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Sample records for plant pressure drop

  1. Pressure Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Mike Lawson briefly discussed pressure drop for aerospace applications and presented short stories about adventures experienced while working at NASA and General Dynamics, including exposure to technologies like the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart and the SWME.

  2. Gas Pressure-Drop Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal

    2010-01-01

    Most chemical engineering undergraduate laboratories have fluid mechanics experiments in which pressure drops through pipes are measured over a range of Reynolds numbers. The standard fluid is liquid water, which is essentially incompressible. Since density is constant, pressure drop does not depend on the pressure in the pipe. In addition, flow…

  3. PS foams at high pressure drop rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammaro, Daniele; De Maio, Attilio; Carbone, Maria Giovanna Pastore; Di Maio, Ernesto; Iannace, Salvatore

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we report data on PS foamed at 100 °C after CO2 saturation at 10 MPa in a new physical foaming batch that achieves pressure drop rates up to 120 MPa/s. Results show how average cell size of the foam nicely fit a linear behavior with the pressure drop rate in a double logarithmic plot. Furthermore, foam density initially decreases with the pressure drop rate, attaining a constant value at pressure drop rates higher than 40 MPa/s. Interestingly, furthermore, we observed that the shape of the pressure release curve has a large effect on the final foam morphology, as observed in tests in which the maximum pressure release rate was kept constant but the shape of the curve changed. These results allow for a fine tuning of the foam density and morphology for specific applications.

  4. Pressure drop in two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akashah, S. A.

    1980-12-01

    A computer program was developed containing some of the methods for predicting pressure drop in two-phase flow. The program contains accurate methods for predicting phase behavior and physical properties and can be used to calculate pressure drops for horizontal, inclined and vertical phases. The program was used to solve test cases for many types of flow, varying the diameter, roughness, composition, overall heat transfer coefficient, angle of inclination, and length. The Lockhart-Martinelli correlation predicts the highest pressure drop while the Beggs and Brill method predicts the lowest. The American Gas Association-American Petroleum Institute method is consistent and proved to be reliable in vertical, horizontal and inclined flow. The roughness of the pipe diameter had great effect on pressure drop in two-phase flow, while the overall heat transfer coefficient had little effect.

  5. Program calculates two-phase pressure drop

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, W.W.

    1980-11-24

    Analysts have developed a program for determining the two-phase pressure drop in piping. Written for the TI-59 programmable calculator used with a PC-100C printer, the program incorporates several unique features: it calculates single-phase as well as two-phase pressure drops, has a 10-20 s execution time, permits the operating data to be changed easily, and includes an option for calculating the estimated surface tension of paraffinic hydrocarbon liquids.

  6. Pressure Drop in Radiator Air Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, S R

    1921-01-01

    This report describes a method for measuring the drop in static pressure of air flowing through a radiator and shows (1) a reason for the discrepancy noted by various observers between head resistance and drop in pressure; (2) a difference in degree of contraction of the jet in entering a circular cell and a square cell; (3) the ratio of internal frictional resistance to total head resistance for two representative types; (4) the effect of smoothness of surface on pressure gradient; and (5) the effects of supplying heat to the radiator on pressure gradient. The fact that the pressure gradients are found to be approximately proportional to the square of the rate of flow of air appears to indicate turbulent flow, even in the short tubes of the radiator. It was found that the drop in the static pressure in the air stream through a cellular radiator and the pressure gradient in the air tubes are practically proportional to the square of the air flow in a given air density; that the difference between the head resistance per unit area and the fall of static pressure through the air tubes in radiators is apparent rather than real; and that radiators of different types differ widely in the amount of contraction of the jet at entrance. The frictional resistance was found to vary considerably, and in one case to be two-thirds of the head resistance in the type using circular cells and one-half of the head resistance of the radiator type using square cells of approximately the same dimensions.

  7. Pressure Drops Due to Silica Scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.L.; Freeston, D.H.; Dimas, Z.O.; Slatter, A.

    1995-01-01

    Experience with reinjection returns in many geothermal fields has prompted a move towards injecting waste fluids at some distance from the production field. This means that often, reinjection pipelines cover very long distances. If the waste water in the pipelines is supersaturated with respect to amorphous silica, then the deposition of silica in these pipelines is almost certain. Although the deposit may be of negligible thickness, the inner surface characteristics of the pipe will be different to those of clean mild steel. During a silica scaling experiment. geothermal brine was passed through a series of pipes of different sizes and over a period of three weeks, silica scale formed on the inner surface. The pressure drop along a distance of approximately 5m was measured by a water manometer in all test pipe sections. Significant pressure drop was observed during this time and can be correlated with the increase in the friction factor of the pipe walls due to silica scaling.

  8. Predicting Pressure Drop In Porous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawing, Pierce L.

    1990-01-01

    Theory developed to predict drop in pressure based on drag of individual fibers. Simple correlation method for data also developed. Helps in predicting flow characteristics of many strain-isolation pad (SIP) glow geometries in Shuttle Orbiter tile system. Also helps in predicting venting characteristics of tile assemblies during ascent and leakage of hot gas under tiles during descent. Useful in study of mechanics of flows through fibrous and porous media, and procedures applicable to purged fiberglass insulation, dialysis filters, and other fibrous and porous media.

  9. Method for reducing pressure drop through filters, and filter exhibiting reduced pressure drop

    DOEpatents

    Sappok, Alexander; Wong, Victor

    2014-11-18

    Methods for generating and applying coatings to filters with porous material in order to reduce large pressure drop increases as material accumulates in a filter, as well as the filter exhibiting reduced and/or more uniform pressure drop. The filter can be a diesel particulate trap for removing particulate matter such as soot from the exhaust of a diesel engine. Porous material such as ash is loaded on the surface of the substrate or filter walls, such as by coating, depositing, distributing or layering the porous material along the channel walls of the filter in an amount effective for minimizing or preventing depth filtration during use of the filter. Efficient filtration at acceptable flow rates is achieved.

