Science.gov

Sample records for plant examination program

  1. Nondestructive Examination for Nuclear Power Plant Cable Aging Management Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, Samuel W.; Fifield, Leonard S.

    2016-01-01

    Degradation of the cable jacket, electrical insulation, and other cable components of installed cables within nuclear power plants (NPPs) is known to occur as a function of age, temperature, radiation, and other environmental factors. System tests verify cable function under normal loads; however, the concern is over cable performance under exceptional loads associated with design-basis events (DBEs). The cable’s ability to perform safely over the initial 40 year planned and licensed life has generally been demonstrated and there have been very few age-related cable failures. With greater than 1000 km of power, control, instrumentation, and other cables typically found in an NPP, replacing all the cables would be a severe cost burden. Justification for life extension to 60 and 80 years requires a cable aging management program (AMP) to justify cable performance under normal operation as well as accident conditions. This paper addresses various NDE technologies that constitute the essence of an acceptable aging management program.

  2. Individual plant examination program: Perspectives on reactor safety and plant performance. Part 6, appendices A, B, and C

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    This report provides perspectives gained by reviewing 75 Individual Plant Examination (IPE) submittals pertaining to 108 nuclear power plant units. IPEs are probabilistic analyses that estimate the core damage frequency (CDF) and containment performance for accidents initiated by internal events (including internal flooding, but excluding internal fire). The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, reviewed the WE submittals with the objective of gaining perspectives in three major areas: (1) improvements made to individual plants as a result of their IPEs and the collective results of the IPE program, (2) plant-specific design and operational features and modeling assumptions that significantly affect the estimates of CDF and containment performance, and (3) strengths and weaknesses of the models and methods used in the IPEs. These perspectives are gained by assessing the core damage and containment performance results, including overall CDF, accident sequences, dominant contributions to component failure and human error, and containment failure modes. In particular, these results are assessed in relation to the design and operational characteristics of the various reactor and containment types, and by comparing the IPEs to probabilistic risk assessment characteristics. Methods, data, boundary conditions, and assumptions used in the IPEs are considered in understanding the differences and similarities observed among the various types of plants.

  3. Individual plant examination program: Perspectives on reactor safety and plant performance. Part 1: Final summary report; Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    This report provides perspectives gained by reviewing 75 Individual Plant Examination (IPE) submittals pertaining to 108 nuclear power plant units. IPEs are probabilistic analyses that estimate the core damage frequency (CDF) and containment performance for accidents initiated by internal events. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviewed the IPE submittals with the objective of gaining perspectives in three major areas: (1) improvements made to individual plants as a result of their IPEs and the collective results of the IPE program, (2) plant-specific design and operational features and modeling assumptions that significantly affect the estimates of CDF and containment performance, and (3) strengths and weaknesses of the models and methods used in the IPEs. These perspectives are gained by assessing the core damage and containment performance results, including overall CDF, accident sequences, dominant contributions to component failure and human error, and containment failure modes. Methods, data, boundary conditions, and assumptions used in the IPEs are considered in understanding the differences and similarities observed among the various types of plants. This report is divided into three volumes containing six parts. Part 1 is a summary report of the key perspectives gained in each of the areas identified above, with a discussion of the NRC`s overall conclusions and observations. Part 2 discusses key perspectives regarding the impact of the IPE Program on reactor safety. Part 3 discusses perspectives gained from the IPE results regarding CDF, containment performance, and human actions. Part 4 discusses perspectives regarding the IPE models and methods. Part 5 discusses additional IPE perspectives. Part 6 contains Appendices A, B and C which provide the references of the information from the IPEs, updated PRA results, and public comments on draft NUREG-1560 respectively.

  4. Individual plant examination program: Perspectives on reactor safety and plant performance. Parts 2--5: Final report; Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    This report provides perspectives gained by reviewing 75 Individual Plant Examination (IPE) submittals pertaining to 108 nuclear power plant units. IPEs are probabilistic analyses that estimate the core damage frequency (CDF) and containment performance for accidents initiated by internal events. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviewed the IPE submittals with the objective of gaining perspectives in three major areas: (1) improvements made to individual plants as a result of their IPEs and the collective results of the IPE program, (2) plant-specific design and operational features and modeling assumptions that significantly affect the estimates of CDF and containment performance, and (3) strengths and weaknesses of the models and methods used in the IPEs. These perspectives are gained by assessing the core damage and containment performance results, including overall CDF, accident sequences, dominant contributions to component failure and human error, and containment failure modes. Methods, data, boundary conditions, and assumptions used in the IPEs are considered in understanding the differences and similarities observed among the various types of plants. This report is divided into three volumes containing six parts. Part 1 is a summary report of the key perspectives gained in each of the areas identified above, with a discussion of the NRC`s overall conclusions and observations. Part 2 discusses key perspectives regarding the impact of the IPE Program on reactor safety. Part 3 discusses perspectives gained from the IPE results regarding CDF, containment performance, and human actions. Part 4 discusses perspectives regarding the IPE models and methods. Part 5 discusses additional IPE perspectives. Part 6 contains Appendices A, B and C which provide the references of the information from the IPEs, updated PRA results, and public comments on draft NUREG-1560 respectively.

  5. Bulk Electrical Cable Non-Destructive Examination Methods for Nuclear Power Plant Cable Aging Management Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, Samuel W.; Jones, Anthony M.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Hartman, Trenton S.

    2016-09-01

    This Pacific Northwest National Laboratory milestone report describes progress to date on the investigation of nondestructive test methods focusing particularly on bulk electrical test methods that provide key indicators of cable aging and damage. The work includes a review of relevant literature as well as hands-on experimental verification of inspection capabilities. As nuclear power plants consider applying for second, or subsequent, license renewal to extend their operating period from 60 years to 80 years, it is important to understand how the materials installed in plant systems and components will age during that time and develop aging management programs to assure continued safe operation under normal and design basis events (DBE). Normal component and system tests typically confirm the cables can perform their normal operational function. The focus of the cable test program, however, is directed toward the more demanding challenge of assuring the cable function under accident or DBE. The industry has adopted 50% elongation at break (EAB) relative to the un-aged cable condition as the acceptability standard. All tests are benchmarked against the cable EAB test. EAB, however, is a destructive test so the test programs must apply an array of other nondestructive examination (NDE) tests to assure or infer the overall set of cable’s system integrity. Assessment of cable integrity is further complicated in many cases by vendor’s use of dissimilar material for jacket and insulation. Frequently the jacket will degrade more rapidly than the underlying insulation. Although this can serve as an early alert to cable damage, direct test of the cable insulation without violating the protective jacket becomes problematic. This report addresses the range of bulk electrical NDE cable tests that are or could be practically implemented in a field-test situation with a particular focus on frequency domain reflectometry (FDR). The FDR test method offers numerous advantages

  6. Better Plants Program Overview

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Better Buildings, Better Plants Program is a voluntary partnership initiative to drive significant energy efficiency improvement across energy intensive companies and organizations. 157 leading manufacturers and public water and wastewater treatment utilities are partnering with DOE through Better Plants to improve energy efficiency, slash carbon emissions, and cut energy costs.

  7. Audubon Plant Study Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Audubon Society, New York, NY.

    Included are an illustrated student reader, "The Story of Plants and Flowers," an adult leaders' guide, and a large wall chart picturing 37 wildflowers and describing 23 major plant families. The student reader presents these main topics: The Plant Kingdom, The Wonderful World of Plants, Plants Without Flowers, Flowering Plants, Plants Make Food…

  8. Audubon Plant Study Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Audubon Society, New York, NY.

    Included are an illustrated student reader, "The Story of Plants and Flowers," an adult leaders' guide, and a large wall chart picturing 37 wildflowers and describing 23 major plant families. The student reader presents these main topics: The Plant Kingdom, The Wonderful World of Plants, Plants Without Flowers, Flowering Plants, Plants Make Food…

  9. Examination - Plants - Lunar (Germ Free) Soil - Plant Laboratory - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-10-08

    S69-53894 (October 1969) --- Dr. Charles H. Walkinshaw, Jr., Spaceflight Biotechnology Branch botanist, Preventive Medicine Division, Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC), examines sorghum and tobacco plants in lunar (germ free) soil in the Plant Laboratory of the MSC’s Lunar Receiving Laboratory. The soil was brought back from the moon by the crew of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission.

  10. Human event observations in the individual plant examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Forester, J.

    1995-04-01

    A major objective of the Individual Plant Examination Insights Program is to identify the important determinants of core damage frequency for the different reactor and containment types and plant designs as indicated in the IPEs. The human reliability analysis is a critical component of the probabilistic risk assessments which were done for the IPEs. The determination and selection of human actions for incorporation into the event and fault tree models and the quantification of their failure probabilities can have an important impact on the resulting estimates of CDF and risk. Two important goals of the NRCs IPE Insights Program are (1) to determine the extent to which human actions and their corresponding failure probabilities influenced the results of the IPEs and (2) to identify which factors played significant roles in determining the differences and similarities in the results of the HRA analyses across the different plants. To obtain the relevant information, the NRC`s IPE database, which contains information on plant design, CDF, and containment performance obtained from the IPEs, was used in conjunction with a systematic examination of the HRA analyses and results from the IPEs. Regarding the extent to which the results of the HRA analyses were significant contributors to the plants` CDFs, examinations of several different measures indicated that while individual human actions could have important influences on CDF for particular initiators, the HRA results did not appear to be the most significant driver of plant risk. Another finding was that while there were relatively wide variations in the calculated human error probabilities for similar events across plants, there was no evidence for any systematic variation as a function of the HRA methods used in the analyses. Much of the variability in HEP values can be explained by differences in plant characteristics and sequence-specific factors. Details of these results and other findings are discussed.

  11. Human event observations in the individual plant examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Forester, J.

    1995-01-01

    A major objective of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) Individual Plant Examination (IPE) Insights Program is to identify the important determinants of core damage frequency (CDF) for the different reactor and containment types and plant designs as indicated in the IPEs. The human reliability analysis (HRA) is a critical component of the probabilistic risk assessments (PRAS) which were done for the IPES. The determination and selection of human actions for incorporation into the event and fault tree models and the quantification of their failure probabilities can have an important impact on the resulting estimates of CDF and risk. Therefore, two important goals of the NRCs IPE Insights Program are (1) to determine the extent to which human actions and their corresponding failure probabilities influenced the results of the IPEs and (2) to identify which factors played significant roles in determining the differences and similarities in the results of the HRA analyses across the different plants. To obtain the relevant information, the NRC`s IPE database, which contains information on plant design, CDF, and containment performance obtained from the IPES, was used in conjunction with a systematic examination of the HRA analyses and results from the IPES. Regarding the extent to which the results of the HRA analyses were significant contributors to the plants` CDFs, examinations of several different measures indicated that while individual human actions could have important influences on CDF for particular initiators, the HRA results did not appear to be the most significant driver of plant risk (CDF). Another finding was that while there were relatively wide variations in the calculated human error probabilities (HEPs) for similar events across plants, there was no evidence for any systematic variation as a function of the HRA methods used in the analyses.

  12. EXAMINING CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS IN FUTURE PLANTS.

    SciTech Connect

    O'HARA,J.M.HIGGINS,J.BROWN,W.KRAMER,J.PERSENSKY,J.

    2004-09-19

    This paper will examine the results of this research that focus on future concepts of operations. Our approach was to look at current technological developments in the areas of reactor technology, I&C technology, and human-system integration technology and to make projections into the near and longer-term future concerning their potential impact on human performance. The results were discussed in terms of three aspects of concepts of operations: functional staffing models, plant automation, and training and qualifications. Significant changes to each are anticipated and discussed. Research will be needed to address these changes in order to provide for confidence that changes to concepts of operations are accomplished in ways that maintain public safety.

  13. Examining Black Underrepresentation in Gifted Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Kay

    This paper examines factors contributing to the underrepresentation of black children in gifted and talented education programs. The paper reviews the history of school desegregation and finds that integration and equal educational opportunity for minority students have yet to be achieved. The persistent maintenance of cultural control by the…

  14. State power plant productivity programs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    The findings of a working group formed to review the status of efforts by utilities and utility regulators to increase the availability and reliability of generating units are presented. Representatives from nine state regulatory agencies, NRRI, and DOE, participated on the Working Group. The Federal government has been working cooperatively with utilities, utility organizations, and with regulators to encourage and facilitate improvements in power plant productivity. Cooperative projects undertaken with regulatory and energy commissions in California, Illinois, New York, Ohio, Texas, North Carolina and Mighigan are described. Following initiation of these cooperative projects, DOE funded a survey to determine which states were explicitly addressing power plant productivity through the regulatory process. The Working Group was formed following completion of this survey. The Working Group emphasized the need for those power plant productivity improvements which are cost effective. The cost effectiveness of proposed availability improvement projects should be determined within the context of opportunities for operating and capital improvements available to an entire utility. The Working Group also identified the need for: allowing for plant designs that have a higher construction cost, but are also more reliable; allowing for recovery and reducing recovery lags for productivity-related capital expenditures; identifying and reducing disincentives in the regulatory process; ascertaining that utilities have sufficient money available to undertake timely maintenance; and support of EPRI and NERC to develop a relevant and accurate national data base. The DOE views these as extremely important aspects of any regulatory program to improve power plant productivity.

  15. [Human Resource Development for Thyroid Ultrasound Examination Program in Fukushima].

    PubMed

    Sato, Ayako; Shimura, Hiroki; Hakoiwa, Tomomi; Sakagami, Toshie; Ohishi, Manabu; Sato, Yukari; Sakuma, Nobuko; Midorikawa, Sanae; Suzuki, Satoru; Ohtsuru, Akira; Suzuki, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    As a response to the health effects associated with the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident that occurred after the Great East Japan Earthquake, the Thyroid Ultrasound Examination program as a part of the Fukushima Health Management Survey was started on Oct. 9th, 2011. Since this project required a large-scale cohort comprising all residents aged ≤ 18 years living in Fukushima when the earthquake happened, the nurturing of many ultrasound examiners was a matter of great urgency. Moreover, the standardization of examination procedures and skills of examiners were also important issues. Therefore, educational projects were established to develop ultrasound skills for medical doctors and technicians in Fukushima Prefecture. Marked efforts for this project resulted in increases in ultrasound examiners and institutions taking part in the Thyroid Ultrasound Examination project. Medical technicians specialized in ultrasound examinations are actively involved in these educational projects. We report the details of human resource development projects from the point of view of such medical technicians.

  16. TMI-2 technical information and examination program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, C. J.

    1985-04-01

    In 1984, the US Department of Energy's Technical Information and Examination Program entered its fifth year of research and development work at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) and at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and other supporting laboratories. The work concentrated on six major areas: (1) waste immobilization; (2) reactor evaluation; (3) data acquisition; (4) information and industry coordination; (5) core activities, and (6) EPICOR 2 and waste research and disposition.

  17. Thrips management program for plants for planting

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thrips Management includes sanitation, exclusion, chemical control and biological control. Sanitation. Remove weeds, old plant debris, and growing medium from within and around the greenhouse. Eliminate old stock plants as these are a source of thrips and viruses. Removing old flowers may reduce the...

  18. Tamarisk coalition - native riparian plant materials program

    Treesearch

    Stacy Kolegas

    2012-01-01

    The Tamarisk Coalition (TC), a nonprofit organization dedicated to riparian restoration in the western United States, has created a Native Plant Materials Program to address the identified need for native riparian plant species for use in revegetation efforts on the Colorado Plateau. The specific components of the Native Plant Materials Program include: 1) provide seed...

  19. Examination of plants in lunar (germ free) soil in Plant Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Dr. Charles Walkenshaw, Manned Spacecraft Center botanist, examines sorghum and tobacco plants in lunar (germ free) soil in the Plant Laboratory of the Lunar Receiving Laboratory. The soil was brought back from the Moon by the Apollo 11 astronauts.

  20. Examination of plants in lunar (germ free) soil in Plant Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Dr. Charles Walkenshaw, Manned Spacecraft Center botanist, examines sorghum and tobacco plants in lunar (germ free) soil in the Plant Laboratory of the Lunar Receiving Laboratory. The soil was brought back from the Moon by the Apollo 11 astronauts.

  1. Examining Dissatisfaction with an Online Doctoral Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenby, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Background: Online learning community based education is still new. As institutions implement new programs they can encounter learner satisfaction issues. Purpose: To investigate learner unhappiness during the second semester of a new online doctoral program and develop a substantive grounded theory concerning its cause(s). Setting: The Doctorado…

  2. An Examination of College Programs for Paraprofessionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartner, Alan; Johnson, Harriet

    This study focuses upon programs designed for full-time paraprofessional employees in human service agencies given time off with pay to attend school. The programs discussed are those whose curricula are designed to connect with and supplement the participants' work and which also grant degrees. Questionnaire returns from 162 such programs…

  3. 49 CFR 390.105 - Medical examiner training programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medical examiner training programs. 390.105... FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS; GENERAL National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners § 390.105 Medical examiner training programs. An applicant for medical examiner certification must complete...

  4. 49 CFR 390.105 - Medical examiner training programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Medical examiner training programs. 390.105... FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS; GENERAL National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners § 390.105 Medical examiner training programs. An applicant for medical examiner certification must complete...

  5. Examining the Impact of Afterschool STEM Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnamurthi, Anita; Ballard, Melissa; Noam, Gil G.

    2014-01-01

    Afterschool programs that provide strong science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) learning experiences are making an impact on participating youth not only become excited and engaged in these fields but develop STEM skills and proficiencies, come to value these fields and their contributions to society, and--significantly--begin to see…

  6. House Examines Overall Federal R & D Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibney, Ling-yee

    1975-01-01

    Reports on hearings held before the House Subcommittee on Domestic and International Scientific Planning and Analysis. Topics included the status and general trends in federal research and development (R&D) programs, policies and practices that could stimulate R&D, and the possibility of cooperative ventures between companies. (GS)

  7. 75 FR 34941 - Review of the Commission's Program Access Rules and Examination of Programming Tying Arrangements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 76 Review of the Commission's Program Access Rules and Examination of Programming... Order, In the Matter of Review of the Commission's Program Access Rules and Examination of Programming... Matter of Review of the Commission's Program Access Rules and Examination of Programming Tying...

  8. Legislative examination of the new perspectives program

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.

    1994-01-01

    'We need a fundamental reform in managing all of the resources associated with the lands of the National Forest system ... The days have ended when the forest may be viewed as timber. The soil and the water, the grasses and the shrubs, the fish and the wildlife, and the beauty that is the forest must become integral parts of the resource manager's thinking and action' (Humphrey in Greiman 1990). This call for change and plea for policy revision within the U.S. Forest Service could easily describe the difficulty facing the agency in the 1990s. Ironically, it is a passage taken from Senator Hubert Humphrey's initial speech to Congress in l976 as he introduced the National Forest Management Act. The problem today is a familiar one for the Forest Service-- public discontent with land management policies. In an attempt to confront public dissatisfaction, the Forest Service has devised a program called New Perspectives.

  9. Preliminary perspectives gaines from individual plant examination of external events (IPEEE) seismic and fire submittal review

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.T.; Connell, E.; Chokshi, N.

    1997-02-01

    As a result of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) initiated Individual plant Examination of External Events (IPEEE) program, every operating nuclear power reactor in the United States has performed an assessment of severe accident due to external events. This paper provides a summary of the preliminary insights gained through the review of 24 IPEEE submittals.

  10. Phylogenetic examination of crude drugs derived from Yunnanese Swertia plants.

    PubMed

    Kakiuchi, Nobuko; Iwaki, Naoko; Mikage, Masayuki; Xiao, Huai; Wang, Zhigang; Hattori, Masao

    2014-01-01

    Aiming to examine whether the genetic background of the crude drugs derived from four Yunnanese Swertia plants and their chemical constituent profiles correlate, we analyzed the nucleotide sequences of their nuclear ribosomal DNA regions including ITS1, 5.8S ribosomal RNA gene, and ITS2, together with those of Japanese S. japonica and S. pseudochinensis from Hebei Province. The result that two of the Yunnanese Swertia plants, S. binchuanensis and S. punicea, were genetically similar may explain their similarity in chemical constituent profiles. On the other hand, in spite of differences in chemical profile, S. decora and S. pseudochinensis were genetically close. The other Yunnanese Swertia plants, S. delavayi, and S. japonica, stood at intermediate positions between these two genetically similar pairs. The result suggests that although genetic background would have an influence, environmental factors, e.g., soil and weather conditions, might be critical for their production of secondary metabolites.

  11. The Adult Performance Level Program: A Serious and Deliberate Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, William S.; Cervero, Ronald M.

    Noting that the Federal adult education program, Adult Performance Level Program (APL), only affects 1% of its target population, the author examines the program and concludes with seven major observations: (1) Increased attention should be given to the admonition, "Users of the instrument should have a general knowledge of the principles of…

  12. Examining the Perceptions of Brand Images Regarding Competing MBA Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinds, Timothee; Falgoust, Dexter; Thomas, Kerry, Jr.; Budden, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    In today's economic environment, it is crucial to create a strong, consistent brand image within a graduate business program. This study examines the perceptions that students at Southeastern Louisiana University hold about its MBA program and the MBA programs of its main competitors. A focus group was conducted to identify competitors and factors…

  13. Driver License Examiner Supervisors; Basic Training Program. Trainee Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendleton, John T.; Patton, C. Duane

    This is the third part of a four-part systematized training program intended for driver license examiner supervisors. The purpose of this study guide is to act as a program compendium to aid the trainee in successfully completing the program. The lesson material presented, apart from the introduction, is: orientation to license examiner…

  14. The fuels program for the Nucla AFBC plant

    SciTech Connect

    Fellin, M.A.; Mahr, D.

    1996-12-31

    The Nucla Station originally consisted of three 1959 vintage, 36 (3 x 12) MWe, stoker-fired boilers. The plant was built under the Rural Electrification Administration program to service the scenic, western slope of Colorado. In 1988, the stokers were replaced by a new, dual combustor, 110 MWe AFBC boiler in EPRI`s fluidized bed demonstration program. A new 74 MWe topping steam turbine/generator, with extraction to the existing turbines, was installed at that time. The Nucla Plant was a key project in EPRI`s program to demonstrate the commercialization of AFBC technology. This program has been the subject of numerous reports and papers on fluidized bed combustion. The fuel used by the Nucla Station was a relatively good quality, bituminous coal. Nucla`s coal was trucked more than 100 miles to the plant from a mine in Colorado. In addition, some high sulfur coal was test burned in the plant. This coal was trucked to the plant from a mine located near Kayenta, Arizona. The primary purpose of the demonstration program was to scale-up the size of the combustor and examine parameters that affect fluidization, heat transfer, erosion, and other boiler related issues. Sulfur capture and the ability to utilize lower grade fuels was previously demonstrated in other, smaller scale programs. To utilize project funds efficiently, the 1988 AFBC retrofit was dedicated to adding the 110 MWe combustor and related equipment. The plant was revamped specifically for test purposes. To conserve funds, silo storage of coal for the AFBC unit was limited to an 8-hour supply. Existing plant auxiliaries, that could adequately perform during the demonstration, were not upgraded. These included the coal handling system.

  15. A Plant-Based Nutrition Program.

    PubMed

    Evans, Joanne; Magee, Alexandra; Dickman, Kathy; Sutter, Rebecca; Sutter, Caroline

    2017-03-01

    : Proper nutrition is an important but often overlooked component of preventive care and disease management. Following a plant-based diet in particular has been shown to have dramatic effects on health and well-being in a relatively short period of time. For this reason, nurses at three faculty-led community health clinics participated in a nutrition educational program, following a plant-based diet for 21 days. They sought to improve their knowledge of plant-based nutrition and experience firsthand the benefits of such a diet. The authors conclude that this type of program, with its experiential component and beneficial personal health results, has the potential to influence a larger nursing audience as participants apply their knowledge and experience to patient care and to classroom discussions with nursing students.

  16. Westinghouse inadvertent plant trip reduction program

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, G.K.; Candris, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    During recent years, the nuclear power industry has become increasingly aware of the high average number of inadvertent plant trips experienced by commercial units in the United States versus similar experience in other countries, most strikingly, Japan. The need to address this problem stems from the potential consequences which include lost generating capacity (and lost revenue) for the utility, the cost of replacement power, reductions in component and plant life expectancies (due to cycling), and customer dissatisfaction. Perhaps another, more subtle, concern is the impact these trips have on the general public and the confidence that it has in the maturity of the commercial nuclear power program in the United States. This paper serves two purposes: first, it summarizes the program Westinghouse has established to reduce the frequency of unplanned automatic scrams, and second, it discusses several observations, made during the implementation of this program at different utilities.

  17. 75 FR 56059 - Patent Examiner Technical Training Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office Patent Examiner Technical Training Program AGENCY: United States Patent and Trademark Office, Commerce. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) is seeking public assistance in providing technical training to patent...

  18. The Adult Performance Level Program: A Serious and Deliberate Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, William S.; Cervero, Ronald M.

    1977-01-01

    Examines the claims of the developers of the Adult Performance Level (APL) program to improve the teaching and testing of adults enrolled in federally supported adult basic education programs, identifies APL's theoretical problems, scrutinizes the technical aspects of its development, and evaluates the role of the U.S. Office of Education in these…

  19. Examination of a Museum Program for Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Shelley; Rais, Paula; Steele-Driscoll, Jacqueline; Townsend, Samantha

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a children's museum program designed to support young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and their families. The program offers specialized materials, financial incentives, an exclusive time, and trained volunteers to increase the comfort level, enjoyment, and learning opportunities of attendees.…

  20. An Examination of a Gender-Separate Advisory Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weilbacher, Gary; Lanier, Jill

    2012-01-01

    In this qualitative study, the authors examine the advisory program of a Horizon Schools to Watch middle grades school. Horizon Schools to Watch is the Illinois affiliate of the National Forum to Accelerate Middle School Reform national Schools to Watch (STW) program, meaning schools with the STW designation have made significant inroads in…

  1. Examination of a Museum Program for Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Shelley; Rais, Paula; Steele-Driscoll, Jacqueline; Townsend, Samantha

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a children's museum program designed to support young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and their families. The program offers specialized materials, financial incentives, an exclusive time, and trained volunteers to increase the comfort level, enjoyment, and learning opportunities of attendees.…

  2. AP: A Critical Examination of the Advanced Placement Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, Philip M.; Sonnert, Gerhard; Tai, Robert; Klopfenstein, Kirstin

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Placement (AP) program was created to enhance the experience of gifted students as they transition from high school to college. "AP: A Critical Examination of the Advanced Placement Program," edited by Philip M. Sadler, Gerhard Sonnert, Robert Tai, and Kirstin Klopfenstein (2010, Harvard Education Press), questions the…

  3. Examining relationships between coal characteristics and the performance of TVA power plants. Part 1. Approach and some early results

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, R. E.; Holt, Jr., E. C.; Cole, R. M.; Frank, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes an ongoing program to examine historic TVA coal and power plant performance data for the purpose of searching for relationships between coal characterization and various measures of power plant performance. Power plant performance parameters of interest include unit efficiency, boiler capacity, boiler availability, plant operating costs, and plant maintenance costs. The program is being conducted using TVA data from the past 18 years (1961-1978) as the data base. Early results of the program show that unit heat rate, slagging outages, and maintenance costs are strongly influenced by coal ash and coal sulfur, at least for some TVA plants. Unit capacity and unit availability have not been shown to be strongly dependent on coal ash and sulfur in early results.

  4. Scaling Plant Phenology in Citizen Science Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S.; Richardson, A. D.; Kosmala, M.; Ward, D.; Bevington, K.

    2015-12-01

    In the past decade, there has been increasing interest in exploring phenology as a way to better understand how the natural world is responding to changing climates. Concurrently, there has been rapid growth in the collection and analysis of data by non-experts. So called 'citizen scientists' are collecting and analyzing data at unprecedented rates on a variety of topics including plant phenology. Through the development of online programs and activities, citizen science data is being collected at spatial and temporal scales that were previously not possible. Citizen science data vastly exceeds what scientists or land managers can collect or analyze on their own. As such, it provides opportunities for scaling both in terms of data collection and analysis. This presentation will focus on two plant phenology projects that involve citizen scientists in the data life cycle at different scales - Project BudBurst which is based on the collection of ground observations and Season Spotter which is based on the classification of remotely sensed landscape imagery. NEON's Project BudBurst (budburst.org) is a national citizen science program focused on the collection of observations of the timing of leafing, flowering, and fruiting in hundreds of plant species. The PhenoCam Network's Season Spotter (seasonspotter.org) engages individuals in the classification and annotation of a variety of vegetated landscape images via a new platform on Zooniverse. Citizen Science contributions to plant phenology are proving to be an invaluable tool that can be used to both validate existing and support development of new methods to extract phenology information from remotely sensed imagery including PhenoCam and satellite sources. This presentation will compare and contrast the contribution made to the study of plant phenology at multiple scales - ground observation data of individual plants and classification and annotation of data collected through a network do automated digital cameras.

  5. Doing the hard work where it's easiest? Examining the relationships between urban greening programs and social and ecological characteristics

    Treesearch

    Dexter H. Locke; J. Morgan. Grove

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we examine the performance of formal programs associated with tree plantings in Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, MD to understand the relationships between the implementation of urban greening programs and the social and ecological characteristics of a city. Previous research has examined variations in patterns of existing and possible tree canopy cover...

  6. Apoptotic-like programmed cell death in plants.

    PubMed

    Reape, Theresa J; McCabe, Paul F

    2008-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is now accepted as a fundamental cellular process in plants. It is involved in defence, development and response to stress, and our understanding of these processes would be greatly improved through a greater knowledge of the regulation of plant PCD. However, there may be several types of PCD that operate in plants, and PCD research findings can be confusing if they are not assigned to a specific type of PCD. The various cell-death mechanisms need therefore to be carefully described and defined. This review describes one of these plant cell death processes, namely the apoptotic-like PCD (AL-PCD). We begin by examining the hallmark 'apoptotic-like' features (protoplast condensation, DNA degradation) of the cell's destruction that are characteristic of AL-PCD, and include examples of AL-PCD during the plant life cycle. The review explores the possible cellular 'executioners' (caspase-like molecules; mitochondria; de novo protein synthesis) that are responsible for the hallmark features of the cellular destruction. Finally, senescence is used as a case study to show that a rigorous definition of cell-death processes in plant cells can help to resolve arguments that occur in the scientific literature regarding the timing and control of plant cell death.

  7. Neurolinguistic Programming Examined: Imagery, Sensory Mode, and Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fromme, Donald K.; Daniell, Jennifer

    1984-01-01

    Tested Neurolinguistic Programming (NLP) assumptions by examining intercorrelations among response times of students (N=64) for extracting visual, auditory, and kinesthetic information from alphabetic images. Large positive intercorrelations were obtained, the only outcome not compatible with NLP. Good visualizers were significantly better in…

  8. Examining Evaluation System of an English Language Program in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Si-hong, Li

    2007-01-01

    In the field of EFL, effective language evaluation is receiving more and more attention. However, in many Chinese EFL situations, the evaluation of language development is still considered to be product-oriented. It is the purpose of this article to examine an evaluation system of an English language program offered by a university in Yunnan…

  9. Examining the Efficacy of Management for Pennsylvania School Health Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobi, Wendy J.

    2010-01-01

    In Pennsylvania, certified school nurses were governed by the same educational rules and administrative directives as teachers. School nurses were supervised and evaluated by non-nurse managers who had no knowledge of the scope of school nurse practice. A focus of the study was to examine the efficacy of management for school health programs. The…

  10. Examining the Efficacy of Management for Pennsylvania School Health Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobi, Wendy J.

    2010-01-01

    In Pennsylvania, certified school nurses were governed by the same educational rules and administrative directives as teachers. School nurses were supervised and evaluated by non-nurse managers who had no knowledge of the scope of school nurse practice. A focus of the study was to examine the efficacy of management for school health programs. The…

  11. Neurolinguistic Programming Examined: Imagery, Sensory Mode, and Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fromme, Donald K.; Daniell, Jennifer

    1984-01-01

    Tested Neurolinguistic Programming (NLP) assumptions by examining intercorrelations among response times of students (N=64) for extracting visual, auditory, and kinesthetic information from alphabetic images. Large positive intercorrelations were obtained, the only outcome not compatible with NLP. Good visualizers were significantly better in…

  12. TMI-2 Technical Information and Examination Program. 1982 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1983-04-01

    The Department of Energy's Technical Information and Examination Program at Three Mile Island Unit 2 continued the research and development work begun on the island in 1980. The work concentrated in seven major areas: instrumentation and electrical components, radiation and environment, core activities, information and industry coordination, configuration and document control, waste immobilization, and reactor evaluation. The program assists in resolving specific problems at TMI-2 while developing techniques and broadening understanding of accident consequences to improve the overall safety and reliability of nuclear power. The Technical Information and Examination Program aims to communicate applicable information to the nuclear power industry to ensure that the industry can avail itself of the maximum amount of information possible.

  13. TMI-2 Technical Information and Examination Program 1983 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Scardena, D E

    1984-04-01

    The Department of Energy's Technical Information and Examination Program at Three Mile Island Unit 2 continued the research and development work begun on the Island in 1980. The work concentrated in six major areas: waste immobilization, reactor evaluation, data acquisition, information and industry coordination, core activities, and EPICOR II and waste research and disposition. The program assists in resolving specific problems at TMI-2 while developing techniques and broadening understanding of accident consequences to improve the overall safety and reliability of nuclear power. The Technical Information and Examination Program aims to communicate applicable information to the nuclear power industry to ensure that the industry can avail itself to the maximum amount of information possible.

  14. Savannah River restart Peer Evaluation Program examination report

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.P.

    1990-11-01

    During the period of August 13, 1990 through September 14, 1990 the Savannah River Peer Evaluation Program was administered to forty-eight certified Central Control Room Operators and Supervisors assigned to the K Reactor, on the Savannah River Site (SRS). This examination was conducted in response to recommendations made by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. The examination process was administered by Westinghouse-Savannah River Company (WSRC) and evaluated in parallel by WSRC Peer Evaluators and Training Evaluators from Department of Energy (DOE). A detailed discussion of the examination development and administration methodology is provided in appendices. 4 tabs.

  15. LPG-recovery processes for baseload LNG plants examined

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, C.H.

    1997-11-24

    With demand on the rise, LPG produced from a baseload LNG plant becomes more attractive as a revenue-earning product similar to LNG. Efficient use of gas expanders in baseload LNG plants for LPG production therefore becomes more important. Several process variations for LPG recovery in baseload LNG plants are reviewed here. Exergy analysis (based on the Second Law of Thermodynamics) is applied to three cases to compare energy efficiency resulting from integration with the main liquefaction process. The paper discusses extraction in a baseload plant, extraction requirements, process recovery parameters, extraction process variations, and exergy analysis.

  16. Redox regulation in plant programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    De Pinto, M C; Locato, V; De Gara, L

    2012-02-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a genetically controlled process described both in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. Even if it is clear that PCD occurs in plants, in response to various developmental and environmental stimuli, the signalling pathways involved in the triggering of this cell suicide remain to be characterized. In this review, the main similarities and differences in the players involved in plant and animal PCD are outlined. Particular attention is paid to the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as key inducers of PCD in plants. The involvement of different kinds of ROS, different sites of ROS production, as well as their interaction with other molecules, is crucial in activating PCD in response to specific stimuli. Moreover, the importance is stressed on the balance between ROS production and scavenging, in various cell compartments, for the activation of specific steps in the signalling pathways triggering this cell suicide process. The review focuses on the complexity of the interplay between ROS and antioxidant molecules and enzymes in determining the most suitable redox environment required for the occurrence of different forms of PCD. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. TMI-2 Technical Information and Examination Program. 1984 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, C.J.

    1985-04-01

    In 1984, the US Department of Energy's Technical Information and Examination Program entered its fifth year of research and development work at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) and at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and other supporting laboratories. The work concentrated on six major areas: waste immobilization, reactor evaluation, data acquisition, information and industry coordination, core activities, and EPICOR II and waste research and disposition.

  18. Military and academic programs outperform community programs on the American Board of Surgery Examinations.

    PubMed

    Falcone, John L; Charles, Anthony G

    2013-01-01

    There is a paucity of American Board of Surgery (ABS) Qualifying Examination (QE) and Certifying Examination (CE) outcomes comparing residency programs by academic, community, or military affiliation. We hypothesize that the larger academic programs will outperform the smaller community programs. In this retrospective study from 2002 to 2012, examination performance on the ABS QE and CE were obtained from the ABS for all of the general surgery residency programs. Programs were categorized by academic, community, and military affiliation. Both nonparametric and parametric statistics were used for comparison, using an α = 0.05. There were 137/235 (58.3%) academic programs, 90/235 (38.3%) community programs, and 8/235 (3.4%) military programs that satisfied inclusion criteria for this study. The Mann-Whitney U tests showed that the military programs outperformed academic and community programs on the ABS QE and the ABS CE, and had a higher proportion of examinees passing both examinations on the first attempt (all p≤0.02). One-tailed Student t-tests showed that academic programs had higher pass rates than community programs on the ABS QE (85.4%±9.5% vs. 81.9%±11.5%), higher pass rates on the ABS CE (83.6%±8.3% vs. 80.6%±11.0%), and a higher proportion of examinees passing both examinations on the first attempt (0.73±0.12 vs. 0.68±0.15) (all p≤0.01). The chi-square and Fisher exact tests showed that examinees performed highest in military programs, followed by academic programs, and lowest in community programs on the ABS QE and ABS CE (all p≤ 0.01). Military programs have the highest degrees of success on all of the ABS examinations. Academic programs outperform community programs. These results have the potential to affect application patterns to established general surgery residency programs. Copyright © 2013 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Programmed cell death in plant reproduction.

    PubMed

    Wu, H M; Cheun, A Y

    2000-10-01

    Reproductive development is a rich arena to showcase programmed cell death in plants. After floral induction, the first act of reproductive development in some plants is the selective killing of cells destined to differentiate into an unwanted sexual organ. Production of functional pollen grains relies significantly on deterioration and death of the anther tapetum, a tissue whose main function appears to nurture and decorate the pollen grains with critical surface molecules. Degeneration and death in a number of anther tissues result ultimately in anther rupture and dispersal of pollen grains. Female sporogenesis frequently begins with the death of all but one of the meiotic derivatives, with surrounding nucellar cells degenerating in concert with embryo sac expansion. Female tissues that interact with pollen undergo dramatic degeneration, including death, to ensure the encounter of compatible male and female gametes. Pollen and pistil interact to kill invading pollen from an incompatible source. Most observations on cell death in reproductive tissues have been on the histological and cytological levels. We discuss various cell death phenomena in reproductive development with a view towards understanding the biochemical and molecular mechanisms that underlie these processes.

  20. Oral anatomy laboratory examinations in a physical therapy program.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, Philip A

    2013-01-01

    The process of creating and administering traditional tagged anatomy laboratory examinations is time consuming for instructors and limits laboratory access for students. Depending on class size and the number of class, sections, creating, administering, and breaking down a tagged laboratory examination may involve one to two eight-hour days. During the time that a tagged examination is being created, student productivity may be reduced as the anatomy laboratory is inaccessible to students. Further, the type of questions that can be asked in a tagged laboratory examination may limit student assessment to lower level cognitive abilities and may limit the instructors' ability to assess the students' understanding of anatomical and clinical concepts. Anatomy is a foundational science in the Physical Therapy curriculum and a thorough understanding of anatomy is necessary to progress through the subsequent clinical courses. Physical therapy curricula have evolved to reflect the changing role of physical therapists to primary caregivers by introducing a greater scope of clinical courses earlier in the curriculum. Physical therapy students must have a thorough understanding of clinical anatomy early in the education process. However, traditional anatomy examination methods may not be reflective of the clinical thought processes required of physical therapy students. Traditional laboratory examination methods also reduce student productivity by limiting access during examination set-up and breakdown. To provide a greater complexity of questions and reduced overall laboratory time required for examinations, the Physical Therapy Program at Mercer University has introduced oral laboratory examinations for the gross anatomy course series. © 2012 American Association of Anatomists.

  1. THE NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT GRAPHITE PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    William E. Windes; Timothy D. Burchell; Robert L. Bratton

    2008-09-01

    Developing new nuclear grades of graphite used in the core of a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is one of the critical development activities being pursued within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program. Graphite’s thermal stability (in an inert gas environment), high compressive strength, fabricability, and cost effective price make it an ideal core structural material for the HTGR reactor design. While the general characteristics necessary for producing nuclear grade graphite are understood, historical “nuclear” grades no longer exist. New grades must be fabricated, characterized, and irradiated to demonstrate that current grades of graphite exhibit acceptable non-irradiated and irradiated properties upon which the thermo-mechanical design of the structural graphite in NGNP is based. The NGNP graphite R&D program has selected a handful of commercially available types for research and development activities necessary to qualify this nuclear grade graphite for use within the NGNP reactor. These activities fall within five primary areas; 1) material property characterization, 2) irradiated material property characterization, 3) modeling, and 4) ASTM test development, and 5) ASME code development efforts. Individual research and development activities within each area are being pursued with the ultimate goal of obtaining a commercial operating license for the nuclear graphite from the US NRC.

  2. Examining adaptations of evidence-based programs in natural contexts.

    PubMed

    Moore, Julia E; Bumbarger, Brian K; Cooper, Brittany Rhoades

    2013-06-01

    When evidence-based programs (EBPs) are scaled up in natural, or non-research, settings, adaptations are commonly made. Given the fidelity-versus-adaptation debate, theoretical rationales have been provided for the pros and cons of adaptations. Yet the basis of this debate is theoretical; thus, empirical evidence is needed to understand the types of adaptations made in natural settings. In the present study, we introduce a taxonomy for understanding adaptations. This taxonomy addresses several aspects of adaptations made to programs including the fit (philosophical or logistical), timing (proactive or reactive), and valence, or the degree to which the adaptations align with the program's goals and theory, (positive, negative, or neutral). Self-reported qualitative data from communities delivering one of ten state-funded EBPs were coded based on the taxonomy constructs; additionally, quantitative data were used to examine the types and reasons for making adaptations under natural conditions. Forty-four percent of respondents reported making adaptations. Adaptations to the procedures, dosage, and content were cited most often. Lack of time, limited resources, and difficulty retaining participants were listed as the most common reasons for making adaptations. Most adaptations were made reactively, as a result of issues of logistical fit, and were not aligned with, or deviated from, the program's goals and theory.

  3. Relationship between internal medicine program board examination pass rates, accreditation standards, and program size.

