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Sample records for plant demolition project

  1. Ashtabula Environmental Management Project Main Extrusion Plant Demolition Project. Demolition of the Ashtabula Environmental Management Project's Main Extrusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Colborn, Kurt; Johnson, Kathryn K.

    2003-02-27

    Significant progress was made this year toward closure of the Department of Energy's Ashtabula Environmental Management Project (AEMP) with the demolition of the 9-building Main Extrusion Plant Complex. The 44,000 square foot building complex formerly housed uranium extrusion facilities and equipment. At the start of the project in October of 2001, the buildings still contained a RCRA Part B storage area, operating mixed waste treatment facilities, active waste shredding and compacting process areas, and a state EPA permitted HEPA ventilation system. This paper presents a discussion of the multidisciplinary effort to bring the building to a safe shutdown condition in just six months, including relocation of existing process areas, utility isolation, and preliminary decontamination. Also discussed is the demolition strategy in which portions of the facility remained active while demolition was proceeding in other areas. Other details of the technical approach to the demolition are also discussed, including innovative techniques for demolition, galbestos removal, contamination control, and waste minimization. These techniques contributed to the early completion of demolition in July of 2002, fully two months ahead of schedule and $1.5 million under budget.

  2. ACCELERATED PILOT PROJECT FOR U CANYON DEMOLITION

    SciTech Connect

    KEHLER KL

    2011-01-13

    At the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeast Washington State, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) is underway on a first-of-a-kind project with the decommissioning and demolition of the U Canyon. Following the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) Record of Decision for the final remediation of the canyon, CH2M HILL is combining old and new technology and techniques to prepare U Canyon for demolition. The selected remedial action called first for consolidating and grouting equipment currently in the canyon into lower levels of the plant (openings called cells), after which the cell galleries, hot pipe trench, ventilation tunnel, drains and other voids below the operating deck and crane-way deck levels will be filled with approximately 20,000 cubic yards of grout and the canyon roof and walls demolished down to the approximate level of the canyon deck. The remaining canyon structure will then be buried beneath an engineered barrier designed to control potential contaminant migration for a 500-year life. Methods and lessons learned from this project will set the stage for the future demolition of Hanford's four other canyon-type processing facilities.

  3. DETAIL VIEW OF BATCH BIN AFTER PLANT DEMOLITION, LOOKING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF BATCH BIN AFTER PLANT DEMOLITION, LOOKING EAST TOWARD ARNOLD - Chambers Window Glass Company, Batch Plant, North of Drey (Nineteenth) Street, West of Constitution Boulevard, Arnold, Westmoreland County, PA

  4. 128. DETAIL OF NORTH PLANT AMMUNITION DEMOLITION FACILITY, SHOWING SMOKESTACK. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    128. DETAIL OF NORTH PLANT AMMUNITION DEMOLITION FACILITY, SHOWING SMOKESTACK. VIEW TO EAST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  5. 120. NORTH PLANT GB BULK STORAGE BUILDING AND AMMUNITION DEMOLITION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    120. NORTH PLANT GB BULK STORAGE BUILDING AND AMMUNITION DEMOLITION FACILITY AT CENTER AND CASE FILLING PLANT/CLUSTER ASSEMBLY BUILDING (BUILDING 1601/1606) IN BACKGROUND, FROM GB MANUFACTURING PLANT. VIEW TO WEST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  6. 125. NORTH PLANT AMMUNITION DEMOLITION FACILITY IN FOREGROUND AND ASSEMBLY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    125. NORTH PLANT AMMUNITION DEMOLITION FACILITY IN FOREGROUND AND ASSEMBLY PLANT/WAREHOUSE (BUILDING 1601/1606/1701) IN BACKGROUND. FROM GB MANUFACTURING PLANT. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  7. 126. DETAIL OF NORTH PLANT AMMUNITION DEMOLITION FACILITY, WITH ASSEMBLY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    126. DETAIL OF NORTH PLANT AMMUNITION DEMOLITION FACILITY, WITH ASSEMBLY PLANT/WAREHOUSE (BUILDING 1601/1606/1701) IN BACKGROUND, FROM GB MANUFACTURING PLANT. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  8. 117. NORTH PLANT AMMUNITION DEMOLITION FACILITY (BUILDING 1703) AT RIGHT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    117. NORTH PLANT AMMUNITION DEMOLITION FACILITY (BUILDING 1703) AT RIGHT FOREGROUND AND GB MANUFACTURING PLANT (BUILDING 1501) AT CENTER. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  9. 127. DETAIL OF NORTH PLANT AMMUNITION DEMOLITION FACILITY, WITH GB ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    127. DETAIL OF NORTH PLANT AMMUNITION DEMOLITION FACILITY, WITH GB MANUFACTURING PLANT (BUILDING 1501) IN BACKGROUND. VIEW TO EAST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  10. 77 FR 65818 - Safety Zone; Bridge Demolition Project; Indiana Harbor Canal, East Chicago, IN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-31

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Bridge Demolition Project; Indiana Harbor... Demolition Project on the Cline Avenue Bridge. This temporary safety zone is necessary to protect the... the hazards associated with the demolition project on the Cline Avenue Bridge, which are discussed...

  11. 77 FR 70684 - Safety Zone; Bridge Demolition Project; Indiana Harbor Canal, East Chicago, IN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-27

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR PART 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Bridge Demolition Project; Indiana Harbor... demolition Project on the Cline Avenue Bridge. This temporary safety zone is necessary to protect the... demolition project on the Cline Avenue bridge, which are discussed further below. Under 5 U.S.C. 553(d)(3...

  12. 78 FR 2616 - Safety Zone; Bridge Demolition Project; Indiana Harbor Canal, East Chicago, IN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Bridge Demolition Project; Indiana Harbor... demolition Project on the Cline Avenue Bridge. This temporary safety zone is necessary to protect the... demolition project on the Cline Avenue Bridge, which are discussed further below. Under 5 U.S.C. 553(d)(3...

  13. 77 FR 63732 - Safety Zone; Bridge Demolition Project; Indiana Harbor Canal, East Chicago, IN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Bridge Demolition Project; Indiana Harbor... Demolition Project on the Cline Avenue Bridge. This temporary safety zone is necessary to protect the... demolition project on the Cline Avenue bridge, which are discussed further below. Under 5 U.S.C. 553(d)(3...

  14. 129. DETAIL OF NORTH PLANT AMMUNITION DEMOLITION FACILITY, SHOWING FREESTANDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    129. DETAIL OF NORTH PLANT AMMUNITION DEMOLITION FACILITY, SHOWING FREE-STANDING SMOKESTACK (BUILDING 1504). VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  15. 107. DETAIL OF NORTH PLANT, WITH AMMUNITION DEMOLITION FACILITY (BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    107. DETAIL OF NORTH PLANT, WITH AMMUNITION DEMOLITION FACILITY (BUILDING 1611) AT RIGHT FOREGROUND AND SCRUBBER SYSTEM AT CENTER. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  16. 78 FR 18234 - Demolition or Disposition of Public Housing Projects

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 24 CFR Part 970 Demolition or Disposition of Public Housing Projects CFR Correction 0 In Title 24 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 700 to 1699, revised as of April 1, 2012, on...

  17. Project Management Actions Demolition of a Research Facility Building 431

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, W L

    2005-09-06

    The Demolition of B431 is required to achieve the mission of LLNL and the NNSA FIRP objectives by: (1) Supporting the NNSA Infrastructure Plan goal to ''demolish excess facilities as early as possible''; (2) Banking square footage that allows continued application of advanced science and nuclear technology to the Nation's defense; and (3) Helping maintain and enhance the safety, security, and reliability of the weapons stockpile. A significant effort has been put into the demolition concept in order to ensure that it is well thought out and represents best-value to the government for the money.

  18. PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) 241-Z LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT FACILITY DEACTIVATION AND DEMOLITION

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSTON GA

    2008-01-15

    Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) is proud to submit the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) 241-Z liquid Waste Treatment Facility Deactivation and Demolition (D&D) Project for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2008. The decommissioning of the 241-Z Facility presented numerous challenges, many of which were unique with in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. The majority of the project budget and schedule was allocated for cleaning out five below-grade tank vaults. These highly contaminated, confined spaces also presented significant industrial safety hazards that presented some of the most hazardous work environments on the Hanford Site. The 241-Z D&D Project encompassed diverse tasks: cleaning out and stabilizing five below-grade tank vaults (also called cells), manually size-reducing and removing over three tons of process piping from the vaults, permanently isolating service utilities, removing a large contaminated chemical supply tank, stabilizing and removing plutonium-contaminated ventilation ducts, demolishing three structures to grade, and installing an environmental barrier on the demolition site . All of this work was performed safely, on schedule, and under budget. During the deactivation phase of the project between November 2005 and February 2007, workers entered the highly contaminated confined-space tank vaults 428 times. Each entry (or 'dive') involved an average of three workers, thus equaling approximately 1,300 individual confined -space entries. Over the course of the entire deactivation and demolition period, there were no recordable injuries and only one minor reportable skin contamination. The 241-Z D&D Project was decommissioned under the provisions of the 'Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order' (the Tri-Party Agreement or TPA), the 'Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976' (RCRA), and the 'Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980' (CERCLA). The

  19. HAZWOPER project documents for demolition of the Waste Evaporator Facility, Building 3506, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This document, in support of the Waste Evaporator Facility (WEF) demolition project and contains the Project Work Plan and the Project Health and Safety Plan for demolition and partial remediation actions by ATG at the Waste Evaporator Facility, Building 3506. Various activities will be conducted during the course of demolition, and this plan provides details on the work steps involved, the identification of hazards, and the health and safety practices necessary to mitigate these hazards. The objective of this document is to develop an approach for implementing demolition activities at the WEF. This approach is based on prior site characterization information and takes into account all of the known hazards at this facility. The Project Work Plan provides instructions and requirements for identified work steps that will be utilized during the performance of demolition, while the Health and Safety Plan addresses the radiological, hazardous material exposure, and industrial safety concerns that will be encountered.

  20. Demolition Range Noise Abatement Technique Demonstration and Evaluation for the McAlester Army Ammunition Plant

    SciTech Connect

    CALDERONE,JAMES J.; GARBIN,H. DOUGLAS

    2001-08-01

    Public concern regarding the effects of noise generated by the detonation of excess and obsolete explosive munitions at U.S. Army demolition ranges is a continuing issue for the Army's demilitarization and disposal groups. Recent concerns of citizens living near the McAlester Army Ammunition Plant (MCAAP) in Oklahoma have lead the U.S. Army Defense Ammunition Center (DAC) to conduct a demonstration and evaluation of noise abatement techniques that could be applied to the MCAAP demolition range. With the support of the DAC, MCAAP, and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), three types of noise abatement techniques were applied: aqueous foams, overburden (using combinations of sand beds and dirt coverings), and rubber or steel blast mats. Eight test configurations were studied and twenty-four experiments were conducted on the MCAAP demolition range in July of 2000. Instrumentation and data acquisition systems were fielded for the collection of near-field blast pressures, far-field acoustic pressures, plant boundary seismic signals, and demolition range meteorological conditions. The resulting data has been analyzed and reported, and a ranking of each technique's effects has been provided to the DAC.

  1. PROJECT EXPERIENCE REPORT DEMOLITION OF HANFORDS 233-S PLUTONIUM CONCENTRATION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    BERLIN, G.T.

    2004-06-25

    This report provides a summary of the preparation, operations, innovative work practices, and lessons learned associated with demolition of the 2334 Plutonium Concentration Facility. This project represented the first open-air demolition of a highly-contaminated plutonium facility at the Hanford Site. This project may also represent the first plutonium facility in the US. Department of Energy (DOE) complex to have been demolished without first decontaminating surfaces to near ''free release'' standards. Demolition of plutonium contaminated structures, if not properly managed, can subject cleanup personnel and the environment to significant risk. However, with proper sequencing and innovative use of commercially available equipment, materials, and services, this project demonstrated that a plutonium processing facility can be demolished while avoiding the need to perform extensive decontamination or to construct large enclosures. This project utilized an excavator with concrete shears, diamond circular saws, water misting and fogging equipment, commercially available fixatives and dust suppressants, conventional mobile crane and rigging services, and near real-time modeling of meteorological and radiological conditions. Following a significant amount of preparation, actual demolition of the 2333 Facility began in October 2003 and was completed in late April 2004. The knowledge and experience gained on this project are important to the Hanford Site as additional plutonium processing facilities are scheduled for demolition in the near future. Other sites throughout the DOE Complex may also be faced with similar challenges. Numerous innovations and effective work practices were implemented on this project. Accordingly, a series of ''Lessons Learned and Innovative Practices Fact Sheets'' were developed and are included as an appendix to this report. This collection of fact sheets is not intended to capture every innovative work practice and lesson learned, but rather to

  2. PROJECT EXPERIENCE REPORT DEMOLITION OF HANFORDS 233-S PLUTONIUM CONCENTRATION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    BERLIN, G.T.; ORGILL, T.K.

    2004-07-14

    This report provides a summary of the preparation, operations, innovative work practices, and lessons learned associated with demolition of the 2334 Plutonium Concentration Facility. This project represented the first open-air demolition of a highly-contaminated plutonium facility at the Hanford Site. This project may also represent the first plutonium facility in the US. Department of Energy (DOE) complex to have been demolished without first decontaminating surfaces to near ''free release'' standards. Demolition of plutonium contaminated structures, if not properly managed, can subject cleanup personnel and the environment to significant risk. However, with proper sequencing and innovative use of commercially available equipment, materials, and services, this project demonstrated that a plutonium processing facility can be demolished while avoiding the need to perform extensive decontamination or to construct large enclosures. This project utilized an excavator with concrete shears, diamond circular saws, water misting and fogging equipment, commercially available fixatives and dust suppressants, conventional mobile crane and rigging services, and near real-time modeling of meteorological and radiological conditions. Following a significant amount of preparation, actual demolition of the 233-S Facility began in October 2003 and was completed in late April 2004. The knowledge and experience gained on this project are important to the Hanford Site as additional plutonium processing facilities are scheduled for demolition in the near future. Other sites throughout the DOE Complex may also be faced with similar challenges. Numerous innovations and effective work practices were implemented on this project. Accordingly, a series of ''Lessons Learned and Innovative Practices Fact Sheets'' were developed and are included as an appendix to this report. This collection of fact sheets is not intended to capture every innovative work practice and lesson learned, but rather

  3. DEMOLITION OF HANFORDS 232-Z WASTE INCINERATION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    LLOYD, E.R.

    2006-11-21

    The 232-Z Plutonium Incinerator Facility was a small, highly alpha-contaminated, building situated between three active buildings located in an operating nuclear complex. Approximately 500 personnel worked within 250 meters (800 ft) of the structure and expectations were that the project would neither impact plant operations nor result in any restrictions when demolition was complete. Precision demolition and tight controls best describe the project. The team used standard open-air demolition techniques to take the facility to slab-on-grade. Several techniques were key to controlling contamination and confining it to the demolition area: spraying fixatives before demolition began; using misting systems, frequently applying fixatives, and using a methodical demolition sequence and debris load-out process. Detailed air modeling was done before demolition to determine necessary facility source-term levels, establish radiological boundaries, and confirm the adequacy of the proposed demolition approach. By only removing the major source term in equipment, HEPA filters, gloveboxes, and the like, and leaving fixed contamination on the walls, ceilings and floors, the project showed considerable savings and reduced worker hazards and exposure. The ability to perform this demolition safely and without the spread of contamination provides confidence that similar operations can be performed successfully. By removing the major source terms, fixing the remaining contamination in the building, and using controlled demolition and contamination control techniques, similar structures can be demolished cost effectively and safely.

  4. Geopolymerisation of silt generated from construction and demolition waste washing plants.

    PubMed

    Lampris, C; Lupo, R; Cheeseman, C R

    2009-01-01

    Recycling plants that size, sort and wash construction and demolition waste can produce high quality aggregate. However, they also produce up to 80ton per hour of filter cake waste containing fine (<63mum) silt particles that is classified as inert waste and normally landfilled. This research investigated the potential to form geopolymers containing silt, which would allow this problematic waste to be beneficially reused as aggregate. This would significantly improve the economic viability of recycling plants that wash wastes. Silt filter cakes have been collected from a number of aggregate washing plants operating in the UK. These were found to contain similar aluminosilicate crystalline phases. Geopolymer samples were produced using silt and silt mixed with either metakaolin or pulverised fuel ash (PFA). Silt geopolymers cured at room temperature had average 7-day compressive strengths of 18.7MPa, while partial substitution of silt by metakaolin or PFA increased average compressive strengths to 30.5 and 21.9MPa, respectively. Curing specimens for 24h at 105 degrees C resulted in a compressive strength of 39.7MPa and microstructural analysis confirmed the formation of dense materials. These strengths are in excess of those required for materials to be used as aggregate, particularly in unbound applications. The implications of this research for the management of waste silt at construction and demolition waste washing plants are discussed.

  5. The Decontamination, Decommissioning, and Demolition of the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho Cleanup Project

    SciTech Connect

    Coyne, D.W.

    2008-07-01

    In September 2007, CH2M-WG Idaho completed the decontamination, decommissioning and demolition (D and D) of the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) facility. The 50-year-old research reactor, located at the Idaho National Laboratory site, posed significant challenges involving regulations governing the demolition of a historical facility, the removal of a large amount of hazardous materials as well as issues associated with the removal and disposal of the 112-ton reactor vessel. Prior to commencing full scale D and D, hazardous constituents were removed including cadmium, PCB oils and electrical components, lead, asbestos and mercury among others. The reactor required isolation in order to be removed. Due to activated metal within the reactor vessel, dose rates in the core region were approximately 1100 R/hr. Subsequent dose rates outside the vessel varied from 60 mR to greater than 2 R. Due to the dose rates, the project team decided to fill the reactor vessel with grout to a level above the core region and below the discharge to the canal. To remove the reactor, access to the 17 mounting shoes was required. These shoes were encased in the high density concrete biological shield approximately 8 feet below grade. The project team used explosives to remove the biological shield. The demolition had to be controlled to prevent damaging the reactor vessel and to limit the seismic impact on a nearby operating reactor. Upon completion of the blast, the concrete was removed exposing the support shoes for the vessel. The reactor building was then demolished to accommodate the twin gantry system used to lift the reactor vessel. In September, the reactor vessel was lifted and placed onto a multi-axle trailer for transport to an onsite disposal facility. (authors)

  6. Microstructure of Concrete with Aggregates from Construction and Demolition Waste Recycling Plants.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Miguel; Santos Silva, António; de Brito, Jorge; Evangelista, Luís

    2016-02-01

    This paper intends to analyze the microstructure of concrete with recycled aggregates (RA) from construction and demolition waste from various Portuguese recycling plants. To that effect, several scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses were performed. Various concrete mixes were evaluated in order to analyze the influence of the RA's collection point and consequently of their composition on the mixes' characteristics. Afterward all the mixes were subjected to the capillary water absorption test in order to quantitatively evaluate their porosity. Results from the SEM/EDS analysis were compared with those from capillary water absorption test. The SEM/EDS analysis showed that the bond capacity of aggregates to the new cement paste is greatly influenced by the RA's nature. On the other hand, there was an increase in porosity with the incorporation of RA.

  7. Correspondence about the Applicability of Asbestos NESHAP to Residential Demolition Projects

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These correspondence about the asbestos NESHAP provide clarification on some demolition concerns such as the definition of a facility, the definition of site, and ownership applicability for renovations conducted on buildings after resale.

  8. Brownfields Recover Your Resources - Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle Construction and Demolition Materials at Land Revitalization Projects

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document provides background information on how the sustainable reuse of brownfield properties includes efforts to reduce the environmental impact by reusing and recycling materials generated during building construction, demolition, or renovation.

  9. Deriving a Planting Medium from Solid Waste Compost and Construction, Demolition and Excavation Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farajalla, Nadim; Assaf, Eleni; Bashour, Issam; Talhouk, Salma

    2014-05-01

    Lebanon's very high population density has been increasing since the end of the war in the early 1990s reaching 416.36 people per square kilometer. Furthermore, the influx of refugees from conflicts in the region has increased the resident population significantly. All these are exerting pressure on the country's natural resources, pushing the Lebanese to convert more forest and agricultural land into roads, buildings and houses. This has led to a building boom and rapid urbanization which in turn has created a demand for construction material - mainly rock, gravel, sand, etc. nearly all of which were locally acquired through quarrying to the tune of three million cubic meters annually. This boom has been followed by a war with Israel in 2006 which resulted in thousands of tonnes of debris. The increase in population has also led to an increase in solid waste generation with 1.57 million tonnes of solid waste generated in Lebanon per year. The combination of construction, demolition and excavation (CDE) waste along with the increase in solid waste generation has put a major stress on the country and on the management of its solid waste problem. Compounding this problem are the issues of quarries closure and rehabilitation and a decrease in forest and vegetative cover. The on-going research reported in this paper aims to provide an integrated solution to the stated problem by developing a "soil mix" derived from a mélange of the organic matter of the solid waste (compost), the CDE waste, and soil. In this mix, native and indicator plants are planted (in pots) from which the most productive mix will be selected for further testing at field level in later experiments. The plant species used are Matiolla, a native Lebanese plant and Zea mays, which is commonly known used as an indicator plant due to its sensitivity to environmental conditions. To ensure sustainability and environmental friendliness of the mix, its physical and chemical characteristics are monitored

  10. Characterizing PCB contamination in Painted Demolition Debris: The Painted History at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    as PCB Bulk Product Waste (i.e. no samples; waste disposed in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill). EPA requests paint and substrate samples be...OR PCB remediation waste?  EPA TSCA guidance states painted demolition debris is PCB bulk waste product and may be disposed of in a municipal solid waste  EPA

  11. Environmental assessment for the salvage/demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area steam plants

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This environmental assessment has been prepared to assess potential environmental impacts associated with the US Department of Energy`s proposed action: the salvage/demolition of the 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants and steam distribution piping. Impact information will be used by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office Manager, to determine if the proposed action is a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. If the proposed action is determined to be major and significant, an environmental impact statement will be prepared. If the proposed action is determined not to be major and significant, a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) will be issued and the action can proceed. The proposed action involves the salvage and demolition of the 200 West Area, 200 East Are, and 300 Area steam plants and their associated steam distribution piping, equipment, and ancillary facilities. Activities include the salvaging and recycling of all materials, wastes, and equipment where feasible, with waste minimization efforts utilized.

  12. Nuclear Rocket Facility Decommissioning Project: Controlled Explosive Demolition of Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Michael R. Kruzic

    2008-06-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Test Cell A (TCA) Facility (Figure 1) was used in the early to mid-1960s for testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program, to further space travel. Nuclear rocket testing resulted in the activation of materials around the reactors and the release of fission products and fuel particles. The TCA facility, known as Corrective Action Unit 115, was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) from December 2004 to July 2005 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The SAFER process allows environmental remediation and facility closure activities (i.e., decommissioning) to occur simultaneously, provided technical decisions are made by an experienced decision maker within the site conceptual site model. Facility closure involved a seven-step decommissioning strategy. First, preliminary investigation activities were performed, including review of process knowledge documentation, targeted facility radiological and hazardous material surveys, concrete core drilling and analysis, shield wall radiological characterization, and discrete sampling, which proved to be very useful and cost-effective in subsequent decommissioning planning and execution and worker safety. Second, site setup and mobilization of equipment and personnel were completed. Third, early removal of hazardous materials, including asbestos, lead, cadmium, and oil, was performed ensuring worker safety during more invasive demolition activities. Process piping was to be verified void of contents. Electrical systems were de-energized and other systems were rendered free of residual energy. Fourth, areas of high radiological contamination were decontaminated using multiple methods. Contamination levels varied across the facility. Fixed beta/gamma contamination levels ranged up to 2 million disintegrations per minute (dpm)/100

  13. Plant Biology Science Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.

    This book contains science projects about seed plants that deal with plant physiology, plant ecology, and plant agriculture. Each of the projects includes a step-by-step experiment followed by suggestions for further investigations. Chapters include: (1) "Bean Seed Imbibition"; (2) "Germination Percentages of Different Types of Seeds"; (3)…

  14. Plant Biology Science Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.

    This book contains science projects about seed plants that deal with plant physiology, plant ecology, and plant agriculture. Each of the projects includes a step-by-step experiment followed by suggestions for further investigations. Chapters include: (1) "Bean Seed Imbibition"; (2) "Germination Percentages of Different Types of Seeds"; (3)…

  15. K-25 Structural Separation and Demolition

    SciTech Connect

    Cater, Frank

    2008-01-15

    The K-25 building is a former gaseous diffusion plant, built in 1944-1945 as part of the United States Manhattan Project. The structure was the largest structure under one roof, surpassed only by the Pentagon. Together the three wings represent about 17.8 hectare (44 acres) under roof and are generally about 18.3 meters (60 ft.) high on the outside face and approximately 12.2 meters (40 ft.) high on the inside face. The entire structure was built in the shape of a 'U', with a lateral distance of approximately one mile. It was constructed in individual building units with each unit connected using expansion joint-type connection. A single unit is approximately 24.4 meters (80 ft.) across and 122 meters (400 ft.) deep. The northern structure is connected to the eastern and western structures at the upper level floors. The four-level, U-shaped building is a steel-frame structure with corrugated cement-asbestos siding. The cell level is an elevated concrete structure supported by reinforced concrete columns located in the basement, or vault area. The vault area can be accessed at grade level from the outside perimeter. Inside the courtyard, the grade level has been raised to provide entry to the second or cell floor level. An engineering evaluation of the structure was performed to determine the condition of the structure and possibility of unplanned collapse of any portion of the structure. The evaluation included physical inspections, calculations for wind, pre-demolition loads, and evaluation of failure modes. The results of the evaluation have provided guidance for the demolition plan and the development of criteria for protection of personnel performing pre-demolition activities. Challenges include degradation of the structure that necessitated repair, dealing with changes in the code revisions from both the American Concrete Institute (ACI) and the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC), access to areas of the structure that were not necessarily designed

  16. Oak Tree Planting Project

    Treesearch

    Sherryl L. Nives; William D. Tietje; William H. Weitkamp

    1991-01-01

    An Oak Tree Planting Project was conducted during 1989/90 in San Luis Obispo County by the Integrated Hardwood Range Management Program (IHRMP)/Central Coast. The local media and an IHRMP workshop were used to publicize the Planting Project and give information on the status of oaks (Quercus spp.) in California and oak planting techniques. Outreach...

  17. Environmental analysis of a construction and demolition waste recycling plant in Portugal--Part II: Environmental sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Coelho, André; de Brito, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Part I of this study deals with the primary energy consumption and CO(2)eq emissions of a 350 tonnes/h construction and demolition waste (CDW) recycling facility, taking into account incorporated, operation and transportation impacts. It concludes that the generated impacts are mostly concentrated in operation and transportation, and that the impacts prevented through material recycling can be up to one order of magnitude greater than those generated. However, the conditions considered for the plant's operation and related transportation system may, and very likely will, vary in the near future, which will affect its environmental performance. This performance is particularly affected by the plant's installed capacity, transportation fuel and input CDW mass. In spite of the variations in overall primary energy and CO(2)eq balances, the prevented impacts are always higher than the generated impacts, at least by a factor of three and maybe even as high as 16 times in particular conditions. The analysis indicates environmental performance for variations in single parameters, except for the plant's capacity, which was considered to vary simultaneously with all the others. Extreme best and worst scenarios were also generated to fit the results into extreme limits. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Radiological Surveys Performed in Support of the Demolition and Bulk Disposal Decommissioning Method

    SciTech Connect

    Yetter, R.F.; Newson, C.T.

    2006-07-01

    Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company is decommissioning the Haddam Neck Plant using the 'Demolition and Bulk Disposal' method, or commonly referred to as 'Rip and Ship'. In general, completing the project using this method entails the removal of all irradiated fuel and highly contaminated systems and components, and the subsequent demolition of the above ground portions of most site structures. Since most structures are removed from site, cost and time savings are realized by virtually eliminating the need for remediation. However, this method of decommissioning creates more waste, both radiological and non-radiological, which must be segregated, packaged and disposed of properly. Prior to demolition, various types of radiological surveys must be performed and work controls put into place to minimize the spread of contamination to other areas of the site, and to prevent the inadvertent release of radioactive materials from the site. This paper will discuss the various types of radiological surveys performed, and controls implemented, in support of the demolition and bulk material disposal decommissioning method, with the emphasis on pre-demolition surveys. Details will be provided on the release criteria, survey design, survey implementation and data analysis on each of the various surveys, as well as a discussion on the controls implemented to prevent the various wastes from inadvertently being shipped to an inappropriate disposal facility. This paper will also strive to provide lessons learned for future projects that utilize the demolition and bulk disposal decommissioning method. (authors)

  19. Demolition of Cooling Towers from the World's First Commercial Reactors - the Nuclear Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Foss, D.L.

    2006-07-01

    The demolition of hyperbolic cooling towers would be a relatively routine demolition project because the method of demolition has been proven straightforward and repeatable with the successful demolition of over 200 similar structures in the last 30 years. This paper will detail the unique aspects of the planning and execution of the cooling tower demolition project due to its location on a nuclear site and proximity to active nuclear operations. (authors)

  20. PREPARATION OF U-PLANT FOR FINAL DEMOLITION AND DISPOSAL - 12109E

    SciTech Connect

    FARABEE OA; HERZOG B; CAMERON C

    2012-02-16

    The U-Plant is one of the five major nuclear materials processing facilities at Hanford and was chosen as a pilot project to develop the modalities for closure of the other four facilities at Hanford and the rest of the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The remedy for this facility was determined by a Record of Decision (ROD) pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). That remedy was to 'Close in Place - Partially Demolished Structure'. The U-Plant facility is identified as the 221-U Building and is a large, concrete structure nominally 247m (810 ft) long, 20 M (66 ft) wide and 24 m (77 ft) high with approximately 9 m (30 ft) being below grade level. It is a robust facility with walls ranging from 0.9 m to 2.7 m (3 ft to 9 ft) thick. One large room extends the entire length of the building that provides access to 40 sub-grade processing cells containing tanks, piping and other components. The work breakdown was divided into three major deliverables: (1) Tank D-10 Removal: removal of Tank D-10, which contained TRU waste; (2) Equipment Disposition: placement of contaminated equipment in the sub-grade cells; and (3) Canyon Grouting: grouting canyon void spaces to the maximum extent practical. A large number of pieces of contaminated equipment (pumps, piping, centrifuges, tanks, etc) from other facilities that had been stored on the canyon operating floor were placed inside of the sub-grade cells as final disposition, grouted and the cell shield plug reinstalled. This action precluded a large volume of waste being transported to another burial site. Finally, {approx}19,000 m3 ({approx}25,000 yd3) of grout was placed inside of the cells (in and around the contaminated equipment), in the major galleries. the ventilation tunnel, the external ventilation duct, and the hot pipe trench to minimize the potential for void spaces and to reduce the mobility, solubility, and/or toxicity of the grouted waste. The

  1. Developing a Planting Medium from Solid Waste Compost and Construction and Demolition Rubble for Use in Quarry Rehabilitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assaf, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    The combination of construction, demolition and excavation (CDE) waste along with the increase in solid waste generation has put a major stress on Lebanon and on the management of its solid waste. Compounding this problem are the issues of quarries closure and rehabilitation and a decrease in forest and vegetative cover. This research aims to provide an integrated solution to the stated problem by developing a "soil mix" derived from a mélange of the organic matter of the solid waste (compost), the CDE waste, and soil. Excavation and construction debris were ground to several sizes and mixed with compost and soil at different ratios. Replicates of these mixes and a set of control (regular soil) were used. In this mix, native and indicator plants are planted (in pots). The plant species used are Mathiolla crassifolia and Zea mays (Corn). Results have shown successful growth of both corn and Mathiolla seedlings in the mixes with higher amounts of construction rubble and compost i.e. Rubble: Soil: Compost Ratio of 2:1:1 and 1:0:1. However treatments with no compost and with less quantities of rubble demonstrated the inability of the soil used to sustain plant growth alone (1:1:1 and 1:1:0). Last but not least, the control consisting of soil only ended up being the weakest mix with yellow corn leaves and small Mathiolla seedlings fifty days after planting and fertilizing. Additionally, soil analysis, rubble and compost analysis were conducted. The samples were tested for heavy metals, nutrient availability and values of pH and EC. No contamination has been reported and an abundance of macronutrients and micronutrients was documented for the soil and compost. High alkalinity is due to the presence of concrete and the high percentage of Calcium Carbonate in Lebanese soils. Accordingly, the most adequate mixes for planting are treatments A (2:1:1) and B (1:0:1) and they should be pursued for a pilot scale study to test their potential use in quarry rehabilitation and

  2. Project Evaluation of the Decommissioning of a Laboratory Plant in Studsvik

    SciTech Connect

    Hedvall, H.R.; Stridsman, K.H.; Berg, S.R.; Johnsson, B.

    2006-07-01

    The largest decommissioning project of its kind so far in Sweden has taken seven years. Fourteen thousand square metres have been decommissioned by a small group. In October 2005, a final application was made for free release of the buildings. Demolition of the building is planned for April 2006. The nuclear laboratory plant was contaminated with Co-60, Cs-137, Sr-90, H-3 and transuranic nuclides. The aim of the project was to clean up the laboratory to release levels, and then final demolition. Decommissioning has been under way since 1998.[1] The plant was built between 1959 and 1963 for use as a research facility for reprocessing spent fuel, research on plutonium-enriched fuel, material testing and test fabrication of rods with MOX-fuel. The THOR technology with pyrolyses was developed here and is now being used by Studsvik in Erwin, USA. A thorough final evaluation of the project is presented in this paper. (authors)

  3. Application of Updated Construction and Demolition Waste Reduction Policy to Army Projects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    reuse opportunities exist or are anticipated. This work provides in- put to an Engineering and Construction Bulletin ( ECB ) that directs instal...projects. The ECB and recommendations for further Army up- date of related documents are contained within this document. DISCLAIMER: The contents of this...Service ECB Engineering and Construction Bulletin ER Engineering Regulation FRP Facilities Reduction Program HID high-intensity discharge IDIQ

  4. Phased Demolition of an Occupied Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brede, Lawrence M.; Lauterbach, Merl J.; Witt, Brandon W.; McCague, James

    2008-01-15

    The U.S. government constructed the K-1401 facility in the late 1940's as a support building for various projects supporting the uranium gaseous diffusion process. In 2004 the U.S. Department of Energy authorized Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC (BJC) to decontaminate and demolish the facility. The K-1401 facility was used for a variety of industrial purposes supporting the gaseous diffusion process. Many different substances were used to support these processes over the years and as a result different parts of the facility were contaminated with fluorine, chlorine trifluoride, uranium and technetium radiological contamination, asbestos, and mercury. The total facility area is 46,015 m{sup 2} (495,000 sf) including a 6,800 m{sup 2} basement (73,200 sf). In addition to the contamination areas in the facility, a large portion was leased to businesses for re-industrialization when the D and D activities began. The work scope associated with the facility included purging and steam cleaning the former fluorine and chlorine trifluoride systems, decontaminating loose radiologically contaminated and mercury spill areas, dismantling former radiological lines contaminated with uranium oxide compounds and technetium, abating all asbestos containing material, and demolishing the facility. These various situations contributed to the challenge of successfully conducting D and D tasks on the facility. In order to efficiently utilize the work force, demolition equipment, and waste hauling trucks the normal approach of decontaminating the facility of the hazardous materials, and then conducting demolition in series required a project schedule of five years, which is not cost effective. The entire project was planned with continuous demolition as the goal end state. As a result, the first activities, Phase 1, required to prepare sections for demolition, including steam cleaning fluorine and chlorine trifluoride process lines in basement and facility asbestos abatement, were conducted

  5. Calder Hall Cooling Tower Demolition: Landmark Milestone for Decommissioning at Sellafield

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, E.J.

    2008-07-01

    September 2007 saw a very visible change to the Sellafield site following the culmination of a major decommissioning project; the demolition of the four Calder Hall cooling towers. A key part of the UK's nuclear industrial heritage, Calder Hall, the world's first commercial nuclear power station, was opened by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in October 1953 and continued to generate electricity until its closure in 2003. Following the decision to decommission the Calder Hall site, explosive demolition was identified as the safest and most cost effective route for the removal of the towers. The technique, involving the placement of explosive in 60% of the circumference of both shell and legs, is a tried and tested method which had already been used successfully in more than 200 cooling towers in the UK in the last 30 years. The location and composition of the four 88 metre high towers also created additional challenges. Situated only 40 metres away from the UK's only nuclear Fuel Handling Plant, as well as other sensitive structures on the Sellafield site, the project had to address the impact of a number of key areas, including dust, ground vibration and air over pressure, to ensure that the demolition could be carried out safely and without significant impact on other operational areas on the site. At the same time, the towers had to be prepared for demolition in a way that minimised the amounts of radioactive or hazardous waste materials arising. This paper follows the four year journey from the initial decision to demolish the towers right through to the demolition itself as well as the clean up of the site post demolition. It will also consider the massive programme of work necessary not only to carry out the physical work safely but also to gain regulatory confidence and stakeholder support to carry out the project successfully. In summary: The demolition of the four Calder Hall cooling towers was a highly visible symbol of the changes that are occurring on the

  6. Use of filler limestone and construction and demolition residues for remediating soils contaminated with heavy metals: an assessment by means of plant uptake.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banegas, Ascension; Martinez-Sanchez, Maria Jose; Agudo, Ines; Perez-Sirvent, Carmen

    2010-05-01

    A greenhouse trial was carried out to evaluate the assimilation of heavy metals by three types of horticultural plants (lettuce, broccoli and alfalfa), different parts of which are destined for human and animal consumption (leaves, roots, fruits). The plants were cultivated in four types of soil, one uncontaminated (T1), one soil collected in the surrounding area of Sierra Minera (T2), the third being remediated with residues coming from demolition and construction activities (T3) and the four remediated with filler limestone (T4). To determine the metal content, soil samples were first ground to a fine powder using an agate ball mill. Fresh vegetable samples were separated into root and aboveground biomass and then lyophilized. The DTPA-extractable content was also determined to calculate the bioavailable amount of metal. Finally, the translocation factor (TF) and bioconcentration factor (BCF) were calculated. Arsenic levels were obtained by using atomic fluorescence spectrometry with an automated continuous flow hydride generation (HG-AFS) spectrometer and Cd, Pb and Zn was determined by electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) or flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Samples of the leached water were also obtained and analyzed. According to our results, the retention of the studied elements varies with the type of plant and is strongly decreased by the incorporation of filler limestone and/or construction and demolition residues to the soils. This practice represents a suitable way to reduce the risk posed to the biota by the presence of high levels of heavy metal in soil.

  7. Nuclear Rocket Facility Decommissioning Project: Controlled Explosive Demolition of Neutron Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Michael R. Kruzic

    2007-09-16

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Test Cell A (TCA) Facility was used in the early to mid-1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program, to further space travel. Nuclear rocket testing resulted in the activation of materials around the reactors and the release of fission products and fuel particles in the immediate area. Identified as Corrective Action Unit 115, the TCA facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) from December 2004 to July 2005 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. The SAFER process allows environmental remediation and facility closure activities (i.e., decommissioning) to occur simultaneously provided technical decisions are made by an experienced decision maker within the site conceptual site model, identified in the Data Quality Objective process. Facility closure involved a seven-step decommissioning strategy. Key lessons learned from the project included: (1) Targeted preliminary investigation activities provided a more solid technical approach, reduced surprises and scope creep, and made the working environment safer for the D&D worker. (2) Early identification of risks and uncertainties provided opportunities for risk management and mitigation planning to address challenges and unanticipated conditions. (3) Team reviews provided an excellent mechanism to consider all aspects of the task, integrated safety into activity performance, increase team unity and ''buy-in'' and promoted innovative and time saving ideas. (4) Development of CED protocols ensured safety and control. (5) The same proven D&D strategy is now being employed on the larger ''sister'' facility, Test Cell C.

  8. State Demolition Information

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Contact information and guidances for each state and selected territories's environmental agencies and programs relevant to large-scale residential demolition including asbestos, lead, and open burning.

  9. 24 CFR 247.5 - Inapplicability to substantial rehabilitation or demolition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... rehabilitation or demolition. 247.5 Section 247.5 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing... Projects § 247.5 Inapplicability to substantial rehabilitation or demolition. This subpart shall not apply... project to a purchaser who purchases for the purpose of substantial rehabilitation or demolition....

  10. 24 CFR 247.5 - Inapplicability to substantial rehabilitation or demolition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... rehabilitation or demolition. 247.5 Section 247.5 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing... Projects § 247.5 Inapplicability to substantial rehabilitation or demolition. This subpart shall not apply... project to a purchaser who purchases for the purpose of substantial rehabilitation or demolition. ...

  11. 24 CFR 247.5 - Inapplicability to substantial rehabilitation or demolition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... rehabilitation or demolition. 247.5 Section 247.5 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing... Projects § 247.5 Inapplicability to substantial rehabilitation or demolition. This subpart shall not apply... project to a purchaser who purchases for the purpose of substantial rehabilitation or demolition. ...

  12. 24 CFR 247.5 - Inapplicability to substantial rehabilitation or demolition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... rehabilitation or demolition. 247.5 Section 247.5 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing... Projects § 247.5 Inapplicability to substantial rehabilitation or demolition. This subpart shall not apply... project to a purchaser who purchases for the purpose of substantial rehabilitation or demolition. ...

  13. 24 CFR 247.5 - Inapplicability to substantial rehabilitation or demolition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... rehabilitation or demolition. 247.5 Section 247.5 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing... Projects § 247.5 Inapplicability to substantial rehabilitation or demolition. This subpart shall not apply... project to a purchaser who purchases for the purpose of substantial rehabilitation or demolition. ...

  14. Phased Construction Completion Report for Bldg. K-1401 of the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2008-10-01

    This Phased Construction Completion Report documents the demolition of Bldg. K-1401, Maintenance Building, addressed in the Action Memorandum for the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2003a) as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 non-time-critical removal action. The objectives of the removal action (DOE 2003a) - to eliminate the source of potential contamination, to eliminate the threat of potential future releases, and/or to eliminate the threats to the general public and the environment - were met. The end state of this action is for the slab to remain with all penetrations sealed and grouted or backfilled. The basement and pits remain open. There is residual radiological and polychlorinated biphenyl contamination on the slab and basement. A fixative was applied to the area on the pad contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls. Interim land-use controls will be maintained until final remediation decisions are made under the Zone 2 Record of Decision (DOE 2005a).

  15. Phased Construction Completion Report for Building K-1401 of the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at the East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Garland S.

    2008-03-01

    This Phased Construction Completion Report documents the demolition of Bldg. K-1401, Maintenance Building, addressed in the Action Memorandum for the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2003a) as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 non-time-critical removal action. The objectives of the removal action (DOE 2003a) - to eliminate the source of potential contamination, to eliminate the threat of potential future releases, and/or to eliminate the threats to the general public and the environment - were met. The end state of this action is for the slab to remain with all penetrations sealed and grouted or backfilled. The basement and pits remain open. There is residual radiological and polychlorinated biphenyl contamination on the slab and basement. A fixative was applied to the area on the pad contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls. Interim land-use controls will be maintained until final remediation decisions are made under the Zone 2 Record of Decision (DOE 2005a).

  16. Pre-Demolition Inspections

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A pre-demolition inspection may be one of the most helpful and cost-efficient steps you can take to identify materials that should (or must) be removed from buildings prior to demolition. In some cases it may be required by regulation.

  17. 24 CFR 970.29 - Criteria for disapproval of demolition or disposition applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... demolition or disposition applications. 970.29 Section 970.29 Housing and Urban Development Regulations... HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING PROGRAM-DEMOLITION OR DISPOSITION OF PUBLIC HOUSING PROJECTS § 970.29 Criteria for disapproval of demolition or disposition applications. HUD...

  18. 24 CFR 969.107 - HUD approval of demolition or disposition before ACC expiration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false HUD approval of demolition or... HOUSING AFTER COMPLETION OF DEBT SERVICE § 969.107 HUD approval of demolition or disposition before ACC expiration. This part is not intended to preclude or restrict the demolition or disposition of a project...

  19. 24 CFR 970.23 - Costs of demolition and relocation of displaced tenants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Costs of demolition and relocation..., DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING PROGRAM-DEMOLITION OR DISPOSITION OF PUBLIC HOUSING PROJECTS § 970.23 Costs of demolition and relocation of displaced tenants. Where HUD has approved...

  20. 24 CFR 969.107 - HUD approval of demolition or disposition before ACC expiration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false HUD approval of demolition or... HOUSING AFTER COMPLETION OF DEBT SERVICE § 969.107 HUD approval of demolition or disposition before ACC expiration. This part is not intended to preclude or restrict the demolition or disposition of a project...

  1. 24 CFR 970.23 - Costs of demolition and relocation of displaced tenants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Costs of demolition and relocation..., DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING PROGRAM-DEMOLITION OR DISPOSITION OF PUBLIC HOUSING PROJECTS § 970.23 Costs of demolition and relocation of displaced tenants. Where HUD has approved...

  2. 24 CFR 970.23 - Costs of demolition and relocation of displaced tenants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Costs of demolition and relocation..., DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING PROGRAM-DEMOLITION OR DISPOSITION OF PUBLIC HOUSING PROJECTS § 970.23 Costs of demolition and relocation of displaced tenants. Where HUD has approved...