  10. Effect of humidity on the filter pressure drop

    SciTech Connect

    Vendel, J.; Letourneau, P.

    1995-02-01

    The effects of humidity on the filter pressure drop have been reported in some previous studies in which it is difficult to draw definite conclusions. These studies show contradictory effects of humidity on the pressure drop probably due to differences in the hygroscopicity of the test aerosols. The objective of this paper is to present experimental results on the evolution of the filter pressure drop versus mass loading, for different test aerosols and relative humidities. Present results are compared to those found in various publication. An experimental device has been designed to measure filter pressure drop as the function of the areal density for relative humidity varying in the range of 9 % to 85 %. Experiments have been conducted with hygroscopic: (CsOH) and nonhygroscopic aerosols (TiO{sub 2}). Cesium hydroxyde (CsOH) of size of 2 {mu} M AMMD has been generated by an ultrasonic generator and the 0.7 {mu}m AMMD titanium oxyde has been dispersed by a {open_quotes}turn-table{close_quotes} generator. As it is noted in the BISWAS`publication [3], present results show, in the case of nonhygroscopic aerosols, a linear relationship of pressure drop to mass loading. For hygroscopic aerosols two cases must be considered: for relative humidity below the deliquescent point of the aerosol, the relationship of pressure drop to mass loading remains linear; above the deliquescent point, the results show a sudden increase in the pressure drop and the mass capacity of the filter is drastically reduced.

  11. Two-Phase Flow Pressure Drop of High Quality Steam

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, J. M.; Coffield, R. D.

    2001-10-01

    Two-phase pressure drop across a straight test pipe was experimentally determined for high Reynolds (Re) number steam flow for a flow quality range of 0.995 to 1.0. The testing described has been performed in order to reduce uncertainties associated with the effects of two-phase flow on pressure drop. Two-phase flow develops in steam piping because a small fraction of the steam flow condenses due to heat loss to the surroundings. There has been very limited two-phase pressure drop data in open literature for the tested flow quality range. The two-phase pressure drop data obtained in this test has enabled development of a correlation between friction factor, Reynolds number, and flow quality.

  12. Time-resolved pulsed spray drop sizing at elevated pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drallmeier, J. A.; Peters, J. E.

    1986-04-01

    An experimental program was conducted to measure drop sizes in pulsed sprays for diesel and fuel-injected spark ignition engine applications. A forward-scattering unit was designed with a high-speed data acquisition system to permit the measurement of drop sizes in sprays at 0.4-ms intervals. Data were taken at elevated pressures from 0.345 to 3.45 MPa with a 0-deg pintle nozzle. The Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) and size distribution were calculated using a computational method that is independent of a predetermined distribution function. Results taken at the spray centerline indicate that for most elevated pressures, the SMD in the secondary injection region tended to increase as the pressure in the fuel line decreased and tended to increase with increasing environmental pressure, both suggesting an inverse relationship between drop size and the pressure drop across the nozzle. Also as the environmental pressure was raised, the distribution width decreased at a slower rate than the SMD increased, indicating a spreading of the drop sizes with injection time at elevated pressures. Significant cycle-to-cycle variation in both the SMD and distribution width indicate that cycle-to-cycle variations must be considered in pulsed sprays. In addition, more variation was seen between random rather than consecutive cycles.

  13. System for Manipulating Drops and Bubbles Using Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The manipulation and control of drops of liquid and gas bubbles is achieved using high intensity acoustics in the form of and/or acoustic radiation pressure and acoustic streaming. generated by a controlled wave emission from a transducer. Acoustic radiation pressure is used to deploy or dispense drops into a liquid or a gas or bubbles into a liquid at zero or near zero velocity from the discharge end of a needle such as a syringe needle. Acoustic streaming is useful in manipulating the drop or bubble during or after deployment. Deployment and discharge is achieved by focusing the acoustic radiation pressure on the discharge end of the needle, and passing the acoustic waves through the fluid in the needle. through the needle will itself, or coaxially through the fluid medium surrounding the needle. Alternatively, the acoustic waves can be counter-deployed by focusing on the discharge end of the needle from a transducer axially aligned with the needle, but at a position opposite the needle, to prevent premature deployment of the drop or bubble. The acoustic radiation pressure can also be used for detecting the presence or absence of a drop or a bubble at the tip of a needle or for sensing various physical characteristics of the drop or bubble such as size or density.

  14. Reducing cyclone pressure drop with evasés

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclones are widely used to separate particles from gas flows and as air emissions control devices. Their cost of operation is proportional to the fan energy required to overcome their pressure drop. Evasés or exit diffusers potentially could reduce exit pressure losses without affecting collection...

  15. Microseismicity Induced by Fluid Pressure Drop (Laboratory Study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turuntaev, Sergey; Zenchenko, Evgeny; Melchaeva, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Pore pressure change in saturated porous rocks may result in its fracturing (Maury et Fourmaintraux, 1993) and corresponding microseismic event occurrences. Microseismicity due to fluid injection is considered in numerous papers (Maxwell, 2010, Shapiro et al., 2005). Another type of the porous medium fracturing is related with rapid pore pressure drop at some boundary. The mechanism of such fracturing was considered by (Khristianovich, 1985) as a model of sudden coal blowing and by (Alidibirov, Panov, 1998) as a model of volcano eruptions. If the porous saturated medium has a boundary where it directly contacted with fluid under the high pressure (in a hydraulic fracture or in a borehole), and the pressure at that boundary is dropped, the conditions for tensile cracks can be achieved at some distance from the boundary. In the paper, the results of experimental study of saturated porous sample fracturing due to pore pressure rapid drop are discussed. The samples (82 mm high, ∅60 mm) were made of quartz sand, which was cemented by "liquid glass" glue with mass fraction 1%. The sample (porosity 35%, uniaxial unconfined compression strength 2.5 MPa) was placed in a mould and saturated by oil. The upper end of the sample contacted with the mould upper lid, the lower end contacted with fluid. The fluid pressure was increased to 10 MPa and then discharged through the bottom nipple. The pressure increases/drops were repeated 30-50 times. Pore pressure and acoustic emission (AE) were registered by transducers mounted into upper and bottom lids of the mould. It was found, that AE sources (corresponded to microfracturing) were spreading from the open end to the closed end of the sample, and that maximal number of AE events was registered at some distance from the opened end. The number of AE pulses increased with every next pressure drop, meanwhile the number of pulses with high amplitudes diminished. It was found that AE maximal rate corresponded to the fluid pressure

