cells (embryonic stem cells, primordial germ cell, and spermatogonial stem cells) that are associated with the male germ cell differentiation. We identified thousands of differentially expressed genes in this process, and from these we chose 173 candidate genes, of which 98 genes were involved in cell differentiation, 19 were involved in the metabolic process, and 56 were involved in the differentiation and metabolic processes, like GAL9, AMH, PLK1, and PSMD7 and so on. In addition, we found that 18 key signaling pathways were involved mainly in cell proliferation, differentiation, and signal transduction processes like TGF-β, Notch, and Jak-STAT. Further exploration found that the candidate gene expression patterns were the same between in vitro induction experiments and transcriptome results. Our results yield clues to the mechanistic basis of male germ cell differentiation and provide an important reference for further studies. PMID:25847247

  8. Advances and challenges in the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Abdelalim, Essam M; Emara, Mohamed M

    2015-01-26

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are able to differentiate into several cell types, including pancreatic β cells. Differentiation of pancreatic β cells depends on certain transcription factors, which function in a coordinated way during pancreas development. The existing protocols for in vitro differentiation produce pancreatic β cells, which are not highly responsive to glucose stimulation except after their transplantation into immune-compromised mice and allowing several weeks for further differentiation to ensure the maturation of these cells in vivo. Thus, although the substantial improvement that has been made for the differentiation of induced PSCs and embryonic stem cells toward pancreatic β cells, several challenges still hindering their full generation. Here, we summarize recent advances in the differentiation of PSCs into pancreatic β cells and discuss the challenges facing their differentiation as well as the different applications of these potential PSC-derived β cells.

  9. NOV/CCN3 impairs muscle cell commitment and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Calhabeu, Frederico; Lafont, Jérome; Le Dreau, Gwenvael; Laurent, Maryvonne; Kazazian, Chantal; Schaeffer, Laurent; Martinerie, Cécile; Dubois, Catherine

    2006-06-10

    NOV (nephroblastoma overexpressed) is a member of a family of proteins which encodes secreted matrix-associated proteins. NOV is expressed during development in dermomyotome and limb buds, but its functions are still poorly defined. In order to understand the role of NOV in myogenic differentiation, C2C12 cells overexpressing NOV (C2-NOV) were generated. These cells failed to engage into myogenic differentiation, whereas they retained the ability to differentiate into osteoblasts. In differentiating conditions, C2-NOV cells remained proliferative, failed to express differentiation markers and lost their ability to form myotubes. Inhibition of differentiation by NOV was also observed with human primary muscle cells. Further examination of C2-NOV cells revealed a strong downregulation of the myogenic determination genes MyoD and Myf5 and of IGF-II expression. MyoD forced expression in C2-NOV was sufficient to restore differentiation and IGF-II induction whereas 10(-6) M insulin treatment had no effects. NOV therefore acts upstream of MyoD and does not affect IGF-II induction and signaling. HES1, a target of Notch, previously proposed to mediate NOV action, was not implicated in the inhibition of differentiation. We propose that NOV is a specific cell fate regulator in the myogenic lineage, acting negatively on key myogenic genes thus controlling the transition from progenitor cells to myoblasts.

  10. Vascular Mural Cells Promote Noradrenergic Differentiation of Embryonic Sympathetic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Fortuna, Vitor; Pardanaud, Luc; Brunet, Isabelle; Ola, Roxana; Ristori, Emma; Santoro, Massimo M; Nicoli, Stefania; Eichmann, Anne

    2015-06-23

    The sympathetic nervous system controls smooth muscle tone and heart rate in the cardiovascular system. Postganglionic sympathetic neurons (SNs) develop in close proximity to the dorsal aorta (DA) and innervate visceral smooth muscle targets. Here, we use the zebrafish embryo to ask whether the DA is required for SN development. We show that noradrenergic (NA) differentiation of SN precursors temporally coincides with vascular mural cell (VMC) recruitment to the DA and vascular maturation. Blocking vascular maturation inhibits VMC recruitment and blocks NA differentiation of SN precursors. Inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) signaling prevents VMC differentiation and also blocks NA differentiation of SN precursors. NA differentiation is normal in cloche mutants that are devoid of endothelial cells but have VMCs. Thus, PDGFR-mediated mural cell recruitment mediates neurovascular interactions between the aorta and sympathetic precursors and promotes their noradrenergic differentiation.

  11. Fuel cell power plant integrated systems evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonds, T. L.; Dawes, M. H.; Schnacke, A. W.; Spradlin, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    Power plant configurations for a central station (675 MW) fueled by coal and small dispersed plan generation plants fueled by oil were defined. Capital costs and costs for electricity were evaluated for both plants. Parametric variations and the impact on plants and components are discussed. Alternate oil fueled oil fired cycles as well as several alternate coal gasifiers were examined to show effects on plant performance. The economic attractiveness of the coal fired plant was confirmed and a scenario is established for an oil fired plant with reject heat recovery. Performance for the coal fired plant exceeds the study goal of 6800 Btu/kWh. The oil fired plant performance of 7627 Btu/kWh is very close to the study goal of 7500 Btu/kWh. The development of a finite slice computer model of the carbonate fuel cell is reported and an initial parametric cell and plant performance study was performed using the model. Preliminary subsystem description sheets and plant layout arrangements are presented.

  12. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis of cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Kimura, Akinori; Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Awazu, Kunio

    2007-02-01

    Stem cells and its differentiations have got a lot of attentions in regenerative medicine. The process of differentiations, the formation of tissues, has become better understood by the study using a lot of cell types progressively. These studies of cells and tissue dynamics at molecular levels are carried out through various approaches like histochemical methods, application of molecular biology and immunology. However, in case of using regenerative sources (cells, tissues and biomaterials etc.) clinically, they are measured and quality-controlled by non-invasive methods from the view point of safety. Recently, the use of Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) has been used to monitor biochemical changes in cells, and has gained considerable importance. The objective of this study is to establish the infrared spectroscopy of cell differentiation as a quality control of cell sources for regenerative medicine. In the present study, as a basic study, we examined the adipose differentiation kinetics of preadipocyte (3T3-L1) and the osteoblast differentiation kinetics of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (Kusa-A1) to analyze the infrared absorption spectra. As a result, we achieved to analyze the adipose differentiation kinetics using the infrared absorption peak at 1739 cm-1 derived from ester bonds of triglyceride and osteoblast differentiation kinetics using the infrared absorption peak at 1030 cm-1 derived from phosphate groups of calcium phosphate.

  13. Morphological classification of plant cell deaths

    PubMed Central

    van Doorn, W G; Beers, E P; Dangl, J L; Franklin-Tong, V E; Gallois, P; Hara-Nishimura, I; Jones, A M; Kawai-Yamada, M; Lam, E; Mundy, J; Mur, L A J; Petersen, M; Smertenko, A; Taliansky, M; Van Breusegem, F; Wolpert, T; Woltering, E; Zhivotovsky, B; Bozhkov, P V

    2011-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral part of plant development and of responses to abiotic stress or pathogens. Although the morphology of plant PCD is, in some cases, well characterised and molecular mechanisms controlling plant PCD are beginning to emerge, there is still confusion about the classification of PCD in plants. Here we suggest a classification based on morphological criteria. According to this classification, the use of the term ‘apoptosis' is not justified in plants, but at least two classes of PCD can be distinguished: vacuolar cell death and necrosis. During vacuolar cell death, the cell contents are removed by a combination of autophagy-like process and release of hydrolases from collapsed lytic vacuoles. Necrosis is characterised by early rupture of the plasma membrane, shrinkage of the protoplast and absence of vacuolar cell death features. Vacuolar cell death is common during tissue and organ formation and elimination, whereas necrosis is typically found under abiotic stress. Some examples of plant PCD cannot be ascribed to either major class and are therefore classified as separate modalities. These are PCD associated with the hypersensitive response to biotrophic pathogens, which can express features of both necrosis and vacuolar cell death, PCD in starchy cereal endosperm and during self-incompatibility. The present classification is not static, but will be subject to further revision, especially when specific biochemical pathways are better defined. PMID:21494263

  14. Effects of vibration on differentiation of cultured PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yukiko; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Nam, Kwangwoo; Katoh, Ayako; Masuzawa, Toru; Kishida, Akio

    2011-03-01

    Different types of physiological-mechanical stress, such as shear stress in vascular endothelial cells or hydrostatic pressure in chondrocytes are well known as regulators of cell function. In this study, the effects of vibration, a type of non-physiological mechanical stimulation, on differentiation of rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells are reported. A nano-vibration system was designed to produce nanometer-scale vibration. The frequency and amplitude of the nano-vibrations were monitored by a capacitance displacement sensor connected to an oscilloscope. When PC12 cells exposed to nerve growth factor were subjected to vibration at 10 kHz, differentiation and elongation of their neurites were promoted earlier in the culture. Vibration promoted differentiation of PC12 cells. This approach could therefore also be promising for determining of the effects of the physical environment on cell differentiation.

  15. Interplay between cell growth and cell cycle in plants.

    PubMed

    Sablowski, Robert; Carnier Dornelas, Marcelo

    2014-06-01

    The growth of organs and whole plants depends on both cell growth and cell-cycle progression, but the interaction between both processes is poorly understood. In plants, the balance between growth and cell-cycle progression requires coordinated regulation of four different processes: macromolecular synthesis (cytoplasmic growth), turgor-driven cell-wall extension, mitotic cycle, and endocycle. Potential feedbacks between these processes include a cell-size checkpoint operating before DNA synthesis and a link between DNA contents and maximum cell size. In addition, key intercellular signals and growth regulatory genes appear to target at the same time cell-cycle and cell-growth functions. For example, auxin, gibberellin, and brassinosteroid all have parallel links to cell-cycle progression (through S-phase Cyclin D-CDK and the anaphase-promoting complex) and cell-wall functions (through cell-wall extensibility or microtubule dynamics). Another intercellular signal mediated by microtubule dynamics is the mechanical stress caused by growth of interconnected cells. Superimposed on developmental controls, sugar signalling through the TOR pathway has recently emerged as a central control point linking cytoplasmic growth, cell-cycle and cell-wall functions. Recent progress in quantitative imaging and computational modelling will facilitate analysis of the multiple interconnections between plant cell growth and cell cycle and ultimately will be required for the predictive manipulation of plant growth.

  16. Differential requirement for OBF-1 during antibody-secreting cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Lynn M.; Hasbold, Jhagvaral; Dietrich, Wendy; Hawkins, Edwin; Kallies, Axel; Nutt, Stephen L.; Tarlinton, David M.; Matthias, Patrick; Hodgkin, Philip D.

    2005-01-01

    Resting B cells can be cultured to induce antibody-secreting cell (ASC) differentiation in vitro. A quantitative analysis of cell behavior during such a culture allows the influences of different stimuli and gene products to be measured. The application of this analytical system revealed that the OBF-1 transcriptional coactivator, whose loss impairs antibody production in vivo, has two effects on ASC development. Although OBF-1 represses early T cell–dependent (TD) differentiation, it is also critical for the completion of the final stages of ASC development. Under these conditions, the loss of OBF-1 blocks the genetic program of ASC differentiation so that Blimp-1/prdm1 induction fails, and bcl-6, Pax5, and AID are not repressed as in control ASC. Retroviral complementation confirmed that OBF-1 was the critical entity. Surprisingly, when cells were cultured in lipopolysaccharide to mimic T cell–independent conditions, OBF-1–null B cells differentiated normally to ASC. In the OBF-1−/− ASC generated under either culture regimen, antibody production was normal or only modestly reduced, revealing that Ig genes are not directly dependent on OBF-1 for their expression. The differential requirement for OBF-1 in TD ASC generation was confirmed in vivo. These studies define a new regulatory role for OBF-1 in determining the cell-autonomous capacity of B cells to undergo terminal differentiation in response to different immunological signals. PMID:15867091

  17. Catalysts of plant cell wall loosening

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    The growing cell wall in plants has conflicting requirements to be strong enough to withstand the high tensile forces generated by cell turgor pressure while selectively yielding to those forces to induce wall stress relaxation, leading to water uptake and polymer movements underlying cell wall expansion. In this article, I review emerging concepts of plant primary cell wall structure, the nature of wall extensibility and the action of expansins, family-9 and -12 endoglucanases, family-16 xyloglucan endotransglycosylase/hydrolase (XTH), and pectin methylesterases, and offer a critical assessment of their wall-loosening activity PMID:26918182

  18. Fibronectin and stem cell differentiation – lessons from chondrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Purva; Schwarzbauer, Jean E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The extracellular matrix (ECM) is an intricate network of proteins that surrounds cells and has a central role in establishing an environment that is conducive to tissue-specific cell functions. In the case of stem cells, this environment is the stem cell niche, where ECM signals participate in cell fate decisions. In this Commentary, we describe how changes in ECM composition and mechanical properties can affect cell shape and stem cell differentiation. Using chondrogenic differentiation as a model, we examine the changes in the ECM that occur before and during mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. In particular, we focus on the main ECM protein fibronectin, its temporal expression pattern during chondrogenic differentiation, its potential effects on functions of differentiating chondrocytes, and how its interactions with other ECM components might affect cartilage development. Finally, we discuss data that support the possibility that the fibronectin matrix has an instructive role in directing cells through the condensation, proliferation and/or differentiation stages of cartilage formation. PMID:22976308

  19. Quantitative phosphoproteome analysis of embryonic stem cell differentiation toward blood

    PubMed Central

    Piazzi, Manuela; Williamson, Andrew; Lee, Chia-Fang; Pearson, Stella; Lacaud, Georges; Kouskoff, Valerie; McCubrey, James A.; Cocco, Lucio; Whetton, Anthony D.

    2015-01-01

    Murine embryonic stem (ES) cells can differentiate in vitro into three germ layers (endodermic, mesodermic, ectodermic). Studies on the differentiation of these cells to specific early differentiation stages has been aided by an ES cell line carrying the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) targeted to the Brachyury (Bry) locus which marks mesoderm commitment. Furthermore, expression of the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor receptor 2 (Flk1) along with Bry defines hemangioblast commitment. Isobaric-tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQTM) and phosphopeptide enrichment coupled to liquid chromatography separation and mass spectrometry allow the study of phosphorylation changes occurring at different stages of ES cell development using Bry and Flk1 expression respectively. We identified and relatively quantified 37 phosphoentities which are modulated during mesoderm-induced ES cells differentiation, comparing epiblast-like, early mesoderm and hemangioblast-enriched cells. Among the proteins differentially phosphorylated toward mesoderm differentiation were: the epigenetic regulator Dnmt3b, the protein kinase GSK3b, the chromatin remodeling factor Smarcc1, the transcription factor Utf1; as well as protein specifically related to stem cell differentiation, as Eomes, Hmga2, Ints1 and Rif1. As most key factors regulating early hematopoietic development have also been implicated in various types of leukemia, understanding the post-translational modifications driving their regulation during normal development could result in a better comprehension of their roles during abnormal hematopoiesis in leukemia. PMID:25890499

  20. Gossypol-Induced Differentiation in Human Leukemia HL-60 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Qing; Li, Rong; Bai, Qing-Xian; Liu, Yu-Hong; Zhang, Wei-Ping; Wang, Juan-Hong; Wang, Zhe; Li, Yuan-Fei; Chen, Xie-Qun; Huang, Gao-Sheng

    2006-01-01

    The main treatment of leukemia is traditional radiochemotherapy, which is associated with serious side effects. In the past twenty years, differentiation was found as an important effective measure to treat leukemia with fewer side effects. Gossypol, a natural compound which has been used as an effective contraceptive drug, has been proposed to be a potent drug to treat leukemia, but the differentiation effect has not been studied. In the present study, we investigated the pro-differentiated effects, in vitro, of gossypol on the classic human myeloid leukemia HL-60 cell line. The effects of gossypol were investigated by using morphological changes, nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction, surface markers, cell-cycle analysis and Western blot analysis, etc. When HL-60 cells were incubated with low concentrations of gossypol (2-5μM) for 48hr, a prominent G0/G1 arrest was observed. At 96 hr of treatment, 90% of HL-60 cells differentiated, as evidenced by morphological changes, NBT reduction, and increase in cell surface expression of some molecules were detected. This study is the first to identify gossypol’s pro-differentiated effects on the leukemia cell line, and it induced differentiation through the PBK (PDZ-binding kinase)/TOPK (T-LAKcell-originated protein kinase) (PBK/TOPK) pathway. It is concluded that gossypol could induce differentiation in the leukemia HL-60 cells, and it may be a potential therapeutic agent, chemoprevention or chemotherapeutic adjuvant especially in combination drug therapy for leukemia. PMID:23675007

  1. WBC (White Blood Cell) Differential Count

    MedlinePlus

    ... Results of a differential are usually reported as absolute values of the five types of WBCs and/or ... a percent of the total number of WBCs. Absolute values are calculated by multiplying the total number of ...

  2. New insights in the regulation of human B cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Schmidlin, Heike; Diehl, Sean A.; Blom, Bianca

    2009-01-01

    B lymphocytes provide the cellular basis of the humoral immune response. All stages of this process, from B cell activation to formation of germinal centers and differentiation into memory B cells or plasma cells, are influenced by extrinsic signals and controlled by transcriptional regulation. Compared to naïve B cells, memory B cells display a distinct expression profile, which allows for their rapid secondary responses. Indisputably, many B cell malignancies result from aberrations in the circuitry controlling B cell function, particularly during the GC reaction. Here we review new insights into memory B cell subtypes, recent literature on transcription factors regulating human B cell differentiation, and further evidence for B cell lymphomagenesis emanating from errors during the GC cell reactions. PMID:19447676

  3. Role of Hox genes in stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Anne; Werheid, David F; Knapp, Silvana M; Tobiasch, Edda

    2015-01-01

    Hox genes are an evolutionary highly conserved gene family. They determine the anterior-posterior body axis in bilateral organisms and influence the developmental fate of cells. Embryonic stem cells are usually devoid of any Hox gene expression, but these transcription factors are activated in varying spatial and temporal patterns defining the development of various body regions. In the adult body, Hox genes are among others responsible for driving the differentiation of tissue stem cells towards their respective lineages in order to repair and maintain the correct function of tissues and organs. Due to their involvement in the embryonic and adult body, they have been suggested to be useable for improving stem cell differentiations in vitro and in vivo. In many studies Hox genes have been found as driving factors in stem cell differentiation towards adipogenesis, in lineages involved in bone and joint formation, mainly chondrogenesis and osteogenesis, in cardiovascular lineages including endothelial and smooth muscle cell differentiations, and in neurogenesis. As life expectancy is rising, the demand for tissue reconstruction continues to increase. Stem cells have become an increasingly popular choice for creating therapies in regenerative medicine due to their self-renewal and differentiation potential. Especially mesenchymal stem cells are used more and more frequently due to their easy handling and accessibility, combined with a low tumorgenicity and little ethical concerns. This review therefore intends to summarize to date known correlations between natural Hox gene expression patterns in body tissues and during the differentiation of various stem cells towards their respective lineages with a major focus on mesenchymal stem cell differentiations. This overview shall help to understand the complex interactions of Hox genes and differentiation processes all over the body as well as in vitro for further improvement of stem cell treatments in future regenerative

  4. Epigenetic Control of Cell Division and Cell Differentiation in the Root Apex

    PubMed Central

    Takatsuka, Hirotomo; Umeda, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetics is defined as heritable changes in gene expression and genome integrity that are accompanied by no alteration in DNA sequence. Throughout plant life cycle, many processes, including genome imprinting, stress responses, and cellular differentiation, are known to be determined by epigenetic regulation. The root apex is also considered to be under the control of epigenetic regulation for optimal growth under variable environments. Recent reports reveal that epigenetic control is especially important in the stem cell niche and the meristematic zone where both cell production and cell specification occur. DNA methylation, histone methylation, and histone acetylation are well-known epigenetic modifications, and each epigenetic modification has distinct roles in roots. Here, we review the updated findings that demonstrate the significance of epigenetic regulation in root apex of Arabidopsis. PMID:26734056

  5. Directed Myogenic Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Emi; Woltjen, Knut; Sakurai, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have opened the door to recreating pathological conditions in vitro using differentiation into diseased cells corresponding to each target tissue. Yet for muscular diseases, a method for reproducible and efficient myogenic differentiation from human iPSCs is required for in vitro modeling. Here, we introduce a myogenic differentiation protocol mediated by inducible transcription factor expression that reproducibly and efficiently drives human iPSCs into myocytes. Delivering a tetracycline-inducible, myogenic differentiation 1 (MYOD1) piggyBac (PB) vector to human iPSCs enables the derivation of iPSCs that undergo uniform myogenic differentiation in a short period of time. This differentiation protocol yields a homogenous skeletal muscle cell population, reproducibly reaching efficiencies as high as 70-90 %. MYOD1-induced myocytes demonstrate characteristics of mature myocytes such as cell fusion and cell twitching in response to electric stimulation within 14 days of differentiation. This differentiation protocol can be applied widely in various types of patient-derived human iPSCs and has great prospects in disease modeling particularly with inherited diseases that require studies of early pathogenesis and drug screening. PMID:25971915

  6. Directed Myogenic Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Emi; Woltjen, Knut; Sakurai, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have opened the door to recreating pathological conditions in vitro using differentiation into diseased cells corresponding to each target tissue. Yet for muscular diseases, a method for reproducible and efficient myogenic differentiation from human iPSCs is required for in vitro modeling. Here, we introduce a myogenic differentiation protocol mediated by inducible transcription factor expression that reproducibly and efficiently drives human iPSCs into myocytes. Delivering a tetracycline-inducible, myogenic differentiation 1 (MYOD1) piggyBac (PB) vector to human iPSCs enables the derivation of iPSCs that undergo uniform myogenic differentiation in a short period of time. This differentiation protocol yields a homogenous skeletal muscle cell population, reproducibly reaching efficiencies as high as 70-90 %. MYOD1-induced myocytes demonstrate characteristics of mature myocytes such as cell fusion and cell twitching in response to electric stimulation within 14 days of differentiation. This differentiation protocol can be applied widely in various types of patient-derived human iPSCs and has great prospects in disease modeling particularly with inherited diseases that require studies of early pathogenesis and drug screening.

  7. Disposable Bioreactors for Plant Micropropagation and Mass Plant Cell Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducos, Jean-Paul; Terrier, Bénédicte; Courtois, Didier

    Different types of bioreactors are used at Nestlé R&D Centre - Tours for mass propagation of selected plant varieties by somatic embryogenesis and for large scale culture of plants cells to produce metabolites or recombinant proteins. Recent studies have been directed to cut down the production costs of these two processes by developing disposable cell culture systems. Vegetative propagation of elite plant varieties is achieved through somatic embryogenesis in liquid medium. A pilot scale process has recently been set up for the industrial propagation of Coffea canephora (Robusta coffee). The current production capacity is 3.0 million embryos per year. The pre-germination of the embryos was previously conducted by temporary immersion in liquid medium in 10-L glass bioreactors. An improved process has been developed using a 10-L disposable bioreactor consisting of a bag containing a rigid plastic box ('Box-in-Bag' bioreactor), insuring, amongst other advantages, a higher light transmittance to the biomass due to its horizontal design. For large scale cell culture, two novel flexible plastic-based disposable bioreactors have been developed from 10 to 100 L working volumes, validated with several plant species ('Wave and Undertow' and 'Slug Bubble' bioreactors). The advantages and the limits of these new types of bioreactor are discussed, based mainly on our own experience on coffee somatic embryogenesis and mass cell culture of soya and tobacco.

  8. A Case for Distributed Control of Local Stem Cell Behavior in Plants.

    PubMed

    Rahni, Ramin; Efroni, Idan; Birnbaum, Kenneth D

    2016-09-26

    The root meristem has a centrally located group of mitotically quiescent cells, to which current models assign a stem cell organizer function. However, evidence is emerging for decentralized control of stem cell activity, whereby self-renewing behavior emerges from the lack of cell displacement at the border of opposing differentiation gradients. We term this a "stagnation" model due to its reliance on passive mechanics. The position of stem cells is established by two opposing axes that reciprocally control each other's differentiation. Such broad tissue organization programs would allow plants, like some animal systems, to rapidly reconstitute stem cells from non-stem-cell tissues. PMID:27676436

  9. Alpha-adrenergic blocker mediated osteoblastic stem cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yoon Jung; Lee, Jue Yeon; Lee, Seung Jin; Chung, Chong-Pyoung; Park, Yoon Jeong

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxazocin directly up-regulated bone metabolism at a low dose. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxazocin induced osteoblastic stem cell differentiation without affecting cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This osteogenic stem cell differentiation is mediated by ERK-signal dependent pathway. -- Abstract: Recent researches have indicated a role for antihypertensive drugs including alpha- or beta-blockers in the prevention of bone loss. Some epidemiological studies reported the protective effects of those agents on fracture risk. However, there is limited information on the association with those agents especially at the mechanism of action. In the present study, we investigated the effects of doxazosin, an alpha-blocker that is clinically used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) along with antihypertensive medication, on the osteogenic stem cell differentiation. We found that doxazosin increased osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells, detected by Alizarin red S staining and calcein. Doxazosin not only induced expression of alkaline phosphatase, type I collagen, osteopontin, and osteocalcin, it also resulted in increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), a MAP kinase involved in osteoblastic differentiation. Treatment with U0126, a MAP kinase inhibitor, significantly blocked doxazosin-induced osteoblastic differentiation. Unrelated to activation of osteogenic differentiation by doxazosin, we found that there were no significant changes in adipogenic differentiation or in the expression of adipose-specific genes, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}, aP2, or LPL. In this report, we suggest that doxazosin has the ability to increase osteogenic cell differentiation via ERK1/2 activation in osteogenic differentiation of adult stem cells, which supports the protective effects of antihypertensive drug on fracture risk and

  10. Differentiation induced by Achyrocline satureioides (Lam) infusion in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Blasina, M F; Vaamonde, L; Morquio, A; Echeverry, C; Arredondo, F; Dajas, F

    2009-09-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that flavonoid-rich plants induce beneficial health effects that are likely beyond their potent antioxidant capacity. Thus, the mechanisms by which Achyrocline satureioides (AS), a popular South American medicinal plant, protects cells and neurons in culture, are still unclear. In this sense, a recently described trophic capacity for flavonoids, similar to that evoked by growth factors, could be one of the mechanisms involved in AS cellular protection. Since this trophic activity causes differentiation of PC12 cells, the cell differentiation capacity of AS and some of its flavonoids were evaluated. PC12 cells were treated with AS infusion (10 or 20 microg/mL of total polyphenols), quercetin (Q) (12.5 or 25 microm), luteolin (L) (25 microm), Q + L (12.5 microm each one) or nerve growth factor (NGF) for 3 days. Four morphological parameters (percentage of cells with neurites longer than one cell body diameter, percentage of cells with neurites, average number of neurites per cell and percentage of fusiform cells) were explored. The AS infusion showed differentiation capacity on all parameters with similar potency when compared with NGF. Besides, AS was more potent than some of its constituent flavonoids: Q, L or their combination.

  11. Regulatory T cells inhibit CD34+ cell differentiation into NK cells by blocking their proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Pedroza-Pacheco, Isabela; Shah, Divya; Domogala, Anna; Luevano, Martha; Blundell, Michael; Jackson, Nicola; Thrasher, Adrian; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2016-01-01

    Graft versus Host Disease (GvHD) remains one of the main complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Due to their ability to suppress effector cells, regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been proposed as a cellular therapy to prevent GvHD, however they also inhibit the functions of natural killer (NK) cells, key effectors of the Graft versus Leukemia effect. In this study, we have explored whether a Tregs therapy will also impact on NK cell differentiation. Using an in vitro model of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) differentiation into NK cells, we found that activated Tregs led to a 90% reduction in NK cell numbers when added at the time of commitment to the NK cell lineage. This effect was contact dependent and was reversible upon Tregs depletion. The few NK cells that developed in these cultures were mature and exhibited normal functions. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of activated Tregs in rag-/- γc-/- mice abrogated HSC differentiation into NK cells thus confirming our in vitro findings. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time that activated Tregs can inhibit NK cell differentiation from HSC under specific conditions. PMID:26915707

  12. Interplay of Matrix Stiffness and Cell-Cell Contact in Regulating Differentiation of Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Kai; Cao, Luping; Li, Shiyu; Yu, Lin; Ding, Jiandong

    2016-08-31

    Stem cells are capable of sensing and responding to the mechanical properties of extracellular matrixes (ECMs). It is well-known that, while osteogenesis is promoted on the stiff matrixes, adipogenesis is enhanced on the soft ones. Herein, we report an "abnormal" tendency of matrix-stiffness-directed stem cell differentiation. Well-defined nanoarrays of cell-adhesive arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) peptides were modified onto the surfaces of persistently nonfouling poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels to achieve controlled specific cell adhesion and simultaneously eliminate nonspecific protein adsorption. Mesenchymal stem cells were cultivated on the RGD-nanopatterned PEG hydrogels with the same RGD nanospacing but different hydrogel stiffnesses and incubated in the induction medium to examine the effect of matrix stiffness on osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation extents. When stem cells were kept at a low density during the induction period, the differentiation tendency was consistent with the previous reports in the literature; however, both lineage commitments were favored on the stiff matrices at a high cell density. We interpreted such a complicated stiffness effect at a high cell density in two-dimensional culture as the interplay of matrix stiffness and cell-cell contact. As a result, this study strengthens the essence of the stiffness effect and highlights the combinatory effects of ECM cues and cell cues on stem cell differentiation.

  13. Interplay of Matrix Stiffness and Cell-Cell Contact in Regulating Differentiation of Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Kai; Cao, Luping; Li, Shiyu; Yu, Lin; Ding, Jiandong

    2016-08-31

    Stem cells are capable of sensing and responding to the mechanical properties of extracellular matrixes (ECMs). It is well-known that, while osteogenesis is promoted on the stiff matrixes, adipogenesis is enhanced on the soft ones. Herein, we report an "abnormal" tendency of matrix-stiffness-directed stem cell differentiation. Well-defined nanoarrays of cell-adhesive arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) peptides were modified onto the surfaces of persistently nonfouling poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels to achieve controlled specific cell adhesion and simultaneously eliminate nonspecific protein adsorption. Mesenchymal stem cells were cultivated on the RGD-nanopatterned PEG hydrogels with the same RGD nanospacing but different hydrogel stiffnesses and incubated in the induction medium to examine the effect of matrix stiffness on osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation extents. When stem cells were kept at a low density during the induction period, the differentiation tendency was consistent with the previous reports in the literature; however, both lineage commitments were favored on the stiff matrices at a high cell density. We interpreted such a complicated stiffness effect at a high cell density in two-dimensional culture as the interplay of matrix stiffness and cell-cell contact. As a result, this study strengthens the essence of the stiffness effect and highlights the combinatory effects of ECM cues and cell cues on stem cell differentiation. PMID:26600563

  14. Structural properties of scaffolds: Crucial parameters towards stem cells differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi-Mobarakeh, Laleh; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Tian, Lingling; Shamirzaei-Jeshvaghani, Elham; Dehghani, Leila; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a multidisciplinary field that applies the principles of engineering and life-sciences for regeneration of damaged tissues. Stem cells have attracted much interest in tissue engineering as a cell source due to their ability to proliferate in an undifferentiated state for prolonged time and capability of differentiating to different cell types after induction. Scaffolds play an important role in tissue engineering as a substrate that can mimic the native extracellular matrix and the properties of scaffolds have been shown to affect the cell behavior such as the cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation. Here, we focus on the recent reports that investigated the various aspects of scaffolds including the materials used for scaffold fabrication, surface modification of scaffolds, topography and mechanical properties of scaffolds towards stem cells differentiation effect. We will present a more detailed overview on the effect of mechanical properties of scaffolds on stem cells fate. PMID:26029344

  15. Distinct differentiation characteristics of individual human embryonic stem cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Mikkola, Milla; Olsson, Cia; Palgi, Jaan; Ustinov, Jarkko; Palomaki, Tiina; Horelli-Kuitunen, Nina; Knuutila, Sakari; Lundin, Karolina; Otonkoski, Timo; Tuuri, Timo

    2006-01-01

    Background Individual differences between human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines are poorly understood. Here, we describe the derivation of five hESC lines (called FES 21, 22, 29, 30 and 61) from frozen-thawed human embryos and compare their individual differentiation characteristic. Results The cell lines were cultured either on human or mouse feeder cells. The cells grew significantly faster and could be passaged enzymatically only on mouse feeders. However, this was found to lead to chromosomal instability after prolonged culture. All hESC lines expressed the established markers of pluripotent cells as well as several primordial germ cell (PGC) marker genes in a uniform manner. However, the cell lines showed distinct features in their spontaneous differentiation patterns. The embryoid body (EB) formation frequency of FES 30 cell line was significantly lower than that of other lines and cells within the EBs differentiated less readily. Likewise, teratomas derived from FES 30 cells were constantly cystic and showed only minor solid tissue formation with a monotonous differentiation pattern as compared with the other lines. Conclusion hESC lines may differ substantially in their differentiation properties although they appear similar in the undifferentiated state. PMID:16895598

  16. Serum-Induced Differentiation of Human Meibomian Gland Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, David A.; Liu, Yang; Kam, Wendy R.; Ding, Juan; Green, Karin M.; Shaffer, Scott A.; Hatton, Mark P.; Liu, Shaohui

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We hypothesize that culturing immortalized human meibomian gland epithelial cells in serum-containing medium will induce their differentiation. The purpose of this investigation was to begin to test our hypothesis, and explore the impact of serum on gene expression and lipid accumulation in human meibomian gland epithelial cells. Methods. Immortalized and primary human meibomian gland epithelial cells were cultured in the presence or absence of serum. Cells were evaluated for lysosome and lipid accumulation, polar and neutral lipid profiles, and gene expression. Results. Our results support our hypothesis that serum stimulates the differentiation of human meibomian gland epithelial cells. This serum-induced effect is associated with a significant increase in the expression of genes linked to cell differentiation, epithelium development, the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, vesicles, and lysosomes, and a significant decrease in gene activity related to the cell cycle, mitochondria, ribosomes, and translation. These cellular responses are accompanied by an accumulation of lipids within lysosomes, as well as alterations in the fatty acid content of polar and nonpolar lipids. Of particular importance, our results show that the molecular and biochemical changes of immortalized human meibomian gland epithelial cells during differentiation are analogous to those of primary cells. Conclusions. Overall, our findings indicate that immortalized human meibomian gland epithelial cells may serve as an ideal preclinical model to identify factors that control cellular differentiation in the meibomian gland. PMID:24867579

  17. Differentiation of Multipotent Vascular Stem Cells Contributes to Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhenyu; Wang, Aijun; Yuan, Falei; Yan, Zhiqiang; Liu, Bo; Chu, Julia S.; Helms, Jill A.

    2012-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the de-differentiation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from contractile to proliferative/synthetic phenotype has an important role during vascular remodeling and diseases. Here we provide evidence that challenges this theory. We identify a new type of multipotent vascular stem cell (MVSC) in blood vessel wall. MVSCs express markers including Sox17, Sox10 and S100β, are cloneable, have telomerase activity, and can differentiate into neural cells and mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like cells that subsequently differentiate into SMCs. On the other hand, we use lineage tracing with smooth muscle myosin heavy chain as a marker to show that MVSCs and proliferative or synthetic SMCs do not arise from the de-differentiation of mature SMCs. Upon vascular injuries, MVSCs, instead of SMCs, become proliferative, and MVSCs can differentiate into SMCs and chondrogenic cells, thus contributing to vascular remodeling and neointimal hyperplasia. These findings support a new hypothesis that the differentiation of MVSCs, rather than the de-differentiation of SMCs, contributes to vascular remodeling and diseases. PMID:22673902

  18. DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2004-11-01

    This report includes the progress in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine{reg_sign} (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. The operation of sub-MW hybrid Direct FuelCell/Turbine power plant test facility with a Capstone C60 microturbine was initiated in March 2003. The inclusion of the C60 microturbine extended the range of operation of the hybrid power plant to higher current densities (higher power) than achieved in previous tests using a 30kW microturbine. The design of multi-MW DFC/T hybrid systems, approaching 75% efficiency on natural gas, was initiated. A new concept was developed based on clusters of One-MW fuel cell modules as the building blocks. System analyses were performed, including systems for near-term deployment and power plants with long-term ultra high efficiency objectives. Preliminary assessment of the fuel cell cluster concept, including power plant layout for a 14MW power plant, was performed.

  19. Mechanism of Action of Two Flavone Isomers Targeting Cancer Cells with Varying Cell Differentiation Status

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Laura B.; Miller, Gerald E.; Whitted, Crystal; Lynch, Kayla E.; Ramsauer, Robert E.; Patel, Jasmine U.; Wyatt, Jarrett E.; Street, Doris S.; Adams, Carolyn B.; McPherson, Brian; Tsui, Hei Man; Evans, Julie A.; Livesay, Christopher; Torrenegra, Ruben D.; Palau, Victoria E.

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis can be triggered in two different ways, through the intrinsic or the extrinsic pathway. The intrinsic pathway is mediated by the mitochondria via the release of cytochrome C while the extrinsic pathway is prompted by death receptor signals and bypasses the mitochondria. These two pathways are closely related to cell proliferation and survival signaling cascades, which thereby constitute possible targets for cancer therapy. In previous studies we introduced two plant derived isomeric flavonoids, flavone A and flavone B which induce apoptosis in highly tumorigenic cancer cells of the breast, colon, pancreas, and the prostate. Flavone A displayed potent cytotoxic activity against more differentiated carcinomas of the colon (CaCo-2) and the pancreas (Panc28), whereas flavone B cytotoxic action is observed on poorly differentiated carcinomas of the colon (HCT 116) and pancreas (MIA PaCa). Apoptosis is induced by flavone A in better differentiated colon cancer CaCo-2 and pancreatic cancer Panc 28 cells via the intrinsic pathway by the inhibition of the activated forms of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and pS6, and subsequent loss of phosphorylation of Bcl-2 associated death promoter (BAD) protein, while apoptosis is triggered by flavone B in poorly differentiated colon cancer HCT 116 and MIA PaCa pancreatic cancer cells through the extrinsic pathway with the concomitant upregulation of the phosphorylated forms of ERK and c-JUN at serine 73. These changes in protein levels ultimately lead to activation of apoptosis, without the involvement of AKT. PMID:26606169

  20. Plant cell shape: modulators and measurements

    PubMed Central

    Ivakov, Alexander; Persson, Staffan

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell shape, seen as an integrative output, is of considerable interest in various fields, such as cell wall research, cytoskeleton dynamics and biomechanics. In this review we summarize the current state of knowledge on cell shape formation in plants focusing on shape of simple cylindrical cells, as well as in complex multipolar cells such as leaf pavement cells and trichomes. We summarize established concepts as well as recent additions to the understanding of how cells construct cell walls of a given shape and the underlying processes. These processes include cell wall synthesis, activity of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons, in particular their regulation by microtubule associated proteins, actin-related proteins, GTP'ases and their effectors, as well as the recently-elucidated roles of plant hormone signaling and vesicular membrane trafficking. We discuss some of the challenges in cell shape research with a particular emphasis on quantitative imaging and statistical analysis of shape in 2D and 3D, as well as novel developments in this area. Finally, we review recent examples of the use of novel imaging techniques and how they have contributed to our understanding of cell shape formation. PMID:24312104

  1. Directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells towards T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lei, Fengyang; Haque, Rizwanul; Xiong, Xiaofang; Song, Jianxun

    2012-05-14

    Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of antigen-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) is a promising treatment for a variety of malignancies (1). CTLs can recognize malignant cells by interacting tumor antigens with the T cell receptors (TCR), and release cytotoxins as well as cytokines to kill malignant cells. It is known that less-differentiated and central-memory-like (termed highly reactive) CTLs are the optimal population for ACT-based immunotherapy, because these CTLs have a high proliferative potential, are less prone to apoptosis than more differentiated cells and have a higher ability to respond to homeostatic cytokines (2-7). However, due to difficulties in obtaining a high number of such CTLs from patients, there is an urgent need to find a new approach to generate highly reactive Ag-specific CTLs for successful ACT-based therapies. TCR transduction of the self-renewable stem cells for immune reconstitution has a therapeutic potential for the treatment of diseases (8-10). However, the approach to obtain embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from patients is not feasible. Although the use of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) for therapeutic purposes has been widely applied in clinic (11-13), HSCs have reduced differentiation and proliferative capacities, and HSCs are difficult to expand in in vitro cell culture (14-16). Recent iPS cell technology and the development of an in vitro system for gene delivery are capable of generating iPS cells from patients without any surgical approach. In addition, like ESCs, iPS cells possess indefinite proliferative capacity in vitro, and have been shown to differentiate into hematopoietic cells. Thus, iPS cells have greater potential to be used in ACT-based immunotherapy compared to ESCs or HSCs. Here, we present methods for the generation of T lymphocytes from iPS cells in vitro, and in vivo programming of antigen-specific CTLs from iPS cells for promoting cancer immune surveillance. Stimulation in vitro with a Notch ligand

  2. Plant expansins: diversity and interactions with plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Daniel J

    2015-06-01

    Expansins were discovered two decades ago as cell wall proteins that mediate acid-induced growth by catalyzing loosening of plant cell walls without lysis of wall polymers. In the interim our understanding of expansins has gotten more complex through bioinformatic analysis of expansin distribution and evolution, as well as through expression analysis, dissection of the upstream transcription factors regulating expression, and identification of additional classes of expansin by sequence and structural similarities. Molecular analyses of expansins from bacteria have identified residues essential for wall loosening activity and clarified the bifunctional nature of expansin binding to complex cell walls. Transgenic modulation of expansin expression modifies growth and stress physiology of plants, but not always in predictable or even understandable ways.

  3. Plant expansins: diversity and interactions with plant cell walls

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Expansins were discovered two decades ago as cell wall proteins that mediate acid-induced growth by catalyzing loosening of plant cell walls without lysis of wall polymers. In the interim our understanding of expansins has gotten more complex through bioinformatic analysis of expansin distribution and evolution, as well as through expression analysis, dissection of the upstream transcription factors regulating expression, and identification of additional classes of expansin by sequence and structural similarities. Molecular analyses of expansins from bacteria have identified residues essential for wall loosening activity and clarified the bifunctional nature of expansin binding to complex cell walls. Transgenic modulation of expansin expression modifies growth and stress physiology of plants, but not always in predictable and even understandable ways. PMID:26057089

  4. Dual Effects of Liquiritigenin on the Proliferation of Bone Cells: Promotion of Osteoblast Differentiation and Inhibition of Osteoclast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Kaho; Okamoto, Kuniaki; Sakai, Eiko; Yoneshima, Erika; Iwatake, Mayumi; Fukuma, Yutaka; Nishishita, Kazuhisa; Tsukuba, Takayuki

    2015-11-01

    Bone is constantly controlled by a balance between osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic bone resorption. Liquiritigenin is a plant-derived flavonoid and has various pharmacological effects, such as antioxidative, antitumor, and antiinflammatory effects. Here, we show that liquiritigenin has dual effects on the proliferation of bone cells, regarding the promotion of osteoblast differentiation and the inhibition of osteoclast differentiation. Liquiritigenin-treated murine osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells showed an increased alkaline phosphatase activity and enhanced phosphorylation of Smad1/5 compared with untreated cells. Moreover, liquiritigenin inhibited osteoclast differentiation, its bone-resorption activity through slightly decreased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa Bα; however, the phosphorylation of Akt and p38 slightly increased in bone marrow-derived osteoclasts. The expression levels of the osteoclast marker proteins nuclear factor of activated T-cell cytoplasmic-1, Src, and cathepsin K diminished. These results suggest that liquiritigenin may be useful as a therapeutic and/or preventive agent for osteoporosis or inflammatory bone diseases.

