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Sample records for plant grace c-m-g

  1. Capital and operating cost estimates. Volume I. Preliminary design and assessment of a 12,500 BPD coal-to-methanol-to-gasoline plant. [Grace C-M-G Plant, Henderson County, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    This Deliverable No. 18b - Capital and Operating Cost Estimates includes a detailed presentation of the 12,500 BPD coal-to-methanol-to-gasoline plant from the standpoint of capital, preoperations, start-up and operations cost estimation. The base capital cost estimate in June 1982 dollars was prepared by the Ralph M. Parsons Company under the direction of Grace. The escalated capital cost estimate as well as separate estimates for preoperations, startup and operations activities were developed by Grace. The deliverable consists of four volumes. Volume I contains details of methodology used in developing the capital cost estimate, summary information on a base June 1982 capital cost, details of the escalated capital cost estimate and separate sections devoted to preoperations, start-up, and operations cost. The base estimate is supported by detailed information in Volumes II, III and IV. The degree of detail for some units was constrained due to proprietary data. Attempts have been made to exhibit the estimating methodology by including data on individual equipment pricing. Proprietary details are available for inspection upon execution of nondisclosure and/or secrecy agreements with the licensors to whom the data is proprietary. Details of factoring certain pieces of equipment and/or entire modules or units from the 50,000 BPD capital estimate are also included. In the case of the escalated capital estimate, Grace has chosen to include a sensitivity analysis which allows for ready assessment of impacts of escalation rates (inflation), contingency allowances and the construction interest financing rates on the escalated capital cost. Each of the estimates associated with bringing the plant to commercial production rates has as a basis the schedule and engineering documentation found in Deliverable No. 14b - Process Engineering and Mechanical Design Report, No. 28b - Staffing Plans, No. 31b - Construction Plan, and No. 33b - Startup and Operation Plan.

  2. Process engineering and mechanical design reports. Volume III. Preliminary design and assessment of a 12,500 BPD coal-to-methanol-to-gasoline plant. [Grace C-M-G Plant, Henderson County, Kentucky; Units 26, 27, 31 through 34, 36 through 39

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, R. M.

    1982-08-01

    Various unit processes are considered as follows: a brief description, basis of design; process selection rationale, a brief description of the process chosen and a risk assessment evaluation (for some cases). (LTN)

  3. Grace and Courtesy and Beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, Pat

    2015-01-01

    Taking up the cause of grace and courtesy across the planes of education, Pat Schaefer tells of the grace and courtesy of successive planes within a school culture and gives a glimpse of how the Montessori vision of a new society can look. Grace and courtesy go well beyond the practice of manners and into the topic of deep observation and…

  4. Stumble into Grace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Jennifer Rogers writes with apt and lyrical snippets from her perspective as a Montessori parent and from her long history as a primary guide. This short piece examines the word "grace" from multiple facets and serves as a meditation that uplifts and reminds us "that the life of a child is a gift."

  5. Grace under Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaeffer, Brett

    2004-01-01

    This article profiles author and activist Grace Llewellyn and her cult classic book, "The Teenage Liberation Handbook: How to Quit School and Get a Real Life and Education." Llewellyn's book, which she published in 1991, created a controversy as it teaches kids everything from how to convince parents to let them leave school to how to pursue their…

  6. GRACE star camera noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Nate

    2016-08-01

    Extending results from previous work by Bandikova et al. (2012) and Inacio et al. (2015), this paper analyzes Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) star camera attitude measurement noise by processing inter-camera quaternions from 2003 to 2015. We describe a correction to star camera data, which will eliminate a several-arcsec twice-per-rev error with daily modulation, currently visible in the auto-covariance function of the inter-camera quaternion, from future GRACE Level-1B product releases. We also present evidence supporting the argument that thermal conditions/settings affect long-term inter-camera attitude biases by at least tens-of-arcsecs, and that several-to-tens-of-arcsecs per-rev star camera errors depend largely on field-of-view.

  7. 'Graceful' old inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Di Marco, Fabrizio; Notari, Alessio

    2006-03-15

    We show that inflation in a false vacuum becomes viable in the presence of a spectator scalar field nonminimally coupled to gravity. The field is unstable in this background; it grows exponentially and slows down the pure de Sitter phase itself, allowing then fast tunneling to a true vacuum. We compute the constraint from graceful exit through bubble nucleation and the spectrum of cosmological perturbations.

  8. Grace and Courtesy: Empowering Children, Liberating Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sackett, Ginni

    2015-01-01

    Ginni Sackett delves into the many implications of grace and courtesy, from social relations and the basis of community to respect for the child's personality. Her point of departure is modern social living with grace and dignity. Hers is an exploration over two generations of seeing grace and courtesy as a comprehensive social view that is the…

  9. Grace and Courtesy in the Elementary Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huneke-Stone, Elise

    2015-01-01

    Don't be fooled by Elise Huneke-Stone's disarming beginning where she implies that grace and courtesy is not normally associated with the elementary. She goes on to elaborate that grace and courtesy is indeed everywhere: in project-based learning, understanding of moral precepts, social and intellectual independence, in the utilization of empathy,…

  10. Living Grace and Courtesy in the Primary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soholt, Polli

    2015-01-01

    Polli Soholt looks at grace and courtesy from the 3-6 classroom perspective with clear theory explanations as they pertain to the larger classroom culture. She discusses the link between older and young children and the presence of the teacher as a model for grace and takes a brief look to neural science for proof of the existence of social…

  11. Grace and Courtesy for the Whole School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Mary Lou

    2015-01-01

    Mary Lou Cobb gives a framework from a very practical point of view, leaning on the aspects of grace and courtesy that are fundamental and arise out of a Montessori administrative point of view. Her examples are pragmatic, such as the grace and courtesy of a greeting, of movement, as a whole-school culture, and the right use of language. She calls…

  12. Progress towards daily "swath" solutions from GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Save, H.; Bettadpur, S. V.; Sakumura, C.

    2015-12-01

    The GRACE mission has provided invaluable and the only data of its kind that measures the total water column in the Earth System over the past 13 years. The GRACE solutions available from the project have been monthly average solutions. There have been attempts by several groups to produce shorter time-window solutions with different techniques. There is also an experimental quick-look GRACE solution available from CSR that implements a sliding window approach while applying variable daily data weights. All of these GRACE solutions require special handling for data assimilation. This study explores the possibility of generating a true daily GRACE solution by computing a daily "swath" total water storage (TWS) estimate from GRACE using the Tikhonov regularization and high resolution monthly mascon estimation implemented at CSR. This paper discusses the techniques for computing such a solution and discusses the error and uncertainty characterization. We perform comparisons with official RL05 GRACE solutions and with alternate mascon solutions from CSR to understand the impact on the science results. We evaluate these solutions with emphasis on the temporal characteristics of the signal content and validate them against multiple models and in-situ data sets.

  13. From GRACE to GRACE Follow-On and Beyond (Vening Meinesz Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettadpur, Srinivas

    2016-04-01

    The 15-year long data record of mass flux variability from the US/German Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) has provided us unprecedented insights into the complete range of Earth System processes. To obtain these insights, the analyst community has revisited the conventional space-geodetic analysis methods in a variety of ways, to work with the precise inter-satellite ranging, accelerometry and GPS tracking data from on-board GRACE. In this talk, we review the methods of modeling and extraction of the gravity field from GRACE data, and put them in the perspective of what we wish to accomplish from the GRACE Follow-On (GRACE-FO) mission. The GRACE-FO mission, once again a US/German collaboration with an intended August 2017 launch, will carry both a microwave as well as a laser interferometer for inter-satellite ranging. We may reasonably expect improved quality of data from GRACE-FO, when compared with GRACE. The user expectations, at the same time, of what may be accomplished from GRACE-FO mass flux variability data have grown. Within this context of growing applications, we review methods that may therefore improve the precision and spatial resolution of the gravity field extracted from future gravity field missions.

  14. Earthquake Signal Visible in GRACE Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure1

    This figure shows the effect of the December 2004 great Sumatra earthquake on the Earth's gravity field as observed by GRACE. The signal is expressed in terms of the relative acceleration of the two GRACE satellites, in this case a few nanometers per second squared, or about 1 billionth of the acceleration we experience everyday at the Earth's surface.GRACE observations show comparable signals in the region of the earthquake.

    Other natural variations are also apparent in the expected places, whereas no other significant change would be expected in the region of the earthquake

    GRACE, twin satellites launched in March 2002, are making detailed measurements of Earth's gravity field which will lead to discoveries about gravity and Earth's natural systems. These discoveries could have far-reaching benefits to society and the world's population.

  15. Regional Deformation Studies with GRACE and GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. L.; Elosequi, P.; Tamisiea, M.; Mitrovica, J. X.

    2005-01-01

    GRACE data indicate large seasonal variations in gravity that have been shown to be to be related to climate-driven fluxes of surface water. Seasonal redistribution of surface mass deforms the Earth, and our previous study using GRACE data demonstrate that annual radial deformations of +/-13 mm in the region of Amazon River Basin were observed by both GRACE and ten GPS sites in the region. For the GRACE determinations, we estimate in a least-squares solution for each Stokes coefficient parameters that represent the amplitudes of the annual variation. We then filter these parameters based on a statistical test that uses the scatter of the postfit residuals. We demonstrate by comparison to the GPS amplitudes that this method is more accurate, for this region, than Gaussian smoothing. Our model for the temporal behavior of the gravity coefficients includes a rate term, and although the time series are noisy, the glacial isostatic adjustment signal over Hudson s Bay can be observed. .

  16. Groundwater Depletion in India Revealed by GRACE

    NASA Video Gallery

    Scientists using data from NASA’s Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) have found that the groundwater beneath Northern India has been receding by as much as one foot per year over the p...

  17. GRACE Sees Groundwater Losses Around the World

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA’s Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) has measured significant groundwater depletion around the world in recent years. These animations show trends in total water storage from Jan....

  18. Tongji-GRACE01: A GRACE-only static gravity field model recovered from GRACE Level-1B data using modified short arc approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiujie; Shen, Yunzhong; Zhang, Xingfu; Chen, Wu; Hsu, Houze

    2015-09-01

    The modified short arc approach, where the position vector in force model are regarded as pseudo observation, is implemented in the SAtellite Gravimetry Analysis Software (SAGAS) developed by Tongji university. Based on the SAGAS platform, a static gravity field model (namely Tongji-GRACE01) complete to degree and order 160 is computed from 49 months of real GRACE Level-1B data spanning the period 2003-2007 (including the observations of K-band range-rate, reduced dynamic orbits, non-conservative accelerations and altitudes). The Tongji-GRACE01 model is compared with the recent GRACE-only models (such as GGM05S, AIUB-GRACE03S, ITG-GRACE03, ITG-GRACE2010S, and ITSG-GRACE2014S) and validated with GPS-leveling data sets in different countries. The results show that the Tongji-GRACE01 model has a considered quality as GGM05S, AIUB-GRACE03S and ITG-GRACE03. The Tongji-GRACE01 model is available at the International Centre for Global Earth Models (ICGEM) web page (http://icgem.gfz-potsdam.de/ICGEM/).

  19. Grace DAKASEP alkaline battery separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovannoni, R. T.; Lundquist, J. T.; Choi, W. M.

    1987-01-01

    The Grace DAKASEP separator was originally developed as a wicking layer for nickel-zinc alkaline batteries. The DAKASEP is a filled non-woven separator which is flexible and heat sealable. Through modification of formulation and processing variables, products with a variety of properties can be produced. Variations of DAKASEP were tested in Ni-H2, Ni-Zn, Ni-Cd, and primary alkaline batteries with good results. The properties of DAKASEP which are optimized for Hg-Zn primary batteries are shown in tabular form. This separator has high tensile strength, 12 micron average pore size, relatively low porosity at 46-48 percent, and consequently moderately high resistivity. Versions were produced with greater than 70 percent porosity and resistivities in 33 wt percent KOH as low as 3 ohm cm. Performance data for Hg-Zn E-1 size cells containing DAKASEP with the properties shown in tabular form, are more reproducible than data obtained with a competitive polypropylene non-woven separator. In addition, utilization of active material is in general considerably improved.

  20. Topological inflation with graceful exit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marunović, Anja; Prokopec, Tomislav

    2016-04-01

    We investigate a class of models of topological inflation in which a super-Hubble-sized global monopole seeds inflation. These models are attractive since inflation starts from rather generic initial conditions, but their not so attractive feature is that, unless symmetry is again restored, inflation never ends. In this work we show that, in presence of another nonminimally coupled scalar field, that is both quadratically and quartically coupled to the Ricci scalar, inflation naturally ends, representing an elegant solution to the graceful exit problem of topological inflation. While the monopole core grows during inflation, the growth stops after inflation, such that the monopole eventually enters the Hubble radius, and shrinks to its Minkowski space size, rendering it immaterial for the subsequent Universe's dynamics. Furthermore, we find that our model can produce cosmological perturbations that source CMB temperature fluctuations and seed large scale structure statistically consistent (within one standard deviation) with all available data. In particular, for small and (in our convention) negative nonminimal couplings, the scalar spectral index can be as large as ns simeq 0.955, which is about one standard deviation lower than the central value quoted by the most recent Planck Collaboration.

  1. Add grace to psychiatric practice

    PubMed Central

    Patkar, Shobha V.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The uniqueness of mindset of an individual makes psychiatric practice interesting, sensitive, and at times subjective. The practice in setup of an organization makes the situation more complex in view of administrative regulations, existing work culture, and issues like confidentiality, etc., Dilemmas are often faced while balancing loyalty between an organization and the patients, values of the therapist and the patient, and different dimension of justice coming from different cultural backgrounds of the patients and the treating doctors. A lot of mental work needs to be put in by the practitioner to consistently adhere to medical ethics and professional approach for taking key decisions despite of contradictory external forces from within and without. Aims: I thought of sharing my experiences especially in setup of an organization with my colleagues so that the decision-taking process becomes somewhat easy and balancing for them. Settings and Design: I have to try to interpret my clinical experiences gathered while working with my patients from the Department of Atomic Energy as well as from my private practice. Conclusion: The need of psycho education to self and others from time to time never ceases simply to make the practice more objective, justified, and graceful. PMID:23825861

  2. Laser Frequency Stabilization for GRACE-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W. M.; deVine, G.; Klipstein, W. M.; McKenzie, K.; Shaddock, D.; Spero, R.; Thompson, R.; Wuchenich, D.; Yu, N.; Stephens, M.; Leitch, J.; Davis, M.; deCino, J.; Pace, C.; Pierce, R.

    2010-01-01

    The GRACE mission monitors changes in the Earth's gravity field by measuring changes in the distance between spacecraft induced by that changing field. The distance variation is measured with a microwave ranging system with sub-micron accuracy. The ranging measurement accuracy is limited by the signal-to-noise ratio and by the frequency stability of the microwave signal referenced to an ultra-stable oscillator (USO). For GRACE-2 a laser ranging system is envisioned with accuracy better than the GRACE microwave ranging system. A laser ranging system easily provides an improved signal-to-noise ratio over the microwave system. Laser frequency stability better than the GRACE USO stability has been demonstrated in several laboratories using thermally stabilized optical cavities. We are developing a space-qualifiable optical cavity and associated optics and electronics for use on GRACE-2 to provide a stable frequency reference for the laser ranging system. Two breadboard units have been developed and tested for performance and ability to survive launch and orbit environments. A prototype unit is being designed using lessons learned from tests of the breadboard units.

  3. Grace and Courtesy across the Planes of Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludick, Pat

    2015-01-01

    Pat Ludick's commentary on grace and courtesy is established by a philosophical orientation to development: Grace is oriented to the life of the interior that is consciousness and being, and courtesy moves outward to daily living where civility reflects on success with human interactions. Pat's projected grace and courtesy across the planes is…

  4. Mascons, GRACE, and Time-variable Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, F.; Lutchke, S.; Rowlands, D.; Klosko, S.; Chinn, D.; Boy, J. P.

    2006-01-01

    The GRACE mission has been in orbit now for three years and now regularly produces snapshots of the Earth s gravity field on a monthly basis. The convenient standard approach has been to perform global solutions in spherical harmonics. Alternative local representations of mass variations using mascons show great promise and offer advantages in terms of computational efficiency, minimization of problems due to aliasing, and increased temporal resolution. In this paper, we discuss the results of processing the GRACE KBRR data from March 2003 through August 2005 to produce solutions for GRACE mass variations over mid-latitude and equatorial regions, such as South America, India and the United States, and over the polar regions (Antarctica and Greenland), with a focus on the methodology. We describe in particular mascon solutions developed on regular 4 degree x 4 degree grids, and those tailored specifically to drainage basins over these regions.

  5. Monitoring groundwater drought with GRACE data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Rodell, M.; Beaudoing, H. K.; Getirana, A.; Zaitchik, B. F.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater drought is a distinct class of drought, not a sub-class of meteorological, agricultural and hydrological drought and has profound impacts on natural environments and societies. Due to a deficiency of in situ measurements, we developed a groundwater drought indicator using groundwater change estimates derived by assimilating GRACE derived terrestrial water storage (TWS) anomalies into the NASA Catchment land surface model. Data assimilation enables spatial and temporal downscaling of coarse GRACE TWS observations (monthly and ~150,000 km2 effective spatial resolution) and extrapolation to near-real time. In this talk, we will present our latest progress on using GRACE satellite data for groundwater drought monitoring in the U.S. and globally. Characteristics of this groundwater drought indicator will be discussed, including its relationship with other types of drought and how they are influenced by model physics and climate conditions. Results are evaluated using in situ groundwater observations.

  6. Contributions of GRACE to Climate Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, Matthew; Famiglietti, James; Chambers, Don P.; Wahr, John

    2011-01-01

    The NASA/German Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) was launched in March 2002. Rather than looking downward, GRACE continuously monitors the locations of and precise distance between twin satellites which orbit in tandem about 200 km apart. Variations in mass near Earth's surface cause heterogeneities in its gravity field, which in turn affect the orbits of satellites. Thus scientists can use GRACE data to map Earth's gravity field with enough accuracy to discern month to month changes caused by ocean circulation and redistribution of water stored on and in the land. Other gravitational influences, such as atmospheric circulation, post-glacial rebound, and solid earth movements are either independently determined and removed or are negligible on a monthly to sub-decadal timescale. Despite its coarse spatial (>150,000 sq km at mid-latitudes) and temporal (approx monthly) resolutions, GRACE has enabled significant advancements in the oceanic, hydrologic, and cryospheric science, and has great potential for climate monitoring, because it is the only global observing system able to measure ocean bottom pressures, total terrestrial water storage, and ice mass changes. The best known GRACE results are estimates of Greenland and Antarctic ice sheet loss rates. Previously, scientists had estimated ice mass losses using ground and satellite based altimetry and surface mass balance estimates based on snowfall accumulation and glacier discharge. While such measurements are still very useful for their spatial detail, they are imperfectly correlated with large-scale ice mass changes, due to snow and ice compaction and incomplete spatial coverage. GRACE enables scientists to generate monthly time series of Greenland and Antarctic ice mass, which have confirmed the shrinking of the polar ice sheets, one of the most obvious and indisputable manifestations of climate change. Further, GRACE has located and quantified hot spots of ice loss in southeastern Greenland and

  7. Graceful label numbering in optical MPLS networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkut, Ibrahim C.; Arkut, Refik C.; Ghani, Nasir

    2000-09-01

    This paper explores the positive effects of the new multi protocol label switching (MPLS) routing platform in IP networks. In particular, novel node numbering algorithms based upon graceful numbering of trees are presented. The first part presents the application of the well-known graceful numbering of spanning caterpillars to the MPLS multicast routing problem. In the second part of the paper, the numbering algorithm is adjusted for the case of unicast routing in the framework of IP-over-WDM optical networks using MPLS, e.g., particularly lambda-labeling and multi protocol lambda switching.

  8. Insights on GRACE (Gender, Race, And Clinical Experience) from the patient's perspective: GRACE participant survey.

    PubMed

    Squires, Kathleen; Feinberg, Judith; Bridge, Dawn Averitt; Currier, Judith; Ryan, Robert; Seyedkazemi, Setareh; Dayaram, Yaswant K; Mrus, Joseph

    2013-06-01

    The Gender, Race And Clinical Experience (GRACE) study was conducted between October 2006 and December 2008 to evaluate sex- and race-based differences in outcomes after treatment with a darunavir/ritonavir-based antiretroviral regimen. Between June 2010 and June 2011, former participants of the GRACE trial at participating sites were asked to complete a 40-item questionnaire as part of the GRACE Participant Survey study, with a primary objective of assessing patients' characteristics, experiences, and opinions about participation in GRACE. Of 243 potential survey respondents, 151 (62%) completed the survey. Respondents were representative of the overall GRACE population and were predominantly female (64%); fewer were black, and more reported recreational drug use compared with nonrespondents (55% vs. 62% and 17% vs. 10%, respectively). Access to treatment (41%) and too many blood draws (26%) were reported as the best and worst part of GRACE, respectively. Support from study site staff was reported as the most important factor in completing the study (47%). Factors associated with nonadherence, study discontinuation, and poor virologic response in univariate analyses were being the primary caregiver for children, unemployment, and transportation difficulties, respectively. Patients with these characteristics may be at risk of poor study outcomes and may benefit from additional adherence and retention strategies in future studies and routine clinical care.

  9. Does GRACE see the water cycle 'intensifying'?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eicker, Annette; Kusche, Jürgen; Forootan, Ehsan; Springer, Anne; Schumacher, Maike; Ohlwein, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Several researchers have postulated that, under a changing climate due to anthropogenic forcing, an intensification of the water cycle is already under way (Huntington, 2006). This is usually related to increases in hydrological fluxes such as precipitation (P), evapotranspiration (E), and river discharge (R). It is under debate, however, whether such observed or reconstructed flux changes are real and on what scales. Large-scale increase or decrease of the flux deficit (P-E) would lead to acceleration or deceleration of water storage anomalies possibly visible in GRACE time series, when discharge variability is small or properly accounted for. We investigate to what extent such accelerations, which are indeed found in maps of global gridded GRACE water storage anomalies, can be explained using output fields derived from global and regional atmospheric (re-)analyses and from hydrological models. We find this analysis challenging, since the GRACE time series is short and dominated by ENSO-type natural variability. Observed accelerations strongly depend on the analysis time frame, and may be explained to a large percentage by natural variability, thus masking a possible anthropogenically driven intensification of the terrestrial water cycle. This motivates us to apply statistical decomposition techniques in order to identify modes of natural variabilities and to remove them from the GRACE time series prior to the estimation of accelerations. Huntington T.G. (2006): Evidence for intensification of the global water cycle: Review and synthesis. J. Hydrology, 319:83-95

  10. Flannery O'Connor's Moments of Grace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Mary Ellen

    1988-01-01

    Suggests that instructors of introductory literature courses can teach students how to analyze content and meaning through a pervading theme. Proposes using three of Flannery O'Connor's works, focusing on the "moment of grace" theme in each story and discussing its central importance in the works. (MS)

  11. Antarctic regional ice loss rates from GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. L.; Wilson, C. R.; Tapley, B. D.; Blankenship, D.; Young, D.

    2008-02-01

    Using recent improved time-variable gravity solutions from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), we estimate rates of Antarctic ice mass change for the period January 2003 through September 2006. Combined improvements in data and filtering techniques allow observation of ice loss in the northern Antarctic Peninsula (AP) and along the coast of the west and central Amundsen Sea Embayment (ASE) in West Antarctica. There is also evidence of ice loss along the coast near the Stancomb-Wills (STA) and Jutulstraumen (JUT) glaciers in Queen Maud Land. Apparent rates are adjusted for influences of limited spatial resolution, filtering, and estimated postglacial rebound (PGR) to obtain ice loss rates for the northern AP, coastal ASE, and STA/JUT of - 28.8 ± 7.9, - 81 ± 17, and - 16.7 ± 9.7 km 3/yr, respectively. This is the first estimate for the northern AP from satellite gravity data. The ASE estimate (- 81 ± 17 km 3/yr) is consistent with a previous value (- 77 ± 14 km 3/yr) using an earlier GRACE data release. These results indicate significant improvement in GRACE data quality, increased spatial resolution, and applicability of GRACE data to a wider class of problems than previously possible.

  12. Antarctic mass balance changes from GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallenberg, B.; Tregoning, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Antarctic ice sheet contains ~30 million km3 of ice and constitutes a significant component of the global water balance with enough freshwater to raise global sea level by ~60 m. Altimetry measurements and climate models suggest variable behaviour across the Antarctic ice sheet, with thickening occurring in a vast area of East Antarctica and substantial thinning in West Antarctica caused by increased temperature gradients in the surrounding ocean. However, the rate at which the polar ice cap is melting is still poorly constrained. To calculate the mass loss of an ice sheet it is necessary to separate present day mass balance changes from glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA), the response of the Earth's crust to mass loss, wherefore it is essential to undertake sufficient geological and geomorphological sampling. As there is only a limited possibility for this in Antarctica, all models (i.e. geological, hydrological as well as atmospheric) are very poorly constrained. Therefore, space-geodetic observations play an important role in detecting changes in mass and spatial variations in the Earth's gravity field. The Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) observed spatial variations in the Earth's gravity field over the past ten years. The satellite detects mass variations in the Earth system including geophysical, hydrological and atmospheric shifts. GRACE itself is not able to separate the GIA from mass balance changes and, due to the insufficient geological and geomorphological database, it is not possible to model the GIA effect accurately for Antarctica. However, the results from GRACE can be compared with other scientific results, coming from other geodetic observations such as satellite altimetry and GPS or by the use of geological observations. In our contribution we compare the GRACE data with recorded precipitation patterns and mass anomalies over East Antarctica to separate the observed GRACE signal into its two components: GIA as a result of mass

  13. Hydrology Applications of the GRACE missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, M. M.; Ivins, E. R.; Jasinski, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    NASA and their German space agency partners have a rich history of global gravity observations beginning with the launch of the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) in 2002. The science goals of the mission include providing monthly maps of variations in the gravity field, where the major time-varying signal is due to water motion in the Earth system. GRACE has a unique ability to observe the mass flux of water movement at monthly time scales. The hydrology applications of the GRACE mission include measurements of seasonal storage of surface and subsurface water and evapotranspiration at the land-ocean-atmosphere boundary. These variables are invaluable for improved modeling and prediction of Earth system processes. Other mission-critical science objectives include measurements that are a key component of NASA's ongoing climate measuring capabilities. Successful strategies to enhance science and practical applications of the proposed GRACE-Follow On (GRACE-FO) mission, scheduled to launch in 2017, will require engaging with and facilitating between representatives in the science, societal applications, and mission planning communities. NASA's Applied Sciences Program is supporting collaboration on an applied approach to identifying communities of potential and of practice in order to identify and promote the societal benefits of these and future gravity missions. The objective is to engage applications-oriented users and organizations and enable them to envision possible applications and end-user needs as a way to increase the benefits of these missions to the nations. The focus of activities for this applications program include; engaging the science community in order to identify applications and current and potential data users, developing a written Applications Plan, conducting workshops and user tutorials, providing ready access to information via web pages, developing databases of key and interested users/scientists, creating printed materials

  14. Can GRACE detect winter snows in Japan?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heki, Kosuke

    2010-05-01

    Current spatial resolution of the GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellites is 300-400 km, and so its hydrological applications have been limited to continents and large islands. The Japanese Islands have width slightly smaller than this spatial resolution, but are known to show large amplitude seasonal changes in surface masses due mainly to winter snow. Such loads are responsible for seasonal crustal deformation observed with GEONET, a dense array of GPS (Global Positioning System) receivers in Japan (Heki, 2001). There is also a dense network of surface meteorological sensors for, e.g. snow depths, atmospheric pressures, etc. Heki (2004) showed that combined effects of surface loads, i.e. snow (predominant), atmosphere, soil moisture, dam impoundment, can explain seasonal crustal deformation observed by GPS to a large extent. The total weight of the winter snow in the Japanese Islands in its peak season may reach ~50 Gt. This is comparable to the annual loss of mountain glaciers in the Asian high mountains (Matsuo & Heki, 2010), and is above the detection level of GRACE. In this study, I use GRACE Level-2 Release-4 data from CSR, Univ. Texas, up to 2009 November, and evaluated seasonal changes in surface loads in and around the Japanese Islands. After applying a 350 km Gaussian filter and a de-striping filter, the peak-to-peak change of the water depth becomes ~4 cm in northern Japan. The maximum value is achieved in February-March. The region of large winter load spans from Hokkaido, Japan, to northeastern Honshu, which roughly coincides with the region of deep snow in Japan. Next I compiled snow depth data from surface meteorological observations, and converted them to loads using time-dependent snow density due to compaction. By applying the same spatial filter as the GRACE data, its spatial pattern becomes similar to the GRACE results. The present study suggests that GRACE is capable of detecting seasonal mass changes in an island arc not

  15. GRACE: Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, A.

    2002-01-01

    While gravity is much weaker than other basic forces in nature, such as magnetism and electricity, its effects are ubiquitous and dramatic. Gravity controls everything from the motion of the ocean tides to the expansion of the entire Universe. To learn more about the mysteries of gravity, twin satellites named GRACE--short for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment--are being launched to make detailed measurements of Earth's gravity field. This experiment could lead to discoveries about gravity and Earth's natural systems, which could have substantial benefits for society and the world's population. The GRACE mission will be the inaugural flight of NASA's Earth System Science Pathfinder Program (ESSP). A component of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise (ESE), the ESSP missions are intended to address unique, specific highly focused scientific issues and provide measurements required to support Earth science research.

  16. 1895: Dr W G Grace's golden summer.

    PubMed Central

    Toghill, P.

    1995-01-01

    One hundred years ago there was another wonderful summer. Dr. W G Grace, England's greatest cricketer, in his 47th year, completed his "century of centuries" and scored 2346 runs. This remarkable achievement was celebrated with enthusiasm and affection by the Victorian public. In more practical terms generous testimonials raised 9073 pound sterling 8s 6d, which made it a golden summer in more ways than one. Images p618-a PMID:7663257

  17. GRACE Collaboration in the Swift Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, C.

    2004-01-01

    I will describe the structure and major discoveries of the Gamma-Ray Afterglow Collaboration at ESO, formed by several European Countries to perform GRB follow up observations using the European Southern Observatory (ESO) ground-based facilities in Chile. I represent the USA-UK node of GRACE. I will also describe a newly funded effort through the Swift GO program aiming at forming a Joint Afterglow NETwork (JANET) using members of the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO).

  18. Water Control on Vegetation Growth Pattern in Eurasia from GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A, G.; Velicogna, I.; Kimball, J. S.; Kim, Y.

    2014-12-01

    High latitude ecosystem productivity is constrained by cold temperature and moisture limitations to plant growth, while these environmental restrictions may be changing with global warming. Satellite data driven assessments indicate that over the past three decades, rapid warming in the northern high latitudes has resulted in earlier and longer potential growing seasons and widespread greening, due to general relaxation of cold temperature constraints to vegetation productivity. However, warming may have also increased water stress limitations to growth. In this study, we use GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) derived total water storage (TWS), 2-m air temperature (T) from ERA-interim reanalysis, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data from MODIS (Collection 5) and satellite data driven vegetation gross primary productivity (GPP) estimates as surrogates for vegetation growth, for the period August 2002-December 2013 to evaluate terrestrial water supply controls to vegetation growth changes over the three major river basins of northern Eurasia. We find that during the analyzed period, the apparent growth response follows regional vegetation, moisture and temperature gradients and is spatially complex. In the drier southwest characterized by grassland, vegetation growth is mainly controlled by TWS availability. In the central region, dominated by cold temperature and water limited boreal forest, T is the main control on vegetation growth. In the Lena basin, where vegetation includes both boreal forest and water limited grassland, both T and TWS impact vegetation growth. We suggest that GRACE TWS estimates provide reliable observational constraints on water availability to vegetation that supplement sparse soil moisture observations and satellite precipitation estimates with unknown bias.

  19. 12 CFR 329.104 - Ten-day grace period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTEREST ON DEPOSITS § 329.104 Ten-day grace period. This interpretive rule provides for 10-day grace periods during which interest may be paid on a deposit without violating § 329.2. (a) During the...

  20. 12 CFR 329.104 - Ten-day grace period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTEREST ON DEPOSITS § 329.104 Ten-day grace period. This interpretive rule provides for 10-day grace periods during which interest may be paid on a deposit without violating § 329.2. (a) During the...

  1. Groundwater Storage Changes: Present Status from GRACE Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianli; Famigliett, James S.; Scanlon, Bridget R.; Rodell, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Satellite gravity measurements from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) provide quantitative measurement of terrestrial water storage (TWS) changes with unprecedented accuracy. Combining GRACE-observed TWS changes and independent estimates of water change in soil and snow and surface reservoirs offers a means for estimating groundwater storage change. Since its launch in March 2002, GRACE time-variable gravity data have been successfully used to quantify long-term groundwater storage changes in different regions over the world, including northwest India, the High Plains Aquifer and the Central Valley in the USA, the North China Plain, Middle East, and southern Murray-Darling Basin in Australia, where groundwater storage has been significantly depleted in recent years (or decades). It is difficult to rely on in situ groundwater measurements for accurate quantification of large, regional-scale groundwater storage changes, especially at long timescales due to inadequate spatial and temporal coverage of in situ data and uncertainties in storage coefficients. The now nearly 13 years of GRACE gravity data provide a successful and unique complementary tool for monitoring and measuring groundwater changes on a global and regional basis. Despite the successful applications of GRACE in studying global groundwater storage change, there are still some major challenges limiting the application and interpretation of GRACE data. In this paper, we present an overview of GRACE applications in groundwater studies and discuss if and how the main challenges to using GRACE data can be addressed.

  2. Recent Advances in the GRACE Data Assimilation System (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitchik, B. F.; Rodell, M.; Kumar, S.; Reichle, R. H.; Bolten, J. D.; Bergaoui, K.

    2013-12-01

    Anomalies in Terrestrial Water Storage (TWS) derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission have been used effectively to study hydrologic variability and trends at basin scale across diverse climatic and geologic conditions. Many hydrology and water resources applications, however, require water storage estimates at higher spatial resolution, greater temporal frequency, and with greater physical specificity (e.g., groundwater versus soil moisture versus snow) than GRACE alone can offer. The GRACE Data Assimilation System (GRACE-DAS) was developed to merge GRACE information on large-scale TWS anomalies with physically-based advanced Land Surface Models in order to improve model simulation of water storage while disaggregating and downscaling the raw GRACE TWS estimate. The primary assimilation algorithm is a variant of the ensemble Kalman Smoother. In recent years the system has been applied to studies of water resources and drought monitoring over four different continents. These experiences have led to refinements in the assimilation system that include modifications to land surface model parameters and the treatment of irrigation withdrawals, adjustments in the assimilation algorithm for snow updates, and, most recently, the implementation of a gridded observation assimilation capability that allows for a more flexible application of the system. This presentation will provide an overview of current GRACE-DAS capabilities, report on recent innovations in the modeling system, and describe future directions in GRACE data assimilation research and applications.

  3. Antarctic tides from GRACE satellite accelerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiese, D. N.; Killett, B.; Watkins, M. M.; Yuan, D.-N.

    2016-05-01

    The extended length of the GRACE data time series (now 13.5 years) provides the unique opportunity to estimate global mass variations due to ocean tides at large (˜300 km) spatial scales. State-of-the-art global tide models rely heavily on satellite altimetry data, which are sparse for latitudes higher than 66°. Thus, the performance of the models is typically worse at higher latitudes. GRACE data, alternately, extend to polar latitudes and therefore provide information for both model validation and improvement at the higher latitudes. In this work, 11 years of GRACE inter-satellite range-acceleration measurements are inverted to solve for corrections to the amplitudes and phases of the major solar and lunar ocean tidal constituents (M2, K1, S2, and O1) from the GOT4.7 ocean tide model at latitudes south of 50°S. Two independent inversion and regularization methods are employed and compared against one another. Uncertainty estimates are derived by subtracting two independent solutions, each spanning a unique 5.5 years of data. Features above the noise floor in the derived solutions likely represent errors in GOT4.7. We find the GOT4.7 amplitudes to be generally too small for M2 and K1, and too large for S2 and O1, and to spatially correlate with geographic regions where GOT4.7 predicts the largest tidal amplitudes. In particular, we find GOT4.7 errors to be dominant over the Patagonia shelf (M2), the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf (M2 and S2), the Ross Ice Shelf (S2), and the Weddell and Ross Seas (K1 and O1).

  4. The design, validation, and performance of Grace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ru

    2016-05-01

    The design, validation and performance of Grace, a GPU-accelerated micromagnetic simulation software, are presented. The software adopts C+ + Accelerated Massive Parallelism (C+ + AMP) so that it runs on GPUs from various hardware vendors including NVidia, AMD and Intel. At large simulation scales, up to two orders of magnitude of speedup factor is observed, compared to CPU-based micromagnetic simulation software OOMMF. The software can run on high-end professional GPUs as well as budget personal laptops, and is free to download.

  5. Monitoring Global Freshwater Resources with GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodell, M.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Velicogna, I.; Swenson, S. C.; Chambers, D. P.

    2011-12-01

    Freshwater resources include surface waters, groundwater, and seasonal snowpack. Given adequate ground based measurements, all of these can be monitored effectively, however, outside of the developed world such measurements often are not systematic and the data not centralized, and as a result reports of freshwater availability may be largely anecdotal. Even in the developed world it can be difficult to quantify changes in groundwater storage over large scales. Owing to its global coverage, satellite remote sensing has become a valuable tool for freshwater resources assessment. In particular, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) has demonstrated an unequaled ability to monitor total terrestrial water storage including groundwater at regional to continental scales. In this presentation we will identify apparent trends in terrestrial water storage observed by GRACE over the past nine years and attempt to explain their origins and predict whether they are likely to continue. Trends in certain regions where groundwater extraction has significantly depleted aquifers, including northern India and California's Central Valley, will be discussed in detail.

  6. Topological Integer Additive Set-Graceful Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudev, N. K.; P., K.; Germina, K. A.

    2015-08-01

    Let $\\mathbb{N}_0$ denote the set of all non-negative integers and $X$ be any subset of $X$. Also denote the power set of $X$ by $\\mathcal{P}(X)$. An integer additive set-labeling (IASL) of a graph $G$ is an injective function $f:V(G)\\to \\mathcal{P}(X)$ such that the induced function $f^+:E(G) \\to \\mathcal{P}(X)$ is defined by $f^+ (uv) = f(u)+ f(v)$, where $f(u)+f(v)$ is the sumset of $f(u)$ and $f(v)$. An IASL $f$ is said to be a topological IASL (Top-IASL) if $f(V(G))\\cup \\{\\emptyset\\}$ is a topology of the ground set $X$. An IASL is said to be an integer additive set-graceful labeling (IASGL) if for the induced edge-function $f^+$, $f^+(E(G))= \\mathcal{P}(X)-\\{\\emptyset, \\{0\\}\\}$. In this paper, we study certain types of IASL of a given graph $G$, which is a topological integer additive set-labeling as well as an integer additive set-graceful labeling of $G$.

  7. Variability in deep ocean circulation from GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boening, C.; Watkins, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Although nearly impossible to observe on a global scale, total water mass transport and inter-basin exchange are central to understanding long-term changes in ocean circulation. Of particular interest are changes in the Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) as they pose potential impacts in continental climtae. However, in-situ observations are limited in space and time preventing a holistic view of current variability. The representation of long-term transports in ocean models is highly dependent on the atmospheric forcing fields, which may misrepresent real interannual variability. The bottom pressure observations from the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) provide for the first time the ability to observe this global water mass transport. Here, we present the first near-global maps of variability in the depth-independent ocean circulation derived from advanced analysis of GRACE data. We find that significant variability on annual to decadal time scales exists in the deep large-scale circulation, some of which are related to the Southern Annular Mode forcing dominating Southern Ocean variability.

  8. Introducing GRACE Follow-On mock data challenge project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbeheshti, Neda; Naeimi, Majid; Hewitson, Martin; Heinzel, Gerhard; Flury, Jakob

    2016-04-01

    GRACE Follow-On satellites will be launched in 2017. Equipped with the additional Laser Ranging Instrument (LRI) sensor, GRACE Follow-On is expected to reach even better spatial and temporal resolution for the Earth's gravity field. GRACE Follow-On mock data challenge project is part of the geo-Q project at Leibniz Universität Hannover and plans several runs of data challenges for GRACE Follow-On. The challenges are coordinated from simple gravity field recovery in 2015 to more advanced forms when LRI noise model will be added in 2016 challenge. The aim of these challenges is to engage different research centers around the world to test their methods for gravity field recovery from simulated data which will lead to develop data analysis tools and capabilities for GRACE follow-On data. In this contribution we introduce the mock data challenge project for GRACE and GRACE Follow-On. The highlights and objectives of the challenges will be given, with the details about the webpage and data exchange for the participants.

  9. GRACE Harmonic and Mascon Solutions at JPL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, M. M.; Yuan, D.; Kuang, D.; Bertiger, W.; Kim, M.; Kruizinga, G. L.

    2005-12-01

    Gravity field solutions at JPL over the past few years have explored use of range, range-rate, and range-acceleration K/Ka-band satellite-satellite data types (with and without GPS), and with both spherical harmonic and mascon-type local mass representations. Until recently, resource and computing limitations have limited the scope of our mascon and other local solutions to a few months and/or small spatial regions and the standard GRACE products have remained spherical harmonic fields. The use of a new very large (~500 node) beowulf machine at JPL is now enabling a wider range of solutions over longer time spans and deeper understanding of their characteristics. These include much higher spherical harmonic degrees, mascons, and hybrids of the two. We will present the current status for several solution types, strengths and weaknesses of each, and our assessments of limiting errors including data noise and aliasing sensitivity.

  10. Integrated instrumentation & computation environment for GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhekne, P. S.

    2002-03-01

    The project GRACE (Gamma Ray Astrophysics with Coordinated Experiments) aims at setting up a state of the art Gamma Ray Observatory at Mt. Abu, Rajasthan for undertaking comprehensive scientific exploration over a wide spectral window (10's keV - 100's TeV) from a single location through 4 coordinated experiments. The cumulative data collection rate of all the telescopes is expected to be about 1 GB/hr, necessitating innovations in the data management environment. As real-time data acquisition and control as well as off-line data processing, analysis and visualization environment of these systems is based on the us cutting edge and affordable technologies in the field of computers, communications and Internet. We propose to provide a single, unified environment by seamless integration of instrumentation and computations by taking advantage of the recent advancements in Web based technologies. This new environment will allow researchers better acces to facilities, improve resource utilization and enhance collaborations by having identical environments for online as well as offline usage of this facility from any location. We present here a proposed implementation strategy for a platform independent web-based system that supplements automated functions with video-guided interactive and collaborative remote viewing, remote control through virtual instrumentation console, remote acquisition of telescope data, data analysis, data visualization and active imaging system. This end-to-end web-based solution will enhance collaboration among researchers at the national and international level for undertaking scientific studies, using the telescope systems of the GRACE project.

  11. Basin scale estimates of evapotranspiration using GRACE and other observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodell, M.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Chen, J.; Seneviratne, S. I.; Viterbo, P.; Holl, S.; Wilson, C. R.

    2004-10-01

    Evapotranspiration is integral to studies of the Earth system, yet it is difficult to measure on regional scales. One estimation technique is a terrestrial water budget, i.e., total precipitation minus the sum of evapotranspiration and net runoff equals the change in water storage. Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite gravity observations are now enabling closure of this equation by providing the terrestrial water storage change. Equations are presented here for estimating evapotranspiration using observation based information, taking into account the unique nature of GRACE observations. GRACE water storage changes are first substantiated by comparing with results from a land surface model and a combined atmospheric-terrestrial water budget approach. Evapotranspiration is then estimated for 14 time periods over the Mississippi River basin and compared with output from three modeling systems. The GRACE estimates generally lay in the middle of the models and may provide skill in evaluating modeled evapotranspiration.

  12. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Courtesy Mrs. Grace S. Caldron ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Courtesy Mrs. Grace S. Caldron (Granddaughter of Geronimo Lopez Photo: ca. 1912 NORTHEAST ELEVATION - Casa de Geronimo Lopez, 1102 Pico Street, San Fernando, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Courtesy Mrs. Grace S. Caldron ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Courtesy Mrs. Grace S. Caldron (Granddaughter of Geronimo Lopez Photo: ca. 1900 SOUTHEAST CORNER - Casa de Geronimo Lopez, 1102 Pico Street, San Fernando, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. GRACE BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES - DARAMEND™ BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Grace Dearborn's DARAMEND™ Bioremediation Technology was developed to treat soils/sediment contaminated with organic contaminants using solid-phase organic amendments. The amendments increase the soil’s ability to supply biologically available water/nutrients to micro...

  15. 4. Photocopy of photograph (from the collection of Grace M. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photocopy of photograph (from the collection of Grace M. Barwise, owner of house in 1972) n.d. INTERIOR, ENTRANCE HALL LOOKING INTO LIVING ROOM - James Frederic Clarke House, 500 South Main Street, Fairfield, Jefferson County, IA

  16. Susquehanna River Bridge swing span. Havre de Grace, Hareford Co., ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Susquehanna River Bridge swing span. Havre de Grace, Hareford Co., MD. Sec. 1201, MP 60.07. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  17. Susquehanna River Bridge. Havre de Grace, Hareford Co., MD. Sec. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Susquehanna River Bridge. Havre de Grace, Hareford Co., MD. Sec. 1201, MP 60.07. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  18. Juniata Street Culvert. Havre de Grace, Hareford Co., MD. Sec. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Juniata Street Culvert. Havre de Grace, Hareford Co., MD. Sec. 1201, MP 60.77. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  19. Status of the GRACE Follow-On Mission (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, M. M.; Flechtner, F.; Tapley, B. D.

    2010-12-01

    NASA has included a GRACE Follow-On mission in its proposed budget for fiscal year 2011. As of the time of this abstract submission (September 2, 2010), although the FY11 NASA budget has not been approved by Congress, we continue to anticipate a new start for the mission in FY11. We also anticipate and welcome a continuation of the GRACE partnership with German colleagues at GFZ and DLR. The proposed mission goal is focused on continuation of the critical global mass flux time series initiated by GRACE, and therefore launching as soon as practical is a high priority. The GRACE mission is well into its extended mission, and we will summarize the latest satellite status and expected lifetime. To minimize the development time of a Follow-On mission while minimizing cost and technical risk, a high inheritance "rebuild" of GRACE is the mission baseline, taking advantage of lessons learned from GRACE. We have conducted a study of the systematic errors from the GRACE thermal control system, the satellite seismicity (particularly the nadir radiator), and the attitude control hardware and software in order to feed forward selected modest cost design improvements which provide high science value to the Follow-On. We have also developed basic plans to incorporate, on a "tech demo" basis, an experimental laser interferometer system derived from technology developed by the Earth Science Technology Office Instrument Incubator program, and in conjunction with German developments led by AEI/U. Hannover. This system could provide important experience and risk reduction for future gravity mapping missions targeted for improved accuracy and spatial resolution. In this talk, we will provide the latest technical and programmatic status of this developing project to continue and extend the successful science from the GRACE mission.

  20. Atmospheric Pressure Error of GRACE in Antarctic Ice Mass Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B.; Eom, J.; Seo, K. W.

    2014-12-01

    As GRACE has observed time-varying gravity longer than a decade, long-term mass changes have been emerged. In particular, linear trends and accelerated patterns in Antarctica were reported and paid attention for the projection of sea level rise. The cause of accelerated ice mass loss in Antarctica is not known since its amplitude is not significantly larger than ice mass change associated with natural climate variations. In this study, we consider another uncertainty in Antarctic ice mass loss acceleration due to unmodeled atmospheric pressure field. We first compare GRACE AOD product with in-situ atmospheric pressure data from SCAR READER project. GRACE AOD (ECMWF) shows spurious jump near Transantarctic Mountains, which is due to the regular model update of ECMWF. In addition, GRACE AOD shows smaller variations than in-situ observation in coastal area. This is possibly due to the lower resolution of GRACE AOD, and thus relatively stable ocean bottom pressure associated with inverted barometric effect suppresses the variations of atmospheric pressure near coast. On the other hand, GRACE AOD closely depicts in-situ observations far from oceans. This is probably because GRACE AOD model (ECMWF) is assimilated with in-situ observations. However, the in-situ observational sites in interior of Antarctica are sparse, and thus it is still uncertain the reliability of GRACE AOD for most region of Antarctica. To examine this, we cross-validate three different reanalysis; ERA Interim, NCEP DOE and MERRA. Residual atmospheric pressure fields as a measure of atmospheric pressure errors, NCEP DOE - ERA Interim or MERRA - ERA Interim, show long-term changes, and the estimated uncertainty in acceleration of Antarctic ice mass change is about 9 Gton/yr^2 from 2003 to 2012. This result implies that the atmospheric surface pressure error likely hinders the accurate estimate of the ice mass loss acceleration in Antarctica.

  1. Quantifying renewable groundwater stress with GRACE

    PubMed Central

    Richey, Alexandra S.; Thomas, Brian F.; Lo, Min‐Hui; Reager, John T.; Voss, Katalyn; Swenson, Sean; Rodell, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Groundwater is an increasingly important water supply source globally. Understanding the amount of groundwater used versus the volume available is crucial to evaluate future water availability. We present a groundwater stress assessment to quantify the relationship between groundwater use and availability in the world's 37 largest aquifer systems. We quantify stress according to a ratio of groundwater use to availability, which we call the Renewable Groundwater Stress ratio. The impact of quantifying groundwater use based on nationally reported groundwater withdrawal statistics is compared to a novel approach to quantify use based on remote sensing observations from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission. Four characteristic stress regimes are defined: Overstressed, Variable Stress, Human‐dominated Stress, and Unstressed. The regimes are a function of the sign of use (positive or negative) and the sign of groundwater availability, defined as mean annual recharge. The ability to mitigate and adapt to stressed conditions, where use exceeds sustainable water availability, is a function of economic capacity and land use patterns. Therefore, we qualitatively explore the relationship between stress and anthropogenic biomes. We find that estimates of groundwater stress based on withdrawal statistics are unable to capture the range of characteristic stress regimes, especially in regions dominated by sparsely populated biome types with limited cropland. GRACE‐based estimates of use and stress can holistically quantify the impact of groundwater use on stress, resulting in both greater magnitudes of stress and more variability of stress between regions. PMID:26900185

  2. Climate-Driven Deformation of the Solid Earth from GRACE and GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. L.; Elosegui, P.; Mitrovica, J. X.; Tamisiea, M. E.

    2004-01-01

    GRACE data indicate large seasonal variations in gravity that are assumed to be related to climate-driven fluxes of space water. Seasonal redistribution of surface mass should deform the Earth, and our calculations using GRACE data suggest vertical deformations of approx. 13 mm in the region of greatest flux, the Amazon River Basin. To test the GRACE gravity-hydrology connection, we analyzed GPS data acquired from sites in this region. After accounting for degree 1 variations not observable with GRACE, we find that annual deformation measured with GPS correlates highly with predictions calculated from GRACE measurements. These results confirm the variations in surface water sensed by GRACE, which are significantly larger than those predicted by some hydrology models. The results also demonstrate that GRACE can be an important tool for monitoring deformation of the Earth, and suggest that combined analysis of GRACE and GPS may be a useful approach for estimation of geocenter variations.

  3. Development of daily "swath" mascon solutions from GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Save, Himanshu; Bettadpur, Srinivas

    2016-04-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission has provided invaluable and the only data of its kind over the past 14 years that measures the total water column in the Earth System. The GRACE project provides monthly average solutions and there are experimental quick-look solutions and regularized sliding window solutions available from Center for Space Research (CSR) that implement a sliding window approach and variable daily weights. The need for special handling of these solutions in data assimilation and the possibility of capturing the total water storage (TWS) signal at sub-monthly time scales motivated this study. This study discusses the progress of the development of true daily high resolution "swath" mascon total water storage estimate from GRACE using Tikhonov regularization. These solutions include the estimates of daily total water storage (TWS) for the mascon elements that were "observed" by the GRACE satellites on a given day. This paper discusses the computation techniques, signal, error and uncertainty characterization of these daily solutions. We discuss the comparisons with the official GRACE RL05 solutions and with CSR mascon solution to characterize the impact on science results especially at the sub-monthly time scales. The evaluation is done with emphasis on the temporal signal characteristics and validated against in-situ data set and multiple models.

  4. GRAF - A GRACE follow-on mission feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flechtner, F.; Neumayer, K. H.; Doll, B.; Munder, J.; Reigber, Ch.; Raimondo, J. C.

    2009-04-01

    After more than 6 years of very successful operation in orbit, the US-German GRACE mission has demonstrated in a very impressive way its outstanding capability to monitor mass motions in the Earth system with unprecedented accuracy and temporal resolution. These results have stimulated many novel research activities in hydrology, oceanography, glaciology, geophysics and geodesy, which also indicate that long term monitoring of such mass motions, possibly with improved spatial and temporal resolution is a must for further understanding of various phenomena. GRACE had been designed for 5 years lifetime, but due to the robust design and some margin on S/C consumables, GRACE can operate likely until 2012, thus about 10 years. Considering this, GFZ Potsdam has recently launched a short study with STI as industrial partner, holding a wealth of GRACE technical experience, to investigate the feasibility/boundaries of a follow on mission taking into account system, cost, programmatic and schedule aspects. An additional goal of the study is to work out some improvement in terms of temporal and spatial resolution, based on lessons learned from GRACE and based on further developed state of the art technology. These results will form the basis for further discussions with potential national and international partners in 2009. The presentation will focus on the main targets of the study.

  5. New Views of Earth's Gravity Field from GRACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Map 1Map 2

    Gravity and the Earth's Shape Gravity is the force that is responsible for the weight of an object and is determined by how the material that makes up the Earth is distributed throughout the Earth. Because gravity changes over the surface of the Earth, the weight of an object changes along with it. One can define standard gravity as the value of gravity for an perfectly smooth 'idealized' Earth, and the gravity 'anomaly' is a measure of how actual gravity deviates from this standard. Gravity reflects the Earth's surface topography to a high degree and is associated with features that most people are familiar with such as large mountains and deep ocean trenches.

    Progress in Measuring the Earth's Gravity Field Through GRACE Prior to GRACE, the Earth's gravity field was determined using measurements of varying quality from different satellites and of incomplete coverage. Consequently the accuracy and resolution of the gravity field were limited. As is shown in Figure 1, the long wavelength components of the gravity field determined from satellite tracking were limited to a resolution of approximately 700 km. At shorter wavelengths, the errors were too large to be useful. Only broad geophysical features of the Earth's structure could be detected (see map 1).

    In contrast, GRACE, by itself, has provided accurate gravity information with a resolution of 200 km. Now, much more detail is clearly evident in the Earth's geophysical features (see map 2). High resolution features detected by GRACE that are representative of geophysical phenomena include the Tonga/Kermadec region (a zone where one tectonic plate slides under another), the Himalayan/Tibetan Plateau region (an area of uplift due to colliding plates), and the mid-Atlantic ridge (an active spreading center in the middle of the Atlantic ocean where new crust is being created). Future GRACE gravity

  6. The Current Status and Future Prospects for the GRACE Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapley, Byron; Flechtner, Frank; Watkins, Michael; Bettadpur, Srinivas; Boening, Carmen

    2016-04-01

    The twin satellites of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) were launched on March 17, 2002 and have operated for over 13 years. The mission objectives are to sense the spatial and temporal variations of the Earth's mass through its effects on the gravity field at the GRACE satellite altitude. The major cause of the time varying mass is water motion and the GRACE mission has provided a continuous decade long measurement sequences which characterizes the seasonal cycle of mass transport between the oceans, land, cryosphere and atmosphere; its inter-annual variability; and the climate driven secular, or long period, mass transport signals. In 2012, the RLO5 solution, based on a complete reanalysis of the mission data, data release, was initiated. The monthly solutions from this effort were released in mid-2013 with the mean fields following in 2014 and 2015. The mission is entering the final phases of operations. The current mission operations strategy emphasizes extending the mission lifetime to achieve mission overlap with the GRACE Follow On Mission. This presentation will review the mission status and the projections for mission lifetime, summarize plans for the RL 06 data re-analysis, describe the issues that influence the operations philosophy and discuss the impact the operations may have on the scientific data products.

  7. Analysis of water level variations in Brazilian basins using GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, A.; Blitzkow, D.; Almeida, F.; Costa, S.; Campos, I.; Barbosa, A.

    2012-01-01

    A comparison between daily in-situ water level time series measured at ground-based hydrometric stations (HS - 1,899 stations located in twelve Brazilian basins) of the Agência Nacional de Águas (ANA) with vertically-integrated water height anomaly deduced from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) geoid is carried out in Brazil. The equivalent water height (EWH) of 10-day intervals of GRACE models were computed by GRGS/CNES. It is a 6-year analysis (July-2002 to May-2008). The coefficient of determination is computed between the ANA water level and GRACE EWH. Values higher than 0.6 were detected in the following basins: Amazon, north of Paraguay, Tocantins-Araguaia, Western North-East Atlantic and north of the Parnaíba. In the Uruguay (Pampas region) and the west of São Francisco basins, the coefficient of determination is around 0.5 and 0.6. These results were adjusted with a linear transfer function and two second degree polynomials (flood and ebb period) between GRACE EWH and ANA water level. The behavior of these two polynomials is related to the phase difference of the two time series and yielded four different types of responses. This paper shows seven ANA stations that represent these responses and relates them with their hydro-geological domain.

  8. Saving Grace - A Climate Change Documentary Education Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, J. M.; McDaniel, S.; Graham, J.; Little, L.; Hoggan, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    Saving Grace conveys climate change knowledge from the best international scientists and social scientists using a series of new media formats. An Education and Communication Plan (ECP) has been developed to disseminate climate change knowledge on impacts, mitigation and adaptation for individuals, and for all sectors of society. The research team is seeking contacts with science and social science colleagues around the world to provide the knowledge base for the ECP. Poverty enslaves…and climate change has, and will, spread and deepen poverty to hundreds of millions of people, primarily in the developing world. And make no mistake; we are enslaving hundreds of millions of people in a depressing and debilitating poverty that in numbers will far surpass the horrors of the slave trade of past centuries. Saving Grace is the story of that poverty - and minimizing that poverty. Saving Grace stars the best of the world's climate researchers. Saving Grace presents the science; who, where and why of greenhouse gases that drive climate change; current and projected impacts of a changing climate around the world; and most important, solutions to the climate change challenges we face.

  9. "Amazing Grace": Literature as a Window on Colonial Slavery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basker, James G.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the book, "Amazing Grace: An Anthology of Poems about Slavery 1660-1810." Presents poems, written by 250 writers, that focus on slavery during the 150 year period. Provides examples of materials included in this book and how it can enable students to increase their understanding of slavery. (CMK)

  10. Attention, Asceticism, and Grace: Simone Weil and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The work of the French thinker Simone Weil has exerted an important influence on scholars in a wide range of fields. To date, however, her writings have attracted comparatively little interest from educationists. This article discusses some of the key concepts in Weil's philosophy--gravity, grace, decreation, and attention--and assesses their…

  11. GRACE: Providing A New View of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    With the launch of GRACE in 2002, we were for the first time able to view the Earth's time-variable mass distribution - providing a truly unique window into a a large number of key processes within the Earth system, many of which are difficult to fully observe in any other way. These processes range from polar ice sheet dynamics and mass balance, hydrological processes including deep aquifers, ocean mass transport, glacial isostatic adjustment, and even large earthquakes. GRACE has provided data that is not only critically valuable on its own, but also as an excellent complement to ocean altimetry, radar, and soil moisture measuements to more fully characterize these complex processes. The value of this data led to the development of the GRACE Follow-On mission, set to launch in 2017. In this talk, we will review the history of gravity mapping from space, the realization of the value of measuring time variable gravity vs the static mean field, the future technologies in this field, and the inextricable linkage between GRACE and other geodetic techniques. We will also highlight the key science findings of the mission.

  12. GRACE and the development of an education and training curriculum.

    PubMed

    Finch, R G; Blasi, F B; Verheij, T J M; Goossens, H; Coenen, S; Loens, K; Rohde, G; Saenz, H; Akova, M

    2012-09-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a serious threat and compromises the management of infectious disease. This has particular significance in relation to infections of the respiratory tract, which are the lead cause of antibiotic prescribing. Education is fundamental to the correct use of antibiotics. A novel open access curriculum has been developed in the context of a European Union funded research project Genomics to combat Resistance against Antibiotics in Community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections in Europe (GRACE http://www.grace-lrti.org). The curriculum was developed in modular format and populated with clinical and scientific topics relevant to community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections. This curriculum informed the content of a series of postgraduate courses and workshops and permitted the creation of an open access e-Learning portal. A total of 153 presentations matching the topics within the curriculum together with slide material and handouts and 104 webcasts are available through the GRACE e-Learning portal, which is fully searchable using a 'mindmap' to navigate the contents. Metrics of access provided a means for assessing usage. The GRACE project has permitted the development of a unique on-line open access curriculum that comprehensively addresses the issues relevant to community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections and has provided a resource not only for personal learning, but also to support independent teaching activities such as lectures, workshops, seminars and course work.

  13. GRACE Gravity Field Product Description and Mission Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettadpur, S.; Flechtner, F.; Watkins, M. M.

    2003-12-01

    A time sequence of approximately monthly estimates of the Earth's gravity field, derived from the Gravity Recovery And Climate Mission (GRACE) science data, have been recently made available to the user community. In addition to these monthly estimates, a long-term mean gravity field has also been made available. These gravity field products are generated by the GRACE Science Data System team elements at the UT-CSR, Jet Propulsion Laboratory and at GFZ-Potsdam. In this presentation, we briefly describe the gravity field processing standards and methodology in use at UT-CSR. The traditional linearized least-squares implementation of gravity field determination from GRACE tracking data is reviewed with particular attention the to a-priori gravitational force models in use. The evolution of GRACE mission since its launch in March 2002 is then discussed. The main mission events, and the flight dynamic profile (pointing, inter-satellite separation, ground-track evolution, etc) are presented - with the purpose of aiding the interpretation and assessment of the gravity field product quality. The presentation closes with the description of the likely future evolution of the flight profile.

  14. Reducing errors in the GRACE gravity solutions using regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Save, Himanshu; Bettadpur, Srinivas; Tapley, Byron D.

    2012-09-01

    The nature of the gravity field inverse problem amplifies the noise in the GRACE data, which creeps into the mid and high degree and order harmonic coefficients of the Earth's monthly gravity fields provided by GRACE. Due to the use of imperfect background models and data noise, these errors are manifested as north-south striping in the monthly global maps of equivalent water heights. In order to reduce these errors, this study investigates the use of the L-curve method with Tikhonov regularization. L-curve is a popular aid for determining a suitable value of the regularization parameter when solving linear discrete ill-posed problems using Tikhonov regularization. However, the computational effort required to determine the L-curve is prohibitively high for a large-scale problem like GRACE. This study implements a parameter-choice method, using Lanczos bidiagonalization which is a computationally inexpensive approximation to L-curve. Lanczos bidiagonalization is implemented with orthogonal transformation in a parallel computing environment and projects a large estimation problem on a problem of the size of about 2 orders of magnitude smaller for computing the regularization parameter. Errors in the GRACE solution time series have certain characteristics that vary depending on the ground track coverage of the solutions. These errors increase with increasing degree and order. In addition, certain resonant and near-resonant harmonic coefficients have higher errors as compared with the other coefficients. Using the knowledge of these characteristics, this study designs a regularization matrix that provides a constraint on the geopotential coefficients as a function of its degree and order. This regularization matrix is then used to compute the appropriate regularization parameter for each monthly solution. A 7-year time-series of the candidate regularized solutions (Mar 2003-Feb 2010) show markedly reduced error stripes compared with the unconstrained GRACE release 4

  15. Improved Uncertainty Quantification in Groundwater Flux Estimation Using GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reager, J. T., II; Rao, P.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Turmon, M.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater change is difficult to monitor over large scales. One of the most successful approaches is in the remote sensing of time-variable gravity using NASA Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission data, and successful case studies have created the opportunity to move towards a global groundwater monitoring framework for the world's largest aquifers. To achieve these estimates, several approximations are applied, including those in GRACE processing corrections, the formulation of the formal GRACE errors, destriping and signal recovery, and the numerical model estimation of snow water, surface water and soil moisture storage states used to isolate a groundwater component. A major weakness in these approaches is inconsistency: different studies have used different sources of primary and ancillary data, and may achieve different results based on alternative choices in these approximations. In this study, we present two cases of groundwater change estimation in California and the Colorado River basin, selected for their good data availability and varied climates. We achieve a robust numerical estimate of post-processing uncertainties resulting from land-surface model structural shortcomings and model resolution errors. Groundwater variations should demonstrate less variability than the overlying soil moisture state does, as groundwater has a longer memory of past events due to buffering by infiltration and drainage rate limits. We apply a model ensemble approach in a Bayesian framework constrained by the assumption of decreasing signal variability with depth in the soil column. We also discuss time variable errors vs. time constant errors, across-scale errors v. across-model errors, and error spectral content (across scales and across model). More robust uncertainty quantification for GRACE-based groundwater estimates would take all of these issues into account, allowing for more fair use in management applications and for better integration of GRACE

  16. Does GRACE see the terrestrial water cycle "intensifying"?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eicker, Annette; Forootan, Ehsan; Springer, Anne; Longuevergne, Laurent; Kusche, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Several researchers have postulated that, under a changing climate due to anthropogenic forcing, an intensification of the water cycle is already under way. This is usually related to increases in hydrological fluxes as precipitation (P), evapotranspiration (E), and river discharge (R). It is under debate, however, whether such observed or reconstructed flux changes are real and on what scales. Large-scale increase or decrease of the flux deficit (P-E-R), i.e., flux changes that do not compensate, would lead to acceleration or deceleration of water storage anomalies potentially visible in Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data. In agreement with earlier studies, we do find such accelerations in global maps of gridded GRACE water storage anomalies over 2003-2012. However, these have been generally associated with interannual and decadal climate variability. Yet we show that even after carefully isolating and removing the contribution of El Niño that partially masks long-term changes, using a new method, accelerations of up to 12 mm/yr2 remain in regions such as Australia, Turkey, and Northern India. We repeat our analysis with flux fields from two global atmospheric reanalyses that include land surface models (ERA-Interim and MERRA-Land). While agreeing well with GRACE on shorter time scales, they fall short in displaying long-term trends corresponding to GRACE accelerations. We hypothesize that this may be due to time-varying biases in the reanalysis fluxes as noticed in other studies. We conclude that even though its data record is short, GRACE provides new information that should be used to constrain future reanalyses toward a better representation of long-term water cycle evolution.

  17. Reconstruction of Greenland and Antarctica Mass Changes Prior to the GRACE Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerem, R. Steven; Talpe, Matthieu; Pilinski, Emily; Lemoine, Frank G.; Chinn, Douglas S.

    2013-04-01

    Low order coefficients of the gravity field can be determined using conventional satellite tracking data such satellite laser ranging (SLR) and DORIS, a method that extends the gravitational data record across multiple decades. More recently, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission has contributed monthly solutions of the gravity field to degree and order 60, which have led to fundamental advances in our knowledge of changes in the distribution of water across the planet. In particular, GRACE has provided new insight into mass changes in Greenland and Antarctica. The objective of this work is to extend mass change data beyond the ten years of the GRACE mission using SLR data that both predates the GRACE mission and is expected to continue beyond it. This work uses a technique to fuse the two data sets by applying empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis to the GRACE data to isolate the temporal variability and spatial maps associated with the critical modes of mass change. The EOF modes are then reconstructed using the conventional tracking data allowing for a comparison of reconstructed EOF modes and GRACE data products. We will show results from reconstructing Greenland and Antarctica mass changes during the GRACE mission (to validate the technique) as well as prior to the launch of the GRACE mission in 2002. The technique also has important implications for bridging potential gaps between the GRACE and GRACE Follow On missions.

  18. Synergies Between Grace and Regional Atmospheric Modeling Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusche, J.; Springer, A.; Ohlwein, C.; Hartung, K.; Longuevergne, L.; Kollet, S. J.; Keune, J.; Dobslaw, H.; Forootan, E.; Eicker, A.

    2014-12-01

    In the meteorological community, efforts converge towards implementation of high-resolution (< 12km) data-assimilating regional climate modelling/monitoring systems based on numerical weather prediction (NWP) cores. This is driven by requirements of improving process understanding, better representation of land surface interactions, atmospheric convection, orographic effects, and better forecasting on shorter timescales. This is relevant for the GRACE community since (1) these models may provide improved atmospheric mass separation / de-aliasing and smaller topography-induced errors, compared to global (ECMWF-Op, ERA-Interim) data, (2) they inherit high temporal resolution from NWP models, (3) parallel efforts towards improving the land surface component and coupling groundwater models; this may provide realistic hydrological mass estimates with sub-diurnal resolution, (4) parallel efforts towards re-analyses, with the aim of providing consistent time series. (5) On the other hand, GRACE can help validating models and aids in the identification of processes needing improvement. A coupled atmosphere - land surface - groundwater modelling system is currently being implemented for the European CORDEX region at 12.5 km resolution, based on the TerrSysMP platform (COSMO-EU NWP, CLM land surface and ParFlow groundwater models). We report results from Springer et al. (J. Hydromet., accept.) on validating the water cycle in COSMO-EU using GRACE and precipitation, evapotranspiration and runoff data; confirming that the model does favorably at representing observations. We show that after GRACE-derived bias correction, basin-average hydrological conditions prior to 2002 can be reconstructed better than before. Next, comparing GRACE with CLM forced by EURO-CORDEX simulations allows identifying processes needing improvement in the model. Finally, we compare COSMO-EU atmospheric pressure, a proxy for mass corrections in satellite gravimetry, with ERA-Interim over Europe at

  19. The role of accelerometer data calibration within GRACE gravity field recovery: Results from ITSG-Grace2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, Beate; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten

    2016-11-01

    For more than 14 years, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission has provided information about Earth's gravity field with unprecedented accuracy. The twin satellites GRACE-A and GRACE-B are both equipped with a three-axis electrostatic accelerometer, measuring the non-gravitational forces acting on the spacecraft. In order to make use of the uncalibrated Level-1B accelerometer (ACC1B) data during gravity field recovery, bias and scale parameters have to be estimated. The proposed calibration method is a two-step approach and makes use of modeled non-conservative accelerations. The simulated non-conservative accelerations serve as reference for the a priori accelerometer calibration, i.e. for the ACC1B data. During gravity field recovery the calibration parameters are re-estimated. Several calibration parameters for the GRACE accelerometers using different methods have already been published. The aim of our study was primarily to analyze the temperature-dependent behavior of the accelerometer scale factors and biases, and the impact of the parametrization of scale factors and biases on the recovered gravity field solutions; but not to obtain calibrated accelerometer data. Within the ITSG-Grace2016 release, the accelerometer biases are estimated daily using uniform cubic basis splines (UCBS), the scale factors are also estimated daily using a fully-populated scale factor matrix. Therefore, not only the scale factors in along-track, cross-track, and radial direction are estimated, but also the non-orthogonality of the accelerometer axes (cross-talk) and the misalignment between the Accelerometer Frame (AF) and Science Reference Frame (SRF) are taken into account. The time evolution of the estimated calibration parameters over the whole GRACE period (2002-04 to 2016-01) shows a clear temperature-dependency for both scale factors and biases. Using this new approach, the estimates of the C20 coefficient significantly improve, with results now

  20. Status of the GRACE Follow-On Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Michael; Flechtner, Frank; Morton, Phil; Massmann, Franz-Heinrich; Gaston, Rob; Grunwaldt, Ludwig

    2015-04-01

    GRACE Follow-On, a joint US/German satellite mission to extend the critical global mass flux data records from the GRACE mission, continues to mature and advance on both sides of the Atlantic. In January 2014 the Preliminary Design Review (PDR) was conducted, and transition into phase C was accomplished in March 2014. The project Critical Design Review (CDR) is scheduled for February 2015. The current launch date remains August 2017. The presentation will focus on the project status after the CDR of major spacecraft systems, science payloads (microwave ranging system, GNSS receiver, and accelerometer), a demonstration payload (laser ranging interferometer), mission operations, launch services and the science data system. In addition, since we now have more mature predictions of the spacecraft and instrument expected performance, we have continued to update the expected science performance via detailed colored noise simulations.

  1. The GRACE Follow-On Laser Ranging Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Vitali

    2016-07-01

    The GRACE Follow-On mission consists of a pair of satellites to be launched in 2017 into a low-Earth polar orbit. As the precursor mission GRACE, it will provide monthly global maps of Earth's gravity field to study mass changes within the System Earth, like glacier melting or ground-water depletion. The new mission will be equipped with two ranging instruments: a conventional Microwave Ranging Instrument, as already present in the precursor mission, and with a Laser Ranging Interferometer (LRI). Latter acts as a technical demonstrator, which will show the capability for enhanced sensitivity and additional precise attitude information of this new technology. The satellite and in particular the LRI working principle will be introduced together with observables and major noise and error contributors. Furthermore potential modifications and extensions for future gravimetric missions are addressed as well as applications in space-based gravitational wave detectors (i.e. eLISA).

  2. Further assessments of CSR RL04 GRACE gravity field solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettadpur, S.; CSR Level-2 Team

    2007-12-01

    The GRACE Release-04 gravity field data products from UTCSR are considerably improved compared to the previously available Release-01 products. This improvement has been realized through improvements in background gravity models as well as algorithmic changes in the GRACE data processing. These improved products have been available to the user community since late Feb 2007. The interpretation of RL-04 products is slightly different when compared to RL-01. Besides the improvement in quality, a different set of background gravity field models have been applied to the data before the RL-04 products were created. This leads to a potential change in the way these products must be interpreted. The paper will summarize the feedback received from the user community on the applications of these new data products. The error estimates of the RL-04 fields and their effect on interpretation will be presented. A brief review of future directions for product improvement will be provided, as well.