  16. Controlling Vapor Pressure In Hanging-Drop Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Smith, Robbie

    1988-01-01

    Rate of evaporation adjusted to produce larger crystals. Device helps to control vapor pressure of water and other solvents in vicinity of hanging drop of solution containing dissolved enzyme protein. Well of porous frit (sintered glass) holds solution in proximity to drop of solution containing protein or enzyme. Vapor from solution in frit controls evaporation of solvent from drop to control precipitation of protein or enzyme. With device, rate of nucleation limited to decrease number and increase size (and perhaps quality) of crystals - large crystals of higher quality needed for x-ray diffraction studies of macromolecules.

  17. Experimental Investigation of Oscillatory Flow Pressure and Pressure Drop Through Complex Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Wang, Meng; Gedeon, David

    2005-01-01

    A series of experiments have been performed to investigate the oscillatory flow pressure and pressure drop through complex geometries. These experiments were conducted at the CSU-SLRE facility which is a horizontally opposed, two-piston, single-acting engine with a split crankshaft driving mechanism. Flow through a rectangular duct, with no insert (obstruction), was studied first. Then four different inserts were examined: Abrupt, Manifold, Diverging Short and Diverging Long. The inserts were mounted in the center of the rectangular duct to represent different type of geometries that could be encountered in Stirling machines. The pressure and pressure drop of the oscillating flow was studied for: 1) different inserts, 2) different phase angle between the two pistons of the engine (zero, 90 lead, 180, and 90 lag), and 3) for different piston frequencies (5, 10, 15, and 20 Hz). It was found that the pressure drop of the oscillatory flow increases with increasing Reynolds number. The pressure drop was shown to be mainly due to the gas inertia for the case of oscillatory flow through a rectangular duct with no insert. On the other hand, for the cases with different inserts into the rectangular duct, the pressure drop has three sources: inertia, friction, and local losses. The friction pressure drop is only a small fraction of the total pressure drop. It was also shown that the dimensionless pressure drop decreases with increasing kinetic Reynolds number.

  18. Determination of pressure drop across activated carbon fiber respirator cartridges.

    PubMed

    Balanay, Jo Anne G; Lungu, Claudiu T

    2016-01-01

    Activated carbon fiber (ACF) is considered as an alternative adsorbent to granular activated carbon (GAC) for the development of thinner, lighter, and efficient respirators because of their larger surface area and adsorption capacities, thinner critical bed depth, lighter weight, and fabric form. This study aims to measure the pressure drop across different types of commercially available ACFs in respirator cartridges to determine the ACF composition and density that will result in acceptably breathable respirators. Seven ACF types in cloth (ACFC) and felt (ACFF) forms were tested. ACFs in cartridges were challenged with pre-conditioned constant air flow (43 LPM, 23°C, 50% RH) at different compositions (single- or combination-ACF type) in a test chamber. Pressure drop across ACF cartridges were obtained using a micromanometer, and compared among different cartridge configurations, to those of the GAC cartridge, and to the NIOSH breathing resistance requirements for respirator cartridges. Single-ACF type cartridges filled with any ACFF had pressure drop measurements (23.71-39.93 mmH2O) within the NIOSH inhalation resistance requirement of 40 mmH2O, while those of the ACFC cartridges (85.47±3.67 mmH2O) exceeded twice the limit due possibly to the denser weaving of ACFC fibers. All single ACFF-type cartridges had higher pressure drop compared to the GAC cartridge (23.13±1.14 mmH2O). Certain ACF combinations (2 ACFF or ACFC/ACFF types) resulted to pressure drop (26.39-32.81 mmH2O) below the NIOSH limit. All single-ACFF type and all combination-ACF type cartridges with acceptable pressure drop had much lower adsorbent weights than GAC (≤15.2% of GAC weight), showing potential for light-weight respirator cartridges. 100% ACFC in cartridges may result to respirators with high breathing resistance and, thus, is not recommended. The more dense ACFF and ACFC types may still be possibly used in respirators by combining them with less dense ACFF materials and/or by

  19. Frictional pressure drop in horizontal pneumatic conveying of coal and limestone

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, C.S.; Thomas, J.F.

    1983-08-01

    Pneumatic conveying experiments were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with crushed coal, limestone, and coal-limestone mixtures on a conveying system designed to represent the branch feed lines in the TVA 20-MW(e) atmospheric fluidized bed combustor. Test conditions were chosen to cover the anticipated operating ranges of the pilot plant. Details of the experimental apparatus and a summary of the results are presented in ORNL/TM-7724. This report is a further analysis of the horizontal pressure-drop data produced by the ORNL experiments. The results are compared with previous data and correlations in the literature, and the combined data provide strong evidence that there at least two possible pressure-drop modes in horizontal, dilute-phase conveying. The ORNL results follow a high-pressure-drop mode, while a major portion of data in the literature follow a low-pressure-drop mode. The results of Mehta (1955) and Peskin (1963) confirm the existence of the high-pressure-drop mode. It is proposed that the two pressure-drop modes result from inertia-dominated and viscous-dominated flow. With an inertial model, it is possible to derive an expression for the horizontal pressure drop that agrees remarkably well with the ORNL data, the larger-particle data of Mehta (1955), and the data of Peskin (1963). The small particle data of Mehta and the bulk of the data in the literature appear to follow the viscous flow model developed by Julian and Dukler (1965). It also appears that some data in the literature may represent combinations of the two flow regimes or transitions between them. 29 references, 15 figures, 2 tables.