  3. 24 CFR 970.23 - Costs of demolition and relocation of displaced tenants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Costs of demolition and relocation..., DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING PROGRAM-DEMOLITION OR DISPOSITION OF PUBLIC HOUSING PROJECTS § 970.23 Costs of demolition and relocation of displaced tenants. Where HUD has approved...

  4. 24 CFR 970.23 - Costs of demolition and relocation of displaced tenants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Costs of demolition and relocation..., DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING PROGRAM-DEMOLITION OR DISPOSITION OF PUBLIC HOUSING PROJECTS § 970.23 Costs of demolition and relocation of displaced tenants. Where HUD has approved...

  5. 24 CFR 970.29 - Criteria for disapproval of demolition or disposition applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... demolition or disposition applications. 970.29 Section 970.29 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS... HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING PROGRAM-DEMOLITION OR DISPOSITION OF PUBLIC HOUSING PROJECTS § 970.29 Criteria for disapproval of demolition or disposition applications. HUD...

  6. 24 CFR 970.29 - Criteria for disapproval of demolition or disposition applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... demolition or disposition applications. 970.29 Section 970.29 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS... HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING PROGRAM-DEMOLITION OR DISPOSITION OF PUBLIC HOUSING PROJECTS § 970.29 Criteria for disapproval of demolition or disposition applications. HUD...

  7. 24 CFR 970.29 - Criteria for disapproval of demolition or disposition applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... demolition or disposition applications. 970.29 Section 970.29 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS... HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING PROGRAM-DEMOLITION OR DISPOSITION OF PUBLIC HOUSING PROJECTS § 970.29 Criteria for disapproval of demolition or disposition applications. HUD...

  8. 24 CFR 969.107 - HUD approval of demolition or disposition before ACC expiration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false HUD approval of demolition or... HOUSING AFTER COMPLETION OF DEBT SERVICE § 969.107 HUD approval of demolition or disposition before ACC expiration. This part is not intended to preclude or restrict the demolition or disposition of a project...

  9. Pre-Demolition Planning

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Developing a systematic approach to demolition can help manage liability, control, and costs. Careful planning can minimize the release of toxic chemicals and other harmful substances into the environment, and protect the health of workers and the public.

  10. The Walls Come Tumbling Down: Decontamination and Demolition of 29 Manhattan Project and Cold War-Era Buildings and Structures at Los Alamos National Laboratory-12301

    SciTech Connect

    Chaloupka, Allan B.; Finn, Kevin P.; Parsons, Duane A.

    2012-07-01

    ,000 ft{sup 2}). The initially approved baseline for the ARRA D and D Project was to remove 22 buildings and structures that included approximately 14,680 m{sup 2} (158,000 ft{sup 2}) of footprint. By employing efficiencies during subcontracting, demolition, and waste segregation, the savings allowed an additional 1,580 m{sup 2} (17,000 ft{sup 2}) of footprint to be removed using ARRA funds. Additionally, the lessons learned from this experience were used to apply NNSA funding to the removal of six additional non-contaminated buildings and structures. In the end, 29 buildings and structures, including stacks, cooling towers and tanks, were removed from the mesa. The entire DP East area was cleared of buildings and sub-grade structures and the soils cleaned to residential standards. The total footprint reduction at TA-21 as a result of this effort was in excess of 17,650 m{sup 2} (190,000 ft{sup 2}). The use of a Laboratory self-performance team to start demolition of non-contaminated structures resulted in steady work performance early in the project while subcontracts were being put in place to perform more complicated abatement and contaminated demolition activities. Most importantly, there were no serious worker injuries and the minor injuries recorded were those common to construction type activities. Extensive monitoring along the site boundary demonstrated that no hazardous chemicals or radioactive contamination were released and radiological dose to the public was negligible. The ARRA demolition activities were completed six months in advance of the deadline for employing ARRA funds. Additionally, over 17,585 m{sup 3} (23,000 yds{sup 3}) of building demolition debris was safely removed from DP Mesa. All of the major buildings have been removed, unencumbered access to the SWMUs that are required to be cleaned up by the Consent Order with the state of New Mexico, has been achieved, and a significant portion of the mesa has been prepared to support a process that will

  11. Air Monitoring Modeling of Radioactive Releases During Proposed PFP Complex Demolition Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.; Droppo, James G.; Rishel, Jeremy P.

    2011-01-24

    This report is part of the planning process for the demolition of the 234-5Z, 236-Z, 242-Z, and 291-Z-1 structures at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) facilities on the Hanford Site. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) supports the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) demolition planning effort by making engineering estimates of potential releases for various potential demolition alternatives. This report documents an analysis considering open-air demolition using standard techniques. It does not document any decisions about the decommissioning approaches; it is expected that this report will be revisited as demolition plans are finalized.

  12. Environmental analysis of a construction and demolition waste recycling plant in Portugal--Part I: energy consumption and CO2 emissions.

    PubMed

    Coelho, André; de Brito, Jorge

    2013-05-01

    This work is a part of a wider study involving the economic and environmental implications of managing construction and demolition waste (CDW), focused on the operation of a large scale CDW recycling plant. This plant, to be operated in the Lisbon Metropolitan Area (including the Setúbal peninsula), is analysed for a 60 year period, using primary energy consumption and CO2eq emission impact factors as environmental impact performance indicators. Simplified estimation methods are used to calculate industrial equipment incorporated, and the operation and transport related impacts. Material recycling--sorted materials sent to other industries, to act as input--is taken into account by discounting the impacts related to industrial processes no longer needed. This first part focuses on calculating the selected impact factors for a base case scenario (with a 350 tonnes/h installed capacity), while a sensitivity analysis is provided in part two. Overall, a 60 year global primary energy consumption of 71.4 thousand toe (tonne of oil equivalent) and a total CO2eq emission of 135.4 thousand tonnes are expected. Under this operating regime, around 563 thousand toe and 1465 thousand tonnes CO2eq could be prevented by replacing raw materials in several construction materials industries (e.g.: ferrous and non-ferrous metals, plastics, paper and cardboard). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Spatial distribution of organic pollutants in industrial construction and demolition waste and their mutual interaction on an abandoned pesticide manufacturing plant.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sheng; Zhao, Xin; Sun, Yanqiu; Ma, Jianli; Gao, Xiaofeng; Xie, Tian; Xu, Dongsheng; Yu, Yi; Zhao, Youcai

    2016-04-01

    A comprehensive field investigation of organic pollutants was examined in industrial construction and demolition waste (ICDW) inside an abandoned pesticide manufacturing plant. Concentrations of eight types of pesticides, a metabolite and two intermediates were studied. The ICDW was under severe and long-term contamination by organophosphorus, intermediates and pyrethroid pesticide with mean concentrations of 23,429, 3538 and 179.4 mg kg(-1), respectively. FT-IR analysis suggested that physical absorption and chemical bonding were their mutual interaction forms. Patterns of total pesticide spatial distribution showed good correlations with manufacturing processes spreading all over the plant both in enclosed workshops and in residues randomly dumped outside, while bricks and coatings were the most vulnerable to pollutants. Ultimately the fate of the OPPs was diversified as the immersion of ICDW in water largely transferred the pollutants into aquatic systems while exposure outside did not largely lead to pesticide degradation. The adoption of centralized collections for the disposal of wastes could only eliminate part of the contaminated ICDW, probably due to lack of knowledge and criteria. Correlation matrix and cluster analysis indicated that regulated disposal and management of polluted ICDW was effective, thus presenting the requirement for its appropriate disposal.

  14. Use of Source Term and Air Dispersion Modeling in Planning Demolition of Highly Alpha-Contaminated Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Droppo, James G.; Napier, Bruce A.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Bloom, Richard W.

    2011-06-22

    The current cleanup of structures related to cold-war production of nuclear materials includes the need to demolish a number of highly alpha-contaminated structures. The process of planning for the demolition of such structures includes unique challenges related to ensuring the protection of both workers and the public. Pre-demolition modeling analyses were conducted to evaluate potential exposures resulting from the proposed demolition of a number of these structures. Estimated emission rates of transuranic materials during demolition are used as input to an air-dispersion model. The climatological frequencies of occurrence of peak air and surface exposures at locations of interest are estimated based on years of hourly meteorological records. The modeling results indicate that downwind deposition is the main operational limitation for demolition of a highly alpha-contaminated building. The pre-demolition modeling directed the need for better contamination characterization and/or different demolition methods—and in the end, provided a basis for proceeding with the planned demolition activities. Post-demolition modeling was also conducted for several contaminated structures, based on the actual demolition schedule and conditions. Comparisons of modeled and monitoring results are shown. Recent monitoring data from the demolition of a UO3 plant shows increments in concentrations that were previously identified in the pre-demolition modeling predictions; these comparisons confirm the validity and value of the pre-demolition source-term and air dispersion computations for planning demolition activities for other buildings with high levels of radioactive contamination.

  15. Financing Power Plant Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Haney, Lee

    1980-12-01

    The reservoir companies are risk takers. They will explore. They will test and measure. They will conduct reservoir engineering. They will conduct reservoir modeling. Their managements will commit funds to develop. Reservoir companies tend to be advocates of their product. They should be more candid. We have heard at this conference of hydrogen sulfide gas problems at The Geysers, injection system and injection well plugging at the SDG&E/DOE Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility, inadequate well production at the East Mesa Reservoir, high injection pressures at the Brawley Reservoir and other real reservoir difficulties. These must be addressed factually and solutions sought. The utilities and/or plant constructors and operators are not risk takers. Under current regulatory structure, they have no incentive to take any risk. They are troubled by perceived risks which may be real or imagined. To put these perceived risks into perspective, the utilities or plant constructors and operators should be involved in exploration and development at an early date. They need a better understanding of the downhole environment. Before they make significant investments on any reservoir, they want to see the reservoir work. To accomplish this, as we have heard at this conference, they are building 10 MW facilities and no one is taking the commercial size step without outside help. The utilities on the panel indicated they would buy geothermal heat if the reservoir operator would guarantee the reservoir for the life of the power plant. Some reservoir operators do not want to do this and those who will want the plant's operation guaranteed via fixed payments for heat or a long-term take-or-pay contract.

  16. 24 CFR 970.7 - General requirements for HUD approval of a PHA demolition/disposition application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... approval of a PHA demolition/disposition application. 970.7 Section 970.7 Housing and Urban Development... INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING PROGRAM-DEMOLITION OR DISPOSITION OF PUBLIC HOUSING PROJECTS § 970.7 General requirements for HUD approval of a PHA demolition...

  17. 24 CFR 970.7 - General requirements for HUD approval of a PHA demolition/disposition application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... approval of a PHA demolition/disposition application. 970.7 Section 970.7 Housing and Urban Development... INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING PROGRAM-DEMOLITION OR DISPOSITION OF PUBLIC HOUSING PROJECTS § 970.7 General requirements for HUD approval of a PHA demolition...

  18. 24 CFR 970.7 - General requirements for HUD approval of a PHA demolition/disposition application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... approval of a PHA demolition/disposition application. 970.7 Section 970.7 Housing and Urban Development... INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING PROGRAM-DEMOLITION OR DISPOSITION OF PUBLIC HOUSING PROJECTS § 970.7 General requirements for HUD approval of a PHA demolition...

  19. 24 CFR 970.7 - General requirements for HUD approval of a PHA demolition/disposition application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... approval of a PHA demolition/disposition application. 970.7 Section 970.7 Housing and Urban Development... INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING PROGRAM-DEMOLITION OR DISPOSITION OF PUBLIC HOUSING PROJECTS § 970.7 General requirements for HUD approval of a PHA demolition...

  20. 24 CFR 970.7 - General requirements for HUD approval of a PHA demolition/disposition application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... approval of a PHA demolition/disposition application. 970.7 Section 970.7 Housing and Urban Development... INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING PROGRAM-DEMOLITION OR DISPOSITION OF PUBLIC HOUSING PROJECTS § 970.7 General requirements for HUD approval of a PHA demolition...

  1. New Hires, Building Demolition

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Using Recovery Act funding, Department of Energy contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company has hired hundreds of new employees to do cleanup work at the Hanford Site, including demolition of dozens of excess facilities.This video was produced by CH2M HILL on Jan. 8, 2010.

  2. New Hires, Building Demolition

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-08

    Using Recovery Act funding, Department of Energy contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company has hired hundreds of new employees to do cleanup work at the Hanford Site, including demolition of dozens of excess facilities.This video was produced by CH2M HILL on Jan. 8, 2010.

  3. Decommissioning of Active Ventilation Systems in a Nuclear R and D Facility to Prepare for Building Demolition (Whiteshell Laboratories Decommissioning Project, Canada) - 13073

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, Brian; May, Doug; Howlett, Don; Bilinsky, Dennis

    2013-07-01

    Whiteshell Laboratories (WL) is a nuclear research establishment owned by the Canadian government and operated by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) since the early 1960's. WL is currently under a decommissioning license and the mandate is to remediate the nuclear legacy liabilities in a safe and cost effective manner. The WL Project is the first major nuclear decommissioning project in Canada. A major initiative underway is to decommission and demolish the main R and D Laboratory complex. The Building 300 R and D complex was constructed to accommodate laboratories and offices which were mainly used for research and development associated with organic-cooled reactors, nuclear fuel waste management, reactor safety, advanced fuel cycles and other applications of nuclear energy. Building 300 is a three storey structure of approximately 16,000 m{sup 2}. In order to proceed with building demolition, the contaminated systems inside the building have to be characterized, removed, and the waste managed. There is a significant focus on volume reduction of radioactive waste for the WL project. The active ventilation system is one of the significant contaminated systems in Building 300 that requires decommissioning and removal. The active ventilation system was designed to manage hazardous fumes and radioactivity from ventilation devices (e.g., fume hoods, snorkels and glove boxes) and to prevent the escape of airborne hazardous material outside of the laboratory boundary in the event of an upset condition. The system includes over 200 ventilation devices and 32 active exhaust fan units and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. The strategy to remove the ventilation system was to work from the laboratory end back to the fan/filter system. Each ventilation duct was radiologically characterized. Fogging was used to minimize loose contamination. Sections of the duct were removed by various cutting methods and bagged for temporary storage prior to disposition

  4. Analysis of Radioactive Releases During Proposed Demolition Activities for the 224-U and 224-UA Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Droppo, James G.

    2009-03-31

    Atmospheric dispersion modeling has been conducted in support of the demolition of the 224-U and 224-UA buildings using estimated release rates to provide information on the location and levels of radioactive contamination that may be expected. The facilities surrounding the UO3 plant have the potential to affect dispersion patterns through various meteorological phenomena, including building wake effects. Hourly meteorological data collected over a 5-year period were used to examine the effects of wind speed, direction, and stability on projected concentrations of contaminants in air and deposited on nearby surfaces. The modeling results indicate that the radiological exposures from the planned demolition efforts will be below the designated limits for air and soil exposures.

  5. Large-Scale Residential Demolition

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA provides resources for handling residential demolitions or renovations. This includes planning, handling harmful materials, recycling, funding, compliance assistance, good practices and regulations.

  6. Mixing Construction, Demolition and Excavation Waste and Solid Waste Compost for the Derivation of a Planting Medium for Use in the Rehabilitation of Quarries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assaf, Eleni

    2015-04-01

    Lebanon's very high population density has been increasing since the end of the civil war in the early 1990s reaching 416.36 people per square kilometer. Furthermore, the influx of refugees from conflicts in the region has increased the resident population significantly. All these are exerting pressure on the country's natural resources, pushing the Lebanese to convert more forest and agricultural land into roads, buildings and houses. This has led to a building boom and rapid urbanization which in turn has created a demand for construction material - mainly rock, gravel, sand, etc. nearly all of which are locally acquired through quarrying to the tune of three million cubic meters annually. This boom has been interrupted by a war with Israel in 2006 which resulted in thousands of tonnes of debris. The increase in population has also led to an increase in solid waste generation with 1.57 million tonnes of solid waste generated in Lebanon per year. The combination of construction, demolition and excavation (CDE) waste along with the increase in solid waste generation has put a major stress on the country and on the management of its solid waste. Compounding this problem are the issues of quarries closure and rehabilitation and a decrease in forest and vegetative cover. The on-going research reported in this paper aims to provide an integrated solution to the stated problem by developing a "soil mix" derived from a mélange of the organic matter of the solid waste (compost), the CDE waste, and soil. Excavation and construction debris were ground to several sizes and mixed with compost and soil at different ratios. Replicates of these mixes and a set of control (regular soil) were used. In this mix, native and indicator plants are planted (in pots) from which the most productive mix will be selected for further testing at field level in later experiments. The plant species used are Mathiolla crassifolia, a native Lebanese plant and Zea mays (Corn), which is commonly

  7. Pharmaceuticals and Controlled Substances and Demolition

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pharmaceuticals and controlled substances found during residential demolition, such as prescription medications or illegal drugs, may require special treatment for disposal or recycling before demolition.

  8. A Sandia National Laboratories decontamination and demolition success story

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.R.; Barber, D.S.; Lipka, G.

    1994-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) has established a formal facility assessment, decontamination and demolition oversight process with the goal of ensuring that excess or contaminated facilities are managed in a cost-effective manner that is protective of human health and the environment. The decontamination and demolition process is designed so that all disciplines are consulted and have input from the initiation of a project. The committee consists of all essential Environmental, Safety and Health (ES and H) and Facilities disciplines. The interdisciplinary-team approach has provided a mechanism that verifies adequate building and site assessment activities are conducted. This approach ensures that wastes generated during decontamination and demolition activities are handled and disposed according to Department of Energy (DOE), Federal, state, and local requirements. Because of the comprehensive nature of the SNL decontamination and demolition process, the strategy can be followed for demolition, renovation and new construction projects, regardless of funding source. An overview of the SNL/NM decontamination and demolition process is presented through a case study which demonstrates the practical importance of the formal process.

  9. Lessons from the Bevatron Accelerator Demolition - 12191

    SciTech Connect

    Harkins, Joseph; Cronin, Robert

    2012-07-01

    The Bevatron accelerator at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is the first DOE accelerator to be demolished. While there are many lessons learned from its demolition, this paper focuses on the following lessons learned that may be useful for other D and D projects: bounding project scope to ensure success, hazards mapping for focused characterization and remediation, establishing radiological evaluation criteria, and forecasting activation products. With D and D of many DOE accelerators likely to occur in the near future, these lessons learned should be considered in planning those projects. These lessons learned are likely to be applicable to other D and D projects as well. (authors)

  10. HE Machining Complex and Support Buildings Deactivation and Decommissioning Project at the Pantex Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, C.; Conner, M.

    2007-07-01

    This paper describes the issues related to the deactivation and decommissioning of a very unique building at the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant located in Amarillo, TX. Building 12-24 was unique in the fact that it had a number of obstacles that have not been previously addressed in the deactivation and decommissioning of a single structure such as asbestos, beryllium, possible radionuclide contamination, lead paint, heavily reinforced concrete walls, and high explosive (HE) contamination inside and out. To date, the building has been razed and the majority of all equipment has been disposed of. Remaining work includes concrete and soil debris removal, earthen barricade removal, and site leveling. Pantex Site Summary: Pantex Plant is America's only nuclear weapons assembly and disassembly facility. Located on the High Plains of the Texas Panhandle, 17 miles northeast of Amarillo, Pantex is centered on a 16,000-acre site just north of U. S. Highway 60 in Carson County. The Pantex Plant industrial operations are conducted for the DOE by a management and operating contractor (BWXT Pantex), and Sandia National Laboratory. DOE owns approximately 9,100 acres at the Pantex Plant. Just over 2,000 acres of the DOE-owned property are used for industrial operations at Pantex Plant excluding the burning ground, firing sites and other outlying areas. The burning ground and firing sites occupy approximately 489 acres. Remaining DOE-owned land serves DOE safety and security purposes. DOE also owns Pantex Lake, a detached piece of property approximately 4 km (2.5 mi) northeast of the main Plant site that comprises 1,077 acres; the playa lake-bed itself occupying approximately 800 acres. Currently no government industrial operations are conducted at the Pantex Lake property. Seventy-six kilometers (47 mi) of roads exist within the Pantex Plant boundaries. Project Summary: Facilities are deactivated and decommissioned (D and D) when there is no longer a mission for them or they

  11. Application of life-cycle assessment (LCA) methodology for valorization of building demolition materials and products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sara, Balazs; Antonini, Ernesto; Tarantini, Mario

    2001-02-01

    The VAMP project (VAlorization of building demolition Materials and Products, LIFE 98/ENV/IT/33) aims to build an effective and innovative information system to support decision making in selective demolition activity and to manage the valorization (recovery-reuse-recycling) of waste flows produced by the construction and demolition (C&D) sector. The VAMP information system will be tested it in Italy in some case studies of selective demolition. In this paper the proposed demolition-valorization system will be compared to the traditional one in a life cycle perspective, applying LCA methodology to highlight the advantages of VAMP system from an eco-sustainability point of view. Within the system boundaries demolition processes, transport of demolition wastes and its recovery/treatment or disposal in landfill were included. Processes avoided due to reuse-recycling activities, such as extraction of natural resources and manufacture of building materials and components, were considered too. In this paper data collection procedure applied in inventory and impact assessment phases and a general overview about data availability for LCA studies in this sector are presented. Results of application of VAMP methodology to a case study are discussed and compared with a simulated traditional demolition of the same building. Environmental advantages of VAMP demolition-valorization system are demonstrated quantitatively emphasizing the special importance of reuse of building components with high demand of energy for manufacture.

  12. Household Hazardous Waste and Demolition

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Household wastes that are toxic, corrosive, ignitable, or reactive are known as Household Hazardous Waste (HHW). Household Hazardous Waste may be found during residential demolitions, and thus require special handling for disposal.

  13. Harmful Materials and Residential Demolition

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Certain harmful or problematic materials present in residential buildings may need to be handled differently from general demolition debris. Here is a list of several specific types of materials that may be present in residential buildings.

  14. Air Dispersion Modeling of Radioactive Releases During Proposed PFP Complex Demolition Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.; Droppo, James G.; Rishel, Jeremy P.

    2011-01-11

    This report is part of the planning process for the demolition of the 234-5Z, 236-Z, 242-Z, and 291-Z-1 structures at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) on the Hanford Site. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) supports the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) demolition planning effort by making engineering estimates of potential releases for various potential demolition alternatives. This report documents an analysis considering open-air demolition using standard techniques. It does not document any decisions about the decommissioning approaches; it is expected that this report will be revisited as the final details of the demolition are developed.

  15. Sustainable Management of Construction and Demolition Materials

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web page discusses how to sustainably manage construction and demolition materials, Information covers, what they are, and how builders, construction crews, demolition teams,and deign practitioners can divert C&D from landfills.

  16. Lead-Based Paint and Demolition

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Lead Renovation, Repair, and Painting Rule does not apply to total demolition of a structure. Learn about EPA recommended lead-safe practices during total demolition activities to prevent and minimize exposure to lead.

  17. Reuse and Recycling Opportunities and Demolition

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn which about deconstruction, and which materials are good candidates for reuse and recycling during the pre-demolition planning.  Learn more about how to make the site sustainable after demolition.

  18. Recovery Act Weekly Video: Upper ALE Building Demolition

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company demolition of 6652C Space Science Laboratory. The largest building atop Rattlesnake Mountain, the laboratory served as a nightly radar patrol center as well as a barracks. The Recovery Act funded project is helping reduce the site footprint.

  19. Recovery Act Weekly Video: Upper ALE Building Demolition

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company demolition of 6652C Space Science Laboratory. The largest building atop Rattlesnake Mountain, the laboratory served as a nightly radar patrol center as well as a barracks. The Recovery Act funded project is helping reduce the site footprint.

  20. Open air demolition of facilities highly contaminated with plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, E.R.; Lackey, M.B.; Stevens, J.M.; Zinsli, L.C.

    2007-07-01

    The demolition of highly contaminated plutonium buildings usually is a long and expensive process that involves decontaminating the building to near free- release standards and then using conventional methods to remove the structure. It doesn't, however, have to be that way. Fluor has torn down buildings highly contaminated with plutonium without excessive decontamination. By removing the select source term and fixing the remaining contamination on the walls, ceilings, floors, and equipment surfaces; open-air demolition is not only feasible, but it can be done cheaper, better (safer), and faster. Open-air demolition techniques were used to demolish two highly contaminated buildings to slab-on-grade. These facilities on the Department of Energy's Hanford Site were located in, or very near, compounds of operating nuclear facilities that housed hundreds of people working on a daily basis. To keep the facilities operating and the personnel safe, the projects had to be creative in demolishing the structures. Several key techniques were used to control contamination and keep it within the confines of the demolition area: spraying fixatives before demolition; applying fixative and misting with a fine spray of water as the buildings were being taken down; and demolishing the buildings in a controlled and methodical manner. In addition, detailed air-dispersion modeling was done to establish necessary building and meteorological conditions and to confirm the adequacy of the proposed methods. Both demolition projects were accomplished without any spread of contamination outside the modest buffer areas established for contamination control. Furthermore, personnel exposure to radiological and physical hazards was significantly reduced by using heavy equipment rather than 'hands on' techniques. (authors)

  1. OPEN AIR DEMOLITION OF FACILITIES HIGHLY CONTAMINATED WITH PLUTONIUM

    SciTech Connect

    LLOYD, E.R.

    2007-05-31

    The demolition of highly contaminated plutonium buildings usually is a long and expensive process that involves decontaminating the building to near free- release standards and then using conventional methods to remove the structure. It doesn't, however, have to be that way. Fluor has torn down buildings highly contaminated with plutonium without excessive decontamination. By removing the select source term and fixing the remaining contamination on the walls, ceilings, floors, and equipment surfaces; open-air demolition is not only feasible, but it can be done cheaper, better (safer), and faster. Open-air demolition techniques were used to demolish two highly contaminated buildings to slab-on-grade. These facilities on the Department of Energy's Hanford Site were located in, or very near, compounds of operating nuclear facilities that housed hundreds of people working on a daily basis. To keep the facilities operating and the personnel safe, the projects had to be creative in demolishing the structures. Several key techniques were used to control contamination and keep it within the confines of the demolition area: spraying fixatives before demolition; applying fixative and misting with a fine spray of water as the buildings were being taken down; and demolishing the buildings in a controlled and methodical manner. In addition, detailed air-dispersion modeling was done to establish necessary building and meteorological conditions and to confirm the adequacy of the proposed methods. Both demolition projects were accomplished without any spread of contamination outside the modest buffer areas established for contamination control. Furthermore, personnel exposure to radiological and physical hazards was significantly reduced by using heavy equipment rather than ''hands on'' techniques.

  2. Explosive Demolition of a Fire-Water Tower At East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge TN

    SciTech Connect

    Brooksbank, R.D.; Rood, M.S.; Amrit, S.K.; Harper, M.S.; Dypolt, D.J.; Brehse, Mike

    2008-01-15

    On June 17, 2006, the Department of Energy (DOE) successfully demolished a {approx}60 year old fire-water tower (K-1206-E), located at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, TN, using strategically placed explosive charges. The subject demolition project was executed by MCM Management Corporation and Demolition Dynamics under the management of DoE's prime contractor Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). The K-1206-E Fire Water Tower (Tower) supported the ETTP fire water protection system from the mid- 1950's until 1991. The 378,500-L (100,000-gallon) Tower, elevated 53-m (175-feet) above grade, was located in a grassy area within 152-m (500-feet) of several other occupied facilities. Electrical, control circuits and supply water servicing the Tower were deactivated in 2003. Free liquids and sludge were removed from the tank prior to demolition. Demolition of a facility employing explosive demolition at a federal site in the 'post-9/11 era' was a substantial challenge. The subject paper discusses: - the planning and coordination steps that were taken to successfully overcome the challenges prior to the demolition of the empty, deactivated Tower; - the method used for the engineered demolition of the Tower; and - the factors responsible for the successful execution of this demolition project. At least two previous attempts were made to demolish the Tower. In the first attempt, the execution of the project was deferred by the re-allocation of funds. In the subsequent attempt in 2004, the execution of this project was postponed due to concerns that an adjacent facility would have to shut down operations during the duration of mobilization and execution of the project and thereby incur potential financial losses. A total of 51 cubic meters (1,800 cubic feet) of demolition debris was generated, which was compliantly disposed of at a local landfill followed by site restoration.

  3. Report: Significant Modifications Needed To Ensure Success of Fort Worth Asbestos Demolition Method

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #2004-P-00002, December 19, 2003. According to the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) National Asbestos Registry System, over 166,000 asbestos demolition and/or renovation projects were conducted in the last two years.

  4. 36 CFR 401.11 - Demolition criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Demolition criteria. 401.11... MEMORIALS § 401.11 Demolition criteria. As authorized by the provisions of 36 U.S.C. 2106(e), the Commission... appropriate foreign authorities agree to the demolition; and (b)(1) The sponsor of the memorial consents to...

  5. 36 CFR 401.11 - Demolition criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Demolition criteria. 401.11... MEMORIALS § 401.11 Demolition criteria. As authorized by the provisions of 36 U.S.C. 2106(e), the Commission... appropriate foreign authorities agree to the demolition; and (b)(1) The sponsor of the memorial consents to...

  6. 36 CFR 401.11 - Demolition criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Demolition criteria. 401.11... MEMORIALS § 401.11 Demolition criteria. As authorized by the provisions of 36 U.S.C. 2106(e), the Commission... appropriate foreign authorities agree to the demolition; and (b)(1) The sponsor of the memorial consents to...

  7. 29 CFR 1926.859 - Mechanical demolition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mechanical demolition. 1926.859 Section 1926.859 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Demolition § 1926.859 Mechanical demolition. (a...

  8. 29 CFR 1926.859 - Mechanical demolition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mechanical demolition. 1926.859 Section 1926.859 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Demolition § 1926.859 Mechanical demolition. (a...

  9. Progressively safer, cheaper demolition of Fernald

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Nichols; Norman Pennington

    2000-09-29

    Fluor Fernald, Inc. has been progressively improving Decontamination and Dismantlement (D&D) at the Department of Energy's Fernald Environmental Management Project by applying new technologies and better methodologies to the work. Demolition issues existed in the past that necessitated new or improved solutions to maintain worker safety, protect the environment and accomplish the work in a cost effective manner. Lessons learned from D&D of 80 structures has led to a systematic approach, which can be implemented in various D&D arenas. When facility production was halted, hold-up material and process residues remained in the process piping and components. Over 500,000 pounds of material was removed by workers who completed the tasks two years ahead of schedule, $7 million under budget and with an excellent safety record. This success was the result of detailed planning and irdision of lessons learned as work progressed from facility to facility. Work sequences were developed that reduced airborne contamination. Demolition of structures has been performed at Fernald by carefully selected and qualified subcontractors. Asbestos and lead abatement, equipment, piping and conduit removal, and structural demolition have been completed to progressively higher performance specifications developed by Fluor Fernald based on lessons learned during execution. Safety continues to be the primary consideration in performing potentially hazardous work. Technologies such as hydraulic shears have been developed and used to keep workers away from danger. A new technology, ''Cool Suits,'' has been demonstrated to help prevent heat stress when anti-contamination clothing is required in elevated temperature working conditions. For tall structures, implosion technologies have been employed with progressively improved results, Several other new technologies have been evaluated by Fluor Fernald and applied by subcontractors. The improved technologies included the oxy-gas torch, which uses

  10. Operational Limitations for Demolition of a Highly Alpha-Contaminated Building – Modeled Versus Measured Air and Surface Activity Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Droppo, James G.; Napier, Bruce A.; Lloyd, Earl R.; Mantooth, Daniel S.; Minette, Michael J.; Mattlin, Ellen M.

    2007-03-08

    The demolition of a facility historically used for processing and handling transuranic materials is considered. Residual alpha-emitting radionuclide contamination poses an exposure hazard if released to the local environment during the demolition. The process of planning for the demolition of this highly alpha-contaminated building, 232-Z, included a pre-demolition modeling analysis of potential exposures. Estimated emission rates were used as input to an air dispersion model to estimate frequencies of occurrence of peak air and surface exposures. Post-demolition modeling was also conducted based on the actual demolition schedule and conditions. The modeling results indicated that downwind deposition is the main operational limitation for demolition of a highly alpha-contaminated building. During the demolition of the 232-Z, airborne radiation and surface contamination were monitored. The resultant non-detect monitoring results indicate a significant level of conservatism in the modeled results. This comparison supports the use of more realistic assumption in the estimation of emission rates. The resultant reduction in modeled levels of potential exposures has significant implications in terms of the projected costs of demolition of such structures.

  11. AVLIS Production Plant Project Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-15

    The AVLIS Production Plant is designated as a Major System Acquisition (in accordance with DOE Order 4240.IC) to deploy Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) technology at the Oak Ridge, Tennessee site, in support of the US Uranium Enrichment Program. The AVLIS Production Plant Project will deploy AVLIS technology by performing the design, construction, and startup of a production plant that will meet capacity production requirements of the Uranium Enrichment Program. The AVLIS Production Plant Project Management Plan has been developed to outline plans, baselines, and control systems to be employed in managing the AVLIS Production Plant Project and to define the roles and responsibilities of project participants. Participants will develop and maintain detailed procedures for implementing the management and control systems in agreement with this plan. This baseline document defines the system that measures work performed and costs incurred. This plan was developed by the AVLIS Production Plant Project staff of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in accordance with applicable DOE directives, orders and notices. 38 figures, 19 tables.

  12. Project Work on Plant Roots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devonald, V. G.

    1986-01-01

    Methods of investigating plant root growth developed for research purposes can be adopted for student use. Investigations of the effect of water table level and of ethylene concentration are described, and techniques of measuring root growth are explained. (Author/ML)

  13. Project Work on Plant Roots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devonald, V. G.

    1986-01-01

    Methods of investigating plant root growth developed for research purposes can be adopted for student use. Investigations of the effect of water table level and of ethylene concentration are described, and techniques of measuring root growth are explained. (Author/ML)

  14. Analysis of Radioactive Releases During Proposed Demolition Activities for the 224-U and 224-UA Buildings - Addendum

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Droppo, James G.; Joyce, Kevin E.; Strom, Daniel J.

    2010-12-21

    A post-demolition modeling analysis is conducted that compares during-demolition atmospheric concentration monitoring results with modeling results based on the actual meteorological conditions during the demolition activities. The 224-U and 224-UA Buildings that were located in the U-Plant UO3 complex in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site were demolished during the summer of 2010. These facilities converted uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH), a product of Hanford’s Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant, into uranium trioxide (UO3). This report is an addendum to a pre-demolition emission analysis and air dispersion modeling effort that was conducted for proposed demolition activities for these structures.

  15. Forecast Inaccuracies in Power Plant Projects From Project Managers' Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanabria, Orlando

    Guided by organizational theory, this phenomenological study explored the factors affecting forecast preparation and inaccuracies during the construction of fossil fuel-fired power plants in the United States. Forecast inaccuracies can create financial stress and uncertain profits during the project construction phase. A combination of purposeful and snowball sampling supported the selection of participants. Twenty project managers with over 15 years of experience in power generation and project experience across the United States were interviewed within a 2-month period. From the inductive codification and descriptive analysis, 5 themes emerged: (a) project monitoring, (b) cost control, (c) management review frequency, (d) factors to achieve a precise forecast, and (e) factors causing forecast inaccuracies. The findings of the study showed the factors necessary to achieve a precise forecast includes a detailed project schedule, accurate labor cost estimates, monthly project reviews and risk assessment, and proper utilization of accounting systems to monitor costs. The primary factors reported as causing forecast inaccuracies were cost overruns by subcontractors, scope gaps, labor cost and availability of labor, and equipment and material cost. Results of this study could improve planning accuracy and the effective use of resources during construction of power plants. The study results could contribute to social change by providing a framework to project managers to lessen forecast inaccuracies, and promote construction of power plants that will generate employment opportunities and economic development.

  16. Construction and demolition waste indicators.

    PubMed

    Mália, Miguel; de Brito, Jorge; Pinheiro, Manuel Duarte; Bravo, Miguel

    2013-03-01

    The construction industry is one of the biggest and most active sectors of the European Union (EU), consuming more raw materials and energy than any other economic activity. Furthermore, construction waste is the commonest waste produced in the EU. Current EU legislation sets out to implement construction and demolition waste (CDW) prevention and recycling measures. However it lacks tools to accelerate the development of a sector as bound by tradition as the building industry. The main objective of the present study was to determine indicators to estimate the amount of CDW generated on site both globally and by waste stream. CDW generation was estimated for six specific sectors: new residential construction, new non-residential construction, residential demolition, non-residential demolition, residential refurbishment, and non-residential refurbishment. The data needed to develop the indicators was collected through an exhaustive survey of previous international studies. The indicators determined suggest that the average composition of waste generated on site is mostly concrete and ceramic materials. Specifically for new residential and new non-residential construction the production of concrete waste in buildings with a reinforced concrete structure lies between 17.8 and 32.9 kg m(-2) and between 18.3 and 40.1 kg m(-2), respectively. For the residential and non-residential demolition sectors the production of this waste stream in buildings with a reinforced concrete structure varies from 492 to 840 kg m(-2) and from 401 to 768 kg/m(-2), respectively. For the residential and non-residential refurbishment sectors the production of concrete waste in buildings lies between 18.9 and 45.9 kg/m(-2) and between 18.9 and 191.2 kg/m(-2), respectively.

  17. DEMOLITION OF HANFORDS 233-S PLUTONIUM CONCENTRATION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    BERLIN, G.T.

    2004-01-21

    This paper describes the technical approach being used to demolish a plutonium-contaminated processing facility at the Hanford Site. This project represents the first open-air demolition of a highly-contaminated plutonium facility at the Hanford Site. This project may also represent one of the first plutonium facilities in the DOE complex to be demolished without first decontaminating surfaces to near ''free release'' standards. Demolition of plutonium contamination structures, if not properly managed, can subject cleanup personnel and the environment to significant risk. However, with proper sequencing and innovative use of commercially-available equipment, materials, and services, this project is demonstrating that a plutonium processing facility can be demolished while avoiding the need to perform extensive decontamination or construct large enclosures. The project is utilizing an excavator with purpose-built concrete shears, diamond circular saws, water misting and fogging equipment, specialized fixatives and dust suppressant mixtures, conventional mobile crane and rigging services, and near real-time modeling of meteorological and radiological conditions. Between the months of October and December 2003, approximately 85 percent of the footprint of the 233-S Facility had been demolished and properly disposed. Demolition of the remaining and more technically-challenging portion of the facility is expected to be completed by April 2004.

  18. VIEW OF RBC (REFINED BICARBONATE) BUILDING LOOKING NORTHEAST. DEMOLITION IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF RBC (REFINED BICARBONATE) BUILDING LOOKING NORTHEAST. DEMOLITION IN PROGRESS. "ARM & HAMMER BAKING SODA WAS MADE HERE FOR OVER 50 YEARS AND THEN SHIPPED ACROSS THE STREET TO THE CHURCH & DWIGHT PLANT ON WILLIS AVE. (ON THE RIGHT IN THIS PHOTO). LAYING ON THE GROUND IN FRONT OF C&D BUILDING IS PART OF AN RBC DRYING TOWER. - Solvay Process Company, Refined Bicarbonate Building, Between Willis & Milton Avenues, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  19. Recycling of rubble from building demolition for low-shrinkage concretes.

    PubMed

    Corinaldesi, Valeria; Moriconi, Giacomo

    2010-04-01

    In this project concrete mixtures were prepared that were characterized by low ductility due to desiccation by using debris from building demolition, which after a suitable treatment was used as aggregate for partial replacement of natural aggregates. The recycled aggregate used came from a recycling plant, in which rubble from building demolition was selected, crushed, cleaned, sieved, and graded. Such aggregates are known to be more porous as indicated by the Saturated Surface Dry (SSD) moisture content. The recycled concrete used as aggregates were added to the concrete mixture in order to study their influence on the fresh and hardened concrete properties. They were added either after water pre-soaking or in dry condition, in order to evaluate the influence of moisture in aggregates on the performance of concrete containing recycled aggregate. In particular, the effect of internal curing, due to the use of such aggregates, was studied. Concrete behavior due to desiccation under dehydration was studied by means of both drying shrinkage test and German angle test, through which shrinkage under the restrained condition of early age concrete can be evaluated. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Report on Hawaii Geothermal Power Plant Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-06-01

    The report describes the design, construction, and operation of the Hawaii Geothermal Generator Project. This power plant, located in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii, produces three megawatts of electricity from the steam phase of a geothermal well. (ACR)

  1. Native plant containers for restoration projects

    Treesearch

    Thomas D. Landis; David E. Steinfeld; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2010-01-01

    The choice of container is one of the most important considerations when growing or ordering native plants for a restoration project. Container characteristics affect not only growth and production efficiencies in the nursery, they can also have important consequences after outplanting. The challenging conditions on restoration sites require containers with...

  2. Parts of Plants. Hawaii Nature Study Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Curriculum Research and Development Group.

    This teaching guide is one of a series developed by the Curriculum Research and Development Group at the University of Hawaii. The program is laboratory and field oriented for elementary students. The focus of study for the project is the plant and animal life and the physical components of the Hawaiian environment, and their ecological…

  3. Parts of Plants. Hawaii Nature Study Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Curriculum Research and Development Group.

    This teaching guide is one of a series developed by the Curriculum Research and Development Group at the University of Hawaii. The program is laboratory and field oriented for elementary students. The focus of study for the project is the plant and animal life and the physical components of the Hawaiian environment, and their ecological…

  4. AVLIS production plant project schedule and milestones

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-15

    An AVLIS Production Plant Deployment Schedule for the engineering, procurement, and construction for both the Initial Increment of Production and the fully Activated Plant, has been developed by the project team consisting of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. with architect-engineer support from Bechtel National, Inc., Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation, and Westinghouse Corporation. The initial deployment phase consists of six separators modules and the three laser power amplifier modules consistent with the FY84 reference design with a name plate capacity of 5 million separative work units/yr followed by a full plant activation to approximately 13 million separative work units/yr. The AVLIS Production Plant project team's strategy for deployment schedule analysis focused on three schedule options: engineering limited schedule; authorization limited schedule; and funding limited project schedule. The three deployment schedule options developed by AVLIS project team have been classified in ranges such as an optimistic, rapid/moderate, or moderate/pessimistic based on the probability of meeting the individual schedule option's major milestones or program objectives of enriching uranium by the AVLIS process in an effective cost and schedule manner. 47 figures, 7 tables.

  5. Report on Hawaii geothermal power plant project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-06-01

    The Hawaii Geothermal Generator Project is the first power plant in the State of Hawaii to be powered by geothermal energy. This plant, which is located in the Puna District on the Island of Hawaii, produces three (3) megawatts of electricity utilizing the steam phase from the geothermal well. This project represents the climax of the geophysical research efforts going on for two decades in the Hawaiian Islands which resulted in the discovery of a significant reservoir of geothermal energy which could be put to practical use. In 1978 the Department of Energy, in conjunction with the State of Hawaii, entered into negotiations to design and build a power plant. The purpose and objective of this plant was to demonstrate the feasibility of constructing and operating a geothermal power plant located in a remote volcanically active area. A contract was signed in mid 1978 between the Research Corporation of the University of Hawaii (RCUH) and the Department of Energy (DOE). To date, the DOE has provided 8.3 million dollars with the State of Hawaii and others contributing 2.1 million dollars. The cost of the project exceeded its original estimates by approximately 25%. These increases in cost were principally contributed to the higher cost for construction than was originally estimated. Second, the cost of procuring the various pieces of equipment exceed their estimates by 10 to 20 percent, and third, the engineering dollar per man hour rose 20 to 25 percent.

  6. Recovery Act Weekly Video: 200 Area Asbestos Removal, U-Ancillary Demolition, 200 West Transfer Building Footings

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    A weekly update of the Recovery Act at work. Demolition of U-Ancillary that was contaminated with uranium and asbestos as well as removing asbestos from the Steam Generation Plant in the 200 East Area.

  7. Recovery Act Weekly Video: 200 Area Asbestos Removal, U-Ancillary Demolition, 200 West Transfer Building Footings

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    A weekly update of the Recovery Act at work. Demolition of U-Ancillary that was contaminated with uranium and asbestos as well as removing asbestos from the Steam Generation Plant in the 200 East Area.

  8. ASBESTOS RELEASE DURING BUILDING DEMOLITION ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL) monitored block-wide building demolition and debris disposal activities at Santa Cruz and Watsonsville, California following the 1989 earthquake; an implosion demolition of a 26-story bu...

  9. ASBESTOS RELEASE DURING BUILDING DEMOLITION ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL) monitored block-wide building demolition and debris disposal activities at Santa Cruz and Watsonsville, California following the 1989 earthquake; an implosion demolition of a 26-story bu...