  3. Analysis of Terrestrial Water Storage Changes from GRACE and GLDAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, Tajdarul H.; Famiglietti, James S.; Rodell, Matthew; Chen, Jianli; Wilson, Clark R.

    2008-01-01

    Since March 2002, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) has provided first estimates of land water storage variations by monitoring the time-variable component of Earth's gravity field. Here we characterize spatial-temporal variations in terrestrial water storage changes (TWSC) from GRACE and compare them to those simulated with the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS). Additionally, we use GLDAS simulations to infer how TWSC is partitioned into snow, canopy water and soil water components, and to understand how variations in the hydrologic fluxes act to enhance or dissipate the stores. Results quantify the range of GRACE-derived storage changes during the studied period and place them in the context of seasonal variations in global climate and hydrologic extremes including drought and flood, by impacting land memory processes. The role of the largest continental river basins as major locations for freshwater redistribution is highlighted. GRACE-based storage changes are in good agreement with those obtained from GLDAS simulations. Analysis of GLDAS-simulated TWSC illustrates several key characteristics of spatial and temporal land water storage variations. Global averages of TWSC were partitioned nearly equally between soil moisture and snow water equivalent, while zonal averages of TWSC revealed the importance of soil moisture storage at low latitudes and snow storage at high latitudes. Evapotranspiration plays a key role in dissipating globally averaged terrestrial water storage. Latitudinal averages showed how precipitation dominates TWSC variations in the tropics, evapotranspiration is most effective in the midlatitudes, and snowmelt runoff is a key dissipating flux at high latitudes. Results have implications for monitoring water storage response to climate variability and change, and for constraining land model hydrology simulations.

  4. Analysis of terrestrial water storage changes from GRACE and GLDAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed, Tajdarul H.; Famiglietti, James S.; Rodell, Matthew; Chen, Jianli; Wilson, Clark R.

    2008-02-01

    Since March 2002, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) has provided first estimates of land water storage variations by monitoring the time-variable component of Earth's gravity field. Here we characterize spatial-temporal variations in terrestrial water storage changes (TWSC) from GRACE and compare them to those simulated with the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS). Additionally, we use GLDAS simulations to infer how TWSC is partitioned into snow, canopy water and soil water components, and to understand how variations in the hydrologic fluxes act to enhance or dissipate the stores. Results quantify the range of GRACE-derived storage changes during the studied period and place them in the context of seasonal variations in global climate and hydrologic extremes including drought and flood, by impacting land memory processes. The role of the largest continental river basins as major locations for freshwater redistribution is highlighted. GRACE-based storage changes are in good agreement with those obtained from GLDAS simulations. Analysis of GLDAS-simulated TWSC illustrates several key characteristics of spatial and temporal land water storage variations. Global averages of TWSC were partitioned nearly equally between soil moisture and snow water equivalent, while zonal averages of TWSC revealed the importance of soil moisture storage at low latitudes and snow storage at high latitudes. Evapotranspiration plays a key role in dissipating globally averaged terrestrial water storage. Latitudinal averages showed how precipitation dominates TWSC variations in the tropics, evapotranspiration is most effective in the midlatitudes, and snowmelt runoff is a key dissipating flux at high latitudes. Results have implications for monitoring water storage response to climate variability and change, and for constraining land model hydrology simulations.

  5. Graceful exit via polymerization of pre-big-bang cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    De Risi, Giuseppe; Maartens, Roy; Singh, Parampreet

    2007-11-15

    We consider a phenomenological modification of the pre-big-bang scenario using ideas from the resolution of curvature singularities in loop quantum cosmology. We show that nonperturbative loop modifications to the dynamics, arising from the underlying polymer representation, can resolve the graceful exit problem. The curvature and the dilaton energy stay finite at all times, in both the string and Einstein frames. In the string frame, the dilaton tends to a constant value at late times after the bounce.

  6. Using GRACE as an Orbiting Fiducial Laboratory for GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, B. J.; Bar-Sever, Y. E.; Bertiger, W.; Byun, S.; Desai, S. D.; Hajj, G.

    2006-12-01

    Uncertainties in the phase-center variations (PCV) of the GPS transmitter antennas are among the limiting sources of error in GPS-based global geodesy. We have used data from the BlackJack GPS receivers onboard the twin GRACE satellites to develop new estimates of GPS satellite antenna PCV. The estimates are expressed as tracking observable (distance) corrections mapped in two dimensions (nadir angle and azimuth). We have developed maps for both ionosphere-free carrier phase (LC) and pseudorange (PC). The GRACE tandem mission offers a number of substantial advantages for developing GPS PCV maps. The scale (mean height) of our GRACE orbit solutions is well determined at the cm level from dynamical constraints, and there is no troposphere signal to confound interpretation of the measurements. The multipath environment is also very favorable. We discuss our strategy for determining the GPS satellite PCV estimates from these data, and describe evaluations of the estimates using independent GPS data from both the TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P; 1992--2005) and Jason-1 (2001 - ) missions. A heretofore unexplained 5--6 cm offset in the solved-for position of the T/P receiver antenna is reduced to less than 1 cm by applying the GRACE-based GPS PCV maps. The corresponding offset for Jason-1 is similarly decreased. Equally important, a spurious long-term (4-yr) drift in the daily estimated Jason-1 offsets is significantly reduced. These results hint at the potential benefits of these new GPS antenna PCV maps for wide-ranging geodetic applications wherein scale and long-term stability are important.

  7. Grace's story: prolonged incestuous abuse from childhood into adulthood.

    PubMed

    Salter, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Some sexually abused women in mental health settings are reporting prolonged incest and yet little is known about the circumstances that enable fathers to sexually abuse their daughters over a period of decades. This article draws from the life history of Grace, a woman who survived prolonged incest, in order to document and analyze the interplay of familial, social, and political factors that entrap girls and women within prolonged incestuous abuse.

  8. Greenland's mass balance observed by GRACE between 2003-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wouters, B.; Schrama, E.

    2009-04-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites have been providing the scientific community with a quasi-continuous record of the Earth's gravity field over the last 6 years. Due to its global coverage, it offers an excellent tool to study mass changes over large regions. Among others, GRACE has lead to a leap in our understanding of the mass balance of Greenland ice sheet, which was indirectly known until a few years ago. In this presentation, we demonstrate how the GRACE observations can be used to monitor changes in Greenland's mass distribution on a regional scale. Over the period of 2003-2008, the ice sheet lost annually approximately 210 cubic kilometers of ice on average, contributing 0.5 mm per year to global mean sea level. According to (Rignot,2008) this value is unprecedented in the last 50 years suggesting a significant impact of global warming on the Greenland's ice volume. A forward modeling technique significantly helps to identify the hydrologic basins where the melt occurs. As a result we now know from the GRACE data that the main melting signal occurs during summer along the southeastern coast, although spreading to the northwest, with most pronounced changes so far occurring in 2007. Although 2008 was not a record year in terms of total mass lost, it may be called exceptional in terms of the spatial pattern of the summer losses, which mainly took place in the high North, consistent with surface melt observations and regional climate model results. Largest mass losses are observed in the regions surroundig the Humboldt Glacier and Zachariae Isstrom, two glaciers that have been reported to have retreated significantly in 2008.

  9. Validation of the EGSIEM combined monthly GRACE gravity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhao; van Dam, Tonie; Chen, Qiang; Weigelt, Matthias; Güntner, Andreas; Jäggi, Adrian; Meyer, Ulrich; Jean, Yoomin; Altamimi, Zuheir; Rebischung, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Observations indicate that global warming is affecting the water cycle. Here in Europe predictions are for more frequent high precipitation events, wetter winters, and longer and dryer summers. The consequences of these changes include the decreasing availability of fresh water resources in some regions as well as flooding and erosion of coastal and low-lying areas in other regions. These weather related effects impose heavy costs on society and the economy. We cannot stop the immediate effects global warming on the water cycle. But there may be measures that we can take to mitigate the costs to society. The Horizon2020 supported project, European Gravity Service for Improved Emergency Management (EGSIEM), will add value to EO observations of variations in the Earth's gravity field. In particular, the EGSIEM project will interpret the observations of gravity field changes in terms of changes in continental water storage. The project team will develop tools to alert the public water storage conditions could indicate the onset of regional flooding or drought. As part of the EGSIEM project, a combined GRACE gravity product is generated, using various monthly GRACE solutions from associated processing centers (ACs). Since each AC follows a set of common processing standards but applies its own independent analysis method, the quality, robustness, and reliability of the monthly combined gravity fields should be significantly improved as compared to any individual solution. In this study, we present detailed and updated comparisons of the combined EGSIEM GRACE gravity product with GPS position time series, hydrological models, and existing GRACE gravity fields. The GPS residuals are latest REPRO2 station position residuals, obtained by rigorously stacking the IGS Repro 2 , daily solutions, estimating, and then restoring the annual and semi-annual signals.

  10. Application of GRACE for Monitoring Groundwater in Data Scarce Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, Matt; Li, Bailing; Famiglietti, Jay; Zaitchik, Ben

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, groundwater storage is somewhat well monitored (spatial and temporal data gaps notwithstanding) and abundant data are freely and easily accessible. Outside of the U.S., groundwater often is not monitored systematically and where it is the data are rarely centralized and made available. Since 2002 the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission has delivered gravity field observations which have been used to infer variations in total terrestrial water storage, including groundwater, at regional to continental scales. Challenges to using GRACE for groundwater monitoring include its relatively coarse spatial and temporal resolutions, its inability to differentiate groundwater from other types of water on and under the land surface, and typical 2-3 month data latency. Data assimilation can be used to overcome these challenges, but uncertainty in the results remains and is difficult to quantify without independent observations. Nevertheless, the results are preferable to the alternative - no data at all- and GRACE has already revealed groundwater variability and trends in regions where only anecdotal evidence existed previously.

  11. High-Resolution Analysis and Modeling of GRACE Accelerometer Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flury, J.; Bettadpur, S.; Tapley, B. D.

    2007-12-01

    A better understanding and modeling of high-resolution GRACE accelerometer data serves three purposes: (1) to ensure that the best possible data are used in the GRACE gravity field processing, (2) to obtain precise and clean non-gravitational accelerations for aeronomy research, and (3) to understand and quantify disturbances which may play a role for future space-borne accelerometry. The external non-gravitational forces acting on the twin GRACE satellites are superimposed by a complex signal pattern of satellite-induced effects, originating from switching events in electrical circuits of on-board heaters and magnetic torquers, from vibrations and thruster accelerations. For each of these processes, we compared and averaged 10 Hz acceleration signals from a large number of events from long accelerometer time series. The analysis results provide constraints, e.g., on thrust accuracy, misalignments, and vibration frequencies. These constraints may help to understand the underlying physics. We modeled and reduced acceleration signals due to thrusters and heater switching and obtained considerably smoother and cleaner signals of external non-gravitational accelerations which may be useful for applications in aeronomy research.

  12. An evaluation of GRACE groundwater estimates over East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanteza, J.; Thomas, B. F.; de Linage, C.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    The East African (EA) region, comprised of five countries (Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Rwanda and Burundi), is among those regions characterized as vulnerable to water stress. The region's freshwater resources, both surface and groundwater, are impacted due to increased pressure from changes in climate and human activities. Better management approaches are required to ensure that these pressures do not significantly impact water availability and accessibility. However, the lack of adequate ground-based observation networks to monitor freshwater resources - especially groundwater (the major source of freshwater in EA), limits effective management of the available water resources. In this study, we explore the potential of using remotely sensed data to monitor freshwater resources over EA. The study uses data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite to estimate groundwater storage variations over EA during the last decade. The satellite's performance in accurately observing changes in groundwater storage is examined by evaluating the GRACE groundwater estimates against spatially interpolated in-situ groundwater observations using goodness of fit criteria including linear regression coefficient, coefficient of determination and root mean square errors. The results demonstrate that GRACE performs well in observing the behavior of groundwater storage. These results can be useful in improving land surface model simulations - a basis for better decision making in water resources management in the region.

  13. Identifying water mass depletion in northern Iraq observed by GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, G.; Olsthoorn, T. N.; Al-Manmi, D. A. M. A.; Schrama, E. J. O.; Smidt, E. H.

    2015-03-01

    Observations acquired by Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission indicate a mass loss of 146 ± 6 mm equivalent water height (EWH) in northern Iraq between 2007 and 2009. These data are used as an independent validation of lake mass variations and a rainfall-runoff model, which is based on local geology and climate conditions. Model inputs are precipitation from Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) observations, and climatic parameters from Global Land Data Assimilation Systems (GLDAS) model parameters. The model is calibrated with observed river discharge and includes a representation of the karstified aquifers in the region to improve model realism. Lake mass variations were derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) in combination with satellite altimetry and some in situ data. Our rainfall-runoff model confirms that northern Iraq suffered a drought between 2007 and 2009 and captures the annual cycle and longer trend of the observed GRACE data. The total mass depletion seen by GRACE between 2007 and 2009 is mainly explained by a lake mass depletion of 75 ± 3 mm EWH and a natural groundwater depletion of 39 ± 8 mm EWH. Our findings indicate that anthropogenic groundwater extraction has a minor influence in this region, while a decline in lake mass and natural depletion of groundwater play a key role.

  14. Time Variable Gravity from Local Mascon Analysis of GRACE Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank G.; Luthcke, Scott B.; Klosko, Steven M.; Rowlands, David; Chinn, Douglas S.; McCarthy, John J.; Cox, Christopher M.; Williams, Terry A.; Pavlis, Despina E.

    2004-01-01

    We have analyzed GRACE Level 1-B data in 2003 and assessed a new approach for extracting time variable gravity that isolates the gravity signal in both time and space. The Level-1B satellite-to-satellite range rate (KBRR) data and accelerometry are processed in daily arcs using the precise orbit products produced by the GRACE team from GPS to calibrate both the accelerometer and KBRR data. We then adjusted select components of the intersatellite baseline vector for each data segment isolated to the region of interest. Herein, we solved for mass anomalies in 45 deg x 45 deg blocks over the Amazon and the nearby Atlantic Ocean and estimate mass flux in units of cm of water over each block. We show with this approach that we can recover mass anomalies on a submonthly basis with 10 to 15 day temporal resolution. We discuss the important issues related to this solution, including the size of the mascon blocks, the weight given to the temporal and spatial constraint used to stabalize the solutions, as well as the optimal correlation in time and distance. We compare the the mascon results with solutions obtained from the more standard approach using spherical harmonics and with independent hydrology models and lake data. This technique demonstrates that sub-monthly medium wavelength mass flux phenomena are well sensed by the hyper-precise line of sight velocity data produced from GRACE.

  15. California Drought Recovery Assessment Using GRACE Satellite Gravimetry Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, C. A.; Aghakouchak, A.; Madadgar, S.; Tourian, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    California has been experiencing its most extreme drought in recent history due to a combination of record high temperatures and exceptionally low precipitation. An estimate for when the drought can be expected to end is needed for risk mitigation and water management. A crucial component of drought recovery assessments is the estimation of terrestrial water storage (TWS) deficit. Previous studies on drought recovery have been limited to surface water hydrology (precipitation and/or runoff) for estimating changes in TWS, neglecting the contribution of groundwater deficits to the recovery time of the system. Groundwater requires more time to recover than surface water storage; therefore, the inclusion of groundwater storage in drought recovery assessments is essential for understanding the long-term vulnerability of a region. Here we assess the probability, for varying timescales, of California's current TWS deficit returning to its long-term historical mean. Our method consists of deriving the region's fluctuations in TWS from changes in the gravity field observed by NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites. We estimate the probability that meteorological inputs, precipitation minus evaporation and runoff, over different timespans will balance the current GRACE-derived TWS deficit (e.g. in 3, 6, 12 months). This method improves upon previous techniques as the GRACE-derived water deficit comprises all hydrologic sources, including surface water, groundwater, and snow cover. With this empirical probability assessment we expect to improve current estimates of California's drought recovery time, thereby improving risk mitigation.

  16. Constraints of Melting, Sea-Level and the Paleoclimate from GRACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, James L.

    2005-01-01

    To gauge the accuracy of the GRACE data, we have undertaken a study to compare deformations predicted by GRACE inferences of seasonal water loading to crustal position variations determined from GRACE data. Two manuscripts that resulted from this study are attached. We found a very high correlation between the GRACE and GPS determinations for South America [Duvis et al., 2004]. We also developed a statistical approach for choosing which Stokes coefficients to include. This approach proves to be somewhat more accurate than the traditional Gaussian filter [Duvis et al., 2005].

  17. Innovative analysis constraints in the ANU GRACE mascon solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tregoning, P.; McClusky, S.; Purcell, A.; Lescarmontier, L.

    2013-12-01

    The GRACE products used by many scientists to study mass changes on and within the surface of the Earth are typically in the form of spherical harmonics. We have developed new software that processes the Level-1B data of the GRACE mission to derive estimates of mass changes using the 'mascons' (mass concentration) approach. We have taken a fresh look at the Level-1B observations and the way in which the observations contribute to the estimation of the temporal gravity field and will present several new ideas of ways in which the processing of the observations can be improved. We include in our analysis a multi-tiered definition of the shape of each mascon which enables a more accurate computation of the effect of mass changes on the satellite orbits as well as irregular-shaped mascons to be used. We use a topography model of the Earth's surface to define more accurately the spatial relation between the location of mass change and the GRACE satellites, which can affect the mass change estimates by 5-10%. From an understanding of what forces are acting upon the GRACE satellites while in the shadow of the Earth, it is possible to place constraints on the values of the calibrated accelerometer observations during this time in the cross-track and radial directions. We have derived corresponding constraint equations that we apply during eclipse periods to aid in the estimation of accelerometer bias estimates. It is well known that the regular thrust events designed to maintain the orientation of the GRACE satellites do generate some linear component of acceleration that is detected by the onboard accelerometers. Once filtered in the process of generating the Level-1B accelerometer observations, these short-period square-pulse thrusts are smeared over tens of seconds. We derived a model to remove the filtered linear accelerations from thruster firings found in the accelerometer observations then insert square thrust pulses that better reflects the actual forces that acted

  18. The instrument on NASA's GRACE Mission: Augmentation of GPS to achieve unprecedented gravity field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, C.; Bertiger, W.; Franklin, G.; Harris, I.; Kruizinga, G.; Meehan, T.; Nandi, S.; Nguyen, D.; Rogstad, T.; Thomas, J. B.; Tien, J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper will describe the design and on-orbit performance of the GRACE Instrument Processing Unit (IPU) that integrates most of the critical science functions required by the GRACE mission to perform its gravity science and atmospheric radio occultation tasks.

  19. Remote Sensing of Terrestrial Water Storage with GRACE and Future Satellite Gravimetry Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodell, M.; Watkins, M. M.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) has demonstrated that satellite gravimetry can be a valuable tool for regional to global water cycle observation. Studies of ice sheet and glacier mass losses, ocean bottom pressure and circulation, and variability of water stored on and in the land including groundwater all have benefited from GRACE observations, and the list of applications and discoveries continues to grow. As the mission approaches its tenth anniversary of launch on March 12, 2012, it has nearly doubled its proposed lifetime but is showing some signs of age. In particular, degraded battery capacity limits the availability of power in certain orbital configurations, so that the accelerometers must be turned off for approximately one month out of six. The mission managers have decided to operate the spacecrafts in a manner that maximizes the remaining lifetime, so that the longest possible climate data record is available from GRACE. Nevertheless, it is not unlikely that there will be a data gap between GRACE and the GRACE Follow On mission, currently proposed for launch in 2016. In this presentation we will describe recent GRACE enabled science, GRACE mission health, and plans for GRACE Follow On and other future satellite gravimetry missions.

  20. 29 CFR 779.418 - Grace period for computing portion of compensation representing commissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Grace period for computing portion of compensation... § 779.418 Grace period for computing portion of compensation representing commissions. Where it is not practicably possible for the employer to compute the commission earnings of the employee for all...

  1. 29 CFR 779.418 - Grace period for computing portion of compensation representing commissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Grace period for computing portion of compensation... § 779.418 Grace period for computing portion of compensation representing commissions. Where it is not practicably possible for the employer to compute the commission earnings of the employee for all...

  2. Remote Sensing of Terrestrial Water Storage with GRACE and Future Gravimetry Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, Matt; Watkins, Mike; Famiglietti, Jay

    2011-01-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) has demonstrated that satellite gravimetry can be a valuable tool for regional to global water cycle observation. Studies of ice sheet and glacier mass losses, ocean bottom pressure and circulation, and variability of water stored on and in the land including groundwater all have benefited from GRACE observations, and the list of applications and discoveries continues to grow. As the mission approaches its tenth anniversary of launch on March 12,2012, it has nearly doubled its proposed lifetime but is showing some signs of age. In particular, degraded battery capacity limits the availability of power in certain orbital configurations, so that the accelerometers must be turned off for approximately one month out of six. The mission managers have decided to operate the spacecrafts in a manner that maximizes the remaining lifetime, so that the longest possible climate data record is available from GRACE. Nevertheless, it is not unlikely that there will be a data gap between GRACE and the GRACE Follow On mission, currently proposed for launch in 2016. In this presentation we will describe recent GRACE enabled science, GRACE mission health, and plans for GRACE Follow On and other future satellite gravimetry missions.

  3. Magnetic torquer induced disturbing signals within GRACE accelerometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterseim, Nadja; Flury, Jakob; Schlicht, Anja

    2012-05-01

    The GRACE (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment) gravity field satellite mission was launched in 2002. Although many investigations have been carried out, not all disturbances and perturbations upon satellite instruments and sensors are resolved yet. In this work the issue of acceleration disturbances onboard of GRACE due to magnetic torquers is investigated and discussed. Each of the GRACE satellites is equipped with a three-axes capacitive accelerometer to measure non-gravitational forces acting on the spacecraft. We used 10 Hz Level 1a raw accelerometer data in order to determine the impact of electric current changes on the accelerometer. After reducing signals which are induced by highly dominating processes in the low frequency range, such as thermospheric drag and solar radiation pressure, which can easily be done by applying a high-pass filter, disturbing signals from onboard instruments such as thruster firing events or heater switch events need to be removed from the previously filtered data. Afterwards the spikes which are induced by the torquers can be very well observed. Spikes vary in amplitude with respect to an increasing or decreasing current used for magnetic torquers, and can be as large as 20 nm/s2. Furthermore, we were able to set up a model for the spikes of each scenario with which we were able to compute model spike time series. With these time series the spikes can successfully be removed from the 10 Hz raw accelerometer data. Spectral analysis of the time series reveal that an influence onto gravity field determination due to these effects is very unlikely, but can theoretically not be excluded.

  4. Test environments for the GRACE follow-on laser ranging interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görth, A.; Sanjuan, J.; Gohlke, M.; Rasch, S.; Abich, K.; Braxmaier, C.; Heinzel, G.

    2016-05-01

    In the year 2017 a follow-on mission to the very successful joint German/US mission GRACE (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment) will be launched. As of this day the two GRACE satellites have successfully been mapping the spatial and temporal varitations of the gravitational field of the Earth by satellite-to-satellite tracking for over a decade. The main science instrument on GRACE and its successor mission GRACE Follow-On which is used to measure the inter-satellite distance changes is a microwave link sensor. However, an additional instrument, the laser ranging interferometer (LRI), will be implemented into the architecture of the GRACE Follow-On satellites as a technology demonstrator. In this paper we will give a brief overview of a fiber-based test environment which is currently used during the assembly, integration and test of the LRI flight hardware.

  5. Complete mitogenome of the Graceful Shark Carcharhinus amblyrhynchoides (Carcharhiniformes: Carcharhinidae).

    PubMed

    Feutry, Pierre; Pillans, Richard D; Kyne, Peter M; Chen, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    In this manuscript we describe the first complete mitochondrial sequence for the Near Threatened Graceful Shark Carcharhinus amblyrhynchoides. It is 16,705 bp in length, consists of two rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes and one control region with the typical gene arrangement pattern and translate orientation in vertebrates. The overall base composition is 31.4% A, 25.1% C, 13.2% G and 30.3% T. The shortest tRNA-Ser2 cannot fold into a clover-leaf secondary structure due to the lack of the dihydrouridine arm. PMID:24617479

  6. Estimating signal loss in regularized GRACE gravity field solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, S. C.; Wahr, J. M.

    2011-05-01

    Gravity field solutions produced using data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission are subject to errors that increase as a function of increasing spatial resolution. Two commonly used techniques to improve the signal-to-noise ratio in the gravity field solutions are post-processing, via spectral filters, and regularization, which occurs within the least-squares inversion process used to create the solutions. One advantage of post-processing methods is the ability to easily estimate the signal loss resulting from the application of the spectral filter by applying the filter to synthetic gravity field coefficients derived from models of mass variation. This is a critical step in the construction of an accurate error budget. Estimating the amount of signal loss due to regularization, however, requires the execution of the full gravity field determination process to create synthetic instrument data; this leads to a significant cost in computation and expertise relative to post-processing techniques, and inhibits the rapid development of optimal regularization weighting schemes. Thus, while a number of studies have quantified the effects of spectral filtering, signal modification in regularized GRACE gravity field solutions has not yet been estimated. In this study, we examine the effect of one regularization method. First, we demonstrate that regularization can in fact be performed as a post-processing step if the solution covariance matrix is available. Regularization then is applied as a post-processing step to unconstrained solutions from the Center for Space Research (CSR), using weights reported by the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales/Groupe de Recherches de geodesie spatiale (CNES/GRGS). After regularization, the power spectra of the CSR solutions agree well with those of the CNES/GRGS solutions. Finally, regularization is performed on synthetic gravity field solutions derived from a land surface model, revealing that in

  7. Complete mitogenome of the Graceful Shark Carcharhinus amblyrhynchoides (Carcharhiniformes: Carcharhinidae).

    PubMed

    Feutry, Pierre; Pillans, Richard D; Kyne, Peter M; Chen, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    In this manuscript we describe the first complete mitochondrial sequence for the Near Threatened Graceful Shark Carcharhinus amblyrhynchoides. It is 16,705 bp in length, consists of two rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes and one control region with the typical gene arrangement pattern and translate orientation in vertebrates. The overall base composition is 31.4% A, 25.1% C, 13.2% G and 30.3% T. The shortest tRNA-Ser2 cannot fold into a clover-leaf secondary structure due to the lack of the dihydrouridine arm.

  8. Checkpointing for graceful degradation in distributed embedded systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sababha, Belal Hussein

    Graceful degradation is an approach to developing dependable safety-critical embedded applications, where redundant active or standby resources are used to cope with faults through a system reconfiguration at run-time. Compared to traditional hardware and software redundancy, it is a promising technique that may achieve dependability with a significant reduction in cost, size, weight, and power requirements. Reconfiguration at run-time necessitates using proper checkpointing protocols to support state reservation to ensure correct task restarts after a system reconfiguration. One of the most common checkpointing protocols are communication induced checkpointing (CIC) protocols, which are well developed and understood for large parallel and information systems, but not much has been done for resource limited embedded systems. This work implements and evaluates some of the most common CIC protocols in a periodic resource constrained distributed embedded system for graceful degradation purposes. A test-bed has been developed and used for the evaluation of the various protocols. The implemented protocols are thoroughly studied and performances are contrasted. Specifically the periodicity property and how it benefits checkpointing in embedded systems is investigated. This work introduces a unique effort of CIC protocol implementation and evaluation in the field of distributed embedded systems. Other than providing a test-bed for graceful degradation support, this work shows that some checkpointing protocols that are not efficient in large information systems and supercomputers perform well in embedded systems. We show that a simple index-based CIC protocol, such as the BCS protocol, is more appropriate in embedded system applications compared to other protocols that piggyback a significant amount of information to reduce the number of forced checkpoints. Finally, this work proposes a whole graceful degradation approach to achieve fault tolerance in resource constrained

  9. Expectation Maximisation based Kalman Filter parameter estimation of GRACE data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, Marcel; Holschneider, Matthias; Lorenz, Christof

    2015-04-01

    GRACE gravity field solutions have proven to be a great device to measure Earth's water storage variations. Nevertheless, if one tries to project the available satellite space-time structure of the time varying fields onto a global time varying field, the well known problem of aliasing appears, as it is manifested in the stripes of the inverse solution. This phenomenon is largely enforced through the use of global spacial modeling functions like spherical harmonics. One method to approach this problem is to apply the Kalman filter technique. This procedure requires knowledge of stochastic models of observations and process dynamics. However, Earth's gravity field is constantly changing in such a complex manner that it is impossible to accurately determine the correct process dynamic. The Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process was applied as a viable process dynamic. This process contains free hyper parameters, that need to be estimated by an Expectation- Minimization(EM) algorithm, allowing it to take into account an a-priori space-time correlation pattern to improve Kalman Filter estimations. The method was applied to unfiltered GRACE gaussian coefficients, using the intrinsic regularization abilities of the Kalman Filter itself. The result was a regularized potential field without additional hydrological information or other assumptions of the gravity field other than Kaula's Law.

  10. GRACE KBR and Accelerometer Data Reduction and Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowlands, D. D.; Luthcke, S. B.; Klosko, S. M.; Lemoine, F. G.; Williams, T. A.

    2004-12-01

    The Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE), launched on March 17, 2002, represents the state-of-the-art in geodetic observations of the static and time varying components of the Earth's geopotential field. The fundamental measurement used to observe gravity is the inter-satellite range and range rate between two coplanar, low altitude satellites obtained from a K-band ranging (KBR) system. In addition to the K-band ranging system, each satellite possess a SuperSTAR Accelerometer, a GPS receiver/antenna package, Star Cameras and a Laser Retro Reflector (LRR) to complete the compliment of science instruments. The GRACE project has now released two years of Level 1B data derived from the science instruments and sensors. An integral component of our time variable gravity research is the reduction, calibration and analyses of these Level 1B data. In particular we have analyzed several months of K-band ranging (KBR1B), accelerometry (ACC1B) and GPS navigation (GNAV1B) data. Accelerometer calibration and KBR data reduction methodology and results will be presented. We discuss the impact of these analyses on the recovery of time variable gravity.

  11. GRACE KBR and Accelerometer Data Reduction and Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlands, David D.; Lutheke, Scott B.; Klosko, Steven M.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Williams, Terry A.

    2004-01-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), launched on March 17, 2002, represents the state-of-the-art in geodetic observations of the static and time varying components of the Earth's geopotential field. The fundamental measurement used to observe gravity is the inter-satellite range and range rate between two coplanar, low altitude satellites obtained from a K-band ranging (KBR) system. In addition to the K-band ranging system, each satellite possess a Super-STAR Accelerometer, a GPS receiver/antenna package, Star Cameras and a Laser Retro Reflector (LRR) to complete the compliment of science instruments. The GRACE project has now released two years of Level 1B data derived from the science instruments and sensors. An integral component of our time variable gravity research is the reduction, calibration and analyses of these Level 1B data. In particular we have analyzed several months of K-band ranging (KBR1B), accelerometry (ACC1B) and GPS navigation (GNAV1B) data. Accelerometer calibration and KBR data reduction methodology and results will be presented. We discuss the impact of these analyses on the recovery of time variable gravity.

  12. Quantifying Water Stress Using Total Water Volumes and GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richey, A. S.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Druffel-Rodriguez, R.

    2011-12-01

    Water will follow oil as the next critical resource leading to unrest and uprisings globally. To better manage this threat, an improved understanding of the distribution of water stress is required today. This study builds upon previous efforts to characterize water stress by improving both the quantification of human water use and the definition of water availability. Current statistics on human water use are often outdated or inaccurately reported nationally, especially for groundwater. This study improves these estimates by defining human water use in two ways. First, we use NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) to isolate the anthropogenic signal in water storage anomalies, which we equate to water use. Second, we quantify an ideal water demand by using average water requirements for the domestic, industrial, and agricultural water use sectors. Water availability has traditionally been limited to "renewable" water, which ignores large, stored water sources that humans use. We compare water stress estimates derived using either renewable water or the total volume of water globally. We use the best-available data to quantify total aquifer and surface water volumes, as compared to groundwater recharge and surface water runoff from land-surface models. The work presented here should provide a more realistic image of water stress by explicitly quantifying groundwater, defining water availability as total water supply, and using GRACE to more accurately quantify water use.

  13. GRACE Orbit Deterimation for Gravity Field Recovery at CSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, P. B.; Kang, Z.; Cheng, M.; Pastor, R.

    2002-12-01

    Determining the orbits of the GRACE satellites is an important aspect of the operational data processing for gravity field recovery. Precise orbits are required for data quality assessment and verification and finally as reference for the gravity field estimation step. Several stages are needed as part of the preparation for the gravity field solution. Using GPS tracking data, initial orbits are computed to produce model accelerometer and attitude data, edited tracking data and improved initial conditions. The model data are used to assess the performance of the accelerometer and star tracker as well as the quality of the measurements from these instruments. The tracking data are further edited to remove anomalous data. A final converged orbit is determined using the on-board accelerometer and attitude data along with the edited tracking data. Results of initial and final orbit fits for a period of data from April and May 2002 will be presented. Orbit quality metrics including GPS data residuals and SLR residuals will be presented. Improvement of the orbit fits due to an improved gravity field will be demonstrated. Using an initial GRACE derived gravity solution, an orbit accuracy at the few cm level is achieved.

  14. Dual GRACE-type Mission Architectures for Temporal Gravity Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiese, D. N.; Nerem, R.

    2009-12-01

    While the expected end-of-lifetime date for the GRACE mission draws nearer, more attention is being given to the design of a follow-on mission for GRACE. The primary purpose of the follow-on mission should be to continue the time series of global mass flux measurements, with a secondary focus on improving the spatial and/or temporal resolution of the GRACE gravity measurements. Previous studies have explored a variety of ways to increase the spatial and/or temporal resolution of the derived gravity fields, including flying an upgraded instrumentation suite (i.e. replacing the microwave ranging instrument with a laser interferometer, and flying drag-free rather than having an accelerometer onboard to measure non-conservative forces), flying an alternate satellite formation (i.e. cartwheel and pendulum formations), and flying multiple pairs of satellites in collinear formations similar to the current GRACE mission. Simulation studies have shown that when flying the upgraded instrumentation suite, the limiting error source in recovering the gravity field is high frequency variations in the atmosphere and ocean; i.e. temporal aliasing errors. This result suggests that a reduction of temporal aliasing errors should be a top priority in mission design considerations. One way in which temporal aliasing errors can be reduced is by making more frequent measurements of the gravity field, which can be accomplished through using multiple satellite pairs. An in-depth study of finding an optimum configuration of two pairs of satellites in a collinear formation has been performed. All satellites are assumed to carry a laser interferometer and fly drag-free. One pair of satellites is in a repeating polar orbit while the other pair is in a repeating lower inclined orbit (~65 deg inclination). The repeat period of the polar pair is varied between approximately three and eight sidereal days, while the repeat period of the lower inclined pair is varied between approximately ten and

  15. Comparison of GRACE data and groundwater levels for the assessment of groundwater depletion in Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liesch, Tanja; Ohmer, Marc

    2016-04-01

    Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) derived groundwater storage (GWS) data are compared with in-situ groundwater levels from five groundwater basins in Jordan, using newly gridded GRACE GRCTellus land data. It is shown that (1) the time series for GRACE-derived GWS data and in-situ groundwater-level measurements can be correlated, with R 2 from 0.55 to 0.74, (2) the correlation can be widely ascribed to the seasonal and trend component, since the detrended and deseasonalized time series show no significant correlation for most cases, implying that anomalous signals that deviate from the trend or seasonal behaviour are overlaid by noise, (3) estimates for water losses in Jordan based on the trend of GRACE data from 2003 to 2013 could be up to four times higher than previously assumed using estimated recharge and abstraction rates, and (4) a significant time-lagged cross correlation of the monthly changes in GRACE-derived groundwater storage and precipitation data was found, suggesting that the conventional method for deriving GWS from GRACE data probably does not account for the typical conditions in the study basins. Furthermore, a new method for deriving plausible specific yields from GRACE data and groundwater levels is demonstrated.

  16. Comparison of GRACE data and groundwater levels for the assessment of groundwater depletion in Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liesch, Tanja; Ohmer, Marc

    2016-09-01

    Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) derived groundwater storage (GWS) data are compared with in-situ groundwater levels from five groundwater basins in Jordan, using newly gridded GRACE GRCTellus land data. It is shown that (1) the time series for GRACE-derived GWS data and in-situ groundwater-level measurements can be correlated, with R 2 from 0.55 to 0.74, (2) the correlation can be widely ascribed to the seasonal and trend component, since the detrended and deseasonalized time series show no significant correlation for most cases, implying that anomalous signals that deviate from the trend or seasonal behaviour are overlaid by noise, (3) estimates for water losses in Jordan based on the trend of GRACE data from 2003 to 2013 could be up to four times higher than previously assumed using estimated recharge and abstraction rates, and (4) a significant time-lagged cross correlation of the monthly changes in GRACE-derived groundwater storage and precipitation data was found, suggesting that the conventional method for deriving GWS from GRACE data probably does not account for the typical conditions in the study basins. Furthermore, a new method for deriving plausible specific yields from GRACE data and groundwater levels is demonstrated.

  17. Estimation of the Earth's gravity field by combining normal equation matrices from GRACE and SLR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberkorn, Christoph; Bloßfeld, Mathis; Bouman, Johannes

    2014-05-01

    Since 2002, GRACE observes the Earth's gravity field with a spatial resolution up to 150 km. The main goal of this mission is the determination of temporal variations in the Earth's gravity field to detect mass displacements. The GRACE mission consists of two identical satellites, which observe the range along the line of sight of both satellites. GRACE observations can be linked with the Earth's gravitational potential, which is expressed in terms of spherical harmonics for global solutions. However, the estimation of low degree coefficients is difficult with GRACE. In contrast to gravity field missions, which observe the gravity field with high spectral resolution, SLR data allow to estimate the lower degree coefficients. Therefore, the coefficient C20 is often replaced by a value derived from Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR). Instead of replacing C20, it can be determined consistently by a combined estimation using GRACE and SLR data. We compute monthly normal equation (NEQ) matrices for GRACE and SLR. Coefficients from monthly GRACE gravity field models of different institutions (Center for Space Research (CSR), USA, Geoforschungszentrum Potsdam (GFZ), Germany and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), USA) and coefficients from monthly gravity field models of our SLR processing are then combined using the NEQ matrices from both techniques. We will evaluate several test scenarios with gravity field models from different institutions and with different set ups for the SLR NEQ matrices. The effect of the combination on the estimated gravity field will be analysed and presented.

  18. High-frequency signal and noise estimates of CSR GRACE RL04

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonin, Jennifer A.; Bettadpur, Srinivas; Tapley, Byron D.

    2012-12-01

    A sliding window technique is used to create daily-sampled Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) solutions with the same background processing as the official CSR RL04 monthly series. By estimating over shorter time spans, more frequent solutions are made using uncorrelated data, allowing for higher frequency resolution in addition to daily sampling. Using these data sets, high-frequency GRACE errors are computed using two different techniques: assuming the GRACE high-frequency signal in a quiet area of the ocean is the true error, and computing the variance of differences between multiple high-frequency GRACE series from different centers. While the signal-to-noise ratios prove to be sufficiently high for confidence at annual and lower frequencies, at frequencies above 3 cycles/year the signal-to-noise ratios in the large hydrological basins looked at here are near 1.0. Comparisons with the GLDAS hydrological model and high frequency GRACE series developed at other centers confirm CSR GRACE RL04's poor ability to accurately and reliably measure hydrological signal above 3-9 cycles/year, due to the low power of the large-scale hydrological signal typical at those frequencies compared to the GRACE errors.

  19. Evolution and characterization of drought events from GRACE and other satellite and observation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, M.; A, G.; Velicogna, I.; Kimball, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    We use GRACE Terrestrial Water Storage (TWS) changes to calculate a newly developed global drought severity index (GRACE-DSI) for monthly monitoring of water supply changes during 2002-2015. We compare GRACE-DSI with Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) and other ancillary data to characterize drought timing, evolution and magnitude in the continental US since 2002. Overall GRACE-DSI and PDSI show an excellent correspondence in the US. However PDSI is very sensitive to atmospheric moisture stress, while GRACE-DSI only responds to changes in terrestrial water storage. We use the complementary nature of these two indices together with temperature and precipitation observations to characterize drought evolution and its nature. For instance, during the 2012 flash drought in the Great Plains, the PDSI decreases several months earlier than the GRACE-DSI in response to the enhanced atmosphere moisture demand caused by unusual early season warming. When the drought peaks later in the summer, the PDSI indicates exceptional drought, while the GRACE-DSI observes moderate drought conditions in the underlying total water supply, implying a meteorological drought in nature. GRACE-DSI is based solely on satellite observations; hence it has the advantage of not being affected by uncertainty associated with variable that are not well known at the global scale (e.g. precipitation estimates) and by biases associated to global climate model outputs. We find that GRACE-DSI captures major drought events in the globe occurring during 2002-2015, including those in sub-Sahara Africa, Australia, Amazon, Asia, North America and the Arctic.

  20. Tone-assisted time delay interferometry on GRACE Follow-On

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Samuel P.; Shaddock, Daniel A.; Sutton, Andrew J.; de Vine, Glenn; Ware, Brent; Spero, Robert E.; Klipstein, William M.; McKenzie, Kirk

    2015-07-01

    We have demonstrated the viability of using the Laser Ranging Interferometer on the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO) space mission to test key aspects of the interspacecraft interferometry proposed for detecting gravitational waves. The Laser Ranging Interferometer on GRACE-FO will be the first demonstration of interspacecraft interferometry. GRACE-FO shares many similarities with proposed space-based gravitational wave detectors based on the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) concept. Given these similarities, GRACE-FO provides a unique opportunity to test novel interspacecraft interferometry techniques that a LISA-like mission will use. The LISA Experience from GRACE-FO Optical Payload (LEGOP) is a project developing tests of arm locking and time delay interferometry (TDI), two frequency stabilization techniques, that could be performed on GRACE-FO. In the proposed LEGOP TDI demonstration one GRACE-FO spacecraft will have a free-running laser while the laser on the other spacecraft will be locked to a cavity. It is proposed that two one-way interspacecraft phase measurements will be combined with an appropriate delay in order to produce a round-trip, dual one-way ranging (DOWR) measurement independent of the frequency noise of the free-running laser. This paper describes simulated and experimental tests of a tone-assisted TDI ranging (TDIR) technique that uses a least-squares fitting algorithm and fractional-delay interpolation to find and implement the delays needed to form the DOWR TDI combination. The simulation verifies tone-assisted TDIR works under GRACE-FO conditions. Using simulated GRACE-FO signals the tone-assisted TDIR algorithm estimates the time-varying interspacecraft range with a rms error of ±0.2 m , suppressing the free-running laser frequency noise by 8 orders of magnitude. The experimental results demonstrate the practicability of the technique, measuring the delay at the 6 ns level in the presence of a

  1. Investigating different filter and rescaling methods on simulated GRACE-like TWS variations for hydrological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liangjing; Dahle, Christoph; Neumayer, Karl-Hans; Dobslaw, Henryk; Flechtner, Frank; Thomas, Maik

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial water storage (TWS) variations obtained from GRACE play an increasingly important role in various hydrological and hydro-meteorological applications. Since monthly-mean gravity fields are contaminated by errors caused by a number of sources with distinct spatial correlation structures, filtering is needed to remove in particular high frequency noise. Subsequently, bias and leakage caused by the filtering need to be corrected before the final results are interpreted as GRACE-based observations of TWS. Knowledge about the reliability and performance of different post-processing methods is highly important for the GRACE users. In this contribution, we re-assess a number of commonly used post-processing methods using a simulated GRACE-like gravity field time-series based on realistic orbits and instrument error assumptions as well as background error assumptions out of the updated ESA Earth System Model. Two non-isotropic filter methods from Kusche (2007) and Swenson and Wahr (2006) are tested. Rescaling factors estimated from five different hydrological models and the ensemble median are applied to the post-processed simulated GRACE-like TWS estimates to correct the bias and leakage. Since TWS anomalies out of the post-processed simulation results can be readily compared to the time-variable Earth System Model initially used as "truth" during the forward simulation step, we are able to thoroughly check the plausibility of our error estimation assessment and will subsequently recommend a processing strategy that shall also be applied to planned GRACE and GRACE-FO Level-3 products for hydrological applications provided by GFZ. Kusche, J. (2007): Approximate decorrelation and non-isotropic smoothing of time-variable GRACE-type gravity field models. J. Geodesy, 81 (11), 733-749, doi:10.1007/s00190-007-0143-3. Swenson, S. and Wahr, J. (2006): Post-processing removal of correlated errors in GRACE data. Geophysical Research Letters, 33(8):L08402.

  2. Ninety-day oral toxicity studies on two genetically modified maize MON810 varieties in Wistar Han RCC rats (EU 7th Framework Programme project GRACE).

    PubMed

    Zeljenková, Dagmar; Ambrušová, Katarína; Bartušová, Mária; Kebis, Anton; Kovrižnych, Jevgenij; Krivošíková, Zora; Kuricová, Miroslava; Líšková, Aurélia; Rollerová, Eva; Spustová, Viera; Szabová, Elena; Tulinská, Jana; Wimmerová, Soňa; Levkut, Mikuláš; Révajová, Viera; Ševčíková, Zuzana; Schmidt, Kerstin; Schmidtke, Jörg; La Paz, Jose Luis; Corujo, Maria; Pla, Maria; Kleter, Gijs A; Kok, Esther J; Sharbati, Jutta; Hanisch, Carlos; Einspanier, Ralf; Adel-Patient, Karine; Wal, Jean-Michel; Spök, Armin; Pöting, Annette; Kohl, Christian; Wilhelm, Ralf; Schiemann, Joachim; Steinberg, Pablo

    2014-12-01

    The GMO Risk Assessment and Communication of Evidence (GRACE; www.grace-fp7.eu ) project is funded by the European Commission within the 7th Framework Programme. A key objective of GRACE is to conduct 90-day animal feeding trials, animal studies with an extended time frame as well as analytical, in vitro and in silico studies on genetically modified (GM) maize in order to comparatively evaluate their use in GM plant risk assessment. In the present study, the results of two 90-day feeding trials with two different GM maize MON810 varieties, their near-isogenic non-GM varieties and four additional conventional maize varieties are presented. The feeding trials were performed by taking into account the guidance for such studies published by the EFSA Scientific Committee in 2011 and the OECD Test Guideline 408. The results obtained show that the MON810 maize at a level of up to 33 % in the diet did not induce adverse effects in male and female Wistar Han RCC rats after subchronic exposure, independently of the two different genetic backgrounds of the event. PMID:25270621

  3. One-year oral toxicity study on a genetically modified maize MON810 variety in Wistar Han RCC rats (EU 7th Framework Programme project GRACE).

    PubMed

    Zeljenková, Dagmar; Aláčová, Radka; Ondrejková, Júlia; Ambrušová, Katarína; Bartušová, Mária; Kebis, Anton; Kovrižnych, Jevgenij; Rollerová, Eva; Szabová, Elena; Wimmerová, Soňa; Černák, Martin; Krivošíková, Zora; Kuricová, Miroslava; Líšková, Aurélia; Spustová, Viera; Tulinská, Jana; Levkut, Mikuláš; Révajová, Viera; Ševčíková, Zuzana; Schmidt, Kerstin; Schmidtke, Jörg; Schmidt, Paul; La Paz, Jose Luis; Corujo, Maria; Pla, Maria; Kleter, Gijs A; Kok, Esther J; Sharbati, Jutta; Bohmer, Marc; Bohmer, Nils; Einspanier, Ralf; Adel-Patient, Karine; Spök, Armin; Pöting, Annette; Kohl, Christian; Wilhelm, Ralf; Schiemann, Joachim; Steinberg, Pablo

    2016-10-01

    The GRACE (GMO Risk Assessment and Communication of Evidence; www.grace-fp7.eu ) project was funded by the European Commission within the 7th Framework Programme. A key objective of GRACE was to conduct 90-day animal feeding trials, animal studies with an extended time frame as well as analytical, in vitro and in silico studies on genetically modified (GM) maize in order to comparatively evaluate their use in GM plant risk assessment. In the present study, the results of a 1-year feeding trial with a GM maize MON810 variety, its near-isogenic non-GM comparator and an additional conventional maize variety are presented. The feeding trials were performed by taking into account the guidance for such studies published by the EFSA Scientific Committee in 2011 and the OECD Test Guideline 452. The results obtained show that the MON810 maize at a level of up to 33 % in the diet did not induce adverse effects in male and female Wistar Han RCC rats after a chronic exposure.

  4. One-year oral toxicity study on a genetically modified maize MON810 variety in Wistar Han RCC rats (EU 7th Framework Programme project GRACE).

    PubMed

    Zeljenková, Dagmar; Aláčová, Radka; Ondrejková, Júlia; Ambrušová, Katarína; Bartušová, Mária; Kebis, Anton; Kovrižnych, Jevgenij; Rollerová, Eva; Szabová, Elena; Wimmerová, Soňa; Černák, Martin; Krivošíková, Zora; Kuricová, Miroslava; Líšková, Aurélia; Spustová, Viera; Tulinská, Jana; Levkut, Mikuláš; Révajová, Viera; Ševčíková, Zuzana; Schmidt, Kerstin; Schmidtke, Jörg; Schmidt, Paul; La Paz, Jose Luis; Corujo, Maria; Pla, Maria; Kleter, Gijs A; Kok, Esther J; Sharbati, Jutta; Bohmer, Marc; Bohmer, Nils; Einspanier, Ralf; Adel-Patient, Karine; Spök, Armin; Pöting, Annette; Kohl, Christian; Wilhelm, Ralf; Schiemann, Joachim; Steinberg, Pablo

    2016-10-01

    The GRACE (GMO Risk Assessment and Communication of Evidence; www.grace-fp7.eu ) project was funded by the European Commission within the 7th Framework Programme. A key objective of GRACE was to conduct 90-day animal feeding trials, animal studies with an extended time frame as well as analytical, in vitro and in silico studies on genetically modified (GM) maize in order to comparatively evaluate their use in GM plant risk assessment. In the present study, the results of a 1-year feeding trial with a GM maize MON810 variety, its near-isogenic non-GM comparator and an additional conventional maize variety are presented. The feeding trials were performed by taking into account the guidance for such studies published by the EFSA Scientific Committee in 2011 and the OECD Test Guideline 452. The results obtained show that the MON810 maize at a level of up to 33 % in the diet did not induce adverse effects in male and female Wistar Han RCC rats after a chronic exposure. PMID:27439414

  5. Ninety-day oral toxicity studies on two genetically modified maize MON810 varieties in Wistar Han RCC rats (EU 7th Framework Programme project GRACE).

    PubMed

    Zeljenková, Dagmar; Ambrušová, Katarína; Bartušová, Mária; Kebis, Anton; Kovrižnych, Jevgenij; Krivošíková, Zora; Kuricová, Miroslava; Líšková, Aurélia; Rollerová, Eva; Spustová, Viera; Szabová, Elena; Tulinská, Jana; Wimmerová, Soňa; Levkut, Mikuláš; Révajová, Viera; Ševčíková, Zuzana; Schmidt, Kerstin; Schmidtke, Jörg; La Paz, Jose Luis; Corujo, Maria; Pla, Maria; Kleter, Gijs A; Kok, Esther J; Sharbati, Jutta; Hanisch, Carlos; Einspanier, Ralf; Adel-Patient, Karine; Wal, Jean-Michel; Spök, Armin; Pöting, Annette; Kohl, Christian; Wilhelm, Ralf; Schiemann, Joachim; Steinberg, Pablo

    2014-12-01

    The GMO Risk Assessment and Communication of Evidence (GRACE; www.grace-fp7.eu ) project is funded by the European Commission within the 7th Framework Programme. A key objective of GRACE is to conduct 90-day animal feeding trials, animal studies with an extended time frame as well as analytical, in vitro and in silico studies on genetically modified (GM) maize in order to comparatively evaluate their use in GM plant risk assessment. In the present study, the results of two 90-day feeding trials with two different GM maize MON810 varieties, their near-isogenic non-GM varieties and four additional conventional maize varieties are presented. The feeding trials were performed by taking into account the guidance for such studies published by the EFSA Scientific Committee in 2011 and the OECD Test Guideline 408. The results obtained show that the MON810 maize at a level of up to 33 % in the diet did not induce adverse effects in male and female Wistar Han RCC rats after subchronic exposure, independently of the two different genetic backgrounds of the event.

  6. Using Tikhonov Regularization for Spatial Projections from CSR Regularized Spherical Harmonic GRACE Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Save, H.; Bettadpur, S. V.

    2013-12-01

    It has been demonstrated before that using Tikhonov regularization produces spherical harmonic solutions from GRACE that have very little residual stripes while capturing all the signal observed by GRACE within the noise level. This paper demonstrates a two-step process and uses Tikhonov regularization to remove the residual stripes in the CSR regularized spherical harmonic coefficients when computing the spatial projections. We discuss methods to produce mass anomaly grids that have no stripe features while satisfying the necessary condition of capturing all observed signal within the GRACE noise level.

  7. Rockot Launch Vehicle Commercial Operations for Grace and Iridium Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viertel, Y.; Kinnersley, M.; Schumacher, I.

    2002-01-01

    The GRACE mission and the IRIDIUM mission on ROCKOT launch vehicle are presented. Two identical GRACE satellites to measure in tandem the gravitational field of the earth with previously unattainable accuracy - it's called the Gravity Research and Climate Experiment, or and is a joint project of the U.S. space agency, NASA and the German Centre for Aeronautics and Space Flight, DLR. In order to send the GRACE twins into a 500x500 km , 89deg. orbit, the Rockot launch vehicle was selected. A dual launch of two Iridium satellites was scheduled for June 2002 using the ROCKOT launch vehicle from Plesetsk Cosmodrome in Northern Russia. This launch will inject two replacement satellites into a low earth orbit (LEO) to support the maintenance of the Iridium constellation. In September 2001, Eurockot successfully carried out a "Pathfinder Campaign" to simulate the entire Iridium mission cycle at Plesetsk. The campaign comprised the transport of simulators and related equipment to the Russian port-of-entry and launch site and also included the integration and encapsulation of the simulators with the actual Rockot launch vehicle at Eurockot's dedicated launch facilities at Plesetsk Cosmodrome. The pathfinder campaign lasted four weeks and was carried out by a joint team that also included Khrunichev, Russian Space Forces and Eurockot personnel on the contractors' side. The pathfinder mission confirmed the capability of Eurockot Launch Services to perform the Iridium launch on cost and on schedule at Plesetsk following Eurockot's major investment in international standard preparation, integration and launch facilities including customer facilities and a new hotel. In 2003, Eurockot will also launch the Japanese SERVI'S-1 satellite for USEF. The ROCKOT launch vehicle is a 3 stage liquid fuel rocket whose first 2 stages have been adapted from the Russian SS-19. A third stage, called "Breeze", can be repeatedly ignited and is extraordinarily capable of manoeuvre. Rockot can place

  8. Current Status of the GRACE Follow-On Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Michael; Flechtner, Frank; Webb, Frank; Landerer, Felix; Grunwald, Ludwig

    2016-04-01

    The GRACE Follow-On Mission has now advanced to the Assembly and Test Phase with the delivery of essentially all satellite subsystems and science instruments. As of the time of this abstract submission, the team continues to plan launch in 2017. The project team is conducting tests of satellite and instrument operation and performance and putting together updated simulations of expected performance on-orbit, including intersatellite ranging (both microwave and laser), accelerometer, thermal variability and deformation, and other errors. In addition, all required ground analysis software of the Science Data System is in development and testing at JPL, The UTCSR, and GFZ, in preparation for fully integrated end-to-end (international) testing from Level-1 through Level-3 data in the coming year. In this presentation, we will provide the detailed status of project integration and test, the latest simulations of science performance, and schedule for remaining project milestones.

  9. Efficient implementation techniques for gracefully degradable multiprocessor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.C.; Shin, K.G.

    1995-04-01

    We propose the dynamic reconfiguration network (DRN) and a monitoring-at-transmission (MAT) bus to support dynamic reconfiguration of an N-modular redundancy (NMR) multiprocessor system. In the reconfiguration process, a maximal number of processor triads are guaranteed to be formed on each processor cluster, thus supporting gracefully degradable operations. This is made possible by dynamically routing the control and clock signals of processors on the DRN so as to synchronize fault-free processors. The MAT bus is an efficient way to implement a triple modular redundant (TMR) pipeline voter (PV), which is a special case of the voting network proposed previously. Extensive experimental results have shown to support our design concept, and the performance of different cache memory organizations is evaluated through an analytic model. 22 refs.

  10. Status and Assessments of CSR GRACE Level-2 Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettadpur, Srinivas; Kang, Zhigui; Nagel, Peter; Pastor, Rick; Poole, Steve; Ries, John; Save, Himanshu

    2015-04-01

    The joint NASA/DLR GRACE mission has successfully operated for more than 13 years, and has provided a remarkable record of global mass flux due to a large variety of geophysical and climate processes at various spatio-temporal scales. The University of Texas Center for Space Research (CSR) hosts the mission PI, and is responsible for delivery of operational (presently denoted as Release-05 or RL05) gravity field data products. In addition, CSR generates and distributes a variety of other gravity field data products, including products generated from the use of satellite laser ranging data. This poster will provide an overview of all these data products, their relative quality, potential applications, and future plans for their development and delivery.

  11. CSR GRACE Release-05 Data Products: Status & Assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettadpur, S. V.

    2013-12-01

    The joint NASA/DLR mission has provided a decade of ground-breaking insights into several aspects of the Earth system mass flux variability. The GRACE Science Data System has released the latest revision of the monthly gravity field time-series, dubbed Release-05 (RL05). Examination of this series shows a factor of two to three improvement, in terms of variance reduction, relative to the previous (RL04) release. In this paper, we provide a detailed assessment of the CSR RL05 time-series and describe the manner in which it improves upon the RL04 series. The focus of this paper is a characterization and detailed description of the errors in the CSR monthly gravity field time-series, including the changing character of the errors as the flight system passes through different stages in its 11 year lifetime.

  12. Analyses of altimetry errors using Argo and GRACE data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legeais, Jean-François; Prandi, Pierre; Guinehut, Stéphanie

    2016-05-01

    This study presents the evaluation of the performances of satellite altimeter missions by comparing the altimeter sea surface heights with in situ dynamic heights derived from vertical temperature and salinity profiles measured by Argo floats. The two objectives of this approach are the detection of altimeter drift and the estimation of the impact of new altimeter standards that requires an independent reference. This external assessment method contributes to altimeter calibration-validation analyses that cover a wide range of activities. Among them, several examples are given to illustrate the usefulness of this approach, separating the analyses of the long-term evolution of the mean sea level and its variability, at global and regional scales and results obtained via relative and absolute comparisons. The latter requires the use of the ocean mass contribution to the sea level derived from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) measurements. Our analyses cover the estimation of the global mean sea level trend, the validation of multi-missions altimeter products as well as the assessment of orbit solutions.Even if this approach contributes to the altimeter quality assessment, the differences between two versions of altimeter standards are getting smaller and smaller and it is thus more difficult to detect their impact. It is therefore essential to characterize the errors of the method, which is illustrated with the results of sensitivity analyses to different parameters. This includes the format of the altimeter data, the method of collocation, the temporal reference period and the processing of the ocean mass solutions from GRACE. We also assess the impact of the temporal and spatial sampling of Argo floats, the choice of the reference depth of the in situ profiles and the importance of the deep steric contribution. These analyses provide an estimation of the robustness of the method and the characterization of associated errors. The results also allow us

  13. Towards Improved Snow Water Equivalent Estimation via GRACE Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Bart; Reichle, Rofl; Rodell, Matt

    2011-01-01

    Passive microwave (e.g. AMSR-E) and visible spectrum (e.g. MODIS) measurements of snow states have been used in conjunction with land surface models to better characterize snow pack states, most notably snow water equivalent (SWE). However, both types of measurements have limitations. AMSR-E, for example, suffers a loss of information in deep/wet snow packs. Similarly, MODIS suffers a loss of temporal correlation information beyond the initial accumulation and final ablation phases of the snow season. Gravimetric measurements, on the other hand, do not suffer from these limitations. In this study, gravimetric measurements from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission are used in a land surface model data assimilation (DA) framework to better characterize SWE in the Mackenzie River basin located in northern Canada. Comparisons are made against independent, ground-based SWE observations, state-of-the-art modeled SWE estimates, and independent, ground-based river discharge observations. Preliminary results suggest improved SWE estimates, including improved timing of the subsequent ablation and runoff of the snow pack. Additionally, use of the DA procedure can add vertical and horizontal resolution to the coarse-scale GRACE measurements as well as effectively downscale the measurements in time. Such findings offer the potential for better understanding of the hydrologic cycle in snow-dominated basins located in remote regions of the globe where ground-based observation collection if difficult, if not impossible. This information could ultimately lead to improved freshwater resource management in communities dependent on snow melt as well as a reduction in the uncertainty of river discharge into the Arctic Ocean.

  14. Integrating Data from GRACE and Other Observing Systems for Hydrological Research and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, M.; Famiglietti, J. S.; McWilliams, E.; Beaudoing, H. K.; Li, B.; Zaitchik, B.; Reichle, R.; Bolten, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission provides a unique view of water cycle dynamics, enabling the only space based observations of water on and beneath the land surface that are not limited by depth. GRACE data are immediately useful for large scale applications such as ice sheet ablation monitoring, but they are even more valuable when combined with other types of observations, either directly or within a data assimilation system. Here we describe recent results of hydrological research and applications projects enabled by GRACE. These include the following: 1) global monitoring of interannual variability of terrestrial water storage and groundwater; 2) water balance estimates of evapotranspiration over several large river basins; 3) NASA's Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) state of the global water budget project; 4) drought indicator products now being incorporated into the U.S. Drought Monitor; 5) GRACE data assimilation over several regions.

  15. Hydrological Variations in Australia Recovered by GRACE High-Resolution Mascons Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carabajal, Claudia C.; Boy, Jean-Paul; Sabaka, Terence J.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Rowlands. David; Luthcke, Scott B.; Brown, M. Y.

    2011-01-01

    Australia represents a challenging region in which to study hydrological variations as recovered by the GRACE (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment) mission data. Much of Australia is characterized by relatively small hydrological signals, with large precipitation gradients between the North and the South. These signals are better recovered using innovative GRACE processing techniques such as high-resolution mascon solutions, which may help overcome the deficiencies in the standard GRACE data processing and filtering methods. We will show the power of using regional and global mas con solutions to recover hydrological variations from 2003 to 2011, as well as the oceanic mass variations in the surrounding regions. We will compare the GRACE signals with state of the art hydrology and ocean general circulation models, precipitation, soil moisture and groundwater data sets. We especially emphasize the gravity signatures observed during the decadal drought in the Murray-Darling river basin and the early 2011 floods in North-Western Australia.

  16. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: GRACE DEARBORN INC.'S DARAMEND BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Grace Dearborn's DARAMEND Bioremediation Technology was developed to treat soils/sediment contaminated with organic contaminants using solid-phase organic amendments. The amendments increase the soil's ability to supply biologically available water/nutrients to microorganisms and...

  17. Measuring Earth: Current status of the GRACE Follow-On Laser Ranging Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütze, Daniel; LRI Team

    2016-05-01

    The GRACE mission that was launched in 2002 has impressively proven the feasibility of low-orbit satellite-to-satellite tracking for Earth gravity observations. Especially mass transport related to Earth's hydrological system could be well resolved both spatially and temporally. This allows to study processes such as polar ice sheet decline and ground water depletion in great detail. Owing to GRACE's success, NASA and GFZ will launch the successor mission GRACE Follow-On in 2017. In addition to the microwave ranging system, GRACE Follow-On will be the first mission to use a Laser Ranging Interferometer as technology demonstrator to track intersatellite distance changes with unprecedented precision. This new ranging device inherits some of the technologies which have been developed for the future spaceborne gravitational wave detector LISA. I will present the architecture of the Laser Ranging Interferometer, point out similarities and differences to LISA, and conclude with the current status of the flight hardware production.

  18. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for the Grace Road Site (631-22G)

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.

    1998-10-02

    This report summarizes the activities and documents the results of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation conducted at Grace Road Site on the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina.

  19. Proxy representation of Arctic ocean bottom pressure variability: Bridging gaps in GRACE observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta-Ferriz, Cecilia; Morison, James H.; Wallace, John M.

    2016-09-01

    Using time-varying ocean bottom pressure (OBP) from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), a 9 year in situ OBP record at the North Pole, and wind reanalysis products, we perform a linear regression analysis to identify primary predictor time series that enable us to create a proxy representation of the Arctic time-varying OBP that explains the largest fraction of the observed Arctic OBP variability. After cross validation, two predictors—North Pole OBP record and wind-OBP coupling from maximum covariance analysis—explain 50% of the total variance of the Arctic OBP. This work provides a means for bridging existing short gaps in GRACE measurements and potentially longer future gaps that may result if GRACE and its follow-on mission do not overlap. The technique may be applicable to bridge gaps in GRACE measurements in other oceanic regions.

  20. Prognostic Value of TIMI Score versus GRACE Score in ST-segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Luis C. L.; Garcia, Guilherme; Kalil, Felipe; Ferreira, Felipe; Carvalhal, Manuela; Oliveira, Ruan; Silva, André; Vasconcelos, Isis; Henri, Caio; Noya-Rabelo, Márcia

    2014-01-01

    Background The TIMI Score for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) was created and validated specifically for this clinical scenario, while the GRACE score is generic to any type of acute coronary syndrome. Objective Between TIMI and GRACE scores, identify the one of better prognostic performance in patients with STEMI. Methods We included 152 individuals consecutively admitted for STEMI. The TIMI and GRACE scores were tested for their discriminatory ability (C-statistics) and calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow) in relation to hospital death. Results The TIMI score showed equal distribution of patients in the ranges of low, intermediate and high risk (39 %, 27 % and 34 %, respectively), as opposed to the GRACE Score that showed predominant distribution at low risk (80 %, 13 % and 7%, respectively). Case-fatality was 11%. The C-statistics of the TIMI score was 0.87 (95%CI = 0.76 to 0.98), similar to GRACE (0.87, 95%CI = 0.75 to 0.99) - p = 0.71. The TIMI score showed satisfactory calibration represented by χ2 = 1.4 (p = 0.92), well above the calibration of the GRACE score, which showed χ2 = 14 (p = 0.08). This calibration is reflected in the expected incidence ranges for low, intermediate and high risk, according to the TIMI score (0 %, 4.9 % and 25 %, respectively), differently to GRACE (2.4%, 25% and 73%), which featured middle range incidence inappropriately. Conclusion Although the scores show similar discriminatory capacity for hospital death, the TIMI score had better calibration than GRACE. These findings need to be validated populations of different risk profiles. PMID:25029471

  1. Broadband assessment of degree-2 gravitational changes from GRACE and other estimates, 2002-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. L.; Wilson, C. R.; Ries, J. C.

    2016-03-01

    Space geodetic measurements, including the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), satellite laser ranging (SLR), and Earth rotation provide independent and increasingly accurate estimates of variations in Earth's gravity field Stokes coefficients ΔC21, ΔS21, and ΔC20. Mass redistribution predicted by climate models provides another independent estimate of air and water contributions to these degree-2 changes. SLR has been a successful technique in measuring these low-degree gravitational changes. Broadband comparisons of independent estimates of ΔC21, ΔS21, and ΔC20 from GRACE, SLR, Earth rotation, and climate models during the GRACE era from April 2002 to April 2015 show that the current GRACE release 5 solutions of ΔC21 and ΔS21 provided by the Center for Space Research (CSR) are greatly improved over earlier solutions and agree remarkably well with other estimates, especially on ΔS21 estimates. GRACE and Earth rotation ΔS21 agreement is exceptionally good across a very broad frequency band from intraseasonal, seasonal, to interannual and decadal periods. SLR ΔC20 estimates remain superior to GRACE and Earth rotation estimates, due to the large uncertainty in GRACE ΔC20 solutions and particularly high sensitivity of Earth rotation ΔC20 estimates to errors in the wind fields. With several estimates of ΔC21, ΔS21, and ΔC20 variations, it is possible to estimate broadband noise variance and noise power spectra in each, given reasonable assumptions about noise independence. The GRACE CSR release 5 solutions clearly outperform other estimates of ΔC21 and ΔS21 variations with the lowest noise levels over a broad band of frequencies.

  2. Measuring the Value of Earth Observation Information with the Gravity Research and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernknopf, R.; Kuwayama, Y.; Brookshire, D.; Macauley, M.; Zaitchik, B.; Pesko, S.; Vail, P.

    2014-12-01

    Determining how much to invest in earth observation technology depends in part on the value of information (VOI) that can be derived from the observations. We design a framework and then evaluate the value-in-use of the NASA Gravity Research and Climate Experiment (GRACE) for regional water use and reliability in the presence of drought. As a technology that allows measurement of water storage, the GRACE Data Assimilation System (DAS) provides information that is qualitatively different from that generated by other water data sources. It provides a global, reproducible grid of changes in surface and subsurface water resources on a frequent and regular basis. Major damages from recent events such as the 2012 Midwest drought and the ongoing drought in California motivate the need to understand the VOI from remotely sensed data such as that derived from GRACE DAS. Our conceptual framework models a dynamic risk management problem in agriculture. We base the framework on information from stakeholders and subject experts. The economic case for GRACE DAS involves providing better water availability information. In the model, individuals have a "willingness to pay" (wtp) for GRACE DAS - essentially, wtp is an expression of savings in reduced agricultural input costs and for costs that are influenced by regional policy decisions. Our hypothesis is that improvements in decision making can be achieved with GRACE DAS measurements of water storage relative to data collected from groundwater monitoring wells and soil moisture monitors that would be relied on in the absence of GRACE DAS. The VOI is estimated as a comparison of outcomes. The California wine grape industry has features that allow it to be a good case study and a basis for extrapolation to other economic sectors. We model water use in this sector as a sequential decision highlighting the attributes of GRACE DAS input as information for within-season production decisions as well as for longer-term water reliability.

  3. Bridging a possible gap of GRACE observations in the Arctic Ocean using existing GRACE data and in situ bottom pressure sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta Ferriz, C.; Morison, J.

    2014-12-01

    Since 2003, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite system has provided the means of investigating month-to-month to inter-annual variability of, among many other things, Arctic Ocean circulation over the entire Arctic Basin. Such a comprehensive picture could not have been achieved with the limited in situ pressure observations available. Results from the first 10 years of ocean bottom pressure measurements from GRACE in the Arctic Ocean reveal distinct patterns of ocean variability that are strongly associated with changes in large-scale atmospheric circulation (Peralta-Ferriz et al., 2014): the leading mode of variability being a wintertime basin-coherent mass change driven by winds in the Nordic Seas; the second mode of variability corresponding to a mass signal coherent along the Siberian shelves, and driven by the Arctic Oscillation; and the third mode being a see-saw between western and eastern Arctic shelves, also driven by the large-scale wind patterns. In order to understand Arctic Ocean changes, it is fundamental to continue to track ocean bottom pressure. Our concern is what to do if the present GRACE system, which is already well beyond its design lifetime, should fail before its follow-on is launched, currently estimated to be in 2017. In this work, we regress time series of pressure from the existing and potential Arctic Ocean bottom pressure recorder locations against the fundamental modes of bottom pressure variation. Our aim is to determine the optimum combination of in situ measurements to represent the broader scale variability now observed by GRACE. With this understanding, we can be better prepared to use in situ observations to at least partially cover a possible gap in GRACE coverage. Reference:Peralta-Ferriz, Cecilia, James H. Morison, John M. Wallace, Jennifer A. Bonin, Jinlun Zhang, 2014: Arctic Ocean Circulation Patterns Revealed by GRACE. J. Climate, 27, 1445-1468. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/JCLI-D-13-00013.1

  4. Estimation of water storage change of Lake Nasser using GRACE gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahran, Khaled

    2010-05-01

    Lake Nasser, which impounds by the High Dam, is the main water reservoir for the whole Egyptian territory. Water storage at the lake plays an essential role in water demands and affects almost the whole country. Thus, observation based information about water income, the spatial distribution and temporal variation of water storage is of great importance. We used data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission to determine the spatiotemporal variation of water stored on the Lake or beneath the crust surrounding it. Integrated gravity signals from Grace have been separated into its individual components related to mass redistribution in and around the Lake. Temporal gravity variation from GRACE correlated quiet well with the hydrological cycle of the Lake. Spectral analysis has been used to differentiate between water storage in the Lake and the spatial distribution of underground water variation. On the other hand, GRACE data enable the complete scope of the whole Nile basin and its relation to the water storage of the Lake. In this manner, filtering of the spherical harmonics from GRACE plays an important role and has been tested in the current research. Finally, global data from GRACE to the whole Nile basin together with global hydrological models give important information of the seasonal water income to the Lake and puts an important step toward for the construction of a hydrological model to predict water income to the Lake.

  5. Spurious barometric pressure acceleration in Antarctica and propagation into GRACE Antarctic mass change estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byeong-Hoon; Eom, Jooyoung; Seo, Ki-Weon; Wilson, Clark R.