  5. Quantitative Aspects of Cyclosis in Plant Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howells, K. F.; Fell, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an exercise which is currently used in a course in cell physiology at Oxford Polytechnic in England. This exercise can give students some idea of the molecular events involved in bringing about movement of chloroplasts (and other organelles) in plant cells. (HM)

  6. The role of copper in HL-60 cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, B.; Percival, S.S. )

    1991-03-15

    Copper deficiency in humans has been shown to result in neutropenia. This research asks what is copper's function in the development of neutrophils HL-60 cells, a promyelocyte cell line, was induced to differentiate towards the granulocytic lineage with 1 {mu}M retinoic acid for 5 days. Both noninduced and induced cells were incubated in either complete medium or in medium supplemented with 8 {mu}M copper. Intracellular copper levels, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase activity and the respiratory burst (RB) activity of the cells were measured. The respiratory burst of neutrophils is a measure of cellular function and degree of differentiation. Induced cells, as expected, showed greater RB activity than the non-induced cells. Copper supplementation, however, had no effect on this activity. Differentiated HL-60 cells had two times more intracellular copper but ten times less Cu/Zn-SOD activity. Copper supplementation enhanced Cu/Zn-SOD activity in both noninduced and induced cells. This suggests that the availability of intracellular copper is important in expressing Cu/ZN-SOD activity and that differentiated cells, although they have more intracellular copper under basal conditions, cannot utilize that copper for Cu/Zn-SOD enzyme activity. When supplemental copper was provided during differentiation, Cu/Zn-SOD activity was maintained.

  7. IL-12 could induce monocytic tumor cells directional differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ting-Ting; Wu, Bi-Tao; Lin, Yan; Xiong, Hai-Yu; Wang, Qin; Li, Zi-Wei; Cheng, Feng; Tu, Zhi-Guang

    2015-04-01

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12), a member of interleukin family, plays a critical role in immune responses and anti-tumor activity. In this study, the effects of IL-12 on monocytic tumor cell lines differentiation to macrophagocyte and its likely mechanism was investigated. We examined the differentiation markers, morphological and functional changes, and possible mechanism in IL-12-treated THP-1 and U937 cells. It was found that IL-12 could up-regulated macrophage surface marker CD68 and CD11b expression in a time-dependent manner. Morphologically, after IL-12 treatment, THP-1 and U937 cells became round or irregular shape, even stretched many cell membrane protuberances; some cell nuclei became fuzzy or completely disappeared, and the chromatin appeared dense and cordlike. Furthermore, IL-12-induced monocytic tumor cell differentiation was accompanied by the growth arrest with G1-phase accumulation and S-phase reduction; apoptosis increased with anti-apoptosis protein Bcl-2 down-expression and pro-apoptosis protein Fas up-regulation, and enhanced phagocytosis function. The IL-12-induced macrophage differentiation of THP-1 and U937 cells was associated with the up-regulation of c-fms expression and the CSF-1R Tyr 809 site phosphorylation. These findings have revealed that IL-12 could induce monocytic tumor cells directional differentiation into macrophage-like cells, and its mechanism is possible connected with the up-regulation of c-fms expression and the phosphorylation of CSF-1R Tyr-809 site.

  8. The organelle of differentiation in embryos: the cell state splitter.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Natalie K; Gordon, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The cell state splitter is a membraneless organelle at the apical end of each epithelial cell in a developing embryo. It consists of a microfilament ring and an intermediate filament ring subtending a microtubule mat. The microtubules and microfilament ring are in mechanical opposition as in a tensegrity structure. The cell state splitter is bistable, perturbations causing it to contract or expand radially. The intermediate filament ring provides metastability against small perturbations. Once this snap-through organelle is triggered, it initiates signal transduction to the nucleus, which changes gene expression in one of two readied manners, causing its cell to undergo a step of determination and subsequent differentiation. The cell state splitter also triggers the cell state splitters of adjacent cells to respond, resulting in a differentiation wave. Embryogenesis may be represented then as a bifurcating differentiation tree, each edge representing one cell type. In combination with the differentiation waves they propagate, cell state splitters explain the spatiotemporal course of differentiation in the developing embryo. This review is excerpted from and elaborates on "Embryogenesis Explained" (World Scientific Publishing, Singapore, 2016). PMID:26965444

  9. Mouse bone marrow stromal cells differentiate to neuron-like cells upon inhibition of BMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Monika; Prashar, Paritosh; Yadav, Prem Swaroop; Sen, Jonaki

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are a source of autologous stem cells that have the potential for undergoing differentiation into multiple cell types including neurons. Although the neuronal differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells has been studied for a long time, the molecular players involved are still not defined. Here we report that the genetic deletion of two members of the bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp) family, Bmp2 and Bmp4 in mouse BMSCs causes their differentiation into cells with neuron-like morphology. Surprisingly these cells expressed certain markers characteristic of both neuronal and glial cells. Based on this observation, we inhibited BMP signaling in mouse BMSCs through a brief exposure to Noggin protein which also led to their differentiation into cells expressing both neuronal and glial markers. Such cells seem to have the potential for further differentiation into subtypes of neuronal and glial cells and thus could be utilized for cell-based therapeutic applications.

  10. Plant single-cell and single-cell-type metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Misra, Biswapriya B; Assmann, Sarah M; Chen, Sixue

    2014-10-01

    In conjunction with genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics, plant metabolomics is providing large data sets that are paving the way towards a comprehensive and holistic understanding of plant growth, development, defense, and productivity. However, dilution effects from organ- and tissue-based sampling of metabolomes have limited our understanding of the intricate regulation of metabolic pathways and networks at the cellular level. Recent advances in metabolomics methodologies, along with the post-genomic expansion of bioinformatics knowledge and functional genomics tools, have allowed the gathering of enriched information on individual cells and single cell types. Here we review progress, current status, opportunities, and challenges presented by single cell-based metabolomics research in plants.

  11. COMPUTATION MODELING OF TCDD DISRUPTION OF B CELL TERMINAL DIFFERENTIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we established a computational model describing the molecular circuit underlying B cell terminal differentiation and how TCDD may affect this process by impinging upon various molecular targets.

  12. Bone marrow cells differentiation into organ cells using stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y-J; Li, X-L; Xue, Y; Zhang, C-X; Wang, Y; Hu, X; Dai, Q

    2016-07-01

    Bone marrow cells (BMC) are progenitors of bone, cartilage, skeletal tissue, the hematopoiesis-supporting stroma and adipocyte cells. BMCs have the potential to differentiate into neural cells, cardiac myocytes, liver hepatocytes, chondrocytes, renal, corneal, blood, and myogenic cells. The bone marrow cell cultures from stromal and mesenchymal cells are called multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs). MAPCs can differentiate into mesenchymal cells, visceral mesoderm, neuroectoderm and endoderm in vitro. It has been shown that the stem cells derived from bone marrow cells (BMCs) can regenerate cardiac myocytes after myocardial infarction (MI). Adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells have the ability to regenerate neural cells. Neural stem/progenitor cells (NS/PC) are ideal for treating central nervous system (CNS) diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington disease. However, there are important ethical issues about the therapeutic use of stem cells. Neurons, cardiac myocytes, hepatocytes, renal cells, blood cells, chondrocytes and adipocytes regeneration from BMCs are very important in disease control. It is known that limbal epithelial stem cells in the cornea can repair the eye sight and remove symptoms of blindness. Stem cell therapy (SCT) is progressing well in animal models, but the use of SCT in human remains to be explored further.

  13. Signatures of human NK cell development and terminal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Luetke-Eversloh, Merlin; Killig, Monica; Romagnani, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are part of the innate lymphoid cell (ILC) family and represent the main cytotoxic population. NK cells develop from bone marrow common lymphoid progenitors and undergo terminal differentiation in the periphery, where they finally gain their cytotoxic competence as well as the ability to produce IFN-γ in response to engagement of activating receptors. This process has been at least partially elucidated and several markers have been identified to discriminate different NK cell stages and other ILC populations. NK cell terminal differentiation is not only associated with progressive phenotypic changes but also with defined effector signatures. In this essay, we will describe the phenotypic and functional characteristics of the main stages of NK cell development and terminal differentiation and discuss them in light of recent discoveries of novel ILC populations.

  14. Signatures of Human NK Cell Development and Terminal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Luetke-Eversloh, Merlin; Killig, Monica; Romagnani, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are part of the innate lymphoid cell (ILC) family and represent the main cytotoxic population. NK cells develop from bone marrow common lymphoid progenitors and undergo terminal differentiation in the periphery, where they finally gain their cytotoxic competence as well as the ability to produce IFN-γ in response to engagement of activating receptors. This process has been at least partially elucidated and several markers have been identified to discriminate different NK cell stages and other ILC populations. NK cell terminal differentiation is not only associated with progressive phenotypic changes but also with defined effector signatures. In this essay, we will describe the phenotypic and functional characteristics of the main stages of NK cell development and terminal differentiation and discuss them in light of recent discoveries of novel ILC populations. PMID:24416035

  15. T Cell Receptor Signaling in the Control of Regulatory T Cell Differentiation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming O.; Rudensky, Alexander Y.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (TReg cells), a specialized T cell lineage, have a pivotal function in the control of self-tolerance and inflammatory responses. Recent studies have revealed a discrete mode of TCR signaling that regulates Treg cell differentiation, maintenance and function and that impacts on gene expression, metabolism, cell adhesion and migration of these cells. Here, we discuss the emerging understanding of TCR-guided differentiation of Treg cells in the context of their function in health and disease. PMID:27026074

  16. Microtubule networks for plant cell division.

    PubMed

    de Keijzer, Jeroen; Mulder, Bela M; Janson, Marcel E

    2014-09-01

    During cytokinesis the cytoplasm of a cell is divided to form two daughter cells. In animal cells, the existing plasma membrane is first constricted and then abscised to generate two individual plasma membranes. Plant cells on the other hand divide by forming an interior dividing wall, the so-called cell plate, which is constructed by localized deposition of membrane and cell wall material. Construction starts in the centre of the cell at the locus of the mitotic spindle and continues radially towards the existing plasma membrane. Finally the membrane of the cell plate and plasma membrane fuse to form two individual plasma membranes. Two microtubule-based cytoskeletal networks, the phragmoplast and the pre-prophase band (PPB), jointly control cytokinesis in plants. The bipolar microtubule array of the phragmoplast regulates cell plate deposition towards a cortical position that is templated by the ring-shaped microtubule array of the PPB. In contrast to most animal cells, plants do not use centrosomes as foci of microtubule growth initiation. Instead, plant microtubule networks are striking examples of self-organizing systems that emerge from physically constrained interactions of dispersed microtubules. Here we will discuss how microtubule-based activities including growth, shrinkage, severing, sliding, nucleation and bundling interrelate to jointly generate the required ordered structures. Evidence mounts that adapter proteins sense the local geometry of microtubules to locally modulate the activity of proteins involved in microtubule growth regulation and severing. Many of the proteins and mechanisms involved have roles in other microtubule assemblies as well, bestowing broader relevance to insights gained from plants. PMID:25136380

  17. Clonogenic multipotent stem cells in human adipose tissue differentiate into functional smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Larissa V.; Alfonso, Zeni; Zhang, Rong; Leung, Joanne; Wu, Benjamin; Ignarro, Louis J.

    2006-01-01

    Smooth muscle is a major component of human tissues and is essential for the normal function of a multitude of organs including the intestine, urinary tract and the vascular system. The use of stem cells for cell-based tissue engineering and regeneration strategies represents a promising alternative for smooth muscle repair. For such strategies to succeed, a reliable source of smooth muscle precursor cells must be identified. Adipose tissue provides an abundant source of multipotent cells. In this study, the capacity of processed lipoaspirate (PLA) and adipose-derived stem cells to differentiate into phenotypic and functional smooth muscle cells was evaluated. To induce differentiation, PLA cells were cultured in smooth muscle differentiation medium. Smooth muscle differentiation of PLA cells induced genetic expression of all smooth muscle markers and further confirmed by increased protein expression of smooth muscle cell-specific α actin (ASMA), calponin, caldesmon, SM22, myosin heavy chain (MHC), and smoothelin. Clonal studies of adipose derived multipotent cells demonstrated differentiation of these cells into smooth muscle cells in addition to trilineage differentiation capacity. Importantly, smooth muscle-differentiated cells, but not their precursors, exhibit the functional ability to contract and relax in direct response to pharmacologic agents. In conclusion, adipose-derived cells have the potential to differentiate into functional smooth muscle cells and, thus, adipose tissue can be a useful source of cells for treatment of injured tissues where smooth muscle plays an important role. PMID:16880387

  18. Sambucus williamsii induced embryonic stem cells differentiated into neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shih-Ping; Hsu, Chien-Yu; Fu, Ru-Huei; Huang, Yu-Chuen; Chen, Shih-Yin; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Shyu, Woei-Cherng

    2015-01-01

    The pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic stem cells (ESCs), are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into any cell type, thus making them the focus of many clinical application studies. However, the efficiency of ESCs differentiated into neurons needs to improve. In this study, we tried to increase efficiently to a neural fate in the presence of various transitional Chinese medicines through a three-step differentiation strategy. From extracts of 10 transitional Chinese medicine candidates, we determined that Sambucus williamsii (SW) extract triggers the up-regulation of Nestin and Tuj1 (neuron cells markers) gene expression levels. After determining the different concentrations of SW extract, the number of neurons in the 200 μg/ml SW extract group was higher than the control, 50, 100, and 400 μg/ml SW extract groups. In addition, the number of neurons in the 200 μg/ml SW extract group was higher and higher after each time passage (three times). We also detected the Oct4, Sox2 (stem cells markers), Tuj1, and Nestin genes expression levels by RT-PCR. In the differentiated process, Oct4 and Sox2 genes decreased while the Tuj1 and Nestin genes expression levels increased. In summary, we demonstrated that SW could induce pluripotent stem cells differentiated into neurons. Thus, SW might become a powerful material for neurons-differentiating strategies.

  19. Differentiated HL-60 promyelocytic leukaemia cells produce a factor inducing differentiation.

    PubMed

    Djulbegović, B; Christmas, S E; Moore, M

    1987-01-01

    The bipotential human promyelocytic leukaemia cell line HL-60 can be induced to differentiate into monocytic or granulocytic cells by treatment with 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) or dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) respectively. Conditioned media (CM) from 1,25(OH)2D3- or DMSO-treated cells were able to induce monocytic differentiation in fresh HL-60 cells as measured by induction of non-specific esterase and macrophage surface markers. CM from 1,25(OH)2D3-treated cells also led to a dose dependent loss of proliferative capacity in soft agar colony assays. These effects were not due to a toxic effect of the CM or to residual inducer present in the CM. gamma-interferon and GM-CSF were apparently not responsible for these effects. CM from the human histiocytic lymphoma cell line U937 led to only a low level of induction of macrophage differentiation in fresh HL-60 cells. The defect in HL-60 leukaemic cells may therefore be at the level of induction of an autonomously-produced differentiation factor.

  20. Monoclonal antibodies against plant cell wall polysaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.G.; Bucheli, E.; Darvill, A.; Albersheim, P. )

    1989-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) are useful tools to probe the structure of plant cell wall polysaccharides and to localize these polysaccharides in plant cells and tissues. Murine McAbs were generated against the pectic polysaccharide, rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I), isolated from suspension-cultured sycamore cells. The McAbs that were obtained were grouped into three classes based upon their reactivities with a variety of plant polysaccharides and membrane glycoproteins. Eleven McAbs (Class I) recognize epitope(s) that appear to be immunodominant and are found in RG-I from sycamore and maize, citrus pectin, polygalacturonic acid, and membrane glycoproteins from suspension-cultured cells of sycamore, maize, tobacco, parsley, and soybean. A second group of five McAbs (Class II) recognize epitope(s) present in sycamore RG-I, but do not bind to any of the other polysaccharides or glycoproteins recognized by Class I. Lastly, one McAb (Class III) reacts with sycamore RG-I, sycamore and tamarind xyloglucan, and sycamore and rice glucuronoarabinoxylan, but does not bind to maize RG-I, polygalacturonic acid or the plant membrane glycoproteins recognized by Class I. McAbs in Classes II and III are likely to be useful in studies of the structure, biosynthesis and localization of plant cell wall polysaccharides.

  1. Laser-mediated perforation of plant cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehner, Martin; Jacobs, Philipp; Esser, Dominik; Schinkel, Helga; Schillberg, Stefan

    2007-07-01

    The functional analysis of plant cells at the cellular and subcellular levels requires novel technologies for the directed manipulation of individual cells. Lasers are increasingly exploited for the manipulation of plant cells, enabling the study of biological processes on a subcellular scale including transformation to generate genetically modified plants. In our setup either a picosecond laser operating at 1064 nm wavelength or a continuous wave laser diode emitting at 405 nm are coupled into an inverse microscope. The beams are focused to a spot size of about 1.5 μm and the tobacco cell protoplasts are irradiated. Optoporation is achieved when targeting the laser focal spot at the outermost edge of the plasma membrane. In case of the picosecond laser a single pulse with energy of about 0.4 μJ was sufficient to perforate the plasma membrane enabling the uptake of dye or DNA from the surrounding medium into the cytosol. When the ultraviolet laser diode at a power level of 17 mW is employed an irradiation time of 200 - 500 milliseconds is necessary to enable the uptake of macromolecules. In the presence of an EYFP encoding plasmid with a C-terminal peroxisomal signal sequence in the surrounding medium transient transformation of tobacco protoplasts could be achieved in up to 2% of the optoporated cells. Single cell perforation using this novel optoporation method shows that isolated plant cells can be permeabilized without direct manipulation. This is a valuable procedure for cell-specific applications, particularly where the import of specific molecules into plant cells is required for functional analysis.

  2. Integrating human stem cell expansion and neuronal differentiation in bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Margarida; Brito, Catarina; Costa, Eunice M; Sousa, Marcos FQ; Alves, Paula M

    2009-01-01

    Background Human stem cells are cellular resources with outstanding potential for cell therapy. However, for the fulfillment of this application, major challenges remain to be met. Of paramount importance is the development of robust systems for in vitro stem cell expansion and differentiation. In this work, we successfully developed an efficient scalable bioprocess for the fast production of human neurons. Results The expansion of undifferentiated human embryonal carcinoma stem cells (NTera2/cl.D1 cell line) as 3D-aggregates was firstly optimized in spinner vessel. The media exchange operation mode with an inoculum concentration of 4 × 105 cell/mL was the most efficient strategy tested, with a 4.6-fold increase in cell concentration achieved in 5 days. These results were validated in a bioreactor where similar profile and metabolic performance were obtained. Furthermore, characterization of the expanded population by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry showed that NT2 cells maintained their stem cell characteristics along the bioreactor culture time. Finally, the neuronal differentiation step was integrated in the bioreactor process, by addition of retinoic acid when cells were in the middle of the exponential phase. Neurosphere composition was monitored and neuronal differentiation efficiency evaluated along the culture time. The results show that, for bioreactor cultures, we were able to increase significantly the neuronal differentiation efficiency by 10-fold while reducing drastically, by 30%, the time required for the differentiation process. Conclusion The culture systems developed herein are robust and represent one-step-forward towards the development of integrated bioprocesses, bridging stem cell expansion and differentiation in fully controlled bioreactors. PMID:19772662

  3. Rhizoid differentiation in Spirogyra: position sensing by terminal cells.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Naoko; Yamada, Shin-ya; Nagata, Yoko; Shimmen, Teruo

    2002-05-01

    Some species of Spirogyra anchor themselves to the substrate by differentiating rhizoids. A rhizoid is differentiated only from the terminal cell, suggesting that this cell can recognize its terminal position in a filament. In the present study, we have analyzed the mechanism for position sensing by the terminal cell. When a filament is cut, a new cell occupies the terminal position, and three phenomena are induced: (1) the cell wall of the cut cell detaches from the new terminal cell; (2) adhesive material is secreted by the terminal cell; and (3) the terminal cell begins to differentiate a rhizoid via tip growth. All of these phenomena were inhibited by adding sorbitol to the external medium, suggesting that turgor pressure is involved in position sensing by the terminal cell. The inhibition by sorbitol was reversible. Upon cutting a filament, the distal end of a new terminal cell became convex. However, when a filament was cut in the presence of sorbitol, the distal end of a new terminal cell became less convex. Either treatment with Gd(3+) or decrease in extracellular Ca(2+) resulted in inhibition of all these phenomena, suggesting possible involvement of stretch-activated ion channel in position sensing by terminal cells.

  4. Mutagenesis and differentiation induction in mammalian cells by environmental chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, J.; Huberman, E.

    1980-01-01

    These studies indicate that in agreement with the somatic mutation hypothesis, chemical carcinogens: (1) are mutagenic for mammalian cells as tested in the cell-mediated assay; (2) the degree of mutagenicity is correlated with their degree of carcinogenicity; (3) that at least in cases when analyzed carefully the metabolites responsible for mutagenesis are also responsible for initiating the carcinogenic event; and (4) that a cell organ type specificity can be established using the cell-mediated assay. Studies with HL-60 cells and HO melanoma cells and those of others suggest that tumor-promoting phorbol diesters can alter cell differentiation in various cell types and that the degree of the observed alteration in the differentiation properties may be related to the potency of the phorbol esters. Thus these and similar systems may serve as models for both studies and identification of certain types of tumor promoting agents. (ERB)

  5. Differentiation of human alloreactive CD8+ T cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rentenaar, Rob J; Vosters, Jelle L G; Van Diepen, Frank N J; Remmerswaal, Ester B M; Van Lier, René A W; Ten Berge, Ineke J M

    2002-01-01

    Expansion and differentiation of alloantigen-reactive CD8+ T cells in mixed lymphocyte cultures was followed by measurement of the loss of carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) fluorescence of responder cells. Proliferation of CD8+ T cells became detectable on day 4 of culture and, 2 days later, > 60% of the CD8+ T cells in culture were dividing alloreactive lymphocytes. In parallel with expansion, CD8+ T-cell differentiation was initiated, as evidenced by an increase in the number of CD45RA− and CD27− T cells and acquisition of the ability to produce interferon-γ after restimulation with the specific alloantigen. Finally, although short-term stimulation and measurement of intracellular cytokine production allowed visualization of alloreactive CD8+ T cells expanded in vitro, this procedure did not detect circulating alloreactive CD8+ T cells activated in vivo in recipients of allogeneic kidney grafts. PMID:11918689

  6. Differential role of ICAM ligands in determination of human memory T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Omar D; Mitchell, Dennis; Nolan, Garry P

    2007-01-01

    Background Leukocyte Function Antigen-1 (LFA-1) is a primary adhesion molecule that plays important roles in T cell activation, leukocyte recirculation, and trans-endothelial migration. By applying a multivariate intracellular phospho-proteomic analysis, we demonstrate that LFA-1 differentially activates signaling molecules. Results Signal intensity was dependent on both ICAM ligand and LFA-1 concentration. In the presence of CD3 and CD28 stimulation, ICAM-2 and ICAM-3 decreased TGFβ1 production more than ICAM-1. In long-term differentiation experiments, stimulation with ICAM-3, CD3, and CD28 generated IFNγ producing CD4+CD45RO+CD62L-CD11aBrightCD27- cells that had increased expression of intracellular BCL2, displayed distinct chemokine receptor profiles, and exhibited distinct migratory characteristics. Only CD3/CD28 with ICAM-3 generated CD4+CD45RO+CD62L-CD11aBrightCD27- cells that were functionally responsive to chemotaxis and exhibited higher frequencies of cells that signaled to JNK and ERK1/2 upon stimulation with MIP3α. Furthermore, these reports identify that the LFA-1 receptor, when presented with multiple ligands, can result in distinct T cell differentiation states and suggest that the combinatorial integration of ICAM ligand interactions with LFA-1 have functional consequences for T cell biology. Conclusion Thus, the ICAM ligands, differentially modulate LFA-1 signaling in T cells and potentiate the development of memory human T cells in vitro. These findings are of importance in a mechanistic understanding of memory cell differentiation and ex vivo generation of memory cell subsets for therapeutic applications. PMID:17233909

  7. Expression of bacterial genes in plant cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fraley, R T; Rogers, S G; Horsch, R B; Sanders, P R; Flick, J S; Adams, S P; Bittner, M L; Brand, L A; Fink, C L; Fry, J S; Galluppi, G R; Goldberg, S B; Hoffmann, N L; Woo, S C

    1983-01-01

    Chimeric bacterial genes conferring resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics have been inserted into the Agrobacterium tumefaciens tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid and introduced into plant cells by in vitro transformation techniques. The chimeric genes contain the nopaline synthase 5' and 3' regulatory regions joined to the genes for neomycin phosphotransferase type I or type II. The chimeric genes were cloned into an intermediate vector, pMON120, and inserted into pTiB6S3 by recombination and then introduced into petunia and tobacco cells by cocultivating A. tumefaciens cells with protoplast-derived cells. Southern hybridization was used to confirm the presence of the chimeric genes in the transformed plant tissues. Expression of the chimeric genes was determined by the ability of the transformed cells to proliferate on medium containing normally inhibitory levels of kanamycin (50 micrograms/ml) or other aminoglycoside antibiotics. Plant cells transformed by wild-type pTiB6S3 or derivatives carrying the bacterial neomycin phosphotransferase genes with their own promoters failed to grow under these conditions. The significance of these results for plant genetic engineering is discussed. Images PMID:6308651

  8. Spatiotemporally controlled delivery of soluble factors for stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Jiro; Kimura, Hiroshi; Akutsu, Hidenori; Sakai, Yasuyuki; Fujii, Teruo

    2012-11-01

    Despite the fact that cells in vivo are largely affected by the spatial heterogeneity in their surroundings, in vitro experimental procedures for stem cell differentiation have been relying on spatially uniform culture environments so far. Here, we present a method to form spatiotemporally non-uniform culture environments for stem cell differentiation using a membrane-based microfluidic device. By adopting a porous membrane with relatively large pores, patterned delivery of soluble factors is maintained stably over a period of time long enough for cell differentiation. We report that spatial patterns of mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (miPSCs) differentiation can be controlled by the present method. Furthermore, it is shown that the cell fate decision of miPSCs is determined by time-dependent switching of the delivery pattern. The present technique could be of relevance to the detailed analyses of the characteristics of stem cell differentiation in time and space, opening up a new insight into regenerative biology. PMID:22968416

  9. Regulation of cell division in higher plants. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Thomas W.

    2000-02-29

    Research in the latter part of the grant period was divided into two parts: (1) expansion of the macromolecular tool kit for studying plant cell division; (2) experiments in which the roles played by plant cell cycle regulators were to be cast in the light of the emerging yeast and animal cell paradigm for molecular control of the mitotic cycle. The first objectives were accomplished to a very satisfactory degree. With regard to the second part of the project, we were driven to change our objectives for two reasons. First, the families of cell cycle control genes that we cloned encoded such closely related members that the prospects for success at raising distinguishing antisera against each were sufficiently dubious as to be impractical. Epitope tagging is not feasible in Pisum sativum, our experimental system, as this species is not realistically transformable. Therefore, differentiating the roles of diverse cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases was problematic. Secondly, our procedure for generating mitotically synchronized pea root meristems for biochemical studies was far too labor intensive for the proposed experiments. We therefore shifted our objectives to identifying connections between the conserved proteins of the cell cycle engine and factors that interface it with plant physiology and development. In this, we have obtained some very exciting results.

  10. DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2003-05-27

    The subMW hybrid DFC/T power plant facility was upgraded with a Capstone C60 microturbine and a state-of-the-art full size fuel cell stack. The integration of the larger microturbine extended the capability of the hybrid power plant to operate at high power ratings with a single gas turbine without the need for supplementary air. The objectives of this phase of subMW hybrid power plant tests are to support the development of process and control and to provide the insight for the design of the packaged subMW hybrid demonstration units. The development of the ultra high efficiency multi-MW power plants was focused on the design of 40 MW power plants with efficiencies approaching 75% (LHV of natural gas). The design efforts included thermodynamic cycle analysis of key gas turbine parameters such as compression ratio.

  11. Isolation, characterization, and differentiation of human multipotent dermal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Fukunaga-Kalabis, Mizuho; Herlyn, Meenhard

    2013-01-01

    Skin, as the body's largest organ, has been extensively used to study adult stem cells. Most previous skin-related studies have focused on stem cells isolated from hair follicles and from keratinocytes. Here we present a protocol to isolate multipotent neural crest stem-like dermis-derived stem cells (termed dermal stem cells or DSCs) from human neonatal foreskins. DSCs grow like neural spheres in human embryonic stem cell medium and gain the ability to self-renew and differentiate into several cell lineages including melanocytes, neuronal cells, Schwann cells, smooth muscle cells, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. These cells express neural crest stem cell markers (NGFRp75 and nestin) as well as an embryonic stem cell marker (OCT4).

  12. UV-Induced cell death in plants.

    PubMed

    Nawkar, Ganesh M; Maibam, Punyakishore; Park, Jung Hoon; Sahi, Vaidurya Pratap; Lee, Sang Yeol; Kang, Chang Ho

    2013-01-14

    Plants are photosynthetic organisms that depend on sunlight for energy. Plants respond to light through different photoreceptors and show photomorphogenic development. Apart from Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR; 400-700 nm), plants are exposed to UV light, which is comprised of UV-C (below 280 nm), UV-B (280-320 nm) and UV-A (320-390 nm). The atmospheric ozone layer protects UV-C radiation from reaching earth while the UVR8 protein acts as a receptor for UV-B radiation. Low levels of UV-B exposure initiate signaling through UVR8 and induce secondary metabolite genes involved in protection against UV while higher dosages are very detrimental to plants. It has also been reported that genes involved in MAPK cascade help the plant in providing tolerance against UV radiation. The important targets of UV radiation in plant cells are DNA, lipids and proteins and also vital processes such as photosynthesis. Recent studies showed that, in response to UV radiation, mitochondria and chloroplasts produce a reactive oxygen species (ROS). Arabidopsis metacaspase-8 (AtMC8) is induced in response to oxidative stress caused by ROS, which acts downstream of the radical induced cell death (AtRCD1) gene making plants vulnerable to cell death. The studies on salicylic and jasmonic acid signaling mutants revealed that SA and JA regulate the ROS level and antagonize ROS mediated cell death. Recently, molecular studies have revealed genes involved in response to UV exposure, with respect to programmed cell death (PCD).

  13. Osmosis in Poisoned Plant Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatina, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Describes two simple laboratory exercises that allow students to test hypotheses concerning the requirement of cell energy for osmosis. The first exercise involves osmotically-caused changes in the length of potato tubers and requires detailed quantitative observations. The second exercise involves osmotically-caused changes in turgor of Elodea…

  14. Metal-accelerated oxidation in plant cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Czuba, M. )

    1993-05-01

    Cadmium and mercury toxicity is further enhanced by external oxidizing conditions O[sub 3] or inherent plant processes. Lepidium sativum L, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill., or Phaseolus vulgaris L, were grown inpeat-lite to maturity under continuous cadmium exposure followed by one oxidant (O[sub 3]-6 hr. 30 pphm) exposure, with or without foliar calcium pretreatments. In comparison, Daucus carota, L and other species grown in a 71-V suspension, with or without 2,4-D were exposed continuously to low levels of methylmercury during exponential growth and analyzed in aggregates of distinct populations. Proteins were extracted and analyzed. Mechanisms of toxicity and eventual cell death are Ca-mediated and involve chloroplast, stomatal-water relations and changes in oxidant-anti-oxidant components in cells. Whether the metal-accelerated oxidative damage proceeds to cell death, depends on the species and its differential biotransformation system and cell association component.

  15. Arsenic inhibits hedgehog signaling during P19 cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jui Tung; Bain, Lisa J.

    2014-12-15

    Arsenic is a toxicant found in ground water around the world, and human exposure mainly comes from drinking water or from crops grown in areas containing arsenic in soils or water. Epidemiological studies have shown that arsenic exposure during development decreased intellectual function, reduced birth weight, and altered locomotor activity, while in vitro studies have shown that arsenite decreased muscle and neuronal cell differentiation. The sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway plays an important role during the differentiation of both neurons and skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether arsenic can disrupt Shh signaling in P19 mouse embryonic stem cells, leading to changes muscle and neuronal cell differentiation. P19 embryonic stem cells were exposed to 0, 0.25, or 0.5 μM of sodium arsenite for up to 9 days during cell differentiation. We found that arsenite exposure significantly reduced transcript levels of genes in the Shh pathway in both a time and dose-dependent manner. This included the Shh ligand, which was decreased 2- to 3-fold, the Gli2 transcription factor, which was decreased 2- to 3-fold, and its downstream target gene Ascl1, which was decreased 5-fold. GLI2 protein levels and transcriptional activity were also reduced. However, arsenic did not alter GLI2 primary cilium accumulation or nuclear translocation. Moreover, additional extracellular SHH rescued the inhibitory effects of arsenic on cellular differentiation due to an increase in GLI binding activity. Taken together, we conclude that arsenic exposure affected Shh signaling, ultimately decreasing the expression of the Gli2 transcription factor. These results suggest a mechanism by which arsenic disrupts cell differentiation. - Highlights: • Arsenic exposure decreases sonic hedgehog pathway-related gene expression. • Arsenic decreases GLI2 protein levels and transcriptional activity in P19 cells. • Arsenic exposure does not alter the levels of SHH

  16. A Role of TDIF Peptide Signaling in Vascular Cell Differentiation is Conserved Among Euphyllophytes.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Yuki; Bowman, John L

    2015-01-01

    Peptide signals mediate a variety of cell-to-cell communication crucial for plant growth and development. During Arabidopsis thaliana vascular development, a CLE (CLAVATA3/EMBRYO SURROUNDING REGION-related) family peptide hormone, TDIF (tracheary element differentiation inhibitory factor), regulates procambial cell fate by its inhibitory activity on xylem differentiation. To address if this activity is conserved among vascular plants, we performed comparative analyses of TDIF signaling in non-flowering vascular plants (gymnosperms, ferns and lycophytes). We identified orthologs of TDIF/CLE as well as its receptor TDR/PXY (TDIF RECEPTOR/PHLOEM INTERCALATED WITH XYLEM) in Ginkgo biloba, Adiantum aethiopicum, and Selaginella kraussiana by RACE-PCR. The predicted TDIF peptide sequences in seed plants and ferns were identical to that of A. thaliana TDIF. We examined the effects of exogenous CLE peptide-motif sequences of TDIF in these species. We found that liquid culturing of dissected leaves or shoots was useful for examining TDIF activity during vascular development. TDIF treatment suppressed xylem/tracheary element differentiation of procambial cells in G. biloba and A. aethiopicum leaves. In contrast, neither TDIF nor putative endogenous TDIF inhibited xylem differentiation in developing shoots and rhizophores of S. kraussiana. These data suggest that activity of TDIF in vascular development is conserved among extant euphyllophytes. In addition to the conserved function, via liquid culturing of its bulbils, we found a novel inhibitory activity on root growth in the fern Asplenium × lucrosum suggesting lineage-specific co-option of peptide signaling occurred during the evolution of vascular plant organs. PMID:26635860

  17. A Role of TDIF Peptide Signaling in Vascular Cell Differentiation is Conserved Among Euphyllophytes

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Yuki; Bowman, John L.

    2015-01-01

    Peptide signals mediate a variety of cell-to-cell communication crucial for plant growth and development. During Arabidopsis thaliana vascular development, a CLE (CLAVATA3/EMBRYO SURROUNDING REGION-related) family peptide hormone, TDIF (tracheary element differentiation inhibitory factor), regulates procambial cell fate by its inhibitory activity on xylem differentiation. To address if this activity is conserved among vascular plants, we performed comparative analyses of TDIF signaling in non-flowering vascular plants (gymnosperms, ferns and lycophytes). We identified orthologs of TDIF/CLE as well as its receptor TDR/PXY (TDIF RECEPTOR/PHLOEM INTERCALATED WITH XYLEM) in Ginkgo biloba, Adiantum aethiopicum, and Selaginella kraussiana by RACE-PCR. The predicted TDIF peptide sequences in seed plants and ferns were identical to that of A. thaliana TDIF. We examined the effects of exogenous CLE peptide-motif sequences of TDIF in these species. We found that liquid culturing of dissected leaves or shoots was useful for examining TDIF activity during vascular development. TDIF treatment suppressed xylem/tracheary element differentiation of procambial cells in G. biloba and A. aethiopicum leaves. In contrast, neither TDIF nor putative endogenous TDIF inhibited xylem differentiation in developing shoots and rhizophores of S. kraussiana. These data suggest that activity of TDIF in vascular development is conserved among extant euphyllophytes. In addition to the conserved function, via liquid culturing of its bulbils, we found a novel inhibitory activity on root growth in the fern Asplenium × lucrosum suggesting lineage-specific co-option of peptide signaling occurred during the evolution of vascular plant organs. PMID:26635860

  18. Cell Shape and Cardiosphere Differentiation: A Revelation by Proteomic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Nanako; Machida, Mitsuyo; Nakanishi, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells (embryonic stem cells, somatic stem cells such as neural stem cells, and cardiac stem cells) and cancer cells are known to aggregate and form spheroid structures. This behavior is common in undifferentiated cells and may be necessary for adapting to certain conditions such as low-oxygen levels or to maintain undifferentiated status in microenvironments including stem cell niches. In order to decipher the meaning of this spheroid structure, we established a cardiosphere clone (CSC-21E) derived from the rat heart which can switch its morphology between spheroid and nonspheroid. Two forms, floating cardiospheres and dish-attached flat cells, could be switched reversibly by changing the cell culture condition. We performed differential proteome analysis studies and obtained protein profiles distinct between spherical forms and flat cells. From protein profiling analysis, we found upregulation of glycolytic enzymes in spheroids with some stress proteins switched in expression levels between these two forms. Evidence has been accumulating that certain chaperone/stress proteins are upregulated in concert with cellular changes including proliferation and differentiation. We would like to discuss the possible mechanism of how these aggregates affect cell differentiation and/or other cellular functions. PMID:24073335

  19. Asymmetric growth of root epidermal cells is related to the differentiation of root hair cells in Hordeum vulgare (L.)

    PubMed Central

    Marzec, Marek

    2013-01-01

    The root epidermis of most vascular plants harbours two cell types, namely trichoblasts (capable of producing a root hair) and atrichoblasts. Here, in vivo analysis, confocal laser-scanning microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, histological analysis, and three-dimensional reconstruction were used to characterize the cell types present in the barley root epidermis and their distribution in the tissue. Both trichoblasts and atrichoblasts were present in the wild-type cultivars and could be distinguished from one another at an early stage. Trichoblast/atrichoblast differentiation depended on asymmetric cell expansion after a period of symmetrical cell division. After asymmetric growth, only the shorter epidermal cells could produce root hairs, whereas the longer cells became atrichoblasts. Moreover, the root epidermis did not develop root hairs at all if the epidermal cells did not differentiate into two asymmetric cell types. The root hairless phenotype of bald root barley (brb) and root hairless 1.b (rhl1.b) mutants was caused by a mutation in a gene related to the asymmetric expansion of the root epidermal cells. Additionally, the results showed that the mechanism of trichoblast/atrichoblast differentiation is not evolutionally conserved across the subfamilies of the Poaceae; in the Pooideae subfamily, both asymmetric division and asymmetric cell expansion have been observed. PMID:24043851

  20. Calcium signaling in plant cells in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordyum, E.

    Changes in the intracellular Ca 2 + concentration in altered gravity (microgravity and clinostating) evidence that Ca2 + signaling can play a fundamental role in biological effects of microgravity. Calcium as a second messenger is known to play a crucial role in stimulus - response coupling for many plant cellular signaling pathways. Its messenger functions are realized by transient changes in the cytosolic ion concentration induced by a variety of internal and external stimuli such as light, hormones, temperature, anoxia, salinity, and gravity. Although the first data on the changes in the calcium balance in plant cells under the influence of altered gravity have appeared in eighties, a review highlighting the performed research and the possible significance of such Ca 2 + changes in the structural and metabolic rearrangements of plant cells in altered gravity is still lacking. In this paper, an attempt was made to summarize the available experimental results and to consider some hypotheses in this field of research. It is proposed to distinguish between cell gravisensing and cell graviperception; the former is related to cell structure and metabolism stability in the gravitational field and their changes in microgravity (cells not specialized to gravity perception), the latter is related to active use of a gravitational stimulus by cells presumably specialized to gravity perception for realization of normal space orientation, growth, and vital activity (gravitropism, gravitaxis) in plants. The main experimental data concerning both redistribution of free Ca 2 + ions in plant cell organelles and the cell wall, and an increase in the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration under the influence of altered gravity are presented. Based on the gravitational decompensation hypothesis, the consequence of events occurring in gravis ensing cells not specialized to gravity perception under altered gravity are considered in the following order: changes in the cytoplasmic membrane

  1. Oncogenic NRAS Primes Primary Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells for Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Brendel, Cornelia; Teichler, Sabine; Millahn, Axel; Stiewe, Thorsten; Krause, Michael; Stabla, Kathleen; Ross, Petra; Huynh, Minh; Illmer, Thomas; Mernberger, Marco; Barckhausen, Christina; Neubauer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    RAS mutations are frequently found among acute myeloid leukemia patients (AML), generating a constitutively active signaling protein changing cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. We have previously shown that treatment of AML patients with high-dose cytarabine is preferentially beneficial for those harboring oncogenic RAS. On the basis of a murine AML cell culture model, we ascribed this effect to a RAS-driven, p53-dependent induction of differentiation. Hence, in this study we sought to confirm the correlation between RAS status and differentiation of primary blasts obtained from AML patients. The gene expression signature of AML blasts with oncogenic NRAS indeed corresponded to a more mature profile compared to blasts with wildtype RAS, as demonstrated by gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and real-time PCR analysis of myeloid ecotropic viral integration site 1 homolog (MEIS1) in a unique cohort of AML patients. In addition, in vitro cell culture experiments with established cell lines and a second set of primary AML cells showed that oncogenic NRAS mutations predisposed cells to cytarabine (AraC) driven differentiation. Taken together, our findings show that AML with inv(16) and NRAS mutation have a differentiation gene signature, supporting the notion that NRAS mutation may predispose leukemic cells to AraC induced differentiation. We therefore suggest that promotion of differentiation pathways by specific genetic alterations could explain the superior treatment outcome after therapy in some AML patient subgroups. Whether a differentiation gene expression status may generally predict for a superior treatment outcome in AML needs to be addressed in future studies. PMID:25901794

  2. Cell Fate and Differentiation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jimi, Eijiro

    2016-01-01

    Osteoblasts and bone marrow adipocytes originate from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and there appears to be a reciprocal relationship between adipogenesis and osteoblastogenesis. Alterations in the balance between adipogenesis and osteoblastogenesis in BMMSCs wherein adipogenesis is increased relative to osteoblastogenesis are associated with decreased bone quality and quantity. Several proteins have been reported to regulate this reciprocal relationship but the exact nature of the signals regulating the balance between osteoblast and adipocyte formation within the bone marrow space remains to be determined. In this review, we focus on the role of Transducin-Like Enhancer of Split 3 (TLE3), which was recently reported to regulate the balance between osteoblast and adipocyte formation from BMMSCs. We also discuss evidence implicating canonical Wnt signalling, which plays important roles in both adipogenesis and osteoblastogenesis, in regulating TLE3 expression. Currently, there is demand for new effective therapies that target the stimulation of osteoblast differentiation to enhance bone formation. We speculate that reducing TLE3 expression or activity in BMMSCs could be a useful approach towards increasing osteoblast numbers and reducing adipogenesis in the bone marrow environment. PMID:27298623

  3. Involvement of Plant Stem Cells or Stem Cell-Like Cells in Dedifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fangwei; Feng, Zhenhua; Liu, Hailiang; Zhu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Dedifferentiation is the transformation of cells from a given differentiated state to a less differentiated or stem cell-like state. Stem cell-related genes play important roles in dedifferentiation, which exhibits similar histone modification and DNA methylation features to stem cell maintenance. Hence, stem cell-related factors possibly synergistically function to provide a specific niche beneficial to dedifferentiation. During callus formation in Arabidopsis petioles, cells adjacent to procambium cells (stem cell-like cells) are dedifferentiated and survive more easily than other cell types. This finding indicates that stem cells or stem cell-like cells may influence the dedifferentiating niche. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of stem cell maintenance and dedifferentiation regulation. We also summarize current knowledge of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms underlying the balance between differentiation and dedifferentiation. Furthermore, we discuss the correlation of stem cells or stem cell-like cells with dedifferentiation. PMID:26635851

  4. Metabolic regulation of T cell differentiation and function

    PubMed Central

    Park, Benjamin V.; Pan, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Upon encountering pathogens, T cells mount immune responses by proliferating, increasing cellular mass and differentiating. These cellular changes impose significant energetic challenges on T cells. It was believed that TCR and cytokine-mediated signaling are dominant dictators of T cell-mediated immune responses. Recently, it was recognized that T cells utilize metabolic transporters and metabolic sensors that allow them to rapidly respond to nutrient-limiting inflammatory environments. Metabolic sensors allow T cells to find a balance between energy consumption (anabolic metabolism) and production (catabolic metabolism) in order to mount effective immune responses. Also, metabolic regulators interact with cytokine-dependent transcriptional regulators, suggesting a more integrative and advanced model of T cell activation and differentiation. In this review, we will discuss recent discoveries regarding the roles of metabolic regulators in effector and memory T cell development and their interaction with canonical transcription factors. PMID:26277275

  5. Human embryonic stem cells differentiate into functional renal proximal tubular-like cells.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Karthikeyan; Schumacher, Karl M; Tasnim, Farah; Kandasamy, Karthikeyan; Schumacher, Annegret; Ni, Ming; Gao, Shujun; Gopalan, Began; Zink, Daniele; Ying, Jackie Y

    2013-04-01

    Renal cells are used in basic research, disease models, tissue engineering, drug screening, and in vitro toxicology. In order to provide a reliable source of human renal cells, we developed a protocol for the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into renal epithelial cells. The differentiated stem cells expressed markers characteristic of renal proximal tubular cells and their precursors, whereas markers of other renal cell types were not expressed or expressed at low levels. Marker expression patterns of these differentiated stem cells and in vitro cultivated primary human renal proximal tubular cells were comparable. The differentiated stem cells showed morphological and functional characteristics of renal proximal tubular cells, and generated tubular structures in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the differentiated stem cells contributed in organ cultures for the formation of simple epithelia in the kidney cortex. Bioreactor experiments showed that these cells retained their functional characteristics under conditions as applied in bioartificial kidneys. Thus, our results show that human embryonic stem cells can differentiate into renal proximal tubular-like cells. Our approach would provide a source for human renal proximal tubular cells that are not affected by problems associated with immortalized cell lines or primary cells.