  10. Final Demolition and Disposition of 209-E Critical Mass Laboratory - 12267

    SciTech Connect

    Woolery, Wade; Dodd, Edwin III

    2012-07-01

    The 209-E Critical Mass Laboratory was constructed in 1960 to provide a heavy shielded reactor room where quantities of plutonium or uranium in solution could be brought to near-critical configurations under carefully controlled and monitored conditions. In the late 1980's, the responsible contractor, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), was directed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare the facility for unoccupied status. The facility was demolished under a Removal Action Work Plan pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The funding for this project was provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The primary rooms of concern with regards to contamination in 209-E facility, which is over 9,000 square feet, are the criticality assembly room (CAR), the mix room, and the change room. The CAR contained two reactor hoods (HO-140 and HO-170), which each had a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter system. The CAR contained 13 tanks ranging from 38 L (10 gal) to 401 L (106 gal). Tanks TK-109 and TK-110 are below grade, and were removed as part of this demolition and disposition remedy. Nonradiological and radiological hazardous substances were removed, decontaminated, or fixed in place, prior to demolition. Except for the removal of below grade tanks TK-109 and TK-110, the facility was demolished to slab-on-grade. PNNL performed stabilization and deactivation activities that included removal of bulk fissile material and chemicals, flushing tanks, stabilizing contamination within gloveboxes and hoods, and packaging and removing waste. The removal of the contaminated plutonium equipment and materials from the 209E facility presented a number of challenges similar in nature to those associated with the inventory reduction and cleanup activities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Although there were no bulk fissile materials or chemicals within the facility, there were

  11. Distribution of materials in construction and demolition waste in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Coelho, André; de Brito, Jorge

    2011-08-01

    It may not be enough simply to know the global volume of construction and demolition waste (CDW) generated in a certain region or country if one wants to estimate, for instance, the revenue accruing from separating several types of materials from the input entering a given CDW recycling plant. A more detailed determination of the distribution of the materials within the generated CDW is needed and the present paper addresses this issue, distinguishing different buildings and types of operation (new construction, retrofitting and demolition). This has been achieved by measuring the materials from buildings of different ages within the Portuguese building stock, and by using direct data from demolition/retrofitting sites and new construction average values reported in the literature. An attempt to establish a benchmark with other countries is also presented. This knowledge may also benefit industry management, especially that related to CDW recycling, helping to optimize procedures, equipment size and operation and even industrial plant spatial distribution. In an extremely competitive market, where as in Portugal low-tech and high environmental impact procedures remain the norm in the construction industry (in particular, the construction waste industry), the introduction of a successful recycling industry is only possible with highly optimized processes and based on a knowledge-based approach to problems.

  12. Asbestos release from whole-building demolition of buildings with asbestos-containing material.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Robert A; Hargesheimer, John; Fourie, Walter

    2007-12-01

    The whole-building demolition method, which entails one-or two-story buildings pushed down by heavy equipment, loaded into trucks, and hauled away, is generally the most cost-effective means to remove small buildings. For taller buildings, a crane and wrecking ball may be used initially to reduce the height of the building. Demolitions might release asbestos fibers from friable asbestos-containing material (ACM). Fibers also might be released from nominally nonfriable ACM (Categories I and II nonfriable ACM) if it becomes friable after rough handling throughout the whole-building demolition process. This paper reports on asbestos air monitoring from two demolition projects involving ACM. In one building, Category II nonfriable ACM was present because it could not be removed safely prior to demolition. Both projects had large quantities of gypsum wallboard with ACM joint compound and ACM flooring. One building had large quantities of ACM spray-on ceiling material. During the demolitions personal air monitoring of the workers and area air monitoring downwind and around the sites were conducted. The monitoring found the concentrations of fibers detected by phase contrast microscopy were generally well below the permissible exposure limits (PEL) of workers. Electron microcopy analysis of samples at or near the PEL indicated most of the fibers were not asbestos, and the actual asbestos exposure was often below the detection limit of the procedure. The buildings were kept wet with fire hoses during the demolition and that required large quantities of water, 20,000-60,000 gal/day (75-225 m(3)/day). Earlier studies found little asbestos release from buildings containing only nonfriable ACM demolished by this method. This project found a negligible release of asbestos fibers, despite the presence of nonfriable materials that might become friable, such as ACM joint compound and spray-on ACM ceiling coating.

  13. Proceedings of a Topical Meeting On Small Scale Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Power Plant Projects

    SciTech Connect

    1986-02-12

    These proceedings describe the workshop of the Topical Meeting on Small Scale Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Power Plant Projects. The projects covered include binary power plants, rotary separator, screw expander power plants, modular wellhead power plants, inflow turbines, and the EPRI hybrid power system. Active projects versus geothermal power projects were described. In addition, a simple approach to estimating effects of fluid deliverability on geothermal power cost is described starting on page 119. (DJE-2005)

  14. Environmental Assessment for Building 88 Interior Demolition, Pearl Harbor Naval Complex, O’ahu, Hawaii

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    Peninsula NAVMAG Pearl Harbor West Loch Branch Waipahu H-1 FreewayKamehameha Highway Fa rrin gto n H ighw ay F o rt W e a ve r R o a d H-1 Fr eew ay...Honolulu Not to Scale Kahuku Point Mokapu Point Makapu`u Point O`ahu Project Site Project Location Map Building 88 Interior Demolition Environmental

  15. Power plant development at Mammoth Project

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, B.; Campbell, R.G.

    1984-04-01

    The Mammoth Geothermal Project is located within the Long Valley Known Geothermal Resources Area (KGRA) on the eastern slope of the Sierra Nevada mountain range of California some 300 miles north of Los Angeles. The plant is owned by Mammoth-Pacific (M-P), a joint venture of Pacific Energy Resources Incorporated and Mammoth Binary Power Company. The plan is to build two identical 3500 kW (net) air-cooled binary cycle geothermal power plants scheduled for completion in mid 1984. Nearly all the residential and commercial space heating in the Mammoth Lakes area is electrical. Electrical usage peaks in the wintertime, unlike the rest of the Edison system. While some power is provided by hydro plants in the area, most of the Edison supply arrives via a transmission line connecting to Edison facilities in the Mojave desert some 200 miles to the south. Peak power consumption in the area is about 40 MWe. The need to augment energy needs in the area by producing electricity from geothermal resources and using geothermal heat to replace electricity for space heating has long been recognized. The feasibility of this project is discussed.

  16. OPERATIONAL LIMITATIONS FOR DEMOLITION OF A HIGHLY ALPHA CONTAMINATED BUILDING MODLES VERSUS MEASURED AIR & SURFACE ACTIVITY CONCENTRATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    LLOYD, E.R.

    2006-11-02

    The demolition of a facility historically used for processing and handling transuranic materials is considered. Residual alpha emitting radionuclide contamination poses an exposure hazard if released to the local environment during the demolition. The process of planning for the demolition of this highly alpha contaminated building, 232-Z, included a predemolition modeling analysis of potential exposures. Estimated emission rates were used as input to an air dispersion model to estimate frequencies of occurrence of peak air and surface exposures. Postdemolition modeling was also conducted, based on the actual demolition schedule and conditions. The modeling results indicated that downwind deposition is the main operational limitation for demolition of a highly alpha-contaminated building. During the demolition of 232-Z, airborne radiation and surface contamination were monitored. The resultant non-detect monitoring results indicate a significant level of conservatism in the modeled results. This comparison supports the use of more realistic assumption in the estimating emission rates. The resultant reduction in modeled levels of potential exposures has significant implications in terms of the projected costs of demolition of such structures.

  17. Managing Stormwater and Dust at Demolition Sites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn how to manage stormwater and dust at demolition sites, including developing a stormwater solution prevention plan, best practices for erosion, runoff and sediment control to reduce environmental impacts and comply with environmental regulations.

  18. Discovery of Asbestos After Demolition is Underway

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Asbestos National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants Applicability Determination about additional friable asbestos material that arises during renovation or demolition being subject to the regulations from the time of creation or discovery

  19. Mercury-Containing Devices and Demolition

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Some items inside residential buildings contain mercury, which poses a persistent and toxic human health and environmental threat. These materials should be carefully salvaged for proper recycling to prevent mercury contamination prior to demolition.

  20. Great Basin Native Plant Project: 2013 Progress Report

    Treesearch

    Francis Kilkenny; Nancy Shaw; Corey Gucker

    2014-01-01

    The Interagency Native Plant Materials Development Program outlined in the 2002 United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and United States Department of Interior (USDI) Report to Congress encouraged use of native plant materials for rangeland rehabilitation and restoration where feasible. The Great Basin Native Plant Project is a cooperative project lead by the...

  1. Great Basin Native Plant Project: 2014 Progress Report

    Treesearch

    Francis Kilkenny; Anne Halford; Alexis Malcomb

    2015-01-01

    The Interagency Native Plant Materials Development Program outlined in the 2002 United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and United States Department of Interior (USDI) Report to Congress encouraged use of native plant materials for rangeland rehabilitation and restoration where feasible. The Great Basin Native Plant Project is a cooperative project lead by the...

  2. Great Basin Native Plant Project: 2015 Progress Report

    Treesearch

    Francis Kilkenny; Fred Edwards; Alexis Malcomb

    2016-01-01

    The Interagency Native Plant Materials Development Program outlined in the 2002 United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and United States Department of Interior (USDI) Report to Congress encouraged use of native plant materials for rangeland rehabilitation and restoration where feasible. The Great Basin Native Plant Project is a cooperative project lead...

  3. Molten wax as a dust control agent for demolition of facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, E.E.; Welty, B.D.

    2007-07-01

    Molten wax shows considerable promise as a fixative and dust control agent in demolition of radioactively contaminated facilities. Sticky molten wax, modified with special surfactants and wetting agents, is capable of not only coating materials but also penetrating into friable or dusty materials and making them incapable of becoming airborne during demolition. Wax also shows significant promise for stabilization of waste residuals that may be contained in buildings undergoing demolition. Some of the building materials that have been tested to date include concrete, wood, sheet rock, fiber insulation, lime, rock, and paper. Protective clothing, clay, sand, sulfur, and bentonite clay have been tested as surrogates for certain waste materials that may be encountered during building demolition. The paper describes several potential applications of molten wax for dust control in demolition of radioactive contaminated facilities. As a case-study, this paper describes a research test performed for a pipeline closure project being completed by the Idaho Cleanup Project at the Idaho National Laboratory. The project plans to excavate and remove a section of buried Duriron drain piping containing highly radioactive and friable and 'flighty' waste residuals. A full-scale pipeline mockup containing simulated waste was buried in sand to simulate the direct buried subsurface condition of the subject piping. The pipeline was pre-heated by drawing hot air through the line with a HEPA vacuum blower unit. Molten wax was pumped into the line and allowed to cool. The line was then broken apart in various places to evaluate the permeation performance of the wax. The wax fully permeated all the surrogate materials rendering them non-friable with a consistency similar to modeling clay. Based on the performance during the mockup, it is anticipated that the wax will be highly effective in controlling the spread of radiological contamination during pipe demolition activities. (authors)

  4. Methods for demolition of building E5625. Contractor report, September 1987-November 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, T.J.; Hill, T.E.; Buchi, K.M.

    1990-03-01

    The U.S. Army Chemical Research, Development and Engineering Center (CRDEC) plans to dismantle and demolish the Pilot Plant (Building E5625). Now obsolete, this building was used to conduct chemical warfare (CW) agent studies. The objective of this program was to study and develop the best methods to safely demolish Building E5625. Aspects of the demolition considered included: environmental and personnel safety, applicable demolition techniques, debris disposal, and time and cost considerations. Five developed concepts were composed of combinations of the following major tasks: plan generation, site preparation, enclosing Building E5625 within a metal building, building demolition (selective or gantry crane/wrecking ball), hot gas decontamination of the entire building, decontamination of the building debris (chemical decontamination or incineration), and site closure.

  5. HEAVY METALS IN RECOVERED FINES FOR CONSTRUCTION AND DEMOLITION DEBRIS RECYCLING FACILITIES IN FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major product recovered from the processing and recycling of construction and demolition (C&D) debris is screened soil, also referred to as fines. A proposed reuse option for C&D debris fines is fill material, typically in construction projects as a substitute for natural soil....

  6. 24 CFR 970.29 - Criteria for disapproval of demolition or disposition applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Criteria for disapproval of... PUBLIC HOUSING PROJECTS § 970.29 Criteria for disapproval of demolition or disposition applications. HUD... related to the requirements of this part, such as failure to meet the requirements for the...

  7. HEAVY METALS IN RECOVERED FINES FOR CONSTRUCTION AND DEMOLITION DEBRIS RECYCLING FACILITIES IN FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major product recovered from the processing and recycling of construction and demolition (C&D) debris is screened soil, also referred to as fines. A proposed reuse option for C&D debris fines is fill material, typically in construction projects as a substitute for natural soil....

  8. Leaching behaviour of hazardous demolition waste.

    PubMed

    Roussat, Nicolas; Méhu, Jacques; Abdelghafour, Mohamed; Brula, Pascal

    2008-11-01

    Demolition wastes are generally disposed of in unlined landfills for inert waste. However, demolition wastes are not just inert wastes. Indeed, a small fraction of demolition waste contains components that are hazardous to human health and the environment, e.g., lead-based paint, mercury-contained in fluorescent lamps, treated wood, and asbestos. The objective of this study is to evaluate the release potential of pollutants contained in these hazardous components when they are mixed with inert wastes in unlined landfills. After identification of the different building products which can contain hazardous elements and which can be potentially pollutant in landfill scenario, we performed leaching tests using three different lysimeters: one lysimeter containing only inert wastes and two lysimeters containing inert wastes mixed with hazardous demolition wastes. The leachates from these lysimeters were analysed (heavy metals, chlorides, sulphates fluoride, DOC (Dissolved Organic Carbon), phenol index, and PAH). Finally, we compared concentrations and cumulative releases of elements in leachates with the limits values of European regulation for the acceptance of inert wastes at landfill. Results indicate that limit values are exceeded for some elements. We also performed a percolation column test with only demolition hazardous wastes to evaluate the specific contribution of these wastes in the observed releases.

  9. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project

    SciTech Connect

    F. H. Southworth; P. E. MacDonald

    2003-11-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project will demonstrate emissions-free nuclearassisted electricity and hydrogen production by 2015. The NGNP reactor will be a helium-cooled, graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor with a design goal outlet temperature of 1000 C or higher. The reactor thermal power and core configuration will be designed to assure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage during hypothetical accidents. The fuel cycle will be a once-through very high burnup low-enriched uranium fuel cycle. This paper provides a description of the project to build the NGNP at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The NGNP Project includes an overall reactor design activity and four major supporting activities: materials selection and qualification, NRC licensing and regulatory support, fuel development and qualification, and the hydrogen production plant. Each of these activities is discussed in the paper. All the reactor design and construction activities will be managed under the DOE’s project management system as outlined in DOE Order 413.3. The key elements of the overall project management system discussed in this paper include the client and project management organization relationship, critical decisions (CDs), acquisition strategy, and the project logic and timeline. The major activities associated with the materials program include development of a plan for managing the selection and qualification of all component materials required for the NGNP; identification of specific materials alternatives for each system component; evaluation of the needed testing, code work, and analysis required to qualify each identified material; preliminary selection of component materials; irradiation of needed sample materials; physical, mechanical, and chemical testing of unirradiated and irradiated materials; and documentation of final materials selections. The NGNP will be licensed by the NRC under 10 CFR 50 or 10

  10. 26 CFR 1.280B-1 - Demolition of structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Demolition of structures. 1.280B-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Not Deductible § 1.280B-1 Demolition of structures. (a) In general. Section 280B provides that, in the case of the demolition of any structure, no deduction otherwise...

  11. 26 CFR 1.280B-1 - Demolition of structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Demolition of structures. 1.280B-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Not Deductible § 1.280B-1 Demolition of structures. (a) In general. Section 280B provides that, in the case of the demolition of any structure, no deduction otherwise...

  12. 26 CFR 1.280B-1 - Demolition of structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Demolition of structures. 1.280B-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Items Not Deductible § 1.280B-1 Demolition of structures. (a) In general. Section 280B provides that, in the case of the demolition of any structure, no deduction otherwise allowable...

  13. 26 CFR 1.280B-1 - Demolition of structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Demolition of structures. 1.280B-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Not Deductible § 1.280B-1 Demolition of structures. (a) In general. Section 280B provides that, in the case of the demolition of any structure, no deduction otherwise...

  14. 40 CFR 61.145 - Standard for demolition and renovation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for demolition and renovation... for Asbestos § 61.145 Standard for demolition and renovation. (a) Applicability. To determine which requirements of paragraphs (a), (b), and (c) of this section apply to the owner or operator of a demolition or...

  15. 26 CFR 1.280B-1 - Demolition of structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Demolition of structures. 1.280B-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Not Deductible § 1.280B-1 Demolition of structures. (a) In general. Section 280B provides that, in the case of the demolition of any structure, no deduction otherwise...

  16. 29 CFR 1926.860 - Selective demolition by explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Selective demolition by explosives. 1926.860 Section 1926.860 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Selective demolition by explosives. Selective demolition by explosives shall be conducted in accordance...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.860 - Selective demolition by explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Selective demolition by explosives. 1926.860 Section 1926.860 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Selective demolition by explosives. Selective demolition by explosives shall be conducted in accordance...

  18. 29 CFR 1926.860 - Selective demolition by explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Selective demolition by explosives. 1926.860 Section 1926.860 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Selective demolition by explosives. Selective demolition by explosives shall be conducted in accordance...

  19. 29 CFR 1926.860 - Selective demolition by explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Selective demolition by explosives. 1926.860 Section 1926.860 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Selective demolition by explosives. Selective demolition by explosives shall be conducted in accordance...

  20. 29 CFR 1926.860 - Selective demolition by explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Selective demolition by explosives. 1926.860 Section 1926.860 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Selective demolition by explosives. Selective demolition by explosives shall be conducted in accordance...

  1. Construction and demolition waste generation rates for high-rise buildings in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Mah, Chooi Mei; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Ho, Chin Siong

    2016-12-01

    Construction and demolition waste continues to sharply increase in step with the economic growth of less developed countries. Though the construction industry is large, it is composed of small firms with individual waste management practices, often leading to the deleterious environmental outcomes. Quantifying construction and demolition waste generation allows policy makers and stakeholders to understand the true internal and external costs of construction, providing a necessary foundation for waste management planning that may overcome deleterious environmental outcomes and may be both economically and environmentally optimal. This study offers a theoretical method for estimating the construction and demolition project waste generation rate by utilising available data, including waste disposal truck size and number, and waste volume and composition. This method is proposed as a less burdensome and more broadly applicable alternative, in contrast to waste estimation by on-site hand sorting and weighing. The developed method is applied to 11 projects across Malaysia as the case study. This study quantifies waste generation rate and illustrates the construction method in influencing the waste generation rate, estimating that the conventional construction method has a waste generation rate of 9.88 t 100 m(-2), the mixed-construction method has a waste generation rate of 3.29 t 100 m(-2), and demolition projects have a waste generation rate of 104.28 t 100 m(-2).

  2. Bat Surveys of Retired Facilitiies Scheduled for Demolition by Washington Closure Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Gano, K. A.; Lucas, J. G.; Lindsey, C. T.

    2011-06-30

    This project was conducted to evaluate buildings and facilities remaining in the Washington Closure Hanford (WCH) deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition schedule for bat roost sites. The project began in spring of 2009 and was concluded in spring of 2011. A total of 196 buildings and facilities were evaluated for the presence of bat roosting sites. The schedule for the project was prioritized to accommodate the demolition schedule. As the surveys were completed, the results were provided to the project managers to facilitate planning and project completion. The surveys took place in the 300 Area, 400 Area, 100-H, 100-D, 100-N, and 100-B/C Area. This report is the culmination of all the bat surveys and summarizes the findings by area and includes recommended mitigation actions where bat roosts were found.

  3. 29 CFR 1926.859 - Mechanical demolition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... operations shall be permitted in this area at any other time. (b) The weight of the demolition ball shall not... such manner that the weight cannot become accidentally disconnected. (e) When pulling over walls or... other such ornamental stonework shall be removed prior to pulling walls over. (g) During demoliton...

  4. 29 CFR 1926.859 - Mechanical demolition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... operations shall be permitted in this area at any other time. (b) The weight of the demolition ball shall not... such manner that the weight cannot become accidentally disconnected. (e) When pulling over walls or... other such ornamental stonework shall be removed prior to pulling walls over. (g) During demoliton...

  5. 29 CFR 1926.859 - Mechanical demolition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... operations shall be permitted in this area at any other time. (b) The weight of the demolition ball shall not... such manner that the weight cannot become accidentally disconnected. (e) When pulling over walls or... other such ornamental stonework shall be removed prior to pulling walls over. (g) During demoliton...

  6. 36 CFR 401.11 - Demolition criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MEMORIALS § 401.11 Demolition criteria. As authorized by the provisions of 36 U.S.C. 2106(e), the Commission may take necessary action to demolish any war memorial built outside the United States by a citizen of... association and to dispose of the site of the memorial in a way the Commission decides is proper, if— (a)...

  7. 36 CFR 401.11 - Demolition criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MEMORIALS § 401.11 Demolition criteria. As authorized by the provisions of 36 U.S.C. 2106(e), the Commission may take necessary action to demolish any war memorial built outside the United States by a citizen of... association and to dispose of the site of the memorial in a way the Commission decides is proper, if— (a)...

  8. Use of rubble from building demolition in mortars.

    PubMed

    Corinaldesi, V; Giuggiolini, M; Moriconi, G

    2002-01-01

    Because of increasing waste production and public concerns about the environment, it is desirable to recycle materials from building demolition. If suitably selected, ground, cleaned and sieved in appropriate industrial crushing plants, these materials can be profitably used in concrete. Nevertheless, the presence of masonry instead of concrete rubble is particularly detrimental to the mechanical performance and durability of recycled-aggregate concrete and the same negative effect is detectable when natural sand is replaced by fine recycled aggregate fraction. An alternative use of both masonry rubble and fine recycled material fraction could be in mortars. These could contain either recycled instead of natural sand or powder obtained by bricks crushing as partial cement substitution. In particular, attention is focused on the modification that takes place when either polypropylene or stainless steel fibers are added to these mortars. Polypropylene fibers are added in order to reduce shrinkage of mortars, stainless steel fibers for improving their flexural strength. The combined use of polypropylene fibers and fine recycled material from building demolition could allow the preparation of mortars showing good performance, in particular when coupled with bricks. Furthermore, the combined use of stainless steel fibers and mortars containing brick powder seems to be an effective way to guarantee a high flexural strength.

  9. Strategy of Construction and Demolition Waste Management after Chemical Industry Facilities Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashkinova, I. N.; Batrakova, G. M.; Vaisman, Ya I.

    2017-06-01

    Mixed waste products are generated in the process of irrelevant industrial projects’ removal if conventional techniques of their demolition and dismantling are applied. In Russia the number of unused chemical industry facilities including structures with high rate of wear is growing. In removing industrial buildings and production shops it is used conventional techniques of demolition and dismantling in the process of which mixed waste products are generated. The presence of hazardous chemicals in these wastes makes difficulties for their use and leads to the increasing volume of unutilized residues. In the process of chemical industry facilities’ removal this fact takes on special significance as a high level of hazardous chemicals in the waste composition demands for the realization of unprofitable measures aimed at ensuring environmental and industrial safety. The proposed strategy of managing waste originated from the demolition and dismantling of chemical industry facilities is based on the methodology of industrial metabolism which allows identifying separate material flows of recycled, harmful and ballast components, performing separate collection of components during removal and taking necessary preventive measures. This strategy has been tested on the aniline synthesis plant being in the process of removal. As a result, a flow of 10 wt. %, subjected to decontamination, was isolated from the total volume of construction and demolition waste (C&D waste). The considered approach allowed using the resource potential of more than 80wt. % of waste and minimizing the disposed waste volume.

  10. Compressed Air System Optimization Project Improves Production at a Metal Forging Plant (Modern Forge, TN, Plant)

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-01

    In 1995, Modern Forge of Tennessee implemented a compressed air system improvement project at its Piney Flats, Tennessee, forging plant. Due to the project’s implementation, the plant was able to operate with fewer compressors and improve its product quality, thus allowing it to increase productivity. The project also resulted in considerable energy and maintenance savings.

  11. Electronic Leaf Project: An Innovative Method for Plant Identification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargis, Jace; Houston, Carolyn

    2000-01-01

    Explains a leaf project on the classification of plants for fifth through eighth grade students. Integrates technology into the unit and studies the subject as an electronic file. Recommends incorporation of metacognitive strategies into students' learning processes. (YDS)

  12. Green Residential Demolitions: Case Study of Vacant Land Reuse in Storm Water Management in Cleveland

    EPA Science Inventory

    The demolition process impacts how vacant land might be reused for storm water management. For five residential demolition sites (Cleveland, Ohio), an enhanced green demolition process was observed in 2012, and soil physical and hydrologic characteristics were measured predemolit...

  13. Green Residential Demolitions: Case Study of Vacant Land Reuse in Storm Water Management in Cleveland

    EPA Science Inventory

    The demolition process impacts how vacant land might be reused for storm water management. For five residential demolition sites (Cleveland, Ohio), an enhanced green demolition process was observed in 2012, and soil physical and hydrologic characteristics were measured predemolit...

  14. Approaches to Teaching Plant Nutrition. Children's Learning in Science Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeds Univ. (England). Centre for Studies in Science and Mathematics Education.

    During the period 1984-1986, over 30 teachers from the Yorkshire (England) region have worked in collaboration with the Children's Learning in Science Project (CLIS) developing and testing teaching schemes in the areas of energy, particle theory, and plant nutrition. The project is based upon the constructivist approach to teaching. This document…

  15. The health impact of demolition dust.

    PubMed

    Holman, Claire

    2012-09-01

    Dr Claire Holman, Principal at ENVIRON, a global consultancy which works with clients 'to manage their most challenging environmental and health and safety issues, and attain their sustainability goals', considers the impacts on health of dust released during demolition work, and the measures that can be taken to mitigate them. Drawing on a recent case study, she explains how ENVIRON prepared a comprehensive site dust management plan (DMP) to minimise fungal spore release during the demolition of a building located adjacent to residential accommodation for child leukaemia patients and their parents. She also considers some of the lessons learned, in terms of actions that 'worked well' and those that could, with hindsight, have been undertaken 'better'.

  16. Hanford Patrol Academy demolition sites closure plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-30

    The Hanford Site is owned by the U.S. Government and operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office. Westinghouse Hanford Company is a major contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office and serves as co-operator of the Hanford Patrol Academy Demolition Sites, the unit addressed in this paper. This document consists of a Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Part A Permit Application, Form 3 (Revision 4), and a closure plan for the site. An explanation of the Part A Form 3 submitted with this closure plan is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. This Hanford Patrol Academy Demolition Sites Closure Plan submittal contains information current as of December 15, 1994.

  17. The association between demolition activity and children's blood lead levels.

    PubMed

    Rabito, F A; Iqbal, S; Shorter, C F; Osman, P; Philips, P E; Langlois, E; White, L E

    2007-03-01

    Urban renewal efforts are a priority for many American cities. As efforts to reconstitute urban centers increase, the demolition of old, deteriorated structures has accelerated. Recent studies have identified demolitions as a potential source of environmental lead exposure. We conducted a study examining the relationship between demolition activity and blood lead levels of children residing in neighborhoods where demolition activity occurred. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in St. Louis City, Missouri. The study period was January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2002. Data were obtained from the Missouri Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program's (CLPPP) lead surveillance system and St. Louis Demolition Permit Database. Children were considered exposed to a demolition if they had a blood lead test within 45 days of any demolition on a census block. Exposure was classified as both a dichotomous (yes/no) and a categorical (none/one/multiple) variable and was analyzed separately. Linear regression models were developed to determine effects of demolitions on blood lead levels. A total of 1196 children 6-72 months of age living in 395 census blocks were included. 314 (26.3%) were exposed and 882 (73.7%) were unexposed to a demolition. In an adjusted model, exposure to multiple demolitions was found to have significant effects on children blood lead levels (coefficient=0.281; 95% CI=0.069, 0.493; P-value=0.010). Age of the child, race, and age of housing where children's resided were also significant predictors. This study suggests that multiple demolitions within a census block may significantly increase children's blood lead levels. The findings may be useful to municipal planners in older cities where demolitions are being used as an urban renewal tool.

  18. Nevada geothermal power plant project approved

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    A proposal to construct and test a 12.5-megawatt geothermal power plant in the Steamboat Hot Springs KGRA in Washoe County, Nevada, has been approved by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The power plant could be completed by October 1987. Several stipulations are included in the BLM approval. The stipulations include a program to monitor ground water, surface water, and hydrothermal features to detect any impacts on the hydrology in the Steamboat Hot Springs area. When plant operations are tested, an emission test will be required to verify that noncondensible gas concentrations are within federal and state standards. No geothermal fluid will be discharged on the land's surface. Other stipulations include the special construction of electrical distribution lines to protect birds of prey; the fencing of hazardous areas; and a minimal disturbance of surface areas.

  19. Infection control considerations during construction activities: land excavation and demolition.

    PubMed

    Cheng, S M; Streifel, A J

    2001-10-01

    Because current trends in hospital restructuring in North America, amalgamations and mergers, and the aging of health care facilities, the need to restructure physical buildings has become greater. Hospital construction carries with it risks to patients. One key concern is the risk of aspergillosis associated with hospital construction. Infection control practitioners must consider some key factors when addressing land excavation and building demolition, which differ in some ways from construction that occurs within a health care facility. The key factors to consider are project concept, risk assessment of patients, procedures and environment, air quality, routes of entry and egress, soil management, conducting inspections, contingency planning, housekeeping, and lines of cooperation and communication with various stakeholders. Considering these areas will help ensure that health care facility personnel and the workers have exercised diligence in patient care.

  20. Primarily Plants, A Plant Study for K-3. Project AIMS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Evalyn; Mercier, Sheryl

    Project AIMS (Activities to Integrate Mathematics and Science) has as its purpose the integration of subject matter in grades K-9. Field testing of the curriculum materials produced by AIMS indicates that this interpretation produces the following beneficial results: (1) mathematics becomes more meaningful, hence more useful; (2) science is…

  1. Primarily Plants, A Plant Study for K-3. Project AIMS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Evalyn; Mercier, Sheryl

    Project AIMS (Activities to Integrate Mathematics and Science) has as its purpose the integration of subject matter in grades K-9. Field testing of the curriculum materials produced by AIMS indicates that this interpretation produces the following beneficial results: (1) mathematics becomes more meaningful, hence more useful; (2) science is…

  2. Small-Scale Geothermal Power Plant Field Verification Projects: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kutscher, C.

    2001-07-03

    In the spring of 2000, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory issued a Request for Proposal for the construction of small-scale (300 kilowatt [kW] to 1 megawatt [MW]) geothermal power plants in the western United States. Five projects were selected for funding. Of these five, subcontracts have been completed for three, and preliminary design work is being conducted. The three projects currently under contract represent a variety of concepts and locations: a 1-MW evaporatively enhanced, air-cooled binary-cycle plant in Nevada; a 1-MW water-cooled Kalina-cycle plant in New Mexico; and a 750-kW low-temperature flash plant in Utah. All three also incorporate direct heating: onion dehydration, heating for a fish hatchery, and greenhouse heating, respectively. These projects are expected to begin operation between April 2002 and September 2003. In each case, detailed data on performance and costs will be taken over a 3-year period.

  3. High Flux Isotopes Reactor (HFIR) Cooling Towers Demolition Waste Management

    SciTech Connect

    Pudelek, R. E.; Gilbert, W. C.

    2002-02-26

    This paper describes the results of a joint initiative between Oak Ridge National Laboratory, operated by UT-Battelle, and Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC (BJC) to characterize, package, transport, treat, and dispose of demolition waste from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Cooling Tower. The demolition and removal of waste from the site was the first critical step in the planned HFIR beryllium reflector replacement outage scheduled. The outage was scheduled to last a maximum of six months. Demolition and removal of the waste was critical because a new tower was to be constructed over the old concrete water basin. A detailed sampling and analysis plan was developed to characterize the hazardous and radiological constituents of the components of the Cooling Tower. Analyses were performed for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) heavy metals and semi-volatile constituents as defined by 40 CFR 261 and radiological parameters including gross alpha, gross beta, gross gamma, alpha-emitting isotopes and beta-emitting isotopes. Analysis of metals and semi-volatile constituents indicated no exceedances of regulatory limits. Analysis of radionuclides identified uranium and thorium and associated daughters. In addition 60Co, 99Tc, 226Rm, and 228Rm were identified. Most of the tower materials were determined to be low level radioactive waste. A small quantity was determined not to be radioactive, or could be decontaminated. The tower was dismantled October 2000 to January 2001 using a detailed step-by-step process to aid waste segregation and container loading. The volume of waste as packaged for treatment was approximately 1982 cubic meters (70,000 cubic feet). This volume was comprised of plastic ({approx}47%), wood ({approx}38%) and asbestos transite ({approx}14%). The remaining {approx}1% consisted of the fire protection piping (contaminated with lead-based paint) and incidental metal from conduit, nails and braces/supports, and sludge from the basin. The waste

  4. The CELSS breadboard project: Plant production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, William M.

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Breadboard Project for the Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) program is described. The simplified schematic of a CELSS is given. A modular approach is taken to building the CELSS Breadboard. Each module is researched in order to develop a data set for each one prior to its integration into the complete system. The data being obtained from the Biomass Production Module or the Biomass Production Chamber is examined. The other primary modules, food processing and resource recovery or waste management, are discussed briefly. The crew habitat module is not discussed. The primary goal of the Breadboard Project is to scale-up research data to an integrated system capable of supporting one person in order to establish feasibility for the development and operation of a CELSS. Breadboard is NASA's first attempt at developing a large scale CELSS.

  5. 253. Photocopy of drawing (1975 demolition drawing by the Ralph ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    253. Photocopy of drawing (1975 demolition drawing by the Ralph M. Parsons Company) DEMOLITION AND REMOVAL FOR LAUNCHER - SLC-3E, SHEET D-9 - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  6. 186. Photocopy of drawing (1975 demolition drawing by the Ralph ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    186. Photocopy of drawing (1975 demolition drawing by the Ralph M. Parsons Company) DEMOLITION AND REMOVAL PLANS FOR THE MST; NORTH, SOUTH, AND EAST, TOWER ELEVATIONS, SHEET D-3 - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  7. 187. Photocopy of drawing (1975 demolition drawing by the Ralph ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    187. Photocopy of drawing (1975 demolition drawing by the Ralph M. Parsons Company) DEMOLITION AND REMOVAL PLANS FOR MST STATIONS 3 AND 12, SHEET D-4 - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  8. 188. Photocopy of drawing (1975 demolition drawing by the Ralph ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    188. Photocopy of drawing (1975 demolition drawing by the Ralph M. Parsons Company) DEMOLITION AND REMOVAL PLANS FOR MST STATION 39, 48, 55.5, AD 63, SHEET D-6 - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  9. Computer, Video, and Rapid-Cycling Plant Projects in an Undergraduate Plant Breeding Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaels, T. E.

    1993-01-01

    Studies the perceived effectiveness of four student projects involving videotape production, computer conferencing, microcomputer simulation, and rapid-cycling Brassica breeding for undergraduate plant breeding students in two course offerings in consecutive years. Linking of the computer conferencing and video projects improved the rating of the…

  10. Computer, Video, and Rapid-Cycling Plant Projects in an Undergraduate Plant Breeding Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaels, T. E.

    1993-01-01

    Studies the perceived effectiveness of four student projects involving videotape production, computer conferencing, microcomputer simulation, and rapid-cycling Brassica breeding for undergraduate plant breeding students in two course offerings in consecutive years. Linking of the computer conferencing and video projects improved the rating of the…

  11. Project plan remove special nuclear material from PFP project plutonium finishing plant

    SciTech Connect

    BARTLETT, W.D.

    1999-05-13

    This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Remove Special Nuclear Material (SNM) Materials. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Integrated Project Management Plan (IPMP), HNF-3617, Rev. 0. This project plan is the top-level definitive project management document for PFP Remove SNM Materials project. It specifies the technical, schedule, requirements and the cost baselines to manage the execution of the Remove SNM Materials project. Any deviations to the document must be authorized through the appropriate change control process.

  12. Gentrification in black and white: the racial impact of public housing demolition in American cities.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The gentrification that has transformed high-poverty neighbourhoods in US cities since the mid 1990s has been characterised by high levels of state reinvestment. Prominent among public-sector interventions has been the demolition of public housing and in some cases multimillion dollar redevelopment efforts. In this paper, the racial dimension of state-supported gentrification in large US cities is examined by looking at the direct and indirect displacement induced by public housing transformation. The data show a clear tendency towards the demolition of public housing projects with disproportionately high African American occupancy. The pattern of indirect displacement is more varied; public housing transformation has produced a number of paths of neighbourhood change. The most common, however, involve significant reductions in poverty, sometimes associated with Black to White racial turnover and sometimes not. The findings underscore the central importance of race in understanding the dynamics of gentrification in US cities.

  13. 48 CFR 52.246-13 - Inspection-Dismantling, Demolition, or Removal of Improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., Demolition, or Removal of Improvements. 52.246-13 Section 52.246-13 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.246-13 Inspection—Dismantling, Demolition, or Removal of Improvements..., demolition, or removal of improvements: Inspection—Dismantling, Demolition, or Removal of Improvements (AUG...

  14. 48 CFR 52.246-13 - Inspection-Dismantling, Demolition, or Removal of Improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., Demolition, or Removal of Improvements. 52.246-13 Section 52.246-13 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.246-13 Inspection—Dismantling, Demolition, or Removal of Improvements..., demolition, or removal of improvements: Inspection—Dismantling, Demolition, or Removal of Improvements (AUG...

  15. 48 CFR 52.246-13 - Inspection-Dismantling, Demolition, or Removal of Improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., Demolition, or Removal of Improvements. 52.246-13 Section 52.246-13 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.246-13 Inspection—Dismantling, Demolition, or Removal of Improvements..., demolition, or removal of improvements: Inspection—Dismantling, Demolition, or Removal of Improvements (AUG...

  16. 48 CFR 52.246-13 - Inspection-Dismantling, Demolition, or Removal of Improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., Demolition, or Removal of Improvements. 52.246-13 Section 52.246-13 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.246-13 Inspection—Dismantling, Demolition, or Removal of Improvements..., demolition, or removal of improvements: Inspection—Dismantling, Demolition, or Removal of Improvements (AUG...

  17. 48 CFR 52.246-13 - Inspection-Dismantling, Demolition, or Removal of Improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., Demolition, or Removal of Improvements. 52.246-13 Section 52.246-13 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.246-13 Inspection—Dismantling, Demolition, or Removal of Improvements..., demolition, or removal of improvements: Inspection—Dismantling, Demolition, or Removal of Improvements (AUG...

  18. Plants. Learning in Science Project. Working Paper No. 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stead, Beverley

    One area explored in the second (in-depth) phase of the Learning in Science Project was "children's science," defined as views of the world and the meanings for words that children have and bring with them to science lessons. The investigation reported focuses on the concept of "plant" held by 29 students. Data were obtained by…

  19. 7 CFR 1412.48 - Planting Transferability Pilot Project.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... a program of crop rotation on the farm to achieve agronomic and pest and disease management benefits... PROGRAM AND AVERAGE CROP REVENUE ELECTION PROGRAM FOR THE 2008 AND SUBSEQUENT CROP YEARS Direct and... § 1412.47, for each of the 2009 and subsequent crop years, the Planting Transferability Pilot Project...

  20. 7 CFR 1412.48 - Planting Transferability Pilot Project.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... a program of crop rotation on the farm to achieve agronomic and pest and disease management benefits... PROGRAM AND AVERAGE CROP REVENUE ELECTION PROGRAM FOR THE 2008 AND SUBSEQUENT CROP YEARS Direct and... § 1412.47, for each of the 2009 and subsequent crop years, the Planting Transferability Pilot Project...

  1. Plants. Learning in Science Project. Working Paper No. 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stead, Beverley

    One area explored in the second (in-depth) phase of the Learning in Science Project was "children's science," defined as views of the world and the meanings for words that children have and bring with them to science lessons. The investigation reported focuses on the concept of "plant" held by 29 students. Data were obtained by…

  2. 7 CFR 1412.48 - Planting Transferability Pilot Project.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... a program of crop rotation on the farm to achieve agronomic and pest and disease management benefits... PROGRAM AND AVERAGE CROP REVENUE ELECTION PROGRAM FOR THE 2008 AND SUBSEQUENT CROP YEARS Direct and... § 1412.47, for each of the 2009 and subsequent crop years, the Planting Transferability Pilot Project...

  3. 7 CFR 1412.48 - Planting Transferability Pilot Project.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... a program of crop rotation on the farm to achieve agronomic and pest and disease management benefits... PROGRAM AND AVERAGE CROP REVENUE ELECTION PROGRAM FOR THE 2008 AND SUBSEQUENT CROP YEARS Direct and... § 1412.47, for each of the 2009 and subsequent crop years, the Planting Transferability Pilot Project...

  4. 7 CFR 1412.48 - Planting Transferability Pilot Project.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... a program of crop rotation on the farm to achieve agronomic and pest and disease management benefits... PROGRAM AND AVERAGE CROP REVENUE ELECTION PROGRAM FOR THE 2008 AND SUBSEQUENT CROP YEARS Direct and... § 1412.47, for each of the 2009 and subsequent crop years, the Planting Transferability Pilot Project...

  5. A BIM-based system for demolition and renovation waste estimation and planning

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jack C.P.; Ma, Lauren Y.H.

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: ► We developed a waste estimation system leveraging the BIM technology. ► The system can calculate waste disposal charging fee and pick-up truck demand. ► We presented an example scenario demonstrating this system. ► Automatic, time-saving and wide applicability are the features of the system. - Abstract: Due to the rising worldwide awareness of green environment, both government and contractors have to consider effective construction and demolition (C and D) waste management practices. The last two decades have witnessed the growing importance of demolition and renovation (D and R) works and the growing amount of D and R waste disposed to landfills every day, especially in developed cities like Hong Kong. Quantitative waste prediction is crucial for waste management. It can enable contractors to pinpoint critical waste generation processes and to plan waste control strategies. In addition, waste estimation could also facilitate some government waste management policies, such as the waste disposal charging scheme in Hong Kong. Currently, tools that can accurately and conveniently estimate the amount of waste from construction, renovation, and demolition projects are lacking. In the light of this research gap, this paper presents a building information modeling (BIM) based system that we have developed for estimation and planning of D and R waste. BIM allows multi-disciplinary information to be superimposed within one digital building model. Our system can extract material and volume information through the BIM model and integrate the information for detailed waste estimation and planning. Waste recycling and reuse are also considered in our system. Extracted material information can be provided to recyclers before demolition or renovation to make recycling stage more cooperative and more efficient. Pick-up truck requirements and waste disposal charging fee for different waste facilities will also be predicted through our system. The results

  6. A BIM-based system for demolition and renovation waste estimation and planning.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jack C P; Ma, Lauren Y H

    2013-06-01

    Due to the rising worldwide awareness of green environment, both government and contractors have to consider effective construction and demolition (C&D) waste management practices. The last two decades have witnessed the growing importance of demolition and renovation (D&R) works and the growing amount of D&R waste disposed to landfills every day, especially in developed cities like Hong Kong. Quantitative waste prediction is crucial for waste management. It can enable contractors to pinpoint critical waste generation processes and to plan waste control strategies. In addition, waste estimation could also facilitate some government waste management policies, such as the waste disposal charging scheme in Hong Kong. Currently, tools that can accurately and conveniently estimate the amount of waste from construction, renovation, and demolition projects are lacking. In the light of this research gap, this paper presents a building information modeling (BIM) based system that we have developed for estimation and planning of D&R waste. BIM allows multi-disciplinary information to be superimposed within one digital building model. Our system can extract material and volume information through the BIM model and integrate the information for detailed waste estimation and planning. Waste recycling and reuse are also considered in our system. Extracted material information can be provided to recyclers before demolition or renovation to make recycling stage more cooperative and more efficient. Pick-up truck requirements and waste disposal charging fee for different waste facilities will also be predicted through our system. The results could provide alerts to contractors ahead of time at project planning stage. This paper also presents an example scenario with a 47-floor residential building in Hong Kong to demonstrate our D&R waste estimation and planning system. As the BIM technology has been increasingly adopted in the architectural, engineering and construction industry

  7. Project plan international atomic energy agency (IAEA) safeguards project plutonium finishing plant

    SciTech Connect

    BARTLETT, W.D.

    1999-05-13

    This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) project. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the PFP Integrated Project Management Plan (PMP), HNF-3617, Rev. 0. This project plan is the top-level definitive project management document for the PFP IAEA project. It specifies the technical, schedule, requirements and the cost baselines to manage the execution of the IAEA project. Any deviations to the document must be authorized through the appropriate change control process.