    2016-06-01

    Apparent acceleration in GRACE Antarctic ice mass time series may reflect both ice discharge and surface mass balance contributions. However, a recent study suggests there is also contamination from errors in atmospheric pressure de-aliasing fields (ECMWF operational products) used during GRACE data processing. To further examine this question, we compare GRACE atmospheric pressure de-aliasing (GAA) fields with in-situ surface pressure data from coastal and inland stations. Differences between the two are likely due to GAA errors, and provide a measure of error in GRACE solutions. Time series of differences at individual weather stations are fit to four presumed error components: annual sinusoids, a linear trend, an acceleration term, and jumps at times of known ECMWF model changes. Using data from inland stations, we estimate that atmospheric pressure error causes an acceleration error of about +7.0 Gt/yr2, which is large relative to prior GRACE estimates of Antarctic ice mass acceleration in the range of -12 to -14 Gt/yr2. We also estimate apparent acceleration rates from other barometric pressure (reanalysis) fields, including ERA-Interim, MERRA and NCEP/DOE. When integrated over East Antarctica, the four mass acceleration estimates (from GAA and the three reanalysis fields) vary considerably (by ˜2-16 Gt/yr2). This shows the need for further effort to improve atmospheric mass estimates in this region of sparse in situ observations, in order to use GRACE observations to measure ice mass acceleration and related sea level change.

  6. Analysis of a GRACE global mascon solution for Gulf of Alaska glaciers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arendt, Anthony; Luthcke, Scott; Gardner, Alex; O'Neel, Shad; Hill, David; Moholdt, Geir; Abdalati, Waleed

    2013-01-01

    We present a high-resolution Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mascon solution for Gulf of Alaska (GOA) glaciers and compare this with in situ glaciological, climate and other remote-sensing observations. Our GRACE solution yields a GOA glacier mass balance of –65 ± 11 Gt a–1 for the period December 2003 to December 2010, with summer balances driving the interannual variability. Between October/November 2003 and October 2009 we obtain a mass balance of –61 ± 11 Gt a–1 from GRACE, which compares well with –65 ± 12 Gt a–1 from ICESat based on hypsometric extrapolation of glacier elevation changes. We find that mean summer (June–August) air temperatures derived from both ground and lower-troposphere temperature records were good predictors of GRACE-derived summer mass balances, capturing 59% and 72% of the summer balance variability respectively. Large mass losses during 2009 were likely due to low early melt season surface albedos, measured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and likely associated with the 31 March 2009 eruption of Mount Redoubt, southwestern Alaska. GRACE data compared well with in situ measurements at Wolverine Glacier (maritime Alaska), but poorly with those at Gulkana Glacier (interior Alaska). We conclude that, although GOA mass estimates from GRACE are robust over the entire domain, further constraints on subregional and seasonal estimates are necessary to improve fidelity to ground observations.

  7. Analysis of a GRACE Global Mascon Solution for Gulf of Alaska Glaciers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendt, Anthony; Luthcke, Scott B.; Gardner, Alex; O'Neel, Shad; Hill, David; Moholdt, Geir; Abdalati, Waleed

    2013-01-01

    We present a high-resolution Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mascon solution for Gulf of Alaska (GOA) glaciers and compare this with in situ glaciological, climate and other remote-sensing observations. Our GRACE solution yields a GOA glacier mass balance of -6511 Gt a(exp.-1) for the period December 2003 to December 2010, with summer balances driving the interannual variability. Between October/November 2003 and October 2009 we obtain a mass balance of -6111 Gt a(exp. -1) from GRACE, which compares well with -6512 Gt a(exp. -1) from ICESat based on hypsometric extrapolation of glacier elevation changes. We find that mean summer (June-August) air temperatures derived from both ground and lower-troposphere temperature records were good predictors of GRACE-derived summer mass balances, capturing 59% and 72% of the summer balance variability respectively. Large mass losses during 2009 were likely due to low early melt season surface albedos, measured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and likely associated with the 31 March 2009 eruption of Mount Redoubt, southwestern Alaska. GRACE data compared well with in situ measurements atWolverine Glacier (maritime Alaska), but poorly with those at Gulkana Glacier (interior Alaska). We conclude that, although GOA mass estimates from GRACE are robust over the entire domain, further constraints on subregional and seasonal estimates are necessary to improve fidelity to ground observations.

  8. Regularized GRACE monthly solutions by constraining the difference between the longitudinal and latitudinal gravity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiujie; Chen, Wu; Shen, Yunzhong; Zhang, Xingfu; Hsu, Houze

    2016-04-01

    The existing unconstrained Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) monthly solutions i.e. CSR RL05 from Center for Space Research (CSR), GFZ RL05a from GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ), JPL RL05 from Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), DMT-1 from Delft Institute of Earth Observation and Space Systems (DEOS), AIUB from Bern University, and Tongji-GRACE01 as well as Tongji-GRACE02 from Tongji University, are dominated by correlated noise (such as north-south stripe errors) in high degree coefficients. To suppress the correlated noise of the unconstrained GRACE solutions, one typical option is to use post-processing filters such as decorrelation filtering and Gaussian smoothing , which are quite effective to reduce the noise and convenient to be implemented. Unlike these post-processing methods, the CNES/GRGS monthly GRACE solutions from Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) were developed by using regularization with Kaula rule, whose correlated noise are reduced to such a great extent that no decorrelation filtering is required. Actually, the previous studies demonstrated that the north-south stripes in the GRACE solutions are due to the poor sensitivity of gravity variation in east-west direction. In other words, the longitudinal sampling of GRACE mission is very sparse but the latitudinal sampling of GRACE mission is quite dense, indicating that the recoverability of the longitudinal gravity variation is poor or unstable, leading to the ill-conditioned monthly GRACE solutions. To stabilize the monthly solutions, we constructed the regularization matrices by minimizing the difference between the longitudinal and latitudinal gravity variations and applied them to derive a time series of regularized GRACE monthly solutions named RegTongji RL01 for the period Jan. 2003 to Aug. 2011 in this paper. The signal powers and noise level of RegTongji RL01 were analyzed in this paper, which shows that: (1) No smoothing or decorrelation filtering is required for RegTongji RL

  9. The 2009 exceptional Amazon flood and interannual terrestrial water storage change observed by GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. L.; Wilson, C. R.; Tapley, B. D.

    2010-12-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite gravity mission provides a new capability for measuring extreme climate events, such as floods and droughts associated with large-scale terrestrial water storage (TWS) change. GRACE gravity measurements show significant TWS increases in the lower Amazon basin in the first half of 2009, clearly associated with the exceptional flood season in that region. The extended record of GRACE monthly gravity solutions reveals the temporal and spatial evolution of both nonseasonal and interannual TWS change in the Amazon basin over the 7 year mission period from April 2002 to August 2009. GRACE observes a very dry season in 2002-2003 and an extremely wet season in 2009. In March 2009 (approximately the peak of the recent Amazon flood), total TWS surplus in the entire Amazon basin is ˜624 ± 32 Gt, roughly equal to U.S. water consumption for a year. GRACE measurements are consistent with precipitation data. Interannual TWS changes in the Amazon basin are closely connected to ENSO events in the tropical Pacific. The 2002-2003 dry season is clearly tied to the 2002-2003 El Niño and the 2009 flood to the recent La Niña event. The most significant contribution of this study in the area of water resources is to confront the hydrological community with the latest results of the GRACE satellite mission and further demonstrates the unique strength of GRACE and follow-up satellite gravity observations for measuring large-scale extreme climate events.

  10. GRACE data assimilation into WGHM: Validation of updated water states and fluxes in the Mississippi Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Maike; Müller Schmied, Hannes; Kusche, Jürgen; Döll, Petra; Rodell, Matthew; van Dijk, Albert

    2015-04-01

    The Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission provides the unique opportunity of observing the water storage changes including soil, surface and groundwater with global coverage. However, the relatively coarse spatial (few 100 km) and temporal resolution (monthly) and the necessary disaggregation of total water storage anomalies (TWSA) into individual water storage compartments provide challenges for hydrological studies. The GRACE-derived TWSA fields are increasingly used for data assimilation into hydrological models for model improvement and downscaling of GRACE data. Recently, Eicker et al. (2014) proposed a new ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) method that integrates gridded TWSA fields into the WaterGAP Global Hydrology Model (WGHM) and simultaneously calibrates its parameters. Application to the Mississippi River Basin showed promising results when comparing post-assimilation model-predicted TWSA to GRACE observations. Here, we carry out an extensive validation of the reported assimilation results with independent data sets. The focus is on individual water compartments, such as snow, soil, surface water and groundwater, and fluxes, like river discharge. The validation data includes in-situ data (e.g. groundwater well observations, river discharge) and remote sensing data (altimetry). In addition, we compare to GRACE and to snow, lake, river and sub-surface estimates from the Global Water Cycle Re-analysis product, independently derived through GRACE assimilation into a multi-model ensemble. The results demonstrate that the established calibration and data assimilation framework enables an improved fit of modeled TWSA with observations. Moreover, we show to what extent estimates of individual water compartments and fluxes improve. Eicker, A., Schumacher, M., Kusche, J., Döll, P., Müller Schmied, H. (2014): Calibration/Data Assimilation Approach for Integrating GRACE Data into the WaterGAP Global Hydrology Model (WGHM) Using an Ensemble

  11. Application of GRACE Data for Quantifying Mesoscale Groundwater Stress - Urucuia Aquifer System, Northeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stollberg, R.; Gonçalves, R. D.; Weiss, H.; Chang, H. K.

    2015-12-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission provides a couple of applications in hydrology research such as total water storage (TWS) changes monitoring, quantitative water cycle components estimation, drought monitoring and hydrological modelling. Limited spatial resolutions of gravity measurements and noise contamination can cause errors and uncertainty of the study objective. Therefore, several GRACE studies recommend application of GRACE data retrievals to areas of interests only larger 200,000 km². The Urucuia Aquifer System (UAS) represents a major strategic water resource for Brazil. UAS is located in the drought-stricken northeast of Brazil and its discharge covers about 30% of the São Francisco River water (4th largest river in South America). Hydrological monitoring of the UAS is of increased importance to guarantee future river water supply and related ecosystem services for the territories crossed. A pre-processed GRACE three-model-ensemble was used to account for TWS changes and a negative balance was revealed for the UAS territory indicating potential water stress. Individual water cycle components needed to be excluded from the total GRACE signal using supplemental data sets to characterize the remaining storage term equivalent to 'water stress'. Comprehensive hydrological ground measurements of precipitation, river discharge, hydraulic heads plus further climate remote-sensing data sources were taken into account trying to distinguish natural from anthropogenic groundwater stress. Consideration of climate data from global hydrological models showed an insufficient accuracy which is related to spatial scaling issues whereas the inclusion of available ground data could increase the overall significance of the GRACE signal for this study. GRACE-based TWS retrievals were applied successfully in combination with comprehensive hydrological monitoring data to quantify potential groundwater storage changes of the 120,000 km² large UAS.

  12. Stochastic filtering for determining gravity variations for decade-long time series of GRACE gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Davis, James L.; Hill, Emma M.; Tamisiea, Mark E.

    2016-04-01

    We present a new stochastic filter technique for statistically rigorous separation of gravity signals and correlated "stripe" noises in a series of monthly gravitational spherical harmonic coefficients (SHCs) produced by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission. Unlike the standard destriping process that removes the stripe contamination empirically, the stochastic approach simultaneously estimates gravity signals and correlated noises relying on covariance information that reflects both the spatial spectral features and temporal correlations among them. A major benefit of the technique is that by estimating the stripe noise in a Bayesian framework, we are able to propagate statistically rigorous covariances for the destriped GRACE SHCs, i.e. incorporating the impact of the destriping on the SHC uncertainties. The Bayesian approach yields a natural resolution for the gravity signal that reflects the correlated stripe noise, and thus achieve a kind of spatial smoothing in and of itself. No spatial Gaussian smoothing is formally required although it might be useful for some circumstances. Using the stochastic filter, we process a decade-length series of GRACE monthly gravity solutions, and compare the results with GRACE Tellus data products that are processed using the "standard" destriping procedure. The results show that the stochastic filter is able to remove the correlated stripe noise to a remarkable degree even without an explicit smoothing step. The estimates from the stochastic filter for each destriped GRACE field are suitable for Bayesian integration of GRACE with other geodetic measurements and models, and the statistically rigorous estimation of the time-varying rates and seasonal cycles in GRACE time series.

  13. Inter-annual precipitation changes as quadratic signals in the GRACE time-variable gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, R.; Chao, B. F.; Heki, K.

    2009-04-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission has been producing scientific results on mass variations on inter-annual timescales, e.g. melting of ice sheet in Greenland and mountain glaciers in Alaska, Eastern Africa drought, water level increase in Caspian Sea, etc. In these discussions only linear trends and the seasonal components have been analyzed in the monthly GRACE time series, whereas little attention has been paid so far to the existence of the quadratic changes which signify the temporal accelerations. With over 6 years of GRACE data and revisiting the time-variable gravity field of various regions, we find that such acceleration/deceleration terms are quite often significantly different from zero. They include East Africa, near Obi River, Caspian Sea, Black Sea, Central Asia, and southern South America, whereof discussions of linear trends without specifying the epochs are inadequate. Here we investigate geophysical implication of these quadratic terms; in particular gravity changes in land areas reflect, to a large extent, soil moisture variations. Soil moisture is the time integration of water fluxes, i.e. precipitation, evapotranspiration and runoff. Here we consider that the linear trend in precipitation is responsible for the quadratic change in gravity, and examine trends of observed precipitation in various regions from CMAP (Climate Prediction Center Merged Analysis of Precipitation). Thus, in order to compare linear trend in CMAP and acceleration in GRACE, we calculate month-to-month difference of equivalent water depth at GRACE grid points, and modeled them with seasonal variations and linear trends. We found good agreement between their geographical distributions although amplitudes are smaller in GRACE, meaning the quadratic gravity changes in the GRACE data do reflect inter-annual changes of precipitation fairly faithfully.

  14. A systematic impact assessment of GRACE error correlation on data assimilation in hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Maike; Kusche, Jürgen; Döll, Petra

    2016-06-01

    Recently, ensemble Kalman filters (EnKF) have found increasing application for merging hydrological models with total water storage anomaly (TWSA) fields from the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission. Previous studies have disregarded the effect of spatially correlated errors of GRACE TWSA products in their investigations. Here, for the first time, we systematically assess the impact of the GRACE error correlation structure on EnKF data assimilation into a hydrological model, i.e. on estimated compartmental and total water storages and model parameter values. Our investigations include (1) assimilating gridded GRACE-derived TWSA into the WaterGAP Global Hydrology Model and, simultaneously, calibrating its parameters; (2) introducing GRACE observations on different spatial scales; (3) modelling observation errors as either spatially white or correlated in the assimilation procedure, and (4) replacing the standard EnKF algorithm by the square root analysis scheme or, alternatively, the singular evolutive interpolated Kalman filter. Results of a synthetic experiment designed for the Mississippi River Basin indicate that the hydrological parameters are sensitive to TWSA assimilation if spatial resolution of the observation data is sufficiently high. We find a significant influence of spatial error correlation on the adjusted water states and model parameters for all implemented filter variants, in particular for subbasins with a large discrepancy between observed and initially simulated TWSA and for north-south elongated sub-basins. Considering these correlated errors, however, does not generally improve results: while some metrics indicate that it is helpful to consider the full GRACE error covariance matrix, it appears to have an adverse effect on others. We conclude that considering the characteristics of GRACE error correlation is at least as important as the selection of the spatial discretisation of TWSA observations, while the choice

  15. Establishing the Framework for Land Data Assimilation of GRACE Terrestrial Water Storage Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakumura, C.; Bettadpur, S. V.; Yang, Z. L.; Save, H.; McCullough, C.

    2015-12-01

    Assimilation of terrestrial water storage (TWS) data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission into current land surface models can correct model deficiencies due to errors in the model structure, atmospheric forcing datasets, parameters, etc. However, the assimilation process is complicated by spatial and temporal resolution discrepancies between the model and observational datasets, characterization of the error in each, and limitations of the algorithms used to calculate and update the model state. This study aims to establish a framework for hydrological data assimilation with GRACE. GRACE is an independent and accurate but coarse resolution terrestrial water storage dataset. While the models cannot attain the accuracy of GRACE, they are effective in interpretation and downscaling of the product and providing continuity over space and time. Accurate assimilation of GRACE TWS into LSMs thus will take the best characteristics of each and create a combined product that outperforms each individual source. More specifically, this framework entails a comprehensive analysis of the deficiencies and potential improvements of the satellite data products, the assimilation procedures and error characterization, and assimilation effectiveness. A daily sliding window mascon GRACE TWS product, presented previously, was developed to reduce smoothing in time and space during assimilation into the Community Land Model 4.0. The Ensemble Kalman Filter assimilation algorithms are analyzed and adapted for use with the new products, GRACE error information, and model characteristics. Additional assimilation tools such as Gaspari-Cohn localization and ensemble inflation are implemented and tuned for the model and observation properties. Analysis of the observational data, model data, sensitivity and effectiveness of the assimilation routines, and the assimilated results is done through regional comparison with independent in-situ datasets and external model

  16. GRACE Orbit and Gravity Field Recovery at GFZ Potsdam - First Experiences and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reigber, C.; Flechtner, F.; Koenig, R.; Meyer, U.; Neumayer, K.; Schmidt, R.; Schwintzer, P.; Zhu, S.

    2002-12-01

    Since the launch of the two GRACE satellites on March 17, 2002, both satellites follow each other in a distance of about 220 km in an almost polar, circular and 500 km high orbit. For orbit and long-wavelength gravity field recovery the GRACE mission concept follows CHAMP's configuration, i.e., GPS satellite-to-satellite tracking and accelerometry on each of the two satellites. The essentially new element is the K-band microwave link measuring the relative distance of one satellite with respect to the other in both directions with an ultra-high precision (few æm). To fully exploit this high precision, the requirements on the performance and precision of the accelerometers to measure non-gravitational orbit perturbations are one order of magnitude more stringent than on CHAMP. The goal of GRACE is a distinct progress in global gravity field recovery from space with respect to accuracy and spatial as well as temporal resolution. First experiences of the GFZ project team with the instrument and sensor performance on the GRACE satellites, the parametrization of the data in precise orbit determination and first tentative gravity field solutions are discussed and compared with CHAMP related results. GRACE data processing at GFZ Potsdam is part of the GRACE level-2 product generation and validation, which is shared with UTEX/CSR and NASA/JPL. On level-1, GFZ Potsdam is responsible for providing high frequency atmosphere and ocean mass variation models to avoid alias effects in GRACE's envisaged sequence of monthly gravity field solutions. Gravity de-aliasing products quality will be discussed.

  17. Tackling mass redistribution phenomena by time-dependent GRACE- and terrestrial gravity observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weise, A.; Kroner, C.; Abe, M.; Creutzfeldt, B.; Förste, C.; Güntner, A.; Ihde, J.; Jahr, T.; Jentzsch, G.; Wilmes, H.; Wziontek, H.; Petrovic, S.

    2012-09-01

    Time variable gravity field models derived from the satellite mission GRACE have been demonstrated to be consistent with water mass variations in the global hydrological cycle. Independent observations are provided by terrestrial measurements. In order to achieve a maximum of reliability and information gain, ground-based gravity observations may be deployed for comparison with the gravity field variations derived from the GRACE satellite mission. In this context, the data of the network of superconducting gravimeters (SG) of the 'Global Geodynamics Project' (GGP) are of particular interest. This study is focused on the dense SG network in Central Europe with its long-term gravity observations. It is shown that after the separation and reduction of local hydrological effects in the SG observations especially for subsurface stations, the time-variable gravity signals from GRACE agree well with the terrestrial observations from the SG station cluster. Station stability of the SG sites with respect to vertical deformations was checked by GNSS based observations. Most of the variability can be explained by loading effects due to changes in continental water storage, and, in general, the stability of all stations has been confirmed. From comparisons based on correlation and coherence analyses in combination with the root mean square (RMS) variability of the time series emerges, that the maximum correspondence between the SG and GRACE time series is achieved when filtering the GRACE data with Gaussian filters of about 1000 km filter length, which is in accordance with previous publications. Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOF) analysis was applied to the gravity time series in order to identify common characteristic spatial and temporal patterns. The high correspondence of the first modes for GRACE and SG data implies that the first EOF mode represents a large-scale (Central European) time-variable gravity signal seen by both the GRACE satellites and the SG cluster.

  18. Monitoring and Characterizing Seasonal Drought, Water Supply Pattern and Their Impact on Vegetation Growth Using Satellite Soil Moisture Data, GRACE Water Storage and In-situ Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A, G.; Velicogna, I.; Kimball, J. S.; Kim, Y.; Colliander, A.; Njoku, E. G.

    2015-12-01

    We combine soil moisture (SM) data from AMSR-E, AMSR-2 and SMAP, terrestrial water storage (TWS) changes from GRACE, in-situ groundwater measurements and atmospheric moisture data to delineate and characterize the evolution of drought and its impact on vegetation growth. GRACE TWS provides spatially continuous observations of total terrestrial water storage changes and regional drought extent, persistence and severity, while satellite derived soil moisture estimates provide enhanced delineation of plant-available soil moisture. Together these data provide complementary metrics quantifying available plant water supply. We use these data to investigate the supply changes from water components at different depth in relation to satellite based vegetation metrics, including vegetation greenness (NDVI) measures from MODIS and related higher order productivity (GPP) before, during and following the major drought events observed in the continental US for the past 14 years. We observe consistent trends and significant correlations between monthly time series of TWS, SM, NDVI and GPP. We study how changes in atmosphere moisture stress and coupling of water storage components at different depth impact on the spatial and temporal correlation between TWS, SM and vegetation metrics. In Texas, we find that surface SM and GRACE TWS agree with each other in general, and both capture the underlying water supply constraints to vegetation growth. Triggered by a transit increase in precipitation following the 2011 hydrological drought, vegetation productivity in Texas shows more sensitivity to surface SM than TWS. In the Great Plains, the correspondence between TWS and vegetation productivity is modulated by temperature-induced atmosphere moisture stress and by the coupling between surface soil moisture and groundwater through irrigation.

  19. Simulating cross-polar pollution transport during POLARCAT-GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodemann, H.; Arnold, S.; Burkhart, J.; Monks, S.; Pommier, M.; Stohl, A.; Turquety, S.

    2009-04-01

    The POLARCAT-GRACE campaign was targeted at aircraft and satellite-remote sensing observations of biomass burning emission transport into the Arctic. During two episodes (2-5 July and 7-10 July) extended smoke plumes originating from large Siberian forest fires were advected directly across the North Pole and into the European Arctic. The focus of this work is on the ability of models to correctly simulate cross-polar pollution transport. Close to the pole, depending on the underlying horizontal grid in a model, numerical artifacts can be created, which potentially lead to considerable latitudinal displacements and structural distortion of pollution features. Here we compare transport simulations of total column carbon monoxide (CO) for the FLEXPART model (with and without polar stereographic projection) and the TOMCAT model with retrievals of total column CO from the IASI passive infrared sensor onboard the MetOp-A satellite. The multi-model approach allows to separate the influences of meteorological fields, model realisation, and grid type on the plume structure. First results indicate very good agreement between simulated and observed total column CO fields.

  20. Loop corrections and graceful exit in string cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foffa, Stefano; Maggiore, Michele; Sturani, Riccardo

    1999-07-01

    We examine the effect of perturbative string loops on the cosmological pre-big-bang evolution. We study loop corrections derived from heterotic string theory compactified on a ZN orbifold and we consider the effect of the all-order loop corrections to the Kähler potential and of the corrections to gravitational couplings, including both threshold corrections and corrections due to the mixed Kähler-gravitational anomaly. We find that string loops can drive the evolution into the region of the parameter space where a graceful exit is in principle possible, and we find solutions that, in the string frame, connect smoothly the superinflationary pre-big-bang evolution to a phase where the curvature and the derivative of the dilaton are decreasing. We also find that at a critical coupling the loop corrections to the Kähler potential induce a ghost-like instability, i.e. the kinetic term of the dilaton vanishes. This is similar to what happens in Seiberg-Witten theory and signals the transition to a new regime where the light modes in the effective action are different and are related to the original ones by S-duality. In a string context, this means that we enter a D-brane dominated phase.

  1. Mass Loss in Greenland and Antarctica from 1993 to 2013 Determined from a Combination of GRACE and SLR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talpe, Matthieu; Nerem, Steven; Lemoine, Frank; Chinn, Doug; Riva, Riccardo; Pilinski, Emily

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this work is to extend the record of ice melt derived from space-borne gravity prior to the GRACE mission. We merge GRACE fields with conventional tracking data spanning 1993 to the present. The conventional tracking data consist of satellite laser ranging (SLR) and Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) data and are provided as weekly global fields of degree and order five. Their multi-decade timespan complements the monthly fields of GRACE of degree and order 60 that start in 2003 and will end when the GRACE mission terminates. The two datasets are combined via an empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis, whereby the GRACE fields are first decomposed into spatial and temporal modes that are reflective of interannual gravity variability. Conventional tracking data temporal modes are then obtained by fitting GRACE spatial modes via normal equations; combining those temporal modes with GRACE spatial modes yields the reconstructed global gravity fields. We will show that the reconstructed Greenland and Antarctica mass changes capture the recent behavior of the ice melt over 1993 - 2013. The accelerating term, linear trend, and mass changes match with existing literature values, specifically, with similar GRACE analyses over 2002 - 2013 and with glaciological and altimetric evidence prior to the GRACE mission. We will also show current efforts to mitigate the limits of the reconstructions (e.g., in the EOF fitting process, the accuracy of the SLR/DORIS solutions, etc.) and their impact on the evolution and spatial accuracy of mass change in Greenland and Antarctica. The technique also has important implications for bridging the potential gap in global gravity coverage between the GRACE and GRACE Follow On missions, slated to launch in 2017.

  2. Assimilating GRACE terrestrial water storage data into a conceptual hydrology model for the River Rhine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiastuti, E.; Steele-Dunne, S. C.; Gunter, B.; Weerts, A.; van de Giesen, N.

    2009-12-01

    Terrestrial water storage (TWS) is a key component of the terrestrial and global hydrological cycles, and plays a major role in the Earth’s climate. The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) twin satellite mission provided the first space-based dataset of TWS variations, albeit with coarse resolution and limited accuracy. Here, we examine the value of assimilating GRACE observations into a well-calibrated conceptual hydrology model of the Rhine river basin. In this study, the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and smoother (EnKS) were applied to assimilate the GRACE TWS variation data into the HBV-96 rainfall run-off model, from February 2003 to December 2006. Two GRACE datasets were used, the DMT-1 models produced at TU Delft, and the CSR-RL04 models produced by UT-Austin . Each center uses its own data processing and filtering methods, yielding two different estimates of TWS variations and therefore two sets of assimilated TWS estimates. To validate the results, the model estimated discharge after the data assimilation was compared with measured discharge at several stations. As expected, the updated TWS was generally somewhere between the modeled and observed TWS in both experiments and the variance was also lower than both the prior error covariance and the assumed GRACE observation error. However, the impact on the discharge was found to depend heavily on the assimilation strategy used, in particular on how the TWS increments were applied to the individual storage terms of the hydrology model.

  3. The method of tailored sensitivity kernels for GRACE mass change estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groh, Andreas; Horwath, Martin

    2016-04-01

    To infer mass changes (such as mass changes of an ice sheet) from time series of GRACE spherical harmonic solutions, two basic approaches (with many variants) exist: The regional integration approach (or direct approach) is based on surface mass changes (equivalent water height, EWH) from GRACE and integrates those with specific integration kernels. The forward modeling approach (or mascon approach, or inverse approach) prescribes a finite set of mass change patterns and adjusts the amplitudes of those patterns (in a least squares sense) to the GRACE gravity field changes. The present study reviews the theoretical framework of both approaches. We recall that forward modeling approaches ultimately estimate mass changes by linear functionals of the gravity field changes. Therefore, they implicitly apply sensitivity kernels and may be considered as special realizations of the regional integration approach. We show examples for sensitivity kernels intrinsic to forward modeling approaches. We then propose to directly tailor sensitivity kernels (or in other words: mass change estimators) by a formal optimization procedure that minimizes the sum of propagated GRACE solution errors and leakage errors. This approach involves the incorporation of information on the structure of GRACE errors and the structure of those mass change signals that are most relevant for leakage errors. We discuss the realization of this method, as applied within the ESA "Antarctic Ice Sheet CCI (Climate Change Initiative)" project. Finally, results for the Antarctic Ice Sheet in terms of time series of mass changes of individual drainage basins and time series of gridded EWH changes are presented.

  4. Groundwater storage changes from GRACE satellite in the Southern Gobi Region of Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemer, B.; Yanping, C.; Bayanzul, B. B.; Altangerel, E. E.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater is an important resource in the Southern Gobi Region of Mongolia because rainfall and surface water availability are severely limited and the demands are expected to increase rapidly with the development of mining and new population centers. Groundwater systems are more complex and yet its distribution and quantity are poorly known. The purpose of the research is to evaluate the potential utility of GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellites to monitor groundwater storage in the arid area. Regional groundwater storage changes in SGR are estimated using monthly GRACE total water storage change data. Groundwater storage change estimates are compared to groundwater level measurements of 66 shallow dug wells and 72 deep boreholes for the period 2004-2012. Groundwater storage decreases during the cold season and increases during the warm season. Seasonal groundwater change calculated from GRACE total water storage is highly correlated to groundwater level measurements in shallow aquifers. There is no correlation between groundwater storage changes derived from GRACE and deep aquifer. The result indicates that GRACE can be used to monitor large area where groundwater observation is limited, especially unconfined shallow aquifers.

  5. GRACE storage-runoff hystereses reveal the dynamics of regional watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sproles, E. A.; Leibowitz, S. G.; Reager, J. T.; Wigington, P. J., Jr.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Patil, S. D.

    2015-07-01

    We characterize how regional watersheds function as simple, dynamic systems through a series of hysteresis loops using measurements from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites. These loops illustrate the temporal relationship between runoff and terrestrial water storage in three regional-scale watersheds (> 150 000 km2) of the Columbia River Basin, USA and Canada. The shape and size of the hysteresis loops are controlled by the climate, topography, and geology of the watershed. The direction of the hystereses for the GRACE signals moves in opposite directions from the isolated groundwater hystereses. The subsurface water (soil moisture and groundwater) hystereses more closely resemble the storage-runoff relationship of a soil matrix. While the physical processes underlying these hystereses are inherently complex, the vertical integration of terrestrial water in the GRACE signal encapsulates the processes that govern the non-linear function of regional-scale watersheds. We use this process-based understanding to test how GRACE data can be applied prognostically to predict seasonal runoff (mean Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency of 0.91) and monthly runoff during the low flow/high demand month of August (mean Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency of 0.77) in all three watersheds. The global nature of GRACE data allows this same methodology to be applied in other regional-scale studies, and could be particularly useful in regions with minimal data and in trans-boundary watersheds.

  6. Low-degree gravity change from GPS data of COSMIC and GRACE satellite missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tingjung; Hwang, Cheinway; Tseng, Tzu-Pang; Chao, B. F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper demonstrates estimation of time-varying gravity harmonic coefficients from GPS data of COSMIC and GRACE satellite missions. The kinematic orbits of COSMIC and GRACE are determined to the cm-level accuracy. The NASA Goddard's GEODYN II software is used to model the orbit dynamics of COSMIC and GRACE, including the effect of a static gravity field. The surface forces are estimated per one orbital period. Residual orbits generated from kinematic and reference orbits serve as observables to determine the harmonic coefficients in the weighted-constraint least-squares. The monthly COSMIC and GRACE GPS data from September 2006 to December 2007 (16 months) are processed to estimate harmonic coefficients to degree 5. The geoid variations from the GPS and CSR RL04 (GRACE) solutions show consistent patterns over space and time, especially in regions of active hydrological changes. The monthly GPS-derived second zonal coefficient closely resembles the SLR-derived and CSR RL04 values, and third and fourth zonal coefficients resemble the CSR RL04 values.

  7. "A Prairie Childhood" by Edith Abbott: An Excerpt from "The Children's Champion," a Biography of Grace Abbott

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, John

    2003-01-01

    Grace Abbott's courageous struggles--to protect the rights of immigrants, to increase the role of women in government, and to improve the lives of all children--are filled with adventurous tales of the remarkable human ability to seek out suffering and to do something about it. "A Prairie Childhood" is an excerpt from the Grace Abbott biography…

  8. Grace and Courtesy: A Human Responsibility. AMI/USA Conference (Oak Brook, Illinois, July 23-26, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Montessori International of the United States, Inc., Rochester, NY.

    This conference proceedings compile presentations from a 1998 meeting of the American Montessori International of the United States, focusing on the importance of grace and courtesy in children's lives and in Montessori education. The papers presented are: (1) "Grace--The Felicity of Being" (Renilde Montessori); (2) "A Montessori Community for…

  9. Predictive modeling of cholera using GRACE and TRMM satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutla, A.; Akanda, A. S. S.; Colwell, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    Cholera outbreaks can be classified in three forms- epidemic (sudden or seasonal outbreaks), endemic (recurrence and persistence of the disease for several consecutive years) and mixed-mode endemic (combination of certain epidemic and endemic conditions) with significant spatial and temporal heterogeneity. Endemic cholera is related to floods and droughts in regions where water and sanitation infrastructure are inadequate or insufficient. With more than a decade of terrestrial water storage (TWS) data obtained from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), understanding dynamics of river discharge is now feasible. We explored lead-lag relationships between TWS in the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM) basin and endemic cholera in Bangladesh. Since bimodal seasonal peaks in cholera in Bangladesh occur during the spring and autumn season, two separate models, between TWS and disease time series (2002 to 2010) were developed. TWS, hence water availability, showed an asymmetrical, strong association with spring (τ=-0.53; p<0.001) and autumn (τ=0.45; p<0.001) cholera prevalence up to five to six months in advance. One unit (cm of water) decrease in water availability in the basin increased odds of above normal cholera by 24% [confidence interval (CI) 20-31%; p<0.05] in the spring season, while an increase in regional water by one unit, through floods, increased odds of above average cholera in the autumn by 29% [CI:22-33%; p<0.05]. Epidemic cholera is related with warm temperatures and heavy rainfall. Using TRMM data for several locations in Asia and Africa, probability of cholera increases 18% [CI:15-23%; p<0.05] after heavy precipitation resulted in a societal conditions where access to safe water and sanitation was disrupted. Results from mechanistic modeling framework using systems approach that include satellite based hydroclimatic information with tradition disease transmission models will also be presented.

  10. GRACES observations of young [α/Fe]-rich stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, David; Casagrande, Luca; Venn, Kim A.; Chené, André-Nicolas; Keown, Jared; Malo, Lison; Martioli, Eder; Alves-Brito, Alan; Asplund, Martin; Dotter, Aaron; Martell, Sarah L.; Meléndez, Jorge; Schlesinger, Katharine J.

    2016-06-01

    We measure chemical abundance ratios and radial velocities in four massive (i.e. young) [α/Fe]-rich red giant stars using high-resolution high-S/N spectra from ESPaDOnS fed by Gemini-GRACES. Our differential analysis ensures that our chemical abundances are on the same scale as the Alves-Brito et al. (2010) study of bulge, thin, and thick disc red giants. We confirm that the program stars have enhanced [α/Fe] ratios and are slightly metal poor. Aside from lithium enrichment in one object, the program stars exhibit no chemical abundance anomalies when compared to giant stars of similar metallicity throughout the Galaxy. This includes the elements Li, O, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Ni, Cu, Ba, La, and Eu. Therefore, there are no obvious chemical signatures that can help to reveal the origin of these unusual stars. While our new observations show that only one star (not the Li-rich object) exhibits a radial velocity variation, simulations indicate that we cannot exclude the possibility that all four could be binaries. In addition, we find that two (possibly three) stars show evidence for an infrared excess, indicative of a debris disc. This is consistent with these young [α/Fe]-rich stars being evolved blue stragglers, suggesting their apparent young age is a consequence of a merger or mass transfer. We would expect a binary fraction of ˜50 per cent or greater for the entire sample of these stars, but the signs of the circumbinary disc may have been lost since these features can have short time-scales. Radial velocity monitoring is needed to confirm the blue straggler origin.

  11. Estimation and Validation of Oceanic Mass Circulation from the GRACE Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boy, J.-P.; Rowlands, D. D.; Sabaka, T. J.; Luthcke, S. B.; Lemoine, F. G.

    2011-01-01

    Since the launch of the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) in March 2002, the Earth's surface mass variations have been monitored with unprecedented accuracy and resolution. Compared to the classical spherical harmonic solutions, global high-resolution mascon solutions allows the retrieval of mass variations with higher spatial and temporal sampling (2 degrees and 10 days). We present here the validation of the GRACE global mascon solutions by comparing mass estimates to a set of about 100 ocean bottom pressure (OSP) records, and show that the forward modelling of continental hydrology prior to the inversion of the K-band range rate data allows better estimates of ocean mass variations. We also validate our GRACE results to OSP variations modelled by different state-of-the-art ocean general circulation models, including ECCO (Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean) and operational and reanalysis from the MERCATOR project.

  12. GRace: a MATLAB-based application for fitting the discrimination-association model.

    PubMed

    Stefanutti, Luca; Vianello, Michelangelo; Anselmi, Pasquale; Robusto, Egidio

    2014-10-28

    The Implicit Association Test (IAT) is a computerized two-choice discrimination task in which stimuli have to be categorized as belonging to target categories or attribute categories by pressing, as quickly and accurately as possible, one of two response keys. The discrimination association model has been recently proposed for the analysis of reaction time and accuracy of an individual respondent to the IAT. The model disentangles the influences of three qualitatively different components on the responses to the IAT: stimuli discrimination, automatic association, and termination criterion. The article presents General Race (GRace), a MATLAB-based application for fitting the discrimination association model to IAT data. GRace has been developed for Windows as a standalone application. It is user-friendly and does not require any programming experience. The use of GRace is illustrated on the data of a Coca Cola-Pepsi Cola IAT, and the results of the analysis are interpreted and discussed.

  13. On the Simulation of the Laser Ranging Instrument for GRACE Follow-on

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbeheshti, N.; Mueller, V.; Hewitson, M.; Heinzel, G.

    2015-12-01

    GRACE Follow-On will be the first satellite mission to use inter-satellite laser interferometryin space. The laser ranging instrument (LRI) will provide two additional measurements compared to GRACE mission: Interferometric inter-satellite ranging with nanometer precisionand inter-satellite pointing information from Differential wavefront Sensing.We will discuss these two LRI measurements and errors; and present models how to simulate two major noise sources in LRI, namely pointing jitter and laser frequency noise.The LRI simulated data will be available to the geodesy community by Geo-Q (Relativistic Geodesy and Gravimetry with Quantum Sensors) project before the GRACE Follow-On launch to enable the timely development of data analysis tools around the world.The LRI simulation will demonstrate potentials and limitations of the LRI measurements for gravity field recovery.

  14. A modified acceleration-based monthly gravity field solution from GRACE data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiujie; Shen, Yunzhong; Chen, Wu; Zhang, Xingfu; Hsu, Houze; Ju, Xiaolei

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes an alternative acceleration approach for determining GRACE monthly gravity field models. The main differences compared to the traditional acceleration approach can be summarized as: (1) The position errors of GRACE orbits in the functional model are taken into account; (2) The range ambiguity is eliminated via the difference of the range measurements and (3) The mean acceleration equation is formed based on Cowell integration. Using this developed approach, a new time-series of GRACE monthly solution spanning the period January 2003 to December 2010, called Tongji_Acc RL01, has been derived. The annual signals from the Tongji_Acc RL01 time-series agree well with those from the GLDAS model. The performance of Tongji_Acc RL01 shows that this new model is comparable with the RL05 models released by CSR and JPL as well as with the RL05a model released by GFZ.

  15. Simulation Study of a Follow-on Gravity Mission to GRACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, Bryant D.; Nerem, R. S.; Luthcke, Scott B.

    2012-01-01

    The gravity recovery and climate experiment (GRACE) has been providing monthly estimates of the Earth's time-variable gravity field since its launch in March 2002. The GRACE gravity estimates are used to study temporal mass variations on global and regional scales, which are largely caused by a redistribution of water mass in the Earth system. The accuracy of the GRACE gravity fields are primarily limited by the satellite-to-satellite range-rate measurement noise, accelerometer errors, attitude errors, orbit errors, and temporal aliasing caused by unmodeled high-frequency variations in the gravity signal. Recent work by Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp., Boulder, CO has resulted in the successful development of an interferometric laser ranging system to specifically address the limitations of the K-band microwave ranging system that provides the satellite-to-satellite measurements for the GRACE mission. Full numerical simulations are performed for several possible configurations of a GRACE Follow-On (GFO) mission to determine if a future satellite gravity recovery mission equipped with a laser ranging system will provide better estimates of time-variable gravity, thus benefiting many areas of Earth systems research. The laser ranging system improves the range-rate measurement precision to approximately 0.6 nm/s as compared to approx. 0.2 micro-seconds for the GRACE K-band microwave ranging instrument. Four different mission scenarios are simulated to investigate the effect of the better instrument at two different altitudes. The first pair of simulated missions is flown at GRACE altitude (approx. 480 km) assuming on-board accelerometers with the same noise characteristics as those currently used for GRACE. The second pair of missions is flown at an altitude of approx. 250 km which requires a drag-free system to prevent satellite re-entry. In addition to allowing a lower satellite altitude, the drag-free system also reduces the errors associated with the

  16. Using the Community Land Model to Assess Uncertainty in Basin Scale GRACE-Based Groundwater Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, S. C.; Lawrence, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    One method for interpreting the variability in total water storage observed by GRACE is to partition the integrated GRACE measurement into its component storage reservoirs based on information provided by hydrological models. Such models, often designed to be used in couple Earth System models, simulate the stocks and fluxes of moisture through the land surface and subsurface. One application of this method attempts to isolate groundwater changes by removing modeled surface water, snow, and soil moisture changes from GRACE total water storage estimates. Human impacts on groundwater variability can be estimated by further removing model estimates of climate-driven groundwater changes. Errors in modeled water storage components directly affect the residual groundwater estimates. Here we examine the influence of model structure and process representation on soil moisture and groundwater uncertainty using the Community Land Model, with a particular focus on basins in the western U.S.

  17. GRace: a MATLAB-based application for fitting the discrimination-association model.

    PubMed

    Stefanutti, Luca; Vianello, Michelangelo; Anselmi, Pasquale; Robusto, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    The Implicit Association Test (IAT) is a computerized two-choice discrimination task in which stimuli have to be categorized as belonging to target categories or attribute categories by pressing, as quickly and accurately as possible, one of two response keys. The discrimination association model has been recently proposed for the analysis of reaction time and accuracy of an individual respondent to the IAT. The model disentangles the influences of three qualitatively different components on the responses to the IAT: stimuli discrimination, automatic association, and termination criterion. The article presents General Race (GRace), a MATLAB-based application for fitting the discrimination association model to IAT data. GRace has been developed for Windows as a standalone application. It is user-friendly and does not require any programming experience. The use of GRace is illustrated on the data of a Coca Cola-Pepsi Cola IAT, and the results of the analysis are interpreted and discussed. PMID:26054728

  18. Vertical crustal movement around the southeastern Tibetan Plateau constrained by GPS and GRACE data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Ming; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Wang, Qingliang; Cui, Duxin; Qin, Shanlan

    2016-03-01

    Using measurements of continuous GPS stations and GRACE across the southeastern Tibetan Plateau, we found that the GRACE-derived vertical displacements are highly correlated with GPS-modeled vertical annual and semiannual displacements, which demonstrates that the vertical seasonal variations on ground surface are mainly caused by hydrological mass loading. After removing GRACE-modeled seasonal variations from the GPS time series, we used a stacking technique to filter out the common mode errors. Then we estimated the best noise model for the filtered time series, which can be best characterized by power law noise model. Finally, we determined the rates of vertical crustal movement of southeastern Tibetan Plateau. Our results suggest that the southeastern Tibetan Plateau is undergoing uplift, whereas the southern Sichuan-Yunnan fragment is subsiding with respect to the region to the north. The assumption of uniform extension throughout the crust does not explain the subsidence of southern Sichuan-Yunnan fragment.

  19. Acceleration of the Greenland ice sheet mass loss as observed by GRACE: Confidence and sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svendsen, P. L.; Andersen, O. B.; Nielsen, A. A.

    2013-02-01

    We examine the scale and spatial distribution of the mass change acceleration in Greenland and its statistical significance, using processed gravimetric data from the GRACE mission for the period 2002-2011. Three different data products - the CNES/GRGS, DMT-1b and GGFC GRACE solutions - have been used, all revealing an accelerating mass loss in Greenland, though with significant local differences between the three datasets. Compensating for leakage effects, we obtain acceleration values of -18.6 Gt/yr2 for CNES/GRGS, -8.8 Gt/yr2 for DMT-1b, and -14.8 Gt/yr2 for GGFC. We find considerable mass loss acceleration in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, some of which will leak into the values for Greenland, depending on the approach used, and for our computations the leakage has been estimated at up to -4.7 Gt/yr2. The length of the time series of the GRACE data makes a huge difference in establishing an acceleration of the data. For both 10-day and monthly GRACE solutions, an observed acceleration on the order of 10-20 Gt/yr2 is shown to require more than 5 yrs of data to establish with statistical significance. In order to provide an independent evaluation, ICESat laser altimetry data have been smoothed to match the resolution of the GRACE solutions. This gives us an estimated upper bound for the acceleration of about -29.7 Gt/yr2 for the period 2003-2009, consistent with the acceleration values and corresponding confidence intervals found with GRACE data.

  20. Spurious barometric pressure acceleration in Antarctica and propagation into GRACE Antarctic mass change estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byeong-Hoon; Eom, Jooyoung; Seo, Ki-Weon; Wilson, Clark R.

    2016-08-01

    Apparent acceleration in Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Antarctic ice mass time-series may reflect both ice discharge and surface mass balance contributions. However, a recent study suggests there is also contamination from errors in atmospheric pressure de-aliasing fields [European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) operational products] used during GRACE data processing. To further examine this question, we compare GRACE atmospheric pressure de-aliasing (GAA) fields with in situ surface pressure data from coastal and inland stations. Differences between the two are likely due to GAA errors, and provide a measure of error in GRACE solutions. Time-series of differences at individual weather stations are fit to four presumed error components: annual sinusoids, a linear trend, an acceleration term and jumps at times of known ECMWF model changes. Using data from inland stations, we estimate that atmospheric pressure error causes an acceleration error of about +7.0 Gt yr-2, which is large relative to prior GRACE estimates of Antarctic ice mass acceleration in the range of -12 to -14 Gt yr-2. We also estimate apparent acceleration rates from other barometric pressure (reanalysis) fields, including ERA-Interim, MERRA and NCEP/DOE. When integrated over East Antarctica, the four mass acceleration estimates (from GAA and the three reanalysis fields) vary considerably (by ˜2-16 Gt yr-2). This shows the need for further effort to improve atmospheric mass estimates in this region of sparse in situ observations, in order to use GRACE observations to measure ice mass acceleration and related sea level change.

  1. Annual and seasonal water storage changes detected from GRACE data in the La Plata Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Ayelen; Pacino, María Cristina

    2012-12-01

    The gravity does not remain constant, but changes over time depending on the redistribution of the masses. Aquatic environments, like a river basin, perform important functions in nature such as control of climate, floods and nutrients; and they also provide goods and services for humanity. To monitor these environments at large spatial scales, the satellite gravity mission GRACE provides time-variable gravity field models that reflect the Earth's gravity field variations due to mass transport processes, like continental water storage variations. The La Plata Basin is the second largest in South America and is a sample of the abundance, variety and quality of natural resources and possibilities offered in connection with the production of goods and services. The objective of this work is to analyze GRACE capability to monitor the water storage variations in the La Plata Basin. Firstly, GRACE solutions from four different processing centers are used to estimate the gravity trend and gravity amplitude over this basin. Afterwards, the calculated hydrological signal is used to obtain mass change models over this hydrographic system's area, using two different methods and for the period from 2002 to 2009. Next, the annual and seasonal water storage changes from GRACE solutions are validated in Argentina by rainfall data over the time periods where extreme weather conditions took place. The results indicate that GRACE detected the variations of the continental water storage in the La Plata Basin, and particularly, it detected the important decrease in the South of the basin. Moreover, a coherency between the estimates of water mass changes and rainfall data was found, which shows that GRACE also detected extreme weather events (such as drought and intense rain episodes) that occurred in the 2004-2009 period in Argentina.

  2. Interannual mass variation over Chao Phraya river basin observed by GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Keiko; Fukuda, Yoichi; Nakaegawa, Toshiyuki; Hasegawa, Takashi; Taniguchi, Makoto

    2010-05-01

    A project to assess the effects of human activities on the subsurface environment in Asian developing cities has been in progress (Research Institute for Humanity and Nature, Japan, 2009). Bangkok, Thailand is one of the study cities in this project. Using GRACE satellite gravity data of 2002 to 2009, we recovered landwater mass variation over the Chao Phraya river basin, where Bangkok is located on the downstream. The result shows that a negative interannual mass trend was observed over the Chao Phraya river basin from 2002 to the beginning of 2005, and after that, no significant trend was observed up to 2009. Over Bangkok and the surrounding area, serious groundwater decrease has been reported because of the previous excessive pumping accompanying development of the city. One of our concerns is whether the GRACE-derived negative trend from 2002 to 2005 has some relationship with the previous groundwater pumping. Thus, we firstly compared the GRACE-derived mass variation with a groundwater storage variation calculated by a regional numerical groundwater model (Yamanaka, personal communication, 2009). The result shows that the model-estimated confined groundwater storage shows positive interannual trend over the GRACE mission time period, which is in contrast to GRACE-derived negative mass change. Further, the magnitude of the confined groundwater storage change is much smaller than that of the GRACE-derived mass change. Thus, it is expected that the negative mass trend was not caused by regional confined groundwater decrease. On the other hand, the terrestrial water storage variation derived from global scale hydrological model shows similar change with the GRACE-derived mass variation. Further, similar mass trend changes at the beginning of 2005 are observed not only over Chao Phraya basin, but over several other areas in the world, e.g. Africa, Antarctica etc. Thus, we supposed that the negative mass change over Chao Phraya basin does not mainly come from

  3. Quantifying Modern Recharge to the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System: Inferences from GRACE and Land Surface Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, A.; Sultan, M.; Ahmed, M.; Yan, E.

    2014-12-01

    The Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System (NSAS) is shared by Egypt, Libya, Chad and Sudanand is one of the largest (area: ~ 2 × 106 km2) groundwater systems in the world. Despite its importance to the population of these countries, major hydrological parameters such as modern recharge and extraction rates remain poorly investigated given: (1) the large extent of the NSAS, (2) the absence of comprehensive monitoring networks, (3) the general inaccessibility of many of the NSAS regions, (4) difficulties in collecting background information, largely included in unpublished governmental reports, and (5) limited local funding to support the construction of monitoring networks and/or collection of field and background datasets. Data from monthly Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) gravity solutions were processed (Gaussian smoothed: 100 km; rescaled) and used to quantify the modern recharge to the NSAS during the period from January 2003 to December 2012. To isolate the groundwater component in GRACE data, the soil moisture and river channel storages were removed using the outputs from the most recent Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5). GRACE-derived recharge calculations were performed over the southern NSAS outcrops (area: 835 × 103 km2) in Sudan and Chad that receive average annual precipitation of 65 km3 (77.5 mm). GRACE-derived recharge rates were estimated at 2.79 ± 0.98 km3/yr (3.34 ± 1.17 mm/yr). If we take into account the total annual extraction rates (~ 0.4 km3; CEDARE, 2002) from Chad and Sudan the average annual recharge rate for the NSAS could reach up to ~ 3.20 ± 1.18 km3/yr (3.84 ± 1.42 mm/yr). Our recharge rates estimates are similar to those calculated using (1) groundwater flow modelling in the Central Sudan Rift Basins (4-8 mm/yr; Abdalla, 2008), (2) WaterGAP global scale groundwater recharge model (< 5 mm/yr, Döll and Fiedler, 2008), and (3) chloride tracer in Sudan (3.05 mm/yr; Edmunds et al. 1988). Given the available global

  4. Setup assessment for assimilating GRACE observations into the Australian Water Resource Assessment (AWRA) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaki, Mehdi; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Schumacher, Maike; Van Dijk, Albert; Kuhn, Michael; Awange, Joseph; Forootan, Ehsan

    2016-04-01

    Hydrological models have usually been used to simulate variations in water storage compartments resulting from changes in fluxes (i.e., precipitation, evapotranspiration) considering physical or conceptual frameworks. In an effort to improve the simulation of storage compartments, this research investigated the benefits of assimilating the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) derived terrestrial water storage (TWS) anomalies into the AWRA (Australian Water Resource Assessment) model using an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) approach in 2009. The Murray-Darling Basin (MDB), which is Australia's biggest river system, was selected to perform the assimilation. Our investigations address (i) the optimal implementation of the EnKF, including sensitivity to ensemble size, localization length scale, observational errors correlations, inflation and stochastic parameterization of forcing terms, and (ii) the best strategy for assimilating GRACE data, which are available at different spatial resolutions (few hundred kilometres). Our motivation to select EnKF was due to its promising performance in previous studies to deal with the nonlinearity and high-dimensionality of hydrological models. However, the small size of ensembles might represent a critical issue for its success, since the statistical state of the system might not be well represented. Therefore, in this study, we analysed the relation between ensemble size and the performance of assimilation process. Previous studies have demonstrated that GRACE can be used to enhance the performance of models. However, it is very difficult to deal with its relatively low spatial resolution. Furthermore, assimilation of GRACE TWS measurements at different spatial resolution may result in different degree of improvements. Therefore, attempts were made here to find an optimal assimilation resolution of GRACE TWS observations into AWRA over MDB. Eventually, a localization approach was applied to modify the error covariance

  5. Estimating sub-monthly TWS using MODIS and GRACE satellite observations, a case study over Tonlé Sap floodplain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele-Dunne, S. C.; Tangdamrongsub, N.; Ditmar, P.; Gunter, B. C.; Sutanudjaja, E.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of Terrestrial Water Storage (TWS) can provide valuable information that can be used to improve our understanding of the hydrological cycle and the impact of extreme climate events. Global TWS observations are currently only available from the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment satellite mission (GRACE) at monthly time scales. In this study, we present a new approach to derive the sub-monthly TWS variation over a regularly inundated area by using MODIS reflectance data in addition to GRACE solutions. In the "training" phase, monthly TWS are computed from filtered GRACE solutions. A signal restoration method is applied to correct for signal leakage caused by filtering. In parallel, a time-series of mean monthly inundated area estimates is computed based on the Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI), derived from MODIS data. The training phase completes by finding an empirical relationship between the inundated area and the GRACE-based TWS variations, using a regression analysis. Then, the estimated parameters can be used to convert inundated area estimates into TWS variations without a further need in GRACE data. This approach has 3 major advantages over the usage of GRACE data alone. First, it can be used to cross-validate GRACE and MODIS reflectance data in order to identify and eliminate unreliable estimates. Second, it can provide sub-monthly (e.g., 8-day) TWS variations without loss of spatial resolution. Lastly, it can be used to fill gaps in TWS estimates based on GRACE data and to extend the time-series of TWS estimates beyond the time interval when GRACE data are available. The methodology is demonstrated using the Tonlé Sap floodplain located in Central Cambodia as a test case. The analysis shows an excellent agreement between the 8-day NDWI-based TWS estimates averaged over monthly intervals and the GRACE-based monthly TWS variations. The approach developed would have similar application in other areas that experience regular large

  6. Women in History--Grace Abbott: A Leader in Social Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Shari Cole

    2006-01-01

    This article profiles Grace Abbott, one of the earlier 20th century American women leaders in Progressivism. Abbott's heritage influenced her lifetime commitment to social improvement. She was born on November 17, 1878 in Grand Island, Nebraska into a family of activists. Her Quaker mother, Elizabeth Griffin Abbott, came from an abolitionist…

  7. Flight-Like Optical Reference Cavity for GRACE Follow-On Laser Frequency Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W. M.; deVine, G.; Klipstein, W. M.; McKenzie, K.; Spero, R.; Thompson, R.; Yu, N.; Stephens, M.; Leitch, J.; Pierce, R.; Shaddock, D.; Lam, T.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a prototype optical cavity and associated optics that has been developed to provide a stable frequency reference for a future space-based laser ranging system. This instrument is being considered for inclusion as a technology demonstration on the recently announced GRACE follow-on mission, which will monitor variations in the Earth's gravity field.

  8. Evaluation of GRACE daily gravity solutions for hydrological extremes in selected river basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouweleeuw, Ben; Güntner, Andreas; Gain, Animesh; Gruber, Christian; Flechtner, Frank; Kvas, Andreas; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten

    2016-04-01

    Water storage anomalies from the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission (2002-present) have been shown to be a unique descriptor of large-scale hydrological extreme events. However, possibly due to its coarse temporal (monthly to weekly) and spatial (> 150.000 km2) resolution, the comprehensive information from GRACE on total water storage variations has rarely been evaluated for flood or drought monitoring or forecasting so far. In the context of the Horizon 2020 funded European Gravity Service for Improved Emergency Management (EGSIEM) project, we evaluate two approaches to solve the spatio-temporal variations of the Earth's gravity field as daily solutions through comparison to selected historical extreme events in medium-large river basins (Ganges-Brahmaputra, Lower Mekong, Danube, Elbe). These comparisons show that highs and lows of GRACE-derived total water storage are closely related to the occurrence of hydrological extremes and serve as an early indicator of these events. The degree to which the daily GRACE solutions contain high-frequent temporal hydrological information, e.g. individual flood peaks, is related to the size of the extreme event.

  9. Estimation of Greenland's Ice Sheet Mass Balance Using ICESat and GRACE Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobbe, D.; Ditmar, P.; Lindenbergh, R.

    2007-12-01

    Data of the GRACE gravity mission and the ICESat laser altimetry mission are used to create two independent estimates of Greenland's ice sheet mass balance over the full measurement period. For ICESat data, a processing strategy is developed using the elevation differences of geometrically overlapping footprints of both crossing and repeated tracks. The dataset is cleaned using quality flags defined by the GLAS science team. The cleaned dataset reveals some strong, spatially correlated signals that are shown to be related to physical phenomena. Different processing strategies are used to convert the observed temporal height differences to mass changes for 6 different drainage systems, further divided into a region above and below 2000 meter elevation. The results are compared with other altimetry based mass balance estimates. In general, the obtained results confirm trends discovered by others, but we also show that the choice of processing strategy strongly influences our results, especially for the areas below 2000 meter. Furthermore, GRACE based monthly variations of the Earth's gravity field as processed by CNES, CSR, GFZ and DEOS are used to estimate the mass balance change for North and South Greenland. It is shown that our results are comparable with recently published GRACE estimates (mascon solutions). On the other hand, the estimates based on GRACE data are only partly confirmed by the ICESat estimates. Possible explanations for the obvious differences will be discussed.

  10. 76 FR 75797 - Transportation Conformity Rule: MOVES Regional Grace Period Extension

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... analyses''). DATES: Effective December 5, 2011, EPA withdraws the direct final rule published at 76 FR... extending the MOVES regional conformity grace period, published on October 13, 2011 (76 FR 63554). We stated... be based on the parallel proposed rule also published on October 13, 2011 (76 FR 63575). As stated...

  11. Improving un-gauged hydrological modeling by assimilating GRACE Terrestrial Water Storage data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, K.; Li, X.; Liang, J.; Liu, X.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrological modeling usually requires accurate meteorological gauge data, which might pose challenges for those sparsely gauged or un-gauged regions. One alternative approach is to use reanalysis datasets from meteorological modeling. However, models driven by reanalysis data are less reliable than those driven by well-gauged ones, due to the relatively inaccurate meteorological forces. In this paper, we propose a new approach to improve the reliability of the hydrological modeling driven by reanalysis data, via assimilating the terrestrial water storage (TWS) data measured by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite system. Launched at 2002, the GRACE system enables the unprecedented measurements of global TWS anomalies, which are potentially useful in the poorly gauged regions. In order to justify this approach, we assimilated the GRACE TWS data into a reanalysis data driven SWAT model. This catchment model was driven by Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) data, and was set up to simulate the hydrological process in the Pearl River Basin (PRB), South China, from 2003 to 2005. The simulated stream flows were then evaluated against the monthly observations obtained from 9 hydrological stations in the PRB. Overall, the RMSE of the assimilation results (10080 cms) is about 30% smaller than that of the open-loop simulation (15452 cms). The experimental results suggest that the assimilation of GRACE TWS data is capable of improving the reliability of reanalysis data-driven modeling, and this approach is potentially useful in those sparsely gauged or un-gauged regions.

  12. Evaluation of recent GRACE monthly solution series with an ice sheet perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwath, Martin; Groh, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    GRACE monthly global gravity field solutions have undergone a remarkable evolution, leading to the latest (Release 5) series by CSR, GFZ, and JPL, to new series by other processing centers, such as ITSG and AIUB, as well as to efforts to derive combined solutions, particularly by the EGSIEM (European Gravity Service for Improved Emergency Management) project. For applications, such as GRACE inferences on ice sheet mass balance, the obvious question is on what GRACE solution series to base the assessment. Here we evaluate different GRACE solution series (including the ones listed above) in a unified framework. We concentrate on solutions expanded up to degree 90 or higher, since this is most appropriate for polar applications. We empirically assess the error levels in the spectral as well as in the spatial domain based on the month-to-month scatter in the high spherical harmonic degrees. We include empirical assessment of error correlations. We then apply all series to infer Antarctic and Greenland mass change time series and compare the results in terms of apparent signal content and noise level. We find that the ITSG solutions show lowest noise level in the high degrees (above 60). A preliminary combined solution from the EGSIEM project shows lowest noise in the degrees below 60. This virtue maps into the derived ice mass time series, where the EGSIEM-based results show the lowest noise in most cases. Meanwhile, there is no indication that any of the considered series systematically dampens actual geophysical signals.

  13. Child Center of Our Lady of Grace. Statement of Policies and Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Center of Our Lady of Grace, St. Louis, MO.

    The document contains policies and guidelines for the Child Center of Our Lady of Grace, a facility offering psychiatric evaluation and treatment for children (ages 4 to 17) in the St. Louis (Missouri and Illinois) region. After a brief statement of program rationale and an introduction to the program, services and policies are described.…

  14. 14 CFR 91.1071 - Crewmember: Tests and checks, grace provisions, training to accepted standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... test or check in the month in which it is required. (b) If a pilot being checked under this subpart... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Crewmember: Tests and checks, grace... OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Fractional Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1071 Crewmember:...

  15. Using an SLR inversion to measure the mass balance of Greenland before and during GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonin, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    The GRACE mission has done an admirable job of measuring large-scale mass changes over Greenland since its launch in 2002. However before that time, measurements of large-scale ice mass balance were few and far between, leading to a lack of baseline knowledge. High-quality Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) data existed a decade earlier, but normally has too low a spatial resolution to be used for this purpose. I demonstrate that a least squares inversion technique can reconstitute the SLR data and use it to measure ice loss over Greenland. To do so, I first simulate the problem by degrading today's GRACE data to a level comparable with SLR, then demonstrating that the inversion can re-localize Greenland's contribution to the low-resolution signal, giving an accurate time series of mass change over all of Greenland which compares well with the full-resolution GRACE estimates. I then utilize that method on the actual SLR data, resulting in an independent 1994-2014 time series of mass change over Greenland. I find favorable agreement between the pure-SLR inverted results and the 2012 Ice-sheet Mass Balance Inter-comparison Exercise (IMBIE) results, which are largely based on the "input-output" modeling method before GRACE's launch.

  16. GRACE Hydrological estimates for small basins: Evaluating processing approaches on the High Plains Aquifer, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longuevergne, Laurent; Scanlon, Bridget R.; Wilson, Clark R.

    2010-11-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites provide observations of water storage variation at regional scales. However, when focusing on a region of interest, limited spatial resolution and noise contamination can cause estimation bias and spatial leakage, problems that are exacerbated as the region of interest approaches the GRACE resolution limit of a few hundred km. Reliable estimates of water storage variations in small basins require compromises between competing needs for noise suppression and spatial resolution. The objective of this study was to quantitatively investigate processing methods and their impacts on bias, leakage, GRACE noise reduction, and estimated total error, allowing solution of the trade-offs. Among the methods tested is a recently developed concentration algorithm called spatiospectral localization, which optimizes the basin shape description, taking into account limited spatial resolution. This method is particularly suited to retrieval of basin-scale water storage variations and is effective for small basins. To increase confidence in derived methods, water storage variations were calculated for both CSR (Center for Space Research) and GRGS (Groupe de Recherche de Géodésie Spatiale) GRACE products, which employ different processing strategies. The processing techniques were tested on the intensively monitored High Plains Aquifer (450,000 km2 area), where application of the appropriate optimal processing method allowed retrieval of water storage variations over a portion of the aquifer as small as ˜200,000 km2.

  17. Wavelet and Gaussian Approaches for Estimation of Groundwater Variations Using GRACE Data.

    PubMed

    Fatolazadeh, Farzam; Voosoghi, Behzad; Naeeni, Mehdi Raoofian

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a scheme is presented to estimate groundwater storage variations in Iran. The variations are estimated using 11 years of Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiments (GRACE) observations from period of 2003 to April 2014 in combination with the outputs of Global Land Data Assimilation Systems (GLDAS) model including soil moisture, snow water equivalent, and total canopy water storage. To do so, the sums of GLDAS outputs are subtracted from terrestrial water storage variations determined by GRACE observations. Because of stripping errors in the GRACE data, two methodologies based on wavelet analysis and Gaussian filtering are applied to refine the GRACE data. It is shown that the wavelet approach could better localize the desired signal and increase the signal-to-noise ratio and thus results in more accurate estimation of groundwater storage variations. To validate the results of our procedure in estimation of ground water storage variations, they are compared with the measurements of pisometric wells data near the Urmia Lake which shows favorable agreements with our results.

  18. Observations of Atlantic overturning variability and latitudinal coherence with GRACE time-variable gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landerer, Felix; Wiese, David; Bentel, Katrin; Watkins, Michael; Boening, Carmen

    2016-04-01

    The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is a key mechanism of pole-ward planetary heat transport. Concerns about AMOC changes imply the need for a continuous, large-scale observation capability to detect and monitor changes on interannual to decadal time scales. Here we present measurements of AMOC component transport changes directly obtained from time-variable gravity observations of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites from 2003 until now. Recent improvements at JPL of monthly gravity field retrievals allow the detection of AMOC-related interannual bottom pressure anomalies and in turn LNADW transport estimates. In the Atlantic at 26N, these GRACE AMOC estimates are in good agreement with those from the Rapid Climate Change-Meridional Overturning Circulation and Heatflux Array (RAPID/MOCHA) . We extend the GRACE-based estimates of AMOC variability from the Southern Ocean to the Northern sinking branch to assess meridional coherence and discuss challenges of the GRACE observing system. Our results highlight the efficacy and utility of space-gravimetry for observing AMOC variations to evaluate latitudinal coherency and long-term variability.

  19. Generating a Reduced-energy Antiproton beam using Channeling Electrostatic elements (GRACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, Gerard; Pacifico, Nicola; Aegis Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    A device was designed for Generating a Reduced-energy Antiproton-beam using Channeling Electrostatic elements (GRACE). A series of einzel lenses and electrodes are used to create a slow beam of antiprotons with tunable mean energy (0 to 16 keV with root mean squared value below 20%) using antiprotons (mean energy of 5 MeV) from the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN. Degrader foil is in place, so GRACE further deflects the beam bunches away from the annihilation products, focusing them on a 14 mm x 14 mm detector. Manufacturing parameters were found using simulations written in C++. The device is currently in use by the Antihydrogen Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy (AEgIS) collaboration at CERN, which seeks to measure the sign of the gravitational constant for antimatter by performing interferometry studies on an antihydrogen beam. GRACE delivers on the order of 10 events per beam bunch from the AD. Antiprotons will eventually be used together with a pulse of positronium atoms to make antihydrogen atoms with horizontal velocity. GRACE is being used to perform intermediary experiments concerning interferometry of antiprotons, an important stepping stone on the way to measuring the sign of gravity. Special thanks to Boston University Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program, Lawrence Sulak, and Michael Doser.

  20. Ocean calibration approach for data from the GRACE Follow-On mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Peter L.; Betts, Casey R.

    2016-02-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission has been providing valuable new information on time variations in the Earth's gravity field since 2002. In addition, the GRACE Follow-On mission is scheduled to be flown soon after the end of life of the GRACE mission in order to minimize the loss of valuable data on the Earth's gravity field changes. In view of the major benefits to hydrology and oceanography, as well as to other fields, it is desirable to investigate the fundamental limits to monitoring the time variations in the Earth's gravity field during GRACE-type missions. A simplified model is presented in this paper for making estimates of the effect of differential spurious accelerations of the satellites during times when four successive revolutions cross the Pacific Ocean. The analysis approach discussed is to make use of changes in the satellite separation observed during passages across low-latitude regions of the Pacific and of other oceans to correct for spurious accelerations of the satellites. The low-latitude regions of the Pacific and of other oceans are the extended regions where the a priori uncertainties in the time variations of the geopotential heights due to mass distribution changes are known best. In addition, advantage can be taken of the repeated crossings of the South Pole and the North Pole, since the uncertainties in changes in the geopotential heights at the poles during the time required for four orbit revolutions are likely to be small.

  1. GRACE and ICESat Data for Estimation of Ice Sheet Surface Changes in LAS, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, H.; Ju, X.; Liu, J.; Gu, Z.; Liu, S.; Tian, Y.; Chen, L.; Shen, Y.; Tong, X.; Sun, B.; Li, R.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of mass changes of the Antarctic ice sheet is essential for understanding global climate change, specifically, for sea-level change. This presentation reports the the results of a comparative study on changes of regional ice sheet mass and surface elevation based on observations of GRACE and ICESat satellites over the period of 2004 - 2008 in the Lambert Glacier-Amery Ice Shelf System (LAS), East Antarctica. LAS is an important drainage system in East Antarctica and one of the significant contributors to the mass budget of the Antarctic. We fitted the GRACE monthly solutions to a model that contains a linear trend, an acceleration, annual and semiannual terms, and a 161 days tide aliasing term (S2). We employed the IJ05 R2 GIA model. For ICESat observations, we employed a modified spatial-temporal polynomial model to describe the ice surface topography and an annual elevation change rate (trend), which is solved by using repeat-track points within a moving box along the repeating tracks. Uncertainties of the source data and the estimated trends from both GRACE and ICESat data are given. The mass changes from GRACE and ICESat are compared and the differences are analyzed. A number of key issues in the comparison and mass - volume conversion are discussed. Afterwards, spatial and temporal correlations between the results at the annual change level derived from the two data sets are analyzed. Impact of firn models, GIA models, and comparison with other research results in LAS demonstrated.

  2. Groundwater Storage Depletion in the Northwest India Aquifer using Forward Modeling and GRACE Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, D.; Scanlon, B. R.; Chen, J.

    2014-12-01

    Signal restoration of GRACE total water storage (TWS) and groundwater storage (GWS) changes for aquifers is challenging because human-induced water storage changes are often not simulated and have large uncertainties in land surface models (LSMs). This study demonstrates the effectiveness of forward modeling for restoring GRACE signal loss due to low-pass filtering applied to GRACE data. A new approach integrating the strengths of LSMs and forwarding modeling is developed to recover TWS and GWS changes using the North India Aquifer as a case study. GWS for a broad region of North India (~1,000,000 km2) during the past decade (Jan 2003-Jan 2013) showed a generally consistent decreasing trend at a rate of -2.1 cm/a (-22. 3 km3/a), and GWS changes for the three-state region (Punjab, Haryana & Delhi, and Rajasthan, 436,390 km2) for the period Jul 2003-Jul 2008 was estimated to be -2.9 cm/a (-12.7 km3/a). This study provides new insights into GRACE signal restoration for TWS and GWS estimation over aquifers.

  3. Assimilation of Terrestrial Water Storage from GRACE in a Snow-Dominated Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Barton A.; Reichle, R. H.; Rodell, M.

    2011-01-01

    Terrestrial water storage (TWS) information derived from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) measurements is assimilated into a land surface model over the Mackenzie River basin located in northwest Canada. Assimilation is conducted using an ensemble Kalman smoother (EnKS). Model estimates with and without assimilation are compared against independent observational data sets of snow water equivalent (SWE) and runoff. For SWE, modest improvements in mean difference (MD) and root mean squared difference (RMSD) are achieved as a result of the assimilation. No significant differences in temporal correlations of SWE resulted. Runoff statistics of MD remain relatively unchanged while RMSD statistics, in general, are improved in most of the sub-basins. Temporal correlations are degraded within the most upstream sub-basin, but are, in general, improved at the downstream locations, which are more representative of an integrated basin response. GRACE assimilation using an EnKS offers improvements in hydrologic state/flux estimation, though comparisons with observed runoff would be enhanced by the use of river routing and lake storage routines within the prognostic land surface model. Further, GRACE hydrology products would benefit from the inclusion of better constrained models of post-glacial rebound, which significantly affects GRACE estimates of interannual hydrologic variability in the Mackenzie River basin.