  6. In-vitro differentiation of pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Soria, B

    2001-10-01

    Stem cell biology is a new field that holds promise for in-vitro mass production of pancreatic beta-cells, which are responsible for insulin synthesis, storage, and release. Lack or defect of insulin produces diabetes mellitus, a devastating disease suffered by 150 million people in the world. Transplantation of insulin-producing cells could be a cure for type 1 and some cases of type 2 diabetes, however this procedure is limited by the scarcity of material. Obtaining pancreatic beta-cells from embryonic stem cells would overcome this problem. We have derived insulin-producing cells from mouse embryonic stem cells by a 3-step in-vitro differentiation method consisting of directed differentiation, cell-lineage selection, and maturation. These insulin-producing cells normalize blood glucose when transplanted into streptozotocin-diabetic mice. Strategies to increase islet precursor cells from embryonic stem cells include the expression of relevant transcription factors (Pdx1, Ngn3, Isl-1, etc), together with the use of extracellular factors. Once a high enough proportion of islet precursors has been obtained there is a need for cell-lineage selection in order to purify the desired cell population. For this purpose, we designed a cell-trapping method based on a chimeric gene that fuses the human insulin gene regulatory region with the structural gene that confers resistance to neomycin. When incorporated into embryonic stem cells, this fusion gene will generate neomycin resistance in those cells that initiate the synthesis of insulin. Not only embryonic, but also adult stem cells are potential sources for insulin-containing cells. Duct cells from the adult pancreas are committed to differentiate into the four islet cell types; other possibilities may include nestin-positive cells from islets and adult pluripotent stem cells from other origins. Whilst the former are committed to be islet cells but have a reduced capacity to expand, the latter are more pluripotent and

  7. Propolis Inhibits Neurite Outgrowth in Differentiating SH-SY5Y Human Neuroblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han Bit; Yoo, Byung Sun

    2016-07-01

    Propolis is a multicomponent, active, complex resinous substance collected by honeybees from a variety of plant sources. We have studied the effect of propolis on neurite outgrowth of SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells induced to differentiate by all-trans-retinoic acid (RA). Propolis, at a concentration of 3 μg/mL, had no significant effect on the viability of differentiating SH-SY5Y cells. However, the neurite outgrowth of the differentiating SH-SY5Y cells treated with propolis (0.3~3 μg/mL) for 48 hr was significantly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of RA-stimulated differentiating SH-SY5Y cells with 0.3 to 3 μg/mL propolis resulted in decreased level of transglutaminase and 43-kDa growth-associated protein (GAP-43) in a dose-dependent manner. The results indicate that propolis is able to inhibit neurite outgrowth of differentiating SH-SY5Y cells. PMID:27437091

  8. Propolis Inhibits Neurite Outgrowth in Differentiating SH-SY5Y Human Neuroblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han Bit; Yoo, Byung Sun

    2016-07-01

    Propolis is a multicomponent, active, complex resinous substance collected by honeybees from a variety of plant sources. We have studied the effect of propolis on neurite outgrowth of SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells induced to differentiate by all-trans-retinoic acid (RA). Propolis, at a concentration of 3 μg/mL, had no significant effect on the viability of differentiating SH-SY5Y cells. However, the neurite outgrowth of the differentiating SH-SY5Y cells treated with propolis (0.3~3 μg/mL) for 48 hr was significantly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of RA-stimulated differentiating SH-SY5Y cells with 0.3 to 3 μg/mL propolis resulted in decreased level of transglutaminase and 43-kDa growth-associated protein (GAP-43) in a dose-dependent manner. The results indicate that propolis is able to inhibit neurite outgrowth of differentiating SH-SY5Y cells.

  9. Propolis Inhibits Neurite Outgrowth in Differentiating SH-SY5Y Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Han Bit; Yoo, Byung Sun

    2016-01-01

    Propolis is a multicomponent, active, complex resinous substance collected by honeybees from a variety of plant sources. We have studied the effect of propolis on neurite outgrowth of SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells induced to differentiate by all-trans-retinoic acid (RA). Propolis, at a concentration of 3 μg/mL, had no significant effect on the viability of differentiating SH-SY5Y cells. However, the neurite outgrowth of the differentiating SH-SY5Y cells treated with propolis (0.3~3 μg/mL) for 48 hr was significantly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of RA-stimulated differentiating SH-SY5Y cells with 0.3 to 3 μg/mL propolis resulted in decreased level of transglutaminase and 43-kDa growth-associated protein (GAP-43) in a dose-dependent manner. The results indicate that propolis is able to inhibit neurite outgrowth of differentiating SH-SY5Y cells. PMID:27437091

  10. Hyaluronan scaffold supports osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow concentrate cells.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, C; Desando, G; Ferrari, A; Zini, N; Mariani, E; Grigolo, B

    2016-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions are considered a challenge for orthopedic surgeons. Currently, the treatments available are often unsatisfactory and unable to stimulate tissue regeneration. Tissue engineering offers a new therapeutic strategy, taking into account the role exerted by cells, biomaterial and growth factors in restoring tissue damage. In this light, Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) have been indicated as a fascinating tool for regenerative medicine thanks to their ability to differentiate into bone, cartilage and adipose tissue. However, in vitro-cultivation of MSCs could be associated with some risks such as de-differentiation/reprogramming, infection and contaminations of the cells. To overcome these shortcomings, a new approach is represented by the use of Bone Marrow Concentrate (BMC), that could allow the delivery of cells surrounded by their microenvironment in injured tissue. For this purpose, cells require a tridimensional scaffold that can support their adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. This study is focused on the potentiality of BMC seeded onto a hyaluronan-based scaffold (Hyaff-11) to differentiate into osteogenic lineage. This process depends on the specific interaction between cells derived from bone marrow (surrounded by their niche) and scaffold, that create an environment able to support the regeneration of damaged tissue. The data obtained from the present study demonstrate that BMC grown onto Hyaff-11 are able to differentiate toward osteogenic sense, producing specific osteogenic genes and matrix proteins.

  11. Hyaluronan scaffold supports osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow concentrate cells.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, C; Desando, G; Ferrari, A; Zini, N; Mariani, E; Grigolo, B

    2016-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions are considered a challenge for orthopedic surgeons. Currently, the treatments available are often unsatisfactory and unable to stimulate tissue regeneration. Tissue engineering offers a new therapeutic strategy, taking into account the role exerted by cells, biomaterial and growth factors in restoring tissue damage. In this light, Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) have been indicated as a fascinating tool for regenerative medicine thanks to their ability to differentiate into bone, cartilage and adipose tissue. However, in vitro-cultivation of MSCs could be associated with some risks such as de-differentiation/reprogramming, infection and contaminations of the cells. To overcome these shortcomings, a new approach is represented by the use of Bone Marrow Concentrate (BMC), that could allow the delivery of cells surrounded by their microenvironment in injured tissue. For this purpose, cells require a tridimensional scaffold that can support their adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. This study is focused on the potentiality of BMC seeded onto a hyaluronan-based scaffold (Hyaff-11) to differentiate into osteogenic lineage. This process depends on the specific interaction between cells derived from bone marrow (surrounded by their niche) and scaffold, that create an environment able to support the regeneration of damaged tissue. The data obtained from the present study demonstrate that BMC grown onto Hyaff-11 are able to differentiate toward osteogenic sense, producing specific osteogenic genes and matrix proteins. PMID:27358127

  12. Endoplasmic reticulum calcium pumps and cancer cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Papp, Béla; Brouland, Jean-Philippe; Arbabian, Atousa; Gélébart, Pascal; Kovács, Tünde; Bobe, Régis; Enouf, Jocelyne; Varin-Blank, Nadine; Apáti, Agota

    2012-03-05

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a major intracellular calcium storage pool and a multifunctional organelle that accomplishes several calcium-dependent functions involved in many homeostatic and signaling mechanisms. Calcium is accumulated in the ER by Sarco/Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPase (SERCA)-type calcium pumps. SERCA activity can determine ER calcium content available for intra-ER functions and for calcium release into the cytosol, and can shape the spatiotemporal characteristics of calcium signals. SERCA function therefore constitutes an important nodal point in the regulation of cellular calcium homeostasis and signaling, and can exert important effects on cell growth, differentiation and survival. In several cell types such as cells of hematopoietic origin, mammary, gastric and colonic epithelium, SERCA2 and SERCA3-type calcium pumps are simultaneously expressed, and SERCA3 expression levels undergo significant changes during cell differentiation, activation or immortalization. In addition, SERCA3 expression is decreased or lost in several tumor types when compared to the corresponding normal tissue. These observations indicate that ER calcium homeostasis is remodeled during cell differentiation, and may present defects due to decreased SERCA3 expression in tumors. Modulation of the state of differentiation of the ER reflected by SERCA3 expression constitutes an interesting new aspect of cell differentiation and tumor biology.

  13. Silicon Micropore based Electromechanical Transducer to Differentiate Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Waqas; Raza, Muhammad U.; Khanzada, Raja R.; Kim, Young-Tae; Iqbal, Samir M.

    2015-03-01

    Solid-state micropores have been used before to differentiate cancer cells from normal cells using size-based filtering. Tumor cells differ from normal ones not only in size but also in physical properties like elasticity, shape, motility etc. Tumor cells show different physical attributes depending on the stage and type of cancer. We report a micropore based electromechanical transducer that differentiated cancer cells based on their mechanophysical properties. The device was interfaced with a high-speed patch-clamp measurement system that biased the ionic solution across the silicon-based membrane. The bias resulted in the flow of ionic current. Electrical pulses were generated when cells passed through. Different cells depicted characteristic pulses. Translocation profiles of cells that were either small or were more elastic and flexible caused electrical pulses shorter in widths and amplitudes whereas cells with larger size or lesser elasticity/flexibility showed deeper and wider pulses. Three non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines NCI-H1155, A549 and NCI-H460 were successfully differentiated. NCI-H1155, due to their comparatively smaller size, were found quickest in translocating through. The solid-sate micropore based electromechanical transducer could process the whole blood sample of cancer patient without any pre-processing requirements and is ideal for point-of-care applications. Support Acknowledged from NSF through ECCS-1201878.

  14. [Cell therapy using stem cells: trophic factor, differentiation, and cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Hida, Hideki

    2013-02-01

    Our research of stem cell transplantation using mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent (iPS) cells was carried out from the aspect of trophic factor, cell differentiation, and better survival of grafted cells. Pleiotrophin, an enhanced trophic factor in the dopamine (DA)-depleted striatum, increased the number of DAergic neurons from ES-derived neural stem cells (ES-NSCs), increased cell survival of cultured DAergic neurons, and affected cell survival of grafted DAergic cells in Parkinson model rats. It was shown that DAergic differentiation from ES-NSCs was mediated by hypoxia inducible factor 1-alpha. Our challenges of the transplantation of ES-NSCs and iPS-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (iPS-OPCs) into periventricular leukomalasia (PVL) model rats are also presented. It was found that grafted ES-NSCs survived better in the corpus callosum without immunosuppressant and most of them differentiated into neurons near the grafted site. It was also revealed that only a few of the grafted iPS-OPCs induced by a stepwise culture method with no use of serum could survive in PVL model rats, indicating that trophic factor (s) and improvement of graft techniques will be needed for better survival of grafted iPS-OPCs.

  15. Differential protein network analysis of the immune cell lineage.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Trevor; Hovig, Eivind

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the Immunological Genome Project (ImmGen) completed the first phase of the goal to understand the molecular circuitry underlying the immune cell lineage in mice. That milestone resulted in the creation of the most comprehensive collection of gene expression profiles in the immune cell lineage in any model organism of human disease. There is now a requisite to examine this resource using bioinformatics integration with other molecular information, with the aim of gaining deeper insights into the underlying processes that characterize this immune cell lineage. We present here a bioinformatics approach to study differential protein interaction mechanisms across the entire immune cell lineage, achieved using affinity propagation applied to a protein interaction network similarity matrix. We demonstrate that the integration of protein interaction networks with the most comprehensive database of gene expression profiles of the immune cells can be used to generate hypotheses into the underlying mechanisms governing the differentiation and the differential functional activity across the immune cell lineage. This approach may not only serve as a hypothesis engine to derive understanding of differentiation and mechanisms across the immune cell lineage, but also help identify possible immune lineage specific and common lineage mechanism in the cells protein networks. PMID:25309909

  16. Manifold gasket accommodating differential movement of fuel cell stack

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, Dana A.; Farooque, Mohammad

    2007-11-13

    A gasket for use in a fuel cell system having at least one externally manifolded fuel cell stack, for sealing the manifold edge and the stack face. In accordance with the present invention, the gasket accommodates differential movement between the stack and manifold by promoting slippage at interfaces between the gasket and the dielectric and between the gasket and the stack face.

  17. Dexamethasone Suppresses Oxysterol-Induced Differentiation of Monocytic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Son, Yonghae; Kim, Bo-Young; Eo, Seong-Kug; Park, Young Chul; Kim, Koanhoi

    2016-01-01

    Oxysterol like 27-hydroxycholesterol (27OHChol) has been reported to induce differentiation of monocytic cells into a mature dendritic cell phenotype. We examined whether dexamethasone (Dx) affects 27OHChol-induced differentiation using THP-1 cells. Treatment of monocytic cells with Dx resulted in almost complete inhibition of transcription and surface expression of CD80, CD83, and CD88 induced by 27OHChol. Elevated surface levels of MHC class I and II molecules induced by 27OHChol were reduced to basal levels by treatment with Dx. A decreased endocytosis ability caused by 27OHChol was recovered by Dx. We also examined effects of Dx on expression of CD molecules involved in atherosclerosis. Increased levels of surface protein and transcription of CD105, CD137, and CD166 by treatment with 27OHChol were significantly inhibited by cotreatment with Dx. These results indicate that Dx inhibits 27OHChol-induced differentiation of monocytic cells into a mature dendritic cell phenotype and expression of CD molecules whose levels are associated with atherosclerosis. In addition, we examined phosphorylation of AKT induced by 27OHChol and effect of Dx, where cotreatment with Dx inhibited the phosphorylation of AKT. The current study reports that Dx regulates oxysterol-mediated dendritic cell differentiation of monocytic cells. PMID:27340507

  18. Substrate Induced Osteoblast-Like Differentiation of Stromal Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belizar, Jacqueline; Glaser, Reena; Hung, Matthew; Simon, Marcia; Jurukovski, Vladimir; Rafailovich, Miriam; Shih, Alice

    2009-03-01

    We have demonstrated that Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) can be induced to biomineralize on a polybutadiene (PB) coated Si substrate. The cells began to generate calcium phosphate deposits after a five-day incubation period in the absence of dexamethasone. Control cells plated on tissue culture PS culture dish (TCP) did not biomineralize. In addition, the biomineralizing culture retained proliferative cells In order to determine whether the induction was transient, we transferred the cells exposed to polybutadiene after 14 and 28-day incubation periods to TCP dishes. These cells continued to biominerlize. Genetic testing is underway which will determine whether differentiation is maintained after transfer.

  19. How to let go: pectin and plant cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Daher, Firas Bou; Braybrook, Siobhan A

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells do not, in general, migrate. They maintain a fixed position relative to their neighbors, intimately linked through growth and differentiation. The mediator of this connection, the pectin-rich middle lamella, is deposited during cell division and maintained throughout the cell's life to protect tissue integrity. The maintenance of adhesion requires cell wall modification and is dependent on the actin cytoskeleton. There are developmental processes that require cell separation, such as organ abscission, dehiscence, and ripening. In these instances, the pectin-rich middle lamella must be actively altered to allow cell separation, a process which also requires cell wall modification. In this review, we will focus on the role of pectin and its modification in cell adhesion and separation. Recent insights gained in pectin gel mechanics will be discussed in relation to existing knowledge of pectin chemistry as it relates to cell adhesion. As a whole, we hope to begin defining the physical mechanisms behind a cells' ability to hang on, and how it lets go.

  20. Somatic mutation and cell differentiation in neoplastic transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Huberman, E.; Collart, F.R.

    1987-01-01

    In brief, the authors suggest that tumor formation may result from continuous expression of growth facilitating genes that, as a result of irreversible changes during the initiation step, are placed under the control of genes expressed during normal differentiation. Thus, to understand carcinogenesis, we must decipher the processes that lead to the acquisition of a mature phenotype in both normal and tumor cells and characterize the growth dependency of tumor cells to inducers of cell differentiation. Furthermore, the growth of a variety of tumors may be controlled through the use of inducers of maturation that activate genes located beyond the gene that is altered during tumor initiation. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Cloning mice and ES cells by nuclear transfer from somatic stem cells and fully differentiated cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongde

    2011-01-01

    Cloning animals by nuclear transfer (NT) has been successful in several mammalian species. In addition to cloning live animals (reproductive cloning), this technique has also been used in several species to establish cloned embryonic stem (ntES) cell lines from somatic cells. It is the latter application of this technique that has been heralded as being the potential means to produce isogenic embryonic stem cells from patients for cell therapy (therapeutic cloning). These two types of cloning differ only in the steps after cloned embryos are produced: for reproductive cloning the cloned embryos are transferred to surrogate mothers to allow them to develop to full term and for therapeutic cloning the cloned embryos are used to derive ntES cells. In this chapter, a detailed NT protocol in mouse by using somatic stem cells (neuron and skin stem cells) and fully differentiated somatic cells (cumulus cells and fibroblast cells) as nuclear donors is described.

  2. Detection of Osteogenic Differentiation by Differential Mineralized Matrix Production in Mesenchymal Stromal Cells by Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, He-Guei; Chiang, Hui-Hua Kenny; Lee, Oscar Kuang-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) hold great potential in skeletal tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. However, conventional methods that are used in molecular biology to evaluate osteogenic differentiation of MSCs require a relatively large amount of cells. Cell lysis and cell fixation are also required and all these steps are time-consuming. Therefore, it is imperative to develop a facile technique which can provide real-time information with high sensitivity and selectivity to detect the osteogenic maturation of MSCs. In this study, we use Raman spectroscopy as a biosensor to monitor the production of mineralized matrices during osteogenic induction of MSCs. In summary, Raman spectroscopy is an excellent biosensor to detect the extent of maturation level during MSCs-osteoblast differentiation with a non-disruptive, real-time and label free manner. We expect that this study will promote further investigation of stem cell research and clinical applications. PMID:23734254

  3. PPARγ Agonists Promote Oligodendrocyte Differentiation of Neural Stem Cells by Modulating Stemness and Differentiation Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kanakasabai, Saravanan; Pestereva, Ecaterina; Chearwae, Wanida; Gupta, Sushil K.; Ansari, Saif; Bright, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are a small population of resident cells that can grow, migrate and differentiate into neuro-glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS). Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a nuclear receptor transcription factor that regulates cell growth and differentiation. In this study we analyzed the influence of PPARγ agonists on neural stem cell growth and differentiation in culture. We found that in vitro culture of mouse NSCs in neurobasal medium with B27 in the presence of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) induced their growth and expansion as neurospheres. Addition of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and PPARγ agonist ciglitazone or 15-Deoxy-Δ12,14-Prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell viability and proliferation of NSCs in culture. Interestingly, NSCs cultured with PPARγ agonists, but not ATRA, showed significant increase in oligodendrocyte precursor-specific O4 and NG2 reactivity with a reduction in NSC marker nestin, in 3–7 days. In vitro treatment with PPARγ agonists and ATRA also induced modest increase in the expression of neuronal β-III tubulin and astrocyte-specific GFAP in NSCs in 3–7 days. Further analyses showed that PPARγ agonists and ATRA induced significant alterations in the expression of many stemness and differentiation genes associated with neuro-glial differentiation in NSCs. These findings highlight the influence of PPARγ agonists in promoting neuro-glial differentiation of NSCs and its significance in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23185633

  4. Hypergravity Stimulation Enhances PC12 Neuron-Like Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Altered gravity is a strong physical cue able to elicit different cellular responses, representing a largely uninvestigated opportunity for tissue engineering/regenerative medicine applications. Our recent studies have shown that both proliferation and differentiation of C2C12 skeletal muscle cells can be enhanced by hypergravity treatment; given these results, PC12 neuron-like cells were chosen to test the hypothesis that hypergravity stimulation might also affect the behavior of neuronal cells, in particular promoting an enhanced differentiated phenotype. PC12 cells were thus cultured under differentiating conditions for either 12 h or 72 h before being stimulated with different values of hypergravity (50 g and 150 g). Effects of hypergravity were evaluated at transcriptional level 1 h and 48 h after the stimulation, and at protein level 48 h from hypergravity exposure, to assess its influence on neurite development over increasing differentiation times. PC12 differentiation resulted strongly affected by the hypergravity treatments; in particular, neurite length was significantly enhanced after exposure to high acceleration values. The achieved results suggest that hypergravity might induce a faster and higher neuronal differentiation and encourage further investigations on the potential of hypergravity in the preparation of cellular constructs for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering purposes. PMID:25785273

  5. Age-associated decrease in muscle precursor cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lees, Simon J; Rathbone, Christopher R; Booth, Frank W

    2006-02-01

    Muscle precursor cells (MPCs) are required for the regrowth, regeneration, and/or hypertrophy of skeletal muscle, which are deficient in sarcopenia. In the present investigation, we have addressed the issue of age-associated changes in MPC differentiation. MPCs, including satellite cells, were isolated from both young and old rat skeletal muscle with a high degree of myogenic purity (>90% MyoD and desmin positive). MPCs isolated from skeletal muscle of 32-mo-old rats exhibited decreased differentiation into myotubes and demonstrated decreased myosin heavy chain (MHC) and muscle creatine kinase (CK-M) expression compared with MPCs isolated from 3-mo-old rats. p27(Kip1) is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor that has been shown to enhance muscle differentiation in culture. Herein we describe our finding that p27(Kip1) protein was lower in differentiating MPCs from skeletal muscle of 32-mo-old rats than in 3-mo-old rat skeletal muscle. Although MHC and CK-M expression were approximately 50% lower in differentiating MPCs isolated from 32-mo-old rats, MyoD protein content was not different and myogenin protein concentration was twofold higher. These data suggest that there are inherent differences in cell signaling during the transition from cell cycle arrest to the formation of myotubes in MPCs isolated from sarcopenic muscle. Furthermore, there is an age-associated decrease in muscle-specific protein expression in differentiating MPCs despite normal MyoD and elevated myogenin levels. PMID:16192302

  6. Hypergravity stimulation enhances PC12 neuron-like cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Genchi, Giada Graziana; Cialdai, Francesca; Monici, Monica; Mazzolai, Barbara; Mattoli, Virgilio; Ciofani, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Altered gravity is a strong physical cue able to elicit different cellular responses, representing a largely uninvestigated opportunity for tissue engineering/regenerative medicine applications. Our recent studies have shown that both proliferation and differentiation of C2C12 skeletal muscle cells can be enhanced by hypergravity treatment; given these results, PC12 neuron-like cells were chosen to test the hypothesis that hypergravity stimulation might also affect the behavior of neuronal cells, in particular promoting an enhanced differentiated phenotype. PC12 cells were thus cultured under differentiating conditions for either 12 h or 72 h before being stimulated with different values of hypergravity (50 g and 150 g). Effects of hypergravity were evaluated at transcriptional level 1 h and 48 h after the stimulation, and at protein level 48 h from hypergravity exposure, to assess its influence on neurite development over increasing differentiation times. PC12 differentiation resulted strongly affected by the hypergravity treatments; in particular, neurite length was significantly enhanced after exposure to high acceleration values. The achieved results suggest that hypergravity might induce a faster and higher neuronal differentiation and encourage further investigations on the potential of hypergravity in the preparation of cellular constructs for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering purposes.

  7. Evaluation of a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay (Keystone Sym)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our goal is to establish an in vitro model system to evaluate chemical effects using a single stem cell culture technique that would improve throughput and provide quantitative markers of differentiation and cell number. To this end, we have used an adherent cell differentiation ...

  8. Differential migration and proliferation of geometrical ensembles of cell clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Girish; Chen, Bo; Co, Carlos C.; Ho, Chia-Chi

    2011-06-10

    Differential cell migration and growth drives the organization of specific tissue forms and plays a critical role in embryonic development, tissue morphogenesis, and tumor invasion. Localized gradients of soluble factors and extracellular matrix have been shown to modulate cell migration and proliferation. Here we show that in addition to these factors, initial tissue geometry can feedback to generate differential proliferation, cell polarity, and migration patterns. We apply layer by layer polyelectrolyte assembly to confine multicellular organization and subsequently release cells to demonstrate the spatial patterns of cell migration and growth. The cell shapes, spreading areas, and cell-cell contacts are influenced strongly by the confining geometry. Cells within geometric ensembles are morphologically polarized. Symmetry breaking was observed for cells on the circular pattern and cells migrate toward the corners and in the direction parallel to the longest dimension of the geometric shapes. This migration pattern is disrupted when actomyosin based tension was inhibited. Cells near the edge or corner of geometric shapes proliferate while cells within do not. Regions of higher rate of cell migration corresponded to regions of concentrated growth. These findings demonstrate that multicellular organization can result in spatial patterns of migration and proliferation.

  9. On the track of transfer cell formation by specialized plant-parasitic nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Rodiuc, Natalia; Vieira, Paulo; Banora, Mohamed Youssef; de Almeida Engler, Janice

    2014-01-01

    Transfer cells are ubiquitous plant cells that play an important role in plant development as well as in responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. They are highly specialized and differentiated cells playing a central role in the acquisition, distribution and exchange of nutrients. Their unique structural traits are characterized by augmented ingrowths of invaginated secondary wall material, unsheathed by an amplified area of plasma membrane enriched in a suite of solute transporters. Similar morphological features can be perceived in vascular root feeding cells induced by sedentary plant-parasitic nematodes, such as root-knot and cyst nematodes, in a wide range of plant hosts. Despite their close phylogenetic relationship, these obligatory biotrophic plant pathogens engage different approaches when reprogramming root cells into giant cells or syncytia, respectively. Both nematode feeding-cells types will serve as the main source of nutrients until the end of the nematode life cycle. In both cases, these nematodes are able to remarkably maneuver and reprogram plant host cells. In this review we will discuss the structure, function and formation of these specialized multinucleate cells that act as nutrient transfer cells accumulating and synthesizing components needed for survival and successful offspring of plant-parasitic nematodes. Plant cells with transfer-like functions are also a renowned subject of interest involving still poorly understood molecular and cellular transport processes. PMID:24847336

  10. Epigenetic regulation of human adipose-derived stem cells differentiation.

    PubMed

    Daniunaite, Kristina; Serenaite, Inga; Misgirdaite, Roberta; Gordevicius, Juozas; Unguryte, Ausra; Fleury-Cappellesso, Sandrine; Bernotiene, Eiva; Jarmalaite, Sonata

    2015-12-01

    Adult stem cells have more restricted differentiation potential than embryonic stem cells (ESCs), but upon appropriate stimulation can differentiate into cells of different germ layers. Epigenetic factors, including DNA modifications, take a significant part in regulation of pluripotency and differentiation of ESCs. Less is known about the epigenetic regulation of these processes in adult stem cells. Gene expression profile and location of DNA modifications in adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and their osteogenically differentiated lineages were analyzed using Agilent microarrays. Methylation-specific PCR and restriction-based quantitative PCR were applied for 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) detection in selected loci. The level of DNA modifications in the POU5F1 locus was quantified with deep sequencing. Expression levels of selected genes were assayed by real-time PCR. ADSCs differentiation into osteogenic lineages involved marked changes in both 5mC and 5hmC profiles, but 5hmC changes were more abundant. 5mC losses and 5hmC gains were the main events observed during ADSCs differentiation, and were accompanied by increased expression of TET1 (P = 0.009). In ADSCs, POU5F1 was better expressed than NANOG or SOX2 (P ≤ 0.001). Both 5mC and 5hmC marks were present in the POU5F1 locus, but only hydroxymethylation of specific cytosine showed significant effect on the gene expression. In summary, the data of our study suggest significant involvement of changes in 5hmC profile during the differentiation of human adult stem cells.

  11. Direct FuelCell/Turbine Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2008-09-30

    This report summarizes the progress made in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T system employs an indirectly heated Turbine Generator to supplement fuel cell generated power. The concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, minimal emissions, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. Proof-of-concept tests using a sub-MW-class DFC/T power plant at FuelCell Energy's (FCE) Danbury facility were conducted to validate the feasibility of the concept and to measure its potential for electric power production. A 400 kW-class power plant test facility was designed and retrofitted to conduct the tests. The initial series of tests involved integration of a full-size (250 kW) Direct FuelCell stack with a 30 kW Capstone microturbine. The operational aspects of the hybrid system in relation to the integration of the microturbine with the fuel cell, process flow and thermal balances, and control strategies for power cycling of the system, were investigated. A subsequent series of tests included operation of the sub-MW Direct FuelCell/Turbine power plant with a Capstone C60 microturbine. The C60 microturbine extended the range of operation of the hybrid power plant to higher current densities (higher power) than achieved in initial tests using the 30kW microturbine. The proof-of-concept test results confirmed the stability and controllability of operating a fullsize (250 kW) fuel cell stack in combination with a microturbine. Thermal management of the system was confirmed and power plant operation, using the microturbine as the only source of fresh air supply to the

  12. Natural Product Vibsanin A Induces Differentiation of Myeloid Leukemia Cells through PKC Activation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zu-Yin; Xiao, He; Wang, Li-Mei; Shen, Xing; Jing, Yu; Wang, Lin; Sun, Wen-Feng; Zhang, Yan-Feng; Cui, Yu; Shan, Ya-Jun; Zhou, Wen-Bing; Xing, Shuang; Xiong, Guo-Lin; Liu, Xiao-Lan; Dong, Bo; Feng, Jian-Nan; Wang, Li-Sheng; Luo, Qing-Liang; Zhao, Qin-Shi; Cong, Yu-Wen

    2016-05-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-based cell differentiation therapy has been successful in treating acute promyelocytic leukemia, a unique subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, other subtypes of AML display resistance to ATRA-based treatment. In this study, we screened natural, plant-derived vibsane-type diterpenoids for their ability to induce differentiation of myeloid leukemia cells, discovering that vibsanin A potently induced differentiation of AML cell lines and primary blasts. The differentiation-inducing activity of vibsanin A was mediated through direct interaction with and activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Consistent with these findings, pharmacological blockade of PKC activity suppressed vibsanin A-induced differentiation. Mechanistically, vibsanin A-mediated activation of PKC led to induction of the ERK pathway and decreased c-Myc expression. In mouse xenograft models of AML, vibsanin A administration prolonged host survival and inhibited PKC-mediated inflammatory responses correlated with promotion of skin tumors in mice. Collectively, our results offer a preclinical proof of concept for vibsanin A as a myeloid differentiation-inducing compound, with potential application as an antileukemic agent. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2698-709. ©2016 AACR.

  13. Osteogenic differentiation of human dental papilla mesenchymal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Etsuko; Hirose, Motohiro . E-mail: motohiro-hirose@aist.go.jp; Kotobuki, Noriko; Shimaoka, Hideki; Tadokoro, Mika; Maeda, Masahiko; Hayashi, Yoshiko; Kirita, Tadaaki; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2006-04-21

    We isolated dental papilla from impacted human molar and proliferated adherent fibroblastic cells after collagenase treatment of the papilla. The cells were negative for hematopoietic markers but positive for CD29, CD44, CD90, CD105, and CD166. When the cells were further cultured in the presence of {beta}-glycerophosphate, ascorbic acid, and dexamethasone for 14 days, mineralized areas together with osteogenic differentiation evidenced by high alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin contents were observed. The differentiation was confirmed at both protein and gene expression levels. The cells can also be cryopreserved and, after thawing, could show in vivo bone-forming capability. These results indicate that mesenchymal type cells localize in dental papilla and that the cells can be culture expanded/utilized for bone tissue engineering.

  14. Activated mast cells promote differentiation of B cells into effector cells

    PubMed Central

    Palm, Anna-Karin E.; Garcia-Faroldi, Gianni; Lundberg, Marcus; Pejler, Gunnar; Kleinau, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Based on the known accumulation of mast cells (MCs) in B cell-dependent inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, we hypothesized that MCs directly modulate B cells. We show here that degranulated, and to a lesser extent naïve or IgE-sensitized, MCs activate both naïve and B cell receptor-activated B cells. This was shown by increased proliferation, blast formation, and expression of CD19, MHC class II and CD86 in the B cells. Further, MCs stimulated the secretion of IgM and IgG in IgM+ B cells, indicating that MCs can induce class-switch recombination in B cells. We also show that coculture of MCs with B cells promotes surface expression of L-selectin, a homing receptor, on the B cells. The effects of MCs on B cells were partly dependent on cell-cell contact and both follicular and marginal zone B cells could be activated by MCs. Our findings suggest that degranulated MCs support optimal activation of B cells, a finding that is in line with in vivo studies showing that MCs frequently degranulate in the context of B-cell driven pathologies such as arthritis. Together, our findings show that MCs have the capacity to differentiate B cells to effector cells. PMID:26847186

  15. Structure of Plant Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Larry; Albersheim, Peter

    1979-01-01

    Wild type Bacillus subtilis, when grown on beet araban, secretes into its culture medium an endo-arabanase and two arabinosidases. An alternate procedure to one previously described (Kaji A, T Saheki 1975 Biochim Biophys Acta 410: 354-360) has been developed for the purification of the endo-arabanase. The purified endo-arabanase is shown to be homogeneous by sodium dodecyl sulfate-urea disc gel electrophoresis (molecular weight ≃ 32,000) and by isoelectric focusing (pI = 9.3). The endo-arabanase, acting on a branched araban substrate, has maximal activity at pH 6.0 and preferentially cleaves 5-linked arabinosyl residues. One of the arabinosidases (molecular weight ≃ 65,000, pI = 5.3) has been purified to the point that it contains only one quantitatively minor contaminant, as shown by sodium dodecyl sulfate-urea disc gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. The purified arabinosidase, acting on p-nitrophenyl-α-l-arabinofuranoside, has maximal activity at pH 6.5, and, when acting on a branched araban substrate, preferentially attacks nonreducing terminal arabinosyl residues linked to the 2 or 3 position of other arabinosyl residues. Neither of the two purified enzymes is capable of hydrolyzing a variety of carbohydrate substrates which lack arabinosidic linkages. The purified endo-arabinase is shown to be capable of releasing arabinosyl oligomers from the walls of suspension-cultured sycamore cells, thereby suggesting its usefulness as a probe in studying the structure of the araban component of primary cell walls. PMID:16660741

  16. Variable DNA methylation changes during differentiation of human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Steigerwald, S D; Pfeifer, G P

    1988-09-01

    The DNA 5-methylcytosine content has been analyzed in the human melanoma cell line M21 at several time points after induction of differentiation by a variety of inducers. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine reduces DNA methylation to about 50% of the control level and this demethylation occurs prior to the establishment of the differentiated phenotype. The DNA synthesis inhibitors cytosine arabinoside, aphidicolin, and hydroxyurea exert different effects on DNA methylation in these cells. Cytosine arabinoside induces an early DNA hypermethylation, which is however reversible and drops to the original level after 24 h. Hydroxyurea induces DNA hypermethylation after a lag period of more than 48 h and the DNA polymerase alpha inhibitor aphidicolin has no effect on the DNA methylation level. Treatment of cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, another potent inducer of melanoma cell differentiation, does not result in a change of total DNA methylation over a period of 96 h. These results indicate that differentiation of human melanoma cells can be accompanied by variable changes of the DNA methylation pattern. These changes can be neither generally related to the differentiation process itself nor related to the effects of DNA synthesis inhibition on DNA methylation, but may more likely reflect a direct or indirect particular effect of the inducer on the DNA methylation process.

  17. Lack of vimentin impairs endothelial differentiation of embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Boraas, Liana C.; Ahsan, Tabassum

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeletal filament vimentin is inherent to the endothelial phenotype and is critical for the proper function of endothelial cells in adult mice. It is unclear, however, if the presence of vimentin is necessary during differentiation to the endothelial phenotype. Here we evaluated gene and protein expression of differentiating wild type embryonic stem cells (WT ESCs) and vimentin knockout embryonic stem cells (VIM −/− ESCs) using embryoid bodies (EBs) formed from both cell types. Over seven days of differentiation VIM −/− EBs had altered morphology compared to WT EBs, with a rippled outer surface and a smaller size due to decreased proliferation. Gene expression of pluripotency markers decreased similarly for EBs of both cell types; however, VIM −/− EBs had impaired differentiation towards the endothelial phenotype. This was quantified with decreased expression of markers along the specification pathway, specifically the early mesodermal marker Brachy-T, the lateral plate mesodermal marker FLK1, and the endothelial-specific markers TIE2, PECAM, and VE-CADHERIN. Taken together, these results indicate that the absence of vimentin impairs spontaneous differentiation of ESCs to the endothelial phenotype in vitro. PMID:27480130

  18. Lack of vimentin impairs endothelial differentiation of embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Boraas, Liana C; Ahsan, Tabassum

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeletal filament vimentin is inherent to the endothelial phenotype and is critical for the proper function of endothelial cells in adult mice. It is unclear, however, if the presence of vimentin is necessary during differentiation to the endothelial phenotype. Here we evaluated gene and protein expression of differentiating wild type embryonic stem cells (WT ESCs) and vimentin knockout embryonic stem cells (VIM -/- ESCs) using embryoid bodies (EBs) formed from both cell types. Over seven days of differentiation VIM -/- EBs had altered morphology compared to WT EBs, with a rippled outer surface and a smaller size due to decreased proliferation. Gene expression of pluripotency markers decreased similarly for EBs of both cell types; however, VIM -/- EBs had impaired differentiation towards the endothelial phenotype. This was quantified with decreased expression of markers along the specification pathway, specifically the early mesodermal marker Brachy-T, the lateral plate mesodermal marker FLK1, and the endothelial-specific markers TIE2, PECAM, and VE-CADHERIN. Taken together, these results indicate that the absence of vimentin impairs spontaneous differentiation of ESCs to the endothelial phenotype in vitro. PMID:27480130

  19. SWI/SNF in cardiac progenitor cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lei, Ienglam; Liu, Liu; Sham, Mai Har; Wang, Zhong

    2013-11-01

    Cardiogenesis requires proper specification, proliferation, and differentiation of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs). The differentiation of CPCs to specific cardiac cell types is likely guided by a comprehensive network comprised of cardiac transcription factors and epigenetic complexes. In this review, we describe how the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling SWI/SNF complexes work synergistically with transcription and epigenetic factors to direct specific cardiac gene expression during CPC differentiation. Furthermore, we discuss how SWI/SNF may prime chromatin for cardiac gene expression at a genome-wide level. A detailed understanding of SWI/SNF-mediated CPC differentiation will provide important insight into the etiology of cardica defects and help design novel therapies for heart disease.

  20. Plant development: cell movement relative to each other is both common and very important.

    PubMed

    Lev-Yadun, Simcha

    2015-01-01

    The common view that "plant cells cannot move relative to each other" is incorrect. Relative movement of plant cells relative to each other is expressed during fiber elongation, growth of arms of branched sclereids, intrusive growth of the tips of fusiform initials in the cambium, the increase in diameter of vessel members, growth in length of vessel-member elements in the secondary xylem of the few monocotyledons that express secondary growth, growth of laticifers, formation of tylosis, dilatation in the bark via parenchyma cell expansion, and growth of pollen tubes in the style. In all these cases, part of the plant cell remains in its original position, while other parts of the cell grow to the new locations, moving significantly relative to other cells. Not considering these movements will cause a delay in studying and understanding many aspects of differentiation of plant cells and tissues.