  20. Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop in Concentric Annular Flows of Binary Inert Gas Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, R. S.; Martin, J. J.; Yocum, D. J.; Stewart, E. T.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of heat transfer and pressure drop of binary inert gas mixtures flowing through smooth concentric circular annuli, tubes with fully developed velocity profiles, and constant heating rate are described. There is a general lack of agreement among the constant property heat transfer correlations for such mixtures. No inert gas mixture data exist for annular channels. The intent of this study was to develop highly accurate and benchmarked pressure drop and heat transfer correlations that can be used to size heat exchangers and cores for direct gas Brayton nuclear power plants. The inside surface of the annular channel is heated while the outer surface of the channel is insulated. Annulus ratios range 0.5 < r* < 0.83. These smooth tube data may serve as a reference to the heat transfer and pressure drop performance in annuli, tubes, and channels having helixes or spacer ribs, or other surfaces.

  1. Prediction of Pressure Drop in the ITER Divertor Cooling Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, S.T.; Chen, J.L.

    2005-04-15

    This study investigated the pressure drop in the divertor cooling channels of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The water in the cooling channels will encounter the following flow and boiling regimes: 1) single-phase convection, 2) highly-subcooled boiling, 3) onset of nucleate boiling (ONB), and 4) fully-developed subcooled boiling. The upper operating boundary is limited by the departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) or burnout conditions. Twisted-tape insert will be used to enhance local heat transfer. Analytical models, validated with relevant databases, were proposed for the above-identified flow regimes. A user-friendly computer code was developed to calculate the overall pressure drop and the exit pressure of a specific local segment throughout the entire flow circuit. Although the operating parameters were based on the CDA phase input the results are found in general agreement when compared with the ITER EDA results.

  2. Experimental study on pressure drop of bends in dense phase pneumatic conveying under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Gaoyang; Liang, Cai; Chen, Xiaoping; Xu, Pan; Xu, Guiling; Shen, Liu

    2014-04-01

    The transport test using nitrogen as conveying gas are carried out at high operating pressure up to 4MPa in the experimental equipment for dense phase pneumatic conveying. The transport powders in the experiment are anthracite coal and petroleum coke. The pressure drop characteristics in bends are acquired with the different transport powder. The experimental results show that under the similar mass flow, the pressure drop of vertical upward bend is greater than the horizontal bend and the horizontal bend is greater than the vertical downward bend at the same superficial gas velocity, while there is a best superficial gas velocity minimizes the pressure drop of the bend. Under the similar mass flow rate and the similar particle size, the pressure drop of the bend with the petroleum coke is greater than the pressure drop with the anthracite coal as the same superficial gas velocity. According to Barth's additional pressure drop method, the pressure drop fitting formulas of the vertical upward bend, the horizontal bend and the vertical downward bend are obtained, and the predicted results are in accordance with that of the experiments.

  3. Description of an oscillating flow pressure drop test rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J. Gary; Miller, Eric L.; Gedeon, David R.; Koester, Gary E.

    1988-01-01

    A test rig designed to generate heat exchanger pressure drop information under oscillating flow conditions is described. This oscillating flow rig is based on a variable stroke and variable frequency linear drive motor. A frequency capability of 120 hertz and a mean test pressure up to 15 mPA (2200 psi) allows for testing at flow conditions found in modern high specific power Stirling engines. An important design feature of this rig is that it utilizes a single close coupled dynamic pressure transducer to measure the pressure drop across the test sample. This eliminates instrumentation difficulties associated with the pressure sensing lines common to differential pressure transducers. Another feature of the rig is that it utilizes a single displacement piston. This allows for testing of different sample lengths and configurations without hardware modifications. All data acquisition and reduction for the rig is performed with a dedicated personal computer. Thus the overall system design efficiently integrates the testing and data reduction procedures. The design methodology and details of the test rig is described.

  4. Pressure drop and He II flow through fine mesh screens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddocks, J. R.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    1989-01-01

    Fluid acquisition systems for He II transfer devices will utilize gallery arms to ensure that the fluid encounters the pump inlet. In near term experiments such as Superfluid Helium on Orbit Transfer (SHOOT), the preferred configuration consists of several rectangular channels which have one side made from a Dutch weave stainless steel screen having 325 x 2300 wires per inch. The effective pore diameter for this screen is about 5 microns. The present paper reports on measurements of pressure drop across a screen when it is subjected to a flow of liquid helium. The experiment measures the time rate of change of the level in two different helium reservoirs connected by a screen-blocked channel. Results with normal helium are compared with predictions based on the Armour-Cannon (1968) equations. The He II data show considerable deviation from the classical result. A discussion of the He II pressure drop results in terms of two fluid hydrodynamics is included.