  8. Conservation and restoration of indigenous plants to improve community livelihoods: the Useful Plants Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulian, Tiziana; Sacandé, Moctar; Mattana, Efisio

    2014-05-01

    Kew's Millennium Seed Bank partnership (MSBP) is one of the largest ex situ plant conservation initiatives, which is focused on saving plants in and from regions most at risk, particularly in drylands. Seeds are collected and stored in seed banks in the country of origin and duplicated in the Millennium Seed Bank in the UK. The MSBP also strengthens the capacity of local communities to successfully conserve and sustainably use indigenous plants, which are important for their wellbeing. Since 2007, high quality seed collections and research information have been gathered on ca. 700 useful indigenous plant species that were selected by communities in Botswana, Kenya, Mali, Mexico and South Africa through Project MGU - The Useful Plants Project. These communities range from various farmer's groups and organisations to traditional healers, organic cotton/crop producers and primary schools. The information on seed conservation and plant propagation was used to train communities and to propagate ca. 200 species that were then planted in local gardens, and as species reintroduced for reforestation programmes and enriching village forests. Experimental plots have also been established to further investigate the field performance (plant survival and growth rate) of indigenous species, using low cost procedures. In addition, the activities support revenue generation for local communities directly through the sustainable use of plant products or indirectly through wider environmental and cultural services. This project has confirmed the potential of biodiversity conservation to improve food security and human health, enhance community livelihoods and strengthen the resilience of land and people to the changing climate. This approach of using indigenous species and having local communities play a central role from the selection of species to their planting and establishment, supported by complementary research, may represent a model for other regions of the world, where

  9. Robots in PSE G's nuclear plants - experience and future projections

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, H.T. )

    1992-01-01

    Since the cleanup at Three Mile Island Unit 2 utilities have used robots, specifically teleoperated devices, to save significant human exposure, reduce plant downtime, and improve plant operations. Early work has centered on plant inspection, surveillance, and monitoring tasks, with future efforts likely to be directed toward operation and maintenance tasks. Public Service Electric Gas (PSE G) Company has been a pioneer in the application of this technology, gaining worldwide recognition for its work. PSE G's leadership role in this technology and their nationally recognized Applied Robotics Technology (ART) Facility has served as a model for the national and international utility industries. This paper very briefly explores the growth in utility robotic applications; discusses in detail PSE G's use of robotic devices; examines the role of the ART Facility in PSE G's success; and projects the potential role of robots in the power plant of the future.

  10. China's first 100% foreign equity power plant project

    SciTech Connect

    Manguen, Y.

    1998-07-01

    GEC ALSTHOM has acquired significant experience as an investor with large equity participating in private infrastructure projects. GEC ALSTHOM secured under a joint-venture with EDF the contract to design, finance, build, own, operate and transfer after 18 years the first 100 percent foreign equity power plant project in China, the 700 MW LAIBIN B project, after international competitive bidding. The total project cost amounts to 650 MUSD and the security package is complex and inventive. For the Chinese Government, the project constitutes a true scale test before finalizing the Act setting the legal framework for all future BOT projects in the country. The project, most notably, has been structured around commercial and foreign exchange obligations by the Regional Government but without any financial guarantee from it, nor from the Central Government nor from the State Bank of China, none of them being liable for the eventual reimbursement at the loans. Regarding political risks, COFACF has accepted to provide a cover to lenders against simply a general Letter of Support to the project by the Chinese authorities.

  11. URBAN WOOD/COAL CO-FIRING IN THE NIOSH BOILER PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    James T. Cobb Jr.

    2005-02-10

    Phase I of this project began by obtaining R&D variances for permits at the NIOSH boilerplant (NBP), Emery Tree Service (ETS) and the J. A. Rutter Company (JARC) for their portions of the project. Wood for the test burn was obtained from the JARC inventory (pallets), Thompson Properties and Seven D Corporation (construction wood), and the Arlington Heights Housing Project (demolition wood). The wood was ground at ETS and JARC, delivered to the Three Rivers Terminal and blended with coal. Three one-day tests using wood/coal blends of 33% wood by volume (both construction wood and demolition wood) were conducted at the NBP. Blends using hammermilled wood were operationally successful. Emissions of SO{sub 2} and NOx decreased and that of CO increased when compared with combusting coal alone. Mercury emissions were measured and evaluated. During the first year of Phase II the principal work focused upon searching for a replacement boilerplant and developing a commercial supply of demolition wood. The NBP withdrew from the project and a search began for another stoker boilerplant in Pennsylvania to replace it on the project. Three potential commercial demolition wood providers were contacted. Two were not be able to supply wood. At the end of the first year of Phase II, discussions were continuing with the third one, a commercial demolition wood provider from northern New Jersey. During the two-and-a-third years of the contract extension it was determined that the demolition wood from northern New Jersey was impractical for use in Pittsburgh, in another power plant in central New Jersey, and in a new wood gasifier being planned in Philadelphia. However, the project team did identify sufficient wood from other sources for the gasifier project. The Principal Investigator of this project assisted a feasibility study of wood gasification in Clarion County, Pennsylvania. As a result of the study, an independent power producer in the county has initiated a small wood

  12. How EPA's Asbestos Regulations Apply to Municipal Demolition Activities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Memos about the Asbestos National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants provide clarification on demolition concerns such as the definition of a facility, and the applicability of asbestos NESHAP to structures demolished by municipal entities.

  13. 31. VIEW OF DEMOLITION OF FOUNDRY SAND BLASTING AND CLEANING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. VIEW OF DEMOLITION OF FOUNDRY SAND BLASTING AND CLEANING BUILDING FROM INSIDE FOUNDRY. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Mount Clare Shops, South side of Pratt Street between Carey & Poppleton Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  14. 30. VIEW OF DEMOLITION OF FOUNDRY SAND BLASTING AND CLEANING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. VIEW OF DEMOLITION OF FOUNDRY SAND BLASTING AND CLEANING BUILDING FROM INSIDE FOUNDRY. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Mount Clare Shops, South side of Pratt Street between Carey & Poppleton Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  15. Senseless demolition in progress, showing destruction of perfectly decent and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Senseless demolition in progress, showing destruction of perfectly decent and recyclable mill building. Problem exacerbated by high value of scrap iron. - Phoenix Iron Company, Rolling Mill, North of French Creek, west of Fairview Avenue, Phoenixville, Chester County, PA

  16. 16. DETAIL VIEW OF BRIDGE DECK DURING DEMOLITION, SHOWING EXTRADOSAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. DETAIL VIEW OF BRIDGE DECK DURING DEMOLITION, SHOWING EXTRADOSAL REINFORCING BARS OF PATENTED THACHER TYPE, AND PLAIN TRANSVERSE BARS CONNECTING EXTRADOSAL AND INTRADOSAL REINFORCEMENTS - Sanderson Avenue Bridge, Sanderson Avenue spanning Lackawanna River, Scranton, Lackawanna County, PA

  17. 35 mm PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN PRIOR TO DEMOLITION OF STRUCTURE. SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35 mm PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN PRIOR TO DEMOLITION OF STRUCTURE. SOUTH (SIDE) AND EAST (FRONT) ELEVATIONS OF BUILDING. VIEW TO NORTHWEST - Plattsburgh Air Force Base, Gas Station, New York Road, Plattsburgh, Clinton County, NY

  18. 6. Detail of interior bin wall section, during demolition. Shows ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Detail of interior bin wall section, during demolition. Shows alternating courses of channel tile with steel bands and largers hollow tile. - Saint Anthony Elevator No. 3, 620 Malcom Avenue, Southeast, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  19. AFBC (atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion) conversion at Northern States Power Company: Volume 3, Demolition and relocation: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Grieve, R.

    1988-11-01

    This document is the third volume in a series of four reports detailing the conversion of Northern States Power Company's Black Dog Unit 2 from pulverized coal firing to atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion (AFBC). This particular report describes the demolition and relocation of equipment and systems at Unit 2, prior to the installation of the new AFBC system. The purpose of these reports is to share the information gathered during the Black Dog Unit 2 Conversion Project and present it so that other utilities can evaluate the technical feasibility and cost effectiveness of converting units within their systems from pulverized coal to AFBC. To this end, each volume in this series of reports presents material concerning a different aspect of the Black Dog project as shown in the following breakdown: Volume 1--Project Origins; Volume 2--Unit Design; Volume 3--Unit Demolition and Relocation; Volume 4--Unit Construction. 17 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. The breadboard project: A functioning CELSS plant growth system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, W. M.

    The primary objective of the Breadboard project for the next 3-4 years is to develop, integrate and operate a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) at a one person scale. The focus of this project over the past two years has been the development of the plant growth facility, the first module of the CELSS. The other major modules, food preparation, biomass processing, and resource recovery, have been researched at the laboratory scale during the past two years and facilities are currently under construction to scale-up these modules to an operational state. This paper will outline the design requirements for the Biomass Production Chamber (BPC), the plant growth facility for the project, and the control and monitoring subsystems which operate the chamber and will present results from both engineering and biological tests of the facility. Three production evaluations of wheat, conducted in the BPC during the past year, will be described and the data generated from these tests discussed. Future plans for the BPC will be presented along with future goals for the project as the other modules become active.

  1. Project Execution Plan for the River Protection Project Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect

    MELLINGER, G.B.

    2003-05-03

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), Project W-530, is the cornerstone in the mission of the Hanford Site's cleanup of more than 50 million gallons of highly toxic, high-level radioactive waste contained in aging underground storage tanks.

  2. Successful decommissioning and demolition at Weldon Spring

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.L.

    1994-12-31

    B&W Nuclear Environmental Services, Inc. (B&W NESI) and OHM Corporation (OHM) formed a joint venture company, B&W/OHM Weldon Spring, Inc. (B&W/OHM WSI) to perform work at the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP). This joint venture company combines the hazardous and toxic waste remediation experience of OHM with the radiological decontamination and decommissioning experience of B&W NESI. Together, the two companies have over 60 yr of relevant experience and a strong record of performance in resolving problems associated with nuclear and hazardous materials contamination. The B&W/OHM WSI is under contract to MK-Ferguson, DOE`s project management contractor (PMC), at WSSRAP to provide supervision, tools, labor, and equipment to decontaminate and dismantle 11 buildings at the chemical plant site. The Weldon Spring site, located in St. Charles, Missouri, was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission from 1957 through 1966 as a feed material production site to process uranium and thorium ore concentrates. Since the cessation of production activity at this site, the buildings and structures contained in the chemical plant have badly deteriorated, posing an immediate potential threat to workers, the general public, and the environment, prompting the DOE to initiate an Expedited Response Action to decontaminate, empty, and dismantle all the buildings and structures.

  3. Quantifying construction and demolition waste: an analytical review.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zezhou; Yu, Ann T W; Shen, Liyin; Liu, Guiwen

    2014-09-01

    Quantifying construction and demolition (C&D) waste generation is regarded as a prerequisite for the implementation of successful waste management. In literature, various methods have been employed to quantify the C&D waste generation at both regional and project levels. However, an integrated review that systemically describes and analyses all the existing methods has yet to be conducted. To bridge this research gap, an analytical review is conducted. Fifty-seven papers are retrieved based on a set of rigorous procedures. The characteristics of the selected papers are classified according to the following criteria - waste generation activity, estimation level and quantification methodology. Six categories of existing C&D waste quantification methodologies are identified, including site visit method, waste generation rate method, lifetime analysis method, classification system accumulation method, variables modelling method and other particular methods. A critical comparison of the identified methods is given according to their characteristics and implementation constraints. Moreover, a decision tree is proposed for aiding the selection of the most appropriate quantification method in different scenarios. Based on the analytical review, limitations of previous studies and recommendations of potential future research directions are further suggested.

  4. Quantifying construction and demolition waste: An analytical review

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zezhou; Yu, Ann T.W.; Shen, Liyin; Liu, Guiwen

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Prevailing C and D waste quantification methodologies are identified and compared. • One specific methodology cannot fulfill all waste quantification scenarios. • A relevance tree for appropriate quantification methodology selection is proposed. • More attentions should be paid to civil and infrastructural works. • Classified information is suggested for making an effective waste management plan. - Abstract: Quantifying construction and demolition (C and D) waste generation is regarded as a prerequisite for the implementation of successful waste management. In literature, various methods have been employed to quantify the C and D waste generation at both regional and project levels. However, an integrated review that systemically describes and analyses all the existing methods has yet to be conducted. To bridge this research gap, an analytical review is conducted. Fifty-seven papers are retrieved based on a set of rigorous procedures. The characteristics of the selected papers are classified according to the following criteria - waste generation activity, estimation level and quantification methodology. Six categories of existing C and D waste quantification methodologies are identified, including site visit method, waste generation rate method, lifetime analysis method, classification system accumulation method, variables modelling method and other particular methods. A critical comparison of the identified methods is given according to their characteristics and implementation constraints. Moreover, a decision tree is proposed for aiding the selection of the most appropriate quantification method in different scenarios. Based on the analytical review, limitations of previous studies and recommendations of potential future research directions are further suggested.

  5. Allocating plant manpower resources to multi-project requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Yonko, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    At the Mound Facility of Monsanto Research Corporation, the problem of scheduling and coordinating numerous manpower resources within their matrix organization has been eased considerably by the Manpower Resource Planning (MRP) System. The system has proven to be successful in promoting the timely completion of plant engineering projects. The system is straightforward. First, the available manpower resources in mandays are identified. Second, the manpower requirements of all the major projects are identified. Then, the requirements for the individual projects are totaled and compared with the available resources. If available manpower does not meet the project requirements, area engineers meet to resolve the manpower conflicts for the tradesmen and other hourly resources. The supervisors for the discipline engineering groups and draftsmen resolve any conflicts within their resources. Requirements and resources are matched by rescheduling projects to reduce requirements, by assigning overtime, or by subcontracting work to increase the resources. The plan developed is then reviewed by management before it is distributed for use in scheduling work. The procedural steps of the MRP concept are illustrated.

  6. Project BudBurst: People, Plants, and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S.; Ward, D.; Havens, K.; Gardiner, L. S.; Alaback, P.

    2010-12-01

    Providing opportunities for individuals to contribute to a better understanding of climate change is the hallmark of Project BudBurst (www.budburst.org). This highly successful, national citizen science program, now in its third year, is bringing climate change education outreach to thousands of individuals. Project BudBurst is a national citizen science initiative designed to engage the public in observations of phenological (plant life cycle) events that raise awareness of climate change, and create a cadre of informed citizen scientists. Citizen science programs such as Project BudBurst provide the opportunity for students and interested laypersons to actively participate in scientific research. Such programs are important not only from an educational perspective, but because they also enable scientists to broaden the geographic and temporal scale of their observations. The goals of Project BudBurst are to 1) increase awareness of phenology as an area of scientific study; 2) Increase awareness of the impacts of changing climates on plants; and 3) increase science literacy by engaging participants in the scientific process. From its 2008 launch in February, this on-line educational and data-entry program, engaged participants of all ages and walks of life in recording the timing of the leafing and flowering of wild and cultivated species found across the continent. Thus far, thousands of participants from all 50 states have submitted data. Project BudBurst has been the subject of almost 200 media outlets including NPR, national and regional television broadcasts, and most of the major national and regional newspapers. This presentation will provide an overview of Project BudBurst and will report on the results of the 2009 field campaign and discuss plans to expand Project BudBurst in 2010 including the use of mobile phones applications for data collection and reporting from the field. Project BudBurst co managed by the National Ecological Observatory Network and

  7. The Breadboard Project - A functioning CELSS plant growth system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, W. M.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the Breadboard Project for the next 3-4 years is to develop, integrate and operate a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) at a one-person scale. The focus of this project over the past two years has been the development of the plant growth facility, the first module of the CELSS. The other major modules, food preparation, biomass processing, and resource recovery, have been researched at the laboratory scale during the past two years and facilities are currently under construction to scale-up these modules to an operational state. This paper will outline the design requirements for the Biomass Production Chamber (BPC), the plant growth facility for the project, and the control and monitoring subsystems which operate the chamber and will present results from both engineering and biological tests of the facility. Three production evaluations of wheat, conducted in the BPC during the past year, will be described and the data generated from these tests discussed.

  8. The Breadboard Project - A functioning CELSS plant growth system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, W. M.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the Breadboard Project for the next 3-4 years is to develop, integrate and operate a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) at a one-person scale. The focus of this project over the past two years has been the development of the plant growth facility, the first module of the CELSS. The other major modules, food preparation, biomass processing, and resource recovery, have been researched at the laboratory scale during the past two years and facilities are currently under construction to scale-up these modules to an operational state. This paper will outline the design requirements for the Biomass Production Chamber (BPC), the plant growth facility for the project, and the control and monitoring subsystems which operate the chamber and will present results from both engineering and biological tests of the facility. Three production evaluations of wheat, conducted in the BPC during the past year, will be described and the data generated from these tests discussed.

  9. SOURCE TERM REMEDIATION & DEMOLITION STRATEGY FOR THE HANFORD K-AREA SPENT FUEL BASINS

    SciTech Connect

    CHRONISTER, G.B.

    2006-03-23

    This paper discusses the technologies applied at Hanford's K-Basins to mitigate risk and reduce the source term in preparing the basins for deactivation and demolition. These project technologies/strategies (in various stages of implementation) are sequential in nature and are the basis for preparing to dispose of the K Basins--two highly contaminated concrete basins at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. A large collection of spent nuclear fuel stored for many years underwater at the K Basins has been removed to stable, dry, safe storage. Remediation activities are underway to prepare the basin structures for de-inventory, decontamination, and disposal.

  10. Benchmarking of municipal waste water treatment plants (an Austrian project).

    PubMed

    Lindtner, S; Kroiss, H; Nowak, O

    2004-01-01

    An Austrian research project focused on the development of process indicators for treatment plants with different process and operation modes. The whole treatment scheme was subdivided into four processes, i.e. mechanical pretreatment (Process 1), mechanical-biological waste water treatment (Process 2), sludge thickening and stabilisation (Process 3) and further sludge treatment and disposal (Process 4). In order to get comparable process indicators it was necessary to subdivide the sample of 76 individual treatment plants all over Austria into five groups according to their mean organic load (COD) in the influent. The specific total yearly costs, the yearly operating costs and the yearly capital costs of the four processes have been related to the yearly average of the measured organic load expressed in COD (110 g COD/pe/d). The specific investment costs for the whole treatment plant and for Process 2 have been related to a calculated standard design capacity of the mechanical-biological part of the treatment plant expressed in COD. The capital costs of processes 1, 3 and 4 have been related to the design capacity of the treatment plant. For each group (related to the size of the plant) a benchmark band has been defined for the total yearly costs, the total yearly operational costs and the total yearly capital costs. For the operational costs of the Processes 1 to 4 one benchmark ([see symbol in text] per pe/year) has been defined for each group. In addition a theoretical cost reduction potential has been calculated. The cost efficiency in regard to water protection and some special sub-processes such as aeration and sludge dewatering has been analysed.

  11. Projecting the success of plant restoration with population viability analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, T.J.; Bowles, M.L.; McEachern, A.K.; Brigham, C.A.; Schwartz, M.W.

    2003-01-01

    Conserving viable populations of plant species requires that they have high probabilities of long-term persistence within natural habitats, such as a chance of extinction in 100 years of less than 5% (Menges 1991, 1998; Brown 1994; Pavlik 1994; Chap. 1, this Vol.). For endangered and threatened species that have been severely reduces in range and whose habitats have been fragmented, important species conservation strategies may include augmenting existing populations or restoring new viable populations (Bowles and Whelan 1994; Chap. 2, this Vol.). Restoration objectives may include increasing population numbers to reduce extinction probability, deterministic manipulations to develop a staged cohort structure, or more complex restoration of a desired genetic structure to allow outcrossing or increase effective population size (DeMauro 1993, 1994; Bowles et al. 1993, 1998; Pavlik 1994; Knapp and Dyer 1998; Chap. 2, this Vol.). These efforts may require translocation of propagules from existing (in situ) populations, or from ex situ botanic gardens or seed storage facilities (Falk et al. 1996; Guerrant and Pavlik 1998; Chap. 2, this Vol.). Population viability analysis (PVA) can provide a critical foundation for plant restoration, as it models demographic projections used to evaluate the probability of population persistence and links plant life history with restoration strategies. It is unknown how well artificially created populations will meet demographic modeling requirements (e.g., due to artificial cohort transitions) and few, if any, PVAs have been applied to restorations. To guide application of PVA to restored populations and to illustrate potential difficulties, we examine effects of planting different life stages, model initial population sizes needed to achieve population viability, and compare demographic characteristics between natural and restored populations. We develop and compare plant population restoration viability analysis (PRVA) case studies of

  12. Sampling and Analysis Plan - Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, Steve P.

    2006-05-26

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) describes planned data collection activities for four entry boreholes through the sediment overlying the basalt, up to three new deep rotary boreholes through the basalt and sedimentary interbeds, and one corehole through the basalt and sedimentary interbeds at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site. The SAP will be used in concert with the quality assurance plan for the project to guide the procedure development and data collection activities needed to support borehole drilling, geophysical measurements, and sampling. This SAP identifies the American Society of Testing Materials standards, Hanford Site procedures, and other guidance to be followed for data collection activities.

  13. Simulation of construction and demolition waste leachate

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, T.G.; Jang, Y.; Thurn, L.G.

    1999-11-01

    Solid waste produced from construction and demolition (C and D) activities is typically disposed of in unlined landfills. Knowledge of C{ampersand}D debris landfill leachate is limited in comparison to other types of wastes. A laboratory study was performed to examine leachate resulting from simulated rainfall infiltrating a mixed C and D waste stream consisting of common construction materials (e.g., concrete, wood, drywall). Lysimeters (leaching columns) filled with the mixed C and D waste were operated under flooded and unsaturated conditions. Leachate constituent concentrations in the leachate from specific waste components were also examined. Leachate samples were collected and analyzed for a number of conventional water quality parameters including pH, alkalinity, total organic carbon, total dissolved solids, and sulfate. In experiments with the mixed C and D waste, high concentrations of total dissolved solids (TDS) and sulfate were detected in the leachate. C and D leachates produced as a result of unsaturated conditions exhibited TDS concentrations in the range of 570--2,200 mg/L. The major contributor to the TDS was sulfate, which ranged in concentration between 280 and 930 mg/L. The concentrations of sulfate in the leachate exceeded the sulfate secondary drinking water standard of 250 mg/L.

  14. Sustainable construction: construction and demolition waste reconsidered.

    PubMed

    del Río Merino, Mercedes; Izquierdo Gracia, Pilar; Weis Azevedo, Isabel Salto

    2010-02-01

    Construction activity in Europe has increased substantially in the past decade. Likewise, there has also been a commensurate rise in the generation of construction and demolition waste (C&DW). This, together with the fact that in many European countries the rate of recycling and reuse of C&DW is still quite low has engendered a serious environmental problem and a motivation to develop strategies and management plans to solve it. Due to its composition, there is a significant potential to reuse and/or recycle C&DW, and thereby, contribute to improving the sustainability of construction and development, but practical procedures are not yet widely known or practiced in the construction industry. This article (a) summarizes the different applications that are presently practiced to optimize the recovery and/or application of C&DW for reuse, and (b) proposes various measures and strategies to improve the processing of this waste. The authors suggest that to enhance environmental effectiveness, a conscious and comprehensive C&DW management plan should be implemented in each jurisdiction. More precisely, this study presents a holistic approach towards C&DW management, through which environmental benefits can be achieved through the application of new construction methods that can contribute to sustainable growth.

  15. 75 FR 73962 - Safety Zone; Bridge Demolition; Illinois River, Seneca, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Bridge Demolition; Illinois River, Seneca... from a portion of the Illinois River due to the demolition of the Seneca Highway Bridge. This temporary... the demolition of the Seneca Highway Bridge. DATES: This rule is effective in the CFR on November 30...

  16. 24 CFR 247.10 - Inapplicability to substantial rehabilitation or demolition; right of disposition unimpaired.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... rehabilitation or demolition; right of disposition unimpaired. 247.10 Section 247.10 Housing and Urban... or demolition; right of disposition unimpaired. This subpart shall not apply in any case in which HUD... of substantial rehabilitation or demolition. Nothing in this subpart should be construed to affect in...

  17. 29 CFR 570.66 - Occupations involved in wrecking, demolition, and shipbreaking operations (Order 15).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Occupations involved in wrecking, demolition, and... Detrimental to Their Health or Well-Being § 570.66 Occupations involved in wrecking, demolition, and..., demolition, and shipbreaking operations are particularly hazardous for the employment of minors between 16...

  18. 24 CFR 969.107 - HUD approval of demolition or disposition before ACC expiration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false HUD approval of demolition or...-INCOME HOUSING AFTER COMPLETION OF DEBT SERVICE § 969.107 HUD approval of demolition or disposition before ACC expiration. This part is not intended to preclude or restrict the demolition or disposition of...

  19. 44 CFR 63.10 - Demolition or relocation contractor to be joint payee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Demolition or relocation contractor to be joint payee. 63.10 Section 63.10 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY... Demolition or relocation contractor to be joint payee. If a demolition or relocation contractor is used, the...

  20. 44 CFR 63.10 - Demolition or relocation contractor to be joint payee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Demolition or relocation contractor to be joint payee. 63.10 Section 63.10 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY... Demolition or relocation contractor to be joint payee. If a demolition or relocation contractor is used, the...

  1. 24 CFR 247.10 - Inapplicability to substantial rehabilitation or demolition; right of disposition unimpaired.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... rehabilitation or demolition; right of disposition unimpaired. 247.10 Section 247.10 Housing and Urban... or demolition; right of disposition unimpaired. This subpart shall not apply in any case in which HUD... of substantial rehabilitation or demolition. Nothing in this subpart should be construed to affect in...

  2. 24 CFR 972.112 - Relationship between required conversion and demolition/disposition requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... conversion and demolition/disposition requirements. 972.112 Section 972.112 Housing and Urban Development... Relationship between required conversion and demolition/disposition requirements. (a) Section 18 of the United States Housing Act of 1937 does not apply to demolition of developments removed from the inventory of the...

  3. 32 CFR 644.478 - Demolition of buildings and other improvements for utilization of salvage material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Demolition of buildings and other improvements... Buildings and Other Improvements (without the Related Land) § 644.478 Demolition of buildings and other improvements for utilization of salvage material. With respect to DA property, demolition may be undertaken by...

  4. 32 CFR 644.478 - Demolition of buildings and other improvements for utilization of salvage material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Demolition of buildings and other improvements... Buildings and Other Improvements (without the Related Land) § 644.478 Demolition of buildings and other improvements for utilization of salvage material. With respect to DA property, demolition may be undertaken by...

  5. 48 CFR 46.313 - Contracts for dismantling, demolition, or removal of improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., demolition, or removal of improvements. 46.313 Section 46.313 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL..., demolition, or removal of improvements. The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 52.246-13, Inspection—Dismantling, Demolition, or Removal of Improvements, in solicitations and contracts for...

  6. 24 CFR 972.112 - Relationship between required conversion and demolition/disposition requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... conversion and demolition/disposition requirements. 972.112 Section 972.112 Housing and Urban Development... Relationship between required conversion and demolition/disposition requirements. (a) Section 18 of the United States Housing Act of 1937 does not apply to demolition of developments removed from the inventory of the...

  7. 32 CFR 644.478 - Demolition of buildings and other improvements for utilization of salvage material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Demolition of buildings and other improvements... Buildings and Other Improvements (without the Related Land) § 644.478 Demolition of buildings and other improvements for utilization of salvage material. With respect to DA property, demolition may be undertaken by...

  8. 48 CFR 46.313 - Contracts for dismantling, demolition, or removal of improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., demolition, or removal of improvements. 46.313 Section 46.313 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL..., demolition, or removal of improvements. The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 52.246-13, Inspection—Dismantling, Demolition, or Removal of Improvements, in solicitations and contracts for...

  9. 29 CFR 570.66 - Occupations involved in wrecking, demolition, and shipbreaking operations (Order 15).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Occupations involved in wrecking, demolition, and... Detrimental to Their Health or Well-Being § 570.66 Occupations involved in wrecking, demolition, and..., demolition, and shipbreaking operations are particularly hazardous for the employment of minors between 16...

  10. 29 CFR 570.66 - Occupations involved in wrecking, demolition, and shipbreaking operations (Order 15).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Occupations involved in wrecking, demolition, and... Detrimental to Their Health or Well-Being § 570.66 Occupations involved in wrecking, demolition, and..., demolition, and shipbreaking operations are particularly hazardous for the employment of minors between 16...

  11. 44 CFR 63.10 - Demolition or relocation contractor to be joint payee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Demolition or relocation contractor to be joint payee. 63.10 Section 63.10 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY... Demolition or relocation contractor to be joint payee. If a demolition or relocation contractor is used, the...

  12. 44 CFR 63.10 - Demolition or relocation contractor to be joint payee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Demolition or relocation contractor to be joint payee. 63.10 Section 63.10 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY... Demolition or relocation contractor to be joint payee. If a demolition or relocation contractor is used, the...

  13. 24 CFR 247.10 - Inapplicability to substantial rehabilitation or demolition; right of disposition unimpaired.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... rehabilitation or demolition; right of disposition unimpaired. 247.10 Section 247.10 Housing and Urban... or demolition; right of disposition unimpaired. This subpart shall not apply in any case in which HUD... of substantial rehabilitation or demolition. Nothing in this subpart should be construed to affect in...

  14. 32 CFR 644.478 - Demolition of buildings and other improvements for utilization of salvage material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Demolition of buildings and other improvements... Buildings and Other Improvements (without the Related Land) § 644.478 Demolition of buildings and other improvements for utilization of salvage material. With respect to DA property, demolition may be undertaken by...

  15. 48 CFR 46.313 - Contracts for dismantling, demolition, or removal of improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., demolition, or removal of improvements. 46.313 Section 46.313 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL..., demolition, or removal of improvements. The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 52.246-13, Inspection—Dismantling, Demolition, or Removal of Improvements, in solicitations and contracts for...

  16. 44 CFR 63.10 - Demolition or relocation contractor to be joint payee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Demolition or relocation contractor to be joint payee. 63.10 Section 63.10 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY... Demolition or relocation contractor to be joint payee. If a demolition or relocation contractor is used, the...

  17. 48 CFR 46.313 - Contracts for dismantling, demolition, or removal of improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., demolition, or removal of improvements. 46.313 Section 46.313 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL..., demolition, or removal of improvements. The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 52.246-13, Inspection—Dismantling, Demolition, or Removal of Improvements, in solicitations and contracts for...

  18. 24 CFR 972.112 - Relationship between required conversion and demolition/disposition requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... conversion and demolition/disposition requirements. 972.112 Section 972.112 Housing and Urban Development... Relationship between required conversion and demolition/disposition requirements. (a) Section 18 of the United States Housing Act of 1937 does not apply to demolition of developments removed from the inventory of the...

  19. 29 CFR 570.66 - Occupations involved in wrecking, demolition, and shipbreaking operations (Order 15).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Occupations involved in wrecking, demolition, and... Detrimental to Their Health or Well-Being § 570.66 Occupations involved in wrecking, demolition, and..., demolition, and shipbreaking operations are particularly hazardous for the employment of minors between 16...

  20. 24 CFR 972.112 - Relationship between required conversion and demolition/disposition requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... conversion and demolition/disposition requirements. 972.112 Section 972.112 Housing and Urban Development... Relationship between required conversion and demolition/disposition requirements. (a) Section 18 of the United States Housing Act of 1937 does not apply to demolition of developments removed from the inventory of the...

  1. 24 CFR 247.10 - Inapplicability to substantial rehabilitation or demolition; right of disposition unimpaired.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... rehabilitation or demolition; right of disposition unimpaired. 247.10 Section 247.10 Housing and Urban... or demolition; right of disposition unimpaired. This subpart shall not apply in any case in which HUD... of substantial rehabilitation or demolition. Nothing in this subpart should be construed to affect in...

  2. 24 CFR 972.112 - Relationship between required conversion and demolition/disposition requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... conversion and demolition/disposition requirements. 972.112 Section 972.112 Housing and Urban Development... Relationship between required conversion and demolition/disposition requirements. (a) Section 18 of the United States Housing Act of 1937 does not apply to demolition of developments removed from the inventory of the...

  3. 24 CFR 247.10 - Inapplicability to substantial rehabilitation or demolition; right of disposition unimpaired.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... rehabilitation or demolition; right of disposition unimpaired. 247.10 Section 247.10 Housing and Urban... or demolition; right of disposition unimpaired. This subpart shall not apply in any case in which HUD... of substantial rehabilitation or demolition. Nothing in this subpart should be construed to affect in...

  4. 22 CFR 121.11 - Military demolition blocks and blasting caps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Military demolition blocks and blasting caps... THE UNITED STATES MUNITIONS LIST Enumeration of Articles § 121.11 Military demolition blocks and blasting caps. Military demolition blocks and blasting caps referred to in Category IV(a) do not...

  5. 22 CFR 121.11 - Military demolition blocks and blasting caps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Military demolition blocks and blasting caps... THE UNITED STATES MUNITIONS LIST Enumeration of Articles § 121.11 Military demolition blocks and blasting caps. Military demolition blocks and blasting caps referred to in Category IV(a) do not...

  6. 22 CFR 121.11 - Military demolition blocks and blasting caps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Military demolition blocks and blasting caps... THE UNITED STATES MUNITIONS LIST Enumeration of Articles § 121.11 Military demolition blocks and blasting caps. Military demolition blocks and blasting caps referred to in Category IV(a) do not...

  7. 22 CFR 121.11 - Military demolition blocks and blasting caps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Military demolition blocks and blasting caps... THE UNITED STATES MUNITIONS LIST Enumeration of Articles § 121.11 Military demolition blocks and blasting caps. Military demolition blocks and blasting caps referred to in Category IV(a) do not...

  8. 22 CFR 121.11 - Military demolition blocks and blasting caps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Military demolition blocks and blasting caps... THE UNITED STATES MUNITIONS LIST Enumeration of Articles § 121.11 Military demolition blocks and blasting caps. Military demolition blocks and blasting caps referred to in Category IV(a) do not...

  9. Building a (UN) condom manufacturing plant for social marketing projects.

    PubMed

    Yonese, T

    1994-12-01

    At the 10th International Conference on AIDS held in Yokohama, Japan, August 7-12, 1994, reports revealed that the social marketing of condoms has become popular and successful in developing countries. The nongovernmental organization distribution approach is very useful in providing condoms to new users, whose numbers have been increasing since the condom was identified as effective in preventing sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including HIV. The rapid establishment of semi-commercial outlets even in remote areas enabled many people to obtain condoms more easily than from the government program and at a cheaper price. The social marketing concept has a clear advantage: condoms can be distributed with little government budget disbursement, and the project is based on self-reliance. Meanwhile, the additional free supply programs by many governments of developing countries are reportedly not functioning efficiently, since often large quantities of condoms, donated by agencies for family planning and STD programs, pile up in warehouses and do not reach those who need them. Moreover, the demand for condoms is limited because of the lack of effective campaigns to encourage their use. Quality condoms can be procured at lower costs if a special manufacturing plant could be built that produces condoms exclusively for the social marketing free supply program. Such a condom plant could be built in a developing country where good quality latex, the material used for condoms, is available. The unit production cost of condoms at the proposed plant would be lower compared to costs in developed countries because personnel expenses in latex-producing countries such as Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, India, and Sri Lanka, are cheaper, and the price of latex itself is lower. Mass production is possible because the demand for condoms for the social marketing projects is expected to grow even more.

  10. Nevada Renewable Energy Training Project: Geothermal Power Plant Operators

    SciTech Connect

    Jim, Nichols

    2014-04-29

    The purpose of this project was to develop and institute a training program for certified geothermal power plant operators (GPO). An advisory board consisting of subject matter experts from the geothermal energy industry and academia identified the critical skill sets required for this profession. A 34-credit Certificate of Achievement (COA), Geothermal Power Plant Operator, was developed using eight existing courses and developing five new courses. Approval from the Nevada System of Higher Education Board of Regents was obtained. A 2,400 sq. ft. geothermal/fluid mechanics laboratory and a 3,000 sq. ft. outdoor demonstration laboratory were constructed for hands-on training. Students also participated in field trips to geothermal power plants in the region. The majority of students were able to complete the program in 2-3 semesters, depending on their level of math proficiency. Additionally the COA allowed students to continue to an Associate of Applied Science (AAS), Energy Technologies with an emphasis in Geothermal Energy (26 additional credits), if they desired. The COA and AAS are stackable degrees, which provide students with an ongoing career pathway. Articulation agreements with other NSHE institutions provide students with additional opportunities to pursue a Bachelor of Applied Science in Management or Instrumentation. Job placement for COA graduates has been excellent.

  11. Compiling Utility Requirements For New Nuclear Power Plant Project

    SciTech Connect

    Patrakka, Eero

    2002-07-01

    Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) submitted in November 2000 to the Finnish Government an application for a Decision-in-Principle concerning the construction of a new nuclear power plant in Finland. The actual investment decision can be made first after a positive decision has been made by the Government and the Parliament. Parallel to the licensing process, technical preparedness has been upheld so that the procurement process can be commenced without delay, when needed. This includes the definition of requirements for the plant and preliminary preparation of bid inquiry specifications. The core of the technical requirements corresponds to the specifications presented in the European Utility Requirement (EUR) document, compiled by major European electricity producers. Quite naturally, an amount of modifications to the EUR document are needed that take into account the country- and site-specific conditions as well as the experiences gained in the operation of the existing NPP units. Along with the EUR-related requirements concerning the nuclear island and power generation plant, requirements are specified for scope of supply as well as for a variety of issues related to project implementation. (author)

  12. A study of urban housing demolitions as sources of lead in ambient dust: demolition practices and exterior dust fall.

    PubMed Central

    Farfel, Mark R; Orlova, Anna O; Lees, Peter S J; Rohde, Charles; Ashley, Peter J; Chisolm, J Julian

    2003-01-01

    Demolition of older housing for urban redevelopment purposes benefits communities by removing housing with lead paint and dust hazards and by creating spaces for lead paint-free housing and other community resources. This study was conducted to assess changes, if any, in ambient dust lead levels associated with demolition of blocks of older lead-containing row houses in Baltimore, Maryland (USA). In this article we present results based on dust-fall samples collected from fixed locations within 10 m of three demolition sites. In subsequent reports we will describe dust lead changes on streets, sidewalks, and residential floors within 100 m of the demolition sites. Geometric mean (GM) lead dust-fall rate increased by > 40-fold during demolition to 410 micro g Pb/m2/hr (2,700 micro g Pb/m2 per typical work day) and by > 6-fold during debris removal to 61 micro g Pb/m2/hr (440 micro g Pb/m2 per typical work day). Lead concentrations in dust fall also increased during demolition (GM, 2,600 mg/kg) and debris removal (GM, 1,500 mg/kg) compared with baseline (GM, 950 mg/kg). In the absence of dust-fall standards, the results were compared with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA's) dust-lead surface loading standard for interior residential floors (40 micro g/ft2, equivalent to 431 micro g/m2); daily lead dust fall during demolition exceeded the U.S. EPA floor standard by 6-fold on average and as much as 81-fold on an individual sample basis. Dust fall is of public health concern because it settles on surfaces and becomes a pathway of ambient lead exposure and a potential pathway of residential exposure via tracking and blowing of exterior dust. The findings highlight the need to minimize demolition lead deposition and to educate urban planners, contractors, health agencies, and the public about lead and other community concerns so that society can maximize the benefits of future demolition activities nationwide. PMID:12842778

  13. A study of urban housing demolitions as sources of lead in ambient dust: demolition practices and exterior dust fall.

    PubMed

    Farfel, Mark R; Orlova, Anna O; Lees, Peter S J; Rohde, Charles; Ashley, Peter J; Chisolm, J Julian

    2003-07-01

    Demolition of older housing for urban redevelopment purposes benefits communities by removing housing with lead paint and dust hazards and by creating spaces for lead paint-free housing and other community resources. This study was conducted to assess changes, if any, in ambient dust lead levels associated with demolition of blocks of older lead-containing row houses in Baltimore, Maryland (USA). In this article we present results based on dust-fall samples collected from fixed locations within 10 m of three demolition sites. In subsequent reports we will describe dust lead changes on streets, sidewalks, and residential floors within 100 m of the demolition sites. Geometric mean (GM) lead dust-fall rate increased by > 40-fold during demolition to 410 micro g Pb/m2/hr (2,700 micro g Pb/m2 per typical work day) and by > 6-fold during debris removal to 61 micro g Pb/m2/hr (440 micro g Pb/m2 per typical work day). Lead concentrations in dust fall also increased during demolition (GM, 2,600 mg/kg) and debris removal (GM, 1,500 mg/kg) compared with baseline (GM, 950 mg/kg). In the absence of dust-fall standards, the results were compared with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA's) dust-lead surface loading standard for interior residential floors (40 micro g/ft2, equivalent to 431 micro g/m2); daily lead dust fall during demolition exceeded the U.S. EPA floor standard by 6-fold on average and as much as 81-fold on an individual sample basis. Dust fall is of public health concern because it settles on surfaces and becomes a pathway of ambient lead exposure and a potential pathway of residential exposure via tracking and blowing of exterior dust. The findings highlight the need to minimize demolition lead deposition and to educate urban planners, contractors, health agencies, and the public about lead and other community concerns so that society can maximize the benefits of future demolition activities nationwide.

  14. Hanford Single-Pass Reactor Fuel Storage Basin Demolition.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Jason A.

    2003-02-01

    ABSTRACT The Environmental Restoration Contractor at the Hanford Site is tasked with removing auxiliary reactor structures and leaving the remaining concrete structure surrounding each reactor core. This is referred to as Interim Safe Storage. Part of placing the F Reactor into Interim Safe Storage is the demolition of the fuel storage basin, which was deactivated in 1970 by placing debris material into the basin prior to back filling with soil. Besides the debris material (wooden floor decking, handrails, and monorail pieces), the fuel storage basin contents included the possibility of spent nuclear fuel, fuel buckets, fuel spacers, process tubes, and tongs. Demolition of the fuel storage basin offered many unique radiological control challenges and innovative approaches to demolition. This paper describes how the total effective dose equivalent and contamination were controlled, how the use of a remote operated excavator was employed to remove high-dose-rate material, and how wireless technology was used to monitor changing radiological conditions.

  15. Expedited Demolition Notification for 2nd Quarter CY 2012 Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Juarez, Catherine L.

    2012-06-18

    The National Nuclear Security Administration and Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) (collectively the Permittees) are informing the New Mexico Environment Department Hazardous Waste Bureau (NMED-HWB) of the need to expedite the demolition of structures summarized in the enclosures. These structures have been identified to receive funding and be demolished prior to the 3rd Quarter Demolition Notification (June 30, 2012). This letter is a follow up to the email that was sent to the NMED-HWB on April 17, 2012. The enclosures attached to this letter satisfy the reporting requirements as outlined in Section 1.17 of the LANL Hazardous Facility Waste Permit (Permit). Demolition of buildings that appear on this list will not occur until 30 days after NMED has received this notification.

  16. Hanford single-pass reactor fuel storage basin demolition.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Jason A

    2003-02-01

    The Environmental Restoration Contractor at the Hanford Site is tasked with removing auxiliary reactor structures and leaving the remaining concrete structure surrounding each reactor core. This is referred to as Interim Safe Storage. Part of placing the F Reactor into Interim Safe Storage is the demolition of the fuel storage basin, which was deactivated in 1970 by placing debris material into the basin prior to back filling with soil. Besides the debris material (wooden floor decking, handrails, and monorail pieces), the fuel storage basin contents included the possibility of spent nuclear fuel, fuel buckets, fuel spacers, process tubes, and tongs. Demolition of the fuel storage basin offered many unique radiological control challenges and innovative approaches to demolition. This paper describes how the total effective dose equivalent and contamination were controlled, how the use of a remote operated excavator was employed to remove high-dose-rate material, and how wireless technology was used to monitor changing radiological conditions.

  17. JPL - Small Power Systems Applications Project. [for solar thermal power plant development and commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferber, R. R.; Marriott, A. T.; Truscello, V.

    1978-01-01

    The Small Power Systems Applications (SPSA) Project has been established to develop and commercialize small solar thermal power plants. The technologies of interest include all distributed and central receiver technologies which are potentially economically viable in power plant sizes of one to 10 MWe. The paper presents an overview of the SPSA Project and briefly discusses electric utility involvement in the Project.

  18. JPL - Small Power Systems Applications Project. [for solar thermal power plant development and commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferber, R. R.; Marriott, A. T.; Truscello, V.

    1978-01-01

    The Small Power Systems Applications (SPSA) Project has been established to develop and commercialize small solar thermal power plants. The technologies of interest include all distributed and central receiver technologies which are potentially economically viable in power plant sizes of one to 10 MWe. The paper presents an overview of the SPSA Project and briefly discusses electric utility involvement in the Project.

  19. Cultural Resource Assessment of the Test Area North Demolition Landfill at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Brenda R. Pace

    2003-07-01

    The proposed new demolition landfill at Test Area North on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) will support ongoing demolition and decontamination within the facilities on the north end of the INEEL. In June of 2003, the INEEL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, field surveys, and coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify all cultural resources that might be adversely affected by the project and to provide recommendations to protect those listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. These investigations showed that landfill construction and operation would affect two significant cultural resources. This report outlines protective measures to ensure that these effects are not adverse.

  20. Emergence of hand contamination with Aspergillus during demolition work.

    PubMed

    Cunat, Lisiane; Ahmed-Lecheheb, Djihane; Hartemann, Philippe; Hunter, Paul R; Hautemanière, Alexis

    2013-01-01

    Hand rubbing with hydro-alcoholic solutions prevent the exogenous nosocomial infection, but the hydro-alcoholic solutions were not sporicidal. A major program of demolition was organized on the area of the University Hospital of Nancy (France) between 2007 and 2010, and this period is often considered as a possible source of suspending Aspergillus spores. This study shows the emergence of Aspergillus on the hands of the medical students during demolition period despite the same quality of hand hygiene. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. 33 CFR 165.T10-0693 - Regulated Navigation Area; Greenville Bridge Demolition, Lower Mississippi River, Mile 531.3.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...; Greenville Bridge Demolition, Lower Mississippi River, Mile 531.3. 165.T10-0693 Section 165.T10-0693... Bridge Demolition, Lower Mississippi River, Mile 531.3. (a) Regulated Navigation Area. The following is a... potential safety hazards involved in the demolition of the Greenville Bridge; Demolition means the removal...