  1. VHL Induces Renal Cell Differentiation and Growth Arrest through Integration of Cell-Cell and Cell-Extracellular Matrix Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Davidowitz, Eliot J.; Schoenfeld, Alan R.; Burk, Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    Mutations in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene are involved in the family cancer syndrome for which it is named and the development of sporadic renal cell cancer (RCC). Reintroduction of VHL into RCC cells lacking functional VHL [VHL(−)] can suppress their growth in nude mice, but not under standard tissue culture conditions. To examine the hypothesis that the tumor suppressor function of VHL requires signaling through contact with extracellular matrix (ECM), 786-O VHL(−) RCC cells and isogenic sublines stably expressing VHL gene products [VHL(+)] were grown on ECMs. Cell-cell and cell-ECM signalings were required to elicit VHL-dependent differences in growth and differentiation. VHL(+) cells differentiated into organized epithelial sheets, whereas VHL(−) cells were branched and disorganized. VHL(+) cells grown to high density on collagen I underwent growth arrest, whereas VHL(−) cells continued to proliferate. Integrin levels were up-regulated in VHL(−) cells, and cell adhesion was down-regulated in VHL(+) cells during growth at high cell density. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α, a transcription factor and global activator of proximal tubule-specific genes in the nephron, was markedly up-regulated in VHL(+) cells grown at high cell density. These data indicate that VHL can induce renal cell differentiation and mediate growth arrest through integration of cell-cell and cell-ECM signals. PMID:11154273

  2. Glacial history affected phenotypic differentiation in the alpine plant, Campanula thyrsoides.

    PubMed

    Scheepens, J F; Frei, Eva S; Stöcklin, Jürg

    2013-01-01

    Numerous widespread Alpine plant species show molecular differentiation among populations from distinct regions. This has been explained as the result of genetic drift during glacial survival in isolated refugia along the border of the European Alps. Since genetic drift may affect molecular markers and phenotypic traits alike, we asked whether phenotypic differentiation mirrors molecular patterns among Alpine plant populations from different regions. Phenotypic traits can be under selection, so we additionally investigated whether part of the phenotypic differentiation can be explained by past selection and/or current adaptation. Using the monocarpic Campanula thyrsoides as our study species, a common garden experiment with plants from 21 populations from four phylogeographic groups located in regions across the Alps and the Jura Mountains was performed to test for differentiation in morphological and phenological traits. Past selection was investigated by comparing phenotypic differentiation among and within regions with molecular differentiation among and within regions. The common garden results indicated regional differentiation among populations for all investigated phenotypic traits, particularly in phenology. Delayed flowering in plants from the South-eastern Alps suggested adaptation to long sub-mediterranean summers and contrasted with earlier flowering of plants experiencing shorter growing seasons in regions with higher elevation to the West. Comparisons between molecular and phenotypic differentiation revealed diversifying selection among regions in height and biomass, which is consistent with adaptation to environmental conditions in glacial refugia. Within regions, past selection acted against strong diversification for most phenotypic traits, causing restricted postglacial adaptation. Evidence consistent with post-glacial adaptation was also given by negative correlation coefficients between several phenotypic traits and elevation of the population

  3. Isolation, identification and differentiation of human embryonic cartilage stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Changhao; Yan, Zi; Xu, Hao; Zhang, Chen; Zhang, Qi; Wei, Anhui; Yang, Xi; Wang, Yi

    2015-07-01

    We isolated human embryonic cartilage stem cells (hECSCs), a novel stem cell population, from the articular cartilage of eight-week-old human embryos. These stem cells demonstrated a marker expression pattern and differentiation potential intermediate to those of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human adult stem cells (hASCs). hECSCs expressed markers associated with both hESCs (OCT4, NANOG, SOX2, SSEA-3 and SSEA-4) and human adult stem cells (hASCs) (CD29, CD44, CD90, CD73 and CD10). These cells also differentiated into adipocytes, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, neurons and islet-like cells under specific inducing conditions. We identified N(6), 2'-O-dibutyryl cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (Bt2cAMP) as an inducer of chondrogenic differentiation in hECSCs. Similar results using N(6), 2'-O-dibutyryl cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (Bt2cAMP) were obtained for two other types of human embryonic tissue-derived stem cells, human embryonic hepatic stem cells (hEHSCs) and human embryonic amniotic fluid stem cells (hEASCs), both of which exhibited a marker expression pattern similar to that of hECSCs. The isolation of hECSCs and the discovery that N(6), 2'-O-dibutyryl cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (Bt2cAMP) induces chondrogenic differentiation in different stem cell populations might aid the development of strategies in tissue engineering and cartilage repair.

  4. Sertoli Cell Differentiation in Pubertal Boars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meishan boars experience puberty at a younger age than crossbred (BX) boars in association with earlier cessation of Sertoli cell proliferation and smaller post pubertal testicular size. The current study defined changes in expression, assessed by immunohistochemistry, of anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH...

  5. Glucosylceramide is Critical for Cell-Type Differentiation and Organogenesis, but not for Cell Viability in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Msanne, Joseph; Chen, Ming; Luttgeharm, Kyle D.; Bradley, Amanda M.; Mays, Elizabeth S.; Paper, Janet M.; Boyle, Daniel L.; Cahoon, Rebecca E.; Schrick, Kathrin; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Glucosylceramides (GlcCer), glucose-conjugated sphingolipids, are major components of the endomembrane system and plasma membrane in most eukaryote cells. Yet, the quantitative significance and cellular functions of GlcCer are not well characterized in plants and other multi-organ eukaryotes. To address this, we examined Arabidopsis lines lacking or deficient in GlcCer by insertional disruption or by RNAi suppression of the single gene for GlcCer synthase (GCS, At2g19880), the enzyme that catalyzes GlcCer synthesis. Null mutants for GCS (designated “gcs-1”) were viable as seedlings, albeit strongly reduced in size, and failed to develop beyond the seedling stage. Heterozygous plants harboring the insertion allele exhibited reduced transmission through the male gametophyte. Undifferentiated calli generated from gcs-1 seedlings and lacking GlcCer proliferated in a manner similar to calli from wild-type plants. However, gcs-1 calli, in contrast to wild-type calli, were unable to develop organs on differentiation media. Consistent with a role for GlcCer in organ-specific cell differentiation, calli from gcs-1 mutants formed roots and leaves on media supplemented with the glucosylated sphingosine glucopsychosine, which was readily converted to GlcCer independent of GCS. Underlying these phenotypes, gcs-1 cells had altered Golgi morphology and fewer cisternae per Golgi apparatus relative to wild-type cells, indicative of protein trafficking defects. Despite seedling lethality in the null mutant, GCS RNAi suppression lines with ≤2% of wild-type GlcCer levels were viable and fertile. Collectively, these results indicate that GlcCer are essential for cell-type differentiation and organogenesis, and plant cells produce GlcCer amounts in excess of that required for normal development. PMID:26313010

  6. Glucosylceramides are critical for cell-type differentiation and organogenesis, but not for cell viability in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Msanne, Joseph; Chen, Ming; Luttgeharm, Kyle D; Bradley, Amanda M; Mays, Elizabeth S; Paper, Janet M; Boyle, Daniel L; Cahoon, Rebecca E; Schrick, Kathrin; Cahoon, Edgar B

    2015-10-01

    Glucosylceramides (GlcCer), glucose-conjugated sphingolipids, are major components of the endomembrane system and plasma membrane in most eukaryotic cells. Yet the quantitative significance and cellular functions of GlcCer are not well characterized in plants and other multi-organ eukaryotes. To address this, we examined Arabidopsis lines that were lacking or deficient in GlcCer by insertional disruption or by RNA interference (RNAi) suppression of the single gene for GlcCer synthase (GCS, At2g19880), the enzyme that catalyzes GlcCer synthesis. Null mutants for GCS (designated 'gcs-1') were viable as seedlings, albeit strongly reduced in size, and failed to develop beyond the seedling stage. Heterozygous plants harboring the insertion allele exhibited reduced transmission through the male gametophyte. Undifferentiated calli generated from gcs-1 seedlings and lacking GlcCer proliferated in a manner similar to calli from wild-type plants. However, gcs-1 calli, in contrast to wild-type calli, were unable to develop organs on differentiation media. Consistent with a role for GlcCer in organ-specific cell differentiation, calli from gcs-1 mutants formed roots and leaves on media supplemented with the glucosylated sphingosine glucopsychosine, which was readily converted to GlcCer independent of GCS. Underlying these phenotypes, gcs-1 cells had altered Golgi morphology and fewer cisternae per Golgi apparatus relative to wild-type cells, indicative of protein trafficking defects. Despite seedling lethality in the null mutant, GCS RNAi suppression lines with ≤2% of wild-type GlcCer levels were viable and fertile. Collectively, these results indicate that GlcCer are essential for cell-type differentiation and organogenesis, and plant cells produce amounts of GlcCer in excess of that required for normal development. PMID:26313010

  7. Cell cycle-dependent differentiation dynamics balances growth and endocrine differentiation in the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yung Hae; Larsen, Hjalte List; Rué, Pau; Lemaire, Laurence A; Ferrer, Jorge; Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2015-03-01

    Organogenesis relies on the spatiotemporal balancing of differentiation and proliferation driven by an expanding pool of progenitor cells. In the mouse pancreas, lineage tracing at the population level has shown that the expanding pancreas progenitors can initially give rise to all endocrine, ductal, and acinar cells but become bipotent by embryonic day 13.5, giving rise to endocrine cells and ductal cells. However, the dynamics of individual progenitors balancing self-renewal and lineage-specific differentiation has never been described. Using three-dimensional live imaging and in vivo clonal analysis, we reveal the contribution of individual cells to the global behaviour and demonstrate three modes of progenitor divisions: symmetric renewing, symmetric endocrinogenic, and asymmetric generating a progenitor and an endocrine progenitor. Quantitative analysis shows that the endocrine differentiation process is consistent with a simple model of cell cycle-dependent stochastic priming of progenitors to endocrine fate. The findings provide insights to define control parameters to optimize the generation of β-cells in vitro.

  8. MTA3 regulates differentiation of human cytotrophoblast stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Horii, Mariko; Moretto-Zita, Matteo; Nelson, Katharine K.; Li, Yingchun; Parast, Mana M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Early placental development depends on the correct balance of cytotrophoblast (CTB) proliferation and differentiation, into either syncytiotrophoblast (STB) involved in nutrient/gas exchange, or invasive extravillous trophoblast (EVT) involved in establishment of blood flow to the placenta. Metastasis associated protein-3 (MTA3) is a transcriptional co-repressor known to regulate cell migration. In addition, MTA3 is reportedly decreased in preeclampsia. We set out to investigate the role of MTA3 in human trophoblast differentiation. Methods We co-stained first and third trimester placental sections with antibodies to MTA3 and other trophoblast markers. We also evaluated MTA3 expression following in vitro differentiation of primary isolated CTB. In order to evaluate the role of MTA3 in trophoblast differentiation, we used lentiviral constructs to overexpress and knock down its expression. Trophoblast differentiation was assessed by a combination of marker expression and functional assays, including hCG ELISA and cell migration. Results MTA3 was abundantly expressed in CTB and proximal cell column EVT in the human placenta and decreased with further differentiation into STB and mature EVT. MTA3 knockdown in JEG3 resulted in a 2–3 fold decrease in STB markers, CGB and GCM1, as well as in hCG secretion. In terms of EVT differentiation, MTA3 knockdown led to a 1.5–2 fold increase in HLA-G and cell migration, but decreased the mature EVT marker ITGA1. Discussion Taken together, our data suggest a role for MTA3 in terminal trophoblast differentiation into both hCG-secreting STB and mature EVT. PMID:26198267

  9. Genomic characterization of plant cell wall degrading enzymes and in silico analysis of xylanses and polygalacturonases of Fusarium virguliforme

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) are important effectors for plant pathogens to invade plants. In this study, the composition of PCWDEs in Fusarium virguliforme that were grown for 5-days and 20 days in liquid medium was determined by RNA-Seq. Differential expression analysis showed more P...

  10. The Hematopoietic Differentiation and Production of Mature Myeloid Cells from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyung-Dal; Vodyanik, Maxim; Slukvin, Igor I.

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe a protocol for hematopoietic differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and generation of mature myeloid cells from hPSCs through expansion and differentiation of hPSC-derived lin-CD34+CD43+CD45+ multipotent progenitors. The protocol is comprised of three major steps: (i) induction of hematopoietic differentiation by coculture of hPSCs with OP9 bone marrow stromal cells, (ii) short-term expansion of multipotent myeloid progenitors with a high dose of GM-CSF, and (iii) directed differentiation of myeloid progenitors into neutrophils, eosinophils, dendritic cells (DCs), Langerhans cells (LCs), macrophages, and osteoclasts. The generation of multipotent hematopoietic progenitors from hPSCs requires 9 days of culture, and an additional 2 days are needed to expand myeloid progenitors. Differentiation of myeloid progenitors into mature myeloid cells requires an additional 5–19 days of culture with cytokines, depending on the cell type. PMID:21372811

  11. Placental-derived stem cells: Culture, differentiation and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Maira S; Barreto-Filho, João B

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising approach to clinical healing in several diseases. A great variety of tissues (bone marrow, adipose tissue, and placenta) are potentially sources of stem cells. Placenta-derived stem cells (p-SCs) are in between embryonic and mesenchymal stem cells, sharing characteristics with both, such as non-carcinogenic status and property to differentiate in all embryonic germ layers. Moreover, their use is not ethically restricted as fetal membranes are considered medical waste after birth. In this context, the present review will be focused on the biological properties, culture and potential cell therapy uses of placental-derived stem cells. Immunophenotype characterization, mainly for surface marker expression, and basic principles of p-SC isolation and culture (mechanical separation or enzymatic digestion of the tissues, the most used culture media, cell plating conditions) will be presented. In addition, some preclinical studies that were performed in different medical areas will be cited, focusing on neurological, liver, pancreatic, heart, muscle, pulmonary, and bone diseases and also in tissue engineering field. Finally, some challenges for stem cell therapy applications will be highlighted. The understanding of the mechanisms involved in the p-SCs differentiation and the achievement of pure cell populations (after differentiation) are key points that must be clarified before bringing the preclinical studies, performed at the bench, to the medical practice. PMID:26029347

  12. Optical quantification of forces at play during stem cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Christine M.; Brickman, Joshua M.; Oddershede, Lene B.

    2016-03-01

    A cell is in constant interaction with its environment, it responds to external mechanical, chemical and biological signals. The response to these signals can be of various nature, for instance intra-cellular mechanical re-arrangements, cell-cell interactions, or cellular reinforcements. Optical methods are quite attractive for investigating the mechanics inside living cells as, e.g., optical traps are amongst the only nanotools that can reach and manipulate, measure forces, inside a living cell. In the recent years it has become increasingly evident that not only biochemical and biomolecular cues, but also that mechanical ones, play an important roles in stem cell differentiation. The first evidence for the importance of mechanical cues emerged from studies showing that substrate stiffness had an impact on stem cell differentiation. Recently, techniques such as optical tweezers and stretchers have been applied to stem cells, producing new insights into the role of mechanics in regulating renewal and differentiation. Here, we describe how optical tweezers and optical stretchers can be applied as a tool to investigate stem cell mechanics and some of the recent results to come out of this work.

  13. The microRNA-dependent cell fate of multipotent stromal cells differentiating to endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cha, Min-Ji; Choi, Eunhyun; Lee, Seahyoung; Song, Byeong-Wook; Yoon, Cheesoon; Hwang, Ki-Chul

    2016-02-15

    In the endothelial recovery process, bone marrow-derived MSCs are a potential source of cells for both research and therapy, and their capacities to self-renew and to differentiate into all the cell types in the human body make them a promising therapeutic agent for remodeling cellular differentiation and a valuable resource for the treatment of many diseases. Based on the results provided in a miRNA database, we selected miRNAs with unique targets in cell fate-related signaling pathways. The tested miRNAs targeting GSK-3β (miR-26a), platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and CD133 (miR-26a and miR-29b) induced MSC differentiation into functional ECs, whereas miRNAs targeting VEGF receptor (miR-15, miR-144, miR-145, and miR-329) inhibited MSC differentiation into ECs through VEGF stimulation. In addition, the expression levels of these miRNAs were correlated with in vivo physiological endothelial recovery processes. These findings indicate that the miRNA expression profile is distinct for cells in different stages of differentiation from MSCs to ECs and that specific miRNAs can function as regulators of endothelialization.

  14. The Role of Lymphatic Niches in T Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Capece, Tara; Kim, Minsoo

    2016-01-01

    Long-term immunity to many viral and bacterial pathogens requires CD8+ memory T cell development, and the induction of long-lasting CD8+ memory T cells from a naïve, undifferentiated state is a major goal of vaccine design. Formation of the memory CD8+ T cell compartment is highly dependent on the early activation cues received by naïve CD8+ T cells during primary infection. This review aims to highlight the cellularity of various niches within the lymph node and emphasize recent evidence suggesting that distinct types of T cell activation and differentiation occur within different immune contexts in lymphoid organs. PMID:27306645

  15. Cell-to-cell movement of plastids in plants

    PubMed Central

    Thyssen, Gregory; Svab, Zora; Maliga, Pal

    2012-01-01

    Our objective was to test whether or not plastids and mitochondria, the two DNA-containing organelles, move between cells in plants. As our experimental approach, we grafted two different species of tobacco, Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana sylvestris. Grafting triggers formation of new cell-to-cell contacts, creating an opportunity to detect cell-to-cell organelle movement between the genetically distinct plants. We initiated tissue culture from sliced graft junctions and selected for clonal lines in which gentamycin resistance encoded in the N. tabacum nucleus was combined with spectinomycin resistance encoded in N. sylvestris plastids. Here, we present evidence for cell-to-cell movement of the entire 161-kb plastid genome in these plants, most likely in intact plastids. We also found that the related mitochondria were absent, suggesting independent movement of the two DNA-containing organelles. Acquisition of plastids from neighboring cells provides a mechanism by which cells may be repopulated with functioning organelles. Our finding supports the universality of intercellular organelle trafficking and may enable development of future biotechnological applications. PMID:22308369

  16. Quantification of plant cell coupling with live-cell microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liesche, Johannes; Schulz, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Movement of nutrients and signaling compounds from cell to cell is an essential process for plant growth and development. To understand processes such as carbon allocation, cell communication, and reaction to pathogen attack it is important to know a specific molecule's capacity to pass a specific cell wall interface. Transport through plasmodesmata, the cell wall channels that directly connect plant cells, is regulated not only by a fixed size exclusion limit, but also by physiological and pathological adaptation. The noninvasive approach described here offers the possibility of precisely determining the plasmodesmata-mediated cell wall permeability for small molecules in living cells.The method is based on photoactivation of the fluorescent tracer caged fluorescein. Non-fluorescent caged fluorescein is applied to a target tissue, where it is taken up passively into all cells. Imaged by confocal microscopy, loaded tracer is activated by UV illumination in a target cell and its spread to neighboring cells monitored. When combined with high-speed acquisition by resonant scanning or spinning disc confocal microscopy, the high signal-to-noise ratio of photoactivation allows collection of three-dimensional (3D) time series. These contain all necessary functional and anatomical data to measure cell coupling in complex tissues noninvasively.

  17. Glycosylation of Fluorophenols by Plant Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Kei; Kubota, Naoji; Kondo, Yoko; Sato, Daisuke; Hamada, Hiroki

    2009-01-01

    Fluoroaromatic compounds are used as agrochemicals and released into environment as pollutants. Glycosylation of 2-, 3-, and 4-fluorophenols using plant cell cultures of Nicotiana tabacum was investigated to elucidate their potential to metabolize these compounds. Cultured N. tabacum cells converted 2-fluorophenol into its β-glucoside (60%) and β-gentiobioside (10%). 4-Fluorophenol was also glycosylated to its β-glucoside (32%) and β-gentiobioside (6%) by N. tabacum cells. On the other hand, N. tabacum glycosylated 3-fluorophenol to β-glucoside (17%). PMID:19564930

  18. Fluorescence activated cell sorting of plant protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Bargmann, Bastiaan O R; Birnbaum, Kenneth D

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution, cell type-specific analysis of gene expression greatly enhances understanding of developmental regulation and responses to environmental stimuli in any multicellular organism. In situ hybridization and reporter gene visualization can to a limited extent be used to this end but for high resolution quantitative RT-PCR or high-throughput transcriptome-wide analysis the isolation of RNA from particular cell types is requisite. Cellular dissociation of tissue expressing a fluorescent protein marker in a specific cell type and subsequent Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) makes it possible to collect sufficient amounts of material for RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis/amplification and microarray analysis. An extensive set of cell type-specific fluorescent reporter lines is available to the plant research community. In this case, two marker lines of the Arabidopsis thaliana root are used: P(SCR;)::GFP (endodermis and quiescent center) and P(WOX5;)::GFP (quiescent center). Large numbers (thousands) of seedlings are grown hydroponically or on agar plates and harvested to obtain enough root material for further analysis. Cellular dissociation of plant material is achieved by enzymatic digestion of the cell wall. This procedure makes use of high osmolarity-induced plasmolysis and commercially available cellulases, pectinases and hemicellulases to release protoplasts into solution. FACS of GFP-positive cells makes use of the visualization of the green versus the red emission spectra of protoplasts excited by a 488 nm laser. GFP-positive protoplasts can be distinguished by their increased ratio of green to red emission. Protoplasts are typically sorted directly into RNA extraction buffer and stored for further processing at a later time. This technique is revealed to be straightforward and practicable. Furthermore, it is shown that it can be used without difficulty to isolate sufficient numbers of cells for transcriptome analysis, even for very scarce

  19. Fluorescence activated cell sorting of plant protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Bargmann, Bastiaan O R; Birnbaum, Kenneth D

    2010-02-18

    High-resolution, cell type-specific analysis of gene expression greatly enhances understanding of developmental regulation and responses to environmental stimuli in any multicellular organism. In situ hybridization and reporter gene visualization can to a limited extent be used to this end but for high resolution quantitative RT-PCR or high-throughput transcriptome-wide analysis the isolation of RNA from particular cell types is requisite. Cellular dissociation of tissue expressing a fluorescent protein marker in a specific cell type and subsequent Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) makes it possible to collect sufficient amounts of material for RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis/amplification and microarray analysis. An extensive set of cell type-specific fluorescent reporter lines is available to the plant research community. In this case, two marker lines of the Arabidopsis thaliana root are used: P(SCR;)::GFP (endodermis and quiescent center) and P(WOX5;)::GFP (quiescent center). Large numbers (thousands) of seedlings are grown hydroponically or on agar plates and harvested to obtain enough root material for further analysis. Cellular dissociation of plant material is achieved by enzymatic digestion of the cell wall. This procedure makes use of high osmolarity-induced plasmolysis and commercially available cellulases, pectinases and hemicellulases to release protoplasts into solution. FACS of GFP-positive cells makes use of the visualization of the green versus the red emission spectra of protoplasts excited by a 488 nm laser. GFP-positive protoplasts can be distinguished by their increased ratio of green to red emission. Protoplasts are typically sorted directly into RNA extraction buffer and stored for further processing at a later time. This technique is revealed to be straightforward and practicable. Furthermore, it is shown that it can be used without difficulty to isolate sufficient numbers of cells for transcriptome analysis, even for very scarce

  20. Matricellular protein Cfl1 regulates cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiuyun; Lin, Xiaorong

    2013-11-01

    Like higher eukaryotic cells in tissues, microbial cells in a community act in concert in response to environmental stimuli. They coordinate gene expression and their physiological and morphological states through intercellular communication mediated by matricellular signals. The adhesion protein Cfl1 was recently shown to be a matricellular signal in regulating morphogenesis and biofilm formation in the eukaryotic microbe Cryptococcus neoformans. Cfl1 is naturally highly expressed in the hyphal subpopulation during the mating colony development. Some Cfl1 proteins are cleaved and released to the ECM (extracellular matrix). The released exogenous Cfl1 activates Cryptococcus cells to express their endogenous Cfl1, to undergo filamentation, and to form structured biofilm colonies. In this study, we demonstrate that the N-terminal signal peptide and the novel conserved cysteine-rich SIGC domain at the C-terminus are critical for the adherence property and the signaling activity of this multifunctional protein. The investigation of this fungal matricellular signaling network involving Cfl1 and the master regulator of morphogenesis Znf2 provides a foundation to further elucidate intercellular communication in microbial development.

  1. 5-azacytidine promotes terminal differentiation of hepatic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    He, Yun; Cui, Jiejie; He, Tongchuan; Bi, Yang

    2015-08-01

    5-azacytidine (5-azaC) is known to induce cardiomyocyte differentiation. However, its function in hepatocyte differentiation is unclear. The present study investigated the in vitro capability of 5-azaC to promote maturation and differentiation of mouse embryonic hepatic progenitor cells, with the aim of developing an approach for improving hepatic differentiation. Mouse embryonic hepatic progenitor cells (HP14.5 cells) were treated with 5-azaC at concentrations from 0 to 20 μmol/l, in addition to hepatocyte induction culture medium. Hepatocyte induction medium induces HP14.5 cell differentiation. 5-azaC may enhance the albumin promotor-driven Gaussia luciferase (ALB-GLuc) activity in induced HP14.5 cells. In the present study 2 μmol/l was found to be the optimum concentration with which to achieve this. The expression of hepatocyte-associated factors was not significantly different between the group treated with 5-azaC alone and the control group. The mRNA levels of ALB; cytokeratin 18 (CK18); tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT); and cytochrome p450, family 1, member A1 (CYP1A1); in addition to the protein levels of ALB, CK18 and uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferase 1A (UGT1A) in the induced group with 5-azaC, were higher than those in the induced group without 5-azaC, although no significant differences were detected in expression of the hepatic stem cell markers, DLK and α-fetoprotein, between the two groups. Treatment with 5-azaC alone did not affect glycogen synthesis or indocyanine green (ICG) metabolic function in HP14.5 cells, although it significantly increased ICG uptake and periodic acid-Schiff-positive cell numbers amongst HP14.5 cells. Therefore, the present study demonstrated that treatment with 5-azaC alone exerted no effects on the maturation and differentiation of HP14.5 cells. However, 5-azaC exhibited a synergistic effect on the terminal differentiation of induced hepatic progenitor cells in association with a hepatic induction medium. PMID

  2. Metabolic profiling of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells during proliferation and differentiation into red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Daud, Hasbullah; Browne, Susan; Al-Majmaie, Rasoul; Murphy, William; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2016-01-25

    An understanding of the metabolic profile of cell proliferation and differentiation should support the optimization of culture conditions for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation, differentiation, and maturation into red blood cells. We have evaluated the key metabolic parameters during each phase of HSPC culture for red blood cell production in serum-supplemented (SS) and serum-free (SF) conditions. A simultaneous decrease in growth rate, total protein content, cell size, and the percentage of cells in the S/G2 phase of cell cycle, as well as an increase in the percentage of cells with a CD71(-)/GpA(+) surface marker profile, indicates HSPC differentiation into red blood cells. Compared with proliferating HSPCs, differentiating HSPCs showed significantly lower glucose and glutamine consumption rates, lactate and ammonia production rates, and amino acid consumption and production rates in both SS and SF conditions. Furthermore, extracellular acidification was associated with late proliferation phase, suggesting a reduced cellular metabolic rate during the transition from proliferation to differentiation. Under both SS and SF conditions, cells demonstrated a high metabolic rate with a mixed metabolism of both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in early and late proliferation, an increased dependence on OXPHOS activity during differentiation, and a shift to glycolytic metabolism only during maturation phase. These changes indicate that cell metabolism may have an important impact on the ability of HSPCs to proliferate and differentiate into red blood cells. PMID:26013297

  3. Metabolic profiling of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells during proliferation and differentiation into red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Daud, Hasbullah; Browne, Susan; Al-Majmaie, Rasoul; Murphy, William; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2016-01-25

    An understanding of the metabolic profile of cell proliferation and differentiation should support the optimization of culture conditions for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation, differentiation, and maturation into red blood cells. We have evaluated the key metabolic parameters during each phase of HSPC culture for red blood cell production in serum-supplemented (SS) and serum-free (SF) conditions. A simultaneous decrease in growth rate, total protein content, cell size, and the percentage of cells in the S/G2 phase of cell cycle, as well as an increase in the percentage of cells with a CD71(-)/GpA(+) surface marker profile, indicates HSPC differentiation into red blood cells. Compared with proliferating HSPCs, differentiating HSPCs showed significantly lower glucose and glutamine consumption rates, lactate and ammonia production rates, and amino acid consumption and production rates in both SS and SF conditions. Furthermore, extracellular acidification was associated with late proliferation phase, suggesting a reduced cellular metabolic rate during the transition from proliferation to differentiation. Under both SS and SF conditions, cells demonstrated a high metabolic rate with a mixed metabolism of both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in early and late proliferation, an increased dependence on OXPHOS activity during differentiation, and a shift to glycolytic metabolism only during maturation phase. These changes indicate that cell metabolism may have an important impact on the ability of HSPCs to proliferate and differentiate into red blood cells.

  4. Turning terminally differentiated skeletal muscle cells into regenerative progenitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heng; Lööf, Sara; Borg, Paula; Nader, Gustavo A; Blau, Helen M; Simon, András

    2015-01-01

    The ability to repeatedly regenerate limbs during the entire lifespan of an animal is restricted to certain salamander species among vertebrates. This ability involves dedifferentiation of post-mitotic cells into progenitors that in turn form new structures. A long-term enigma has been how injury leads to dedifferentiation. Here we show that skeletal muscle dedifferentiation during newt limb regeneration depends on a programmed cell death response by myofibres. We find that programmed cell death-induced muscle fragmentation produces a population of 'undead' intermediate cells, which have the capacity to resume proliferation and contribute to muscle regeneration. We demonstrate the derivation of proliferating progeny from differentiated, multinucleated muscle cells by first inducing and subsequently intercepting a programmed cell death response. We conclude that cell survival may be manifested by the production of a dedifferentiated cell with broader potential and that the diversion of a programmed cell death response is an instrument to achieve dedifferentiation. PMID:26243583

  5. Turning terminally differentiated skeletal muscle cells into regenerative progenitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heng; Lööf, Sara; Borg, Paula; Nader, Gustavo A; Blau, Helen M; Simon, András

    2015-01-01

    The ability to repeatedly regenerate limbs during the entire lifespan of an animal is restricted to certain salamander species among vertebrates. This ability involves dedifferentiation of post-mitotic cells into progenitors that in turn form new structures. A long-term enigma has been how injury leads to dedifferentiation. Here we show that skeletal muscle dedifferentiation during newt limb regeneration depends on a programmed cell death response by myofibres. We find that programmed cell death-induced muscle fragmentation produces a population of 'undead' intermediate cells, which have the capacity to resume proliferation and contribute to muscle regeneration. We demonstrate the derivation of proliferating progeny from differentiated, multinucleated muscle cells by first inducing and subsequently intercepting a programmed cell death response. We conclude that cell survival may be manifested by the production of a dedifferentiated cell with broader potential and that the diversion of a programmed cell death response is an instrument to achieve dedifferentiation.

  6. Derivation and differentiation of haploid human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sagi, Ido; Chia, Gloryn; Golan-Lev, Tamar; Peretz, Mordecai; Weissbein, Uri; Sui, Lina; Sauer, Mark V; Yanuka, Ofra; Egli, Dieter; Benvenisty, Nissim

    2016-04-01

    Diploidy is a fundamental genetic feature in mammals, in which haploid cells normally arise only as post-meiotic germ cells that serve to ensure a diploid genome upon fertilization. Gamete manipulation has yielded haploid embryonic stem (ES) cells from several mammalian species, but haploid human ES cells have yet to be reported. Here we generated and analysed a collection of human parthenogenetic ES cell lines originating from haploid oocytes, leading to the successful isolation and maintenance of human ES cell lines with a normal haploid karyotype. Haploid human ES cells exhibited typical pluripotent stem cell characteristics, such as self-renewal capacity and a pluripotency-specific molecular signature. Moreover, we demonstrated the utility of these cells as a platform for loss-of-function genetic screening. Although haploid human ES cells resembled their diploid counterparts, they also displayed distinct properties including differential regulation of X chromosome inactivation and of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, alongside reduction in absolute gene expression levels and cell size. Surprisingly, we found that a haploid human genome is compatible not only with the undifferentiated pluripotent state, but also with differentiated somatic fates representing all three embryonic germ layers both in vitro and in vivo, despite a persistent dosage imbalance between the autosomes and X chromosome. We expect that haploid human ES cells will provide novel means for studying human functional genomics and development.

  7. Derivation and differentiation of haploid human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sagi, Ido; Chia, Gloryn; Golan-Lev, Tamar; Peretz, Mordecai; Weissbein, Uri; Sui, Lina; Sauer, Mark V; Yanuka, Ofra; Egli, Dieter; Benvenisty, Nissim

    2016-04-01

    Diploidy is a fundamental genetic feature in mammals, in which haploid cells normally arise only as post-meiotic germ cells that serve to ensure a diploid genome upon fertilization. Gamete manipulation has yielded haploid embryonic stem (ES) cells from several mammalian species, but haploid human ES cells have yet to be reported. Here we generated and analysed a collection of human parthenogenetic ES cell lines originating from haploid oocytes, leading to the successful isolation and maintenance of human ES cell lines with a normal haploid karyotype. Haploid human ES cells exhibited typical pluripotent stem cell characteristics, such as self-renewal capacity and a pluripotency-specific molecular signature. Moreover, we demonstrated the utility of these cells as a platform for loss-of-function genetic screening. Although haploid human ES cells resembled their diploid counterparts, they also displayed distinct properties including differential regulation of X chromosome inactivation and of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, alongside reduction in absolute gene expression levels and cell size. Surprisingly, we found that a haploid human genome is compatible not only with the undifferentiated pluripotent state, but also with differentiated somatic fates representing all three embryonic germ layers both in vitro and in vivo, despite a persistent dosage imbalance between the autosomes and X chromosome. We expect that haploid human ES cells will provide novel means for studying human functional genomics and development. PMID:26982723

  8. Jarid2 regulates mouse epidermal stem cell activation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Mejetta, Stefania; Morey, Lluis; Pascual, Gloria; Kuebler, Bernd; Mysliwiec, Matthew R; Lee, Youngsook; Shiekhattar, Ramin; Di Croce, Luciano; Benitah, Salvador Aznar

    2011-08-02

    Jarid2 is required for the genomic recruitment of the polycomb repressive complex-2 (PRC2) in embryonic stem cells. However, its specific role during late development and adult tissues remains largely uncharacterized. Here, we show that deletion of Jarid2 in mouse epidermis reduces the proliferation and potentiates the differentiation of postnatal epidermal progenitors, without affecting epidermal development. In neonatal epidermis, Jarid2 deficiency reduces H3K27 trimethylation, a chromatin repressive mark, in epidermal differentiation genes previously shown to be targets of the PRC2. However, in adult epidermis Jarid2 depletion does not affect interfollicular epidermal differentiation but results in delayed hair follicle (HF) cycling as a consequence of decreased proliferation of HF stem cells and their progeny. We conclude that Jarid2 is required for the scheduled proliferation of epidermal stem and progenitor cells necessary to maintain epidermal homeostasis.

  9. Accumulation of differentiating intestinal stem cell progenies drives tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Zongzhao; Kondo, Shu; Ha, Nati; Boquete, Jean-Philippe; Brunner, Michael; Ueda, Ryu; Lemaitre, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell self-renewal and differentiation are coordinated to maintain tissue homeostasis and prevent cancer. Mutations causing stem cell proliferation are traditionally the focus of cancer studies. However, the contribution of the differentiating stem cell progenies in tumorigenesis is poorly characterized. Here we report that loss of the SOX transcription factor, Sox21a, blocks the differentiation programme of enteroblast (EB), the intestinal stem cell progeny in the adult Drosophila midgut. This results in EB accumulation and formation of tumours. Sox21a tumour initiation and growth involve stem cell proliferation induced by the unpaired 2 mitogen released from accumulating EBs generating a feed-forward loop. EBs found in the tumours are heterogeneous and grow towards the intestinal lumen. Sox21a tumours modulate their environment by secreting matrix metalloproteinase and reactive oxygen species. Enterocytes surrounding the tumours are eliminated through delamination allowing tumour progression, a process requiring JNK activation. Our data highlight the tumorigenic properties of transit differentiating cells. PMID:26690827

  10. Gene expression dynamics during cell differentiation: Cell fates as attractors and cell fate decisions as bifurcations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sui

    2006-03-01

    During development of multicellular organisms, multipotent stem and progenitor cells undergo a series of hierarchically organized ``somatic speciation'' processes consisting of binary branching events to achieve the diversity of discretely distinct differentiated cell types in the body. Current paradigms of genetic regulation of development do not explain this discreteness, nor the time-irreversibility of differentiation. Each cell contains the same genome with the same N (˜ 25,000) genes and each cell type k is characterized by a distinct stable gene activation pattern, expressed as the cell state vector Sk(t) = xk1(t) ,.. xki(t),.. xkN(t), where xki is the activation state of gene i in cell type k. Because genes are engaged in a network of mutual regulatory interactions, the movement of Sk(t) in the N-dimensional state space is highly constrained and the organism can only realize a tiny fraction of all possible configurations Sk. Then, the trajectories of Sk reflect the diversifying developmental paths and the mature cell types are high-dimensional attractor states. Experimental results based on gene expression profile measurements during blood cell differentiation using DNA microarrays are presented that support the old idea that cell types are attractors. This basic notion is extended to treat binary fate decisions as bifurcations in the dynamics of networks circuits. Specifically, during cell fate decision, the metastable progenitor attractor is destabilized, poising the cell on a `watershed state' so that it can stochastically or in response to deterministic perturbations enter either one of two alternative fates. Overall, the model and supporting experimental data provide an overarching conceptual framework that helps explain how the specifics of gene network architecture produces discreteness and robustness of cell types, allows for both stochastic and deterministic cell fate decision and ensures directionality of organismal development.

  11. Multi-omics maps of cotton fibre reveal epigenetic basis for staged single-cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Maojun; Wang, Pengcheng; Tu, Lili; Zhu, Sitao; Zhang, Lin; Li, Zhonghua; Zhang, Qinghua; Yuan, Daojun; Zhang, Xianlong

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications are highlighted for their great importance in regulating plant development, but their function associated with single-cell differentiation remains undetermined. Here, we used the cotton fibre, which is the epidermal hair on the cotton ovule, as a model to investigate the regulatory role of DNA methylation in cell differentiation. The level of CHH (H = A, T, or C) DNA methylation level was found to increase during fibre development, accompanied by a decrease in RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM). Examination of nucleosome positioning revealed a gradual transition from euchromatin to heterochromatin for chromatin dynamics in developing fibres, which could shape the DNA methylation landscape. The observed increase in DNA methylation in fibres, compared with other ovule tissue, was demonstrated to be mediated predominantly by an active H3K9me2-dependent pathway rather than the RdDM pathway, which was inactive. Furthermore, integrated multi-omics analyses revealed that dynamic DNA methylation played a role in the regulation of lipid biosynthesis and spatio-temporal modulation of reactive oxygen species during fibre differentiation. Our study illustrates two divergent pathways mediating a continuous increase of DNA methylation and also sheds further light on the epigenetic basis for single-cell differentiation in plants. These data and analyses are made available to the wider research community through a comprehensive web portal. PMID:27067544

  12. ECHIDNA-mediated post-Golgi trafficking of auxin carriers for differential cell elongation.

    PubMed

    Boutté, Yohann; Jonsson, Kristoffer; McFarlane, Heather E; Johnson, Errin; Gendre, Delphine; Swarup, Ranjan; Friml, Jirí; Samuels, Lacey; Robert, Stéphanie; Bhalerao, Rishikesh P

    2013-10-01

    The plant hormone indole-acetic acid (auxin) is essential for many aspects of plant development. Auxin-mediated growth regulation typically involves the establishment of an auxin concentration gradient mediated by polarly localized auxin transporters. The localization of auxin carriers and their amount at the plasma membrane are controlled by membrane trafficking processes such as secretion, endocytosis, and recycling. In contrast to endocytosis or recycling, how the secretory pathway mediates the localization of auxin carriers is not well understood. In this study we have used the differential cell elongation process during apical hook development to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the post-Golgi trafficking of auxin carriers in Arabidopsis. We show that differential cell elongation during apical hook development is defective in Arabidopsis mutant echidna (ech). ECH protein is required for the trans-Golgi network (TGN)-mediated trafficking of the auxin influx carrier AUX1 to the plasma membrane. In contrast, ech mutation only marginally perturbs the trafficking of the highly related auxin influx carrier LIKE-AUX1-3 or the auxin efflux carrier PIN-FORMED-3, both also involved in hook development. Electron tomography reveals that the trafficking defects in ech mutant are associated with the perturbation of secretory vesicle genesis from the TGN. Our results identify differential mechanisms for the post-Golgi trafficking of de novo-synthesized auxin carriers to plasma membrane from the TGN and reveal how trafficking of auxin influx carriers mediates the control of differential cell elongation in apical hook development. PMID:24043780

  13. Multi-omics maps of cotton fibre reveal epigenetic basis for staged single-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Maojun; Wang, Pengcheng; Tu, Lili; Zhu, Sitao; Zhang, Lin; Li, Zhonghua; Zhang, Qinghua; Yuan, Daojun; Zhang, Xianlong

    2016-05-19

    Epigenetic modifications are highlighted for their great importance in regulating plant development, but their function associated with single-cell differentiation remains undetermined. Here, we used the cotton fibre, which is the epidermal hair on the cotton ovule, as a model to investigate the regulatory role of DNA methylation in cell differentiation. The level of CHH (H = A, T, or C) DNA methylation level was found to increase during fibre development, accompanied by a decrease in RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM). Examination of nucleosome positioning revealed a gradual transition from euchromatin to heterochromatin for chromatin dynamics in developing fibres, which could shape the DNA methylation landscape. The observed increase in DNA methylation in fibres, compared with other ovule tissue, was demonstrated to be mediated predominantly by an active H3K9me2-dependent pathway rather than the RdDM pathway, which was inactive. Furthermore, integrated multi-omics analyses revealed that dynamic DNA methylation played a role in the regulation of lipid biosynthesis and spatio-temporal modulation of reactive oxygen species during fibre differentiation. Our study illustrates two divergent pathways mediating a continuous increase of DNA methylation and also sheds further light on the epigenetic basis for single-cell differentiation in plants. These data and analyses are made available to the wider research community through a comprehensive web portal.

  14. Protein tyrosine phosphatase regulation of endothelial cell apoptosis and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, C; Chang, J; Gorospe, M; Passaniti, A

    1996-02-01

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, occurs during development and may also be an important factor in many diseases. However, little is known about the signal transduction pathways regulating apoptosis. In these studies, loss of endothelial cell-substrate attachment and apoptosis after removal of growth factors was associated with dephosphorylation of tyrosine residues at the cell periphery. Dephosphorylation of total cellular proteins accompanied apoptosis and was reduced by orthovanadate, an inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatases. Orthovanadate blocked the fragmentation of nuclear DNA, inhibited DNA laddering, and suppressed the expression of TRPM-2, an apoptosis-associated gene. The tyrosine phosphorylation levels of FAK125, erk1 (mitogen-activated kinase kinase), and cdc-2 were reduced during apoptosis. FAK125 dephosphorylation was inhibited by orthovanadate, but premature activation (tyrosine dephosphorylation) of cdc-2 was not. Orthovanadate was as effective as basic fibroblast growth factor in activating erk1 without increasing cell proliferation and in preventing the apoptosis of endothelial cells after treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha. Endothelial cell differentiation on extracellular matrix (Matrigel) was also stimulated by orthovanadate in the absence of basic fibroblast growth factor without affecting growth arrest and inhibition of DNA synthesis. Expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 (Waf1/Cip1/Sdi1) was down-regulated during the early stages of differentiation, remained low for at least 6 hours as differentiation proceeded, and increased upon completion of differentiation. Cells that failed to down-regulate p21 mRNA on Matrigel in the absence of angiogenic factors underwent apoptosis. These results suggest that protein tyrosine phosphatases are actively involved in signal transduction during apoptosis and may regulate p21 expression to inhibit endothelial cell differentiation.