  4. GRACE L1b inversion through a self-consistent modified radial basis function approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Kusche, Juergen; Rietbroek, Roelof; Eicker, Annette

    2016-04-01

    Implementing a regional geopotential representation such as mascons or, more general, RBFs (radial basis functions) has been widely accepted as an efficient and flexible approach to recover the gravity field from GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment), especially at higher latitude region like Greenland. This is since RBFs allow for regionally specific regularizations over areas which have sufficient and dense GRACE observations. Although existing RBF solutions show a better resolution than classical spherical harmonic solutions, the applied regularizations cause spatial leakage which should be carefully dealt with. It has been shown that leakage is a main error source which leads to an evident underestimation of yearly trend of ice-melting over Greenland. Unlike some popular post-processing techniques to mitigate leakage signals, this study, for the first time, attempts to reduce the leakage directly in the GRACE L1b inversion by constructing an innovative modified (MRBF) basis in place of the standard RBFs to retrieve a more realistic temporal gravity signal along the coastline. Our point of departure is that the surface mass loading associated with standard RBF is smooth but disregards physical consistency between continental mass and passive ocean response. In this contribution, based on earlier work by Clarke et al.(2007), a physically self-consistent MRBF representation is constructed from standard RBFs, with the help of the sea level equation: for a given standard RBF basis, the corresponding MRBF basis is first obtained by keeping the surface load over the continent unchanged, but imposing global mass conservation and equilibrium response of the oceans. Then, the updated set of MRBFs as well as standard RBFs are individually employed as the basis function to determine the temporal gravity field from GRACE L1b data. In this way, in the MRBF GRACE solution, the passive (e.g. ice melting and land hydrology response) sea level is automatically

  5. Consistent patterns of Antarctic ice sheet interannual variations from ENVISAT radar altimetry and GRACE satellite gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwath, Martin; Legrésy, Benoît; Rémy, Frédérique; Blarel, Fabien; Lemoine, Jean-Michel

    2012-05-01

    Interannual variations of the Antarctic ice sheet due to surface mass balance (SMB) fluctuations are important for mass balance estimates and interpretations. To date, these variations are primarily assessed by global or regional atmospheric modelling. Satellite altimetry and satellite gravimetry over the ice sheet provide complementary observations of the related volume and mass effects, respectively. Yet, so far the interannual signal contents of these observations have not been extensively studied. We compare and jointly interpret ENVISAT radar altimetry (RA) and GRACE satellite gravimetry results, relying on RA products from the along-track repeat satellite RA approach and on the GRACE 10-d solutions by CNES/GRGS. RA results and GRACE results are expressed in terms of variations of ice sheet thickness, Δz(t), and ice-equivalent thickness, Δzice(t), respectively. In view of the different errors and limitations of both techniques and of differences between Δz(t) and Δzice(t) expected due to firn-related processes, our principal approach is a comparison of qualitative patterns in space and time. To adjust the spatial resolution of both data sets, we describe the spatial filtering inherent to the regularization of the CNES/GRGS GRACE solutions and apply this filtering to the ENVISAT RA height changes in a consistent fashion. After correction for glacial isostatic adjustment, the spatial patterns of linear trends seen by ENVISAT RA and GRACE over the period 2002 October to 2009 August agree well, not only for the extreme ice losses in the West Antarctic Amundsen Sea Sector but also for an alternating sequence of gains and losses along the East Antarctic coast. Our main focus is on interannual signals, which we represent by the low-pass filtered non-linear, non-seasonal components of the Δz(t) and Δzice(t) time-series. These components should reflect interannual SMB variations, apart from effects of changes in ice flow. We find an agreement between the

  6. Insights about data assimilation frameworks for integrating GRACE with hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Maike; Kusche, Jürgen; Van Dijk, Albert I. J. M.; Döll, Petra; Schuh, Wolf-Dieter

    2016-04-01

    Improving the understanding of changes in the water cycle represents a challenging objective that requires merging information from various disciplines. Debates exist on selecting an appropriate assimilation technique to integrate GRACE-derived terrestrial water storage changes (TWSC) into hydrological models in order to downscale and disaggregate GRACE TWSC, overcome model limitations, and improve monitoring and forecast skills. Yet, the effect of the specific data assimilation technique in conjunction with ill-conditioning, colored noise, resolution mismatch between GRACE and model, and other complications is still unclear. Due to its simplicity, ensemble Kalman filters or smoothers (EnKF/S) are often applied. In this study, we show that modification of the filter approach might open new avenues to improve the integration process. Particularly, we discuss an improved calibration and data assimilation (C/DA) framework (Schumacher et al., 2016), which is based on the EnKF and was extended by the square root analysis scheme (SQRA) and the singular evolutive interpolated Kalman (SEIK) filter. In addition, we discuss an off-line data blending approach (Van Dijk et al., 2014) that offers the chance to merge multi-model ensembles with GRACE observations. The investigations include: (i) a theoretical comparison, focusing on similarities and differences of the conceptual formulation of the filter algorithms, (ii) a practical comparison, for which the approaches were applied to an ensemble of runs of the WaterGAP Global Hydrology Model (WGHM), as well as (iii) an impact assessment of the GRACE error structure on C/DA results. First, a synthetic experiment over the Mississippi River Basin (USA) was used to gain insights about the C/DA set-up before applying it to real data. The results indicated promising performances when considering alternative methods, e.g. applying the SEIK algorithm improved the correlation coefficient and root mean square error (RMSE) of TWSC by 0

  7. Mass variations of the Baltic Sea compared to superconducting gravimeter and GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, H.; Virtanen, J.; Nordman, M.; Bilker-Koivula, M.; Mäkinen, J.

    2009-04-01

    We study the gravity effect of Baltic Sea mass variations observed using different methods and time resolutions. We compare data from tide gauges, from superconductive gravimeter (SG) at Metsähovi, Finland and from the GRACE gravity satellite. The mass variation in the semi-enclosed Baltic Sea is due to both internal redistribution of the water mass and due to changes in the so-called fill level caused by water exchange with the North Sea. The monthly variation in the water mass is about 60 Gt over an area of 390000 km-2. Due to a dense network of tide gauges, the Baltic Sea is one of best monitored mass variations in this size in the world. For modeling the observed water mass, we have used both monthly PSMSL tide gauge records and hourly values from several sources. In addition, we have hydrodynamic models for comparisons. To calculate gravity effect, we have used Green's function formalism for modeled sea surface. We have previously used temporal gravity field data from GRACE satellite to show that GRACE can recover the total mass variation in the Baltic Sea on monthly scales. In addition to monthly GRACE solutions with different filters, we now also use 10-day mascon block solutions from Goddard Space Flight Center. As the GRACE solutions are already corrected for gravity changes due to oceans, we have restored the contribution due to the Baltic Sea. We have also corrected for an effect due to leakage of continental water storage using the GLDAS hydrology model. The fundamental station Metsähovi is located 10 km from the nearest bay of the Baltic Sea and 15 km from the open sea. Using a single tide gauge at the distance of 30 km from SG at Metsähovi, very clear correlation is found between gravity and sea level. Superconducting gravity data has been corrected by tides and polar motion, atmospheric mass redistribution, local groundwater and drift. Hourly mass variations of sea are clearly separable. Theoretically one-meter even-layer water cause 30 nms-2

  8. Sensitivity of Groundwater Depletion Rates Estimated from Different GRACE Products and Water Balance Models of Different Spatial Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukasha, M.; Ramirez, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of water storage anomalies monitored by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiments (GRACE) satellite mission have recently been used to estimate regional-scale groundwater depletion. Different GRACE products are available such as the JPL 1°x1° GRACE Tellus dataset and the University of Colorado (CU) dataset of regional-averages. In addition, in order to estimate groundwater depletion rates, GRACE data must be used in conjunction with auxiliary hydrologic and land-use information such as soil moisture, vegetation types, snow storage, etc. These auxiliary datasets are usually estimated using coarse scale (usually 1°x1°) hydrological/land surface observations and models. Therefore, it is important to quantify the sensitivity of estimates of groundwater depletion to different GRACE products, types of auxiliary datasets, and different spatial scales. In this study we show results of a sensitivity analysis of groundwater depletion trends for the Central Valley aquifer of California using three different GRACE products: i) GRACE Tellus, ii) CU GRACE data and, iii) Scaled CU data (filtered CU data optimally scaled to capture peaks in observed water balance). Using soil moisture and snow water storage estimated from 1/8th degree Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model and observed surface water storages (e.g., reservoirs etc.), groundwater depletion from April 2006-March 2010 for three GRACE products is estimated as 15.8, 13.9 and 36.3 km3 respectively. For the time period April 2006-September 2009 these estimates are 7.95, 5.5 and 29.2 km3, respectively. In addition, a sensitivity analysis with respect to spatial scale of VIC model will be presented, which involves using estimates of soil moisture and snow storage at the following three different spatial scales: i) 1 degree, ii) 1/8th degree and, iii) 1/16th degree.

  9. An improved GRACE monthly gravity field solution by modeling the non-conservative acceleration and attitude observation errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiujie; Shen, Yunzhong; Chen, Wu; Zhang, Xingfu; Hsu, Houze

    2016-06-01

    The main contribution of this study is to improve the GRACE gravity field solution by taking errors of non-conservative acceleration and attitude observations into account. Unlike previous studies, the errors of the attitude and non-conservative acceleration data, and gravity field parameters, as well as accelerometer biases are estimated by means of weighted least squares adjustment. Then we compute a new time series of monthly gravity field models complete to degree and order 60 covering the period Jan. 2003 to Dec. 2012 from the twin GRACE satellites' data. The derived GRACE solution (called Tongji-GRACE02) is compared in terms of geoid degree variances and temporal mass changes with the other GRACE solutions, namely CSR RL05, GFZ RL05a, and JPL RL05. The results show that (1) the global mass signals of Tongji-GRACE02 are generally consistent with those of CSR RL05, GFZ RL05a, and JPL RL05; (2) compared to CSR RL05, the noise of Tongji-GRACE02 is reduced by about 21 % over ocean when only using 300 km Gaussian smoothing, and 60 % or more over deserts (Australia, Kalahari, Karakum and Thar) without using Gaussian smoothing and decorrelation filtering; and (3) for all examples, the noise reductions are more significant than signal reductions, no matter whether smoothing and filtering are applied or not. The comparison with GLDAS data supports that the signals of Tongji-GRACE02 over St. Lawrence River basin are close to those from CSR RL05, GFZ RL05a and JPL RL05, while the GLDAS result shows the best agreement with the Tongji-GRACE02 result.

  10. Hydrologic implications of GRACE satellite data in the Colorado River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Bridget R.; Zhang, Zizhan; Reedy, Robert C.; Pool, Donald R.; Save, Himanshu; Long, Di; Chen, Jianli; Wolock, David M.; Conway, Brian D.; Winester, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Use of GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellites for assessing global water resources is rapidly expanding. Here we advance application of GRACE satellites by reconstructing long-term total water storage (TWS) changes from ground-based monitoring and modeling data. We applied the approach to the Colorado River Basin which has experienced multiyear intense droughts at decadal intervals. Estimated TWS declined by 94 km3 during 1986-1990 and by 102 km3 during 1998-2004, similar to the TWS depletion recorded by GRACE (47 km3) during 2010-2013. Our analysis indicates that TWS depletion is dominated by reductions in surface reservoir and soil moisture storage in the upper Colorado basin with additional reductions in groundwater storage in the lower basin. Groundwater storage changes are controlled mostly by natural responses to wet and dry cycles and irrigation pumping outside of Colorado River delivery zones based on ground-based water level and gravity data. Water storage changes are controlled primarily by variable water inputs in response to wet and dry cycles rather than increasing water use. Surface reservoir storage buffers supply variability with current reservoir storage representing ˜2.5 years of available water use. This study can be used as a template showing how to extend short-term GRACE TWS records and using all available data on storage components of TWS to interpret GRACE data, especially within the context of droughts. This article was corrected on 12 JAN 2016. See the end of the full text for details.

  11. A Smallsat Multi-pair GRACE-like Mission: Concept and Simulated Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, M.; Weimer, C. S.; Leitch, J. W.; Bennett, S. C.; Weinberg, J. D.; Rohrschneider, R.; Walther, R.; Landin, B.; Pierce, R.; Nerem, R. S.; Choe, J.

    2014-12-01

    The GRACE mission uses two spacecraft in near identical Earth orbits with a phase sensitive microwave ranging instrument that measures changes in spacecraft separation. High precision measurements of the spacecraft separation yield monthly Earth gravity field measurements. The GRACE FO mission adds the Laser Ranging Instrument (LRI) to demonstrate high resolution spacecraft separation measurements with phase-sensitive detection of a frequency-stabilized laser transponder. Previous studies show the improvements in mass change detection afforded by the higher sensitivity range change measurements. The sparse spatial/temporal sampling and single gravity field component detection of a polar orbiting satellite pair leads to aliasing and artifacts in the gravity field data. These effects limit the mass change detection capability of a GRACE-like mission. Adding a second pair of satellites improves overall system performance by filling in data gaps and sampling the gravity field in different directions. The added expense of a second satellite pair has made this option for improved performance untenable. A SmallSat GRACE-like mission addresses the cost concern for a multi-pair mission by reducing spacecraft expense and making common launch possible. Through use of a laser ranging sensor and other low-power subsystems and use of existing smallsat architectures, a complete spacecraft-instrument system is shown to meet measurement requirements and make the overall system expense comparable to existing single-pair missions. The resulting multi-pair space segment approach offers a viable option for a GRACE-like mission while improving the science through its better sampling of the gravity field. We show the system concept and simulated gravity field retrievals based on estimates of instrument and spacecraft performance.

  12. Constraining Earth's Rheology of the Barents Sea Using Grace Gravity Change Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wal, W.; Root, B. C.; Tarasov, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Barents Sea region was ice covered during last glacial maximum and experiences Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA). Because of the limited amount of relevant geological and geodetic observations, it is difficult to constrain GIA models for this region. With improved ice sheet models and gravity observations from GRACE, it is possible to better constrain Earth rheology. This study aims to constrain the upper mantle viscosity and elastic lithosphere thickness from GRACE data in the Barents Sea region. The GRACE observations are corrected for current ice melting on Svalbard, Novaya Zemlya and Frans Joseph Land. A secular trend in gravity rate trend is estimated from the CSR release 5 GRACE data for the period of February 2003 to July 2013. Furthermore, long wavelength effects from distant large mass balance signals such as Greenland ice melting are filtered out. A new high-variance set of ice loading histories from calibrated glaciological modeling are used in the GIA modeling as it is found that ICE-5G over-estimates the observed GIA gravity change in the region. It is found that the rheology structure represented by VM5a results in over-estimation of the observed gravity change in the region for all ice sheet chronologies investigated. Therefore, other rheological Earth models were investigated. The best fitting upper mantle viscosity and elastic lithosphere thickness in the Barents Sea region are 4 (±0.5)*10^20 Pas and 110 (±20) km, respectively. The GRACE satellite mission proves to be a useful constraint in the Barents Sea Region for improving our knowledge on the upper mantle rheology.

  13. Inferring regional surface mass anomalies from GRACE KBRR data by energy integral approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Bo; Luo, Zhicai; Li, Qiong; Zhou, Hao

    2016-04-01

    GRACE mission provides an effective technique to detect the mass redistribution through its effects on Earth gravity. Although the mass anomalies on the earth's surface inferred from the monthly average of the spherical harmonic coefficients has been largely successful, this approach has not revealed the submonthly time scale information and fundamental resolution of the GRACE observations. As the GRACE K-band range rate (KBRR) can reveal the local signature more sensitively, the regional recovered approach based on regional basic function is offered to recovery the local mass redistribution with submonthly and high spatial resolution. We established an approach to estimate regional surface mass anomalies by inverting GRACE-based potential difference anomalies at satellite altitude. Spatial constraints versus spherical distance between the mass concentrations are introduced to stabilize the linear system to eliminate the effects of the north-south striping. The efficiency of our approach has been validated using a closed-loop simulation study over South America. It is demonstrated that spatial constraints assist the solutions on reducing striping error inherent in the measurement configuration and temporal aliasing. Finally, time series of 10-day and 30-day regional surface mass anomalies over Tibet plateau also prove to be consistent with independent hydrological models. The time series of mass anomalies reveal the seasonal changes in the source area of three rivers and the accumulation in the north-east Gan-Qing block and Tibet block. Keywords: regional surface mass anomalies, GRACE KBRR, spatial constraints Acknowledgements: This research was jointly supported by the National 973 Program of China (No.2013CB733302), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No.41474019, No.41131067,No. 41504014).

  14. Inferring Aquifer Storage Parameters Using GRACE and In-Situ Measurement: Estimation Under Data Uncertainty (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, A. Y.; Green, R. T.; Rodell, M.; Swenson, S. C.

    2010-12-01

    Terrestrial water storage (TWS) data derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission have been widely used to assess water storage changes at the regional and continental scales. Although promising, the accuracy of GRACE data is inherently limited by instrumentation error, inaccuracies in atmospheric and ocean fields, and leakage error arising from using a limited range of spherical harmonics to represent the gravity field variations. Similarly, the ancillary data used for disaggregating GRACE data to track changes in individual hydrologic cycle components are also subject to uncertainty. This reflects a familiar dilemma in water resources management, where the remotely sensed and in-situ data provide increasingly more information content and call for more application uses, but the uncertainty inherent in these Earth observation products poses a barrier to the timely fusion of these data. In the worst case scenario, the data uncertainty can render the estimated solution completely meaningless. We present a robust optimization method for inferring aquifer storage parameters (i.e., specific yield or storativity) under uncertainty. The data involved are GRACE TWS, in-situ well level observations, and model-generated soil moisture distributions, all of which are uncertain. The robust optimization paradigm only requires knowing the uncertainty bounds of parameters, but not their actual probability distributions. Error bounds are either specified by data processing centers when distributing the processed satellite data or can be estimated from time series analysis. We demonstrate our method for the interconnected Edwards-Trinity Plateau and Pecos Valley aquifers in central Texas. The study area is divided into multiple zones based on the geology and monitor well coverage. Our estimated aquifer storage parameters are consistent with previous results obtained from pumping tests and model calibration, demonstrating the potential of using

  15. Near real-time GRACE gravity field solutions for hydrological monitoring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvas, Andreas; Gouweleeuw, Ben; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten; Güntner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Within the EGSIEM (European Gravity Service for Improved Emergency Management) project, a demonstrator for a near real-time (NRT) gravity field service which provides daily GRACE gravity field solutions will be established. Compared to the official GRACE gravity products, these NRT solutions will increase the temporal resolution from one month to one day and reduce the latency from currently two months to five days. This fast availability allows the monitoring of total water storage variations and of hydrological extreme events as they occur, in contrast to a 'confirmation after occurrence' as is the situation today. The service will be jointly run by GFZ (German Research Centre for Geosciences) and Graz University of Technology, with each analysis center providing an independent solution. A Kalman filter framework, in which GRACE data is combined with prior information, serves as basis for the gravity field recovery in order to increase the redundancy of the gravity field estimates. The on-line nature of the NRT service necessitates a tailored smoothing algorithm as opposed to post-processing applications, where forward-backward smoothing can be applied. This contribution gives an overview on the near real-time processing chain and highlights differences between the computed NRT solutions and the standard GRACE products. We discuss the special characteristics of the Kalman filtered gravity field models as well as derived products and give an estimate of the expected error levels. Additionally, we show the added value of the NRT solutions through comparison of the first results of the pre-operational phase with in-situ data and monthly GRACE gravity field models.

  16. Stress Variation Caused by the Terrestrial Water Storage Inferred from GRACE Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, H.; Wen, L.

    2014-12-01

    We estimate stress variation caused by the terrestrial water storage (TWS) change from 2003 to 2013. We first infer the TWS change from the monthly gravity field change in the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE). We then estimate the stress change at the Earth's surface caused by elastic loading of mass change associated with the inferred TWS change.The monthly spherical harmonics of the GRACE gravity solutions are processed using a decorrelation filter and Gaussian smoothing, to suppress the noise in high degree and order, following the approach of Swenson and Wahr [2006] and Chen et al. [2007]. The gravity variation associated with the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) is further removed from the GRACE solutions based on a geodynamical model by Paulson et al. [2007]. The inferred TWS changes exhibit a trend of increase from 2003 to 2013 in Amazon basin, southern Africa, the northern United State America (USA) and Queen Maud Land of Antarctica, and a trend of decrease in the same period in central Argentina, southern Chile, northern India, northern Iran, Alaska of the USA, Greenland and Marie Byrd Land of Antarctica.Surface stress variation due to the TWS loading is calculated, assuming an incompressible and self-gravitating Earth, with an elastic crust and a viscoelastic mantle overlying an inviscid core based on PREM model. We will present the geographical distribution of the stress variation caused by the TWS loading and discuss its possible implications. Chen, J. L., C. R. Wilson, B. D. Tapley, and S. Grand (2007), GRACE detects coseismic and postseismic deformation from the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, Geophys Res Lett, 34(13), doi:10.1029/2007GL030356. Paulson, A., S. J. Zhong, and J. Wahr (2007), Inference of mantle viscosity from GRACE and relative sea level data, Geophys J Int, 171(2), 497-508, doi:10.1111/j.1365-246X.2007.03556.x. Swenson, S., and J. Wahr (2006), Post-processing removal of correlated errors in GRACE data, Geophys Res Lett, 33

  17. Assimilation of gridded terrestrial water storage observations from GRACE into a land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girotto, Manuela; De Lannoy, Gabriëlle J. M.; Reichle, Rolf H.; Rodell, Matthew

    2016-05-01

    Observations of terrestrial water storage (TWS) from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission have a coarse resolution in time (monthly) and space (roughly 150,000 km2 at midlatitudes) and vertically integrate all water storage components over land, including soil moisture and groundwater. Data assimilation can be used to horizontally downscale and vertically partition GRACE-TWS observations. This work proposes a variant of existing ensemble-based GRACE-TWS data assimilation schemes. The new algorithm differs in how the analysis increments are computed and applied. Existing schemes correlate the uncertainty in the modeled monthly TWS estimates with errors in the soil moisture profile state variables at a single instant in the month and then apply the increment either at the end of the month or gradually throughout the month. The proposed new scheme first computes increments for each day of the month and then applies the average of those increments at the beginning of the month. The new scheme therefore better reflects submonthly variations in TWS errors. The new and existing schemes are investigated here using gridded GRACE-TWS observations. The assimilation results are validated at the monthly time scale, using in situ measurements of groundwater depth and soil moisture across the U.S. The new assimilation scheme yields improved (although not in a statistically significant sense) skill metrics for groundwater compared to the open-loop (no assimilation) simulations and compared to the existing assimilation schemes. A smaller impact is seen for surface and root-zone soil moisture, which have a shorter memory and receive smaller increments from TWS assimilation than groundwater. These results motivate future efforts to combine GRACE-TWS observations with observations that are more sensitive to surface soil moisture, such as L-band brightness temperature observations from Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) or Soil Moisture Active Passive

  18. Greenland Ice Sheet seasonal and spatial mass variability from model simulations and GRACE (2003-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Patrick M.; Tedesco, Marco; Schlegel, Nicole-Jeanne; Luthcke, Scott B.; Fettweis, Xavier; Larour, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Improving the ability of regional climate models (RCMs) and ice sheet models (ISMs) to simulate spatiotemporal variations in the mass of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is crucial for prediction of future sea level rise. While several studies have examined recent trends in GrIS mass loss, studies focusing on mass variations at sub-annual and sub-basin-wide scales are still lacking. At these scales, processes responsible for mass change are less well understood and modeled, and could potentially play an important role in future GrIS mass change. Here, we examine spatiotemporal variations in mass over the GrIS derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites for the January 2003-December 2012 period using a "mascon" approach, with a nominal spatial resolution of 100 km, and a temporal resolution of 10 days. We compare GRACE-estimated mass variations against those simulated by the Modèle Atmosphérique Régionale (MAR) RCM and the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM). In order to properly compare spatial and temporal variations in GrIS mass from GRACE with model outputs, we find it necessary to spatially and temporally filter model results to reproduce leakage of mass inherent in the GRACE solution. Both modeled and satellite-derived results point to a decline (of -178.9 ± 4.4 and -239.4 ± 7.7 Gt yr-1 respectively) in GrIS mass over the period examined, but the models appear to underestimate the rate of mass loss, especially in areas below 2000 m in elevation, where the majority of recent GrIS mass loss is occurring. On an ice-sheet-wide scale, the timing of the modeled seasonal cycle of cumulative mass (driven by summer mass loss) agrees with the GRACE-derived seasonal cycle, within limits of uncertainty from the GRACE solution. However, on sub-ice-sheet-wide scales, some areas exhibit significant differences in the timing of peaks in the annual cycle of mass change. At these scales, model biases, or processes not accounted for by models related

  19. Comparison of Seasonal Terrestrial Water Storage Variations from GRACE with Groundwater-level Measurements from the High Plains Aquifer (USA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strassberg, Gil; Scanlon, Bridget R.; Rodell, Matthew

    2007-01-01

    This study presents the first direct comparison of variations in seasonal GWS derived from GRACE TWS and simulated SM with GW-level measurements in a semiarid region. Results showed that variations in GWS and SM are the main sources controlling TWS changes over the High Plains, with negligible storage changes from surface water, snow, and biomass. Seasonal variations in GRACE TWS compare favorably with combined GWS from GW-level measurements (total 2,700 wells, average 1,050 GW-level measurements per season) and simulated SM from the Noah land surface model (R = 0.82, RMSD = 33 mm). Estimated uncertainty in seasonal GRACE-derived TWS is 8 mm, and estimated uncertainty in TWS changes is 11 mm. Estimated uncertainty in SM changes is 11 mm and combined uncertainty for TWS-SM changes is 15 mm. Seasonal TWS changes are detectable in 7 out of 9 monitored periods and maximum changes within a year (e.g. between winter and summer) are detectable in all 5 monitored periods. Grace-derived GWS calculated from TWS-SM generally agrees with estimates based on GW-level measurements (R = 0.58, RMSD = 33 mm). Seasonal TWS-SM changes are detectable in 5 out of the 9 monitored periods and maximum changes are detectable in all 5 monitored periods. Good correspondence between GRACE data and GW-level measurements from the intensively monitored High Plains aquifer validates the potential for using GRACE TWS and simulated SM to monitor GWS changes and aquifer depletion in semiarid regions subjected to intensive irrigation pumpage. This method can be used to monitor regions where large-scale aquifer depletion is ongoing, and in situ measurements are limited, such as the North China Plain or western India. This potential should be enhanced by future advances in GRACE processing, which will improve the spatial and temporal resolution of TWS changes, and will further increase applicability of GRACE data for monitoring GWS.

  20. Monthly and sub-monthly hydrological variability: in-orbit validation by GRACE level 1B observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eicker, Annette; Springer, Anne

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we present an approach to validate hydrological model output directly on the level of GRACE level 1B observations by analyzing K-band range-rate residuals. Modeled water mass variations are converted to simulated satellite observations and subtracted from the original measurements. This procedure bypasses the downward continuation and filtering steps generally required for water cycle analysis on the basis of gravity field maps. The goal of the study is twofold: (1) we demonstrate the feasibility of using residuals analysis for hydrological model validation in general and (2) we focus on the potential of the approach to investigate the signal content of temporally high-frequent (daily) modeled hydrological mass variations. In addition to the output of three different hydrological process models, we study mass changes computed from two different daily GRACE products. GRACE here serves as a reference, but its spatial resolution is limited and the daily models are not computed independently. Regarding aspect (1), our results show that the agreement of each of the models with GRACE varies strongly depending on geographical location. Aspect (2) is not only interesting for model validation, but it is also important in the context of improving the GRACE de-aliasing concept. We demonstrate that not only the daily GRACE models, but also the daily hydrological model output contains information on time scales smaller than 1 month. Realistically modeled or observed short-term hydrological mass changes may serve as additional de-aliasing product for GRACE and thus contribute to increasing the accuracy and resolution of future GRACE products.

  1. GRACE gravity model: assssment in terms of deep ocean currents from hydrography and from the ECCO ocean model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zlotnicki, V.; Stammer, D.; Fukumori, I.

    2003-01-01

    Here we assess the new generation of gravity models, derived from GRACE data. The differences between a global geoid model (one from GRACE data and one the well-known EGM-96), minus a Mean Sea Surface derived from over a decade of altimetric data are compared to hydrographic data from the Levitus compilation and to the ECCO numerical ocean model, which assimilates altimetry and other data.

  2. Mass evolution of Mediterranean, Black, Red, and Caspian Seas from GRACE and altimetry: accuracy assessment and solution calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomis, B. D.; Luthcke, S. B.

    2016-09-01

    We present new measurements of mass evolution for the Mediterranean, Black, Red, and Caspian Seas as determined by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) GRACE time-variable global gravity mascon solutions. These new solutions are compared to sea surface altimetry measurements of sea level anomalies with steric corrections applied. To assess their accuracy, the GRACE- and altimetry-derived solutions are applied to the set of forward models used by GSFC for processing the GRACE Level-1B datasets, with the resulting inter-satellite range-acceleration residuals providing a useful metric for analyzing solution quality. We also present a differential correction strategy to calibrate the time series of mass change for each of the seas by establishing the strong linear relationship between differences in the forward modeled mass and the corresponding range-acceleration residuals between the two solutions. These calibrated time series of mass change are directly determined from the range-acceleration residuals, effectively providing regionally-tuned GRACE solutions without the need to form and invert normal equations. Finally, the calibrated GRACE time series are discussed and combined with the steric-corrected sea level anomalies to provide new measurements of the unmodeled steric variability for each of the seas over the span of the GRACE observation record. We apply ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) to adaptively sort the mass and steric components of sea level anomalies into seasonal, non-seasonal, and long-term temporal scales.

  3. Validation of static gravity field models using GRACE K-band ranging and GOCE gradiometry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi Farahani, H.; Ditmar, P.; Klees, R.; Teixeira da Encarnação, J.; Liu, X.; Zhao, Q.; Guo, J.

    2013-08-01

    The ability of satellite gravimetry data to validate global static models of the Earth's gravity field is studied. Two types of data are considered: K-band ranging (KBR) data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission and Satellite Gravity Gradiometry (SGG) data from the GOCE (Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer) mission. The validation is based on analysis of misfits obtained as the differences between the data observed and those computed with a force model that includes, in particular, a static gravity field model to be assessed. To facilitate the model assessment on a region-by-region basis, we convert KBR data into so-called range combinations, which are approximately equivalent to the intersatellite accelerations. We only use the accurately measured components of SGG data, that is, xx, yy, zz and xz components with x, y and z being along-track, cross-track and radial axes. We perform the validation in spectral and spatial domain. The latter requires elimination of low-frequency noise in the misfit data with a subsequent averaging over pre-defined blocks. Only `independent' data are used, that is, those that have not been used in the production of the models under consideration. The proposed methodology is applied to eight models: EGM2008 (truncated at degree 250), EIGEN-6C (truncated at degree 250), two GRACE-only models (ITG-Grace03 and ITG-Grace2010s) and four (satellite-only) combined GRACE/GOCE models (GOCO01S, EIGEN-6S, GOCO02S and DGM-1S). The latter is a novel model developed at Delft University of Technology in collaboration with GNSS Research Centre of Wuhan University. The GRACE KBR and GOCE SGG data demonstrate a pronounced sensitivity to inaccuracies of EGM2008 in 5-22 mHz (27-120 cycles-per-revolution, cpr) and 10-28 mHz (54-150 cpr) frequency ranges, respectively. The latter data also show a high sensitivity to inaccuracies of ITG-Grace2010s in 25-37 mHz (135-200 cpr) frequency range. From the

  4. Large-scale hydrological changes in North America and Scandinavia from GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Holger; Wang, Hansheng; Jia, Lulu; Wu, Patrick; Jiang, Liming; Hsu, Houtse; Xiang, Longwei; Wang, Zhiyong; Hu, Bo

    2013-04-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission has proven to be an invaluable tool in monitoring hydrological changes. Due to the fact that GRACE detects combined mass changes from different sources, dedicated hydrological studies, however, have been mainly limited to areas where the GRACE signal is assumed to be solely related to hydrology or where other overlapping processes can be removed as accurately as possible. In North America and northern Europe, the dominating glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) signal is shadowing water storage changes. Here, modeled GIA data are used for removal, but model imperfections contaminate the hydrology signal. With a new separation approach we are able to self-determine the hydrological contribution in North America and northern Europe from GRACE and GPS data (Wang et al., 2012). The separation of the hydrological signal is not GIA model dependent and thus provides a clear picture of water storage changes in those areas free of the usually large remnant GIA contributions. From August 2002 to March 2011, the derived mass increase in central North America is about 43.0±5.0 Gt/yr. This is about three quarter of all water falling down Niagara Falls every year. Average groundwater variations from wells in Alberta and central Saskatchewan are in very good agreement to our result and show a significant increase from the year 2002 on. Before that year, there is a significant drop in water levels beginning in 1999/2000, which is related to a drought in the Canadian Prairies during these years. The increase from about 2003 on can be interpreted as the recovery of the water storage after the drought. As the GRACE observation period begins during that time, GRACE exactly observes this recovery in form of a significant mass increase. Changes in water levels from tide gauges for the Great Lakes and groundwater wells in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan also agree to our findings. At the southern tip of the Scandinavian

  5. Comparison of Polar Motion Excitation Series Derived from GRACE and from Analyses of Geophysical Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nastula, J.; Ponte, R. M.; Salstein, D. A.

    2007-01-01

    Three sets of degree-2, order-1 harmonics of the gravity field, derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data processed at the Center for Space Research (CSR), Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and GeoforschungsZentrum (GFZ), are used to compute polar motion excitation functions X1 and X2. The GFZ and JPL excitations and the CSR X2, excitation compare generally well with geodetically observed excitation after removal of effects of oceanic currents and atmospheric winds. The agreement considerably exceeds that from previous GRACE data releases. For the JPL series, levels of correlation with the geodetic observations and the variance explained are comparable to, but still lower than, those obtained independently from available models and analyses of the atmosphere, ocean, and land hydrology. Improvements in data quality of gravity missions are still needed to deliver even tighter constraints on mass-related excitation of polar motion.

  6. Insights into the Earth System mass variability from CSR-RL05 GRACE gravity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettadpur, S.

    2012-04-01

    The next-generation Release-05 GRACE gravity field data products are the result of extensive effort applied to the improvements to the GRACE Level-1 (tracking) data products, and to improvements in the background gravity models and processing methodology. As a result, the squared-error upper-bound in RL05 fields is half or less than the squared-error upper-bound in RL04 fields. The CSR-RL05 field release consists of unconstrained gravity fields as well as a regularized gravity field time-series that can be used for several applications without any post-processing error reduction. This paper will describe the background and the nature of these improvements in the data products, and provide an error characterization. We will describe the insights these new series offer in measuring the mass flux due to diverse Hydrologic, Oceanographic and Cryospheric processes.

  7. Regional high-resolution spatiotemporal gravity modeling from GRACE data using spherical wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M.; Han, S.-C.; Kusche, J.; Sanchez, L.; Shum, C. K.

    2006-04-01

    We determine a regional spatiotemporal gravity field over northern South America including the Amazon region using GRACE inter-satellite range-rate measurements by application of a wavelet-based multiresolution technique. A major advantage of this method is that we are able to represent the Amazon hydrological signals in form of time series of detail signals with level-dependent temporal resolution: the coarser structures generally require only ten days, whereas the medium and finer details are computable from one month of data. To this end, we employ the basic property of multiresolution representations, which is to split a signal into detail signals, each related to a specific resolution level and computable from data covering a specific part of the spectrum. Our results, which for the first time fully exploit the spatial and temporal resolutions of GRACE data in modeling Amazon hydrological fluxes, are in good agreement with hydrological models and GPS-derived height variations.

  8. The Influence of Atmospheric Modeling Errors on GRACE Estimates of Mass Loss in Greenland and Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, R. A.; Nerem, R. S.; Wiese, D. N.

    2015-12-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) has produced robust estimates of the contributions of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets to sea level rise. A limiting factor in these estimates is the background model (AOD1B) used to remove the atmospheric contribution to the gravity signal. We test the accuracy of this background model against in situ pressure measurements in Greenland and Antarctica and find significant evidence of drift in the model relative to the instruments. Furthermore, we find that the ECMWF Reanalysis (ERA) Interim product better agrees with the in situ data over Greenland and Antarctica. Relative to ERA, biases in atmospheric pressure mask additional trends over both ice sheets and a significant acceleration in mass loss over Antarctica. Agreement with in situ measurements affirms the viability of ERA-Interim for correcting Level 2 GRACE products over these regions.

  9. Seasonal Hydrological Loading in Southern Tibet Detected by Joint Analysis of GPS and GRACE.

    PubMed

    Zou, Rong; Wang, Qi; Freymueller, Jeffrey T; Poutanen, Markku; Cao, Xuelian; Zhang, Caihong; Yang, Shaomin; He, Ping

    2015-01-01

    In southern Tibet, ongoing vertical and horizontal motions due to the collision between India and Eurasia are monitored by large numbers of global positioning system (GPS) continuous and campaign sites installed in the past decade. Displacements measured by GPS usually include tectonic deformation as well as non-tectonic, time-dependent signals. To estimate the regional long-term tectonic deformation using GPS more precisely, seasonal elastic deformation signals associated with surface loading must be removed from the observations. In this study, we focus on seasonal variation in vertical and horizontal motions of southern Tibet by performing a joint analysis of GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) and GPS data, not only using continuous sites but also GPS campaign-mode sites. We found that the GPS-observed and GRACE-modeled seasonal oscillations are in good agreements, and a seasonal displacement model demonstrates that the main reason for seasonal variations in southern Tibet is from the summer monsoon and its precipitation. The biggest loading appears from July to August in the summer season. Vertical deformations observed by GPS and modeled by GRACE are two to three times larger than horizontal oscillations, and the north components demonstrate larger amplitudes than the east components. We corrected the GPS position time series using the GRACE-modeled seasonal variations, which gives significant reductions in the misfit and weighted root-mean-squares (WRMS). Misfit (χ2 divided by degree of freedom) reductions for campaign sites range between 20% and 56% for the vertical component, and are much smaller for the horizontal components. Moreover, time series of continuous GPS (cGPS) sites near the 2015 Nepal earthquakes must be corrected using appropriate models of seasonal loading for analyzing postseismic deformation to avoid biasing estimates of the postseismic relaxation. PMID:26690157

  10. Seasonal Hydrological Loading in Southern Tibet Detected by Joint Analysis of GPS and GRACE.

    PubMed

    Zou, Rong; Wang, Qi; Freymueller, Jeffrey T; Poutanen, Markku; Cao, Xuelian; Zhang, Caihong; Yang, Shaomin; He, Ping

    2015-12-04

    In southern Tibet, ongoing vertical and horizontal motions due to the collision between India and Eurasia are monitored by large numbers of global positioning system (GPS) continuous and campaign sites installed in the past decade. Displacements measured by GPS usually include tectonic deformation as well as non-tectonic, time-dependent signals. To estimate the regional long-term tectonic deformation using GPS more precisely, seasonal elastic deformation signals associated with surface loading must be removed from the observations. In this study, we focus on seasonal variation in vertical and horizontal motions of southern Tibet by performing a joint analysis of GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) and GPS data, not only using continuous sites but also GPS campaign-mode sites. We found that the GPS-observed and GRACE-modeled seasonal oscillations are in good agreements, and a seasonal displacement model demonstrates that the main reason for seasonal variations in southern Tibet is from the summer monsoon and its precipitation. The biggest loading appears from July to August in the summer season. Vertical deformations observed by GPS and modeled by GRACE are two to three times larger than horizontal oscillations, and the north components demonstrate larger amplitudes than the east components. We corrected the GPS position time series using the GRACE-modeled seasonal variations, which gives significant reductions in the misfit and weighted root-mean-squares (WRMS). Misfit (χ2 divided by degree of freedom) reductions for campaign sites range between 20% and 56% for the vertical component, and are much smaller for the horizontal components. Moreover, time series of continuous GPS (cGPS) sites near the 2015 Nepal earthquakes must be corrected using appropriate models of seasonal loading for analyzing postseismic deformation to avoid biasing estimates of the postseismic relaxation.

  11. Grace Signal Filtering as a Means of Determining Equivalent Water Thickness in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biryło, Monika; Nastula, Jolanta

    2012-01-01

    In the paper an Equivalent Water Thickness (EWT) determination as a way of observing gravity variations is described. Since raw data acquired directly from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment - GRACE satellites is unsuitable for analysis due to stripes occurrence, a filtering algorithm must be used. In this paper, authors are testing two isotropic (Gauss, CNES/GRGS) filters and two anisotropic filters (Wiener- -Kolomogorov, ANS). Correlation, amplitude ratio, and modification were determined as well as maps were generated.

  12. Analysis of star camera errors in GRACE data and their impact on monthly gravity field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inácio, Pedro; Ditmar, Pavel; Klees, Roland; Farahani, Hassan Hashemi

    2015-06-01

    Star cameras (SCs) on board the GRACE satellites provide information about the attitudes of the spacecrafts. This information is needed to reduce the K-band ranging data to the centre of mass of the satellites. In this paper, we analyse GRACE SC errors using two months of real data of the primary and secondary SCs. We show that the errors consist of a harmonic component, which is highly correlated with the satellite's true anomaly, and a stochastic component. We built models of both error components, and use these models for error propagation studies. Firstly, we analyse the propagation of SC errors into inter-satellite accelerations. A spectral analysis reveals that the stochastic component exceeds the harmonic component, except in the 3-10 mHz frequency band. In this band, which contains most of the geophysically relevant signal, the harmonic error component is larger than the random component. Secondly, we propagate SC errors into optimally filtered monthly mass anomaly maps and compare them with the total error. We found that SC errors account for about 18 % of the total error. Moreover, gaps in the SC data series amplify the effect of SC errors by a factor of . Finally, an analysis of inter-satellite pointing angles for GRACE data between 2003 and 2010 reveals that inter-satellite ranging errors were exceptionally large during the period February 2003 till May 2003. During these months, SC noise is amplified by a factor of 3 and is a considerable source of errors in monthly GRACE mass anomaly maps. In the context of future satellite gravity missions, the noise models developed in this paper may be valuable for mission performance studies.

  13. A GRACE-based assessment of interannual groundwater dynamics in the Community Land Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, S. C.; Lawrence, D. M.

    2015-11-01

    The estimation of groundwater storage variations is important for quantifying available water resources and managing storage surpluses to alleviate storage deficiencies during droughts. This is particularly true in semi-arid regions, where multiyear droughts can be common. To complement the local information provided by soil moisture and well level measurements, land models such as the Community Land Model (CLM) can be used to simulate regional scale water storage variations. CLM includes a bulk aquifer model to simulate saturated water storage dynamics below the model soil column. Aquifer storage increases when it receives recharge from the overlying soil column, and decreases due to lateral flow (i.e., base flow) and capillary rise. In this study, we examine the response of the CLM aquifer model to transitions between low and high recharge inputs, and show that the model simulates unrealistic long-period behavior relative to total water storage (TWS) observations from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE). We attribute the model's poor response to large wetting events to the lack of a finite lower boundary in the bulk aquifer model. We show that by removing the bulk aquifer model and adding a zero-flux boundary condition at the base of the soil column, good agreement with GRACE observations can be achieved. In addition, we examine the sensitivity of simulated total water storage to the depth at which the zero-flux boundary is applied, i.e., the thickness of the soil column. Based on comparisons to GRACE, an optimal soil thickness map is constructed. Simulations using the modified CLM with the derived soil thickness map are shown to perform as well or better than standard CLM simulations. The improvements in simulated, climatically induced, long-period water storage variability will reduce the uncertainty in GRACE-based estimates of anthropogenic groundwater depletion.

  14. Correction of Correlation Errors in Greenland Ice Mass Variations from GRACE using Empirical Orthogonal Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, J.; Seo, K. W.

    2015-12-01

    Since its launch in March 2002, the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) has provided monthly geopotential fields represented by Stokes coefficients of spherical harmonics (SH). Nominally, GRACE gravity solutions exclude effects from tides, ocean dynamics and barometric pressure by incorporating geophysical models for them. However, those models are imperfect, and thus GRACE solutions include the residual gravity effects. Particularly, unmodeled gravity variations of sub-monthly or shorter time scale cause aliasing error, which produces peculiar longitudinal stripes. Those north-south patterns are removed by spatial filtering, but caution is necessary for the aliasing correction because signals with longitudinal patterns are possibly removed during the procedure. This would be particularly problematic for studies associated with Greenland ice mass balance since large ice mass variations are expected in the West and South-West coast of Greenland that are elongated along the longitudinal direction. In this study, we develop a novel method to remove the correlation error using extended Empirical Orthogonal Function (extended EOF). The extended EOF is useful to separate spatially and temporally coherent signal from high frequency variations. Since temporal variability of the correlation error is high, the error is possibly removed via the extended EOF. Ice mass variations reduced by the extended EOF show more detail patterns of ice mass loss/gain than those from the conventional spatial filtering. Large amount of ice loss has occurred along the West, South-West and East coastal area during summer. The extended EOF is potentially useful to enhance signal to noise ratio and increase spatial resolution of GRACE data.

  15. Anthropogenic Effects on Total Water Storage from GRACE on Large South American Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier, L.; Becker, M.; Cazenave, A. A.; Güntner, A.; Rotunno, O.

    2009-12-01

    Over continents, GRACE total water storage (TWS) solutions are expected to represent main surface, soil and groundwater stocks variability. Recent studies have showed that intensive groundwater resources withdrawal in India can be “captured” by GRACE. Another important anthropogenic impact on the natural water cycle is the building and operation of large dams. Even though they impact primarily the local water stock variations, one can expect subsequent changes on the water cycle and some evidence of this from GRACE. This would be particularly evident where the volume of stored water behind dams represents a significant proportion of the total TWS. In this study, we analyzed the effect on the water cycle of large dams over South American large watersheds. Most of Brazilians large dams are located in the Upper Paraná watershed, upstream the Itaipu dam. By performing a correlation analysis between the upstream integrated rainfall and the GRACE TWS series, we found a noticeable phase difference between the two quantities. The phase difference is larger over the utmost upstream region of Upper Parana watershed. We assumed that this pattern could be due to an effect of man-made reservoirs. We took into account the reservoirs storage and found that they induce an additional phase-lag of about 1 month in the TWS response to precipitation forcing. We also investigated dams’ impact on the simulations of the Water Gap Hydrological Model. The results also show a similar time delay similar, suggesting that the model correctly accounts for the dam effect. Finally we see similar lags, though smaller, over other South American river basins.

  16. GRACE RL03-v2 monthly time series of solutions from CNES/GRGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, Jean-Michel; Bourgogne, Stéphane; Bruinsma, Sean; Gégout, Pascal; Reinquin, Franck; Biancale, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Based on GRACE GPS and KBR Level-1B.v2 data, as well as on LAGEOS-1/2 SLR data, CNES/GRGS has published in 2014 the third full re-iteration of its GRACE gravity field solutions. This monthly time series of solutions, named RL03-v1, complete to spherical harmonics degree/order 80, has displayed interesting performances in terms of spatial resolution and signal amplitude compared to JPL/GFZ/CSR RL05. This is due to a careful selection of the background models (FES2014 ocean tides, ECMWF ERA-interim (atmosphere) and TUGO (non IB-ocean) "dealiasing" models every 3 hours) and to the choice of an original method for gravity field inversion : truncated SVD. Identically to the previous CNES/GRGS releases, no additional filtering of the solutions is necessary before using them. Some problems have however been identified in CNES/GRGS RL03-v1: - an erroneous mass signal located in two small circular rings close to the Earth's poles, leading to the recommendation not to use RL03-v1 above 82° latitudes North and South; - a weakness in the sectorials due to an excessive downweighting of the GRACE GPS observations. These two problems have been understood and addressed, leading to the computation of a corrected time series of solutions, RL03-v2. The corrective steps have been: - to strengthen the determination of the very low degrees by adding Starlette and Stella SLR data to the normal equations; - to increase the weight of the GRACE GPS observations; - to adopt a two steps approach for the computation of the solutions: first a Choleski inversion for the low degrees, followed by a truncated SVD solution. The identification of these problems will be discussed and the performance of the new time series evaluated.

  17. Seasonal Hydrological Loading in Southern Tibet Detected by Joint Analysis of GPS and GRACE

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Rong; Wang, Qi; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Poutanen, Markku; Cao, Xuelian; Zhang, Caihong; Yang, Shaomin; He, Ping

    2015-01-01

    In southern Tibet, ongoing vertical and horizontal motions due to the collision between India and Eurasia are monitored by large numbers of global positioning system (GPS) continuous and campaign sites installed in the past decade. Displacements measured by GPS usually include tectonic deformation as well as non-tectonic, time-dependent signals. To estimate the regional long-term tectonic deformation using GPS more precisely, seasonal elastic deformation signals associated with surface loading must be removed from the observations. In this study, we focus on seasonal variation in vertical and horizontal motions of southern Tibet by performing a joint analysis of GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) and GPS data, not only using continuous sites but also GPS campaign-mode sites. We found that the GPS-observed and GRACE-modeled seasonal oscillations are in good agreements, and a seasonal displacement model demonstrates that the main reason for seasonal variations in southern Tibet is from the summer monsoon and its precipitation. The biggest loading appears from July to August in the summer season. Vertical deformations observed by GPS and modeled by GRACE are two to three times larger than horizontal oscillations, and the north components demonstrate larger amplitudes than the east components. We corrected the GPS position time series using the GRACE-modeled seasonal variations, which gives significant reductions in the misfit and weighted root-mean-squares (WRMS). Misfit (χ2 divided by degree of freedom) reductions for campaign sites range between 20% and 56% for the vertical component, and are much smaller for the horizontal components. Moreover, time series of continuous GPS (cGPS) sites near the 2015 Nepal earthquakes must be corrected using appropriate models of seasonal loading for analyzing postseismic deformation to avoid biasing estimates of the postseismic relaxation. PMID:26690157

  18. Utilizing Grace TWS, NDVI, and Precipitation for Drought Identification and Classification in Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCandless, S. E.; Bettadpur, S. V.; Howard, T.; Wells, G. L.

    2014-12-01

    Drought is one of the most widespread natural phenomena in the world and many indices exist today to monitor drought progression. The "Merged-dataset Drought Index" (MDI) is a new quantitative index calculated using the US/German Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment total water storage (GRACE TWS), NASA MODIS-derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), and NOAA/NWS precipitation data. These particular datasets constitute MDI because each correlates with a different drought type. Dataset deviations from established climatology are used, where negative deviations indicate deficits. MDI is objectively and transparently calculated based on dataset z-scores. GRACE TWS is the least mature dataset used in these calculations, but TWS solution variance does not negatively impact MDI. A new classification scheme to categorize drought severity is also proposed. MDI is studied in Texas and its smaller sub-regions. Within these sub-regions, MDI identifies multiple droughts during 2002 - 2014, with the most severe beginning in 2011. Drought analysis using MDI shows for the first time that GRACE data provides information on a sub-regional scale in Texas, an area with low overall signal amplitudes. Past studies have shown TWS capable of identifying drought, but MDI is the first index to quantitatively use GRACE TWS in a manner consistent with current practices of identifying drought. MDI also establishes a framework for a future, completely remote-sensing based index that can enable temporally and spatially consistent drought identification across the globe. This study is useful as well for establishing a baseline for the necessary spatial resolution required from future geodetic space missions for use in drought identification at smaller scales.

  19. A Statistical Filtering Approach for Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Gravity Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis. J. L.; Tamisiea, M. E.; Elosegui, P.; Mitrovica, J. X.; Hill, E. M.

    2008-01-01

    We describe and analyze a statistical filtering approach for GRACE data that uses a parametrized model for the temporal evolution of the GRACE coefficients. After least-squares adjustment, a statistical test is performed to assess the significance of the estimated parameters. If the test is passed, the parameters are used by the filter in the reconstruction of the field; otherwise they are rejected. The test is performed, and the filter is formed, separately for annual components of the model and the trend. This new approach is distinct from Gaussian smoothing since it uses the data themselves to test for specific components of the time-varying gravity field. The statistical filter appears inherently to remove most of the "stripes" present in the GRACE fields, although destriping the fields prior to filtering seems to help the trend recovery. We demonstrate that the statistical filter produces reasonable maps for the annual components and trend. We furthermore assess the statistical filter for the annual components using ground-based GPS data in South America by assuming that the annual component of the gravity signal is associated only with groundwater storage. The un-destriped, statistically filtered field has a X2 value relative to the GPS data consistent with the best result from smoothing. In the space domain, the statistical filters are qualitatively similar to Gaussian smoothing. Unlike Gaussian smoothing, however, the statistical filter has significant sidelobes, including large negative sidelobes on the north-south axis, potentially revealing information on the errors, and the correlations among the errors, for the GRACE coefficients.

  20. Properties of Traveling Atmospheric Disturbances (TADs) Inferred From CHAMP and GRACE Accelerometer Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruinsma, S. L.; Forbes, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    The accelerometers on the CHAMP and GRACE satellites have made it possible to accumulate near- continuous records of thermosphere density between about 370 and 490 km since May 2001, and July 2002, respectively. They have recorded the response to virtually every significant geomagnetic storm during this period. CHAMP and GRACE are in (near) polar and quasi-circular orbits, sampling 24 hr local time approximately every 4 and 5 months, respectively. These capabilities offer unique opportunities to study the temporal and latitudinal responses of the thermosphere to geomagnetic disturbances. Data from initially 34 geomagnetic storms were explored, but significant and unambiguous TAD activity in the observed response of the thermosphere was detected for about half the events. The atmospheric variability is evaluated by de-trending the data, allowing the extraction of specific ranges in horizontal scale, and analyzing density "residuals". The scale of the perturbation is decisive for its lifetime and relative amplitude. Sometimes the disturbances represent wave-like structures propagating far from the source, and these so- called 'TADs' were detected and described for the May 2003 storm for the first time. Some TADs traveled over the pole into the opposite hemisphere; this was found in both CHAMP and GRACE data. Most TADs propagate equatorward, but poleward propagating TADs have on occasion been detected too. The estimated speeds of the observed TADs are of the order of 400-900 m/s, and their mean scale is approximately 2000 km. The TADs observed with GRACE are significantly slower than those seen in the CHAMP data. The opposite is expected from theory: speed increasing with altitude.

  1. What Can be Expected from the GRACE-FO Laser Ranging Interferometer for Earth Science Applications?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flechtner, Frank; Neumayer, Karl-Hans; Dahle, Christoph; Dobslaw, Henryk; Fagiolini, Elisa; Raimondo, Jean-Claude; Güntner, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The primary objective of the gravity recovery and climate experiment follow-on (GRACE-FO) satellite mission, due for launch in August 2017, is to continue the GRACE time series of global monthly gravity field models. For this, evolved versions of the GRACE microwave instrument, GPS receiver, and accelerometer will be used. A secondary objective is to demonstrate the effectiveness of a laser ranging interferometer (LRI) in improving the satellite-to-satellite tracking measurement performance. In order to investigate the expected enhancement for Earth science applications, we have performed a full-scale simulation over the nominal mission lifetime of 5 years using a realistic orbit scenario and error assumptions both for instrument and background model errors. Unfiltered differences between the synthetic input and the finally recovered time-variable monthly gravity models show notable improvements with the LRI, on a global scale, of the order of 23 %. The gain is realized for wavelengths smaller than 240 km in case of Gaussian filtering but decreases to just a few percent when anisotropic filtering is applied. This is also confirmed for some typical regional Earth science applications which show randomly distributed patterns of small improvements but also degradations when using DDK4-filtered LRI-based models. Analysis of applied error models indicates that accelerometer noise followed by ocean tide and non-tidal mass variation errors are the main contributors to the overall GRACE-FO gravity model error. Improvements in these fields are therefore necessary, besides optimized constellations, to make use of the increased LRI accuracy and to significantly improve gravity field models from next-generation gravity missions.

  2. The new GRACE AOD1B Product Release 06: Product Details and Initial Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poropat, Lea; Bergmann-Wolf, Inga; Dobslaw, Henryk; Thomas, Maik

    2016-04-01

    The GRACE satellites, orbiting the Earth at very low altitudes, are affected by rapid changes in the Earth's gravity field caused by mass redistribution in atmosphere and oceans. To avoid temporal aliasing of such high-frequency variability into the final monthly-mean gravity fields, those effects are typically modeled during the numerical orbit integration by applying the 6-hourly GRACE Atmosphere and Ocean De-Aliasing Level-1B (AOD1B) a priori model. In preparation of the next GRACE gravity field re-processing planned by the GRACE Science Data System for the second half of the year 2016, a new version of AOD1B is currently calculated. The data-set is based on 3-hourly surface pressure anomalies from ECMWF that have been mapped to a common reference orography by means of ECMWF's mean sea level pressure diagnostic. Atmospheric tides as well as the corresponding oceanic response at the S1, S2, and M2 frequencies and its annual modulations have been removed in order to retain the non-tidal variability only. The data-set is expanded into spherical harmonics complete up to degree and order 180. AOD1B RL06 will be available since 1976 in order to allow for the consistent reprocessing of all SLR observations to LAGEOS, and of all relevant satellite altimetry missions. The processing of the whole 40-years-long time-series is expected to be complete in May 2016, and we will present in this talk the current status of our efforts including some preliminary validation of the oceanic component against in situ ocean bottom pressure observations.

  3. A better GRACE solution for improving the regional Greenland mass balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrama, E.; Xu, Z.

    2012-04-01

    In most GRACE based researches, a variety of smoothing methods is employed to remove alternating bands of positive and negative stripes stretching in the north-south direction. Many studies have suggested to smooth the GRACE maps, on which mass variations are represented as equivalent water height (EWH). Such maps are capable of exposing the redistribution of earth surface mass over time. In Greenland the shrinking of the ice cap becomes significant in the last decade. Our present study confirms that the dominating melting trends are in the east and southeast coastal zones, however, the smoothed signals along the coastline in these areas do not represent the original but averaged measurements from GRACE satellites which means the signal strength indicating that negative mass variations are mixed with some positive signals that are very close to this area. An exact identification of the topographic edge is not possible and visually the EWH maps appear to be blurred. To improve this, we firstly used spherical harmonic coefficients of GRACE level-2 data from CSR-RL04 and produced a smoothed EWH map. Empirical Orthogonal Functions(EOF)/Principal Component Analysis(PCA) have been introduced as well, in order to extract the melting information associated with the recent warming climate. Next, the Greenland area is redefined by 16 basins and the corresponding melting zones are quantified respectively. Least Squares methods are invoked to interpolate the mass distribution function on each basin. In this way we are able to estimate more accurately regional ice melting rate and we sharpen the EWH map. After comparing our results with a hydrological model the combination SMB - D is established which contains the surface mass balance (SMB) and ice-discharge (D). A general agreement can be reached and it turns out this method is capable to enhance our understanding of the shrinking global cryosphere

  4. Antarctic contribution to sea level rise observed by GRACE with improved GIA correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivins, Erik R.; James, Thomas S.; Wahr, John; Schrama, Ernst J. O.; Landerer, Felix W.; Simon, Karen M.

    2013-06-01

    Antarctic volume changes during the past 21 thousand years are smaller than previously thought, and here we construct an ice sheet history that drives a forward model prediction of the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) gravity signal. The new model, in turn, should give predictions that are constrained with recent uplift data. The impact of the GIA signal on a Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Antarctic mass balance estimate depends on the specific GRACE analysis method used. For the method described in this paper, the GIA contribution to the apparent surface mass change is re-evaluated to be +55±13 Gt/yr by considering a revised ice history model and a parameter search for vertical motion predictions that best fit the GPS observations at 18 high-quality stations. Although the GIA model spans a range of possible Earth rheological structure values, the data are not yet sufficient for solving for a preferred value of upper and lower mantle viscosity nor for a preferred lithospheric thickness. GRACE monthly solutions from the Center for Space Research Release 04 (CSR-RL04) release time series from January 2003 to the beginning of January 2012, uncorrected for GIA, yield an ice mass rate of +2.9± 29 Gt/yr. The new GIA correction increases the solved-for ice mass imbalance of Antarctica to -57±34 Gt/yr. The revised GIA correction is smaller than past GRACE estimates by about 50 to 90 Gt/yr. The new upper bound to the sea level rise from the Antarctic ice sheet, averaged over the time span 2003.0-2012.0, is about 0.16±0.09 mm/yr.

  5. Seasonal Mass Changes in the Red Sea Observed By GPS and Grace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alothman, A. O.; Fing, W.; Fernandes, R. M. S.; Bos, M. S.; Elsaka, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Red Sea is a semi-enclosed basin and exchanges water with the Gulf of Aden through the strait of Bab-el-Mandeb at the southern part of the sea. Its circulation is affected by the Indian Monsoon through its connection via the Gulf of Aden. Two distinctive (in summer and in winter) seasonal signals represent the water exchange. To understand the seasonal mass changes in the Red Sea, estimates of the mass changes based on two geodetic techniques are presented: from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and from the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). The GRACE solutions were truncated up to spherical harmonic degree and order degree 60 to estimate the average monthly mass change in the atmosphere and ocean from models (several hours). GNSS solution is based on observations from four stations along the Red Sea that have been acquired in continuous mode starting in 2007 (having at least 5 years' data-span). The time series analysis of the observed GNSS vertical deformation of these sites has been analyzed. The results revealed that the GNSS observed vertical loading agrees with the atmospheric loading (ATML) assuming that the hydrological signal along the costs of the Red sea is negligible. Computed values of daily vertical atmospheric loading using the NCEP surface pressure data (Inverted Barometer IB) for the 4 stations for 2003 until 2013 are provided. Comparison of the GRACE and GNSS solutions has shown significant annual mass variations in the Red Sea (about 15 cm annual amplitude). After removing the atmospheric effect (ATML), the ocean loading can be observed by GNSS and GRACE estimates in the Red Sea.

  6. Southern Ocean variability derived from GRACE retrievals, model simulations and in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böning, C.; Timmermann, R.; Macrander, A.; Schröter, J.; Boebel, O.

    2009-04-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) provides estimates of the Earth's static and time-variant gravity field. Solutions from various processing centres (GFZ, CSR, GRGS, JPL etc.) enable us to determine mass redistributions on the globe. Given that land signals are generally large compared to anomalies over the ocean, an assessment of the latter requires a particularly careful filtering of the data. We utilized the Finite Element Sea-Ice Ocean Model (FESOM) to develop a filtering algorithm which relies on the spatial coherency of ocean bottom pressure (OBP) anomalies. Taking large-scale circulation patterns into account, the new filter yields an improved representation of OBP (i.e. ocean mass) variability in the filtered GRACE data. In order to investigate the representation of Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) variability in the pattern-filtered GRACE retrievals, an analysis of OBP anomalies in FESOM results and in-situ measurements has been performed. A bottom pressure recorder array in the ACC region south of Africa (36°S-58°S, 1°W-7°E) provides data from 2002-2008. Based on anomalies of OBP gradients between individual instruments, these in-situ measurements give an estimate of the overall transport variability as well as of the movement of ACC fronts and transport redistribution between different sectors of the ACC. The validation of simulated and satellite-derived OBP anomaly gradients against these data yields a measure for the representation of this variability in FESOM and GRACE. Furthermore, model simulations are used to assess the relation between transport variations in individual filaments of the Southern Ocean and total transport variability in this and other sectors of the ACC.

  7. Spatiotemporal evolution of water storage changes in India from the updated GRACE-derived gravity records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Dileep K.; Wahr, John

    2016-01-01

    Investigating changes in terrestrial water storage (TWS) is important for understanding response of the hydrological cycle to recent climate variability worldwide. This is particularly critical in India where the current economic development and food security greatly depend on its water resources. We use 129 monthly gravity solutions from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites for the period of January 2003 to May 2014 to characterize spatiotemporal variations of TWS and groundwater storage (GWS). The spatiotemporal evolution of GRACE data reflects consistent patterns with that of several hydroclimatic variables and also shows that most of the water loss has occurred in the northern parts of India. Substantial GWS depletion at the rate of 1.25 and 2.1 cm yr-1 has taken place, respectively in the Ganges Basin and Punjab state, which are known as the India's grain bowl. Of particular concern is the Ganges Basin's storage loss in drought years, primarily due to anthropogenic groundwater withdrawals that sustain rice and wheat cultivation. We estimate these losses to be approximately 41, 44, and 42 km3 in 2004, 2009, and 2012, respectively. The GWS depletions that constitute about 90% of the observed TWS loss are also influenced by a marked rise in temperatures since 2008. A high degree of correspondence between GRACE-derived GWS and in situ groundwater levels from observation well validates the results. This validation increases confidence level in the application of GRACE observations in monitoring large-scale storage changes in intensely irrigated areas in India and other regions around the world.

  8. The GRACE Follow-On Laser Ranging Instrument - On track for launch in 2017

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görth, Alexander; LRI Team

    2016-04-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) is a highly successful satellite mission whose main purpose is to record the temporal and spatial variations of the gravitational field of the Earth. Its successor mission, GRACE Follow-On, is scheduled for launch in the summer of 2017. It will be the first space mission to host a laser-based intersatellite ranging system as a technology demonstrator: the laser ranging interferometer (LRI). The ranging sensitivity of the LRI is expected to be ≤80 nm/sqrt(Hz) which would exceed the original GRACE ranging noise by at least one order of magnitude. Additionally, the LRI will provide new precise data streams for the line-of-sight alignment of the two spacecraft. 
In January 2015 the LRI's critical design review, a major project milestone, was passed successfully. By the end of last year the production of flight hardware was completed. Currently, the LRI is being integrated into the spacecraft and important calibration measurements are performed.
 In my talk I will give an overview of the unique design of the LRI and give an update on the current status of the instrument.

  9. GRACE Mission Design: Impact of Uncertainties in Disturbance Environment and Satellite Force Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazanek, Daniel D.; Kumar, Renjith R.; Seywald, Hans; Qu, Min

    2000-01-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) primary mission will be performed by making measurements of the inter-satellite range change between two co-planar, low altitude, near-polar orbiting satellites. Understanding the uncertainties in the disturbance environment, particularly the aerodynamic drag and torques, is critical in several mission areas. These include an accurate estimate of the spacecraft orbital lifetime, evaluation of spacecraft attitude control requirements, and estimation of the orbital maintenance maneuver frequency necessitated by differences in the drag forces acting on both satellites. The FREEMOL simulation software has been developed and utilized to analyze and suggest design modifications to the GRACE spacecraft. Aerodynamic accommodation bounding analyses were performed and worst-case envelopes were obtained for the aerodynamic torques and the differential ballistic coefficients between the leading and trailing GRACE spacecraft. These analyses demonstrate how spacecraft aerodynamic design and analysis can benefit from a better understanding of spacecraft surface accommodation properties, and the implications for mission design constraints such as formation spacing control.

  10. Solar flare effects on the thermosphere and E-layer as observed by GRACE and DEMETER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Krauss, Sandro; Sawas, Sami; Hausleitner, Walter; Parrot, Michel; Voller, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the effect of solar flares on the lower thermosphere and ionosphere of the Earth. For this study we select solar flares which occurred in the period from Nov. 2004 to Sept. 2005. We combine the measurements of the GRACE and DEMETER satellites which lead us to estimate, respectively, the atmospheric density and the electric field variation at an altitude of about 100 km. The accelerometer measurements from GRACE orbiting at an altitude of about 450 km comprise all non gravitational forces acting on the satellite and may be used to determine the atmospheric neutral density. The intensity variation of the transmitter ground signals is detected by DEMETER at an altitude in the order of 700 km. In this study we insist on an atmosphere-ionosphere coupling effect which may appear at an altitude of about 100 km. This crucial altitude corresponds to critical regions where important changes are observed in the atmosphere (Mesosphere/Thermosphere) and in the ionosphere (D/E layers). We discuss the possible correlation between the measurements of GRACE and DEMETER observations, where both the local and global effects are taken into consideration.

  11. Seasonal Mass Changes and Crustal Vertical Deformations Constrained by GPS and GRACE in Northeastern Tibet.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuanjin; Shen, Wen-Bin; Hwang, Cheinway; Liao, Chaoming; Zhang, Tengxu; Zhang, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    Surface vertical deformation includes the Earth's elastic response to mass loading on or near the surface. Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) stations record such deformations to estimate seasonal and secular mass changes. We used 41 CGPS stations to construct a time series of coordinate changes, which are decomposed by empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs), in northeastern Tibet. The first common mode shows clear seasonal changes, indicating seasonal surface mass re-distribution around northeastern Tibet. The GPS-derived result is then assessed in terms of the mass changes observed in northeastern Tibet. The GPS-derived common mode vertical change and the stacked Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mass change are consistent, suggesting that the seasonal surface mass variation is caused by changes in the hydrological, atmospheric and non-tidal ocean loads. The annual peak-to-peak surface mass changes derived from GPS and GRACE results show seasonal oscillations in mass loads, and the corresponding amplitudes are between 3 and 35 mm/year. There is an apparent gradually increasing gravity between 0.1 and 0.9 μGal/year in northeast Tibet. Crustal vertical deformation is determined after eliminating the surface load effects from GRACE, without considering Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) contribution. It reveals crustal uplift around northeastern Tibet from the corrected GPS vertical velocity. The unusual uplift of the Longmen Shan fault indicates tectonically sophisticated processes in northeastern Tibet. PMID:27490550

  12. Are GRACE-era Terrestrial Water Trends Driven by Anthropogenic Climate Change?

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fasullo, J. T.; Lawrence, D. M.; Swenson, S. C.

    2016-01-01

    To provide context for observed trends in terrestrial water storage (TWS) during GRACE (2003–2014), trends and variability in the CESM1-CAM5 Large Ensemble (LE) are examined. Motivated in part by the anomalous nature of climate variability during GRACE, the characteristics of both forced change and internal modes are quantified and their influences on observations are estimated. Trends during the GRACE era in the LE are dominated by internal variability rather than by the forced response, with TWS anomalies in much of the Americas, eastern Australia, Africa, and southwestern Eurasia largely attributable to the negative phases of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO)more » and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). While similarities between observed trends and the model-inferred forced response also exist, it is inappropriate to attribute such trends mainly to anthropogenic forcing. For several key river basins, trends in the mean state and interannual variability and the time at which the forced response exceeds background variability are also estimated while aspects of global mean TWS, including changes in its annual amplitude and decadal trends, are quantified. The findings highlight the challenge of detecting anthropogenic climate change in temporally finite satellite datasets and underscore the benefit of utilizing models in the interpretation of the observed record.« less

  13. GRACE, time-varying gravity, Earth system dynamics and climate change.

    PubMed

    Wouters, B; Bonin, J A; Chambers, D P; Riva, R E M; Sasgen, I; Wahr, J

    2014-11-01

    Continuous observations of temporal variations in the Earth's gravity field have recently become available at an unprecedented resolution of a few hundreds of kilometers. The gravity field is a product of the Earth's mass distribution, and these data-provided by the satellites of the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE)-can be used to study the exchange of mass both within the Earth and at its surface. Since the launch of the mission in 2002, GRACE data has evolved from being an experimental measurement needing validation from ground truth, to a respected tool for Earth scientists representing a fixed bound on the total change and is now an important tool to help unravel the complex dynamics of the Earth system and climate change. In this review, we present the mission concept and its theoretical background, discuss the data and give an overview of the major advances GRACE has provided in Earth science, with a focus on hydrology, solid Earth sciences, glaciology and oceanography.

  14. Separation of GRACE geoid time-variations using Independent Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frappart, F.; Ramillien, G.; Maisongrande, P.; Bonnet, M.

    2009-12-01

    Independent Component Analysis (ICA) is a blind separation method based on the simple assumptions of the independence of the sources and the non-Gaussianity of the observations. An approach based on this numerical method is used here to extract hydrological signals over land and oceans from the polluting striping noise due to orbit repetitiveness and present in the GRACE global mass anomalies. We took advantage of the availability of monthly Level-2 solutions from three official providers (i.e., CSR, JPL and GFZ) that can be considered as different observations of the same phenomenon. The efficiency of the methodology is first demonstrated on a synthetic case. Applied to one month of GRACE solutions, it allows to clearly separate the total water storage change from the meridional-oriented spurious gravity signals on the continents but not on the oceans. This technique gives results equivalent as the destriping method for continental water storage for the hydrological patterns with less smoothing. This methodology is then used to filter the complete series of the 2002-2009 GRACE solutions.

  15. A methodology for evaluating evapotranspiration estimates at the watershed-scale using GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billah, Mirza M.; Goodall, Jonathan L.; Narayan, Ujjwal; Reager, J. T.; Lakshmi, Venkat; Famiglietti, James S.

    2015-04-01

    Accurate quantification of evapotranspiration (ET) at the watershed-scale remains an important research challenge. ET products from model simulations and remote sensing, even after incorporating in situ ET observations from flux towers in calibration or assimilation procedures, often produce different watershed areal-averaged ET estimates. These differences in ET estimates are magnified when they are integrated over time as part of water balance calculations. To address this challenge, we present a methodology for comparing watershed-average ET within a water balance framework that makes use of Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE)-observed terrestrial water storage change (TWSC). The methodology is demonstrated for South Carolina for a five-year period (2003-2007) using four different ET products: ET generated using a locally calibrated VIC model, a MODIS-derived ET product, and ET generated from two models (NOAH and VIC) as part of the North American Land Data Assimilation Systems 2 (NLDAS-2) project. The results of the example application suggest that the NLDAS-NOAH ET product is most consistent with GRACE-observed TWSC for the overall study region and time period. However, for periods of decreasing TWS, when ET becomes a more significant term in the water balance, the locally calibrated VIC model showed the most agreement with GRACE-observed TWSC. Application of the methodology for other regions and time periods can provide insight into different ET products when used for watershed-scale water resources management.

  16. Estimating GPS Satellite Antenna Phase Center Variations Using Data from the Jason-1 and GRACE Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, S. D.; Bar-Sever, Y.; Bertiger, W.; Haines, B.; Nerem, S.; Morken, D.