    PubMed

    Falcone, John L; Gonzalo, Jed D

    2014-01-19

    To determine Internal Medicine residency program compliance with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education 80% pass-rate standard and the correlation between residency program size and performance on the American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying Examination. Using a cross-sectional study design from 2010-2012 American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying Examination data of all Internal Medicine residency pro-grams, comparisons were made between program pass rates to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education pass-rate standard. To assess the correlation between program size and performance, a Spearman's rho was calculated. To evaluate program size and its relationship to the pass-rate standard, receiver operative characteristic curves were calculated. Of 372 Internal Medicine residency programs, 276 programs (74%) achieved a pass rate of =80%, surpassing the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education minimum standard. A weak correlation was found between residency program size and pass rate for the three-year period (p=0.19, p<0.001). The area underneath the receiver operative characteristic curve was 0.69 (95% Confidence Interval [0.63-0.75]), suggesting programs with less than 12 examinees/year are less likely to meet the minimum Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education pass-rate standard (sensitivity 63.8%, specificity 60.4%, positive predictive value 82.2%, p<0.001). Although a majority of Internal Medicine residency programs complied with Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education pass-rate standards, a quarter of the programs failed to meet this requirement. Program size is positively but weakly associated with American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying Examination performance, suggesting other unidentified variables significantly contribute to program performance.

  4. Relationship between internal medicine program board examination pass rates, accreditation standards, and program size

    PubMed Central

    Falcone, John L.; Gonzalo, Jed D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To determine Internal Medicine residency program compliance with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education 80% pass-rate standard and the correlation between residency program size and performance on the American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying Examination. Methods Using a cross-sectional study design from 2010-2012 American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying Examination data of all Internal Medicine residency programs, comparisons were made between program pass rates to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education pass-rate standard. To assess the correlation between program size and performance, a Spearman’s rho was calculated. To evaluate program size and its relationship to the pass-rate standard, receiver operative characteristic curves were calculated. Results Of 372 Internal Medicine residency programs, 276 programs (74%) achieved a pass rate of ≥80%, surpassing the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education minimum standard. A weak correlation was found between residency program size and pass rate for the three-year period (ρ=0.19, p<0.001). The area underneath the receiver operative characteristic curve was 0.69 (95% Confidence Interval [0.63-0.75]), suggesting programs with less than 12 examinees/year are less likely to meet the minimum Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education pass-rate standard (sensitivity 63.8%, specificity 60.4%, positive predictive value 82.2%, p<0.001). Conclusions Although a majority of Internal Medicine residency programs complied with Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education pass-rate standards, a quarter of the programs failed to meet this requirement. Program size is positively but weakly associated with American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying Examination performance, suggesting other unidentified variables significantly contribute to program performance. PMID:25341205

  5. LAND JUDGING AND PLANT NUTRITION, A PROGRAMMED INSTRUCTION UNIT, REPORT NUMBER 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LONG, GILBERT A.

    A UNIT OF PROGRAMED LEARNING MATERIALS WAS PRESENTED ON THE PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES OF LAND JUDGING AND PLANT NUTRITION. IN HIS PREPARATION, THE AUTHOR FIRST IDENTIFIED PRINCIPLES AND FACTS NECESSARY FOR EFFECTIVE LAND CLASSIFICATION AND PLANT NUTRITION BY EXAMINING RELEVANT SCIENTIFIC REPORTS. USING THIS INFORMATION, HE THEN FORMED A TEAM OF 16…

  6. Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs: An Examination of Committed Teachers and Student-Centered Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubenstein, Eric D.; Thoron, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    SAE programs were designed as an integral component in SBAE. However, participation has continued to decline. This qualitative study examined exemplary SAE programs in rural SBAE to discover factors that were working in SAE development and implementation. Through focus groups, individual and informal interviews, and observations, two themes that…

  7. Examining a therapeutic yoga program for prostate cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Ross Zahavich, Ashley N; Robinson, John A; Paskevich, David; Culos-Reed, S Nicole

    2013-03-01

    In the earlier stages of prostate cancer, effective treatments have created a need for research to focus on practices that may improve quality of life throughout survivorship. Physical activity is a significant supportive care management strategy for prostate cancer survivors, though the optimal modality is not yet understood. The authors hypothesized that yoga would be a feasible physical activity option for prostate cancer survivors and their support persons and that the incorporation of social support would increase physical activity adherence. This 14-week feasibility study involved a 7-week class-based yoga program (adherence phase), followed by 7 weeks of self-selected physical activity (maintenance phase). Demographic information, physical activity behavior, quality of life, fatigue, stress, mood, and fitness variables were assessed at 3 time points. Prostate cancer survivors' perceived social support was rated during yoga and after yoga. Class attendance was 6.1 and 5.8 for prostate cancer survivors (n = 15) and their support persons (n = 10), respectively, for the 7 classes. Levels of perceived social support were higher for those who brought a support person. Significant improvements with regard to stress, fatigue, and mood before and after yoga class (all Ps < .05) were reported by all participants. No clinically significant changes were noted on prostate cancer survivor's quality of life or fatigue over the course of the 14-week study. Yoga is a feasible physical activity option for prostate cancer survivors. The program had a promising uptake rate, high program adherence rate, and there were acute program benefits with regard to stress, fatigue, and mood for all participants. Future examination is warranted with regard to chronic benefits and group cohesion influences on levels of perceived social support.

  8. Can local voluntary environmental programs "work"? An examination of Fort Collins' (Colorado) climate wise program.

    PubMed

    Mosier, Samantha; Samantha, Mosier; Fisk, Jonathan; Jonathan, Fisk

    2013-05-01

    Previous research on voluntary environmental programs (VEPs) frequently assesses the effectiveness of federal, state, and third party programs and why organizations seek to join such programs. Yet, research has yet to evaluate the effectiveness or firm motivation relative to local VEPs. Recognizing this gap, our paper examines the structure and organization of Fort Collins' Climate Wise program, a local VEP. Using a variety of sources, we find that the program has successfully met both short- and long-term goals by persistently self-evaluating and seeking outside financial support. Findings from this analysis can aid in understanding and developing local VEPs elsewhere. Specifically, this initial research suggests that local VEPs need to consider local context and available resources when implementing such programs. Furthermore, it is possible for local VEPs to attract a diverse variety of participating firms by avoiding one-size-fits-all participation levels and by establishing a sense of ownership among partners.

  9. Preventing Mania: A Preliminary Examination of the GOALS Program

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sheri L.; Fulford, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    There is strong evidence of a relationship between goal dysregulation and mania. Building on these findings, we examined the feasibility of developing a mania prevention treatment program designed to improve goal regulation skills for those with bipolar disorder. Here, we describe the process of developing a manual, delivering the intervention to a series of cases, and then conducting a small open uncontrolled trial. All participants met diagnostic criteria for bipolar I disorder based on the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and were not currently experiencing episodes of depression or mania. Ten participants (8 female, mean age = 46.7 years) were enrolled in the GOALS program and completed an average of 13.2 weekly sessions. Participants were administered the Bech-Rafaelson Mania Scale (BRMS) and the Modified Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression at baseline and termination. Some participants completed self-report scales including the Altman Self-Rating Mania Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Willingly Approached Set of Statistically Unrealistic Pursuits at baseline and termination. In addition, participants were administered a consumer satisfaction questionnaire at termination. At termination, all 10 participants found the program highly relevant and helpful. Most importantly, even though levels of mania were low initially, mean levels of manic symptoms on the BRMS decreased significantly from baseline to termination, and all 10 participants were within a healthy range (BRMS <7) at termination. Although the lack of control group or follow-up data limits this study, preliminary evidence suggests that it is feasible to identify treatment targets by drawing from the basic research literature in bipolar disorder. Findings await replication and more careful testing within a randomized controlled trial. PMID:19433142

  10. An Examination of the Indiana State University Aerospace Administration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwab, Gregory L.

    2005-01-01

    Declining enrollments in the Indiana State University (ISU) aerospace administration program prompted this case study. which evaluates the program in comparison with parallel programs at other universities, industry standards, and an independent audit. Survey instruments were administered to graduates, faculty, and employers for their views on competencies of an excellent aerospace administration program Results show the deficiency of the ISU program. Graduates, faculty, and employers rated all competencies-from moderate to considerable importance-similarly for an excellent program. Recommendations for program improvement were made, and suggestions for further research include studies to evaluate the effectiveness of a revised aerospace administration program.

  11. Examining Dehydration and Hypoxic Stress in Wheat Plants Using a Porous Tube Plant Nutrient Delivery System Developed for Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreschel, T. W.; Hall, C. R.; Foster, T. E.; Salganic, M.; Warren, L.; Corbett, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Porous Tube Plant Nutrient Delivery System (PTPNDS) was designed for NASA to grow plants in microgravity of space. The system utilizes a controlled fluid loop to supply nutrients and water to plant roots growing on a ceramic surface moistened by capiflary action. A PTPNDS test bed was developed and utilizing remote sensing systems, spectral analyses procedures, gas-exchange, and fluorescence measurements, we examined differences in plant water status for wheat plants (Triticum aestivum, cv. Perigee) grown in a modified growth chamber during the summers of 2003 and 2004. Some differences in plant performance were detectable in the gas-exchange and fluorescence measurements. For instance, in both years the plants grown with the most available water had the lowest rates of photosynthesis and exhibited higher proportions of non-photochemical quenching particularly under low light levels. In addition, small differences in mean leaf water content between treatments were detected using spectral reflectance analyses.

  12. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants. Volume 1. A Field Study Training Program. Third Edition. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    The purpose of this wastewater treatment field study training program is to: (1) develop new qualified wastewater treatment plant operators; (2) expand the abilities of existing operators, permitting better service both to employers and public; and (3) prepare operators for civil service and certification examinations (examinations administered by…

  13. Water Treatment Plant Operation. Volume I. A Field Study Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Sacramento. School of Engineering.

    The purpose of this water treatment field study training program is to: (1) develop new qualified water treatment plant operators; (2) expand the abilities of existing operators, permitting better service both to employers and public; and (3) prepare operators for civil service and certification examinations (examinations administered by…

  14. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants. Volume 1. A Field Study Training Program. Third Edition. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    The purpose of this wastewater treatment field study training program is to: (1) develop new qualified wastewater treatment plant operators; (2) expand the abilities of existing operators, permitting better service both to employers and public; and (3) prepare operators for civil service and certification examinations (examinations administered by…

  15. Water Treatment Plant Operation Volume 2. A Field Study Training Program. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Sacramento. School of Engineering.

    The purpose of this water treatment field study training program is to: (1) develop new qualified water treatment plant operators; (2) expand the abilities of existing operators, permitting better service both to employers and public; and (3) prepare operators for civil service and certification examinations (examinations administered by…

  16. Water Treatment Plant Operation. Volume II. A Field Study Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Sacramento. School of Engineering.

    The purpose of this water treatment field study training program is to: (1) develop new qualified water treatment plant operators; (2) expand the abilities of existing operators, permitting better service both to employers and public; and (3) prepare operators for civil service and certification examinations (examinations administered by…

  17. Water Treatment Plant Operation. Volume II. A Field Study Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Sacramento. School of Engineering.

    The purpose of this water treatment field study training program is to: (1) develop new qualified water treatment plant operators; (2) expand the abilities of existing operators, permitting better service both to employers and public; and (3) prepare operators for civil service and certification examinations (examinations administered by…

  18. Water Treatment Plant Operation. Volume I. A Field Study Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Sacramento. School of Engineering.

    The purpose of this water treatment field study training program is to: (1) develop new qualified water treatment plant operators; (2) expand the abilities of existing operators, permitting better service both to employers and public; and (3) prepare operators for civil service and certification examinations (examinations administered by…

  19. Examining youth and program predictors of engagement in out-of-school time programs.

    PubMed

    Greene, Kaylin M; Lee, Bora; Constance, Nicole; Hynes, Kathryn

    2013-10-01

    Prior research suggests that youths' engagement in out-of-school time programs may be a crucial factor linking program participation to positive outcomes during adolescence. Guided by the theoretical concept of flow and by stage-environment fit theory, the present study explored correlates of engagement in youth programs. Engagement was conceptualized as the extent to which youth found the program activities enjoyable, interesting, and challenging. The current study examined how program content, monetary incentives, and youth demographic characteristics were linked to youth engagement among a sample of primarily low-income middle and high school youth attending 30 out-of-school programs (n = 435, 51 % female). Results from multilevel models suggested that program content and staff quality were strongly associated with youth engagement. Youth who reported learning new skills, learning about college, and learning about jobs through activities in the program were more engaged, as were youth who found the staff caring and competent. Results demonstrated that the link between learning content for the future and engagement was stronger for older youth than younger youth. In addition, there was a trend suggesting that providing a monetary incentive was associated negatively with youth engagement. Taken as a whole, these findings have important implications for researchers, practitioners, and policymakers interested in understanding the characteristics of out-of-school time programs that engage older youth.

  20. Optimizing violence prevention programs: an examination of program effectiveness among urban high school students.

    PubMed

    Thompkins, Amanda C; Chauveron, Lisa M; Harel, Ofer; Perkins, Daniel F

    2014-07-01

    While demand for youth violence prevention programs increases, the ability of the school-day schedule to accommodate their time requirements has diminished. Viable school-based prevention programs must strike a balance between brevity and effectiveness. This article reports results from an effectiveness trial of a 12-session curriculum-based universal violence prevention program that promotes healthy conflict resolution skills among urban adolescents. Using a review of program record data and a multisite quasi-experimental study design, we examined the effectiveness of a New York City-based violence prevention program entitled the Violence Prevention project (VPP) optimized to meet school needs. We analyzed survey data from 1112 9th- and 10th-grade students in 13 New York City public high schools across 4 consecutive school years. Both participants and nonparticipants were surveyed. Review of program record data indicated that the program was implemented with acceptable fidelity to the core component structure, and that participant responsiveness to the model was high. Multilevel modeling indicated that VPP participation was protective for academic self-concept and promoted conflict resolution skills. Findings indicate that semester-long violence prevention programs optimized to meet the needs of a typical high school can be effective at promoting healthy conflict resolution skills in urban adolescents. © 2014, American School Health Association.

  1. Interdisciplinary research and training program in the plant sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Wolk, C.P.

    1991-01-01

    This document is the compiled progress reports from the Interdisciplinary Research and Training Program in the Plant Sciences funded through the MSU-DOE Plant Research Laboratory. Fourteen reports are included, covering topics such as the molecular basis of plant/microbe symbiosis, cell wall proteins and assembly, gene expression, stress responses, growth regulator biosynthesis, interaction between nuclear and organelle genomes, sensory transduction and tropisms, intracellular sorting and membrane trafficking, regulation of lipid metabolism, the molecular basis of disease resistance and plant pathogenesis, developmental biology of Cyanobacteria and hormonal involvement in environmental control of plant growth. 132 refs. (MHB)

  2. Utility of a grief services program for medical examiners' offices.

    PubMed

    Berry, Ryan S; Aurelius, Michelle B; Barickman, Nancy; Lathrop, Sarah L

    2013-03-01

    Medical examiner/coroner's (ME/C) offices investigate sudden, violent, and unexpected deaths, leaving those close to the deceased suffering traumatic loss with little in terms of support and counseling. We investigated a grief services program (GSP) at the New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator (OMI) to better understand the needs of bereaved individuals, identify the services provided, and propose our findings as a model for others. A total of 1085 contacts occurred over 1 year, with the majority occurring at OMI (60.5%), followed by telephone (23.1%). Support was primarily provided to those suffering a loss due to homicide (28.8%) and suicide (26.1%). The roles grief counselors play in the setting of a GSP and ME/C office are multiple. Given the frequent utilization of OMI's GSP and diverse reasons for visits, it is apparent there is a need for GSPs at ME/C offices, particularly given the traumatic nature of deaths investigated by ME/Cs.

  3. Plant service award 1992: Oak Ridge Y-12 recycling program

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.I.; Walton, R.M.

    1992-04-28

    The solid waste recycling program at the Y-12 plant is described. Their efforts to minimize the filling of sanitary landfills are exemplary. Aluminium cans and paper are recycled. Cost recovery information is presented.

  4. An Examination of School Climate in Effective Alternative Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Mary Magee; Poirier, Jeffrey M.; Faller, Susan E.; Gable, Robert A.; Tonelson, Steven W.

    2006-01-01

    The alternative education field lacks a common definition and has a major divide between the differing philosophies of alternative programs; little empirical evidence is available to identify the components necessary to create effective alternative educational programs. Tremendous growth in the availability of alternative programs in the United…

  5. An update of preliminary perspectives gained from Individual Plant Examination of External Events (IPEEE) submittal reviews

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, A.M.; Chen, J.T.; Chokshi, N.; Nowlen, S.P.; Bohn, M.P.; Sewell, R.; Kazarians, M.; Lambright, J.

    1998-03-01

    As a result of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) initiated Individual Plant Examination of External Events (IPEEE) program, virtually every operating commercial nuclear power reactor in the US has performed an assessment of severe accident risk due to external events. To date, the USNRC staff has received 63 IPEEE submittals and will receive an additional 11 by mid 1998. Currently, 49 IPEEE submittals are under various stages ore view. This paper is based on the information available for those 41 plants for which at least preliminary Technical Evaluation Reports have been prepared by the review teams. The goal of the review is to ascertain whether the licensee`s IPEEE process is capable of identifying external events-induced severe accident vulnerabilities and cost-effective safety improvements to either eliminate or reduce the impact of these vulnerabilities. The review does not, however, attempt to validate or verify the results of the licensee`s IPEEE. The primary objective of this paper is to provide an update on the preliminary perspectives and insights gained from the IPEEE process.

  6. Examining Quality Improvement Programs: The Case of Minnesota Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Olson, John R; Belohlav, James A; Cook, Lori S; Hays, Julie M

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine if there is a hierarchy of improvement program adoption by hospitals and outline that hierarchy. Data Sources Primary data were collected in the spring of 2007 via e-survey from 210 individuals representing 109 Minnesota hospitals. Secondary data from 2006 were assembled from the Leapfrog database. Study Design As part of a larger survey, respondents were given a list of improvement programs and asked to identify those programs that are used in their hospital. Data Collection/Data Extraction Rasch Model Analysis was used to assess whether a unidimensional construct exists that defines a hospital's ability to implement performance improvement programs. Linear regression analysis was used to assess the relationship of the Rasch ability scores with Leapfrog Safe Practices Scores to validate the research findings. Principal Findings The results of the study show that hospitals have widely varying abilities in implementing improvement programs. In addition, improvement programs present differing levels of difficulty for hospitals trying to implement them. Our findings also indicate that the ability to adopt improvement programs is important to the overall performance of hospitals. Conclusions There is a hierarchy of improvement programs in the health care context. A hospital's ability to successfully adopt improvement programs is a function of its existing capabilities. As a hospital's capability increases, the ability to successfully implement higher level programs also increases. PMID:18761677

  7. Examining incentive design strategies for worksite wellness program engagement.

    PubMed

    Norman, Gregory J; Heltemes, Kevin J; Drew, Joseph

    2014-12-01

    The objective was to examine employee engagement in worksite wellness activities at 2 large US companies that differed in engagement strategy and incentive plan. Inclusion criteria were US employees aged 18 to 65 who were eligible to receive wellness benefits throughout 2012. Company B's incentive was twice the dollar value of Company A's and produced higher engagement rates for the health assessment (HA; 26.1% vs. 24.4%, P<.001), and biometric screening (32.8% vs. 25.4%, P<.001). Among the subgroup of employees who completed the HA and the biometric screening, 44.6% (N=2,309) at Company A engaged in at least 1 coaching session compared to 8.9% (N=594) at Company B. Fewer employees at Company A with high-risk cholesterol engaged in coaching compared to Company B (44.6% vs. 54.9%, P=.009). However, more Company A employees with high-risk blood pressure engaged in coaching compared to Company B (41.3% vs. 34.8%, P=.053). Company A engaged more obese employees compared to Company B (43.7% vs. 13.9%, P<.001), although obesity was not directly targeted at either company. Predictors of enrolling in coaching included being female, older age, higher education, and those not at high risk for stress, diet, and tobacco for Company A, and older age, and high risk for blood pressure, cholesterol, and obesity for Company B. A population approach to incentive design for program engagement engaged high-risk employees in coaching, and engaged a high proportion of employees not at high risk, but who can still be at risk for chronic diseases.

  8. B Plant/WESF suspect/counterfeit parts identification program

    SciTech Connect

    Mertz, D.W.

    1996-01-12

    This document describes a suspect/counterfeit parts inspection program required by DOE conducted in accordance with Internal Memo 16710-94-DWM-048, J.A. O`Brien to J. N. Nansen, B Plant Suspect/ Counterfeit Parts Action Plan, dated May 24, 1994. The program included: physical inspection of all spare parts inventories within the plant; screening of installed B Plant/WESF (Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility) systems for applications where the use and subsequent potential failure of suspect/counterfeit parts could have critical consequences; and a physical inspection based upon this screening.

  9. Bibliography of the Maryland Power Plant Siting Program, fourth edition

    SciTech Connect

    Magette, T.

    1983-01-01

    The Maryland Power Plant Siting Act of 1971 established the Power Plant Siting Program to insure that demands for electric power would be met in a timely manner at a reasonable cost while assuring that the associated environmental impact would be acceptable. The scope of the Program extends to estimating the impact of proposed new generating facilities, evaluating the acceptability of proposed transmission line routes assessing the impact of existing generating facilities, acquiring sites for utilities unable to find a suitable site for generation, and investigating generic issues related to power plant site evaluation and associated environmental and land use considerations.

  10. Examination of a University-Affiliated Safe Ride Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gieck, D. Joseph; Slagle, David M.

    2010-01-01

    A university-affiliated safe ride program was evaluated to determine whether these programs can reduce drunk-driving related costs. Data was collected from 187 safe ride passengers during three nights of operation. Among the passengers, 93% were enrolled at a local University, 31% were younger than 21, and 40% reported a prior alcohol-related…

  11. Examining Internationalization in U.S. Counseling Psychology Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Erica J.; Gerstein, Lawrence H.; Aegisdottir, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gather more information about the process of internationalization in U.S. counseling psychology programs. Participants included 26 training directors and 83 doctoral students, representing 32 of the 63 APA-accredited counseling psychology programs. Results suggested that the presence of international training…

  12. Examining Internationalization in U.S. Counseling Psychology Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Erica J.; Gerstein, Lawrence H.; Aegisdottir, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gather more information about the process of internationalization in U.S. counseling psychology programs. Participants included 26 training directors and 83 doctoral students, representing 32 of the 63 APA-accredited counseling psychology programs. Results suggested that the presence of international training…

  13. "PASSport to Success": An Examination of a Parent Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramirez, A. Y.

    2004-01-01

    This report highlights the evaluation of a parent education program conducted with an urban middle school in Southern California. The program called "PASSport to Success" enables parents to learn study skills and how to better teach their children how to study in school. This evaluative report conducted a pretest and a posttest on…

  14. Examination of a University-Affiliated Safe Ride Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gieck, D. Joseph; Slagle, David M.

    2010-01-01

    A university-affiliated safe ride program was evaluated to determine whether these programs can reduce drunk-driving related costs. Data was collected from 187 safe ride passengers during three nights of operation. Among the passengers, 93% were enrolled at a local University, 31% were younger than 21, and 40% reported a prior alcohol-related…

  15. Bibliography of the Maryland power plant siting program, Seventh Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Magette, T.

    1986-02-01

    The Maryland Power Plant Siting Act of 1971 established the Power Plant Siting Program to insure that demands for electric power would be met in a timely manner at a reasonable cost while assuring that the associated environmental impact would be acceptable. The scope of the Program extends to estimating the impact of proposed new generating facilities, evaluating the acceptability of proposed transmission-line routes, assessing the impact of existing generating facilities, acquiring sites for utilities unable to find a suitable site for generation, and investigating generic issues related to power-plant site evaluation and associated environmental and land-use considerations. The bibliography is a compilation of all the studies performed for and/or by the Power Plant Siting Program since its inception.

  16. Bibliography of the Maryland Power Plant Siting Program, Fifth Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Magette, T.

    1984-01-01

    The Maryland Power Plant Siting Act of 1971 established the Power Plant Siting Program to insure that demands for electric power would be met in a timely manner at a reasonable cost while assuring that the associated environmental impact would be acceptable. The scope of the Program extends to estimating the impact of proposed new generating facilities, evaluating the acceptability of proposed transmission line routes, assessing the impact of existing generating facilities, acquiring sites for utilities unable to find a suitable site for generation, and investigating generic issues related to power plant site evaluation and associated environmental and land use considerations. This bibliography is a compilation of all the studies performed for and/or by the Power Plant Siting Program since its inception.

  17. Bibliography of the Maryland Power Plant Siting Program. Sixth edition

    SciTech Connect

    Magette, T.

    1985-02-01

    The Maryland Power Plant Siting Act of 1971 established the Power Plant Siting Program to insure that demands for electric power would be met in a timely manner at a reasonable cost while assuring that the associated environmental impact would be acceptable. The scope of the Program extends to estimating the impact of proposed new generating facilities, evaluating the acceptability of proposed transmission line routes, assessing the impact of existing generating facilities, acquiring sites for utilities unable to find a suitable site for generation, and investigating generic issues related to power plant site evaluation and associated environmental and land-use considerations. This bibliography is a compilation of all studies performed for and/or by the Power Plant Siting Program since its inception.

  18. State of Washington Aquatic Plant Management Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-01

    waterfowl diet. A digestive tract analysis of several waterfowl species done by Florshutz (1973) between 1968 and 1971 in Virginia and North Carolina...uustablei and the meal made from milfoil pigmented broilers (Smith, 1971). The estimated c~ost/acre of mechanical harvesting (assuming two cuttings per... digestive tract, large amounts of incom- pletely digested plant material are returned to the water. The nutrients contained in this mate’eial are added to

  19. Water treatment plant simulation program, version 1. 21, user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The User's Manual for Version 1.21 of the Water Treatment Plant Simulation Program has been prepared to provide a basic understanding of (1) how to operate the program, and (2) the underlying assumptions and equations that are used to calculate the removal of natural organic matter and the formation of disinfection by-products. The manual represents the first public release of the program.

  20. Oral Anatomy Laboratory Examinations in a Physical Therapy Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabrizio, Philip A.

    2013-01-01

    The process of creating and administering traditional tagged anatomy laboratory examinations is time consuming for instructors and limits laboratory access for students. Depending on class size and the number of class, sections, creating, administering, and breaking down a tagged laboratory examination may involve one to two eight-hour days.…

  1. Oral Anatomy Laboratory Examinations in a Physical Therapy Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabrizio, Philip A.

    2013-01-01

    The process of creating and administering traditional tagged anatomy laboratory examinations is time consuming for instructors and limits laboratory access for students. Depending on class size and the number of class, sections, creating, administering, and breaking down a tagged laboratory examination may involve one to two eight-hour days.…

  2. Tree planting incentive programs: How you can make these programs work for you

    Treesearch

    Linda DePaul

    2002-01-01

    If you are like most people, the thought of dealing with bureaucratic, slow-moving, cumbersome, government programs does not excite you. And the thought of incentive programs is boring at best. However, I would like to challenge you to try to gain enough of a comfort level with the federal tree planting incentive programs that you will be able to see them as...

  3. Savannah River Restart Peer Evaluation Program final examination report

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.P.; Draper, D.G.

    1991-12-01

    During the period of August 13, 1990 through September 6, 1991 the Savannah River Peer Evaluation Program was administered during three distinct phases to 73 certified Central Control Room Operators, Central Control Room Supervisors, and Shift Technical Engineers assigned to the K Reactor, on the Savannah River Site (SRS). This program was conceived and developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) and it's implementation satisfies recommendations made by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. The review identified both strengths and weaknesses of the procedures and personnel.

  4. Savannah River Restart Peer Evaluation Program final examination report

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.P.; Draper, D.G.

    1991-12-01

    During the period of August 13, 1990 through September 6, 1991 the Savannah River Peer Evaluation Program was administered during three distinct phases to 73 certified Central Control Room Operators, Central Control Room Supervisors, and Shift Technical Engineers assigned to the K Reactor, on the Savannah River Site (SRS). This program was conceived and developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) and it`s implementation satisfies recommendations made by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. The review identified both strengths and weaknesses of the procedures and personnel.

  5. Bibliography of the Maryland Power Plant Research Program, fourteenth edition

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, R.I.

    1993-02-01

    The Power Plant Siting Act of 1971 (Sec. 3-303) established the Power Plant Research Program to ensure that demands for electric power would be met in a timely manner at a reasonable cost while assuring that the associated environmental impact would be acceptable. The scope of the Program extends to estimating the impact of proposed new generating facilities, evaluating the acceptability of proposed transmission line routes, assessing the impact of existing generation facilities, and investigating generic issues related to power plant site evaluation and associated environmental and land use considerations. The bibliography is a compilation of all the studies performed for and/or by the Power Plant and Environmental Review Division since its inception.

  6. Bibliography of the Maryland Power Plant Research Program, Thirteenth Edition

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, R.I.

    1992-02-01

    The Power Plant Siting Act of 1971 (Sec. 3-303) established the Power Plant Research Program to insure that demands for electric power would be met in a timely manner at a reasonable cost while assuring that the associated environmental impact would be acceptable. The scope of the Program extends to estimating the impact of proposed new generating facilities, evaluating the acceptability of proposed transmission line routes, assessing the impact of existing generation facilities, and investigating generic issues related to power plant site evaluation and associated environmental and land use considerations. The bibliography is a compilation of all the studies performed for and or by the Power Plant and Environmental Review Division since its inception. Reports published by the Division considered to be of general interest are routinely made available through the National Technical Information Service. Those reports so registered may be identified by the NTIS accession number immediately following the citation in the bibliography.

  7. An Examination of Potential Career Programs. Special Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson County Community Coll., Overland Park, KS.

    Surveys of local employers were conducted by Johnson County Community College to determine the needs for potential career programs as related to job opportunities in the following areas: (1) accounting; (2) advertising and journalism; (3) animal health technology; (4) automotive technology; (5) building construction; (6) child care for…

  8. Program Evaluation of "Young at Heart": Examining Elderly Volunteers' Generativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Jean Pearson; Reifman, Alan; Mulsow, Miriam; Feng, Du

    2003-01-01

    Elderly volunteers in the Young at Heart child care program (n=14), Meals on Wheels (n=14), other volunteer activities (n=24), and nonvolunteers (n=49) were compared. Although child-care volunteers were expected to score highest in generativity, volunteers in other activities did, followed by Young at Heart volunteers. (Contains 10 references.)…

  9. Examining Teachers' Attitudes toward a Required Environmental Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Judith Chen-Hsuan; Monroe, Martha C.

    2010-01-01

    Requiring teachers to partake in environmental education (EE) may generate negative reactions since elementary teachers can be overloaded with meeting standards and student performance goals. This study explores teachers' attitudes toward a required EE program, Lagoon Quest. We compare attitudes among teachers with and without prior Lagoon Quest,…

  10. Examining Teachers' Attitudes toward a Required Environmental Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Judith Chen-Hsuan; Monroe, Martha C.

    2010-01-01

    Requiring teachers to partake in environmental education (EE) may generate negative reactions since elementary teachers can be overloaded with meeting standards and student performance goals. This study explores teachers' attitudes toward a required EE program, Lagoon Quest. We compare attitudes among teachers with and without prior Lagoon Quest,…

  11. An Examination of Potential Career Programs. Special Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson County Community Coll., Overland Park, KS.

    Surveys of local employers were conducted by Johnson County Community College to determine the needs for potential career programs as related to job opportunities in the following areas: (1) accounting; (2) advertising and journalism; (3) animal health technology; (4) automotive technology; (5) building construction; (6) child care for…

  12. Program for the medical examination (consultation) of cosmonauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The medical selection process used to screen cosmonaut candidates is outlined. The various stages of selection are discussed, and the specific types of medical examinations are described. Various criteria used for selection are presented.

  13. Implementing a Compressed Air System Leak Management Program at an Automotive Plant (Visteon's Monroe Plant)

    SciTech Connect

    2001-01-01

    The energy team at Visteon’s Monroe plant, formerly owned by Ford Motor Company, implemented an ongoing compressed air system leak management program. The team developed an approach that combined a traditional “find and fix” effort with an innovative implementation and marketing program. As a result of the leak management program, compressed air system consumption was reduced by more than 50% on a per production unit basis.

  14. Examining Understandings of Parent Involvement in Early Childhood Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilado, Aimee V.; Kallemeyn, Leanne; Phillips, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    The importance of parent involvement in children's development and learning is increasingly recognized in the research literature and in federal and state policies; however, no unified definition of parent involvement exists. This study examined different understandings and definitions of parent involvement in a sample of administrators of…

  15. Mortuary Science Programs: Examination of the External Evaluation Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhard, D. Elaine

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to expand the literature on mortuary science accreditation site visit teams. This study used a mixed methodology design to examine: (1) who serves on the American Board of Funeral Service Education accreditation external site visit teams; (2) reasons for involvement in accreditation; (3) perceptions of important site…

  16. Conflicts of Time: Examining School Schedules in Secondary Agricultural Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epps, Rebekah B.; Adams, Randy J.; Vincent, Stacy K.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how school schedules can or cannot be justified through the perspective of student performance on state core content assessments and occupational skills standards assessments. This study utilized the Theory of Power in Education when considering school schedules as a means to student success on core content…

  17. Conserved Gene Expression Programs in Developing Roots from Diverse Plants

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ling; Schiefelbein, John

    2015-01-01

    The molecular basis for the origin and diversification of morphological adaptations is a central issue in evolutionary developmental biology. Here, we defined temporal transcript accumulation in developing roots from seven vascular plants, permitting a genome-wide comparative analysis of the molecular programs used by a single organ across diverse species. The resulting gene expression maps uncover significant similarity in the genes employed in roots and their developmental expression profiles. The detailed analysis of a subset of 133 genes known to be associated with root development in Arabidopsis thaliana indicates that most of these are used in all plant species. Strikingly, this was also true for root development in a lycophyte (Selaginella moellendorffii), which forms morphologically different roots and is thought to have evolved roots independently. Thus, despite vast differences in size and anatomy of roots from diverse plants, the basic molecular mechanisms employed during root formation appear to be conserved. This suggests that roots evolved in the two major vascular plant lineages either by parallel recruitment of largely the same developmental program or by elaboration of an existing root program in the common ancestor of vascular plants. PMID:26265761

  18. Conserved Gene Expression Programs in Developing Roots from Diverse Plants.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ling; Schiefelbein, John

    2015-08-01

    The molecular basis for the origin and diversification of morphological adaptations is a central issue in evolutionary developmental biology. Here, we defined temporal transcript accumulation in developing roots from seven vascular plants, permitting a genome-wide comparative analysis of the molecular programs used by a single organ across diverse species. The resulting gene expression maps uncover significant similarity in the genes employed in roots and their developmental expression profiles. The detailed analysis of a subset of 133 genes known to be associated with root development in Arabidopsis thaliana indicates that most of these are used in all plant species. Strikingly, this was also true for root development in a lycophyte (Selaginella moellendorffii), which forms morphologically different roots and is thought to have evolved roots independently. Thus, despite vast differences in size and anatomy of roots from diverse plants, the basic molecular mechanisms employed during root formation appear to be conserved. This suggests that roots evolved in the two major vascular plant lineages either by parallel recruitment of largely the same developmental program or by elaboration of an existing root program in the common ancestor of vascular plants.

  19. Aquatic Plant Control Research Program. Allelopathic Aquatic Plants for Aquatic Plant Management: A Feasibility Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Allelopathy "Bioassay . Growth inhibition. Aquatic macrophytes. Biocontrol Lena minor 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on...Bibliography of Aquatic Plant Allelopathy ........ Al 2 ALLELOPATHIC AQUATIC PLANTS FOR AQUATIC PLANT MANAGEMENT; A FEASIBILITY STUDY Introduction Background 1...nutrients, water, and other biotic effects could have overriding effects that appear as competition or allelopathy . These biotic factors must be

  20. 49 CFR 452.9 - Elements of a continuous examination program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Elements of a continuous examination program. 452.9 Section 452.9 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) COAST GUARD... Elements of a continuous examination program. (a) Examinations required by § 452.7 must conform to the...

  1. 49 CFR 452.9 - Elements of a continuous examination program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Elements of a continuous examination program. 452.9 Section 452.9 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) COAST GUARD... Elements of a continuous examination program. (a) Examinations required by § 452.7 must conform to the...

  2. 49 CFR 452.9 - Elements of a continuous examination program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Elements of a continuous examination program. 452.9 Section 452.9 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) COAST GUARD... Elements of a continuous examination program. (a) Examinations required by § 452.7 must conform to the...

  3. 49 CFR 452.9 - Elements of a continuous examination program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Elements of a continuous examination program. 452... Elements of a continuous examination program. (a) Examinations required by § 452.7 must conform to the... established or industry accepted pass/fail criteria to determine whether a container has any deficiency...

  4. 46 CFR 176.650 - Alternative Hull Examination Program options: Divers or underwater ROV.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alternative Hull Examination Program options: Divers or...) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Hull and Tailshaft Examinations § 176.650 Alternative Hull Examination Program options: Divers or underwater ROV. To complete the...

  5. A Competency-Based Instructional Program for Plant Process Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Joy; Mills, Steven

    This program guide provides materials to prepare learners for employment as Process Plant Operators through classroom instruction and practical shop experience. Contents include instructional goal and subgoals, an instructional analysis that describes development of the materials and instructional equipment and supplies and facilities…

  6. The Meteorological Monitoring program at a former nuclear weapons plant

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, D.R.; Bowen, B.M.

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of the Meteorological Monitoring program at Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) is to provide meteorological information for use in assessing the transport, and diffusion, and deposition of effluent actually or potentially released into the atmosphere by plant operations. Achievement of this objective aids in protecting health and safety of the public, employees, and environment, and directly supports Emergency Response programs at RFP. Meteorological information supports the design of environmental monitoring networks for impact assessments, environmental surveillance activities, remediation activities, and emergency responses. As the mission of the plant changes from production of nuclear weapons parts to environmental cleanup and economic development, smaller releases resulting from remediation activities become more likely. These possible releases could result from airborne fugitive dust, evaporation from collection ponds, or grass fires.

  7. The Trauma Program Manager role: a current examination.

    PubMed

    Griffith, P M; Alo, K; Cohen, M

    2001-01-01

    To describe the history and define current application of the Trauma Program Manger (TPM) role. To suggest that a professional networking group can assist a TPM to accomplish the significant demands of the role. SIGNIFICANCE TO CARE: Improved understanding of the current role. Enhanced effectiveness in fulfilling the current functions of the TPM role through networking. Literature review on the role of the TPM, discussing the growth, development and progression to its current form. Evaluation of one professional group of TPMs and how it aided members in accomplishing the significant demands of the role. METHODS OF EVALUATION: A 6-year retrospective review of the administrative records for a professional networking group of TPMs was conducted. Meeting content was sorted and tabulated into the 10 functional requirements of the TPM role. TPMs who were members of the group during the same 6-year period were surveyed regarding the perceived value of group participation relative to accomplishing each of the TPM role functions. The current form of the TPM role is significant and encompasses at least 10 distinct functions. A professional group of TPMs is a useful tool to aid individuals in fulfilling their TPM roles. This may be true for both novice and experienced TPMs. The professional group may serve as an adjunct to obtaining formal role education.

  8. Aquatic Plant Control Research Program. Habitat Value of Aquatic Plants for Fishes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    If larger populations of fish are less sensitive to predator effects (Pitcher, Magurran, Winfield 1982) and to interspecific competitive restraints...9 AQUATIC PLANT CONTROLA D-A239 569 RESEARCH PROGRAM _ __ I I 11111 111111 H 1111 1 il TECHNICAL REPORT A-91-5 S Arm CorpSEi HABITAT VALUE OF...AQUATIC PLANTS FOR FISHES by K. Jack Killgore Environmental Laboratory DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY Waterways Experiment Station, Corps of Engineers 30,,09 Halls

  9. Programmed cell death in the plant immune system.

    PubMed

    Coll, N S; Epple, P; Dangl, J L

    2011-08-01

    Cell death has a central role in innate immune responses in both plants and animals. Besides sharing striking convergences and similarities in the overall evolutionary organization of their innate immune systems, both plants and animals can respond to infection and pathogen recognition with programmed cell death. The fact that plant and animal pathogens have evolved strategies to subvert specific cell death modalities emphasizes the essential role of cell death during immune responses. The hypersensitive response (HR) cell death in plants displays morphological features, molecular architectures and mechanisms reminiscent of different inflammatory cell death types in animals (pyroptosis and necroptosis). In this review, we describe the molecular pathways leading to cell death during innate immune responses. Additionally, we present recently discovered caspase and caspase-like networks regulating cell death that have revealed fascinating analogies between cell death control across both kingdoms.

  10. Functions and Regulation of Programmed Cell Death in Plant Development.

    PubMed

    Daneva, Anna; Gao, Zhen; Van Durme, Matthias; Nowack, Moritz K

    2016-10-06

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a collective term for diverse processes causing an actively induced, tightly controlled cellular suicide. PCD has a multitude of functions in the development and health of multicellular organisms. In comparison to intensively studied forms of animal PCD such as apoptosis, our knowledge of the regulation of PCD in plants remains limited. Despite the importance of PCD in plant development and as a response to biotic and abiotic stresses, the complex molecular networks controlling different forms of plant PCD are only just beginning to emerge. With this review, we provide an update on the considerable progress that has been made over the last decade in our understanding of PCD as an inherent part of plant development. We highlight both functions of developmental PCD and central aspects of its molecular regulation.

  11. 15. international conference on plant growth substances: Program -- Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Since the 14th Conference in Amsterdam in 1991, progress in plant hormone research and developmental plant biology has been truly astonishing. The five ``classical`` plant hormones, auxin, gibberellin, cytokinin, ethylene, and abscisic acid, have been joined by a number of new signal molecules, e.g., systemin, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, whose biosynthesis and functions are being understood in ever greater detail. Molecular genetics has opened new vistas in an understanding of transduction pathways that regulate developmental processes in response to hormonal and environmental signals. The program of the 15th Conference includes accounts of this progress and brings together scientists whose work focuses on physiological, biochemical, and chemical aspects of plant growth regulation. This volume contains the abstracts of papers presented at this conference.

  12. Use of the GPA solubility program in cryogenic plant design

    SciTech Connect

    McCartney, D.G.; Janowski, S.T.