  5. Validation of an All-Pressure Fluid Drop Model: Heptane Fluid Drops in Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K.; Bellan, J.; Bulzan, Daniel L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Despite the fact that supercritical fluids occur both in nature and in industrial situations, the fundamentals of their behavior is poorly understood because supercritical fluids combine the characteristics of both liquids and gases, and therefore their behavior is not intuitive. There are several specific reasons for the lack of understanding: First, data from (mostly optical) measurements can be very misleading because regions of high density thus observed are frequently identified with liquids. A common misconception is that if in an experiment one can optically identify "drops" and "ligaments", the observed fluid must be in a liquid state. This inference is incorrect because in fact optical measurements detect any large change (i.e. gradients) in density. Thus, the density ratio may be well below Omicron(10(exp 3)) that characterizes its liquid/gas value, but the measurement will still identify a change in the index of refraction providing that the change is sudden (steep gradients). As shown by simulations of supercritical fluids, under certain conditions the density gradients may remain large during the supercritical binary fluids mixing, thus making them optically identifiable. Therefore, there is no inconsistency between the optical observation of high density regions and the fluids being in a supercritical state. A second misconception is that because a fluid has a liquid-like density, it is appropriate to model it as a liquid. However, such fluids may have liquid-like densities while their transport properties differ from those of a liquid. Considering that the critical pressure of most fuel hydrocarbons used in Diesel and gas turbine engines is in the range of 1.5 - 3 MPa, and the fact that the maximum pressure attained in these engines is about 6 Mps, it is clear that the fuel in the combustion chamber will experience both subcritical and supercritical conditions. Studies of drop behavior over a wide range of pressures were performed in the past

  6. The pressure drop in a porous material layer during combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Kondrikov, B.N.

    1995-07-01

    During the combustion of a porous material layer, a manometer, which is attached to the cold end of the charge, records at the bottom of the layer a pressure reduction, which was discovered more than 20 years ago but which remains essentially unexplained up to the present. It is experimentally shown that this effect is similar to the pressure change in the cavities when a light gas (helium, hydrogen) diffuses from (or to) them under isothermal conditions and that it increases during the combustion mainly due to the accompanying Stefan type flow, and probably also as a result of the thermal diffusion. A pressure drop in the cavities is evidently made possible also by the pressure reduction in the flame which follows from the Hugoniot adiabatic theory.

  7. Limiting the Accidental Pressure Drop in NIF Beam Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M

    2000-11-06

    This report summarizes the use of a one-dimensional model of a time-dependent compressible flow condition to validate the results from a more sophisticated three-dimensional model. The flow conditions consist of the sudden decompression of a pressurized tube joined to an evacuated sphere, where the tube also has a leak to external atmosphere that is triggered open at a given pressure difference below sea-level pressure. This flow model is used to calculate conditions in a NIF beam tube if an internal vacuum barrier fails, and to calculate how the size and timing of an opening to external atmosphere changes tube pressure. Decompression of a NIF beam tube is a potential safety hazard since the tube could collapse if the tube pressure is reduced below the buckling limit. To prevent this from occurring, each pressurized section includes a rupture panel which is designed to open to external atmosphere at a given pressure difference. The inrush of external atmosphere through the rupture panel fills both the tube and the vacuum drawing on it, and in this way the pressure drop in the tube is quickly limited and reversed. In summary, the results from the 1D model indicate that the 3-D calculations are accurate and reasonable.

  8. Metamorphic record of catastrophic pressure drops in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamato, P.; Brun, J. P.

    2017-01-01

    When deeply buried in subduction zones, rocks undergo mineral transformations that record the increase of pressure and temperature. The fact that high-pressure metamorphic parageneses are found at the Earth’s surface proves that rock burial is followed by exhumation. Here we use analysis of available data sets from high-pressure metamorphic rocks worldwide to show that the peak pressure is proportional to the subsequent decompression occurring during the initial stage of retrogression. We propose, using a simple mechanical analysis, that this linear relationship can be explained by the transition from burial-related compression to extension at the onset of exhumation. This major switch in orientation and magnitude of principal tectonic stresses leads to a catastrophic pressure drop prior to actual rock ascent. Therefore, peak pressures are not necessarily, as commonly believed, directly dependent on the maximum burial depth, but can also reflect a change of tectonic regime. Our results, which are in agreement with natural data, have significant implications for rock rheology, subduction zone seismicity, and the magnitudes of tectonic pressures sustained by rocks. Current views of subduction dynamics could be reconsidered in that perspective.

  9. Air Flow and Pressure Drop Measurements Across Porous Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Dennis S.; Cuy, Michael D.; Werner, Roger A.

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of air flow tests across eight porous, open cell ceramic oxide samples. During ceramic specimen processing, the porosity was formed using the sacrificial template technique, with two different sizes of polystyrene beads used for the template. The samples were initially supplied with thicknesses ranging from 0.14 to 0.20 in. (0.35 to 0.50 cm) and nonuniform backside morphology (some areas dense, some porous). Samples were therefore ground to a thickness of 0.12 to 0.14 in. (0.30 to 0.35 cm) using dry 120 grit SiC paper. Pressure drop versus air flow is reported. Comparisons of samples with thickness variations are made, as are pressure drop estimates. As the density of the ceramic material increases the maximum corrected flow decreases rapidly. Future sample sets should be supplied with samples of similar thickness and having uniform surface morphology. This would allow a more consistent determination of air flow versus processing parameters and the resulting porosity size and distribution.

  10. Axisymmetric drop shape analysis-constrained sessile drop (ADSA-CSD): a film balance technique for high collapse pressures.

    PubMed

    Saad, Sameh M I; Policova, Zdenka; Acosta, Edgar J; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2008-10-07

    Collapse pressure of insoluble monolayers is a property determined from surface pressure/area isotherms. Such isotherms are commonly measured by a Langmuir film balance or a drop shape technique using a pendant drop constellation (ADSA-PD). Here, a different embodiment of a drop shape analysis, called axisymmetric drop shape analysis-constrained sessile drop (ADSA-CSD) is used as a film balance. It is shown that ADSA-CSD has certain advantages over conventional methods. The ability to measure very low surface tension values (e.g., <2 mJ/m2), an easier deposition procedure than in a pendant drop setup, and leak-proof design make the constrained sessile drop constellation a better choice than the pendant drop constellation in many situations. Results of compression isotherms are obtained on three different monolayers: octadecanol, dipalmitoyl-phosphatidyl-choline (DPPC), and dipalmitoyl-phosphatidyl-glycerol (DPPG). The collapse pressures are found to be reproducible and in agreement with previous methods. For example, the collapse pressure of DPPC is found to be 70.2 mJ/m2. Such values are not achievable with a pendant drop. The collapse pressure of octadecanol is found to be 61.3 mJ/m2, while that of DPPG is 59.0 mJ/m2. The physical reasons for these differences are discussed. The results also show a distinctive difference between the onset of collapse and the ultimate collapse pressure (ultimate strength) of these films. ADSA-CSD allows detailed study of this collapse region.