  15. Regulation of the differentiation of PC12 pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, K; Lazarovici, P; Guroff, G

    1989-01-01

    The PC12 clone, developed from a pheochromocytoma tumor of the rat adrenal medulla, has become a premiere model for the study of neuronal differentiation. When treated in culture with nanomolar concentrations of nerve growth factor, PC12 cells stop dividing, elaborate processes, become electrically excitable, and will make synapses with appropriate muscle cells in culture. The changes induced by nerve growth factor lead to cells that, by any number of criteria, resemble mature sympathetic neurons. These changes are accompanied by a series of biochemical alterations occurring in the membrane, the cytoplasm, and the nucleus of the cell. Some of these events are independent of changes in transcription, while others clearly involve changes in gene expression. A number of the alterations seen in the cells involve increases or decreases in the phosphorylation of key cellular proteins. The information available thus far allows the construction of a hypothesis regarding the biochemical basis of PC12 differentiation. PMID:2647474

  16. Cell Surfaces in Plant-Microorganism Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Esquerré-Tugayé, Marie-Thérèse; Lamport, Derek T. A.

    1979-01-01

    Infection of muskmelon Cucumis melo seedlings by the fungus Colletotrichum lagenarium causes a 10-fold increase in the amount of cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein. Evidence for this increase was provided by studying two specific markers of this glycoprotein, namely hydroxyproline and glycosylated serine. The lability of the O-glycosidic linkage of wall-bound glycosylated serine in the presence of hydrazine, was used to determine the amount of serine which is glycosylated. A large increase in the hydroxyproline content of infected plants is shown, but the ratios of glycosylated serine to hydroxyproline are similar in healthy and infected plants. As far as these markers are concerned, the hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins secreted into the wall as a result of the disease are similar to those of healthy plants. In addition, the extent of glycosylation of the wall serine, in both healthy and infected plants, decreases as the plant ages. Serine- and hydroxyproline-rich (glyco)peptides were also isolated after trypsinolysis of the wall. These (glyco)peptides include the galactosyl-containing pentapeptide, serine-hydroxyproline4. This pentapeptide is characteristic of cell wall protein. PMID:16660956

  17. Mechanical stimuli differentially control stem cell behavior: morphology, proliferation, and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Maul, Timothy M.; Chew, Douglas W.; Nieponice, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy has demonstrated applications in vascular regenerative medicine. Although blood vessels exist in a mechanically dynamic environment, there has been no rigorous, systematic analysis of mechanical stimulation on stem cell differentiation. We hypothesize that mechanical stimuli, relevant to the vasculature, can differentiate MSCs toward smooth muscle (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs). This was tested using a unique experimental platform to differentially apply various mechanical stimuli in parallel. Three forces, cyclic stretch, cyclic pressure, and laminar shear stress, were applied independently to mimic several vascular physiologic conditions. Experiments were conducted using subconfluent MSCs for 5 days and demonstrated significant effects on morphology and proliferation depending upon the type, magnitude, frequency, and duration of applied stimulation. We have defined thresholds of cyclic stretch that potentiate SMC protein expression, but did not find EC protein expression under any condition tested. However, a second set of experiments performed at confluence and aimed to elicit the temporal gene expression response of a select magnitude of each stimulus revealed that EC gene expression can be increased with cyclic pressure and shear stress in a cell-contact-dependent manner. Further, these MSCs also appear to express genes from multiple lineages simultaneously which may warrant further investigation into post-transcriptional mechanisms for controlling protein expression. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic examination of the effects of mechanical stimulation on MSCs and has implications for the understanding of stem cell biology, as well as potential bioreactor designs for tissue engineering and cell therapy applications. PMID:21253809

  18. Human dermal stem cells differentiate into functional epidermal melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Fukunaga-Kalabis, Mizuho; Yu, Hong; Xu, Xiaowei; Kong, Jun; Lee, John T; Herlyn, Meenhard

    2010-03-15

    Melanocytes sustain a lifelong proliferative potential, but a stem cell reservoir in glabrous skin has not yet been found. Here, we show that multipotent dermal stem cells isolated from human foreskins lacking hair follicles are able to home to the epidermis to differentiate into melanocytes. These dermal stem cells, grown as three-dimensional spheres, displayed a capacity for self-renewal and expressed NGFRp75, nestin and OCT4, but not melanocyte markers. In addition, cells derived from single-cell clones were able to differentiate into multiple lineages including melanocytes. In a three-dimensional skin equivalent model, sphere-forming cells differentiated into HMB45-positive melanocytes, which migrated from the dermis to the epidermis and aligned singly among the basal layer keratinocytes in a similar fashion to pigmented melanocytes isolated from the epidermis. The dermal stem cells were negative for E-cadherin and N-cadherin, whereas they acquired E-cadherin expression and lost NGFRp75 expression upon contact with epidermal keratinocytes. These results demonstrate that stem cells in the dermis of human skin with neural-crest-like characteristics can become mature epidermal melanocytes. This finding could significantly change our understanding of the etiological factors in melanocyte transformation and pigmentation disorders; specifically, that early epigenetic or genetic alterations leading to transformation may take place in the dermis rather than in the epidermis.

  19. Principles and limitations of stable isotopes in differentiating organic and conventional foodstuffs: 1. Plant products.

    PubMed

    Inácio, Caio Teves; Chalk, Phillip Michael; Magalhães, Alberto M T

    2015-01-01

    Among the lighter elements having two or more stable isotopes (H, C, N, O, S), δ(15)N appears to be the most promising isotopic marker to differentiate plant products from conventional and organic farms. Organic plant products vary within a range of δ(15)N values of +0.3 to +14.6%, while conventional plant products range from negative to positive values, i.e. -4.0 to +8.7%. The main factors affecting δ(15)N signatures of plants are N fertilizers, biological N2 fixation, plant organs and plant age. Correlations between mode of production and δ(13)C (except greenhouse tomatoes warmed with natural gas) or δ(34)S signatures have not been established, and δ(2)H and δ(18)O are unsuitable markers due to the overriding effect of climate on the isotopic composition of plant-available water. Because there is potential overlap between the δ(15)N signatures of organic and conventionally produced plant products, δ(15)N has seldom been used successfully as the sole criterion for differentiation, but when combined with complementary analytical techniques and appropriate statistical tools, the probability of a correct identification increases. The use of organic fertilizers by conventional farmers or the marketing of organic produce as conventional due to market pressures are additional factors confounding correct identification. The robustness of using δ(15)N to differentiate mode of production will depend on the establishment of databases that have been verified for individual plant products.

  20. Principles and limitations of stable isotopes in differentiating organic and conventional foodstuffs: 1. Plant products.

    PubMed

    Inácio, Caio Teves; Chalk, Phillip Michael; Magalhães, Alberto M T

    2015-01-01

    Among the lighter elements having two or more stable isotopes (H, C, N, O, S), δ(15)N appears to be the most promising isotopic marker to differentiate plant products from conventional and organic farms. Organic plant products vary within a range of δ(15)N values of +0.3 to +14.6%, while conventional plant products range from negative to positive values, i.e. -4.0 to +8.7%. The main factors affecting δ(15)N signatures of plants are N fertilizers, biological N2 fixation, plant organs and plant age. Correlations between mode of production and δ(13)C (except greenhouse tomatoes warmed with natural gas) or δ(34)S signatures have not been established, and δ(2)H and δ(18)O are unsuitable markers due to the overriding effect of climate on the isotopic composition of plant-available water. Because there is potential overlap between the δ(15)N signatures of organic and conventionally produced plant products, δ(15)N has seldom been used successfully as the sole criterion for differentiation, but when combined with complementary analytical techniques and appropriate statistical tools, the probability of a correct identification increases. The use of organic fertilizers by conventional farmers or the marketing of organic produce as conventional due to market pressures are additional factors confounding correct identification. The robustness of using δ(15)N to differentiate mode of production will depend on the establishment of databases that have been verified for individual plant products. PMID:24915332

  1. Wound healing response and xylem differentiation in tobacco plants over-expressing a fungal endopolygalacturonase is mediated by copper amine oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Cona, Alessandra; Tisi, Alessandra; Ghuge, Sandip Annasaheb; Franchi, Stefano; De Lorenzo, Giulia; Angelini, Riccardo

    2014-09-01

    In this work, we have investigated the involvement of copper amine oxidase (CuAO; EC 1.4.3.21) in wound healing and xylem differentiation of Nicotiana tabacum plants over-expressing a fungal endopolygalacturonase (PG plants), which show constitutively activated defence responses. In petioles and stems of PG plants, we found higher CuAO activity and lower polyamine (PA) levels, particularly putrescine (Put), with respect to wild-type (WT) plants. Upon wounding, a more intense autofluorescence of cell wall phenolics was observed in correspondence of wound surface, extending to epidermis and cortical parenchima only in PG plants. This response was mostly dependent on CuAO activity, as suggested by the reversion of autofluorescence upon supply of 2-bromoethylamine (2-BrEt), a CuAO specific inhibitor. Moreover, in unwounded plants, histochemical analysis revealed a tissue-specific expression of the enzyme in the vascular cambium and neighboring derivative cells of both petioles and stems of PG plants, whereas the corresponding WT tissues appeared unstained or faintly stained. A higher histochemical CuAO activity was also observed in xylem cells of PG plants as compared to WT xylem tissues suggesting a peculiar role of CuAO activity in xylem differentiation in PG plants. Indeed, roots of PG plants exhibited early xylem differentiation, a phenotype consistent with both the higher CuAO and the lower Put levels observed and supported by the 2-BrEt-mediated reversion of early root xylem differentiation and H2O2 accumulation. These results strongly support the relevance of PA-catabolism derived H2O2 in defence responses, such as those signaled by a compromised status of cell wall pectin integrity.

  2. Measuring energy metabolism in cultured cells, including human pluripotent stem cells and differentiated cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Nuebel, Esther; Wisidagama, Dona R R; Setoguchi, Kiyoko; Hong, Jason S; Van Horn, Christine M; Imam, Sarah S; Vergnes, Laurent; Malone, Cindy S; Koehler, Carla M; Teitell, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of glycolysis and mitochondrial function are required to quantify energy metabolism in a wide variety of cellular contexts. In human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and their differentiated progeny, this analysis can be challenging because of the unique cell properties, growth conditions and expense required to maintain these cell types. Here we provide protocols for analyzing energy metabolism in hPSCs and their early differentiated progenies that are generally applicable to mature cell types as well. Our approach has revealed distinct energy metabolism profiles used by hPSCs, differentiated cells, a variety of cancer cells and Rho-null cells. The protocols measure or estimate glycolysis on the basis of the extracellular acidification rate, and they measure or estimate oxidative phosphorylation on the basis of the oxygen consumption rate. Assays typically require 3 h after overnight sample preparation. Companion methods are also discussed and provided to aid researchers in developing more sophisticated experimental regimens for extended analyses of cellular bioenergetics. PMID:22576106

  3. How to let go: pectin and plant cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Firas Bou; Braybrook, Siobhan A.

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells do not, in general, migrate. They maintain a fixed position relative to their neighbors, intimately linked through growth and differentiation. The mediator of this connection, the pectin-rich middle lamella, is deposited during cell division and maintained throughout the cell’s life to protect tissue integrity. The maintenance of adhesion requires cell wall modification and is dependent on the actin cytoskeleton. There are developmental processes that require cell separation, such as organ abscission, dehiscence, and ripening. In these instances, the pectin-rich middle lamella must be actively altered to allow cell separation, a process which also requires cell wall modification. In this review, we will focus on the role of pectin and its modification in cell adhesion and separation. Recent insights gained in pectin gel mechanics will be discussed in relation to existing knowledge of pectin chemistry as it relates to cell adhesion. As a whole, we hope to begin defining the physical mechanisms behind a cells’ ability to hang on, and how it lets go. PMID:26236321

  4. Differential allelopathic expression of different plant parts of Achillea biebersteinii.

    PubMed

    Abu-Romman, Saeid

    2016-06-01

    Achillea biebersteinii (Asteraceae) is a perennial medicinal plant and has a wide distributional range in the Mediterranean region. The present study investigated the inhibitory effects of different plant parts of A. biebersteinii on germination characteristics and seedling growth of wild barley (Hordeum spontaneum). Water extracts were prepared by incubating separately five grams of dried powder of roots, stems, leaves and flowers of A. biebersteinii in 100 ml of distilled water for 24 h and distilled water was used as the control. The water extracts from different plant parts of A. biebersteinii differed in their effects on the germination and seedling growth of wild barley. Water extracts prepared from leaves and flowers were more suppressive to germination of wild barley than root and stem extracts. The maximum inhibition in radical and plumule growth of germinating caryopses and in root and shoot growth of greenhouse-grown wild barley was recorded for leaf extract followed by flower extract. The lowest Chl a, Chl b and total chlorophyll and protein contents were resulted after exposure to leaf extracts. According to these results, the inhibitory effects of different A. biebersteinii plant parts can be arranged in the order: leaf > flower > stem > root. PMID:27165527

  5. Small Buccal Fat Pad Cells Have High Osteogenic Differentiation Potential.

    PubMed

    Tsurumachi, Niina; Akita, Daisuke; Kano, Koichiro; Matsumoto, Taro; Toriumi, Taku; Kazama, Tomohiko; Oki, Yoshinao; Tamura, Yoko; Tonogi, Morio; Isokawa, Keitaro; Shimizu, Noriyoshi; Honda, Masaki

    2016-03-01

    Dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells derived from mature adipocytes have mesenchymal stem cells' (MSCs) characteristics. Generally, mature adipocytes are 60-110 μm in diameter; however, association between adipocyte size and dedifferentiation efficiency is still unknown. This study, therefore, investigated the dedifferentiation efficiency of adipocytes based on cell diameter. Buccal fat pad was harvested from five human donors and dissociated by collagenase digestion. After exclusion of unwanted stromal cells by centrifugation, floating adipocytes were collected and their size distribution was analyzed. The floating adipocytes were then separated into two groups depending on cell size using 40- and 100-μm nylon mesh filters: cell diameters less than 40 μm (small adipocytes: S-adipocytes) and cell diameters of 40-100 μm (large adipocytes: L-adipocytes). Finally, we evaluated the efficiency of adipocyte dedifferentiation and then characterized the resultant DFAT cells. The S-adipocytes showed a higher capacity to dedifferentiate into DFAT cells (S-DFAT cells) compared to the L-adipocytes (L-DFAT cells). The S-DFAT cells also showed a relatively higher proportion of CD146-positive cells than L-DFAT cells, and exhibited more osteogenic differentiation ability based on the alkaline phosphatase activity and amount of calcium deposition. These results suggested that the S- and L-DFAT cells had distinct characteristics, and that the higher dedifferentiation potential of S-adipocytes compared to L-adipocytes gives the former group an advantage in yielding DFAT cells.

  6. Regulation of T Cell Differentiation and Function by EZH2.

    PubMed

    Karantanos, Theodoros; Chistofides, Anthos; Barhdan, Kankana; Li, Lequn; Boussiotis, Vassiliki A

    2016-01-01

    The enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), one of the polycomb-group proteins, is the catalytic subunit of Polycomb-repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and induces the trimethylation of the histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) promoting epigenetic gene silencing. EZH2 contains a SET domain promoting the methyltransferase activity, while the three other protein components of PRC2, namely EED, SUZ12, and RpAp46/48, induce compaction of the chromatin permitting EZH2 enzymatic activity. Numerous studies highlight the role of this evolutionary conserved protein as a master regulator of differentiation in humans involved in the repression of the homeotic gene and the inactivation of X-chromosome. Through its effects in the epigenetic regulation of critical genes, EZH2 has been strongly linked to cell cycle progression, stem cell pluripotency, and cancer biology, being currently at the cutting edge of research. Most recently, EZH2 has been associated with hematopoietic stem cell proliferation and differentiation, thymopoiesis and lymphopoiesis. Several studies have evaluated the role of EZH2 in the regulation of T cell differentiation and plasticity as well as its implications in the development of autoimmune diseases and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge regarding the role of EZH2 in the regulation of the differentiation and function of T cells focusing on possible applications in various immune-mediated conditions, including autoimmune disorders and GVHD.

  7. Transcription factor interplay in T helper cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Evans, Catherine M; Jenner, Richard G

    2013-11-01

    The differentiation of CD4 helper T cells into specialized effector lineages has provided a powerful model for understanding immune cell differentiation. Distinct lineages have been defined by differential expression of signature cytokines and the lineage-specifying transcription factors necessary and sufficient for their production. The traditional paradigm of differentiation towards Th1 and Th2 subtypes driven by T-bet and GATA3, respectively, has been extended to incorporate additional T cell lineages and transcriptional regulators. Technological advances have expanded our view of these lineage-specifying transcription factors to the whole genome and revealed unexpected interplay between them. From these data, it is becoming clear that lineage specification is more complex and plastic than previous models might have suggested. Here, we present an overview of the different forms of transcription factor interplay that have been identified and how T cell phenotypes arise as a product of this interplay within complex regulatory networks. We also suggest experimental strategies that will provide further insight into the mechanisms that underlie T cell lineage specification and plasticity.

  8. Characterisation of insulin-producing cells differentiated from tonsil derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, So-Yeon; Kim, Ye-Ryung; Park, Woo-Jae; Kim, Han Su; Jung, Sung-Chul; Woo, So-Youn; Jo, Inho; Ryu, Kyung-Ha; Park, Joo-Won

    2015-01-01

    Tonsil-derived (T-) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) display mutilineage differentiation potential and self-renewal capacity and have potential as a banking source. Diabetes mellitus is a prevalent disease in modern society, and the transplantation of pancreatic progenitor cells or various stem cell-derived insulin-secreting cells has been suggested as a novel therapy for diabetes. The potential of T-MSCs to trans-differentiate into pancreatic progenitor cells or insulin-secreting cells has not yet been investigated. We examined the potential of human T-MSCs to trans-differentiate into pancreatic islet cells using two different methods based on β-mercaptoethanol and insulin-transferin-selenium, respectively. First, we compared the efficacy of the two methods for inducing differentiation into insulin-producing cells. We demonstrated that the insulin-transferin-selenium method is more efficient for inducing differentiation into insulin-secreting cells regardless of the source of the MSCs. Second, we compared the differentiation potential of two different MSC types: T-MSCs and adipose-derived MSCs (A-MSCs). T-MSCs had a differentiation capacity similar to that of A-MSCs and were capable of secreting insulin in response to glucose concentration. Islet-like clusters differentiated from T-MSCs had lower synaptotagmin-3, -5, -7, and -8 levels, and consequently lower secreted insulin levels than cells differentiated from A-MSCs. These results imply that T-MSCs can differentiate into functional pancreatic islet-like cells and could provide a novel, alternative cell therapy for diabetes mellitus.

  9. Regulatory T Cells: Differentiation and Function.

    PubMed

    Plitas, George; Rudensky, Alexander Y

    2016-09-01

    The immune system of vertebrate animals has evolved to mount an effective defense against a diverse set of pathogens while minimizing transient or lasting impairment in tissue function that could result from the inflammation caused by immune responses to infectious agents. In addition, misguided immune responses to "self" and dietary antigens, as well as to commensal microorganisms, can lead to a variety of inflammatory disorders, including autoimmunity, metabolic syndrome, allergies, and cancer. Regulatory T cells expressing the X chromosome-linked transcription factor Foxp3 suppress inflammatory responses in diverse biological settings and serve as a vital mechanism of negative regulation of immune-mediated inflammation. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(9); 721-5. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27590281

  10. Differential induction of meristematic stem cells of Catharanthus roseus and their characterization.

    PubMed

    Moon, So Hyun; Venkatesh, Jelli; Yu, Jae-Woong; Park, Se Won

    2015-11-01

    Plant cell culture technology has been introduced for the mass production of the many useful components. A variety of plant-derived compounds is being used in various fields, such as pharmaceuticals, foods, and cosmetics. Plant cell cultures are believed to be derived from the dedifferentiation process. In the present study, an undifferentiated cambial meristematic cell (CMCs) of Catharanthus is isolated using histological and genetic methods, and compared with dedifferentiation-derived callus (DDCs) cultures. Furthermore, differential culture conditions for both DDCs- and CMCs-derived cell lines were established. A suitable media for the increased accumulation of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) was also standardized. Compared with DDCs, CMCs showed marked accumulation of TIAs in cell lines grown on media with 1.5 mg·mL(-1) of NAA and 0.5 mg·mL(-1) of kinetin. CMCs-derived cultures of Catharanthus, as a source of key anticancer drugs (viblastine and vincristine), would overcome the obstacles usually associated with the production of natural metabolites through the use of DDCs. Cell culture systems that are derived from CMCs may also provide a cost-effective and eco-friendly basis for the sustainable production of a number of important plant natural products.

  11. Neural crest development: the interplay between morphogenesis and cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Erickson, C A; Reedy, M V

    1998-01-01

    The final pattern of tissues established during embryogenesis reflects the outcome of two developmental processes: differentiation and morphogenesis. Avian neural crest cells are an excellent system in which to study this interaction. In the first phase of neural crest cell migration, neural crest cells separate from the neural epithelium via an epithelial-mesenchymal transformation. We present three models to account for this process: (1) separation by asymmetric mitosis, (2) separation by generating tractional force in order to rupture cell adhesions and (3) loss of expression or function of cell-cell adhesion molecules that keep the presumptive neural crest cells tethered to the neural epithelium. Evidence is presented that the segregation of the neural crest lineage apart from the neural epithelium is caused by the epithelial-mesenchymal transformation. Once they have detached from the neural tube, neural crest cells take two pathways in the trunk of the chick embryo: (1) the ventral path between the neural tube and somite, where neural crest cells give rise to neurons and glial cells of the peripheral nervous systems, and (2) the dorsolateral path between the ectoderm and dermamyotome of the somite, where they differentiate into pigment cells of the skin. We present data to suggest that the migration and differentiation along the ventral path is controlled primarily by environmental cues, which we refer to as the environment-directed model of neural crest morphogenesis. Conversely, only melanoblasts can migrate into the dorsolateral space, and the ability to invade that path is dependent upon their early specification as melanoblasts. We call this the phenotype-directed model for neural crest cell migration and suggest that this latter model for the positioning of neural crest derivatives in the embryo may be more common than previously suspected. These observations invite a re-examination of patterning of other crest derivates, which previously were believed

  12. 3. Right side of Zinc Plant, from Cell Room midpoint ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Right side of Zinc Plant, from Cell Room midpoint to Plant Office (foreground) and #5 Roaster and Concentrate Handling (background). View is to the east. - Sullivan Electrolytic Zinc Plant, Government Gulch, Kellogg, Shoshone County, ID

  13. Immunomodulation in stem cell differentiation into neurons and brain repair.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Henning; do Nascimento, Isis Cristina; Bocsi, Jozsef; Tárnok, Attila

    2015-06-01

    Immunomodulators regulate stem cell activity at all stages of development as well as during adulthood. Embryonic stem cell (ESC) proliferation as well as neurogenic processes during embryonic development are controlled by factors of the immune system. We review here immunophenotypic expression patterns of  different stem cell types, including ESC, neural (NSC) and tissue-specific mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), and focus on immunodulatory properties of these cells. Immune and inflammatory responses, involving actions of cytokines as well as toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling are known to affect the differentiation capacity of NSC and MSC. Secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory messengers by MSC have been observed as the consequence of TLR and cytokine activation and promotion of differentiation into specified phenotypes. As result of augmented differentiation capacity, stem cells secrete angiogenic factors including vascular endothelial growth factor, resulting in multifactorial actions in tissue repair. Immunoregulatory properties of tissue specific adult stem cells are put into the context of possible clinical applications.

  14. Retinoic acid-induced neural differentiation of embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Jones-Villeneuve, E M; Rudnicki, M A; Harris, J F; McBurney, M W

    1983-01-01

    We have previously shown that the P19 line of embryonal carcinoma cells develops into neurons, astroglia, and fibroblasts after aggregation and exposure to retinoic acid. The neurons were initially identified by their morphology and by the presence of neurofilaments within their cytoplasm. We have more fully documented the neuronal nature of these cells by showing that their cell surfaces display tetanus toxin receptors, a neuronal cell marker, and that choline acetyl-transferase and acetyl cholinesterase activities appear coordinately in neuron-containing cultures. Several days before the appearance of neurons, there is a marked decrease in the amount of an embryonal carcinoma surface antigen, and at the same time there is a substantial decrease in the volumes of individual cells. Various retinoids were able to induce the development of neurons in cultures of aggregated P19 cells, but it did not appear that polyamine metabolism was involved in the effect. We have isolated a mutant clone which does not differentiate in the presence of any of the drugs which are normally effective in inducing differentiation of P19 cells. This mutant and others may help to elucidate the chain of events triggered by retinoic acid and other differentiation-inducing drugs. Images PMID:6656766

  15. Cell responses to FGFR3 signalling: growth, differentiation and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    L'Hote, Corine G.M. . E-mail: Corine.LHote@cancer.org.uk; Knowles, Margaret A.

    2005-04-01

    FGFR3 is a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) of the FGF receptor family, known to have a negative regulatory effect on long bone growth. Fgfr3 knockout mice display longer bones and, accordingly, most germline-activating mutations in man are associated with dwarfism. Somatically, some of the same activating mutations are associated with the human cancers multiple myeloma, cervical carcinoma and carcinoma of the bladder. How signalling through FGFR3 can lead to either chondrocyte apoptosis or cancer cell proliferation is not fully understood. Although FGFR3 can be expressed as two main splice isoforms (IIIb or IIIc), there is no apparent link with specific cell responses, which may rather be associated with the cell type or its differentiation status. Depending on cell type, differential activation of STAT proteins has been observed. STAT1 phosphorylation seems to be involved in inhibition of chondrocyte proliferation while activation of the ERK pathway inhibits chondrocyte differentiation and B-cell proliferation (as in multiple myeloma). The role of FGFR3 in epithelial cancers (bladder and cervix) is not known. Some of the cell specificity may arise via modulation of signalling by crosstalk with other signalling pathways. Recently, inhibition of the ERK pathway in achondroplastic mice has provided hope for an approach to the treatment of dwarfism. Further understanding of the ability of FGFR3 to trigger different responses depending on cell type and cellular context may lead to treatments for both skeletal dysplasias and cancer.

  16. Erythroid differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells is independent of donor cell type of origin

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Isabel; Klich, Katharina; Arauzo-Bravo, Marcos J.; Radstaak, Martina; Santourlidis, Simeon; Ghanjati, Foued; Radke, Teja F.; Psathaki, Olympia E.; Hargus, Gunnar; Kramer, Jan; Einhaus, Martin; Kim, Jeong Beom; Kögler, Gesine; Wernet, Peter; Schöler, Hans R.; Schlenke, Peter; Zaehres, Holm

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic memory in induced pluripotent stem cells, which is related to the somatic cell type of origin of the stem cells, might lead to variations in the differentiation capacities of the pluripotent stem cells. In this context, induced pluripotent stem cells from human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells might be more suitable for hematopoietic differentiation than the commonly used fibroblast-derived induced pluripotent stem cells. To investigate the influence of an epigenetic memory on the ex vivo expansion of induced pluripotent stem cells into erythroid cells, we compared induced pluripotent stem cells from human neural stem cells and human cord blood-derived CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells and evaluated their potential for differentiation into hematopoietic progenitor and mature red blood cells. Although genome-wide DNA methylation profiling at all promoter regions demonstrates that the epigenetic memory of induced pluripotent stem cells is influenced by the somatic cell type of origin of the stem cells, we found a similar hematopoietic induction potential and erythroid differentiation pattern of induced pluripotent stem cells of different somatic cell origin. All human induced pluripotent stem cell lines showed terminal maturation into normoblasts and enucleated reticulocytes, producing predominantly fetal hemoglobin. Differences were only observed in the growth rate of erythroid cells, which was slightly higher in the induced pluripotent stem cells derived from CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells. More detailed methylation analysis of the hematopoietic and erythroid promoters identified similar CpG methylation levels in the induced pluripotent stem cell lines derived from CD34+ cells and those derived from neural stem cells, which confirms their comparable erythroid differentiation potential. PMID:25326431

  17. Differentiation state determines neural effects on microvascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Muffley, Lara A.; Pan, Shin-Chen; Smith, Andria N.; Ga, Maricar; Hocking, Anne M.; Gibran, Nicole S.

    2012-10-01

    Growing evidence indicates that nerves and capillaries interact paracrinely in uninjured skin and cutaneous wounds. Although mature neurons are the predominant neural cell in the skin, neural progenitor cells have also been detected in uninjured adult skin. The aim of this study was to characterize differential paracrine effects of neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons on dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Our results suggest that neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons have unique secretory profiles and distinct effects on dermal microvascular endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and nitric oxide production. Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons secrete different proteins related to angiogenesis. Specific to neural progenitor cells were dipeptidyl peptidase-4, IGFBP-2, pentraxin-3, serpin f1, TIMP-1, TIMP-4 and VEGF. In contrast, endostatin, FGF-1, MCP-1 and thrombospondin-2 were specific to dorsal root ganglion neurons. Microvascular endothelial cell proliferation was inhibited by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. In contrast, microvascular endothelial cell migration in a scratch wound assay was inhibited by neural progenitor cells and unaffected by dorsal root ganglion neurons. In addition, nitric oxide production by microvascular endothelial cells was increased by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dorsal root ganglion neurons, not neural progenitor cells, regulate microvascular endothelial cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neural progenitor cells, not dorsal root ganglion neurons, regulate microvascular endothelial cell migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons do not effect microvascular endothelial tube formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dorsal root ganglion neurons, not neural progenitor cells, regulate

  18. Differentiation and transdifferentiation potentials of cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Allan Yi; Ouyang, Gaoliang

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells actively contribute to constructing their own microenvironment during tumorigenesis and tumor progression. The tumor microenvironment contains multiple types of stromal cells that work together with the extracellular matrix and local and systemic factors to coordinately contribute to tumor initiation and progression. Tumor cells and their stromal compartments acquire many genetic and/or epigenetic alternations to facilitate tumor growth and metastasis. The cancer stem cell (CSC) concept has been widely applied to interpreting tumor initiation, growth, metastasis, dormancy and relapse. CSCs have differentiation abilities to generate the original lineage cells that are similar to their normal stem cell counterparts. Interestingly, recent evidence demonstrates that CSCs also have the potential to transdifferentiate into vascular endothelial cells and pericytes, indicating that CSCs can transdifferentiate into other lineage cells for promoting tumor growth and metastasis in some tissue contexts instead of only recruiting stromal cells from local or distant tissues. Although the transdifferentiation of CSCs into tumor stromal cells provides a new dimension that explains tumor heterogeneity, many aspects of CSC transdifferentiation remain elusive. In this review, we summarize the multi-lineage differentiation and transdifferentiation potentials of CSCs as well as discuss their potential contributions to tumor heterogeneity and tumor microenvironment in tumor progression. PMID:26474460

  19. Differentiation and transdifferentiation potentials of cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhengjie; Wu, Tiantian; Liu, Allan Yi; Ouyang, Gaoliang

    2015-11-24

    Tumor cells actively contribute to constructing their own microenvironment during tumorigenesis and tumor progression. The tumor microenvironment contains multiple types of stromal cells that work together with the extracellular matrix and local and systemic factors to coordinately contribute to tumor initiation and progression. Tumor cells and their stromal compartments acquire many genetic and/or epigenetic alternations to facilitate tumor growth and metastasis. The cancer stem cell (CSC) concept has been widely applied to interpreting tumor initiation, growth, metastasis, dormancy and relapse. CSCs have differentiation abilities to generate the original lineage cells that are similar to their normal stem cell counterparts. Interestingly, recent evidence demonstrates that CSCs also have the potential to transdifferentiate into vascular endothelial cells and pericytes, indicating that CSCs can transdifferentiate into other lineage cells for promoting tumor growth and metastasis in some tissue contexts instead of only recruiting stromal cells from local or distant tissues. Although the transdifferentiation of CSCs into tumor stromal cells provides a new dimension that explains tumor heterogeneity, many aspects of CSC transdifferentiation remain elusive. In this review, we summarize the multi-lineage differentiation and transdifferentiation potentials of CSCs as well as discuss their potential contributions to tumor heterogeneity and tumor microenvironment in tumor progression. PMID:26474460

  20. Model microgravity enhances endothelium differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Nan, Yayun; Wang, Huan; Chen, Jun; Wang, Nanding; Xie, Juan; Ma, Jing; Wang, Zongren

    2013-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of differentiation into multilineage cell types under certain induction conditions. Previous studies have demonstrated that physical environments and mechanical force can influence MSC fate, indicating that these factors may be favorable inducers for clinical treatment. Our previous study found that MSCs are spread with a spindle shape when cultured in normal gravity (NG), and under modeled microgravity (MMG) for 72 h, they become unspread and round and their cytoskeleton fibers are reorganized. These morphological changes affected the function of MSCs through the activity of RhoA. We examined the responses of MSCs under MMG stimulation, followed with VEGF differentiation. We found that MSCs under MMG for 72 h were differentiated into endothelial-like cells by detecting the expression of endothelial-specific molecules (Flk-1 and vWF), which were also able to form a capillary network. Their endothelial differentiation potential was improved under MMG compared with that under NG. We believe that this method is a novel choice of MMG stimulation for neovascularization. This phenomenon may increase the potential of MSC differentiation, which might be a new strategy for the treatment of various vascular diseases and improve vascularization in tissue engineering.

  1. Gelatin induces trophectoderm differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, Sha; Hua, Jinlian; Cao, Xuanhong; Wang, Huayan

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we selected gelatin as ECM (extracellular matrix) to support differentiation of mES (mouse embryonic stem) cells into TE (trophectoderm), as gelatin was less expensive and widely used. We found that 0.2% and 1.5% gelatin were the suitable concentrations to induce TE differentiation by means of detecting Cdx2 expression using real-time PCR. Moreover, about 15% cells were positive for Cdx2 staining after 6 days differentiation. We discovered that the expressions of specific markers for TE, such as Cdx2, Eomes, Hand1 and Esx1 were prominently increased after gelatin induction. Meanwhile, the expression of Oct4 was significantly decreased. We also found that inhibition of the BMP (bone morphogenetic protein) signalling by Noggin could promote mES cells differentiation into TE, whereas inhibition of the Wnt signalling by Dkk1 had the contrary effect. This could be used as a tool to study the differentiation and function of early trophoblasts as well as further elucidating the molecular mechanism during abnormal placental development.

  2. Characterization of Cellulose Synthesis in Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Samaneh Sadat; Mohammadi, Kourosh; Ji, Kong-shu

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose is the most significant structural component of plant cell wall. Cellulose, polysaccharide containing repeated unbranched β (1-4) D-glucose units, is synthesized at the plasma membrane by the cellulose synthase complex (CSC) from bacteria to plants. The CSC is involved in biosynthesis of cellulose microfibrils containing 18 cellulose synthase (CesA) proteins. Macrofibrils can be formed with side by side arrangement of microfibrils. In addition, beside CesA, various proteins like the KORRIGAN, sucrose synthase, cytoskeletal components, and COBRA-like proteins have been involved in cellulose biosynthesis. Understanding the mechanisms of cellulose biosynthesis is of great importance not only for improving wood production in economically important forest trees to mankind but also for plant development. This review article covers the current knowledge about the cellulose biosynthesis-related gene family. PMID:27314060

  3. Characterization of Cellulose Synthesis in Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Samaneh Sadat; Mohammadi, Kourosh; Ji, Kong-Shu

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose is the most significant structural component of plant cell wall. Cellulose, polysaccharide containing repeated unbranched β (1-4) D-glucose units, is synthesized at the plasma membrane by the cellulose synthase complex (CSC) from bacteria to plants. The CSC is involved in biosynthesis of cellulose microfibrils containing 18 cellulose synthase (CesA) proteins. Macrofibrils can be formed with side by side arrangement of microfibrils. In addition, beside CesA, various proteins like the KORRIGAN, sucrose synthase, cytoskeletal components, and COBRA-like proteins have been involved in cellulose biosynthesis. Understanding the mechanisms of cellulose biosynthesis is of great importance not only for improving wood production in economically important forest trees to mankind but also for plant development. This review article covers the current knowledge about the cellulose biosynthesis-related gene family. PMID:27314060

  4. Decreased Ferroportin Promotes Myeloma Cell Growth and Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhimin; Wang, He; Xia, Jiliang; Yang, Ye; Jin, Zhendong; Xu, Hongwei; Shi, Jumei; De Domenico, Ivana; Tricot, Guido; Zhan, Fenghuang

    2016-01-01

    Iron homeostasis is disrupted in multiple myeloma, a difficult-to-cure plasma cell malignancy with lytic bone lesions. Here, we systematically analyzed iron gene expression signature and demonstrated that mRNA expression of iron exporter ferroportin (FPN1) is significantly downregulated in myeloma cells and correlates negatively with clinic outcome. Restoring expression of FPN1 reduces intracellular liable iron pool, inhibits STAT3-MCL-1 signaling, and suppresses myeloma cells growth. Furthermore, we demonstrated that mRNA of FPN1 is also downregulated at the initial stages of osteoclast differentiation and suppresses myeloma cell–induced osteoclast differentiation through regulating iron regulator TFRC, NF-κB, and JNK pathways. Altogether, we demonstrated that downregulation of FPN1 plays critical roles in promoting myeloma cell growth and bone resorption in multiple myeloma. PMID:25855377

  5. Fuel cell power plant economic and operational considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Fuel cell power plants intended for electric utility and cogeneration applications are now in the design and construction stage. This paper describes economic and operational considerations being used in the development and design of plants utilizing air cooled phosphoric acid fuel cells. Fuel cell power plants have some unique characteristics relative to other types of power plants. As a result it was necessary to develop specific definitions of the fuel cell power plant characteristics in order to perform cost of electricity calculations. This paper describes these characteristics and describes the economic analyses used in the Westinghouse fuel cell power plant program.

  6. Directed Differentiation of Zebrafish Pluripotent Embryonic Cells to Functional Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yao; Gao, Maomao; Gao, Luna; Zhao, Yu; Hong, Qiang; Li, Zhigang; Yao, Jing; Cheng, Hanhua; Zhou, Rongjia

    2016-09-13

    A cardiomyocyte differentiation in vitro system from zebrafish embryos remains to be established. Here, we have determined pluripotency window of zebrafish embryos by analyzing their gene-expression patterns of pluripotency factors together with markers of three germ layers, and have found that zebrafish undergoes a very narrow period of pluripotency maintenance from zygotic genome activation to a brief moment after oblong stage. Based on the pluripotency and a combination of appropriate conditions, we established a rapid and efficient method for cardiomyocyte generation in vitro from primary embryonic cells. The induced cardiomyocytes differentiated into functional and specific cardiomyocyte subtypes. Notably, these in vitro generated cardiomyocytes exhibited typical contractile kinetics and electrophysiological features. The system provides a new paradigm of cardiomyocyte differentiation from primary embryonic cells in zebrafish. The technology provides a new platform for the study of heart development and regeneration, in addition to drug discovery, disease modeling, and assessment of cardiotoxic agents. PMID:27569061

  7. Effects of trichostatins on differentiation of murine erythroleukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, M.; Nomura, S.; Beppu, T.

    1987-07-15

    The fungistatic antibiotics trichostatins (TS) A and C were isolated from culture broth of Streptomyces platensis No. 145 and were found to be potent inducers of differentiation in murine erythroleukemia (Friend and RV133) cells at concentrations of 1.5 X 10(-8) M for TSA and 5 X 10(-7) M for TSC. Differentiation induced by TS was cooperatively enhanced by UV irradiation but not by treatment with dimethyl sulfoxide. This enhanced activity was completely inhibited by adding cycloheximide to the culture medium 2 h after exposure to TS, suggesting that TS are dimethyl sulfoxide-type inducers of erythroid differentiation. No inhibitory effect of TS was observed on macromolecular synthesis in cultured cells.

  8. Control of Differentiation of a Mammary Cell Line by Lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulbecco, Renato; Bologna, Mauro; Unger, Michael

    1980-03-01

    A rat mammary cell line (LA7) undergoes spontaneous differentiation into domes due to production of specific inducers by the cells. Some of these inducers may be lipids, and we show that lipids regulate this differentiation as both inducers and inhibitors. One inhibitor is the tumor promoter tetradecanoyl-13 phorbol 12-acetate. The inducers are saturated fatty acids of two groups: butyric acid and acids with chain lengths from C13 to C16, especially myristic acid (C14). Other inducers are myristoyl and palmitoyl lysolecithins, myristic acid methyl ester, and two cationic detergents with a tetradecenyl chain. We propose that the lipids with a C14-C16 alkyl chain affect differentiation by recognizing specific receptors through their alkyl chains and that the effects obtained depend on the head groups. These lipids may be physiological regulators in the mammary gland.

  9. Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie; Fardel, Olivier; Vernhet, Laurent

    2013-01-15

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the antileukemic trivalent inorganic arsenic prevents the development of severe pro-inflammatory diseases mediated by excessive Th1 and Th17 cell responses. Differentiation of Th1 and Th17 subsets is mainly regulated by interleukins (ILs) secreted from dendritic cells (DCs) and the ability of inorganic arsenic to impair interferon-γ and IL-17 secretion by interfering with the physiology of DCs is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that high concentrations of sodium arsenite (As(III), 1–2 μM) clinically achievable in plasma of arsenic-treated patients, block differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytes into immature DCs (iDCs) by inducing their necrosis. Differentiation of monocytes in the presence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) (0.1 to 0.5 μM) only slightly impacts endocytotic activity of iDCs or expression of co-stimulatory molecules in cells activated with lipopolysaccharide. However, this differentiation in the presence of As(III) strongly represses secretion of IL-12p70 and IL-23, two major regulators of Th1 and Th17 activities, from iDCs stimulated with different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in metalloid-free medium. Such As(III)-exposed DCs also exhibit reduced mRNA levels of IL12A and/or IL12B genes when activated with TLR agonists. Finally, differentiation of monocytes with non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) subsequently reduces the ability of activated DCs to stimulate the release of interferon-γ and IL-17 from Th cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that clinically relevant concentrations of inorganic arsenic markedly impair in vitro differentiation and functions of DCs, which may contribute to the putative beneficial effects of the metalloid towards inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Highlights: ► Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells (DCs) ► Arsenite (> 1 μM) blocks differentiation of dendritic cells by

  10. Alternative splicing regulates mouse embryonic stem cell pluripotency and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Salomonis, Nathan; Schlieve, Christopher R; Pereira, Laura; Wahlquist, Christine; Colas, Alexandre; Zambon, Alexander C; Vranizan, Karen; Spindler, Matthew J; Pico, Alexander R; Cline, Melissa S; Clark, Tyson A; Williams, Alan; Blume, John E; Samal, Eva; Mercola, Mark; Merrill, Bradley J; Conklin, Bruce R

    2010-06-01

    Two major goals of regenerative medicine are to reproducibly transform adult somatic cells into a pluripotent state and to control their differentiation into specific cell fates. Progress toward these goals would be greatly helped by obtaining a complete picture of the RNA isoforms produced by these cells due to alternative splicing (AS) and alternative promoter selection (APS). To investigate the roles of AS and APS, reciprocal exon-exon junctions were interrogated on a genome-wide scale in differentiating mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells with a prototype Affymetrix microarray. Using a recently released open-source software package named AltAnalyze, we identified 144 genes for 170 putative isoform variants, the majority (67%) of which were predicted to alter protein sequence and domain composition. Verified alternative exons were largely associated with pathways of Wnt signaling and cell-cycle control, and most were conserved between mouse and human. To examine the functional impact of AS, we characterized isoforms for two genes. As predicted by AltAnalyze, we found that alternative isoforms of the gene Serca2 were targeted by distinct microRNAs (miRNA-200b, miRNA-214), suggesting a critical role for AS in cardiac development. Analysis of the Wnt transcription factor Tcf3, using selective knockdown of an ES cell-enriched and characterized isoform, revealed several distinct targets for transcriptional repression (Stmn2, Ccnd2, Atf3, Klf4, Nodal, and Jun) as well as distinct differentiation outcomes in ES cells. The findings herein illustrate a critical role for AS in the specification of ES cells with differentiation, and highlight the utility of global functional analyses of AS. PMID:20498046

  11. Zfp423 promotes adipogenic differentiation of bovine stromal vascular cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Das, Arun Kr; Yang, Qi-Yuan; Zhu, Mei-Jun; Du, Min

    2012-01-01

    Intramuscular fat or marbling is critical for the palatability of beef. In mice, very recent studies show that adipocytes and fibroblasts share a common pool of progenitor cells, with Zinc finger protein 423 (Zfp423) as a key initiator of adipogenic differentiation. To evaluate the role of Zfp423 in intramuscular adipogenesis and marbling in beef cattle, we sampled beef muscle for separation of stromal vascular cells. These cells were immortalized with pCI neo-hEST2 and individual clones were selected by G418. A total of 288 clones (3×96 well plates) were isolated and induced to adipogenesis. The presence of adipocytes was assessed by Oil-Red-O staining. Three clones with high and low adipogenic potential respectively were selected for further analyses. In addition, fibro/adipogenic progenitor cells were selected using a surface marker, platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) α. The expression of Zfp423 was much higher (307.4±61.9%, P<0.05) in high adipogenic cells, while transforming growth factor (TGF)-β was higher (156.1±48.7%, P<0.05) in low adipogenic cells. Following adipogenic differentiation, the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα) were much higher (239.4±84.1% and 310.7±138.4%, respectively, P<0.05) in high adipogenic cells. Over-expression of Zfp423 in stromal vascular cells and cloned low adipogenic cells dramatically increased their adipogenic differentiation, accompanied with the inhibition of TGF-β expression. Zfp423 knockdown by shRNA in high adipogenic cells largely prevented their adipogenic differentiation. The differential regulation of Zfp423 and TGF-β between low and high adipogenic cells is associated with the DNA methylation in their promoters. In conclusion, data show that Zfp423 is a critical regulator of adipogenesis in stromal vascular cells of bovine muscle, and Zfp423 may provide a molecular target for enhancing intramuscular adipogenesis

  12. Modulation of plasma membrane H+-ATPase activity differentially activates wound and pathogen defense responses in tomato plants.