    2004-12-01

    Reducing the uncertainty in locating the phase centers on both GPS transmitter and receiver antennas has emerged as an area of active research in the GPS geodetic community. We have used on-orbit data from the Jason-1 (2001-) and GRACE (2002-) missions to develop estimates of GPS satellite antenna phase-center variations (PCV). These missions offer a number of advantages for this exercise. The heights of the Jason-1 and GRACE satellites are well-determined at the 1-2 cm level, and there is no troposphere signal to confound interpretation of the measurements. The multipath environments are also favorable, particularly for the GRACE mission. We discuss several strategies for determining the GPS satellite PCV estimates from these data, and describe evaluations of the candidate solutions using independent data from terrestrial GPS stations. We also compare our GPS satellite PCV estimates with those determined independently from a terrestrial network. These estimates have potential benefits for wide-ranging geodetic applications.

  17. Have GRACE satellites overestimated groundwater depletion in the Northwest India Aquifer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Di; Chen, Xi; Scanlon, Bridget R.; Wada, Yoshihide; Hong, Yang; Singh, Vijay P.; Chen, Yaning; Wang, Cunguang; Han, Zhongying; Yang, Wenting

    2016-04-01

    The Northwest India Aquifer (NWIA) has been shown to have the highest groundwater depletion (GWD) rate globally, threatening crop production and sustainability of groundwater resources. Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites have been emerging as a powerful tool to evaluate GWD with ancillary data. Accurate GWD estimation is, however, challenging because of uncertainties in GRACE data processing. We evaluated GWD rates over the NWIA using a variety of approaches, including newly developed constrained forward modeling resulting in a GWD rate of 3.1 ± 0.1 cm/a (or 14 ± 0.4 km3/a) for Jan 2005–Dec 2010, consistent with the GWD rate (2.8 cm/a or 12.3 km3/a) from groundwater-level monitoring data. Published studies (e.g., 4 ± 1 cm/a or 18 ± 4.4 km3/a) may overestimate GWD over this region. This study highlights uncertainties in GWD estimates and the importance of incorporating a priori information to refine spatial patterns of GRACE signals that could be more useful in groundwater resource management and need to be paid more attention in future studies.

  18. GRACE time-variable gravity field recovery using an improved energy balance approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Kun; Guo, Junyi; Shum, C. K.; Dai, Chunli; Luo, Jia

    2015-12-01

    A new approach based on energy conservation principle for satellite gravimetry mission has been developed and yields more accurate estimation of in situ geopotential difference observables using K-band ranging (KBR) measurements from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) twin-satellite mission. This new approach preserves more gravity information sensed by KBR range-rate measurements and reduces orbit error as compared to previous energy balance methods. Results from analysis of 11 yr of GRACE data indicated that the resulting geopotential difference estimates agree well with predicted values from official Level 2 solutions: with much higher correlation at 0.9, as compared to 0.5-0.8 reported by previous published energy balance studies. We demonstrate that our approach produced a comparable time-variable gravity solution with the Level 2 solutions. The regional GRACE temporal gravity solutions over Greenland reveals that a substantially higher temporal resolution is achievable at 10-d sampling as compared to the official monthly solutions, but without the compromise of spatial resolution, nor the need to use regularization or post-processing.

  19. Gravimetric excitation function of polar motion from the GRACE RL05 solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastula, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Impact of land hydrosphere on polar motion excitation is still not as well known as the impact of the angular momentum of the atmosphere and ocean. Satellite mission Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) from 2002 provides additional information about mass distribution of the land hydrosphere. However, despite the use of similar computational procedures, the differences between GRACE data series made available by the various centers of computations are still considerable. In the paper we compare three series of gravimetric excitation functions of polar motion determined from Rl05 GRACE solution from the Center for Space Research (CSR), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ). These data are used to determine the gravimetric polar motion excitation function. Gravimetric signal is compared also with the geodetic residuals computed by subtracting atmospheric and oceanic signals from geodetic excitation functions of polar motion. Gravimetric excitation functions obtained on the basis of JPL data differ significantly from the geodetic residuals while and the series obtained from CSR and GFZ are more compatible.

  20. Have GRACE satellites overestimated groundwater depletion in the Northwest India Aquifer?

    PubMed

    Long, Di; Chen, Xi; Scanlon, Bridget R; Wada, Yoshihide; Hong, Yang; Singh, Vijay P; Chen, Yaning; Wang, Cunguang; Han, Zhongying; Yang, Wenting

    2016-01-01

    The Northwest India Aquifer (NWIA) has been shown to have the highest groundwater depletion (GWD) rate globally, threatening crop production and sustainability of groundwater resources. Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites have been emerging as a powerful tool to evaluate GWD with ancillary data. Accurate GWD estimation is, however, challenging because of uncertainties in GRACE data processing. We evaluated GWD rates over the NWIA using a variety of approaches, including newly developed constrained forward modeling resulting in a GWD rate of 3.1 ± 0.1 cm/a (or 14 ± 0.4 km(3)/a) for Jan 2005-Dec 2010, consistent with the GWD rate (2.8 cm/a or 12.3 km(3)/a) from groundwater-level monitoring data. Published studies (e.g., 4 ± 1 cm/a or 18 ± 4.4 km(3)/a) may overestimate GWD over this region. This study highlights uncertainties in GWD estimates and the importance of incorporating a priori information to refine spatial patterns of GRACE signals that could be more useful in groundwater resource management and need to be paid more attention in future studies. PMID:27075595

  1. Evaluating the Amazon water cycle components using ED model against GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E.; Han, S. C.; Yeo, I. Y.; Longo, M.; Swann, A. L. S.; Knox, R. G.; Briscoe, J.; Moorcroft, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Changes in the water cycle components of the Amazon and its surrounding regions are a key to assessing regional impacts of climate and land-cover changes, as they may affect rain-fed agriculture and hydroelectric power generation in Brazil. A comprehensive validation of the modeled water budget, therefore, is a necessary part of understanding the region's hydroclimatology. We evaluate the water cycle components from Ecosystem Demography (ED) model both as a stand-alone model and a coupled model to the Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (BRAMS). Model results are compared with satellite-driven observations and a flux tower measurement in central Amazon. Our results indicate that the modeled EDBRAMS precipitation over Amazonia replicates the observed patterns of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) from 2001 to 2009. Total Water Storage Change (TWSC) anomalies from the ED model at the Paraná River basin shows a better agreement with the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite observation from 2002 to 2008, as compared to the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS)/NOAH model. The Nash-Sutcliff model efficiency coefficient improved from 0.50 (GLDAS/NOAH vs. GRACE) to 0.65 (ED vs. GRACE). We also evaluate the modeled evapotranspiration (ET) against the flux tower measurement. Our study affirms the capabilities of the ED model in simulating the Amazon hydrological cycle, which helps investigate its sustainable thresholds with various land-cover and climate change scenarios.

  2. Seasonal Mass Changes and Crustal Vertical Deformations Constrained by GPS and GRACE in Northeastern Tibet

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yuanjin; Shen, Wen-Bin; Hwang, Cheinway; Liao, Chaoming; Zhang, Tengxu; Zhang, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    Surface vertical deformation includes the Earth’s elastic response to mass loading on or near the surface. Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) stations record such deformations to estimate seasonal and secular mass changes. We used 41 CGPS stations to construct a time series of coordinate changes, which are decomposed by empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs), in northeastern Tibet. The first common mode shows clear seasonal changes, indicating seasonal surface mass re-distribution around northeastern Tibet. The GPS-derived result is then assessed in terms of the mass changes observed in northeastern Tibet. The GPS-derived common mode vertical change and the stacked Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mass change are consistent, suggesting that the seasonal surface mass variation is caused by changes in the hydrological, atmospheric and non-tidal ocean loads. The annual peak-to-peak surface mass changes derived from GPS and GRACE results show seasonal oscillations in mass loads, and the corresponding amplitudes are between 3 and 35 mm/year. There is an apparent gradually increasing gravity between 0.1 and 0.9 μGal/year in northeast Tibet. Crustal vertical deformation is determined after eliminating the surface load effects from GRACE, without considering Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) contribution. It reveals crustal uplift around northeastern Tibet from the corrected GPS vertical velocity. The unusual uplift of the Longmen Shan fault indicates tectonically sophisticated processes in northeastern Tibet. PMID:27490550

  3. Have GRACE satellites overestimated groundwater depletion in the Northwest India Aquifer?

    PubMed Central

    Long, Di; Chen, Xi; Scanlon, Bridget R.; Wada, Yoshihide; Hong, Yang; Singh, Vijay P.; Chen, Yaning; Wang, Cunguang; Han, Zhongying; Yang, Wenting

    2016-01-01

    The Northwest India Aquifer (NWIA) has been shown to have the highest groundwater depletion (GWD) rate globally, threatening crop production and sustainability of groundwater resources. Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites have been emerging as a powerful tool to evaluate GWD with ancillary data. Accurate GWD estimation is, however, challenging because of uncertainties in GRACE data processing. We evaluated GWD rates over the NWIA using a variety of approaches, including newly developed constrained forward modeling resulting in a GWD rate of 3.1 ± 0.1 cm/a (or 14 ± 0.4 km3/a) for Jan 2005–Dec 2010, consistent with the GWD rate (2.8 cm/a or 12.3 km3/a) from groundwater-level monitoring data. Published studies (e.g., 4 ± 1 cm/a or 18 ± 4.4 km3/a) may overestimate GWD over this region. This study highlights uncertainties in GWD estimates and the importance of incorporating a priori information to refine spatial patterns of GRACE signals that could be more useful in groundwater resource management and need to be paid more attention in future studies. PMID:27075595

  4. Can the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission detect hydrological droughts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustin Brena Naranjo, Jose; Pedrozo Acuña, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    Detecting and characterizing hydrological droughts at the global scale is a difficult task as several thousands of mid-to-large catchments remain ungauged or have limited discharge records. In water-limited regions, research on hydrological drought is even more complex because of the dominant streamflow perennial regime that characterizes small order watersheds. Over the last decade, the emergence of global remote sensing products has remarkably improved the capability to observe different climate and land surface processes that affect catchment discharge. Among several observational satellites that provide continuous data on terrestrial hydrology, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) is perhaps the only tool able to retrieve information about large-scale water storage variations across the world's terrestrial surface. This work tests the hypothesis that water storage deficits derived from GRACE are inextricably linked to below-than-average baseflow values extracted from streamflow records. This study case analyzed several regions in Mexico and USA with different hydro-climate regimes. Drought conditions using total water storage variations and observed streamflow records from 2003 until 2013 were computed and compared. Results indicate that although the GRACE mission is moderately/highly correlated to streamflow and baseflow time series, discrepancies in the magnitude of hydrological deficit exist and can be attributed to active versus passive catchment storage issues. Finally, the suitability of creating an improved product to monitor hydrological drought by merging in situ with remote sensed information will be discussed.

  5. Using GRACE Total Water Storage Changes to constrain River Routing Models in the Amazon River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Linage, C.; Lo, M.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Ray, R. L.; Beighley, R. E.

    2010-12-01

    The GRACE mission provides monthly to 10-day maps of Total Water Storage Anomalies corresponding to the vertically integrated land water storage (soil moisture and groundwater) as well as storage in river channels and floodplains (surface waters). The surface water component is an important contributor to total water storage in the Amazon River basin as shown by improved agreement between GRACE observations and model simulations when runoff is routed through the river network as compared to no river routing. We use the Community Land Model version 3.5 to model land water storage along with runoff by accounting for a simple ground water model. Surface and subsurface runoff predictions are then routed using two different routing models: a simple cell-to-cell routing scheme (e.g. Branstetter and Famiglietti, 1999) and the Hillslope River Routing (Beighley et al. 2010). We evaluate model performances against the spatio-temporal variations of GRACE data by carrying out a Singular Value Decomposition of the cross-covariance matrix. We also compare the two models in the light of their respective intrinsic capabilities. We finally investigate the impact of the precipitation data on model outputs by using TRMM products instead of GLDAS (CMAP) products.

  6. Have GRACE satellites overestimated groundwater depletion in the Northwest India Aquifer?

    PubMed

    Long, Di; Chen, Xi; Scanlon, Bridget R; Wada, Yoshihide; Hong, Yang; Singh, Vijay P; Chen, Yaning; Wang, Cunguang; Han, Zhongying; Yang, Wenting

    2016-04-14

    The Northwest India Aquifer (NWIA) has been shown to have the highest groundwater depletion (GWD) rate globally, threatening crop production and sustainability of groundwater resources. Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites have been emerging as a powerful tool to evaluate GWD with ancillary data. Accurate GWD estimation is, however, challenging because of uncertainties in GRACE data processing. We evaluated GWD rates over the NWIA using a variety of approaches, including newly developed constrained forward modeling resulting in a GWD rate of 3.1 ± 0.1 cm/a (or 14 ± 0.4 km(3)/a) for Jan 2005-Dec 2010, consistent with the GWD rate (2.8 cm/a or 12.3 km(3)/a) from groundwater-level monitoring data. Published studies (e.g., 4 ± 1 cm/a or 18 ± 4.4 km(3)/a) may overestimate GWD over this region. This study highlights uncertainties in GWD estimates and the importance of incorporating a priori information to refine spatial patterns of GRACE signals that could be more useful in groundwater resource management and need to be paid more attention in future studies.

  7. Seasonal Mass Changes and Crustal Vertical Deformations Constrained by GPS and GRACE in Northeastern Tibet.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuanjin; Shen, Wen-Bin; Hwang, Cheinway; Liao, Chaoming; Zhang, Tengxu; Zhang, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    Surface vertical deformation includes the Earth's elastic response to mass loading on or near the surface. Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) stations record such deformations to estimate seasonal and secular mass changes. We used 41 CGPS stations to construct a time series of coordinate changes, which are decomposed by empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs), in northeastern Tibet. The first common mode shows clear seasonal changes, indicating seasonal surface mass re-distribution around northeastern Tibet. The GPS-derived result is then assessed in terms of the mass changes observed in northeastern Tibet. The GPS-derived common mode vertical change and the stacked Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mass change are consistent, suggesting that the seasonal surface mass variation is caused by changes in the hydrological, atmospheric and non-tidal ocean loads. The annual peak-to-peak surface mass changes derived from GPS and GRACE results show seasonal oscillations in mass loads, and the corresponding amplitudes are between 3 and 35 mm/year. There is an apparent gradually increasing gravity between 0.1 and 0.9 μGal/year in northeast Tibet. Crustal vertical deformation is determined after eliminating the surface load effects from GRACE, without considering Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) contribution. It reveals crustal uplift around northeastern Tibet from the corrected GPS vertical velocity. The unusual uplift of the Longmen Shan fault indicates tectonically sophisticated processes in northeastern Tibet.

  8. Arm locking with the GRACE follow-on laser ranging interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, James Ira; McKenzie, Kirk

    2016-02-01

    Arm locking is a technique for stabilizing the frequency of a laser in an interspacecraft interferometer by using the spacecraft separation as the frequency reference. A candidate technique for future space-based gravitational wave detectors such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna, arm locking has been extensive studied in this context through analytic models, time-domain simulations, and hardware-in-the-loop laboratory demonstrations. In this paper we show the laser ranging interferometer instrument flying aboard the upcoming Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment follow-on (GRACE-FO) mission provides an appropriate platform for an on-orbit demonstration of the arm-locking technique. We describe an arm-locking controller design for the GRACE-FO system and a series of time-domain simulations that demonstrate its feasibility. We conclude that it is possible to achieve laser frequency noise suppression of roughly 2 orders of magnitude around a Fourier frequency of 1 Hz with conservative margins on the system's stability. We further demonstrate that "pulling" of the master laser frequency due to fluctuating Doppler shifts and lock acquisition transients is less than 100 MHz over several GRACE-FO orbits. These findings motivate further study of the implementation of such a demonstration.

  9. Closing the Global Sea Level Rise Budget with GRACE, Argo, and Altimetry Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuliette, E. W.; Miller, L.

    2008-12-01

    An important goal of climate studies is to determine the relative contribution of steric (heating and salinty) and eustatic (melting ice, runoff) sea level rise and to understand how and why these contributions vary. Concurrent measurements from the Argo array of profiling floats and the GRACE gravity mission, which respectively measure steric and eustatic changes, provide an independent measure of total sea level change. An analysis of the steric and ocean mass components of sea level shows that the sea level rise budget for the period January 2004 to December 2007 can be closed. Using corrected and verified Jason-1 and Envisat altimetry observations of total sea level, upper ocean steric sea level from the Argo array, and ocean mass variations inferred from GRACE gravity mission observations, we find that the sum of steric sea level and the ocean mass component has a trend of 1.5 ± 1.5 mm/year over the period, in agreement with the total sea level rise observed by either Jason-1 (2.2 ± 1.6 mm/year) or Envisat (1.7 ± 1.8 mm/year). This provides verification that the altimeters, Argo buoys, and GRACE are providing consistent results and opens the way to routine monitoring of the major components of sea level rise.

  10. Analysis of Hydrology Induced Gravity Variations Observed by GRACE --- and Other Applications of Spherical Wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, V.

    2005-12-01

    A spherical wavelet analysis of monthly GRACE gravity data is presented. We observe strong correlations to gravity variations predicted by some common hydrology models, in particular in the Amazon, Zambezi and Ganges area. A time series analysis of the predicted gravity due to surface density changes in comparison to spherical wavelet coefficients of the GRACE potential demonstrates the advantages of spherical wavelets. Whereas a spherical harmonics expansion always implicitly includes a global averaging process, wavelets represent localizing basis functions that are much better able to analyze regional variations of a considered data set. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the spherical wavelet approach due to W. Freeden and U. Windheuser can be extended to a larger set of problems including the modelling of functions on balls, i.e. not only on the spherical surface. Examples of applications, such as the volume density recovery from simulated SGG gravity data (cf. planned satellite mission GOCE) are demonstrated. References: M.J. Fengler, W. Freeden, A. Kohlhaas, V. Michel, T. Peters: Wavelet Modelling of Regional and Temporal Variations of the Earth's Gravitational Potential Observed by GRACE, Schriften zur Funktionalanalysis und Geomathematik, 21 (2005), preprint, article submitted to Journal of Geodesy, 2005. V. Michel: Regularized Wavelet--based Multiresolution Recovery of the Harmonic Mass Density Distribution from Data of the Earth's Gravitational Field at Satellite Height, Inverse Problems, 21 (2005), 997-1025.

  11. Aerothermal Analysis and Design of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazanek, Daniel D.; Kumar, Renjith R.; Qu, Min; Seywald, Hans

    2000-01-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) primary mission will be performed by making measurements of the inter-satellite range change between two co-planar, low altitude near-polar orbiting satellites. Understanding the uncertainties in the disturbance environment, particularly the aerodynamic drag and torques, is critical in several mission areas. These include an accurate estimate of the spacecraft orbital lifetime, evaluation of spacecraft attitude control requirements, and estimation of the orbital maintenance maneuver frequency necessitated by differences in the drag forces acting on both satellites. The FREEMOL simulation software has been developed and utilized to analyze and suggest design modifications to the GRACE spacecraft. Aerodynamic accommodation bounding analyses were performed and worst-case envelopes were obtained for the aerodynamic torques and the differential ballistic coefficients between the leading and trailing GRACE spacecraft. These analyses demonstrate how spacecraft aerodynamic design and analysis can benefit from a better understanding of spacecraft surface accommodation properties, and the implications for mission design constraints such as formation spacing control.

  12. Land ice evolution from a new GRACE iterated global mascon solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luthcke, S. B.; Sabaka, T. J.; Loomis, B. D.; Arendt, A. A.; Rowlands, D. D.

    2012-12-01

    Land ice mass evolution is determined from a new GRACE global mascon solution. The solution is estimated directly from the reduction of the inter-satellite K-band range rate observations taking into account the full noise covariance, and formally iterating the solution. The new solution increases signal recovery while reducing the GRACE KBRR observation residuals. The mascons are estimated with 10-day and 1-arc-degree equal area sampling, applying anisotropic constraints for enhanced temporal and spatial resolution of the recovered land ice signal. The details of the solution are presented including error and resolution analysis. An Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) adaptive filter is applied to the mascon solution time series to compute timing of balance seasons and annual mass balances. Modeled surface mass balance, airborne and satellite altimetry data are included in the forward modeling and their impact on the mascon solution and the GRACE observation residuals is presented. The details and causes of the spatial and temporal variability of the land ice regions studied, and their impact on sea level are discussed.

  13. GRACE water storage estimates for the Middle East and other regions with significant reservoir and lake storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longuevergne, L.; Wilson, C. R.; Scanlon, B. R.; Crétaux, J. F.

    2012-10-01

    While GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellites are increasingly being used to monitor water storage changes globally, the impact of spatial distribution of water storage within a basin is generally ignored but may be substantial. In many basins, water may be stored in reservoirs, lakes, flooded areas, small aquifer systems, and other localized regions with sizes typically below GRACE resolution. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of non-uniform water storage distribution on GRACE estimates as basin-wide averages, focusing on surface water reservoirs. Analysis included numerical experiments testing the effect of mass size and position within a basin, and application to the Lower Nile (Lake Nasser) and Tigri-Euphrates (TE) basins as examples. Numerical experiments show that by assuming uniform mass distribution, GRACE estimates may under- or over-estimate basin-average water storage by up to a factor of two, depending on reservoir location and extent. Although their spatial extent may be unresolved by GRACE, reservoir storage may dominate in some basins. For example, it accounts for 95% of seasonal variations in the Lower Nile and 10% in the TE basins. Because reservoirs are used to mitigate droughts and buffer against climate extremes, their influence on interannual time scales can be large, for example accounting for 50% of total water storage decline during the 2007-2009 drought in the TE basin. Effects on GRACE estimates are not easily accounted for via simple multiplicative scaling, but in many cases independent information may be available to improve estimates. Accurate estimation of the reservoir contribution is critical, especially when separating groundwater from GRACE total water storage changes. Because the influence of spatially concentrated water storage - and more generally water distribution - is significant, GRACE estimates will be improved when it is possible to combine independent spatial distribution information

  14. GRACE water storage estimates for the Middle East and other regions with significant reservoir and lake storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longuevergne, L.; Wilson, C. R.; Scanlon, B. R.; Crétaux, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    While GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellites are increasingly being used to monitor total water storage (TWS) changes globally, the impact of spatial distribution of water storage within a basin is generally ignored but may be substantial. In many basins, water is often stored in reservoirs or lakes, flooded areas, small aquifer systems, and other localized regions with areas typically below GRACE resolution (~200 000 km2). The objective of this study was to assess the impact of nonuniform water storage distribution on GRACE estimates of TWS changes as basin-wide averages, focusing on surface water reservoirs and using a priori information on reservoir storage from radar altimetry. Analysis included numerical experiments testing effects of location and areal extent of the localized mass (reservoirs) within a basin on basin-wide average water storage changes, and application to the lower Nile (Lake Nasser) and Tigris-Euphrates basins as examples. Numerical experiments show that by assuming uniform mass distribution, GRACE estimates may under- or overestimate basin-wide average water storage by up to a factor of ~2, depending on reservoir location and areal extent. Although reservoirs generally cover less than 1% of the basin area, and their spatial extent may be unresolved by GRACE, reservoir storage may dominate water storage changes in some basins. For example, reservoir storage accounts for ~95% of seasonal water storage changes in the lower Nile and 10% in the Tigris-Euphrates. Because reservoirs are used to mitigate droughts and buffer against climate extremes, their influence on interannual timescales can be large. For example, TWS decline during the 2007-2009 drought in the Tigris-Euphrates basin measured by GRACE was ~93 km3. Actual reservoir storage from satellite altimetry was limited to 27 km3, but their apparent impact on GRACE reached 45 km3, i.e., 50% of GRACE trend. Therefore, the actual impact of reservoirs would have been greatly

  15. An interpretation of the interannual mass trend change over the Indochina Peninsula observed by GRACE data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Fukuda, Y.; Nakaegawa, T.; Hasegawa, T.; Taniguchi, M.

    2010-12-01

    In Research Institute for Humanity and Nature, a project “Human Impacts on Urban Subsurface Environments” to assess impacts of human activities on urban subsurface environment in several Asian developing cities is now in progress. Although one of the main purposes of the project is to investigate local groundwater systems on and around the urban cities, the project also aims to understand large-scale landwater movements including the areas, and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite gravity data is used for the purpose. In the previous study (Yamamoto et al., 2010), we recovered the regional-scale interannual landwater mass variation over the Indochina Peninsula, which includes one of the test cities in the project, i.e. Bangkok, Thailand, by using GRACE data. The recovered mass variation showed the change of the interannual trend at around the beginning of 2005: it decreased up to the beginning of 2005, and after that, increased up to 2009. The compared results with observed/modeled hydrological and meteorological data sets showed that the observed trend change did not caused by regional human activities, e.g. excessive groundwater pumping, but caused by global-scale meteorological phenomena. In fact, the interannual mass variation showed high correlation with the climate index represents the intensity of Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) phenomena. In this study, we investigated the correlation mechanism between the interannual mass change in the Indochina Peninsula and the IOD phenomena, which is the spatial anomaly pattern of sea surface temperature. We firstly made the moisture flux data sets in the GRACE mission duration by using atmospheric objective reanalysis data. The obtained flux pattern was discussed by comparing with the typical flux pattern during the pure IOD years estimated by Ummenhofer et al., 2009. Further, the moisture flux over the Indochina Peninsula was assessed whether the value is quantitatively agreeable by comparing with

  16. Estimation of regional mass anomalies from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) over Himalayan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, R.; Singh, S. K.; Rajawat, A. S.; Ajai

    2014-11-01

    Time-variable gravity changes are caused by a combination of postglacial rebound, redistribution of water and snow/ice on land and as well as in the ocean. The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission, launched in 2002, provides monthly average of the spherical harmonic co-efficient. These spherical harmonic co-efficient describe earth's gravity field with a resolution of few hundred kilometers. Time-variability of gravity field represents the change in mass over regional level with accuracies in cm in terms of Water Equivalent Height (WEH). The WEH reflects the changes in the integrated vertically store water including snow cover, surface water, ground water and soil moisture at regional scale. GRACE data are also sensitive towards interior strain variation, surface uplift and surface subsidence cover over a large area. GRACE data was extracted over the three major Indian River basins, Indus, Ganga and Brahmaputra, in the Himalayas which are perennial source of fresh water throughout the year in Northern Indian Plain. Time series analysis of the GRACE data was carried out from 2003-2012 over the study area. Trends and amplitudes of the regional mass anomalies in the region were estimated using level 3 GRACE data product with a spatial resolution at 10 by 10 grid provided by Center for Space Research (CSR), University of Texas at Austin. Indus basin has shown a subtle decreasing trend from 2003-2012 however it was observed to be statistically insignificant at 95 % confidence level. Ganga and Brahmaputra basins have shown a clear decreasing trend in WEH which was also observed to be statistically significant. The trend analysis over Ganga and Brahamputra basins have shown an average annual change of -1.28 cm and -1.06 cm in terms of WEH whereas Indus basin has shown a slight annual change of -0.07 cm. This analysis will be helpful to understand the loss of mass in terms of WEH over Indian Himalayas and will be crucial for hydrological and

  17. Study of Sub-basin Scale Groundwater Variations in Asia Using GRACE, Satellite Altimetry and in-situ Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Fukuda, Y.; Taniguchi, M.

    2008-12-01

    A project to assess the effects of human activities on the subsurface environment in Asian developing cities is now in progress (Research Institute for Humanity and Nature., 2008). In the project, precise in situ gravity and landwater observations combined with GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellite gravity data is proposed to evaluate local groundwater level changes of the developing urban areas in Asia. It is necessary for precise and accurate estimation of the local groundwater variations to separate local groundwater level changes from regional or global scale landwater variations. GRACE data is useful to estimate large scale landwater variations. Using GRACE Level 2 monthly gravity field solutions, we previously recovered landwater mass variation around Bangkok, in Thailand, which is one of the test areas of the project and located on the downstream of Chao Phraya river basin in the Indochina Peninsula. However, it is difficult to distinguish landwater signal of Chao Phraya river basin itself with the neighboring 3 large river basins because of the limitation of the spatial resolution of the GRACE monthly solutions. In this study, we recovered mass variation of Chao Phraya river basin using GRACE"fs along track range rate data instead of the monthly solutions. We used the method developed by Chen et al (2007), which uses GRACE"fs line-of-sight range acceleration measurements. We also tested the recoveries of landwater mass variations in other small scale river basins including Jakarta, Seoul and Taipei, which are also study areas of the project. Using the sub-basin scale landwater mass variation recovered by GRACE, we estimated groundwater level change in the project study areas by combing with in situ landwater and gravity observations. Satellite altimetry data is also used to separate groundwater variation from other landwater components as a constraint of river water storage variations.

  18. Assimilation and Calibration Approach for WGHM Using Gridded GRACE Observations: Validation for the Mississippi, Amazon and Danube Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Maike; Kusche, Jürgen; Eicker, Annette; Müller Schmied, Hannes; Döll, Petra

    2014-05-01

    Global hydrological models describe the terrestrial water cycle with detailed spatial and temporal resolution; e.g. the WaterGAP Global Hydrology Model (WGHM) simulates the vertical and horizontal water fluxes on a 0.5°x0.5° grid with daily resolution. On the other hand, the column-integrated sum of total water storage (TWS) changes can be derived from Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) observations. An assimilating hydrological model that combines the advantages of detailed model resolution and accurate water storage measurements would be of great benefit for geophysical applications. Daily GRACE assimilated model outputs have the potential for being used for de-aliasing of GRACE products, replacing missing GRACE solutions or providing trends to separate GIA and perform ice mass corrections. In our group, a new ensemble Kalman filter approach has been developed to improve WGHM. The method assimilates GRACE-derived gridded TWS changes and calibrates WGHM parameters. The model-derived states and satellite measurements and their error information are used to determine updated water storage states. Since hydrological models do not provide error information, an empirical covariance matrix needs to be estimated. In this study, we focus on the validation of the performance of our approach. Therefore, GRACE data is assimilated into WGHM and its parameters are calibrated over a certain period of time. Afterwards, a free model run, considering the calibrated parameters and assimilated states, is performed for the following years. The predicted TWS values are then compared with those of GRACE observations and the original model outputs. We also validate the assimilated model outputs against independent discharge measurements. We applied our method to the Mississippi and Amazon basin, which exhibit a strong TWS signal, and the Danube basin, which represents a moderate signal.

  19. The Singular Spectrum Analysis Approach in the Analysis of Weekly GRACE and Hydrology Models Water Mass Anomalies Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangelova, E.; Kim, J. W.

    2009-05-01

    We use the method of singular spectrum analysis to extract short- and long-term periodic water mass anomaly signals from a time series of the recently publicly available GFZ weekly GRACE solutions. We analyze time- lagged continuous time series (from February 2004 to May 2008) of GRACE spherical harmonic coefficients of maximum degree and order 30. One of the main advantages of performing the analysis in the spectral domain instead of in the spatial domain is the reduction of the computational load because a much smaller number of coefficients than spatial pixels are analyzed. Furthermore, no de-striping and isotropic smoothing filters are necessary because our filtering technique is able to smooth significantly the GRACE random errors and to reduce largely the correlated errors besides extracting all significant periodic signals. Moreover, the removal of part of geophysical signals together with the correlated GRACE errors and the reduction of the GRACE-derived water mass anomaly amplitudes are avoided. We demonstrate that our filtering technique effectively reduces the average RMS of water mass variability over the oceans when all but annual, semi-annual and long-term global variations in the spherical harmonic coefficients are filtered out. On land, we compare the filtered weekly GRACE-derived water mass anomalies with the weekly-averaged GLDAS mass anomalies for Amazon, Congo, Ob and Mississippi basins. The GRACE-derived trends agree well with the GLDAS model trends in all of the studied basins. Our results also demonstrate that the singular spectrum analysis approach is a powerful tool for extracting any short- and long-term signals as well as phase shifts and amplitude variations of the periodic water mass anomalies.

  20. GRACE Estimated Terrestrial and Aquifer Storage Change Using An Improved Energy Balance And Regional Gravity Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, K.; Guo, J.; Dai, C.; Duan, J.; Shum, C. K.; Schmidt, M. G.; Bezděk, A.; Klokocnik, J.; Kostelecky, J.; Sebera, J.

    2014-12-01

    Energy Balance Approach (EBA) has been demonstrated to be an efficient method to estimate the regional terrestrial water storage changes from GRACE via in situ geopotential difference observations directly computed using the GRACE Level 1B data. The primary purpose of this study is to overcome several limitations in previous EBA by demonstrating an improved EBA to obtain a more precise estimation of in situ geopotential difference, which would be able to preserve both the low- and high-frequency gravity signals and also improve the temporal resolutions. Consequently, this method would yield a full scale, i.e., both regional and global water storage change, including world's aquifers. To achieve this goal, we developed an innovative approach to incorporate GRACE inter-satellite range-rate observations into energy conservation equation, which is realized by a so-called alignment equation, together with a technique to estimate the reference orbits for the GRACE twin-satellites. We will present our results for both global and regional GRACE solutions using the improved EBA for water storage change estimates with enhanced spatial and temporal resolutions over selected terrestrial hydrologic basins and large aquifers.

  1. Time Variable Gravity from Weekly Solutions from 1993 to 2010 using SLR and DORIS data and Comparisons with GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinn, D. S.; Lemoine, F. G.; Le Bail, K.; Luthcke, S. B.; Zelensky, N. P.; Rowlands, D. D.; Sabaka, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    GRACE has been routinely monitoring the time-variable gravity field of the Earth since 2003 with either periodic solutions expressed as spherical harmonics or mascons. GRACE can resolve time-variable gravity to between degree 40 and 60, however the time series may be interrupted prior to the launch of a GRACE-2 spacecraft. A suite of satellites tracked by SLR, DORIS and also GPS has been in orbit for many years, and with these satellites it is possible to construct a time series of low degree spherical harmonics over several decades. We have recently reprocessed SLR and DORIS data from 1993 to 2010 using ITRF2008 and have developed weekly solutions based on SLR data to Lageos1, Lageos2, Starlette, Stella, Ajisai, Larets, TOPEX/Poseidon, Envisat, the SPOT satellites, and Jason-2. The new C20 solutions compare favorably to independent SLR solutions, however the annual amplitude in the SLR solutions is greater than in the annual amplitude of the C20 recoveries from GRACE-derived solutions. For non-zonal low degree coefficients, the GRACE and SLR time series seem in reasonable agreement over the time period where the data are in common. We summarize the current status of the processing, and the quality of the solutions that have been obtained thus far, and provide a perspective on future work that remains to be done.

  2. Earth surface deformation in the North China Plain detected by joint analysis of GRACE and GPS data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Renli; Li, Jiancheng; Fok, Hok Sum; Shum, C K; Li, Zhao

    2014-10-22

    Mass redistribution of the Earth causes variable loading that deforms the solid Earth. While most recent studies using geodetic techniques focus on regions (such as the Amazon basin and the Nepal Himalayas) with large seasonal deformation amplitudes on the order of 1-4 cm due to hydrologic loading, few such studies have been conducted on the regions where the seasonal deformation amplitude is half as large. Here, we use joint GPS and GRACE data to investigate the vertical deformation due to hydrologic loading in the North China Plain, where significant groundwater depletion has been reported. We found that the GPS- and GRACE-derived secular trends and seasonal signals are in good agreement, with an uplift magnitude of 1-2 mm/year and a correlation of 85.0%-98.5%, respectively. This uplift rate is consistent with groundwater depletion rate estimated from GRACE data and in-situ groundwater measurements from earlier report studies; whereas the seasonal hydrologic variation reflects human behavior of groundwater pumping for agriculture irrigation in spring, leading to less water storage in summer than that in the winter season. However, less than 20% of weighted root-mean-squared (WRMS) reductions were detected for all the selected GPS stations when GRACE-derived seasonal deformations were removed from detrended GPS height time series. This discrepancy is probably because the GRACE-derived seasonal signals are large-scale, while the GPS-derived signals are local point measurements.

  3. Earth surface deformation in the North China Plain detected by joint analysis of GRACE and GPS data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Renli; Li, Jiancheng; Fok, Hok Sum; Shum, C K; Li, Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Mass redistribution of the Earth causes variable loading that deforms the solid Earth. While most recent studies using geodetic techniques focus on regions (such as the Amazon basin and the Nepal Himalayas) with large seasonal deformation amplitudes on the order of 1-4 cm due to hydrologic loading, few such studies have been conducted on the regions where the seasonal deformation amplitude is half as large. Here, we use joint GPS and GRACE data to investigate the vertical deformation due to hydrologic loading in the North China Plain, where significant groundwater depletion has been reported. We found that the GPS- and GRACE-derived secular trends and seasonal signals are in good agreement, with an uplift magnitude of 1-2 mm/year and a correlation of 85.0%-98.5%, respectively. This uplift rate is consistent with groundwater depletion rate estimated from GRACE data and in-situ groundwater measurements from earlier report studies; whereas the seasonal hydrologic variation reflects human behavior of groundwater pumping for agriculture irrigation in spring, leading to less water storage in summer than that in the winter season. However, less than 20% of weighted root-mean-squared (WRMS) reductions were detected for all the selected GPS stations when GRACE-derived seasonal deformations were removed from detrended GPS height time series. This discrepancy is probably because the GRACE-derived seasonal signals are large-scale, while the GPS-derived signals are local point measurements. PMID:25340454

  4. The GRACE Follow-On Laser Ranging Interferometer; A inter-spacecraft laser interferometry technology demonstrator with similarities to LISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klipstein, William; McKenzie, Kirk; Grace Follow-On LASER Ranging Interferometer Team

    2016-03-01

    GRACE Follow-On will replace the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission, which has been measuring Earth's gravity field since 2002. Like GRACE, GRACE Follow-On will use a microwave link as its primary instrument to measure micron-level changes in the 200km separation of a pair of satellites in a following polar orbit. GRACE Follow-On will also include a 2-way laser-link, the Laser Ranging Interferometer (LRI), as a technology demonstrator package. The LRI is an NASA/German partnership and will demonstrate inter-spacecraft laser interferometry with a goal of 10 times better precision than the microwave instrument, or about 90 nm/ √(Hz) between 10 and 100 mHz. The similarities between the LRI and a single arm of Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mean many of the required technologies will be the same. This talk will give an overview of the LRI and the status of the LRI instruments, and implications for LISA.

  5. Using Enhanced Grace Water Storage Data to Improve Drought Detection by the U.S. and North American Drought Monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houborg, Rasmus; Rodell, Matthew; Lawrimore, Jay; Li, Bailing; Reichle, Rolf; Heim, Richard; Rosencrans, Matthew; Tinker, Rich; Famiglietti, James S.; Svoboda, Mark; Wardlow, Brian; Zaitchik, Benjamin F.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites measure time variations of the Earth's gravity field enabling reliable detection of spatio-temporal variations in total terrestrial water storage (TWS), including groundwater. The U.S. and North American Drought Monitors rely heavily on precipitation indices and do not currently incorporate systematic observations of deep soil moisture and groundwater storage conditions. Thus GRACE has great potential to improve the Drought Monitors by filling this observational gap. GRACE TWS data were assimilating into the Catchment Land Surface Model using an ensemble Kalman smoother enabling spatial and temporal downscaling and vertical decomposition into soil moisture and groundwater components. The Drought Monitors combine several short- and long-term drought indicators expressed in percentiles as a reference to their historical frequency of occurrence. To be consistent, we generated a climatology of estimated soil moisture and ground water based on a 60-year Catchment model simulation, which was used to convert seven years of GRACE assimilated fields into drought indicator percentiles. At this stage we provide a preliminary evaluation of the GRACE assimilated moisture and indicator fields.

  6. Earth Surface Deformation in the North China Plain Detected by Joint Analysis of GRACE and GPS Data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Renli; Li, Jiancheng; Fok, Hok Sum; Shum, C.K.; Li, Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Mass redistribution of the Earth causes variable loading that deforms the solid Earth. While most recent studies using geodetic techniques focus on regions (such as the Amazon basin and the Nepal Himalayas) with large seasonal deformation amplitudes on the order of 1–4 cm due to hydrologic loading, few such studies have been conducted on the regions where the seasonal deformation amplitude is half as large. Here, we use joint GPS and GRACE data to investigate the vertical deformation due to hydrologic loading in the North China Plain, where significant groundwater depletion has been reported. We found that the GPS- and GRACE-derived secular trends and seasonal signals are in good agreement, with an uplift magnitude of 1–2 mm/year and a correlation of 85.0%–98.5%, respectively. This uplift rate is consistent with groundwater depletion rate estimated from GRACE data and in-situ groundwater measurements from earlier report studies; whereas the seasonal hydrologic variation reflects human behavior of groundwater pumping for agriculture irrigation in spring, leading to less water storage in summer than that in the winter season. However, less than 20% of weighted root-mean-squared (WRMS) reductions were detected for all the selected GPS stations when GRACE-derived seasonal deformations were removed from detrended GPS height time series. This discrepancy is probably because the GRACE-derived seasonal signals are large-scale, while the GPS-derived signals are local point measurements. PMID:25340454

  7. High-frequency terrestrial water storage signal capture via a regularized sliding window mascon product from GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakumura, Carly; Bettadpur, Srinivas; Save, Himanshu; McCullough, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission has provided an unprecedented global, homogeneous observational data set of time variation in terrestrial water storage since 2002. The typical GRACE product uses approximately 30 equally weighted days of data to estimate a monthly mean gravity field with 300+ km resolution. The coarse spatial and temporal resolution of the typical GRACE solution, however, limits scientific analysis to primarily seasonal and long-term hydrological processes. In this study, we enhance the temporal and spatial resolution of the GRACE data product through the use of sliding windows, regularization, and mascon basis functions in the estimation process. Each regularized sliding window mascon (RSWM) gravity field is composed of 21 days of observational data differentially weighted to optimize the frequency retention while ensuring sufficient observability for a global solution. Tikhonov regularization informed by RL05 error is applied in the estimation process, and the product is derived in mascon basis functions to increase the amplitude and localization of signal retention. The final RSWM data product is the first daily time-variable gravity data set created solely from GRACE information. The improved filter design reduces aliasing, increases the signal bandwidth, and better captures the amplitude and power of geophysical signals. Comparison with land surface model and in situ data sets shows a similar spatial and temporal signal content at all frequencies within the filter bandwidth and highlights the overall accuracy of the product. The new data set expands opportunities for scientific analysis of subseasonal terrestrial water storage variability.

  8. Assimilation of GRACE Terrestrial Water Storage into a Land Surface Model: Evaluation 1 and Potential Value for Drought Monitoring in Western and Central Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Bailing; Rodell, Matthew; Zaitchik, Benjamin F.; Reichle, Rolf H.; Koster, Randal D.; van Dam, Tonie M.

    2012-01-01

    A land surface model s ability to simulate states (e.g., soil moisture) and fluxes (e.g., runoff) is limited by uncertainties in meteorological forcing and parameter inputs as well as inadequacies in model physics. In this study, anomalies of terrestrial water storage (TWS) observed by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission were assimilated into the NASA Catchment land surface model in western and central Europe for a 7-year period, using a previously developed ensemble Kalman smoother. GRACE data assimilation led to improved runoff correlations with gauge data in 17 out of 18 hydrological basins, even in basins smaller than the effective resolution of GRACE. Improvements in root zone soil moisture were less conclusive, partly due to the shortness of the in situ data record. In addition to improving temporal correlations, GRACE data assimilation also reduced increasing trends in simulated monthly TWS and runoff associated with increasing rates of precipitation. GRACE assimilated root zone soil moisture and TWS fields exhibited significant changes in their dryness rankings relative to those without data assimilation, suggesting that GRACE data assimilation could have a substantial impact on drought monitoring. Signals of drought in GRACE TWS correlated well with MODIS Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data in most areas. Although they detected the same droughts during warm seasons, drought signatures in GRACE derived TWS exhibited greater persistence than those in NDVI throughout all seasons, in part due to limitations associated with the seasonality of vegetation.

  9. 76 FR 10899 - Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees From the W.R. Grace and Company...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ... Company in Curtis, MD, To Be Included in the Special Exposure Cohort AGENCY: National Institute for... class of employees from the W.R. Grace and Company in Curtis, Maryland, to be included in the Special... evaluation, is as follows: Facility: W.R. Grace and Company. Location: Curtis, Maryland. Job Titles...

  10. Basin mass dynamic changes in China from GRACE based on a multibasin inversion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Shuang; Wang, Qiuyu; Sun, Wenke

    2016-05-01

    Complex landforms, miscellaneous climates, and enormous populations have influenced various geophysical phenomena in China, which range from water depletion in the underground to retreating glaciers on high mountains and have attracted abundant scientific interest. This paper, which utilizes gravity observations during 2003-2014 from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), intends to comprehensively estimate the mass status in 16 drainage basins in the region. We propose a multibasin inversion method that features resistance to stripe noise and an ability to alleviate signal attenuation from the truncation and smoothing of GRACE data. The results show both positive and negative trends. Tremendous mass accumulation has occurred from the Tibetan Plateau (12.1 ± 0.6 Gt/yr) to the Yangtze River (7.7 ± 1.3 Gt/yr) and southeastern coastal areas, which is suggested to involve an increase in the groundwater storage, lake and reservoir water volume, and the flow of materials from tectonic processes. Additionally, mass loss has occurred in the Huang-Huai-Hai-Liao River Basin (-10.2 ± 0.9 Gt/yr), the Brahmaputra-Nujiang-Lancang River Basin (-15.0 ± 1.1 Gt/yr), and Tienshan Mountain (-4.1 ± 0.3 Gt/yr), a result of groundwater pumping and glacier melting. Areas with groundwater depletion are consistent with the distribution of cities with land subsidence in North China. We find that intensified precipitation can alter the local water supply and that GRACE can adequately capture these dynamics, which could be instructive for China's South-to-North Water Diversion hydrologic project.

  11. 3D viscosity maps for Greenland and effect on GRACE mass balance estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wal, Wouter; Xu, Zheng

    2016-04-01

    The GRACE satellite mission measures mass loss of the Greenland ice sheet. To correct for glacial isostatic adjustment numerical models are used. Although generally found to be a small signal, the full range of possible GIA models has not been explored yet. In particular, low viscosities due to a wet mantle and high temperatures due to the nearby Iceland hotspot could have a significant effect on GIA gravity rates. The goal of this study is to present a range of possible viscosity maps, and investigate the effect on GRACE mass balance estimates. Viscosity is derived using flow laws for olivine. Mantle temperature is computed from global seismology models, based on temperature derivatives for different mantle compositions. An indication for grain sizes is obtained by xenolith findings at a few locations. We also investigate the weakening effect of the presence of melt. To calculate gravity rates, we use a finite-element GIA model with the 3D viscosity maps and the ICE-5G loading history. GRACE mass balances for mascons in Greenland are derived with a least-squares inversion, using separate constraints for the inland and coastal areas in Greenland. Biases in the least-squares inversion are corrected using scale factors estimated from a simulation based on a surface mass balance model (Xu et al., submitted to The Cryosphere). Model results show enhanced gravity rates in the west and south of Greenland with 3D viscosity maps, compared to GIA models with 1D viscosity. The effect on regional mass balance is up to 5 Gt/year. Regional low viscosity can make present-day gravity rates sensitivity to ice thickness changes in the last decades. Therefore, an improved ice loading history for these time scales is needed.

  12. GRACE captures basin mass dynamic changes in China based on a multi-basin inversion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Shuang; Wang, Qiuyu; Sun, Wenke

    2016-04-01

    Complex landform, miscellaneous climate and enormous population have enriched China with geophysical phenomena ranging from water depletion in the underground to glaciers retreat on the high mountains and have aroused large scientific interests. This paper, utilizing gravity observations 2003-2014 from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), intends to make a comprehensive estimation of mass status in 16 drainage basins in the whole region. We proposed a multi-basin inversion method, which is featured by resistance to the stripe noise and ability to alleviate signal attenuation due to truncation and smoothing of GRACE data. The results show both positive and negative trends: there is a tremendous mass accumulation spreading from the Tibetan plateau (12.2 ± 0.6 Gt/yr) to the Yangtze River (7.6 ± 1.3 Gt/yr), and further to the southeast coastal areas, which is suggested to involve an increase in the ground water storage, lake and reservoir water volume and likely materials flowed in by tectonic process; a mass loss is occurring in Huang-Huai-Hai-Liao River Basin (-10.5 ± 0.8 Gt/yr), as well as the Brahmaputra-Nujiang-Lancang River Basin (-15.0 ± 0.9 Gt/yr) and Tienshan Mountain (-4.1 ± 0.3 Gt/yr), which is a result of groundwater pumping and glacier melting. The groundwater depletion area is well consistent with the distribution of land subsidence in North China. In the end, we find intensified precipitation can alter the local water supply and GRACE is proficient to capture this dynamics, which could be instructive for the South-to-North Water Diversion - one China's giant hydrologic project.

  13. GRACE Mass Flux Measurements of Inland and Marginal Seas from Mascons: Analysis and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomis, B.; Luthcke, S. B.; Sabaka, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    The latest GRACE time-variable gravity mascon solution from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) applies an optimized set of models and constraints towards the direct measurement of 1-arc-degree global mass flux parameters each month. Separate mascon spatial constraint regions have been defined for the largest inland and marginal seas: Mediterranean Sea, Black Sea, Caspian Sea, Red Sea, and Hudson Bay. The mascon estimation approach, when applied with well-designed constraints, minimizes signal leakage across regional boundaries and eliminates the need for post-processing strategies. These post-processing techniques (e.g. smoothed averaging kernels) are necessary for computing regional mass change from the unconstrained spherical harmonics provided by the GRACE project to reduce the effect of noisy high degree and order terms, but introduce signal leakage into and out of the considered region. These mass signals are also difficult to obtain from altimetry measurements due to the comparatively sparse temperature and salinity data in these regions, which is needed to compute and remove the steric component of sea level variations. We provide new GSFC mascon measurements of these inland and marginal seas and compare to results obtained from kernel-averaged spherical harmonic solutions and steric-corrected altimetry measurements. The relative accuracy of the various solutions is determined by incorporating their output into the set of forward models applied in our processing of the GRACE Level-1B data and analyzing the effect on the inter-satellite range-rate residuals, where a reduction in residuals is a direct validation of improved solution quality.

  14. AIUB-RL02: an improved time-series of monthly gravity fields from GRACE data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, U.; Jäggi, A.; Jean, Y.; Beutler, G.

    2016-05-01

    The new release AIUB-RL02 of monthly gravity models from GRACE GPS and K-Band range-rate data is based on reprocessed satellite orbits referring to the reference frame IGb08. The release is consistent with the IERS2010 conventions. Improvements with respect to its predecessor AIUB-RL01 include the use of reprocessed (RL02) GRACE observations, new atmosphere and ocean dealiasing products (RL05), an upgraded ocean tide model (EOT11A), and the interpolation of shallow ocean tides (admittances). The stochastic parametrization of AIUB-RL02 was adapted to include daily accelerometer scale factors, which drastically reduces spurious signal at the 161 d period in C20 and at other low degree and order gravity field coefficients. Moreover, the correlation between the noise in the monthly gravity models and solar activity is considerably reduced in the new release. The signal and the noise content of the new AIUB-RL02 monthly gravity fields are studied and calibrated errors are derived from their non-secular and non-seasonal variability. The short-period time-variable signal over the oceans, mostly representing noise, is reduced by 50 per cent with respect to AIUB-RL01. Compared to the official GFZ-RL05a and CSR-RL05 monthly models, the AIUB-RL02 stands out by its low noise at high degrees, a fact emerging from the estimation of seasonal variations for selected river basins and of mass trends in polar regions. Two versions of the monthly AIUB-RL02 gravity models, with spherical harmonics resolution of degree and order 60 and 90, respectively, are available for the time period from March 2003 to March 2014 at the International Center for Global Earth Models or from ftp://ftp.unibe.ch/aiub/GRAVITY/GRACE (last accessed 22 March 2016).

  15. Simultaneous Observations of TADs in GOCE, CHAMP and GRACE Density Data Compared with CTIPe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruinsma, S. L.; Fedrizzi, M.

    2012-12-01

    The accelerometers on the CHAMP and GRACE satellites have made it possible to accumulate near-continuous records of thermosphere density between about 300 and 490 km since May 2001, and July 2002, respectively. Since November 2009, a third gravity field satellite mission, ESA's GOCE, is in a very low and near heliosynchronous dawn-dusk orbit at about 270 km. The spacecraft is actively maintained at that constant altitude using an ion propulsion engine that compensates the aerodynamic drag in the flight direction. The thrust level, combined with accelerometer and satellite attitude data, is used to compute atmospheric densities and cross-track winds. The response of the thermosphere to geomagnetic disturbances, i.e., space weather, has been extensively studied using the exceptional datasets of CHAMP and GRACE. Thanks to GOCE we now have a third excellent data set for these studies. In this presentation we will show the observed density and its variability for the geomagnetic storm of 5 April 2010, and compare it with predictions along the orbits obtained from a self-consistent physics-based coupled model of the thermosphere, ionosphere, plasmasphere and electrodynamics (CTIPe). For this storm, the CHAMP and GOCE orbit planes were perpendicular (12/24 Local Solar Time, and 6/18 LST, respectively) and the altitude difference was only approximately 30 km. The GRACE densities are at a much higher altitude of about 475 km. Wave-like features are revealed or enhanced after filtering of the densities and calculation of relative density variations. Traveling Atmospheric Disturbances are observed in the data, and the model's fidelity in reproducing the waves is evaluated.

  16. Water resource monitoring in Iran using satellite altimetry and satellite gravimetry (GRACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaki, Mehdi; Sneeuw, Nico

    2015-04-01

    Human civilization has always been in evolution by having direct access to water resources throughout history. Water, with its qualitative and quantitative effects, plays an important role in economic and social developments. Iran with an arid and semi-arid geographic specification is located in Southwest Asia. Water crisis has appeared in Iran as a serious problem. In this study we're going to use various data sources including satellite radar altimetry and satellite gravimetry to monitor and investigate water resources in Iran. Radar altimeters are an invaluable tool to retrieve from space vital hydrological information such as water level, volume and discharge, in particular from regions where the in situ data collection is difficult. Besides, Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) provide global high resolution observations of the time variable gravity field of the Earth. This information is used to derive spatio-temporal changes of the terrestrial water storage body. This study isolates the anthropogenic perturbations to available water supplies in order to quantify human water use as compared to available resources. Long-term monitor of water resources in Iran is contain of observing freshwaters, lakes and rivers as well as exploring ground water bodies. For these purposes, several algorithms are developed to quantitatively monitor the water resources in Iran. The algorithms contain preprocessing on datasets, eliminating biases and atmospheric corrections, establishing water level time series and estimating terrestrial water storage considering impacts of biases and leakage on GRACE data. Our primary goal in this effort is to use the combination of satellite radar altimetry and GRACE data to study on water resources as well as methods to dealing with error sources include cross over errors and atmospheric impacts.

  17. The use of gravimetric data from GRACE mission in the understanding of polar motion variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seoane, L.; Nastula, J.; Bizouard, C.; Gambis, D.

    2009-08-01

    Tesseral coefficients C21 and S21 derived from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) observations allow to compute the mass term of the polar-motion excitation function. This independent estimation can improve the geophysical models and, in addition, determine the unmodelled phenomena. In this paper, we intend to validate the polar motion excitation derived from GRACE's last release (GRACE Release 4) computed by different institutes: GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ), Postdam, Germany; Center for Space Research (CSR), Austin, USA; Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, USA, and the Groupe de Recherche en Géodésie Spatiale (GRGS), Toulouse, France. For this purpose, we compare these excitations functions first to the mass term obtained from observed Earth's rotation variations free of the motion term and, second, to the mass term estimated from geophysical fluids models. We confirm the large improvement of the CSR solution, and we show that the GRGS estimate is also well correlated with the geodetic observations. Significant discrepancies exist between the solutions of each centre. The source of these differences is probably related to the data processing strategy. We also consider residuals computed after removing the geophysical models or the gravimetric solutions from the geodetic mass term. We show that the residual excitation based on models is smoother than the gravimetric data, which are still noisy. Still, they are comparable for the χ2 component. It appears that χ2 residual signals using GFZ and JPL data have less variability. Finally, for assessing the impact of the geophysical fluids models choice on our results, we checked two different oceanic excitation series. We show the significant differences in the residuals correlations, especially for the χ1 more sensitive to the oceanic signals.

  18. GIA models with composite rheology and 3D viscosity: effect on GRACE mass balance in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wal, Wouter; Whitehouse, Pippa; Schrama, Ernst

    2014-05-01

    Most Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) models that have been used to correct GRACE data for the influence of GIA assume a radial stratification of viscosity in the Earth's mantle (1D viscosity). Seismic data in Antarctica indicate that there are large viscosity variations in the horizontal direction (3D viscosity). The purpose of this research is to determine the effect of 3D viscosity on GIA model output, and hence mass balance estimates in Antarctica. We use a GIA model with 3D viscosity and composite rheology in combination with ice loading histories ICE-5G and W12a. From comparisons with uplift and sea-level data in Fennoscandia and North America three preferred viscosity models are selected. For two of the 3D viscosity models the maximum gravity rate due to ICE-5G forcing is located over the Ronne-Filchner ice shelf. This is in contrast with the results obtained using a 1D model, in which the maximum gravity rate due to ICE-5G forcing is always located over the Ross ice shelf. This demonstrates that not all 3D viscosity models can be approximated with a 1D viscosity model. Using CSR release 5 GRACE data from February 2003 to June 2013 mass balance estimates for the three preferred viscosity models are -131 to -171 Gt/year for the ICE-5G model, and -48 to -57 Gt/year for the W12a model. The range due to Earth model uncertainty is larger than the error bar for GRACE (10 Gt/year), but smaller than the range resulting from the difference in ice loading histories.

  19. Measuring Terrestrial Water Storage Change Using GPS, Absolute Gravity and GRACE in Scandinavia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Lulu; Wang, Hansheng; Wang, Xinsheng

    2015-04-01

    For Scandinavia, terrestrial water storage change estimates from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) would be seriously affected by the process of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) . The effects of GIA are typically removed using modeled values. However, the uncertainty in current GIA models is very large. To solve this problem, we calculates the measured linear ratio of GIA gravity rates and vertical displacement rates according to the data from collocation stations for absolute gravity and GPS in Scandinavia. Using the linear ratio and uplift field derived from GPS observation network, we get the gravity signal of GIA. Gravity change rates from GRACE RL05 data can be corrected for GIA using independent gravity rates derived from GPS vertical velocities, and then we can calculate corresponding equivalent water thickness in Scandinavia and the uncertainties are evaluated by considering the uncertainties from data. Our method utilizes observational data only and can avoid the enormous uncertainty from GIA models.The results are compared with that of two hydrological models. The ratio of gravity versus uplift obtained by ground-based measurements in Scandinavia is 0.148±0.020μGal/mm, which validates Wahr's approximate theoretical ratio (Wahr et al., 1995) and is very close to the result from North America (Mazzotti et al., 2011). From January 2003 to March 2011, terrestrial water storage shows obvious increase in Scandinavia. The main signal locates at the Vänern lake which is in the southern tip of the peninsula. The rate of total water storage change is 4.6±2.1 Gt/yr and the corresponding cumulative quantity is 38±17 Gt for the period 2003-2011. Results from hydrological models are consistent with our result very well. The correlation coefficient between GRACE and WGHM hydrological model can reach 0.69, while for GLDAS model the correlation coefficient is slightly smaller(0.57)

  20. Identification of statistically independent climatic pattern in GRACE and hydrological model data over West-Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusche, J.; Forootan, E.; Eicker, A.; Hoffmann-Dobrev, H.

    2012-04-01

    West-African countries have been exposed to changes in rainfall patterns over the last decades, including a significant negative trend. This causes adverse effects on water resources, for instance reduced freshwater availability, and changes in the frequency, duration and magnitude of droughts and floods. Extracting the main patterns of water storage change in West Africa from remote sensing and linking them to climate variability, is therefore an essential step to understand the hydrological aspects of the region. In this study, the higher order statistical method of Independent Component Analysis (ICA) is employed to extract statistically independent water storage patterns from monthly Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE), from the WaterGAP Global Hydrology Model (WGHM) and from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) products over West Africa, for the period 2002-2012. Then, to reveal the influences of climatic teleconnections on the individual patterns, these results were correlated to the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) indices. To study the predictability of water storage changes, advanced statistical methods were applied on the main independent Sea Surface Temperature (SST) patterns over the Atlantic and Indian Oceans for the period 2002-2012 and the ICA results. Our results show a water storage decrease over the coastal regions of West Africa (including Sierra Leone, Liberia, Togo and Nigeria), associated with rainfall decrease. The comparison between GRACE estimations and WGHM results indicates some inconsistencies that underline the importance of forcing data for hydrological modeling of West Africa. Keywords: West Africa; GRACE-derived water storage; ICA; ENSO; IOD

  1. Hydrogeology and water quality in the Graces Quarters area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tenbus, Frederick J.; Blomquist, Joel D.

    1995-01-01

    Graces Quarters was used for open-air testing of chemical-warfare agents from the late 1940's until 1971. Testing and disposal activities have resulted in the contamination of ground water and surface water. The hydrogeology and water quality were examined at three test areas, four disposal sites, a bunker, and a service area on Graces Quarters. Methods of investigation included surface and borehole geophysics, water-quality sampling, water- level measurement, and hydrologic testing. The hydrogeologic framework is complex and consists of a discontinuous surficial aquifer, one or more upper confining units, and a confined aquifer system. Directions of ground-water flow vary spatially and temporally, and results of site investigations show that ground-water flow is controlled by the geology of the area. The ground water and surface water at Graces Quarters generally are unmineralized; the ground water is mildly acidic (median pH is 5.38) and poorly buffered. Inorganic constituents in excess of certain Federal drinking-water regulations and ambient water-quality criteria were detected at some sites, but they probably were present naturally. Volatile and semivolatile organic com- pounds were detected in the ground water and surface water at seven of the nine sites that were investi- gated. Concentrations of organic compounds at two of the nine sites exceeded Federal drinking-water regulations. Volatile compounds in concentrations as high as 6,000 m/L (micrograms per liter) were detected in the ground water at the site known as the primary test area. Concentrations of volatile compounds detected in the other areas ranged from 0.57 to 17 m/L.

  2. Sea level budget in the Bay of Bengal (2002-2014) from GRACE and altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusche, J.; Uebbing, B.; Rietbroek, R.; Shum, C. K.; Khan, Z. H.

    2016-02-01

    Sea level rise is perceived as a major threat to the densely populated coast of the Bay of Bengal. Addressing future rise requires understanding the present-day sea level budget. Using a novel method and data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite, we partition altimetric sea level rise (6.1 mm/a over 2002-2014) into mass and steric components. We find that current mass trends in the Bay of Bengal are slightly above global mean, while steric trends appear much larger: 2.2-3.1 mm/a if we disregard a residual required to close the budget, and 4.3-4.6 mm/a if, as an upper bound, we attribute this residual entirely to steric expansion. Our method differs from published approaches in that it explains altimetry and GRACE data in a least squares inversion, while mass anomalies are parameterized through gravitationally self-consistent fingerprints, and steric expansion through EOFs. We validate our estimates by comparing to Argo and modeling for the Indian Ocean, and by comparing total water storage change (TWSC) for the Ganges and Brahmaputra basins to the conventional GRACE approach. We find good agreement for TWSC, and reasonable agreement for steric heights, depending on the ocean region and Argo product. We ascribe differences to weaknesses of the Argo data, but we also find the inversion to be to some extent sensitive with respect to the EOFs. Finally, combining our estimates with CMIP5-simulations, we estimate that Bay of Bengal absolute sea level may rise for additional 37 cm under the RCP4.5 scenario and 40 cm under RCP8.5 until 2050, with respect to 2005.

  3. Assessing and Improving Land Surface Model Outputs Over Africa Using GRACE, Field, and Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mohamed; Sultan, Mohamed; Yan, Eugene; Wahr, John

    2016-05-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), along with other relevant field and remote sensing datasets, was used to assess the performance of two land surface models (LSMs: CLM4.5-SP and GLDAS-Noah) over the African continent and improve the outputs of the CLM4.5-SP model. Spatial and temporal analysis of monthly (January 2003-December 2010) Terrestrial Water Storage (TWS) estimates extracted from GRACE (TWSGRACE), CLM4.5-SP (TWSCLM4.5), and GLDAS-Noah (TWSGLDAS) indicates the following: (1) compared to GRACE, LSMs overestimate TWS in winter months and underestimate them in summer months; (2) the amplitude of annual cycle (AAC) of TWSGRACE is higher than that of TWSLSM (AAC: TWSGRACE > TWSGLDAS > TWSCLM4.5); (3) higher, and statistically significant correlations were observed between TWSGRACE and TWSGLDAS compared to those between TWSGRACE and TWSCLM4.5; (4) differences in forcing precipitation and temperature datasets for GLDAS-Noah and CLM4.5-SP models are unlikely to be the main cause for the observed discrepancies between TWSGRACE and TWSLSM; and (5) the CLM4.5-SP model overestimates evapotranspiration (ET) values in summer months and underestimates them in winter months compared to ET estimates extracted from field-based (FLUXNET-MTE) and satellite-based (MOD16 and GLEAM) ET measurements. A first-order correction was developed and applied to correct the CLM4.5-derived ET, soil moisture, groundwater, and TWS. The corrections improved the correspondence (i.e., higher correlation and comparable AAC) between TWSCLM4.5 and TWSGRACE over various climatic settings. Our findings suggest that similar straightforward correction approaches could potentially be developed and used to assess and improve the performance of a wide range of LSMs.

  4. Water Mass Loss of the Himalayas from GRACE, ICESat and SRTM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muskett, Reginald

    2010-05-01

    The Himalayas and the Tibet Plateau form a region of about 3.4 million square kilometers. Home to numerous large lakes and tarns (glacier lakes), and to more than 50,000 glaciers and high-elevation snowfields, this region is the source of the Indus, Ganga, Brahmaputra, and Yamuna Rivers, the Indo-Gangetic River system. The Himalayan Mountains and associated ranges form a boundary separating continental air masses associated with the westerlies, and marine air masses associated with the summer South Asian monsoon. Adverse changes in water storage / river discharge driven by effects of climate change will impact agriculture, hydroelectric power facilities, commerce, and the lives of more than 1.3 billion people. We are investigating water mass loss derived by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), the ICE, Cloud and land Elevation (ICESat) and the Shuttle Radar Topograghy Mission (SRTM). In our current analysis we remove the effects of isostatic glacial adjustment and both retain and remove the annual cycle of water equivalent mass change for evaluation. Least-squares regression of GRACE monthly time-series shows the Himalaya region lost 17.9 ± 11.0 km3/yr water equivalent mass from August 2002 through December 2006 (annual cycle removed basis). Retaining the annual cycle of water equivalent mass change and extending the time series for one additional year, the least-squares trend is 9.9 ± 4.7 km3/yr of water equivalent mass loss from August 2002 through December 2007. Comparison of same-datum ICESat and SRTM elevations above 5000 meters shows snow surface elevations are decreasing at 1.1 ± 0.7 m/yr from June 2005 through April 2007. We will present updated analyses of the trends of regional water equivalent mass and elevation changes from GRACE and ICESat - SRTM measurements.

  5. Electrostatic Accelerometer for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On Mission (GRACE FO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, Eddy; Christophe, Bruno; Foulon, Bernard; Boulanger, Damien; Liorzou, Françoise; Lebat, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    The GRACE FO mission, led by the JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), is an Earth-orbiting gravity mission, continuation of the GRACE mission, that will produce an accurate model of the Earth's gravity field variation providing global climatic data during five year at least. The mission involves two satellites in a loosely controlled tandem formation, with a micro-wave link measuring the inter-satellites distance variation. Non-uniformities in the distribution of the Earth's mass cause the distance between the two satellites to vary. This variation is measured to recover gravity, after substracting the non-gravitational contributors, as the residual drag. ONERA (the French Aerospace Lab) is developing and manufacturing electrostatic accelerometers measuring this residual drag applied on the satellites. The accelerometer is composed of two main parts: the Sensor Unit (including the Sensor Unit Mechanics and the Front-End Electronic Unit) and the Interface Control Unit. In the Accelerometer Core, located in the Sensor Unit Mechanics, the proof mass is levitated and maintained in a center of an electrode cage by electrostatic forces. Thus, any drag acceleration applied on the satellite involves a variation on the servo-controlled electrostatic suspension of the mass. The voltage on the electrodes providing this electrostatic force is the measurement output of the accelerometer. The impact of the accelerometer defaults (geometry, electronic and parasitic forces) leads to bias, misalignment and scale factor error, non-linearity and noise. Some of these accelerometer defaults are characterized by tests with micro-gravity pendulum bench and with drops in ZARM catapult. Besides, a thermal stability is needed for the accelerometer core and front-end electronics to avoid bias and scale factor variation. To reach this stability, the sensor unit is enclosed in a thermal box designed by Astrium, spacecraft manufacturer. The accelerometers are designed to endure mechanical

  6. Delay-reduction theory--the case for temporal context: comment on Grace and Savastano (2000).

    PubMed

    Fantino, E

    2000-12-01

    R. C. Grace and H. I. Savastano (2000) have devised a procedure to determine whether the effectiveness of a stimulus as a conditioned reinforcer depends on the temporal context of reinforcement. Although they interpret their results in terms of the contextual choice model, which maintains that value is independent of context, the results also support delay-reduction theory, which maintains that value depends on temporal context. It is argued that the delay-reduction view of the role of temporal context is also intuitively more plausible and more consistent with the way choice responds to changes in conditions.

  7. Improvement of the GRACE star camera data based on the revision of the combination method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandikova, Tamara; Flury, Jakob

    2014-11-01

    The new release of the sensor and instrument data (Level-1B release 02) of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) had a substantial impact on the improvement of the overall accuracy of the gravity field models. This has implied that improvements on the sensor data level can still significantly contribute to arriving closer to the GRACE baseline accuracy. The recent analysis of the GRACE star camera data (SCA1B RL02) revealed their unexpectedly higher noise. As the star camera (SCA) data are essential for the processing of the K-band ranging data and the accelerometer data, thorough investigation of the data set was needed. We fully reexamined the SCA data processing from Level-1A to Level-1B with focus on the combination method of the data delivered by the two SCA heads. In the first step, we produced and compared our own combined attitude solution by applying two different combination methods on the SCA Level-1A data. The first method introduces the information about the anisotropic accuracy of the star camera measurement in terms of a weighing matrix. This method was applied in the official processing as well. The alternative method merges only the well determined SCA boresight directions. This method was implemented on the GRACE SCA data for the first time. Both methods were expected to provide optimal solution characteristic by the full accuracy about all three axes, which was confirmed. In the second step, we analyzed the differences between the official SCA1B RL02 data generated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and our solution. SCA1B RL02 contains systematically higher noise of about a factor 3-4. The data analysis revealed that the reason is the incorrect implementation of algorithms in the JPL processing routines. After correct implementation of the combination method, significant improvement within the whole spectrum was achieved. Based on these results, the official reprocessing of the SCA data is suggested, as the SCA attitude data

  8. Evaluation of global equal-area mass grid solutions from GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Save, Himanshu; Bettadpur, Srinivas; Tapley, Byron

    2015-04-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) range-rate data was inverted into global equal-area mass grid solutions at the Center for Space Research (CSR) using Tikhonov Regularization to stabilize the ill-posed inversion problem. These solutions are intended to be used for applications in Hydrology, Oceanography, Cryosphere etc without any need for post-processing. This paper evaluates these solutions with emphasis on spatial and temporal characteristics of the signal content. These solutions will be validated against multiple models and in-situ data sets.

  9. GRACE Gravity Data Target Possible Mega-impact in North Central Wilkes Land, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonFrese, Ralph R. B.; Wells, Stuart B.; Potts. Laramie V.; Gaya-Pique, Luis R.; Golynsky, Alexander V.; Hernandez, Orlando; Kim, Jeong Woo; Kim, Hyung Rae; Hwang, Jong Sun; Taylor, Patrick T.

    2005-01-01

    A prominent positive GRACE satellite-measured free-air gravity anomaly over regionally depressed subglacial topography may identify a mascon centered on (70 deg S, 120 deg E) between the Gamburtsev and Transantarctic Mountains of East Antarctica. Being more than twice the size of the Chicxulub crater, the inferred Wilkes Land impact crater is a strong candidate for a Gondwana source of the greatest extinction of life at the end of the Permian. Its ring structure intersects the coastline and thus may have strongly influenced the Cenozoic rifting of East Antarctica from Australia that resulted in the enigmatic lack of crustal thinning on the conjugate Australian block.

  10. "Tugboat Annie:" nursing's hero of Pearl Harbor--Grace Lally (1897-1983).

    PubMed

    Hawkins, J W; Matthews, I

    1991-01-01

    In 1991 we will mark the 50th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Few nurses know that the Chief Nurse aboard the USS Solace, the only hospital ship in port on that fateful day, played a critical role in caring for the survivors. Grace Lally's calm, professional manner, along with her sensitivity to the needs of her patients, her 12 nurses, and the crew of the Solace made her a hero. This study is an investigation of her role on December 7, 1941, and her contributions as a career military nurse.

  11. GRACE Gravity Data Constrain Ancient Ice Geometries and Continental Dynamics over Laurentia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamisiea, M. E.; Mitrovica, J. X.; Davis, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    The free-air gravity trend over Canada, derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission, robustly isolates the gravity signal associated with glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) from the longer-time scale mantle convection process. This trend proves that the ancient Laurentian ice complex was composed of two large domes to the west and east of Hudson Bay, in accord with one of two classes of earlier reconstructions. Moreover, GIA models that reconcile the peak rates contribute approximately 25 to approximately 45% to the observed static gravity field, which represents an important boundary condition on the buoyancy of the continental tectosphere.