  11. Pressure drop of He II flow through a porous media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddocks, J. R.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    1990-01-01

    The paper reports on measurements of He II pressure drop across two porous SiO2 ceramic filter materials. These materials vary only in porosity, having values of 0.94 and 0.96. The average fiber diameter in both cases is approximately 5 microns. The experiment consists of a glass tube containing a piece of this sponge in one end. The tube is rapidly displaced downward in a bath of helium and the liquid levels are allowed to equilibrate over time producing variable velocities up to 10 cm/sec. The results are compared with those previously obtained using fine mesh screens. Good qualitative agreement is observed for turbulent flow; however, the behavior in the laminar flow regime is not fully understood.

  12. Method - Pressure drop tests for fuel system components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-12-01

    Techniques are presented for testing components and improving the accuracy of such tests to meet the requirements of MIL-F-8615 or equivalent specifications. Pressure-drop tests for individual components are described generally including the single and double piezometer-tube methods, and many of the suggested improvements apply to these techniques. The test setup is presented graphically, and the procedural conditions are described. The suggestions for improving the test results include notes regarding air bubbles, pumping-source pulsations, attachment fittings, overshooting the flow rate, and the importance of precise calibration. Diagrams are given for the double piezometer-tube, the mercury-manometer, and the fuel-manometer tests, and the arithmetic computation is described for the data-reduction equation.

  13. Pressure drop and thrust predictions for transonic micronozzle flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, J.; Groll, R.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the expansion of xenon, argon, krypton, and neon gases through a Laval nozzle is studied experimentally and numerically. The pressurized gases are accelerated through the nozzle into a vacuum chamber in an attempt to simulate the operating conditions of a cold-gas thruster for attitude control of a micro-satellite. The gases are evaluated at several mass flow rates ranging between 0.178 mg/s and 3.568 mg/s. The Re numbers are low (8-256) and the estimated values of Kn number lie between 0.33 and 0.02 (transition and slip-flow regime). Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and continuum-based simulations with a no-slip boundary condition are performed. The DSMC and the experimental results show good agreement in the range Kn > 0.1, while the Navier-Stokes results describe the experimental data more accurately for Kn < 0.05. Comparison between the experimental and Navier-Stokes results shows high deviations at the lower mass flow rates and higher Kn numbers. A relation describing the deviation of the pressure drop through the nozzle as a function of Kn is obtained. For gases with small collision cross sections, the experimental pressure results deviate more strongly from the no-slip assumption. From the analysis of the developed function, it is possible to correct the pressure results for the studied gases, both in the slip-flow and transition regimes, with four gas-independent accommodation coefficients. The thrust delivered by the cold-gas thruster and the specific impulse is determined based on the numerical results. Furthermore, an increase of the thickness of the viscous boundary layer through the diffuser of the micronozzle is observed. This results in a shock-less decrease of the Mach number and the flow velocity, which penalizes thrust efficiency. The negative effect of the viscous boundary layer on thrust efficiency can be lowered through higher values of Re and a reduction of the diffuser length.

  14. Resonances, radiation pressure and optical scattering phenomena of drops and bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, P. L.; Goosby, S. G.; Langley, D. S.; Loporto-Arione, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    Acoustic levitation and the response of fluid spheres to spherical harmonic projections of the radiation pressure are described. Simplified discussions of the projections are given. A relationship between the tangential radiation stress and the Konstantinov effect is introduced and fundamental streaming patterns for drops are predicted. Experiments on the forced shape oscillation of drops are described and photographs of drop fission are displayed. Photographs of critical angle and glory scattering by bubbles and rainbow scattering by drops are displayed.

  15. The effect of pressure on annular flow pressure drop in a small pipe

    SciTech Connect

    de Bertodano, M.A.L.; Beus, S.G.; Shi, Jian-Feng

    1996-09-01

    New experimental data was obtained for pressure drop and entrainment for annular up-flow in a vertical pipe. The 9.5 mm. pipe has an L/D ratio of 440 to insure fully developed annular flow. The pressure ranged from 140 kPa to 660 kPa. Therefore the density ratio was varied by a factor of four approximately. This allows the investigation of the effect of pressure on the interfacial shear models. Gas superficial velocities between 25 and 126 m/s were tested. This extends the range of previous data to higher gas velocities. The data were compared with well known models for interfacial shear that represent the state of the art. Good results were obtained when the model by Asali, Hanratty and Andreussi was modified for the effect of pressure. Furthermore an equivalent model was obtained based on the mixing length theory for rough pipes. It correlates the equivalent roughness to the film thickness.

  16. Low pressure drop airborne molecular contaminant filtration using open-channel networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallas, Andrew J.; Ding, Lefei; Joriman, Jon; Zastera, Dustin; Seguin, Kevin; Empson, James

    2006-03-01

    Airborne molecular contamination (AMC) continues to play a very decisive role in the performance of many microelectronic devices and manufacturing processes. Currently, the state of the filtration industry is such that optimum filter life and removal efficiency for AMC is offered by granular filter beds. However, the attributes that make packed beds of adsorbents extremely efficient also impart issues related to elevated filter weight and pressure drop. Most of the low pressure drop AMC filters currently offered tend to be quiet costly and contaminant nonspecific. Many of these low pressure drop filters are simply pleated combinations of various adsorptive and reactive media. On the other hand, low pressure drop filters, such as those designed as open-channel networks (OCNs), can still offer good filter life and removal efficiency, with the additional benefits of significant reductions in overall filter weight and pressure drop. Equally important for many applications, the OCN filters can reconstruct the airflow so as to enhance the operation of a tool or process. For tool mount assemblies and full fan unit filters this can result in reduced fan and blower speeds, which subsequently can provide reduced vibration and energy costs. Additionally, these low pressure drop designs can provide a cost effective way of effectively removing AMC in full fab (or HVAC) filtration applications without significantly affecting air-handling requirements. Herein, we will present a new generation of low pressure drop OCN filters designed for AMC removal in a wide range of applications.