  2. 33 CFR 165.T10-0693 - Regulated Navigation Area; Greenville Bridge Demolition, Lower Mississippi River, Mile 531.3.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...; Greenville Bridge Demolition, Lower Mississippi River, Mile 531.3. 165.T10-0693 Section 165.T10-0693... Bridge Demolition, Lower Mississippi River, Mile 531.3. (a) Regulated Navigation Area. The following is a... potential safety hazards involved in the demolition of the Greenville Bridge; Demolition means the removal...

  3. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site

    SciTech Connect

    L.E. Demick

    2011-10-01

    This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

  4. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site

    SciTech Connect

    L.E. Demick

    2011-10-01

    This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

  5. Progress in Decommissioning the Humboldt Bay Power Plant - 13604

    SciTech Connect

    Rod, Kerry; Shelanskey, Steven K.; Kristofzski, John

    2013-07-01

    Decommissioning of the Pacific Gas and Electric (PG and E) Company Humboldt Bay Power Plant (HBPP) Unit 3 nuclear facility has now, after more than three decades of SAFSTOR and initial decommissioning work, transitioned to full-scale decommissioning. Decommissioning activities to date have been well orchestrated and executed in spite of an extremely small work site with space constricted even more by other concurrent on-site major construction projects including the demolition of four fossil units, construction of a new generating station and 60 KV switchyard upgrade. Full-scale decommissioning activities - now transitioning from Plant Systems Removal (PG and E self-perform) to Civil Works Projects (contractor performed) - are proceeding in a safe, timely, and cost effective manner. As a result of the successful decommissioning work to date (approximately fifty percent completed) and the intense planning and preparations for the remaining work, there is a high level of confidence for completion of all HBPP Unit 3 decommissions activities in 2018. Strategic planning and preparations to transition into full-scale decommissioning was carried out in 2008 by a small, highly focused project team. This planning was conducted concurrent with other critical planning requirements such as the loading of spent nuclear fuel into dry storage at the Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) finishing December 2008. Over the past four years, 2009 through 2012, the majority of decommissioning work has been installation of site infrastructure and removal of systems and components, known as the Plant System Removal Phase, where work scope was dynamic with significant uncertainty, and it was self-performed by PG and E. As HBPP Decommissioning transitions from the Plant System Removal Phase to the Civil Works Projects Phase, where work scope is well defined, a contracting plan similar to that used for Fossil Decommissioning will be implemented. Award of five major work scopes

  6. Pleasant Prairie Power Plant air quality control upgrade project, Pleasant Praire, Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect

    Gebhart, S.; Pennline, D.; Brodsky, I.; Bichler, D.

    2007-10-15

    We Energies recently completed a multiyear project at its Pleasant Prairie Power Plant to add a selective catalytic reduction system to one of its two units and a scrubber to both. These projects are described. 7 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Estimation of construction and demolition waste using waste generation rates in Chennai, India.

    PubMed

    Ram, V G; Kalidindi, Satyanarayana N

    2017-06-01

    A large amount of construction and demolition waste is being generated owing to rapid urbanisation in Indian cities. A reliable estimate of construction and demolition waste generation is essential to create awareness about this stream of solid waste among the government bodies in India. However, the required data to estimate construction and demolition waste generation in India are unavailable or not explicitly documented. This study proposed an approach to estimate construction and demolition waste generation using waste generation rates and demonstrated it by estimating construction and demolition waste generation in Chennai city. The demolition waste generation rates of primary materials were determined through regression analysis using waste generation data from 45 case studies. Materials, such as wood, electrical wires, doors, windows and reinforcement steel, were found to be salvaged and sold on the secondary market. Concrete and masonry debris were dumped in either landfills or unauthorised places. The total quantity of construction and demolition debris generated in Chennai city in 2013 was estimated to be 1.14 million tonnes. The proportion of masonry debris was found to be 76% of the total quantity of demolition debris. Construction and demolition debris forms about 36% of the total solid waste generated in Chennai city. A gross underestimation of construction and demolition waste generation in some earlier studies in India has also been shown. The methodology proposed could be utilised by government bodies, policymakers and researchers to generate reliable estimates of construction and demolition waste in other developing countries facing similar challenges of limited data availability.

  8. Fuel Cell Balance-of-Plant Reliability Testbed Project

    SciTech Connect

    Sproat, Vern; LaHurd, Debbie

    2016-10-29

    Reliability of the fuel cell system balance-of-plant (BoP) components is a critical factor that needs to be addressed prior to fuel cells becoming fully commercialized. Failure or performance degradation of BoP components has been identified as a life-limiting factor in fuel cell systems.1 The goal of this project is to develop a series of test beds that will test system components such as pumps, valves, sensors, fittings, etc., under operating conditions anticipated in real Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems. Results will be made generally available to begin removing reliability as a roadblock to the growth of the PEM fuel cell industry. Stark State College students participating in the project, in conjunction with their coursework, have been exposed to technical knowledge and training in the handling and maintenance of hydrogen, fuel cells and system components as well as component failure modes and mechanisms. Three test beds were constructed. Testing was completed on gas flow pumps, tubing, and pressure and temperature sensors and valves.

  9. Sampling and Analysis Plan Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project.

    SciTech Connect

    Brouns, Thomas M.

    2007-07-15

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) describes planned data collection activities for four entry boreholes through the sediment overlying the Saddle Mountains Basalt, up to three new deep rotary boreholes through the Saddle Mountains Basalt and sedimentary interbeds, and one corehole through the Saddle Mountains Basalt and sedimentary interbeds at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site. The SAP will be used in concert with the quality assurance plan for the project to guide the procedure development and data collection activities needed to support borehole drilling, geophysical measurements, and sampling. This SAP identifies the American Society of Testing Materials standards, Hanford Site procedures, and other guidance to be followed for data collection activities. Revision 3 incorporates all interim change notices (ICN) that were issued to Revision 2 prior to completion of sampling and analysis activities for the WTP Seismic Boreholes Project. This revision also incorporates changes to the exact number of samples submitted for dynamic testing as directed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Revision 3 represents the final version of the SAP.

  10. TVA commercial demonstration plant project. Volume 2. Basis of study assessments and project selection. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is considering the design, construction, and operation of a commercial scale coal gasification facility to produce a clean, medium Btu fuel gas (MBG). The project includes all process and support systems required to convert approximately 20,000 tons per day of Kentucky No. 9 bituminous coal, as fed to the gasifiers, into MBG equivalent to about 300 billion Btu per day. The first phase of the proposed project involves conceptual design, environmental and siting studies and economic analyses of commercial plants emphasizing the following gasification technologies: Babcock and Wilcox entrained flow gasifier, Lurgi dry ash gasifier, BGC/Lurgi slagging gasifier, Texaco entrained flow gasifier, and Koppers Totzek entrained flow gasifier. Foster Wheeler's study and assessments/process selection is summarized in this volume.

  11. DEMOLITIONS OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S CONCENTRATOR AND FINISHING FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Mcdonagh, P; Cathy Sizemore, C

    2007-01-17

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has produced Special Nuclear Materials (SNMs) starting in the early 1950's to the mid 1970's for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and from the mid 1970's to the present for the Department of Energy (DOE). In that time, over 1,000 facilities have been built in the sixteen (16) operational areas of the eight hundred (800) square kilometer site. Over the years, many of the facilities have been dispositioned by the DOE as inactive. In FY-03, DOE identified two hundred and forty-seven (247) (inactive or soon to be inactive) facilities that required demolition. Demolition work was scheduled to start in FY-04 and be completed in the first quarter of FY-07. Two-hundred and thirty-nine (239) of these facilities have been demolished employing Routine demolition techniques. This presentation reviews and discusses two (2) of the eight (8) Non-Routine demolitions Facilities, 420-D ''The Concentrator Facility'', and 421-D ''The Finishing Facility''.

  12. Demolition Notification for Quarter Ending March 30, 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Juarez, Catherine L.

    2014-01-06

    The National Nuclear Administration (NNSA) and Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS), (collectively the Permittees) are submitting notice of demolition activities for quarter ending March 30, 2014 in accordance with Permit Section 1.17.2 of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit to the New Mexico Environment Department Hazardous Waste Bureau (NMED_HWB).

  13. 40 CFR 61.145 - Standard for demolition and renovation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... presence of asbestos, including Category I and Category II nonfriable ACM. The requirements of paragraphs... and Category I and Category II nonfriable ACM. (vi) Estimate of the approximate amount of RACM to be... nonfriable ACM in the affected part of the facility that will not be removed before demolition....

  14. 26 CFR 1.165-3 - Demolition of buildings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Demolition of buildings. 1.165-3 Section 1.165-3... buildings. (a) Intent to demolish formed at time of purchase. (1) Except as provided in subparagraph (2) of... immediately or subsequently the buildings situated thereon: No deduction shall be allowed under section...

  15. Interior of during demolition; the brick structure in the middle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior of during demolition; the brick structure in the middle housed the electric motors that ran the rolling mill (the motor house and rolling mills date from the early twentieth century) - Bethlehem Steel Corporation, South Bethlehem Works, Rolling Mill, Along Lehigh River, North of Fourth Street, West of Minsi Trail Bridge, Bethlehem, Northampton County, PA

  16. 26 CFR 1.165-3 - Demolition of buildings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Demolition of buildings. 1.165-3 Section 1.165-3... buildings. (a) Intent to demolish formed at time of purchase. (1) Except as provided in subparagraph (2) of... immediately or subsequently the buildings situated thereon: No deduction shall be allowed under section 165(a...

  17. 26 CFR 1.165-3 - Demolition of buildings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Demolition of buildings. 1.165-3 Section 1.165-3... buildings. (a) Intent to demolish formed at time of purchase. (1) Except as provided in subparagraph (2) of... immediately or subsequently the buildings situated thereon: No deduction shall be allowed under section 165(a...

  18. 26 CFR 1.165-3 - Demolition of buildings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Demolition of buildings. 1.165-3 Section 1.165-3... buildings. (a) Intent to demolish formed at time of purchase. (1) Except as provided in subparagraph (2) of... immediately or subsequently the buildings situated thereon: No deduction shall be allowed under section 165(a...

  19. A Study of Leachate Generated from Construction and Demolition Landfills,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    solid waste (MSW) landfills and hazardous waste landfills. Regulators felt that since C&D landfills did not accept large quantities of hazardous waste...Construction and demolition (C&D) waste landfills have largely been ignored because they have been viewed as innocuous in comparison to municipal

  20. Composting and bioremediation process evaluation of wood waste materials generated from the construction and demolition industry.

    PubMed

    McMahon, V; Garg, A; Aldred, D; Hobbs, G; Smith, R; Tothill, I E

    2008-04-01

    The suitability of using bioremediation and composting techniques for diverting construction and demolition (C&D) waste from landfill has been validated in this study. Different timber products from C&D waste have been composted using various composting approaches. The present work demonstrates the quality of compost produced as a result of composting of mixed board product wood waste, which is frequently obtained from the construction and demolition industry. Three compost mixes were prepared by mixing shredded chip board, medium density fibre, hardboard and melamine. Poultry manure, Eco-Bio mixture and green waste were used as nutrient supplements. The results revealed that compost produced from mixtures of poultry manure and green waste used as nutrient supplements improved the performance in plant growth trials (phytotoxicity tests). Results obtained from the experimental study clearly indicate that the composts produced comply with the criterion suggested in BSI PAS 100 (A specification for compost materials) for use in different applications. Composting can also be demonstrated to be a very practical approach to material management including transport reduction to and from the site. The economic suitability of the process will be improved with the increase in landfill tax. In the current regulatory scenario, it is recommended that these materials should be composted at a centralised facility.

  1. Demolitions of the Savannah River Site's concentrator and finishing facilities

    SciTech Connect

    McDonagh, Paul

    2008-01-15

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has produced Special Nuclear Materials (SNMs) starting in the early 1950's to the mid 1970's for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and from the mid 1970's to the present for the Department of Energy (DOE). In that time, over 1,000 facilities have been built in the sixteen operational areas of the eight hundred square kilometer site. Over the years, many of the facilities have been dispositioned by the DOE as inactive. In FY-03, DOE identified two hundred and forty-seven (inactive or soon to be inactive) facilities that required demolition. Demolition work was scheduled to start in FY-04 and be completed in the first quarter of FY-07. Two-hundred and thirty-nine of these facilities have been demolished employing Routine demolition techniques. This presentation reviews and discusses two of the eight Non-Routine demolitions Facilities, 420-D 'The Concentrator Facility', and 421-D 'The Finishing Facility'. Facilities 420-D and 421-D were toppled by attaching rigging from the structural steel building frame to bulldozers and toppling the facilities over. The greatest advantage of this method is that it employs equipment that is on hand at SRS, saving time on locating and leasing offsite equipment as well as operator training. In addition, although the toppled structure does not land in the original facilities footprint, it does land in a contained area that is easily barricaded to prevent access during the operation. There are several disadvantages. First, there must be adequate area for the structure to topple into. Also if the wire rope size required to topple the structure is larger than two in., the ropes become extremely difficult to work with. Lastly, the yield strength of steel members is guaranteed by the manufacturer as a minimum strength, so its ultimate strength is unknown. This requires extremely conservative specifications sizing the bulldozers and any rigging equipment employed. Two hundred and forty-seven facilities have

  2. Project plan for the background soils project for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Background Soils Project for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (BSPP) will determine the background concentration levels of selected naturally occurring metals, other inorganics, and radionuclides in soils from uncontaminated areas in proximity to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. The data will be used for comparison with characterization and compliance data for soils, with significant differences being indicative of contamination. All data collected as part of this project will be in addition to other background databases established for the PGDP. The BSPP will address the variability of surface and near-surface concentration levels with respect to (1) soil taxonomical types (series) and (2) soil sampling depths within a specific soil profile. The BSPP will also address the variability of concentration levels in deeper geologic formations by collecting samples of geologic materials. The BSPP will establish a database, with recommendations on how to use the data for contaminated site assessment, and provide data to estimate the potential human and health and ecological risk associated with background level concentrations of potentially hazardous constituents. BSPP data will be used or applied as follows.

  3. Heavy metals in recovered fines from construction and demolition debris recycling facilities in Florida.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Timothy; Tolaymat, Thabet; Leo, Kevin; Jambeck, Jenna

    2004-10-01

    A major product recovered from the processing and recycling of construction and demolition (C&D) debris is screened soil, also referred to as fines. A proposed reuse option for C&D debris fines is fill material, typically in construction projects as a substitute for natural soil. Waste material that is reused in a manner similar to soil must first be characterized to examine potential risks to human health and the environment. In Florida, samples of C&D debris fines from 13 C&D debris recycling facilities were characterized for 11 total and leachable heavy metal concentrations. Total metal concentration results (mg/kg) were compared to existing data on background Florida soil concentrations and to Florida's risk-based soil cleanup target levels (SCTLs). All of the detected metals were found to be elevated with respect to background. The 95% upper confidence level of arsenic from 99 samples was 3.2 mg/kg; arsenic presented the greatest limitation to reuse when compared to the SCTLs. Lead was not found to pose a major problem, likely because of the relatively new building infrastructure in Florida, which results in less demolition debris and less material impacted by lead-based paint. The results of batch leaching tests conducted using simulated rainwater (mg/l) were compared directly to risk-based groundwater levels for Florida and were found not to pose a risk using existing risk assessment policies.

  4. “Everyone called me grandma”: Public housing demolition and relocation among older adults in Atlanta

    PubMed Central

    Keene, Danya E; Ruel, Erin

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few decades public and political dissatisfaction with public housing projects and an increasing emphasis on poverty deconcentration has led to the demolition of public housing in cities across the country. A significant body of literature has examined experiences of relocation from public housing and their implications for the well-being of individuals and communities. While much of this literature has focused on young or middle-aged adults and children, older adults have also been affected by demolition and relocation. The displacement of older adults raises a new set of age and life-course specific concerns for the well-being of this population. In this paper, we analyze the relocation narratives of 25 former public housing residents in Atlanta, Georgia. Our analysis focuses on the loss of geographically rooted communities of kinship, support and belonging that many participants, particularly those who have aged in place, attribute to their former developments. Participants describe many material and psychosocial benefits associated with living in communities that were “like families” and where they often held important roles as respected elders. While some were satisfied with their moves, others describe the dispersal of these “families” as a deeply felt loss. While some were able to draw on support from children and grandchildren in their new homes, others describe experiences of profound isolation after relocation. PMID:24187415

  5. "Everyone called me grandma": Public housing demolition and relocation among older adults in Atlanta.

    PubMed

    Keene, Danya E; Ruel, Erin

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few decades public and political dissatisfaction with public housing projects and an increasing emphasis on poverty deconcentration has led to the demolition of public housing in cities across the country. A significant body of literature has examined experiences of relocation from public housing and their implications for the well-being of individuals and communities. While much of this literature has focused on young or middle-aged adults and children, older adults have also been affected by demolition and relocation. The displacement of older adults raises a new set of age and life-course specific concerns for the well-being of this population. In this paper, we analyze the relocation narratives of 25 former public housing residents in Atlanta, Georgia. Our analysis focuses on the loss of geographically rooted communities of kinship, support and belonging that many participants, particularly those who have aged in place, attribute to their former developments. Participants describe many material and psychosocial benefits associated with living in communities that were "like families" and where they often held important roles as respected elders. While some were satisfied with their moves, others describe the dispersal of these "families" as a deeply felt loss. While some were able to draw on support from children and grandchildren in their new homes, others describe experiences of profound isolation after relocation.

  6. QA program plan plutonium stabilization and handling project W-460

    SciTech Connect

    SCHULTZ, J.W.

    1999-09-02

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) identifies Project Quality Assurance (QA) program requirements for all parties participating in the design, procurement, demolition, construction, installation, inspection and testing for Project W-460.

  7. 24 CFR 290.25 - Determination not to preserve a project or a part of a project.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... project will enhance long-term project viability, for example, demolition of a building to provide space for a playground, open space, or combining one-bedroom units to create larger units for families....

  8. 24 CFR 290.25 - Determination not to preserve a project or a part of a project.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... project will enhance long-term project viability, for example, demolition of a building to provide space for a playground, open space, or combining one-bedroom units to create larger units for families....

  9. 24 CFR 290.25 - Determination not to preserve a project or a part of a project.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... project will enhance long-term project viability, for example, demolition of a building to provide space for a playground, open space, or combining one-bedroom units to create larger units for families....

  10. 24 CFR 290.25 - Determination not to preserve a project or a part of a project.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... project will enhance long-term project viability, for example, demolition of a building to provide space for a playground, open space, or combining one-bedroom units to create larger units for families....

  11. A need for a transdisciplinary environment: the Plant Pathways Elucidation Project.

    PubMed

    Reid, Robert W; Brouwer, Cory R; Jackson, Eric W; Lila, Mary Ann

    2014-08-01

    The Plant Pathways Elucidation Project (P2EP) is a multi-institutional project that utilizes cutting-edge genomics research and related disciplines to provide greater understanding of the relation between plant-pathway products and human health. P2EP includes an educational focus to expose student scholars to the rigors of research, while harnessing open collaborations between academia and industry.

  12. BACA Project: geothermal demonstration power plant. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    The various activities that have been conducted by Union in the Redondo Creek area while attempting to develop the resource for a 50 MW power plant are described. The results of the geologic work, drilling activities and reservoir studies are summarized. In addition, sections discussing the historical costs for Union's involvement with the project, production engineering (for anticipated surface equipment), and environmental work are included. Nineteen geothermal wells have been drilled in the Redondo Creek area of the Valles Caldera: a prominent geologic feature of the Jemez mountains consisting of Pliocene and Pleistocene age volcanics. The Redondo Creek area is within a complex longitudinal graben on the northwest flank of the resurgent structural dome of Redondo Peak and Redondo Border. The major graben faults, with associated fracturing, are geologically plausible candidates for permeable and productive zones in the reservoir. The distribution of such permeable zones is too erratic and the locations too imprecisely known to offer an attractive drilling target. Log analysis indicates there is a preferred mean fracture strike of N31W in the upper portion of Redondo Creek wells. This is approximately perpendicular to the major structure in the area, the northeast-striking Redondo Creek graben. The geothermal fluid found in the Redondo Creek reservoir is relatively benign with low brine concentrations and moderate H/sub 2/S concentrations. Geothermometer calculations indicate that the reservoir temperature generally lies between 500/sup 0/F and 600/sup 0/F, with near wellbore flashing occurring during the majority of the wells' production.

  13. Predicting Plant Invasions Following China's Water Diversion Project.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dasheng; Wang, Rui; Gordon, Doria R; Sun, Xihua; Chen, Lu; Wang, Yanwen

    2017-02-07

    China's South to North Water Diversion (SNWD) project connects portions of the Yangtze River in the south to the Yellow River system in the north, overcoming biogeographic barriers to water movement. The diversion will supply potable water to over 110 million people and provide multiple other socioeconomic benefits. However, an inadvertent negative impact of this connection includes creation of conduits for species invasions. Alligator weed (Alternanthera philoxeroides), water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes), and water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes) are the only aquatic plant species on China's shortlists for special control. These species are mainly invasive in the Yangtze River basin. If these species are able to invade the SNWD and further spread via the SNWD, they have the potential to alter water supply, including water quantity and quality, as well as local ecology and agriculture, threatening the goals of the diversion. Understanding the full potential for these species to invade northern China is critical to early management decisions to avoid costly negative impacts. We used Maxent modeling to evaluate the probability that each of these species might become invasive in the receiving water regions. The models predict that all three species will be able to expand their ranges northward, with alligator weed and water hyacinth having the greatest potential for range expansion. These results suggest the need for prevention, monitoring, and management strategies for these species to reduce the risk and costs of impacts.

  14. Environmental assessment for Mound Plant decontamination and decommissioning projects, Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) for seven decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) projects at the Mound Plant in Miamisburg, Ohio, that have not been previously addressed in the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Mound Facility (June 1979). Based on the information presented in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  15. Augusta Newsprint: Paper Mill Pursues Five Projects Following Plant-Wide Energy Efficiency Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2003-07-01

    Augusta Newsprint undertook a plant-wide energy efficiency assessment of its Augusta, Georgia, plant in 2001. The assessment helped the company decide to implement five energy efficiency projects. Four of the five projects will save the company 11,000 MWh of electrical energy (about$369,000) each year. The remaining project will produce more than$300,000 annually, from sale of the byproduct turpentine. The largest annual savings,$881,000, will come from eliminating Kraft pulp by using better process control. All of the projects could be applied to other paper mills and most of the projects could be applied in other industries.

  16. Technology Assessment of Dust Suppression Techniques Applied During Structural Demolition

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreaux, J.F.; Ebadian, M.A.; Williams, P.T.; Dua, S.K.

    1998-10-20

    Hanford, Fernald, Savannah River, and other sites are currently reviewing technologies that can be implemented to demolish buildings in a cost-effective manner. In order to demolish a structure properly and, at the same time, minimize the amount of dust generated from a given technology, an evaluation must be conducted to choose the most appropriate dust suppression technology given site-specific conditions. Thus, the purpose of this research, which was carried out at the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University, was to conduct an experimental study of dust aerosol abatement (dust suppression) methods as applied to nuclear D and D. This experimental study targeted the problem of dust suppression during the demolition of nuclear facilities. The resulting data were employed to assist in the development of mathematical correlations that can be applied to predict dust generation during structural demolition.

  17. Tracking photon jumps with repeated quantum non-demolition parity measurements.

    PubMed

    Sun, L; Petrenko, A; Leghtas, Z; Vlastakis, B; Kirchmair, G; Sliwa, K M; Narla, A; Hatridge, M; Shankar, S; Blumoff, J; Frunzio, L; Mirrahimi, M; Devoret, M H; Schoelkopf, R J

    2014-07-24

    Quantum error correction is required for a practical quantum computer because of the fragile nature of quantum information. In quantum error correction, information is redundantly stored in a large quantum state space and one or more observables must be monitored to reveal the occurrence of an error, without disturbing the information encoded in an unknown quantum state. Such observables, typically multi-quantum-bit parities, must correspond to a special symmetry property inherent in the encoding scheme. Measurements of these observables, or error syndromes, must also be performed in a quantum non-demolition way (projecting without further perturbing the state) and more quickly than errors occur. Previously, quantum non-demolition measurements of quantum jumps between states of well-defined energy have been performed in systems such as trapped ions, electrons, cavity quantum electrodynamics, nitrogen-vacancy centres and superconducting quantum bits. So far, however, no fast and repeated monitoring of an error syndrome has been achieved. Here we track the quantum jumps of a possible error syndrome, namely the photon number parity of a microwave cavity, by mapping this property onto an ancilla quantum bit, whose only role is to facilitate quantum state manipulation and measurement. This quantity is just the error syndrome required in a recently proposed scheme for a hardware-efficient protected quantum memory using Schrödinger cat states (quantum superpositions of different coherent states of light) in a harmonic oscillator. We demonstrate the projective nature of this measurement onto a region of state space with well-defined parity by observing the collapse of a coherent state onto even or odd cat states. The measurement is fast compared with the cavity lifetime, has a high single-shot fidelity and has a 99.8 per cent probability per single measurement of leaving the parity unchanged. In combination with the deterministic encoding of quantum information in cat

  18. Environmental Assessment for Demolition of Buildings 5303 and 5312

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    abatement of asbestos and/or lead-based paint (LBP), removal of the foundations and footings, removal of buried utilities, backfilling, and... asbestos -containing material ADEC Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation AFI Air Force Instruction AFOSH Air Force Occupational Safety...work necessary to demolish the two buildings, including demolition, removal and abatement of asbestos and/or lead-based paint (LBP), removal of the

  19. Estimation of construction and demolition waste volume generation in new residential buildings in Spain.

    PubMed

    Villoria Sáez, Paola; del Río Merino, Mercedes; Porras-Amores, César

    2012-02-01

    The management planning of construction and demolition (C&D) waste uses a single indicator which does not provide enough detailed information. Therefore the determination and implementation of other innovative and precise indicators should be determined. The aim of this research work is to improve existing C&D waste quantification tools in the construction of new residential buildings in Spain. For this purpose, several housing projects were studied to determine an estimation of C&D waste generated during their construction process. This paper determines the values of three indicators to estimate the generation of C&D waste in new residential buildings in Spain, itemizing types of waste and construction stages. The inclusion of two more accurate indicators, in addition to the global one commonly in use, provides a significant improvement in C&D waste quantification tools and management planning.

  20. Improving Sensitivity and Bandwidth of an Atomic Magnetometer using Quantum Non-Demolition Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Vishal; Vasilakis, Georgios; Romalis, Michael

    2009-05-01

    The fundamental sensitivity of an atomic magnetometer is limited by spin projection noise. In the case of uniform spin relaxation, it is well understood that it is not possible to improve the sensitivity using spin squeezing induced by quantum non-demolition (QND) measurement for measurement time scales longer than spin relaxation time [1, 2]. It is however possible to increase the bandwidth of the magnetometer using QND measurement. Here we experimentally demonstrate, in excellent agreement with the theory, an improvement in the bandwidth of our scalar alkali vapor atomic magnetometer using continuous QND measurement. We also investigate the possibility of improving sensitivity of our magnetometer in the special case in which the spin relaxation is time dependent. The case of time dependent spin relaxation naturally arises in high polarization regime in an alkali-alkali spin-exchange relaxation dominated atomic sample. [1] S. F. Huelga, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 3865 -- 3868, 1997. [2] M. Auzinsh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 173002, 2004.

  1. Effect of unexpected demolition announcement on health of residents.

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, D. S.; Reid, J.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the impact of an unexpected announcement of the demolition of a housing estate on the health of the area's residents. DESIGN--Study of general practitioner consultation rates of the estate's residents after the announcement compared with those of other areas and with those of the previous year. SETTING--General practices in Runcorn, Cheshire. PATIENTS--17,000 patients on lists of the two group practices serving the estate and surrounding area. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Relative weekly consultation rates with general practitioners. RESULTS--The mean adjusted odds ratio for consultation was 1.12 (SD 0.12) when demolition was expected and 0.877 (0.05) when it was not (t = 5.94, p less than 0.001). The difference remained after the adjustment for the fall in the estate's population was removed (t = 3.7, p less than 0.01). CONCLUSION--Announcement of the estate's demolition adversely affected residents' health. Images p1230-a PMID:1515798

  2. Compressed Air System Optimization Project Saves Energy and Improves Production at a Citation Forging Plant

    SciTech Connect

    2003-05-01

    In the 1990s, a subsidiary of the Citation Corporation, Interstate Forging, implemented a compressed air system improvement project at its Milwaukee, Wisconsin, forging plant. This improvement enabled the plant to maintain an adequate and stable pressure level using fewer compressors, which led to improved product quality and lower production downtime. The project also yielded annual energy savings of 820,000 kWh and $45,000. With a total project cost of $67,000, the plant achieved a simple payback of just 1.5 years.

  3. Long Frontal Projections Help Battus philenor (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) Larvae Find Host Plants

    PubMed Central

    Kandori, Ikuo; Tsuchihara, Kazuko; Suzuki, Taichi A.; Yokoi, Tomoyuki; Papaj, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Animals sometimes develop conspicuous projections on or near their heads as, e.g., weaponry, burrowing or digging tools, and probes to search for resources. The frontal projections that insects generally use to locate and assess resources are segmented appendages, including antennae, maxillary palps, and labial palps. There is no evidence to date that arthropods, including insects, use projections other than true segmental appendages to locate food. In this regard, it is noteworthy that some butterfly larvae possess a pair of long antenna-like projections on or near their heads. To date, the function of these projections has not been established. Larvae of pipevine swallowtail butterflies Battus philenor (Papilionidae) have a pair of long frontal fleshy projections that, like insect antennae generally, can be actively moved. In this study, we evaluated the possible function of this pair of long moveable frontal projections. In laboratory assays, both frontal projections and lateral ocelli were shown to increase the frequency with which search larvae found plants. The frontal projections increased finding of host and non-host plants equally, suggesting that frontal projections do not detect host-specific chemical cues. Detailed SEM study showed that putative mechanosensillae are distributed all around the frontal as well as other projections. Taken together, our findings suggest that the frontal projections and associated mechanosensillae act as vertical object detectors to obtain tactile information that, together with visual information from lateral ocelli and presumably chemical information from antennae and mouthparts, help larvae to find host plants. Field observations indicate that host plants are small and scattered in southern Arizona locations. Larvae must therefore find multiple host plants to complete development and face significant challenges in doing so. The frontal projections may thus be an adaptation for finding a scarce resource before starving to

  4. Minnesota Project: district heating and cooling through power plant retrofit and distribution network. Final report. Phase 1. [Minnesota Project

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    Appendices are presented for the Minnesota Project: District Heating and Cooling Through Power Plant Retrofit and Distribution Network. These are: SYNTHA results (SYNTHA II is a proprietary program of the SYNTHA Corporation); Market Survey Questionnaire: Environmental Review Procedures; Public Service Commission Regulation of District Heating; Energy Use Normalization Procedures; Power Plant Description; Letters of Commitment; Bond Opinion and Issuance; and Marvin Koeplin Letter, Chairman of Public Service Commission, Moorehead, Minnesota.

  5. Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant Project: construction schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Purcell, W.J.; Martin, E.M.; Shivley, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    The construction schedule for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant and its evolution are described. The initial schedule basis, changes necessitated by the evaluation of the overall plant design, and constructability improvements that have been effected to assure adherence to the schedule are presented. The schedule structure and hierarchy are discussed, as are tools used to define, develop, and evaluate the schedule.

  6. When Interests Collide: Collaboration and Demolition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stay, Byron L.

    1994-01-01

    Provides an analysis of conflict arising out of creative writing students' attempts at coauthorship. Gives insight into the kinds of conflict underlying collaborative writing projects. Considers conflict in coauthorship within the context of current knowledge regarding conflict in larger collaborative contexts. (HB)

  7. Encoal mild coal gasification project: Commercial plant feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    In order to determine the viability of any Liquids from Coal (LFC) commercial venture, TEK-KOL and its partner, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI), have put together a technical and economic feasibility study for a commercial-size LFC Plant located at Zeigler Coal Holding Company`s North Rochelle Mine site. This resulting document, the ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Plant: Commercial Plant Feasibility Study, includes basic plant design, capital estimates, market assessment for coproducts, operating cost assessments, and overall financial evaluation for a generic Powder River Basin based plant. This document and format closely resembles a typical Phase II study as assembled by the TEK-KOL Partnership to evaluate potential sites for LFC commercial facilities around the world.

  8. Method for assigning sites to projected generic nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Holter, G.M.; Purcell, W.L.; Shutz, M.E.; Young, J.R.

    1986-07-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed a method for forecasting potential locations and startup sequences of nuclear power plants that will be required in the future but have not yet been specifically identified by electric utilities. Use of the method results in numerical ratings for potential nuclear power plant sites located in each of the 10 federal energy regions. The rating for each potential site is obtained from numerical factors assigned to each of 5 primary siting characteristics: (1) cooling water availability, (2) site land area, (3) power transmission land area, (4) proximity to metropolitan areas, and (5) utility plans for the site. The sequence of plant startups in each federal energy region is obtained by use of the numerical ratings and the forecasts of generic nuclear power plant startups obtained from the EIA Middle Case electricity forecast. Sites are assigned to generic plants in chronological order according to startup date.

  9. Synthetic Minor NSR Permit: Chipeta Processing, LLC - Chipeta Gas Plant Train IV Project

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains the response to public comments and the final synthetic minor NSR permit for the Chipeta Processing, LLC, Chipeta Gas Plant Train IV Project, located on the Uintah and Ouray Indian Reservation in Uintah County, UT.

  10. Guide for prioritizing power plant productivity improvement projects: handbook of availability improvement methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-15

    As part of its program to help improve electrical power plant productivity, the Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a methodology for evaluating productivity improvement projects. This handbook presents a simplified version of this methodology called the Availability Improvement Methodology (AIM), which provides a systematic approach for prioritizing plant improvement projects. Also included in this handbook is a description of data taking requirements necessary to support the AIM methodology, benefit/cost analysis, and root cause analysis for tracing persistent power plant problems. In applying the AIM methodology, utility engineers should be mindful that replacement power costs are frequently greater for forced outages than for planned outages. Equivalent availability includes both. A cost-effective ranking of alternative plant improvement projects must discern between those projects which will reduce forced outages and those which might reduce planned outages. As is the case with any analytical procedure, engineering judgement must be exercised with respect to results of purely mathematical calculations.

  11. Successful Demolition of Historic Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Facilities: Managing the Process to Maximize Recycle Value to Fund Demolition

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A.; Hambro, L.; Hooper, K.

    2008-07-01

    This paper will present the history of the Atlas 36 and Titan 40 Space Launch Complexes (SLC), the facility assessment process, demolition planning, recycle methodology, and actual facility demolition that resulted in a 40% reduction in baseline cost. These two SLC launched hundreds of payloads into space from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (AFS), Florida. The Atlas-Centaur family of rockets could lift small- to medium-size satellites designed for communications, weather, or military use, placing them with near pinpoint accuracy into their intended orbits. The larger Titan family was relied upon for heavier lifting needs, including launching military satellites as well as interplanetary probes. But despite their efficiency and cost-effectiveness, the Titan rockets, as well as earlier generation Atlas models, were retired in 2005. Concerns about potential environmental health hazards from PCBs and lead-based paint chipping off the facilities also contributed to the Air Force's decision in 2005 to dismantle and demolish the Atlas and Titan missile-launching systems. Lockheed Martin secured the complex following the final launch, removed equipment and turned over the site to the Air Force for decommissioning and demolition (D and D). AMEC was retained by the Air Force to perform demolition planning and facility D and D in 2004. AMEC began with a review of historical information, interviews with past operations personnel, and 100% facility assessment of over 100 structures. There where numerous support buildings that due to their age contained asbestos containing material (ACM), PCB-impacted material, and universal material that had to be identified and removed prior to demolition. Environmental testing had revealed that the 36B mobile support tower (MST) exceeded the TSCA standard for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) paint (<50 ppm), as did the high bay sections of the Titan Vertical Integration Building (VIB). Thus, while most of the steel structures could be

  12. The decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition of loss-of-fluid test reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory Site

    SciTech Connect

    Floerke, J.P.; Borschel, Th.F.; Rhodes, L.K.

    2007-07-01

    resolution through the contractor (CH2M-WG Idaho), the U.S. Department of Energy, the Idaho State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO), and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation. The project team identified multiple hazards that would result if conventional techniques were used to demolish the dome. The physical structure of the vessel containment facility reached 30 meters (98 feet) above grade, presenting significant worker safety hazards created by hoisting and rigging activities. The dome also included a polar crane, 19 meters (62 feet) above grade, that posed similar hazards to workers. The need to work on significantly elevated surfaces, and the thickness of the dome walls - 30 millimeters (1-3/16 inches) of carbon steel - would prove difficult with traditional arc plasma cutting tools. The dome's proximity to operating facilities with equipment sensitive to vibration added to the demolition challenges. To address cultural resource issues, the project team engaged all parties in negotiations and in mapping a path foreword. Open and frequent communication resulted in a Memorandum of Agreement, with stipulations that mitigated the adverse affects of the intended demolition action. The unique mitigating actions resulted in a favorable agreement being signed and issued. To mitigate hazards posed by the height of the facility, the project team had to abandon traditional D and D techniques and employ other methods to complete demolition safely. A different approach and a change in demolition sequence resulted in the safe and efficient removal of the one-of-a-kind containment facility. The approach reduced the use of aerial lifts, aboveground size reduction, and dangerous hoisting and rigging activities that could pose significant hazards to workers. (authors)

  13. Low NOx demonstration project at Gaojing Power Plant, Beijing, China

    SciTech Connect

    Verhoeff, F.; Kissing, B.J.; Bos, H.G.

    1997-12-31

    In November 1996 Stork Thermeq in the Netherlands received the order for the design, manufacture and commissioning of 12 coal/oil-fired low-NOx burners for the Gaojing Power Plant in Beijing, China. The aim of this burner retrofit is to decrease the NOx emission of this power plant and to demonstrate that, with leading-edge combustion technology, considerable reductions of NOx emissions are possible. In this paper a description of the low-NOx combustion technology is given, and field experiences with these burners installed in a new boiler and in a modified existing boiler will be highlighted. Further, insight will be given to the design and construction of the new burners for the Gaojing Power Plant and the results of reference measurements in this power plant will be presented.

  14. Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal Power Plants: Final ARRA Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bharathan, D.

    2013-06-01

    Many binary-cycle geothermal plants use air as the heat rejection medium. Usually this is accomplished by using an air-cooled condenser (ACC) system to condense the vapor of the working fluid in the cycle. Many air-cooled plants suffer a loss of production capacity of up to 50% during times of high ambient temperatures. Use of limited amounts of water to supplement the performance of ACCs is investigated. Deluge cooling is found to be one of the least-cost options. Limiting the use of water in such an application to less than one thousand operating hours per year can boost plant output during critical high-demand periods while minimizing water use in binary-cycle geothermal power plants.

  15. An introduction to the medicinal plant genome project.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shilin; Xiang, Li; Guo, Xu; Li, Qiushi

    2011-06-01

    In recent years, genomics has developed rapidly with the application of next-generation sequencing technology. However, very few studies have been carried out on genomics for medicinal plants. This paper introduces the genome research of medicinal plants, including genome sequencing, assembly, annotation, and functional genomics, to set up the foundation for the development of natural medicines and the selection of cultivars with good agricultural traits. This study places the study on traditional Chinese medicine into the frontier field of life science.

  16. Great Basin Native Plant Selection and Increase Project: 2012 progress report

    Treesearch

    Nancy Shaw; Mike Pellant

    2013-01-01

    The Interagency Native Plant Materials Development Program outlined in the 2002 USDA and USDI Report to Congress, USDI Bureau of Land Management programs and policies, and the Great Basin Restoration Initiative encourage the use of native species for rangeland rehabilitation and restoration where feasible. The Great Basin Native Plant Selection and Increase Project was...

  17. Pupils' Ideas about Flowering Plants. Learning in Science Project (Primary). Working Paper No. 125.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddulph, Fred

    The Learning in Science Project (Primary)--LISP(P)--investigated the ideas and interests children have about flowering plants (in particular whether these plants have a life cycle). Data were obtained from: individual interviews with children, ages 7- to 14-year-old (10 students for each age level), using the "interview-about-instances"…

  18. Pupils' Ideas about Flowering Plants. Learning in Science Project (Primary). Working Paper No. 125.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddulph, Fred

    The Learning in Science Project (Primary)--LISP(P)--investigated the ideas and interests children have about flowering plants (in particular whether these plants have a life cycle). Data were obtained from: individual interviews with children, ages 7- to 14-year-old (10 students for each age level), using the "interview-about-instances"…

  19. Great Basin Native Plant Selection and Increase Project FY08 Progress Report

    Treesearch

    Nancy Shaw; Mike Pellant

    2009-01-01

    The Interagency Native Plant Materials Development Program (USDI and USDA 2002), USDI Bureau of Land Management programs and policies, and the Great Basin Restoration Initiative encourage the use of native species for rangeland rehabilitation and restoration where feasible. This project was initiated to foster the development of native plant materials for use in the...

  20. 75 FR 67216 - Regulated Navigation Area; Greenville Bridge Demolition, Lower Mississippi River Mile 531.3, AR, MS

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA11 Regulated Navigation Area; Greenville Bridge Demolition... demolition of the Greenville Bridge, Lower Mississippi River Mile 531.3. Additionally, vessels will not be... personnel and vessels from the potential safety hazards during the demolition of the Greenville Bridge...

  1. 48 CFR 236.701 - Standard and optional forms for use in contracting for construction or dismantling, demolition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... forms for use in contracting for construction or dismantling, demolition, or removal of improvements..., Demolition, or Removal of Improvements 236.701 Standard and optional forms for use in contracting for construction or dismantling, demolition, or removal of improvements. (c) Do not use Optional Form 347, Order...

  2. 48 CFR 236.701 - Standard and optional forms for use in contracting for construction or dismantling, demolition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... forms for use in contracting for construction or dismantling, demolition, or removal of improvements..., Demolition, or Removal of Improvements 236.701 Standard and optional forms for use in contracting for construction or dismantling, demolition, or removal of improvements. (c) Do not use Optional Form 347, Order...

  3. 48 CFR 236.701 - Standard and optional forms for use in contracting for construction or dismantling, demolition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... forms for use in contracting for construction or dismantling, demolition, or removal of improvements..., Demolition, or Removal of Improvements 236.701 Standard and optional forms for use in contracting for construction or dismantling, demolition, or removal of improvements. (c) Do not use Optional Form 347, Order...

  4. 48 CFR 36.701 - Standard and optional forms for use in contracting for construction or dismantling, demolition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... forms for use in contracting for construction or dismantling, demolition, or removal of improvements. 36... Contracting for Construction, Architect-Engineer Services, and Dismantling, Demolition, or Removal of..., demolition, or removal of improvements. (a) Standard Form 1442, Solicitation, Offer, and Award (Construction...

  5. 48 CFR 236.701 - Standard and optional forms for use in contracting for construction or dismantling, demolition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... forms for use in contracting for construction or dismantling, demolition, or removal of improvements..., Demolition, or Removal of Improvements 236.701 Standard and optional forms for use in contracting for construction or dismantling, demolition, or removal of improvements. (c) Do not use Optional Form 347, Order...

  6. 48 CFR 236.701 - Standard and optional forms for use in contracting for construction or dismantling, demolition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... forms for use in contracting for construction or dismantling, demolition, or removal of improvements..., Demolition, or Removal of Improvements 236.701 Standard and optional forms for use in contracting for construction or dismantling, demolition, or removal of improvements. (c) Do not use Optional Form 347, Order...

  7. Performance oriented packaging report for charge, demolition, shaped, 40 pound, M3A1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sniezek, F.M.

    1992-11-02

    This POP report is for the Charge, Demolition, Shaped, 40 Pound, M3Al which is packaged 1 charge/Mil-B-2427 wood box. This report describes the results of testing conducted.... Performance oriented packaging, POP, Charge, Demolition, Shaped, 40 Pound, M3Al, Mil-B-2427 Wood box.

  8. Performance oriented packaging report for charge, demolition, shaped, 15 pound, M2A4. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sniezek, F.M.

    1992-11-02

    This POP report is for the Charge, Demolition, Shaped, 15 Pound, M2A4 which is packaged 4 charges/Mil-B-2427 wood box. This report describes the results of testing conducted. Performance Oriented Packaging, POP, Charge, Demolition, Shaped, 15 Pound, M2A4, Mil-B-2427 Wood box.

  9. 77 FR 66541 - Safety Zone; Alliance Road Bridge Demolition; Black Warrior River, Locust Fork; Birmingham, AL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-06

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Alliance Road Bridge Demolition; Black... navigable waters during the demolition of the Alliance Road Bridge (Co. Rd. 61). Entry into, transiting or.... ] The Coast Guard received notification on September 11, 2012 from R.R. Dawson Bridge Company LLC of...

  10. 76 FR 32313 - Safety Zone; Chelsea St. Bridge Demolition, Chelsea River, Chelsea, MA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-06

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Chelsea St. Bridge Demolition, Chelsea... demolition of the Chelsea St. Bridge. This safety zone is necessary to provide for the safety of life on... would occur before the rulemaking process was complete. The Chelsea Street Bridge will need to be...