  12. Use of GRACE Terrestrial Water Storage Retrievals to Evaluate Model Estimates by the Australian Water Resources Assessment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    van Dijk, A. I. J. M.; Renzullo, L. J.; Rodell, M.

    2011-01-01

    Terrestrial water storage (TWS) estimates retrievals from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission were compared to TWS modeled by the Australian Water Resources Assessment (AWRA) system. The aim was to test whether differences could be attributed and used to identify model deficiencies. Data for 2003 2010 were decomposed into the seasonal cycle, linear trends and the remaining de-trended anomalies before comparing. AWRA tended to have smaller seasonal amplitude than GRACE. GRACE showed a strong (greater than 15 millimeter per year) drying trend in northwest Australia that was associated with a preceding period of unusually wet conditions, whereas weaker drying trends in the southern Murray Basin and southwest Western Australia were associated with relatively dry conditions. AWRA estimated trends were less negative for these regions, while a more positive trend was estimated for areas affected by cyclone Charlotte in 2009. For 2003-2009, a decrease of 7-8 millimeter per year (50-60 cubic kilometers per year) was estimated from GRACE, enough to explain 6-7% of the contemporary rate of global sea level rise. This trend was not reproduced by the model. Agreement between model and data suggested that the GRACE retrieval error estimates are biased high. A scaling coefficient applied to GRACE TWS to reduce the effect of signal leakage appeared to degrade quantitative agreement for some regions. Model aspects identified for improvement included a need for better estimation of rainfall in northwest Australia, and more sophisticated treatment of diffuse groundwater discharge processes and surface-groundwater connectivity for some regions.

  13. Improved GRACE regional mass balance estimates of the Greenland ice sheet cross-validated with the input-output method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zheng; Schrama, Ernst J. O.; van der Wal, Wouter; van den Broeke, Michiel; Enderlin, Ellyn M.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we use satellite gravimetry data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) to estimate regional mass change of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) and neighboring glaciated regions using a least squares inversion approach. We also consider results from the input-output method (IOM). The IOM quantifies the difference between the mass input and output of the GrIS by studying the surface mass balance (SMB) and the ice discharge (D). We use the Regional Atmospheric Climate Model version 2.3 (RACMO2.3) to model the SMB and derive the ice discharge from 12 years of high-precision ice velocity and thickness surveys. We use a simulation model to quantify and correct for GRACE approximation errors in mass change between different subregions of the GrIS, and investigate the reliability of pre-1990s ice discharge estimates, which are based on the modeled runoff. We find that the difference between the IOM and our improved GRACE mass change estimates is reduced in terms of the long-term mass change when using a reference discharge derived from runoff estimates in several subareas. In most regions our GRACE and IOM solutions are consistent with other studies, but differences remain in the northwestern GrIS. We validate the GRACE mass balance in that region by considering several different GIA models and mass change estimates derived from data obtained by the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat). We conclude that the approximated mass balance between GRACE and IOM is consistent in most GrIS regions. The difference in the northwest is likely due to underestimated uncertainties in the IOM solutions.

  14. Study of landwater variation over Chao Phraya river basin using GRACE, satellite altimetry and in situ data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Fukuda, Y.; Nakaegawa, T.; Taniguchi, M.

    2009-12-01

    A project to assess the effects of human activities on the subsurface environment in Asian developing cities has been in progress (Research Institute for Humanity and Nature, Japan, 2009). Bangkok, Thailand is one of the study cities in this project. Using GRACE satellite gravity data, we previously recovered landwater mass variation over the Chao Phraya river basin, where Bangkok is located on downstream. However, mainly because of insufficient spatial resolution of the GRACE data then released, it was difficult to distinguish mass variation over the Chao Phraya basin with the ones of the neighboring Mekong, Irrawaddy and Salween river basins. Recently, some new versions of GRACE data sets have been available, and thus we estimated again the mass variations over these basins using version 2 of CNS/GRGS data set. The result shows that mass variations of the each basin could be distinguished due to improvement of the spatial resolution of the data. One of the interesting things is that a negative interannual mass trend is observed only over the Chao Phraya river basin, while the other basins show positive trend values. One of our concerns was which of the landwater components were decreasing. Because GRACE can only detect total terrestrial water storage, we further used satellite altimeter data to separate surface- and groundwater components. EnviSat data were mainly used as satellite altimetry data in this study, because the mission period is overlapping with GRACE mission and the ground track separation is relatively small. River water levels were recovered from satellite altimetry data, and converted to river water storage. Estimated river water storage was subtracted from the GRACE data. Thus, interannual surface- and groundwater trends were discussed separately. Another concern is whether the landwater decrease is caused by meteorological factors or factors of human activities. Thus, we also compared above results with global hydrological simulation model and

  15. Improved source parameter constraints for five undersea earthquakes from north component of GRACE gravity and gravity gradient change measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Chunli; Shum, C. K.; Guo, Junyi; Shang, Kun; Tapley, Byron; Wang, Rongjiang

    2016-06-01

    The innovative processing of Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) data using only the north component of gravity change and its corresponding gravity gradient changes allows the enhancement of the spatial resolution for coseismic deformation signals. Here, we report the study of five undersea earthquakes using this technique: the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, the 2007 Bengkulu earthquake, the 2010 Maule, Chile earthquake, the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, and the 2012 Indian Ocean earthquakes. By using the high spherical harmonic degree (up to degree 96) data products and the associated GRACE data processing techniques, the retrieved north component of gravity change is up to - 34 ± 1.4 μGal for the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, which illustrates by far the highest amplitude of the coseismic signal retrieved from satellite gravimetry among previous studies. We creatively apply the localized spectral analysis as an efficient method to empirically determine the practical spherical harmonic truncation degree. By combining least squares adjustment with the simulated annealing algorithm, point source parameters are estimated, which demonstrates the unique constraint on source model from GRACE data compared to other data sources. For the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, GRACE data produce a shallower centroid depth (9.1 km), as compared to the depth (28.3 km) from GPS data. For the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, the GRACE-estimated centroid location is southwest of the GPS/seismic solutions, and the slip orientation is about 10° clockwise from the published GPS/seismic slip models. We concluded that these differences demonstrate the additional and critical offshore constraint by GRACE on source parameters, as compared to GPS/seismic data.

  16. Integrating Enhanced Grace Terrestrial Water Storage Data Into the U.S. and North American Drought Monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housborg, Rasmus; Rodell, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites measure time variations nf the Earth's gravity field enabling reliable detection of spatio-temporal variations in total terrestrial water storage (TWS), including ground water. The U.S. and North American Drought Monitors are two of the premier drought monitoring products available to decision-makers for assessing and minimizing drought impacts, but they rely heavily on precipitation indices and do not currently incorporate systematic observations of deep soil moisture and groundwater storage conditions. Thus GRACE has great potential to improve the Drought Monitors hy filling this observational gap. Horizontal, vertical and temporal disaggregation of the coarse-resolution GRACE TWS data has been accomplished by assimilating GRACE TWS anomalies into the Catchment Land Surface Model using ensemble Kalman smoother. The Drought Monitors combine several short-term and long-term drought indices and indicators expressed in percentiles as a reference to their historical frequency of occurrence for the location and time of year in question. To be consistent, we are in the process of generating a climatology of estimated soil moisture and ground water based on m 60-year Catchment model simulation which will subsequently be used to convert seven years of GRACE assimilated fields into soil moisture and groundwater percentiles. for systematic incorporation into the objective blends that constitute Drought Monitor baselines. At this stage we provide a preliminary evaluation of GRACE assimilated Catchment model output against independent datasets including soil moisture observations from Aqua AMSR-E and groundwater level observations from the U.S. Geological Survey's Groundwater Climate Response Network.

  17. Application of EOF/PCA-based methods in the post-processing of GRACE derived water variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forootan, Ehsan; Kusche, Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    Two problems that users of monthly GRACE gravity field solutions face are 1) the presence of correlated noise in the Stokes coefficients that increases with harmonic degree and causes ‘striping', and 2) the fact that different physical signals are overlaid and difficult to separate from each other in the data. These problems are termed the signal-noise separation problem and the signal-signal separation problem. Methods that are based on principal component analysis and empirical orthogonal functions (PCA/EOF) have been frequently proposed to deal with these problems for GRACE. However, different strategies have been applied to different (spatial: global/regional, spectral: global/order-wise, geoid/equivalent water height) representations of the GRACE level 2 data products, leading to differing results and a general feeling that PCA/EOF-based methods are to be applied ‘with care'. In addition, it is known that conventional EOF/PCA methods force separated modes to be orthogonal, and that, on the other hand, to either EOFs or PCs an arbitrary orthogonal rotation can be applied. The aim of this paper is to provide a common theoretical framework and to study the application of PCA/EOF-based methods as a signal separation tool due to post-process GRACE data products. In order to investigate and illustrate the applicability of PCA/EOF-based methods, we have employed them on GRACE level 2 monthly solutions based on the Center for Space Research, University of Texas (CSR/UT) RL04 products and on the ITG-GRACE03 solutions from the University of Bonn, and on various representations of them. Our results show that EOF modes do reveal the dominating annual, semiannual and also long-periodic signals in the global water storage variations, but they also show how choosing different strategies changes the outcome and may lead to unexpected results.

  18. Characterization of spatio-temporal patterns for various GRACE- and GLDAS-born estimates for changes of global terrestrial water storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Wang, Chao; Yu, Zhongbo; Xu, Feng

    2013-10-01

    Since the launch in March 2002, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission has provided us with a new method to estimate terrestrial water storage (TWS) variations by measuring earth gravity change with unprecedented accuracy. Thus far, a number of standardized GRACE-born TWS products are published by different international research teams. However, no characterization of spatio-temporal patterns for different GRACE hydrology products from the global perspective could be found. It is still a big challenge for the science community to identify the reliable global measurement of TWS anomalies due to our limited knowledge on the true value. Hence, it is urgently necessary to evaluate the uncertainty for various global estimates of the GRACE-born TWS changes by a number of international research organizations. Toward this end, this article presents an in-depth analysis for various GRACE-born and GLDAS-based estimates for changes of global terrestrial water storage. The work characterizes the inter-annual and intra-annual variability, probability density variations, and spatial patterns among different GRACE-born TWS estimates over six major continents, and compares them with results from GLDAS simulations. The underlying causes of inconsistency between GRACE- and GLDAS-born TWS estimates are thoroughly analyzed with an aim to improve our current knowledge in monitoring global TWS change. With a comprehensive consideration of the advantages and disadvantages among GRACE- and GLDAS-born TWS anomalies, a summary is thereafter recommended as a rapid reference for scientists, end-users, and policy-makers in the practices of global TWS change research. To our best knowledge, this work is the first attempt to characterize difference and uncertainty among various GRACE-born terrestrial water storage changes over the major continents estimated by a number of international research organizations. The results can provide beneficial reference to usage of

  19. Assessing groundwater depletion and dynamics using GRACE and InSAR: Potential and limitations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castellazzi, Pascal; Martel, Richard; Galloway, Devin L.; Longuevergne, Laurent; Rivera, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, remote sensing of the temporal variation of ground level and gravity has improved our understanding of groundwater dynamics and storage. Mass changes are measured by GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellites, whereas ground deformation is measured by processing synthetic aperture radar satellites data using the InSAR (Interferometry of Synthetic Aperture Radar) techniques. Both methods are complementary and offer different sensitivities to aquifer system processes. GRACE is sensitive to mass changes over large spatial scales (more than 100,000 km2). As such, it fails in providing groundwater storage change estimates at local or regional scales relevant to most aquifer systems, and at which most groundwater management schemes are applied. However, InSAR measures ground displacement due to aquifer response to fluid-pressure changes. InSAR applications to groundwater depletion assessments are limited to aquifer systems susceptible to measurable deformation. Furthermore, the inversion of InSAR-derived displacement maps into volume of depleted groundwater storage (both reversible and largely irreversible) is confounded by vertical and horizontal variability of sediment compressibility. During the last decade, both techniques have shown increasing interest in the scientific community to complement available in situ observations where they are insufficient. In this review, we present the theoretical and conceptual bases of each method, and present idealized scenarios to highlight the potential benefits and challenges of combining these techniques to remotely assess groundwater storage changes and other aspects of the dynamics of aquifer systems.

  20. Globally averaged exospheric temperatures derived from CHAMP and GRACE accelerometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, J. O.; Burke, W. J.; Sutton, E. K.

    2012-04-01

    Neutral densities (ρ) inferred from accelerometer measurements on the polar-orbiting Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites are used to compile exospheric temperatures (T∞) during extended periods in 2003 and 2004 when their orbital planes were nearly parallel and at quadrature, respectively. Exospheric temperatures were first estimated using ρ-h-T∞ relationships implicit within the Jacchia models, then averaged over individual orbits. We found good agreement between the orbital-averaged T∞ obtained from CHAMP and GRACE accelerometer data as well as with globally averaged exospheric temperatures derived from drag measurements from the constellation of satellites used in the High-Accuracy Satellite Drag Model. Our analysis corrects a critical conjecture by Burke (2008) that globally averaged T∞ is essentially the same as orbit-averaged values obtained by polar-orbiting satellites, independent of the local time of their orbital planes. Unlike the symmetric 0200-1400 LT distribution of T∞ minima and maxima found in early Jacchia models, presented data indicate that the minima are located closer to the dawn meridian. We also demonstrate that the averaging technique used to estimate T∞ affects the outcomes. Statistical analyses provide an empirical basis for improving estimates of the thermosphere's total energy budget.

  1. GRACE gravity observations constrain Weichselian ice thickness in the Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Root, B. C.; Tarasov, L.; Wal, W.

    2015-05-01

    The Barents Sea is subject to ongoing postglacial uplift since the melting of the Weichselian ice sheet that covered it. The regional ice sheet thickness history is not well known because there is only data at the periphery due to the locations of Franz Joseph Land, Svalbard, and Novaya Zemlya surrounding this paleo ice sheet. We show that the linear trend in the gravity rate derived from a decade of observations from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission can constrain the volume of the ice sheet after correcting for current ice melt, hydrology, and far-field gravitational effects. Regional ice-loading models based on new geologically inferred ice margin chronologies show a significantly better fit to the GRACE data than that of ICE-5G. The regional ice models contain less ice in the Barents Sea than present in ICE-5G (5-6.3 m equivalent sea level versus 8.5 m), which increases the ongoing difficulty in closing the global sea level budget at the Last Glacial Maximum.

  2. Land Water Storage within the Congo Basin Inferred from GRACE Satellite Gravity Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, John W.; Mitrovica, Jerry X.; Bailey, Richard C.; Tamisiea, Mark E.; Davis, James L.

    2006-01-01

    GRACE satellite gravity data is used to estimate terrestrial (surface plus ground) water storage within the Congo Basin in Africa for the period of April, 2002 - May, 2006. These estimates exhibit significant seasonal (30 +/- 6 mm of equivalent water thickness) and long-term trends, the latter yielding a total loss of approximately 280 km(exp 3) of water over the 50-month span of data. We also combine GRACE and precipitation data set (CMAP, TRMM) to explore the relative contributions of the source term to the seasonal hydrological balance within the Congo Basin. We find that the seasonal water storage tends to saturate for anomalies greater than 30-44 mm of equivalent water thickness. Furthermore, precipitation contributed roughly three times the peak water storage after anomalously rainy seasons, in early 2003 and 2005, implying an approximately 60-70% loss from runoff and evapotranspiration. Finally, a comparison of residual land water storage (monthly estimates minus best-fitting trends) in the Congo and Amazon Basins shows an anticorrelation, in agreement with the 'see-saw' variability inferred by others from runoff data.

  3. Water Storage Changes over the Tibetan Plateau Revealed by GRACE Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jinyun; Mu, Dapeng; Liu, Xin; Yan, Haoming; Sun, Zhongchang; Guo, Bin

    2016-04-01

    We use GRACE gravity data released by the Center for Space Research (CSR) and the Groupe de Recherches en Geodesie Spatiale (GRGS) to detect the water storage changes over the Tibetan Plateau (TP). A combined filter strategy is put forward to process CSR RL05 data to remove the effect of striping errors. After the correction for GRACE by GLDAS and ICE-5G, we find that TP has been overall experiencing the water storage increase during 2003-2012. During the same time, the glacier over the Himalayas was sharply retreating. Interms of linear trends, CSR's results derived by the combined filter are close to GRGS RL03 with the Gaussian filter of 300-km window. The water storage increasing rates determined from CSR's RL05 products in the interior TP, Karakoram Mountain, Qaidam Basin, Hengduan Mountain, and middle Himalayas are 9.7, 6.2, 9.1, -18.6, and -20.2 mm/yr, respectively. J. GUO et al. These rates from GRGS's RL03 products are 8.6, 5.8, 10.5, -19.3 and -21.4 mm/yr, respectively.

  4. Repairing filtering induced damage to the GRACE time-series at catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt Vishwakarma, Bramha; Sneeuw, Nico; Devaraju, Balaji

    2016-04-01

    The gravity field products from Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites are usable only after filtering. Filtering suppresses noise, but also changes the signal. There are methods to minimize the signal change, and most of them depend on a hydrological model to compute leakage, scale factor or bias for improving the time-series signal. Using a model to suppress the uncertainty introduced by filtering is not without problems of its own, because it brings in the uncertainty in the model, that varies spatially and temporally. We provide a mathematical relation between leakage, true signal and filtered signal. We find that not only the amplitude but also the phase of the total water storage time-series is affected due to filtering. For certain catchments the phase change can be equivalent to a shift of half a month or nearly a month. We propose a data driven approach to negate the effects of filtering on catchment scale signal. We demonstrate our method in a closed loop simulation environment and compare it to other widely used approaches for 24 catchments. The method proposed is independent of the filter type and works exceptionally well for catchments above the filter resolution. We apply our approach to GRACE products and discuss its limitations.

  5. Graceful Failure, Engineering, and Planning for Extremes: The Engineering for Climate Extremes Partnership (ECEP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruyere, C. L.; Tye, M. R.; Holland, G. J.; Done, J.

    2015-12-01

    Graceful failure acknowledges that all systems will fail at some level and incorporates the potential for failure as a key component of engineering design, community planning, and the associated research and development. This is a fundamental component of the ECEP, an interdisciplinary partnership bringing together scientific, engineering, cultural, business and government expertise to develop robust, well-communicated predictions and advice on the impacts of weather and climate extremes in support of decision-making. A feature of the partnership is the manner in which basic and applied research and development is conducted in direct collaboration with the end user. A major ECEP focus is the Global Risk and Resilience Toolbox (GRRT) that is aimed at developing public-domain, risk-modeling and response data and planning system in support of engineering design, and community planning and adaptation activities. In this presentation I will outline the overall ECEP and GRIP activities, and expand on the 'graceful failure' concept. Specific examples for direct assessment and prediction of hurricane impacts and damage potential will be included.

  6. Gravity Estimation from a Simulated GRACE Mission: Short vs. Long Arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlands, David D.; Ray, Richard D.; Chinn, D. S.; Lemoine, F. G.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present simulations of gravity estimation from a GRACE-like satellite mission: low-low intersatellite tracking with a precision of order 1 micron s(exp -1) yielding gravity fields of degree and order 120. We employ a unique parameterization of the intersatellite baseline vector which allows the gravity estimation to be performed (relatively) independently of the GPS (global positioning system) tracking data once sufficiently accurate orbits are obtained. This considerably simplifies data processing during the gravity estimation. During that process only certain components of the baseline parameterization need be adjusted; other components are uncorrelated with gravity and may be adopted unchanged from the initial GPS orbits. The technique is also amenable to very short arcs of data. We present comparisons of gravity estimation from 30 days of observations with arcs of length 15 minutes vs. arcs of one day. Our 'truth' field is the EGM96 (Earth Gravitational Model) model; our prior field is a degree-70 clone of EGM96, perturbed from it by amounts comparable to the standard errors of EGM96 (and identically zero for degrees 71-120). For a high inclination orbit, the short-arc analysis recovers low order gravity coefficients remarkably well, although higher order terms, especially sectorial terms, are understandably less accurate. The simulations suggest that either long or short arcs of GRACE data are likely to improve parts of the geopotential spectrum by several orders of magnitude. This is especially so for low order coefficients, which are markedly improved for all degrees through 120.

  7. Drought analysis of the Haihe river basin based on GRACE terrestrial water storage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhua; Jiang, Dong; Huang, Yaohuan; Wang, Hao

    2014-01-01

    The Haihe river basin (HRB) in the North China has been experiencing prolonged, severe droughts in recent years that are accompanied by precipitation deficits and vegetation wilting. This paper analyzed the water deficits related to spatiotemporal variability of three variables of the gravity recovery and climate experiment (GRACE) derived terrestrial water storage (TWS) data, precipitation, and EVI in the HRB from January 2003 to January 2013. The corresponding drought indices of TWS anomaly index (TWSI), precipitation anomaly index (PAI), and vegetation anomaly index (AVI) were also compared for drought analysis. Our observations showed that the GRACE-TWS was more suitable for detecting prolonged and severe droughts in the HRB because it can represent loss of deep soil water and ground water. The multiyear droughts, of which the HRB has sustained for more than 5 years, began in mid-2007. Extreme drought events were detected in four periods at the end of 2007, the end of 2009, the end of 2010, and in the middle of 2012. Spatial analysis of drought risk from the end of 2011 to the beginning of 2012 showed that human activities played an important role in the extent of drought hazards in the HRB.

  8. Evaluation of Release-05 GRACE time-variable gravity coefficients over the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, D. P.; Bonin, J. A.

    2012-10-01

    The latest release of GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) gravity field coefficients (Release-05, or RL05) are evaluated for ocean applications. Data have been processed using the current methodology for Release-04 (RL04) coefficients, and have been compared to output from two different ocean models. Results indicate that RL05 data from the three Science Data Centers - the Center for Space Research (CSR), GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ), and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) - are more consistent among themselves than the previous RL04 data. Moreover, the variance of residuals with the output of an ocean model is 50-60% lower for RL05 data than for RL04 data. A more optimized destriping algorithm is also tested, which improves the results slightly. By comparing the GRACE maps with two different ocean models, we can better estimate the uncertainty in the RL05 maps. We find the standard error to be about 1 cm (equivalent water thickness) in the low- and mid-latitudes, and between 1.5 and 2 cm in the polar and subpolar oceans, which is comparable to estimated uncertainty for the output from the ocean models.

  9. Evaluation of Release-05 GRACE time-variable gravity coefficients over the Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, D. P.; Bonin, J. A.

    2012-06-01

    The latest release of GRACE gravity field coefficients (Release-05, or RL05) are evaluated for ocean applications. Data have been processed using the current methodology for Release-04 (RL04) coefficients, and have been compared to output from two different ocean models. Results indicate that RL05 data from the three Science Data Centers - the Center for Space Research (CSR), GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ), and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) - are more consistent than the previous RL04 data. Moreover, the variance of residuals with the output of an ocean model is 50-60% lower for RL05 data than for RL04 data. A more optimized destriping algorithm is also tested, which improves the results slightly. By comparing the GRACE maps with two different ocean models, we can better estimate the uncertainty in the RL05 maps. We find the standard error to be about 1 cm (equivalent water thickness) in the low- and mid-latitudes, and between 1.5 and 2 cm in the polar and sub-polar oceans, which is comparable to estimated uncertainty for the output from the ocean models.

  10. Drought Analysis of the Haihe River Basin Based on GRACE Terrestrial Water Storage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianhua; Jiang, Dong; Huang, Yaohuan; Wang, Hao

    2014-01-01

    The Haihe river basin (HRB) in the North China has been experiencing prolonged, severe droughts in recent years that are accompanied by precipitation deficits and vegetation wilting. This paper analyzed the water deficits related to spatiotemporal variability of three variables of the gravity recovery and climate experiment (GRACE) derived terrestrial water storage (TWS) data, precipitation, and EVI in the HRB from January 2003 to January 2013. The corresponding drought indices of TWS anomaly index (TWSI), precipitation anomaly index (PAI), and vegetation anomaly index (AVI) were also compared for drought analysis. Our observations showed that the GRACE-TWS was more suitable for detecting prolonged and severe droughts in the HRB because it can represent loss of deep soil water and ground water. The multiyear droughts, of which the HRB has sustained for more than 5 years, began in mid-2007. Extreme drought events were detected in four periods at the end of 2007, the end of 2009, the end of 2010, and in the middle of 2012. Spatial analysis of drought risk from the end of 2011 to the beginning of 2012 showed that human activities played an important role in the extent of drought hazards in the HRB. PMID:25202732

  11. Incorporation of GRACE Data into a Bayesian Model for Groundwater Drought Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slinski, K.; Hogue, T. S.; McCray, J. E.; Porter, A.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater drought, defined as the sustained occurrence of below average availability of groundwater, is marked by below average water levels in aquifers and reduced flows to groundwater-fed rivers and wetlands. The impact of groundwater drought on ecosystems, agriculture, municipal water supply, and the energy sector is an increasingly important global issue. However, current drought monitors heavily rely on precipitation and vegetative stress indices to characterize the timing, duration, and severity of drought events. The paucity of in situ observations of aquifer levels is a substantial obstacle to the development of systems to monitor groundwater drought in drought-prone areas, particularly in developing countries. Observations from the NASA/German Space Agency's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) have been used to estimate changes in groundwater storage over areas with sparse point measurements. This study incorporates GRACE total water storage observations into a Bayesian framework to assess the performance of a probabilistic model for monitoring groundwater drought based on remote sensing data. Overall, it is hoped that these methods will improve global drought preparedness and risk reduction by providing information on groundwater drought necessary to manage its impacts on ecosystems, as well as on the agricultural, municipal, and energy sectors.

  12. Results and Error Estimates from GRACE Forward Modeling over Greenland, Canada, and Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonin, J. A.; Chambers, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    Forward modeling using a weighted least squares technique allows GRACE information to be projected onto a pre-determined collection of local basins. This decreases the impact of spatial leakage, allowing estimates of mass change to be better localized. The technique is especially valuable where models of current-day mass change are poor, such as over Greenland and Antarctica. However, the accuracy of the forward model technique has not been determined, nor is it known how the distribution of the local basins affects the results. We use a "truth" model composed of hydrology and ice-melt slopes as an example case, to estimate the uncertainties of this forward modeling method and expose those design parameters which may result in an incorrect high-resolution mass distribution. We then apply these optimal parameters in a forward model estimate created from RL05 GRACE data. We compare the resulting mass slopes with the expected systematic errors from the simulation, as well as GIA and basic trend-fitting uncertainties. We also consider whether specific regions (such as Ellesmere Island and Baffin Island) can be estimated reliably using our optimal basin layout.

  13. High resolution Greenland ice sheet inter-annual mass variations combining GRACE gravimetry and Envisat altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xiaoli; Shum, C. K.; Guo, Junyi; Duan, Jianbin; Howat, Ian; Yi, Yuchan

    2015-07-01

    Inter-annual mass variations of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) are important for improving mass balance estimates, validation of atmospheric circulation models and their potential improvement. By combining observed inter-annual variations from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and Environmental Satellite (Envisat) altimetry data over the period from January 2003 to December 2009, we are able to estimate the nominal density, with the objective of obtaining higher resolution mass changes using altimeter data at the inter-annual scale. We find high correlations between these two inter-annual variations on the order of 0.7 over 60% of the GrIS, in particular over the west side along the central ice divide. Significant negative correlations are found in parts of Northeast and Southeast GrIS, where negative inter-annual variation correlations were also found between mass change from GRACE and snow depth from ECMWF reanalysis in a previous study. In the regions of positive correlation, the estimated nominal densities range from 383.7 ± 50.9 to 596.2 ± 34.1 kgm-3. We demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining high-resolution inter-annual mass variation over Southwest GrIS, one of the regions with positive correlations, based on density-corrected Envisat altimetry, 2003-2009. A definitive explanation for the existence of regions of negative correlation remains elusive.

  14. North Atlantic meridional overturning circulation variations from GRACE ocean bottom pressure anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landerer, Felix W.; Wiese, David N.; Bentel, Katrin; Boening, Carmen; Watkins, Michael M.

    2015-10-01

    Concerns about North Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (NAMOC) changes imply the need for a continuous, large-scale observation capability to detect changes on interannual to decadal time scales. Here we present the first measurements of Lower North Atlantic Deep Water (LNADW) transport changes using only time-variable gravity observations from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites from 2003 until now. Improved monthly gravity field retrievals allow the detection of North Atlantic interannual bottom pressure anomalies and LNADW transport estimates that are in good agreement with those from the Rapid Climate Change-Meridional Overturning Circulation and Heatflux Array (RAPID/MOCHA). Concurrent with the observed AMOC transport anomalies from late 2009 through early 2010, GRACE measured ocean bottom pressures changes in the 3000-5000 m deep western North Atlantic on the order of 20 mm-H2O (200 Pa), implying a southward volume transport anomaly in that layer of approximately -5.5 sverdrup. Our results highlight the efficacy of space gravimetry for observing AMOC variations to evaluate latitudinal coherency and long-term variability.

  15. Solution to some limitations of frequency-entangled-based sensor applied in GRACE-like mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanghe; Xu, Luping; Zhang, Hua; Zhu, Yingtong; Cheng, Pengfei

    2016-02-01

    Although frequency-entangled-based (FEB) sensor has advantages of precise ranging accuracy and potential enhanced safety, its performance of the distance measurement becomes poor during GRACE and some other GRACE-like missions (GRAIL) that are located at low Earth orbit (LEO) or have a large inter-satellite distance. Thus, the primary purpose of this study is to analyze the essential cause of the above limitations and to propose two types of techniques to solve them, i.e., shortening the accumulated time Ta and introducing the time-varying delay. Using a specific configuration of the entangled photons source, Ta is shortened to 0.126 s and the ranging accuracy can be lowered to 57.58 cm. However, affected by relative motion, this improved accuracy is still worse than what we expect. Adopting the shortened value of Ta of 0.126 s, we can essentially cancel the effect of relative motion by introducing the time-varying delay, and obtain a narrow accumulated profile determining a ranging accuracy in an order of mm which is only restricted by the resolution of coincidence system.

  16. Comparing Different Analysis Approaches for the GRACE Follow-On Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Peter L.

    2016-03-01

    The NASA-DLR GRACE Follow-On Mission (GFO) is scheduled for launch in 2017. It will continue the measurements of the GRACE Mission, which has very successfully monitored changes in the Earth's mass distribution since 2002. Some reductions in measurement noise sources are expected, but some empirical parameter correction method will still need to be used to partially correct for satellite acceleration noise. In studies of possible future gravity missions after GFO, quite different assumptions have been made about the length of the data arcs used in the analysis and the nature and numbers of empirical parameters to be estimated. In this talk, the advantages of comparing the different approaches in simulations by analyzing the results along the satellite orbits and at altitude will be discussed. The usual approach is to combine the data arcs over 10 to 30 day periods before solutions for changes in the mass distribution are solved for. But then, the changes in the mass distribution between the times of the different arcs will affect the results. The along track approach is particularly suitable for a suggested analysis method called the ocean calibration approach, where most of the weight in correcting for acceleration noise is given to data collected over the equatorial oceans.

  17. Validation of GLORYS ocean bottom pressure using global high resolution GRACE mascon solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boy, Jean-Paul; Rowlands, David; Luthcke, Scott; Sabaka, Terence; Lemoine, Frank; Ferry, Nicolas; Parent, Laurent

    2010-05-01

    We present the comparison of oceanic mass variations deduced from GLORYS1V1 (GLobal Ocean ReanalYses and Simulations) eddy-resolving ocean model and derived from a global high resolution GRACE (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment) mascon solution (Rowlands et al., 2010), for the period 2003-2008. Compared to the classical spherical harmonic solutions, the mascon (mass concentration) technique allows the retrieval of mass variations at the Earth's surface with higher temporal and spatial sampling (2 degrees and 10 days). The forward modeling of hydrology using GLDAS (Global Land Data Assimilation System) also reduces the leakage of continental hydrology into the oceans, demonstrating that the global mascon solution developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (Rowlands et al., 2010) is optimal for studying global oceanic circulation. GLORYS1V1 is the first implementation of the global eddy-resolving (1/4 degree) ocean reanalysis performed by Mecator-Océan, covering the ARGO period (2002-2008). The model assimilate sea-surface height variations from radar altimetry (AVISO), sea-surface temperature (Reynolds) and in-situ temperature and salinity measurements (CORIOLIS).We also show the comparison, in terms of ocean bottom pressure variations, with the 1/4 degree operational (PSY3) models. In addition, we compare and validate both GLORYS and GRACE estimated bottom pressure variations to an independent datasets of bottom pressure records.

  18. Rapid variability of Antarctic Bottom Water transport into the Pacific Ocean inferred from GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazloff, Matthew R.; Boening, Carmen

    2016-04-01

    Air-ice-ocean interactions in the Antarctic lead to formation of the densest waters on Earth. These waters convect and spread to fill the global abyssal oceans. The heat and carbon storage capacity of these water masses, combined with their abyssal residence times that often exceed centuries, makes this circulation pathway the most efficient sequestering mechanism on Earth. Yet monitoring this pathway has proven challenging due to the nature of the formation processes and the depth of the circulation. The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) gravity mission is providing a time series of ocean mass redistribution and offers a transformative view of the abyssal circulation. Here we use the GRACE measurements to infer, for the first time, a 2003-2014 time series of Antarctic Bottom Water export into the South Pacific. We find this export highly variable, with a standard deviation of 1.87 sverdrup (Sv) and a decorrelation timescale of less than 1 month. A significant trend is undetectable.

  19. EGSIEM: Combination of GRACE monthly gravity models on normal equation level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Ulrich; Jean, Yoomin; Jäggi, Adrian; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten; Neumayer, Hans; Lemoine, Jean-Michel

    2016-04-01

    One of the three geodetic services to be realized in the frame of the EGSIEM project is a scientific combination service. Each associated processing center (AC) will follow a set of common processing standards but will apply its own, independent analysis method. Therefore the quality, robustness and reliability of the combined monthly gravity fields is expected to improve significantly compared to the individual solutions. The Monthly GRACE gravity fields of all ACs are combined on normal equation level. The individual normal equations are weighted depending on pairwise comparisons of the individual gravity field solutions. To derive these weights and for quality control of the individual contributions first a combination of the monthly gravity fields on solution level is performed. The concept of weighting and of the combination on normal equation level is introduced and the formats used for normal equation exchange and gravity field solutions is described. First results of the combination on normal equation level are presented and compared to the corresponding combinations on solution level. EGSIEM has an open data policy and all processing centers of GRACE gravity fields are invited to participate in the combination.

  20. Geocenter motion due to surface mass transport from GRACE satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, R. E. M.; van der Wal, W.; Lavallée, D. A.; Hashemi Farahani, H.; Ditmar, P.

    2012-04-01

    Measurements of mass redistribution from satellite gravimetry are insensitive to geocenter motions. However, geocenter motions can be constrained by satellite gravity data alone if we partition mass changes between land and oceans, under the assumption that the ocean is passive (i.e., in gravitational equilibrium with the land load and the solid earth). Here, we make use of 8 years (2003-2010) of optimally filtered monthly GRACE-based solutions produced at TU Delft to determine changes in the land load and the corresponding geocenter motion, through an iterative procedure. We pay particular attention to correcting for signal leakage caused by the limited spatial resolution of GRACE. We also investigate how the choice of a model of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) affects the estimated geocenter motion trend due to present-day surface mass transport. Finally, we separate the contribution of ice masses from that of land hydrology and show how they have a different sensitivity to the chosen GIA model and observational time-span.

  1. Globally gridded terrestrial water storage variations from GRACE satellite gravimetry for hydrometeorological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liangjing; Dobslaw, Henryk; Thomas, Maik

    2016-07-01

    Globally gridded estimates of monthly-mean anomalies of terrestrial water storage (TWS) are estimated from the most recent GRACE release 05a of GFZ Potsdam in order to provide non-geodetic users a convenient access to state-of-the-art GRACE monitoring data. We use an ensemble of five global land model simulations with different physics and different atmospheric forcing to obtain reliable gridded scaling factors required to correct for spatial leakage introduced during data processing. To allow for the application of this data-set for large-scale monitoring tasks, model validation efforts, and subsequently also data assimilation experiments, globally gridded estimates of TWS uncertainties that include (i) measurement, (ii) leakage and (iii) re-scaling errors are provided as well. The results are generally consistent with the gridded data provided by Tellus, but deviate in some basins which are largely affected by the uncertainties of the model information required for re-scaling, where the approach based on the median of a small ensemble of global land models introduced in this paper leads to more robust results.

  2. GRACE satellite observed hydrological controls on interannual and seasonal variability in surface greenness over mainland Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuting; Long, Di; Guan, Huade; Scanlon, Bridget R.; Simmons, Craig T.; Jiang, Lei; Xu, Xiang

    2014-12-01

    Water-limited ecosystems, covering ~50% of the global land, are controlled primarily by hydrologic factors. Because climate change is predicted to markedly alter current hydroclimatic conditions later this century, a better hydrological indicator of ecosystem performance is warranted to improve understanding of hydrological controls on vegetation and to predict changes in the future. Here we show that the observed total water storage anomaly (TWSA) from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) can serve as this indicator. Using the Australian mainland as a case study, where ecosystems are generally water limited, we found that GRACE-observed TWSA can explain changes in surface greenness (as measured by the normalized difference vegetation index, NDVI) both interannually and seasonally. In addition, we found that TWSA shows a significant decreasing trend during the millennium drought from 1997 through 2009 in the region. However, decline in annual mean NDVI during the same period was mainly driven by decline in annual minimum monthly NDVI, whereas annual maximum monthly NDVI remained relatively constant across biomes. This phenomenon reveals an intrinsic sensitivity of ecosystems to water availability that drought-induced reductions in surface greenness are more likely expressed through its influence on vegetation during lower NDVI months, whereas ecosystem activities tend to recover to their maximum level during periods when the combined environmental conditions favor vegetation growth within a year despite the context of the prolonged drought.

  3. How errors in the calibration of GRACE accelerometers affect the estimates of temporal gravity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tregoning, P.; McClusky, S.; Purcell, A. P.; McQueen, H.

    2015-12-01

    Non-gravitational accelerations acting on each of the GRACE satellites are measured in the along-track, cross-track and radial directions by the accelerometers onboard each satellite. The calibration of the observed non-gravitational accelerations requires determining a scaling factor and (at least) an offset for the observations in each of the three directions. We demonstrate in this presentation how small errors in the scale factors used to calibrate the accelerometer observations affect the noise level in the estimated temporal gravity field. We performed a parameter space search to find the optimal scale factors that generated the smallest prefit range-rate residuals and found that we can model the satellite orbits without the use of any empirical parameters, whilst still being able to identify the temporal gravity field signal in the prefit KBRR residuals. We will describe some physical conditions when the satellites are in the shadow of the Earth that we use to constrain the estimates of calibration biases and scales and show how the noise level of the estimated temporal gravity field varies with and without the use of the optimal calibration values for the accelerometer observations. A similar approach will be both required and effective to calibrate the accelerometers onboard the GRACE Follow-On mission.

  4. A quantitative approach for hydrological drought characterization in southwestern China using GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Nengfang; Wang, Zhengtao; Jiang, Weiping; Chao, Dingbo

    2016-06-01

    A quantitative approach for hydrological drought characterization, based on non-seasonal water storage deficit data from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission, is assessed. Non-seasonal storage deficit is the negative terrestrial water storage after deducting trend, acceleration and seasonal signals, and it is designated as a drought event when it persists for three or more continuous months. The non-seasonal water storage deficit is used for measuring the hydrological drought in southwestern China. It is found that this storage-deficit method clearly identifies hydrological drought onset, end and duration, and quantifies instantaneous severity, peak drought magnitude, and time to recovery. Moreover, it is found that severe droughts have frequently struck southwestern China in the past several decades, among which, the drought of 2011-2012 was the most severe; the duration was 10 months, the severity was -208.92 km3/month, and the time to recovery was 17 months. These results compare well with the National Climate Center of China drought databases, which signifies that the GRACE-based non-seasonal water storage deficit has a quantitative effect on hydrological drought characterization and provides an effective tool for researching droughts.

  5. On the capability of Swarm for surface mass variation monitoring: Quantitative assessment based on orbit information from CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, Oliver; Weigelt, Matthias; Zehentner, Norbert; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten; Jäggi, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    In the last decade, temporal variations of the gravity field from GRACE observations have become one of the most ubiquitous and valuable sources of information for geophysical and environmental studies. In the context of global climate change, mass balance of the Arctic and Antarctic ice sheets gained particular attention. Because GRACE has outlived its predicted lifetime by several years already, it is very likely that a gap between GRACE and its successor GRACE follow-on (supposed to be launched in 2017, at the earliest) occurs. The Swarm mission - launched on November 22, 2013 - is the most promising candidate to bridge this potential gap, i.e., to directly acquire large-scale mass variation information on the Earth's surface in case of a gap between the present GRACE and the upcoming GRACE follow-on projects. Although the magnetometry mission Swarm has not been designed for gravity field purposes, its three satellites have the characteristics for such an endeavor: (i) low, near-circular and near-polar orbits, (ii) precise positioning with high-quality GNSS receivers, (iii) on-board accelerometers to measure the influence of non-gravitational forces. Hence, from an orbit analysis point of view the Swarm satellites are comparable to the CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE spacecraft. Indeed and as data analysis from CHAMP has been shown, the detection of annual signals and trends from orbit analysis is possible for long-wavelength features of the gravity field, although the accuracy associated with the inter-satellite GRACE measurements cannot be reached. We assess the capability of the (non-dedicated) mission Swarm for mass variation detection in a real-case environment (opposed to simulation studies). For this purpose, we "approximate" the Swarm scenario by the GRACE+CHAMP and GRACE+GOCE constellations. In a first step, kinematic orbits of the individual satellites are derived from GNSS observations. From these orbits, we compute monthly combined GRACE+CHAMP and GRACE

  6. Evaluation of Groundwater Storage changes at Konya Closed Basin, Turkey using GRACE-based and in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamil Yilmaz, Koray; Saber, Mohamed; Tugrul Yilmaz, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    The Konya Closed Basin (KCB) located in Central Anatolia, Turkey, is the primary grain producer in Turkey. The lack of sufficient surface water resources and recently changing crop patterns have led to over-exploitation of groundwater resources and resulted in significant drop in groundwater levels. For this reason monitoring of the groundwater storage change in this region is critical to understand the potential of the current water resources and to devise effective water management strategies to avoid further depletion of the groundwater resources. Therefore, the main objective of this study is to examine and assess the utility of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) to monitor and investigate the groundwater storage changes in the Konya Closed Basin. Groundwater storage changes are derived using GRACE and GLDAS data and then are compared with the groundwater changes derived from the observed groundwater levels. The initial results of the comparison indicate an acceptable agreement between declining trends in GRACE-based and observed groundwater storage change during the study time period (2002 to 2015). Additionally, the results indicated that the study region exhibited remarkable drought conditions during 2007-2008 period. This study shows that the GRACE/GLDAS datasets can be used to monitor the equivalent groundwater storage changes which is crucial for long-term effective water management strategies.

  7. 26 CFR 5.856-1 - Extensions of the grace period for foreclosure property by a real estate investment trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Extensions of the grace period for foreclosure property by a real estate investment trust. 5.856-1 Section 5.856-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY INCOME TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE REVENUE ACT OF 1978 §...

  8. Analysis of systematic differences from GPS-measured and GRACE-modeled deformation in Central Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Weijie; Dong, Danan; Chen, Junping; Wu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Crustal seasonal displacement signals, which are commonly attributed to surface mass redistributions, can be measured by continuous GPS, modeled by GRACE and loading models. Previous studies have shown that the three methods generally agree with one another. However, the discrepancy among them in some regions has not yet been investigated comprehensively. In this paper, we compare the vertical annual displacement signals in the Central Valley, California derived from GPS, GRACE and loading models. The results show a general agreement from these three methods for most sites, which reach the maximum during the dry late summer and autumn. Irregular annual terms with peaks during the wet winter and spring are detected from GPS solutions for the sites located in places with extensive groundwater depletion. However, annual vertical variations for these same sites derived from GRACE and loading models reach the maximum in August and minimum in February. To explain such apparent discrepancy, we find that the vertical components of abnormal sites show a strong correlation with in situ groundwater data, which display peaks during cold months. In addition, with the assistance of water table depth data, we perform hydrological simulations based on Terzaghi's Principle, Mogi's Model and Green's function method. The results suggest that the discrepancy from GPS-measured and GRACE-modeled deformation is induced by the seasonal variations of groundwater.

  9. On the formulation of gravitational potential difference between the GRACE satellites based on energy integral in Earth fixed frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Y. Y.; Guo, J. Y.; Shang, K.; Shum, C. K.; Yu, J. H.

    2015-09-01

    Two methods for computing gravitational potential difference (GPD) between the GRACE satellites using orbit data have been formulated based on energy integral; one in geocentric inertial frame (GIF) and another in Earth fixed frame (EFF). Here we present a rigorous theoretical formulation in EFF with particular emphasis on necessary approximations, provide a computational approach to mitigate the approximations to negligible level, and verify our approach using simulations. We conclude that a term neglected or ignored in all former work without verification should be retained. In our simulations, 2 cycle per revolution (CPR) errors are present in the GPD computed using our formulation, and empirical removal of the 2 CPR and lower frequency errors can improve the precisions of Stokes coefficients (SCs) of degree 3 and above by 1-2 orders of magnitudes. This is despite of the fact that the result without removing these errors is already accurate enough. Furthermore, the relation between data errors and their influences on GPD is analysed, and a formal examination is made on the possible precision that real GRACE data may attain. The result of removing 2 CPR errors may imply that, if not taken care of properly, the values of SCs computed by means of the energy integral method using real GRACE data may be seriously corrupted by aliasing errors from possibly very large 2 CPR errors based on two facts: (1) errors of bar C_{2,0} manifest as 2 CPR errors in GPD and (2) errors of bar C_{2,0} in GRACE data-the differences between the CSR monthly values of bar C_{2,0} independently determined using GRACE and SLR are a reasonable measure of their magnitude-are very large. Our simulations show that, if 2 CPR errors in GPD vary from day to day as much as those corresponding to errors of bar C_{2,0} from month to month, the aliasing errors of degree 15 and above SCs computed using a month's GPD data may attain a level comparable to the magnitude of gravitational potential

  10. Linking GRACE-Derived Water Storage Accelerations to Changes in Hydro-Mteorological Fluxes over West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusche, J.; Eicker, A.; Springer, A.; Forootan, E.; Jütten, T.; Diekkrüger, B.

    2015-12-01

    Several researchers have postulated that, under a changing climate, an intensification of the water cycle is under way. This is usually related to increases in hydrological fluxes such as precipitation (P), evapotranspiration (E), and discharge (R). It is under debate, however, whether such observed or reconstructed flux changes are real for West Africa and on what scale. Large-scale increase or decrease of the flux deficit P-E-R, i.e. flux changes that do not compensate, would lead to acceleration or deceleration of water storage potentially visible in GRACE-derived time series. In agreement with earlier studies, we do find accelerations in global maps of gridded GRACE water storage anomalies (Eicker et al., submitted). For sub-Sahel West Africa such accelerations amount up to 7 mm/a2; i.e. statistically significant even seen the short GRACE record. However, W Africa water storage variability is strongly controlled by sea surface temperature and precipitation (Forootan et al., 2014), and interannual/decadal climate variability may mask long-term changes e.g. related to land use change. Yet, here we show that even after isolating and removing a global climate mode in the GRACE data that appears ENSO-related, using a new method, the observed signal over W Africa remains. We can explain this effect only partly with changing surface water levels (Volta reservoir). We then repeat our analysis with flux fields from global atmospheric reanalysis that include land surface models in online (ERA-Interim, CFSR) and off-line (MERRA-Land) mode, and TRMM precipitation data. We find that these fields show surprising skills in reconstructing water storage variability at the monthly timescale when compared to GRACE. In contrast, in particular ERA-Interim falls short in displaying trends that would correspond to GRACE accelerations. We hypothesize this may be due to time-varying biases in the reanalysis-generated fluxes as noticed in other studies. Essentially we conclude that

  11. SAPS 3, APACHE IV or GRACE: which score to choose for acute coronary syndrome patients in intensive care units?

    PubMed

    Nassar Junior, Antonio Paulo; Mocelin, Amilcar Oshiro; Andrade, Fabio Moreira; Brauer, Leonardo; Giannini, Fabio Poianas; Nunes, Andre Luiz Baptiston; Dias, Carlos Augusto

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) are a common cause of intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Specific prognostic scores have been developed and validated for ACS patients and, among them, GRACE (Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events) has had the best performance. However, intensive care clinicians generally use prognostic scores developed from heterogeneous populations of critically ill patients, such as APACHE IV (Acute Physiologic and Chronic Health Evaluation IV) and SAPS 3 (Simplified Acute Physiology Score 3). The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the performance of these three scores in a non-selected population of ACS cases. DESIGN AND SETTING Retrospective observational study to evaluate three prognostic scores in a population of ACS patients admitted to three general ICUs in private hospitals in São Paulo. METHODS All patients with ACS admitted from July 2008 to December 2009 were considered for inclusion in the study. Score calibration and discrimination were evaluated in relation to predicting hospital mortality. RESULTS A total of 1065 patients were included. The calibration was appropriate for APACHE IV and GRACE but not for SAPS 3. The discrimination was very good for all scores (area under curve of 0.862 for GRACE, 0.860 for APACHE IV and 0.804 for SAPS 3). CONCLUSIONS In this population of ACS patients admitted to ICUs, GRACE and APACHE IV were adequately calibrated, but SAPS 3 was not. All three scores had very good discrimination. GRACE and APACHE IV may be used for predicting mortality risk among ACS patients.

  12. Coseismic and post-seismic signatures of the Sumatra 2004 December and 2005 March earthquakes in GRACE satellite gravity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panet, I.; Mikhailov, V.; Diament, M.; Pollitz, F.; King, G.; de Viron, O.; Holschneider, M.; Biancale, R.; Lemoine, J.-M.

    2007-01-01

    The GRACE satellite mission has been measuring the Earth's gravity field and its temporal variations since 2002 April. Although these variations are mainly due to mass transfer within the geofluid envelops, they also result from mass displacements associated with phenomena including glacial isostatic adjustment and earthquakes. However, these last contributions are difficult to isolate because of the presence of noise and of geofluid signals, and because of GRACE's coarse spatial resolution (>400 km half-wavelength). In this paper, we show that a wavelet analysis on the sphere helps to retrieve earthquake signatures from GRACE geoid products. Using a wavelet analysis of GRACE geoids products, we show that the geoid variations caused by the 2004 December (Mw = 9.2) and 2005 March (Mw = 8.7) Sumatra earthquakes can be detected. At GRACE resolution, the 2004 December earthquake produced a strong coseismic decrease of the gravity field in the Andaman Sea, followed by relaxation in the area affected by both the Andaman 2004 and the Nias 2005 earthquakes. We find two characteristic timescales for the relaxation, with a fast variation occurring in the vicinity of the Central Andaman ridge. We discuss our coseismic observations in terms of density changes of crustal and upper-mantle rocks, and of the vertical displacements in the Andaman Sea. We interpret the post-seismic signal in terms of the viscoelastic response of the Earth's mantle. The transient component of the relaxation may indicate the presence of hot, viscous material beneath the active Central Andaman Basin. ?? 2007 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2007 RAS.

  13. GRACE and AMSR-E-based estimates of winter season solid precipitation accumulation in the Arctic drainage region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Ki-Weon; Ryu, Dongryeol; Kim, Baek-Min; Waliser, Duane E.; Tian, Baijun; Eom, Jooyoung

    2010-10-01

    Solid precipitation plays a major role in controlling the winter hydrological cycle and spring discharge in the Arctic region. However, it has not been well documented due to sharply decreasing numbers of precipitation gauges, gauge measurement biases, as well as limitations of conventional satellite methods in high latitudes. In this study, we document the winter season solid precipitation accumulation in the Arctic region using the latest new satellite measurements from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E). GRACE measures the winter total water (mainly from snow water equivalent (SWE)) storage change through gravity changes while AMSR-E measures the winter SWE through passive microwave measurements. The GRACE and AMSR-E measurements are combined with in situ and numerical model estimates of discharge and evapotranspiration to estimate the winter season solid precipitation accumulation in the Arctic region using the water budget equation. These two satellite-based estimates are then compared to the conventional estimates from two global precipitation products, such as the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) and Climate Prediction Center's Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP), and three reanalyses, the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis, the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts' ERA-Interim, and the Japan Meteorological Agency's Climate Data Assimilation System (JCDAS) reanalysis. The GRACE-based estimate is very close to the GPCP and ERA-Interim estimates. The AMSR-E-based estimate is the most different from the other estimates. This GRACE-based measurement of winter season solid precipitation accumulation can provide a new valuable benchmark to understand the hydrological cycle, to validate and evaluate the model simulation, and to improve data assimilation in the

  14. Secular gravity variation at Svalbard (Norway) from ground observations and GRACE satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mémin, A.; Rogister, Y.; Hinderer, J.; Omang, O. C.; Luck, B.

    2011-03-01

    The Svalbard archipelago, Norway, is affected by both the present-day ice melting (PDIM) and Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) subsequent to the Last Pleistocene deglaciation. The induced deformation of the Earth is observed by using different techniques. At the Geodetic Observatory in Ny-Ålesund, precise positioning measurements have been collected since 1991, a superconducting gravimeter (SG) has been installed in 1999, and six campaigns of absolute gravity (AG) measurements were performed between 1998 and 2007. Moreover, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission provides the time variation of the Earth gravity field since 2002. The goal of this paper is to estimate the present rate of ice melting by combining geodetic observations of the gravity variation and uplift rate with geophysical modelling of both the GIA and Earth's response to the PDIM. We estimate the secular gravity variation by superimposing the SG series with the six AG measurements. We collect published estimates of the vertical velocity based on GPS and VLBI data. We analyse the GRACE solutions provided by three groups (CSR, GFZ, GRGS). The crux of the problem lies in the separation of the contributions from the GIA and PDIM to the Earth's deformation. To account for the GIA, we compute the response of viscoelastic Earth models having different radial structures of mantle viscosity to the deglaciation histories included in the models ICE-3G or ICE-5G. To account for the effect of PDIM, we compute the deformation of an elastic Earth model for six models of ice-melting extension and rates. Errors in the gravity variation and vertical velocity are estimated by taking into account the measurement uncertainties and the variability of the GRACE solutions and GIA and PDIM models. The ground observations agree with models that involve a current ice loss of 25 km3 water equivalent yr-1 over Svalbard, whereas the space observations give a value in the interval [5, 18] km3

  15. Improved GIA Correction and Antarctic Contribution to Sea-level Rise Observed by GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivins, Erik; James, Thomas; Wahr, John; Schrama, Ernst; Landerer, Felix; Simon, Karen

    2013-04-01

    Measurement of continent-wide glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) is needed to interpret satellite-based trends for the grounded ice mass change of the Antarctic ice sheet (AIS). This is especially true for trends determined from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission. Three data sets have matured to the point where they can be used to shrink the range of possible GIA models for Antarctica: the glacial geological record has expanded to include exposure ages using 10Be,26Al measurements that constrain past thickness of the ice sheet, modelled ice core records now better constrain the temporal variation in past rates of snow accumulation, and Global Positioning System (GPS) vertical rate trends from across the continent are now available. The volume changes associated with Antarctic ice loading and unloading during the past 21 thousand years (21 ka) are smaller than previously thought, generating model present-day uplift rates that are consistent with GPS observations. We construct an ice sheet history that is designed to predict maximum volume changes, and in particular, maximum Holocene change. This ice sheet model drives a forward model prediction of GIA gravity signal, that in turn, should give maximum GIA response predictions. The apparent surface mass change component of GIA is re-evaluated to be +55 ± 13 Gt/yr by considering a revised ice history model and a parameter search for vertical motion predictions that best-fit the GPS observations at 18 high-quality stations. Although the GIA model spans a wide range of possible earth rheological structure values, the data are not yet sufficient for solving for a preferred value of upper and lower mantle viscosity, nor for a preferred lithospheric thickness. GRACE monthly solutions from CSR-RL04 release time series from Jan. 2003 through the beginning of Jan. 2012, uncorrected for GIA, yield an ice mass rate of +2.9 ± 34 Gt/yr. A new rough upper bound to the GIA correction is about 60

  16. On spline and polynomial interpolation of low earth orbiter data: GRACE example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uz, Metehan; Ustun, Aydin

    2016-04-01

    GRACE satellites, which are equipped with specific science instruments such as K/Ka band ranging system, have still orbited around the earth since 17 March 2002. In this study the kinematic and reduced-dynamic orbits of GRACE-A/B were determined to 10 seconds interval by using Bernese 5.2 GNSS software during May, 2010 and also daily orbit solutions were validated with GRACE science orbit, GNV1B. The RMS values of kinematic and reduced-dynamic orbit validations were about 2.5 and 1.5 cm, respectively. 
Throughout the time period of interest, more or less data gaps were encountered in the kinematic orbits due to lack of GPS measurements and satellite manoeuvres. Thus, the least square polynomial and the cubic spline approaches (natural, not-a-knot and clamped) were tested to interpolate both small data gaps and 5 second interval on precise orbits. The latter is necessary for example in case of data densification in order to use the K / Ka band observations. The interpolated coordinates to 5 second intervals were also validated with GNV1B orbits. The validation results show that spline approaches have delivered approximately 1 cm RMS values and are better than those of least square polynomial interpolation. When data gaps occur on daily orbit, the spline validation results became worse depending on the size of the data gaps. Hence, the daily orbits were fragmented into small arcs including 30, 40 or 50 knots to evaluate effect of the least square polynomial interpolation on data gaps. From randomly selected daily arc sets, which are belonging to different times, 5, 10, 15 and 20 knots were removed, independently. While 30-knot arcs were evaluated with fifth-degree polynomial, sixth-degree polynomial was employed to interpolate artificial gaps over 40- and 50-knot arcs. The differences of interpolated and removed coordinates were tested with each other by considering GNV1B validation RMS result, 2.5 cm. With 95% confidence level, data gaps up to 5 and 10 knots can

  17. Progress on Antarctic Glacial Isostatic Adjustment and GRACE constraints on ice loss (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivins, E. R.; James, T. S.; Wahr, J. M.; Schrama, E. J.; Simon, K. M.; Landerer, F. W.; Watkins, M. M.; Wiese, D. N.

    2013-12-01

    Preparations for the Intergovermental Panel on Climate Change: Assessment Report 5 (IPCC AR5) has placed pressure on various research groups to accelerate the pace of their work in order to meet the Report deadlines. While this stimulates both positive and negative bi-products, it helped to focus attention to irreconcilable mass balance determinations for the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) using space and airborne data. A glaring ';sore-thumb' for determining AIS trends from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite data is the large signal of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) that is poorly constrained and possibly of the same magnitude as the present-day mass change. The report published in Science (vol. 338, pp. 1183-89) by S13 [Shepherd et al. 2013] met this challenge head-on by investing heavily in improving the GIA models with new GPS data, and new chronological constraints on ice sheet evolution across the Antarctic continent. This new data has emerged only within the last five years, and it came at a fortuitous time for advancing the IPCC AR5 goals. In this presentation we speak to the improvements developed in a recent JGR Solid Earth publication (14 June 2013). We extend the analysis using all of the official 05 releases of the analysis centers, including the JPL-mascon fields. The total error budgets of GIA correction are poorly determined, in spite of the great model improvements witnessed in the past 5 years. S12 reported the uncertainty for space-based sea level sourcing during 1992-2011 to Antarctica at roughly 0.23 mm/yr. Although GRACE 2002-2013 estimates vary, the uncertainly is about half this value. Here we examine how much of that uncertainty is still caused by GIA models and discuss how new classes of GIA models, and the collection of yet new GPS and ice constraint data for Antarctica, will enhance the value of a GRACE Follow-On mission. However, there will be a limit to constraining GIA, and a limit, therefore, to GIA error due to

  18. Use of GRACE determined secular gravity rates for glacial isostatic adjustment studies in North-America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wal, Wouter; Wu, Patrick; Sideris, Michael G.; Shum, C. K.

    2008-10-01

    Monthly geopotential spherical harmonic coefficients from the GRACE satellite mission are used to determine their usefulness and limitations for studying glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) in North-America. Secular gravity rates are estimated by unweighted least-squares estimation using release 4 coefficients from August 2002 to August 2007 provided by the Center for Space Research (CSR), University of Texas. Smoothing is required to suppress short wavelength noise, in addition to filtering to diminish geographically correlated errors, as shown in previous studies. Optimal cut-off degrees and orders are determined for the destriping filter to maximize the signal to noise ratio. The halfwidth of the Gaussian filter is shown to significantly affect the sensitivity of the GRACE data (with respect to upper mantle viscosity and ice loading history). Therefore, the halfwidth should be selected based on the desired sensitivity. It is shown that increase in water storage in an area south west of Hudson Bay, from the summer of 2003 to the summer of 2006, contributes up to half of the maximum estimated gravity rate. Hydrology models differ in the predictions of the secular change in water storage, therefore even 4-year trend estimates are influenced by the uncertainty in water storage changes. Land ice melting in Greenland and Alaska has a non-negligible contribution, up to one-fourth of the maximum gravity rate. The estimated secular gravity rate shows two distinct peaks that can possibly be due to two domes in the former Pleistocene ice cover: west and south east of Hudson Bay. With a limited number of models, a better fit is obtained with models that use the ICE-3G model compared to the ICE-5G model. However, the uncertainty in interannual variations in hydrology models is too large to constrain the ice loading history with the current data span. For future work in which GRACE will be used to constrain ice loading history and the Earth's radial viscosity profile, it is

  19. GRACE gravity data help constraining seismic models of the 2004 Sumatran earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambiotti, G.; Bordoni, A.; Sabadini, R.; Colli, L.

    2011-10-01

    The analysis of Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Level 2 data time series from the Center for Space Research (CSR) and GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ) allows us to extract a new estimate of the co-seismic gravity signal due to the 2004 Sumatran earthquake. Owing to compressible self-gravitating Earth models, including sea level feedback in a new self-consistent way and designed to compute gravitational perturbations due to volume changes separately, we are able to prove that the asymmetry in the co-seismic gravity pattern, in which the north-eastern negative anomaly is twice as large as the south-western positive anomaly, is not due to the previously overestimated dilatation in the crust. The overestimate was due to a large dilatation localized at the fault discontinuity, the gravitational effect of which is compensated by an opposite contribution from topography due to the uplifted crust. After this localized dilatation is removed, we instead predict compression in the footwall and dilatation in the hanging wall. The overall anomaly is then mainly due to the additional gravitational effects of the ocean after water is displaced away from the uplifted crust, as first indicated by de Linage et al. (2009). We also detail the differences between compressible and incompressible material properties. By focusing on the most robust estimates from GRACE data, consisting of the peak-to-peak gravity anomaly and an asymmetry coefficient, that is given by the ratio of the negative gravity anomaly over the positive anomaly, we show that they are quite sensitive to seismic source depths and dip angles. This allows us to exploit space gravity data for the first time to help constraining centroid-momentum-tensor (CMT) source analyses of the 2004 Sumatran earthquake and to conclude that the seismic moment has been released mainly in the lower crust rather than the lithospheric mantle. Thus, GRACE data and CMT source analyses, as well as geodetic slip distributions aided

  20. Global gravity field models from the GPS positions of CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezděk, A.; Sebera, J.; Klokočník, J.; Kostelecký, J.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of our work is to generate Earth's gravity field models from the GPS positions of low Earth orbiters. We will present our inversion method and numerical results based on the real-world data of CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE satellites. The presented inversion method is based on Newton's second law of motion, which relates the observed acceleration of the satellite with the forces acting on it. The vector of the observed acceleration is obtained through a numerical second-derivative filter applied to the time series of the kinematic positions. Forces other than those due to the geopotential are either modelled (lunisolar perturbations, tides) or provided by the onboard measurements (nongravitational perturbations). Then the observation equations are formulated using the gradient of the spherical harmonic expansion of the geopotential. From this linear system the harmonic coefficients are directly obtained. We do not use any a priori gravity field model. Although the basic scheme of the acceleration approach is straightforward, the implementation details play a crucial role in obtaining reasonable results. The numerical derivative of noisy data (here the GPS positions) strongly amplifies the high frequency noise and creates autocorrelation in the observation errors. We successfully solve both of these problems by using the generalized least squares method, which defines a linear transformation of the observation equations. In the transformed variables the errors become uncorrelated, so the ordinary least squares estimation may be used to find the regression parameters with correct estimates of their uncertainties. The digital filter of the second derivative is an approximation to the analytical operation. We will show how different the results might be depending on the particular choice of the parameters defining the filter. Another problem is the correlation of the errors in the GPS positions. Here we use the tools from time series analysis. The systematic behaviour

  1. Electrostatic Accelerometer for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On Mission (GRACE FO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebat, V.; Foulon, B.; Christophe, B.

    2013-12-01

    The GRACE FO mission, led by the JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), is an Earth-orbiting gravity mission, continuation of the GRACE mission, that will produce an accurate model of the Earth's gravity field variation providing global climatic data during five year at least. The mission involves two satellites in a loosely controlled tandem formation, with a micro-wave link measuring the inter-satellites distance variation. Non-uniformities in the distribution of the Earth's mass cause the distance between the two satellites to vary. This variation is measured to recover gravity, after subtracting the non-gravitational contributors, as the residual drag. ONERA (the French Aerospace Lab) is developing, manufacturing and testing electrostatic accelerometers measuring this residual drag applied on the satellites. The accelerometer is composed of two main parts: the Sensor Unit (including the Sensor Unit Mechanics and the Front-End Electronic Unit) and the Interface Control Unit. In the Accelerometer Core, located in the Sensor Unit Mechanics, the proof mass is levitated and maintained in a center of an electrode cage by electrostatic forces. Thus, any drag acceleration applied on the satellite involves a variation on the servo-controlled electrostatic suspension of the mass. The voltage on the electrodes providing this electrostatic force is the measurement output of the accelerometer. The impact of the accelerometer defaults (geometry, electronic and parasitic forces) leads to bias, misalignment and scale factor error, non-linearity and noise. Some of these accelerometer defaults are characterized by tests with micro-gravity pendulum bench and with drops in ZARM catapult. Besides, a thermal stability is needed for the accelerometer core and front-end electronics to avoid bias and scale factor variation, and reached by a thermal box designed by Astrium, spacecraft manufacturer. The accelerometers are designed to endure the launch vibrations and the thermal environment at

  2. Explorations Around "Graceful Failure" in Transportation Infrastructure: Lessons Learned By the Infrastructure and Climate Network (ICNet)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, J. M.; Thomas, N.; Mo, W.; Kirshen, P. H.; Douglas, E. M.; Daniel, J.; Bell, E.; Friess, L.; Mallick, R.; Kartez, J.; Hayhoe, K.; Croope, S.

    2014-12-01

    Recent events have demonstrated that the United States' transportation infrastructure is highly vulnerable to extreme weather events which will likely increase in the future. In light of the 60% shortfall of the $900 billion investment needed over the next five years to maintain this aging infrastructure, hardening of all infrastructures is unlikely. Alternative strategies are needed to ensure that critical aspects of the transportation network are maintained during climate extremes. Preliminary concepts around multi-tier service expectations of bridges and roads with reference to network capacity will be presented. Drawing from recent flooding events across the U.S., specific examples for roads/pavement will be used to illustrate impacts, disruptions, and trade-offs between performance during events and subsequent damage. This talk will also address policy and cultural norms within the civil engineering practice that will likely challenge the application of graceful failure pathways during extreme events.

  3. Equivalent water height extracted from GRACE gravity field model with robust independent component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jinyun; Mu, Dapeng; Liu, Xin; Yan, Haoming; Dai, Honglei

    2014-08-01

    The Level-2 monthly GRACE gravity field models issued by Center for Space Research (CSR), GeoForschungs Zentrum (GFZ), and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) are treated as observations used to extract the equivalent water height (EWH) with the robust independent component analysis (RICA). The smoothing radii of 300, 400, and 500 km are tested, respectively, in the Gaussian smoothing kernel function to reduce the observation Gaussianity. Three independent components are obtained by RICA in the spatial domain; the first component matches the geophysical signal, and the other two match the north-south strip and the other noises. The first mode is used to estimate EWHs of CSR, JPL, and GFZ, and compared with the classical empirical decorrelation method (EDM). The EWH STDs for 12 months in 2010 extracted by RICA and EDM show the obvious fluctuation. The results indicate that the sharp EWH changes in some areas have an important global effect, like in Amazon, Mekong, and Zambezi basins.

  4. Improved methods for GRACE-derived groundwater storage change estimation in large-scale agroecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brena, A.; Kendall, A. D.; Hyndman, D. W.

    2013-12-01

    Large-scale agroecosystems are major providers of agricultural commodities and an important component of the world's food supply. In agroecosystems that depend mainly in groundwater, it is well known that their long-term sustainability can be at risk because of water management strategies and climatic trends. The water balance of groundwater-dependent agroecosystems such as the High Plains aquifer (HPA) are often dominated by pumping and irrigation, which enhance hydrological processes such as evapotranspiration, return flow and recharge in cropland areas. This work provides and validates new quantitative groundwater estimation methods for the HPA that combine satellite-based estimates of terrestrial water storage (GRACE), hydrological data assimilation products (NLDAS-2) and in situ measurements of groundwater levels and irrigation rates. The combined data can be used to elucidate the controls of irrigation on the water balance components of agroecosystems, such as crop evapotranspiration, soil moisture deficit and recharge. Our work covers a decade of continuous observations and model estimates from 2003 to 2013, which includes a significant drought since 2011. This study aims to: (1) test the sensitivity of groundwater storage to soil moisture and irrigation, (2) improve estimates of irrigation and soil moisture deficits (3) infer mean values of groundwater recharge across the HPA. The results show (1) significant improvements in GRACE-derived aquifer storage changes using methods that incorporate irrigation and soil moisture deficit data, (2) an acceptable correlation between the observed and estimated aquifer storage time series for the analyzed period, and (3) empirically-estimated annual rates of groundwater recharge that are consistent with previous geochemical and modeling studies. We suggest testing these correction methods in other large-scale agroecosystems with intensive groundwater pumping and irrigation rates.

  5. Graphical remedial assessment and cost evaluation (GRACE): A hydrologic- and economic-based environmental design tool

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, J.; Murdoch, L.; Koustubh, J.H.A.; Savage, K.; Uber, J. . USEPA Center Hill Solid and Hazardous Waste Research Facility )

    1992-01-01

    The cost and effectiveness of most in situ remedial efforts are closely tied to the performance of recovery systems, such as wells or interceptor trenches. GRACE is a graphic-based, recovery-system design package developed for the PC environment. The software allows engineers to design recovery systems based on both hydrologic and economic performance, evaluate the effectiveness of the design, and modify it if necessary. This capability is the result of combining a contaminant transport simulator with a cost database; the transport simulator-cost database combination allows the user to arrive at design scenarios that both meet remedial objectives and minimize costs. GRACE allows a recovery system, including such items as wells, interceptor trenches, and slurry walls, to be located on a site basemap. the on-screen layout of the recovery system components (and associated treatment and disposal facilities) accesses a detailed cost database, providing immediate feedback on the capital cost of the facility. Designing the recovery system automatically prepares an input file for the contaminant transport simulator. Output from the contaminant transport simulator is displayed in map-view via full color animation. Plume migration across the basemap graphically shows the effectiveness of the design. Individual windows may opened to display graphs of head, drawdown, or concentration through time at any location. Recovery system components are easily moved, and the contaminant transport re-simulated until the remedial objectives are met. Additionally, the system accesses information describing operating and maintenance costs of the designed system, providing estimates of total remedial cost through time.

  6. Effect of Numerical Error on Gravity Field Estimation for GRACE and Future Gravity Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, Christopher; Bettadpur, Srinivas

    2015-04-01

    In recent decades, gravity field determination from low Earth orbiting satellites, such as the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), has become increasingly more effective due to the incorporation of high accuracy measurement devices. Since instrumentation quality will only increase in the near future and the gravity field determination process is computationally and numerically intensive, numerical error from the use of double precision arithmetic will eventually become a prominent error source. While using double-extended or quadruple precision arithmetic will reduce these errors, the numerical limitations of current orbit determination algorithms and processes must be accurately identified and quantified in order to adequately inform the science data processing techniques of future gravity missions. The most obvious numerical limitation in the orbit determination process is evident in the comparison of measured observables with computed values, derived from mathematical models relating the satellites' numerically integrated state to the observable. Significant error in the computed trajectory will corrupt this comparison and induce error in the least squares solution of the gravitational field. In addition, errors in the numerically computed trajectory propagate into the evaluation of the mathematical measurement model's partial derivatives. These errors amalgamate in turn with numerical error from the computation of the state transition matrix, computed using the variational equations of motion, in the least squares mapping matrix. Finally, the solution of the linearized least squares system, computed using a QR factorization, is also susceptible to numerical error. Certain interesting combinations of each of these numerical errors are examined in the framework of GRACE gravity field determination to analyze and quantify their effects on gravity field recovery.

  7. Diagnosing Land Water Storage Variations in Major Indian River Basins using GRACE observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Aarti; Syed, Tajdarul H.