  17. Effect of External Pressure Drop on Loop Heat Pipe Operating Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jentung, Ku; Ottenstein, Laura; Rogers, Paul; Cheung, Kwok; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the effect of the pressure drop on the operating temperature in a loop heat pipe (LHP). Because the evaporator and the compensation chamber (CC) both contain two-phase fluid, a thermodynamic constraint exists between the temperature difference and the pressure drop for these two components. As the pressure drop increases, so will the temperature difference. The temperature difference in turn causes an increase of the heat leak from the evaporator to the CC, resulting in a higher CC temperature. Furthermore, the heat leak strongly depends on the vapor void fraction inside the evaporator core. Tests were conducted by installing a valve on the vapor line so as to vary the pressure drop, and by charging the LHP with various amounts of fluid. Test results verify that the LHP operating temperature increases with an increasing differential pressure, and the temperature increase is a strong function of the fluid inventory in the loop.

  18. Compressibility Effects on Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop in Smooth Cylindrical Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Jack N

    1944-01-01

    An analysis is made to simplify pressure-drop calculations for nonadiabatic and adiabatic friction flow of air in smooth cylindrical tubes when the density changes due to heat transfer and pressure drop are appreciable. Solutions of the equation of motion are obtained by the use of Reynolds' analogy between heat transfer and skin friction. Charts of the solutions are presented for making pressure-drop calculations. A technique of using the charts to determine the position of a normal shock in a tube is described.

  19. Laboratory manual for static pressure drop experiments in LMFBR wire wrapped rod bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, K.J.; Todreas, N.E.

    1980-07-01

    Purpose of this experiment is to determine both interior and edge subchannel axial pressure drops for a range of Reynolds numbers. The subchannel static pressure drop is used to calculate subchannel and bundle average friction factors, which can be used to verify existing friction factor correlations. The correlations for subchannel friction factors are used as input to computer codes which solve the coupled energy, continuity, and momentum equations, and are also used to develop flow split correlations which are needed as input to codes which solve only the energy equation. The bundle average friction factor is used to calculate the overall bundle pressure drop, which determines the required pumping power.

  20. LHe Flow Regime/Pressure Drop for D0 Solenoid at Steady State Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1993-03-03

    This paper describes in a note taking format what was learned from several sources on two phase liquid helium flow regimes and pressure drops as applied to the D-Zero solenoid upgrade project. Calculations to estimate the steady state conditions for the D-Zero solenoid at 5, 10 and 15 g/s are also presented. For the lower flow rates a stratified type regime can be expected with a pressure drop less than 0.5 psi. For the higher flow rate a more homogeneous flow regime can be expected with a pressure drop between 0.4 to 1.5 psi.

  1. 75 FR 31288 - Plant-Verified Drop Shipment (PVDS)-Nonpostal Documentation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-03

    ... 111 Plant-Verified Drop Shipment (PVDS)--Nonpostal Documentation AGENCY: Postal Service TM . ACTION... Service, Domestic Mail Manual (DMM ) 705.15. 2.14 to clarify that PS Form 8125, Plant-Verified Drop...: As a result of reviews of USPS policy concerning practices at induction points of plant-verified...

  2. Stretching and squeezing of sessile dielectric drops by the optical radiation pressure.

    PubMed

    Chraïbi, Hamza; Lasseux, Didier; Arquis, Eric; Wunenburger, Régis; Delville, Jean-Pierre

    2008-06-01

    We study numerically the deformation of sessile dielectric drops immersed in a second fluid when submitted to the optical radiation pressure of a continuous Gaussian laser wave. Both drop stretching and drop squeezing are investigated at steady state where capillary effects balance the optical radiation pressure. A boundary integral method is implemented to solve the axisymmetric Stokes flow in the two fluids. In the stretching case, we find that the drop shape goes from prolate to near-conical for increasing optical radiation pressure whatever the drop to beam radius ratio and the refractive index contrast between the two fluids. The semiangle of the cone at equilibrium decreases with the drop to beam radius ratio and is weakly influenced by the index contrast. Above a threshold value of the radiation pressure, these "optical cones" become unstable and a disruption is observed. Conversely, when optically squeezed, the drop shifts from an oblate to a concave shape leading to the formation of a stable "optical torus." These findings extend the electrohydrodynamics approach of drop deformation to the much less investigated "optical domain" and reveal the openings offered by laser waves to actively manipulate droplets at the micrometer scale.

  3. Effects of pressure drop and superficial velocity on the bubbling fluidized bed incinerator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Jehng; Chen, Suming; Lei, Perng-Kwei; Wu, Chung-Hsing

    2007-12-01

    Since performance and operational conditions, such as superficial velocity, pressure drop, particles viodage, and terminal velocity, are difficult to measure on an incinerator, this study used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to determine numerical solutions. The effects of pressure drop and superficial velocity on a bubbling fluidized bed incinerator (BFBI) were evaluated. Analytical results indicated that simulation models were able to effectively predict the relationship between superficial velocity and pressure drop over bed height in the BFBI. Second, the models in BFBI were simplified to simulate scale-up beds without excessive computation time. Moreover, simulation and experimental results showed that minimum fluidization velocity of the BFBI must be controlled in at 0.188-3.684 m/s and pressure drop was mainly caused by bed particles.