  11. DOE's Oak Ridge Site Kick Off Demolition of the K-27 Building

    SciTech Connect

    Cange, Sue; Rueter, Ken

    2016-02-10

    DOE's Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management kicked off demolition of the K-27 Building this month, moving closer to fulfilling Vision 2016 — removal of all gaseous diffusion buildings from the site by year’s end. As the site's last uranium enrichment building falls, it will mark the first-ever demolition and cleanup of a gaseous diffusion complex anywhere.

  12. Safety Practices for Demolition Procedures. Module SH-41. Safety and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This student module on safety practices for demolition procedures is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. This module presents a general outline of the safe work practices that should be followed at a demolition job site in order for workers to avoid injury. Following the introduction, 10 objectives (each keyed to a page in the…

  13. 33 CFR 165.T11-589 - Safety zone; SFOBB Demolition Safety Zone, San Francisco, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety zone; SFOBB Demolition Safety Zone, San Francisco, CA. 165.T11-589 Section 165.T11-589 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Guard District § 165.T11-589 Safety zone; SFOBB Demolition Safety Zone, San Francisco, CA. (a) Location...

  14. Plant a Planetary Pennant, and Other Art Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Claudia; and others

    1970-01-01

    Art projects discussed include the creation of outer space flags, painting with wool, making ceramics and sculptures from inexpensive ingredients, constructing cardboard rockets, costume design, and reed representations of flowers and insects. (DB)

  15. Decommissioning and Demolition of a Redundant UK Research Facility at AWE Aldermaston - 12453

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, Paul

    2012-07-01

    The redundant two-storey brick built research facility on the AWE Site at Aldermaston, UK is in the closing stages of decommissioning and demolition. The facility was used for a variety of purposes up to 1995 predominately involving the use of alpha-emitting isotopes. The two main areas of alpha-based contamination have been decommissioned with the removal of hot -boxes and fume cupboards on the ground floor and HEPA filter units and ventilation equipment on the first floor. Many of these activities were undertaken using both airline fed suits, (supplied via a free standing mobile unit), and full face respirators. Asbestos materials were located and cleared from the first floor by specialist contractor. All sections of active drain running from the building to the site active effluent disposal system were removed early in the program using established techniques with specialist monitoring equipment used to provide confidence in the data required for disposal of the decommissioning debris. In particular a dedicated High Resolution Gamma Spectrometer (radioactive materials scanning unit) was utilized to categorise waste drums and wrapped packages. The building has been decommissioned and the monitoring and sampling of the structure was completed in November 2011 - the results demonstrating that the building was clear of contamination in accordance with UK clearance and exemption requirements. The demolition plan was developed and implemented in December with site excavation of foundations and site clearance currently ongoing in preparation for final site backfill activities and project close. A number of useful lessons have been learnt during the operations and are set out at the rear of the main text. (authors)

  16. Control room modernization at Finnish nuclear power plants - Two projects compared

    SciTech Connect

    Laarni, J.; Norros, L.

    2006-07-01

    The modernization of automation systems and human-machine interfaces is a current issue at both of the two nuclear power plants (i.e., Fortum's Loviisa plant and TVO's Olkiluoto plant) in Finland. Since the plants have been launched in the 1970's or 1980's, technology is in part old-fashioned and needs to be renewed. At Olkiluoto upgrades of the turbine operator systems have already been conducted; at Loviisa the first phase of the modernization project has just started. Basically, there is a question of the complete digitalization of the information streams at the two plants, and transition from a conventional hard-wired or hybrid control room to a screen-based one. The new human-machine interfaces will comprise new technology, such as PC workstations, soft control, touch screens and large-screen overall displays. The modernization of human-system interfaces is carried out in a stepwise manner at both plants. At both plants the main driver has not been the need to renew the user interfaces of the control room, but the need to upgrade the automation systems. In part because of this, there is a lack of a systematic top-down approach in which different aspects of human factors (HF) engineering are considered in relationship to higher level goals. Our aim here is to give an overview description of the control room modernization projects at the two plants and provide a preliminary evaluation of their progress to date. The projects are also compared, for example, in terms of duration, scope and phasing, and who is responsible for the realization of the project. In addition, we also compare experiences from the Finnish projects to experiences from similar projects abroad. The main part of the data used in this study is based on designers' and project members' interviews. (authors)

  17. Chronic lower respiratory diseases among demolition and cement workers: a population-based register study

    PubMed Central

    Mølgaard, Ellen Fischer; Hannerz, Harald; Tüchsen, Finn; Brauer, Charlotte; Kirkeskov, Lilli

    2013-01-01

    Objective To estimate standardised hospitalisation ratios (SHR) for chronic lower respiratory diseases among demolition and cement workers in Denmark, 1995–2009. Design This is a population-based register study on data from ‘the Occupational Hospitalisation Register’. SHR of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was calculated for both demolition and cement workers. Settings Register study with data from all hospitals in Denmark. Participants 895 demolition workers and 5633 cement and concrete workers were included in the study and all economical active men were used as reference group. Results We found a statistically significant high SHR for the cement workers, SHR=134 (95% CI 117 to 153). The SHR for demolition workers was 131 (95% CI 87 to 188). Conclusions We find a higher risk of being hospitalised due to COPD in cement and concrete workers (significant) and demolition workers (insignificant) compared to gainfully employed men. PMID:23315517

  18. Chronic lower respiratory diseases among demolition and cement workers: a population-based register study.

    PubMed

    Mølgaard, Ellen Fischer; Hannerz, Harald; Tüchsen, Finn; Brauer, Charlotte; Kirkeskov, Lilli

    2013-01-11

    To estimate standardised hospitalisation ratios (SHR) for chronic lower respiratory diseases among demolition and cement workers in Denmark, 1995-2009. This is a population-based register study on data from 'the Occupational Hospitalisation Register'. SHR of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was calculated for both demolition and cement workers. Register study with data from all hospitals in Denmark. 895 demolition workers and 5633 cement and concrete workers were included in the study and all economical active men were used as reference group. We found a statistically significant high SHR for the cement workers, SHR=134 (95% CI 117 to 153). The SHR for demolition workers was 131 (95% CI 87 to 188). We find a higher risk of being hospitalised due to COPD in cement and concrete workers (significant) and demolition workers (insignificant) compared to gainfully employed men.

  19. Projecting labor demand and worker immigration at nuclear power plant construction sites: an evaluation of methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, H.W. Jr; Schlottmann, A.M.; Schriver, W.R.

    1981-12-01

    The study evaluates methodology employed for the projection of labor demand at, and worker migration to, nuclear power plant construction sites. In addition, suggestions are offered as to how this projection methodology might be improved. The study focuses on projection methodologies which forecast either construction worker migration or labor requirements of alternative types of construction activity. Suggested methodological improvements relate both to institutional factors within the nuclear power plant construction industry, and to a better use of craft-specific data on construction worker demand/supply. In addition, the timeliness and availability of the regional occupational data required to support, or implement these suggestions are examined.

  20. Fatigue of reinforcing bars during hydro-demolition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyland, C. W. K.; Ouwejan, A.

    2017-05-01

    Reinforcing steel fractured during hydro-demolition of a reinforced concrete pier head due to low cycle flexural fatigue from vibration caused by impact of the high pressure water jet on the exposed length of the bars. Research into the fatigue performance of steel reinforcing steel tends to focus on the high cycle axial performance in reinforced concrete members and re-bending behaviour. However with the increasing use of hydro-demolition of concrete structures as part of remediation works care is required to ensure the steel reinforcement exposed to the high pressure jet of water is not going to suffer relatively low cycle flexural damage that may compromise the designed performance of the completed reinforced concrete structure. This paper describes the failure assessment, fatigue analysis, and metallographic examination that was undertaken. It was found that the rib to flank transition radius on the reinforcement steel was small enough to cause a significant stress concentration effect and was the location of fatigue crack growth. A relatively simple analysis using the maximum unrestrained cantilevered bar length and force exerted by the water jet was used to calculate the maximum expected bending moment. This was compared to the bending capacity at initiation of yielding at the rib flank transition accounting for stress concentration effects. This showed that the observed cyclic reversing ductile crack growth and fracture of the H25 bars was consistent with the loading applied. A method is proposed based on these observations to assess suitable limits for unrestrained bar lengths or maximum working offset of the water jet from the point of bar restraint when undertaking hydro-demolition work. The fatigue critical performance requirements of AS/NZS4671 500E bars are also therefore compared with those of BS4449:2005 and PN EN/ISO 15630-1:2011 for comparable 500C bars

  1. 10. SOUTHEAST EXTERIOR CORNER. During demolition large iron bars were ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. SOUTHEAST EXTERIOR CORNER. During demolition large iron bars were found embedded in the south brick walls about 11 courses above the water table. These were possibly used to secure the roof structure of a shed which housed the fire engine of the Relief Fire Company (see Articles of Agreement, 1815, papers of the Central Philadelphia Meeting), which specified that the Engine House was to be situated at the northeast corner of the lot. Perhaps at some later date the shed was moved. - Twelfth Street Meeting House, 20 South Twelfth Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  2. Overview regarding construction and demolition waste in Spain.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Robles, Desirée; García-González, Julia; Juan-Valdés, Andrés; Morán-Del Pozo, Julia M; Guerra-Romero, M Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    The construction sector comprises a number of activities that may result in environmental impacts of considerable magnitude, waste generation being one of the major negative effects of this industry due to the large streams generated. Proper knowledge of the environmental problem caused by the sector is of great importance in order to achieve an effective waste management. Thus, this paper analyse the Spanish situation regarding construction and demolition waste (CDW) compared with other European Union countries; which sets out the current figures of the CDW scenario (legislation, generation, composition, treatment and market) as well as the difficulties encountered when handling this residue.

  3. 106. OVERALL VIEW OF NORTH PLANT, WITH GB MANUFACTURING PLANT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    106. OVERALL VIEW OF NORTH PLANT, WITH GB MANUFACTURING PLANT (BUILDING 1501) AT LEFT BACKGROUND AND AMMUNITION DEMOLITION FACILITY (BUILDING 1611) AT RIGHT FOREGROUND. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  4. Salton Sea Project, Phase 1. [solar pond power plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peelgren, M. L.

    1982-01-01

    A feasibility study was made for a salt gradient solar pond power plant in or near the Salton Sea of California. The conclusions support continuance 5-MWe proof-of-concept experiment, and ultimate construction by an electric utility company of a 600-MWe plant. The Solar Pond concept would be an environmental benefit to the Salton Sea by reversing the increasing salinity trend. The greatest cost drivers are the lake dike construction and pond sealing. Problems to be resolved include method of brine production from Salton Sea water for the first unit (which requires evaporation pond area and time), the high turbidity and color content of the Salton Sea water (which requires pretreatment), and other questions related to pond permeability, bio-activity and soil/brine chemical reactions. All technical and environmental problems appear solvable and/or manageable if care is taken in mitigating impacts.

  5. New Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, Preliminary Point Design

    SciTech Connect

    F. H. Southworth; P. E. MacDonald; A. M. Baxter; P. D. Bayless; J. M. Bolin; H. D. Gougar; R. L. Moore; A. M. Ougouag; M. B. Richards; R. L. Sant; J. W. Sterbentz; W. K. Terry

    2004-03-01

    This paper provides a preliminary assessment of two possible versions of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), a prismatic fuel type helium gas-cooled reactor and a pebblebed fuel helium gas reactor. Both designs will meet the three basic requirements that have been set for the NGNP: a coolant outlet temperature of 1000 C, passive safety, and a total power output consistent with that expected for commercial high-temperature gas-cooled reactors.

  6. Integrated safety assessment of an oxygen reduction project at Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power's Haddam Neck plant

    SciTech Connect

    Aubrey, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company (CYAPCo) has implemented an Integrated Safety Assessment Program (ISAP) for the integrated evaluation and prioritization of plant-specific licensing issues, regulatory policy issues, and plant improvement projects. As part of the ISAP process, probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) is utilized to evaluate the net safety impact of plant modification projects. On a few occasions, implementation of this approach has resulted in the identification of projects with negative safety impacts that could not be quantified via the normal design review and 10CFR50.59 safety evaluation process. An example is a plant modification that was proposed to reduce the oxygen in the Haddam Neck plant's demineralized water storage tank (DWST). The project involved the design and installation of a nitrogen blanketing system on the DWST. The purpose of the project was to reduce the oxygen content on the secondary side, consistent with recommendations from the Electric Power Research Institute Steam Generator Owners Group. Oxygen is one of the contributors to the corrosion process in systems in contact with the feedwater and can cause damage to associated components if not controlled.

  7. Summary for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project in Review

    SciTech Connect

    L.E. Demick

    2010-09-01

    This paper reports on the major progress that the NGNP Project has made toward developing and commercializing the HTGR technology. Significant R&D progress has been made in addressing key technical issues for qualification of the HTGR fuel and graphite, codification of high temperature materials and verification and validation of design codes. Work is also progressing in heat transfer/transport design and testing and in development of the high temperature steam electrolysis hydrogen production process. A viable licensing strategy has been formulated in coordination with the NRC and DOE. White papers covering key licensing issues have been and will continue to be submitted and necessary discussions of these key issues have begun with the NRC. Continued government support is needed to complete the Project objectives as established in the 2005 Energy Policy Act.

  8. Summary for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project in Review

    SciTech Connect

    L.E. Demick

    2010-08-01

    This paper reports on the major progress that the NGNP Project has made toward developing and commercializing the HTGR technology. Significant R&D progress has been made in addressing key technical issues for qualification of the HTGR fuel and graphite, codification of high temperature materials and verification and validation of design codes. Work is also progressing in heat transfer/transport design and testing and in development of the high temperature steam electrolysis hydrogen production process. A viable licensing strategy has been formulated in coordination with the NRC and DOE. White papers covering key licensing issues have been and will continue to be submitted and necessary discussions of these key issues have begun with the NRC. Continued government support is needed to complete the Project objectives as established in the 2005 Energy Policy Act.

  9. Preliminary study for the management of construction and demolition waste.

    PubMed

    Kourmpanis, B; Papadopoulos, A; Moustakas, K; Stylianou, M; Haralambous, K J; Loizidou, M

    2008-06-01

    This paper refers to the management of the construction and demolition (C&D) waste since, according to the EU Waste Strategy, C&D waste is considered to be one of the priority waste streams and appropriate actions need to be taken with respect to its effective management. Initially, the paper presents the state-of-the-art of the problem of C&D waste, including the amount and composition of C&D waste in EU countries, differences in the characteristics of this waste stream depending on its origin, as well as collection and management practices that are applied. A methodology is described for the estimation of the quantities of the waste stream under examination, since in most cases quantitative primary data is not available. Next, the fundamentals for the development of an integrated scheme for the management of C&D waste are presented and discussed, such as appropriate demolition procedures and location of waste management (off-site waste management, on-site waste management, direct on-site recovery, centralized on-site recovery). Finally, taking into consideration all relevant parameters, alternative systems that could be applied for the management of the C&D waste are suggested.

  10. Quality and quantity of construction and demolition waste in Tehran.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Alireza; Ghorbanian, Tahereh; Yousefi, Nader; Dadashzadeh, Dariush; Khalili, Fatemeh; Bagheri, Amin; Raei, Mehdi; Mahvi, Amir Hossein

    2017-01-01

    In recent years the generation rate of construction and demolition waste (C&D) has significantly augmented. The aim of this study was to assessed the quality and quantity of construction and demolition waste in Tehran (capital of Iran). Questionnaire methods were used for estimating the amount of generated C&D wastes national statistical data and typical waste generation data. In order to defining the composition of C&D waste, trucks were randomly selected and their wastes were separated and weighted. According to obtained results, about 82,646,051 m(3) of C&D waste (average 16,529,210 m(3) per year) were generated during 2011 to 2016 which only about 26% of them has been recycled. Mixing sand and cement, concrete, broken bricks and soil have the highest amount of the composition of C&D waste in Tehran that was 30, 19, 18 and 11%, respectively. Based on the results, about 2,784,158 t of the waste will generate in 2025 and this is approximately 122% higher than wastes generate in 2016. Based on MAPSA's data, 360 teams of personnel cruise and control the illegal disposals, but due to the expansion of Tehran this number of teams is inadequate and can't be effective in controlling the situation. In general, the overall condition of C&D waste management in Tehran seems undesirable and needs to be updated based on the experience of successful countries in this field.

  11. Quantum demolition filtering and optimal control of unstable systems.

    PubMed

    Belavkin, V P

    2012-11-28

    A brief account of the quantum information dynamics and dynamical programming methods for optimal control of quantum unstable systems is given to both open loop and feedback control schemes corresponding respectively to deterministic and stochastic semi-Markov dynamics of stable or unstable systems. For the quantum feedback control scheme, we exploit the separation theorem of filtering and control aspects as in the usual case of quantum stable systems with non-demolition observation. This allows us to start with the Belavkin quantum filtering equation generalized to demolition observations and derive the generalized Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation using standard arguments of classical control theory. This is equivalent to a Hamilton-Jacobi equation with an extra linear dissipative term if the control is restricted to Hamiltonian terms in the filtering equation. An unstable controlled qubit is considered as an example throughout the development of the formalism. Finally, we discuss optimum observation strategies to obtain a pure quantum qubit state from a mixed one.

  12. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project 2009 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Demick; Jim Kinsey; Keith Perry; Dave Petti

    2010-05-01

    The mission of the NGNP Project is to broaden the environmental and economic benefits of nuclear energy technology to the United States and other economies by demonstrating its applicability to market sectors not served by light water reactors (LWRs). Those markets typically use fossil fuels to fulfill their energy needs, and high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) like the NGNP can reduce this dependence and the resulting carbon footprint.

  13. Technical data for concentrated solar power plants in operation, under construction and in project.

    PubMed

    Pelay, Ugo; Luo, Lingai; Fan, Yilin; Stitou, Driss; Rood, Mark

    2017-08-01

    This article presents technical data for concentrated solar power (CSP) plants in operation, under construction and in project all over the world in the form of tables. These tables provide information about plants (e.g., name of the CSP plant, country of construction, owner of the plant, aim of the plant) and their technical characteristics (e.g., CSP technology, solar power, area of the plant, presence and type of hybridization system, electricity cost, presence and type of TES, power cycle fluid, heat transfer fluid, operating temperature, operating pressure, type of turbine, type and duration of storage, etc.). Further interpretation of the data and discussions on the current state-of-the-art and future trends of CSP can be found in the associated research article (Pelay et al., 2017) [1].

  14. Risk assessment of exposure to particulate output of a demolition site.

    PubMed

    Brown, A; Barrett, J E S; Robinson, H; Potgieter-Vermaak, S

    2015-08-01

    Whilst vehicular and industrial contributions to the airborne particulate budget are well explored, the input due to building demolition is relatively unknown. Air quality is of importance to human health, and it is well known that composition of airborne particles can have a significant influence on both chronic and acute health effects. Road dust (RD) was collected before and after the demolition of a large building to elucidate changes in elemental profile. Rainfall and PM10 mass concentration data aided interpretation of the elemental data. Quantification of Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Rh, S, Si, Sn, Ti, V and Zn was carried out. It was found that only Al, K, Mg, Si and S increased in concentration across all size fractions after the building demolition. Risk assessment was then carried out on elements with applicable reference dose values to assess the potential health risks due to the demolition. Significant risk to children was observed for chromium and aluminium exposure. PM10, monitored 40 metres from the demolition site, indicated no abnormal concentrations during the demolition; however, rainfall data were shown to affect the concentration of PM10. The elemental data observed in this study could possibly indicate the role of increased sulphur concentrations (in this case as a result of the demolition) on the buffer capacity of RD, hence leaching metals into rainwater.

  15. TVA commercial demonstration plant project. Volume 4. Plant based on Babcock and Wilcox gasifier. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    The baseline design of a coal gasification plant producing medium Btu gas, based upon the Babcock and Wilcox gasification process is documented in this report. The coal gasification plant consists of four identical modules, each with a capacity of approximately 5000 tons of coal per day as delivered to the gasifiers. The entire plant (four modules) produces 1205.7 MCFD of gas with a GHV value of approximately 299 Btu/SCF for a total heating value of about 360 billion Btu/day. The plant location is the rural site of Murphy Hill, located along the Tennessee River, some 30 miles east of Huntsville, Alabama. The desired product gas is a clean, medium-Btu gas suitable for pipeline distribution. The coal used for processing and for auxiliary boilers is a Kentucky No. 9 coal. The site is accessible by barge and road, with the plant receiving coal primarily by barge. Water needed for cooling and for process consumption will be drawn from the Tennessee River and will be treated by the plant water treatment facility. A description of the plant by major sections is included as well as flow diagrams, stream balances and lists of major equipment. Estimates of emissions and effluents are presented.

  16. Lead dustfall from demolition of scattered site family housing: developing a sampling methodology.

    PubMed

    Mucha, Amy Pelka; Stites, Nicole; Evens, Anne; MacRoy, Patrick M; Persky, Victoria W; Jacobs, David E

    2009-02-01

    Over 3000 older homes containing lead-based paint are demolished in Chicago each year. While previous studies investigating large multifamily housing demolitions have shown high levels of lead in dustfall, dispersed single-family housing demolition have yet to be assessed. Presently, no standards exist to regulate the extent of lead dustfall from housing demolition. We studied ten residences in Chicago undergoing demolition and debris removal and compared dustfall rates to five standing homes from March to October 2006. Dustfall was measured using a modification of APHA Method 502; samplers consisted of plastic buckets filled with 1l of deionized water, elevated to breathing zone height and placed around the demolition site perimeter. Laboratory analysis consisted of filtration, acid digestion and analysis by ICP/MS. During demolition, the geometric mean lead dustfall (n=43 at 10 locations) was 64.1 microgPb/m(2)/h (range: 1.3-3902.5), while the geometric mean lead dustfall for areas with no demolition (n=18 at 6 locations) was 12.9 microgPb/m(2)/h (range: 1.8-54.5). This difference was highly statistically significant (p=0.0004). When dust suppression measures were used, dustfall lead levels were lower, although the difference was not statistically significant. The geometric mean lead dustfall with dust suppression (n=25 at five locations) and without (n=22 at six locations) was 48 Pbmicrog/m(2)/h and 74.6 microgPb/m(2)/h, respectively. Demolition dustfall lead levels are much higher than background levels of lead during demolition of single-family housing and may constitute a yet uncharacterized but important source of lead exposure to nearby residents. Simple dust suppression methods are likely to reduce the contamination considerably.

  17. Lead and other heavy metals in dust fall from single-family housing demolition.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, David E; Cali, Salvatore; Welch, Alison; Catalin, Bogdan; Dixon, Sherry L; Evens, Anne; Mucha, Amy P; Vahl, Nicole; Erdal, Serap; Bartlett, John

    2013-01-01

    We measured lead and other heavy metals in dust during older housing demolition and effectiveness of dust suppression. We used American Public Housing Association Method 502 and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Methods SW3050B and SW6020 at 97 single-family housing demolition events with intermittent (or no) use of water to suppress dust at perimeter, non-perimeter, and locations without demolition, with nested mixed modeling and tobit modeling with left censoring. The geometric mean (GM) lead dust fall during demolition was 6.01 micrograms of lead per square foot per hour (μg Pb/ft(2)/hour). GM lead dust fall was 14.18 μg Pb/ft(2)/hour without dust suppression, but declined to 5.48 μg Pb/ft(2)/hour (p=0.057) when buildings and debris were wetted. Significant predictors included distance, wind direction, and main street location. At 400 feet, lead dust fall was not significantly different from background. GM lead concentration at demolition (2,406 parts per million [ppm]) was significantly greater than background (GM=579 ppm, p=0.05). Arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, and manganese demolition dust fall was significantly higher than background (p<0.001). Demolition of approximately 400 old housing units elsewhere with more dust suppression was only 0.25 μg Pb/ft(2)/hour. Lead dust suppression is feasible and important in single-family housing demolition where distances between houses are smaller and community exposures are higher. Neighbor notification should be expanded to at least 400 feet away from single-family housing demolition, not just adjacent properties. Further research is needed on effects of distance, potential water contamination, occupational exposures, and water application.

  18. Lead and Other Heavy Metals in Dust Fall from Single-Family Housing Demolition

    PubMed Central

    Cali, Salvatore; Welch, Alison; Catalin, Bogdan; Dixon, Sherry L.; Evens, Anne; Mucha, Amy P.; Vahl, Nicole; Erdal, Serap; Bartlett, John

    2013-01-01

    Objective We measured lead and other heavy metals in dust during older housing demolition and effectiveness of dust suppression. Methods We used American Public Housing Association Method 502 and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Methods SW3050B and SW6020 at 97 single-family housing demolition events with intermittent (or no) use of water to suppress dust at perimeter, non-perimeter, and locations without demolition, with nested mixed modeling and tobit modeling with left censoring. Results The geometric mean (GM) lead dust fall during demolition was 6.01 micrograms of lead per square foot per hour (μg Pb/ft2/hour). GM lead dust fall was 14.18 μg Pb/ft2/hour without dust suppression, but declined to 5.48 μg Pb/ft2/hour (p=0.057) when buildings and debris were wetted. Significant predictors included distance, wind direction, and main street location. At 400 feet, lead dust fall was not significantly different from background. GM lead concentration at demolition (2,406 parts per million [ppm]) was significantly greater than background (GM=579 ppm, p=0.05). Arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, and manganese demolition dust fall was significantly higher than background (p<0.001). Demolition of approximately 400 old housing units elsewhere with more dust suppression was only 0.25 μg Pb/ft2/hour. Conclusions Lead dust suppression is feasible and important in single-family housing demolition where distances between houses are smaller and community exposures are higher. Neighbor notification should be expanded to at least 400 feet away from single-family housing demolition, not just adjacent properties. Further research is needed on effects of distance, potential water contamination, occupational exposures, and water application. PMID:24179257

  19. Quality assessment for recycling aggregates from construction and demolition waste: An image-based approach for particle size estimation.

    PubMed

    Di Maria, Francesco; Bianconi, Francesco; Micale, Caterina; Baglioni, Stefano; Marionni, Moreno

    2016-02-01

    The size distribution of aggregates has direct and important effects on fundamental properties of construction materials such as workability, strength and durability. The size distribution of aggregates from construction and demolition waste (C&D) is one of the parameters which determine the degree of recyclability and therefore the quality of such materials. Unfortunately, standard methods like sieving or laser diffraction can be either very time consuming (sieving) or possible only in laboratory conditions (laser diffraction). As an alternative we propose and evaluate the use of image analysis to estimate the size distribution of aggregates from C&D in a fast yet accurate manner. The effectiveness of the procedure was tested on aggregates generated by an existing C&D mechanical treatment plant. Experimental comparison with manual sieving showed agreement in the range 81-85%. The proposed technique demonstrated potential for being used on on-line systems within mechanical treatment plants of C&D.

  20. Construction quality assurance report for the Y-12 Construction/Demolition Landfill VII (CDL VII), Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, P.M.

    1994-11-01

    This Construction Quality Assurance (CQA) Report provides documentation that Bid Option 2 of the Y-12 Plant Construction Demolition Landfill 7 (CDL-7) was constructed in substantial compliance with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) approved design, as indicated and specified in the permit drawings, approved changes, and specifications. CDL-7 is located in Anderson County on the south side of Chestnut Ridge, approximately 0.5 miles south of the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This report applies specifically to the limits of excavation for Area No. 1 portions of the perimeter maintenance road and drainage channel and Sedimentation Pond No. 3. A partial ``As-Built`` survey was performed and is included.

  1. Report: treatment of commercial, construction and demolition waste in North Rhine-Westphalia: policy-making and operation options.

    PubMed

    Karavezyris, Vassilios

    2007-04-01

    This paper summarizes a long-term-investigation of the mechanical treatment of commercial, construction and demolition waste materials in North Rhine-Westphalia in the light of applied operation standards and a disposal ban on untreated waste. It is shown how both the allocation of output materials from mechanical treatment plants and the subsequent treatment channels have changed since enforcement of the ban in 2005. Based on the findings of the investigation, two waste management scenarios offering alternative policies have been defined and are discussed. It is suggested that consistent enforcement of the ban affects both the diversion of waste to incineration and the recovery of materials on a regional scale. On the other hand, potential energy recovery may be fully exploited only insofar as operators of mechanical treatment plants concentrate their business on the production of refuse-derived fuel.

  2. Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the South Texas Project nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bumgardner, J.D.; Nickolaus, J.R.; Moffitt, N.E.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V.

    1993-12-01

    In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. South Texas Project was selected as a plant for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by the NRC inspectors in preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk important components at the South Texas Project plant.

  3. Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Saurwein, John

    2011-07-15

    This report is the Final Technical Report for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project conducted by a team led by General Atomics under DOE Award DE-NE0000245. The primary overall objective of the project was to develop and document a conceptual design for the Steam Cycle Modular Helium Reactor (SC-MHR), which is the reactor concept proposed by General Atomics for the NGNP Demonstration Plant. The report summarizes the project activities over the entire funding period, compares the accomplishments with the goals and objectives of the project, and discusses the benefits of the work. The report provides complete listings of the products developed under the award and the key documents delivered to the DOE.

  4. Tri-State Synfuels Project Review: Volume 12. Fluor project status. [Proposed Henderson, Kentucky coal to gasoline plant; engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to document and summarize activities associated with Fluor's efforts on the Tri-State Synfuels Project. The proposed facility was to be coal-to-transport fuels facility located in Henderson, Kentucky. Tri-State Synfuels Company was participating in the project as a partner of the US Department of Energy per terms of a Cooperative Agreement resulting from DOE's synfuel's program solicitation. Fluor's initial work plan called for preliminary engineering and procurement services to the point of commitment for construction for a Sasol Fischer-Tropsch plant. Work proceeded as planned until October 1981 when results of alternative coal-to-methanol studies revealed the economic disadvantage of the Synthol design for US markets. A number of alternative process studies followed to determine the best process configuration. In January 1982 Tri-State officially announced a change from Synthol to a Methanol to Gasoline (MTG) design basis. Further evaluation and cost estimates for the MTG facility eventually led to the conclusion that, given the depressed economic outlook for alternative fuels development, the project should be terminated. Official announcement of cancellation was made on April 13, 1982. At the time of project cancellation, Fluor had completed significant portions of the preliminary engineering effort. Included in this report are descriptions and summaries of Fluor's work during this project. In addition location of key project data and materials is identified and status reports for each operation are presented.

  5. Integrated project management plan for the Plutonium Finishing Plant stabilization and deactivation project

    SciTech Connect

    SINCLAIR, J.C.

    1999-05-03

    This document sets forth the plans, organization, and control systems for managing the PFP Stabilization and Deactivation Project, and includes the top level cost and schedule baselines. The project includes the stabilization of Pu-bearing materials, storage, packaging, and transport of these and other nuclear materials, surveillance and maintenance of facilities and systems relied upon for storage of the materials, and transition of the facilities in the PFP Complex.

  6. Investigating the determinants of contractor's construction and demolition waste management behavior in Mainland China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zezhou; Yu, Ann T W; Shen, Liyin

    2017-02-01

    The abundant generation of construction and demolition (C&D) waste presents a significant challenge to the sustainable development of the construction industry in Mainland China. As the implementer of construction activities, the contractor's C&D waste management performance plays an important role in C&D waste minimization. This paper aims to investigate the determinants of the contractor's C&D waste management behavior in Mainland China. The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) was selected as the basis of the theoretical model. In addition, three contextual constructs (i.e., economic viability, governmental supervision, and project constraints) were introduced, formulating the initial model. Based on the initial model, eight constructs were identified and seven hypotheses were proposed. A questionnaire survey was conducted to collect data and a Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) analysis was employed to test the proposed hypotheses. Results showed that the C&D waste management intention is not a significant determinant of contractor's C&D waste management behavior. The most important determinant is economic viability, followed by governmental supervision as the second most important determinant. Nevertheless, the construct of project constraints is an insignificant determinant for contractor's adoption of C&D waste management behavior. The research findings imply that, in Mainland China, the government, at this stage, plays an important role in guiding and promoting the contractor to exhibit better C&D waste management behavior.

  7. Advanced Grid-Friendly Controls Demonstration Project for Utility-Scale PV Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Gevorgian, Vahan; O'Neill, Barbara

    2016-01-21

    A typical photovoltaic (PV) power plant consists of multiple power electronic inverters and can contribute to grid stability and reliability through sophisticated 'grid-friendly' controls. The availability and dissemination of actual test data showing the viability of advanced utility-scale PV controls among all industry stakeholders can leverage PV's value from being simply an energy resource to providing additional ancillary services that range from variability smoothing and frequency regulation to power quality. Strategically partnering with a selected utility and/or PV power plant operator is a key condition for a successful demonstration project. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Solar Energy Technologies Office selected the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to be a principal investigator in a two-year project with goals to (1) identify a potential partner(s), (2) develop a detailed scope of work and test plan for a field project to demonstrate the gird-friendly capabilities of utility-scale PV power plants, (3) facilitate conducting actual demonstration tests, and (4) disseminate test results among industry stakeholders via a joint NREL/DOE publication and participation in relevant technical conferences. The project implementation took place in FY 2014 and FY 2015. In FY14, NREL established collaborations with AES and First Solar Electric, LLC, to conduct demonstration testing on their utility-scale PV power plants in Puerto Rico and Texas, respectively, and developed test plans for each partner. Both Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority and the Electric Reliability Council of Texas expressed interest in this project because of the importance of such advanced controls for the reliable operation of their power systems under high penetration levels of variable renewable generation. During FY15, testing was completed on both plants, and a large amount of test data was produced and analyzed that demonstrates the ability of PV power plants to

  8. [New materia medica project: synthetic biology based bioactive metabolites research in medicinal plant].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong

    2017-03-25

    In the last decade, synthetic biology research has been gradually transited from monocellular parts or devices toward more complex multicellular systems. The emerging plant synthetic biology is regarded as the "next chapter" of synthetic biology. The complex and diverse plant metabolism as the entry point, plant synthetic biology research not only helps us understand how real life is working, but also facilitates us to learn how to design and construct more complex artificial life. Bioactive compounds innovation and large-scale production are expected to be breakthrough with the redesigned plant metabolism as well. In this review, we discuss the research progress in plant synthetic biology and propose the new materia medica project to lift the level of traditional Chinese herbal medicine research.

  9. Advanced conceptual design report: T Plant secondary containment and leak detection upgrades. Project W-259

    SciTech Connect

    Hookfin, J.D.

    1995-05-12

    The T Plant facilities in the 200-West Area of the Hanford site were constructed in the early 1940s to produce nuclear materials in support of national defense activities. T Plant includes the 271-T facility, the 221-T facility, and several support facilities (eg, 2706-T), utilities, and tanks/piping systems. T Plant has been recommended as the primary interim decontamination facility for the Hanford site. Project W-259 will provide capital upgrades to the T Plant facilities to comply with Federal and State of Washington environmental regulations for secondary containment and leak detection. This document provides an advanced conceptual design concept that complies with functional requirements for the T Plant Secondary Containment and Leak Detection upgrades.

  10. Improved Construction and Project Management for Future Nuclear Power Plants - Westinghouse Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Matzie, Regis A.

    2002-07-01

    The economic competitiveness of future nuclear power plants is the key issue to the expansion of this vital technology. The challenge is greater today than it has been because of the worldwide trend of deregulation of the power market. Deregulation favors smaller investments with shorter payback times. However, the key economic parameter is the power generation cost and its competitiveness to other sources of electric generation, principally natural gas and coal. The relative competitiveness of these three fuel types today is largely dictated by the availability of domestic sources of both fuel and technology infrastructure. The competitiveness of new nuclear power plants can be improved in any power market environment first by the features of the design itself, second by the approach to construction, and finally by the project structure used to implement the plant, or more importantly, a series of plants. These three aspects form the cornerstone to a successful resurgence of new nuclear power plant construction. (author)

  11. Certified quantum non-demolition measurement of material systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, M. W.; Koschorreck, M.; Kubasik, M.; Napolitano, M.; Sewell, R. J.

    2012-08-01

    An extensive debate on quantum non-demolition (QND) measurement, reviewed in Grangier et al (1998 Nature 396 537), finds that true QND measurements must have both non-classical state-preparation capability and non-classical information-damage tradeoff. Existing figures of merit for these non-classicality criteria require direct measurement of the signal variable and are thus difficult to apply to optically-probed material systems. Here we describe a method to demonstrate both criteria without need for to direct signal measurements. Using a covariance matrix formalism and a general noise model, we compute meter observables for QND measurement triples, which suffice to compute all QND figures of merit. The result will allow certified QND measurement of atomic spin ensembles using existing techniques.

  12. Forecasting of construction and demolition waste in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Paz, Diogo Hf; Lafayette, Kalinny Pv

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this article is to develop a computerised tool (software) that facilitates the analysis of strategies for waste management on construction sites through the use of indicators of construction and demolition waste generation. The development involved the following steps: knowledge acquisition, structuring the system, coding and system evaluation. The step of knowledge acquisition aims to provide subsidies for the representation of them through models. In the step of structuring the system, it was presented the structuring and formalisation of knowledge for the development of the system, and has two stages: the construction of the conceptual model and the subsequent instantiation of the model. The coding system aims to implement (code) the conceptual model developed in a model played by computer (digital). The results showed that the system is very useful and applicable in construction sites, helping to improve the quality of waste management, and creating a database that will support new research.

  13. Remote Control Concrete Demolition System. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    The Remote Control Concrete Demolition System (Brokk BM150) is a remote operated articulated hydraulic boom with various tool head attachments to perform the work. The machine is designed primarily to drive a hammer and has a reach of fifteen feet. The Brokk can be operated by someone 400 feet away or in a different room with a TV monitor. The machine can be operated up to a 30 degree gradient. The unit requires a 480 volt, 50 amp circuit for it's power source. Two attachments were used in this demonstration. The hydraulic hammer and the excavating bucket. The hammer operates at 600 foot pounds and has outputs of 1000 to 1500 beats per minute. The bucket had a capacity of 1/4 cubic yard and had a smooth cutting edge. Other attachments available include a concrete crusher, a La Bounty Shear, and a 1/4 yard clamshell bucket.

  14. Generation of construction and demolition waste in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Coelho, André; de Brito, Jorge

    2011-07-01

    In line with the growing concern around the world about construction and demolition waste (CDW) management, an attempt has been made to quantify the amount of CDW generated in Portugal, a country where no reliable/official data exist. This is an increasingly important concern of companies, businesses and municipalities involved with CDW, in a context of rising demands and more demanding recent legislation. One methodology is presented to quantify the present generation, and another to extrapolate this generation over the next few years, up to 2020. It is concluded that at present substantially less CDW is generated than the figure usually cited for Portugal, based on Spanish estimates, although it is predicted that this value will be higher on a 10-15 year timescale, reaching over 400 kg person⁻¹ year⁻¹.

  15. On the Road to Reuse: Residential Demolition Bid Specification Development Tool Report & Factsheet - September 2013

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The September 2013 EPA Region 5 report and factsheet provide tools to help with waste management plans, waste disposal, handling hazardous materials, and earthwork. The documents also suggest demolition modifications to improve environmental results.

  16. 36 CFR 72.41 - Demolition and replacement of existing recreation properties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR URBAN PARK AND RECREATION RECOVERY ACT OF 1978 Grants for Recovery... replacement. The applicant must present a cost analysis (well documented case) for demolition and replacement...

  17. 36 CFR 72.41 - Demolition and replacement of existing recreation properties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR URBAN PARK AND RECREATION RECOVERY ACT OF 1978 Grants for Recovery... replacement. The applicant must present a cost analysis (well documented case) for demolition and replacement...

  18. A Guide to Normal Demolition Practices Under the Asbestos NESHAP (EPA-340/1-92-013)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document includes demolition practices, waste handling procedures, and definitions of terms taken from the November 20,1990 revision of the asbestos National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants regulation.

  19. Acceptance test report for project C-157 ``T-Plant electrical upgrade``

    SciTech Connect

    Jeppson, L.A.

    1997-08-05

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents for record purposes the field results, acceptance, and approvals of the completed acceptance test per WHC-SD-Cl57-ATP-001, Rev. 0, ``Acceptance Test Proceedure for Project C-157 `T Plant Electrical Upgrade``` The test was completed and approved without any problems or exceptions.

  20. GRIN-Global: An International Project to Develop a Global Plant Genebank and Information Management System

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mission of the GRIN-Global Project is to create a new, scalable version of the Germplasm Resource Information System (GRIN) to provide the world’s crop genebanks with a powerful, flexible, easy-to-use plant genetic resource (PGR) information management system. The system will help safeguard PGR ...

  1. GRIN-Global: An International Project to Develop a Global Plant Genebank and Information Management System

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mission of the GRIN-Global Project is to create a new, scalable version of the Germplasm Resource Information System (GRIN) to provide the world's crop genebanks with a powerful, flexible, easy-to-use plant genetic resource (PGR) information management system. The system will help safeguard PGR ...

  2. GRIN-Global: An International Project to Develop a Global Plant Genebank Information Management System

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mission of the GRIN-Global Project is to create a new, scalable version of the Germplasm Resource Information System (GRIN) to provide the world’s crop genebanks with a powerful, flexible, easy-to-use plant genetic resource (PGR) information management system. The system will help safeguard PGR ...

  3. Patterns of Genetic Variation in Woody Plant Species in the Missouri Ozark Forest Ecosystem Project

    Treesearch

    Victoria L. Sork; Anthony Koop; Marie Ann de la Fuente; Paul Foster; Jay. Raveill

    1997-01-01

    We quantified current patterns of genetic variation of three woody plant species—Carya tomentosa (Juglandaceae), Quercus alba (Fagaceae), and Sassafras albidum (Lauraceae)—distributed throughout the nine Missouri Ozark Forest Ecosystem Project (MOFEP) study sites and evaluated the data in light of the MOFEP...

  4. Project T.E.A.M. (Technical Education Advancement Modules). Introduction to Plant Floor Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mao, Leii

    This instructional guide, one of a series developed by the Technical Education Advancement Modules (TEAM) project, is a 16-hour introduction to plant floor operations. The guide is designed to develop the following competencies: (1) understanding the characteristics and components of personal computer (PC) networks; (2) computer networking…

  5. Functional design criteria, Project W-059, B Plant Canyon ventilation upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Roege, P.E.

    1995-03-02

    This document outlines the essential functions and requirements to be included in the design of the proposed B Plant canyon exhaust system upgrade. The project will provide a new exhaust air filter system and isolate the old filters from the airstream.

  6. Use of a Modern Polymerization Pilot-Plant for Undergraduate Control Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza-Bustos, S. A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Described is a project where students gain experience in handling large volumes of hazardous materials, process start up and shut down, equipment failures, operational variations, scaling up, equipment cleaning, and run-time scheduling while working in a modern pilot plant. Included are the system design, experimental procedures, and results. (KR)

  7. GRIN-Global: An International Project to Develop a Global Plant Genebank and Information Management System

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mission of the GRIN-Global Project is to create a new, scalable version of the Germplasm Resource Information System (GRIN) to provide the world's crop genebanks with a powerful, flexible, easy-to-use plant genetic resource (PGR) information management system. The system will help safeguard PGR ...

  8. GRIN-Global: An International Project to Develop a Global Plant Genebank and Information Management System

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mission of the GRIN-Global Project is to create a new, scalable version of the Germplasm Resource Information System (GRIN) to provide the world’s crop genebanks with a powerful, flexible, easy-to-use plant genetic resource (PGR) information management system. The system will help safeguard PGR...

  9. Teaching about Animal, Plant, Living. Part 1. Learning in Science Project. Working Paper No. 31.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Beverley, Ed.

    Presented is a guide for teaching activities produced as a result of a Learning in Science Project investigation which showed that children often have quite different meanings for the words "animal,""plant," and "living" than do scientists. Included are: (1) focus of instruction at different educational levels; (2) a…

  10. Great Basin Native Plant Selection and Increase Project: FY2010 Progress Report

    Treesearch

    Nancy Shaw; Mike Pellant

    2011-01-01

    The Interagency Native Plant Materials Development Program outlined in the 2002 Report to Congress (USDI and USDA 2002), USDI Bureau of Land Management programs and policies, and the Great Basin Restoration Initiative encourage the use of native species for rangeland rehabilitation and restoration where feasible. This project was initiated to foster the development of...

  11. Great Basin Native Plant Selection and Increase Project: 2011 Progress Report

    Treesearch

    Nancy Shaw; Mike Pellant

    2012-01-01

    The Interagency native Plant Materials Development Program outlined in the 2002 Report to Congress (USDI and USDA 2002), USDI Bureau of Land Management programs and policies, and the Great Basin Restoration Initiative encourage the use of native species for rangeland rehabilitation and restoration where feasible. This project was initiated to foster the development of...

  12. SLIGHTLY IRRADIATED FUEL (SIF) INTERIM DISPOSITION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    NORTON SH

    2010-02-23

    nuclear reservation. Workers had to pass through metal detectors when they arrived at the plant and materials leaving the plant had to be scanned for security reasons. Whereas other high-security nuclear materials were shipped from the PFP to Savannah River, S.C. as part ofa Department of Energy (DOE) program to consolidate weapons-grade plutonium, it was determined that the SIF should remain onsite pending disposition to a national repository. Nevertheless, the SIF still requires a high level of security that the PFP complex has always provided. With the 60-year PFP mission of producing and storing plutonium concluded, the environmental cleanup plans for Hanford call for the demolition of the 63-building PFP complex. Consequently, if the SIF remained at PFP it not only would have interfered with the environmental cleanup plans, but would have required $100 million in facility upgrades to meet increased national security requirements imposed after the 9/11 terrorist attacks. A new smaller and more cost-effective area was needed to store this material, which led to the SIF Project. Once the SIF project was successfully completed and the SIF was safely removed from PFP, the existing Protected Area at PFP could be removed, and demolition could proceed more quickly without being encumbered by restrictive security requirements that an active Protected Area requires. The lightened PFP security level brought by safely removing and storing the SIF would also yield lowered costs for deactivation and demolition, as well as reduce overall life-cycle costs.