    2015-10-01

    Scarcity of freshwater is one of the most critical resource issue the world is facing today. Due to its finite nature, renewable freshwater reserves are under relentless pressure due to population growth, economic development and rapid industrialization. Assessment of Terrestrial Water Storage (TWS), as an unified measure of freshwater reserve, is vital to understand hydrologic and climatic processes controlling its availability. In this study, TWS variations from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites are analyzed in conjuction with multi-platform hydrologic observations for the period of 2003-2012. Here, the primary objective is to quantify and attribute the observed short-term variability of TWS and groundwater storage in the largest river basins of India (Ganga, Godavari, Krishna and Mahanadi). Alongside commendable agreement between TWS variations obtained from GRACE and water balance computation, results highlight some of the important deficiencies between the two. While monthly changes in TWS are highly correlated with precipitation, monthly TWS anomalies reveal a 1-2 month lag in their concurrence. Analysis of groundwater storage estimates demonstrate significant decline in the Ganga basin (- 1.28 ± 0.20 mm/month) but practically no change in the Mahanadi basin. On the contrary, groundwater storage in Godavari and Krishna basins reveal notable increase at the rate of 0.74 ± 0.21 mm/month and 0.97 ± 0.21 mm/month respectively. Subsequently, in order to assess the influence of quasi-periodic, planetary scale, variations in the Earth's climate system, groundwater storage anomalies are evaluated with reference to ENSO variability. Results manifest that in all the basins, with the exception of Ganga, groundwater storage is dominantly influenced by ENSO, with large decrease (increase) during El Niño (La Niña) events. In the Ganga basin, groundwater storage variations refer to possible amalgamation of human intervention and natural climate

  8. Multichannel singular spectrum analysis in application to GRACE and Jason-1 satellites data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotov, Leonid; Barinov, Michael; Nosova, Svetlana; Huang, Zhenwei; Shum, C. K.

    2010-05-01

    Multichannel singular spectrum analysis (MSSA) was applied to the Stokes coefficients of the temporal gravity filed solutions obtained from the GRACE twin-satellite gravity mapping mission, and to the 10-days gridded maps of Sea Surface Height (SSH) time series from Jason-1 altimetry satellite. With use of this method Principal components (PCs), representing different physical phenomena were separated, and the noise has been filtered out from these data sets. MSSA is a generalization of Principal Components Analysis (PCA) for the multidimensional time series. It allows one to recognize correlated spatially-temporal patterns and separate them into the PCs. MSSA is more flexible then PCA in terms of oscillations, trends and noise separation, because it searches for correlations in the time series over an embedding space of large dimensionality, or globally. Instead of using covariance matrix analysis for each component, full trajectory matrix for all the components is analyzed at once. Natural extension of MSSA is the prediction of components. MSSA of GRACE monthly gravity anomalies allowed to decompose the signal into an average, PC of annual period, secular component, and higher order components containing geographically-correlated high-frequency noise (stripes) and transient mass redistributions. MSSA-processing of ocean altimetry SSH-maps from Jason-1 satellite demonstrated the strength of the method by providing the PCs of different periods separated from the noise. Results are available at http://lnfm1.sai.msu.ru/~tempus/science/MSSA/ We conclude that the suggested processing method of multidimensional, time-variable observations simplifies studies of quantifying geophysical phenomena, related with global environmental changes, post-glacial rebound, annual cycles, El Nino. Acknowledgment. This work is supported by grant of the President of Russia MK-4234.2009.5. the Ohio State University (OSU) component of the research is supported by NASA and by OSU's Climate

  9. Using MODIS and GRACE to assess water storage in regional Wetlands: Iraqi and Sudd Marsh systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, R.

    2015-12-01

    Both The Iraqi (Mesopotamian) Marshes, an extensive wetlands system in Iraq, and the Sudd Marshlands, located in Sudan have been heavily impacted by both human and climate forces over the past decades. The Sudd wetlands are highly variable in size, averaging roughly 30,000 km2, but extending to as large as ~130,000 km2 during the wet seasons, while the Iraqi marshes are smaller, at ~15,000 km2, without the same extent of intra-annual variability. A combination of MODIS and GRACE images from 2003-2015 for the study areas were used to determine the time dependent change in surface water area (SWA) in the marshes, marshland extent and variability in total water storage. Combined open water area and vegetation abundance and cover, as determined by MODIS (NDVI and MNDWI), is highly correlated with total mass variability observed by GRACE (RL05 Tellus land grid). Annual variability in the Iraqi marshes correlates well with combined SWA and vegetation extent. Variability of vegetation in the Sudd marshes is seen to correlate well on an annual basis with water storage variation, and with a 2 month lag (water mass increases and decreases lead vegetation increases and decreases) when examined on a monthly basis. As a result, in both systems, the overall wetlands extent and health is observed to be water limited. Predictions for precipitation variability and human diversions of water through either dam storage or navigation modifications are predicted to lower water availability and lower variability in these systems. These two regional wetlands systems will shrink, with resulting loss in habitat and other ecosystem services.

  10. Monitoring climate and man-made induced variations in terrestrial water storage (TWS) across Africa using GRACE data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. E.; Sultan, M.; Wahr, J. M.; Yan, E.; Bonin, J. A.; Chouinard, K.

    2012-12-01

    It is common practice for researchers engaged in research related to climate change to examine the temporal variations in relevant climatic parameters (e.g., temperature, precipitation) and to extract and examine drought indices reproduced from one or more such parameters. Drought indices (meteorological, agricultural and hydrological) define departures from normal conditions and are used as proxies for monitoring water availability. Many of these indices exclude significant controlling factor(s), do not work well in specific settings and regions, and often require long (≥50 yr) calibration time periods and substantial meteorological data, limiting their application in areas lacking adequate observational networks. Additional uncertainties are introduced by the models used in computing model-dependent indices. Aside from these uncertainties, none of these indices measure the variability in terrestrial water storage (TWS), a term that refers to the total vertically integrated water content in an area regardless of the reservoir in which it resides. Inter-annual trends in TWS were extracted from monthly Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data acquired (04/2002 to 08/2011) over Africa and correlated (in a GIS environment) with relevant temporal remote sensing, geologic, hydrologic, climatic, and topographic datasets. Findings include the following: (1) large sectors of Africa are undergoing statistically significant variations (+36 mm/yr to -16 mm/yr) due to natural and man-made causes; (2) warming of the tropical Atlantic ocean apparently intensified Atlantic monsoons and increased precipitation and TWS over western and central Africa's coastal plains, proximal mountainous source areas, and inland areas as far as central Chad; (3) warming in the central Indian Ocean decreased precipitation and TWS over eastern and southern Africa; (4) the high frequency of negative phases of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) increased precipitation and TWS over

  11. Estimating geocenter motion and barystatic sea-level variability from GRACE observations with explicit consideration of self-attraction and loading effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann-Wolf, Inga; Dobslaw, Henryk

    2016-04-01

    Estimating global barystatic sea-level variations from monthly mean gravity fields delivered by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission requires additional information about geocenter motion. These variations are not available directly due to the mission implementation in the CM-frame and are represented by the degree-1 terms of the spherical harmonics expansion. Global degree-1 estimates can be determined with the method of Swenson et al. (2008) from ocean mass variability, the geometry of the global land-sea distribution, and GRACE data of higher degrees and orders. Consequently, a recursive relation between the derivation of ocean mass variations from GRACE data and the introduction of geocenter motion into GRACE data exists. In this contribution, we will present a recent improvement to the processing strategy described in Bergmann-Wolf et al. (2014) by introducing a non-homogeneous distribution of global ocean mass variations in the geocenter motion determination strategy, which is due to the effects of loading and self-attraction induced by mass redistributions at the surface. A comparison of different GRACE-based oceanographic products (barystatic signal for both the global oceans and individual basins; barotropic transport variations of major ocean currents) with degree-1 terms estimated with a homogeneous and non-homogeneous ocean mass representation will be discussed, and differences in noise levels in most recent GRACE solutions from GFZ (RL05a), CSR, and JPL (both RL05) and their consequences for the application of this method will be discussed. Swenson, S., D. Chambers and J. Wahr (2008), Estimating geocenter variations from a combination of GRACE and ocean model output, J. Geophys. Res., 113, B08410 Bergmann-Wolf, I., L. Zhang and H. Dobslaw (2014), Global Eustatic Sea-Level Variations for the Approximation of Geocenter Motion from GRACE, J. Geod. Sci., 4, 37-48

  12. Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) detection of water storage changes in the Three Gorges Reservoir of China and comparison with in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianwei; de Linage, Caroline; Famiglietti, James; Zender, Charles S.

    2011-12-01

    Water impoundment in the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) of China caused a large mass redistribution from the oceans to a concentrated land area in a short time period. We show that this mass shift is captured by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) unconstrained global solutions at a 400 km spatial resolution after removing correlated errors. The WaterGAP Global Hydrology Model (WGHM) is selected to isolate the TGR contribution from regional water storage changes. For the first time, this study compares the GRACE (minus WGHM) estimated TGR volume changes with in situ measurements from April 2002 to May 2010 at a monthly time scale. During the 8 year study period, GRACE-WGHM estimated TGR volume changes show an increasing trend consistent with the TGR in situ measurements and lead to similar estimates of impounded water volume. GRACE-WGHM estimated total volume increase agrees to within 14% (3.2 km3) of the in situ measurements. This indicates that GRACE can retrieve the true amplitudes of large surface water storage changes in a concentrated area that is much smaller than the spatial resolution of its global harmonic solutions. The GRACE-WGHM estimated TGR monthly volume changes explain 76% (r2 = 0.76) of in situ measurement monthly variability and have an uncertainty of 4.62 km3. Our results also indicate reservoir leakage and groundwater recharge due to TGR filling and contamination from neighboring lakes are nonnegligible in the GRACE total water storage changes. Moreover, GRACE observations could provide a relatively accurate estimate of global water volume withheld by newly constructed large reservoirs and their impacts on global sea level rise since 2002.

  13. Estimating geocenter motion and barystatic sea-level variability from GRACE observations with explicit consideration of self-attraction and loading effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann-Wolf, I.; Dobslaw, H.

    2015-12-01

    Estimating global barystatic sea-level variations from monthly mean gravity fields delivered by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission requires additional information about geocenter motion. These variations are not available directly due to the mission implementation in the CM-frame and are represented by the degree-1 terms of the spherical harmonics expansion. Global degree-1 estimates can be determined with the method of Swenson et al. (2008) from ocean mass variability, the geometry of the global land-sea distribution, and GRACE data of higher degrees and orders. Consequently, a recursive relation between the derivation of ocean mass variations from GRACE data and the introduction of geocenter motion into GRACE data exists.In this contribution, we will present a recent improvement to the processing strategy described in Bergmann-Wolf et al. (2014) by introducing a non-homogeneous distribution of global ocean mass variations in the geocenter motion determination strategy, which is due to the effects of loading and self-attraction induced by mass redistributions at the surface. A comparison of different GRACE-based oceanographic products (barystatic signal for both the global oceans and individual basins; barotropic transport variations of major ocean currents) with degree-1 terms estimated with a homogeneous and non-homogeneous ocean mass representation will be discussed, and differences in noise levels in most recent GRACE solutions from GFZ (RL05a), CSR, and JPL (both RL05) and their consequences for the application of this method will be discussed.

  14. Comparison of regional hydrological excitation of polar motion derived from hydrological models and the GRACE gravity field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastula, J.; Kolaczek, B.; Salstein, D. A.

    2009-09-01

    Global geophysical excitation functions of polar motion do not explain fully the observed polar motion as determined by geodetic techniques. The impact of continental hydrologic signals, from land water, snow, and ice, on polar motion excitation HAM (Hydrological Angular Momentum), is still inadequately estimated and not known so well as atmospheric and oceanic ones. Recently the GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellite mission monitoring Earth's time variable gravity field has allowed us to determine global mass term of the polar motion excitation functions, which inherently includes the atmospheric, oceanic and hydrological portions. We use these terms to make comparisons with the mass term of the geodetic and geophysical excitation functions of polar motion on seasonal scales. Global GRACE excitation function of polar motion and hydrological excitation function of polar motion have been determined and were studied earlier

  15. Integrating GRACE and multi-source data sets to quantify the seasonal groundwater depletion in mega agricultural regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y.; Wang, D.; Zhu, T.; Ringler, C.; Sun, A. Y.

    2015-12-01

    It is challenging to quantify the groundwater depletion in the mega basins owing to the huge spatial scale and the intensive anthrophonic activities (e.g. dams and reservoirs). Recently, the satellite Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data provides an opportunity to monitor large-scale groundwater depletion. However, the data is only available after 2002, limiting the understanding of inter-annual variability of seasonal groundwater depletion. In this study, a simple model with two parameters is developed, based on the seasonal Budyko framework for quantifying the seasonal groundwater depletion. The model is applied to the Indus and Ganges River basin in South Asia and the High Plain/Ogallala aquifer in United States. The parameters of the model are estimated by integrating GRACE and other multi-source data sets. Total water storage changes before 2003 are reconstructed based on the developed model with available data of evaporation, precipitation, and potential evaporation.

  16. Relations Between Grace-Derived Water Storage Change with Precipitation and Temperature Over Kaidu River Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Zhou, Q.

    2016-06-01

    Water is essential for human survival and well-being, and important to virtually all sectors of the economy. In the aridzone of China's west, water resource is the controlling factor on the distribution of human settlements. Water cycle variation is sensitive to temperature and precipitation, which are influenced by human activity and climate change. Satellite observations of Earth's time-variable gravity field from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission, which enable direct measurement of changes of total terrestrial water storage, could be useful to aid this modelling. In this pilot study, TWS change from 2002 to 2013 obtained from GRACE satellite mission over the Kaidu River Basin in Xinjiang, China is presented. Precipitation and temperature data from in-situ station and National Satellite Meteorological Centre of China (NSMC) are analysed to examine whether there is a statistically significant correlation between them.

  17. Variations in the total water storage in the major river basins of India from GRACE satellite gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, V. M.; Wahr, J. M.; Swenson, S.

    2008-12-01

    We present an estimate of total water storage variations of the major river basins of India during the period of 2002 to mid 2008 from modelling of time-variable gravity field observed by GRACE satellite by utilising the scheme of Swenson and Wahr, (2002). The largest annual volume change is observed over the upper Ganga basin, followed by the lower Gnaga basin and the Yamuna basin of northern India. Basins of northern India show a declining trend of water storage over this time period, whereas the Godavari basin, the largest basin of central south India, as well as basins in central India show similar seasonal variations but increasing trends. It is interesting to note that these trends are prevalent over a decadal time period of ground water level and therefore the trend observed from GRACE data can be extrapolated backward. If these trends are sustained over a long time period, northern India and Bangladesh will lead to a major water crisis

  18. Assessing Drought Impacts on Water Storage using GRACE Satellites and Regional Groundwater Modeling in the Central Valley of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, B. R.; Zhang, Z.; Save, H.; Faunt, C. C.; Dettinger, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Increasing concerns about drought impacts on water resources in California underscores the need to better understand effects of drought on water storage and coping strategies. Here we use a new GRACE mascons solution with high spatial resolution (1 degree) developed at the Univ. of Texas Center for Space Research (CSR) and output from the most recent regional groundwater model developed by the U.S. Geological Survey to evaluate changes in water storage in response to recent droughts. We also extend the analysis of drought impacts on water storage back to the 1980s using modeling and monitoring data. The drought has been intensifying since 2012 with almost 50% of the state and 100% of the Central Valley under exceptional drought in 2015. Total water storage from GRACE data declined sharply during the current drought, similar to the rate of depletion during the previous drought in 2007 - 2009. However, only 45% average recovery between the two droughts results in a much greater cumulative impact of both droughts. The CSR GRACE Mascons data offer unprecedented spatial resolution with no leakage to the oceans and no requirement for signal restoration. Snow and reservoir storage declines contribute to the total water storage depletion estimated by GRACE with the residuals attributed to groundwater storage. Rates of groundwater storage depletion are consistent with the results of regional groundwater modeling in the Central Valley. Traditional approaches to coping with these climate extremes has focused on surface water reservoir storage; however, increasing conjunctive use of surface water and groundwater and storing excess water from wet periods in depleted aquifers is increasing in the Central Valley.

  19. Global analysis of approaches for deriving total water storage changes from GRACE satellites and implications for groundwater storage change estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, D.; Scanlon, B. R.; Longuevergne, L.; Chen, X.

    2015-12-01

    Increasing interest in use of GRACE satellites and a variety of new products to monitor changes in total water storage (TWS) underscores the need to assess the reliability of output from different products. The objective of this study was to assess skills and uncertainties of different approaches for processing GRACE data to restore signal losses caused by spatial filtering based on analysis of 1°×1° grid scale data and basin scale data in 60 river basins globally. Results indicate that scaling factors from six land surface models (LSMs), including four models from GLDAS-1 (Noah 2.7, Mosaic, VIC, and CLM 2.0), CLM 4.0, and WGHM, are similar over most humid, sub-humid, and high-latitude regions but can differ by up to 100% over arid and semi-arid basins and areas with intensive irrigation. Large differences in TWS anomalies from three processing approaches (scaling factor, additive, and multiplicative corrections) were found in arid and semi-arid regions, areas with intensive irrigation, and relatively small basins (e.g., ≤ 200,000 km2). Furthermore, TWS anomaly products from gridded data with CLM4.0 scaling factors and the additive correction approach more closely agree with WGHM output than the multiplicative correction approach. Estimation of groundwater storage changes using GRACE satellites requires caution in selecting an appropriate approach for restoring TWS changes. A priori ground-based data used in forward modeling can provide a powerful tool for explaining the distribution of signal gains or losses caused by low-pass filtering in specific regions of interest and should be very useful for more reliable estimation of groundwater storage changes using GRACE satellites.

  20. Simultaneous Observation of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances and Traveling Atmospheric Disturbances Using a GPS Receiver Network and the GRACE Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, N.; Saito, A.; Tsugawa, T.

    2007-12-01

    The variations of the thermospheric mass density and the ionospheric electron density inside Large Scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (LSTIDs) were studied with the GRACE accelerometer data and the GPS total electron content (GPS TEC) data. LSTIDs were detected by a GPS receiver network in Japan, GEONET, which is operated by Geographical Survey Institute. The characteristics of the LSTIDs, such as time, location, amplitude, wavelength, and propagation velocity, were derived from the TEC data of GEONET. The thermospheric total mass density at 500km altitude was derived from the high-accuracy accelerometers on board the GRACE satellites. The GRACE satellites flew over the LSTIDs during two events in August 2003 and November 2003. In both two events, wave-like structures of the thermospheric mass density were detected. They propagated from the high latitude to the low latitude in about 300m/s and 500m/s, and the spatial scales of the structures were about 2000km and 2500km, respectively. The velocities and the spatial scales of these Traveling Atmospheric Disturbances (TADs) were similar to those of LSTIDs detected by GEONET TEC in both events. In both two events, the ratio of the perturbation component of the neutral mass density to the background was about 11% and 18%, while that of the TEC was about 6% and 8%. These thermospheric total mass density variations of TADs are interpreted to cause the electron density variations of LSTIDs. We will discuss the relationship between LSTIDs measured by GPS receivers, and TADs detected by the GRACE accelerometers in this presentation.

  1. Coseismic slip of the 2010 Mw 8.8 Great Maule, Chile, earthquake quantified by the inversion of GRACE observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Shum, C. K.; Simons, Frederik J.; Tassara, Andrés; Erkan, Kamil; Jekeli, Christopher; Braun, Alexander; Kuo, Chungyen; Lee, Hyongki; Yuan, Dah-Ning

    2012-06-01

    The 27 February 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule, Chile, earthquake ruptured over 500 km along a mature seismic gap between 34° S and 38° S—the Concepción-Constitución gap, where no large megathrust earthquakes had occurred since the 1835 Mw ˜8.5 event. Notable discrepancies exist in slip distribution and moment magnitude estimated by various models inverted using traditional observations such as teleseismic networks, coastal/river markers, tsunami sensors, Global Positioning System (GPS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). We conduct a spatio-spectral localization analysis, based on Slepian basis functions, of data from Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) to extract coseismic gravity change signals of the Maule earthquake with improved spatial resolution (350 km half-wavelength). Our results reveal discernible differences in the average slip between the GRACE observation and predictions from various coseismic models. The sensitivity analysis reveals that GRACE observation is sensitive to the size of the fault, but unable to separate depth and slip. Here we assume the depth of the fault is known, and simultaneously invert for the fault-plane area and the average slip using the simulated annealing algorithm. Our GRACE-inverted fault plane length and width are 429±6 km, 146±5 km, respectively. The estimated slip is 8.1±1.2 m, indicating that most of the strain accumulated since 1835 in the Concepción-Constitución gap was released by the 2010 Maule earthquake.

  2. Record of decision remedial alternative selection for the Grace Road site (631-22G) operable unit: Final action

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.

    1997-01-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Grace Road Site located at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The selected action was developed in accordance with CERCLA, as amended, and to the extent practicable, the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP). The selected remedy satisfies both CERCLA and RCRA 3004 requirements. This decision is based on the Administrative Record File for this specific RCRA/CERCLA unit.

  3. A new Approach to Combine GRACE and ICESat Observations to Estimate Glacial Isostatic Adjustment in East Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallenberg, B.; Tregoning, P.; Purcell, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring and understanding ongoing changes in Antarctic mass balance is of great interest, as the melting of the ice sheet would significantly contribute to global sea level changes. While scientists agree that the West Antarctic ice sheet is losing mass, opinions about the East Antarctic ice sheet are more widespread, with some areas showing an increase in mass. In recent years satellite missions have significantly contributed to the understanding of ongoing changes within the polar ice sheets, and became an important tool in detecting variations in ice height, ice mass and bedrock isostasy. The Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission detects mass loss in regions where the ice sheet has its bed well below sea level and where warmer ocean water penetrates beneath the ice sheet, melting it from the base. Meanwhile an increase in mass has been observed in regions along the East Antarctic coastline, raising the question whether GRACE detects glacial isostatic adjustment due to ice mass loss or an actual increase in snowfall, contributing positively to surface mass balance. To improve our understanding on the contribution of glacial isostatic adjustment and surface mass balance to mass variations, we developed a new approach on how to subtract elevation changes observed by satellite altimetry from observed mass changes as detected by GRACE. We have established our own firn compaction model that we apply to the altimetry data to subtract changes due to the densification of snow, before using the ICESat observations. We will present results of the firn compaction model and our approach on combining GRACE and ICESat observations to separate the contribution of glacial isostatic adjustment from ongoing surface mass changes in East Antarctica.

  4. Distributed fault slip model for the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake from GNSS and GRACE/GOCE satellite gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Martin Johann; Hooper, Andrew; Broerse, Taco; Bouman, Johannes

    2016-02-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission (launched 2002) and the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) mission (March 2009 to November 2013) collected spaceborne gravity data for the preseismic and postseismic periods of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. In addition, the dense Japan GeoNet Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) network measured with approximately 1050 stations the coseismic and postseismic surface displacements. We use a novel combination of GNSS, GRACE, and GOCE observations for a distributed fault slip model addressing the issues with gravimetric and geometric change over consistent time windows. Our model integrates the coseismic and postseismic effects as we include GOCE observations averaged over a 2 year interval, but their inclusion reveals the gravity change with unprecedented spatial accuracy. The gravity gradient grid, evaluated at GOCE orbit height of 265 km, has an estimated formal error of 0.20 mE which provides sensitivity to the mainly coseismic and integrated postseismic-induced gravity gradient signal of -1.03 mE. We show that an increased resolution of the gravity change provides valuable information, with GOCE gravity gradient observations sensitive to a more focused slip distribution in contrast to the filtered GRACE equivalent. The 2 year averaging window of the observations makes it important to incorporate estimates of the variance/covariance of unmodeled processes in the inversion. The GNSS and GRACE/GOCE combined model shows a slip pattern with 20 m peak slip at the trench. The total gravity change (≈200 μGal) and the spatial mapping accuracy would have been considerably lower by omitting the GOCE-derived fine-scale gravity field information.

  5. Variability of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current derived from GRACE retrievals, model simulations and in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boening, C.; Timmermann, R.; Macrander, A.; Schroeter, J.; Boebel, O.

    2008-12-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) provides estimates of the Earth's static and time-variant gravity field. Solutions from various processing centres (GFZ, CSR, GRGS, JPL etc.) enable us to determine mass redistributions on the globe. Given that land signals are generally large compared to anomalies over the ocean, an assessment of the latter requires a particularly careful filtering of the data. We utilized the Finite Element Sea-Ice Ocean Model (FESOM) to develop a filtering algorithm which relies on the spatial coherency of ocean bottom pressure (OBP) anomalies. Taking large-scale circulation patterns into account, the new filter yields an improved representation of OBP (i.e. ocean mass) variability in the filtered GRACE data. In order to investigate the representation of Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) variability in the pattern-filtered GRACE retrievals, an analysis of OBP anomalies in FESOM results and in-situ measurements has been performed. Data from a PIES (Pressure sensor equipped Inverted Echo Sounder) array (36°S-55°S, 2°W-13°E) south of Africa provides bottom pressure recorder data from 2002-2008 for the ACC region. Based on anomalies of OBP gradients between individual instruments, these in-situ measurements give an estimate of the overall transport variability as well as of the movement of ACC fronts and transport redistribution between different sectors of the ACC. The validation of simulated and satellite-derived OBP anomaly gradients against these data yields a measure for the representation of this variability in FESOM and GRACE. Furthermore, model simulations are used to assess the relation between transport variations in individual filaments of the Southern Ocean and total transport variability in this and other sectors of the ACC.

  6. Improving Budyko curve-based estimates of long-term water partitioning using hydrologic signatures from GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Kuai; Shen, Chaopeng; Fisher, Joshua B.; Niu, Jie

    2016-07-01

    The Budyko hypothesis provides a first-order estimate of water partitioning into runoff (Q) and evapotranspiration (E). Observations, however, often show significant departures from the Budyko curve; moreover, past improvements to Budyko curve tend to lose predictive power when migrated between regions or to small scales. Here to estimate departures from the Budyko curve, we use hydrologic signatures extracted from Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) terrestrial water storage anomalies. The signatures include GRACE amplitude as a fraction of precipitation (A/P), interannual variability, and 1-month lag autocorrelation. We created a group of linear models embodying two alternate hypotheses that departures can be predicted by (a) Taylor series expansion based on the deviation of physical characteristics (seasonality, snow fraction, and vegetation index) from reference conditions and (b) surrogate indicators covarying with E, e.g., A/P. These models are fitted using a mesoscale USA data set (HUC4) and then evaluated using world data sets and USA basins <1 × 105 km2. The model with A/P could reduce error by 50% compared to Budyko itself. We found that seasonality and fraction of precipitation as snow account for a major portion of the predictive power of A/P, while the remainder is attributed to unexplained basin characteristics. When migrated to a global data set, type b models performed better than type a. This contrast in transferability is argued to be due to data set limitations and catchment coevolution. The GRACE-based correction performs well for USA basins >1000 km2 and, according to comparison with other global data sets, is suitable for data fusion purposes, with GRACE error as estimates of uncertainty.

  7. Re-estimation of glacier mass loss in Greenland from GRACE with correction of land-ocean leakage effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shuanggen; Zou, Fang

    2015-12-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites can estimate the high-precision time-varying gravity field and the changes of Earth's surface mass, which have been widely used in water cycle and glacier mass balance. However, one of larger errors in GRACE measurements, land-ocean leakage effects, restricts high precision retrieval of ocean mass and terrestrial water storage variations along the coasts, particularly estimation of mass loss in Greenland. The land-ocean leakage effect along the coasts in Greenland will contaminate the mass loss signals with significant signal attenuation. In this paper, the precise glacier mass loss in Greenland from GRACE is re-estimated with correction of land-ocean leakage effects using the forward gravity modeling. The loss of Greenland ice-sheets is - 102.8 ± 9.01 Gt/a without removing leakage effect, but - 183.0 ± 19.91 Gt/a after removing the leakage effect from September 2003 to March 2008, which has a good agreement with ICESat results of - 184.8 ± 28.2 Gt/a. From January 2003 to December 2013, the total Greenland ice-sheet loss is at - 261.54 ± 6.12 Gt/a from GRACE measurements with removing the leakage effect by 42.4%, while two-thirds of total glacier melting in Greenland occurred in southern Greenland in the past 11 years. The secular leakage effects on glacier melting estimate is mainly located in the coastal areas, where larger glacier signals are significantly attenuated due to leaking out into the ocean. Furthermore, the leakage signals also have remarkable effects on seasonal and acceleration variations of glacier mass loss in Greenland. More significantly accelerated loss of glacier mass in Greenland is found at - 26.19 Gt/a2 after correcting for leakage effects.

  8. Deriving Scaling Factors Using a Global Hydrological Model to Restore GRACE Total Water Storage Changes for China's Yangtze River Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Di; Yang, Yuting; Yoshihide, Wada; Hong, Yang; Liang, Wei; Chen, Yaning; Yong, Bin; Hou, Aizhong; Wei, Jiangfeng; Chen, Lu

    2015-01-01

    This study used a global hydrological model (GHM), PCR-GLOBWB, which simulates surface water storage changes, natural and human induced groundwater storage changes, and the interactions between surface water and subsurface water, to generate scaling factors by mimicking low-pass filtering of GRACE signals. Signal losses in GRACE data were subsequently restored by the scaling factors from PCR-GLOBWB. Results indicate greater spatial heterogeneity in scaling factor from PCR-GLOBWB and CLM4.0 than that from GLDAS-1 Noah due to comprehensive simulation of surface and subsurface water storage changes for PCR-GLOBWB and CLM4.0. Filtered GRACE total water storage (TWS) changes applied with PCR-GLOBWB scaling factors show closer agreement with water budget estimates of TWS changes than those with scaling factors from other land surface models (LSMs) in China's Yangtze River basin. Results of this study develop a further understanding of the behavior of scaling factors from different LSMs or GHMs over hydrologically complex basins, and could be valuable in providing more accurate TWS changes for hydrological applications (e.g., monitoring drought and groundwater storage depletion) over regions where human-induced interactions between surface water and subsurface water are intensive.

  9. Calibration of a large-scale groundwater flow model using GRACE data: a case study in the Qaidam Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Litang; Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    2015-11-01

    Traditional numerical models usually use extensive observed hydraulic-head data as calibration targets. However, this calibration process is not applicable in remote areas with limited or no monitoring data. This study presents an approach to calibrate a large-scale groundwater flow model using the monthly Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite data, which have been available globally on a spatial grid of 1° in the geographic coordinate system since 2002. A groundwater storage anomaly isolated from the terrestrial water storage (TWS) anomaly is converted into hydraulic head at the center of the grid, which is then used as observed data to calibrate a numerical model to estimate aquifer hydraulic conductivity. The aquifer system in the remote and hyperarid Qaidam Basin, China, is used as a case study to demonstrate the applicability of this approach. A groundwater model using FEFLOW is constructed for the Qaidam Basin and the GRACE-derived groundwater storage anomaly over the period 2003-2012 is included to calibrate the model, which is done using an automatic estimation method (PEST). The calibrated model is then run to output hydraulic heads at three sites where long-term hydraulic head data are available. The reasonably good fit between the calculated and observed hydraulic heads, together with the very similar groundwater storage anomalies from the numerical model and GRACE data, demonstrate that this approach is generally applicable in regions of groundwater data scarcity.

  10. Global Mass Flux Solutions from GRACE: A Comparison of Parameter Estimation Strategies - Mass Concentrations Versus Stokes Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlands, D. D.; Luthcke, S. B.; McCarthy J. J.; Klosko, S. M.; Chinn, D. S.; Lemoine, F. G.; Boy, J.-P.; Sabaka, T. J.

    2010-01-01

    The differences between mass concentration (mas con) parameters and standard Stokes coefficient parameters in the recovery of gravity infonnation from gravity recovery and climate experiment (GRACE) intersatellite K-band range rate data are investigated. First, mascons are decomposed into their Stokes coefficient representations to gauge the range of solutions available using each of the two types of parameters. Next, a direct comparison is made between two time series of unconstrained gravity solutions, one based on a set of global equal area mascon parameters (equivalent to 4deg x 4deg at the equator), and the other based on standard Stokes coefficients with each time series using the same fundamental processing of the GRACE tracking data. It is shown that in unconstrained solutions, the type of gravity parameter being estimated does not qualitatively affect the estimated gravity field. It is also shown that many of the differences in mass flux derivations from GRACE gravity solutions arise from the type of smoothing being used and that the type of smoothing that can be embedded in mas con solutions has distinct advantages over postsolution smoothing. Finally, a 1 year time series based on global 2deg equal area mascons estimated every 10 days is presented.

  11. Terrestrial Water Storage Variations from GRACE for the Validation of CMIP5 Coupled Climate Model Hind-Casts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liangjing; Dobslaw, Henryk; Dahle, Christoph; Thomas, Maik

    2013-04-01

    Land-atmosphere feedbacks are increasingly recognized as important drivers for multi-year climate variability. For example, water stored in the root-zone modifies surface albedo by determining vegetation grow, and ultimately limits the amount of water available for evapo-transpiration. Modern climate models therefore require a realistic representation of the terrestrial branch of the hydrological cycle in order to be able to reliably simulate such feedbacks. Temporal gravity field variations that are observed by the satellite mission GRACE for more than one decade now, provide quantitative information about changes in the terrestrially stored water. in this contribution, we derive basin-scale water mass anomalies from the recent release 05 of GRACE gravity field coefficients from GFZ Potsdam, augmented by degree-one coefficients obtained from a method suggested by Swenson et al. (2008). Correlated errors are removed using an anisotropic filter from Kusche (2007), and the impact of random noise is minimized using the spatiospectral localization method developed by Simons and Dahlen (2007). We use those estimates of terrestrial water storage anomalies to validate an ensemble of hind-casts performed with the MPI_ESM model of the Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology on seasonal to interannual time-scales, and discuss where GRACE-type observations might contribute to further improvements of those types of coupled Earth System Models in the future.

  12. Using nonlinear programming to correct leakage and estimate mass change from GRACE observation and its application to Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jingshi; Cheng, Haowen; Liu, Lin

    2012-11-01

    The Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission has been providing high quality observations since its launch in 2002. Over the years, fruitful achievements have been obtained and the temporal gravity field has revealed the ongoing geophysical, hydrological and other processes. These discoveries help the scientists better understand various aspects of the Earth. However, errors exist in high degree and order spherical harmonics, which need to be processed before use. Filtering is one of the most commonly used techniques to smooth errors, yet it attenuates signals and also causes leakage of gravity signal into surrounding areas. This paper reports a new method to estimate the true mass change on the grid (expressed in equivalent water height or surface density). The mass change over the grid can be integrated to estimate regional or global mass change. This method assumes the GRACE-observed apparent mass change is only caused by the mass change on land. By comparing the computed and observed apparent mass change, the true mass change can be iteratively adjusted and estimated. The problem is solved with nonlinear programming (NLP) and yields solutions which are in good agreement with other GRACE-based estimates.

  13. A Comparison of Groundwater Storage Using GRACE Data, Groundwater Levels, and a Hydrological Model in Californias Central Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuss, Amber; Brandt, William; Randall, Joshua; Floyd, Bridget; Bourai, Abdelwahab; Newcomer, Michelle; Skiles, Joseph; Schmidt, Cindy

    2011-01-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) measures changes in total water storage (TWS) remotely, and may provide additional insight to the use of well-based data in California's agriculturally productive Central Valley region. Under current California law, well owners are not required to report groundwater extraction rates, making estimation of total groundwater extraction difficult. As a result, other groundwater change detection techniques may prove useful. From October 2002 to September 2009, GRACE was used to map changes in TWS for the three hydrological regions (the Sacramento River Basin, the San Joaquin River Basin, and the Tulare Lake Basin) encompassing the Central Valley aquifer. Net groundwater storage changes were calculated from the changes in TWS for each of the three hydrological regions and by incorporating estimates for additional components of the hydrological budget including precipitation, evapotranspiration, soil moisture, snow pack, and surface water storage. The calculated changes in groundwater storage were then compared to simulated values from the California Department of Water Resource's Central Valley Groundwater- Surface Water Simulation Model (C2VSIM) and their Water Data Library (WDL) Geographic Information System (GIS) change in storage tool. The results from the three methods were compared. Downscaling GRACE data into the 21 smaller Central Valley sub-regions included in C2VSIM was also evaluated. This work has the potential to improve California's groundwater resource management and use of existing hydrological models for the Central Valley.

  14. Electrostatic Accelerometer for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On Mission (GRACE FO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, Eddy; Boulanger, Damien; Christophe, Bruno; Foulon, Bernard; Liorzou, Françoise; Lebat, Vincent

    2014-05-01

    The GRACE FO mission, led by the JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), is an Earth-orbiting gravity mission, continuation of the GRACE mission, that will produce an accurate model of the Earth's gravity field variation providing global climatic data during five year at least. The mission involves two satellites in a loosely controlled tandem formation, with a micro-wave link, and optionally a laser link, measuring the inter-satellites distance variation. Non-uniformities in the distribution of the Earth's mass cause the distance between the two satellites to vary. This variation is measured to recover gravity, after subtracting the non-gravitational contributors, as the residual drag. ONERA (the French Aerospace Lab) is developing, manufacturing and testing electrostatic accelerometers measuring this residual drag applied on the satellites. The accelerometer is composed of two main parts: the Sensor Unit (including the Sensor Unit Mechanics - SUM - and the Front-End Electronic Unit - FEEU) and the Interface Control Unit. In the Accelerometer Core, located in the Sensor Unit Mechanics, the proof mass is levitated and maintained in a center of an electrode cage by electrostatic forces. Thus, any drag acceleration applied on the satellite involves a variation on the servo-controlled electrostatic suspension of the mass. The voltage on the electrodes providing this electrostatic force is the measurement output of the accelerometer. The Preliminary Design Review was achieved successfully on November 2013. The FEEU Engineering Model is under test. Preliminary results on electronic unit will be compared with the expected performance. The integration of the SUM Engineering Model and the first ground levitation of the proof-mass will be presented. The impact of the accelerometer defaults (geometry, electronic and parasitic forces) leads to bias, misalignment and scale factor error, non-linearity and noise. Some of these accelerometer defaults are characterized by tests with

  15. Evapotranspiration Estimation over Yangtze River Basin from GRACE satellite measurement and in situ data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiong; Luo, Zhicai; Zhong, Bo; Wang, Haihong; Zhou, Zebing

    2016-04-01

    As the critical component of hydrologic cycle, evapotranspiration (ET) plays an important role in global water exchanges and energy flow across the hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere. Influenced by the Asian monsoon, the Yangtze River Basin (YRB) suffer from the several severe floods and droughts over the last decades due to the significant difference between temporal and spatial distribution terrestrial water storages. As an indispensable part, it is practically important to assessment ET in the YRB accompany with increased population and rapid economic and agriculture development. Average ET over the YRB is computed as the residual of terrestrial water budget using the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite-based measurements and the ground-based observations. The GRACE-based ET were well coincidence with the ET from MODIS, with the correlation coefficient of 0.853, and the correlation coefficient is 0.696 while comparing with the ET ground-based observation. The mean monthly average of ET from these various estimates is 56.9 mm/month over the whole YRB, and peak between June and August. Monthly variations of ET reach a maximum in Wujiang with 69.11 mm/month and a minimum in Jinshajiang with 39.01 mm/month. Based on the correlation between ET and independent estimates of near-surface temperature and soil moisture, it is showed that as the temperature increased, the ET of the seven sub-catchment were rising except for the Poyang Lake and Donting Lake. And we also can infer that the midstream of YRB is significant correlated with ESON especially in the Hanjiang basin. The Surface Humidity Index over the YRB was gradually decreased and its variations in each sub-catchment showed a significant decreasing trend in Jinshajiang and Mingjiang. This research has important potential for use in large-scale water budget assessments and intercomparison studies. Acknowledgements: This research is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of

  16. GRACE gravity field modeling with an investigation on correlation between nuisance parameters and gravity field coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qile; Guo, Jing; Hu, Zhigang; Shi, Chuang; Liu, Jingnan; Cai, Hua; Liu, Xianglin

    2011-05-01

    The GRACE (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment) monthly gravity models have been independently produced and published by several research institutions, such as Center for Space Research (CSR), GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ), Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES) and Delft Institute of Earth Observation and Space Systems (DEOS). According to their processing standards, above institutions use the traditional variational approach except that the DEOS exploits the acceleration approach. The background force models employed are rather similar. The produced gravity field models generally agree with one another in the spatial pattern. However, there are some discrepancies in the gravity signal amplitude between solutions produced by different institutions. In particular, 10%-30% signal amplitude differences in some river basins can be observed. In this paper, we implemented a variant of the traditional variational approach and computed two sets of monthly gravity field solutions using the data from January 2005 to December 2006. The input data are K-band range-rates (KBRR) and kinematic orbits of GRACE satellites. The main difference in the production of our two types of models is how to deal with nuisance parameters. This type of parameters is necessary to absorb low-frequency errors in the data, which are mainly the aliasing and instrument errors. One way is to remove the nuisance parameters before estimating the geopotential coefficients, called NPARB approach in the paper. The other way is to estimate the nuisance parameters and geopotential coefficients simultaneously, called NPESS approach. These two types of solutions mainly differ in geopotential coefficients from degree 2 to 5. This can be explained by the fact that the nuisance parameters and the gravity field coefficients are highly correlated, particularly at low degrees. We compare these solutions with the official and published ones by means of spectral analysis. It is

  17. Analysis of star-camera noise in GRACE data and its impact on monthly gravity field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inácio, Pedro; Ditmar, Pavel; Farahani, Hassan H.; Klees, Roland

    2014-05-01

    Each GRACE satellite uses two star cameras (SCs) for the precise measurement of the spacecraft's attitude in the Celestial Reference Frame. In the context of gravity field modelling, the spacecraft's attitudes are critical to compute the 3-D offset between the K-Band antenna phase centre and the satellite's centre of mass. A detailed investigation of SC noise and its propagation into monthly gravity field models has not yet been done. The presence of two (primary and secondary) SCs on each GRACE satellite creates a redundancy in the measurement of satellite attitudes. We interpret differences between primary and secondary SC data as observations of noise in the SC instruments. Two distinct noise components are revealed: a deterministic component, which is highly correlated with the satellite's true anomaly, and a stochastic component. We build noise models that accurately describe each component. This allows realistic realizations of SC noise to be generated. We propagate SC noise realizations into inter-satellite accelerations (ISA) and analyse them in the spectral domain. We show that SC noise may provide a significant contribution to the overall error budget in ISA. In the frequency range 3-10 mHz, for instance, SC errors may become comparable with the total noise. Furthermore, SC noise is propagated into monthly gravity field models and is compared with the estimated total impact of noise in GRACE data. We show that existing gaps in SC data series amplify SC noise by 20% above 10 mHz in terms of ISA and by 8% in terms of constrained (i.e., filtered) gravity field models. Furthermore, we identify periods of poor attitude control in the GRACE time-series by inspecting the inter-satellite pointing angles. We found that the attitude control was particularly poor between February 2003 and May 2003. During these months, SC noise is likely the dominant source of errors in GRACE gravity field models. Our findings are particularly relevant for future satellite gravity

  18. Use of GRACE data to monitor climate change-induced variations in water storage availability in the African continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. E.; Sultan, M.; Wahr, J. M.; Yan, E.; Milewski, A.; Mohsen, F.; Chouinard, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data provides direct measurements of temporal mass variations; the latter is largely controlled by variations in water volumes in various reservoirs such as surface water (e.g., lakes and streams), groundwater (e.g., shallow and deep aquifers) and in the soil profile. Climatic changes impact the amounts of precipitation and its partitioning into each of these reservoirs. We explored the use of GRACE data for monitoring climate change-induced variations in water availability in the African continent over a period of nine years and used the identified trends to predict water storage availability across the continent over the next decade. Monthly GRACE gravity field solutions (Center of Space Research [CSR] RL04) in form of Spherical Harmonic Coefficients (SHC's) that span the period from April 2002 through November 2010 were processed (temporal mean was removed, de-striped, smoothed [250 km; Gaussian], and converted to 0.5 x 0.5 deg. equivalent water thicknesses). Several relevant GRACE bi-products (e.g., standard deviation, annual trend) were generated over time periods of six, seven, eight, and nine years and compared (in a GIS environment) with relevant co-registered data sets and derived products (e.g., precipitation, topography, geology, VNIR Landsat, NDVI, stream network distribution, water bodies distribution, watershed boundaries, and Community Climate System Model [CCSM-3] products). Spatial correlations of the co-registered data sets revealed the following: (1) persistent and increasingly pronounced linear annual trends (+ve: increasing mass; -ve: decreasing mass) over periods of six to nine years with the most pronounced trends detected over domains of high signal to noise ratios; (2) +ve trends over the source areas for the Blue Nile basin (4.2 mm/yr) and over the source areas of the Congo basin (7 mm/yr) and over the Zambezi basin (24 mm/yr), whereas -ve trends were detected over Central Africa (-7 mm

  19. Investigating the relation between the geometric properties of river basins and the filtering parameters for regional land hydrology applications using GRACE models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piretzidis, Dimitrios; Sideris, Michael G.

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the possibilities of local hydrology signal extraction using GRACE data and conventional filtering techniques. The impact of the basin shape has also been studied in order to derive empirical rules for tuning the GRACE filter parameters. GRACE CSR Release 05 monthly solutions were used from April 2002 to August 2015 (161 monthly solutions in total). SLR data were also used to replace the GRACE C2,0 coefficient, and a de-correlation filter with optimal parameters for CSR Release 05 data was applied to attenuate the correlation errors of monthly mass differences. For basins located at higher latitudes, the effect of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) was taken into account using the ICE-6G model. The study focuses on three geometric properties, i.e., the area, the convexity and the width in the longitudinal direction, of 100 basins with global distribution. Two experiments have been performed. The first one deals with the determination of the Gaussian smoothing radius that minimizes the gaussianity of GRACE equivalent water height (EWH) over the selected basins. The EWH kurtosis was selected as a metric of gaussianity. The second experiment focuses on the derivation of the Gaussian smoothing radius that minimizes the RMS difference between GRACE data and a hydrology model. The GLDAS 1.0 Noah hydrology model was chosen, which shows good agreement with GRACE data according to previous studies. Early results show that there is an apparent relation between the geometric attributes of the basins examined and the Gaussian radius derived from the two experiments. The kurtosis analysis experiment tends to underestimate the optimal Gaussian radius, which is close to 200-300 km in many cases. Empirical rules for the selection of the Gaussian radius have been also developed for sub-regional scale basins.

  20. Analysis of GRACE Range-rate Residuals with Emphasis on Reprocessed Star-Camera Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, S.; Flury, J.; Naeimi, M.; Bandikova, T.; Guerr, T. M.; Klinger, B.

    2015-12-01

    Since March 2002 the two GRACE satellites orbit the Earth at rela-tively low altitude. Determination of the gravity field of the Earth including itstemporal variations from the satellites' orbits and the inter-satellite measure-ments is the goal of the mission. Yet, the time-variable gravity signal has notbeen fully exploited. This can be seen better in the computed post-fit range-rateresiduals. The errors reflected in the range-rate residuals are due to the differ-ent sources as systematic errors, mismodelling errors and tone errors. Here, weanalyse the effect of three different star-camera data sets on the post-fit range-rate residuals. On the one hand, we consider the available attitude data andon other hand we take the two different data sets which has been reprocessedat Institute of Geodesy, Hannover and Institute of Theoretical Geodesy andSatellite Geodesy, TU Graz Austria respectively. Then the differences in therange-rate residuals computed from different attitude dataset are analyzed inthis study. Details will be given and results will be discussed.

  1. Characterization of Terrestrial Water Dynamics in the Congo Basin Using GRACE and Satellite Radar Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Lyongki; Beighley, R. Edward; Alsdorf, Douglas; Jung, Hahn Chul; Shum, C. K.; Duan, Jianbin; Guo, Junyi; Yamazaki, Dai; Andreadis, Konstantinos

    2011-01-01

    The Congo Basin is the world's third largest in size (approximately 3.7 million km^2), and second only to the Amazon River in discharge (approximately 40,200 cms annual average). However, the hydrological dynamics of seasonally flooded wetlands and floodplains remains poorly quantified. Here, we separate the Congo wetland into four 3 degree x 3 degree regions, and use remote sensing measurements (i.e., GRACE, satellite radar altimeter, GPCP, JERS-1, SRTM, and MODIS) to estimate the amounts of water filling and draining from the Congo wetland, and to determine the source of the water. We find that the amount of water annually filling and draining the Congo wetlands is 111 km^3, which is about one-third the size of the water volumes found on the mainstem Amazon floodplain. Based on amplitude comparisons among the water volume changes and timing comparisons among their fluxes, we conclude that the local upland runoff is the main source of the Congo wetland water, not the fluvial process of river-floodplain water exchange as in the Amazon. Our hydraulic analysis using altimeter measurements also supports our conclusion by demonstrating that water surface elevations in the wetlands are consistently higher than the adjacent river water levels. Our research also highlights differences in the hydrology and hydrodynamics between the Congo wetland and the mainstem Amazon floodplain.

  2. Characterization of Terrestrial Water Dynamics in the Congo Basin Using GRACE and Satellite Radar Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Hyongki; Beighley, R. Edward; Alsdorf, Douglas; Jung, Hahn Chul; Shum, C. K.; Duan, Jianbin; Guo, Junyi; Yamazaki, Dai; Andreadis, Konstantinos

    2011-01-01

    The Congo Basin is the world's third largest in size (approx.3.7 million sq km), and second only to the Amazon River in discharge (approx.40,200 cu m/s annual average). However, the hydrological dynamics of seasonally flooded wetlands and floodplains remains poorly quantified. Here, we separate the Congo wetland into four 3deg 3deg regions, and use remote sensing measurements (i.e., GRACE, satellite radar altimeter, GPCP, JERS-1, SRTM, and MODIS) to estimate the amounts of water filling and draining from the Congo wetland, and to determine the source of the water. We find that the amount of water annually filling and draining the Congo wetlands is 111 cu km, which is about one-third the size of the water volumes found on the mainstem Amazon floodplain. Based on amplitude comparisons among the water volume changes and timing comparisons among their fluxes, we conclude that the local upland runoff is the main source of the Congo wetland water, not the fluvial process of river-floodplain water exchange as in the Amazon. Our hydraulic analysis using altimeter measurements also supports our conclusion by demonstrating that water surface elevations in the wetlands are consistently higher than the adjacent river water levels. Our research highlights differences in the hydrology and hydrodynamics between the Congo wetland and the mainstem Amazon floodplain.

  3. Establishing a Global Radiation Oncology Collaboration in Education (GRaCE): Objectives and priorities.

    PubMed

    Turner, Sandra; Eriksen, Jesper G; Trotter, Theresa; Verfaillie, Christine; Benstead, Kim; Giuliani, Meredith; Poortmans, Philip; Holt, Tanya; Brennan, Sean; Pötter, Richard

    2015-10-01

    Representatives from countries and regions world-wide who have implemented modern competency-based radiation- or clinical oncology curricula for training medical specialists, met to determine the feasibility and value of an ongoing international collaboration. In this forum, educational leaders from the ESTRO School, encompassing many European countries adopting the ESTRO Core Curriculum, and clinician educators from Canada, Denmark, the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand considered the training and educational arrangements within their jurisdictions, identifying similarities and challenges between programs. Common areas of educational interest and need were defined, which included development of new competency statements and assessment tools, and the application of the latter. The group concluded that such an international cooperation, which might expand to include others with similar goals, would provide a valuable vehicle to ensure training program currency, through sharing of resources and expertise, and enhance high quality radiation oncology education. Potential projects for the Global Radiation Oncology Collaboration in Education (GRaCE) were agreed upon, as was a strategy designed to maintain momentum. This paper describes the rationale for establishing this collaboration, presents a comparative view of training in the jurisdictions represented, and reports early goals and priorities.

  4. Investigation of - and Post-Seismic Signals in GRACE Satellite Gravity Data Using Mcmc Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, V. O.; Hayn, M.; Pollitz, F. F.; Panet, I.; Holschneider, M.; Diament, M.

    2013-12-01

    Earthquakes cause mass shifts and stress-dependent density changes. The corresponding gravity field variations can be measured by the GRACE satellites what was demonstrated for recent Andaman-Sumatra (2004), Maule, Chili (2010) and Tohoku-Oki (2011) earthquakes. In contrast to other data, satellite gravity regularly covers continental and oceanic areas, providing important information about the seismic cycle, especially in subduction zones. We make use of the characteristic temporal behavior and spatial scale of the earthquake signals, in order to separate them from other contributions to the gravity field. This is realized by wavelet transform and application of a time evolution model. The later consists of a step function followed by an exponential decay, representing co- and post-seismic variations. As the problem is nonlinear, parameters were fitted by determining their posterior distribution by means of a Markov-Chain Metropolis-Hasting sampling. As a result, we clearly separate the co- and post-seismic gravity variations for all three abovementioned earthquakes. We also apply the method to separate post-seismic signals from the Andaman-Sumatra and Nias-Sumatra events. The later occurred 3 months later to the south of the main megathrust event. These results are compared with other geophysical data and models. This allows to discriminate between candidate models for the co-seismic gravity variations using GPS data and seismology, and to better understand the physical processes involved in the post-seismic deformation.

  5. Identification of prominent spatio-temporal signals in GRACE derived terrestrial water storage for India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, C.; Nagesh Kumar, D.

    2014-11-01

    Fresh water is a necessity of the human civilization. But with the increasing global population, the quantity and quality of available fresh water is getting compromised. To mitigate this subliminal problem, it is essential to enhance our level of understanding about the dynamics of global and regional fresh water resources which include surface and ground water reserves. With development in remote sensing technology, traditional and much localized in-situ observations are augmented with satellite data to get a holistic picture of the terrestrial water resources. For this reason, Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission was jointly implemented by NASA and German Aerospace Research Agency - DLR to map the variation of gravitational potential, which after removing atmospheric and oceanic effects is majorly caused by changes in Terrestrial Water Storage (TWS). India also faces the challenge of rejuvenating the fast deteriorating and exhausting water resources due to the rapid urbanization. In the present study we try to identify physically meaningful major spatial and temporal patterns or signals of changes in TWS for India. TWS data set over India for a period of 90 months, from June 2003 to December 2010 is use to isolate spatial and temporal signals using Principal Component Analysis (PCA), an extensively used method in meteorological studies. To achieve better disintegration of the data into more physically meaningful components we use a blind signal separation technique, Independent Component Analysis (ICA).

  6. Variations in water storage in China over recent decades from GRACE observations and GLDAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, X.; Wu, J. J.; Wang, Q.; Zhou, H.

    2016-02-01

    We applied Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Tellus products in combination with Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) simulations and data from reports, to analyze variations in terrestrial water storage (TWS) in China as a whole and eight of its basins from 2003 to 2013. Amplitudes of TWS were well restored after scaling, and showed good correlations with those estimated from models at the basin scale. TWS generally followed variations in annual precipitation; it decreased linearly in the Huai River basin (-0.56 cm yr-1) and increased with fluctuations in the Changjiang River basin (0.35 cm yr-1), Zhujiang basin (0.55 cm yr-1) and southeast rivers basin (0.70 cm yr-1). In the Hai River basin and Yellow River basin, groundwater exploitation may have altered TWS's response to climate, and TWS kept decreasing until 2012. Changes in soil moisture storage contributed over 50 % of variance in TWS in most basins. Precipitation and runoff showed a large impact on TWS, with more explained TWS in the south than in the north. North China and southwest rivers region exhibited long-term TWS depletions. TWS has increased significantly over recent decades in the middle and lower reaches of Changjiang River, southeastern coastal areas, as well as the Hoh Xil, and the headstream region of the Yellow River in the Tibetan Plateau. The findings in this study could be helpful to climate change impact research and disaster mitigation planning.

  7. Impact of changes in GRACE derived terrestrial water storage on vegetation growth in Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A, G.; Velicogna, I.; Kimball, J. S.; Kim, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We use GRACE-derived terrestrial water storage (TWS) and ERA-interim air temperature, as proxy for available water and temperature constraints on vegetation productivity, inferred from MODIS satellite normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), in Northern Eurasia during 2002-2011. We investigate how changes in TWS affect the correlation between NDVI and temperature during the non-frozen season. We find that vegetation growth exhibits significant spatial and temporal variability associated with varying trend in TWS and temperature. The largest NDVI gains occur over boreal forests associated with warming and wetting. The largest NDVI losses occur over grasslands in the Southwestern Ob associated with regional drying and cooling, with dominant constraint from TWS. Over grasslands and temperate forests in the Southeast Ob and South Yenisei, wetting and cooling lead to a dominant temperature constraint due to the relaxation of TWS constraints. Overall, we find significant monthly correlation of NDVI with TWS and temperature over 35% and 50% of the domain, respectively. These results indicate that water availability (TWS) plays a major role in modulating Eurasia vegetation response to temperature changes.

  8. Using tesseroid mascons to improve the estimations of water-mass variations with GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fereria, Vagner; Heck, Bernhard; Seitz, Kurt; Grombein, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Observing and monitoring the different components of the hydrological cycle and their dynamics are essential steps to understand and predict natural disasters like floods and droughts, all of which periodically occur worldwide. Nevertheless, in the absence of ground-based measurements as, for example, in Africa and South America, space-borne geodetic sensors offers an opportunity for monitoring the temporal variations of the terrestrial water storage (TWS). However, the TWS fields - inverted from the temporal variations of the gravity field - are generally computed based on a global solution, which has not exploited the fundamental resolution of the satellite gravimetry observations. Thus, in order to overcome the deficiencies of global solutions based on spherical harmonic coefficients, results of TWS can be inverted from a regional recovery approach considering the in-situ measurements of Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission. To this end, an approach based on the tesseroids is proposed to compute the TWS, expressed as equivalent water heights, from the gravitational potential at the altitude of the spacecraft.

  9. Life, performance and safety of Grace rechargeable lithium-titanium disulfide cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerbrod, D.; Giovannoni, R. T.; Grossman, K. R.

    The development of rechargeable Li-TiS2 cells is discussed. This proprietary process produces thin, flexible TiS2 cathodes with a life in excess of 500 cycles. TiS2 utilization of 93 percent is typically achieved at a C/5 discharge rate. A life of 200 cycles has been achieved for AA-size cells at a C/5 discharge rate and 60 cycles at the C rate. The practical energy density is 115 Wh/kg. Safety testing is underway. Vibration and high altitude did not cause venting. Crushing did not result in ignition or temperature rise. Forced overcharge and overdischarge did not result in skin temperatures above 40 C. The peak skin temperature during the short-circuit test was 120 C. Safety analyses point to the need for careful control of electrolyte volume and the benefits of a fusible separator. Grace is developing such a separator, which would shut down the electrochemical cell reaction at a temperature of 130 C.

  10. Establishing a Global Radiation Oncology Collaboration in Education (GRaCE): Objectives and priorities.

    PubMed

    Turner, Sandra; Eriksen, Jesper G; Trotter, Theresa; Verfaillie, Christine; Benstead, Kim; Giuliani, Meredith; Poortmans, Philip; Holt, Tanya; Brennan, Sean; Pötter, Richard

    2015-10-01

    Representatives from countries and regions world-wide who have implemented modern competency-based radiation- or clinical oncology curricula for training medical specialists, met to determine the feasibility and value of an ongoing international collaboration. In this forum, educational leaders from the ESTRO School, encompassing many European countries adopting the ESTRO Core Curriculum, and clinician educators from Canada, Denmark, the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand considered the training and educational arrangements within their jurisdictions, identifying similarities and challenges between programs. Common areas of educational interest and need were defined, which included development of new competency statements and assessment tools, and the application of the latter. The group concluded that such an international cooperation, which might expand to include others with similar goals, would provide a valuable vehicle to ensure training program currency, through sharing of resources and expertise, and enhance high quality radiation oncology education. Potential projects for the Global Radiation Oncology Collaboration in Education (GRaCE) were agreed upon, as was a strategy designed to maintain momentum. This paper describes the rationale for establishing this collaboration, presents a comparative view of training in the jurisdictions represented, and reports early goals and priorities. PMID:26381531

  11. Arctic sea surface height variability and change from satellite radar altimetry and GRACE, 2003-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armitage, T.; Bacon, S.; Ridout, A.; Thomas, S. F.; Aksenov, Y.; Wingham, D.

    2015-12-01

    Sea surface height (SSH) is poorly observed in the Arctic due to limitations of conventional observation techniques. We present the first basin-wide, monthly estimates of Arctic Ocean SSH from satellite radar altimetry and combine this with GRACE ocean mass to estimate steric height. The large seasonal cycle of Arctic SSH (amplitude ~4cm) is dominated by seasonal freshwater fluxes and peaks in October-November. Overall, the annual mean steric height increases by 2.3±1.1cm between 2003-2012 before falling to ca. 2003 levels between 2012-2014. The total secular change in SSH between 2003-2014 is then dominated by a 1.8±0.6cm net increase in ocean mass. The well-documented doming of SSH in the Beaufort Sea is revealed by Empirical Orthogonal Function analysis to be concurrent with SSH reductions in the Siberian Arctic. Ocean storage flux estimates from altimetry agree well with high-resolution modelled results, demonstrating the potential for altimetry to elucidate the Arctic hydrological cycle. We also examine changes in Arctic Ocean geostrophic circulation and compare this with sea ice drift and atmospheric circulation. There is an increase in ocean geostrophic circulation around the Beaufort Gyre in late 2007, a year that saw large reductions in multiyear sea ice coverage in the Canadian Arctic as well as strong wintertime atmopheric forcing.

  12. Analysis of the characteristics of GRACE dual one-way ranging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Ung Dai

    The motivation for this research was an improvement of the quality of the Earth's gravity solutions from the GRACE mission data through an instrument-level study. The objective was a better understanding of the characteristics and sources of the high-frequency noise in the range of (0.02 ˜ 0.1 Hz) in the dual one-way ranging (DOWR) and its effect on the gravity solution. For this purpose, the mathematical model of the DOWR observation was derived and the Allan variance was computed to establish an upper bound on the level of frequency instability of the ultra-stable oscillators (USO) to determine their contribution to the high-frequency noise. Because they are dominated by the high-frequency noise, the postfit residuals of the time derivative of the DOWR ranges were also examined to evaluate the contributions of various other factors such as system noise from the microwave signal receiver, external influences, and internal influences. The results indicate that the system noise is the dominant source of the excessive high-frequency noise. As one method of mitigation, a tighter bandwidth filter was applied to the DOWR processing, resulting in modest improvements in gravity solutions.

  13. GRACE, GLDAS and measured groundwater data products show water storage loss in Western Jilin, China.

    PubMed

    Moiwo, Juana Paul; Lu, Wenxi; Tao, Fulu

    2012-01-01

    Water storage depletion is a worsening hydrological problem that limits agricultural production in especially arid/semi-arid regions across the globe. Quantifying water storage dynamics is critical for developing water resources management strategies that are sustainable and protective of the environment. This study uses GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment), GLDAS (Global Land Data Assimilation System) and measured groundwater data products to quantify water storage in Western Jilin (a proxy for semi-arid wetland ecosystems) for the period from January 2002 to December 2009. Uncertainty/bias analysis shows that the data products have an average error <10% (p < 0.05). Comparisons of the storage variables show favorable agreements at various temporal cycles, with R(2) = 0.92 and RMSE = 7.43 mm at the average seasonal cycle. There is a narrowing soil moisture storage change, a widening groundwater storage loss, and an overall storage depletion of 0.85 mm/month in the region. There is possible soil-pore collapse, and land subsidence due to storage depletion in the study area. Invariably, storage depletion in this semi-arid region could have negative implications for agriculture, valuable/fragile wetland ecosystems and people's livelihoods. For sustainable restoration and preservation of wetland ecosystems in the region, it is critical to develop water resources management strategies that limit groundwater extraction rate to that of recharge rate.

  14. A new computer-controlled multi-channel high voltage supply system for GRACE instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manna, A.; Chakrabarti, S.; Mukhopadhayay, P. K.

    2002-03-01

    The high energy gamma ray telescopes being set up by the Bhabha Atomic Research Institute Centre (BARC) at Mt. Abu, Rajasthan, as part of the GRACE project, require a very large number (~ 1000) of programmable high voltage power supplies for biasing photomultiplier tubes for the detection and characterization of the atmospheric Cerenkov events. These HV supplies need to be very compact, lightweight and rugged, as they will be mounted on the base of the moving telescope. This paper describes the design aspects of the overall HV system and the performance of the prototype HV modules developed for such applications. In the new design, the inverter switching frequency of the HV supplies has been increased threefold as compared to the earlier design, and surface mounted devices have been used to achieve overall size and weight reductions. The system consists of multiple HV modules, each containing 16 independently programmable HV supplies. Each HV module has an on-board micro-controller for doing control and supervisory functions and is interconnected via a serial 12C bus. The HV supplies have built in over voltage/current, thermal overload protections with output voltage readback and adjustable slew rate control facilities.

  15. Tidal signature of the mid-latitude ionospheric nighttime anomaly using CHAMP and GRACE observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Chao; Lühr, Hermann

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a study on the tidal signatures of the mid-latitude summer nighttime anomaly (MSNA), also known as Weddell Sea anomaly in the southern hemisphere. The electron density observations by CHAMP and GRACE show clear MSNA structures in both hemispheres during local summer nighttime. A linear least squares algorithm for extracting the solar tidal components is utilized to examine the major tidal components affecting the variation of the electron density. In the southern hemisphere, we find a prominent eastward propagating wave-1 of electron density in the local time frame, which could be explained by the symmetric diurnal wave (D0) and a stationary planetary wave (SPW1) component. Conversely, in the northern hemisphere during local summer, a prominent eastward wave-2 can be found, which could be attributed to the diurnal eastward propagating wave (DE1) and a stationary planetary wave (SPW2) component. We are going to offer some explanations that may be responsible for the different appearance of the wave structures in the two hemispheres.

  16. Application of GRACE to the assessment of model-based estimates of monthly Greenland Ice Sheet mass balance (2003-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, Nicole-Jeanne; Wiese, David N.; Larour, Eric Y.; Watkins, Michael M.; Box, Jason E.; Fettweis, Xavier; van den Broeke, Michiel R.

    2016-09-01

    Quantifying the Greenland Ice Sheet's future contribution to sea level rise is a challenging task that requires accurate estimates of ice sheet sensitivity to climate change. Forward ice sheet models are promising tools for estimating future ice sheet behavior, yet confidence is low because evaluation of historical simulations is challenging due to the scarcity of continental-wide data for model evaluation. Recent advancements in processing of Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data using Bayesian-constrained mass concentration ("mascon") functions have led to improvements in spatial resolution and noise reduction of monthly global gravity fields. Specifically, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's JPL RL05M GRACE mascon solution (GRACE_JPL) offers an opportunity for the assessment of model-based estimates of ice sheet mass balance (MB) at ˜ 300 km spatial scales. Here, we quantify the differences between Greenland monthly observed MB (GRACE_JPL) and that estimated by state-of-the-art, high-resolution models, with respect to GRACE_JPL and model uncertainties. To simulate the years 2003-2012, we force the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM) with anomalies from three different surface mass balance (SMB) products derived from regional climate models. Resulting MB is compared against GRACE_JPL within individual mascons. Overall, we find agreement in the northeast and southwest where MB is assumed to be primarily controlled by SMB. In the interior, we find a discrepancy in trend, which we presume to be related to millennial-scale dynamic thickening not considered by our model. In the northwest, seasonal amplitudes agree, but modeled mass trends are muted relative to GRACE_JPL. Here, discrepancies are likely controlled by temporal variability in ice discharge and other related processes not represented by our model simulations, i.e., hydrological processes and ice-ocean interaction. In the southeast, GRACE_JPL exhibits larger seasonal amplitude than predicted by

  17. Monitoring and comparison of terrestrial water storage changes in the northern high plains using GRACE and in-situ based integrated hydrologic model estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyoum, Wondwosen M.; Milewski, Adam M.

    2016-08-01

    Enhanced measurement of the variation of the terrestrial water cycle are imperative to better understand the dynamics, water availability, and evaluate impacts of global changes on the water cycle. This study quantified storage in the various terrestrial water compartments using an integrated hydrologic model (IHM) - MIKE SHE that simulates the entire terrestrial water cycle and the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite data in the intensively irrigated Northern High Plains (area ∼ 250,000 km2). The IHM, mainly constructed using in-situ data, was evaluated using field measured groundwater level, stream flow, and soil moisture data. The model was first used to calculate the incremental water storage for each water balance component (e.g. storage in the saturated zone) and then the GRACE equivalent terrestrial water storage anomaly. In the study area, storage in the saturated zone is the major component of the terrestrial water storage (TWS) anomaly. The GRACE-derived TWS anomaly and the anomaly simulated from the model are generally in agreement on a monthly scale with few discrepancies. Generally, both GRACE and the IHM results displayed a statistically significant increasing trend in the total TWS and groundwater storage anomalies from 2002-2013 over the Northern High Plains. This study demonstrates the applicability of an integrated hydrologic model to monitor TWS variations in a large area, and GRACE data and IHMs are capable of reproducing observed trends in TWS.

  18. Increased Water Storage in the Qaidam Basin, the North Tibet Plateau from GRACE Gravity Data.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy; Zhang, Xiaotao; Liu, Yi; Kuang, Xingxing

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater plays a key role in maintaining the ecology and environment in the hyperarid Qaidam Basin (QB). Indirect evidence and data from sparse observation wells suggest that groundwater in the QB is increasing but there has been no regional assessment of the groundwater conditions in the entire basin because of its remoteness and the severity of the arid environment. Here we report changes in the spatial and temporal distribution of terrestrial water storage (TWS) in the northern Tibetan Plateau (NTP) using Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data. Our study confirms long-term (2003-2012) TWS increases in the NTP. Between 2003 and 2012 the TWS increased by 88.4 and 20.6 km3 in the NTP and the QB, respectively, which is 225% and 52% of the capacity of the Three Gorges Reservoir, respectively. Soil and water changes from the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) were also used to identify groundwater storage in the TWS and to demonstrate a long-term increase in groundwater storage in the QB. We demonstrate that increases in groundwater, not lake water, are dominant in the QB, as observed by groundwater levels. Our study suggests that the TWS increase was likely caused by a regional increase in precipitation and a decrease in evaporation. Degradation of the permafrost increases the thickness of the active layers providing increased storage for infiltrated precipitation and snow and ice melt water, which may also contribute to the increased TWS. The huge increase of water storage in the NTP will have profound effects, not only on local ecology and environment, but also on global water storage and sea level changes.

  19. Increased Water Storage in the Qaidam Basin, the North Tibet Plateau from GRACE Gravity Data.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy; Zhang, Xiaotao; Liu, Yi; Kuang, Xingxing

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater plays a key role in maintaining the ecology and environment in the hyperarid Qaidam Basin (QB). Indirect evidence and data from sparse observation wells suggest that groundwater in the QB is increasing but there has been no regional assessment of the groundwater conditions in the entire basin because of its remoteness and the severity of the arid environment. Here we report changes in the spatial and temporal distribution of terrestrial water storage (TWS) in the northern Tibetan Plateau (NTP) using Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data. Our study confirms long-term (2003-2012) TWS increases in the NTP. Between 2003 and 2012 the TWS increased by 88.4 and 20.6 km3 in the NTP and the QB, respectively, which is 225% and 52% of the capacity of the Three Gorges Reservoir, respectively. Soil and water changes from the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) were also used to identify groundwater storage in the TWS and to demonstrate a long-term increase in groundwater storage in the QB. We demonstrate that increases in groundwater, not lake water, are dominant in the QB, as observed by groundwater levels. Our study suggests that the TWS increase was likely caused by a regional increase in precipitation and a decrease in evaporation. Degradation of the permafrost increases the thickness of the active layers providing increased storage for infiltrated precipitation and snow and ice melt water, which may also contribute to the increased TWS. The huge increase of water storage in the NTP will have profound effects, not only on local ecology and environment, but also on global water storage and sea level changes. PMID:26506230

  20. Predicting Agricultural Drought using NOAH Land Surface Model, MODIS Evapotranspiration and GRACE Terrestrial Water Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    wu, J.; Zhang, X.

    2013-12-01

    Drought is a major natural hazard in the world which costs 6-8 billion per year in the United States. Drought monitoring and prediction are difficult because it usually develops slowly and it is hard to be recognized until it becomes severe. The severity of agricultural drought was estimated by using Soil Moisture Deficit Index (SMDI) based on soil moisture simulated by Noah land surface model. Based on general water balance and delayed response of soil moisture to the forcing of climate variables, a Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) model for agricultural drought prediction was developed, the inputs of which included data at the previous one and two months of precipitation from Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM), evapotranspiration from MODIS MOD 16 product and terrestrial water storage (TWS) derived from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE). The stability of the MLR model is tested using different training datasets from 2003 to 2009 with time spans of one year to six years and the results indicated that the model is stable, with very limited changes in estimated parameters between different datasets. A sensitivity analysis shows that evapotranspiration is the most significant variable affecting soil moisture change compared to precipitation and TWS. The predicted SMDI was compared with U.S. drought monitor products to evaluate its performance for the period of 2010-2012 when a severe drought occurred in the U.S. (Fig.1). The predicted SMDI successfully forecasted the severe drought in the southern U.S. in early 2012 and its expansion in the following summer. The MLR model has a high predictive skill with short-term forecast (1-2 months), while less accuracy is observed for the long-term forecast (3-6 months) (Fig.2).

  1. Arctic sea surface height variability and change from satellite radar altimetry and GRACE, 2003-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armitage, Thomas W. K.; Bacon, Sheldon; Ridout, Andy L.; Thomas, Sam F.; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Wingham, Duncan J.