    1983-01-01

    Although the GPA Solid Solubility Program has existed in various forms for some time, little has been written about its application to cryogenic NGL plant design. The natural gas component that poses the biggest problem for plant designers is carbon dioxide. Although the GPSA Engineering Data Book gives a CO/sub 2/ solid design chart, it is based on limited multicomponent data. Some multicomponent data have been available from some time, but there is a great deal of inconsistency in these data. The Solid Solubility Program is a systematic attempt to correlate these available data. Examples demonstrate the use of this systematic approach. In either the design phase of a project, or after start-up when problems occur, the new program can be used to adjust the design and operating parameters.

  13. Programmed cell death in C. elegans, mammals and plants.

    PubMed

    Lord, Christina E N; Gunawardena, Arunika H L A N

    2012-08-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is the regulated removal of cells within an organism and plays a fundamental role in growth and development in nearly all eukaryotes. In animals, the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) has aided in elucidating many of the pathways involved in the cell death process. Various analogous PCD processes can also be found within mammalian PCD systems, including vertebrate limb development. Plants and animals also appear to share hallmarks of PCD, both on the cellular and molecular level. Cellular events visualized during plant PCD resemble those seen in animals including: nuclear condensation, DNA fragmentation, cytoplasmic condensation, and plasma membrane shrinkage. Recently the molecular mechanisms involved in plant PCD have begun to be elucidated. Although few regulatory proteins have been identified as conserved across all eukaryotes, molecular features such as the participation of caspase-like proteases, Bcl-2-like family members and mitochondrial proteins appear to be conserved between plant and animal systems. Transgenic expression of mammalian and C. elegans pro- and anti-apoptotic genes in plants has been observed to dramatically influence the regulatory pathways of plant PCD. Although these genes often show little to no sequence similarity they can frequently act as functional substitutes for one another, thus suggesting that action may be more important than sequence resemblance. Here we present a summary of these findings, focusing on the similarities, between mammals, C. elegans, and plants. An emphasis will be placed on the mitochondria and its role in the cell death pathway within each organism. Through the comparison of these systems on both a cellular and molecular level we can begin to better understand PCD in plant systems, and perhaps shed light on the pathways, which are controlling the process. This manuscript adds to the field of PCD in plant systems by profiling apoptotic factors, to scale on a protein

  14. Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant groundwater protection program management plan

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    The Oak Ridge Y- 1 2 Plant (Y-12 Plant) is owned by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) under contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400. The Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), which was initiated in 1975, provides for the protection of groundwater resources consistent with Federal, State, and local regulations, and in accordance with DOE orders and Energy Systems policies and procedures. The Y-12 Plant is located in Anderson County, Tennessee, and is within the corporate limits of the City of Oak Ridge. The Y-12 Plant is one of three major DOE complexes that comprise the 37,000-acre Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) located in Anderson and Roane counties. The Y-12 Plant is located in Bear Creek Valley at an elevation of about 950 feet (ft) above sea level. Bear Creek Valley is bounded on the northwest and southeast, and is isolated from populated areas of Oak Ridge, by parallel ridges that rise about 300 ft above the valley floor. The Y-12 Plant and its fenced buffer area are about 0.6 mile wide by 3.2 miles long and cover approximately 4,900 acres. The main industrialized section encompasses approximately 800 acres.

  15. 75 FR 2594 - Proposed Information Collection (Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP) Veterans...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Health Administration, Department of Veterans...: Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP) Veterans Satisfaction Survey, VA Form 10-0480. OMB...

  16. 77 FR 69549 - Proposed Information Collection (Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP) Veterans...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-19

    ... Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Health Administration, Department of Veterans... information technology. Title: Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP) Veterans...

  17. Using Implementation and Program Theory to Examine Communication Strategies in National Wildlife Federation's Backyard Wildlife Habitat Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Dain; Dann, Shari L.

    2004-01-01

    Our evaluative approach used implementation theory and program theory, adapted from Weiss (1998) to examine communication processes and results for a national wildlife habitat stewardship education program. Using a mail survey of 1427 participants certified in National Wildlife Federation's (NWF) Backyard Wildlife Habitat (BWH) program and a study…

  18. How Do Implementation Efforts Relate to Program Adherence? Examining the Role of Organizational, Implementer, and Program Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dariotis, Jacinda K.; Bumbarger, Brian K.; Duncan, Larissa G.; Greenberg, Mark T.

    2008-01-01

    Widespread replications of evidence-based prevention programs (EBPPs) prompt prevention scientists to examine program implementation adherence in real world settings. Based on Chen's model (1990), we identified five key factors of the implementation system and assessed which characteristics related to program adherence. The sample included 32…

  19. Using Implementation and Program Theory to Examine Communication Strategies in National Wildlife Federation's Backyard Wildlife Habitat Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Dain; Dann, Shari L.

    2004-01-01

    Our evaluative approach used implementation theory and program theory, adapted from Weiss (1998) to examine communication processes and results for a national wildlife habitat stewardship education program. Using a mail survey of 1427 participants certified in National Wildlife Federation's (NWF) Backyard Wildlife Habitat (BWH) program and a study…

  20. Programming desiccation-tolerance: from plants to seeds to resurrection plants.

    PubMed

    Farrant, Jill M; Moore, John P

    2011-06-01

    Desiccation-tolerance (DT) evolved as the key solution to survival on land by the early algal ancestors of terrestrial plants. This 'first' DT involved utilizing rapidly mobilisable repair mechanisms and is still found today in mosses, such as Tortula ruralis, and ferns, such as Mohria caffrorum. The first seed plants lost vegetative DT while investing their seeds with tolerance mechanisms improving their survival in unfavourable environments. The mechanisms of DT in seeds are strongly connected to their developmentally regulated maturation programs. We propose that angiosperm resurrection plants acquired tolerance by re-activating their innate DT mechanisms in their vegetative tissues. Here we review the current hypotheses regarding the genetic evidence for the evolution of DT in resurrection plants. We also present strong evidence showing the activation of seed specific genetic elements in the vegetative tissues of resurrection plants. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. ANALYSIS AND EXAMINATION OF MOX FUEL FROM NONPROLIFERATION PROGRAMS

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, Kevin; Machut, Dr McLean; Morris, Robert Noel; Blanpain, Patrick; Hemrick, James Gordon

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has decided to dispose of a portion of the nation s surplus plutonium by reconstituting it into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and irradiating it in commercial power reactors. Four lead assemblies were manufactured and irradiated to a maximum fuel rod burnup of 47.3 MWd/kg heavy metal. This was the first commercial irradiation of MOX fuel with a 240Pu/239Pu ratio of less than 0.10. Five fuel rods with varying burnups and plutonium contents were selected from one of the assemblies and shipped to Oak Ridge National Laboratory for hot cell examination. The performance of the rods was analyzed with AREVA s next-generation GALILEO code. The results of the analysis confirmed that the fuel rods had performed safely and predictably, and that GALILEO is applicable to MOX fuel with a low 240Pu/239Pu ratio as well as to standard MOX. The results are presented and compared to the GALILEO database. In addition, the fuel cladding was tested to confirm that traces of gallium in the fuel pellets had not affected the mechanical properties of the cladding. The irradiated cladding was found to remain ductile at both room temperature and 350 C for both the axial and circumferential directions.

  2. A New Computer Program for Plant Layout Design - OPDEP Optimal Plant Design and Evaluation Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    systematized technique of plant layout can be traced to "Systematic Layout Planning", by Richard Muther (1). He attempts to provide procedures with sufficient...11). This is the same basic assumption stated by Muther (1) in his previously mentioned book on plant layout. The author acknowledges that this may be...analysis and reasoning towards some optimum solution. REFERENCES 1. Muther , R. Systematic Layout Planning. Industrial Education Institute, Boston

  3. M-C Power commercialization program for MCFC power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cámara, E. H.; Schora, F. C.

    1992-01-01

    M-C Power Corporation was established by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) to develop, manufacture, market, sell and service commercial MCFC power plants using IGT's IMHEX® fuel cell stack concept. M-C Power has created an integrated commercialization program to develop a market-responsive, natural gas-fueled MCFC power plant. M-C Power's market entry offering will range from 500 kW to 3 MW and will be designed for on-site and distributed power applications. Future products will include a wider range of sizes for distributed power and power plants for dispersed (30-50 MW) and base load ( > 100 MW) power generation, the latter fueled by coal-derived gases. M-C Power Corporation has established the world's most advanced MCFC components and stack manufacturing facilities at its plant in Burr Ridge, IL, capable of producing 3 MW/year of stacks based on one shift per day, five days per week operation. This capacity can be increased to 12 MW/year by adding one tape casting machine and operating three shifts per day for 330 days/year. An industry group has been formed to guide, support, and stimulate the IMHEX® Commercialization Program. This group is called the Alliance to Commercialize Carbonate Technology (ACCT). ACCT members include electric, gas and combination utilities as well as pipeline companies and potential industrial users. In addition, the program enjoys wide support from government, industry and research institutions.

  4. Martin Marietta, Y-12 Plant Laboratory Partnership Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Koger, J.

    1995-02-10

    The Y-12 Plant currently embraces three mission areas; stockpile surveillance, maintaining production capability, and storage of special nuclear materials. The Y-12 Plant also contributes to the nations` economic strength by partnering with industry in deploying technology. This partnering has been supported to a great extent through the Technology Transfer Initiative (TTI) directed by DOE/Defense Programs (DP-14). The Oak Ridge Centers for Manufacturing Technology (ORCMT) was established to draw upon the manufacturing and fabrication capabilities at the Y-12 Plant to coordinate and support collaborative efforts, between DP and the domestic industrial sector, toward the development of technologies which offer mutual benefit to both DOE/DP programs and the private sector. Most of the needed technologies for the ``Factory of the Future`` (FOF) are being pursued as core areas at the Y-12 Plant. As a result, 85% of DP-14 projects already support the FOF. The unique capabilities of ORCMT can be applied to a wide range of manufacturing problems to enhance the capabilities of the US industrial base and its economic outcome. The ORCMT has an important role to play in DOE`s Technology Transfer initiative because its capabilities are focused on applied manufacturing and technology deployment which has a more near-term impact on private sector competitiveness. The Y-12 Plant uses the ORCMT to help maintain its own core competencies for the FOF by challenging its engineers and capabilities with technical problems from industry. Areas of strength at the Y-12 Plant that could impact the FOF include modeling of processes and advanced materials; intelligent inspection systems with standardized operator interfaces, analysis software, and part programming language; electronic transfer of designs and features; existing computer-based concurrent engineering; and knowledge-based forming process.

  5. DOE`s nuclear energy plant optimization program

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, D.; Savage, C.D.; Singh, B.P.

    1999-09-01

    In December 1997, the United States agreed to the Kyoto Protocol on Climate Change that outlines specific greenhouse gas emissions reduction requirements. A key element of this protocol is binding emissions targets and timetables. The Protocol calls for the United States to reach emissions targets 7% below 1990 emissions levels over the 5-yr period from 2008 to 2012. A key element to achieving this goal will be the continued safe and economic operation of the Nation`s 104 nuclear power plants. These plants provide >20% of the Nation`s electricity, and nearly one-half of the 50 states receive >25% of their electricity from nuclear power. DOE`s current Strategic Plan specifies that the United States maintain its nuclear energy option and improve the efficiency of existing plants as part of its energy portfolio, in the interest of national security. As a result, DOE proposed two new nuclear energy R and D programs for fiscal year (FY) 1999: the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI), a peer-reviewed, competitively selected R and D program in advanced concepts, and the Nuclear Energy Plant Optimization Program (NEPO). NERI was authorized and received initial funding of $19 million for its first year. NEPO was not funded in 1999 but has been reintroduced in the FY 2000 budget request. NEPO will be a jointly funded R and D program with industry through the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and will address those issues that could hinder continued safe operation of the Nation`s operating nuclear power plants. The FY 2000 funding request to Congress for NEPO is $5 million.

  6. Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs: An Examination of the Development and Implementation of Urban Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubenstein, Eric D.; Thoron, Andrew C.; Colclasure, Blake C.; Gordon, Jillian A.

    2016-01-01

    Urban schools and school-based agricultural education programs (SBAE) face challenges to engage students in the educational system. Specifically, urban SBAE programs face unique challenges engaging students in the development and implementation of SAE programs. While SAE continues to be considered a central component to the total SBAE program, a…

  7. The effects of metallic engineered nanoparticles upon plant systems: An analytic examination of scientific evidence.

    PubMed

    Tolaymat, Thabet; Genaidy, Ash; Abdelraheem, Wael; Dionysiou, Dionysios; Andersen, Christian

    2017-02-01

    Recent evidence for the effects of metallic engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) on plants and plant systems was examined together with its implications for other constituents of the Society-Environment-Economy (SEE) system. In this study, we were particularly interested to determine whether or not metallic ENPs have both stimulatory and inhibitory effects upon plant performance. An emphasis was made to analyze the scientific evidence on investigations examining both types of effects in the same studies. Analysis of evidence demonstrated that metallic ENPs have both stimulatory and inhibitory effects mostly in well-controlled environments and soilless media. Nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) and Cu ENPs have potential for use as micronutrients for plant systems, keeping in mind the proper formulation at the right dose for each type of ENP. The concentration levels for the stimulatory effects of Cu ENPs are lower than for those for nZVI. Newer findings showed that extremely smaller concentrations of Au ENPs (smaller than those for nZVI and Cu ENPs) induce positive effects for plant growth, which is attributed to effects on secondary metabolites. Ag ENPs have demonstrated their usage as antimicrobial/pesticidal agents for plant protection; however, precautions should be taken to avoid higher concentrations not only for plant systems, but also, other constituents in the SEE. Further research is warranted to investigate the stimulatory and inhibitory effects of metallic ENPs in soil media in order to broaden the horizon of sustainable agriculture production in terms of higher and safer yields so as to meet the food requirements of human population.

  8. Planning a Program of School Plant Construction. Research Report, School Plant Planning Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Board of Education, Salt Lake City.

    The importance of long-term planning, and undesirable conditions resulting from failure to plan, are stressed. General procedures named as essential are--(1) the official approval of the Board of Education before the administration proceeds with long-range planning, (2) the design of the school plant around the educational program it is to serve,…

  9. 46 CFR 71.50-19 - The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program...) PASSENGER VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Drydocking § 71.50-19 The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE... apply to the AHE Program. You must submit an application at least 90 days before the requested hull...

  10. An analysis of the impacts of economic incentive programs on commercial nuclear power plant operations and maintenance costs

    SciTech Connect

    Kavanaugh, D.C.; Monroe, W.H.; Wood, R.S.

    1996-02-01

    Operations and Maintenance (O and M) expenditures by nuclear power plant owner/operators possess a very logical and vital link in considerations relating to plant safety and reliability. Since the determinants of O and M outlays are considerable and varied, the potential linkages to plant safety, both directly and indirectly, can likewise be substantial. One significant issue before the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is the impact, if any, on O and M spending from state programs that attempt to improve plant operating performance, and how and to what extent these programs may affect plant safety and pose public health risks. The purpose of this study is to examine the role and degree of impacts from state promulgated economic incentive programs (EIPs) on plant O and M spending. A multivariate regression framework is specified, and the model is estimated on industry data over a five-year period, 1986--1990. Explanatory variables for the O and M spending model include plant characteristics, regulatory effects, financial strength factors, replacement power costs, and the performance incentive programs. EIPs are found to have statistically significant effects on plant O and M outlays, albeit small in relation to other factors. Moreover, the results indicate that the relatively financially weaker firms are more sensitive in their O and M spending to the presence of such programs. Formulations for linking spending behavior and EIPs with plant safety performance remains for future analysis.

  11. An Examination of Program Selection Criteria for Part-Time MBA Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colburn, Michael; Fox, Daniel E.; Westerfelt, Debra Kay

    2011-01-01

    Prospective graduate students select a graduate program as a result of a multifaceted decision-making process. This study examines the selection criteria that part-time MBA students used in selecting a program at a private university. Further, it analyzes the methods by which the students first learned of the MBA program. The authors posed the…

  12. Paramedic Program Accreditation and Individual Performance on the National Paramedic Certification Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Severo A.

    2016-01-01

    Paramedic program accreditation and individual performance on the national paramedic certification examination were analyzed in this study. In 2008, the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians mandated paramedic program accreditation by January 1, 2013. Contemporary literature has not addressed the impact of program accreditation on…

  13. An Examination of Early Intervention Reading Programs in the Denver Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagerty, Patricia J.; Foster, Ann M.; Cobb, Brian

    A study compared and contrasted various early intervention reading programs, examining 12 early intervention programs in 10 school districts within 60 miles of the Denver metropolitan area. Programs selected were considered to be district-wide, had been in place for at least a year, had coordinators who agreed to be interviewed, were designed for…

  14. Will State Regulation of Teacher Education Diminish Program Diversity? An Examination of Three Virginia Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Daniel L.; Tucker, Pamela D.; Bucko, Scott; Duffey, Gena; McBride, Melissa

    2005-01-01

    Growing regulation of teacher preparation programs has raised concerns about standardization in the field of teacher education. With greater uniformity, is there a loss of innovation and program identity? To gather information on this question, we examined teacher preparation programs in Elementary Education, Secondary English, Secondary…

  15. An Examination of Program Selection Criteria for Part-Time MBA Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colburn, Michael; Fox, Daniel E.; Westerfelt, Debra Kay

    2011-01-01

    Prospective graduate students select a graduate program as a result of a multifaceted decision-making process. This study examines the selection criteria that part-time MBA students used in selecting a program at a private university. Further, it analyzes the methods by which the students first learned of the MBA program. The authors posed the…

  16. Paramedic Program Accreditation and Individual Performance on the National Paramedic Certification Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Severo A.

    2016-01-01

    Paramedic program accreditation and individual performance on the national paramedic certification examination were analyzed in this study. In 2008, the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians mandated paramedic program accreditation by January 1, 2013. Contemporary literature has not addressed the impact of program accreditation on…

  17. An Assessment Scale for Use In Examining a Reading Program. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC. Right to Read Program.

    The United States Commissioner of Education asked the Right to Read Office to develop a means to examine systematically existing reading programs or proposals for developing reading programs. This request reflected three needs: (1) to help communities develop reading instruction programs that meet the needs of learners within those communities;…

  18. Examining the Proportion of Dietary Phosphorus From Plants, Animals, and Food Additives Excreted in Urine.

    PubMed

    St-Jules, David E; Jagannathan, Ram; Gutekunst, Lisa; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Sevick, Mary Ann

    2017-03-01

    Phosphorus bioavailability is an emerging topic of interest in the field of renal nutrition that has important research and clinical implications. Estimates of phosphorus bioavailability, based on digestibility, indicate that bioavailability of phosphorus increases from plants to animals to food additives. In this commentary, we examined the proportion of dietary phosphorus from plants, animals, and food additives excreted in urine from four controlled-feeding studies conducted in healthy adults and patients with chronic kidney disease. As expected, a smaller proportion of phosphorus from plant foods was excreted in urine compared to animal foods. However, contrary to expectations, phosphorus from food additives appeared to be incompletely absorbed. The apparent discrepancy between digestibility of phosphorus additives and the proportion excreted in urine suggests a need for human balance studies to determine the bioavailability of different sources of phosphorus. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Programmed cell death in plants: A chloroplastic connection

    PubMed Central

    Ambastha, Vivek; Tripathy, Baishnab C; Tiwari, Budhi Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral cellular program by which targeted cells culminate to demise under certain developmental and pathological conditions. It is essential for controlling cell number, removing unwanted diseased or damaged cells and maintaining the cellular homeostasis. The details of PCD process has been very well elucidated and characterized in animals but similar understanding of the process in plants has not been achieved rather the field is still in its infancy that sees some sporadic reports every now and then. The plants have 2 energy generating sub-cellular organelles- mitochondria and chloroplasts unlike animals that just have mitochondria. The presence of chloroplast as an additional energy transducing and ROS generating compartment in a plant cell inclines to advocate the involvement of chloroplasts in PCD execution process. As chloroplasts are supposed to be progenies of unicellular photosynthetic organisms that evolved as a result of endosymbiosis, the possibility of retaining some of the components involved in bacterial PCD by chloroplasts cannot be ruled out. Despite several excellent reviews on PCD in plants, there is a void on an update of information at a place on the regulation of PCD by chloroplast. This review has been written to provide an update on the information supporting the involvement of chloroplast in PCD process and the possible future course of the field. PMID:25760871

  20. The organization and operation of the Savannah River Plant`s groundwater monitoring program. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, C.M.; Heffner, J.D.

    1988-09-01

    The Savannah River Plant (SRP) is operated by Du Pont for the Department of Energy. The plant has been operating since 1952 and is one of the largest industrial facilities in the nation. Its function is to produce nuclear materials for the national defense. This paper describes the organization and operation of the Groundwater Monitoring Program (GMP) at the SRP. Groundwater has been actively monitored for radiological parameters at the SRP since the commencement of site operations in the 1950s. More recently, monitoring expanded to include chemical parameters and numerous additional facilities. The GMP is a large monitoring program. Over 700 wells monitor more than 70 facilities which are spread over 300 square miles. The program includes both Du Pont personnel and contractors and is responsible for all phases of groundwater monitoring: the installation (or abandonment) of monitoring wells, the determination of water quality (sample collection, analysis, data review, etc.), and the generation of reports.

  1. Modeling an integrative physical examination program for the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, Scott G

    2006-10-01

    Current policies governing the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs physical examination programs are out of step with current evidence-based medical practice. Replacing periodic and other routine physical examination types with annual preventive health assessments would afford our service members additional health benefit at reduced cost. Additionally, the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs repeat the physical examination process at separation and have been unable to reconcile their respective disability evaluation systems to reduce duplication and waste. A clear, coherent, and coordinated strategy to improve the relevance and utility of our physical examination programs is long overdue. This article discusses existing physical examination programs and proposes a model for a new integrative physical examination program based on need, science, and common sense.

  2. Aquatic Plant Control Research Program. Field methods to measure aquatic plant treatment method efficacy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Killgore, K.J.; Payne, B.S.

    1984-04-01

    The Aquatic Plant Control Research Program (APCRP) of the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) is developing field techniques to measure treatment efficacy and to determine site characteristics that influence the treatment efficacy. Treatment efficacy is considered a quantitative determination of the extent and duration of changes in problem aquatic plant populations attributable to the use of a treatment method (i.e., chemical, mechanical, biological, environmental). Depending on the plant species, efficacy can be determined or indicated by changes in biomass, areal distribution, or height of an aquatic plant in response to treatment. Aquatic plant biomass is sampled with a WES aquatic biomass sampler; areal distribution of aquatic plants is determined by aerial photography or with an electronic positioning system; and submersed aquatic plant height is measured with a fathometer (depth recorder) used with an electronic positioning and repositioning system (AGNAV). The APCRP has also developed field techniques to determine site characteristics that influence efficacy using commercially available instrumentation. This instrumentation can be used to measure treatment efficacy and to determine site characteristics simultaneously.

  3. Evidence of Criterion Validity for One Pharmacy School’s Progress Examination Program

    PubMed Central

    Haltom, Wes R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To provide evidence that the progress examination program accurately assesses student failure to demonstrate competence. Methods. A progress examination program aligned with each grade level was locally developed and administered annually to 289 PharmD students in the spring of their first year – fourth year. Correlations and linear regressions were performed to compare the examination scores to performance on national licensing examinations and cumulative didactic grade point average (GPA). Odds ratio analysis was run to determine the ability of the passing scores of the progress examination to identify students at increased risk of failing to graduate on time, earn a GPA below 3.0, and fail the licensing examinations on their first attempt. Results. Progress examination scores were strongly correlated to GPA and national licensing examination scores and weakly correlated to jurisprudence examination scores. Regression analysis indicated a significant linear relationship between examination scores and both GPA and the licensing examinations. Students who performed poorly on the progress examinations were more likely fail the national licensing examination, more likely to fail to graduate on time, and more likely to earn a cumulative didactic GPA below 3.0. Conclusions. The second-year examination program strongly predicts students at risk for failure to graduate on time or achieve a GPA below 3.0, while all four examinations identify students at risk of failing the national licensing examination on their first attempt. PMID:27899831

  4. Evidence of Criterion Validity for One Pharmacy School's Progress Examination Program.

    PubMed

    Alston, Greg L; Haltom, Wes R

    2016-10-25

    Objective. To provide evidence that the progress examination program accurately assesses student failure to demonstrate competence. Methods. A progress examination program aligned with each grade level was locally developed and administered annually to 289 PharmD students in the spring of their first year - fourth year. Correlations and linear regressions were performed to compare the examination scores to performance on national licensing examinations and cumulative didactic grade point average (GPA). Odds ratio analysis was run to determine the ability of the passing scores of the progress examination to identify students at increased risk of failing to graduate on time, earn a GPA below 3.0, and fail the licensing examinations on their first attempt. Results. Progress examination scores were strongly correlated to GPA and national licensing examination scores and weakly correlated to jurisprudence examination scores. Regression analysis indicated a significant linear relationship between examination scores and both GPA and the licensing examinations. Students who performed poorly on the progress examinations were more likely fail the national licensing examination, more likely to fail to graduate on time, and more likely to earn a cumulative didactic GPA below 3.0. Conclusions. The second-year examination program strongly predicts students at risk for failure to graduate on time or achieve a GPA below 3.0, while all four examinations identify students at risk of failing the national licensing examination on their first attempt.

  5. TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF THE PM-1 NUCLEAR POWER PLANT AND RELATED PROGRAMS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The report presents a technical evaluation of the PM-1 Nuclear Power Plant and related programs. The PM-1 Program is documented from its inception...November 1957) to plant shutdown (April 1968). The PM-1 Nuclear Power Plant design objectives and requirements are tabulated. PM-1 plant systems

  6. 46 CFR 115.630 - The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program... PASSENGERS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Hull and Tailshaft Examinations § 115.630 The Alternative Hull... hull examination date to the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection (OCMI) who will oversee the survey...

  7. 78 FR 35330 - Initial Test Programs for Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... COMMISSION Initial Test Programs for Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... revision to Regulatory Guide (RG), 1.68, ``Initial Test Programs for Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants... Initial Test Programs (ITPs) for light water cooled nuclear power plants. ADDRESSES: Please refer to...

  8. Examining strategies to facilitate vitamin B1 biofortification of plants by genetic engineering.

    PubMed

    Pourcel, Lucille; Moulin, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Teresa B

    2013-01-01

    Thiamin (vitamin B1) is made by plants and microorganisms but is an essential micronutrient in the human diet. All organisms require it as a cofactor in its form as thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) for the activity of key enzymes of central metabolism. In humans, deficiency is widespread particularly in populations where polished rice is a major component of the diet. Considerable progress has been made on the elucidation of the biosynthesis pathway within the last few years enabling concrete strategies for biofortification purposes to be devised, with a particular focus here on genetic engineering. Furthermore, the vitamin has been shown to play a role in both abiotic and biotic stress responses. The precursors for de novo biosynthesis of thiamin differ between microorganisms and plants. Bacteria use intermediates derived from purine and isoprenoid biosynthesis, whereas the pathway in yeast involves the use of compounds from the vitamin B3 and B6 groups. Plants on the other hand use a combination of the bacterial and yeast pathways and there is subcellular partitioning of the biosynthesis steps. Specifically, thiamin biosynthesis occurs in the chloroplast of plants through the separate formation of the pyrimidine and thiazole moieties, which are then coupled to form thiamin monophosphate (TMP). Phosphorylation of thiamin to form TPP occurs in the cytosol. Therefore, thiamin (or TMP) must be exported from the chloroplast to the cytosol for the latter step to be executed. The regulation of biosynthesis is mediated through riboswitches, where binding of the product TPP to the pre-mRNA of a biosynthetic gene modulates expression. Here we examine and hypothesize on genetic engineering approaches attempting to increase the thiamin content employing knowledge gained with the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We will discuss the regulatory steps that need to be taken into consideration and can be used a prerequisite for devising such strategies in crop plants.

  9. Minority Summer Research Program in the Plant Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Poff, Kenneth L.

    2004-08-12

    Gutierrez and Larcom (2000) suggest that ''According to the National Science Foundation/Division of Science Resources Studies in 1997, the percentage distribution of scientists and engineers in the labor force by race/ethnicity changed little between 1993 and 1997''. According to this report, Black, non-Hispanic went from 3.6 in 1993 to 3.4 in 1997. Hispanic went from 3.0 in 1993 to 3.1 in 1997; and American Indian/Alaskan Native stayed the same at 0.3 during the same period. The only exceptions were a slight increase in the percentage of Asian from 9.2 in 1993 to 10.4 in 1997, while a slight decrease in percentage White from 83.9 in 1993 to 82.8 in 1997. Overall, no major changes in minorities were present in the science and engineering fields during that period. These data shows that major efforts are needed in order to improve and achieve better results for diversity in the workplace (Gutierrez & Larcom, 2000). This does not mean that major steps have not been taken over this period. For example, the Minority Summer Research Program in Plant Sciences (also funded in part by NSF under the title, ''Undergraduate Researchers in Plant Sciences Program'') was established in an effort to enhance the diversity of the plant science community. The Minority Summer Research Program in Plant Sciences was designed to encourage members of underrepresented groups to seek career opportunities in the plant sciences. To achieve this end, the program contained several components with the primary focus on mentored research for undergraduate students. The research experience was provided during the summer months on the campus of Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan. At the end of the summer experience, each participant presented an oral report on their research, and submitted a written paper on the same topic. This was deliberately designed to mimic the plant science professions in which research leads to presentations in the form of reports, papers, etc. In addition

  10. Programs of Study: A Cross-Study Examination of Programs in Three States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stringfield, Sam; Shumer, Robert; Stipanovic, Natalie; Murphy, Nora

    2013-01-01

    The National Research Center on Career and Technical Education has supported four studies on one of the major components of Perkins legislation: programs of study. In this article, we present qualitative data linking the research center's longitudinal projects based on programs of study, via a one-time cross-case study of sites deemed highly…

  11. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.N. Wright

    2005-09-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Project is envisioned to demonstrate the following: (1) A full-scale prototype VHTR by about 2021; (2) High-temperature Brayton Cycle electric power production at full scale with a focus on economic performance; (3) Nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen (with about 10% of the heat) with a focus on economic performance; and (4) By test, the exceptional safety capabilities of the advanced gas-cooled reactors. Further, the NGNP program will: (1) Obtain a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License to construct and operate the NGNP, this process will provide a basis for future performance based, risk-informed licensing; and (2) Support the development, testing, and prototyping of hydrogen infrastructures. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. The NGNP Materials R&D Program includes the following elements: (1) Developing a specific approach, program plan and other project management tools for

  12. A Lifecycle Management Program for NPP Turbine Balance of Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manabe, Jun; Yamakami, Katsuhiko; Hiraoka, Satoshi; Kawai, Toshinari

    A lifecycle management program, for turbine balance of plant of light water reactor units which had been operated for more than 20 years but still having a long intended residual life time, was proposed and implemented from the view point of system and equipment supplier. Here would be introduced the program executed for several utilities. The program consists of unit surveillance analyzing both operation and inspection data, degradation assessment for the equipment and prospecting for the future by planning the proper measures for the issues based on both technology and economy. The program is introduced exampling the generating power affected by main steam pressure reduction derived from the scale adhesion and degradation of equipment. Multidisciplinary optimum design for the replacement of the feedwater heaters, one of the items of the planning, is introduced. Additionally would be introduced the new concept maintenance support program, mainly applied to the units already replaced their principal machines and auxiliaries, configured with both the condition based maintenance system monitoring the trend of parameters of a component and the diagnosis of malfunctions ascertaining the equipment by analyzing and synthesizing operation parameters.

  13. Only in dying, life: programmed cell death during plant development.

    PubMed

    Van Hautegem, Tom; Waters, Andrew J; Goodrich, Justin; Nowack, Moritz K

    2015-02-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a fundamental process of life. During the evolution of multicellular organisms, the actively controlled demise of cells has been recruited to fulfil a multitude of functions in development, differentiation, tissue homeostasis, and immune systems. In this review we discuss some of the multiple cases of PCD that occur as integral parts of plant development in a remarkable variety of cell types, tissues, and organs. Although research in the last decade has discovered a number of PCD regulators, mediators, and executers, we are still only beginning to understand the mechanistic complexity that tightly controls preparation, initiation, and execution of PCD as a process that is indispensable for successful vegetative and reproductive development of plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. "PERLE bedside-examination-course for candidates in state examination" - Developing a training program for the third part of medical state examination (oral examination with practical skills).

    PubMed

    Karthaus, Anne; Schmidt, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Einführung: Viele Studierende haben Fragen und Beratungsbedarf bei der Vorbereitung für das letzte mündliche Examen. Um sie bei den Examensvorbereitungen zu begleiten und praktische Hilfestellung zu geben, wurde von Tutorinnen und Tutoren des SkillsLabs Perle- „Praxis ERfahren und LErnen“ der FAU Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg ein neues Kursmodell konzipiert.Ziele: Der Kurs soll den Studierenden helfen, sich mit der Prüfungssituation vertraut zu machen und Sicherheit zu erlangen. So ist die Auseinandersetzung mit dieser spezifischen Situation in einem geschützten Rahmen möglich. Außerdem findet eine Anwendung und eine Vertiefung von Softskills statt. Kurskonzept: Dieser Kurs ist angelehnt an das OSCE Modell (Objective Structured Clinical Examination), einem Fallbasierten Lern- und Prüfungsmodell. Anhand von Fallbeispielen wiederholen und vertiefen die Studierenden bereits gelerntes Wissen. Dabei werden sie von erfahrenen Tutoren begleitet, die Hilfestellung zu fachspezifischen und organisatorischen Fragen wie Kleiderordnung und Verhaltensweisen geben.Auswertung des Kurses: Der Kurs wurde von den Teilnehmern am Ende jedes Kurses evaluiert. Anhand der Evaluation wird der Kurs stetig weiterentwickelt. Im März, April und Oktober 2015 fanden sechs Kurse mit in Summe 84 Teilnehmern statt. 76 Fragebögen (91%) wurden vollständig ausgefüllt und ausgewertet.Diskussion: Als Stärken des Kurses sind ein guter Tutoren-Teilnehmer Schlüssel mit 1:4 (1 Tutor betreut 4 Teilnehmer), die Interaktivität des Kurses und die hohe Flexibilität auf die einzelne Gruppe eingehen zu können, zu nennen. Schwächen sind der limitierte Zeitrahmen und die bisher nicht erhobene Leistungsüberprüfung vor und nach dem Kurs. Schlussfolgerung: Dieser Artikel zeigt im Sinne eines „best practice“-Beispiels eine Möglichkeit auf, niederschwellig und mit geringen Kosten eine Vorbereitung für das praktische Examen anzubieten.

  15. Weaving Diversity into LIS: An Examination of Diversity Course Offerings in iSchool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subramaniam, Mega M.; Jaeger, Paul T.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the current state of diversity course offerings in Library and Information Science (LIS) programs through the analysis of syllabi of diversity-related courses offered in the American Library Association accredited Master of Library and Information Science (MLS) programs at iSchools (a group of information schools that include…

  16. The FRIENDS Cognitive Behavioral Program in Japanese Schools: An Examination of the Treatment Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumoto, Yuki; Shimizu, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for childhood anxiety is effective in schools; however, researchers have reported mixed results and expressed concerns regarding sociocultural differences in treating childhood anxiety. This study examined the efficacy of the FRIENDS program, which is a CBT program used at a universal school level. Students (N =…

  17. The FRIENDS Cognitive Behavioral Program in Japanese Schools: An Examination of the Treatment Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumoto, Yuki; Shimizu, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for childhood anxiety is effective in schools; however, researchers have reported mixed results and expressed concerns regarding sociocultural differences in treating childhood anxiety. This study examined the efficacy of the FRIENDS program, which is a CBT program used at a universal school level. Students (N =…

  18. An Examination of the Federal College Work-Study Program at Monterey Peninsula College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobrow, William

    The work-study program at Monterey Peninsula College was evaluated through questionnaires distributed to students in the program and to their supervisors. In particular, the issues involved in work-study education as related to disadvantaged students were examined. Analysis of the questionnaire data revealed that the work-study students felt that…

  19. Deciphering the V-Chip: An Examination of the Television Industry's Program Rating Judgments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunkel, Dale; Farinola, Wendy Jo Maynard; Farrar, Kirstie; Donnerstein, Edward; Biely, Erica; Zwarun, Lara

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the validity of the television industry's labeling of sensitive program content following the advent of the V-chip television ratings system. Examines programs for the nature and extent of portrayals of violence, sexual behavior and dialogue, and adult language. Suggests there are substantial limitations in the ability of the V-chip…

  20. Examining Inclusion of Evidence-Based Practice on Social Work Training Program Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wike, Traci L.; Bledsoe, Sarah E.; Bellamy, Jennifer L.; Grady, Melissa D.

    2013-01-01

    Websites represent a visible medium for social work programs to communicate information about social work research, academics, and professional training priorities, including evidence-based practice (EBP). However, few studies have examined the content of social work program websites. This exploratory study aimed to answer the question: Are EBP…

  1. Teaming up for Literacy: Examining Participants' Contributions to a Collaborative Family-Based Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Tracey

    2016-01-01

    This study of participants' contributions to a university-based family literacy program was informed by both "funds of knowledge" (Moll, 1992) and "multiple literacies" (Auerbach, 1995). The study examined participants' contributions to the design, implementation, and evaluation of a university-based family literacy program. In…

  2. Examining Student Perceptions in Four Instructional Programs for Students at Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Stephanie L.; Kneese, Carolyn C.

    1999-01-01

    Examined four types of at-risk intervention programs that responded differently to at-risk students' characteristics and needs, investigating various dimensions of student perceptions that have been linked to at-risk status. Survey and interview data indicated that students in all four programs had similarly high perceptions of affiliation,…

  3. Deciphering the V-Chip: An Examination of the Television Industry's Program Rating Judgments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunkel, Dale; Farinola, Wendy Jo Maynard; Farrar, Kirstie; Donnerstein, Edward; Biely, Erica; Zwarun, Lara

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the validity of the television industry's labeling of sensitive program content following the advent of the V-chip television ratings system. Examines programs for the nature and extent of portrayals of violence, sexual behavior and dialogue, and adult language. Suggests there are substantial limitations in the ability of the V-chip…

  4. Examining How Teachers Use Graphs to Teach Mathematics during a Professional Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bautista, Alfredo; Cañadas, María C.; Brizuela, Bárbara M.; Schliemann, Analúcia D.

    2015-01-01

    There are urgent calls for more studies examining the impact of Professional Development (PD) programs on teachers' instructional practices. In this study, we analyzed how grades 5-9 mathematics teachers used graphs to teach mathematics at the start and end of a PD program. This topic is relevant because while many studies have investigated…

  5. 46 CFR 71.50-31 - Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Continued participation in the Alternative Hull... the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) program. (a) To continue to participate in the AHE Program, vessel operators must conduct an annual hull condition assessment. At a minimum, vessel operators must...

  6. Examining Sense of Community among Medical Professionals in an Online Graduate Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Kadriye O.; McVay-Dyche, Jennifer; Chen, Haiqin; Seto, Teresa L.

    2015-01-01

    As the number of online degree programs continues to grow, one of the greatest challenges is developing a sense of community among learners who do not convene at the same time and place. This study examined the sense of community among medical professionals in an online graduate program for healthcare professionals. We took the sample from a fully…

  7. Weaving Diversity into LIS: An Examination of Diversity Course Offerings in iSchool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subramaniam, Mega M.; Jaeger, Paul T.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the current state of diversity course offerings in Library and Information Science (LIS) programs through the analysis of syllabi of diversity-related courses offered in the American Library Association accredited Master of Library and Information Science (MLS) programs at iSchools (a group of information schools that include…

  8. Effectiveness of landowner assistance activities: an examination of the USDA Forest Service's Forest Stewardship Program

    Treesearch

    Brett J. Butler; Marla Markowski-Lindsay; Stephanie Snyder; Paul Catanzaro; David B. Kittredge; Kyle Andrejczyk; Brenton J. Dickinson; Derya Eryilmaz; Jaketon H. Hewes; Paula Randler; Donna Tadle; Michael A. Kilgore

    2014-01-01

    The USDA Forest Service's Forest Stewardship Program (FSP) is the nation's most prominent private forestry assistance program. We examined the FSP using a multiple analytic approach: analysis of annual FSP accomplishments, survey of state FSP coordinators, analytic comparison of family forest owners receiving and not receiving forestry practice assistance,...

  9. Listening to Students: Examining Underlying Mechanisms That Contribute to the AVID Program's Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Llamas, Jasmín D.; López, Susana A.; Quirk, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    This study used a mixed-methods approach to examine the effects of the Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) program from the student perspective, specifically focusing on factors associated with student resilience. The AVID program aims to close the achievement gap among predominantly minority and low-income students without a family…

  10. Workplace ESL Literacy Program of the Los Angeles Herald Examiner Newspaper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herald Examiner, Los Angeles, CA.

    This packet of materials from the Los Angeles Herald Examiner's English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) workplace literacy program, defunct since the newspaper's closing, contains the following items: an overview of the program; a list of units and subunits; two sample lesson plans; teacher guidelines about evaluation and progress; lists of specific…

  11. Examining Inclusion of Evidence-Based Practice on Social Work Training Program Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wike, Traci L.; Bledsoe, Sarah E.; Bellamy, Jennifer L.; Grady, Melissa D.