  13. Nonnuclear consolidation weapons production support project for the Kansas City Plant

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) to assist the agency in complying with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 as it applies to a Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project (the project) that uses an electrochemical etching process at the DOE`s Kansas City Plant (KCP). The project is expected to last approximately five years. This action is needed to support continued reconfiguration of the Nonnuclear Weapons Complex. AU elements of the reassigned project, except electrochemical etching of solid depleted uranium (DU) components, have been performed at the KCP for several years and are considered ongoing and continuing operations in support of the plant`s mission. The proposed action includes renovation of an existing building at the KCP to accommodate equipment, security and environmental controls, and building restoration upon project completion, including disposal of equipment and wastes. The electrochemical etching process will use a sulfamic acid bath which will be designed to include environmental controls that prevent impact to the environment. Low-level waste (LLW) and mixed wastes will be generated by the electrochemical etching process. No liquid effluents or air emissions are anticipated as a result of this process. Pollution prevention practices will be aggressively utilized to reduce the quantity of wastes generated as a result of this work. The no-action alternative is to continue current operations without assignment of the electrochemical etching process to the KCP.

  14. DOE's Oak Ridge Site Kick Off Demolition of the K-27 Building

    ScienceCinema

    Cange, Sue; Rueter, Ken

    2016-07-12

    DOE's Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management kicked off demolition of the K-27 Building this month, moving closer to fulfilling Vision 2016 — removal of all gaseous diffusion buildings from the site by year’s end. As the site's last uranium enrichment building falls, it will mark the first-ever demolition and cleanup of a gaseous diffusion complex anywhere.

  15. The SNO+ Scintillator Purification Plant and Projected Sensitivity to Solar Neutrinos in the Pure Scintillator Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pershing, Teal; SNO+ Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The SNO+ detector is a neutrino and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment utilizing the renovated SNO detector. In the second phase of operation, the SNO+ detector will contain 780 tons of organic liquid scintillator composed of 2 g/L 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). In this phase, SNO+ will strive to detect solar neutrinos in the sub-MeV range, including CNO production neutrinos and pp production neutrinos. To achieve the necessary detector sensitivity, a four-part scintillator purification plant has been constructed in SNOLAB for the removal of ionic and radioactive impurities. We present an overview of the SNO+ scintillator purification plant stages, including distillation, water extraction, gas stripping, and metal scavenger columns. We also give the projected SNO+ sensitivities to various solar-produced neutrinos based on the scintillator plant's projected purification efficiency.

  16. Indicators to assess the recovery of natural resources contained in demolition waste.

    PubMed

    Roussat, Nicolas; Méhu, Jacques; Dujet, Christiane

    2009-03-01

    Demolition waste materials are one of the major industrial waste deposits in many countries and represent an important quantity of potential resources that are not exploited, because the major part of these wastes go to landfill. Indeed, recycling or recovery of demolition waste can reduce the need of primary natural resources. This article gives indicators and a method to analyse demolition waste management with regard to the use of resources contained in these wastes. Demolition wastes are characterized by their contents in energy and raw materials. This content is quantified on the basis of the sum of energy and raw materials necessary for the construction of the building considering the non-renewable character of materials contained in wastes. In fact, this content represents the environmental investment which was necessary to construct the building. An energy balance and a mass balance, with this concept of ;raw material and energy' content, can allow a strategy of waste management to be determined in order to salvage the most important parts of energy and raw materials contained in demolition waste, and so identify the strategy which permits a maximum fraction of the initial environmental investment to be saved. Five waste management scenarios concerning building demolition were assessed with this method and these indicators, and the results are presented in this article.

  17. Influence of construction and demolition waste management on the environmental impact of buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, Andre; Brito, Jorge de

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental impacts of different demolition practices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 'Top-down' approach to the Life Cycle Analysis methodology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results based on real buildings measurements and demolition contractor activities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Not every type of selective demolition brings about environmental benefits. - Abstract: The purpose of this study is to quantify comparable environmental impacts within a Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) perspective, for buildings in which the first (Materials) and last (End of Life) life cycle stages are adjusted to several waste/material management options. Unlike most LCAs, the approach is 'top-down' rather than 'bottom-up', which usually involves large amounts of data and the use of specific software applications. This approach is considered appropriate for a limited but expedient LCA designed to compare the environmental impacts of different life cycle options. Present results, based on real buildings measurements and demolition contractor activities, show that shallow, superficial, selective demolition may not result in reduced environmental impacts. Calculations actually show an increase (generally less than 5%) in most impact categories for the Materials and End of Life stages because of extra transportation needs. However, core material separation in demolition operations and its recycling and/or reuse does bring environmental benefits. A reduction of around 77% has been estimated in the climate change impact category, 57% in acidification potential and 81% in the summer smog impact (for the life cycle stages referred).

  18. Suitable Days for Plant Growth Disappear under Projected Climate Change: Potential Human and Biotic Vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Camilo; Caldwell, Iain R.; Caldwell, Jamie M.; Fisher, Micah R.; Genco, Brandon M.; Running, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    Ongoing climate change can alter conditions for plant growth, in turn affecting ecological and social systems. While there have been considerable advances in understanding the physical aspects of climate change, comprehensive analyses integrating climate, biological, and social sciences are less common. Here we use climate projections under alternative mitigation scenarios to show how changes in environmental variables that limit plant growth could impact ecosystems and people. We show that although the global mean number of days above freezing will increase by up to 7% by 2100 under “business as usual” (representative concentration pathway [RCP] 8.5), suitable growing days will actually decrease globally by up to 11% when other climatic variables that limit plant growth are considered (i.e., temperature, water availability, and solar radiation). Areas in Russia, China, and Canada are projected to gain suitable plant growing days, but the rest of the world will experience losses. Notably, tropical areas could lose up to 200 suitable plant growing days per year. These changes will impact most of the world’s terrestrial ecosystems, potentially triggering climate feedbacks. Human populations will also be affected, with up to ~2,100 million of the poorest people in the world (~30% of the world’s population) highly vulnerable to changes in the supply of plant-related goods and services. These impacts will be spatially variable, indicating regions where adaptations will be necessary. Changes in suitable plant growing days are projected to be less severe under strong and moderate mitigation scenarios (i.e., RCP 2.6 and RCP 4.5), underscoring the importance of reducing emissions to avoid such disproportionate impacts on ecosystems and people. PMID:26061091

  19. Suitable Days for Plant Growth Disappear under Projected Climate Change: Potential Human and Biotic Vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Mora, Camilo; Caldwell, Iain R; Caldwell, Jamie M; Fisher, Micah R; Genco, Brandon M; Running, Steven W

    2015-06-01

    Ongoing climate change can alter conditions for plant growth, in turn affecting ecological and social systems. While there have been considerable advances in understanding the physical aspects of climate change, comprehensive analyses integrating climate, biological, and social sciences are less common. Here we use climate projections under alternative mitigation scenarios to show how changes in environmental variables that limit plant growth could impact ecosystems and people. We show that although the global mean number of days above freezing will increase by up to 7% by 2100 under "business as usual" (representative concentration pathway [RCP] 8.5), suitable growing days will actually decrease globally by up to 11% when other climatic variables that limit plant growth are considered (i.e., temperature, water availability, and solar radiation). Areas in Russia, China, and Canada are projected to gain suitable plant growing days, but the rest of the world will experience losses. Notably, tropical areas could lose up to 200 suitable plant growing days per year. These changes will impact most of the world's terrestrial ecosystems, potentially triggering climate feedbacks. Human populations will also be affected, with up to ~2,100 million of the poorest people in the world (~30% of the world's population) highly vulnerable to changes in the supply of plant-related goods and services. These impacts will be spatially variable, indicating regions where adaptations will be necessary. Changes in suitable plant growing days are projected to be less severe under strong and moderate mitigation scenarios (i.e., RCP 2.6 and RCP 4.5), underscoring the importance of reducing emissions to avoid such disproportionate impacts on ecosystems and people.

  20. Usage of air jigging for multi-component separation of construction and demolition waste.

    PubMed

    Ambrós, Weslei Monteiro; Sampaio, Carlos Hoffmann; Cazacliu, Bogdan Grigore; Miltzarek, Gerson Luis; Miranda, Leonardo R

    2017-02-01

    The use of air jigging for performing multi-component separation in the treatment of mixed construction and demolition waste was studied. Sorting tests were carried out with mixtures of equal bulk volume of concrete and brick in which fixed quantities of unwanted materials - gypsum, wood and paper - were added. Experimental results have demonstrated the possibility to use air jigging to carry out both the removal of low-density contaminants and the concrete concentration in only one process step. In relation to the removal of contaminants only, the overall performance of jigging process can be comparable with that of commercial air classifiers and automatic sorting systems. Also, the initial content of contaminants seems does not have a significant effect on the separation extent. These results are of particular importance for recycling plants processing as they represent an alternative to optimize the use of air jigs. Further investigation is needed in order to evaluate the practical feasibility of such method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Recycled blocks with improved sound and fire insulation containing construction and demolition waste.

    PubMed

    Leiva, Carlos; Solís-Guzmán, Jaime; Marrero, Madelyn; García Arenas, Celia

    2013-03-01

    The environmental problem posed by construction and demolition waste (C&D waste) is derived not only from the high volume produced, but also from its treatment and disposal. Treatment plants receive C&D waste which is then transformed into a recycled mixed aggregate. The byproduct is mainly used for low-value-added applications such as land escape restoration, despite the high quality of the aggregate. In the present work, the chemical composition properties and grading curve properties of these aggregates are defined. Furthermore, the resulting recycled concrete with a high proportion of recycled composition, from 20% to 100% replacement of fine and coarse aggregate, is characterized physically and mechanically. An environmental study of the new construction material when all aggregates are substituted by C&D waste shows a low toxicity level, similar to that of other construction materials. The new material also has improved properties with respect to standard concrete such as high fire resistance, good heat insulation, and acoustic insulation.

  2. Recycling of construction and demolition waste materials: a chemical-mineralogical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, G; Marrocchino, E; Tassinari, R; Vaccaro, C

    2005-01-01

    Building activity is currently demanding remarkable amounts of inert materials (such as gravel and sand) that are usually provided by alluvial sediments. The EU directives and Italian Legislation are encouraging the re-use of construction and demolition waste provided by continuous urban redevelopment. The re-utilisation of building waste is a relatively new issue for Italy: unfortunately the employment of recycled inert materials is still limited to general bulk and drainage fills, while a more complete re-evaluation is generally hampered by the lack of suitable recycling plants. In this paper, chemical-mineralogical characterization of recycled inert materials was carried out after preliminary crushing and grain-size sorting. XRF and XRD analysis of the different grain-size classes allowed us to recognise particular granulometric classes that can be re-utilised as first-order material in the building activity. Specifically, the presented chemical-mineralogical appraisal indicates that the recycled grain-size fraction 0.6-0.125 mm could be directly re-employed in the preparation of new mortar and concrete, while finer fractions could be considered as components for industrial processing in the preparation of cements and bricks/tiles.

  3. Research and development on PFBC-CC in China and Jiawang pilot plant project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Ningsheng; Zhang, Mingyao; Li, Daji; Fu, Wenling

    1994-09-01

    Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion(PFBC) is recognized as an advanced coal-fired technology which can improve efficiency in combined cycle scheme and reduce environmental pollution. Progressive status on PFBC-CC in China is presented in this paper. Test results on a 1 MWt bench scale experimental PFBC facility is reviewed briefly. Based on retrofitting of an old steam power plant located at Jiawang, a project to construct a PFBC-CC pilot plant is under way. Designed capacity of the pilot plant is about 15 MWe, 3 MWe from gas cycle and 12 MWe from steam cycle. The system configuration, main design parameters, estimated technical performance as well as construction schedule of the pilot plant are described. The bright future for PFBC-CC in China is also indicated.

  4. A survey of research projects in maintenance optimization for Electricite de France power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquot, J.P.

    1996-12-31

    Six years ago, Electricite de France launched a Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) pilot project to optimize preventive maintenance for its nuclear power plants. After a feasibility study, a Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) method was standardized. It is now applied on a large scale to the 50 EDF nuclear units. A RCM workstation based on this standardized method has been developed and is now used in each plant. In the next step, the author will consider whether a risk based approach can be included in this RCM process in order to analyze critical passive components such as pipes and supports. Considering the potential advantages of these optimization techniques, a dedicated process has been also developed for maintenance of future plants, gas turbines, or nuclear units. For these future plants, a Logistic Support Analysis (LSA) will be added to the RCM process to globally evaluate availability, safety and maintenance costs. This paper will present a survey of these different developments of methods and tools.

  5. Checklist Model to Improve Work Practices in Small-Scale Demolition Operations with Silica Dust Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Muianga, Custodio; Rice, Carol; Lentz, Thomas; Lockey, James; Niemeier, Richard; Succop, Paul

    2012-01-01

    A systematic approach was developed to review, revise and adapt existing exposure control guidance used in developed countries for use in developing countries. One-page employee and multiple-page supervisor guidance sheets were adapted from existing documents using a logic framework and workers were trained to use the information to improve work practices. Interactive, hands-on training was delivered to 26 workers at five small-scale demolition projects in Maputo City, Mozambique, and evaluated. A pre-and-post walkthrough survey used by trained observers documented work practice changes. Worker feedback indicated that the training was effective and useful. Workers acquired knowledge (84% increase, p < 0.01) and applied the work practice guidance. The difference of proportions between use of work practice components before and after the intervention was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Changes in work practices following training included preplanning, use of wet methods and natural ventilation and end-of-task review. Respirable dust measurements indicated a reduction in exposure following training. Consistency in observer ratings and observations support the reliability and validity of the instruments. This approach demonstrated the short-term benefit of training in changing work practices; follow-up is required to determine the long-term impact on changes in work practices, and to evaluate the need for refresher training. PMID:22470296

  6. An empirical investigation of construction and demolition waste generation rates in Shenzhen city, South China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Weisheng; Yuan, Hongping; Li, Jingru; Hao, Jane J L; Mi, Xuming; Ding, Zhikun

    2011-04-01

    The construction and demolition waste generation rates (C&D WGRs) is an important factor in decision-making and management of material waste in any construction site. The present study investigated WGRs by conducting on-site waste sorting and weighing in four ongoing construction projects in Shenzhen city of South China. The results revealed that WGRs ranged from 3.275 to 8.791 kg/m(2) and miscellaneous waste, timber for formwork and falsework, and concrete were the three largest components amongst the generated waste. Based on the WGRs derived from the research, the paper also discussed the main causes of waste in the construction industry and attempted to connect waste generation with specific construction practices. It was recommended that measures mainly including performing waste sorting at source, employing skilful workers, uploading and storing materials properly, promoting waste management capacity, replacing current timber formwork with metal formwork and launching an incentive reward program to encourage waste reduction could be potential solutions to reducing current WGRs in Shenzhen. Although these results were derived from a relatively small sample and so cannot justifiably be generalized, they do however add to the body of knowledge that is currently available for understanding the status of the art of C&D waste management in China.

  7. A web-based Decision Support System for the optimal management of construction and demolition waste.

    PubMed

    Banias, G; Achillas, Ch; Vlachokostas, Ch; Moussiopoulos, N; Papaioannou, I

    2011-12-01

    Wastes from construction activities constitute nowadays the largest by quantity fraction of solid wastes in urban areas. In addition, it is widely accepted that the particular waste stream contains hazardous materials, such as insulating materials, plastic frames of doors, windows, etc. Their uncontrolled disposal result to long-term pollution costs, resource overuse and wasted energy. Within the framework of the DEWAM project, a web-based Decision Support System (DSS) application - namely DeconRCM - has been developed, aiming towards the identification of the optimal construction and demolition waste (CDW) management strategy that minimises end-of-life costs and maximises the recovery of salvaged building materials. This paper addresses both technical and functional structure of the developed web-based application. The web-based DSS provides an accurate estimation of the generated CDW quantities of twenty-one different waste streams (e.g. concrete, bricks, glass, etc.) for four different types of buildings (residential, office, commercial and industrial). With the use of mathematical programming, the DeconRCM provides also the user with the optimal end-of-life management alternative, taking into consideration both economic and environmental criteria. The DSS's capabilities are illustrated through a real world case study of a typical five floor apartment building in Thessaloniki, Greece.

  8. An empirical investigation of construction and demolition waste generation rates in Shenzhen city, South China

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Weisheng; Yuan Hongping; Li Jingru; Hao, Jane J.L.; Mi Xuming; Ding Zhikun

    2011-04-15

    The construction and demolition waste generation rates (C and D WGRs) is an important factor in decision-making and management of material waste in any construction site. The present study investigated WGRs by conducting on-site waste sorting and weighing in four ongoing construction projects in Shenzhen city of South China. The results revealed that WGRs ranged from 3.275 to 8.791 kg/m{sup 2} and miscellaneous waste, timber for formwork and falsework, and concrete were the three largest components amongst the generated waste. Based on the WGRs derived from the research, the paper also discussed the main causes of waste in the construction industry and attempted to connect waste generation with specific construction practices. It was recommended that measures mainly including performing waste sorting at source, employing skilful workers, uploading and storing materials properly, promoting waste management capacity, replacing current timber formwork with metal formwork and launching an incentive reward program to encourage waste reduction could be potential solutions to reducing current WGRs in Shenzhen. Although these results were derived from a relatively small sample and so cannot justifiably be generalized, they do however add to the body of knowledge that is currently available for understanding the status of the art of C and D waste management in China.

  9. Project C-018H, 242-A Evaporator/PUREX Plant Process Condensate Treatment Facility, functional design criteria. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, N.

    1995-05-02

    This document provides the Functional Design Criteria (FDC) for Project C-018H, the 242-A Evaporator and Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant Condensate Treatment Facility (Also referred to as the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility [ETF]). The project will provide the facilities to treat and dispose of the 242-A Evaporator process condensate (PC), the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant process condensate (PDD), and the PUREX Plant ammonia scrubber distillate (ASD).

  10. The Power Plant Mapping Student Project: Bringing Citizen Science to Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayne, K.; Oda, T.; Gurney, K. R.; O'Keeffe, D.; Petron, G.; Tans, P. P.; Frost, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    An emission inventory (EI) is a conventional tool to quantify and monitor anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants into the atmosphere. Gridded EI can visually show geographical patterns of emissions and their changes over time. These patterns, when available, are often determined using location data collected by regional governments, industries, and researchers. Datasets such as Carbon Monitoring and Action (CARMA, www.carma.org) are particularly useful for mapping emissions from large point sources and have been widely used in the EI community. The EI community is aware of potentially significant errors in the geographical locations of point sources, including power plants. The big challenge, however, is to review tens of thousands of power plant locations around the world and correct them where needed. The Power Plant Mapping Student Project (PPMSP) is a platform designed for students in 4th through 12th grade to improve the geographical location of power plants indicated in existing datasets to benefit international EI research. In PPMSP, we use VENTUS, a web-based platform (http://ventus.project.asu.edu/) that invites citizens to contribute power plant location data. Using VENTUS, students view scenes in the vicinity of reported power plant coordinates on Google Maps. Students either verify the location of a power plant or search for it within a designated radius using various indicators, an e-guide, and a power plant photo gallery for assistance. If the power plant cannot be found, students mark the plant as unverified. To assure quality for research use, the project contains multiple checkpoints and levels of review. While participating in meaningful research that directly benefits the EI research community, students are engaged in relevant science curricula designed to meet each grade level's Next Generation Science Standards. Students study energy, climate change, the atmosphere, and geographical information systems. The curricula is

  11. Macro optical projection tomography for large scale 3D imaging of plant structures and gene activity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Karen J. I.; Calder, Grant M.; Hindle, Christopher R.; Newman, Jacob L.; Robinson, Simon N.; Avondo, Jerome J. H. Y.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Optical projection tomography (OPT) is a well-established method for visualising gene activity in plants and animals. However, a limitation of conventional OPT is that the specimen upper size limit precludes its application to larger structures. To address this problem we constructed a macro version called Macro OPT (M-OPT). We apply M-OPT to 3D live imaging of gene activity in growing whole plants and to visualise structural morphology in large optically cleared plant and insect specimens up to 60 mm tall and 45 mm deep. We also show how M-OPT can be used to image gene expression domains in 3D within fixed tissue and to visualise gene activity in 3D in clones of growing young whole Arabidopsis plants. A further application of M-OPT is to visualise plant-insect interactions. Thus M-OPT provides an effective 3D imaging platform that allows the study of gene activity, internal plant structures and plant-insect interactions at a macroscopic scale. PMID:28025317

  12. Macro optical projection tomography for large scale 3D imaging of plant structures and gene activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Karen J I; Calder, Grant M; Hindle, Christopher R; Newman, Jacob L; Robinson, Simon N; Avondo, Jerome J H Y; Coen, Enrico S

    2016-12-26

    Optical projection tomography (OPT) is a well-established method for visualising gene activity in plants and animals. However, a limitation of conventional OPT is that the specimen upper size limit precludes its application to larger structures. To address this problem we constructed a macro version called Macro OPT (M-OPT). We apply M-OPT to 3D live imaging of gene activity in growing whole plants and to visualise structural morphology in large optically cleared plant and insect specimens up to 60 mm tall and 45 mm deep. We also show how M-OPT can be used to image gene expression domains in 3D within fixed tissue and to visualise gene activity in 3D in clones of growing young whole Arabidopsis plants. A further application of M-OPT is to visualise plant-insect interactions. Thus M-OPT provides an effective 3D imaging platform that allows the study of gene activity, internal plant structures and plant-insect interactions at a macroscopic scale.

  13. Longitudinal assessment of lipid and hepatic clinical parameters in workers involved with the demolition of perfluoroalkyl manufacturing facilities.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Geary W; Ehresman, David J; Buehrer, Betsy D; Gibson, Barbara A; Butenhoff, John L; Zobel, Larry R

    2012-08-01

    To examine in a longitudinal occupational assessment whether changes in serum concentrations of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) are associated with changes in non-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. Baseline and end-of-project PFOA, PFOS, lipid, and hepatic clinical chemistries were measured in 204 workers involved with the demolition of former perfluoroalkyl manufacturing facilities. Analyses were restricted to the 179 workers who did not take lipid-lowering medications. Two thirds had baseline PFOA and PFOS levels similar to the general population. The change in non-HDL cholesterol was not associated with the changes in PFOA or PFOS. An increase in HDL was associated with an increase in PFOA, although the magnitude was small. This increase in HDL resulted in a decrease in the total cholesterol/HDL ratio. Adverse associations were not observed between changes in PFOA, PFOS, non-HDL cholesterol, HDL, and hepatic clinical chemistries.

  14. The PlantLIBRA project: how we intend to innovate the science of botanicals.

    PubMed

    Bucchini, Luca; Rodarte, Alejandro; Restani, Patrizia

    2011-12-01

    The main aim of the EC-financed R&D project PlantLIBRA (PLANT food supplements: Levels of Intake, Benefit and Risk Assessment) is to foster the safe use of food supplements containing plants or botanical preparations, by enabling science-based decision making by regulators and stakeholders. To make informed decisions, competent authorities and industry need more accessible and quality-assured information, as well as better tools (e.g., databases) and procedures for safety and benefit assessments, supported by broadly accepted methodologies. Consequently, PlantLIBRA is working to develop, validate and disseminate data and methodologies for risk and benefit assessment of plant food supplements, and to implement sustainable international cooperation. International cooperation will help ensure the quality of botanicals imported in the EU. Moreover, the project will provide data on intake by conducting a harmonized consumption survey. Existing composition and safety data will be collated into a meta-database. New analytical data and methods will be investigated and validated. The consortium is working closely with competent authorities and stakeholders.

  15. Decontamination and Decommissioning Experience at a Sellafield Uranium Purification Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Prosser, J.L.

    2006-07-01

    Built in the 1950's, this plant was originally designed to purify depleted uranyl nitrate solution arising from reprocessing operations at the Primary Separation and Head End Plant (Fig. 1). The facility was used for various purposes throughout its life cycle such as research, development and trial based processes. Test rigs were operated in the building from the 1970's until 1984 to support development of the process and equipment now used at Sellafield's Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP). The extensive decommissioning program for this facility began over 15 years ago. Many challenges have been overcome throughout this program such as decommissioning the four main process cells, which were very highly alpha contaminated. The cells contained vessels and pipeline systems that were contaminated to such levels that workers had to use pressurized suits to enter the cells. Since decommissioning at Sellafield was in its infancy, this project has trialed various decontamination/decommissioning methods and techniques in order to progress the project, and this has provided valuable learning for other decommissioning projects. The project has included characterization, decontamination, dismantling, waste handling, and is now ready for demolition during late 2005, early 2006. This will be the first major facility within the historic Separation Area at Sellafield to be demolished down to base slab level. The lessons learnt from this project will directly benefit numerous decommissioning projects as the cleanup at Sellafield continues. (authors)

  16. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 SLUDGE STORAGE OPTIONS ASSESSMENT OF T PLANT VERSUS ALTERNATE STORAGE FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    RUTHERFORD WW; GEUTHER WJ; STRANKMAN MR; CONRAD EA; RHOADARMER DD; BLACK DM; POTTMEYER JA

    2009-04-29

    The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) a two phase approach for removal and storage (Phase 1) and treatment and packaging for offsite shipment (Phase 2) of the sludge currently stored within the 105-K West Basin. This two phased strategy enables early removal of sludge from the 105-K West Basin by 2015, allowing remediation of historical unplanned releases of waste and closure of the 100-K Area. In Phase 1, the sludge currently stored in the Engineered Containers and Settler Tanks within the 105-K West Basin will be transferred into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs). The STSCs will be transported to an interim storage facility. In Phase 2, sludge will be processed (treated) to meet shipping and disposal requirements and the sludge will be packaged for final disposal at a geologic repository. The purpose of this study is to evaluate two alternatives for interim Phase 1 storage of K Basin sludge. The cost, schedule, and risks for sludge storage at a newly-constructed Alternate Storage Facility (ASF) are compared to those at T Plant, which has been used previously for sludge storage. Based on the results of the assessment, T Plant is recommended for Phase 1 interim storage of sludge. Key elements that support this recommendation are the following: (1) T Plant has a proven process for storing sludge; (2) T Plant storage can be implemented at a lower incremental cost than the ASF; and (3) T Plant storage has a more favorable schedule profile, which provides more float, than the ASF. Underpinning the recommendation of T Plant for sludge storage is the assumption that T Plant has a durable, extended mission independent of the K Basin sludge interim storage mission. If this assumption cannot be validated and the operating costs of T Plant are borne by the Sludge Treatment Project, the conclusions and recommendations of this study would change. The following decision-making strategy, which is

  17. Projected impacts of climate change on regional capacities for global plant species richness

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Jan Henning; Kreft, Holger; Kier, Gerold; Jetz, Walter; Mutke, Jens; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2010-01-01

    Climate change represents a major challenge to the maintenance of global biodiversity. To date, the direction and magnitude of net changes in the global distribution of plant diversity remain elusive. We use the empirical multi-variate relationships between contemporary water-energy dynamics and other non-climatic predictor variables to model the regional capacity for plant species richness (CSR) and its projected future changes. We find that across all analysed Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change emission scenarios, relative changes in CSR increase with increased projected temperature rise. Between now and 2100, global average CSR is projected to remain similar to today (+0.3%) under the optimistic B1/+1.8°C scenario, but to decrease significantly (−9.4%) under the ‘business as usual’ A1FI/+4.0°C scenario. Across all modelled scenarios, the magnitude and direction of CSR change are geographically highly non-uniform. While in most temperate and arctic regions, a CSR increase is expected, the projections indicate a strong decline in most tropical and subtropical regions. Countries least responsible for past and present greenhouse gas emissions are likely to incur disproportionately large future losses in CSR, whereas industrialized countries have projected moderate increases. Independent of direction, we infer that all changes in regional CSR will probably induce on-site species turnover and thereby be a threat to native floras. PMID:20335215

  18. WSSRAP chemical plant geotechnical investigations for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    This document has been prepared for the United states Department of Energy (DOE) Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) by the Project Management Contractor (PMC), which consists of MK-Ferguson Company (MKF) and Morrison Knudsen Corporation Environmental Services Group (MKES) with Jacobs Engineering Group (JEG) as MKF's predesignated subcontractor. This report presents the results of site geotechnical investigations conducted by the PMC in the vicinity of the Weldon Spring chemical plant and raffinate pits (WSCP/RP) and in potential on-site and off-site clayey material borrow sources. The WSCP/RP is the proposed disposal cell (DC) site. 39 refs., 24 figs., 12 tabs.

  19. Economic analysis of projected high-level waste immobilization operations at the Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    McDonell, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    A model has been defined and input established for the projection of operating costs for processing high-level radioactive wastes to solid form in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The projected costs (expressed in categories designated essential materials, utilities, manpower, and overhead) determine economic incentives for process optimization in both near-term DWPF operations and long-term waste generation at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). The process model, though not predictive of specific modes of DWPF operation, permits evaluation of incremental costs in circumstances involving large backlogs of accumulated waste.

  20. Providing more informative projections of climate change impact on plant distribution in a mountain environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randin, C.; Engler, R.; Pearman, P.; Vittoz, P.; Guisan, A.

    2007-12-01

    Due to their conic shape and the reduction of area with increasing elevation, mountain ecosystems were early identified as potentially very sensitive to global warming. Moreover, mountain systems may experience unprecedented rates of warming during the next century, two or three times higher than that records of the 20th century. In this context, species distribution models (SDM) have become important tools for rapid assessment of the impact of accelerated land use and climate change on the distribution plant species. In this study, we developed and tested new predictor variables for species distribution models (SDM), specific to current and future geographic projections of plant species in a mountain system, using the Western Swiss Alps as model region. Since meso- and micro-topography are relevant to explain geographic patterns of plant species in mountain environments, we assessed the effect of scale on predictor variables and geographic projections of SDM. We also developed a methodological framework of space-for-time evaluation to test the robustness of SDM when projected in a future changing climate. Finally, we used a cellular automaton to run dynamic simulations of plant migration under climate change in a mountain landscape, including realistic distance of seed dispersal. Results of future projections for the 21st century were also discussed in perspective of vegetation changes monitored during the 20th century. Overall, we showed in this study that, based on the most severe A1 climate change scenario and realistic dispersal simulations of plant dispersal, species extinctions in the Western Swiss Alps could affect nearly one third (28.5%) of the 284 species modeled by 2100. With the less severe B1 scenario, only 4.6% of species are predicted to become extinct. However, even with B1, 54% (153 species) may still loose more than 80% of their initial surface. Results of monitoring of past vegetation changes suggested that plant species can react quickly to the

  1. Dose-projection considerations for emergency conditions at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Stoetzel, G.A.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Poeton, R.W.; Powell, D.C.; Desrosiers, A.E.

    1983-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to review the problems and issues associated with making environmental radiation-dose projections during emergencies at nuclear power plants. The review is divided into three areas: source-term development, characterization of atmospheric dispersion and selection of appropriate dispersion models, and development of dosimetry calculations for determining thyroid dose and whole-body dose for ground-level and elevated releases. A discussion of uncertainties associated with these areas is also provided.

  2. North Plant co-generation project for South Davis County Sewer Improvement District

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, L.S.

    1993-12-31

    In the summer of 1988, the South Davis County Sewer Improvement District (SDCSID) learned of a grant/loan program being administered by the Utah State Department of Energy(DOE) for projects that demonstrate new and innovative ways of conserving energy or utilizing renewable energy sources. The SDCSID applied for and received from the DOE both a grant and a no-interest loan to finance half of the cost of a co-generation project at the North Wastewater Treatment Plant. This co-generation project utilizes methane gas, a by-product of the anaerobic digestion process, to generate both electricity and heat that is used at the plant. The SDCSID calculated that at the current anaerobic gas production rate, a 140 KW engine generator could be run almost 24 hours a day. Approximately 75% of the current electrical needs at the North Plant are supplied by the 140 KW engine generator. Also, all of the heat necessary to raise the temperature of the incoming sludge to 95{degrees}F, and to heat four large buildings is supplied from the heat recovery system of the engine. The system utilizes an induction type generator to supply electricity, which is somewhat simpler to design and less expensive to install than a synchronous type system. An induction system utilizes the Electrical Utility`s incoming power to excite the generator to correct the phase so that is can be used by the loads in the plant. In addition, the SDCSID installed a second identical engine generator as a back-up and to peak shave. Plant effluent is used to cool the engines instead of air-cooling through radiators.

  3. The INSIDE project integrating inherent SHE in chemical process development and plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, R.L.; Mansfield, D.P.; Malmen, Y.

    1995-12-31

    The concept of {open_quote}Inherently Safer{close_quote} plant has been with us now for many years, but despite its clear potential safety, health, environmental (SHE) and cost benefits, there have been few attempts to systematically consider or apply inherently safer approaches in process development and plant design. This is one of the findings of a pilot study commissioned by the United Kingdom (UK) Health and Safety Executive and carried out by AEA Technology to assess the current status of Inherent Safety in UK Industry. This pilot study has now been expanded into a major industry/CEC Industrial Safety co-sponsored project (The INSIDE Project) which is taking an European wide view on the current status of inherently SHE approaches. It will also develop tools for chemists and engineers to use to identify and evaluate safer options and to optimise processes and plant designs accordingly. This paper summarises the findings of the HSE pilot study and describes the results of Phase 1 of the CEC project which have given a valuable insight into the way SHE issues are addressed throughout the process development and design lifecycle and highlighted ways in which these can be improved to encourage the adoption of inherent SHE approaches. The overall framework being used for tool development is described and the early tool ideas and their underlying principles are also discussed. 19 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  4. Large-scale biomass plantings in Minnesota: Scale-up and demonstration projects in perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, T.; Downing, M.

    1995-09-01

    Scale-up projects are an important step toward demonstration and commercialization of woody biomass because simply planting extensive acreage of hybrid poplar will not develop markets. Project objectives are to document the cost to plant and establish, and effort needed to monitor and maintain woody biomass on agricultural land. Conversion technologies and alternative end-uses are examined in a larger framework in order to afford researchers and industrial partners information necessary to develop supply and demand on a local or regional scale. Likely to be determined are risk factors of crop failure and differences between establishment of research plots and agricultural scale field work. Production economics are only one consideration in understanding demonstration and scale-up. Others are environmental, marketing, industrial, and agricultural in nature. Markets for energy crops are only beginning to develop. Although information collected as a result of planting up to 5000 acres of hybrid poplar in central Minnesota will not necessarily be transferable to other areas of the country, a national perspective will come from development of regional markets for woody and herbaceous crops. Several feedstocks, with alternative markets in different regions will eventually comprise the entire picture of biofuels feedstock market development. Current projects offer opportunities to learn about the complexity and requirements that will move biomass from research and development to actual market development. These markets may include energy and other end-uses such as fiber.

  5. Demolition of high-rise public housing increases particulate matter air pollution in communities of high-risk asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Dorevitch, Samuel; Demirtas, Hakan; Perksy, Victoria W; Erdal, Serap; Conroy, Lorraine; Schoonover, Todd; Scheff, Peter A

    2006-07-01

    Public housing developments across the United States are being demolished, potentially increasing local concentrations of particulate matter (PM) in communities with high burdens of severe asthma. Little is known about the impact of demolition on local air quality. At three public housing developments in Chicago, IL, PM with an aerodynamic diameter < 10 microm (PM10) and < 2.5 microm were measured before and during high-rise demolition. Additionally, size-selective sampling and real-time monitoring were concurrently performed upwind and downwind of one demolition site. The concentration of particulates attributable to demolition was estimated after accounting for background urban air pollution. Particle microscopy was performed on a small number of samples. Substantial increases of PM10 occurred during demolition, with the magnitude of that increase varying based on sampler distance, wind direction, and averaging time. During structural demolition, local concentrations of PM10 42 m downwind of a demolition site increased 4- to 9-fold above upwind concentrations (6-hr averaging time). After adjusting for background PM10, the presence of dusty conditions was associated with a 74% increase in PM10 100 m downwind of demolition sites (24-hr averaging times). During structural demolition, short-term peaks in real-time PM10 (30-sec averaging time) occasionally exceeded 500 microg/m(3). The median particle size downwind of a demolition site (17.3 microm) was significantly larger than background (3 microm). Specific activities are associated with realtime particulate measures. Microscopy did not identify asbestos or high concentrations of mold spores. In conclusion, individuals living near sites of public housing demolition are at risk for exposure to high particulate concentrations. This increase is characterized by relatively large particles and high short-term peaks in PM concentration.

  6. Data access for the 1,000 Plants (1KP) project

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The 1,000 plants (1KP) project is an international multi-disciplinary consortium that has generated transcriptome data from over 1,000 plant species, with exemplars for all of the major lineages across the Viridiplantae (green plants) clade. Here, we describe how to access the data used in a phylogenomics analysis of the first 85 species, and how to visualize our gene and species trees. Users can develop computational pipelines to analyse these data, in conjunction with data of their own that they can upload. Computationally estimated protein-protein interactions and biochemical pathways can be visualized at another site. Finally, we comment on our future plans and how they fit within this scalable system for the dissemination, visualization, and analysis of large multi-species data sets. PMID:25625010

  7. Data access for the 1,000 Plants (1KP) project.

    PubMed

    Matasci, Naim; Hung, Ling-Hong; Yan, Zhixiang; Carpenter, Eric J; Wickett, Norman J; Mirarab, Siavash; Nguyen, Nam; Warnow, Tandy; Ayyampalayam, Saravanaraj; Barker, Michael; Burleigh, J Gordon; Gitzendanner, Matthew A; Wafula, Eric; Der, Joshua P; dePamphilis, Claude W; Roure, Béatrice; Philippe, Hervé; Ruhfel, Brad R; Miles, Nicholas W; Graham, Sean W; Mathews, Sarah; Surek, Barbara; Melkonian, Michael; Soltis, Douglas E; Soltis, Pamela S; Rothfels, Carl; Pokorny, Lisa; Shaw, Jonathan A; DeGironimo, Lisa; Stevenson, Dennis W; Villarreal, Juan Carlos; Chen, Tao; Kutchan, Toni M; Rolf, Megan; Baucom, Regina S; Deyholos, Michael K; Samudrala, Ram; Tian, Zhijian; Wu, Xiaolei; Sun, Xiao; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Jun; Leebens-Mack, Jim; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu

    2014-01-01

    The 1,000 plants (1KP) project is an international multi-disciplinary consortium that has generated transcriptome data from over 1,000 plant species, with exemplars for all of the major lineages across the Viridiplantae (green plants) clade. Here, we describe how to access the data used in a phylogenomics analysis of the first 85 species, and how to visualize our gene and species trees. Users can develop computational pipelines to analyse these data, in conjunction with data of their own that they can upload. Computationally estimated protein-protein interactions and biochemical pathways can be visualized at another site. Finally, we comment on our future plans and how they fit within this scalable system for the dissemination, visualization, and analysis of large multi-species data sets.

  8. Environmental management of construction and demolition waste in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Kartam, Nabil; Al-Mutairi, Nayef; Al-Ghusain, Ibrahim; Al-Humoud, Jasem

    2004-01-01

    There is an increasing pressure on the construction industry to reduce costs and improve the quality of our environment. The fact is that both of these goals can be achieved at the same time. Although construction and demolition (C&D) constitutes a major source of waste in terms of volume and weight, its management and recycling efforts have not yet seen the light in Kuwait. This study focuses on recycling efforts leading to the minimization of the total C&D waste that is currently landfilled in Kuwait. This paper presents the current status of C&D waste disposal system in Kuwait and identifies the potential problems to the environment, people and economy. Then, it investigates alternative solutions to manage and control this major type of waste in an economically efficient and environmentally safe manner. Next, the paper describes the feasibility of establishing a C&D waste recycling facility in Kuwait. It concludes by highlighting the major benefits and bottleneck problems with such a recycling facility.

  9. A valuable product from a construction and demolition facility

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, S.G.

    1997-12-31

    A Construction and Demolition (C and D) Facility in Northeast Florida produces a manufactured soil that is a by-product of recycling operations. Upon arrival at the facility, the incoming material is separated into concrete and non-concrete materials. The non-concrete material passes through several screen and conveyor line stations to remove deleterious and unsuitable materials. The remaining material becomes the final product known as recycled soil product. The consistency of the material is similar to soil mixed with some mulch. Present uses of the material include daily landfill cover and fill material (exclusive of top cover) at construction sites, road base preparation and landscaping material. In order to determine if the material was safe to be used in places where it may come in contact with the public or sensitive environments, several analytical tests for metals and volatile organic compounds were performed. The material was determined to be within applicable standards for all parameters sampled and the product is expected to be approved for unrestricted use. This former waste material has been proven to be a valuable commodity again.

  10. A systems analysis tool for construction and demolition wastes management.

    PubMed

    Wang, James Y; Touran, Ali; Christoforou, Christoforos; Fadlalla, Hatim

    2004-01-01

    Managing construction and demolition (C&D) wastes has challenged many municipalities with diminishing waste disposal capacity. Facing such challenges, the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection proposed a policy restricting the landfill disposal of certain C&D waste materials, if unprocessed. This research is to study the potential economic impact of such restriction on construction contractors and C&D waste processors. A spreadsheet-based systems analysis model has been developed to assist the cost-benefit evaluation for various C&D waste management scenarios. The model, developed based on the mass balance principle, is designed to track a C&D waste stream through the various stages of a waste management system, i.e. generation, source separation, processing, recycling, and final disposal. This model, by incorporating the material flow data with the cost/revenue data associated with each management activity, can then provide an economic analysis for a proposed C&D waste management scenario. A case study illustrating the application of this model for Massachusetts is also presented.

  11. Development of porous ceramsite from construction and demolition waste.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuan; Wu, Jian-Zhi; Zhang, Fu-Shen

    2013-01-01

    The disposal of construction and demolition (C&D) waste has become a serious problem in China due to the rapid increase of Chinese construction industry in recent years. In the present study, typical C&D waste was employed for ceramsite fabrication so as to find a new way for its effective recycling. A novel process was developed for manufacturing high-quality porous ceramsite according to the special chemical composition and properties of C&D waste. Most importantly, a unique bloating agent was developed for the porous structure formation since it was difficult to obtain a suitable porous structure using traditional bloating agents. The effects of processing parameters such as sintering temperature, heating rate and soaking time were investigated, and the bloating mechanism for ceramsite was discussed. The C&D waste ceramsite (CDWC), with high-intensity, low density and homogeneous mechanical properties, was much more suitable for application in the construction field. This study provides a practical process for efficient recycling of the rapidly increasing quantities of C&D waste.

  12. Separability studies of construction and demolition waste recycled sand.

    PubMed

    Ulsen, Carina; Kahn, Henrique; Hawlitschek, Gustav; Masini, Eldon A; Angulo, Sérgio C

    2013-03-01

    The quality of recycled aggregates from construction and demolition waste (CDW) is strictly related to the content of porous and low strength phases, and specifically to the patches of cement that remain attached to the surface of natural aggregates. This phase increases water absorption and compromises the consistency and strength of concrete made from recycled aggregates. Mineral processing has been applied to CDW recycling to remove the patches of adhered cement paste on coarse recycled aggregates. The recycled fine fraction is usually disregarded due to its high content of porous phases despite representing around 50% of the total waste. This paper focus on laboratory mineral separability studies for removing particles with a high content of cement paste from natural fine aggregate particles (quartz/feldspars). The procedure achieved processing of CDW by tertiary impact crushing to produce sand, followed by sieving and density and magnetic separability studies. The attained results confirmed that both methods were effective in reducing cement paste content and producing significant mass recovery (80% for density concentration and 60% for magnetic separation). The production of recycled sand contributes to the sustainability of the construction environment by reducing both the consumption of raw materials and disposal of CDW, particularly in large Brazilian centers with a low quantity of sand and increasing costs of this material due to long transportation distances.

  13. Characterization of wastes from construction and demolition sector.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Swarnalatha; Jeon, Tae-Wan; Kang, Young-Yeul; Kim, Woo-Il; Jeong, Seong-Kyeong; Kim, Yong-Jun; Yeon, Jin-Mo; Shin, Sun Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    In Republic of Korea, construction and demolition (C&D) waste accounts for 49.9% of the total waste. In the present work, the mineralogical composition, the concentrations of 11 heavy metals, 19 PAH, and 7 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners present in the 6 broad category (9 subcategories) of C&D hazardous waste were discussed along with their leaching characteristics. In concrete/mixed cement waste, the concentrations of As, Cr(6+), Hg, and Zn were in the range of 1.76-7.86, ND-1.63, 0.026-0.047, and 110.90-280.17 mg/kg, respectively. The asphalt waste sample A1 possessed relatively high concentrations of phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benz(a)anthracene, benzo(a)pyrene, and indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene comparing to the other samples and it contains 0.08-0.1% of coal tar. Hazardous nature of the C&D wastes greatly depends on the source of the collection. Zn concentration was above 1000 mg/kg for road asphalt waste samples A4 and A5. Total PCB concentration were high in the soil waste sample S1 (130 μg/kg) as it was the excavated soil obtained from the premises of an oil station. Leaching of As, Ba, CN(-), and F(-) were observed in most of the C&D waste samples.