    2016-06-01

    Arctic sea surface height (SSH) is poorly observed by radar altimeters due to the poor coverage of the polar oceans provided by conventional altimeter missions and because large areas are perpetually covered by sea ice, requiring specialized data processing. We utilize SSH estimates from both the ice-covered and ice-free ocean to present monthly estimates of Arctic Dynamic Ocean Topography (DOT) from radar altimetry south of 81.5°N and combine this with GRACE ocean mass to estimate steric height. Our SSH and steric height estimates show good agreement with tide gauge records and geopotential height derived from Ice-Tethered Profilers. The large seasonal cycle of Arctic SSH (amplitude ˜5 cm) is dominated by seasonal steric height variation associated with seasonal freshwater fluxes, and peaks in October-November. Overall, the annual mean steric height increased by 2.2 ± 1.4 cm between 2003 and 2012 before falling to circa 2003 levels between 2012 and 2014 due to large reductions on the Siberian shelf seas. The total secular change in SSH between 2003 and 2014 is then dominated by a 2.1 ± 0.7 cm increase in ocean mass. We estimate that by 2010, the Beaufort Gyre had accumulated 4600 km3 of freshwater relative to the 2003-2006 mean. Doming of Arctic DOT in the Beaufort Sea is revealed by Empirical Orthogonal Function analysis to be concurrent with regional reductions in the Siberian Arctic. We estimate that the Siberian shelf seas lost ˜180 km3 of freshwater between 2003 and 2014, associated with an increase in annual mean salinity of 0.15 psu yr-1. Finally, ocean storage flux estimates from altimetry agree well with high-resolution model results, demonstrating the potential for altimetry to elucidate the Arctic hydrological cycle.

  2. Towards a new ITSG-Grace release: improvements within the processing chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, Beate; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten; Behzadpour, Saniya; Ellmer, Matthias; Kvas, Andreas; Zehentner, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    Compared to the official ITSG-Grace2014 release, multiple improvements within the processing chain have been implemented: updated background models, instrument data screening, improved numerical orbit integration, and covariance function estimation. An instrument data screening step is now included within the data pre-processing. Based on the Sequence of Events (SoE) file time periods containing calibration maneuvers are excluded from processing. Additionally, time periods affected by yaw-turns (which are necessary for battery maintenance) are excluded based on the analysis of the corresponding inter-satellite pointing angles. The Level-1B accelerometer data is compared to modeled non-conservative forces (atmospheric drag, solar radiation pressure and albedo) in order to enable an a-priori accelerometer calibration and to detect large-scale outliers. Furthermore, the numerical orbit integration was improved by introducing an elliptical reference orbit replacing the linear motions used before. During the gravity field recovery process the KBR range-rate data is decorrelated by an empirical covariance function, the length of which was increased to three hours. A robust covariance estimator is now used to guarantee that the estimated covariance function is resistant to outliers. The constraints used for the combined estimation of daily gravity field variations are now based on improved error estimates for the dealiasing models. First investigations indicate a noise reduction within the monthly solutions of about 20 percent, especially the north/south striping can be reduced visibly. The reprocessed release is presented and selected parts of the processing chain, as well as their effect on the estimated gravity field solutions, are discussed.

  3. The Relationship between GRACE Score and Epicardial Fat Thickness in non-STEMI Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Ilker; Zungur, Mustafa; Aykan, Ahmet Cagri; Gokdeniz, Teyyar; Kalaycioğlu, Ezgi; Turan, Turhan; Hatem, Engin; Boyaci, Faruk

    2016-01-01

    Background GRACE risk score (GS) is a scoring system which has a prognostic significance in patients with non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (non-STEMI). Objective The present study aimed to determine whether end-systolic or end-diastolic epicardial fat thickness (EFT) is more closely associated with high-risk non-STEMI patients according to the GS. Methods We evaluated 207 patients who had non-STEMI beginning from October 2012 to February 2013, and 162 of them were included in the study (115 males, mean age: 66.6 ± 12.8 years). End-systolic and end-diastolic EFTs were measured with echocardiographic methods. Patients with high in-hospital GS were categorized as the H-GS group (in hospital GS > 140), while other patients were categorized as the low-to-moderate risk group (LM-GS). Results Systolic and diastolic blood pressures of H-GS patients were lower than those of LM-GS patients, and the average heart rate was higher in this group. End-systolic EFT and end-diastolic EFT were significantly higher in the H-GS group. The echocardiographic assessment of right and left ventricles showed significantly decreased ejection fraction in both ventricles in the H-GS group. The highest correlation was found between GS and end-diastolic EFT (r = 0.438). Conclusion End-systolic and end-diastolic EFTs were found to be increased in the H-GS group. However, end-diastolic EFT and GS had better correlation than end-systolic EFT and GS. PMID:26885974

  4. Thermospheric and geomagnetic responses to interplanetary coronal mass ejections observed by ACE and GRACE: Statistical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, S.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A.; Baur, O.; Lammer, H.

    2015-10-01

    For the period July 2003 to August 2010, the interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) catalogue maintained by Richardson and Cane lists 106 Earth-directed events, which have been measured in situ by plasma and field instruments on board the ACE satellite. We present a statistical investigation of the Earth's thermospheric neutral density response by means of accelerometer measurements collected by the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites, which are available for 104 ICMEs in the data set, and its relation to various geomagnetic indices and characteristic ICME parameters such as the impact speed (vmax), southward magnetic field strength (Bz). The majority of ICMEs causes a distinct density enhancement in the thermosphere, with up to a factor of 8 compared to the preevent level. We find high correlations between ICME Bz and thermospheric density enhancements (≈0.9), while the correlation with the ICME impact speed is somewhat smaller (≈0.7). The geomagnetic indices revealing the highest correlations are Dst and SYM-H(≈0.9); the lowest correlations are obtained for Kp and AE (≈0.7), which show a nonlinear relation with the thermospheric density enhancements. Separating the response for the shock-sheath region and the magnetic structure of the ICME, we find that the Dst and SYM-H reveal a tighter relation to the Bz minimum in the magnetic structure of the ICME, whereas the polar cap indices show higher correlations with the Bz minimum in the shock-sheath region. Since the strength of the Bz component—either in the sheath or in the magnetic structure of the ICME—is highly correlated (≈0.9) with the neutral density enhancement, we discuss the possibility of satellite orbital decay estimates based on magnetic field measurements at L1, i.e., before the ICME hits the Earth magnetosphere. These results are expected to further stimulate progress in space weather understanding and applications regarding satellite operations.

  5. Increased Water Storage in the Qaidam Basin, the North Tibet Plateau from GRACE Gravity Data

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy; Zhang, Xiaotao; Liu, Yi; Kuang, Xingxing

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater plays a key role in maintaining the ecology and environment in the hyperarid Qaidam Basin (QB). Indirect evidence and data from sparse observation wells suggest that groundwater in the QB is increasing but there has been no regional assessment of the groundwater conditions in the entire basin because of its remoteness and the severity of the arid environment. Here we report changes in the spatial and temporal distribution of terrestrial water storage (TWS) in the northern Tibetan Plateau (NTP) using Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data. Our study confirms long-term (2003–2012) TWS increases in the NTP. Between 2003 and 2012 the TWS increased by 88.4 and 20.6 km3 in the NTP and the QB, respectively, which is 225% and 52% of the capacity of the Three Gorges Reservoir, respectively. Soil and water changes from the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) were also used to identify groundwater storage in the TWS and to demonstrate a long-term increase in groundwater storage in the QB. We demonstrate that increases in groundwater, not lake water, are dominant in the QB, as observed by groundwater levels. Our study suggests that the TWS increase was likely caused by a regional increase in precipitation and a decrease in evaporation. Degradation of the permafrost increases the thickness of the active layers providing increased storage for infiltrated precipitation and snow and ice melt water, which may also contribute to the increased TWS. The huge increase of water storage in the NTP will have profound effects, not only on local ecology and environment, but also on global water storage and sea level changes. PMID:26506230

  6. The Midlatitude Summer Night Anomaly as observed by CHAMP and GRACE: Interpreted as tidal features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Chao; Lühr, Hermann

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a description of the Midlatitude Summer Night Anomaly (MSNA) in terms of solar tidal signatures, based on in situ observations from CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload) and GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) during the solar minimum years 2008 and 2009. Our analysis is focusing on 40° to 60° magnetic latitude ranges in both hemispheres, where the reversed diurnal variations of the electron density are strongest. The results revealed that in the Southern Hemisphere the longitudinally symmetric tide D0 is particularly strong during December solstice. The well-known Weddell Sea Anomaly is caused by a simultaneous constructive interference of three components D0, DW2, and SPW1. During June solstice the eastward propagating tide DE1 is the strongest in the Northern Hemisphere, which causes a wave-2 longitudinal pattern. The two crests of the wave-2 pattern at nighttime correspond well with the MSNA feature in the Northern Hemisphere. The MSNA feature over the USA continent is particularly strong, which can be explained by the combined contributions of the components DE1, D0, and DW2. The diurnally varying difference in electron density between the USA East and West Coast can also be explained by the phase propagation of the DE1. A similar effect has also been observed in the Asian region. The peak electron densities of the tidal component D0 appear around 0700 LT and 2000 LT in the Southern and Northern Hemispheres, respectively. The time shift suggests that the two hemispheres move in antiphase up and down. The planetary wave SPW1 exhibits an electron density crest near longitude sectors where the dip equator reaches far into the summer hemisphere.

  7. Mass Loss of Glaciers and Ice Caps From GRACE During 2002-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciraci, E.; Velicogna, I.; Wahr, J. M.; Swenson, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    We use time series of time-variable gravity from the NASA/DLR GRACE mission using a mascon approach to estimate the ice mass balance of the Earth's Mountain Glaciers and Ice Caps (GICs), excluding the Antarctic and the Greenland peripheral glaciers, between January 2003 and October 2014. We estimate a total ice mass loss equal to -217 ± 33 Gt/yr, equivalent to a sea level rise of 0.6±0.09 mm/yr. The global signal is driven by a few regions, contributing to almost of 75% of the total ice mass loss. Among these areas, the main contributor is the Canadian Arctic Archipelago with a total mass loss of -75 ± 9 Gt/yr, followed by Alaska (-51 ± 10 Gt/yr), Patagonia (-26 ± 10 Gt/yr) and the High Mountains of Asia (-25 ± 13 Gt/yr). The mass loss for most of the arctic regions is not constant, but accelerates with time. The Canadian Archipelago, in particular, undergoes a strong acceleration in mass waste (-7±1 Gt/yr2). The signal acceleration is mainly driven by the northern located Queen Elisabeth Islands (-4.5 ± 0.6 Gt/yr2). A similar behavior is observed for Svalbard and the Russian Arctic. In this second case, however, we observe an enhanced mass loss starting from the second decade of the 21st century after a period of nearly stable mass balance. The observed acceleration helps reconcile regional ice mass estimates obtained for different time periods.

  8. Deep Ocean Warming Assessed from Altimeters, GRACE, 3 In-situ Measurements, and a Non-Boussinesq OGCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Y. Tony; Colberg, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Observational surveys have shown significant oceanic bottom water warming, but they are too spatially and temporally sporadic to quantify the deep ocean contribution to the present-day sea level rise (SLR). In this study, altimetry sea surface height (SSH), Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) ocean mass, and in situ upper ocean (0-700 m) steric height have been assessed for their seasonal variability and trend maps. It is shown that neither the global mean nor the regional trends of altimetry SLR can be explained by the upper ocean steric height plus the GRACE ocean mass. A non-Boussinesq ocean general circulation model (OGCM), allowing the sea level to rise as a direct response to the heat added into the ocean, is then used to diagnose the deep ocean steric height. Constrained by sea surface temperature data and the top of atmosphere (TOA) radiation measurements, the model reproduces the observed upper ocean heat content well. Combining the modeled deep ocean steric height with observational upper ocean data gives the full depth steric height. Adding a GRACE-estimated mass trend, the data-model combination explains not only the altimetry global mean SLR but also its regional trends fairly well. The deep ocean warming is mostly prevalent in the Atlantic and Indian oceans, and along the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, suggesting a strong relation to the oceanic circulation and dynamics. Its comparison with available bottom water measurements shows reasonably good agreement, indicating that deep ocean warming below 700 m might have contributed 1.1 mm/yr to the global mean SLR or one-third of the altimeter-observed rate of 3.11 +/- 0.6 mm/yr over 1993-2008.

  9. Changes in gravitational parameters inferred from time variable GRACE data-A case study for October 2005 Kashmir earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Matloob; Eshagh, Mehdi; Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Sadiq, M.; Fatolazadeh, Farzam

    2016-09-01

    The earth's gravity changes are attributed to the redistribution of masses within and/or on the surface of the earth, which are due to the frictional sliding, tensile cracking and/or cataclastic flow of rocks along the faults and detectable by earthquake events. Inversely, the gravity changes are useful to describe the earthquake seismicity over the active orogenic belts. The time variable gravimetric data are hardly available to the public domain. However, Gravity Recovery and Climatic Experiment (GRACE) is the only satellite mission dedicated to model the variation of the gravity field and an available source to the science community. Here, we have tried to envisage gravity changes in terms of gravity anomaly (Δg), geoid (N) and the gravity gradients over the Indo-Pak plate with emphasis upon Kashmir earthquake of October 2005. For this purpose, we engaged the spherical harmonic coefficients of monthly gravity solutions from the GRACE satellite mission, which have good coverage over the entire globe with unprecedented accuracy. We have analysed numerically the solutions after removing the hydrological signals, during August to November 2005, in terms of corresponding monthly differentials of gravity anomaly, geoid and the gradients. The regional structures like Main Mantle Thrust (MMT), Main Karakoram Thrust (MKT), Herat and Chaman faults are in closed association with topography and with gravity parameters from the GRACE gravimetry and EGM2008 model. The monthly differentials of these quantities indicate the stress accumulation in the northeast direction in the study area. Our numerical results show that the horizontal gravity gradients seem to be in good agreement with tectonic boundaries and differentials of the gravitational elements are subtle to the redistribution of rock masses and topography caused by 2005 Kashmir earthquake. Moreover, the gradients are rather more helpful for extracting the coseismic gravity signatures caused by seismicity over the area

  10. Investigating GRACE Range-Rate Observations over West Africa with respect to Small-Scale Hydrological Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, A.; Eicker, A.; Kusche, J.; Longuevergne, L.; Diekkrüger, B.; Jütten, T.

    2015-12-01

    Here, GRACE K-band range rate (KBRR) observations are analyzed for the effects from small-scale hydrological signals over West Africa including water level changes in reservoirs, extreme weather events, and water storage variability predicted by hydrological models. The presented approach, which is based on level 1B data, avoids the downward continuation and filtering process required for computing monthly gravity field solutions and, thus, enables to assess hydrological signals with a high temporal resolution and at small spatial scales. In a first step, water mass variations derived from tide gauges, altimetry, and from hydrological model output are converted into simulated KBRR observations. Secondly, these simulated observations and a number of geophysical corrections are reduced from the original GRACE K-band observations to obtain the residuals for a time span of ten years. Then, (i) the residuals are used to validate differently modeled water mass variations and (ii) extreme weather events are identified in the residuals. West Africa represents an interesting study region as it is increasingly facing exteme precipitation events and floodings. In this study, monthly and daily output from different global hydrological models is validated for their representation of long-term and short-term (daily) water storage variability over West Africa. The daily RMS of KBRR residuals ranges between 0.1 μm/s and 0.7 μm/s. Smaller residuals imply that the model is able to better explain the observations. For example, we find that in 2007 the Land Surface Discharge Model (LSDM) better agrees with GRACE range-rate observations than the Water-GAP Global Hydrology Model (WGHM) and the GLDAS-Noah land surface model. Furthermore, we confirm previous studies and show that the signal from Lake Volta is distinctly contained in the residuals. Finally, we investigate variations of other smaller reservoirs and the floodings over West Africa in June 2009 and over Benin in October 2010.

  11. Detection of Characteristic Precipitation Anomaly Patterns of El Nino / La Nina in Time- variable Gravity Fields by GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heki, K.; Morishita, Y.

    2007-12-01

    GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellites, launched in March 2002, have been mapping monthly gravity fields of the Earth, allowing us to infer changes in surface mass, e.g. water and ice. Past findings include the ice mass loss in southern Greenland (Luthcke et al., 2006) and its acceleration in 2004 (Velicogna and Wahr, 2006), crustal dilatation by the 2004 Sumatra Earthquake (Han et al., 2006) and the postseismic movement of water in mantle (Ogawa and Heki, 2007). ENSO (El Nino and Southern Oscillation) brings about global climate impacts, together with its opposite phenomenon, La Nina. Ropelewski and Halpert (1987) showed typical precipitation patterns in ENSO years; characteristic regional-scale precipitation anomalies occur in India, tropical and southern Africa and South America. Nearly opposite precipitation anomalies are shown to occur in La Nina years (Ropelewski and Halpert, 1988). Here we report the detection of such precipitation anomaly patterns in the GRACE monthly gravity data 2002 - 2007, which includes both La Nina (2005 fall - 2006 spring) and El Nino (2006 fall - 2007 spring) periods. We modeled the worldwide gravity time series with constant trends and seasonal changes, and extracted deviations of gravity values at two time epochs, i.e. February 2006 and 2007, and converted them into the changes in equivalent surface water mass. East Africa showed negative gravity deviation (-20.5 cm in water) in 2006 February (La Nina), which reversed to positive (18.7 cm) in 2007 February (El Nino). Northern and southern parts of South America also showed similar see-saw patterns. Such patterns closely resemble to those found meteorologically (Ropelewski and Halpert, 1987; 1988), suggesting the potential of GRACE as a sensor of inter-annual precipitation anomalies through changes in continental water storage. We performed numerical simulations of soil moisture changes at grid points in land area incorporating the CMAP precipitation data, NCEP

  12. Data assimilation of GRACE terrestrial water storage estimates into a regional hydrological model of the Rhine River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangdamrongsub, N.; Steele-Dunne, S. C.; Gunter, B. C.; Ditmar, P. G.; Weerts, A. H.

    2015-04-01

    The ability to estimate terrestrial water storage (TWS) realistically is essential for understanding past hydrological events and predicting future changes in the hydrological cycle. Inadequacies in model physics, uncertainty in model land parameters, and uncertainties in meteorological data commonly limit the accuracy of hydrological models in simulating TWS. In an effort to improve model performance, this study investigated the benefits of assimilating TWS estimates derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data into the OpenStreams wflow_hbv model using an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) approach. The study area chosen was the Rhine River basin, which has both well-calibrated model parameters and high-quality forcing data that were used for experimentation and comparison. Four different case studies were examined which were designed to evaluate different levels of forcing data quality and resolution including those typical of other less well-monitored river basins. The results were validated using in situ groundwater (GW) and stream gauge data. The analysis showed a noticeable improvement in GW estimates when GRACE data were assimilated, with a best-case improvement of correlation coefficient from 0.31 to 0.53 and root mean square error (RMSE) from 8.4 to 5.4 cm compared to the reference (ensemble open-loop) case. For the data-sparse case, the best-case GW estimates increased the correlation coefficient from 0.46 to 0.61 and decreased the RMSE by 35%. For the average improvement of GW estimates (for all four cases), the correlation coefficient increases from 0.6 to 0.7 and the RMSE was reduced by 15%. Only a slight overall improvement was observed in streamflow estimates when GRACE data were assimilated. Further analysis suggested that this is likely due to sporadic short-term, but sizeable, errors in the forcing data and the lack of sufficient constraints on the soil moisture component. Overall, the results highlight the benefit of

  13. GRACE Assimilation into Hydrological Model Improves Representation of Drought-induced Groundwater Trend over Murray-Darling Basin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Maike; Forootan, Ehsan; Van Dijk, Albert I. J. M.; Müller Schmied, Hannes; Crosbie, Russell S.; Kusche, Jürgen; Döll, Petra

    2016-04-01

    The Murray-Darling Basin, one of the largest and driest river basins over the world, experienced a long-term drought (over 2003-2009), the so-called Millennium Drought. As a result, the terrestrial water storage in the region decreased, which was attributed to dry meteorological conditions and extensive irrigation for agriculture. We used simulations of the WaterGAP Global Hydrology Model (WGHM) driven by monthly climate fields from the Climate Research Unit's Time Series (CRU TS 3.2) and precipitation data from the Global Precipitation Climatology Center (GPCC) to estimate linear trends in soil, surface and groundwater compartments, as well as total water storage changes (TWSC). However, the model was not able to capture the effect of the Millennium Drought on the storage compartments likely due to missing processes in dry regions or climate forcing uncertainties. Particularly, TWSC simulated by standard WGHM did not reproduce the negative trend during 2003-2009. Therefore, in this study, we investigate whether assimilating TWSC from the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission into WGHM enables a more realistic representation of the Millennium Drought on the basin hydrology. Firstly, the quality of monthly GRACE TWSC and its post-processing over the Murray-Darling Basin was assessed. An improved calibration and data assimilation (C/DA) approach (Schumacher et al., JoG-2016) was then applied to integrate GRACE TWSC along with its full error covariance information into WGHM during 2003-2009. Independent observations of soil moisture, groundwater and surface water extent were used to validate the model outputs after C/DA. Our investigations indicate that the integration of GRACE data indeed introduces a negative trend to TWSC simulations of WGHM, which occurred predominantly in the south (Murray Basin). The trend was found to be associated with the changes in groundwater storage, which was confirmed through validation with in

  14. Looking age-appropriate while growing old gracefully: A qualitative study of ageing and body image among older adults.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Glen S; Diedrichs, Phillippa C; Williamson, Heidi; Christopher, Gary; Harcourt, Diana

    2016-04-01

    Body dissatisfaction can be significantly detrimental to wellbeing. Little is known about older adults' body image, despite the fact that ageing causes unique bodily changes and that sociocultural pressures to resist these changes abound. We conducted six focus groups with a UK community sample of White British and South Asian older adults aged 65-92 years. Thematic analysis highlighted four themes: appearance indicates capability and identity; physical ability trumps appearance; felt pressures to age 'gracefully' while resisting appearance changes; and gender and cultural differences. These findings suggest that older adults' body image can have important implications for their wellbeing and merits researchers' attention. PMID:24776689

  15. Proposed plan/Statement of basis for the Grace Road Site (631-22G) operable unit: Final action

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.

    1997-08-19

    This Statement of Basis/Proposed Plan is being issued by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), which functions as the lead agency for the Savannah River Site (SRS) remedial activities, with concurrence by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The purpose of this Statement of Basis/Proposed Plan is to describe the preferred alternative for addressing the Grace Road site (GRS) located at the Savannah River Site (SRS), in Aiken, South Carolina and to provide an opportunity for public input into the remedial action selection process.

  16. Water storage variations extracted from GRACE data by combination of multi-resolution representation (MRR) and principal component analysis (PCA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ressler, Gerhard; Eicker, Annette; Lieb, Verena; Schmidt, Michael; Seitz, Florian; Shang, Kun; Shum, Che-Kwan

    2015-04-01

    Regionally changing hydrological conditions and their link to the availability of water for human consumption and agriculture is a challenging topic in the context of global change that is receiving increasing attention. Gravity field changes related to signals of land hydrology have been observed by the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission over a period of more than 12 years. These changes are being analysed in our studies with respect to changing hydrological conditions, especially as a consequence of extreme weather situations and/or a change of climatic conditions. Typically, variations of the Earth's gravity field are modeled as a series expansion in terms of global spherical harmonics with time dependent harmonic coefficients. In order to investigate specific structures in the signal we alternatively apply a wavelet-based multi-resolution technique for the determination of regional spatiotemporal variations of the Earth's gravitational potential in combination with principal component analysis (PCA) for detailed evaluation of these structures. The multi-resolution representation (MRR) i.e. the composition of a signal considering different resolution levels is a suitable approach for spatial gravity modeling especially in case of inhomogeneous distribution of observation data on the one hand and because of the inhomogeneous structure of the Earth's gravity field itself on the other hand. In the MRR the signal is split into detail signals by applying low- and band-pass filters realized e.g. by spherical scaling and wavelet functions. Each detail signal is related to a specific resolution level and covers a certain part of the signal spectrum. Principal component analysis (PCA) enables for revealing specific signal patterns in the space as well as the time domain like trends and seasonal as well as semi seasonal variations. We apply the above mentioned combined technique to GRACE L1C residual potential differences that have been

  17. Identification of Outliers in Grace Data for Indo-Gangetic Plain Using Various Methods (Z-Score, Modified Z-score and Adjusted Boxplot) and Its Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, S.

    2015-12-01

    Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data are widely used for the hydrological studies for large scale basins (≥100,000 sq km). GRACE data (Stokes Coefficients or Equivalent Water Height) used for hydrological studies are not direct observations but result from high level processing of raw data from the GRACE mission. Different partner agencies like CSR, GFZ and JPL implement their own methodology and their processing methods are independent from each other. The primary source of errors in GRACE data are due to measurement and modeling errors and the processing strategy of these agencies. Because of different processing methods, the final data from all the partner agencies are inconsistent with each other at some epoch. GRACE data provide spatio-temporal variations in Earth's gravity which is mainly attributed to the seasonal fluctuations in water level on Earth surfaces and subsurface. During the quantification of error/uncertainties, several high positive and negative peaks were observed which do not correspond to any hydrological processes but may emanate from a combination of primary error sources, or some other geophysical processes (e.g. Earthquakes, landslide, etc.) resulting in redistribution of earth's mass. Such peaks can be considered as outliers for hydrological studies. In this work, an algorithm has been designed to extract outliers from the GRACE data for Indo-Gangetic plain, which considers the seasonal variations and the trend in data. Different outlier detection methods have been used such as Z-score, modified Z-score and adjusted boxplot. For verification, assimilated hydrological (GLDAS) and hydro-meteorological data are used as the reference. The results have shown that the consistency amongst all data sets improved significantly after the removal of outliers.

  18. Comparison of hydrological and GRACE-based excitation functions of polar motion in the seasonal spectral band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastula, J.; Kolaczek, B.; Salstein, D. A.

    2008-04-01

    Understanding changes in the global balance of the Earths angular momentum due to the mass redistribution of geophysical fluids is needed to explain the observed polar motion. The impact of continental hydrologic signals, from land water, snow, and ice, on polar motion excitation (hydrological angular momentum-HAM), is still inadequately known. Although estimates of HAM have been made from several models of global hydrology based upon the observed distribution of surface water, snow, and soil moisture, the relatively sparse observation network and the presence of errors in the data and the geophysical fluid models preclude a full understanding of the HAM influence on polar motion variations. Recently the GRACE mission monitoring Earths time variable gravity field has allowed us to determine the mass term of polar motion excitation functions and compare them with the mass term derivable as a residual from the geodetic excitation functions and geophysical fluid motion terms on seasonal time scales. Differences between these mass terms in the years 2004 - 2005.5 are still on the order of 20 mas. Besides the overall mass excitation of polar motion comparisons with GRACE (RL04-release), we also intercompare the non-atmospheric, non-oceanic signals in the mass term of geodetic polar motion excitation with hydrological excitation of polar motion.

  19. Spectral characteristics of the Hellenic vertical network - Validation over Central and Northern Greece using GOCE/GRACE global geopotential models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andritsanos, Vassilios D.; Vergos, George S.; Grigoriadis, Vassilios N.; Pagounis, Vassilios; Tziavos, Ilias N.

    2014-05-01

    The Elevation project, funded by the action "Archimedes III - Funding of research groups in T.E.I.", co-financed by the E.U. (European Social Fund) and national funds under the Operational Program "Education and Lifelong Learning 2007-2013" aims mainly to the validation of the Hellenic vertical datum. This validation is carried out over two areas under study, one in Central and another in Northern Greece. During the first stage of the validation process, satellite-only as well as combined satellite-terrestrial models of the Earth's geopotential are used. GOCE and GRACE satellite information is compared against recently measured GPS/Levelling observations at specific benchmarks of the vertical network in Attiki (Central Greece) and Thessaloniki (Northern Greece). A spectral enhancement approach is followed where, given the GOCE/GRACE GGM truncation degree, EGM2008 is used to fill-in the medium and high-frequency content along with RTM effects for the high and ultra high part. The second stage is based on the localization of possible blunders of the vertical network using the spectral information derived previously. The undoubted accuracy of the contemporary global models at the low frequency band leads to some initial conclusions about the consistency of the Hellenic vertical datum.

  20. Improving Global Mass Flux Solutions from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Through Forward Modeling and Continuous Time Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabaka, T. J.; Rowlands, D. D.; Luthcke, S. B.; Boy, J.-P.

    2010-01-01

    We describe Earth's mass flux from April 2003 through November 2008 by deriving a time series of mas cons on a global 2deg x 2deg equal-area grid at 10 day intervals. We estimate the mass flux directly from K band range rate (KBRR) data provided by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission. Using regularized least squares, we take into account the underlying process dynamics through continuous space and time-correlated constraints. In addition, we place the mascon approach in the context of other filtering techniques, showing its equivalence to anisotropic, nonsymmetric filtering, least squares collocation, and Kalman smoothing. We produce mascon time series from KBRR data that have and have not been corrected (forward modeled) for hydrological processes and fmd that the former produce superior results in oceanic areas by minimizing signal leakage from strong sources on land. By exploiting the structure of the spatiotemporal constraints, we are able to use a much more efficient (in storage and computation) inversion algorithm based upon the conjugate gradient method. This allows us to apply continuous rather than piecewise continuous time-correlated constraints, which we show via global maps and comparisons with ocean-bottom pressure gauges, to produce time series with reduced random variance and full systematic signal. Finally, we present a preferred global model, a hybrid whose oceanic portions are derived using forward modeling of hydrology but whose land portions are not, and thus represent a pure GRACE-derived signal.

  1. Groundwater storage change in the Ngadda Catchment of the Lake Chad Basin using GRACE and ground truth data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaskevych, A.; Lee, J.

    2013-12-01

    The present study is to analyze groundwater storage variations in the Ngadda Catchment located in the southwestern edge of Lake Chad Basin using Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data. We collected monthly total water storage data from GRACE and monthly soil moisture data from Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) for the period of 2005 - 2009 with the spatial resolution of 1 and 0.25 degrees. We assumed surface water contributions to be negligible in the study area. The estimated groundwater storage changes were compared to the ground truth groundwater depth data collected in 2005 and 2009. The challenge of the present study is sparseness of the ground truth data in space and time. The study area is one of the data poor regions in the world due to the limited accessibility to the area. Different geostatistical techniques such as Kriging, Thiessen polygons, and Bayesian updating were applied to overcome such sparseness and modeling uncertainty under different scales and resolution. The study shows a significant increase of groundwater storage in the Ngadda catchment during the study period. Uncertainty is significant though depending on the size of the model and modeling technique. The study discusses advantages of using remote sensing data in data poor regions and how geostatistical techniques can be applied to deal with modeling uncertainty.

  2. GRACE Results and Their Impact: Climate Change in Siberia and Northern Canada and the Freshening of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickey, J. O.; Marcus, S. L.; Seitz, F.

    2006-12-01

    Discharges from the land masses surrounding the Arctic Ocean form a key component of its freshwater budget, which in turn plays a critical role in regulating its internal dynamics. Especially during summer, runoff from the Yenisey, Lena and Kolyma basins in Siberia, and the Mackenzie basin in Canada, leads to the formation of a cold Arctic halocline near the surface which strongly impacts the processes of vertical mixing and sea ice formation. To understand the impacts of global change on these processes, therefore, it is critical to gain an accurate assessment of freshwater inputs to the Artic Ocean and their changes as the climate warms. Due to its high orbital inclination and low altitude, the GRACE constellation provides comprehensive geographical coverage, on length scales sufficiently small to resolve the individual catchment basins that provide a major source of freshwater to the Arctic Ocean. Here we explore the impact of GRACE data on tracking changes in Arctic freshwater runoff and its sources, using comparisons with estimated river discharge and net precipitation to form water mass budgets for the individual basins listed above. Changes on both seasonal and interannual timescales will be investigated.

  3. Antarctica, Greenland and Gulf of Alaska Land-ice Evolution from an Iterated GRACE Global Mascon Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthcke, Scott B.; Sabaka, T. J.; Loomis, B. D.; Arendt, A. A.; McCarthy, J. J.; Camp, J.

    2013-01-01

    We have determined the ice mass evolution of the Antarctica and Greenland ice sheets (AIS and GIS) and Gulf of Alaska (GOA) glaciers from a new GRACE global solution of equal-area surface mass concentration parcels (mascons) in equivalent height of water. The mascons were estimated directly from the reduction of the inter-satellite K-band range-rate (KBRR) observations, taking into account the full noise covariance, and formally iterating the solution. The new solution increases signal recovery while reducing the GRACE KBRR observation residuals. The mascons were estimated with 10 day and 1 arc degree equal-area sampling, applying anisotropic constraints. An ensemble empirical mode decomposition adaptive filter was applied to the mascon time series to compute annual mass balances. The details and causes of the spatial and temporal variability of the land-ice regions studied are discussed. The estimated mass trend over the total GIS, AIS and GOA glaciers for the time period 1 December 2003 to 1 December 2010 is -380 plus or minus 31 Gt a(exp -1), equivalent to -1.05 plus or minus 0.09 mma(exp -1) sea-level rise. Over the same time period we estimate the mass acceleration to be -41 plus or minus 27 Gt a(exp -2), equivalent to a 0.11 plus or minus 0.08 mm a(exp -2) rate of change in sea level. The trends and accelerations are dependent on significant seasonal and annual balance anomalies.

  4. Antarctica, Greenland and Gulf of Alaska Land-Ice Evolution from an Iterated GRACE Global Mascon Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthcke, Scott B.; Sabaka, T. J.; Loomis, B. D.; Arendt, A. A.; McCarthy, J. J.; Camp, J.

    2013-01-01

    We have determined the ice mass evolution of the Antarctica and Greenland ice sheets (AIS and GIS) and Gulf of Alaska (GOA) glaciers from a new GRACE global solution of equal-area surface mass concentration parcels (mascons) in equivalent height of water. The mascons were estimated directly from the reduction of the inter-satellite K-band range-rate (KBRR) observations, taking into account the full noise covariance, and formally iterating the solution. The new solution increases signal recovery while reducing the GRACE KBRR observation residuals. The mascons were estimated with 10 day and 1 arc degree equal-area sampling, applying anisotropic constraints. An ensemble empirical mode decomposition adaptive filter was applied to the mascon time series to compute annual mass balances. The details and causes of the spatial and temporal variability of the land-ice regions studied are discussed. The estimated mass trend over the total GIS, AIS and GOA glaciers for the time period 1 December 2003 to 1 December 2010 is -380 plus or minus 31 Gt a(exp -1), equivalent to -1.05 plus or minus 0.09 mma(exp -1) sea-level rise. Over the same time period we estimate the mass acceleration to be -41 plus or minus 27 Gt a(exp -2), equivalent to a 0.11 plus or minus 0.08 mm a(exp -2) rate of change in sea level. The trends and accelerations are dependent on significant seasonal and annual balance anomalies.

  5. The Use of GOCE/GRACE Information in the Latest NGS xGeoid15 Model for the USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, S. A.; Li, X.; Youngman, M.

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. National Geodetic Survey [NGS], through its Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum [GRAV-D] program, is flying airborne gravity surveys over the USA and its territories. By 2022, NGS intends that all orthometric heights in the USA will be determined in the field using a reliable national gravimetric geoid model to transform from geodetic heights obtained from GPS. Towards this end, all available airborne data has been incorporated into a new NGS experimental geoid model - xGEOID15. The xGEOID15 model is the second in a series of annual experimental geoid models that incorporates NGS GRAV-D airborne data. This series provides a useful benchmark for assessing and improving current techniques, to ultimately compute a geoid model that can support a national physical height system by 2022. Here, we focus on the combination of the latest GOCE/GRACE models with the terrestrial gravimetry (land/airborne) that was applied for xGeoid15. Comparisons against existing combination gravitational solutions, such as EGM2008 and EIGEN6C4, as well as recent geoid models, such as xGeoid14 and CGG2013, are interesting for what they reveal about the respective use of the GOCE/GRACE satgrav information.

  6. Effects on the Earth's shape due to ocean mass redistributions from GRACE observations in a warming climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, S. G.; Cho, J.

    2009-04-01

    The Earth's ice cover is melting in more places and at higher rates than at any time since record keeping began. Recent satellite observations and results from around the world show that global ice melting accelerated during the 1990s-which was also the warmest decade on record. This enhanced melting is among the first observable signs of human-induced global warming, caused by the unprecedented release of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases over the last century. Loss of the ice would not only affect the global climate, but also would raise sea levels and influence the Earth rotation and possible Earth's shape. For example, the total ocean mass variations through the input of land water from glaciers cause the secular oceanic bottom pressure (OBP) anomalies and such OBP changes will possibly affect the Earth's shape. In this paper, the secular OBP data are obtained from GRACE measurements (2002-2008). It has been shown that regionally distinct patterns of bottom pressure anomalies emerge in the Southern and Northern Hemispheres due to spatially inhomogeneous warming and ocean circulation change and a net mass transfers from the Southern to the Northern Hemisphere. As the OBP anomalies are directly proportional to mass load anomalies, the secular OBP variations result an asymmetrical variation of the Earth's shape. Next step, we will further analyze its possible mechanism. Key words: Earth shape; Oceanic mass redistribution; GRACE

  7. Scientific improvement proposed in the realisation of the electrostatic accelerometer for the GRACE Follow-On mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christophe, B.; Foulon, B.; Boulanger, D.; Liorzou, F.; Lebat, V.; Perrot, E.

    2012-12-01

    The return of experience of the SuperSTAR instrument operating since ten years on board the twin GRACE satellites, as the new development of the six GRADIO accelerometers composing the three axis gravity gradiometer of the GOCE ESA mission, have been used to improve the design of the accelerometers for the future GRACE Follow-On mission. The instruments shall exhibit a more accurate pre launch calibration. On anti-seimic pendulum, ONERA will match the scale factor of the two flight models. Then during common drop of the accelerometers in the Zarm tower in catapult configuration, the bias will be estimated. These ground calibrations should improve the post-processing of the accelerometer data, in particular by allowing a good discrimination between scale factor and bias. In addition to thermal stability improvement through a modification of the design, thermal sensors will be mounted around the electrode cage to have a better survey of the temperature and gradient of temperature around the accelerometer. The download of these housekeepings could be used for improving the post-processing of the data.

  8. Integration of altimetric lake levels and GRACE gravimetry over Africa: Inferences for terrestrial water storage change 2003-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, P.; Williams, S. D. P.

    2014-12-01

    Terrestrial water storage (TWS) change for 2003-2011 is estimated over Africa from GRACE gravimetric data. The signatures from change in water of the major lakes are removed by utilizing kernel functions with lake heights recovered from retracked ENVISAT satellite altimetry. In addition, the contribution of gravimetric change due to soil moisture and biomass is removed from the total GRACE signal by utilizing the GLDAS land surface model. The residual TWS time series, namely groundwater and the surface waters in rivers, wetlands, and small lakes, are investigated for trends and the seasonal cycle using linear regression. Typically, such analyses assume that the data are temporally uncorrelated but this has been shown to lead to erroneous inferences in related studies concerning the linear rate and acceleration. In this study, we utilize autocorrelation and investigate the appropriate stochastic model. The results show the proper distribution of TWS change and identify the spatial distribution of significant rates and accelerations. The effect of surface water in the major lakes is shown to contribute significantly to the trend and seasonal variation in TWS in the lake basin. Lake Volta, a managed reservoir in Ghana, is seen to have a contribution to the linear trend that is a factor of three greater than that of Lake Victoria despite having a surface area one-eighth of that of Lake Victoria. Analysis also shows the confidence levels of the deterministic trend and acceleration identifying areas where the signatures are most likely due to a physical deterministic cause and not simply stochastic variations.

  9. Using GRACE-Derived Water and Moisture Products as a Predictive Tool for Fire Response in the Contiguous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, N. J.; Jensen, D.; Zajic, B.; Rodell, M.; Reager, J. T., II

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the relationship between wildfire activity and soil moisture in the United States has been difficult to assess, with limited ability to determine areas that are at high risk. This limitation is largely due to complex environmental factors at play, especially as they relate to alternating periods of wet and dry conditions, and the lack of remotely-sensed products. Recent drought conditions and accompanying low Fuel Moisture Content (FMC) have led to disastrous wildfire outbreaks causing economic loss, property damage, and environmental degradation. Thus, developing a programmed toolset to assess the relationship between soil moisture, which contributes greatly to FMC and fire severity, can establish the framework for determining overall wildfire risk. To properly evaluate these parameters, we used data assimilated from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and data from the Fire Program Analysis fire-occurrence database (FPA FOD) to determine the extent soil moisture affects fire activity. Through these datasets, we produced correlation and regression maps at a coarse resolution of 0.25 degrees for the contiguous United States. These fire-risk products and toolsets proved the viability of this methodology, allowing for the future incorporation of more GRACE-derived water parameters, MODIS vegetation indices, and other environmental datasets to refine the model for fire risk. Additionally, they will allow assessment to national-scale early fire management and provide responders with a predictive tool to better employ early decision-support to areas of high risk during regions' respective fire season(s).

  10. Impact of Climatic Variability on Atmospheric Mass Distribution and GRACE-Derived Gravity Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salstein, David A.; Rosen, Richard D.; Ponte, Rui M.; Frey, Herbert (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    During the period we calculated the atmospheric data sets related to its mass and angular momentum distribution. For mass, we determined the various harmonics from the NCEP-NCAR reanalysis, especially the low-order harmonics that are useful in studying the gravitation distribution as will be determined from the GRACE mission. Atmospheric mass is also related to the atmospheric loading on the solid Earth; we cooperated with scientists who needed the atmospheric mass information for understanding its contributions to the overall loading, necessary for vertical and horizontal coordinate estimation. We calculated atmospheric angular momentum from the NCEP-NCAR reanalyses and 4 operational meteorological centers, based on the motion (wind) terms and the mass (surface pressure) terms. These are associated with motions of the planet, including its axial component causing changes in the length of day, more related to the winds, and the equatorial component related to motions of the pole, more related to the mass. Tasks related to the ocean mass and angular momentum were added to the project as well. For these we have noted the ocean impact on motions of the pole as well as the torque mechanisms that relate the transfer of angular momentum between oceans and solid earth. The activities of the project may be summarized in the following first manuscript written in December 2002, for a symposium that Dr. Salstein attended on Geodynamics. We have continued to assess ocean angular momentum (OAM) quantities derived from bottom pressure and velocity fields estimated with our finite-difference barotropic (single layer) model. Three years of output (1993-95) from a run without any data constraints was compared to output from a corresponding run that was constrained by altimeter data using a Kalman filter and smoother scheme. Respective OAM time series were combined with corresponding atmospheric series and compared to observed polar motion. The constrained OAM series provided

  11. Implications of postseismic gravity change following the great 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake from the regional harmonic analysis of GRACE intersatellite tracking data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Han, S.-C.; Sauber, J.; Luthcke, S.B.; Ji, C.; Pollitz., F. F.

    2008-01-01

    We report Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite observations of coseismic displacements and postseismic transients from the great Sumatra-Andaman Islands (thrust event; Mw ???9.2) earthquake in December 2004. Instead of using global spherical harmonic solutions of monthly gravity fields, we estimated the gravity changes directly using intersatellite range-rate data with regionally concentrated spherical Slepian basis functions every 15-day interval. We found significant step-like (coseismic) and exponential-like (postseismic) behavior in the time series of estimated coefficients (from May 2003 to April 2007) for the spherical Slepian function's. After deriving coseismic slip estimates from seismic and geodetic data that spanned different time intervals, we estimated and evaluated postseismic relaxation mechanisms with alternate asthenosphere viscosity models. The large spatial coverage and uniform accuracy of our GRACE solution enabled us to clearly delineate a postseismic transient signal in the first 2 years of postearthquake GRACE data. Our preferred interpretation of the long-wavelength components of the postseismic avity change is biviscous viscoelastic flow. We estimated a transient viscosity of 5 ??17 Pa s and a steady state viscosity of 5 ?? 1018 - 1019 Pa s. Additional years of the GRACE observations should provide improved steady state viscosity estimates. In contrast to our interpretation of coseismic gravity change, the prominent postearthquake positive gravity change around the Nicobar Islands is accounted for by seafloor uplift with less postseismic perturbation in intrinsic density in the region surrounding the earthquake. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Assessment of the capabilities of the tICA and stICA methods for geophysical signal separation in GRACE data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börgens, Eva; Rangelova, Elena; Sideris, Michael; Kusche, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the potential of the tICA and stICA methods for separating geophysical signals in GRACE gravity data. Since the start of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission in 2002, GRACE has provided us with global gravity data with a spatial resolution of a few hundred kilometers and a temporal resolution of one month, 10 days or even a week. These data represent the total, integrated gravity change inducing by mass signals related to hydrological processes, post glacial rebound (PGR), ice mass change and others. Isolating a particular mass signal may be accomplished by removing all others using geophysical background models, but these are usually not perfect. Therefore methods are required for separating data into the different geophysical signals on the basis of their statistical properties. To this end, we assess the potential of temporal Independent Component Analysis (tICA) and spatio-temporal Independent Component Analysis (stICA). The tICA method is based on the assumption of statistical independence of signals in the temporal domain and thus separates the GRACE-observed mass changes into maximal independent source signals. In comparison, stICA maximizes both the temporal and spatial independence. These two ICA methods are compared to the conventional Principle Component Analysis (PCA). We test them on GRACE data with respect to their ability to separate the hydrology signal from a trend signal not induced by hydrological processes, such as post glacial rebound (PGR). In addition, we investigate whether they are capable of separating the hydrological signal in annual and semi-annual components. We analyze both simulated and CSR GRACE water mass anomalies (January 2003 -December 2010). The simulated mass anomalies are composed of outputs of hydrologic, PGR, ice loss and ocean bottom pressure models. The two ICA methods are capable of separating the trend and annual hydrology signals both on a global and regional scale (North

  13. Time Changes of the European Gravity Field from GRACE: A Comparison with Ground Measurements from Superconducting Gravimeters and with Hydrology Model Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinderer, J.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Crossley, D.; Boy, J.-P.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the time-variable gravity changes in Europe retrieved from the initial GRACE monthly solutions spanning a 18 month duration from April 2002 to October 2003. Gravity anomaly maps are retrieved in Central Europe from the monthly satellite solutions we compare the fields according to various truncation levels (typically between degree 10 and 20) of the initial fields (expressed in spherical harmonics to degree 120). For these different degrees, an empirical orthogonal function (EOF) decomposition of the time-variable gravity field leads us to its main spatial and temporal characteristics. We show that the dominant signal is found to be annual with an amplitude and a phase both in agreement with predictions in Europe modeled using snow and soil-moisture variations from recent hydrology models. We compare these GRACE gravity field changes to surface gravity observations from 6 superconducting gravimeters of the GGP (Global Geodynamics Project) European sub-network, with a special attention to loading corrections. Initial results suggest that all 3 data sets (GRACE, hydrology and GGP) are responding to annual changes in near-surface water in Europe of a few microGal (at length scales of approx.1000 km) that show a high value in winter and a summer minimum. We also point out that the GRACE gravity field evolution seems to indicate that there is a trend in gravity between summer 2002 and summer 2003 which can be related to the 2003 heatwave in Europe and its hydrological consequences (drought). Despite the limited time span of our analysis and the uncertainties in retrieving a regional solution from the network of gravimeters, the calibration and validation aspects of the GRACE data processing based on the annual hydrology cycle in Europe are in progress.

  14. A study on the capabilities of the multi-channel singular spectrum method for extracting the main water mass anomaly information from GRACE and hydrology models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangelova, E. V.; Sideris, M. G.; Kim, J.

    2010-12-01

    We study the capabilities of the method of (multi-channel) singular spectrum analysis (MSSA), which is mathematically equivalent to the extended empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs), to extract persistent oscillations (such as annual and semi-annual cycles) from noisy GRACE gravity field solutions. As a non-parametric method, MSSA also allows for modelling inter-annual, intra-annual and trend variations because of the data-adaptive nature of the base functions. In addition, it can identify modulated oscillations in the presence of noise. In our study, we analyze simultaneously a complete 6-year weekly time series of GFZ GRACE spherical harmonic coefficients of degree and order 30. The use of the standard de-correlation filtering is avoided and thus no geophysical signal is removed together with the correlated GRACE errors, which ensures a more fair comparison with geophysical models. Our filtering method reduces the average rms of mass variability over the oceans by more than 60 % when all but the annual, semi-annual and long-term variations in the spherical harmonic coefficients are filtered out. Although MSSA removes the bulk of the correlated errors, additional isotropic smoothing is still required. On land, we analyze time series of basin averages in few of the main river basins, i.e., Amazon, Congo and Mississippi, which are computed from the filtered GRACE and GLDAS coefficients. Generally fair agreement between GRACE and GLDAS data exist but some differences such as phase lags (Amazon) and differences in the water content for particular years (Congo) are found.

  15. Partitioning Regional Sea Level in the Bay of Bengal from a Global Grace and Jason-1/-2 Joint Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusche, J.; Uebbing, B.; Rietbroek, R.

    2014-12-01

    In Bangladesh, large areas are located just above sea level. Present-day sea level rise in combination with land subsidence, poses a major threat to the coastal regions, home of about 30 million people. Consequently, monitoring of sea level and knowledge of all recurrent effects are crucial for coastal protection. As part of the Belmont-project "Bangladesh Delta: Assessment of the Causes of Sea-level Rise Hazards and Integrated Development of Predictive Modeling Towards Mitigation and Adaptation" (BAND-AID) a global inverse method is employed to estimate the different contributors to sea level, such as melting of glaciers and ice-sheets, hydrology, glacial isostatic adjustment, as well as shallow and deep steric effects from Jason-1/2 altimetry and GRACE data. In the global inverse method, spatial patterns (fingerprints) are computed a-priori for each of the contributing process, applying the sea level equation for mass fingerprints, and empirically (PCA) for steric fingerprints from ARGO data. Temporal GRACE gravity data and along-track Jason-1/ -2 altimetry is then combined to estimate the temporal evolution of these patterns, which allows the partitioning of altimetric sea level into individual sources. This method largely mitigates truncation and leakage problems associated with GRACE resolution. Globally, our estimates are close to others, although they point at a somewhat larger deep steric effect. In this work we provide preliminary results for the Bay of Bengal / Bangladesh region by confronting global inversion with local measurements. Estimated sea level trends are compared to trends from tide gauges and differences are interpreted in terms of unmodeled regional effects, such as land subsidence. Initial results provide an indication on the magnitude of the contributions from the different sources at the coast of Bangladesh / in the Bay of Bengal; e.g. the contribution from the Greenland ice-sheets between 2003 and 2011 (0.69 mm/a) is significantly larger

  16. Effect of GIA models with 3D composite mantle viscosity on GRACE mass balance estimates for Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wal, Wouter; Whitehouse, Pippa L.; Schrama, Ernst J. O.

    2015-03-01

    Seismic data indicate that there are large viscosity variations in the mantle beneath Antarctica. Consideration of such variations would affect predictions of models of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA), which are used to correct satellite measurements of ice mass change. However, most GIA models used for that purpose have assumed the mantle to be uniformly stratified in terms of viscosity. The goal of this study is to estimate the effect of lateral variations in viscosity on Antarctic mass balance estimates derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data. To this end, recently-developed global GIA models based on lateral variations in mantle temperature are tuned to fit constraints in the northern hemisphere and then compared to GPS-derived uplift rates in Antarctica. We find that these models can provide a better fit to GPS uplift rates in Antarctica than existing GIA models with a radially-varying (1D) rheology. When 3D viscosity models in combination with specific ice loading histories are used to correct GRACE measurements, mass loss in Antarctica is smaller than previously found for the same ice loading histories and their preferred 1D viscosity profiles. The variation in mass balance estimates arising from using different plausible realizations of 3D viscosity amounts to 20 Gt/yr for the ICE-5G ice model and 16 Gt/yr for the W12a ice model; these values are larger than the GRACE measurement error, but smaller than the variation arising from unknown ice history. While there exist 1D Earth models that can reproduce the total mass balance estimates derived using 3D Earth models, the spatial pattern of gravity rates can be significantly affected by 3D viscosity in a way that cannot be reproduced by GIA models with 1D viscosity. As an example, models with 1D viscosity always predict maximum gravity rates in the Ross Sea for the ICE-5G ice model, however, for one of the three preferred 3D models the maximum (for the same ice model) is found

  17. Multivariate forecasting of water storage change for West-Africa using sea surface temperature and GRACE data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forootan, E.; Kusche, J.; Eicker, A.; Krasbutter, I.; Schuh, W.; Diekkrüger, B.; Schmidt, M. G.; Guo, J.; Shum, C.

    2012-12-01

    Several West-African countries are located besides the Atlantic Ocean, exposed to coastal and Sahel-type regimes. To these countries, global warming may pose multiple threats including sea level rise and reduced freshwater availability. Changes in the terrestrial water cycle may be accompanied by an increasing frequency, duration and magnitude of droughts and floods. Understanding patterns of water storage change from remote sensing and linking them to climate variability is thus essential. However, being able to forecast water storage changes will improve the ability of West African countries to planning and adapting to climate change. In this study, we develop a data-driven method for seasonal forecast of water storage changes that capitalizes on the teleconnections between water storage and sea surface temperature (SST) and on the ability of GRACE to measure total water storage (TWS) change directly. In the first step, we identify statistically independent patterns of TWS from monthly GRACE data over West-Africa, and of SST over the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans. We apply Independent Component Analysis rather than Principle Component Analysis to reveal teleconnections more pronounced. Our results show that annual variability of TWS over West-Africa is controlled by the Atlantic Ocean, while inter-annual and long-term variability is correlated with ENSO. Different auto-regressive models were then derived from these multivariate time-series and applied to predict TWS variations over West-Africa from Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Ocean-SST. The performance of the forecast models is compared to other statistical methods as Canonical Correlation Analysis, as well as to the output of the WaterGAP Global Hydrology Model (WGHM), which is forced by climate data. Forecast errors were also evaluated using a Monte Carlo error propagation. We find that forecasting TWS using SST as indicator shows a reliable performance for periods of up to two years. Future studies

  18. Simulation of ground-water flow and transport of chlorinated hydrocarbons at Graces Quarters, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tenbus, Frederick J.; Fleck, William B.

    2001-01-01

    Military activity at Graces Quarters, a former open-air chemical-agent facility at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, has resulted in ground-water contamination by chlorinated hydrocarbons. As part of a ground-water remediation feasibility study, a three-dimensional model was constructed to simulate transport of four chlorinated hydrocarbons (1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, trichloroethene, carbon tetrachloride, and chloroform) that are components of a contaminant plume in the surficial and middle aquifers underlying the east-central part of Graces Quarters. The model was calibrated to steady-state hydraulic head at 58 observation wells and to the concentration of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane in 58 observation wells and 101direct-push probe samples from the mid-1990s. Simulations using the same basic model with minor adjustments were then run for each of the other plume constituents. The error statistics between the simulated and measured concentrations of each of the constituents compared favorably to the error statisticst,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane calibration. Model simulations were used in conjunction with contaminant concentration data to examine the sources and degradation of the plume constituents. It was determined from this that mixed contaminant sources with no ambient degradation was the best approach for simulating multi-species solute transport at the site. Forward simulations were run to show potential solute transport 30 years and 100 years into the future with and without source removal. Although forward simulations are subject to uncertainty, they can be useful for illustrating various aspects of the conceptual model and its implementation. The forward simulation with no source removal indicates that contaminants would spread throughout various parts of the surficial and middle aquifers, with the100-year simulation showing potential discharge areas in either the marshes at the end of the Graces Quarters peninsula or just offshore in the estuaries. The

  19. Constraints of GRACE on the Ice Model and Mantle Rheology in Glacial Isostatic Adjustment Modeling in North-America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wal, W.; Wu, P.; Sideris, M.; Wang, H.

    2009-05-01

    GRACE satellite data offer homogeneous coverage of the area covered by the former Laurentide ice sheet. The secular gravity rate estimated from the GRACE data can therefore be used to constrain the ice loading history in Laurentide and, to a lesser extent, the mantle rheology in a GIA model. The objective of this presentation is to find a best fitting global ice model and use it to study how the ice model can be modified to fit a composite rheology, in which creep rates from a linear and non-linear rheology are added. This is useful because all the ice models constructed from GIA assume that mantle rheology is linear, but creep experiments on rocks show that nonlinear rheology may be the dominant mechanism in some parts of the mantle. We use CSR release 4 solutions from August 2002 to October 2008 with continental water storage effects removed by the GLDAS model and filtering with a destriping and Gaussian filter. The GIA model is a radially symmetric incompressible Maxwell Earth, with varying upper and lower mantle viscosity. Gravity rate misfit values are computed for with a range of viscosity values with the ICE-3G, ICE-4G and ICE-5G models. The best fit is shown for models with ICE-3G and ICE-4G, and the ICE-4G model is selected for computations with a so-called composite rheology. For the composite rheology, the Coupled Laplace Finite-Element Method is used to compute the GIA response of a spherical self-gravitating incompressible Maxwell Earth. The pre-stress exponent (A) derived from a uni- axial stress experiment is varied between 3.3 x 10-34/10-35/10-36 Pa-3s-1, the Newtonian viscosity η is varied between 1 and 3 x 1021 Pa-s, and the stress exponent is taken to be 3. Composite rheology in general results in geoid rates that are too small compared to GRACE observations. Therefore, simple modifications of the ICE-4G history are investigated by scaling ice heights or delaying glaciation. It is found that a delay in glaciation is a better way to adjust ice

  20. Water mass change in the Amazon basin estimated by multi-temporal SAR data, GRACE gravimetry and water level observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiridonova, S.; Seitz, F.; Hedman, K.; Meyer, F.

    2012-04-01

    The 2007 IPCC assessment report identified the land hydrology as one of the most uncertain components of the global water cycle. Variations of continental water masses occur in several compartments (e.g. surface and soil water, snow/ice, and groundwater). Mass variations and related changes of surface water exten-sions are being observed by contemporary space and in-situ observation systems such as GRACE gravim-etry, altimetry, optical/infrared sensors, SAR/InSAR, and in-situ river gauges. In this session we will present a regional multi-sensor study in the Amazon basin. The study focuses on the quantification of variations of water mass and water surface extent caused by extreme flood and drought situations that were frequent during the last decade. PALSAR data of two extreme events was selected; once when the Amazon River was flooded (March/April 2009) and once when the region suffered from a se-vere drought (October/November 2009). The advantage of using PALSAR is that it operates in L-Band and has the possibility to penetrate through the vegetation which is essential in the Amazon basin with its dense vegetation. Time series of water level variations were obtained from two in-situ gauges at Manacapuru and Obidos as well as from Envisat satellite altimetry. Total water storage change in the whole region was given by GRACE gravimetry. First, the variation of water mass is computed numerically using GRACE. Second the water level variations obtained from the two river gauges are analyzed with respect to observation of Envisat. Third the surface water extent is estimated by extracting water masks from PALSAR image data. The water mass change is obtained by intersecting the water masks with a medium resolution digital elevation model (SRTM). More specifically, water heights along the boundary of the river body were extracted from the DEM and processed for error reduction. Then, pixel heights within the river contour were interpolated with a Delaunay triangula

  1. Groundwater storage changes in the Tibetan Plateau and adjacent areas revealed from GRACE satellite gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Longwei; Wang, Hansheng; Steffen, Holger; Wu, Patrick; Jia, Lulu; Jiang, Liming; Shen, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Understanding groundwater storage (GWS) changes is vital to the utilization and control of water resources in the Tibetan Plateau. However, well level observations are rare in this big area, and reliable hydrology models including GWS are not available. We use hydro-geodesy to quantitate GWS changes in the Tibetan Plateau and surroundings from 2003 to 2009 using a combined analysis of satellite gravity and satellite altimetry data, hydrology models as well as a model of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). Release-5 GRACE gravity data are jointly used in a mascon fitting method to estimate the terrestrial water storage (TWS) changes during the period, from which the hydrology contributions and the GIA effects are effectively deducted to give the estimates of GWS changes for 12 selected regions of interest. The hydrology contributions are carefully calculated from glaciers and lakes by ICESat-1 satellite altimetry data, permafrost degradation by an Active-Layer Depth (ALD) model, soil moisture and snow water equivalent by multiple hydrology models, and the GIA effects are calculated with the new ICE-6G_C (VM5a) model. Taking into account the measurement errors and the variability of the models, the uncertainties are rigorously estimated for the TWS changes, the hydrology contributions (including GWS changes) and the GIA effect. For the first time, we show explicitly separated GWS changes in the Tibetan Plateau and adjacent areas except for those to the south of the Himalayas. We find increasing trend rates for eight basins: + 2.46 ± 2.24 Gt/yr for the Jinsha River basin, + 1.77 ± 2.09 Gt/yr for the Nujiang-Lancangjiang Rivers Source Region, + 1.86 ± 1.69 Gt/yr for the Yangtze River Source Region, + 1.14 ± 1.39 Gt/yr for the Yellow River Source Region, + 1.52 ± 0.95 Gt/yr for the Qaidam basin, + 1.66 ± 1.52 Gt/yr for the central Qiangtang Nature Reserve, + 5.37 ± 2.17 Gt/yr for the Upper Indus basin and + 2.77 ± 0.99 Gt/yr for the Aksu River basin. All these

  2. Groundwater storage changes in the Tibetan Plateau and adjacent areas revealed from GRACE satellite gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Longwei; Wang, Hansheng; Steffen, Holger; Wu, Patrick; Jia, Lulu; Jiang, Liming; Shen, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Understanding groundwater storage (GWS) changes is vital to the utilization and control of water resources in the Tibetan Plateau. However, well level observations are rare in this big area, and reliable hydrology models including GWS are not available. We use hydro-geodesy to quantitate GWS changes in the Tibetan Plateau and surroundings from 2003 to 2009 using a combined analysis of satellite gravity and satellite altimetry data, hydrology models as well as a model of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). Release-5 GRACE gravity data are jointly used in a mascon fitting method to estimate the terrestrial water storage (TWS) changes during the period, from which the hydrology contributions and the GIA effects are effectively deducted to give the estimates of GWS changes for 12 selected regions of interest. The hydrology contributions are carefully calculated from glaciers and lakes by ICESat-1 satellite altimetry data, permafrost degradation by an Active-Layer Depth (ALD) model, soil moisture and snow water equivalent by multiple hydrology models, and the GIA effects are calculated with the new ICE-6G_C (VM5a) model. Taking into account the measurement errors and the variability of the models, the uncertainties are rigorously estimated for the TWS changes, the hydrology contributions (including GWS changes) and the GIA effect. For the first time, we show explicitly separated GWS changes in the Tibetan Plateau and adjacent areas except for those to the south of the Himalayas. We find increasing trend rates for eight basins: + 2.46 ± 2.24 Gt/yr for the Jinsha River basin, + 1.77 ± 2.09 Gt/yr for the Nujiang-Lancangjiang Rivers Source Region, + 1.86 ± 1.69 Gt/yr for the Yangtze River Source Region, + 1.14 ± 1.39 Gt/yr for the Yellow River Source Region, + 1.52 ± 0.95 Gt/yr for the Qaidam basin, + 1.66 ± 1.52 Gt/yr for the central Qiangtang Nature Reserve, + 5.37 ± 2.17 Gt/yr for the Upper Indus basin and + 2.77 ± 0.99 Gt/yr for the Aksu River basin. All

  3. Status of Electrostatic Accelerometer Development for Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On Mission (GRACE FO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, Eddy; Boulanger, Damien; Christophe, Bruno; Foulon, Bernard; Liorzou, Françoise; Lebat, Vincent; Huynh, Phuong-Anh

    2015-04-01

    The GRACE FO mission, led by the JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), is an Earth-orbiting gravity mission, continuation of the GRACE mission, which will produce an accurate model of the Earth's gravity field variation providing global climatic data during five years at least. The mission involves two satellites in a loosely controlled tandem formation, with a micro-wave link measuring the inter-satellites distance variation. Earth's mass distribution non-uniformities cause variations of the inter-satellite distance. This variation is measured to recover gravity, after subtracting the non-gravitational contributors, as the residual drag. ONERA (the French Aerospace Lab) is developing, manufacturing and testing electrostatic accelerometers measuring this residual drag applied on the satellites. The accelerometer is composed of two main parts: the Sensor Unit (including the Sensor Unit Mechanics - SUM - and the Front-End Electronic Unit - FEEU) and the Interface Control Unit - ICU. In the Accelerometer Core, located in the Sensor Unit Mechanics, the proof mass is levitated and maintained at the center of an electrode cage by electrostatic forces. Thus, any drag acceleration applied on the satellite involves a variation on the servo-controlled electrostatic suspension of the mass. The voltage on the electrodes providing this electrostatic force is the measurement output of the accelerometer. The impact of the accelerometer defaults (geometry, electronic and parasitic forces) leads to bias, misalignment and scale factor error, non-linearity and noise. Some of these accelerometer defaults are characterized by tests with micro-gravity pendulum bench on ground and with drops in ZARM catapult. The Critical Design Review was achieved successfully on September 2014. The Engineering Model (EM) was integrated and tested successfully, with ground levitation, drops, Electromagnetic Compatibility and thermal vacuum. The integration of the first Flight Model has begun on December 2014

  4. Tests Results of the Electrostatic Accelerometer Flight Models for Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On Mission (GRACE FO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, E.; Boulanger, D.; Christophe, B.; Foulon, B.; Lebat, V.; Huynh, P. A.; Liorzou, F.

    2015-12-01

    The GRACE FO mission, led by the JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), is an Earth-orbiting gravity mission, continuation of the GRACE mission, which will produce an accurate model of the Earth's gravity field variation providing global climatic data during five years at least. The mission involves two satellites in a loosely controlled tandem formation, with a micro-wave link measuring the inter-satellites distance variation. Earth's mass distribution non-uniformities cause variations of the inter-satellite distance. This variation is measured to recover gravity, after subtracting the non-gravitational contributors, as the residual drag. ONERA (the French Aerospace Lab) is developing, manufacturing and testing electrostatic accelerometers measuring this residual drag applied on the satellites. The accelerometer is composed of two main parts: the Sensor Unit (including the Sensor Unit Mechanics - SUM - and the Front-End Electronic Unit - FEEU) and the Interface Control Unit - ICU. In the Accelerometer Core, located in the Sensor Unit Mechanics, the proof mass is levitated and maintained at the center of an electrode cage by electrostatic forces. Thus, any drag acceleration applied on the satellite involves a variation on the servo-controlled electrostatic suspension of the mass. The voltage on the electrodes providing this electrostatic force is the output measurement of the accelerometer. The impact of the accelerometer defaults (geometry, electronic and parasitic forces) leads to bias, misalignment and scale factor error, non-linearity and noise. Some of these accelerometer defaults are characterized by tests with micro-gravity pendulum bench on ground and with drops in ZARM catapult. The Critical Design Review was achieved successfully on September 2014. The Engineering Model (EM) was integrated and tested successfully, with ground levitation, drops, Electromagnetic Compatibility and thermal vacuum. The integration of the two Flight Models was done on July 2015. The

  5. Sustained Water Changes in California during Drought and Heavy Precipitation Inferred from GPS, InSAR, and GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argus, D. F.; Fu, Y.; Landerer, F. W.; Wiese, D. N.; Farr, T. G.; Liu, Z.; Thomas, B. F.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    About 1200 GPS sites in the westernmost United States are used to weigh changes in surface water as a function of location from 2006 to 2015. The effect of known changes in water in artificial reservoirs is removed, allowing changes in the total of snow, soil moisture, and mountain fracture groundwater to be inferred from GPS. In this study water changes inferred from GPS are placed into the context of complementary InSAR and GRACE data. The southern Central Valley (the San Joaquin Valley and Tulare Basin) is subsiding at spectacular rates of 0.01 m/yr to 0.2 m/yr in response to groundwater management. We construct an elastic model of groundwater change of the southern Central Valley, using GRACE as the basis of total groundwater loss and InSAR to infer the lateral distribution of that groundwater loss. This elastic model of Central Valley groundwater loss is removed from the GPS displacements. Because snow in California is insignificant in October, and because changes in soil moisture between successive autumns are small, we can infer changes in Sierra Nevada mountain fracture groundwater to be: -19 km3 during drought from 2006 to 2009, +35 km3 during heavy precipitation from 2009 to 2011, and -38 km3 during drought from 2011 to 2014 (start and end times are all in October). We infer changes in Sierra Nevada mountain groundwater to be playing an important role in modulating Central Valley groundwater loss. Total water in the Sierra Nevada recovered by 16 km3 from October 2014 to April 2015, but water is being lost again in summer 2015.

  6. Application of the Convolution Formalism to the Ocean Tide Potential: Results from the Gravity and Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, S. D.; Yuan, D. -N.

    2006-01-01

    A computationally efficient approach to reducing omission errors in ocean tide potential models is derived and evaluated using data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission. Ocean tide height models are usually explicitly available at a few frequencies, and a smooth unit response is assumed to infer the response across the tidal spectrum. The convolution formalism of Munk and Cartwright (1966) models this response function with a Fourier series. This allows the total ocean tide height, and therefore the total ocean tide potential, to be modeled as a weighted sum of past, present, and future values of the tide-generating potential. Previous applications of the convolution formalism have usually been limited to tide height models, but we extend it to ocean tide potential models. We use luni-solar ephemerides to derive the required tide-generating potential so that the complete spectrum of the ocean tide potential is efficiently represented. In contrast, the traditionally adopted harmonic model of the ocean tide potential requires the explicit sum of the contributions from individual tidal frequencies. It is therefore subject to omission errors from neglected frequencies and is computationally more intensive. Intersatellite range rate data from the GRACE mission are used to compare convolution and harmonic models of the ocean tide potential. The monthly range rate residual variance is smaller by 4-5%, and the daily residual variance is smaller by as much as 15% when using the convolution model than when using a harmonic model that is defined by twice the number of parameters.

  7. Using GRACE and altimetry to assess the regional sea level budget in the Indian Ocean and Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietbroek, Roelof; Uebbing, Bernd; Kusche, Jürgen; Brunnabend, Sandra-Esther

    2016-04-01

    There are a variety of factors driving present-day sea level rise. On one hand, mass loss from Greenland, Antarctica, and the world's glaciers, cause regionally varying sea level increase. While on the other hand, volumetric expansion due to ocean heating, induce long term trends as well as short term fluctuations. In addition, internal ocean mass fluctuations, and vertical land motion play a considerable role on regional to local scales. On such scales, quantifying the regional sea level budget is more challenging compared to the global average, due to increased errors and complex coastal processes. A combination of GRACE gravimetry and radar altimetry allows the separation of the volumetric contribution from the mass contribution. Here, we also resolve for a finer separation into the various contributions (Greenland, Antarctica, etc.), which requires a more sophisticated approach. We use a simultaneous inversion of GRACE and satellite altimetry data over the years 2002-2014, to separate the sea level budget in the Indian Ocean. For this means, known spatial patterns for the different contributions are prescribed while their individual time variations are estimated from the data. Characteristics of sea level variations in the Indian Ocean (total trend of 3.8 mm/yr) are compared with the global mean sea level budget (2.7 mm/yr). The Bay of Bengal will then serve as an example for a further regionalization of the inversion approach. We find a total sea level in the Bay of Bengal region ranging from 3.8 mm/yr to 5.8 mm./yr, depending on the chosen averaging area and inversion set up. The contributions from the ice sheets and glaciers stand at 1.5 mm/yr, whereas terrestrial hydrology has a negative contribution of about -0.3 mm/yr. The most variable contribution is caused by steric effects whose trend ranges from 1.5 to 3 mm/yr.

  8. Optimal locations for absolute gravity measurements and sensitivity of GRACE observations for constraining glacial isostatic adjustment on the northern hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Holger; Wu, Patrick; Wang, Hansheng

    2012-09-01

    Gravity rate of change is an important quantity in the investigation of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). However, measurements with absolute and relative gravimeters are laborious and time-consuming, especially in the vast GIA-affected regions of high latitudes with insufficient infrastructure. Results of the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission have thus provided tremendous new insight as they fully cover those areas. To better constrain the GIA model (i.e. improve the glaciation history and Earth parameters) with new gravity data, we analyse the currently determined errors in gravity rate of change from absolute gravity (AG) and GRACE measurements in North America and Fennoscandia to test their sensitivity for different ice models, lithospheric thickness, background viscosity and lateral mantle viscosity variations. We provide detailed sensitivity maps for these four parameters and highlight areas that need more AG measurements to further improve our understanding of GIA. The best detectable parameter with both methods in both regions is the sensitivity to ice model changes, which covers large areas in the sensitivity maps. Also, most of these areas are isolated from sensitive areas of the other three parameters. The latter mainly overlap with ice model sensitivity and each other. Regarding existing AG stations, more stations are strongly needed in northwestern and Arctic Canada. In contrast, a quite dense network of stations already exists in Fennoscandia. With an extension to a few sites in northwestern Russia, a complete station network is provided to study the GIA parameters. The data of dense networks would yield a comprehensive picture of gravity change, which can be further used for studies of the Earth's interior and geodynamic processes.

  9. Coseismic density redistribution of the Earth interior based on the spherical dislocation theory and comparison to GRACE data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Changyi; Sun, Wenke; Fu, Guangyu; Dong, Jie

    2015-04-01

    Coseismic deformation produces sudden changes in the Earth's layered density structure due to the volume and internal topography changes, which can disturb global gravitational field. Such gravitational perturbations have been detected by the gravity space mission data (Han et al., 2006; Heki and Matsuo, 2010; Zhou et al., 2011). Han et al. (2006) discussed the gravity changes produced by the density changes related to the crustal dilatation produce by the 2004 Sumatra earthquake (Mw 9.0). But he neglected the gravity changes due to the internal topography changes, and the adopted Earth model is the simple half space media. Cambiotti et al. (2011) also