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, A; Oecking, C

    1999-01-01

    Systemin is an important mediator of wound-induced defense gene activation in tomato plants, and it elicits a rapid alkalinization of the growth medium of cultured Lycopersicon peruvianum cells. A possible mechanistic link between proton fluxes across the plasma membrane and the induction of defense genes was investigated by modulating plasma membrane H+-ATPase activity. Inhibitors of H+-ATPase (erythrosin B, diethyl stilbestrol, and vanadate) were found to alkalinize the growth medium of L. peruvianum cell cultures and to induce wound response genes in whole tomato plants. Conversely, an activator of the H+-ATPase (fusicoccin) acidified the growth medium of L. peruvianum cell cultures and suppressed systemin-induced medium alkalinization. Likewise, in fusicoccin-treated tomato plants, the wound- and systemin-triggered accumulation of wound-responsive mRNAs was found to be suppressed. However, fusicoccin treatment of tomato plants led to the accumulation of salicylic acid and the expression of pathogenesis-related genes. Apparently, the wound and pathogen defense signaling pathways are differentially regulated by changes in the proton electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane. In addition, alkalinization of the L. peruvianum cell culture medium was found to depend on the influx of Ca2+ and the activity of a protein kinase. Reversible protein phosphorylation was also shown to be involved in the induction of wound response genes. The plasma membrane H+-ATPase as a possible target of a Ca2+-activated protein kinase and its role in defense signaling are discussed. PMID:9927643

  13. Bile acids induce hepatic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sawitza, Iris; Kordes, Claus; Götze, Silke; Herebian, Diran; Häussinger, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have the potential to differentiate into multiple cell lineages and their therapeutic potential has become obvious. In the liver, MSC are represented by stellate cells which have the potential to differentiate into hepatocytes after stimulation with growth factors. Since bile acids can promote liver regeneration, their influence on liver-resident and bone marrow-derived MSC was investigated. Physiological concentrations of bile acids such as tauroursodeoxycholic acid were able to initiate hepatic differentiation of MSC via the farnesoid X receptor and transmembrane G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor 5 as investigated with knockout mice. Notch, hedgehog, transforming growth factor-β/bone morphogenic protein family and non-canonical Wnt signalling were also essential for bile acid-mediated differentiation, whereas β-catenin-dependent Wnt signalling was able to attenuate this process. Our findings reveal bile acid-mediated signalling as an alternative way to induce hepatic differentiaion of stem cells and highlight bile acids as important signalling molecules during liver regeneration. PMID:26304833

  14. Timing-Dependent Actions of NGF Required for Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jaehoon; Kubota, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Yu-ichi; Uda, Shinsuke; Kuroda, Shinya

    2010-01-01

    Background Continuous NGF stimulation induces PC12 cell differentiation. However, why continuous NGF stimulation is required for differentiation is unclear. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanisms of the timing-dependent requirement of NGF action for cell differentiation. Methodology/Principal Findings To address the timing-dependency of the NGF action, we performed a discontinuous stimulation assay consisting of a first transient stimulation followed by an interval and then a second sustained stimulation and quantified the neurite extension level. Consequently, we observed a timing-dependent action of NGF on cell differentiation, and discontinuous NGF stimulation similarly induced differentiation. The first stimulation did not induce neurite extension, whereas the second stimulation induced fast neurite extension; therefore, the first stimulation is likely required as a prerequisite condition. These observations indicate that the action of NGF can be divided into two processes: an initial stimulation-driven latent process and a second stimulation-driven extension process. The latent process appears to require the activities of ERK and transcription, but not PI3K, whereas the extension-process requires the activities of ERK and PI3K, but not transcription. We also found that during the first stimulation, the activity of NGF can be replaced by PACAP, but not by insulin, EGF, bFGF or forskolin; during the second stimulation, however, the activity of NGF cannot be replaced by any of these stimulants. These findings allowed us to identify potential genes specifically involved in the latent process, rather than in other processes, using a microarray. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate that NGF induces the differentiation of PC12 cells via mechanically distinct processes: an ERK-driven and transcription-dependent latent process, and an ERK- and PI3K-driven and transcription-independent extension process. PMID:20126402

  15. Epigenetic Dysregulation in Mesenchymal Stem Cell Aging and Spontaneous Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Pengyue; Zhao, Robert C. H.; Guo, Ling; Liu, Zhigang; Wu, Yaojiong

    2011-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold great promise for the treatment of difficult diseases. As MSCs represent a rare cell population, ex vivo expansion of MSCs is indispensable to obtain sufficient amounts of cells for therapies and tissue engineering. However, spontaneous differentiation and aging of MSCs occur during expansion and the molecular mechanisms involved have been poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings Human MSCs in early and late passages were examined for their expression of genes involved in osteogenesis to determine their spontaneous differentiation towards osteoblasts in vitro, and of genes involved in self-renewal and proliferation for multipotent differentiation potential. In parallel, promoter DNA methylation and hostone H3 acetylation levels were determined. We found that MSCs underwent aging and spontaneous osteogenic differentiation upon regular culture expansion, with progressive downregulation of TERT and upregulation of osteogenic genes such as Runx2 and ALP. Meanwhile, the expression of genes associated with stem cell self-renewal such as Oct4 and Sox2 declined markedly. Notably, the altered expression of these genes were closely associated with epigenetic dysregulation of histone H3 acetylation in K9 and K14, but not with methylation of CpG islands in the promoter regions of most of these genes. bFGF promoted MSC proliferation and suppressed its spontaneous osteogenic differentiation, with corresponding changes in histone H3 acetylation in TERT, Oct4, Sox2, Runx2 and ALP genes. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that histone H3 acetylation, which can be modulated by extrinsic signals, plays a key role in regulating MSC aging and differentiation. PMID:21694780

  16. Differentiation: A Central Topic in Developmental and Cell Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, W. A.

    The concept of "differentiation" encompasses all processes leading to differently specialized cell types, beginning with the progressive divergence of developmental pathways and ending with the successive programming and final elaboration of each particular cell type. Guidance and positional information are provided by external cues, by differentially allotted cytoplasmic determinants such as mRNA for transcription factors, and by cascades of intercellular signals. Eventually cell type specific selector genes, such as the muscle cell determining MyoD/myogenin genes and neural key genes (e.g., achaete scute-C, neurogenin), are switched on which control entire sets of subordinate effector genes. In multiplying cells "cell heredity" based on an epigenetic cellular memory enables transmission of the cell type determining program from parental to daughter cells. This memory can be based on autocatalytic self-activation of cell type specific selector genes and on the enduring action of gene groups such as the Polycomb and thrithorax complexes that code for proteins which bind to DNA sequences called cellular memory modules. These modules confer permanent accessibility (potentiation) or inaccessibility (silencing) upon many different gene loci on the chromosomes.

  17. How do plant cell walls extend?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    This article briefly summarizes recent work that identifies the biophysical and biochemical processes that give rise to the extension of plant cell walls. I begin with the biophysical notion of stress relaxation of the wall and follow with recent studies of wall enzymes thought to catalyze wall extension and relaxation. Readers should refer to detailed reviews for more comprehensive discussion of earlier literature (Taiz, 1984; Carpita and Gibeaut, 1993; Cosgrove, 1993).

  18. Platelet microparticles promote neural stem cell proliferation, survival and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hayon, Yael; Dashevsky, Olga; Shai, Ela; Varon, David; Leker, Ronen R

    2012-07-01

    Platelet microparticles (PMP) are small subcellular fragments, shed upon platelet activation. PMP host a variety of cytokines and growth factor that were previously shown to affect angiogenesis and postischemic tissue regeneration. This study attempted to explore the effect of PMP on neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation, survival and differentiation. Cells were grown as neurospheres and treated with PMP, or relevant growth factors, sphere size and cell fates were evaluated. PMP treatment led to larger neurospheres with increased cell survival. PMP treatment was comparable with the effect of acceptable single growth factors such as fibroblastic growth factor (FGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet derived growth factor (PDGF). PMP treatment also increased the differentiation potential of NSC to glia and neurons. Specific growth factor inhibitors only partly blocked these effects, which were associated with increments in ERK and Akt phosphorylation. In this study, we show that various growth factors contained within the PMP promote neuronal cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. The results suggest a role for platelet microparticles in augmenting endogenous neural progenitor and stem cells angiogenesis and neurogenesis that might be utilized for treatment following brain injury.

  19. Fibronectin Expression Modulates Mammary Epithelial Cell Proliferation during Acinar Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Courtney M.; Engler, Adam J.; Slone, R. Daniel; Galante, Leontine L.; Schwarzbauer, Jean E.

    2009-01-01

    The mammary gland consists of a polarized epithelium surrounded by a basement membrane matrix that forms a series of branching ducts ending in hollow, sphere-like acini. Essential roles for the epithelial basement membrane during acinar differentiation, in particular laminin and its integrin receptors, have been identified using mammary epithelial cells cultured on a reconstituted basement membrane. Contributions from fibronectin, which is abundant in the mammary gland during development and tumorigenesis, have not been fully examined. Here, we show that fibronectin expression by mammary epithelial cells is dynamically regulated during the morphogenic process. Experiments with synthetic polyacrylamide gel substrates implicate both specific extracellular matrix components, including fibronectin itself, and matrix rigidity in this regulation. Alterations in fibronectin levels perturbed acinar organization. During acinar development, increased fibronectin levels resulted in overproliferation of mammary epithelial cells and increased acinar size. Addition of fibronectin to differentiated acini stimulated proliferation and reversed growth arrest of mammary epithelial cells negatively affecting maintenance of proper acinar morphology. These results show that expression of fibronectin creates a permissive environment for cell growth that antagonizes the differentiation signals from the basement membrane. These effects suggest a link between fibronectin expression and epithelial cell growth during development and oncogenesis in the mammary gland. PMID:18451144

  20. Selenoprotein O deficiencies suppress chondrogenic differentiation of ATDC5 cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jidong; Fei, Yao; Han, Yan; Lu, Shemin

    2016-10-01

    Selenoprotein O (Sel O) is a selenium-containing protein, but its function is still unclear. In the present study, we observed that the mRNA and protein expression levels of Sel O increased during chondrogenic induction of ATDC5 cells. The effects of Sel O on chondrocyte differentiation were then examined through shRNA-mediated gene silencing technique. The expression of Sel O was significantly suppressed at both mRNA and protein levels in a stable cell line transfected with a Sel O-specific target shRNA construct. Thereafter, we demonstrated that Sel O deficiencies suppress chondrogenic differentiation of ATDC5 cells. Sel O deficiencies inhibited expression of chondrogenic gene Sox9, Col II, and aggrecan. Sel O-deficient cells also accumulated a few cartilage glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and decreased the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP). In addition, Sel O deficiencies inhibited chondrocyte proliferation through delayed cell cycle progression by suppression of cyclin D1 expression. Moreover, Sel O deficiencies induced chondrocyte death through cell apoptosis. In summary, we describe the expression patterns and the essential roles of Sel O in chondrocyte viability, proliferation, and chondrogenic differentiation. Additionally, Sel O deficiency-mediated impaired chondrogenesis may illustrate the mechanisms of Se deficiency in the pathophysiological process of the endemic osteoarthropathy.

  1. Vinpocetine Attenuates the Osteoblastic Differentiation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yun-Yun; Sun, Lin; Chen, Xiu-Juan; Wang, Na; Yi, Peng-Fei; Song, Min; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yu-Zhong; Liang, Qiu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an active process of osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, its definite mechanism remains unknown. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has been demonstrated to inhibit the high glucose-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, it remains unknown whether vinpocetine can affect the osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. We hereby investigated the effect of vinpocetine on vascular calcification using a beta-glycerophosphate-induced cell model. Our results showed that vinpocetine significantly reduced the osteoblast-like phenotypes of vascular smooth muscle cells including ALP activity, osteocalcin, collagen type I, Runx2 and BMP-2 expression as well as the formation of mineralized nodule. Vinpocetine, binding to translocation protein, induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase and Akt and thus inhibited the translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B into the nucleus. Silencing of translocator protein significantly attenuated the inhibitory effect of vinpocetine on osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Taken together, vinpocetine may be a promising candidate for the clinical therapy of vascular calcification. PMID:27589055

  2. Osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in defined protein beads.

    PubMed

    Lund, Amanda W; Bush, Jeff A; Plopper, George E; Stegemann, Jan P

    2008-10-01

    There is a need to develop improved methods for directing and maintaining the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) for regenerative medicine. Here, we present a method for embedding cells in defined protein microenvironments for the directed osteogenic differentiation of hMSC. Composite matrices of collagen I and agarose were produced by emulsification and simultaneous polymerization in the presence of hMSC to produce 30-150 mum diameter hydrogel "beads." The proliferation, morphology, osteogenic gene expression, and calcium deposition of hMSC in bead environments were compared to other two- and three-dimensional culture environments over 14-21 days in culture. Cells embedded within 40% collagen beads exhibited equivalent proliferation rates to those in gel disks, but showed upregulation of bone sialoprotein and increased calcium deposition over 2D controls. Osteocalcin gene expression was not changed in 3D beads and disks, while collagen type I gene expression was downregulated relative to cells in 2D culture. The hydrogel bead format allows controlled cell differentiation and is a cell delivery vehicle that may also enhance vascular invasion and host incorporation. Our results indicate that the application of such beads can be used to promote the osteogenic phenotype in hMSC, which is an important step toward using them in bone repair applications.

  3. Vinpocetine Attenuates the Osteoblastic Differentiation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiu-Juan; Wang, Na; Yi, Peng-Fei; Song, Min; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yu-Zhong; Liang, Qiu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an active process of osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, its definite mechanism remains unknown. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has been demonstrated to inhibit the high glucose-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, it remains unknown whether vinpocetine can affect the osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. We hereby investigated the effect of vinpocetine on vascular calcification using a beta-glycerophosphate-induced cell model. Our results showed that vinpocetine significantly reduced the osteoblast-like phenotypes of vascular smooth muscle cells including ALP activity, osteocalcin, collagen type I, Runx2 and BMP-2 expression as well as the formation of mineralized nodule. Vinpocetine, binding to translocation protein, induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase and Akt and thus inhibited the translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B into the nucleus. Silencing of translocator protein significantly attenuated the inhibitory effect of vinpocetine on osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Taken together, vinpocetine may be a promising candidate for the clinical therapy of vascular calcification. PMID:27589055

  4. Rat parotid gland cell differentiation in three-dimensional culture.

    PubMed

    Baker, Olga J; Schulz, David J; Camden, Jean M; Liao, Zhongji; Peterson, Troy S; Seye, Cheikh I; Petris, Michael J; Weisman, Gary A

    2010-10-01

    The use of polarized salivary gland cell monolayers has contributed to our understanding of salivary gland physiology. However, these cell models are not representative of glandular epithelium in vivo, and, therefore, are not ideal for investigating salivary epithelial functions. The current study has developed a three-dimensional (3D) cell culture model for rat Par-C10 parotid gland cells that forms differentiated acinar-like spheres on Matrigel. These 3D Par-C10 acinar-like spheres display characteristics similar to differentiated acini in salivary glands, including cell polarization, tight junction (TJ) formation required to maintain transepithelial potential difference, basolateral expression of aquaporin-3 and Na+/K+/2Cl- cotransporter-1, and responsiveness to the muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol that is decreased by the anion channel blocker diphenylamine-2-carboxylic acid or chloride replacement with gluconate. Incubation of the spheres in the hypertonic medium increased the expression level of the water channel aquaporin-5. Further, the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma induced alterations in TJ integrity in the acinar-like spheres without affecting individual cell viability, suggesting that cytokines may affect salivary gland function by altering TJ integrity. Thus, 3D Par-C10 acinar-like spheres represent a novel in vitro model to study physiological and pathophysiological functions of differentiated acini.

  5. Nicotinamide induces differentiation of embryonic stem cells into insulin-secreting cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vaca, Pilar; Berna, Genoveva; Araujo, Raquel; Carneiro, Everardo M.; Bedoya, Francisco J.; Soria, Bernat; Martin, Franz

    2008-03-10

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor, nicotinamide, induces differentiation and maturation of fetal pancreatic cells. In addition, we have previously reported evidence that nicotinamide increases the insulin content of cells differentiated from embryonic stem (ES) cells, but the possibility of nicotinamide acting as a differentiating agent on its own has never been completely explored. Islet cell differentiation was studied by: (i) X-gal staining after neomycin selection; (ii) BrdU studies; (iii) single and double immunohistochemistry for insulin, C-peptide and Glut-2; (iv) insulin and C-peptide content and secretion assays; and (v) transplantation of differentiated cells, under the kidney capsule, into streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic mice. Here we show that undifferentiated mouse ES cells treated with nicotinamide: (i) showed an 80% decrease in cell proliferation; (ii) co-expressed insulin, C-peptide and Glut-2; (iii) had values of insulin and C-peptide corresponding to 10% of normal mouse islets; (iv) released insulin and C-peptide in response to stimulatory glucose concentrations; and (v) after transplantation into diabetic mice, normalized blood glucose levels over 7 weeks. Our data indicate that nicotinamide decreases ES cell proliferation and induces differentiation into insulin-secreting cells. Both aspects are very important when thinking about cell therapy for the treatment of diabetes based on ES cells.

  6. In vitro differentiation potential of human haematopoietic CD34(+) cells towards pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Sunitha, Manne Mudhu; Srikanth, Lokanathan; Santhosh Kumar, Pasupuleti; Chandrasekhar, Chodimella; Sarma, Potukuchi Venkata Gurunadha Krishna

    2016-10-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) possess multipotent ability to differentiate into various types of cells on providing appropriate niche. In the present study, the differentiating potential of human HSCs into β-cells of islets of langerhans was explored. Human HSCs were apheretically isolated from a donor and cultured. Phenotypic characterization of CD34 glycoprotein in the growing monolayer HSCs was confirmed by immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry techniques. HSCs were induced by selection with beta cell differentiating medium (BDM), which consists of epidermal growth factor (EGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), transferrin, Triiodo-l-Tyronine, nicotinamide and activin A. Distinct morphological changes of differentiated cells were observed on staining with dithizone (DTZ) and expression of PDX1, insulin and synaptophysin was confirmed by immunocytochemistry. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed distinct expression of specific β-cell markers, pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX1), glucose transporter-2 (GLUT-2), synaptophysin (SYP) and insulin (INS) in these differentiated cells compared to HSCs. Further, these cells exhibited elevated expression of INS gene at 10 mM glucose upon inducing with different glucose concentrations. The prominent feature of the obtained β-cells was the presence of glucose sensors, which was determined by glucokinase activity and high glucokinase activity compared with CD34(+) stem cells. These findings illustrate the differentiation of CD34(+) HSCs into β-cells of islets of langerhans. PMID:27514733

  7. Signaling events during male germ cell differentiation: bases and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Berruti, G

    1998-11-01

    In all species, reproductive function depends on the ability of the individual to produce functional differentiated gametes. Spermatogenesis is a cyclic process in which diploid spermatogonia differentiate into mature haploid spermatozoa. Thus from a genetic point of view, spermatogenesis can be divided into two phases, namely the diploid and haploid phase. Indeed, this complex differentiation process is still more intriguing since primary spermatocytes, if genetically diploid, are functionally tetraploid, while elongating spermatids, the germ cells undergoing the most dramatic morphological changes, if genetically haploid, become functionally anucleate due to ongoing condensation of chromatin resulting in an inactive nuclear DNA. This multi-step differentiative pathway is dependent on a specific environment provided by the anatomical and cellular relationships that take place in the testis and more specifically within the seminiferous tubules. Already, early anatomists (mind comes to Enrico Sertoli and Gustaf Retzius) were fascinated by the mixed cellular composition of the testis correctly deciphered as a whole of interacting and interdependent cell types despite the fact these belong to two well-established and different cell lineages, i.e, the somatic and germinal line. Since their time (the XIX century) up to-day a conspicuous bulk of experimental work and a relative massive bibliographic documentation have been provided. From this it stands out : a) a sophisticated role played by the cyclic hormonal control elicited by the hypothalamic-pituitary axis; b) the structural membrane specializations of Sertoli-germ cell communications; c) the existence and action of a paracrine and autocrine testicular regulative secretion; d) a regulation of germ cell gene expression, highly specialized both at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and translational level; e) an active participation of the haploid genome in the final steps of cell differentiation. Each of these

  8. In vitro differentiation of human tooth germ stem cells into endothelial- and epithelial-like cells.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Ayşegül; Demirci, Selami; Şahin, Fikrettin

    2015-01-01

    Current clinical techniques in dental practice include stem cell and tissue engineering applications. Dental stem cells are promising primary cell source for mainly tooth tissue engineering. Interaction of mesenchymal stem cell with epithelial and endothelial cells is strictly required for an intact tooth morphogenesis. Therefore, it is important to investigate whether human tooth germ stem cells (hTGSCs) derived from wisdom tooth are suitable for endothelial and epithelial cell transformation in dental tissue regeneration approaches. Differentiation into endothelial and epithelial cell lineages were mimicked under defined conditions, confirmed by real time PCR, western blotting and immunocytochemical analysis by qualitative and quantitative methods. HUVECs and HaCaT cells were used as positive controls for the endothelial and epithelial differentiation assays, respectively. Immunocytochemical and western blotting analysis revealed that terminally differentiated cells expressed cell-lineage markers including CD31, VEGFR2, VE-Cadherin, vWF (endothelial cell markers), and cytokeratin (CK)-17, CK-19, EpCaM, vimentin (epithelial cell markers) in significant levels with respect to undifferentiated control cells. Moreover, high expression levels of VEGFR1, VEGFR2, VEGF, CK-18, and CK-19 genes were detected in differentiated endothelial and epithelial-like cells. Endothelial-like cells derived from hTGSCs were cultured on Matrigel, tube-like structure formations were followed as an indication for functional endothelial differentiation. hTGSCs successfully differentiate into various cell types with a broad range of functional abilities using an in vitro approach. These findings suggest that hTGSCs may serve a potential stem cell source for tissue engineering and cell therapy of epithelial and endothelial tissue.

  9. A plant cell division algorithm based on cell biomechanics and ellipse-fitting

    PubMed Central

    Abera, Metadel K.; Verboven, Pieter; Defraeye, Thijs; Fanta, Solomon Workneh; Hertog, Maarten L. A. T. M.; Carmeliet, Jan; Nicolai, Bart M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims The importance of cell division models in cellular pattern studies has been acknowledged since the 19th century. Most of the available models developed to date are limited to symmetric cell division with isotropic growth. Often, the actual growth of the cell wall is either not considered or is updated intermittently on a separate time scale to the mechanics. This study presents a generic algorithm that accounts for both symmetrically and asymmetrically dividing cells with isotropic and anisotropic growth. Actual growth of the cell wall is simulated simultaneously with the mechanics. Methods The cell is considered as a closed, thin-walled structure, maintained in tension by turgor pressure. The cell walls are represented as linear elastic elements that obey Hooke's law. Cell expansion is induced by turgor pressure acting on the yielding cell-wall material. A system of differential equations for the positions and velocities of the cell vertices as well as for the actual growth of the cell wall is established. Readiness to divide is determined based on cell size. An ellipse-fitting algorithm is used to determine the position and orientation of the dividing wall. The cell vertices, walls and cell connectivity are then updated and cell expansion resumes. Comparisons are made with experimental data from the literature. Key Results The generic plant cell division algorithm has been implemented successfully. It can handle both symmetrically and asymmetrically dividing cells coupled with isotropic and anisotropic growth modes. Development of the algorithm highlighted the importance of ellipse-fitting to produce randomness (biological variability) even in symmetrically dividing cells. Unlike previous models, a differential equation is formulated for the resting length of the cell wall to simulate actual biological growth and is solved simultaneously with the position and velocity of the vertices. Conclusions The algorithm presented can produce different

  10. Live cell and immuno-labeling techniques to study gravitational effects on single plant cells.

    PubMed

    Chebli, Youssef; Geitmann, Anja

    2015-01-01

    The constant force of gravity plays a primordial role in the ontogeny of all living organisms. Plants, for example, develop their roots and shoots in accordance with the direction of the gravitational vector. Any change in the magnitude and/or the direction of gravity has an important impact on the development of tissues and cells. In order to understand how the gravitational force affects plant cell growth and differentiation, we established two complementary experimental procedures with which the effect of hyper-gravity on single plant cell development can be assessed. The single model cell system we used is the pollen tube or male gametophyte which, because of its rapid growth behavior, is known for its instant response to external stresses. The physiological response of the pollen tube can be assessed in a quantitative manner based on changes in the composition and spatial distribution of its cell wall components and in the precisely defined pattern of its very dynamic cytoplasmic streaming. Here, we provide a detailed description of the steps required for the immuno-localization of various cell wall components using microwave-assisted techniques and we explain how live imaging of the intracellular traffic can be achieved under hyper-gravity conditions.

  11. Induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) Cell Culture Methods and Induction of Differentiation into Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Ishita; Li, Fei; Kohler, Erin E.; Rehman, Jalees; Malik, Asrar B.; Wary, Kishore K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The studies of stem cell behavior and differentiation in a developmental context is complex, time-consuming and expensive, and for this reason, cell culture remains a method of choice for developmental and regenerative biology and mechanistic studies. Similar to ES cells, iPS cells have the ability to differentiate into endothelial cells (ECs), and the route for differentiation appears to mimic the developmental process that occurs during the formation of an embryo. Traditional EC induction methods from embryonic stem (ES) cells rely mostly on the formation the embryoid body (EB), which employs feeder or feeder-free conditions in the presence or absence of supporting cells. Similar to ES cells, iPS cells can be cultured in feeder-layer or feeder-free conditions. Here, we describe the iPS cell culture methods and induction differentiation of these cells into ECs. We use anti-mouse Flk1 and anti-mouse VE-cadherin to isolate and characterize mouse ECs, because these antibodies are commercially available and their use has been described in the literature, including by our group. The ECs produced by this method have been used by our laboratory, and we have demonstrated their in vivo potential. We also discuss how iPS cells differ in their ability to differentiate into endothelial cells in culture. PMID:25687301

  12. Small molecules induce efficient differentiation into insulin-producing cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kunisada, Yuya; Tsubooka-Yamazoe, Noriko; Shoji, Masanobu; Hosoya, Masaki

    2012-03-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cells have potential uses for drug discovery and cell therapy, including generation of pancreatic β-cells for diabetes research and treatment. In this study, we developed a simple protocol for generating insulin-producing cells from hiPS cells. Treatment with activin A and a GSK3β inhibitor enhanced efficient endodermal differentiation, and then combined treatment with retinoic acid, a bone morphogenic protein inhibitor, and a transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) inhibitor induced efficient differentiation of pancreatic progenitor cells from definitive endoderm. Expression of the pancreatic progenitor markers PDX1 and NGN3 was significantly increased at this step and most cells were positive for anti-PDX1 antibody. Moreover, several compounds, including forskolin, dexamethasone, and a TGF-β inhibitor, were found to induce the differentiation of insulin-producing cells from pancreatic progenitor cells. By combined treatment with these compounds, more than 10% of the cells became insulin positive. The differentiated cells secreted human c-peptide in response to various insulin secretagogues. In addition, all five hiPS cell lines that we examined showed efficient differentiation into insulin-producing cells with this protocol.

  13. Induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) Cell Culture Methods and Induction of Differentiation into Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Ishita; Li, Fei; Kohler, Erin E; Rehman, Jalees; Malik, Asrar B; Wary, Kishore K

    2016-01-01

    The study of stem cell behavior and differentiation in a developmental context is complex, time-consuming, and expensive, and for this reason, cell culture remains a method of choice for developmental and regenerative biology and mechanistic studies. Similar to ES cells, iPS cells have the ability to differentiate into endothelial cells (ECs), and the route for differentiation appears to mimic the developmental process that occurs during the formation of an embryo. Traditional EC induction methods from embryonic stem (ES) cells rely mostly on the formation of embryoid body (EB), which employs feeder or feeder-free conditions in the presence or absence of supporting cells. Similar to ES cells, iPS cells can be cultured in feeder layer or feeder-free conditions. Here, we describe the iPS cell culture methods and induction differentiation of these cells into ECs. We use anti-mouse Flk1 and anti-mouse VE-cadherin to isolate and characterize mouse ECs, because these antibodies are commercially available and their use has been described in the literature, including by our group. The ECs produced by this method have been used by our laboratory, and we have demonstrated their in vivo potential. We also discuss how iPS cells differ in their ability to differentiate into endothelial cells in culture.

  14. Dominant negative mutants of the Cdc2 kinase uncouple cell division from iterative plant development.

    PubMed Central

    Hemerly, A; Engler, J de A; Bergounioux, C; Van Montagu, M; Engler, G; Inzé, D; Ferreira, P

    1995-01-01

    Because plant cells do not move and are surrounded by a rigid cell wall, cell division rates and patterns are believed to be directly responsible for generating new structures throughout development. To study the relationship between cell division and morphogenesis, transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis plants were constructed expressing dominant mutations in a key regulator of the Arabidopsis cell cycle, the Cdc2a kinase. Plants constitutively overproducing the wild-type Cdc2a or the mutant form predicted to accelerate the cell cycle did not exhibit a significantly altered development. In contrast, a mutation expected to arrest the cell cycle abolished cell division when expressed in Arabidopsis, whereas some tobacco plants constitutively producing this mutant protein were recovered. These plants had a reduced histone H1 kinase activity and contained considerably fewer cells. These cells were, however, much larger and underwent normal differentiation. Morphogenesis, histogenesis and developmental timing were unaffected. The results indicate that, in plants, the developmental controls defining shape can act independently from cell division rates. Images PMID:7664733

  15. Placozoa and the evolution of Metazoa and intrasomatic cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Schierwater, Bernd; de Jong, Danielle; Desalle, Rob

    2009-02-01

    The multicellular Metazoa evolved from single-celled organisms (Protozoa) and usually - but not necessarily - consist of more cells than Protozoa. In all cases, and thus by definition, Metazoa possess more than one somatic cell type, i.e. they show-in sharp contrast to protists-intrasomatic differentiation. Placozoa have the lowest degree of intrasomatic variation; the number of somatic cell types according to text books is four (but see also Jakob W, Sagasser S, Dellaporta S, Holland P, Kuhn K, and Schierwater B. The Trox-2 Hox/ParaHox gene of Trichoplax (Placozoa) marks an epithelial boundary. Dev Genes Evol 2004;214:170-5). For this and several other reasons Placozoa have been regarded by many as the most basal metazoan phylum. Thus, the morphologically most simply organized metazoan animal, the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens, resembles a unique model system for cell differentiation studies and also an intriguing model for a prominent "urmetazoon" hypotheses-the placula hypothesis. A basal position of Placozoa would provide answers to several key issues of metazoan-specific inventions (including for example different lines of somatic cell differentiation leading to organ development and axis formation) and would determine a root for unraveling their evolution. However, the phylogenetic relationships at the base of Metazoa are controversial and a basal position of Placozoa is not generally accepted (e.g. Schierwater B, DeSalle R. Can we ever identify the Urmetazoan? Integr Comp Biol 2007;47:670-76; DeSalle R, Schierwater B. An even "newer" animal phylogeny. Bioessays 2008;30:1043-47). Here we review and discuss (i) long-standing morphological evidence for the simple placozoan bauplan resembling an ancestral metazoan stage, (ii) some rapidly changing alternative hypotheses derived from molecular analyses, (iii) the surprising idea that triploblasts (Bilateria) and diploblasts may be sister groups, and (iv) the presence of genes involved in cell differentiation and

  16. Putative intermediates in the nerve cell differentiation pathway in hydra have properties of multipotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Holstein, T.W.; David, C.N. )

    1990-12-01

    We have investigated the properties of nerve cell precursors in hydra by analyzing the differentiation and proliferation capacity of interstitial cells in the peduncle of Hydra oligactis, which is a region of active nerve cell differentiation. Our results indicate that about 50% of the interstitial cells in the peduncle can grow rapidly and also give rise to nematocyte precursors when transplanted into a gastric environment. If these cells were committed nerve cell precursors, one would not expect them to differentiate into nematocytes nor to proliferate apparently without limit. Therefore we conclude that cycling interstitial cells in peduncles are not intermediates in the nerve cell differentiation pathway but are stem cells. The remaining interstitial cells in the peduncle are in G1 and have the properties of committed nerve cell precursors. Thus, the interstitial cell population in the peduncle contains both stem cells and noncycling nerve precursors. The presence of stem cells in this region makes it likely that these cells are the immediate targets of signals which give rise to nerve cells.

  17. Evaluation of a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) has been used to evaluate the effects of xenobiotics using three endpoints, stem cell differentiation, stem cell viability and 3T3-cell viability. Our research goal is to establish amodel system that would evaluate chemical effects using a singl...

  18. Biomaterials Approach to Expand and Direct Differentiation of Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Chou; Leong, Kam W

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells play increasingly prominent roles in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells theoretically allow every cell type in the body to be regenerated. Adult stem cells have also been identified and isolated from every major tissue and organ, some possessing apparent pluripotency comparable to that of ES cells. However, a major limitation in the translation of stem cell technologies to clinical applications is the supply of cells. Advances in biomaterials engineering and scaffold fabrication enable the development of ex vivo cell expansion systems to address this limitation. Progress in biomaterial design has also allowed directed differentiation of stem cells into specific lineages. In addition to delivering biochemical cues, various technologies have been developed to introduce micro- and nano-scale features onto culture surfaces to enable the study of stem cell responses to topographical cues. Knowledge gained from these studies portends the alteration of stem cell fate in the absence of biological factors, which would be valuable in the engineering of complex organs comprising multiple cell types. Biomaterials may also play an immunoprotective role by minimizing host immunoreactivity toward transplanted cells or engineered grafts. PMID:17264853

  19. Chemo-mechanical control of neural stem cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geishecker, Emily R.

    Cellular processes such as adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation are controlled in part by cell interactions with the microenvironment. Cells can sense and respond to a variety of stimuli, including soluble and insoluble factors (such as proteins and small molecules) and externally applied mechanical stresses. Mechanical properties of the environment, such as substrate stiffness, have also been suggested to play an important role in cell processes. The roles of both biochemical and mechanical signaling in fate modification of stem cells have been explored independently. However, very few studies have been performed to study well-controlled chemo-mechanotransduction. The objective of this work is to design, synthesize, and characterize a chemo-mechanical substrate to encourage neuronal differentiation of C17.2 neural stem cells. In Chapter 2, Polyacrylamide (PA) gels of varying stiffnesses are functionalized with differing amounts of whole collagen to investigate the role of protein concentration in combination with substrate stiffness. As expected, neurons on the softest substrate were more in number and neuronal morphology than those on stiffer substrates. Neurons appeared locally aligned with an expansive network of neurites. Additional experiments would allow for statistical analysis to determine if and how collagen density impacts C17.2 differentiation in combination with substrate stiffness. Due to difficulties associated with whole protein approaches, a similar platform was developed using mixed adhesive peptides, derived from fibronectin and laminin, and is presented in Chapter 3. The matrix elasticity and peptide concentration can be individually modulated to systematically probe the effects of chemo-mechanical signaling on differentiation of C17.2 cells. Polyacrylamide gel stiffness was confirmed using rheological techniques and found to support values published by Yeung et al. [1]. Cellular growth and differentiation were assessed by cell counts

  20. Proinflammatory T cells and IL-17 stimulate osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Croes, Michiel; Öner, F Cumhur; van Neerven, Danihel; Sabir, Ekrem; Kruyt, Moyo C; Blokhuis, Taco J; Dhert, Wouter J A; Alblas, Jacqueline

    2016-03-01

    The local immune response is important to consider when the aim is to improve bone regeneration. Recently T lymphocytes and their associated cytokines have been identified as regulators in fracture callus formation, but it is not known whether T cells affect bone progenitor cells directly. The goal of this in vitro study was to investigate the role of different T cell subsets and their secreted factors on the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Significant increases in the alkaline phosphatase activity and the subsequent matrix mineralization by MSCs were found after their exposure to activated T cells or activated T cell-derived conditioned medium. Blocking IFN-γ in the conditioned medium abolished its pro-osteogenic effect, while blocking TGF-β further enhanced osteogenesis. The relative contribution of an anti- or proinflammatory T cell phenotype in MSC osteogenic differentiation was studied next. Enrichment of the fraction of anti-inflammatory regulatory T cells had no beneficial osteogenic effect. In contrast, soluble factors derived from enriched T helper 17 cells upregulated the expression of osteogenic markers by MSCs. IL-17A, and IL-17F, their main proinflammatory cytokines, similarly exhibited strong osteogenic effects when exposed directly to MSCs. IL-17A in particular showed a synergistic action together with bone morphogenetic protein 2. These results indicate that individual T cell subsets, following their activation, affect osteoblast maturation in a different manner through the production of soluble factors. From all T cells, the proinflammatory T cells, including the T helper 17 cells, are most stimulatory for osteogenesis.

  1. Differentiation of cultured epithelial cells: Response to toxic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, R.H.; LaMontagne, A.D.; Petito, C.T.; Rong, Xianhui )

    1989-03-01

    Cell culture systems are instrumental in elucidating regulation of normal function and mechanisms of its perturbation by toxic substances. To this end, three applications of epithelial cells cultured with 3T3 feeder layer support are described. First, treatment of the premalignant human epidermal keratinocyte line SCC-12F2 with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate suppressed cell growth and differentiation. This agent produced a biphasic growth response greatly inhibiting cell growth at 1 to 10 nM, but much less above 100 nM. Expression of the differentiated functions involucrin and transglutaminase was found to be inhibited markedly at concentrations above 10 nM. Second, 3-methylcholanthrene toxicity was surveyed in a variety of rat epithelial cell types. The two most sensitive to growth inhibition were epidermal and mammary epithelial cells, while those from bladder, prostate, thyroid, and endometrium were insensitive to growth inhibition. Finally, expression of estrogen receptors in rat endometrial cells was shown to be stimulated by the cAmP-elevating agent forskolin. Maximal stimulation of 3- to 6-fold occurred in 6 hr, compatible with a requirement for protein synthesis. Pursuit of such results will aid in understanding differences in response among cell types and species, in elucidating mechanisms of action of known toxic substances and, ultimately, in predicting toxicity of less well understood agents.

  2. A study of differential-flow-rate-cell corrosion in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Miyasaka, M.; Kishimoto, K.; Aoki, S.

    1995-10-01

    Mechanisms of differential-flow-rate-cell corrosion (differential-aeration-cell corrosion caused by differential flow rates) of cast iron in seawater were studied. Potential and current density distributions produced by the differential-flow-rate-cell were on actual pumps and a model test cell. Boundary element analysis was also performed on differential-flow-rate-cell corrosion occurred in the model test cell. These studies demonstrate that differential-flow-rate-cell corrosion has characteristics similar to those of galvanic corrosion, and thus can be treated in the same manner as galvanic corrosion.

  3. Differential regulation of the histone chaperone HIRA during muscle cell differentiation by a phosphorylation switch

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jae-Hyun; Song, Tae-Yang; Jo, Chanhee; Park, Jinyoung; Lee, Han-Young; Song, Ilang; Hong, Suji; Jung, Kwan Young; Kim, Jaehoon; Han, Jeung-Whan; Youn, Hong-Duk; Cho, Eun-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Replication-independent incorporation of variant histone H3.3 has a profound impact on chromatin function and numerous cellular processes, including the differentiation of muscle cells. The histone chaperone HIRA and H3.3 have essential roles in MyoD regulation during myoblast differentiation. However, the precise mechanism that determines the onset of H3.3 deposition in response to differentiation signals is unclear. Here we show that HIRA is phosphorylated by Akt kinase, an important signaling modulator in muscle cells. By generating a phosphospecific antibody, we found that a significant amount of HIRA was phosphorylated in myoblasts. The phosphorylation level of HIRA and the occupancy of phosphorylated protein on muscle genes gradually decreased during cellular differentiation. Remarkably, the forced expression of the phosphomimic form of HIRA resulted in reduced H3.3 deposition and suppressed the activation of muscle genes in myotubes. Our data show that HIRA phosphorylation limits the expression of myogenic genes, while the dephosphorylation of HIRA is required for proficient H3.3 deposition and gene activation, demonstrating that the phosphorylation switch is exploited to modulate HIRA/H3.3-mediated muscle gene regulation during myogenesis. PMID:27515126

  4. Programmed synthesis of flagellar tubulin during cell differentiation in Naegleria.

    PubMed

    Fulton, C; Kowit, J D

    1975-06-30

    Amebae of Naegleria gruberi differentiate into flagellates when transferred from growth medium to non-nutrient buffer. This differentiation, which requires 48 min at 28 degrees C, is dependent on transcription and translation. Tubulin of the flagellar outer doublets comprises about 0.15% of the protein of flagellate, and only about 1-2% of the total tubulin. An antiserum to flagellar (outer-doublet) tubulin contains antibodies that react selectively with flagellar tubulin. Measurements using this antiserum have shown that 97-98% of the flagellar tubulin antigen appears during differentiation. The appearance of tubulin antigen is sensitive to actinomycin D and cycloheximide. Isotope dilution experiments using [35S]methione demonstrated that at least 70% of the flagellar tubulin is synthesized from amino acids during differentiation. Experiments using both the specific antiserum and isotopes have shown that flagellar tubulin synthesis begins about one-third of the way through differentiation, before any morphological change has occurred. These experiments demonstrate that most, if not all, of the flagellar tubulin is synthesized de novo during differentiation, and that cells selectively use a specific subpopulation of tubulin in assembling the outer doub)lets. The results bring into focus major unsolved questions about the synthesis and assembly of flagellar tubulin. PMID:1056749

  5. PU.1 silencing leads to terminal differentiation of erythroleukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Atar, Orna; Levi, Ben-Zion . E-mail: blevi@technion.ac.il

    2005-04-22

    The transcription factor PU.1 plays a central role in development and differentiation of hematopoietic cells. Evidence from PU.1 knockout mice indicates a pivotal role for PU.1 in myeloid lineage and B-lymphocyte development. In addition, PU.1 is a key player in the development of Friend erythroleukemia disease, which is characterized by proliferation and differentiation arrest of proerythrocytes. To study the role of PU.1 in erythroleukemia, we have used murine erythroleukemia cells, isolated from Friend virus-infected mice. Expression of PU.1 small interfering RNA in these cells led to significant inhibition of PU.1 levels. This was accompanied by inhibition of proliferation and restoration in the ability of the proerythroblastic cells to produce hemoglobin, i.e., reversion of the leukemic phenotype. The data suggest that overexpression of PU.1 gene is the immediate cause for maintaining the leukemic phenotype of the disease by retaining the self-renewal capacity of transformed erythroblastic cells and by blocking the terminal differentiation program towards erythrocytes.