    2013-01-01

    Websites represent a visible medium for social work programs to communicate information about social work research, academics, and professional training priorities, including evidence-based practice (EBP). However, few studies have examined the content of social work program websites. This exploratory study aimed to answer the question: Are EBP…

  12. An Examination of the Educational Programs Held for Juvenile Delinquents in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozdemir, Soner Mehmet

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine some educational programs given in prisons to socialization juvenile delinquents in Turkey, and to evaluate these educational programs in relation to the views and opinions of juveniles. The study was conducted in Ankara Juvenile and Youth Closed Prison (ACGKCIK), one of 3 juvenile prisons in Turkey. Data…

  13. Examining Nontraditional Graduate Students' Academic Writing Experiences in an Accelerated Adult Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crite, Charles E., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The academic writing competencies of nontraditional graduate students enrolled in accelerated graduate programs have become a growing concern for many higher learning educators in those programs. The purpose of this nonexperimental quantitative study was to examine the writing experiences that impacted nontraditional graduate students enrolled in…

  14. Pediatric Hospital School Programming: An Examination of Educational Services for Students Who Are Hospitalized

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinke, Sarah M.; Elam, Megan; Irwin, Mary Kay; Sexton, Karen; McGraw, Anne

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to define the current functions and operations of hospital school programs nationwide. A 56-item survey was disseminated to hospital teachers across the country to examine perceptions about their work, programs, and professional practice. Quantitative findings were analyzed using descriptive statistics at the individual…

  15. Teaming up for Literacy: Examining Participants' Contributions to a Collaborative Family-Based Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Tracey

    2016-01-01

    This study of participants' contributions to a university-based family literacy program was informed by both "funds of knowledge" (Moll, 1992) and "multiple literacies" (Auerbach, 1995). The study examined participants' contributions to the design, implementation, and evaluation of a university-based family literacy program. In…

  16. Sludge application program at the Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Corey, J C; Lower, M W; Davis, C E

    1985-01-01

    Since 1980 a research program has been conducted at the Savannah River Plant to evaluate the use of domestic sewage sludge to enhance forest productivity. The objectives of the program have been to determine the cost effectiveness and environmental impact of using sewage sludge as a soil conditioner and slow-release fertilizer. The potential impacts of sludge application on nutrient cycling, organic carbon budgets, forest wildlife, and biomass production have been studied. Soil, soil water, groundwater, and stand biomass samples have been analyzed to monitor the availability and movement of nutrients and metals. Remote sensing techniques have been applied to the plots to see if they have large scale application to biomass determinations. Results of the study have been used to develop guidelines for land application of domestic sewage sludge.

  17. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions

    2002-09-24

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to prepare a Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan. This document fulfills the requirement for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This document was prepared by the Hydrology Section of the Westinghouse TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) Environmental Compliance Department, and it is the responsibility of this group to review the plan annually and update it every three years. This document is not, nor is it intended to be, an implementing document that sets forth specific details on carrying out field projects or operational policy. Rather, it is intended to give the reader insight to the groundwater protection philosophy at WIPP.

  18. The Cinchona Program (1940-1945): science and imperialism in the exploitation of a medicinal plant.

    PubMed

    Cuvi, Nicolás

    2011-01-01

    During World War II, the United States implemented programs to exploit hundreds of raw materials in Latin America, many of them botanical. This required the participation of the country's scientific community and marked the beginning of intervention in Latin American countries characterized by the active participation of the United States in negotiations (and not only by private firms supported by the United States). Many federal institutions and companies were created, others were adapted, and universities, research centers and pharmaceutical companies were contracted. The programs undertaken by this coalition of institutions served to build and consolidate the dependence of Latin American countries on United States technology, to focus their economies on the extraction and development of resources that the United States could not obtain at home (known as "complementary") and to impede the development of competition. Latin American republics had been historically dependant on raw material exports (minerals and plants). But during World War II their dependence on U.S. loans, markets, science and technology reached record levels. One example of this can be appreciated through a careful examination of the Cinchona Program, implemented in the 1940s by US agencies in Latin America. This program for the extraction of a single medicinal plant, apart from representing a new model of scientific imperialism (subsequently renamed "scientific cooperation") was the most intensive and extensive scientific exploration of a single medicinal plant in the history of mankind.

  19. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Richard R.; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.; Nigg, David W.; Gougar, Hans D.; Johnson, Richard W; Terry, William K.; Oh, Chang H.; McEligot, Donald W.; Johnsen, Gary W.; McCreery, Glenn E.; Yoon, Woo Y.; Sterbentz, James W.; Herring, J. Steve; Taiwo, Temitope A.; Wei, Thomas Y. C.; Pointer, William D.; Yang, Won S.; Farmer, Michael T.; Khalil, Hussein S.; Feltus, Madeline A.

    2010-12-01

    One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the “highly ranked” phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

  20. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan -- PLN-2498

    SciTech Connect

    Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

    2010-09-01

    One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the “highly ranked” phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

  1. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

    2010-12-01

    One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the “highly ranked” phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

  2. Interdisciplinary Research and Training Program in the Plant Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Wolk, C.P.

    1992-01-01

    Research on plants continued. Topics include: Molecular basis of symbiotic plant-microbe interations; enzymatic mechanisms and regulation of plant cell wall biosynthesis; molecular mechanisms that regulate the expression of genes in plants; resistance of plants to environmental stress; studies on hormone biosynthesis and action; plant cell wall proteins; interaction of nuclear and organelle genomes; sensor transduction in plants; molecular mechanisms of trafficking in the plant cell; regulation of lipid metabolism; molecular bases of plant disease resistance mechanisms; biochemical and molecular aspects of plant pathogenesis; developmental biology of nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria; environmental control of plant development and its relation to plant hormones.

  3. The Use of a Principal Axis Model to Examine Individual Plant Harvest Index in Four Grain Legumes

    PubMed Central

    AYAZ, S.; MOOT, D. J.; MCKENZIE, B. A.; HILL, G. D.; MCNEIL, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims A principal axis model (PAM) has been proposed to enable the selection of crop ideotypes. The PAM enables plant-to-plant variability within crops to be quantified and compared. The aim of this paper is to validate the PAM for four grain legumes. • Methods Four grain legumes (Cicer arietinum, Lens culinaris, Lupinus angustifolius, Pisum sativum) were used to quantify the influence of plant-to-plant variability on crop yields. To create variability, populations of 10, 100 and 400 plants m−2 were established ‘on-the-square’ with sowing depths of 2, 5 and 10 cm. Further, a central plant was treated with nitrogen and the impact of this on its four neighbouring plants was examined. Seeds were sown and plants harvested individually by hand. • Key Results Mean individual plant seed weight (SWT) and plant weight (PWT) decreased as plant population increased but there was a consistent and strong (R2 > 0·90) linear relationship between SWT and PWT, with a negative SWT-axis intercept in all species. These components form the basis of the principal axis model (PAM). The PAM was used to summarize the performance of individual plants within a crop and quantify the variability caused by N treatment and the lowest and highest yielding individual plants. A negative SWT-axis intercept indicated that a minimum plant weight (MPW) was required for seed production and therefore the relationship between plant harvest index (PHI) and PWT was asymptotic. The heaviest MPW was calculated for plants grown at the lowest plant population and it was species-dependent, being higher in the larger seeded species. • Conclusions Agronomic or physiological characteristics that lead to variability in PWT within a population will decrease PHI, and crop yield. The PAM may be useful in breeding programmes to identify plant phenotypes that minimize this plant-to-plant variability. PMID:15292041

  4. Considering Student Voices: Examining the Experiences of Underrepresented Students in Intervention Programs.

    PubMed

    Gibau, Gina Sanchez

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative studies that examine the experiences of underrepresented minority students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields are comparatively few. This study explores the self-reported experiences of underrepresented graduate students in the biomedical sciences of a large, midwestern, urban university. Document analysis of interview transcripts from program evaluations capture firsthand accounts of student experiences and reveal the need for a critical examination of current intervention programs designed to reverse the trend of underrepresentation in the biomedical sciences. Findings point to themes aligned around the benefits and challenges of program components, issues of social adjustment, the utility of supportive relationships, and environmental impacts.

  5. Considering Student Voices: Examining the Experiences of Underrepresented Students in Intervention Programs

    PubMed Central

    Gibau, Gina Sanchez

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative studies that examine the experiences of underrepresented minority students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields are comparatively few. This study explores the self-reported experiences of underrepresented graduate students in the biomedical sciences of a large, midwestern, urban university. Document analysis of interview transcripts from program evaluations capture firsthand accounts of student experiences and reveal the need for a critical examination of current intervention programs designed to reverse the trend of underrepresentation in the biomedical sciences. Findings point to themes aligned around the benefits and challenges of program components, issues of social adjustment, the utility of supportive relationships, and environmental impacts. PMID:26163562

  6. Examining the Influence of Campus Leadership Programs at a Catholic University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Rich; Meents-DeCaigny, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    This study uses the socially responsible leadership and leadership efficacy scales in the Multi-Institutional Study of Leadership (MSL) to examine leadership programs at one Catholic campus, and their influence on socially responsible leadership and leadership efficacy. Examining students that identified as involved in 14 campus leadership…

  7. 46 CFR 71.50-19 - The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) PASSENGER VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Drydocking § 71.50-19 The Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program application. If your vessel meets the eligibility criteria in § 71.50-17 of this part, you may... examination date to the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection (OCMI), who will oversee the hull...

  8. 46 CFR 115.660 - Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Continued participation in the Alternative Hull... MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Hull and Tailshaft Examinations § 115.660 Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program. (a) To continue to participate in...

  9. Examining the Influence of Campus Leadership Programs at a Catholic University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Rich; Meents-DeCaigny, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    This study uses the socially responsible leadership and leadership efficacy scales in the Multi-Institutional Study of Leadership (MSL) to examine leadership programs at one Catholic campus, and their influence on socially responsible leadership and leadership efficacy. Examining students that identified as involved in 14 campus leadership…

  10. Development of a breast self-examination program for the Internet: health information for Korean women.

    PubMed

    Kim, H S; Kim, E; Kim, J W

    2001-04-01

    Internet-based health information will enable us to interact with many people despite distance and time constraints. Informational media by computer is expected to become an important factor that affects health behavior. This study was done to develop an accessible multimedia program about breast self-examination on the Internet. This study was designed by using the two steps of need assessment and program development. For the need assessment step, a survey was carried out. The sample consisted of the 82 women of Yonsei University selected by convenient random sampling. At the program development step, screen design took into account perspectives of computer engineering. A storyboard for every screen was made via screen design and then ported to computer using the Netscape Navigator program. A breast self-examination program was developed using Netscape 4.0 on the Windows 98 platform. The multimedia program, including text, graphics, animation, and sound, was constructed with HTML language using Memo Sheet in Netscape Navigator. The contents of health information posted on the Internet included general information about breast cancer, the importance of breast self-examination, self-risk appraisal of breast cancer, the diverse methods about breast self-examination, the monthly check list graph, and social network for consultation. It is possible to interact with clients through the Question and Answer function on screen. This Internet-based health information program provides enough information, which can be accessed using search systems on the Internet.

  11. Vacuolar processing enzyme in plant programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Hatsugai, Noriyuki; Yamada, Kenji; Goto-Yamada, Shino; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2015-01-01

    Vacuolar processing enzyme (VPE) is a cysteine proteinase originally identified as the proteinase responsible for the maturation and activation of vacuolar proteins in plants, and it is known to be an ortholog of animal asparaginyl endopeptidase (AEP/VPE/legumain). VPE has been shown to exhibit enzymatic properties similar to that of caspase 1, which is a cysteine protease that mediates the programmed cell death (PCD) pathway in animals. Although there is limited sequence identity between VPE and caspase 1, their predicted three-dimensional structures revealed that the essential amino-acid residues for these enzymes form similar pockets for the substrate peptide YVAD. In contrast to the cytosolic localization of caspases, VPE is localized in vacuoles. VPE provokes vacuolar rupture, initiating the proteolytic cascade leading to PCD in the plant immune response. It has become apparent that the VPE-dependent PCD pathway is involved not only in the immune response, but also in the responses to a variety of stress inducers and in the development of various tissues. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the contribution of VPE to plant PCD and its role in vacuole-mediated cell death, and it also compares VPE with the animal cell death executor caspase 1. PMID:25914711

  12. The effect of a forensic fellowship program on general psychiatry residents' in-training examination outcomes.

    PubMed

    McBain, Stacy M; Hinton, Jeremy A; Thrush, Carol R; Williams, D Keith; Guise, J Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how the establishment and existence of a forensic psychiatry fellowship program was associated with improvements in general psychiatry residents' scores on the Psychiatry Resident In-training Examination (PRITE). Four consecutive years of general psychiatry residents' PRITE scores spanning 2 years before and 2 years after implementation of the forensic fellowship program at our institution were compared. Mixed-model statistical analyses accounting for repeated measurements of individual residents across the periods indicated statistically significant improvement in forensic content scores and several other subspecialty areas in which our institution offers educational fellowship programs. External indicators of program outcomes such as standardized examination scores may provide a useful indication of the effects that an educational fellowship program can have on general psychiatry education.

  13. Unique programming: an examination of the benefits of a free choice program

    Treesearch

    Dorothy L. Schmalz; Deborah L. Kerstetter; Harry C. Zinn

    2002-01-01

    This study was an investigation of a free choice program and the benefits free choice yields on the developing characteristics of self-esteem and intrinsic motivation among adolescent girls. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected at Brown Ledge Camp, an all girls summer camp outside of Burlington, Vermont, during the summer of 2000. Quantitative results...

  14. Aquatic Plant Control Research Program: The Rhizosphere Microbiology of Rooted Aquatic Plants.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    processes in terrestrial and marine plants. Nature and Properties of the Rhizosphere Sediment environment 4. A great deal of research has been...investigators have studied nitrogen fixation in Halodule wrightii in the marine environment. Smith and Hayasaka (1982a) examined nitrogenase activity associated...few studies on sulfur cycling in the rhizosphere, despite the plethora of information on sulfur biogeochemistry in both fresh- water and marine

  15. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    2005-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: (1) Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (2) Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: (1) High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior; (2) High temperature materials qualification; (3) Design methods development and validation; (4) Hydrogen production technologies; and (5) Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented

  16. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    P. E. MacDonald

    2005-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Demonstrate safe and economical nuclearassisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior High temperature materials qualification Design methods development and validation Hydrogen production technologies Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented in Section 4. The DOE-funded hydrogen

  17. Assessment of Success on the RHIA Certification Examination: A Comparison of Baccalaureate Program Graduates and Postbaccalaureate Certificate Program Graduates

    PubMed Central

    Condon, Jim; Barefield, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    The demand for registered health information administrators continues to outpace the available supply of credentialed graduates. One solution to address this shortfall has been the availability of postbaccalaureate certificate programs. A health information administration department at an academic health sciences center, which has historically offered a traditional bachelor of science degree in health information administration, has offered a postbaccalaureate certificate program in health information administration since 2001. As part of the program's ongoing quality review/performance improvement process, program faculty conducted an analysis to determine whether success on the registered health information administrator (RHIA) certification examination was the same, regardless of the program type or method of course delivery. Results of this analysis demonstrated that the postbaccalaureate certificate program is a viable alternative for producing successful health information administration graduates, increasing program enrollment, and increasing the number of RHIAs in the workforce. Health information administration programs may consider a postbaccalaureate certificate program as a way to increase the number of graduates and in turn increase the health information administration workforce. PMID:23209451

  18. 33 CFR Appendix B to Part 273 - Information Requirements for Aquatic Plant Control Program Reports

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Aquatic Plant Control Program Reports B Appendix B to Part 273 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL Pt. 273, App. B Appendix B to Part 273—Information Requirements for Aquatic Plant Control Program Reports 1. Location and...

  19. Examining the effectiveness of a restorative justice program for various types of juvenile offenders.

    PubMed

    Bergseth, Kathleen J; Bouffard, Jeffrey A

    2013-09-01

    Restorative justice (RJ) programs have become widespread in the United States and in other countries. These programs are often seen as a viable alternative to traditional retributive processing, especially for minor, and sometimes more serious, forms of delinquency and adult criminality. The programs hold promise for achieving several goals, including increased community and victim involvement, greater satisfaction with the case outcomes, improved offender compliance, increased perceptions of fairness, and even recidivism reduction. Meta-analyses have demonstrated varying degrees of program success in recidivism reduction, which may in part reflect differential effectiveness of the RJ approach for various kinds of offenders. This study examined whether an RJ program for juvenile offenders had differential impacts on recidivism across various offender characteristics (including age, gender, racial group, offending history, and current offense). Results generally support the effectiveness of the program for many types of offenders. Implications for future research and potential improvements to the RJ model are discussed.

  20. Experimental program plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has prepared this Experimental Program Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (EPP) to provide a summary of the DOE experimental efforts needed for the performance assessment process for the WIPP, and of the linkages of this process to the appropriate regulations. The Plan encompasses a program of analyses of the performance of the planned repository based on scientific studies, including tests with transuranic waste at laboratory sites, directed at evaluating compliance with the principal regulations governing the WIPP. The Plan begins with background information on the WIPP project, the requirements of the LWA (Land Withdrawal Act), and its objective and scope. It then presents an overview of the regulatory requirements and the compliance approach. Next are comprehensive discussions of plans for compliance with disposal regulations, followed by the SWDA (Solid Waste Disposal Act) and descriptions of activity programs designed to provide information needed for determining compliance. Descriptions and justifications of all currently planned studies designed to support regulatory compliance activities are also included.

  1. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Groundwater Monitoring Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillesheim, M. B.; Beauheim, R. L.

    2006-12-01

    The development of a groundwater monitoring program is an integral part of any radioactive waste disposal facility. Monitoring improves our understanding of the geologic and hydrologic framework, which improves conceptual models and the quality of groundwater models that provide data input for performance assessment. The purpose of a groundwater monitoring program is to provide objective evidence that the hydrologic system is behaving as expected (i.e., performance confirmation). Monitoring should not be limited to near-field observations but should include the larger natural system in which the repository is situated. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility designed for the safe disposal of transuranic wastes resulting from U.S. defense programs, can serve as a model for other radioactive waste disposal facilities. WIPP has a long-established groundwater monitoring program that is geared towards meeting compliance certification requirements set forth by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The primary task of the program is to measure various water parameters (e.g.., water level, pressure head, chemical and physical properties) using a groundwater monitoring network that currently consists of 85 wells in the vicinity of the WIPP site. Wells are completed to a number of water-bearing horizons and are monitored on a monthly basis. In many instances, they are also instrumented with programmable pressure transducers that take high-frequency measurements that supplement the monthly measurements. Results from higher frequency measurements indicate that the hydrologic system in the WIPP vicinity is in a transient state, responding to both natural and anthropogenic stresses. The insights gathered from the monitoring, as well as from hydrologic testing activities, provide valuable information that contributes to groundwater modeling efforts and performance assessment. Sandia is a multi program laboratory operated by

  2. Examining Variations in Fourth-Grade Children's Participation in School Breakfast and Lunch Programs by Student and Program Demographics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinn, Caroline H.; Baxter, Suzanne Domel; Finney, Christopher J.; Hitchcock, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: Analyses were conducted to examine variations in fourth-grade children's participation in school-breakfast and school-lunch programs by weekday, month, socioeconomic status, absenteeism, gender, and school-breakfast location. Methods: Fourth-grade children were participants in a dietary-reporting validation study during either…

  3. Examining Variations in Fourth-Grade Children's Participation in School Breakfast and Lunch Programs by Student and Program Demographics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinn, Caroline H.; Baxter, Suzanne Domel; Finney, Christopher J.; Hitchcock, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: Analyses were conducted to examine variations in fourth-grade children's participation in school-breakfast and school-lunch programs by weekday, month, socioeconomic status, absenteeism, gender, and school-breakfast location. Methods: Fourth-grade children were participants in a dietary-reporting validation study during either…

  4. A survey of physical examination skills taught in undergraduate nursing programs: are we teaching too much?

    PubMed

    Giddens, Jean Foret; Eddy, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Because content saturation is a growing concern, as reflected in the nursing literature, the content taught in undergraduate nursing curricula should be critically examined. The purpose of this descriptive cross-sectional research was to determine and analyze the physical assessment content currently taught in undergraduate nursing programs. A total of 198 individuals teaching in undergraduate nursing programs completed a Web-based survey. Of the 122 skills included on the survey, 81% were reportedly being taught in most of the nursing programs. Total scores for 18 systems-based assessment categories were significantly different among associate and baccalaureate nursing programs in all but three categories: assessment of integument, breast, and female genitals. Previous research has shown that nurses use less than 25% of these same skills regularly in clinical practice, regardless of their educational preparation. Findings from this research raise questions about the breadth to which physical examination content should be taught in undergraduate nursing education.

  5. Breast Self-Examination: Programs and Materials Available for Teaching and Research

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Linda Del; Desmeules, Louise

    1985-01-01

    There is an abundance of information of breast self-examination (BSE) as a method of detecting breast cancer. This article describes the various teaching programs and sources of information available to physician, nurse and patient. Materials featuring old, young, black or white women are available; many can be obtained in English, French, Spanish and Braille. These materials range from annotated bibliographies, pamphlets and research reports to programs of continuing education for physicians, nurses and patients. PMID:21274089

  6. [Different educational programs on medical ultrasound examination for radiological technologists and medical technologists].

    PubMed

    Ganjitsuda, Kazunori; Tagawa, Masami; Ikeda, Kenichi; Fukushi, Masahiro; Kameoka, Junichi

    2012-01-01

    Radiological technologists (RTs) and medical technologists (MTs) are legally allowed to work as sonographers performing medical ultrasound examination. Despite the total number, much fewer RTs work as sonographers than MTs. To explore the reason, we investigated educational programs, universities, and colleges for both specialties. First, we established five categories of sonographers' competency: 1) Anatomy for imaging diagnosis, 2) Diseases and diagnosis, 3) Imaging, 4) Structure and principle of the equipment, and 5) Evaluation of image quality, using competence reported by the International Society of Radiographers and Radiological Technologists (ISRRT) and diagnostic competency required of sonographers in Japan. Using these categories, we analyzed the content and total instruction time by lectures and seminars based on information written in the syllabi, and explored the differences in education related to sonographers' competency in both programs. "Anatomy for imaging diagnosis" was taught in 15 RT programs (93.8%), and 6 MT programs (31.6%). "Diseases and diagnosis" was taught in 13 RT programs (86.7%), and 8 MT programs (53.3%). "Imaging" was taught in 14 RT programs (100%), and 13 MT programs (76.5%). "Structure and principle of the equipment" was taught in 12 RT programs (85.7%), and 6 MT programs (31.6%). "Evaluation of image quality" was taught in 11 RT programs (84.6%), and 3 MT programs (15.0%). The average instruction time for RT was longer than for MT programs in all categories. RTs are educated and have a foundation to be sonographers at graduation, and may have the possibility to expand their career in this field.

  7. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    The DOE has mandated in DOE Order 5400.1 that its operations will be conducted in an environmentally safe manner. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) will comply with DOE Order 5400.1 and will conduct its operations in a manner that ensures the safety of the environment and the public. This document outlines how the WIPP will protect and preserve groundwater within and surrounding the WIPP facility. Groundwater protection is just one aspect of the WIPP environmental protection effort. The WIPP groundwater surveillance program is designed to determine statistically if any changes are occurring in groundwater characteristics within and surrounding the WIPP facility. If a change is noted, the cause will be determined and appropriate corrective action initiated.

  8. Power plant system assessment. Final report. SP-100 Program

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.V.; Atkins, D.F.; Bost, D.S.; Berman, B.; Clinger, D.A.; Determan, W.R.; Drucker, G.S.; Glasgow, L.E.; Hartung, J.A.; Harty, R.B.

    1983-10-31

    The purpose of this assessment was to provide system-level insights into 100-kWe-class space reactor electric systems. Using these insights, Rockwell was to select and perform conceptual design studies on a ''most attractive'' system that met the preliminary design goals and requirements of the SP-100 Program. About 4 of the 6 months were used in the selection process. The remaining 2 months were used for the system conceptual design studies. Rockwell completed these studies at the end of FY 1983. This report summarizes the results of the power plant system assessment and describes our choice for the most attractive system - the Rockwell SR-100G System (Space Reactor, 100 kWe, Growth) - a lithium-cooled UN-fueled fast reactor/Brayton turboelectric converter system.

  9. Advanced on-site power plant development technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A 30-cell, full area short stack containing advanced cell features was tested for 2900 hours. A stack acid addition approach was selected and will be evaluated on the stack at 5000 hours test time. A brassboard inverter was designed and fabrication was initiated. Evaluation of this brassboard inverter will take place in 1984. A Teflon coated commercial heat exchanger was selected as the preferred approach for the acid condenser. A reformer catalyst with significantly less pressure drop and equivalent performance relative to the 40-K baseline catalyst was selected for the development reformer. The early 40-kW field power plant history was reviewed and adjustments were made to the On-Site Technology Development Program to address critical component issues.

  10. Aquatic Plant Management Program current status and seasonal workplan

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, E.R.; Bates, A.L.; Webb, D.H.

    1993-07-01

    The objective of the TVA Aquatic Plant Management Program is to support in an environmentally and economically responsible manner, the balanced multiple uses of the water resource of the Tennessee Valley. This is accomplished by following an integrated approach to prevent introduction and spread of noxious species, documenting occurrence and spread of existing species, and suppressing or eliminating problems in designated high use areas. It is not the TVA objective, nor is it biologically feasible and prudent to eliminate all aquatic vegetation. Aerial photography, helicopter reconnaissance, and field surveys are used to assess distributions and abundance of various aquatic macrophytes. Water level fluctuations are supplemented by herbicide applications to control undesirable vegetation. Investigations are conducted to evaluate water level fluctuation schemes, as well as biological, mechanical, and alternative chemical control techniques which offer potential for more environmentally compatible and cost-effective management operations.

  11. Introduction to an open source internet-based testing program for medical student examinations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Hwan

    2009-12-20

    The author developed a freely available open source internet-based testing program for medical examination. PHP and Java script were used as the programming language and postgreSQL as the database management system on an Apache web server and Linux operating system. The system approach was that a super user inputs the items, each school administrator inputs the examinees' information, and examinees access the system. The examinee's score is displayed immediately after examination with item analysis. The set-up of the system beginning with installation is described. This may help medical professors to easily adopt an internet-based testing system for medical education.

  12. Optimization of conventional water treatment plant using dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Khezri Seyed; Bahareh, Ghafari; Elahe, Dadvar; Pegah, Dadras

    2015-12-01

    In this research, the mathematical models, indicating the capability of various units, such as rapid mixing, coagulation and flocculation, sedimentation, and the rapid sand filtration are used. Moreover, cost functions were used for the formulation of conventional water and wastewater treatment plant by applying Clark's formula (Clark, 1982). Also, by applying dynamic programming algorithm, it is easy to design a conventional treatment system with minimal cost. The application of the model for a case reduced the annual cost. This reduction was approximately in the range of 4.5-9.5% considering variable limitations. Sensitivity analysis and prediction of system's feedbacks were performed for different alterations in proportion from parameters optimized amounts. The results indicated (1) that the objective function is more sensitive to design flow rate (Q), (2) the variations in the alum dosage (A), and (3) the sand filter head loss (H). Increasing the inflow by 20%, the total annual cost would increase to about 12.6%, while 20% reduction in inflow leads to 15.2% decrease in the total annual cost. Similarly, 20% increase in alum dosage causes 7.1% increase in the total annual cost, while 20% decrease results in 7.9% decrease in the total annual cost. Furthermore, the pressure decrease causes 2.95 and 3.39% increase and decrease in total annual cost of treatment plants. © The Author(s) 2013.

  13. Healthy Weigh (El camino saludable) phase 1: a retrospective critical examination of program evaluation.

    PubMed

    Frable, Pamela Jean; Dart, Lyn; Bradley, Patricia J

    2006-07-01

    Healthy Weigh (El camino saludable) is an obesity prevention program for low-income, predominantly Hispanic and African American families in an urban community in Tarrant County, Texas. Healthy Weigh Phase 1 was a successful community-campus partnership that took place in summer (June-August) and fall (September-November) 2003. The program met stated objectives and extensively engaged students from several health disciplines in service learning. This article describes what we learned about the evaluation of the program by examining the phase 1 evaluation process. Family environments are important intervention settings for establishing life-long dietary practices. Available in English and Spanish, Healthy Weigh Phase 1 helped families that were at risk for overweight and obesity to adopt healthy eating, physical activity, and weight management patterns. Analysis of a program logic model and formative evaluation data identified evaluation questions that could have improved the phase 1 evaluation process. Questions were categorized according to Donabedian's structure-process-outcome framework, and potential benefits of each question were identified. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Framework for Program Evaluation in Public Health standards were used to judge the overall quality of the phase 1 evaluation process. The phase 1 evaluation process successfully assessed the program's effects and generally met evaluation standards. Our critical examination also highlighted structure and process evaluation issues with potential for strengthening future interventions, community partnerships, and program outcomes. Lessons learned influenced the phase 2 grant activities. Most importantly, we learned that involvement of program participants as full partners in program design, evaluation, and implementation is essential. Our understanding and practice of program evaluation evolved as Healthy Weigh became a true community-based participatory research endeavor.

  14. Carbon Cycling in Restored Wisconsin Grasslands: Examining Linkages Between Plant Diversity, Microbial Communities and Ecosystem Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, K. N.; Kucharik, C. J.; Balser, T. C.; Foley, J. A.

    2002-12-01

    It is important to characterize the variability of carbon (C) fluxes and stocks and the relationship between biotic and abiotic factors and C sequestration, a proposed strategy to help mitigate climate change. An observation site to study C cycling was established on land enrolled in the USDA Conservation Reserve Program in southwestern Wisconsin in spring 2002 on silt-loam soil. The site was converted from intensive row-crop agriculture in 1987 to three adjacent land cover types: an assortment of native C4 grasses, two C3 grasses and a nitrogen-fixer, and a disk planted, no-tillage food plot rotation of maize and soybeans. Key goals of the study were to characterize the effect of plant species composition and microbial community characteristics on carbon cycling in an attempt to link above- and below-ground processes. Measurements of soil surface CO2 efflux were made on a near-weekly basis during the growing season using a LICOR-6400, concurrently with soil surface moisture adjacent to the CO2 collars. Thermocouples were installed to record hourly average air temperature and soil temperature at 5 depths, from 2 to 70 cm, and water content sensors made hourly average measurements at 15 and 30 cm. Leaf area index measurements were made weekly, aboveground vegetation biomass was collected monthly, and belowground root biomass was collected bimonthly. Monthly microbial measurements included an assessment of community physiological profiles using BiOLOG, and assays of community composition (lipid analysis) and activity. Preliminary results suggest that land cover types significantly altered carbon cycling and microbial community structure and function, leading to different rates of C sequestration.

  15. Implementation of an accelerated physical examination course in a doctor of pharmacy program.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jackie; Bidwal, Monica K; Lopes, Ingrid C; Shah, Bijal M; Ip, Eric J

    2014-12-15

    To describe the implementation of a 1-day accelerated physical examination course for a doctor of pharmacy program and to evaluate pharmacy students' knowledge, attitudes, and confidence in performing physical examination. Using a flipped teaching approach, course coordinators collaborated with a physician faculty member to design and develop the objectives of the course. Knowledge, attitude, and confidence survey questions were administered before and after the practical laboratory. Following the practical laboratory, knowledge improved by 8.3% (p<0.0001). Students' perceived ability and confidence to perform a physical examination significantly improved (p<0.0001). A majority of students responded that reviewing the training video (81.3%) and reading material (67.4%) prior to the practical laboratory was helpful in learning the physical examination. An accelerated physical examination course using a flipped teaching approach was successful in improving students' knowledge of, attitudes about, and confidence in using physical examination skills in pharmacy practice.

  16. Implementation of an Accelerated Physical Examination Course in a Doctor of Pharmacy Program

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Jackie; Lopes, Ingrid C.; Shah, Bijal M.; Ip, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To describe the implementation of a 1-day accelerated physical examination course for a doctor of pharmacy program and to evaluate pharmacy students’ knowledge, attitudes, and confidence in performing physical examination. Design. Using a flipped teaching approach, course coordinators collaborated with a physician faculty member to design and develop the objectives of the course. Knowledge, attitude, and confidence survey questions were administered before and after the practical laboratory. Assessment. Following the practical laboratory, knowledge improved by 8.3% (p<0.0001). Students’ perceived ability and confidence to perform a physical examination significantly improved (p<0.0001). A majority of students responded that reviewing the training video (81.3%) and reading material (67.4%) prior to the practical laboratory was helpful in learning the physical examination. Conclusion. An accelerated physical examination course using a flipped teaching approach was successful in improving students’ knowledge of, attitudes about, and confidence in using physical examination skills in pharmacy practice. PMID:25657369

  17. Impact of a weekly reading program on orthopedic surgery residents' in-training examination.

    PubMed

    Weglein, Daniel G; Gugala, Zbigniew; Simpson, Suzanne; Lindsey, Ronald W

    2015-05-01

    In response to a decline in individual residents' performance and overall program performance on the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination (OITE), the authors' department initiated a daily literature reading program coupled with weekly tests on the assigned material. The goal of this study was to assess the effect of the reading program on individual residents' scores and the training program's OITE scores. The reading program consisted of daily review articles from the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, followed by a weekly written examination consisting of multiple-choice or fill-in-the-blank questions. All articles were selected and all questions were written by the departmental chair. A questionnaire was given to assess residents' perceptions of the weekly tests. As a result of implementing the reading program for a 10-month period, residents' subsequent performance on the OITE significantly improved (mean score increase, 4, P<.0001; percentile score increase, 11, P=.0007). The difference in mean score was significant for residents in postgraduate years 3, 4, and 5. A statistically significant correlation was found between weekly test scores and performance on the OITE, with a significant correlation between weekly test scores and OITE percentile ranking. The study results also showed a positive correlation between reading test attendance and weekly test scores. Residents' anonymous questionnaire responses also demonstrated the reading program to be a valuable addition to the residency training curriculum. In conclusion, the study strongly supports the benefits of a weekly reading and examination program in enhancing the core knowledge of orthopedic surgery residents.

  18. Effect of a physical examination teaching program on the behavior of medical residents.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Graham T; Marina, Ovidiu; Kritek, Patricia A; Katz, Joel T

    2005-08-01

    The reliance on physical examination as a diagnostic aid is in decline. To determine whether an educational program can increase the use of physical examination by medical residents. A series of educational workshops were provided to 47 second- and third-year medical residents at a large academic teaching hospital. Interns and students reported the frequency and depth of clinical examination performance on morning rounds by their residents before and up to six months after the workshops. Behavior before and after the workshops was compared using a mixed model. A total of 374 reports were returned (77% response). After adjusting for the type of service and observer, there was a statistically significant 23% increase (P=.02) in the performance of physical examination among residents who attended the course. Residents significantly increased the fraction of patients they examined on rounds (absolute increase 11%, P=.002) but did not increase the depth of their examination. The change was greatest on general medical teams, among whom the performance of physical examination had been least frequent. Teaching and feedback events on medicine teams by residents to their interns (2.8 and 1.1 events per 2 weeks, respectively) and medical students (5.9 and 2.8 events per 2 weeks, respectively) remained infrequent. A skills improvement program can significantly increase the frequency of physical examination, but teaching and feedback events remain sporadic and infrequent.

  19. Effect of a Physical Examination Teaching Program on the Behavior of Medical Residents

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Graham T; Marina, Ovidiu; Kritek, Patricia A; Katz, Joel T

    2005-01-01

    Context The reliance on physical examination as a diagnostic aid is in decline. Objective To determine whether an educational program can increase the use of physical examination by medical residents. Design and Participants A series of educational workshops were provided to 47 second- and third-year medical residents at a large academic teaching hospital. Measurements Interns and students reported the frequency and depth of clinical examination performance on morning rounds by their residents before and up to six months after the workshops. Behavior before and after the workshops was compared using a mixed model. Results A total of 374 reports were returned (77% response). After adjusting for the type of service and observer, there was a statistically significant 23% increase (P=.02) in the performance of physical examination among residents who attended the course. Residents significantly increased the fraction of patients they examined on rounds (absolute increase 11%, P=.002) but did not increase the depth of their examination. The change was greatest on general medical teams, among whom the performance of physical examination had been least frequent. Teaching and feedback events on medicine teams by residents to their interns (2.8 and 1.1 events per 2 weeks, respectively) and medical students (5.9 and 2.8 events per 2 weeks, respectively) remained infrequent. Conclusions A skills improvement program can significantly increase the frequency of physical examination, but teaching and feedback events remain sporadic and infrequent. PMID:16050879

  20. Examination of oxygen release from plants in constructed wetlands in different stages of wetland plant life cycle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Wu, Haiming; Hu, Zhen; Liang, Shuang; Fan, Jinlin

    2014-01-01

    The quantification of oxygen release by plants in different stages of wetland plant life cycle was made in this study. Results obtained from 1 year measurement in subsurface wetland microcosms demonstrated that oxygen release from Phragmites australis varied from 108.89 to 404.44 mg O₂/m(2)/d during the different periods from budding to dormancy. Plant species, substrate types, and culture solutions had a significant effect on the capacity of oxygen release of wetland plants. Oxygen supply by wetland plants was estimated to potentially support a removal of 300.37 mg COD/m(2)/d or 55.87 mg NH₄-N/m(2)/d. According to oxygen balance analysis, oxygen release by plants could provide 0.43-1.12% of biochemical oxygen demand in typical subsurface-flow constructed wetlands (CWs). This demonstrates that oxygen release of plants may be a potential source for pollutants removal especially in low-loaded CWs. The results make it possible to quantify the role of plants in wastewater purification.

  1. Knowledge and intentions of ninth-grade girls after a breast self-examination program.

    PubMed

    Ogletree, Roberta J; Hammig, Bart; Drolet, Judy C; Birch, David A

    2004-11-01

    Breast cancer ranks as the second-leading cause of death for women. Until recently the American Cancer Society advocated teaching breast self-examination (BSE) procedures. The Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, active in the fight against breast cancer, continues to support educational efforts to teach breast self-examination skills to adolescent girls. Funded by the Komen Foundation, a BSE education program was developed and delivered by health educators at the Hult Health Education Center. The 50-minute program consisted of a PowerPoint slide presentation of breast cancer and BSE facts, and a video demonstration of proper BSE technique. Using a quasi-experimental design, the program was evaluated for changes in knowledge and intention to perform BSE. Ninth-grade girls at four public high schools (n = 255) in Peoria, Ill., were given a pretest to determine their knowledge about breast cancer and breast self-examination. A delayed posttest was administered between five to six weeks later (n = 211). Using the Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test, girls who participated in the BSE education program (treatment group) recorded a significantly higher overall mean knowledge score than girls who did not participate (comparison group). Those who participated in the program retained that knowledge over a five- to six-week period. Analyses of variance revealed that more girls in the treatment group reported performing BSE in the past month as well as a higher intention to perform BSE in the future.

  2. "School within a School": Examining Implementation Barriers in a Spanish/English Transitional Bilingual Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeNicolo, Christina Passos

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the ways that general education and bilingual teachers make sense of a Spanish/English transitional bilingual program housed at one elementary school in a Midwestern school district. An in-depth examination of perceptions and attitudes unmasks key factors regarding the implementation and interpretation of bilingual programs…

  3. Block Scheduling and the End of Course Examination Program (ECOEP): A South Carolina Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Nanci Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    This causal-comparative study investigates the differences in the End of Course Examination Program (EOCEP) test scores of ninth grade students in English I and Algebra I/Math for the technologies, as influenced by schedules used in South Carolina public high schools during the 2005-2006 academic year. Framing this study is the previous…

  4. University-Based Evaluation Training Programs in the United States 1980-2008: An Empirical Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaVelle, John M.; Donaldson, Stewart I.

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation practice has grown in leaps and bounds in recent years. In contrast, the most recent survey data suggest that there has been a sharp decline in the number and strength of preservice evaluation training programs in the United States. In an effort to further understand this curious trend, an alternative methodology was used to examine the…

  5. Using Methodological Triangulation to Examine the Effectiveness of a Mentoring Program for Online Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drouin, Michelle; Stewart, Jennifer; Van Gorder, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this quasi-experimental mixed methods study, we examined the effectiveness of a faculty-to-faculty mentoring program to increase student success rates in online courses at an American university. Over one semester, 24 faculty mentees worked with 6 faculty mentors on improving course organization and implementing student engagement techniques.…

  6. Examining Strategies for Embedding Literacy Skills within a Whole Language Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botenhagen, Jennifer L.

    A study examined strategies for embedding literacy skills within a whole language program. A questionnaire was given to full-time whole language elementary school teachers who taught in kindergarten through second-grade classrooms. All the participants teach in suburban school districts in the Bay Area including San Francisco, Marin, Sonoma, and…

  7. School Choice Accountability: An Examination of Informed Consumers in Different Choice Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Dunk, Emily; Dickman, Anneliese

    2002-01-01

    Examined parent survey data on several types of choice programs in a large urban school district, investigating the amount of information parents had and whether they selected schools based on factors they considered important. Results suggested that many parents neither possessed adequate information nor sent consistent signals. There were…

  8. Assessment of Primary Representational Systems with Neurolinguistic Programming: Examination of Preliminary Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorn, Fred J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Reviews the inconsistent findings of studies on neurolinguistic programing and recommends some areas that should be examined to verify various claims. Discusses methods of assessing client's primary representational systems, including predicate usage and eye movements, and suggests that more reliable methods of assessing PRS must be found. (JAC)

  9. Peer-Reviewed Research and Individualized Education Programs (IEPS): An Examination of Intent and Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etscheidt, Susan; Curran, Christina M.

    2010-01-01

    The reauthorized Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) requires Individualized Education Program (IEP) teams to base the selection of special education, related services, and supplementary aids and services on peer-reviewed research (PRR) to the extent practicable. This article examines the intended purpose of the PRR provision and…

  10. The Examination of a Pullout STEM Program for Urban Upper Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickerson, Daniel L.; Eckhoff, Angela; Stewart, Craig O.; Chappell, Shanan; Hathcock, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether a pullout STEM program (STARBASE) makes reading and math scores decrease and examine its impact on urban fourth, fifth, and sixth grade students' attitudes and perceptions regarding STEM education and careers. We employed a mixed-methods, case study approach that involved two published and one…

  11. Early Language Learning for All: Examination of a Prekindergarten French Program in an Inclusion Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regalla, Michele; Peker, Hilal

    2015-01-01

    This preliminary study examined a prekindergarten multimodal French program conducted for students in an inclusion charter school. Due to the age and varied ability levels of the students, media such as video and songs combined with kinesthetic activities served as the primary instructional approach. Data on children's ability to understand and…

  12. University-Based Evaluation Training Programs in the United States 1980-2008: An Empirical Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaVelle, John M.; Donaldson, Stewart I.