  14. Lead poisoning in a group of demolition workers.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, B C; Baird, A W

    1977-01-01

    The incidence of lead poisoning in industry has fallen dramatically since the beginning of the twentieth century. This reduction has been partly attributable to increased awareness, improved ventilation and hygiene facilities, and technical changes which have allowed other substances to replace lead, but improved medical surveillance of workers exposed to lead in certain defined industries has also been important. Not all industries where lead exposure can occur are at present covered by specific regulations dealing with lead, however. We report the diagnosis and treatment of eleven oxyacetylene metal burners involved in the demolition of a railway station, who rapidly developed frank lead poisoning. The most suitable measurements to employ in evaluating such a population are considered. The selection, based on blood lead and haemoglobin measurements, of those who should receive further treatment is discussed. Symptoms were found to be more nearly related to indices of effect or toxicity of lead than to indices of exposure or absorption. The effects of chelation therapy upon symptoms, blood lead, haemoglobin and urinary porphyrins are recorded. The need for careful follow-up is illustrated. PMID:412513

  15. One System Integrated Project Team Progress in Coordinating Hanford Tank Farms and the Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Skwarek, Raymond J.; Harp, Ben J.; Duncan, Garth M.

    2013-12-18

    The One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was formed at the Hanford Site in late 2011 as a way to improve coordination and itegration between the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) on interfaces between the two projects, and to eliminate duplication and exploit opportunities for synergy. The IPT is composed of jointly staffed groups that work on technical issues of mutal interest, front-end design and project definition, nuclear safety, plant engineering system integration, commissioning, planning and scheduling, and environmental, safety, health and quality (ESH&Q) areas. In the past year important progress has been made in a number of areas as the organization has matured and additional opportunities have been identified. Areas covered in this paper include: Support for development of the Office of Envirnmental Management (EM) framework document to progress the Office of River Protection's (ORP) River Protection Project (RPP) mission; Stewardship of the RPP flowsheet; Collaboration with Savannah River Site (SRS), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Operations programs integration; and, Further development of the waste acceptance criteria.

  16. Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant Project. Summary edition. 1980 technical progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This technical progress report on the CRBRP Project describes the objectives, design decisions, and major accomplishments achieved in the planning, organizing, design, and execution of the Project during the period October 1, 1979, through September 30, 1980. It is a summary of the 1980 CRBRP Technical Progress Report, which was prepared by the Advanced Reactors Division of Westinghouse Electric Corporation, the Lead Reactor Manufacturer for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant Project, in fulfillment of contract requirements with the United States Department of Energy. It includes inputs from the CRBRP Architect-Engineer (Burns and Roe, Inc.), from the Constructor (Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation), and from the supporting Reactor Manufacturers (Atomics International Division of the Energy Systems Group of Rockwell International Corporation, the Advanced Reactor Systems Department of General Electric Company, and the Advanced Reactors Division of Westinghouse Electric Corporation).

  17. Demolition waste generation for development of a regional management chain model.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Miguel; Gomes, Marta Castilho; de Brito, Jorge

    2016-03-01

    Even though construction and demolition waste (CDW) is the bulkiest waste stream, its estimation and composition in specific regions still faces major difficulties. Therefore new methods are required especially when it comes to make predictions limited to small areas, such as counties. This paper proposes one such method, which makes use of data collected from real demolition works and statistical information on the geographical area under study. Based on a correlation analysis between the demolition waste estimates and indicators such as population density, buildings ageing index, buildings density and land occupation type, relationships are established that can be used to determine demolition waste outputs in a given area. The derived models are presented and explained. This methodology is independent from the specific region with which it is exemplified (the Lisbon Metropolitan Area) and can therefore be applied to any region of the world, from the country to the county level. Generation of demolition waste data at the county level is the basis of the design of a systemic model for CDW management in a region. Future developments proposed include a mixed-integer linear programming formulation of such recycling network. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Notification of Concurrence - K-25/K-27 D&D Project, ETTP - Change Number of EMWMF Waste Lots in the Waste Handling Plan for Demolition of the K-25 and K-27 Building Structures and Remaining Components Located at the ETTP, Oak Ridge, TN From Two to Three

    SciTech Connect

    Trice K.D.

    2009-02-11

    Section 5.1 of the approved Waste Handling Plan for Demolition ofthe K-25 and K-2 7 Building Structures and Remaining Components Located at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (WHP) includes two Environmental Management Waste Management (EMWMF) waste lots: (1) Asbestos-contaminated roofing/transite; and (2) Construction debris, such as nonasbestos roofing, structural steel/miscellaneous metal/equipment, nonradiological piping, wood, and miscellaneous small quantities of concrete. This concurrence form adds an additional EMWMF waste lot 6.47 for lavatory sink drains. Based on an analysis of the building structure characterization data, the only individual building structure with either an analytic carcinogenic or Hazard Index (HI) sum-of-fractions (SOF) greater than 1 is the lavatory sink drains (Table 1). The HI SOF for the lavatory sink drains is 1.34 (Table 2). When all media are combined with the material of construction calculations, the HI SOF is 1.22 (Table 3). However, when the lavatory sink drains are segregated from all other media, the HI SOF is only 0.256, which is well below the EMWMF waste acceptance criteria SOF limit of 1 (Table 4). Given the large volume (124, 625 cubic yards) of other building structure media with a small HI SOF of 0.256 and the small volume (one cubic yard) of lavatory sink drains with a large HI SOF of 1.34, a separate waste lot for lavatory sink drains is recommended. Lead is the primary contributor to the large HI SOF in the lavatory sink drains. Lead in the lavatory sink drains was shown using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test statistically to have higher concentrations than all other building structure media combined. Other analytes having statistically different median concentrations in the lavatory sink drains compared to all other media are antimony, arsenic, boron, cadmium, selenium, solver, vanadium, zinc, mercury, strontium, and Uranium-233/234 (Table 5). A separate waste lot for the lavatory sink drains

  19. SRC-1: coal liquefaction demonstration plant. Project Baseline assessment report supplement

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-01

    ICRC issued a Revised Baseline for the SRC-I Demonstration Project in order to incorporate the results of these research activities and the changes in the design that had occurred since FY82. The Revised Baseline, prepared by ICRC, provides the necessary information for any future government or commercial decisions relating to the design, construction and operation of an SRC-I-type coal liquefaction facility. No further activities to complete the design of the demonstration plant, or to proceed with construction are planned by DOE. The Project Baseline is an ICRC-documented reference for controlling any future project work and cost. The original Baseline was issued in March 1982; this summary document is available from National Technical Information Service (NTIS) as document number DOE/ORO/030540-T13. The Revised Baseline (dated April 1984) is available as document numbers DOE/OR/03054-T14 and T16. Supporting documentation, in the main concerned with research activities undertaken in support of the design, is also available from NTIS as DOE/OR/03054-T1 through T10 and DOE/OR/03054-1 through 125. The Baseline itself is made up of a documented design configuration, a documented estimate, in First Quarter Fiscal Year 1982 Dollars (1QFY82$), and a detailed schedule of the activities required to complete the project as of 3QFY82. The Baseline design is embodied in the 26 process design packages and other support documentation identified in the Baseline, as well as preliminary engineering flow diagrams prepared for all of the major process areas of the plant. All elements of the Project Baseline were developed within the constraints of the project criteria.

  20. Decommissioning the Belgonucleaire Dessel MOX plant: presentation of the project and situation end august 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Cuchet, J.M.; Libon, H.; Verheyen, C.; Boden, S.; Joffroy, F.; Walthery, R.

    2013-07-01

    Belgonucleaire has been operating the Dessel MOX plant at an industrial scale between 1986 and 2006. During this period, 40 metric tons of plutonium (HM) have been processed into 90 reloads of MOX fuel for commercial light water reactors. The decision to stop the production in 2006 and to decommission the MOX plant was the result of the shrinkage of the MOX fuel market due to political and commercial factors. As a significant part of the decommissioning project of the Dessel MOX plant, about 170 medium-sized glove-boxes and about 1.200 metric tons of structure and equipment outside the glove-boxes are planned for dismantling. The license for the dismantling of the MOX plant was granted by Royal Decree in 2008 and the dismantling started in March 2009. The dismantling works are carried out by an integrated organization under leadership and responsibility of Belgonucleaire; this organization includes 3 main contractors, namely Tecnubel N.V., the THV ('Tijdelijke HandelsVereniging') Belgoprocess / SCK-CEN and Studsvik GmbH and Tractebel Engineering as project manager. In this paper, after having described the main characteristics of the project, the authors review the different organizational and technical options considered for the decommissioning of the glove-boxes; thereafter the main decision criteria (qualification of personnel and of processes, confinement, cutting techniques and radiation protection, safety aspects, alpha-bearing waste management) are analyzed as well. Finally the progress, the feedback and the lessons learned at the end of August 2013 are presented, giving the principal's and contractors point of view. (authors)

  1. 33 CFR 165.T01-0394 - Regulated Navigation Area; Waldo-Hancock Bridge Demolition, Penobscot River, between Prospect and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area; Waldo-Hancock Bridge Demolition, Penobscot River, between Prospect and Verona, ME. 165.T01-0394 Section 165.T01... Bridge Demolition, Penobscot River, between Prospect and Verona, ME. (a) Location. The following area is...

  2. 41 CFR 102-75.170 - What happens to the related personal property in a structure scheduled for demolition?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What happens to the related personal property in a structure scheduled for demolition? 102-75.170 Section 102-75.170 Public... scheduled for demolition? When a structure is to be demolished, any fixtures or related personal property...

  3. 41 CFR 102-75.170 - What happens to the related personal property in a structure scheduled for demolition?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What happens to the related personal property in a structure scheduled for demolition? 102-75.170 Section 102-75.170 Public... scheduled for demolition? When a structure is to be demolished, any fixtures or related personal property...

  4. 41 CFR 102-75.170 - What happens to the related personal property in a structure scheduled for demolition?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What happens to the related personal property in a structure scheduled for demolition? 102-75.170 Section 102-75.170 Public... scheduled for demolition? When a structure is to be demolished, any fixtures or related personal property...

  5. 41 CFR 102-75.170 - What happens to the related personal property in a structure scheduled for demolition?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What happens to the related personal property in a structure scheduled for demolition? 102-75.170 Section 102-75.170 Public... scheduled for demolition? When a structure is to be demolished, any fixtures or related personal property...

  6. 41 CFR 102-75.170 - What happens to the related personal property in a structure scheduled for demolition?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What happens to the related personal property in a structure scheduled for demolition? 102-75.170 Section 102-75.170 Public... scheduled for demolition? When a structure is to be demolished, any fixtures or related personal property...

  7. Quantities of arsenic-treated wood in demolition debris generated by Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Brajesh; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Townsendt, Timothy G

    2007-03-01

    The disaster debris from Hurricane Katrina is one of the largest in terms of volume and economic loss in American history. One of the major components of the demolition debris is wood waste of which a significant proportion is treated with preservatives, including preservatives containing arsenic. As a result of the large scale destruction of treated wood structures such as electrical poles, fences, decks, and homes a considerable amount of treated wood and consequently arsenic will be disposed as disaster debris. In this study an effort was made to estimate the quantity of arsenic disposed through demolition debris generated in the Louisiana and Mississippi area through Hurricane Katrina. Of the 72 million cubic meters of disaster debris generated, roughly 12 million cubic meters were in the form of construction and demolition wood resulting in an estimated 1740 metric tons of arsenic disposed. Management of disaster debris should consider the relatively large quantities of arsenic associated with pressure-treated wood.

  8. Quantities of Arsenic-Treated Wood in Demolition Debris Generated by Hurricane Katrina

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Brajesh; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Townsend, Timothy G.

    2008-01-01

    The disaster debris from Hurricane Katrina is one of the largest in terms of volume and economic loss in American history. One of the major components of the demolition debris is wood waste of which a significant proportion is treated with preservatives, including preservatives containing arsenic. As a result of the large scale destruction of treated wood structures such as electrical poles, fences, decks, and homes a considerable amount of treated wood and consequently arsenic will be disposed as disaster debris. In this study an effort was made to estimate the quantity of arsenic disposed through demolition debris generated in the Louisiana and Mississippi area through Hurricane Katrina. Of the 72 million cubic meters of disaster debris generated, roughly 12 million cubic meters were in the form of construction and demolition wood resulting in an estimated 1740 metric tons of arsenic disposed. Management of disaster debris should consider the relatively large quantities of arsenic associated with pressure-treated wood. PMID:17396637

  9. Pilot-based assessment of the economics of recycling construction demolition waste.

    PubMed

    Srour, Issam M; Chehab, Ghassan R; El-Fadel, Mutasem; Tamraz, Sandy

    2013-11-01

    The significant amount of waste generated from construction demolition has become a chronic problem in many developing countries. Using data obtained from demolition contractors and various other sources, this paper proposes a framework for proper handling of construction demolition waste (CDW) to serve as a decision support tool in countries suffering from the lack of national CDW management guidelines. The framework is then demonstrated through a case study in the city of Beirut, Lebanon, and a sensitivity analysis is carried out to examine the economic feasibility of developing a recycling facility. The analysis showed that in order for a facility to be feasible, a gate fee should be charged in the presence of a market for recycled aggregates. The results confirm the significance of instigating and implementing legislation to control illegal dumping, constructing, and managing engineered landfills, and establishing markets for recycled CDW.

  10. Risk Assessment of Exposure to Silica Dust in Building Demolition Sites.

    PubMed

    Normohammadi, Mohammad; Kakooei, Hossein; Omidi, Leila; Yari, Saeed; Alimi, Rasul

    2016-09-01

    Building demolition can lead to emission of dust into the environment. Exposure to silica dust may be considered as an important hazard in these sites. The objectives of this research were to determine the amount of workers' exposure to crystalline silica dust and assess the relative risk of silicosis and the excess lifetime risk of mortality from lung cancer in demolition workers. Four sites in the Tehran megacity region were selected. Silica dust was collected using the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health method 7601 and determined spectrophotometrically. The Mannetje et al and Rice et al models were chosen to examine the rate of silicosis-related mortality and the excess lifetime risk of mortality from lung cancer, respectively. The amount of demolition workers' exposure was in the range of 0.085-0.185 mg/m(3). The range of relative risk of silicosis related mortality was increased from 1 in the workers with the lowest exposure level to 22.64/1,000 in the employees with high exposure level. The range of the excess lifetime risk of mortality from lung cancer was in the range of 32-60/1,000 exposed workers. Geometric and arithmetic mean of exposure was higher than threshold limit value for silica dust in all demolition sites. The risk of silicosis mortality for many demolition workers was higher than 1/1,000 (unacceptable level of risk). Estimating the lifetime lung cancer mortality showed a higher risk of mortality from lung cancer in building demolition workers.

  11. Beyond ectomycorrhizal bipartite networks: projected networks demonstrate contrasted patterns between early- and late-successional plants in Corsica

    PubMed Central

    Taudiere, Adrien; Munoz, François; Lesne, Annick; Monnet, Anne-Christine; Bellanger, Jean-Michel; Selosse, Marc-André; Moreau, Pierre-Arthur; Richard, Franck

    2015-01-01

    The ectomycorrhizal (ECM) symbiosis connects mutualistic plants and fungal species into bipartite networks. While links between one focal ECM plant and its fungal symbionts have been widely documented, systemic views of ECM networks are lacking, in particular, concerning the ability of fungal species to mediate indirect ecological interactions between ECM plant species (projected-ECM networks). We assembled a large dataset of plant–fungi associations at the species level and at the scale of Corsica using molecular data and unambiguously host-assigned records to: (i) examine the correlation between the number of fungal symbionts of a plant species and the average specialization of these fungal species, (ii) explore the structure of the plant–plant projected network and (iii) compare plant association patterns in regard to their position along the ecological succession. Our analysis reveals no trade-off between specialization of plants and specialization of their partners and a saturation of the plant projected network. Moreover, there is a significantly lower-than-expected sharing of partners between early- and late-successional plant species, with fewer fungal partners for early-successional ones and similar average specialization of symbionts of early- and late-successional plants. Our work paves the way for ecological readings of Mediterranean landscapes that include the astonishing diversity of below-ground interactions. PMID:26539201

  12. Data base on dose reduction research projects for nuclear power plants. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, T.A.; Yu, C.K.; Roecklein, A.K.

    1994-05-01

    This is the fifth volume in a series of reports that provide information on dose reduction research and health physics technology or nuclear power plants. The information is taken from two of several databases maintained by Brookhaven National Laboratory`s ALARA Center for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The research section of the report covers dose reduction projects that are in the experimental or developmental phase. It includes topics such as steam generator degradation, decontamination, robotics, improvements in reactor materials, and inspection techniques. The section on health physics technology discusses dose reduction efforts that are in place or in the process of being implemented at nuclear power plants. A total of 105 new or updated projects are described. All project abstracts from this report are available to nuclear industry professionals with access to a fax machine through the ACEFAX system or a computer with a modem and the proper communications software through the ACE system. Detailed descriptions of how to access all the databases electronically are in the appendices of the report.

  13. Sulphate release from construction and demolition material in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Stefan; Wessolek, Gerd

    2013-04-01

    In Berlin and many other cities soils are heavily influenced by anthropogenic activities and deposited substrates. A widespread technical substrate in technosols is construction and demolition material from residential and industrial buildings. Existing rubble landfills without sealing facilities pose threats to ground water quality. In the central city of Berlin rising sulphate concentrations of groundwaters (up to 1200 mg/L) are measured since more than two decades. Previous studies point out that the high sulphate concentrations are mainly attributed to World War II rubble. The major part of debris was deposited in form of landfills and contains approximately 0.3 wt% gypsum. The scope of our research is to determine mechanisms of sulphate release from debris material, interactions between sulphate release, soil hydraulic properties and potential sinks of sulphur. To estimate equilibrium concentration and kinetics of sulphate release of various debris components batch and column experiments are conducted. The same method is applied to determine potential adsorptive character of common debris components. To analyse the impacts of soil hydraulic properties on sulphate leaching we carry out soil column experiments with defined upper and lower boundary conditions, varying water flow velocity and induced preferential flow. Simultaneously we monitor sulphate concentration of soil leachate in a 2 m³ lysimeter. First results of the batch experiments show that gypsum from broken stucco is the main source of sulphate in the observed technosols. Other components as mortar and slag show a quite low sulphate release. Similar results are found within the column experiments. For brigs medium and strongly time dependent sulphate release is determined. Concentrations up to 1500 mg/L are measured in the soil leachate from the lysimeter.

  14. Trend of the research on construction and demolition waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Hongping; Shen Liyin

    2011-04-15

    Research interests in addressing construction and demolition (C and D) waste management issues have resulted in a large amount of publications during the last decade. This study demonstrates that there is no systematic examination on the research development in literature in the discipline of C and D waste management. This study presents the latest research trend in the discipline through analyzing the publications from 2000 to 2009 in eight major international journals. The analysis is conducted on the number of papers published annually, main authors' contributions, research methods and data analysis methods adopted, and research topics covered. The results exhibit an increasing research interest in C and D waste management in recent years. Researchers from developed economies have contributed significantly to the development of the research in the discipline. Some developing countries such as Malaysia and China have also been making good efforts in promoting C and D waste management research. The findings from this study also indicate that survey and case study are major methods for data collection, and the data are mostly processed through descriptive analysis. It is anticipated that more future studies on C and D waste management will be led by researchers from developing economies, where construction works will remain their major economic activities. On the other hand, more sophisticated modeling and simulating techniques have been used effectively in a number of studies on C and D waste management research, and this is considered a major methodology for future research in the discipline. C and D waste management will continue to be a hot research topic in the future, in particularly, the importance of human factors in C and D waste management has emerged as a new challenging topic.

  15. Biological sulfate removal from gypsum contaminated construction and demolition debris.

    PubMed

    Kijjanapanich, Pimluck; Annachhatre, Ajit P; Esposito, Giovanni; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Lens, Piet N L

    2013-12-15

    Construction and demolition debris (CDD) contains high levels of sulfate that can cause detrimental environmental impacts when disposed without adequate treatment. In landfills, sulfate can be converted to hydrogen sulfide under anaerobic conditions. CDD can thus cause health impacts or odor problems to landfill employees and surrounding residents. Reduction of the sulfate content of CDD is an option to overcome these problems. This study aimed at developing a biological sulfate removal system to reduce the sulfate content of gypsum contaminated CDD in order to decrease the amount of solid waste, to improve the quality of CDD waste for recycling purposes and to recover sulfur from CDD. The treatment leached out the gypsum contained in CDD by water in a leaching column. The sulfate loaded leachate was then treated in a biological sulfate reducing Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactor to convert the sulfate to sulfide. The UASB reactor was operated at 23 ± 3 °C with a hydraulic retention time and upflow velocity of 15.5 h and 0.1 m h(-1), respectively while ethanol was added as electron donor at a final organic loading rate of 3.46 g COD L(-1) reactor d(-1). The CDD leachate had a pH of 8-9 and sulfate dissolution rates of 526.4 and 609.8 mg L(-1) d(-1) were achieved in CDD gypsum and CDD sand, respectively. Besides, it was observed that the gypsum dissolution was the rate limiting step for the biological treatment of CDD. The sulfate removal efficiency of the system stabilized at around 85%, enabling the reuse of the UASB effluent for the leaching step, proving the versatility of the bioreactor for practical applications.

  16. Trend of the research on construction and demolition waste management.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hongping; Shen, Liyin

    2011-04-01

    Research interests in addressing construction and demolition (C&D) waste management issues have resulted in a large amount of publications during the last decade. This study demonstrates that there is no systematic examination on the research development in literature in the discipline of C&D waste management. This study presents the latest research trend in the discipline through analyzing the publications from 2000 to 2009 in eight major international journals. The analysis is conducted on the number of papers published annually, main authors' contributions, research methods and data analysis methods adopted, and research topics covered. The results exhibit an increasing research interest in C&D waste management in recent years. Researchers from developed economies have contributed significantly to the development of the research in the discipline. Some developing countries such as Malaysia and China have also been making good efforts in promoting C&D waste management research. The findings from this study also indicate that survey and case study are major methods for data collection, and the data are mostly processed through descriptive analysis. It is anticipated that more future studies on C&D waste management will be led by researchers from developing economies, where construction works will remain their major economic activities. On the other hand, more sophisticated modeling and simulating techniques have been used effectively in a number of studies on C&D waste management research, and this is considered a major methodology for future research in the discipline. C&D waste management will continue to be a hot research topic in the future, in particularly, the importance of human factors in C&D waste management has emerged as a new challenging topic.

  17. A study of urban housing demolition as a source of lead in ambient dust on sidewalks, streets, and alleys.

    PubMed

    Farfel, Mark R; Orlova, Anna O; Lees, Peter S J; Rohde, Charles; Ashley, Peter J; Julian Chisolm, J

    2005-10-01

    We examined changes in ambient dust lead (Pb) levels associated with the demolition of older row houses containing lead paint in Baltimore, MD, USA. Our previous paper describes the three study sites, the demolition processes, and increases in the Pb dustfall rate during demolition (>40-fold) and debris removal (>6-fold) within 10 m of sites where wetting was of limited effectiveness. This paper presents the analysis of settled dust collected using a cyclone device from streets, sidewalks, and alleys within 100 m of study sites before, immediately after, and 1 month after demolition. We found acute increases in Pb loadings and dust loadings after demolition and debris removal that are of public health concern. Streets and alleys had the greatest increases in Pb loadings and the highest levels overall. At one site, geometric mean (GM) Pb loadings immediately after demolition increased 200% for streets to 8080 microg/ft(2), 138% for alleys to 6020 microg/ft(2), and 26% for sidewalks to 2170 microg/ft(2). One month after demolition, the GM Pb loadings for streets, alleys, and sidewalks were reduced on average by 41-67% from post-demolition levels and were below baseline levels for alleys and sidewalks. The other main site had smaller increases in GM Pb loadings immediately after demolition-18% for alleys to 1740 microg/ft(2) and 18% for sidewalks to 2050 microg/ft(2)-and a decrease of 29% for streets to 2730 microg/ft(2). Exterior dust is a public health concern because it is a pathway of ambient Pb exposure and a potential source of residential exposure via tracking and re-aerosolization and re-deposition. Our findings highlight the need to control demolition-related Pb deposition and to educate planners, contractors, and health and housing agencies. This is particularly important given the large numbers of aging US dwellings that will be razed as part of future urban redevelopment efforts.

  18. Ambient exposure to coarse and fine particle emissions from building demolition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarmi, Farhad; Kumar, Prashant

    2016-07-01

    Demolition of buildings produce large quantities of particulate matter (PM) that could be inhaled by on-site workers and people living in the neighbourhood, but studies assessing ambient exposure at the real-world demolition sites are limited. We measured concentrations of PM10 (≤10 μm), PM2.5 (≤2.5 μm) and PM1 (≤1 μm) along with local meteorology for 54 working hours over the demolition period. The measurements were carried out at (i) a fixed-site in the downwind of demolished building, (ii) around the site during demolition operation through mobile monitoring, (iii) different distances away from the demolition site through sequential monitoring, and (iv) inside an excavator vehicle cabin and on-site temporary office for engineers. Position of the PM instrument was continuously recorded using a Global Positioning System on a second basis during mobile measurements. Fraction of coarse particles (PM2.5-10) contributed 89 (with mean particle mass concentration, PMC ≈ 133 ± 17 μg m-3), 83 (100 ± 29 μg m-3), and 70% (59 ± 12 μg m-3) of total PMC during the fixed-site, mobile monitoring and sequential measurements, respectively, compared with only 50% (mean 12 ± 6 μg m-3) during the background measurements. The corresponding values for fine particles (PM2.5) were 11, 17 and 30% compared with 50% during background, showing a much greater release of coarse particles during demolition. The openair package in R and map source software (ArcGIS) were used to assess spatial variation of PMCs in downwind and upwind of the demolition site. A modified box model was developed to determine the emission factors, which were 210, 73 and 24 μg m-2 s-1 for PM10, PM2.5 and PM1, respectively. The average respiratory deposited doses to coarse (and fine) particles inside the excavator cabin and on-site temporary office increased by 57- (and 5-) and 13- (and 2-) times compared with the local background level, respectively. The monitoring stations in downwind direction

  19. 75 FR 69711 - STP Nuclear Operating Company, South Texas Project Nuclear Power Plant, Units 3 and 4; Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ...] STP Nuclear Operating Company, South Texas Project Nuclear Power Plant, Units 3 and 4; Exemption 1.0...: 1. RG 1.132, ``Site Investigations for Foundations of Nuclear Power Plants.'' 2. RG 1.138 ``Laboratory Investigations of Soils and Rocks for Engineering Analysis and Design of Nuclear Power...

  20. The main goals of experiments with the higher plants in the project MARS - 500.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sychev, Vladimir; Levinskikh, Margarita; Podolsky, Igor; Gushin, Vadim; Bingham, Gail; Bates, Scott

    At the present step of development of manned flight to Mars there is a current opinion that including a greenhouse in the composition of Life Support Systems (LSS) of Martian expedition would essentially improve a spacecraft habitat conditions and also would have impact to preventing of a number of possible consequences of continuous presence of human in artificial environment. Development of design objectives of future space greenhouses applicable for conditions of Martian expedition should be based, in our opinion, not only on the results of real space experiments, conducted onboard of orbital stations, but also on the results of ground-based experiments. In connection with above considerations there is a number of technological, biological and psychological experiments is planned to be conducted in the frame of MARS-500 project to resolve questions related to incorporation of higher plants in LSS of inter-planetary flights. The questions include: testing of developed elements of the greenhouse construction and methods for cultivation of vegetables under conditions of imitation of the flight of Martian expedition; selection of breeds and species of vegetables, characterized by high speed of biomass accumulation, attractive taste and appearance; investigation of growth, development and metabolism of plants under long-term continuous cultivation in manned pressurized object; comparison of the productivity of the plants as a function of utilization of different light source; determination of maximum amount of planted biomass of the plants and number of possible vegetation under conditions of long-term utilization of vegetation chamber of the greenhouse without substrate replacement; investigation of crops dietetic preferences of crew members; estimation of quality of plant biomass using seeding of the plants by microorganisms and nitrates and vitamins content as markers; development and approbation of methodical approaches to estimation of psychological factors of

  1. Marine ecological habitat: a case study on projected thermal power plant around Dharamtar Creek, India.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Vikrant A; Naidu, Velamala S; Jagtap, Tanaji G

    2011-03-01

    Estuaries and tidal creeks, harboring mangroves particularly, face tremendous anthropogenic pressures. Expansion of mega cities and the thermal power plants are generally proposed in the vicinity of estuaries and creek, due to the feasibility of intake and discharge of water for cooling. Discharges from such developments remain constant threat of increasing thermal pollution and affecting the quality of environment. The baseline information on prevailing quality of aquatic environment comes handy for understanding alterations due to such activities. Principle component analysis (PCA) revealed that temperature, pH, salinity, suspended solids, DO, BOD and phaeophytins are major parameters influencing the creek system. Heated effluents may have direct and adverse impacts on these parameters, altering biotic constituents. Hence, periodic and detailed observations are necessary to estimate exact response of biotic communities to changing environment. The present paper is based on case study, projecting a power plant in the vicinity of major mangrove habitats of Dharamtar creek.

  2. Plant Response and Environmental Data from the Oldfield Community Climate and Atmospheric Manipulation (OCCAM) Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Oldfield Community Climate and Atmospheric Manipulation (OCCAM) project is a joint effort of ORNL and the University of Tennessee to investigate community and ecosystem response to global change, specifically looking at the interactive effects of atmospheric carbon dioxide, surface temperatures, and soil moisture. The plants studied for their response to warming temperatures, elevated carbon dioxide, and altered water availability include C3 and C4 grasses, forbs, and legumes. These plants are typical of an old-field ecosystem that establishes itself on unused agricultural land. The results of the research focus on species abundance, production, phenology, and what is going on chemically below ground. Data are currently available from 2003 through July, 2008.

  3. S.A.P. Students Adopt Plants: A Curriculum Guide for Independent Research Projects in High School Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Gayle A.

    This curriculum guide begins with classroom and text study of plants and develops into an individual research project that continues throughout the school year outside the regular biology or botany teaching plan and text. The project uses about one class period every 2 weeks for group discussions, evaluations, and suggestions for the individual…

  4. Cesium Ion Exchange Program at the Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    CHARLES, NASH

    2004-12-02

    The River Protection Project - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant will use cesium ion exchange to remove 137Cs from Low Activity Waste down to 0.3 Ci/m3 in the Immobilized LAW, ILAW product. The project baseline for cesium ion exchange is the elutable SuperLig, R, 644, SL-644, resin registered trademark of IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc., American Fork, UT or the Department of Energy approved equivalent. SL-644 is solely available through IBC Advanced Technologies. To provide an alternative to this sole-source resin supply, the RPP-WTP initiated a three-stage process for selection and qualification of an alternative ion exchange resin for cesium removal in the RPPWTP. It was recommended that resorcinol formaldehyde RF be pursued as a potential alternative to SL-644.

  5. Condensed listing of surface boreholes at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Project through 31 December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, L.R.; Aguilar, R.; Mercer, J.W.; Newman, G.

    1997-01-01

    This report contains a condensed listing of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) project surface boreholes drilled for the purpose of site selection and characterization through 31 December 1995. The US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored the drilling activities, which were conducted primarily by Sandia National Laboratories. The listing provides physical attributes such as location (township, range, section, and state-plane coordinates), elevation, and total borehole depth, as well as the purpose for the borehole, drilling dates, and information about extracted cores. The report also presents the hole status (plugged, testing, monitoring, etc.) and includes salient findings and references. Maps with borehole locations and times-of-drilling charts are included.

  6. Projected techno-economic improvements for advanced solar thermal power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, T.; Manvi, R.; Roschke, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    The projected characteristics of solar thermal power plants (with outputs up to 10 MWe) employing promising advanced technology subsystems/components are compared to current (or pre-1985) steam-Rankine systems. Improvements accruing to advanced technology development options are delineated. The improvements derived from advanced systems result primarily from achieving high efficiencies via solar collector systems which (1) capture a large portion of the available insolation and (2) concentrate this captured solar flux to attain high temperatures required for high heat engine/energy conversion performance. The most efficient solar collector systems employ two-axis tracking. Attractive systems include the central receiver/heliostat and the parabolic dish.

  7. Projected techno-economic improvements for advanced solar thermal power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, T.; Manvi, R.; Roschke, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    The projected characteristics of solar thermal power plants (with outputs up to 10 MWe) employing promising advanced technology subsystems/components are compared to current (or pre-1985) steam-Rankine systems. Improvements accruing to advanced technology development options are delineated. The improvements derived from advanced systems result primarily from achieving high efficiencies via solar collector systems which (1) capture a large portion of the available insolation and (2) concentrate this captured solar flux to attain high temperatures required for high heat engine/energy conversion performance. The most efficient solar collector systems employ two-axis tracking. Attractive systems include the central receiver/heliostat and the parabolic dish.

  8. American Water Heater Company: Compressed Air System Optimization Project Saves Energy and Improves Production at Water Heater Plant

    SciTech Connect

    2003-11-01

    In 2001, American Water Heater Company implemented a system-level improvement project on the compressed air system that serves its manufacturing plant in Johnson City, Tennessee. The plant now operates with less compressor capacity, which has reduced its energy consumption and maintenance needs. The project's total cost was $228,000. The annual compressed air energy savings (2,345,000 kWh) and maintenance savings total $160,000, yielding a simple payback of 17 months. Furthermore, the system now supports the plant's production processes more effectively, which has improved product quality and increased production.

  9. Air Dispersion Modeling for Building 3026C/D Demolition

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Richard C; Sjoreen, Andrea L; Eckerman, Keith F

    2010-06-01

    This report presents estimates of dispersion coefficients and effective dose for potential air dispersion scenarios of uncontrolled releases from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) buildings 3026C, 3026D, and 3140 prior to or during the demolition of the 3026 Complex. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) AERMOD system1-6 was used to compute these estimates. AERMOD stands for AERMIC Model, where AERMIC is the American Meteorological Society-EPA Regulatory Model Improvement Committee. Five source locations (three in building 3026D and one each in building 3026C and the filter house 3140) and associated source characteristics were determined with the customer. In addition, the area of study was determined and building footprints and intake locations of air-handling systems were obtained. In addition to the air intakes, receptor sites consisting of ground level locations on four polar grids (50 m, 100 m, 200 m, and 500 m) and two intersecting lines of points (50 m separation), corresponding to sidewalks along Central Avenue and Fifth Street. Three years of meteorological data (2006 2008) were used each consisting of three datasets: 1) National Weather Service data; 2) upper air data for the Knoxville-Oak Ridge area; and 3) local weather data from Tower C (10 m, 30 m and 100 m) on the ORNL reservation. Annual average air concentration, highest 1 h average and highest 3 h average air concentrations were computed using AERMOD for the five source locations for the three years of meteorological data. The highest 1 h average air concentrations were converted to dispersion coefficients to characterize the atmospheric dispersion as the customer was interested in the most significant response and the highest 1 h average data reflects the best time-averaged values available from the AERMOD code. Results are presented in tabular and graphical form. The results for dose were obtained using radionuclide activities for each of the buildings provided by the customer.7

  10. Life cycle assessment of construction and demolition waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Butera, Stefania Christensen, Thomas H.; Astrup, Thomas F.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • LCA of C&DW utilisation in road vs. C&DW landfilling. • C&DW utilisation in road better than landfilling for most categories. • Transportation is the most important process in non-toxic impact categories. • Leaching of oxyanions is the critical process in toxic impact categories. • Modelling of Cr fate in the subsoil is highly influential to the results. - Abstract: Life cycle assessment (LCA) modelling of construction and demolition waste (C&DW) management was carried out. The functional unit was management of 1 Mg mineral, source separated C&DW, which is either utilised in road construction as a substitute for natural aggregates, or landfilled. The assessed environmental impacts included both non-toxic and toxic impact categories. The scenarios comprised all stages of the end-of-life management of C&DW, until final disposal of all residues. Leaching of inorganic contaminants was included, as was the production of natural aggregates, which was avoided because of the use of C&DW. Typical uncertainties related to contaminant leaching were addressed. For most impact categories, utilisation of C&DW in road construction was preferable to landfilling; however, for most categories, utilisation resulted in net environmental burdens. Transportation represented the most important contribution for most nontoxic impacts, accounting for 60–95 per cent of these impacts. Capital goods contributed with negligible impacts. Leaching played a critical role for the toxic categories, where landfilling had lower impacts than utilisation because of the lower levels of leachate per ton of C&DW reaching the groundwater over a 100-year perspective. Leaching of oxyanions (As, V and Sb) was critical with respect to leaching. Typical experimental uncertainties in leaching data did not have a pivotal influence on the results; however, accounting for Cr immobilisation in soils as part of the impact assessment was critical for modelling the leaching impacts. Compared

  11. Life cycle assessment of construction and demolition waste management.

    PubMed

    Butera, Stefania; Christensen, Thomas H; Astrup, Thomas F

    2015-10-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) modelling of construction and demolition waste (C&DW) management was carried out. The functional unit was management of 1 Mg mineral, source separated C&DW, which is either utilised in road construction as a substitute for natural aggregates, or landfilled. The assessed environmental impacts included both non-toxic and toxic impact categories. The scenarios comprised all stages of the end-of-life management of C&DW, until final disposal of all residues. Leaching of inorganic contaminants was included, as was the production of natural aggregates, which was avoided because of the use of C&DW. Typical uncertainties related to contaminant leaching were addressed. For most impact categories, utilisation of C&DW in road construction was preferable to landfilling; however, for most categories, utilisation resulted in net environmental burdens. Transportation represented the most important contribution for most nontoxic impacts, accounting for 60-95 per cent of these impacts. Capital goods contributed with negligible impacts. Leaching played a critical role for the toxic categories, where landfilling had lower impacts than utilisation because of the lower levels of leachate per ton of C&DW reaching the groundwater over a 100-year perspective. Leaching of oxyanions (As, V and Sb) was critical with respect to leaching. Typical experimental uncertainties in leaching data did not have a pivotal influence on the results; however, accounting for Cr immobilisation in soils as part of the impact assessment was critical for modelling the leaching impacts. Compared with the overall life cycle of building and construction materials, leaching emissions were shown to be potentially significant for toxicity impacts, compared with contributions from production of the same materials, showing that end-of-life impacts and leaching should not be disregarded when assessing environmental impacts from construction products and materials. CO2 uptake in the C

  12. Research and Development Technology Development Roadmaps for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ian McKirdy

    2011-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for process heat, hydrogen and electricity production. The reactor will be graphite moderated with helium as the primary coolant and may be either prismatic or pebble-bed. Although, final design features have not yet been determined. Research and Development (R&D) activities are proceeding on those known plant systems to mature the technology, codify the materials for specific applications, and demonstrate the component and system viability in NGNP relevant and integrated environments. Collectively these R&D activities serve to reduce the project risk and enhance the probability of on-budget, on-schedule completion and NRC licensing. As the design progresses, in more detail, toward final design and approval for construction, selected components, which have not been used in a similar application, in a relevant environment nor integrated with other components and systems, must be tested to demonstrate viability at reduced scales and simulations prior to full scale operation. This report and its R&D TDRMs present the path forward and its significance in assuring technical readiness to perform the desired function by: Choreographing the integration between design and R&D activities; and proving selected design components in relevant applications.

  13. Olkiluoto 1 and 2 - Plant efficiency improvement and lifetime extension-project (PELE) implemented during outages 2010 and 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Kosonen, M.; Hakola, M.

    2012-07-01

    Teollisuuden Voima Oyj (TVO) is a non-listed public company founded in 1969 to produce electricity for its stakeholders. TVO is the operator of the Olkiluoto nuclear power plant. TVO follows the principle of continuous improvement in the operation and maintenance of the Olkiluoto plant units. The PELE project (Plant Efficiency Improvement and Lifetime Extension), mainly completed during the annual outages in 2010 and 2011, and forms one part of the systematic development of Olkiluoto units. TVO maintains a long-term development program that aims at systematically modernizing the plant unit systems and equipment based on the latest technology. According to the program, the Olkiluoto 1 and Olkiluoto 2 plant units are constantly renovated with the intention of keeping them safe and reliable, The aim of the modernization projects is to improve the safety, reliability, and performance of the plant units. PELE project at Olkiluoto 1 was done in 2010 and at Olkiluoto 2 in 2011. The outage length of Olkiluoto 1 was 26 d 12 h 4 min and Olkiluoto 2 outage length was 28 d 23 h 46 min. (Normal service-outage is about 14 days including refueling and refueling-outage length is about seven days. See figure 1) The PELE project consisted of several single projects collected into one for coordinated project management. Some of the main projects were as follows: - Low pressure turbines: rotor, stator vane, casing and turbine instrumentation replacement. - Replacement of Condenser Cooling Water (later called seawater pumps) pumps - Replacement of inner isolation valves on the main steam lines. - Generator and the generator cooling system replacement. - Low voltage switchgear replacement. This project will continue during future outages. PELE was a success. 100 TVO employees and 1500 subcontractor employees participated in the project. The execution of the PELE projects went extremely well during the outages. The replacement of the low pressure turbines and seawater pumps improved the

  14. Implementation of Case-Based Reasoning System for Knowledge Management of Power Plant Construction Projects in a Korean Company

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Gil-Sang

    Recently, plant construction industries are enjoying a favorable business climate centering around developing countries and oil producing countries rich in oil money. This paper proposes a methodology of implementing corporation-wide case-based reasoning (CBR) system for effectively managing lessons learned knowledge like experiences and know-how obtained in performing power plant construction projects. Our methodology is consisted of 10 steps: user requirement analysis, information modeling, case modeling, case base design, similarity function design, user interface design, case base building, CBR module development, user interface development, integration test. Also, to illustrate the usability of proposed methodology, the practical CBR system is implemented for the plant construction business division of ’H’ company which has international competitiveness in the field of plant construction industry. At present, our CBR system is successfully utilizing as storing, sharing, and reusing the knowledge which is accumulated in performing power plant construction projects in the target enterprise.

  15. The uncertainty principle in resonant gravitational wave antennae and quantum non-demolition measurement schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortini, Pierluigi; Onofrio, Roberto; Rioli, Alessandro

    1993-01-01

    A review of current efforts to approach and to surpass the fundamental limit in the sensitivity of the Weber type gravitational wave antennae is reported. Applications of quantum non-demolition techniques to the concrete example of an antenna resonant with the transducer are discussed in detail. Analogies and differences from the framework of the squeezed states in quantum optics are discussed.

  16. Quantum non demolition measurement of cyclotron excitations in a Penning trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzoli, Irene; Tombesi, Paolo

    1993-01-01

    The quantum non-demolition measurement of the cyclotron excitations of an electron confined in a Penning trap could be obtained by measuring the resonance frequency of the axial motion, which is coupled to the cyclotron motion through the relativistic shift of the electron mass.

  17. Overview On Alternative Asbestos Control Method Research: Alternative Methods To Demolition

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Alternative Asbestos Control Method (AACM) is an experimental approach to building demolition. Unlike the NESHAP method, the AACM allows some regulated asbestos-containing material to remain in the building and a surfactant-water solution is used to suppress asbestos fibers ...

  18. Choosing a sustainable demolition waste management strategy using multicriteria decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Roussat, Nicolas; Dujet, Christiane; Méhu, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an application of the ELECTRE III decision-aid method in the context of choosing a sustainable demolition waste management strategy for a case study in the city of Lyon, France. This choice of waste management strategy takes into consideration the sustainable development objectives, i.e. economic aspects, environmental consequences, and social issues. Nine alternatives for demolition waste management were compared with the aid of eight criteria, taking into account energy consumption, depletion of abiotic resources, global warming, dispersion of dangerous substances in the environment, economic activity, employment, and quality of life of the local population. The case study concerned the demolition of 25 buildings of an old military camp. Each alternative was illustrated with different waste treatments, such as material recovery, recycling, landfilling, and energy recovery. The recommended solution for sustainable demolition waste management for the case study is a selective deconstruction of each building with local material recovery in road engineering of inert wastes, local energy recovery of wood wastes, and specific treatments for hazardous wastes.

  19. Choosing a sustainable demolition waste management strategy using multicriteria decision analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Roussat, Nicolas Dujet, Christiane; Mehu, Jacques

    2009-01-15

    This paper presents an application of the ELECTRE III decision-aid method in the context of choosing a sustainable demolition waste management strategy for a case study in the city of Lyon, France. This choice of waste management strategy takes into consideration the sustainable development objectives, i.e. economic aspects, environmental consequences, and social issues. Nine alternatives for demolition waste management were compared with the aid of eight criteria, taking into account energy consumption, depletion of abiotic resources, global warming, dispersion of dangerous substances in the environment, economic activity, employment, and quality of life of the local population. The case study concerned the demolition of 25 buildings of an old military camp. Each alternative was illustrated with different waste treatments, such as material recovery, recycling, landfilling, and energy recovery. The recommended solution for sustainable demolition waste management for the case study is a selective deconstruction of each building with local material recovery in road engineering of inert wastes, local energy recovery of wood wastes, and specific treatments for hazardous wastes.

  20. 78 FR 23837 - Cranes and Derricks in Construction: Underground Construction and Demolition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ..., OSHA prepared a final economic analysis (FEA) as required by the Occupational Safety and Health Act of... demolition. The FEA for the final cranes standard, which included all cranes, crane operations, and industry... economically feasible. Because the FEA drew these conclusions from calculations encompassing all of the...