  6. Cdon, a cell surface protein, mediates oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Chun; Almazan, Guillermina

    2016-06-01

    During central nervous system development, oligodendrocyte progenitors (OLPs) establish multiple branched processes and axonal contacts to initiate myelination. A complete understanding of the molecular signals implicated in cell surface interaction to initiate myelination/remyelination is currently lacking. The objective of our study was to assess whether Cdon, a cell surface protein that was shown to participate in muscle and neuron cell development, is involved in oligodendrocyte (OLG) differentiation and myelination. Here, we demonstrate that endogenous Cdon protein is expressed in OLPs, increasing in the early differentiation stages and decreasing in mature OLGs. Immunocytochemistry of endogenous Cdon showed localization on both OLG cell membranes and cellular processes exhibiting puncta- or varicosity-like structures. Cdon knockdown with siRNA decreased protein levels by 62% as well as two myelin-specific proteins, MBP and MAG. Conversely, overexpression of full-length rat Cdon increased myelin proteins in OLGs. The complexity of OLGs branching and contact point numbers with axons were also increased in Cdon overexpressing cells growing alone or in coculture with dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGNs). Furthermore, myelination of DRGNs was decreased when OLPs were transfected with Cdon siRNA. Altogether, our results suggest that Cdon participates in OLG differentiation and myelination, most likely in the initial stages of development.

  7. Do plant cell walls have a code?

    PubMed

    Tavares, Eveline Q P; Buckeridge, Marcos S

    2015-12-01

    A code is a set of rules that establish correspondence between two worlds, signs (consisting of encrypted information) and meaning (of the decrypted message). A third element, the adaptor, connects both worlds, assigning meaning to a code. We propose that a Glycomic Code exists in plant cell walls where signs are represented by monosaccharides and phenylpropanoids and meaning is cell wall architecture with its highly complex association of polymers. Cell wall biosynthetic mechanisms, structure, architecture and properties are addressed according to Code Biology perspective, focusing on how they oppose to cell wall deconstruction. Cell wall hydrolysis is mainly focused as a mechanism of decryption of the Glycomic Code. Evidence for encoded information in cell wall polymers fine structure is highlighted and the implications of the existence of the Glycomic Code are discussed. Aspects related to fine structure are responsible for polysaccharide packing and polymer-polymer interactions, affecting the final cell wall architecture. The question whether polymers assembly within a wall display similar properties as other biological macromolecules (i.e. proteins, DNA, histones) is addressed, i.e. do they display a code?

  8. Differentiation in human amniotic fluid cell cultures: I: Collagen production.

    PubMed Central

    Priest, R E; Priest, J H; Moinuddin, J F; Keyser, A J

    1977-01-01

    The collagen produced by differentiated cells cultured from human amniotic fluid was characterized in two ways. By chain composition and by 4-hydroxyproline:3-hydroxyproline isomer ratio, the collagen synthesized by F-type (fibroblast) cells was indistinguishable from that made by cultured fetal dermal fibroblasts. The predominant cells in young amniotic fluid cultures, termed AF-type, produced collagen with a lower isomer ratio, resembling that of basement membrane collage. The chain composition, as determined by chromatography on carboxymethyl cellulose, varied for different cultures of the AF-type, but the major pattern was consistent with that of basement membrane collagen. On the basis of these characteristics, F cells are of fibroblast origin, whereas most AF cells are of a different origin either endothelial or epithelial. Other evidence (Megaw et al., 1977) suggests an epithelial origin for AF cells. PMID:881704

  9. Differentiation and Genomic Instability in a Human Mammary Cell Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, R.; Kale, R.; Pettengill, O.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Harvest of prophylactic mastectomy specimens from an obligate heterozygote for ataxia-telangiectasia provided autologous fibroblasts as well epithelial cells (HMEC). The routine availability of these autologous cells has provided an opportunity to study cell-cell interactions in coculture and monoculture, and in 3-dimensional cultures grown in the NASA rotating bioreactor. HMEC and stromal fibroblasts grown in 2-dimensional monoculture were both observed to produce extracellular matrix. Similar matrix was encountered in 3-dimensional cultures containing HMEC. Metaphases were analyzed. For stromal fibroblasts, genomic aberrations were found in 18% of metaphase spreads. For HMEC, aberrations were greater such that a majority were found to be abnormal. The level of genomic instability determined for these noncancerous cells in 2-dimensional monoculture should be useful for generating a human cell model that can correlate the effects of differentiation in 3-dimensional coculture on the level of genomic instability.

  10. [The development, differentiation and composition of flax fiber cells].

    PubMed

    Preisner, Marta; Wojtasik, Wioleta; Szopa, Jan; Kulma, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Having vascular origin, flax fiber belongs to the sclerenchyma (steroids) and its structure is limited to the cell wall. What determines fiber properties is its composition, which in practice means the composition of the secondary cell wall. It consists of four main polymers which constitute approximately 90% of the fiber: cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin, lignin, and a variety of secondary metabolites, proteins, waxes and inorganic compounds. The cell wall is a structure with a high complexity of both the composition and interactions of the particular elements between themselves. It is determined by differentiation and cell growth as well as environmental factors, biotic and abiotic stresses. The molecular background of these processes and mechanisms regulating the synthesis and rearrangement of secondary cell walls components are being intensively studied. In this work we described the latest news about the development, composition and metabolism of flax fiber cell wall components together with the molecular explanation of these processes.

  11. Osteoblastic differentiation of monkey embryonic stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Takada, Tatsuyuki; Narita, Junko; Yamamoto, Gaku; Torii, Ryuzo

    2005-01-01

    Monkey embryonic stem (ES) cell is a useful tool for preclinical studies of regenerative medicine. In this paper, we investigated whether monkey ES cells can be differentiated into osteoblasts in vitro using factors known to promote osteogenesis. We prepared embryoid bodies (EB) in the presence of retinoic acid (RA) and subsequently differentiated in the medium containing either dexamethasone (DEX) or bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 in addition to osteogenic supplements (OS), specifically ascorbic acid and beta-glycerophosphate. RA treatment during EB formation induced osteoblastic marker genes, such as collagen type 1, osteopontin, and Cbfa1. For the expression of osteocalcin, however, cultivation with medium containing either DEX or BMP-2 in addition to OS was required. These results showed that osteoblasts could be derived from monkey ES cells in vitro and BMP-2 + OS was effective to induce calcification. PMID:16390259

  12. FTIR Spectroscopic and Molecular Analysis during Differentiation of Pluripotent Stem Cells to Pancreatic Cells.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Zapien, Gustavo Jesus; Mata-Miranda, Monica Maribel; Sanchez-Monroy, Virginia; Delgado-Macuil, Raul Jacobo; Perez-Ishiwara, David Guillermo; Rojas-Lopez, Marlon

    2016-01-01

    Some of the greatest challenges in stem cells (SCs) biology and regenerative medicine are differentiation control of SCs and ensuring the purity of differentiated cells. In this work, we differentiated mouse pluripotent stem cells (mPSCs) toward pancreatic cells characterizing this differentiation process by molecular and spectroscopic technics. Both mPSCs and Differentiated Pancreatic Cells (DPCs) were subjected to a genetic, phenotypic, and biochemical analysis by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), immunocytochemistry, and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Cultured mPCSs expressed pluripotent genes and proteins (Nanog and SOX2). DPCs expressed endodermal genes (SOX17 and Pdx1) at day 11, an inductor gene of embryonic pancreas development (Pdx1) at day 17 and pancreas genes and proteins (Insulin and Glucagon) at day 21 of differentiation. Likewise, FTIR spectra of mPSCs and DPCs at different maturation stages (11, 17, and 21 days) were obtained and showed absorption bands related with different types of biomolecules. These FTIR spectra exhibited significant spectral changes agreeing with the differentiation process, particularly in proteins and nucleic acids bands. In conclusion, the obtained DPCs passed through the chronological stages of embryonic pancreas development and FTIR spectra provide a new biophysical parameter based on molecular markers indicating the differentiation process of mPSCs to specialized cells.

  13. FTIR Spectroscopic and Molecular Analysis during Differentiation of Pluripotent Stem Cells to Pancreatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mata-Miranda, Monica Maribel; Sanchez-Monroy, Virginia; Delgado-Macuil, Raul Jacobo; Perez-Ishiwara, David Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Some of the greatest challenges in stem cells (SCs) biology and regenerative medicine are differentiation control of SCs and ensuring the purity of differentiated cells. In this work, we differentiated mouse pluripotent stem cells (mPSCs) toward pancreatic cells characterizing this differentiation process by molecular and spectroscopic technics. Both mPSCs and Differentiated Pancreatic Cells (DPCs) were subjected to a genetic, phenotypic, and biochemical analysis by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), immunocytochemistry, and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Cultured mPCSs expressed pluripotent genes and proteins (Nanog and SOX2). DPCs expressed endodermal genes (SOX17 and Pdx1) at day 11, an inductor gene of embryonic pancreas development (Pdx1) at day 17 and pancreas genes and proteins (Insulin and Glucagon) at day 21 of differentiation. Likewise, FTIR spectra of mPSCs and DPCs at different maturation stages (11, 17, and 21 days) were obtained and showed absorption bands related with different types of biomolecules. These FTIR spectra exhibited significant spectral changes agreeing with the differentiation process, particularly in proteins and nucleic acids bands. In conclusion, the obtained DPCs passed through the chronological stages of embryonic pancreas development and FTIR spectra provide a new biophysical parameter based on molecular markers indicating the differentiation process of mPSCs to specialized cells. PMID:27651798

  14. FTIR Spectroscopic and Molecular Analysis during Differentiation of Pluripotent Stem Cells to Pancreatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mata-Miranda, Monica Maribel; Sanchez-Monroy, Virginia; Delgado-Macuil, Raul Jacobo; Perez-Ishiwara, David Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Some of the greatest challenges in stem cells (SCs) biology and regenerative medicine are differentiation control of SCs and ensuring the purity of differentiated cells. In this work, we differentiated mouse pluripotent stem cells (mPSCs) toward pancreatic cells characterizing this differentiation process by molecular and spectroscopic technics. Both mPSCs and Differentiated Pancreatic Cells (DPCs) were subjected to a genetic, phenotypic, and biochemical analysis by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), immunocytochemistry, and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Cultured mPCSs expressed pluripotent genes and proteins (Nanog and SOX2). DPCs expressed endodermal genes (SOX17 and Pdx1) at day 11, an inductor gene of embryonic pancreas development (Pdx1) at day 17 and pancreas genes and proteins (Insulin and Glucagon) at day 21 of differentiation. Likewise, FTIR spectra of mPSCs and DPCs at different maturation stages (11, 17, and 21 days) were obtained and showed absorption bands related with different types of biomolecules. These FTIR spectra exhibited significant spectral changes agreeing with the differentiation process, particularly in proteins and nucleic acids bands. In conclusion, the obtained DPCs passed through the chronological stages of embryonic pancreas development and FTIR spectra provide a new biophysical parameter based on molecular markers indicating the differentiation process of mPSCs to specialized cells.

  15. FTIR Spectroscopic and Molecular Analysis during Differentiation of Pluripotent Stem Cells to Pancreatic Cells.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Zapien, Gustavo Jesus; Mata-Miranda, Monica Maribel; Sanchez-Monroy, Virginia; Delgado-Macuil, Raul Jacobo; Perez-Ishiwara, David Guillermo; Rojas-Lopez, Marlon

    2016-01-01

    Some of the greatest challenges in stem cells (SCs) biology and regenerative medicine are differentiation control of SCs and ensuring the purity of differentiated cells. In this work, we differentiated mouse pluripotent stem cells (mPSCs) toward pancreatic cells characterizing this differentiation process by molecular and spectroscopic technics. Both mPSCs and Differentiated Pancreatic Cells (DPCs) were subjected to a genetic, phenotypic, and biochemical analysis by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), immunocytochemistry, and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Cultured mPCSs expressed pluripotent genes and proteins (Nanog and SOX2). DPCs expressed endodermal genes (SOX17 and Pdx1) at day 11, an inductor gene of embryonic pancreas development (Pdx1) at day 17 and pancreas genes and proteins (Insulin and Glucagon) at day 21 of differentiation. Likewise, FTIR spectra of mPSCs and DPCs at different maturation stages (11, 17, and 21 days) were obtained and showed absorption bands related with different types of biomolecules. These FTIR spectra exhibited significant spectral changes agreeing with the differentiation process, particularly in proteins and nucleic acids bands. In conclusion, the obtained DPCs passed through the chronological stages of embryonic pancreas development and FTIR spectra provide a new biophysical parameter based on molecular markers indicating the differentiation process of mPSCs to specialized cells. PMID:27651798

  16. The potential of single-cell profiling in plants.

    PubMed

    Efroni, Idan; Birnbaum, Kenneth D

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell transcriptomics has been employed in a growing number of animal studies, but the technique has yet to be widely used in plants. Nonetheless, early studies indicate that single-cell RNA-seq protocols developed for animal cells produce informative datasets in plants. We argue that single-cell transcriptomics has the potential to provide a new perspective on plant problems, such as the nature of the stem cells or initials, the plasticity of plant cells, and the extent of localized cellular responses to environmental inputs. Single-cell experimental outputs require different analytical approaches compared with pooled cell profiles and new tools tailored to single-cell assays are being developed. Here, we highlight promising new single-cell profiling approaches, their limitations as applied to plants, and their potential to address fundamental questions in plant biology. PMID:27048384

  17. STELLA Facilitates Differentiation of Germ Cell and Endodermal Lineages of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wongtrakoongate, Patompon; Jones, Mark; Gokhale, Paul J.; Andrews, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    Stella is a developmentally regulated gene highly expressed in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and in primordial germ cells (PGCs). In human, the gene encoding the STELLA homologue lies on chromosome 12p, which is frequently amplified in long-term cultured human ES cells. However, the role played by STELLA in human ES cells has not been reported. In the present study, we show that during retinoic acid (RA)-induced differentiation of human ES cells, expression of STELLA follows that of VASA, a marker of germline differentiation. By contrast, human embryonal carcinoma cells express STELLA at a higher level compared with both karyotypically normal and abnormal human ES cell lines. We found that over-expression of STELLA does not interfere with maintenance of the stem cell state of human ES cells, but following retinoic acid induction it leads to up-regulation of germline- and endodermal-associated genes, whereas neural markers PAX6 and NEUROD1 are down-regulated. Further, STELLA over-expression facilitates the differentiation of human ES cells into BE12-positive cells, in which the expression of germline- and endodermal-associated genes is enriched, and suppresses differentiation of the neural lineage. Taken together, this finding suggests a role for STELLA in facilitating germline and endodermal differentiation of human ES cells. PMID:23457636

  18. Differential cytotoxic effects of arsenic on human and animal cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, T C; Ho, I C

    1994-09-01

    Human fibroblasts (HFW) were 10-fold more susceptible than Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells to sodium arsenite. Comparison of cellular antioxidant enzyme activities showed that CHO-K1 cells contained 3- and 8-fold more glutathione-peroxidase and catalase activities, respectively, than HFW cells. Since vitamin E, methylamine, and benzyl alcohol could prevent, in part, the arsenite-induced killing of HFW cells, we suggest that arsenite can induce oxidative damage in HFW cells. We have also established arsenic-resistant cells, SA7 and CL3R, from CHO cells and from a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line (CL3), respectively. The arsenic resistance of SA7 cells was attributed mainly to elevation of glutathione S-transferase pi levels, and that of CL3R cells was possibly due to an increase in heme oxygenase activity. Since induction of heme oxygenase is a general response to oxidative stress, we suspect that the differential toxicity of arsenic to human and animal cells could be due to arsenic's more efficient induction of oxidative damage in human cells.

  19. Differentiation of the Chinese minority medicinal plant genus Berchemia spp. by evaluating three candidate barcodes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li-Cheng; Zhao, Ming-Ming; Sun, Wei; Teng, Hong-Li; Huang, Bi-Sheng; Zhao, Xiang-Pei

    2016-01-01

    The genus Berchemia comprises important Chinese plants with considerable medicinal value; however, these plants are often misidentified in the herbal medicinal market. To differentiate the various morphotypes of Berchemia species, a proficient method employing the screening of universal DNA barcodes was used in this work. Three candidate barcoding loci, namely, psbA-trnH, rbcL, and the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2), were used to identify an effective DNA barcode that can differentiate the various Berchemia species. Additionally, PCR amplification, efficient sequencing, intra- and inter-specific divergences, and DNA barcoding gaps were employed to assess the ability of each barcode to identify these diverse Berchemia plants authentically; the species were differentiated using the Kimura two-parameter and maximum composite likelihood methods. Sequence data analysis showed that the ITS2 region was the most suitable candidate barcode and exhibited the highest interspecific divergence among the three DNA-barcoding sequences. A clear differentiation was observed at the species level, in which a maximum distance of 0.264 was exhibited between dissimilar species. Clustal analysis also demonstrated that ITS2 clearly differentiated the test species in a more effective manner than that with the two other barcodes at both the hybrid and variety levels. Results indicate that DNA barcoding is ideal for species-level identification of Berchemia and provides a foundation for further identification at the molecular level of other Rhamnaceae medicinal plants. PMID:27347459

  20. Shear stress induces osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yourek, Gregory; McCormick, Susan M; Mao, Jeremy J; Reilly, Gwendolen C

    2014-01-01

    Aim To determine whether fluid flow-induced shear stress affects the differentiation of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) into osteogenic cells. Materials & methods hMSCs cultured with or without osteogenic differentiation medium were exposed to fluid flow-induced shear stress and analyzed for alkaline phosphatase activity and expression of osteogenic genes. Results Immediately following shear stress, alkaline phosphatase activity in osteogenic medium was significantly increased. At days 4 and 8 of culture the mRNA expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and osteopontin was significantly higher in hMSCs subjected to shear stress than those cultured in static conditions. However, hMSCs cultured in osteogenic differentiation medium were less responsive in gene expression of alkaline phosphatase and bone morphogenetic protein-2. Conclusion These data demonstrate that shear stress stimulates hMSCs towards an osteoblastic phenotype in the absence of chemical induction, suggesting that certain mechanical stresses may serve as an alternative to chemical stimulation of stem cell differentiation. PMID:20868327

  1. Stem cells in light of a new concept for cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kristeva, Marlene Anastassova

    2008-10-01

    My concept of cell differentiation involves genetic information from DNA being transcribed into mRNA proteins-morphogenes (mRNAs+ homeodomain proteins)-and stored in the ovoplasm as maternal inheritance, or cytoplasmic genetic memory. Feedback mechanism(s) allow these morphogenes to selectively unlock new genes, regulating the development of the embryo. The blastomeres and the embryonic pluripotent cells of the inner cell mass of early (5 day) blastocysts are loaded with morphogenes which hamper the production of cell lines and are responsible for the formation of embryoid bodies in vitro and teratomas in vivo. There are therefore legitimate concerns as to proposals to use embryonic pluripotent cells for cell therapy and regenerative medicine. An alternative cell therapy would involve the production of tailored growth-related genes-morphogenes-and hence selective in vitro differentiation of adult de-differentiated cells.

  2. Differential Expression of miRNA Regulates T Cell Differentiation and Plasticity During Visceral Leishmaniasis Infection.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Rajan Kumar; Sundar, Shyam; Prajapati, Vijay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a tropical neglected disease caused by Leishmania donovani, results in significant mortality in the Indian subcontinent. The plasticity of T cell proliferation and differentiation depends on microRNA mediated gene regulation which leads Th1/Th2 or Th17/Treg type of immune response during human VL. This study depicts the identification of target immune signaling molecule and transcription factors, which play a role in T-cell proliferation and differentiation followed by the identification of miRNA controlling their gene expression using three web servers' viz., TargetScan, miRPath and miRDB. This study provides the bioinformatics evidences that seed region present in the miRNAs miR-29-b, miR-29a, have the putative binding site in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of TBX21 transcription factor of CD4(+) T helper (Th1), which may suppress the Th1 specific protective immune response. Development of Th2 type specific immune response can be suppressed by binding of miR-135 and miR-126 miRNAs over the 3'-UTR region of GATA-3 transcription factor of Th2 specific CD4(+) T helper cells. MiRNA identified against Th2/Treg immune cells are important and their over expression or administration can be used for developing the Th1/Th17 type of protective immune response during VL infection. This study indicates that miRNAs have the capacity to regulate immune signaling, cytokine production and immune cell migration to control the VL infection in human. This observation warrants further investigation for the development of miRNA based therapy controlling T cell differentiation in human VL. PMID:26941729

  3. Differential Expression of miRNA Regulates T Cell Differentiation and Plasticity During Visceral Leishmaniasis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Rajan Kumar; Sundar, Shyam; Prajapati, Vijay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a tropical neglected disease caused by Leishmania donovani, results in significant mortality in the Indian subcontinent. The plasticity of T cell proliferation and differentiation depends on microRNA mediated gene regulation which leads Th1/Th2 or Th17/Treg type of immune response during human VL. This study depicts the identification of target immune signaling molecule and transcription factors, which play a role in T-cell proliferation and differentiation followed by the identification of miRNA controlling their gene expression using three web servers’ viz., TargetScan, miRPath and miRDB. This study provides the bioinformatics evidences that seed region present in the miRNAs miR-29-b, miR-29a, have the putative binding site in the 3′-untranslated region (UTR) of TBX21 transcription factor of CD4+ T helper (Th1), which may suppress the Th1 specific protective immune response. Development of Th2 type specific immune response can be suppressed by binding of miR-135 and miR-126 miRNAs over the 3′-UTR region of GATA-3 transcription factor of Th2 specific CD4+ T helper cells. MiRNA identified against Th2/Treg immune cells are important and their over expression or administration can be used for developing the Th1/Th17 type of protective immune response during VL infection. This study indicates that miRNAs have the capacity to regulate immune signaling, cytokine production and immune cell migration to control the VL infection in human. This observation warrants further investigation for the development of miRNA based therapy controlling T cell differentiation in human VL. PMID:26941729

  4. Lectins stain cells differentially in the coral, Montipora capitata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, Thierry M.; Farah, Yael

    2014-01-01

    A limitation in our understanding of coral disease pathology and cellular pathogenesis is a lack of reagents to characterize coral cells. We evaluated the utility of plant lectins to stain tissues of a dominant coral, Montipora capitata, from Hawaii. Of 22 lectins evaluated, nine of these stained structures in the upper or basal body wall of corals. Specific structures revealed by lectins that were not considered distinct or evident on routine hematoxylin and eosin sections of coral tissues included apical and basal granules in gastrodermis and epidermis, cnidoglandular tract and actinopharynx cell surface membranes, capsules of mature holotrichous isorhizas, and perivitelline and periseminal cells. Plant lectins could prove useful to further our understanding of coral physiology, anatomy, cell biology, and disease pathogenesis.

  5. Lectins stain cells differentially in the coral, Montipora capitata.

    PubMed

    Work, Thierry M; Farah, Yael

    2014-03-01

    A limitation in our understanding of coral disease pathology and cellular pathogenesis is a lack of reagents to characterize coral cells. We evaluated the utility of plant lectins to stain tissues of a dominant coral, Montipora capitata, from Hawaii. Of 22 lectins evaluated, nine of these stained structures in the upper or basal body wall of corals. Specific structures revealed by lectins that were not considered distinct or evident on routine hematoxylin and eosin sections of coral tissues included apical and basal granules in gastrodermis and epidermis, cnidoglandular tract and actinopharynx cell surface membranes, capsules of mature holotrichous isorhizas, and perivitelline and periseminal cells. Plant lectins could prove useful to further our understanding of coral physiology, anatomy, cell biology, and disease pathogenesis. PMID:24518620

  6. 2003 Plant Cell Walls Gordon Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel J. Cosgrove

    2004-09-21

    This conference will address recent progress in many aspects of cell wall biology. Molecular, genetic, and genomic approaches are yielding major advances in our understanding of the composition, synthesis, and architecture of plant cell walls and their dynamics during growth, and are identifying the genes that encode the machinery needed to make their biogenesis possible. This meeting will bring together international scientists from academia, industry and government labs to share the latest breakthroughs and perspectives on polysaccharide biosynthesis, wood formation, wall modification, expansion and interaction with other organisms, and genomic & evolutionary analyses of wall-related genes, as well as to discuss recent ''nanotechnological'' advances that take wall analysis to the level of a single cell.

  7. Efficient differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells into insulin-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Szu-Hsiu; Lee, Lain-Tze

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are a potential source of a variety of differentiated cells for cell therapy, drug discovery, and toxicology screening. Here, we present an efficacy strategy for the differentiation of mouse ES cells into insulin-producing cells (IPCs) by a two-step differentiation protocol comprising of (i) the formation of definitive endoderm in monolayer culture by activin A, and (ii) this monolayer endoderm being induced to differentiate into IPCs by nicotinamide, insulin, and laminin. Differentiated cells can be obtained within approximately 7 days. The differentiation IPCs combined application of RT-PCR, ELISA, and immunofluorescence to characterize phenotypic and functional properties. In our study, we demonstrated that IPCs produced pancreatic transcription factors, endocrine progenitor marker, definitive endoderm, pancreatic β-cell markers, and Langerhans α and δ cells. The IPCs released insulin in a manner that was dose dependent upon the amount of glucose added. These techniques may be able to be applied to human ES cells, which would have very important ramifications for treating human disease.

  8. Hypericum caprifoliatum and Hypericum connatum affect human trophoblast-like cells differentiation and Ca2+ influx

    PubMed Central

    da Conceição, Aline O.; von Poser, Gilsane Lino; Barbeau, Benoit; Lafond, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of crude methanol and n-hexane extracts of Hypericum connatum (H. connatum) and Hypericum caprifoliatum on trophoblast-like cells. Methods BeWo and JEG-3 trophoblast-like cells were submitted to different extract concentrations (1, 5, 10 and 15 µg/mL) and evaluated in relation to cell viability and in vitro trophoblast differentiation and function. Cell viability was evaluated using WST-1 reagent. Differentiation was measured by luciferase production, hCG production/release, and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway activation. The function of the trophoblast-like cells was measured by 45Ca2+ influx evaluation. Results The results showed a decrease in cell viability/proliferation. Both plants and different extracts induced a significant decrease in hCG production/release and luciferase production. H. connatum did not cause mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway disturbance; however, Hypericum caprifoliatum n-hexane extract at 15 µg/mL inhibited extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation. The significant increase in Ca2+ influx by JEG-3 cells was seen after short and long incubation times with H. connatum methanolic extract at 15 µg/mL. Conclusions The results indicated that these two Hypericum species extracts can interfere on trophoblast differentiation and Ca2+ influx, according to their molecular diversity. Although in vivo experiments are necessary to establish their action on placental formation and function, this study suggests that attention must be paid to the potential toxic effect of these plants. PMID:25182721

  9. In vitro apoptotic cell death during erythroid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zamai, L; Burattini, S; Luchetti, F; Canonico, B; Ferri, P; Melloni, E; Gonelli, A; Guidotti, L; Papa, S; Falcieri, E

    2004-03-01

    Erythropoiesis occurs in bone marrow and it has been shown that during in vivo erythroid differentiation some immature erythroblasts undergo apoptosis. In this regard, it is known that immature erythroblasts are FasL- and TRAIL-sensitive and can be killed by cells expressing these ligand molecules. In the present study, we have investigated the cell death phenomenon that occurs during a common unilineage model of erythroid development. Purified CD34+ human haemopoietic progenitors were cultured in vitro in the presence of SCF, IL-3 and erythropoietin. Their differentiation stages and apoptosis were followed by multiple technical approaches. Flow cytometric evaluation of surface and intracellular molecules revealed that glycophorin A appeared at day 3-4 of incubation and about 75% of viable cells co-expressed high density glycophorin A (Gly(bright)) and adult haemoglobin at day 14 of culture, indicating that this system reasonably recapitulates in vivo normal erythropoiesis. Interestingly, when mature (Gly(bright)) erythroid cells reached their higher percentages (day 14) almost half of cultured cells were apoptotic. Morphological studies indicated that the majority of dead cells contained cytoplasmic granular material typical of basophilic stage, and DNA analysis by flow cytometry and TUNEL reaction revealed nuclear fragmentation. These observations indicate that in vitro unilineage erythroid differentiation, as in vivo, is associated with apoptotic cell death of cells with characteristics of basophilic erythroblasts. We suggest that the interactions between different death receptors on immature basophilic erythroblasts with their ligands on more mature erythroblasts may contribute to induce apoptosis in vitro. PMID:15004520

  10. TCDD alters medial epithelial cell differentiation during palatogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B.D.; Birnbaum, L.S. )

    1989-06-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a widely distributed, persistent environmental contaminant that is teratogenic in mice, where it induces hydronephrosis and cleft palate. The incidence of clefting has been shown to be dose dependent after exposure on either gestation Day (GD) 10 or 12, although the embryo is more susceptible on GD 12. TCDD-exposed palatal shelves meet but do not fuse, and programmed cell death of the medial epithelial cells is inhibited. The mechanism of action through which TCDD alters the program of medial cell development has not been examined in earlier studies, and it is not known whether the mechanism is the same regardless of the dose or developmental stage of exposure. In this study, C57BL/6N mice, a strain sensitive to TCDD, were dosed orally on GD 10 or 12 with 0, 6, 12, 24, or 30 micrograms/kg body wt, in 10 ml corn oil/kg. Embryonic palatal shelves were examined on GD 14, 15, or 16. The degree of palatal closure, epithelial surface morphology, and cellular ultrastructure, the incorporation of (3H)TdR, the expression of EGF receptors, and the binding of 125I-EGF were assessed. After exposure on GD 10 or 12, TCDD altered the differentiation pathway of the medial epithelial cells. The palatal shelves were of normal size and overall morphology, but fusion of the medial epithelia of the opposing shelves did not occur. TCDD prevented programmed cell death of the medial peridermal cells. The expression of EGF receptors by medial cells continued through Day 16 and the receptors were able to bind ligand. The medial cells differentiated into a stratified, squamous, keratinizing epithelium. The shift in phenotype to an oral-like epithelium occurred after exposure on either GD 10 or 12. At the lower dose (6 micrograms/kg), fewer cleft palates were produced, but those shelves which did respond had a fully expressed shift in differentiation.

  11. Myoepithelial Cell Differentiation Markers in Ductal Carcinoma in Situ Progression

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Tanya D.; Jindal, Sonali; Agunbiade, Samiat; Gao, Dexiang; Troxell, Megan; Borges, Virginia F.; Schedin, Pepper

    2016-01-01

    We describe a preclinical model that investigates progression of early-stage ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and report that compromised myoepithelial cell differentiation occurs before transition to invasive disease. Human breast cancer MCF10DCIS.com cells were delivered into the mouse mammary teat by intraductal injection in the absence of surgical manipulations and accompanying wound-healing confounders. DCIS-like lesions developed throughout the mammary ducts with full representation of human DCIS histologic patterns. Tumor cells were incorporated into the normal mammary epithelium, developed ductal intraepithelial neoplasia and DCIS, and progressed to invasive carcinoma, suggesting the model provides a rigorous approach to study early stages of breast cancer progression. Mammary glands were evaluated for myoepithelium integrity with immunohistochemical assays. Progressive loss of the myoepithelial cell differentiation markers p63, calponin, and α-smooth muscle actin was observed in the mouse myoepithelium surrounding DCIS-involved ducts. p63 loss was an early indicator, calponin loss intermediate, and α-smooth muscle actin a later indicator of compromised myoepithelium. Loss of myoepithelial calponin was specifically associated with gain of the basal marker p63 in adjacent tumor cells. In single time point biopsies obtained from 16 women diagnosed with pure DCIS, a similar loss in myoepithelial cell markers was observed. These results suggest that further research is warranted into the role of myoepithelial cell p63 and calponin expression on DCIS progression to invasive disease. PMID:26343330

  12. Interleukin 4: signalling mechanisms and control of T cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Paul, W E

    1997-01-01

    Interleukin 4 (IL-4) is a pleiotropic type I cytokine that controls both growth and differentiation among haemopoietic and non-haemopoietic cells. Its receptor is a heterodimer. One chain, the IL-4R alpha chain, binds IL-4 with high affinity and determines the nature of the biochemical signals that are induced. The second chain, gamma c, is required for the induction of such signals. IL-4-mediated growth depends upon activation events that involve phosphorylation of Y497 of IL-4R alpha, leading to the binding and phosphorylation of 4PS/IRS-2 in haemopoietic cells and of IRS-1 in non-haemopoietic cells. By contrast, IL-4-mediated differentiation events depend upon more distal regions of the IL-4R alpha chain that include a series of STAT-6 binding sites. The distinctive roles of these receptor domains was verified by receptor-reconstruction experiments. The 'growth' and 'differentiation' domains of the IL-4R alpha chain, independently expressed as chimeric structures with a truncated version of the IL-2R beta chain, were shown to convey their functions to the hybrid receptor. The critical role of STAT-6 in IL-4-mediated gene activation and differentiation was made clear by the finding that lymphocytes from STAT-6 knockout mice are strikingly deficient in these functions but have retained the capacity to grow, at least partially, in response to IL-4. IL-4 plays a central role in determining the phenotype of naive CD4+ T cells. In the presence of IL-4, newly primed naive T cells develop into IL-4 producers while in its absence they preferentially become gamma-interferon (IFN-gamma) producers. Recently, a specialized subpopulation of T cells, CD4+/NK1.1+ cells, has been shown to produce large amounts of IL-4 upon stimulation. Two examples of mice with deficiencies in these cells are described--beta 2-microglobulin knockout mice and SJL mice. Both show defects in the development of IL-4-producing cells and in the increase in serum IgE in response to stimulation with the

  13. Trophoblast stem cells differentiate in vitro into invasive trophoblast giant cells.

    PubMed

    Hemberger, Myriam; Hughes, Martha; Cross, James C

    2004-07-15

    Trophoblast cells are characterized by an invasive behavior into the surrounding uterine tissue. In rodents, an early peri-/endovascular type of invasion exerted by trophoblast giant cells can be distinguished from a late interstitial type carried out by glycogen trophoblast cells. Analysis of the molecular mechanisms of trophoblast invasion has been hampered, however, by the complex temporal and spatial patterns of invasion. We utilized trophoblast stem (TS) cell lines to study trophoblast invasion in vitro and to establish a model that facilitates investigation of this process on the molecular level. Our results showed that trophoblast giant cells that differentiate from TS cells in vitro are capable of penetrating a reconstituted basement membrane matrix. Consequently, invasion rates were increased in various giant cell differentiation-promoting conditions. We also derived TS cell lines that are homozygous for a mutation of the Hand1 transcription factor. The Hand1-/- TS cells showed reduced levels of giant cell differentiation and exhibited an approximately 50% decrease in invasion rates. In summary, trophoblast giant cells that differentiate from TS cells in vitro recapitulate the invasive capacity of normal trophoblast cells in vivo. The TS cell system is a valuable tool to identify and quantitatively study regulators of trophoblast invasion.

  14. Differential Hm antigen expression on EC cells and early differentiated derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Simmler, M C; Avner, P R

    1985-01-01

    Differences in the expression of minor histocompatibility (Hm) alloantigens on two mouse embryonal carcinoma (EC) cell lines and the PYS-2 and T.D.M.-1 differentiated derivatives have been demonstrated by their ability to elicit a cytolytic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response. Experiments involving the use of various responder-target strain combinations on the one hand and Recombinant Inbred (RI) mice strains on the other have shown that: (i) there are major differences in Hm expression on the EC cells compared with the differentiated derivatives whose Hm expression appears more akin to that of adult splenocytes; (ii) although both EC cell lines show reduced Hm immunogenicity compared with adult splenocytes, major differences in the expression and possibly presentation between the F9 and PCC3 EC cell lines can be detected both by in vivo priming and by in vitro cold competition target experiments. These results are discussed in connection with the unexpected finding that some EC cell lines are capable of specific competition effects for appropriate CTL effectors despite their inability to stimulate such effectors in vitro and the absence of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) products. PMID:2988940

  15. [Feedback control mechanisms of plant cell expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Cosgrove, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    We have generated considerable evidence for the significance of wall stress relaxation in the control of plant growth and found that several agents (gibberellin, light, genetic loci for dwarf stature) influence growth rate via alteration of wall relaxation. We have refined our methods for measuring wall relaxation and, moreover, have found that wall relaxation properties bear only a distance relationship to wall mechanical properties. We have garnered novel insights into the nature of cell expansion mechanisms by analyzing spontaneous fluctuations of plant growth rate in seedlings. These experiments involved the application of mathematical techniques for analyzing growth rate fluctuations and the development of new instrumentation for measuring and forcing plant growth in a controlled fashion. These studies conclude that growth rate fluctuations generated by the plant as consequence of a feedback control system. This conclusion has important implications for the nature of wall loosening processes and demands a different framework for thinking about growth control. It also implies the existence of a growth rate sensor.

  16. c-Kit and stem cell factor regulate PANC-1 cell differentiation into insulin- and glucagon-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuexiu; Li, Jinming; Saleem, Saira; Yee, Siu-Pok; Hardikar, Anandwardhan A; Wang, Rennian

    2010-09-01

    Recent evidence has shown that stem cell factor (SCF) and its receptor, c-Kit, have an important role in pancreatic islet development by promoting islet cell differentiation and proliferation. In this study, we examined the role of c-Kit and SCF in the differentiation and proliferation of insulin- and glucagon-producing cells using a human pancreatic duct cell line (PANC-1). Our study showed that increased expression of endocrine cell markers (such as insulin and glucagon) and transcription factors (such as PDX-1 and PAX-6) coincided with a decrease in CK19(+) and c-Kit(+) cells (P<0.001) during PANC-1 cell differentiation, determined by immunofluorescence and qRT-PCR. Cells cultured with exogenous SCF showed an increase in insulin(+) (26%) and glucagon(+) (35%) cell differentiation (P<0.01), an increase in cell proliferation (P<0.05) and a decrease in cell apoptosis (P<0.01). siRNA knockdown of c-Kit resulted in a decrease in endocrine cell differentiation with a reduction in PDX-1 and insulin mRNA, as well as the number of cells immunostaining for PDX-1 and insulin. Taken together, these results show that c-Kit/SCF interactions are involved in mediating islet-like cluster formation and islet-like cell differentiation in a human pancreatic duct cell line.

  17. TGF-beta signaling potentiates differentiation of embryonic stem cells to Pdx-1 expressing endodermal cells.

    PubMed

    Shiraki, Nobuaki; Lai, Cheng-Jung; Hishikari, Yosuke; Kume, Shoen

    2005-06-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells have the capacity to differentiate to every cell type that constitutes fetal or adult tissues. To trace and quantitatively assess the differentiation of ES cells into gut endodermal cells, we used an ES cell line with the lacZ gene inserted into the pdx-1 locus. Targeted mutations of pdx-1 in mice demonstrate that pdx-1 is required for pancreatic and rostral duodenal development; therefore, pdx-1 serves as an excellent early gut regional specific marker. When these ES cells were differentiated by removal of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), only fractional cells turned into lacZ positive, which indicates pancreatic-duodenal differentiation. Co-cultivation of ES cells with pancreatic rudiments induced a significant increase in the proportion of lacZ positive cell numbers and this increase was further enhanced by forced expression of a chick putative endoderm inducer gene, cmix. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta2 mimicked the effects of pancreatic rudiments and this effect was enhanced by cmix expression. Expression analysis showed over-expression of cmix induced endodermal marker genes. These data indicate that one can make use of this knowledge on molecular events of embryonic development to drive ES cells to differentiate into pdx-1 expressing endodermal cells in vitro.

  18. Analysis of oocyte-like cells differentiated from porcine fetal skin-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Dyce, Paul W; Shen, Wei; Huynh, Evanna; Shao, Hua; Villagómez, Daniel A F; Kidder, Gerald M; King, W Allan; Li, Julang

    2011-05-01

    We previously reported the differentiation of cells derived from porcine female fetal skin into cells resembling germ cells and oocytes. A subpopulation of these cells expressed germ cell markers and formed aggregates resembling cumulus-oocyte complexes. Some of these aggregates extruded large oocyte-like cells (OLCs) that expressed markers consistent with those of oocytes. The objective of the current study was to further characterize OLCs differentiated from porcine skin-derived stem cells. Reverse transcriptase (RT)-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot revealed the expression of connexin37 and connexin43, both of which are characteristic of ovarian follicles. The expression of meiosis markers DMC1 and synaptonemal complex protein, but not STRA8 and REC8, was detected in the OLC cultures. Immunofluorescence with an antibody against synaptonemal complex protein on chromosome spreads revealed a very small subpopulation of stained OLCs that had a similar pattern to leptotene, zytotene, or pachytene nuclei during prophase I of meiosis. Sodium bisulfite sequencing of the differentially methylated region of H19 indicated that this region is almost completely demethylated in OLCs, similar to in vivo-derived oocytes. We also investigated the differentiation potential of male skin-derived stem cells in the same differentiation medium. Large cells with oocyte morphology were generated in the male stem cell differentiation cultures. These OLCs expressed oocyte genes such as octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4), growth differentiation factor-9b (GDF9B), deleted in azoospermia-like (DAZL), VASA, zona pellucida B (ZPB), and zona pellucida C (ZPC). It was concluded that skin-derived stem cells from both male and female porcine fetuses are capable of entering an oocyte differentiation pathway, but the culture system currently in place is inadequate to support the complete development of competent oocytes.