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation practice has grown in leaps and bounds in recent years. In contrast, the most recent survey data suggest that there has been a sharp decline in the number and strength of preservice evaluation training programs in the United States. In an effort to further understand this curious trend, an alternative methodology was used to examine the…

  13. Examining the Elements of Online Learning Quality in a Fully Online Doctoral Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Templeton, Nathan R.; Ballenger, Julia N.; Thompson, J. Ray

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive quantitative study was to examine the quality elements of online learning in a regional doctoral program. Utilizing the six quality dimensions of Hathaway's (2009) theory of online learning quality as a framework, the study investigated instructor-learner, learner-learner, learner-content, learner-interface,…

  14. Preliminary Examination of Adolescent Spending in a Contingency Management-Based Smoking-Cessation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavallo, Dana A.; Nich, Charla; Schepis, Ty S.; Smith, Anne E.; Liss, Thomas B.; McFetridge, Amanda K.; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra

    2010-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) utilizing monetary incentives is efficacious in enhancing abstinence in an adolescent smoking-cessation program, but how adolescents spend their money has not been examined. We assessed spending habits of 38 adolescent smokers in a CM-based smoking-cessation project prior to quitting and during treatment using a…

  15. Examining the Instructional Planning Process Taught in Agricultural Education Teacher Preparation Programs: Perspectives of University Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greiman, Bradley C.; Bedtke, Mary Anne

    2008-01-01

    Instructional planning is a curricular topic in teacher preparation programs, but limited research in agricultural education has been conducted in this area. The purpose of this study was to examine aspects of the instructional planning process that are taught to agricultural education preservice teachers. Survey research and content analysis of…

  16. A Public Education Program in Self-Examination for Orofacial Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabau, John C.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Instruction in self-examination for early detection of orofacial cancer was given to more than 450 persons at the Erie County (New York) Fair to familiarize the public with the technique. Results of followup studies of participants and program experience suggest that it is feasible to implement the instruction on a large scale. (MF)

  17. Early Language Learning for All: Examination of a Prekindergarten French Program in an Inclusion Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regalla, Michele; Peker, Hilal

    2015-01-01

    This preliminary study examined a prekindergarten multimodal French program conducted for students in an inclusion charter school. Due to the age and varied ability levels of the students, media such as video and songs combined with kinesthetic activities served as the primary instructional approach. Data on children's ability to understand and…

  18. Benefits of Informal Learning Environments: A Focused Examination of STEM-Based Program Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denson, Cameron D.; Austin Stallworth, Chandra; Hailey, Christine; Householder, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines STEM-based informal learning environments for underrepresented students and reports on the aspects of these programs that are beneficial to students. This qualitative study provides a nuanced look into informal learning environments and determines what is unique about these experiences and makes them beneficial for students. We…

  19. Examination of a Dispositional System in a Teacher Education Program: A Mixed Methods Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Prooyen, Traci L.

    2013-01-01

    This mixed methods, case study research examined the teacher education program at Illinois State University (ISU-Normal, Illinois) as related to the views and assessment practices of the dispositions of its teacher candidates. Five years of quantitative and qualitative data from ISU's Disposition Concern form was collected and analyzed currently…

  20. Adolescent Boys' Knowledge of and Attitudes toward Testicular Self-Examination: Evaluating an Outreach Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Jeffrey K.; Sauter, Marcia; Day, Julie

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed adolescent boys who had participated in a brief outreach program to high school health education classes designed to increase boys' knowledge about and improve their attitudes toward testicular self-examination (TSE) and early cancer detection. Results indicated that the 1-hour outreach improved students' knowledge and attitudes regarding…

  1. Block Scheduling and the End of Course Examination Program (ECOEP): A South Carolina Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Nanci Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    This causal-comparative study investigates the differences in the End of Course Examination Program (EOCEP) test scores of ninth grade students in English I and Algebra I/Math for the technologies, as influenced by schedules used in South Carolina public high schools during the 2005-2006 academic year. Framing this study is the previous…

  2. Examining Clinical Judgment in an Adaptive Intervention Design: The Fast Track Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierman, Karen L.; Nix, Robert L.; Maples, Jerry J.; Murphy, Susan A.

    2006-01-01

    Although clinical judgment is often used in assessment and treatment planning, rarely has research examined its reliability, validity, or impact in practice settings. This study tailored the frequency of home visits in a prevention program for aggressive-disruptive children (n = 410; 56% minority) on the basis of 2 kinds of clinical judgment:…

  3. 46 CFR 176.660 - Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... continue to participate in the AHE Program, vessel operators must conduct an annual hull condition assessment. At a minimum, vessel operators must conduct an internal examination and take random hull gaugings... include a representative sampling of hull gaugings. (b) If an underwater survey is required for the annual...

  4. 46 CFR 115.660 - Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the AHE Program, vessel operators must conduct an annual hull condition assessment. At a minimum, vessel operators must conduct an internal examination and take random hull gaugings internally during the... representative sampling of hull gaugings. (b) If an underwater survey is required for the annual hull condition...

  5. Examining Boyer's Scholarship of Engagement: A Case Study of a Faculty Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Miriam F.

    2009-01-01

    In response to significant changes in the global economic, social, and cultural context over the past decade, the teaching, research, and public service missions of public universities and colleges are being reshaped significantly. Faculty professional development programs are a vital but under-examined resource for institutional and academic…

  6. Preliminary Examination of Adolescent Spending in a Contingency Management-Based Smoking-Cessation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavallo, Dana A.; Nich, Charla; Schepis, Ty S.; Smith, Anne E.; Liss, Thomas B.; McFetridge, Amanda K.; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra

    2010-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) utilizing monetary incentives is efficacious in enhancing abstinence in an adolescent smoking-cessation program, but how adolescents spend their money has not been examined. We assessed spending habits of 38 adolescent smokers in a CM-based smoking-cessation project prior to quitting and during treatment using a…

  7. Mock and National Examinations Correlations in a Health Information Associate Degree Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Neisa R.

    2013-01-01

    Students enrolled in associate degree programs face social and personal challenges that can affect their learning and assessment skills. Social and personal challenges such as unemployment rates, race, age, and gender may affect their employability. The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to examine the mock and national…

  8. A Critical Examination of the Process of Modifying the Curriculum of Alternative Secondary Educational Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This study, "A Critical Examination of the Process of Modifying the Curriculum of Alternative Secondary Educational Programs," was done with the use of action research to study (a) whether students currently participating in a continuation school believe their educational and career needs are presently being met; (b) the types of career…

  9. Examining the Elements of Online Learning Quality in a Fully Online Doctoral Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Templeton, Nathan R.; Ballenger, Julia N.; Thompson, J. Ray

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive quantitative study was to examine the quality elements of online learning in a regional doctoral program. Utilizing the six quality dimensions of Hathaway's (2009) theory of online learning quality as a framework, the study investigated instructor-learner, learner-learner, learner-content, learner-interface,…

  10. A Public Education Program in Self-Examination for Orofacial Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabau, John C.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Instruction in self-examination for early detection of orofacial cancer was given to more than 450 persons at the Erie County (New York) Fair to familiarize the public with the technique. Results of followup studies of participants and program experience suggest that it is feasible to implement the instruction on a large scale. (MF)

  11. Using Methodological Triangulation to Examine the Effectiveness of a Mentoring Program for Online Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drouin, Michelle; Stewart, Jennifer; Van Gorder, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this quasi-experimental mixed methods study, we examined the effectiveness of a faculty-to-faculty mentoring program to increase student success rates in online courses at an American university. Over one semester, 24 faculty mentees worked with 6 faculty mentors on improving course organization and implementing student engagement techniques.…

  12. Assessment of Primary Representational Systems with Neurolinguistic Programming: Examination of Preliminary Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorn, Fred J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Reviews the inconsistent findings of studies on neurolinguistic programing and recommends some areas that should be examined to verify various claims. Discusses methods of assessing client's primary representational systems, including predicate usage and eye movements, and suggests that more reliable methods of assessing PRS must be found. (JAC)

  13. "School within a School": Examining Implementation Barriers in a Spanish/English Transitional Bilingual Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeNicolo, Christina Passos

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the ways that general education and bilingual teachers make sense of a Spanish/English transitional bilingual program housed at one elementary school in a Midwestern school district. An in-depth examination of perceptions and attitudes unmasks key factors regarding the implementation and interpretation of bilingual programs…

  14. Benefits of Informal Learning Environments: A Focused Examination of STEM-Based Program Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denson, Cameron D.; Austin Stallworth, Chandra; Hailey, Christine; Householder, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines STEM-based informal learning environments for underrepresented students and reports on the aspects of these programs that are beneficial to students. This qualitative study provides a nuanced look into informal learning environments and determines what is unique about these experiences and makes them beneficial for students. We…

  15. Computer program for afterheat temperature distribution for mobile nuclear power plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, W. G.; Vanbibber, L. E.

    1972-01-01

    ESATA computer program was developed to analyze thermal safety aspects of post-impacted mobile nuclear power plants. Program is written in FORTRAN 4 and designed for IBM 7094/7044 direct coupled system.

  16. Examination of technology integration in an urban elementary science education program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlem, Denise A.

    This mixed methodology case study was designed to examine technology integration in an urban elementary science education program pre- and post-professional development. How multimedia was used to enhance science teaching and learning, effective strategies used by teachers to integrate multimedia into the science education program, how well the integration of multimedia into the science education program enhanced student science achievement, barriers preventing teachers from implementing best practices in the teaching of science, and professional development strategies used to effectively increase multimedia integration were examined. Results revealed a correlation between increased technology use and increased student science outcomes. However, expectations associated with high-stakes tests created barriers that impacted opportunities teachers had to participate in job-embedded professional development and to integrate technology in science education at the target school.

  17. Predicting Scores on the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) General Examinations from Scores Earned on the American College Test (ACT) Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimmer, Donald N.; Shakiba-Nejad, Hadi

    The study was conducted to provide formulae by which College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) General Examination scores may be predicted from scores earned on the American College Test (ACT) Assessment. Five basic areas of liberal arts achievement are measured by the CLEP General Examinations: English Composition, Humanities, Mathematics, Natural…

  18. Conservation Plants for the Northeast. Program Aid No. 1154.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1977

    Descriptions of plants suited to specific conservation uses under different site conditions in the Northeast United States are presented in this booklet. The plants are classified into categories based on conservation use. These include: (1) plants for disturbed areas; (2) ornamental ground covers; (3) plants for coastal dunes and sandy inland…

  19. Predictors of performance on the Maintenance of Certification in Anesthesiology Program® (MOCA®) examination.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huaping; Culley, Deborah J; Lien, Cynthia A; Kitchener, Diana L; Harman, Ann E; Warner, David O

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the independent factors associated with performance on the Maintenance of Certification in Anesthesiology Program (MOCA) examination. Cross-sectional study. The American Board of Anesthesiology, Raleigh, NC. The American Board of Anesthesiology (ABA) diplomates who were certified between 2000 and 2006 and had taken the MOCA examination at least once by July 2013. MOCA examination score for the first attempt. Independent positive predictors for MOCA examination score in multiple regression analysis included passing the ABA Part 1 and Part 2 certification examinations on the first attempt and male sex, whereas negative predictors included history of action(s) taken against any medical license, taking the examination later in the MOCA cycle and older age at primary certification. Several factors in addition to performance on the written examination for primary certification (Part 1 Examination) are independently associated with performance on the MOCA examination. Because many of these factors are not modifiable, those diplomates who possess unfavorable risk factors should pay special attention to engaging in continuing learning to prepare for the MOCA examination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Preparing the Next Generation of Earth Scientists: An Examination of 25 Federal Earth Science Education Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linn, A. M.; Goldstein, A.; Manduca, C. A.; Pyle, E. J.; Asher, P. M.; White, L. D.; Riggs, E. M.; Cozzens, S.; Glickson, D.

    2013-12-01

    Federal agencies play a key role in educating the next generation of earth scientists, offering programs that attract students to the field, support them through formal education, and provide training for an earth science career. In a time of reduced budgets, it is important for federal agencies to invest in education programs that are effective. A National Research Council committee examined 25 federal earth science education programs and described ways to evaluate the success of these programs and opportunities for leveraging federal education resources. Although the programs cover a wide range of objectives and audiences, they are part of a system of opportunities and experiences that attract individuals to the field and prepare them for employment. In this conceptual framework, individuals become aware of earth science, then engage in learning about the Earth and the nature of earth science, and finally prepare for a career by acquiring specialized knowledge, skills, and expertise and by exploring different employment options. The federal education programs considered in this report provide a range of opportunities for raising awareness of earth science (e.g., USDA 4-H Club), nurturing that interest to engage students in the field (e.g., USGS Youth Internship Program), and preparing students for earth science careers (NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates, DOE Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships). These efforts can also contribute toward the development of a robust earth science workforce by connecting programs and providing pathways for students to move through informal and formal education to careers. The conceptual framework shows how the various education opportunities fit together and where connections are needed to move students along earth science pathways. The framework can also be used by federal agencies to identify gaps, overlaps, and imbalances in existing programs; to identify potential partners in other agencies or organizations

  1. The ERDA thermionic program. [for nuclear propulsion and utility power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newby, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    A rationale for increased Federal support of thermionic research is considered and the objectives and milestones of the thermionic program of the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) are examined. The ERDA program is to provide very high specific power systems needed for planned future NASA nuclear electric propulsion missions. Another objective is the enhancement of the overall thermal conversion efficiency of the present utility power plants from approximately 35% to 50% or more. Attention is given to key problem areas, taking into account inadequate analytical tools, the reduction of the plasma arc-drop losses, aspects of hot shell materials development, and the coordination of the participating groups programmatic activities.

  2. The ERDA thermionic program. [for nuclear propulsion and utility power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newby, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    A rationale for increased Federal support of thermionic research is considered and the objectives and milestones of the thermionic program of the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) are examined. The ERDA program is to provide very high specific power systems needed for planned future NASA nuclear electric propulsion missions. Another objective is the enhancement of the overall thermal conversion efficiency of the present utility power plants from approximately 35% to 50% or more. Attention is given to key problem areas, taking into account inadequate analytical tools, the reduction of the plasma arc-drop losses, aspects of hot shell materials development, and the coordination of the participating groups programmatic activities.

  3. Evaluation of a breast self-examination (BSE) program in a breast diagnostic clinic.

    PubMed

    Fitch, M I; McPhail, J; Franssen, E

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the short-term effectiveness of a breast self-examination (BSE) teaching program on women's knowledge about BSE, proficiency in performing BSE, and motivation to perform BSE. The program was developed for delivery by nurses in a breast diagnostic clinic, a clinic designed to meet the need for expeditious management of breast disease, current information about breast cancer risk, surveillance, and counselling. A convenience sample of 68 women attending the clinic in a regional cancer centre participated in a pre- and five month post-teaching program evaluation. The Toronto Breast Self Examination Instrument was used as the evaluation tool. There were statistically significant changes following the teaching program in the areas of knowledge about the correct technique for performing BSE, proficiency performing BSE, and confidence about finding changes when performing BSE. No significant changes were observed in motivation to practise BSE, although group scores did improve following the education. Participants found the video presentation and the review of BSE information pamphlets by the nurse to be the most helpful components of the BSE teaching program.

  4. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2005-07-01

    The DOE established the Groundwater Monitoring Program (GMP) (WP 02-1) to monitor groundwater resources at WIPP. In the past, the GMP was conducted to establish background data of existing conditions of groundwater quality and quantity in the WIPP vicinity, and to develop and maintain a water quality database as required by regulation. Today the GMP is conducted consistent with 204.1.500 NMAC (New MexicoAdministrative Code), "Adoption of 40 CFR [Code of Federal Regulations] Part 264,"specifically 40 CFR §264.90 through §264.101. These sections of 20.4.1 NMAC provide guidance for detection monitoring of groundwater that is, or could be, affected by waste management activities at WIPP. Detection monitoring at WIPP is designed to detect contaminants in the groundwater long before the general population is exposed. Early detection will allow cleanup efforts to be accomplished before any exposure to the general population can occur. Title 40 CFR Part 264, Subpart F, stipulates minimum requirements of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] §6901 et seq.) (RCRA) groundwater monitoring programs including the number and location of monitoring wells; sampling and reporting schedules; analytical methods and accuracy requirements; monitoring parameters; and statistical treatment of monitoring data. This document outlines how WIPP intends to protect and preserve groundwater within the WIPP Land Withdrawal Area (WLWA). Groundwater protection is just one aspect of the WIPP environmental protection effort. An overview of the entire environmental protection effort can be found in DOE/WIPP 99-2194, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan. The WIPP GMP is designed to statistically determine if any changes are occurring in groundwater characteristics within and surrounding the WIPP facility. If a change is noted, the cause will then be determined and the appropriate corrective action(s) initiated.

  5. Examination of pits in Trojan nuclear power plant steam generator tubes: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, D.E.

    1989-05-01

    This report presents the results from examination of defects, oxides, and corrosion products on three steam generator tubes removed from the Trojan Nuclear Plant of Portland General Electric. In-generator eddy current inspection of the steam generator tubes suggested the probability of pits in one tube, located several inches above the tubesheet, within the height of the sludge pile. A weak indication was reported in the second tube, also within the height of the sludge pile. Copper signals were reported above the tubesheet and first support plate for the third tube which was removed. Destructive examination revealed numerous pits in a band several inches above the tubesheet. The depth of the pits corresponded to those anticipated by field eddy current testing. The pits contained a chromium rich iron and nickel depleted corrosion product with traces of copper and zinc. Intergranular penetrations were present at the base of the pits. Traces of sulfur and chlorine were found within the penetrations. Additionally, nickel sulfide and copper sulfide ribbons were present within the corrosion products of the pits. Sulfate and chloride anions were also observed in concentrations of hundreds of parts per million (each) within the exterior surface oxides. Hence, the pitting corrosion was attributed to acid forms of sulfur, acting synergistically with chlorides. The oxides on the external surfaces of the steam generator tubes were found to consist of magnetite (Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/) with minor components of franklinite (ZnFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/). Embedded within this composite were numerous particles of copper in the elemental form. 8 refs.

  6. Implementing the objective structured clinical examination in a geriatrics fellowship program-a 3-year experience.

    PubMed

    Avelino-Silva, Thiago J; Gil, Luiz A; Suemoto, Claudia K; Kikuchi, Elina L; Lin, Sumika M; Farias, Luciana L; Jacob-Filho, Wilson

    2012-07-01

    The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) appears to be an effective alternative for assessing not only medical knowledge, but also clinical skills, including effective communication and physical examination skills. The purpose of the current study was to implement an OSCE model in a geriatrics fellowship program and to compare the instrument with traditional essay examination. Seventy first- and second-year geriatric fellows were initially submitted to a traditional essay examination and scored from 0 to 10 by a faculty member. The same fellows subsequently underwent an OSCE with eight 10-minute stations covering a wide range of essential aspects of geriatric knowledge. Each OSCE station had an examiner responsible for its evaluation according to a predefined checklist. Checklist items were classified for analysis purposes as clinical knowledge items (CKI) and communication skills items (CSI); fellow responses were scored from 0 to 10.Although essay examinations took from 30 to 45 minutes to complete, 180-200 minutes were required to evaluate fellows using the proposed OSCE method. Fellows scored an average of 6.2 ± 1.2 on the traditional essay examination and 6.6 ± 1.0 on the OSCE (P < .001). Subanalyses of OSCE scores indicated that average performance on CKI was lower than the average on CSI (6.4 ± 1.1 vs. 8.4 ± 1.1; P < .001). Fellow performance on the essay examination was similar to their performance on CKI (P = .13). Second-year fellows performed better than first-year fellows on the essay examination (P < .001) and CKI (P = .05), but not on CSI (P = .25).The OSCE was successfully implemented as an educational strategy during a geriatrics fellowship program. Combining different testing modalities may provide the best assessment of competence for various domains of knowledge, skills, and behavior. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society.

  7. Do mitochondria play a role in remodelling lace plant leaves during programmed cell death?

    PubMed

    Lord, Christina E N; Wertman, Jaime N; Lane, Stephanie; Gunawardena, Arunika H L A N

    2011-06-06

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is the regulated death of cells within an organism. The lace plant (Aponogeton madagascariensis) produces perforations in its leaves through PCD. The leaves of the plant consist of a latticework of longitudinal and transverse veins enclosing areoles. PCD occurs in the cells at the center of these areoles and progresses outwards, stopping approximately five cells from the vasculature. The role of mitochondria during PCD has been recognized in animals; however, it has been less studied during PCD in plants. The following paper elucidates the role of mitochondrial dynamics during developmentally regulated PCD in vivo in A. madagascariensis. A single areole within a window stage leaf (PCD is occurring) was divided into three areas based on the progression of PCD; cells that will not undergo PCD (NPCD), cells in early stages of PCD (EPCD), and cells in late stages of PCD (LPCD). Window stage leaves were stained with the mitochondrial dye MitoTracker Red CMXRos and examined. Mitochondrial dynamics were delineated into four categories (M1-M4) based on characteristics including distribution, motility, and membrane potential (ΔΨm). A TUNEL assay showed fragmented nDNA in a gradient over these mitochondrial stages. Chloroplasts and transvacuolar strands were also examined using live cell imaging. The possible importance of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) formation during PCD was indirectly examined via in vivo cyclosporine A (CsA) treatment. This treatment resulted in lace plant leaves with a significantly lower number of perforations compared to controls, and that displayed mitochondrial dynamics similar to that of non-PCD cells. Results depicted mitochondrial dynamics in vivo as PCD progresses within the lace plant, and highlight the correlation of this organelle with other organelles during developmental PCD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of mitochondria and chloroplasts moving on transvacuolar

  8. Do mitochondria play a role in remodelling lace plant leaves during programmed cell death?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Programmed cell death (PCD) is the regulated death of cells within an organism. The lace plant (Aponogeton madagascariensis) produces perforations in its leaves through PCD. The leaves of the plant consist of a latticework of longitudinal and transverse veins enclosing areoles. PCD occurs in the cells at the center of these areoles and progresses outwards, stopping approximately five cells from the vasculature. The role of mitochondria during PCD has been recognized in animals; however, it has been less studied during PCD in plants. Results The following paper elucidates the role of mitochondrial dynamics during developmentally regulated PCD in vivo in A. madagascariensis. A single areole within a window stage leaf (PCD is occurring) was divided into three areas based on the progression of PCD; cells that will not undergo PCD (NPCD), cells in early stages of PCD (EPCD), and cells in late stages of PCD (LPCD). Window stage leaves were stained with the mitochondrial dye MitoTracker Red CMXRos and examined. Mitochondrial dynamics were delineated into four categories (M1-M4) based on characteristics including distribution, motility, and membrane potential (ΔΨm). A TUNEL assay showed fragmented nDNA in a gradient over these mitochondrial stages. Chloroplasts and transvacuolar strands were also examined using live cell imaging. The possible importance of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) formation during PCD was indirectly examined via in vivo cyclosporine A (CsA) treatment. This treatment resulted in lace plant leaves with a significantly lower number of perforations compared to controls, and that displayed mitochondrial dynamics similar to that of non-PCD cells. Conclusions Results depicted mitochondrial dynamics in vivo as PCD progresses within the lace plant, and highlight the correlation of this organelle with other organelles during developmental PCD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of mitochondria and chloroplasts

  9. 77 FR 73056 - Initial Test Programs for Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing for public comment draft regulatory guide (DG), DG-1259, ``Initial Test Programs for Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants.'' This guide describes the general scope and depth that the staff of the NRC considers acceptable for Initial Test Programs (ITPs) for light water cooled nuclear power plants.

  10. 33 CFR Appendix A to Part 273 - Aquatic Plant Control Program Legislative Authority

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., and other obnoxious aquatic plant growths, from the navigable waters, tributary streams, connecting... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aquatic Plant Control Program... OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL Pt. 273, App. A Appendix A to Part 273...

  11. 33 CFR Appendix A to Part 273 - Aquatic Plant Control Program Legislative Authority

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., and other obnoxious aquatic plant growths, from the navigable waters, tributary streams, connecting... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aquatic Plant Control Program... OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL Pt. 273, App. A Appendix A to Part 273...

  12. 46 CFR 176.625 - Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger vessels. 176.625 Section 176.625 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INSPECTION AND... Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger vessels. (a) Your vessel may be eligible for the AHE Program...

  13. Aquatic Plant Control Research Program. Microbiological Control of Eurasian Watermilfoil.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    of enzymes produced by microorganisms occurring naturally on the surface tissues of two species of watermil- foil, Nyriophyllum spicatum and N...the environment, we would isolate microorganisms native to the plant -dominated zone or phyllosphere of the aquatic plant and, by simple manipulation...confirmed by the isolation of approximately 65 percent of the original inoculum numbers by the time of plant harvest. Thus, plant -dependent microorganisms

  14. Invasive plant species and the Joint Fire Science Program.

    Treesearch

    Heather E. Erickson; Rachel White

    2007-01-01

    Invasive nonnative plants may be responsible for serious, long-term ecological impacts, including altering fire behavior and fire regimes. Therefore, knowing how to successfully manage invasive plants and their impacts on natural resources is crucial. We present a summary of research on invasive plants and fire that has been generated through the Joint Fire Science...

  15. Bibliography of the Maryland Power Plant Research Program, sixteenth edition. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, R.I.

    1995-02-01

    Table of Contents: Introduction; Report Availability; General Power Plant Related Research; Air Monitoring and Air Quality Studies; Acid Deposition Studies; Power Plant Studies in the Upper Chesapeake Bay and Lower Susquehanna River; Potomac River Fisheries Program; Combustion By-Product Studies; Site-Specific Monitoring Programs; Radiological Monitoring and Nuclear Evaluations; Site Evaluation Studies; Regional Siting Studies; Transmission Lines; Economic Studies and Alternate Energy Sources; Cumulative Environmental Impact Reports; and Record of the Maryland Power Plant Siting Act.

  16. United States Medical Licensing Examination and American Board of Pediatrics Certification Examination Results: Does the Residency Program Contribute to Trainee Achievement.

    PubMed

    Welch, Thomas R; Olson, Brad G; Nelsen, Elizabeth; Beck Dallaghan, Gary L; Kennedy, Gloria A; Botash, Ann

    2017-09-01

    To determine whether training site or prior examinee performance on the US Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) step 1 and step 2 might predict pass rates on the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) certifying examination. Data from graduates of pediatric residency programs completing the ABP certifying examination between 2009 and 2013 were obtained. For each, results of the initial ABP certifying examination were obtained, as well as results on National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) step 1 and step 2 examinations. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to nest first-time ABP results within training programs to isolate program contribution to ABP results while controlling for USMLE step 1 and step 2 scores. Stepwise linear regression was then used to determine which of these examinations was a better predictor of ABP results. A total of 1110 graduates of 15 programs had complete testing results and were subject to analysis. Mean ABP scores for these programs ranged from 186.13 to 214.32. The hierarchical linear model suggested that the interaction of step 1 and 2 scores predicted ABP performance (F[1,1007.70] = 6.44, P = .011). By conducting a multilevel model by training program, both USMLE step examinations predicted first-time ABP results (b = .002, t = 2.54, P = .011). Linear regression analyses indicated that step 2 results were a better predictor of ABP performance than step 1 or a combination of the two USMLE scores. Performance on the USMLE examinations, especially step 2, predicts performance on the ABP certifying examination. The contribution of training site to ABP performance was statistically significant, though contributed modestly to the effect compared with prior USMLE scores. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. An Approach to Examining the Proximal and Intermediate Outcomes of an Intensive Family Preservation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Kristin Duppong; Griffith, Annette; Ingram, Stephanie; Bolivar, Claudine; Mason, W. Alex; Trout, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of the Boys Town In-Home Family Program (BT-IHFP) on parenting skills, family functioning, and child behavior for at-risk families involved with child protective services. The BT-IHFP is designed as a home-based, family-centered alternative to out-of-home placement with the goal of improving family functioning,…

  18. A qualitative examination of the nature and impact of three California minority engineering programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, Barbara A.

    According to the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering (NACME), the national retention rate of engineering students is 68% and the national retention rate for underrepresented minority engineering students (African American, Latino, Native American and Pacific Islanders) is 37%. In response to the severity of retention issues concerning underrepresented minority students, colleges and universities across the United States have developed special programs known as minority engineering programs (MEP). MEPs are designed to provide academic support, personal counseling, social networking, career counseling and professional development as a means to improve retention. In order to provide a detailed description of the MEPs, the research method selected is a case study. This case study is an examination of the nature and impact of three MEPs in California. This study is also an analysis of the lack of participation by freshmen and sophomore students who qualify for these programs. Methodology included extensive surveys and interviews of students, faculty and staff, site visits, and examination of documents. Over 500 students were surveyed during lower division engineering courses. The qualifying students who gave permission for further interviews were provided with questions about their participation or nonparticipation and the reasons for their behavior. Faculty members were interviews about their knowledge and personal involvement with the minority engineering program on their campuses. Program directors were interviewed to discuss program design and implementation. A categorical method was used to separate the different groups within the study. Of the 509 respondents, 132 were classified as qualifier/nonparticipant freshman and sophomore engineering students. The results demonstrated that a high percentage of the qualifier/nonparticipants are unaware of the programs and events on their campuses. During the interviews the students stated they are very

  19. Relationship between population estimates of cotton fleahoppers (Hemiptera: Miridae) obtained by terminal and whole plant examinations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The standard sampling technique used to quantify cotton fleahopper, Pseudatomoscelis seriatus (Reuter), abundance in cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., involves direct counts of adults and nymphs on plants. This method, however, becomes increasingly laborious and time consuming as plants increase in si...

  20. Resident clinical duties while preparing for the ABR core examination: position statement of the Association of Program Directors in Radiology.

    PubMed

    DeStigter, Kristen K; Mainiero, Martha B; Janower, Murray L; Resnik, Charles S

    2012-11-01

    Historically, diagnostic radiology residents have been allowed time off from clinical duties to study for the ABR oral board examination. This practice has resulted in a disruptive "board frenzy" at many programs. The new ABR examination structure gives programs an opportunity to evaluate this practice. This position statement of the Association of Program Directors in Radiology describes the rationale behind a recommendation of no time off from clinical service before the ABR core examination.

  1. National dissemination of chronic disease self-management education programs: an incremental examination of delivery characteristics.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Ory, Marcia G; Ahn, SangNam; Kulinski, Kristie P; Jiang, Luohua; Horel, Scott; Lorig, Kate

    2014-01-01

    With a near 20-year developmental history as an evidence-based program, the suite of Chronic Disease Self-Management Education (CDSME) programs were selected in 2010 for grand-scale dissemination in a federally supported initiative to improve the health of older Americans. The primary charge of this national effort was to establish a sustainable program delivery system for empowering American adults with one or more chronic conditions to better manage their health. The current study focused on a series of dissemination and implementation science research questions to: (1) examine the geographic distribution of participation in this initiative across the Unites States; (2) describe workshop characteristics engaged to reach program participants in various settings; and (3) describe personal characteristics of the first 100,000 participants. Each subsequent entering cohort was descriptively examined to indicate whether there was constancy or change in delivery sites and populations reached over time. Findings show a strengthening of the workshop delivery infrastructure in that it took 9.4 months to reach the first 25,000 participants in 853 counties compared to 5.4 months to reach the last 25,000 participants in 1,109 counties. The workshop delivery characteristics and participant characteristics remained relatively consistent across increments of 25,000 participants reached, although general trends were observed for some variables. For example, after reaching the first 25,000 participants, subsequent groups of 25,000 participants were reached more quickly. Additionally, workshops were increasingly delivered in ZIP Codes with higher percentages of families residing below the federal poverty line. As more participants were reached, more participants with chronic conditions were enrolled. This national translational study illustrates the rapid expansion of CDSME programs throughout the United States and capability to reach diverse populations in a variety of

  2. State of Washington Aquatic Plant Management Program. Supplement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    accumulations of plant material at dams, obstruction of drainage, restriction of natural water flows, reduced navigability, and damages to fish and wildlife... microorganisms , and competitive plants ) show promise, and are in various stages of development. Grass carp are available for effective-control of watermilfoil...control methods (herbivorous fish and insects, pathogenic microorganisms , and competitiva plants ) are il various stages of development. Grass carp are now

  3. Pinellas Plant site environmental report for calendar year 1989: Environmental Health and Safety Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R.D.

    1990-06-01

    The Pinellas Plant is a government-owned facility operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by the GE Neutron Devices (GEND). The plant's work force is approximately 1700 employees is engaged in the design, development and manufacture of special electronic and mechanical nuclear weapon components. The environmental monitoring programs maintained by the Pinellas Plant are designed to: determine the efficiencies of treatment and control mechanisms for environmental releases, provide measurements of discharge concentrations for comparison with applicable standards, assess the concentrations of these discharges in the on-site and off-site environment, and provide a data base for computer programs to calculate the potential dose to the public resulting from the operation of the Pinellas Plant. The environmental effects of radiological and nonradiological effluents from the operation of the Pinellas Plant have been demonstrated to be significant. This paper discussing the environmental monitoring programs at the Pinellas Plant. 29 refs., 12 figs., 15 tabs.

  4. Microscopy, culture, and quantitative real-time PCR examination confirm internalization of mycobacteria in plants.

    PubMed

    Kaevska, M; Lvoncik, S; Slana, I; Kulich, P; Kralik, P

    2014-07-01

    The environment is a reservoir of nontuberculous mycobacteria and is considered a source of infection for animals and humans. Mycobacteria can persist in different types of environments for a relatively long time. We have studied their possible internalization into plant tissue through intact, as well as damaged, root systems of different types of plants grown in vitro and under field conditions. The substrate into which plants were seeded was previously contaminated with different strains of Mycobacterium avium (10(8) to 10(10) cells/g of soil) and feces from animals with paratuberculosis. We detected M. avium subsp. avium, hominissuis, and paratuberculosis in the stems and leaves of the plants by both culture and real-time quantitative PCR. The presence of mycobacteria in the plant tissues was confirmed by microscopy. The concentration of mycobacteria found inside plant tissue was several orders of magnitude lower (up to 10(4) cells/g of tissue) than the initial concentration of mycobacteria present in the culture medium or substrate. These findings led us to the hypothesis that plants may play a role in the spread and transmission of mycobacteria to other organisms in the environment.

  5. The refinement of a cultural standardized patient examination for a general surgery residency program.

    PubMed

    Chun, Maria B J; Deptula, Peter; Morihara, Sarah; Jackson, David S

    2014-01-01

    Recent articles have documented the importance of cultural competency in surgery. Surgical residency programs have used the Objective Structured Clinical Examinations or cultural standardized patient examinations as a training tool. Past studies evaluating cultural competency have noted the importance of including an observational (control) arm, which would allow for a more objective assessment of a resident's competency in this area. The purpose of our article is to present the results of a follow-up study to a pilot cultural standardized patient examination for surgery residents. All first-year surgery residents were required to participate in the videotaped cultural SP examination as part of the general surgery residency curriculum. Two measures were used to assess resident performance. On the day of the examination, the Cross-Cultural Care Survey was administered. The examination was assessed by the residents themselves, faculty observers, and standardized patients, using a written checklist that was developed to evaluate residents on all 6 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies. The current study includes 20 first-year surgery residents from academic years 2011 to 2012 and 2012 to 2013. The examination of pretest differences in groups found that students born outside of the United States had significantly higher scores on attitude (t = -2.68, df = 18, p = 0.02), but no statistically significant differences were found in skillfulness or knowledge or in the overall rating scale. For the overall rating scale, change from pretest to posttest was statistically significant (t = -2.25, df = 18, p = 0.04). Further analysis revealed that students who were born in the United States demonstrated a significant increase in ratings (t = -3.08, df = 10, p = 0.01) whereas students who were not born in the United States showed little change (t = -0.35, df = 7, p = 0.74). These results show that the means in attitude scales changed little for all

  6. A Computer-Based Multimedia Instruction Program for Woody Plant Identification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiler, J. R.; Peterson, J. A.; Taylor, C. D.; Feret, P. P.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses a multimedia-based program designed to provide students with a self-paced study of woody plants using color images of twigs, leaves, bark, fruit, and flowers. The program uses Authorware, software that can be used on both Macintosh- and Windows-compatible platforms. This program is intended for use as a supplement to field-study…

  7. A Comprehensive Examination of the Influence of State Tobacco Control Programs and Policies on Youth Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Loomis, Brett R.; Han, Beth; Gfroerer, Joe; Kuiper, Nicole; Couzens, G. Lance; Dube, Shanta; Caraballo, Ralph S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the influence of tobacco control policies (tobacco control program expenditures, smoke-free air laws, youth access law compliance, and cigarette prices) on youth smoking outcomes (smoking susceptibility, past-year initiation, current smoking, and established smoking). Methods. We combined data from the 2002 to 2008 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health with state and municipality population data from the US Census Bureau to assess the associations between state tobacco control policy variables and youth smoking outcomes, focusing on youths aged 12 to 17 years. We also examined the influence of policy variables on youth access when these variables were held at 2002 levels. Results. Per capita funding for state tobacco control programs was negatively associated with all 4 smoking outcomes. Smoke-free air laws were negatively associated with all outcomes except past-year initiation, and cigarette prices were associated only with current smoking. We found no association between these outcomes and retailer compliance with youth access laws. Conclusions. Smoke-free air laws and state tobacco control programs are effective strategies for curbing youth smoking. PMID:23327252

  8. Examination of program exposure across intervention delivery modes: face-to-face versus internet

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Rebekah M; Mummery, W Kerry; Dwyer, Trudy

    2007-01-01

    Background There has been increasing interest in the ability of the internet to produce behaviour change. The focus of this study was to describe program exposure across three intervention groups from a randomised trial (RT) comparing traditional face-to-face, internet-mediated (combined internet plus face-to-face), and internet-only program delivery. Methods Baseline and immediately post-intervention survey data, and exposure rates from participants that commenced the RT were included (n = 192). Exposure was defined as either face-to-face attendance, website usage, or a combination of both for the internet-mediated group. Characteristics of participants who were exposed to at least 75% of the program material were explored. Descriptive analysis and logistical regression were used to examine differences between groups for program exposure. Results All groups showed decrease in program exposure over time. Differences were also observed (χ2 = 10.37, p < 0.05), between intervention groups. The internet-mediated (OR = 2.4, 95% CI 1.13–5.1) and internet-only (OR = 2.96, 95% CI 1.38–6.3) groups were more likely to have been exposed to at least 75% of the program compared to the face-to-face group. Participants with high physical activity self-efficacy were 1.82 (95% CI 1.15–2.88) times more likely to have been exposed to 75% of the program, and those allocated to the face-to-face group were less likely to have attended 75% of the face-to-face sessions if they were classified as obese (OR = 0.21 95% CI 0.04–0.96). Conclusion These results suggest that the internet groups were as effective as the face-to-face delivery mode in engaging participants in the program material. However, different delivery methods may be more useful to different sub-populations. It is important to explore which target groups that internet-based programs are best suited, in order to increase their impact. PMID:17352817

  9. Annual radiological environmental operating report: Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant, 1992. Operations Services/Technical Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This report describes the environmental radiological monitoring program conducted by TVA in the vicinity of Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant (BFN) in 1992. The program includes the collection of samples from the environment and the determination of the concentrations of radioactive materials in the samples. Samples are taken from stations in the general area of the plant and from areas not influenced by plant operations. Station locations are selected after careful consideration of the weather patterns and projected radiation doses to the various areas around the plant. Material sampled includes air, water, milk, foods, vegetation, soil, fish, sediment, and direct radiation levels. Results from stations near the plant are compared with concentrations from control stations and with preoperational measurements to determine potential impacts of plant operations. Small amounts of Co-60 and Cs-134 were found in sediment samples downstream from the plant. This activity in stream sediment would result in no measurable increase over background in the dose to the general public.

  10. A Re-examination of the Root Cortex in Wetland Flowering Plants With Respect to Aerenchyma

    PubMed Central

    SEAGO, JAMES L.; MARSH, LELAND C.; STEVENS, KEVIN J.; SOUKUP, ALEŠ; VOTRUBOVÁ, OLGA; ENSTONE, DARYL E.

    2005-01-01

    • Aims We review literature and present new observations on the differences among three general patterns of aerenchyma origin and their systematic distributions among the flowering plants, and we clarify terminology on root aerenchyma. • Scope From our own previous works and some new observations, we have analysed the root cortex in 85 species of 41 families in 21 orders of flowering plants that typically grow in wetlands to determine the characteristic patterns of aerenchyma. • Findings A developmental and structural pattern that we term expansigeny, as manifested by honeycomb aerenchyma, is characteristic of all aquatic basal angiosperms (the Nymphaeales) and basal monocots (the Acorales). Expansigenous aerenchyma develops by expansion of intercellular spaces into lacunae by cell division and cell expansion. Schizogeny and lysigeny, so often characterized in recent reviews as the only patterns of root cortex lacunar formation, are present in most wetland plants, but are clearly not present in the most basal flowering plants. • Conclusion We conclude that expansigeny is the basic type of aerenchyma development in roots of flowering plants and that the presence of expansigenous honeycomb aerenchyma in root cortices was fundamental to the success of the earliest flowering plants found in wetland environments. PMID:16081497

  11. HIGH EFFICIENCY FOSSIL POWER PLANT (HEFPP) CONCEPTUALIZATION PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    J.L. Justice

    1999-03-25

    This study confirms the feasibility of a natural gas fueled, 20 MW M-C Power integrated pressurized molten carbonate fuel cell combined in a topping cycle with a gas turbine generator plant. The high efficiency fossil power plant (HEFPP) concept has a 70% efficiency on a LHV basis. The study confirms the HEFPP has a cost advantage on a cost of electricity basis over the gas turbine based combined cycle plants in the 20 MW size range. The study also identifies the areas of further development required for the fuel cell, gas turbine generator, cathode blower, inverter, and power module vessel. The HEFPP concept offers an environmentally friendly power plant with minuscule emission levels when compared with the combined cycle power plant.

  12. Examining the Factors Associated with Paid Employment of Clients Enrolled in First Episode of Psychosis Programs

    PubMed Central

    Dewa, Carolyn S.; Trojanowski, Lucy; Cheng, Chiachen; Loong, Desmond

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is one of the most debilitating mental disorders. For a significant portion of individuals who suffer from this disorder, onset occurs in young adulthood, arresting important social and educational development that is necessary for future successful labor force participation. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the literature about clients enrolled in first episode psychosis programs and psychosocial outcomes by examining the factors associated with paid employment among young adults who have experienced their first psychotic episodes. In this paper, we consider the association of socioeconomic factors to employment. Our results suggest that in addition to treatment, socioeconomic factors such as receipt of public disability benefits and educational attainment are associated with employment status. These results can help to inform future directions for the enhancement of psychosocial programs in FEP models to promote paid employment. PMID:22966443

  13. What could the program have done differently? A qualitative examination of reasons for leaving outpatient treatment

    PubMed Central

    Laudet, Alexandre B.; Stanick, Virginia; Sands, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Attrition from treatment for substance abuse disorders (SUD) is a persistent challenge that severely limits the effectiveness of services. Though a large body of research has sought to identify predictors of retention, the perspective of clients of services is rarely examined. This exploratory qualitative study presents clients’ stated reasons for leaving outpatient treatment (N = 135, 54% of the sample of 250) and their views of what could have been done differently to keep them engaged in services. Obstacles to retention fell into program- and individual-level factors; the former includes dissatisfaction with the program, especially counselors, unmet social services needs, and lack of flexibility in scheduling; individual-level barriers to retention were low problem recognition and substance use. Study limitations are noted and the implications of findings for research and practice are discussed, emphasizing the need to understand and address clients’ needs and expectations starting at intake to maximize treatment retention and the likelihood of positive outcomes. PMID:19339133

  14. Death's toolbox: examining the molecular components of bacterial programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Rice, Kelly C; Bayles, Kenneth W

    2003-11-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a genetically determined process of cellular suicide that is activated in response to cellular stress or damage, as well as in response to the developmental signals in multicellular organisms. Although historically studied in eukaryotes, it has been proposed that PCD also functions in prokaryotes, either during the developmental life cycle of certain bacteria or to remove damaged cells from a population in response to a wide variety of stresses. This review will examine several putative examples of bacterial PCD and summarize what is known about the molecular components of these systems.

  15. Growing Plants and Scientists: Fostering Positive Attitudes toward Science among All Participants in an Afterschool Hydroponics Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patchen, Amie K.; Zhang, Lin; Barnett, Michael

    2016-12-01

    This study examines an out-of-school time program targeting elementary-aged youth from populations that are typically underrepresented in science fields (primarily African-American, Hispanic, and/or English Language Learner participants). The program aimed to foster positive attitudes toward science among youth by engaging them in growing plants hydroponically (in water without soil). Participants' attitudes toward science, including anxiety, desire, and self-concept, were examined through pre-post survey data (n = 234) over the course of an afterschool program at three separate sites. Data showed that participants' anxiety decreased and desire increased for both male and female participants over the program. Self-concept increased for female participants at all three sites but did not change significantly for male participants. Participants' first language (English or Spanish) was not a factor in attitude outcomes. The primarily positive outcomes suggest that hydroponics can be a useful educational platform for engaging participants in garden-based programming year round, particularly for settings that do not have the physical space or climate to conduct outdoor gardening. Similarities in positive attitude outcomes at the three sites despite differences in format, implementation, and instructor background experience suggest that the program is resilient to variation in context. Understanding which aspects of the program facilitated positive outcomes in the varied contexts could be useful for the design of future programs.

  16. Growing Plants and Scientists: Fostering Positive Attitudes toward Science among All Participants in an Afterschool Hydroponics Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patchen, Amie K.; Zhang, Lin; Barnett, Michael

    2017-06-01

    This study examines an out-of-school time program targeting elementary-aged youth from populations that are typically underrepresented in science fields (primarily African-American, Hispanic, and/or English Language Learner participants). The program aimed to foster positive attitudes toward science among youth by engaging them in growing plants hydroponically (in water without soil). Participants' attitudes toward science, including anxiety, desire, and self-concept, were examined through pre-post survey data ( n = 234) over the course of an afterschool program at three separate sites. Data showed that participants' anxiety decreased and desire increased for both male and female participants over the program. Self-concept increased for female participants at all three sites but did not change significantly for male participants. Participants' first language (English or Spanish) was not a factor in attitude outcomes. The primarily positive outcomes suggest that hydroponics can be a useful educational platform for engaging participants in garden-based programming year round, particularly for settings that do not have the physical space or climate to conduct outdoor gardening. Similarities in positive attitude outcomes at the three sites despite differences in format, implementation, and instructor background experience suggest that the program is resilient to variation in context. Understanding which aspects of the program facilitated positive outcomes in the varied contexts could be useful for the design of future programs.

  17. Application of Item Analysis to Assess Multiple-Choice Examinations in the Mississippi Master Cattle Producer Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parish, Jane A.; Karisch, Brandi B.

    2013-01-01

    Item analysis can serve as a useful tool in improving multiple-choice questions used in Extension programming. It can identify gaps between instruction and assessment. An item analysis of Mississippi Master Cattle Producer program multiple-choice examination responses was performed to determine the difficulty of individual examinations, assess the…

  18. 46 CFR 176.625 - Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger vessels. 176.625 Section 176.625 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INSPECTION AND... Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger vessels. (a) Your vessel may be eligible for the AHE...

  19. Application of Item Analysis to Assess Multiple-Choice Examinations in the Mississippi Master Cattle Producer Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parish, Jane A.; Karisch, Brandi B.

    2013-01-01

    Item analysis can serve as a useful tool in improving multiple-choice questions used in Extension programming. It can identify gaps between instruction and assessment. An item analysis of Mississippi Master Cattle Producer program multiple-choice examination responses was performed to determine the difficulty of individual examinations, assess the…

  20. Advanced nondestructive examination technologies for measuring fatigue damage in nuclear power plant components

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, P.E.; Shah, V.N.; Akers, D.W.

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents recent results from an ongoing project at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to develop advanced nondestructive methods to characterize the aging degradation of nuclear power plant pressure boundary components. One of the advanced methods, positron annihilation, is being developed for in situ characterization of fatigue damage in nuclear power plant piping and other components. This technique can detect and correlate the microstructural changes that are precursors of fatigue cracking in austenitic stainless steel components. In fact, the initial INEL test results show that the method can detect fatigue damage in stainless steel ranging from a few percent of the fatigue life up to 40 percent.

  1. Examining the Effect of Social Values Education Program Being Applied to Nursery School Students upon Acquiring Social Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapsaglam, Özkan; Ömeroglu, Esra

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted in an attempt to develop Social Values Education Program aimed at nursery school students and examine the effect of Social Values Education Program upon the social skill acquisition of nursery school students. The effect of the education program that was developed within the scope of the study upon the social skill…

  2. Examining the Feasibility and Acceptability of a Motivational Interviewing Early Intervention Program to Prevent High School Dropout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iachini, Aidyn L.; Rogelberg, Sandra; Terry, John David; Lutz, Amy

    2016-01-01

    This article describes Aspire, a new motivational interviewing (MI) early intervention program designed to prevent dropout among students repeating the ninth grade, and then examines the feasibility and acceptability of this program through a mixed-methods approach. The Aspire program is a nine-lesson curriculum grounded in MI with an emphasis on…

  3. Examining the Feasibility and Acceptability of a Motivational Interviewing Early Intervention Program to Prevent High School Dropout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iachini, Aidyn L.; Rogelberg, Sandra; Terry, John David; Lutz, Amy

    2016-01-01

    This article describes Aspire, a new motivational interviewing (MI) early intervention program designed to prevent dropout among students repeating the ninth grade, and then examines the feasibility and acceptability of this program through a mixed-methods approach. The Aspire program is a nine-lesson curriculum grounded in MI with an emphasis on…

  4. 46 CFR 176.620 - Description of the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Description of the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE... completed using only divers, this program has four steps: the application process, the preliminary... program, or if a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) is used during the program, the preliminary exam step may...

  5. Medical Knowledge Assessment by Hematology and Medical Oncology In-Training Examinations Are Better Than Program Director Assessments at Predicting Subspecialty Certification Examination Performance.

    PubMed

    Collichio, Frances A; Hess, Brian J; Muchmore, Elaine A; Duhigg, Lauren; Lipner, Rebecca S; Haist, Steven; Hawley, Janine L; Morrison, Carol A; Clayton, Charles P; Raymond, Marilyn J; Kayoumi, Karen M; Gitlin, Scott D

    2017-09-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Next Accreditation System requires training programs to demonstrate that fellows are achieving competence in medical knowledge (MK), as part of a global assessment of clinical competency. Passing American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) certification examinations is recognized as a metric of MK competency. This study examines several in-training MK assessment approaches and their ability to predict performance on the ABIM Hematology or Medical Oncology Certification Examinations. Results of a Hematology In-Service Examination (ISE) and an Oncology In-Training Examination (ITE), program director (PD) ratings, demographic variables, United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE), and ABIM Internal Medicine (IM) Certification Examination were compared. Stepwise multiple regression and logistic regression analyses evaluated these assessment approaches as predictors of performance on the Hematology or Medical Oncology Certification Examinations. Hematology ISE scores were the strongest predictor of Hematology Certification Examination scores (β = 0.41) (passing odds ratio [OR], 1.012; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.008-1.015), and the Oncology ITE scores were the strongest predictor of Medical Oncology Certification Examination scores (β = 0.45) (passing OR, 1.013; 95 % CI, 1.011-1.016). PD rating of MK was the weakest predictor of Medical Oncology Certification Examination scores (β = 0.07) and was not significantly predictive of Hematology Certification Examination scores. Hematology and Oncology ITEs are better predictors of certification examination performance than PD ratings of MK, reinforcing the effectiveness of ITEs for competency-based assessment of MK.

  6. Does triacylglycerol (TAG) serve a photoprotective function in plant leaves? An examination of leaf lipids under shading and drought.

    PubMed

    Marchin, Renée M; Turnbull, Tarryn L; Deheinzelin, Audrey I; Adams, Mark A

    2017-06-29

    Plant survival in many ecosystems requires tolerance of large radiation loads, unreliable water supply and suboptimal soil fertility. We hypothesized that increased production of neutral lipids (triacylglycerols, TAGs) in plant leaves is a mechanism for dissipating excess radiation energy. In a greenhouse experiment, we combined drought and shade treatments and examined responses among four species differing in life form, habitat, and drought- and shade-tolerance. We also present a lipid extraction protocol suitable for sclerophyllous leaves of native Australian trees (e.g. Acacia, Eucalyptus). Fluorescence measurements indicated that plants exposed to full sunlight experienced mild photoinhibition during our experiment. Accumulation of TAGs did not follow photosynthetic capacity, but instead, TAG concentration increased with non-photochemical quenching. This suggests that plants under oxidative stress may increase biosynthesis of TAGs. Moderate drought stress resulted in a 60% reduction in TAG concentration in wheat (Triticum aestivum). Shading had no effect on TAGs, but increased concentrations of polar lipids in leaves; for example, acclimation to shade in Austrodanthonia spp., a native Australian grass, resulted in a 60% increase in associated polar lipids and higher foliar chlorophyll concentrations. Shading also reduced the digalactosyldiacylglycerol:monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG:MGDG) ratio in leaves, with a corresponding increase in the degree of unsaturation and thus fluidity of thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts. Our results suggest that prevention of photodamage may be coordinated with accumulation of TAGs, although further research is required to determine if TAGs serve a photoprotective function in plant leaves. © 2017 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  7. Differential Entry into a Voucher Program: A Longitudinal Examination of Families Who Apply To and Enroll in the Cleveland Scholarship and Tutoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Kelli M.; Legan, Natalie A.; Metcalf, Kim K.

    2007-01-01

    Publicly funded voucher programs attempt to target low-income families, but concern exists as to whether such programs actually "cream" students from public schools. Data collected as part of the evaluation of the Cleveland Scholarship and Tutoring Program are used to examine whether differences exist between three subgroups of…

  8. Examining diapirs as a nutrient source for plants in a High Arctic polar desert.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Sarah; Siciliano, Steven

    2014-05-01

    Polar deserts cover a quarter of ice-free land in the Canadian Arctic, yet little is known about the key ecological processes that take place. This understudied ecosystem is becoming increasingly vulnerable to climate change and growth of the natural resource industry. In polar deserts, below ground soil masses called diapirs occur in some patterned ground features such as frost boils. Diapirs are formed above permafrost soil where increases in moisture and temperature stimulate biological activity when thawing occurs to create an organic rich, Bhy horizon. Vascular plants are scarce (< 5% cover) and nutrients for survival are likely supplied by diapirs but this interaction is poorly understood. To determine if diapirs are an important nutrient source, nitrogen and phosphorous were traced from the diapir Bhy to vascular plants using δ15N and δ18O stable isotope signatures. Recent developments have shown that the oxygen isotopes of orthophosphate (18OP) can be used to trace plant-available phosphorous. At a polar desert site at Alexandra Fjord, Canada, diapir (n=12) and non-diapir (n=12) frost boils were identified in 12 blocks with a field-portable vis-NIR (visible and near infrared spectrometer) device. Soil cores and Salix arctica plant tissue were collected from each frost boil for stable isotope analysis. The δ15N of Salix arctica plant tissue (n=144) shows a significant relationship between block location and diapir presence (p=0.003). There was a consistent pattern in average δ15N in plant tissue parts with increasing concentration from leaf, stem to root in all frost boils. There was no significant difference in total plant δ15N between diapir and non-diapir frost boils but δ15N in soil cores will be measured to determine if these signatures are attributed to the Bhy horizon or biological nitrogen fixation. These results highlight the potential for stable isotopes to be used as a nutrient tracer in polar desert ecosystems and further analysis of

  9. The complexity of vesicle transport factors in plants examined by orthology search.

    PubMed

    Paul, Puneet; Simm, Stefan; Mirus, Oliver; Scharf, Klaus-Dieter; Fragkostefanakis, Sotirios; Schleiff, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Vesicle transport is a central process to ensure protein and lipid distribution in eukaryotic cells. The current knowledge on the molecular components and mechanisms of this process is majorly based on studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis thaliana, which revealed 240 different proteinaceous factors either experimentally proven or predicted to be involved in vesicle transport. In here, we performed an orthologue search using two different algorithms to identify the components of the secretory pathway in yeast and 14 plant genomes by using the 'core-set' of 240 factors as bait. We identified 4021 orthologues and (co-)orthologues in the discussed plant species accounting for components of COP-II, COP-I, Clathrin Coated Vesicles, Retromers and ESCRTs, Rab GTPases, Tethering factors and SNAREs. In plants, we observed a significantly higher number of (co-)orthologues than yeast, while only 8 tethering factors from yeast seem to be absent in the analyzed plant genomes. To link the identified (co-)orthologues to vesicle transport, the domain architecture of the proteins from yeast, genetic model plant A. thaliana and agriculturally relevant crop Solanum lycopersicum has been inspected. For the orthologous groups containing (co-)orthologues from yeast, A. thaliana and S. lycopersicum, we observed the same domain architecture for 79% (416/527) of the (co-)orthologues, which documents a very high conservation of this process. Further, publically available tissue-specific expression profiles for a subset of (co-)orthologues found in A. thaliana and S. lycopersicum suggest that some (co-)orthologues are involved in tissue-specific functions. Inspection of localization of the (co-)orthologues based on available proteome data or localization predictions lead to the assignment of plastid- as well as mitochondrial localized (co-)orthologues of vesicle transport factors and the relevance of this is discussed.

  10. The Complexity of Vesicle Transport Factors in Plants Examined by Orthology Search

    PubMed Central

    Mirus, Oliver; Scharf, Klaus-Dieter; Fragkostefanakis, Sotirios; Schleiff, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Vesicle transport is a central process to ensure protein and lipid distribution in eukaryotic cells. The current knowledge on the molecular components and mechanisms of this process is majorly based on studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis thaliana, which revealed 240 different proteinaceous factors either experimentally proven or predicted to be involved in vesicle transport. In here, we performed an orthologue search using two different algorithms to identify the components of the secretory pathway in yeast and 14 plant genomes by using the ‘core-set’ of 240 factors as bait. We identified 4021 orthologues and (co-)orthologues in the discussed plant species accounting for components of COP-II, COP-I, Clathrin Coated Vesicles, Retromers and ESCRTs, Rab GTPases, Tethering factors and SNAREs. In plants, we observed a significantly higher number of (co-)orthologues than yeast, while only 8 tethering factors from yeast seem to be absent in the analyzed plant genomes. To link the identified (co-)orthologues to vesicle transport, the domain architecture of the proteins from yeast, genetic model plant A. thaliana and agriculturally relevant crop Solanum lycopersicum has been inspected. For the orthologous groups containing (co-)orthologues from yeast, A. thaliana and S. lycopersicum, we observed the same domain architecture for 79% (416/527) of the (co-)orthologues, which documents a very high conservation of this process. Further, publically available tissue-specific expression profiles for a subset of (co-)orthologues found in A. thaliana and S. lycopersicum suggest that some (co-)orthologues are involved in tissue-specific functions. Inspection of localization of the (co-)orthologues based on available proteome data or localization predictions lead to the assignment of plastid- as well as mitochondrial localized (co-)orthologues of vesicle transport factors and the relevance of this is discussed. PMID:24844592

  11. 33 CFR Appendix B to Part 273 - Information Requirements for Aquatic Plant Control Program Reports

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Information Requirements for Aquatic Plant Control Program Reports B Appendix B to Part 273 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL Pt. 273, App. B Appendix B...

  12. Phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant system performance model and computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkasab, K. A.; Lu, C. Y.

    1984-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program was developed for analyzing the performance of phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant systems. Energy mass and electrochemical analysis in the reformer, the shaft converters, the heat exchangers, and the fuel cell stack were combined to develop a mathematical model for the power plant for both atmospheric and pressurized conditions, and for several commercial fuels.

  13. Nutrient management of blueberry – Assessing plant nutrient needs and designing good fertilizer programs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this article and presentation, we will address recommended soil nutrient levels for making pre-planting decisions, starting rates of key nutrients to apply, how to assess plant nutrient status to modify fertilizer programs, timing and source of fertilizer to apply, and fertigation. Key questions ...

  14. An Assessment of ORNL PIE Capabilities for the AGR Program Capsule Post Irradiation Examination

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Robert Noel

    2006-09-01

    ORNL has facilities and experienced staff that can execute +the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) task. While the specific PIE breakdown needs to be more formally defined, the basic outline is clear and the existing capabilities can be assessed within the needs of the tasks defined in the program plan. A one-to-one correspondence between the program plan tasks and the current ORNL PIE status was conducted and while some shortcomings were identified, the general capability is available. Specific upgrade needs were identified and reviewed. A path forward was formulated. Building 3525 is available for this work and this building is currently receiving renewed attention from management so that it will be in good working order prior to the expected PIE start date. This building is equipped with the tools necessary for PIEs of this nature, but the long hiatus in coated particle fuel work has left it with aging analysis tools. This report identified several of these tools and rough estimates of what would be required to update and replace them. In addition, other ORNL buildings are available to support Building 3525 in specialized tasks along with the normal laboratory infrastructure. Before the AGR management embarks on any equipment development effort, the PIE tasks should be updated against current program (modeling and data) needs and better defined so that the items to be measured, their measurement uncertainties, and thru-put needs can be reviewed. A Data Task Matrix (DTM) should be prepared so that the program data needs can be compared against the identified PIE tasks and what is practical in the hot cell environment to make sure nothing is overlooked. Finally, thought should be given to the development of standardized equipment designs between sites to avoid redundant design efforts and different measurement techniques. This is a potentially cost saving effort that can also avoid data inconsistencies.

  15. Can physical therapists deliver a pain coping skills program? An examination of training processes and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Christina; Lewis, Prudence; Bennell, Kim L; Ahamed, Yasmin; Crough, Denae; Jull, Gwendolen A; Kenardy, Justin; Nicholas, Michael K; Keefe, Francis J

    2014-10-01

    Physical therapists are well established as providers of treatments for common, painful, and disabling conditions, such as knee osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, they are well placed to deliver treatments that integrate physical and psychosocial elements. Attention is usually given to outcomes of such programs, but few studies have examined the processes and outcomes of training physical therapists to deliver such treatments. The aim of this study was to describe the processes in training physical therapists: (1) to deliver a standardized pain coping skills treatment and (2) to evaluate the effectiveness of that training. This study was an analysis of data relating to therapist performance in a randomized clinical trial. Eleven physical therapists were trained to deliver a 10-session pain coping skills training program for people with knee OA as part of a randomized controlled trial (N=222). The initial training was provided in a workshop format and included extensive, ongoing supervision by a psychologist and rigorous use of well-defined performance criteria to assess competence. Adherence to the program, ratings of performance, and use of advanced skills were all measured against these criteria in a sample (n=74, 10%) of the audio recordings of the intervention sessions. Overall, the physical therapists achieved a very high standard of treatment delivery, with 96.6% adherence to the program and mean performance ratings all in the satisfactory range. These results were maintained throughout the intervention and across all sessions. Only 10% of the delivered sessions were analyzed, and the physical therapists who took part in the study were a self-selected group. This study demonstrated that a systematic approach to training and accrediting physical therapists to deliver a standardized pain coping skills program can result in high and sustained levels of adherence to the program. Training fidelity was achieved in this group of motivated clinicians, but the supervision

  16. Breast self-examination practices and the effect of a planned training program in Western Turkey.

    PubMed

    Donmez, Yelda Candan; Dolgun, Eda; Yavuz, Meryem

    2012-01-01

    This cross-sectional and descriptive study was aimed to evaluate women breast self-examination (BSE) practice and effects of a planned educational programme for breast cancer and BSE. The samples of the study consisted 266 women. The study data were collected by a questionnaire in six months periods as two times in a month in which the periods were defined and announced to all women. After that all the women were informed about BSE. The statue of performing BSE of women (n=146) was evaluated. They were interviewed on phone after 6 months. The collected data were analyzed by using statistical SPSS program. The average age of women was 35.68±7.54. It is also determined that (61.3%) had no knowledge about BSE, (87.6%) had examined clinical breast examination (CBE) in a year and half of them (50.8%) never practiced BSE, (29.0%) had BSE regularly every month. Concerning the status of BSE practice before the education and after the education significant difference is found statistically (p<0.00). The significance of this study is that it is to give education about breast cancer and BSE for raising awareness among women.

  17. Improving frequency and proficiency of breast self-examination: effectiveness of an education program.

    PubMed Central

    Mamon, J A; Zapka, J G

    1985-01-01

    A randomized trial to improve breast self-examination (BSE) performance among college-age women was developed and results evaluated at a large public university. The major intervention was a BSE group education session conducted in classroom and workshop settings. The pre-intervention and six-months-after experimental-control comparisons show that: current performance of BSE increased by 26 per cent, bi-monthly or more often BSE performance increased by 29 per cent, and performance proficiency improved by 22 per cent. A change index, adjusting for each group's level on these three measures at pre-intervention, showed higher levels of change; 57 per cent, 36 per cent, and 28 per cent, respectively. A significantly larger proportion of women in the experimental group discussed BSE with others than women in the control groups. The "talked to" mothers, compared to the "not talked to" mothers performed BSE more regularly, in more positions, and spent more time on the examination. The results from this study suggest that properly targeted educational programs can significantly improve early detection behaviors in women. In addition, the evaluation protocol defined proficiency measures and validated measurement tools. Subsequent studies need to examine the relation of proficiency measures to detection of abnormality and subsequent effect on morbidity and mortality, so that the debate about BSE efficacy can be scientifically addressed. PMID:4003624

  18. Examining relational empowerment for elementary school students in a yPAR program.

    PubMed

    Langhout, Regina Day; Collins, Charles; Ellison, Erin Rose

    2014-06-01

    This paper joins relational empowerment, youth empowerment, and Bridging Multiple Worlds frameworks to examine forms of relational empowerment for children in two intermediary institutions-school and a youth participatory action research after-school program (yPAR ASP). Participants were twelve children, most of whom were Latina/o and from im/migrant families, enrolled in a yPAR ASP for 2 years. A mixed-method approach was utilized; we analyzed children's interviews, self-defined goals, and their social networks to examine their experiences of relational empowerment. We conclude that children experienced each of the five relational empowerment factors-collaborative competence, bridging social divisions, facilitating others' empowerment, mobilizing networks, and passing on a legacy-in the yPAR ASP setting, and some factors in school. These experiences, however, were more pronounced in the yPAR ASP setting. Additionally, social network analyses revealed that a small but meaningful percentage of actors bridged worlds, especially home and family, but by year 2, also school and the yPAR ASP. Finally, most helpers for school-based goals came from school, but a sizable number came from family, friends, and home worlds, and by year 2, also came from the yPAR ASP. Implications range from theoretical to methodological development, including the use of social network analysis as a tool to descriptively examine relational power in context.

  19. An examination of heat rate improvements due to waste heat integration in an oxycombustion pulverized coal power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Joshua M.

    Oxyfuel, or oxycombustion, technology has been proposed as one carbon capture technology for coal-fired power plants. An oxycombustion plant would fire coal in an oxidizer consisting primarily of CO2, oxygen, and water vapor. Flue gas with high CO2 concentrations is produced and can be compressed for sequestration. Since this compression generates large amounts of heat, it was theorized that this heat could be utilized elsewhere in the plant. Process models of the oxycombustion boiler, steam cycle, and compressors were created in ASPEN Plus and Excel to test this hypothesis. Using these models, heat from compression stages was integrated to the flue gas recirculation heater, feedwater heaters, and to a fluidized bed coal dryer. All possible combinations of these heat sinks were examined, with improvements in coal flow rate, Qcoal, net power, and unit heat rate being noted. These improvements would help offset the large efficiency impacts inherent to oxycombustion technology.

  20. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    G. O. Hayner; E.L. Shaber

    2004-09-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years.

  1. The development of a cultural standardized patient examination for a general surgery residency program.

    PubMed

    Chun, Maria B J; Young, Keane G M; Honda, Andrea F; Belcher, Gary F; Maskarinec, Gregory G

    2012-01-01

    Cultural competency and cross-cultural care issues in surgery resident education are areas of recognized need. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has developed 6 core competencies addressing training to provide high quality care. Of these, cultural training is addressed under 3: patient care, professionalism, and interpersonal and communication skills. Our study sought to develop a measurable tool-a cultural standardized patient (SP) examination-that integrates cross-cultural care issues within the core competencies. All first year surgery residents (PGY-1) were required to participate in the videotaped cultural SP examination as part of the general surgery residency curriculum. Two measures were utilized to assess resident performance. On the same day, we administered a Cross-Cultural Care Survey. The SP examination was assessed by trained surgery teaching faculty using a written checklist that was developed to evaluate residents on all 6 ACGME competencies. Of the 26 eligible participants over 2 years, we were able to analyze the pre- and post-test results for 24 residents. The post-test score of the "attitude toward cross-cultural care" subscale of the Cross-Cultural Care Survey was significantly lower than the pre-test score (p = 0.012; Wilcoxon signed-ranks test). There were significant differences by ethnicity on all 3 subscales of the Cross-Cultural Care Survey (attitude = p < 0.05, knowledge = p < 0.01, skills = p < 0.05) on the pre-test. However, only the knowledge subscale scores remained significantly different between ethnicities on the post-test (p < 0.01). After additional assessment, evaluation, and refinement, our goal is to incorporate cross-cultural health care training as a permanent part of our curriculum. Our hope is that efforts to provide training in cross-cultural healthcare leads to high quality care and positive outcomes for the patient. This will not only enhance our training program, but may also become a

  2. IDENTIFICATION CHALLENGES IN EXAMINATION OF COMMERCIAL PLANT MATERIAL OF PSYCHOTRIA VIRIDIS.

    PubMed

    Kowalczuk, Anna P; Łozak, Anna; Bachliński, Robert; Duszyński, Anna; Sakowska, Joanna; Zjawiony, Jordan K

    2015-01-01

    Psychoria viridis (chacruna) is a hallucinogenic plant with psychoactive properties associated with the presence of N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT). This species is primarily known as an ingredient of the beverage Ayahuasca, but dry leaves are also smoked by recreational users. The plant is controlled in Poland and France and its proper identification poses many challenges due to the fact that genus Psychotria is relatively large and there are other species that are easily confused with chacruna. The aim of the present work was to develop an effective authentication procedure for the dried and shredded leaves of P. viridis, to be used in comparison of chemical and botanical characteristics of its commercial products. Dried leaves of P. viridis originating from Brazil, Peru and Hawaii were purchased from Internet providers. For DMT identification, thin layer chromatography (TLC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods have been elaborated, validated and applied. In order to clarify the existing differences among samples, chemometric methods have been used. Botanical features and the gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS) chromatograms have been analyzed using hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). Our studies revealed significant variety among plant material marketed as P. viridis. Grouping of samples based on their micromorphology features and GC-MS results did not correspond well with the presence of DMT. Based on our results an indisputable identification of dried specimens as P. viridis is very problematic. It is necessary to postulate changes in legislation regarding regulation of P. viridis and replace it with DMT as controlled substance.

  3. A Plant Health Care Program for Brambles in the Pacific Northwest

    PubMed Central

    McElroy, F. D.

    1992-01-01

    Pratylenchus and Xiphinema species have been associated with decline and mortality of brambles (Rubus species) in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. These nematodes cause direct feeding damage and (or) transmit viruses that result in poor fruit quality and plant decline. A nematode management program has been developed by the author to minimize chemical use and nematode-induced damage while optimizing fruit production. Nematode management is an integral part of a total plant health care program in which foliar and soil pests, plant stresses, and fertility are managed. PMID:19283023

  4. State of South Carolina Cooperative Aquatic Plant Control Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    waters of South Carolina in the in- terest of navigation, flood control, agriculture, fish and wildlife, public health , and other related purposes...navigation, flood control, agriculture, fish and wildlife, public health , and other related purposes. Target species include alligator weed, Brazilian...of aquatic plants would * improve drainage and navigation, reduce potential public health problems by. * reducing mosquito breeding areas, and improve

  5. State of Washington, Aquatic Plant Management Program: Design Memorandum.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-01

    those on others who dil not receive it (G. K. Zemansky , our mailing list for the Aqtrt ic Plant Maa nagmenr Friends of the Earth). Study. This includes...added to the Mai ling list. Precisely what was the purpose of this survey? The purpose of the questionnaire was to provide a (G. M. Zemansky , Friends of

  6. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants: A Home Study Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    This manual was prepared by experienced wastewater treatment plant operators to provide a home study course to develop new qualified workers and expand the abilities of existing workers. The objective of this manual is to provide the knowledge and skills necessary for certification. Participants learn the basic operational aspects of treatment…

  7. Plants. Grade 1. Anchorage School District Elementary Science Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anchorage School District, AK.

    This unit includes six lessons on plants for first graders. It provides a material list for 30 students, book list, unit introductions, schedules, and background information for teachers including evaluation and problem areas. Lessons include: (1) "Living and Non-Living Things"; (2) "Seeds and Other Things"; (3) "Sowing…

  8. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants: A Home Study Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    This manual was prepared by experienced wastewater treatment plant operators to provide a home study course to develop new qualified workers and expand the abilities of existing workers. The objective of this manual is to provide the knowledge and skills necessary for certification. Participants learn the basic operational aspects of treatment…

  9. Plants. Grade 1. Anchorage School District Elementary Science Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anchorage School District, AK.

    This unit includes six lessons on plants for first graders. It provides a material list for 30 students, book list, unit introductions, schedules, and background information for teachers including evaluation and problem areas. Lessons include: (1) "Living and Non-Living Things"; (2) "Seeds and Other Things"; (3) "Sowing…

  10. Examining Clinical Judgment in an Adaptive Intervention Design: The Fast Track Program

    PubMed Central

    Bierman, Karen L.; Nix, Robert L.; Maples, Jerry J.; Murphy, Susan A.

    2009-01-01

    Although clinical judgment is often used in assessment and treatment planning, rarely has research examined its reliability, validity, or impact in practice settings. This study tailored the frequency of home visits in a prevention program for aggressive–disruptive children (n = 410; 56% minority) on the basis of 2 kinds of clinical judgment: ratings of parental functioning using a standardized multi-item scale and global assessments of family need for services. Stronger reliability and better concurrent and predictive validity emerged for the 1st kind of clinical judgment than for the 2nd. Exploratory analyses suggested that using ratings of parental functioning to tailor treatment recommendations improved the impact of the intervention by the end of 3rd grade but using more global assessments of family need did not. PMID:16822104

  11. Examining clinical judgment in an adaptive intervention design: The fast track program.

    PubMed

    Bierman, Karen L; Nix, Robert L; Maples, Jerry J; Murphy, Susan A

    2006-06-01

    Although clinical judgment is often used in assessment and treatment planning, rarely has research examined its reliability, validity, or impact in practice settings. This study tailored the frequency of home visits in a prevention program for aggressive- disruptive children (n = 410; 56% minority) on the basis of 2 kinds of clinical judgment: ratings of parental functioning using a standardized multi-item scale and global assessments of family need for services. Stronger reliability and better concurrent and predictive validity emerged for the 1st kind of clinical judgment than for the 2nd. Exploratory analyses suggested that using ratings of parental functioning to tailor treatment recommendations improved the impact of the intervention by the end of 3rd grade but using more global assessments of family need did not. Copyright 2006 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. OPTIMIZING WATER TREATMENT PLANT PERFORMANCE WITH THE COMPOSITE CORRECTION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Technology Transfer Summary Report summarizes the results of an ongoing project to evaluate the utility of the Composite Correction Program (CCP) approach to improving the performance of drinking water treatment facilities. The CCP approach, which has already proven successf...

  13. OPTIMIZING WATER TREATMENT PLANT PERFORMANCE WITH THE COMPOSITE CORRECTION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Technology Transfer Summary Report summarizes the results of an ongoing project to evaluate the utility of the Composite Correction Program (CCP) approach to improving the performance of drinking water treatment facilities. The CCP approach, which has already proven successf...

  14. Nuclear Technology Series. Nuclear Reactor (Plant) Operator Trainee. A Suggested Program Planning Guide. Revised June 80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This program planning guide for a two-year postsecondary nuclear reactor (plant) operator trainee program is designed for use with courses 1-16 of thirty-five in the Nuclear Technology Series. The purpose of the guide is to describe the nuclear power field and its job categories for specialists, technicians and operators; and to assist planners,…

  15. Nuclear Technology Series. Nuclear Reactor (Plant) Operator Trainee. A Suggested Program Planning Guide. Revised June 80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This program planning guide for a two-year postsecondary nuclear reactor (plant) operator trainee program is designed for use with courses 1-16 of thirty-five in the Nuclear Technology Series. The purpose of the guide is to describe the nuclear power field and its job categories for specialists, technicians and operators; and to assist planners,…

  16. Evaluation of breast self-examination program using Health Belief Model in female students

    PubMed Central

    Moodi, Mitra; Mood, Mahdi Baladi; Sharifirad, Gholam Reza; Shahnazi, Hossein; Sharifzadeh, Gholamreza

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Breast cancer has been considered as a major health problem in females, because of its high incidence in recent years. Due to the role of breast self-examination (BSE) in early diagnosis and prevention of morbidity and mortality rate of breast cancer, promoting student knowledge, capabilities and attitude are required in this regard. This study was conducted to evaluation BSE education in female University students using Health Belief Model. METHODS: In this semi-experimental study, 243 female students were selected using multi-stage randomized sampling in 2008. The data were collected by validated and reliable questionnaire (43 questions) before intervention and one week after intervention. The intervention program was consisted of one educational session lasting 120 minutes by lecturing and showing a film based on HBM constructs. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS (version11.5) using statistical paired t-test and ANOVA at the significant level of α = 0.05. RESULTS: 243 female students aged 20.6 ± 2.8 years old were studied. Implementing the educational program resulted in increased knowledge and HBM (perceived susceptibility, severity, benefit and barrier) scores in the students (p ≤ 0.01). Significant increases were also observed in knowledge and perceived benefit after the educational program (p ≤ 0.05). ANOVA statistical test showed significant difference in perceived benefit score in students of different universities (p = 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Due to the positive effects of education on increasing knowledge and attitude of university students about BSE, the efficacy of the HBM in BSE education for female students was confirmed. PMID:22091251

  17. A prospective examination of disease management program use by complex cardiac outpatients.

    PubMed

    Gravely, Shannon; Reid, Robert D; Oh, Paul; Ross, Heather; Stewart, Donna E; Grace, Sherry L

    2012-01-01

    The use of disease management programs (DMPs) by patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) is associated with improved outcomes. Although rates of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) use are well established, less is known about other DMPs. The objectives of this study were to describe the degree of DMP utilization by CVD outpatients, and examine factors related to use. This study represents a secondary analysis of a larger prospective cohort study. In hospital, 2635 CVD inpatients from 11 hospitals in Ontario Canada completed a survey that assessed factors affecting DMP utilization. One year later, 1803 participants completed a mailed survey that assessed DMP utilization. One thousand seventy-three (59.5%) participants reported using at least 1 DMP. Overall, 951 (52.7%) reported participating in cardiac rehabilitation, and among participants with a comorbid indication, 212 (41.2%) reported attending a diabetes education centre, 28 (25.9%) attended stroke rehabilitation, 35 (12.9%) used a heart failure clinic, and 13 (11.7%) attended a smoking cessation program. A multinomial logistic regression analysis showed that compared with no DMP use, participants that attended 1 or multiple programs were younger, married, diagnosed with a myocardial infarction, less likely to have had a percutaneous coronary intervention and had higher perceptions of personal control over their heart condition. There were few differences between participants that used 1 vs multiple DMPs, however, having diabetes or comorbid stroke significantly increased the likelihood of multiple DMP use. Approximately 40% of CVD outpatients do not access DMPs. An integrated approach to vascular disease management appears warranted. Copyright © 2012 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of breast self-examination program using Health Belief Model in female students.

    PubMed

    Moodi, Mitra; Mood, Mahdi Baladi; Sharifirad, Gholam Reza; Shahnazi, Hossein; Sharifzadeh, Gholamreza

    2011-03-01

    Breast cancer has been considered as a major health problem in females, because of its high incidence in recent years. Due to the role of breast self-examination (BSE) in early diagnosis and prevention of morbidity and mortality rate of breast cancer, promoting student knowledge, capabilities and attitude are required in this regard. This study was conducted to evaluation BSE education in female University students using Health Belief Model. In this semi-experimental study, 243 female students were selected using multi-stage randomized sampling in 2008. The data were collected by validated and reliable questionnaire (43 questions) before intervention and one week after intervention. The intervention program was consisted of one educational session lasting 120 minutes by lecturing and showing a film based on HBM constructs. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS (version11.5) using statistical paired t-test and ANOVA at the significant level of α = 0.05. 243 female students aged 20.6 ± 2.8 years old were studied. Implementing the educational program resulted in increased knowledge and HBM (perceived susceptibility, severity, benefit and barrier) scores in the students (p ≤ 0.01). Significant increases were also observed in knowledge and perceived benefit after the educational program (p ≤ 0.05). ANOVA statistical test showed significant difference in perceived benefit score in students of different universities (p = 0.05). Due to the positive effects of education on increasing knowledge and attitude of university students about BSE, the efficacy of the HBM in BSE education for female students was confirmed.

  19. The Examination of a Pullout STEM Program for Urban Upper Elementary Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, Daniel L.; Eckhoff, Angela; Stewart, Craig O.; Chappell, Shanan; Hathcock, Stephanie

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether a pullout STEM program (STARBASE) makes reading and math scores decrease and examine its impact on urban fourth, fifth, and sixth grade students' attitudes and perceptions regarding STEM education and careers. We employed a mixed-methods, case study approach that involved two published and one indigenous instrument composed of Likert scales, semantic differential scales, and open-ended items, along with structured interviews. Results indicate that it is possible for reading, math, and social studies scores to be unaffected when implementing a STEM pullout program, as adjusted trends (for ethnicity and socioeconomic status) are not statistically different from those of non-STARBASE school divisions in the area. Additionally, the Black/White achievement gap, as measured by standardized test scores, was substantially closed over the last decade within STARBASE schools. Quantitative measures revealed few differences in student attitudes from pre- to posttest. Student qualitative responses were overwhelmingly positive. Students wanted more STARBASE time in the regular school year. Students, particularly Black students, also wanted an increase in career education opportunities. Implications regarding curricular changes aimed at STEM education and model adoption are addressed.

  20. How to implement a quality program in a coking plant. The AHMSA experience

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes M, M.A.; Perez, J.L.; Garza, C. de la; Morales, M.

    1995-12-01

    AHMSA (Altos Hornos de Mexico) is the largest integrated Steel Plant in Mexico, with its 3.1 MMMT of Liquid Steel production program for 1995. AHMSA operates two coke plants which began operations in 1955 and 1976. Total coke monthly production capacity amounts to as much as 106,000 Metric Tons (MT). The coke plants working philosophy was discussed and established in 1986 as part of the Quality Improvement Program, where its ultimate goal is to give the best possible coke quality to its main client--the blast furnaces. With this goal in mind, a planned joint effort with their own coal mines was initiated. This paper deals with the implementation process of the Quality Program, and the results of this commitment at the coal mines, coke plants and blast furnaces. The coke quality improvement is shown since 1985 to 1994, as well as the impact on the blast furnace operation.

  1. Results from the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program: Their use in inspection activities

    SciTech Connect

    Gunther, W.; Taylor, J. )

    1990-09-01

    The US NCR's Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program has determined the susceptibility to aging of components and systems, and the potential for aging to impact plant safety and availability. The NPAR Program also identified methods for detecting and mitigating aging in components. This report describes the NPAR results which can enhance NRC inspection activities. Recommendations are provided for communicating pertinent information to NRC inspectors. These recommendations are based on a detailed assessment of the NRC's Inspection Program, and feedback from resident and regional inspectors as described within. Examples of NPAR report summaries and aging inspection guides for components and systems are included. 13 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Onsite 40-kilowatt fuel cell power plant manufacturing and field test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A joint Gas Research Institute and U.S. Department of Energy Program was initiated in 1982 to evaluate the use of fuel cell power systems for on-site energy service. Forty-six 40 kW fuel cell power plants were manufactured at the United Technologies Corporation facility in South Windsor, Connecticut, and are being delivered to host utilities and other program participants in the United States and Japan for field testing. The construction of the 46 fully-integrated power plants was completed in January 1985 within the constraints of the contract plan. The program has provided significant experience in the manufacture, acceptance testing, deployment, and support of on-site fuel cell systems. Initial field test results also show that these experimental power plants meet the performance and environmental requirements of a commercial specification. This Interim Report encompasses the design and manufacturing phases of the 40 kW Power Plant Manufacturing and Field Test program. The contract between UTC and NASA also provides UTC field engineering support to the host utilities, training programs and associated manuals for utility operating and maintenance personnel, spare parts support for a defined test period, and testing at UTC of a power plant made available from a preceding program phase. These activities are ongoing and will be reported subsequently.

  3. Onsite 40-kilowatt fuel cell power plant manufacturing and field test program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-02-01

    A joint Gas Research Institute and U.S. Department of Energy Program was initiated in 1982 to evaluate the use of fuel cell power systems for on-site energy service. Forty-six 40 kW fuel cell power plants were manufactured at the United Technologies Corporation facility in South Windsor, Connecticut, and are being delivered to host utilities and other program participants in the United States and Japan for field testing. The construction of the 46 fully-integrated power plants was completed in January 1985 within the constraints of the contract plan. The program has provided significant experience in the manufacture, acceptance testing, deployment, and support of on-site fuel cell systems. Initial field test results also show that these experimental power plants meet the performance and environmental requirements of a commercial specification. This Interim Report encompasses the design and manufacturing phases of the 40 kW Power Plant Manufacturing and Field Test program. The contract between UTC and NASA also provides UTC field engineering support to the host utilities, training programs and associated manuals for utility operating and maintenance personnel, spare parts support for a defined test period, and testing at UTC of a power plant made available from a preceding program phase. These activities are ongoing and will be reported subsequently.