  19. Differential requirement for Nfil3 during NK cell development.

    PubMed

    Seillet, Cyril; Huntington, Nicholas D; Gangatirkar, Pradnya; Axelsson, Elin; Minnich, Martina; Brady, Hugh J M; Busslinger, Meinrad; Smyth, Mark J; Belz, Gabrielle T; Carotta, Sebastian

    2014-03-15

    NK cells can be grouped into distinct subsets that are localized to different organs and exhibit a different capacity to secrete cytokines and mediate cytotoxicity. Despite these hallmarks that reflect tissue-specific specialization in NK cells, little is known about the factors that control the development of these distinct subsets. The basic leucine zipper transcription factor Nfil3 (E4bp4) is essential for bone marrow-derived NK cell development, but it is not clear whether Nfil3 is equally important for all NK cell subsets or how it induces NK lineage commitment. In this article, we show that Nfil3 is required for the formation of Eomes-expressing NK cells, including conventional medullary and thymic NK cells, whereas TRAIL(+) Eomes(-) NK cells develop independently of Nfil3. Loss of Nfil3 during the development of bone marrow-derived NK cells resulted in reduced expression of Eomes and, conversely, restoration of Eomes expression in Nfil3(-/-) progenitors rescued NK cell development and maturation. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that Nfil3 drives the formation of mature NK cells by inducing Eomes expression and reveal the differential requirements of NK cell subsets for Nfil3. PMID:24532575

  20. Autocrine VEGF Isoforms Differentially Regulate Endothelial Cell Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Hideki; Rundqvist, Helene; Branco, Cristina; Johnson, Randall S.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF) is involved in all the essential biology of endothelial cells, from proliferation to vessel function, by mediating intercellular interactions and monolayer integrity. It is expressed as three major alternative spliced variants. In mice, these are VEGF120, VEGF164, and VEGF188, each with different affinities for extracellular matrices and cell surfaces, depending on the inclusion of heparin-binding sites, encoded by exons 6 and 7. To determine the role of each VEGF isoform in endothelial homeostasis, we compared phenotypes of primary endothelial cells isolated from lungs of mice expressing single VEGF isoforms in normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The differential expression and distribution of VEGF isoforms affect endothelial cell functions, such as proliferation, adhesion, migration, and integrity, which are dependent on the stability of and affinity to VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2). We found a correlation between autocrine VEGF164 and VEGFR2 stability, which is also associated with increased expression of proteins involved in cell adhesion. Endothelial cells expressing only VEGF188, which localizes to extracellular matrices or cell surfaces, presented a mesenchymal morphology and weakened monolayer integrity. Cells expressing only VEGF120 lacked stable VEGFR2 and dysfunctional downstream processes, rendering the cells unviable. Endothelial cells expressing these different isoforms in isolation also had differing rates of apoptosis, proliferation, and signaling via nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. These data indicate that autocrine signaling of each VEGF isoform has unique functions on endothelial homeostasis and response to hypoxia, due to both distinct VEGF distribution and VEGFR2 stability, which appears to be, at least partly, affected by differential NO production. This study demonstrates that each autocrine VEGF isoform has a distinct effect on downstream functions, namely VEGFR2-regulated endothelial cell homeostasis in

  1. Differentiation of Human Umbilical Cord Matrix-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Germ-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Latifpour, Mostafa; Shakiba, Yadollah; Amidi, Fardin; Mazaheri, Zohreh; Sobhani, Aligholi

    2014-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells that can be collected from different sources. Under specific conditions, MSCs can be differentiated to tissue specific cells in vitro. Human Umbilical Cord mesenchymal Stem Cells (hUCMSCs) can easily be harvested and cultured in in vitro conditions. Production of germ cells from mesenchymal stem cells is a very interesting and promising area in the field of reproductive medicine. In the present study, the possible trans-differentiation of hUCMSCs into Primordial like Germ Cell (PGC) was performed in vitro under specific condition. Methods Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells were cultured and expanded in DMEM medium containing 10% FBS. The cultured cells were studied for differentiation ability to adipocytes and osteocytes. Furthermore, MSCs related markers were identified by flow cytometry method. For PGC differentiation, hUCMS cells were cultured in differentiation medium containing Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 (BMP4) and it was followed by retinoic acid (RA). Real time PCR and immunocytochemistry analysis were performed to evaluate the expression of PGC specific genes and proteins, respectively. Results Our results showed that hUCMSCs cultured in the presence of BMP4 and RA are able to transdifferentiate in to PGC like cells in vitro. Real time PCR and immunocytochemistry results showed that differentiated cells expressed PGC specific markers after 14 days of culture. Conclusion Based on these results, it was concluded that hUCMSC may be considered as a promising alternative cell source in reproductive medicine. More studies including laboratory and also animal models are needed to evaluate the functionality of differentiated PGCs before introducing them to clinical applications. PMID:25414784

  2. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Stefania; Grange, Cristina; Tapparo, Marta; Pasquino, Chiara; Romagnoli, Renato; Dametto, Ennia; Amoroso, Antonio; Tetta, Ciro; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Human liver stem cells (HLSCs) are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs), and dendritic cells (DCs) in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell contact and dependent on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. When compared with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), HLSCs were more efficient in inhibiting T-cell proliferation. At variance with MSCs, HLSCs did not elicit NK degranulation. Moreover, HLSCs inhibited NK degranulation against K562, a NK-sensitive target, by a mechanism dependent on HLA-G release. When tested on DC generation from monocytes, HLSCs were found to impair DC differentiation and DCs ability to induce T-cell proliferation through PGE2. This study shows that HLSCs have immunomodulatory properties similar to MSCs, but, at variance with MSCs, they do not elicit a NK response. PMID:27127520

  3. Capillary Isoelectric Focusing Immunoassay for Fat Cell Differentiation Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Johlfs, Mary G.; Gorjala, Priyatham; Urasaki, Yasuyo; Le, Thuc T.; Fiscus, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    Profiling cellular proteome is critical to understanding signal integration during cell fate determination. In this study, the capability of capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF) immunoassays to detect post-translational modifications (PTM) of protein isoforms is demonstrated. cIEF immunoassays exhibit protein detection sensitivity at up to 5 orders of magnitude higher than traditional methods. This detection ultra-sensitivity permits proteomic profiling of several nanograms of tissue samples. cIEF immunoassays are employed to simultaneously profile three protein kinases during fat cell differentiation: cGMP-dependent protein kinase type I (PKG-I) of the nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, protein kinase B (Akt) of the insulin signaling pathway, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Interestingly, a switch in the expression level of PKG- isoforms is observed during fat cell differentiation. While both PKG-Iα and PKG-Iβ isoforms are present in preadipocytes, only PKG-Iβ isoform is expressed in adipocytes. On the other hand, the phosphorylation level increases for Akt while decreases for ERK1 and ERK2 following the maturation of preadipocytes into adipocytes. Taken together, cIEF immunoassay provides a highly sensitive means to study fat cell differentiation proteomics. cIEF immunoassay should be a powerful proteomics tool to study complex protein signal integration in biological systems. PMID:26132171

  4. Robustness of differentiation cascades with symmetric stem cell division.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Taltavull, Daniel; Alarcón, Tomás

    2014-06-01

    Stem cells (SCs) perform the task of maintaining tissue homeostasis by both self-renewal and differentiation. While it has been argued that SCs divide asymmetrically, there is also evidence that SCs undergo symmetric division. Symmetric SC division has been speculated to be key for expanding cell numbers in development and regeneration after injury. However, it might lead to uncontrolled growth and malignancies such as cancer. In order to explore the role of symmetric SC division, we propose a mathematical model of the effect of symmetric SC division on the robustness of a population regulated by a serial differentiation cascade and we show that this may lead to extinction of such population. We examine how the extinction likelihood depends on defining characteristics of the population such as the number of intermediate cell compartments. We show that longer differentiation cascades are more prone to extinction than systems with less intermediate compartments. Furthermore, we have analysed the possibility of mixed symmetric and asymmetric cell division against invasions by mutant invaders in order to find optimal architecture. Our results show that more robust populations are those with unfrequent symmetric behaviour.

  5. Osteogenic differentiation strategies for adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kroeze, Robert Jan; Knippenberg, Marlene; Helder, Marco N

    2011-01-01

    Adipose stem cell preparations, either obtained as a freshly isolated so-called stromal vascular fraction (SVF) or as cells cultured to homogeneity and then referred to as adipose stem cells (ASCs), have found widespread use in a broad variety of studies on tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications, including bone repair.For newcomers within the field, but also for established research laboratories having up to 10 years of expertise in this research area, it may be convenient to strive for, and use consensus protocols (1) for studying the osteogenic differentiation potential of ASC preparations in vitro, and (2) for osteogenic induction regimes for in vivo implementation. To assist in achieving this goal, this chapter describes various step-by-step osteogenic differentiation protocols for adipose-derived stem cell populations (SVF as well as ASCs) currently applied within our laboratory, with particular emphasis on protocols aimed at intra-operative use. The protocols describe the use of inducing compounds, including the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D3, and polyamines, as well as methods and parameters for evaluating the level of differentiation achieved.We would appreciate receiving feedback on the protocols described; this will facilitate the development of consensus protocols, which in turn will allow better comparison of data sets generated by different research groups. This continuing standardization, which might be reported on at international meetings like those of IFATS ( http://www.IFATS.org ), might be of benefit for the whole ASC research community.

  6. A survey of cellulose microfibril patterns in dividing, expanding, and differentiating cells of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Miki; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O

    2014-05-01

    Cellulose microfibrils are critical for plant cell specialization and function. Recent advances in live cell imaging of fluorescently tagged cellulose synthases to track cellulose synthesis have greatly advanced our understanding of cellulose biosynthesis. Nevertheless, cellulose deposition patterns remain poorly described in many cell types, including those in the process of division or differentiation. In this study, we used field emission scanning electron microscopy analysis of cryo-planed tissues to determine the arrangement of cellulose microfibrils in various faces of cells undergoing cytokinesis or specialized development, including cell types in which cellulose cannot be imaged by conventional approaches. In dividing cells, we detected microfibrillar meshworks in the cell plates, consistent with the concentration at the cell plate of cellulose synthase complexes, as detected by fluorescently tagged CesA6. We also observed a loss of parallel cellulose microfibril orientation in walls of the mother cell during cytokinesis, which corresponded with the loss of fluorescently tagged cellulose synthase complexes from these surfaces. In recently formed guard cells, microfibrils were randomly organized and only formed a highly ordered circumferential pattern after pore formation. In pit fields, cellulose microfibrils were arranged in circular patterns around plasmodesmata. Microfibrils were random in most cotyledon cells except the epidermis and were parallel to the growth axis in trichomes. Deposition of cellulose microfibrils was spatially delineated in metaxylem and protoxylem cells of the inflorescence stem, supporting recent studies on microtubule exclusion mechanisms.

  7. Glow in the dark: fluorescent proteins as cell and tissue-specific markers in plants.

    PubMed

    Ckurshumova, Wenzislava; Caragea, Adriana E; Goldstein, Rochelle S; Berleth, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Since the hallmark discovery of Aequorea victoria's Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and its adaptation for efficient use in plants, fluorescent protein tags marking expression profiles or genuine proteins of interest have been used to recognize plant tissues and cell types, to monitor dynamic cell fate selection processes, and to obtain cell type-specific transcriptomes. Fluorescent tagging enabled visualization in living tissues and the precise recordings of dynamic expression pattern changes. The resulting accurate recording of cell fate acquisition kinetics in space and time has strongly stimulated mathematical modeling of self-organizing feedback mechanisms. In developmental studies, the use of fluorescent proteins has become critical, where morphological markers of tissues, cell types, or differentiation stages are either not known or not easily recognizable. In this review, we focus on the use of fluorescent markers to identify and illuminate otherwise invisible cell states in plant development.

  8. Glow in the dark: fluorescent proteins as cell and tissue-specific markers in plants.

    PubMed

    Ckurshumova, Wenzislava; Caragea, Adriana E; Goldstein, Rochelle S; Berleth, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Since the hallmark discovery of Aequorea victoria's Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and its adaptation for efficient use in plants, fluorescent protein tags marking expression profiles or genuine proteins of interest have been used to recognize plant tissues and cell types, to monitor dynamic cell fate selection processes, and to obtain cell type-specific transcriptomes. Fluorescent tagging enabled visualization in living tissues and the precise recordings of dynamic expression pattern changes. The resulting accurate recording of cell fate acquisition kinetics in space and time has strongly stimulated mathematical modeling of self-organizing feedback mechanisms. In developmental studies, the use of fluorescent proteins has become critical, where morphological markers of tissues, cell types, or differentiation stages are either not known or not easily recognizable. In this review, we focus on the use of fluorescent markers to identify and illuminate otherwise invisible cell states in plant development. PMID:21772029

  9. The proliferation and differentiation of stem cell journals.

    PubMed

    Sanberg, Paul R; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2010-12-01

    As scientists position themselves in translating the therapeutic potential of stem cells from laboratory to clinical applications, publishing companies have taken this rapidly evolving field as a unique opportunity to launch new journals for dissemination of stem cell research. Over the last decade, the significant increase in the number of stem cell-based journals has created a conundrum. At stake is the pressure for these new journals to build their reputation by maintaining publication standards, while at the same time attracting a cadre of stem cell researchers to consider their journals as the publication of choice. We discuss here a prophetic path of survival for these journals which likely will closely mimic the core scientific and translational value of stem cells, namely their capacity to proliferate and differentiate into something meaningful! PMID:20694581

  10. Molecular regulation of plant cell wall extensibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Gravity responses in plants often involve spatial and temporal changes in cell growth, which is regulated primarily by controlling the ability of the cell wall to extend. The wall is thought to be a cellulose-hemicellulose network embedded in a hydrated matrix of complex polysaccharides and a small amount of structural protein. The wall extends by a form of polymer creep, which is mediated by expansins, a novel group of wall-loosening proteins. Expansins were discovered during a molecular dissection of the "acid growth" behavior of cell walls. Expansin alters the rheology of plant walls in profound ways, yet its molecular mechanism of action is still uncertain. It lacks detectable hydrolytic activity against the major components of the wall, but it is able to disrupt noncovalent adhesion between wall polysaccharides. The discovery of a second family of expansins (beta-expansins) sheds light on the biological role of a major group of pollen allergens and implies that expansins have evolved for diverse developmental functions. Finally, the contribution of other processes to wall extensibility is briefly summarized.

  11. Molecular regulation of plant cell wall extensibility.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, D J

    1998-05-01

    Gravity responses in plants often involve spatial and temporal changes in cell growth, which is regulated primarily by controlling the ability of the cell wall to extend. The wall is thought to be a cellulose-hemicellulose network embedded in a hydrated matrix of complex polysaccharides and a small amount of structural protein. The wall extends by a form of polymer creep, which is mediated by expansins, a novel group of wall-loosening proteins. Expansins were discovered during a molecular dissection of the "acid growth" behavior of cell walls. Expansin alters the rheology of plant walls in profound ways, yet its molecular mechanism of action is still uncertain. It lacks detectable hydrolytic activity against the major components of the wall, but it is able to disrupt noncovalent adhesion between wall polysaccharides. The discovery of a second family of expansins (beta-expansins) sheds light on the biological role of a major group of pollen allergens and implies that expansins have evolved for diverse developmental functions. Finally, the contribution of other processes to wall extensibility is briefly summarized. PMID:11540640

  12. Mitochondria in mesenchymal stem cell biology and cell therapy: From cellular differentiation to mitochondrial transfer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yi-Chao; Wu, Yu-Ting; Yu, Ting-Hsien; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2016-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are characterized to have the capacity of self-renewal and the potential to differentiate into mesoderm, ectoderm-like and endoderm-like cells. MSCs hold great promise for cell therapies due to their multipotency in vitro and therapeutic advantage of hypo-immunogenicity and lower tumorigenicity. Moreover, it has been shown that MSCs can serve as a vehicle to transfer mitochondria into cells after cell transplantation. Mitochondria produce most of the energy through oxidative phosphorylation in differentiated cells. It has been increasingly clear that the switch of energy supply from glycolysis to aerobic metabolism is essential for successful differentiation of MSCs. Post-translational modifications of proteins have been established to regulate mitochondrial function and metabolic shift during MSCs differentiation. In this article, we review and provide an integrated view on the roles of different protein kinases and sirtuins in the maintenance and differentiation of MSCs. Importantly, we provide evidence to suggest that alteration in the expression of Sirt3 and Sirt5 and relative changes in the acylation levels of mitochondrial proteins might be involved in the activation of mitochondrial function and adipogenic differentiation of adipose-derived MSCs. We summarize their roles in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and metabolism, oxidative responses and differentiation of MSCs. On the other hand, we discuss recent advances in the study of mitochondrial dynamics and mitochondrial transfer as well as their roles in the differentiation and therapeutic application of MSCs to improve cell function in vitro and in animal models. Accumulating evidence has substantiated that the therapeutic potential of MSCs is conferred not only by cell replacement and paracrine effects but also by transferring mitochondria into injured tissues or cells to modulate the cellular metabolism in situ. Therefore, elucidation of the underlying mechanisms

  13. Differential endocytosis of CD4 in lymphocytic and nonlymphocytic cells

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The endocytosis of the T cell differentiation antigen CD4 has been investigated in CD4-transfected HeLa cells, the promyelocytic HL-60 cell line, and in a number of leukemia- or lymphoma-derived T cell lines. CD4 internalization was followed using radioiodinated antibodies in an acid-elution endocytosis assay, or by covalently modifying cell surface proteins with biotin and analyzing CD4 distributions by immunoprecipitation; both approaches gave equivalent results. The assays demonstrated that in transfected HeLa cells and in HL-60 cells CD4 was constitutively internalized and recycled in the absence of ligand. Immunogold labeling and electron microscopy demonstrated that CD4 enters cells through coated pits. In contrast to the nonlymphocytic cells, T cell lines showed very little endocytosis of CD4. Measurements of fluid phase endocytosis and morphometric analysis of the endosome compartment indicated that the endocytic capacities of HeLa and lymphoid cells are equivalent and suggested that the low level of CD4 uptake in lymphocytic cells is due to exclusion of CD4 from coated pits. This conclusion was supported by experiments using truncated CD4 molecules, lacking the bulk of the cytoplasmic domain, which were internalized equally efficiently in both transfected lymphocytes and HeLa cells. Together, these results indicate that the cytoplasmic domain of CD4 mediates the different interactions with the endocytic apparatus in lymphoid and nonlymphoid cells. We suggest that the CD4- associated lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase p56lck may be involved in preventing CD4 endocytosis in T cells. PMID:1900077

  14. Stalk cell differentiation without polyketides in the cellular slime mold.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yukie G; Suarez, Teresa; Saito, Tamao

    2016-07-01

    Polyketides induce prestalk cell differentiation in Dictyostelium. In the double-knockout mutant of the SteelyA and B polyketide synthases, most of the pstA cells-the major part of the prestalk cells-are lost, and we show by whole mount in situ hybridization that expression of prestalk genes is also reduced. Treatment of the double-knockout mutant with the PKS inhibitor cerulenin gave a further reduction, but some pstA cells still remained in the tip region, suggesting the existence of a polyketide-independent subtype of pstA cells. The double-knockout mutant and cerulenin-treated parental Ax2 cells form fruiting bodies with fragile, single-cell layered stalks after cerulenin treatment. Our results indicate that most pstA cells are induced by polyketides, but the pstA cells at the very tip of the slug are induced in some other way. In addition, a fruiting body with a single-cell layered, vacuolated stalk can form without polyketides.

  15. Isolation and differentiation of medaka embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yunhan; Schartl, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    Medaka is a small laboratory fish that daily produces eggs easily controllable by light cycles. This fish represents a unique lower vertebrate compared to mammals, in which embryonic stem (ES) cell lines can be derived from midblastula embryos (MBEs). Like mouse ES cells, medaka ES cells most resemble the totipotent embryonic cells at the blastula stage. Medaka ES cells retain a diploid karyotype, pluripotency in vitro, and chimera competence in vivo. They give rise to high efficiencies of transient and stable gene transfer and maintain their pluripotency after long-term drug selection for transgene integration. They can also be directed to differentiate into particular cell types. Medaka is the most distantly related vertebrate to mammals, and its ES cell lines provide an ideal reference to mammalian ES cells for the molecular analysis of stemness. More important, medaka ES cell lines on their own offer an excellent tool for studying stem cell biology in vitro and in vivo because production and observation of ES-derived chimeras as well as phenotypic analyses are very easy because of its external, transparent, and temperature-adjustable embryology.

  16. Stalk cell differentiation without polyketides in the cellular slime mold.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yukie G; Suarez, Teresa; Saito, Tamao

    2016-07-01

    Polyketides induce prestalk cell differentiation in Dictyostelium. In the double-knockout mutant of the SteelyA and B polyketide synthases, most of the pstA cells-the major part of the prestalk cells-are lost, and we show by whole mount in situ hybridization that expression of prestalk genes is also reduced. Treatment of the double-knockout mutant with the PKS inhibitor cerulenin gave a further reduction, but some pstA cells still remained in the tip region, suggesting the existence of a polyketide-independent subtype of pstA cells. The double-knockout mutant and cerulenin-treated parental Ax2 cells form fruiting bodies with fragile, single-cell layered stalks after cerulenin treatment. Our results indicate that most pstA cells are induced by polyketides, but the pstA cells at the very tip of the slug are induced in some other way. In addition, a fruiting body with a single-cell layered, vacuolated stalk can form without polyketides. PMID:27305283

  17. Differentiation of embryonic and adult stem cells into insulin producing cells.

    PubMed

    Zulewski, H

    2008-03-01

    Replacement of insulin producing cells represents an almost ideal treatment for patients with diabetes mellitus type 1. Transplantation of pancreatic islets of Langerhans is successful in experienced centers. The wider application of this therapy, however, is limited by the lack of donor organs. Insulin producing cells generated from stem cells represent an attractive alternative. Stem cells with the potential to differentiate into insulin producing cells include embryonic stem cells (ESC) as well as adult stem cells from various tissues including the pancreas, liver, bone marrow and adipose tissue. The use of human ESC is hampered by ethical concerns but research with human ESC may help us to decipher important steps in the differentiation process in vitro since almost all information available on pancreas development are based on animal studies. The present review summarizes the current knowledge on the development of insulin producing cells from embryonic and adult stem cells with special emphasis on pancreatic, hepatic and human mesenchymal stem cells. PMID:18427390

  18. Differentiated melanocyte cell division occurs in vivo and is promoted by mutations in Mitf.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kerrie L; Lister, James A; Zeng, Zhiqiang; Ishizaki, Hironori; Anderson, Caroline; Kelsh, Robert N; Jackson, Ian J; Patton, E Elizabeth

    2011-08-01

    Coordination of cell proliferation and differentiation is crucial for tissue formation, repair and regeneration. Some tissues, such as skin and blood, depend on differentiation of a pluripotent stem cell population, whereas others depend on the division of differentiated cells. In development and in the hair follicle, pigmented melanocytes are derived from undifferentiated precursor cells or stem cells. However, differentiated melanocytes may also have proliferative capacity in animals, and the potential for differentiated melanocyte cell division in development and regeneration remains largely unexplored. Here, we use time-lapse imaging of the developing zebrafish to show that while most melanocytes arise from undifferentiated precursor cells, an unexpected subpopulation of differentiated melanocytes arises by cell division. Depletion of the overall melanocyte population triggers a regeneration phase in which differentiated melanocyte division is significantly enhanced, particularly in young differentiated melanocytes. Additionally, we find reduced levels of Mitf activity using an mitfa temperature-sensitive line results in a dramatic increase in differentiated melanocyte cell division. This supports models that in addition to promoting differentiation, Mitf also promotes withdrawal from the cell cycle. We suggest differentiated cell division is relevant to melanoma progression because the human melanoma mutation MITF(4T)(Δ)(2B) promotes increased and serial differentiated melanocyte division in zebrafish. These results reveal a novel pathway of differentiated melanocyte division in vivo, and that Mitf activity is essential for maintaining cell cycle arrest in differentiated melanocytes.

  19. Laser-induced fluorescence of green plants. I - A technique for the remote detection of plant stress and species differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Wood, F. M., Jr.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III; Newcomb, W. W.

    1984-01-01

    The laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of green plants was evaluated as a means of remotely detecting plant stress and determining plant type. Corn and soybeans were used as representatives of monocots and dicots, respectively, in these studies. The fluorescence spectra of several plant pigments was excited with a nitrogen laser emitting at 337 nm. Intact leaves from corn and soybeans also fluoresced using the nitrogen laser. The two plant species exhibited fluorescence spectra which had three maxima in common at 440, 690, and 740 nm. However, the relative intensities of these maxima were distinctly different for the two species. Soybeans had an additional slight maxima at 525 nm. Potassium deficiency in corn caused an increase in fluorescence at 690 and 740 nm. Simulated water stress in soybeans resulted in increased fluorescence at 440, 525, 690, and 740 nm. The inhibition of photosynthesis in soybeans by 3-(3-4-dichlorophenyl)-1-1-dimethyl urea (DCMU) gave incresed fluorescence primarily at 690 and 740 nm. Chlorosis as occurring in senescent soybean leaves caused a decrease in fluorescence at 690 and 740 nm. These studies indicate that LIF measurements of plants offer the potential for remotely detecting certain types of stress condition and also for differentiating plant species.

  20. Controlling Osteogenic Stem Cell Differentiation via Soft Bioinspired Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Amit K.; Jackson, Wesley M.; Healy, Kevin E.

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) is guided by various physical and biochemical factors. Among these factors, modulus (i.e., rigidiy) of the ECM has gained significant attention as a physical osteoinductive signal that can contribute to endochondral ossification of a cartilaginous skeletal template. However, MSCs also participate in intramembranous bone formation, which occurs de novo from within or on a more compliant tissue environment. To further understand the role of the matrix interactions in this process, we evaluated osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs cultured on low moduli (102, 390 or 970 Pa) poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (p(NIPAAm)) based semi-interpenetrating networks (sIPN) modified with the integrin engaging peptide bsp-RGD(15) (0, 105 or 210 µM). Cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs, as measured by alkaline phosphatase (ALP), runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), bone sialoprotein-2 (iBSP), and osteocalcien (OCN) protein expression, was highest on substrates with the highest modulus and peptide concentrations. However, within this range of substrate stiffness, many osteogenic cellular functions were enhanced by increasing either the modulus or the peptide density. These findings suggest that within a compliant and low modulus substrate, a high affinity adhesive ligand serves as a substitute for a rigid matrix to foster osteogenic differentiation. PMID:24937602

  1. Measuring the elasticity of plant cells with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Braybrook, Siobhan A

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of biological materials impact their functions. This is most evident in plants where the cell wall contains each cell's contents and connects each cell to its neighbors irreversibly. Examining the physical properties of the plant cell wall is key to understanding how plant cells, tissues, and organs grow and gain the shapes important for their respective functions. Here, we present an atomic force microscopy-based nanoindentation method for examining the elasticity of plant cells at the subcellular, cellular, and tissue level. We describe the important areas of experimental design to be considered when planning and executing these types of experiments and provide example data as illustration.

  2. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition–Mediated Differentiation of RGC-5 Cells and Interaction with Survival

    PubMed Central

    Schwechter, Brandon R.; Millet, Lucia E.; Levin, Leonard A.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE The acetylation state of histones is modulated by histone deacetylase (HDAC) and histone acetyltransferase and is an important component in regulating gene transcription, including neuronal differentiation. The authors studied the relationship between histone acetylation and the differentiation and survival of the RGC-5 cell line and compared it with nontranscriptional-dependent differentiation with staurosporine. METHODS The retinal ganglion cell line RGC-5 was treated with trichostatin A (TSA), other HDAC inhibitors, and staurosporine; differentiation, neuritogenesis, neurotrophic factor dependence, and dependence on RNA transcription were assessed. RESULTS TSA caused significant differentiation and neuritogenesis. Differences between HDAC inhibition and staurosporine differentiation included the proportion of differentiated cells, cell viability, cell morphology, and transcriptional dependence. HDAC inhibition, but not staurosporine differentiation, resulted in RGC-5 cells that were neurotrophic factor dependent. CONCLUSIONS These results implicate two different mechanisms for RGC-5 differentiation, with a common downstream effect on neurite outgrowth but a differential effect on neurotrophic factor dependence. PMID:17525221

  3. The Populus Class III HD ZIP transcription factor POPCORONA affects cell differentiation during secondary growth of woody stems.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Miura, Eriko; Robischon, Marcel; Martinez, Ciera; Groover, Andrew

    2011-02-28

    The developmental mechanisms regulating cell differentiation and patterning during the secondary growth of woody tissues are poorly understood. Class III HD ZIP transcription factors are evolutionarily ancient and play fundamental roles in various aspects of plant development. Here we investigate the role of a Class III HD ZIP transcription factor, POPCORONA, during secondary growth of woody stems. Transgenic Populus (poplar) trees expressing either a miRNA-resistant POPCORONA or a synthetic miRNA targeting POPCORONA were used to infer function of POPCORONA during secondary growth. Whole plant, histological, and gene expression changes were compared for transgenic and wild-type control plants. Synthetic miRNA knock down of POPCORONA results in abnormal lignification in cells of the pith, while overexpression of a miRNA-resistant POPCORONA results in delayed lignification of xylem and phloem fibers during secondary growth. POPCORONA misexpression also results in coordinated changes in expression of genes within a previously described transcriptional network regulating cell differentiation and cell wall biosynthesis, and hormone-related genes associated with fiber differentiation. POPCORONA illustrates another function of Class III HD ZIPs: regulating cell differentiation during secondary growth.

  4. Co-culture with mature islet cells augments the differentiation of insulin-producing cells from pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Bea Jun; Oh, Seung-Hoon; Choi, Jin Myung; Jin, Sang-Man; Shim, Woo-Young; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, Moon-Kyu; Kim, Kwang-Won; Kim, Jae Hyeon

    2015-02-01

    Islet transplantation has been hampered by the shortage of islet donors available for diabetes therapy. However, pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) can be an alternative source of insulin-producing cells (IPCs) because of their capacity for self-renewal and differentiation. We described a method to efficiently differentiate PSCs into IPCs by co-culturing mature islets with directed-differentiated pancreatic endoderm (PE) cells from mouse and human PSCs. PE cells co-cultured with islet cells or islet cell-derived conditioned medium (CM) showed increased expression levels of β-cell markers; significantly higher levels of proinsulin- and Newport Green (NG)-positive cells, which revealed the characteristics of insulin producing cells; and increased insulin secretion upon glucose stimulation. Co-culturing human PE cells with islet cells was also effective to differentiate PE cells into IPCs. Diabetic nude mice transplanted with co-cultured cells exhibited restored euglycemia, human C-peptide release, and improved glucose tolerance. Immunohistochemistry revealed that insulin+/C-peptide + cells existed in the grafted tissues. These results suggest that mature islet cells can increase the differentiation efficiency of PE cells into mature IPCs via paracrine effects.

  5. Higher Levels of Organization in the Interphase Nucleus of Cycling and Differentiated Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, Andrew R.

    2000-01-01

    The review examines the structured organization of interphase nuclei using a range of examples from the plants, animals, and fungi. Nuclear organization is shown to be an important phenomenon in cell differentiation and development. The review commences by examining nuclei in dividing cells and shows that the organization patterns can be dynamic within the time frame of the cell cycle. When cells stop dividing, derived differentiated cells often show quite different nuclear organizations. The developmental fate of nuclei is divided into three categories. (i) The first includes nuclei that undergo one of several forms of polyploidy and can themselves change in structure during the course of development. Possible function roles of polyploidy is given. (ii) The second is nuclear reorganization without polyploidy, where nuclei reorganize their structure to form novel arrangements of proteins and chromosomes. (iii) The third is nuclear disintegration linked to programmed cell death. The role of the nucleus in this process is described. The review demonstrates that recent methods to probe nuclei for nucleic acids and proteins, as well as to examine their intranuclear distribution in vivo, has revealed much about nuclear structure. It is clear that nuclear organization can influence or be influenced by cell activity and development. However, the full functional role of many of the observed phenomena has still to be fully realized. PMID:10704477

  6. Operational optimization of large-scale parallel-unit SWRO desalination plant using differential evolution algorithm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Wang, Xiaolong; Jiang, Aipeng; Jiangzhou, Shu; Li, Ping

    2014-01-01

    A large-scale parallel-unit seawater reverse osmosis desalination plant contains many reverse osmosis (RO) units. If the operating conditions change, these RO units will not work at the optimal design points which are computed before the plant is built. The operational optimization problem (OOP) of the plant is to find out a scheduling of operation to minimize the total running cost when the change happens. In this paper, the OOP is modelled as a mixed-integer nonlinear programming problem. A two-stage differential evolution algorithm is proposed to solve this OOP. Experimental results show that the proposed method is satisfactory in solution quality. PMID:24701180

  7. Operational Optimization of Large-Scale Parallel-Unit SWRO Desalination Plant Using Differential Evolution Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolong; Jiang, Aipeng; Jiangzhou, Shu; Li, Ping

    2014-01-01

    A large-scale parallel-unit seawater reverse osmosis desalination plant contains many reverse osmosis (RO) units. If the operating conditions change, these RO units will not work at the optimal design points which are computed before the plant is built. The operational optimization problem (OOP) of the plant is to find out a scheduling of operation to minimize the total running cost when the change happens. In this paper, the OOP is modelled as a mixed-integer nonlinear programming problem. A two-stage differential evolution algorithm is proposed to solve this OOP. Experimental results show that the proposed method is satisfactory in solution quality. PMID:24701180

  8. Operational optimization of large-scale parallel-unit SWRO desalination plant using differential evolution algorithm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Wang, Xiaolong; Jiang, Aipeng; Jiangzhou, Shu; Li, Ping

    2014-01-01

    A large-scale parallel-unit seawater reverse osmosis desalination plant contains many reverse osmosis (RO) units. If the operating conditions change, these RO units will not work at the optimal design points which are computed before the plant is built. The operational optimization problem (OOP) of the plant is to find out a scheduling of operation to minimize the total running cost when the change happens. In this paper, the OOP is modelled as a mixed-integer nonlinear programming problem. A two-stage differential evolution algorithm is proposed to solve this OOP. Experimental results show that the proposed method is satisfactory in solution quality.

  9. Differential effects of human and plant N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I (GnTI) in plants.

    PubMed

    Henquet, Maurice; Heinhuis, Bas; Borst, Jan Willem; Eigenhuijsen, Jochem; Schreuder, Mariëlle; Bosch, Dirk; van der Krol, Alexander

    2010-08-01

    In plants and animals, the first step in complex type N-glycan formation on glycoproteins is catalyzed by N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I (GnTI). We show that the cgl1-1 mutant of Arabidopsis, which lacks GnTI activity, is fully complemented by YFP-labeled plant AtGnTI, but only partially complemented by YFP-labeled human HuGnTI and that this is due to post-transcriptional events. In contrast to AtGnTI-YFP, only low levels of HuGnTI-YFP protein was detected in transgenic plants. In protoplast co-transfection experiments all GnTI-YFP fusion proteins co-localized with a Golgi marker protein, but only limited co-localization of AtGnTI and HuGnTI in the same plant protoplast. The partial alternative targeting of HuGnTI in plant protoplasts was alleviated by exchanging the membrane-anchor domain with that of AtGnTI, but in stably transformed cgl1-1 plants this chimeric GnTI still did not lead to full complementation of the cgl1-1 phenotype. Combined, the results indicate that activity of HuGnTI in plants is limited by a combination of reduced protein stability, alternative protein targeting and possibly to some extend to lower enzymatic performance of the catalytic domain in the plant biochemical environment.

  10. Clonal, Self-Renewing and Differentiating Human and Porcine Urothelial Cells, a Novel Stem Cell Population

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Hans M.; Gorostidi, Francois; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.; Barrandon, Yann; Frey, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Although urothelial progenitor-like cells have been described in the human urinary tract, the existence of stem cells remains to be proven. Using a culture system that favors clonogenic epithelial cell growth, we evaluated and characterized clonal human urothelial cells. We isolated human urothelial cells that were clonogenic, capable of self-renewal and could develop into fully differentiated urothelium once re-implanted into the subcapsular space of nude mice. In addition to final urothelial cell differentiation, spontaneous formation of bladder-like microstructures was observed. By examining an epithelial stem cell signature marker, we found p63 to correlate with the self-renewal capacity of the isolated human urothelial clonal populations. Since a clinically relevant, long-term model for functional reconstitution of human cells does not exist, we sought to establish a culture method for porcine urothelial cells in a clinically relevant porcine model. We isolated cells from porcine ureter, urethra and bladder that were clonogenic and capable of self-renewal and differentiation into fully mature urothelium. In conclusion, we could isolate human and porcine cell populations, behaving as urothelial stem cells and showing clonogenicity, self-renewal and, once re-implanted, morphological differentiation. PMID:24587183

  11. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) is an assay which evaluates xenobiotic-induced effects using three endpoints: mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation, mESC viability, and 3T3-cell viability. Our research goal was to develop an improved high-throughput assay by establi...

  12. DIFFERENTIATION IN N15 UPTAKE AND THE ORGANIZATION OF AN ARCTIC TUNDRA PLANT COMMUNITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used N15 soil-labeling techniques to examine how the dominant species in a N-limited, tussock tundra plant community partitioned soil N, and how such partitioning may contribute to community organization. The five most abundant species were well differentiated with respect to...

  13. Transition of differential histone H3 methylation in photoreceptors and other retinal cells during retinal differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Kazuko; Iwagawa, Toshiro; Kuribayashi, Hiroshi; Baba, Yukihiro; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Murakami, Akira; Nagasaki, Masao; Suzuki, Yutaka; Watanabe, Sumiko

    2016-01-01

    To analyze cell lineage-specific transitions in global transcriptional and epigenetic changes during retinogenesis, we purified retinal cells from normal mice during postnatal development into two fractions, namely, photoreceptors and other retinal cells, based on Cd73 expression, and performed RNA sequencing and ChIP sequencing of H3K27me3 and H3K4me3. Genes expressed in the photoreceptor lineage were marked with H3K4me3 in the Cd73-positive cell fraction; however, the level of H3K27me3 was very low in both Cd73-positive and -negative populations. H3K27me3 may be involved in spatio-temporal onset of a subset of bipolar-related genes. Subsets of genes expressed in amacrine and retinal ganglion cells, which are early-born retinal cell types, were suggested to be maintained in a silent state by H3K27me3 during late-stage retinogenesis. In the outer nuclear layer, upregulation of Rho and rod-related genes were observed in Ezh2-ablated retina, suggesting a role for H3K27me3 in the maintenance of proper expression levels. Taken together, our data on the transition of lineage-specific molecular signatures during development suggest that histone methylation is involved in retinal differentiation and maintenance through cell lineage-specific mechanisms. PMID:27377164

  14. High glucose suppresses embryonic stem cell differentiation into neural lineage cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Penghua; Shen, Wei-bin; Reece, E Albert; Chen, Xi; Yang, Peixin

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal neurogenesis occurs during embryonic development in human diabetic pregnancies and in animal models of diabetic embryopathy. Our previous studies in a mouse model of diabetic embryopathy have implicated that high glucose of maternal diabetes delays neurogenesis in the developing neuroepithelium leading to neural tube defects. However, the underlying process in high glucose-impaired neurogenesis is uncharacterized. Neurogenesis from embryonic stem (ES) cells provides a valuable model for understanding the abnormal neural lineage development under high glucose conditions. ES cells are commonly generated and maintained in high glucose (approximately 25 mM glucose). Here, the mouse ES cell line, E14, was gradually adapted to and maintained in low glucose (5 mM), and became a glucose responsive E14 (GR-E14) line. High glucose induced the endoplasmic reticulum stress marker, CHOP, in GR-E14 cells. Under low glucose conditions, the GR-E14 cells retained their pluripotency and capability to differentiate into neural lineage cells. GR-E14 cell differentiation into neural stem cells (Sox1 and nestin positive cells) was inhibited by high glucose. Neuron (Tuj1 positive cells) and glia (GFAP positive cells) differentiation from GR-E14 cells was also suppressed by high glucose. In addition, high glucose delayed GR-E14 differentiation into neural crest cells by decreasing neural crest markers, paired box 3 (Pax3) and paired box 7 (Pax7). Thus, high glucose impairs ES cell differentiation into neural lineage cells. The low glucose adapted and high glucose responsive GR-E14 cell line is a useful in vitro model for assessing the adverse effect of high glucose on the development of the central nervous system. PMID:26940741

  15. High glucose suppresses embryonic stem cell differentiation into neural lineage cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Penghua; Shen, Wei-bin; Reece, E Albert; Chen, Xi; Yang, Peixin

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal neurogenesis occurs during embryonic development in human diabetic pregnancies and in animal models of diabetic embryopathy. Our previous studies in a mouse model of diabetic embryopathy have implicated that high glucose of maternal diabetes delays neurogenesis in the developing neuroepithelium leading to neural tube defects. However, the underlying process in high glucose-impaired neurogenesis is uncharacterized. Neurogenesis from embryonic stem (ES) cells provides a valuable model for understanding the abnormal neural lineage development under high glucose conditions. ES cells are commonly generated and maintained in high glucose (approximately 25 mM glucose). Here, the mouse ES cell line, E14, was gradually adapted to and maintained in low glucose (5 mM), and became a glucose responsive E14 (GR-E14) line. High glucose induced the endoplasmic reticulum stress marker, CHOP, in GR-E14 cells. Under low glucose conditions, the GR-E14 cells retained their pluripotency and capability to differentiate into neural lineage cells. GR-E14 cell differentiation into neural stem cells (Sox1 and nestin positive cells) was inhibited by high glucose. Neuron (Tuj1 positive cells) and glia (GFAP positive cells) differentiation from GR-E14 cells was also suppressed by high glucose. In addition, high glucose delayed GR-E14 differentiation into neural crest cells by decreasing neural crest markers, paired box 3 (Pax3) and paired box 7 (Pax7). Thus, high glucose impairs ES cell differentiation into neural lineage cells. The low glucose adapted and high glucose responsive GR-E14 cell line is a useful in vitro model for assessing the adverse effect of high glucose on the development of the central nervous system.

  16. Cell-mediated remodeling of biomimetic encapsulating hydrogels triggered by adipogenic differentiation of adipose stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Clevenger, Tracy N; Luna, Gabriel; Boctor, Daniel; Fisher, Steven K; Clegg, Dennis O

    2016-01-01

    One of the most common regenerative therapies is autologous fat grafting, which frequently suffers from unexpected volume loss. One approach is to deliver adipose stem cells encapsulated in the engineered hydrogels supportive of cell survival, differentiation, and integration after transplant. We describe an encapsulating, biomimetic poly(ethylene)-glycol hydrogel, with embedded peptides for attachment and biodegradation. Poly(ethylene)-glycol hydrogels containing an Arg–Gly–Asp attachment sequence and a matrix metalloprotease 3/10 cleavage site supported adipose stem cell survival and showed remodeling initiated by adipogenic differentiation. Arg–Gly–Asp–matrix metalloprotease 3/10 cleavage site hydrogels showed an increased number and area of lacunae or holes after adipose stem cell differentiation. Image analysis of adipose stem cells in Arg–Gly–Asp–matrix metalloprotease 3/10 cleavage site hydrogels showed larger Voronoi domains, while cell density remained unchanged. The differentiated adipocytes residing within these newly remodeled spaces express proteins and messenger RNAs indicative of adipocytic differentiation. These engineered scaffolds may provide niches for stem cell differentiation and could prove useful in soft tissue regeneration. PMID:27733898

  17. Lineage-specific interface proteins match up the cell cycle and differentiation in embryo stem cells.

    PubMed

    Re, Angela; Workman, Christopher T; Waldron, Levi; Quattrone, Alessandro; Brunak, Søren

    2014-09-01

    The shortage of molecular information on cell cycle changes along embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation prompts an in silico approach, which may provide a novel way to identify candidate genes or mechanisms acting in coordinating the two programs. We analyzed germ layer specific gene expression changes during the cell cycle and ESC differentiation by combining four human cell cycle transcriptome profiles with thirteen in vitro human ESC differentiation studies. To detect cross-talk mechanisms we then integrated the transcriptome data that displayed differential regulation with protein interaction data. A new class of non-transcriptionally regulated genes was identified, encoding proteins which interact systematically with proteins corresponding to genes regulated during the cell cycle or cell differentiation, and which therefore can be seen as interface proteins coordinating the two programs. Functional analysis gathered insights in f