  4. The catastrophic failures of plants hydraulic network examined trough an model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bienaimé, Diane; Marmottant, Philippe; Brodribb, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Plants live a dangerous game: they have to facilitate water transport in their xylem conduits while minimizing the consequence of hydraulic failure. Indeed, as water flows under negative pressure inside these conduits, cavitation bubbles can spontaneously occur. The failure dynamics of this hydraulic network is poorly studied, while it has important ecological and bioengineering implications. Here, by using dark-field transmission microscopy, we were able to directly visualize the spreading of cavitation bubbles within leaves, where the xylem conduits form a 2D and transparent network. We observe the surprising fact that the probability of cavitation increases in larger veins, where the majority of water flows. Next, in order to understand the physical mechanism of nucleation and propagation, we built artificial networks of channels made in hydrogel, where evaporation generates negative pressures. We find the hydraulic failure follows two stages: first a sudden bubble nucleation relaxing to the elastic stored of the system, and then a slow expansion driven by the flow of water in the surrounding medium. Channel constrictions slow the propagation of the bubble, similarly to the small valves that connect plants conduits. P.M. acknowledges support from the University of Tasmania for a visiting scholar grant.

  5. An examination of stress, coping, and adaptation in nurses in a recovery and monitoring program.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Marie Katherine; Taylor, Kathleen P; Marcus-Aiyeku, Ulanda; Krause-Parello, Cheryl A

    2012-10-01

    Addiction rates in nurses are higher than in the general population. The relationship between stress, coping, and adaptation in nurses (N = 82) enrolled in a recovery and monitoring program in the state of New Jersey was examined. Social support, a variable tested as a mediator of this relationship, was also examined. Participants completed the Perceived Stress Scale, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, and Psychological General Well-Being Index. Negative relationships were found between stress and social support and stress and well-being, and a positive relationship was found between social support and well-being (all ps < .05). The direct relationship between stress and well-being was decreased in the presence of social support. The findings of this research suggest that, to assist nurses, an increased awareness of stress and its injurious effects on overall well-being must be identified so proactive measures can be implemented to prevent potential untoward consequences. Ultimately, methods to strengthen social support and social networks will enhance the probability of sustained recovery, relapse prevention, and safe reentry into nursing practice. Implications for behavioral health providers and health care practitioners are discussed.

  6. Aquatic Plant Control Research Program: Effects of Water Chemistry on Submersed Aquatic Plants: A Synthesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    plants exhibiting C4 photosynthesis, C is conserved by refixing photorespired CO2. These terres- trial adaptations have counterparts in the aquatic...such as low photorespiration rates and low CO2 compensation points. The advantages of this photosynthetic pathway include conservation of... photorespired C and efficient C assimilation under the high dissolved oxygen and low free CO2 concentrations common in dense submersed aquatic plant populations

  7. Metallographic examination of surveillance coupons from the Wilsonville, Alabama, Solvent Refined Coal Pilot Plant, 1977-1978

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, V.B.; King, R.T.; Leslie, B.C.; Crouse, R.S.; Patko, A.J.; Taber, K.C.

    1980-07-01

    Commercialization of the solvent refined coal (SRC) process requires corrosion-resistant yet economical materials of construction. A corrosion surveillance program was initiated at the Wilsonville, Alabama, SRC pilot plant to expose racks of welded specimens of engineering alloys to the various process conditions in major plant vessels. To observe the long-term cumulative exposure effects, sections were taken from the specimens after six months. The coupons were replaced in the vessels for another year and then reexamined. These sections were evaluated at ORNL by standard procedures. Microprobe analyses were performed on the scale on selected specimens. The scale, both on and below the surface, proved to be varying complex mixtures of oxides and sulfides sometimes intermixed with process stream material. Weight change records indicate that corrosion was not a serious problem during these exposures, with the coals processed to date.

  8. Rocky Flats plant qualification testing for PRES Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kautz, D.D.; Tanaka, G.J.

    1994-06-24

    The authors recently completed several tests for EG&G - Rocky Flats, Inc. (RFP) to qualify welding procedures for the PRESS program. The welds that were tested were the Monel 400 to vanadium friction weld used in the Sail-A and the vanadium electron beam welds from the Mast Inner Subassembly. Tests were performed to determine the structural properties of the parts under conditions similar to those encountered in a weapons handling and storage environment. These tests included impact, tensile and pressure loading. Metallographic analysis was done where appropriate to document weld quality. All results were satisfactory for PRESS program purposes.

  9. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants: A Field Study Training Program. Volume I. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    This manual was prepared by experienced wastewater collection system workers to provide a home study course to develop new qualified workers and expand the abilities of existing workers. This volume is directed primarily towards entry-level operators and the operators of ponds, package plants, or small treatment plants. Ten chapters examine the…

  10. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants: A Field Study Training Program. Volume I. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    This manual was prepared by experienced wastewater collection system workers to provide a home study course to develop new qualified workers and expand the abilities of existing workers. This volume is directed primarily towards entry-level operators and the operators of ponds, package plants, or small treatment plants. Ten chapters examine the…

  11. The Savannah River Plant`s Groundwater Monitoring Program - second quarter 1987

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This report is a summary of the groundwater monitoring program conducted by the Environmental Monitoring Group of the Health Protection Department in the second quarter of 1987 and includes the analytical results, field data, and detailed documentation for this program. The purpose of this report is twofold. First, the report provides a historical record of the activities and the rationale of the program; second, it provides an official document of the analytical results.

  12. A Descriptive Survey of Anesthesiology Residency Simulation Programs: How Are Programs Preparing Residents for the New American Board of Anesthesiology APPLIED Certification Examination?

    PubMed

    Isaak, Robert S; Chen, Fei; Arora, Harendra; Martinelli, Susan M; Zvara, David A; Stiegler, Marjorie P

    2017-09-01

    Anesthesiology residency programs may need new simulation-based programs to prepare residents for the new Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) component of the American Board of Anesthesiology (ABA) Primary Certification process. The design of such programs may require significant resources, including faculty time, expertise, and funding, as are currently needed for structured oral examination (SOE) preparation. This survey analyzed the current state of US-based anesthesiology residency programs regarding simulation-based educational programming for SOE and OSCE preparation. An online survey was distributed to every anesthesiology residency program director in the United States. The survey included 15 to 46 questions, depending on each respondent's answers. The survey queried current practices and future plans regarding resident preparation specifically for the ABA APPLIED examination, with emphasis on the OSCE. Descriptive statistics were summarized. χ and Fisher exact tests were used to test the differences in proportions across groups. Spearman rank correlation was used to examine the association between ordinal variables. The responding 66 programs (49%) were a representative sample of all anesthesiology residencies (N = 136) in terms of geographical location (χ P = .58). There was a low response rate from small programs that have 12 or fewer clinical anesthesia residents. Ninety-one percent (95% confidence interval [CI], 84%-95%) of responders agreed that it is the responsibility of the program to specifically prepare residents for primary certification, and most agreed that it is important to practice SOEs (94%; 95% CI, 88%-97%) and OSCEs (89%; 95% CI, 83%-94%). While 100% of respondents reported providing mock SOEs, only 31% (95% CI, 24%-40%) of respondents provided mock OSCE experiences. Of those without an OSCE program, 75% (95% CI, 64%-83%) reported plans to start one. The most common reasons for not having an OSCE program already in place

  13. Parental Preferences for Early Intervention Programming Examined Using Best-Worst Scaling Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabiano, Gregory A.; Schatz, Nicole K.; Jerome, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many programs and interventions are available to support families of young children, yet engagement and participation in these programs is often inconsistent. One explanation for poor engagement is that program parameters may not align with participant preferences. Further, preferred program components may vary across demographic…

  14. Examining a Program Designed to Improve Supervisory Knowledge and Practices of Cooperating Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erbilgin, Evrim

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on how a program based on educative supervision supported the supervisory knowledge and practices of three cooperating teachers. The program was planned as a kind of practicum: the cooperating teachers participated in the program while working with a student teacher. The program included activities where the cooperating…

  15. Parental Preferences for Early Intervention Programming Examined Using Best-Worst Scaling Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabiano, Gregory A.; Schatz, Nicole K.; Jerome, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many programs and interventions are available to support families of young children, yet engagement and participation in these programs is often inconsistent. One explanation for poor engagement is that program parameters may not align with participant preferences. Further, preferred program components may vary across demographic…

  16. A native plant development program for the Colorado Plateau

    Treesearch

    Stephen B. Monsen

    2008-01-01

    (Please note, this is an abstract only) Revegetation programs instigated in the Intermountain West have relied on the use of introduced perennial grasses, with attention focused upon improving the agronomic and forage attributes of these species. Currently, a wide number of site adapted native species are required to restore the extensive disturbances throughout the...

  17. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Selection and Qualification Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    R. Doug Hamelin; G. O. Hayner

    2004-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design is a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble bed thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an average reactor outlet temperature of at least 1000 C. The NGNP will use very high burn up, lowenriched uranium, TRISO-Coated fuel in a once-through fuel cycle. The design service life of the NGNP is 60 years.

  18. Community College First-Year Experience Programs: Examining Student Access, Experience, and Success from the Student Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acevedo-Gil, Nancy; Zerquera, Desiree D.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter examines community college first-year experience programs using critical race theory and ecological theory. The study draws on diverse students' experiences with access, support, and long-term success within community colleges to assess how these programs foster student success, as told through the voices of student participants.

  19. Reading, Learning, and Growing: An Examination of the Benefits of Common Book Programs for First-Year Students' Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soria, Krista M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the continued growth of common book reading programs on college and university campuses, little is known about the benefits of such programs on first-year students' development. Using a multi-institutional survey of undergraduates attending six large, public universities (n = 1,237), the present study examined relationships between…

  20. Reading, Learning, and Growing: An Examination of the Benefits of Common Book Programs for First-Year Students' Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soria, Krista M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the continued growth of common book reading programs on college and university campuses, little is known about the benefits of such programs on first-year students' development. Using a multi-institutional survey of undergraduates attending six large, public universities (n = 1,237), the present study examined relationships between…

  1. Reaching Out to Fathers: An Examination of Staff Efforts That Lead to Greater Father Involvement in Early Childhood Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, researchers and practitioners have become increasingly interested in father/male involvement in early childhood programs. However, few empirical studies have examined early childhood educators' efforts to involve fathers in such programs. The purpose of the present investigation was to assess early childhood educators' efforts to…

  2. A Comparative Cross-Cultural Examination of Community Art Education Programs in South Korea and the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Ryan; Kim, Junghee

    2014-01-01

    The authors conducted comparative cross-cultural research to examine a select group of the available and more noteworthy art education organizations and their programs after observing significant differences in the community art education programs offered in Tucson, Arizona, and Anyang, South Korea. The study reports several major differences…

  3. 46 CFR 71.50-17 - Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger vessels. 71.50-17 Section 71.50-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Drydocking § 71.50... vessels. (a) Your vessel may be eligible for the AHE Program if— (1) It is constructed of steel...

  4. 46 CFR 71.50-17 - Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger vessels. 71.50-17 Section 71.50-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Drydocking § 71.50... vessels. (a) Your vessel may be eligible for the AHE Program if— (1) It is constructed of steel...

  5. 46 CFR 115.625 - Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger vessels. 115.625 Section 115.625 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH... passenger vessels. (a) Your vessel may be eligible for the AHE Program if— (1) It is constructed of steel...

  6. 46 CFR 71.50-17 - Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger vessels. 71.50-17 Section 71.50-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Drydocking § 71.50... vessels. (a) Your vessel may be eligible for the AHE Program if— (1) It is constructed of steel...

  7. Diversity Inclusion in 4-H Youth Programs: Examining the Perceptions among West Virginia 4-H Youth Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaVergne, Douglas D.

    2013-01-01

    The study reported here sought to examine the perceptions of 4-H youth professionals towards diversity inclusion in 4-H youth programs. A majority of professionals positively reported that there are benefits for youth of color and youth with disabilities in 4-H youth programs. Respondents indicated that the lack of information about 4-H youth…

  8. Community College First-Year Experience Programs: Examining Student Access, Experience, and Success from the Student Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acevedo-Gil, Nancy; Zerquera, Desiree D.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter examines community college first-year experience programs using critical race theory and ecological theory. The study draws on diverse students' experiences with access, support, and long-term success within community colleges to assess how these programs foster student success, as told through the voices of student participants.

  9. Diversity Inclusion in 4-H Youth Programs: Examining the Perceptions among West Virginia 4-H Youth Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaVergne, Douglas D.

    2013-01-01

    The study reported here sought to examine the perceptions of 4-H youth professionals towards diversity inclusion in 4-H youth programs. A majority of professionals positively reported that there are benefits for youth of color and youth with disabilities in 4-H youth programs. Respondents indicated that the lack of information about 4-H youth…

  10. Individual and Group Sensitivity to Remedial Reading Program Design: Examining Reading Gains across Three Middle School Reading Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoon, Mary Beth; Petscher, Yaacov

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to examine group- and individual-level responses by struggling adolescents readers (6th-8th grades; N = 155) to three different modalities of the same reading program, Reading Achievement Multi-Component Program. The three modalities differ in the combination of reading components (phonological decoding, spelling,…

  11. Individual and Group Sensitivity to Remedial Reading Program Design: Examining Reading Gains across Three Middle School Reading Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoon, Mary Beth; Petscher, Yaacov

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to examine group- and individual-level responses by struggling adolescents readers (6th-8th grades; N = 155) to three different modalities of the same reading program, Reading Achievement Multi-Component Program. The three modalities differ in the combination of reading components (phonological decoding, spelling,…

  12. The Relationship between Physical Therapist Assistant Faculty Characteristics and Program Outcomes on the National Physical Therapy Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Malorie Kosht

    2009-01-01

    Background. There is a paucity of published literature regarding the correlation between faculty characteristics and outcomes on the National Physical Therapy Examination for Physical Therapist Assistants (NPTE-PTA). Purpose. To determine if there was a relationship between faculty characteristics in PTA educational programs and program outcomes…

  13. Examining Changes in Beliefs and Practices: English Language Teachers' Participation in the School-Based Support Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaaban, Youmen

    2017-01-01

    This article examines changes in teachers' beliefs and practices over the course of a professional development (PD) program concerned with the implementation of a constructivist-oriented pedagogy in English as a Foreign Language (EFL) classrooms. Grounded in situative theories of learning and development, the School-based Support Program places…

  14. A Comparative Cross-Cultural Examination of Community Art Education Programs in South Korea and the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Ryan; Kim, Junghee

    2014-01-01

    The authors conducted comparative cross-cultural research to examine a select group of the available and more noteworthy art education organizations and their programs after observing significant differences in the community art education programs offered in Tucson, Arizona, and Anyang, South Korea. The study reports several major differences…

  15. An Examination of the Quality of Discipline Policies in NAEYC-Accredited Early Care and Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrity, Sarah M.; Longstreth, Sascha L.; Linder, Lisa K.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to expand the knowledge base regarding discipline policies in early care and education (ECE) programs by examining the extent to which programs utilize policies that reflect the implementation of evidence-based practices to prevent and address challenging behaviors in the early years. Discipline policies were gathered…

  16. The Relationship between Physical Therapist Assistant Faculty Characteristics and Program Outcomes on the National Physical Therapy Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Malorie Kosht

    2009-01-01

    Background. There is a paucity of published literature regarding the correlation between faculty characteristics and outcomes on the National Physical Therapy Examination for Physical Therapist Assistants (NPTE-PTA). Purpose. To determine if there was a relationship between faculty characteristics in PTA educational programs and program outcomes…

  17. A Survey of the Review Programs for the Part 1 Exam of the National Board of Medical Examiners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litzinger, Marcia J.; Welker, Weston J.

    1979-01-01

    An academic affairs committee submitted a questionnaire to the 116 U. S. medical schools to obtain specific information concerning the existence of National Board of Medical Examiners' part 1 preparatory review programs and the organization and methods of such courses. Only 25 percent of the respondents indicated an organized program of board…

  18. Exploring the Alignment between Post-Secondary Education Programs and Earnings: An Examination of 2005 Ontario Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Kristyn; Walters, David

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the influence that field of study and level of post-secondary education have on the earnings of recent graduates in Ontario. Graduates of trades, community college, and university programs are compared. Results suggest that graduates of applied and technical programs obtain higher earnings within two years of graduation than…

  19. Relations between Prestige Rankings of Clinical Psychology Doctoral Programs and Scores on the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, James M.; Ryan, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the relationship between "U.S. News and World Report" 2008 rankings of clinical psychology doctoral programs and scores earned by graduates on the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP). For the top 25 programs, relationship between ranking and EPPP scores was not significant, r[subscript s] = -0.28. EPPP scores…

  20. Program Factors That Influence American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination Performance: A Multi-Institutional Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jerry J; Gifford, Edward D; Moazzez, Ashkan; Sidwell, Richard A; Reeves, Mark E; Hartranft, Thomas H; Inaba, Kenji; Jarman, Benjamin T; Are, Chandrakanth; Galante, Joseph M; Amersi, Farin; Smith, Brian R; Melcher, Marc L; Nelson, M Timothy; Donahue, Timothy; Jacobsen, Garth; Arnell, Tracey D; Lee, Steven; Neville, Angela; de Virgilio, Christian

    2015-01-01

    To determine the influence of program strategies, such as program directors' (PD) attitudes about the American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE) and approach to ABSITE preparation, on residents' ABSITE performance. A 17-item questionnaire was sent to PDs at surgical residency programs. The questions were designed to elicit information regarding the educational curriculum, remediation protocols, and opinions relating to the ABSITE. Main outcome measure was categorical resident ABSITE percentile scores from the January 2014 examination. Statistical analysis was performed using the Student t-test, analysis of variance, and linear regression as appropriate. The study was carried out at general surgery residency programs across the country. In total, 15 general surgery residency PDs participated in the study. The PD response rate was 100%. All 460 resident ABSITE scores from the 15 programs were obtained. In total, 10 programs (67%) identified as university affiliated, 4 programs (27%) as independent academic, and 1 program (7%) as hybrid. The mean number of residents per program was 30.7 (range: 15-57). In total, 14 PDs (93%) indicated that an ABSITE review curriculum was in place and 13 PDs (87%) indicated they had a remediation protocol for residents with low ABSITE scores (with differing thresholds of <30th, <35th, and <40th percentile). The median overall ABSITE score for all residents was 61st percentile (interquartile range = 39.5). The mean ABSITE score for each program ranged from 39th to 75th percentile. Program factors associated with higher ABSITE scores included tracking resident reading throughout the year (median 63rd percentile with tracking vs 59th percentile without, p = 0.040) and the type of remediation (by PD: 77th percentile, by PD and faculty: 57th percentile, faculty only: 64th percentile, with Surgical Education and Self-Assessment Program (SESAP): 63rd percentile, outside review course: 43rd percentile; p < 0.001). Programs with

  1. Advanced on-site power plant development technology program

    SciTech Connect

    1989-09-01

    The subject contract was initiated in August 1982 and the technical effort concluded in April 1989. The purpose of the technical effort was to establish a technology base for 200-kW on-site fuel cell power plants. It was conducted in two phases: (1) Component evaluation; and (2) Full-scale system verification. This contract was supplemented by a Gas Research Institute (GRI) contract which was conducted in the 1981--1986 time period. This GRI contract concentrated on 200-kW scale component design, thermal management/water treatment system analysis and redesign and advanced DC/AC inverter development. The component evaluation phase generally included subscale component tests, scale-up to full-size 200-kW hardware and full-size hardware tests of the cell stack (in Tasks 1 and 2), the power conditioner (in Task 3), the heat exchangers and ancillary components (in Task 4), and the fuel processor (in Task 5). The full-size cell stack, fuel processor, heat exchangers, and ancillary components from the component development tasks were integrated into a dc system called the Verification Test Article (VTA). The VTA which was fabricated and tested under Task 7 allowed for system integration issues associated with the cell stack, fuel processor, thermal management, and water treatment subsystems to be explored under conditions similar to an actual fuel cell power plant. Key accomplishments of this contract are described. 193 figs., 37 tabs.

  2. Evolutionary Analysis of the LAFL Genes Involved in the Land Plant Seed Maturation Program

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jing-Dan; Li, Xia; Jiang, Chen-Kun; Wong, Gane K.-S.; Rothfels, Carl J.; Rao, Guang-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Seeds are one of the most significant innovations in the land plant lineage, critical to the diversification and adaptation of plants to terrestrial environments. From perspective of seed evo-devo, the most crucial developmental stage in this innovation is seed maturation, which includes accumulation of storage reserves, acquisition of desiccation tolerance, and induction of dormancy. Based on previous studies of seed development in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, seed maturation is mainly controlled by the LAFL regulatory network, which includes LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (LEC1) and LEC1-LIKE (L1L) of the NF-YB gene family, and ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3), FUSCA3 (FUS3), and LEC2 (LEAFY COTYLEDON2) of the B3-AFL gene family. In the present study, molecular evolution of these LAFL genes was analyzed, using representative species from across the major plant lineages. Additionally, to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the seed maturation program, co-expression pattern analyses of LAFL genes were conducted across vascular plants. The results show that the origin of AFL gene family dates back to a common ancestor of bryophytes and vascular plants, while LEC1-type genes are only found in vascular plants. LAFL genes of vascular plants likely specify their co-expression in two different developmental phrases, spore and seed maturation, respectively, and expression patterns vary slightly across the major vascular plants lineages. All the information presented in this study will provide insights into the origin and diversification of seed plants. PMID:28421087

  3. Remodelling of lace plant leaves: antioxidants and ROS are key regulators of programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Dauphinee, Adrian N; Fletcher, Jacob I; Denbigh, Georgia L; Lacroix, Christian R; Gunawardena, Arunika H L A N

    2017-07-01

    Antioxidants and reactive oxygen species are integral for programmed cell death signaling during perforation formation in the lace plant ( Aponogeton madagascariensis ). The lace plant is an excellent model system for studying developmentally regulated programmed cell death (PCD). During early lace plant leaf development, PCD systematically deletes cells resulting in a perforated leaf morphology that is unique in planta. A distinct feature in young lace plant leaves is an abundance of anthocyanins, which have antioxidant properties. The first sign of PCD induction is the loss of anthocyanin pigmentation in cells that are targeted for destruction, which results in a visible gradient of cell death. The cellular dynamics and time course of lace plant PCD are well documented; however, the signals involved in the pathway remain elusive. This study investigates the roles of antioxidants and ROS in developmental PCD signaling during lace plant perforation formation. The involvement of antioxidants and ROS in the pathway was determined using a variety of techniques including pharmacological whole plant experimentation, long-term live cell imaging, the 2,2'-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid anti-radical activity assay, and western blot analysis. Results indicate that antioxidants and ROS are key regulators of PCD during the remodelling of lace plant leaves.

  4. “Taking My Breath Away by Keeping Stress at Bay” - An Employee Assistance Program in the Automotive Assembly Plant

    PubMed Central

    SUNDRAM, Bala Murali; DAHLUI, Maznah; CHINNA, Karuthan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of individual-focused stress management training namely Deep Breathing Exercise (DBE) on self-perceived occupational stress among male automotive assembly-line workers. Methods A quasi-experimental study was conducted at 2 automotive assembly plants in Malaysia over 9 months, from January 2012 to September 2012. Assembly-line workers from Plant A received DBE training while Plant B acted as a control by receiving pamphlets on stress and its ill-effects. Intention-to-treat analysis was conducted among the self-voluntary respondents in Plant A (n=468) and Plant B (n=293). The level of stress was measured using Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 (DASS-21) stress subscale. Results Significant favorable intervention effects were found in Plant A (Effect size=0.6) as compared to Plant B (Effect size=0.2) at the end of the study in those receiving DBE. Time and group interaction effects were examined using the repeated measure ANOVA test in which there was a significant group *time interaction effect [F (1, 1) = 272.45, P<0.001]. Conclusion The improvement in stress levels showed the potential of DBE training as part of Employee Assistance Program in the automotive assembly plant. Future studies should be carried out to assess the long term effects of an on-site relaxation training to provide stronger evidence for the introduction of DBE among assembly-line workers as a coping strategy to alleviate occupational stress. PMID:25988085

  5. Examining the Role of Multiple Carbon Sources in Isoprene Synthesis in Plants Using Stable Isotope Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, J. L.; Mak, J. E.; Lerdau, M. T.

    2001-12-01

    The carbon source for phytogenc isoprene is an issue with important ramifications for both atmospheric and biological science because of its impact on the isotopic signature of isoprene and its oxidation products and because it lends insight into the function that isoprene serves within leaves. Although recently assimilated carbon is believed to be the primary carbon source for isoprene production in plants, variation in diurnal and seasonal isoprene fluxes that cannot be explained by temperature, light, and leaf development have led to the suggestion that alternative carbon sources may contribute. Stable isotopes of carbon can be used to identify changes in carbon partitioning into isoprene synthesis, and mixing models can assess the relative importance of each source. In preliminary studies, we document an additional 8-10 \\permil discrimination in isoprene emitted in the absence of photosynthesis. This change in signature suggests that the carbon source is switched from recently obtained photosynthate to a source more depleted in 13C. We propose that intermediates from carbohydrate degradation and/or re-fixation of CO2 from mitichondrial respiration and photorespiration can contribute to isoprene production. In addition, we expect alternative carbon sources to be most important when photosynthate is limiting (e.g. during water stress events). Photosynthesis, respiration, and isoprene emission measurements are used to calculate the isotopic signatures of the three potential carbon pools: photosynthate derived from ambient CO2, photosynthate derived from respired CO2, and carbohydrate-derived intermediates.

  6. From glass flowers to computer games: Examining the emergent media practices of plant biologists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitmeyer, Morgan

    The goal of this project is to begin investigating the emergent media practices of current academic disciplines. This dissertation posits that Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) scholars have investigated new media use in undergraduate pedagogy, and to some extent the practices of graduate students. However, WAC scholars have yet to try to understand how Writing in the Disciplines (WID) is being impacted by emergent media. The gap might be, in part, accounted for by the complexity of researching disciplinary writing compounded by the complexity of researching new media. However, in order to both design effective undergraduate curriculum and partner with peers across the discipline, this research must take place. This dissertation proposes a mixed method process, consisting of textual analysis, interviews and observations, in order to understand emergent media writing in the disciplines. Specifically, this research focuses on the practices of plant biologists online publication, online professionalization, and changing use of databases. This preliminary study reflects on the research practices that could be used to gather this information, as well what rhetoric and composition scholars have to gain from this type of difficult work.

  7. An Examination of Interprofessional Team Functioning in a BScN Blended Learning Program: Implications for Accessible Distance-Based Nursing Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Lorraine Mary; Beattie, Bev; Caswell, Wenda; Fitzgerald, Scott; Nowrouzi, Behdin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the perceptions and experiences of an interprofessional team responsible for the development and delivery of the Registered Practical Nurse (RPN) to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BScN) Blended Learning Program at Nipissing University were examined. In this program, RPNs can acquire a BScN through distance-based part-time study,…

  8. An Examination of Interprofessional Team Functioning in a BScN Blended Learning Program: Implications for Accessible Distance-Based Nursing Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Lorraine Mary; Beattie, Bev; Caswell, Wenda; Fitzgerald, Scott; Nowrouzi, Behdin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the perceptions and experiences of an interprofessional team responsible for the development and delivery of the Registered Practical Nurse (RPN) to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BScN) Blended Learning Program at Nipissing University were examined. In this program, RPNs can acquire a BScN through distance-based part-time study,…

  9. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Plant parameters envelope report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The Early Site Permit (ESP) Demonstration Program is the nuclear industry`s initiative for piloting the early resolution of siting-related issues before the detailed design proceedings of the combined operating license review. The ESP Demonstration Program consists of three phases. The plant parameters envelopes task is part of Phase 1, which addresses the generic review of applicable federal regulations and develops criteria for safety and environmental assessment of potential sites. The plant parameters envelopes identify parameters that characterize the interface between an ALWR design and a potential site, and quantify the interface through values selected from the Utility Requirements Documents, vendor design information, or engineering assessments. When augmented with site-specific information, the plant parameters envelopes provide sufficient information to allow ESPs to be granted based on individual ALWR design information or enveloping design information for the evolutionary, passive, or generic ALWR plants. This document is expected to become a living document when used by future applicants.

  10. The microcomputer scientific software series 7: data recorder program for storing plant lists and calculating synecological coordinates.

    Treesearch

    Kevin Nimerfro; Gary Brand

    1993-01-01

    Describes a computer program designed for data recorders that stores plant lists and computes synecological coordinates from the stored list. The method of synecological coordinates uses plant species present on a site to quantify the site`s environmental factors.

  11. A multicenter analysis of the ophthalmic knowledge assessment program and American Board of Ophthalmology written qualifying examination performance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andrew G; Oetting, Thomas A; Blomquist, Preston H; Bradford, Geoffrey; Culican, Susan M; Kloek, Carolyn; Krishnan, Chandrasekharan; Lauer, Andreas K; Levi, Leah; Naseri, Ayman; Rubin, Steven E; Scott, Ingrid U; Tao, Jeremiah; Tuli, Sonal; Wright, Martha M; Wudunn, Darrell; Zimmerman, M Bridget

    2012-10-01

    To compare the performance on the American Board of Ophthalmology Written Qualifying Examination (WQE) with the performance on step 1 of the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) and the Ophthalmic Knowledge Assessment Program (OKAP) examination for residents in multiple residency programs. Comparative case series. Fifteen residency programs with 339 total residents participated in this study. The data were extracted from the 5-year American Board of Ophthalmology report to each participating program in 2009 and included residency graduating classes from 2003 through 2007. Residents were included if data were available for the USMLE, OKAP examination in ophthalmology years 1 through 3, and the WQE score. Residents were excluded if one or more of the test scores were not available. Two-sample t tests, logistic regression analysis, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to examine the association of the various tests (USMLE, OKAP examination year 1, OKAP examination year 2, OKAP examination year 3, and maximum OKAP examination score) as a predictor for a passing or failing grade on the WQE. The primary outcome measure of this study was first time pass rate for the WQE. Using ROC analysis, the OKAP examination taken at the third year of ophthalmology residency best predicted performance on the WQE. For the OKAP examination taken during the third year of residency, the probability of passing the WQE was at least 80% for a score of 35 or higher and at least 95% for a score of 72 or higher. The OKAP examination, especially in the third year of residency, can be useful to residents to predict the likelihood of success on the high-stakes WQE examination. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Lessons Learned on University Education Programs of Chemical Engineering Principles for Nuclear Plant Operations - 13588

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Jun-hyung

    2013-07-01

    University education aims to supply qualified human resources for industries. In complex large scale engineering systems such as nuclear power plants, the importance of qualified human resources cannot be underestimated. The corresponding education program should involve many topics systematically. Recently a nuclear engineering program has been initiated in Dongguk University, South Korea. The current education program focuses on undergraduate level nuclear engineering students. Our main objective is to provide industries fresh engineers with the understanding on the interconnection of local parts and the entire systems of nuclear power plants and the associated systems. From the experience there is a huge opportunity for chemical engineering disciple in the context of giving macroscopic overview on nuclear power plant and waste treatment management by strengthening the analyzing capability of fundamental situations. (authors)

  13. Using Wikis to Collaboratively Prepare for Qualifying Examinations: An Example of Implementation in an Advanced Graduate Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPietro, Joseph C.; Drexler, Wendy; Kennedy, Kathryn; Buraphadeja, Vasa; Liu, Feng; Dawson, Kara

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the experiences of seven Ph.D. students implementing a wiki to collaboratively prepare for qualifying examinations in the educational technology program at a large southeastern university. Concomitant study for such a rigorous examination is rare, and the trials and tribulations of the group are described in detail.…

  14. 46 CFR 115.625 - Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain passenger...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull... OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Hull and Tailshaft Examinations § 115.625 Eligibility requirements for the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program for certain...

  15. Fiscal Year 1993 Well Plugging and Abandonment Program Summary Report Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    This report is a synopsis of the progress of the well plugging and abandonment program at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, from October 1993 through August 1994. A total of 57 wells and borings were plugged and abandoned during the period of time covered in this report. All wells and borings were plugged and abandoned in accordance with the Monitoring Well Plugging and Abandonment Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

  16. Fiscal year 1993 well plugging and abandonment program, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This report is a synopsis of the progress of the well plugging and abandonment program at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, from December 1992 through August 20, 1993. A total of 70 wells and borings were plugged and abandoned during the period of time covered in this report. All wells and borings were plugged and abandoned in accordance with the Monitoring Well Plugging and Abandonment Plan for the US Department of Energy, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (HSW, Inc. 1991).

  17. How All Stars Works: An Examination of Program Effects on Mediating Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeal, Ralph B, Jr.; Hansen, William B.; Harrington, Nancy Grant; Giles, Steven M.

    2004-01-01

    Prevention research continues to focus on school-based substance use programs aimed at adolescents. These programs are designed to reduce substance use and risk behavior by targeting key mediators, such as normative beliefs, which in turn reduce substance use. All Stars is a newly developed program that was recently evaluated in a randomized field…

  18. Faculty Hiring at Top-Ranked Higher Education Administration Programs: An Examination Using Social Network Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiRamio, David; Theroux, Ryan; Guarino, Anthony J.

    2009-01-01

    Using network analysis we investigated faculty hiring at 21 U. S. News top-ranked programs in higher education administration. Our research questions were as follows. Do top programs hire from each other? Are faculty from the "outside" finding positions at top programs? Mixed results hint at implications for the "health" of the hiring network.…

  19. Free for All: A Case Study Examining Implementation Factors of One-to-One Device Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Sarah K.; Rennie, Ellie

    2013-01-01

    Despite significant investment in school one-to-one device programs, little is known about which aspects of program implementation work and why. Through a comparison of two implementation models, adopter-diffusion and saturation, and using existing data from the One Laptop per Child Australia laptop program, we explored how factors of…

  20. Free for All: A Case Study Examining Implementation Factors of One-to-One Device Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Sarah K.; Rennie, Ellie

    2013-01-01

    Despite significant investment in school one-to-one device programs, little is known about which aspects of program implementation work and why. Through a comparison of two implementation models, adopter-diffusion and saturation, and using existing data from the One Laptop per Child Australia laptop program, we explored how factors of…

  1. A Qualitative Examination of Challenges Influencing Doctoral Students in an Online Doctoral Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deshpande, Anant

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to investigate the challenges faced by students in completion of an online doctoral program at the University of Liverpool, Online Doctoral Business Administration program. We analyse the responses of 91 doctoral students in an online DBA program. Based on the exploratory qualitative study themes were developed…

  2. Myth 10: Examining the Ostrich--Gifted Services Do Not Cure a Sick Regular Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Ann

    2009-01-01

    More than 25 years ago, the myth that a small gifted program compensated for a "sick" regular education program took its place in the "Gifted Child Quarterly" special issue pantheon. The myth was framed from the perspective of school districts who implemented limited, part-time programs for gifted students to "comfort…

  3. An Examination and Evaluation of Large Computer Systems for Use in Adult Basic Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller-Parker, Donna; Willing, Delight C.

    This report describes a study conducted to provide information that could be used as a basis for program decision making when adult basic education (ABE) program personnel in Washington purchase an integrated computerized learning system. During the project, the following activities were carried out: (1) programs and systems in use in ABE programs…

  4. Faculty Hiring at Top-Ranked Higher Education Administration Programs: An Examination Using Social Network Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiRamio, David; Theroux, Ryan; Guarino, Anthony J.

    2009-01-01

    Using network analysis we investigated faculty hiring at 21 U. S. News top-ranked programs in higher education administration. Our research questions were as follows. Do top programs hire from each other? Are faculty from the "outside" finding positions at top programs? Mixed results hint at implications for the "health" of the hiring network.…

  5. Examining a Safe Ride Program: An Assessment of the Midnight Special Late Night Bus Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elam, Carol; McKaig, Richard N.; Jacobs, Bruce; Whitlow, Maggie; Louis, Kenneth R. R. Gros

    2006-01-01

    To reduce alcohol-impaired driving among college students, some university officials have organized safe ride programs for their campuses. Such programs provide transportation for students from local bars and restaurants to campus-area housing. In June 2001, Midwestern University (MU) initiated a safe ride program, the Midnight Special, as part…

  6. How All Stars Works: An Examination of Program Effects on Mediating Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeal, Ralph B, Jr.; Hansen, William B.; Harrington, Nancy Grant; Giles, Steven M.

    2004-01-01

    Prevention research continues to focus on school-based substance use programs aimed at adolescents. These programs are designed to reduce substance use and risk behavior by targeting key mediators, such as normative beliefs, which in turn reduce substance use. All Stars is a newly developed program that was recently evaluated in a randomized field…

  7. An Examination of the Relationship between Gifted Students' Self-Image, Gifted Program Model, Years in the Program, and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creasy, Lydia A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the correlations between gifted students' self-image, academic achievement, and number of years enrolled in the gifted programming. In addition, the study examined the relationships between gifted students' educational placement, race, and gender with self-image. Study participants were gifted students in third through eighth…

  8. Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant biological monitoring and abatement program (BMAP) plan

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.M.; Brandt, C.C.; Cicerone, D.S.

    1998-02-01

    The proposed Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) for East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, as described, will be conducted for the duration of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit issued for the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995, and which became effective July 1, 1995. The basic approach to biological monitoring used in this program was developed by the staff in the Environmental Sciences Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of Y-12 Plant personnel. The proposed BMAP plan is based on results of biological monitoring conducted since 1985. Details of the specific procedures used in the current routine monitoring program are provided, but experimental designs for future studies are described in less detail. The overall strategy used in developing this plan was, and continues to be, to use the results obtained from each task to define the scope of future monitoring efforts. Such efforts may require more intensive sampling than initially proposed in some areas or a reduction in sampling intensity in others. By using the results of previous monitoring efforts to define the current program and to guide them in the development of future studies, an effective integrated monitoring program has been developed to assess the impacts of the Y-12 Plant operation on the biota of EFPC and to document the ecological effects of remedial actions.

  9. An examination of science teachers' learning in a laboratory-based professional development program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiehl, Melissa Lynn

    Professional development generally refers to the collection of activities that systematically increase teachers' knowledge of academic subjects and advance teachers' understanding of instructional strategies. Given the complexity of the reform initiatives for science education in the United States of America as set forth by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and the National Science Education Standards (NRC, 1996), professional development might provide a bridge for aligning teacher practice with national standards (Loucks-Horsley, 1995). However, the current model of professional growth, focused largely on expanding a repertoire of skills, is not adequate (Little, 1993). Understanding teacher learning theory and utilizing research on pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) could be the differentiating factor for science teacher professional development; if utilized in design and evaluation, they may promote both knowing science in context and knowing how to tailor science learning to the needs of students (Shulman, 1987). The purpose of this study was to investigate how the Laboratory Science Teacher Professional Development Program (LSTPD), a three year professional development model that immerses teachers in learning science content through inquiry, impacts teachers' learning and classroom practice. It first aimed to analyze teacher learning and PCK; second, it examined their views on professional development; and third, whether they anticipate adapting their practice to include facets of their laboratory experience. Participants were teachers in their second or third year of participation in LSTPD. The study followed a qualitative case study design and made use of in-depth interviews and observations to examine teachers' knowledge, beliefs, and practice. The study drew on a constructivist framework. Findings demonstrated that teachers' understanding of content, inquiry, and science as a living enterprise were greatly increased, and that

  10. Aquatic Plant Control Research Program: Aquatic Plant Identification and Herbicide Use Guide. Volume 2. Aquatic Plants and Susceptibility to Herbicides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    sedges , and rushes are the most common herbaceous components of the freshwater marsh. FS - Freshwater Swamp. This habitat consists of those areas where... sedges , rushes) heart-shaped monoeclous - having staminate and corolla - the inner, usually colored pistillate flowers on the same plant whorl of the...grasses, sedges , and rushes oblanceolate - reverse lance-shaped; cuticle - a waxy, protective layer on broadest at apex, gradually tapering the surfaces

  11. Examination of the leaf proteome during flooding stress and the induction of programmed cell death in maize

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Maize is a major economic crop worldwide, with substantial crop loss attributed to flooding. During a stress response, programmed cell death (PCD) can be an effective way for plants better adapt. To identify flooding stress related PCD proteins in maize leaves, proteomic analysis was performed using two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry. Results Comparative proteomics was combined with physiological and biochemical analysis of maize leaves under flooding stress. Fv/Fm, qP, qN and relative water content (RWC) were found to be altered in response to flooding stress, with an increase in H2O2 content noted in vivo. Furthermore, DNA ladder detection indicated that PCD had occurred under flooding treatment. The maize leaf proteome was analyzed via 2D-DIGE gel, with a total of 32 differentially expressed spots isolated, 31 spots were successfully identified via MALDI-TOF/TOF MS which represent 28 proteins. The identified proteins were related to energy metabolism and photosynthesis, PCD, phytohormones and polyamines. To better characterize the role of translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) in PCD during a stress response, mRNA expression was examined in different plants by stress-induced PCD. These included heat stress induced rice protoplasts, Tobacco Mosaic Virus infected tobacco leaves and dark induced rice and Arabidopsis thaliana leaves, all of which showed active PCD, and TCTP expression was increased in different degrees. Moreover, S-adenosylmethionine synthase 2 (SAMS2) and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC) mRNA expression were also increased, but ACC synthase (ACS) and ACC oxidase (ACO) mRNA expression were not found in maize leaves following flooding. Lastly, ethylene and polyamine concentrations were increased in response to flooding treatment in maize leaves. Conclusions Following flooding stress, the photosynthetic systems were damaged, resulting in a disruption in energy

  12. Quality assurance program description: Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant, Part 1. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This document describes the Department of Energy`s Richland Field Office (DOE-RL) quality assurance (QA) program for the processing of high-level waste as well as the Vitrification Project Quality Assurance Program for the design and construction of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP). It also identifies and describes the planned activities that constitute the required quality assurance program for the HWVP. This program applies to the broad scope of quality-affecting activities associated with the overall HWVP Facility. Quality-affecting activities include designing, purchasing, fabricating, handling, shipping, storing, cleaning, erecting, installing, inspecting, testing, maintaining, repairing, and modifying. Also included are the development, qualification, and production of waste forms which may be safely used to dispose of high-level radioactive waste resulting from national defense activities. The HWVP QA program is made up of many constituent programs that are being implemented by the participating organizations. This Quality Assurance program description is intended to outline and define the scope and application of the major programs that make up the HWVP QA program. It provides a means by which the overall program can be managed and directed to achieve its objectives. Subsequent parts of this description will identify the program`s objectives, its scope, application, and structure.

  13. Controlled Substance Lock-In Programs: Examining An Unintended Consequence Of A Prescription Drug Abuse Policy.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Andrew W; Farley, Joel F; Holmes, G Mark; Oramasionwu, Christine U; Ringwalt, Chris; Sleath, Betsy; Skinner, Asheley C

    2016-10-01

    Controlled substance lock-in programs are garnering increased attention from payers and policy makers seeking to combat the epidemic of opioid misuse. These programs require high-risk patients to visit a single prescriber and pharmacy for coverage of controlled substance medication services. Despite high prevalence of the programs in Medicaid, we know little about their effects on patients' behavior and outcomes aside from reducing controlled substance-related claims. Our study was the first rigorous investigation of lock-in programs' effects on out-of-pocket controlled substance prescription fills, which circumvent the programs' restrictions and mitigate their potential public health benefits. We linked claims data and prescription drug monitoring program data for the period 2009-12 for 1,647 enrollees in North Carolina Medicaid's lock-in program and found that enrollment was associated with a roughly fourfold increase in the likelihood and frequency of out-of-pocket controlled substance prescription fills. This finding illuminates weaknesses of lock-in programs and highlights the need for further scrutiny of the appropriate role, optimal design, and potential unintended consequences of the programs as tools to prevent opioid abuse. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  14. Involvement of chloroplasts in the programmed death of plant cells.

    PubMed

    Samuilov, V D; Lagunova, E M; Dzyubinskaya, E V; Izyumov, D S; Kiselevsky, D B; Makarova, Ya V

    2002-06-01

    The effect of cyanide, an apoptosis inducer, on pea leaf epidermal peels was investigated. Illumination stimulated the CN--induced destruction of guard cells (containing chloroplasts and mitochondria) but not of epidermal cells (containing mitochondria only). The process was prevented by antioxidants (alpha-tocopherol, 2,5-di-tret-butyl-4-hydroxytoluene, and mannitol), by anaerobiosis, by the protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporine, and by cysteine and serine protease inhibitors. Electron acceptors (menadione, p-benzoquinone, diaminodurene, TMPD, DCPIP, and methyl viologen) suppressed CN--induced apoptosis of guard cells, but not epidermal cells. Methyl viologen had no influence on the removal of CN--induced nucleus destruction in guard cells under anaerobic conditions. The light activation of CN--induced apoptosis of guard cells was suppressed by DCMU (an inhibitor of the electron transfer in Photosystem II) and by DNP-INT (an antagonist of plastoquinol at the Qo site of the chloroplast cytochrome b6f complex). It is concluded that apoptosis initiation in guard cells depends on the simultaneous availability of two factors, ROS and reduced quinones of the electron transfer chain. The conditions for manifestation of programmed cell death in guard and epidermal cells of the pea leaf were significantly different.

  15. Are specific residency program characteristics associated with the pass rate of graduates on the ABFM certification examination?

    PubMed

    Mims, Lisa D; Mainous, Arch G; Chirina, Svetlana; Carek, Peter J

    2014-05-01

    Board certification has become an accepted measure of physician quality. The effect of both non-curricular and curricular residency program characteristics on certification rates has not been previously studied. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of various program characteristics on first-time American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) pass rates. Using information from the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), National Resident Matching Program (NRMP), and FREIDA®, program characteristics were obtained. Three-year and 5-year aggregate ABFM board pass rates were calculated. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. The relationship between program characteristics, initial Match rates, and non-Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) required activities (NRCA), and first-time Board pass rates were analyzed using chi-square. Significance was defined as P<.05 level of confidence. Fifty-two percent of residency programs have ABFM board pass rates ? 90%. Both 3- and 5-year aggregate Board pass rates were significantly associated with regional location, program size, accreditation cycle length, and any NRCA, specifically including international experiences and curriculum in alternative medicine. Location type (urban, suburban, rural, or inner city), program structure, salary, moonlighting, available tracks, and P4 participation were not associated. The percent of first-time takers successfully completing the ABFM examination is associated with several residency program characteristics, including regional location, program size, accreditation cycle length, opportunities for international experiences, and training in alternative medicine.

  16. Chitosan-induced programmed cell death in plants.

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, L A; Dzyubinskaya, E V; Zinovkin, R A; Kiselevsky, D B; Lobysheva, N V; Samuilov, V D

    2009-09-01

    Chitosan, CN(-), or H(2)O(2) caused the death of epidermal cells (EC) in the epidermis of pea leaves that was detected by monitoring the destruction of cell nuclei; chitosan induced chromatin condensation and marginalization followed by the destruction of EC nuclei and subsequent internucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Chitosan did not affect stoma guard cells (GC). Anaerobic conditions prevented the chitosan-induced destruction of EC nuclei. The antioxidants nitroblue tetrazolium or mannitol suppressed the effects of chitosan, H(2)O(2), or chitosan + H(2)O(2) on EC. H(2)O(2) formation in EC and GC mitochondria that was determined from 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence was inhibited by CN(-) and the protonophoric uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone but was stimulated by these agents in GC chloroplasts. The alternative oxidase inhibitors propyl gallate and salicylhydroxamate prevented chitosan- but not CN(-)-induced destruction of EC nuclei; the plasma membrane NADPH oxidase inhibitors diphenylene iodonium and quinacrine abolished chitosan- but not CN(-)-induced destruction of EC nuclei. The mitochondrial protein synthesis inhibitor lincomycin removed the destructive effect of chitosan or H(2)O(2) on EC nuclei. The effect of cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis in the cytoplasm, was insignificant; however, it was enhanced if cycloheximide was added in combination with lincomycin. The autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine removed the chitosan effect but exerted no influence on the effect of H(2)O(2) as an inducer of EC death. The internucleosome DNA fragmentation in conjunction with the data on the 3-methyladenine effect provides evidence that chitosan induces programmed cell death that follows a combined scenario including apoptosis and autophagy. Based on the results of an inhibitor assay, chitosan-induced EC death involves reactive oxygen species generated by the NADPH oxidase of the plasma membrane.

  17. Recidivism, Disciplinary History, and Institutional Adjustment: A Quantitative Study Examining Correctional Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flamer, Eric, Sr.

    2012-01-01

    Establishing college-degree programs for prison inmates is an evidence-based effective instructional strategy in reducing recidivism. Evaluating academic arenas as a resource to improve behavior and levels of functioning within correctional facilities is a necessary component of inmate academic programs. The purpose of this quantitative,…

  18. Examination of Applicant Profiles for Admission into and Completion of an Online Secondary Teacher Certification Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Jon J.; Davis, Trina J.; Capraro, Robert M.; Smith, Ben L.; Beason, Lynn; Graham, B. Diane; Strader, R. Arlen

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine whether particular biographic and academic characteristics would predict whether an applicant would matriculate into and successfully complete an online secondary teacher certification program for Texas public schools. Extensive biographic data on applicants were compiled into a program data base…

  19. Examining the Impact of the Engineering Successful/Unsuccessful Grading (SUG) Program on Student Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Heather; Paguyo, Christina; Siller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the Successful/Unsuccessful Grading (SUG) program, an intervention that was founded at a large public university to support students during their transition into the first year of undergraduate engineering (EG) coursework. To understand how the SUG program impacts student retention of EG majors, we conducted an analysis…

  20. Developing an Instrument to Examine Student-Faculty Interaction in Faculty-in-Residence Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sriram, Rishi; McLevain, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Faculty-in-residence programs are a distinct feature of residential colleges (Ryan, 2001), but more recently, institutions of higher education have created more opportunities for faculty to reside in various types of living-learning programs, including theme housing and first-year experience communities. Within the context of this study,…

  1. Recidivism, Disciplinary History, and Institutional Adjustment: A Quantitative Study Examining Correctional Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flamer, Eric, Sr.

    2012-01-01

    Establishing college-degree programs for prison inmates is an evidence-based effective instructional strategy in reducing recidivism. Evaluating academic arenas as a resource to improve behavior and levels of functioning within correctional facilities is a necessary component of inmate academic programs. The purpose of this quantitative,…

  2. An Examination of Student Engagement and Retention in an Honors Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kampfe, Jessica A.; Chasek, Christine L.; Falconer, John

    2016-01-01

    Honors programs at colleges and universities provide academic and developmental opportunities for high-ability students. Learning communities, defined as a group of students who live together, are connected through membership in a common organization, and take classes together, are often a component of honors programs. Most research on learning…

  3. An examination of entrance criteria for international medical graduates (IMGs) into Canadian psychiatry residency programs

    PubMed Central

    Soma, Ashok; Myatt, Mathew; McKenna, Mario; Ganesa, Soma; Leung, Ka Wai

    2017-01-01

    Background Although international medical graduates (IMGs) are essential in health care service delivery, a gap exists in the literature about how IMGs are selected into psychiatry residency programs in Canada. The purpose of this study was to identify the relative weight or importance that Canadian program directors (PDs) of psychiatry place on certain selection criteria when matching IMGs into residency programs. Methods We electronically distributed a web-based questionnaire to 16 university residency program directors of psychiatry in Canada. Program Directors were asked to rate the importance of 43 selection criteria using 5-point Likert Scales. Criteria were grouped into six domains: academic criteria, extracurricular activities, supporting information, behavioural issues of concern, medical school country, and other education. Mean total values for each set of criteria were calculated and used to create rank orders within each domain. Results Eight out of 16 program directors responded. Our analysis indicated that academics and behavioral issues of concern were the most important selection criteria. Conclusion Our findings provide valuable insight about the perspectives of Program Directors toward IMGs who apply for psychiatry residency programs in Canada. Further studies are needed to better understand which criteria contribute to IMGs’ performances as psychiatric residents. PMID:28344716

  4. Enhancing Therapeutic Gains: Examination of Fidelity to the Model for the Intensive Mental Health Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, Camille J.; Biggs, Bridget K.

    2008-01-01

    Given that the development of treatment fidelity assessment protocol is an integral but too frequently ignored aspect of clinical trials for psychological treatments, the Intensive Mental Health Program (IMHP) sought to build fidelity activities into training, program evaluation, and clinical recordkeeping from the outset of a 3 year study period.…

  5. Does Teaching Experience Matter? Examining Biology Teachers' Prior Knowledge for Teaching in an Alternative Certification Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedrichsen, Patricia J.; Abell, Sandra K.; Pareja, Enrique M.; Brown, Patrick L.; Lankford, Deanna M.; Volkmann, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    Alternative certification programs (ACPs) have been proposed as a viable way to address teacher shortages, yet we know little about how teacher knowledge develops within such programs. The purpose of this study was to investigate prior knowledge for teaching among students entering an ACP, comparing individuals with teaching experience to those…

  6. Examining the Association between the "Imagination Library" Early Childhood Literacy Program and Kindergarten Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samiei, Shahin; Bush, Andrew J.; Sell, Marie; Imig, Doug

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated participation in the "Imagination Library" early childhood literacy enrichment program and children's pre-literacy and pre-numeracy skills at kindergarten entry in an urban school district. Previous studies have demonstrated that program participation is associated with greater early childhood reading practices.…

  7. Examining Our Career Switching Teachers' First Year of Teaching: Implications for Alternative Teacher Education Program Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Dawn Renee; Samaras, Anastasia P.

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the impact of an alternative teacher preparation program development from the "inside out" or through the voices of second career teachers, known as "Career Switchers," at a mid-size state university. The major objective of this study was to probe into their perceptions to inform program development with reporting framed in…

  8. Basal Reading Programs and the Deskilling of Teachers: A Critical Examination of the Argument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, James F.

    It is an understatement to assert that American basal reading programs have come under considerable scrutiny. One of the central criticisms of these programs is that they result in the deskilling of teachers (relinquishing control over the goals, methods, materials, and evaluation of reading instruction to the basal reading materials). A critical…

  9. Developing an Instrument to Examine Student-Faculty Interaction in Faculty-in-Residence Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sriram, Rishi; McLevain, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Faculty-in-residence programs are a distinct feature of residential colleges (Ryan, 2001), but more recently, institutions of higher education have created more opportunities for faculty to reside in various types of living-learning programs, including theme housing and first-year experience communities. Within the context of this study,…

  10. Assessment of the ESAA-TV Program: An Examination of Its Production, Distribution, and Financing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Bernadette; And Others

    This study evaluates the Emergency School Assistance Act Television Program (ESAA-TV), which provides grants and/or federal contracts to school districts for the production, duplication, promotion, and distribution of racially integrated children's programming. A review of the origins and intents of the legislation is followed by a description of…

  11. Recruitment Strategies Aiming to Attract Females into Undergraduate Engineering Programs: Examining Their Role and Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howenstine, Julie Anne

    2013-01-01

    By 2009, the percentage of women who graduated with general undergraduate degrees had increased to almost 58% of all students who completed 4-year degree programs (National Center for Education Statistics, 2009a). These percentages, however, have not been reflected in the enrollment rates of females into undergraduate engineering programs. In…

  12. Examining the Effectiveness of a Learning Outcomes Assessment Program: A Four Frames Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoepp, Kevin; Tezcan-Unal, Burcu

    2017-01-01

    Assessment of learning outcomes at the program level is essential to evaluate whether students are achieving what is expected of them as graduates. In this article we present the results of a study in which faculty focus groups were consulted so as to understand the subjective issues that surround the learning outcomes assessment program of an…

  13. Are There Alternatives in Reading Textbooks? An Examination of Three Beginning Reading Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiebert, Elfrieda H.; Martin, Leigh Ann; Menon, Shailaja

    2005-01-01

    The first-grade components of three textbook programs--mainstream basal, combined phonics and literature, and phonics emphasis--were compared on cognitive load (e.g., number of different words) and linguistic content (e.g., number of monosyllabic, simple vowel words). Three levels of three components of a program--literature anthologies, decodable…

  14. Examining the Benefits of a Faculty Technology Mentoring Program on Graduate Students' Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baran, Evrim

    2016-01-01

    Higher education environments need further evidence of the impact of faculty technology mentoring (FTM) models on graduate students to promote and sustain these programs as well as develop policies related to their support. To address this need, the current study investigated the impact of a university-wide FTM program on participating graduate…

  15. A Study Examining the Dimensionality of Core Competencies Measure in Teacher Preparation Programs: Challenges and Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kizil, Ruhan Circi; Briggs, Derek; Seidel, Kent; Green, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    The evidence that teacher preparation programs have an impact on teacher quality is often limited. Progress in research on this topic will remain rather limited in its influence on practice until more proximal measures of teacher education outcomes can be established. The dearth of variables to measure the impact of teacher preparation programs on…

  16. Examining the Association between the "Imagination Library" Early Childhood Literacy Program and Kindergarten Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samiei, Shahin; Bush, Andrew J.; Sell, Marie; Imig, Doug

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated participation in the "Imagination Library" early childhood literacy enrichment program and children's pre-literacy and pre-numeracy skills at kindergarten entry in an urban school district. Previous studies have demonstrated that program participation is associated with greater early childhood reading practices.…

  17. Examining the Impact of the Engineering Successful/Unsuccessful Grading (SUG) Program on Student Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Heather; Paguyo, Christina; Siller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the Successful/Unsuccessful Grading (SUG) program, an intervention that was founded at a large public university to support students during their transition into the first year of undergraduate engineering (EG) coursework. To understand how the SUG program impacts student retention of EG majors, we conducted an analysis…

  18. Reasons for Faith-Based Correctional Program Participation: An Examination of Motive Types

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Okyun; Camp, Scott D.; Daggett, Dawn M.; Klein-Saffran, Jody

    2010-01-01

    Although faith-based correctional programming has become increasingly popular in recent years, offenders' motivation to participate and the impact on prison adjustment have received little attention. Analyzing interview data of 83 participants of the Federal Bureau of Prison's faith-based correctional program, this study explored the different…

  19. Turning Policy into Practice: Examining the Relationship between Policy, Research, and Program Development in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paolucci, Catherine; Jennings, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the relationship between policy, research, and program development in mathematics teacher education. In particular, it considers the influences of policy and research along with social, economic, and cultural factors in the conceptualization and development of an undergraduate mathematics teacher education program in…

  20. Recruitment Strategies Aiming to Attract Females into Undergraduate Engineering Programs: Examining Their Role and Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howenstine, Julie Anne

    2013-01-01

    By 2009, the percentage of women who graduated with general undergraduate degrees had increased to almost 58% of all students who completed 4-year degree programs (National Center for Education Statistics, 2009a). These percentages, however, have not been reflected in the enrollment rates of females into undergraduate engineering programs. In…

  1. Does Teaching Experience Matter? Examining Biology Teachers' Prior Knowledge for Teaching in an Alternative Certification Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedrichsen, Patricia J.; Abell, Sandra K.; Pareja, Enrique M.; Brown, Patrick L.; Lankford, Deanna M.; Volkmann, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    Alternative certification programs (ACPs) have been proposed as a viable way to address teacher shortages, yet we know little about how teacher knowledge develops within such programs. The purpose of this study was to investigate prior knowledge for teaching among students entering an ACP, comparing individuals with teaching experience to those…

  2. Examining the Benefits of a Faculty Technology Mentoring Program on Graduate Students' Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baran, Evrim

    2016-01-01

    Higher education environments need further evidence of the impact of faculty technology mentoring (FTM) models on graduate students to promote and sustain these programs as well as develop policies related to their support. To address this need, the current study investigated the impact of a university-wide FTM program on participating graduate…

  3. Pathways from Middle School to College: Examining the Impact of an Urban, Precollege Preparation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Jennifer; Wolf-Wendel, Lisa; Lombardi, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This study is based on a 2-year evaluation of the Pathways Partnership, a precollege preparation program involving one school district, multiple colleges and universities, and several major businesses in a Midwestern metropolitan area. The week-long summer program cultivates youth leadership and the exploration of higher education through various…

  4. The Influence of Using TI-84 Calculators with Programs on Algebra I High Stakes Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Misty

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a significant difference in scores on the Mississippi Algebra I SATP2 when one group was allowed to use programs and the other group was not allowed to use programs on TI-84 calculators. An additional purpose of the study was also to determine if there was a significant difference in the…

  5. An Examination of Department of Defense Risk Management Policy for Nondevelopmental Items Acquisition Programs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-03-01

    this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instruction, searching existing data ...sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden...1. Program Risk Identification ......... .. 12 2. Program Risk Assessment ... ......... 12 3. Risk Response ........ .............. 14 4. Risk Data

  6. Three Key Issues in the Reform Programs for the Chinese College Entrance Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Qinghua

    2013-01-01

    The new entrance exam reform programs that have been presented in a number of provinces and regions adhere to the direction of new curriculum reform. Within these programs, comprehensive evaluation serves as the weather vane for quality education. The high school academic proficiency test serves as a firmly fixed benchmark for learning ability,…

  7. An Examination of Selected Preservice Agricultural Teacher Education Programs in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Robin C.; Camp, William G.

    2000-01-01

    Graduation criteria and syllabi from 10 agricultural teacher education programs were analyzed. Common content areas included teaching methods, program and curriculum planning, experiential activities, foundations, and technology. Few had separate courses on Future Farmers of America advising or supervised agricultural experience management. (SK)

  8. Three Key Issues in the Reform Programs for the Chinese College Entrance Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Qinghua

    2013-01-01

    The new entrance exam reform programs that have been presented in a number of provinces and regions adhere to the direction of new curriculum reform. Within these programs, comprehensive evaluation serves as the weather vane for quality education. The high school academic proficiency test serves as a firmly fixed benchmark for learning ability,…

  9. Mature Programs of Study: Examining Policy Implementation at the Local Level. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfeld, Corinne; Bhattacharya, Sharika

    2013-01-01

    The 2006 Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act required that all career technical education (CTE) programs offer secondary to postsecondary programs of study (POS), which integrate rigorous academics, offer dual enrollment options, and lead to an industry-recognized degree or credential. Focused on improving students' transition to…

  10. Select Government Matching Fund Programs: An Examination of Characteristics and Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Advancement and Support of Education (NJ1), 2004

    2004-01-01

    Government matching fund programs, at their most fundamental level, are state-based initiatives that match private donations to colleges and universities with public funds. These programs have proven to be effective methods of improving public colleges and universities and successful examples of public-private partnerships, which are key…

  11. The Influence of Using TI-84 Calculators with Programs on Algebra I High Stakes Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Misty

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a significant difference in scores on the Mississippi Algebra I SATP2 when one group was allowed to use programs and the other group was not allowed to use programs on TI-84 calculators. An additional purpose of the study was also to determine if there was a significant difference in the…

  12. Native plant development and restoration program for the Great Basin, USA

    Treesearch

    N. L. Shaw; M. Pellant; P. Olweli; S. L. Jensen; E. D. McArthur

    2008-01-01

    The Great Basin Native Plant Selection and Increase Project, organized by the USDA Bureau of Land Management, Great Basin Restoration Initiative and the USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station in 2000 as a multi-agency collaborative program (http://www.fs.fed.us/rm/boise/research/shrub/greatbasin.shtml), has the objective of improving the availability of...

  13. Statistical analysis on the factors affecting agricultural landowners’ willingness to enroll in a tree planting program

    Treesearch

    Taeyoung Kim; Christian. Langpap

    2015-01-01

    This report provides a statistical analysis of the data collected from two survey regions of the United States, the Pacific Northwest and the Southeast. The survey asked about individual agricultural landowners’ characteristics, characteristics of their land, and the landowners’ willingness to enroll in a tree planting program under incentive payments for carbon...

  14. Risk maps for targeting exotic plant pest detection programs in the United States

    Treesearch

    R.D. Magarey; D.M. Borchert; J.S. Engle; M Garcia-Colunga; Frank H. Koch; et al

    2011-01-01

    In the United States, pest risk maps are used by the Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey for spatial and temporal targeting of exotic plant pest detection programs. Methods are described to create standardized host distribution, climate and pathway risk maps for the top nationally ranked exotic pest targets. Two examples are provided to illustrate the risk mapping...

  15. 33 CFR Appendix A to Part 273 - Aquatic Plant Control Program Legislative Authority

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Legislative Authority A Appendix A to Part 273 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL Pt. 273, App. A Appendix A to Part 273... Stat. 1092) states as follows: Sec. 302(a) There is hereby authorized a comprehensive program...

  16. Annual radiological environmental monitoring report: Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, 1992. Operations Services/Technical Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This report describes the preoperational environmental radiological monitoring program conducted by TVA in the vicinity of the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant (WBN) in 1992. The program includes the collection of samples from the environment and the determination of the concentrations of radioactive materials in the samples. Samples are taken from stations in the general area of the plant and from areas that will not be influenced by plant operations. Material sampled includes air, water, milk, foods, vegetation, soil, fish, sediment, and direct radiation levels. During plant operations, results from stations near the plant will be compared with concentrations from control stations and with preoperational measurements to determine potential impacts to the public. Exposures calculated from environmental samples were contributed by naturally occurring radioactive materials, from materials commonly found in the environment as a result of atmospheric fallout, or from the operation of other nuclear facilities in the area. Since WBN has not operated, there has been no contribution of radioactivity from the plant to the environment.

  17. Maryland power plant siting program radioecology database management system: format for coding radioecology data. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Domotor, S.L.

    1986-01-01

    The Radioecology Laboratory of the State of Maryland Power Plant Siting Program (PPSP) conducts routine radiological monitoring programs designed to assess the environmental impact of radionuclides released by nuclear power plants affecting Maryland. The PPSP radioecology database management system was initiated to store existing and future monitoring data collected by PPSP and its subcontractors in a computer file format. From these files, SAS (Statistical Analysis System) datasets are created for qualitative and quantitative analysis of monitoring data, for modeling studies through incorporation of this data, or for predicting environmental impact. The system was designed to accommodate both gamma and beta radionuclide analyses from water, sediment, soil, air, foodstuff, and aquatic and terrestrial flora and fauna sample types. Plant releases of radionuclides and physical and chemical environmental parameters can also be stored.

  18. 46 CFR 71.50-31 - Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... underwater hull examination using divers. If an underwater examination is required, the examination must... gaugings. (b) If an underwater survey is required for the annual hull condition assessment, the OCMI may... contents. (c) You must submit your preventive maintenance reports or checklists on an annual basis to the...

  19. 46 CFR 115.660 - Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... examination to include an underwater hull examination using divers. If an underwater examination is required... representative sampling of hull gaugings. (b) If an underwater survey is required for the annual hull condition... validity of its contents. (c) You must submit your preventive maintenance reports or checklists on an...

  20. 46 CFR 176.660 - Continued participation in the Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... expanded examination to include an underwater hull examination using divers. If an underwater examination... include a representative sampling of hull gaugings. (b) If an underwater survey is required for the annual... report and confirm the validity of its contents. (c) You must submit your preventive maintenance reports...

  1. WSUSOM Curriculum Evaluation: Analysis Using NBME Examinations. Program Evaluation Studies, Report No. 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markert, Ronald J.; Kolmen, Samuel N.

    This report presents a method for analyzing curriculum using the examinations of the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME). The method provides a system by which the NBME examinations can be used each year to compare the content of an external licensing test with the content of the curriculum at the Wright State University School of Medicine…

  2. Grade 12 Diploma Examinations Program: Social Studies 30. 1987-88 School Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Student Evaluation and Data Processing Branch.

    The purpose of this bulletin is to provide information to teachers and students about the 1988 Social Studies 30 Diploma Examination. The bulletin includes: (1) a description of the examination; (2) an outline of the objectives to be tested; (3) charts illustrating both the multiple-choice and written-response sections of the examination; (4) the…

  3. Connecting Hispanic Women in Baltimore to the Mercy Medical Center Sexual Assault Forensic Examiners/Forensic Nurse Examiners Program: A Preliminary Assessment of Service Utilization and Community Awareness.

    PubMed

    Adams, Margaret; Fitzgerald, Sheila; Holbrook, Debra

    2016-01-01

    Sexual violence and gender-based violence represent a major public health problem causing significant negative mental, physical, and social outcomes for victims. The rapidly growing population of Hispanic women in Baltimore are both more vulnerable to sexual assault and less able to access postassault services. In an effort to assess service utilization and community awareness of the Mercy Medical Center Sexual Assault Forensic Examiners/Forensic Nurse Examiners Program, we conducted a retrospective chart review of 2,322 women who were seen by the program between 2010 and 2013 and found that only 2.5% of the women were identified as Hispanic, about half of what Baltimore City demographic data would predict. This exploratory pilot project, augmented by key informant interviews, reveals that Hispanic women are underutilizing sexual assault services. Multiple barriers exist for Hispanic women in obtaining victim services, including lack of awareness within the community that the services exist, cultural factors, language barriers, lack of awareness of legal rights, and a fear of deportation.

  4. Addressing racial disparities in social welfare programs: using social equity analysis to examine the problem.

    PubMed

    Gooden, Susan T

    2006-01-01

    The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) allows states considerable discretion in developing and implementing their Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) programs. Little research so far has compared the implementation of TANF programs across racial groups. Without such analysis, it is difficult to interpret program outcomes. Using client survey data from a large Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation (MDRC) study, the Project on Devolution and Urban Change, this article compares African-American, Hispanic and White Clients' experiences with diversion, case management, sanctioning, exiting welfare, and dispute resolution. Using residual differences analysis, this article identifies significant differences in treatment among racial and ethnic groups.

  5. The hydrogen sulfide emissions abatement program at the Geysers Geothermal Power Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. W.; Mccluer, H. K.

    1974-01-01

    The scope of the hydrogen sulfide (H2S) abatement program at The Geysers Geothermal Power Plant and the measures currently under way to reduce these emissions are discussed. The Geysers steam averages 223 ppm H2S by weight and after passing through the turbines leaves the plant both through the gas ejector system and by air-stripping in the cooling towers. The sulfide dissolved in the cooling water is controlled by the use of an oxidation catalyst such as an iron salt. The H2S in the low Btu ejector off gases may be burned to sulfur dioxide and scrubbed directly into the circulating water and reinjected into the steam field with the excess condensate. Details are included concerning the disposal of the impure sulfur, design requirements for retrofitting existing plants and modified plant operating procedures. Discussion of future research aimed at improving the H2S abatement system is also included.

  6. Cross-talk of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species in plant programed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiqin; Loake, Gary J.; Chu, Chengcai

    2013-01-01

    In plants, programed cell death (PCD) is an important mechanism to regulate multiple aspects of growth and development, as well as to remove damaged or infected cells during responses to environmental stresses and pathogen attacks. Under biotic and abiotic stresses, plant cells exhibit a rapid synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) and a parallel accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Frequently, these responses trigger a PCD process leading to an intrinsic execution of plant cells. The accumulating evidence suggests that both NO and ROS play key roles in PCD. These redox active small molecules can trigger cell death either independently or synergistically. Here we summarize the recent progress on the cross-talk of NO and ROS signals in the hypersensitive response, leaf senescence, and other kinds of plant PCD caused by diverse cues. PMID:23967004

  7. Probabilistic Safety Study Applications Program for inspection of the Indian Point Unit 3 Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.H.; Fullwood, R.; Fresco, A.

    1986-03-01

    By prioritizing the various areas of interest for inspection and by better defining inspection needs, the NRC expects to make more effective use of finite inspection resources by concentrating on those potential areas most significant to safety. Through review and application of the Indian Point Unit 3 Probabilistic Safety Study's numerical data and event tree modeling, and by utilizing related documents, a technical basis for prioritizing areas for NRC inspection has been developed. This was then tested at the plant site for the NRC Operating Reactor Inspection Program, I and E Manual Chapter 2515. Inspection activities addressed include normal operations, system and component testing, maintenance and surveillance. A computer program entitled NSPKTR, which was developed specifically for this program, modeled the internal plant states to the system level and performed the risk and importance calculations. 17 refs., 21 tabs.

  8. Handbook of nuclear power plant seismic fragilities, Seismic Safety Margins Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Cover, L.E.; Bohn, M.P.; Campbell, R.D.; Wesley, D.A.

    1983-12-01

    The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) has a gola to develop a complete fully coupled analysis procedure (including methods and computer codes) for estimating the risk of an earthquake-induced radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant. As part of this program, calculations of the seismic risk from a typical commercial nuclear reactor were made. These calculations required a knowledge of the probability of failure (fragility) of safety-related components in the reactor system which actively participate in the hypothesized accident scenarios. This report describes the development of the required fragility relations and the data sources and data reduction techniques upon which they are based. Both building and component fragilities are covered. The building fragilities are for the Zion Unit 1 reactor which was the specific plant used for development of methodology in the program. Some of the component fragilities are site-specific also, but most would be usable for other sites as well.

  9. Preliminary examination of a couple-based eating disorder prevention program.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Ana L; Perez, Marisol; Taylor, Aaron

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate a new dissonance-based prevention program that is based on the dual pathway model of eating disorders within the context of an individual's romantic relationship. A total of 209 dating couples participated in a couple-based prevention program or an assessment-only condition and completed measures of body dissatisfaction, thin-ideal internalization, disordered eating, negative affect, and relationship satisfaction at two time points (approximately one week apart) and approximately half of the sample completed 1-month follow-up measures. The prevention program significantly reduced several key risk factors for eating disorders such as environmental pressures to be thin, internalization of the thin and athletic ideals, state body dissatisfaction, and actual-ideal body discrepancy. Initial support was found for the inclusion of couples in eating disorder prevention programs as a successful way of addressing the thin ideal and its detrimental effects for women.

  10. Examining an underappreciated control on lignin decomposition in soils? Effects of reactive manganese species on intact plant cell walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiluweit, M.; Bougoure, J.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Kleber, M.; Nico, P. S.

    2011-12-01

    Lignin comprises a dominant proportion of carbon fluxes into the soil (representing up to 50% of plant litter and roots). Two lines of evidence suggest that manganese (Mn) acts as a strong controlling factor on the residence time of lignin in soil ecosystems. First, Mn content is highly correlated with litter decomposition in temperate and boreal forest soil ecosystems and, second, microbial agents of lignin degradation have been reported to rely on reactive Mn(III)-complexes to specifically oxidize lignin. However, few attempts have been made to isolate the mechanisms responsible for the apparent Mn-dependence of lignin decomposition in soils. Here we tested the hypothesis that Mn(III)-oxalate complexes may act as a perforating 'pretreatment' for structurally intact plant cell walls. We propose that these diffusible oxidizers are small enough to penetrate and react with non-porous ligno-cellulose in cell walls. This process was investigated by reacting single Zinnia elegans tracheary elements with Mn(III)-oxalate complexes in a continuous flow-through microreactor. The uniformity of cultured tracheary elements allowed us to examine Mn(III)-induced changes in cell wall chemistry and ultrastructure on the micro-scale using fluorescence and electron microscopy as well as synchrotron-based infrared and X-ray spectromicroscopy. Our results show that Mn(III)-complexes substantially oxidize specific lignin components of the cell wall, solubilize decomposition products, severely undermine the cell wall integrity, and cause cell lysis. We conclude that Mn(III)-complexes induce oxidative damage in plant cell walls that renders ligno-cellulose substrates more accessible for microbial lignin- and cellulose-decomposing enzymes. Implications of our results for the rate limiting impact of soil Mn speciation and availability on litter decomposition in forest soils will be discussed.

  11. Examining Sustainability Factors for Organizations that Adopted Stanford's Chronic Disease Self-Management Program.

    PubMed

    Tomioka, Michiyo; Braun, Kathryn L

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, funds were received to replicate Stanford's Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) among eldercare providers in Honolulu. This case study, conducted 1 year after the close of the initial 3-year replication grant, explored factors for sustaining the delivery of CDSMP, with an aim to create guidelines for cultivating sustainability. Face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with one representative from each of eight eldercare agencies, with the representative specified by the agency. Representatives discussed the presence and strength (low, medium, or high) of sustainability factors, including readiness, champions, technical assistance, perceived fit of CDSMP with their agency, CDSMP modifiability, perceived benefits of CDSMP, and other. Only three of the eight agencies (38%) were still offering CDSMP by the end of 2010. Agencies who sustained CDSMP rated higher on all sustainability factors compared to those that did not sustain the program. Additional factors identified by representatives as important were funding and ongoing access to pools of elders from which to recruit program participants. When replicating evidence-based programs, sustainability factors must be consciously nurtured. For example, readiness must be cultivated, multiple champions must be developed, agencies must be helped to modify the program to best fit their clientele, evaluation findings demonstrating program benefit should be shared, and linkages to funding may be needed.

  12. Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.M.; Brandt, C.C.; Christensen, S.W.; Greeley, M.S.JR.; Hill, W.R.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

    2000-09-01

    The revised Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) for East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, as described, will be conducted as required by the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit issued for the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective July 1, 1995. The basic approach to biological monitoring used in this program was developed by the staff in the Environmental Science Division (ESD) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at the request of the Y-12 Plant. The revision to the BMAP plan is based on results of biological monitoring conducted during the period of 1985 to present. Details of the specific procedures used in the current routine monitoring program are provided; experimental designs for future studies are described in less detail. The overall strategy used in developing this plan was, and continues to be, to use the results obtained from each task to define the scope of future monitoring efforts. Such efforts may require more intensive sampling than initially proposed in some areas (e.g., additional bioaccumulation monitoring if results indicate unexpectedly high PCBs or Hg) or a reduction in sampling intensity in others (e.g., reduction in the number of sampling sites when no impact is still observed). The program scope will be re-evaluated annually. By using the results of previous monitoring efforts to define the current program and to guide us in the development of future studies, an effective integrated monitoring program has been developed to assess the impacts of Y-12 Plant operations (past and present) on the biota of EFPC and to document the ecological effects of remedial actions.

  13. Examination of food waste co-digestion to manage the peak in energy demand at wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Lensch, D; Schaum, C; Cornel, P

    2016-01-01

    Many digesters in Germany are not operated at full capacity; this offers the opportunity for co-digestion. Within this research the potentials and limits of a flexible and adapted sludge treatment are examined with a focus on the digestion process with added food waste as co-substrate. In parallel, energy data from a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) are analysed and lab-scale semi-continuous and batch digestion tests are conducted. Within the digestion tests, the ratio of sewage sludge to co-substrate was varied. The final methane yields show the high potential of food waste: the higher the amount of food waste the higher the final yield. However, the conversion rates directly after charging demonstrate better results by charging 10% food waste instead of 20%. Finally, these results are merged with the energy data from the WWTP. As an illustration, the load required to cover base loads as well as peak loads for typical daily variations of the plant's energy demand are calculated. It was found that 735 m³ raw sludge and 73 m³ of a mixture of raw sludge and food waste is required to cover 100% of the base load and 95% of the peak load.

  14. Non-Invasive Examination of Plant Surfaces by Opto-Electronic Means—Using Russet as a Prime Example

    PubMed Central

    Klemm, Matthias; Röttger, Olga; Damerow, Lutz; Blanke, Michael

    2016-01-01

    (1) Background: Many disorders and diseases of agricultural produce change the physical features of surfaces of plant organs; in terms of russet, e.g., of apple or pear, affected fruit peel becomes rough and brown in color, which is associated with changes in light reflection; (2) Objective and Methods: The objective of the present project was an interdisciplinary approach between horticultural science and engineering to examine two new innovative technologies as to their suitability for the non-destructive determination of surfaces of plant organs, using russet as an example, and (a) an industrial luster sensor (type CZ-H72, Keyence, Japan) and (b) a new type of a three-dimensional (3D) color microscope (VHX 5000); (3) Results: In the case of russet, i.e., suberinization of the fruit peel, peel roughness increased by ca. 2.5-fold from ca. 20 µm to ca. 50 µm on affected fruit sections when viewed at 200× magnification. Russeted peel showed significantly reduced luster, with smaller variation than russet-devoid peel with larger variation; (4) Conclusion: These results indicate that both sensors are suitable for biological material and their use for non-contact, non-invasive detection of surface disorders on agricultural produce such as russet may be a very powerful tool for many applications in agriculture and beyond in the future. PMID:27043561

  15. Environmental justice and factors that influence participation in tree planting programs in Portland, Oregon, U.S

    Treesearch

    Geoffrey H. Donovan; John Mills

    2014-01-01

    Many cities have policies encouraging homeowners to plant trees. For these policies to be effective, it is important to understand what motivates a homeowner’s tree-planting decision. Researchers address this question by identifying variables that influence participation in a tree-planting program in Portland, Oregon, U.S. According to the study, homeowners with street...

  16. 49 CFR 452.9 - Elements of a continuous examination program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... for defects such as cracks, failures, corrosion, missing or deteriorated fasteners, and any other... the detection of container structural damage. (3) Each thorough examination must apply owner...

  17. Examining Variation in Treatment Costs: A Cost Function for Outpatient Methadone Treatment Programs

    PubMed Central

    Dunlap, Laura J; Zarkin, Gary A; Cowell, Alexander J

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To estimate a hybrid cost function of the relationship between total annual cost for outpatient methadone treatment and output (annual patient days and selected services), input prices (wages and building space costs), and selected program and patient case-mix characteristics. Data Sources Data are from a multistate study of 159 methadone treatment programs that participated in the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment's Evaluation of the Methadone/LAAM Treatment Program Accreditation Project between 1998 and 2000. Study Design Using least squares regression for weighted data, we estimate the relationship between total annual costs and selected output measures, wages, building space costs, and selected program and patient case-mix characteristics. Principal Findings Findings indicate that total annual cost is positively associated with program's annual patient days, with a 10 percent increase in patient days associated with an 8.2 percent increase in total cost. Total annual cost also increases with counselor wages (p<.01), but no significant association is found for nurse wages or monthly building costs. Surprisingly, program characteristics and patient case mix variables do not appear to explain variations in methadone treatment costs. Similar results are found for a model with services as outputs. Conclusions This study provides important new insights into the determinants of methadone treatment costs. Our findings concur with economic theory in that total annual cost is positively related to counselor wages. However, among our factor inputs, counselor wages are the only significant driver of these costs. Furthermore, our findings suggest that methadone programs may realize economies of scale; however, other important factors, such as patient access, should be considered. PMID:18454774

  18. Detection and Plant Monitoring Programs: Lessons from an Intensive Survey of Asclepias meadii with Five Observers

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Helen M.; Reed, Aaron W.; Kettle, W. Dean; Slade, Norman A.; Bodbyl Roels, Sarah A.; Collins, Cathy D.; Salisbury, Vaughn

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring programs, where numbers of individuals are followed through time, are central to conservation. Although incomplete detection is expected with wildlife surveys, this topic is rarely considered with plants. However, if plants are missed in surveys, raw count data can lead to biased estimates of population abundance and vital rates. To illustrate, we had five independent observers survey patches of the rare plant Asclepias meadii at two prairie sites. We analyzed data with two mark-recapture approaches. Using the program CAPTURE, the estimated number of patches equaled the detected number for a burned site, but exceeded detected numbers by 28% for an unburned site. Analyses of detected patches using Huggins models revealed important effects of observer, patch state (flowering/nonflowering), and patch size (number of stems) on probabilities of detection. Although some results were expected (i.e. greater detection of flowering than nonflowering patches), the importance of our approach is the ability to quantify the magnitude of detection problems. We also evaluated the degree to which increased observer numbers improved detection: smaller groups (3–4 observers) generally found 90 – 99% of the patches found by all five people, but pairs of observers or single observers had high error and detection depended on which individuals were involved. We conclude that an intensive study at the start of a long-term monitoring study provides essential information about probabilities of detection and what factors cause plants to be missed. This information can guide development of monitoring programs. PMID:23285179

  19. Knowledge and Intentions of Ninth-Grade Girls after a Breast Self-Examination Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogletree, Roberta J.; Hammig, Bart; Drolet, Judy C.; Birch, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Breast cancer ranks as the second-leading cause of death for women. Until recently the American Cancer Society advocated teaching breast self-examination (BSE) procedures. The Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, active in the fight against breast cancer, continues to support educational efforts to teach breast self-examination skills to…

  20. Development of Web-Based Examination System Using Open Source Programming Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abass, Olalere A.; Olajide, Samuel A.; Samuel, Babafemi O.

    2017-01-01

    The traditional method of assessment (examination) is often characterized by examination questions leakages, human errors during marking of scripts and recording of scores. The technological advancement in the field of computer science has necessitated the need for computer usage in majorly all areas of human life and endeavors, education sector…