  4. Heat transfer and pressure drop for air flow through enhanced passages. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Obot, N.T.; Esen, E.B.

    1992-06-01

    An extensive experimental investigation was carried out to determine the pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics for laminar, transitional and turbulent flow of air through a smooth passage and twenty-three enhanced passages. The internal surfaces of all enhanced passages had spirally shaped geometries; these included fluted, finned/ribbed and indented surfaces. The Reynolds number (Re) was varied between 400 and 50000. The effect of heat transfer (wall cooling or fluid heating) on pressure drop is most significant within the transition region; the recorded pressure drop with heat transfer is much higher than that without heat transfer. The magnitude of this effect depends markedly on the average surface temperature and, to a lesser extent, on the geometric characteristics of the enhanced surfaces. When the pressure drop data are reduced as values of the Fanning friction factor(f), the results are about the same with and without heat transfer for turbulent flow, with moderate differences in the laminar and transition regions.

  5. Heat transfer and pressure drop for air flow through enhanced passages

    SciTech Connect

    Obot, N.T.; Esen, E.B.

    1992-06-01

    An extensive experimental investigation was carried out to determine the pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics for laminar, transitional and turbulent flow of air through a smooth passage and twenty-three enhanced passages. The internal surfaces of all enhanced passages had spirally shaped geometries; these included fluted, finned/ribbed and indented surfaces. The Reynolds number (Re) was varied between 400 and 50000. The effect of heat transfer (wall cooling or fluid heating) on pressure drop is most significant within the transition region; the recorded pressure drop with heat transfer is much higher than that without heat transfer. The magnitude of this effect depends markedly on the average surface temperature and, to a lesser extent, on the geometric characteristics of the enhanced surfaces. When the pressure drop data are reduced as values of the Fanning friction factor(f), the results are about the same with and without heat transfer for turbulent flow, with moderate differences in the laminar and transition regions.

  6. The pressure hold/drop integrity test; its correlation to diffusive flow.

    PubMed

    Trotter, A M; Meltzer, T H

    1998-01-01

    The pressure-drop/hold procedure enables the diffusive flow integrity testing of filters to be performed without breaching the system downstream of the filter. It is not necessary to measure volumetrically the diffused gas on the downstream side of the filter. By means of pressure transducers the pressure loss is determined upstream; thus eliminating the threat of sepsis due to down-stream invasions. The pressure decay exercise can be used to characterize the various filter types. A constancy of filter manufacture is required for a given filter type. Unless the pressure drop exceeds the value established as the maximum allowable decay, the filter is judged to be integral. It qualifies as a sterilizing grade filter. Excessive pressure decays will also eventuate from leaks, as from improperly sealed housings. Performed prior to the filtration, the procedure serves to eliminate the wasteful use of an imperfect system, whether caused by faulty sealing, incorrect filter type or flawed filters. Where leaks are detected, the filter can be reexamined for its integrity. To enable the pressure-drop procedure to serve as an integrity test, the measured pressure decays require being correlated with organism retention data. This is made possible by the arithmetic conversion of the pressure decay curve into the conventional diffusive airflow curve established to have such a correlation. The transformation of the pressure-drop curve into the differential airflow plot is automatically performed by certain of the automated integrity test machines. These devices, utilizing pressure transducers, are capable of measuring small pressure drops with requisite sensitivity; gauges commonly are not. Moreover, as previously stated, the measurements are advantageously made on the upside of the filter. The use of automated test machines is, therefore, recommended for the performance of the pressure hold/drop integrity test in furtherance of the practice of filter integrity testing.

  7. Turning Vanes in Exhaust Duct Flow: Study for Energy Efficiency, Optimization and Pressure Drop Mitigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    backpressure caused by recirculation zones and reduce soot accumulation. The eddy recirculation zones tend to accumulate soot , thereby increasing pressure drop...zone size. Recirculation zones tend to accumulate soot and other particles, increase pressure drop as well as increase the frequency of required...of turning vanes on the reduction of primary and secondary recirculation zones, which will affect soot and particle accumulation sites, has not been

  8. Effect of bed pressure drop on performance of a CFB boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Hairui Yang; Hai Zhang; Shi Yang; Guangxi Yue; Jun Su; Zhiping Fu

    2009-05-15

    The effect of bed pressure drop and bed inventory on the performances of a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler was studied. By using the state specification design theory, the fluidization state of the gas-solids flow in the furnace of conventional CFB boilers was reconstructed to operate at a much lower bed pressure drop by reducing bed inventory and control bed quality. Through theoretical analysis, it was suggested that there would exist a theoretical optimal value of bed pressure drop, around which the boiler operation can achieve the maximal combustion efficiency and with significant reduction of the wear of the heating surface and fan energy consumption. The analysis was validated by field tests carried out in a 75 t/h CFB boiler. At full boiler load, when bed pressure drop was reduced from 7.3 to 3.2 kPa, the height of the dense zone in the lower furnace decreased, but the solid suspension density profile in the upper furnace and solid flow rate were barely influenced. Consequently, the average heat transfer coefficient in the furnace was kept nearly the same and the furnace temperature increment was less than 17{sup o}C. It was also found that the carbon content in the fly ash decreased first with decreasing bed pressure drop and then increased with further increasing bed pressure drop. The turning point with minimal carbon content was referred to as the point with optimal bed pressure drop. For this boiler, at the optimum point the bed pressure was around 5.7 kPa with the overall excess air ratio of 1.06. When the boiler was operated around this optimal point, not only the combustion efficiency was improved, but also fan energy consumption and wear of heating surface were reduced. 23 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Pressure drop of slug flow in microchannels with increasing void fraction: experiment and modeling.

    PubMed

    Molla, Shahnawaz; Eskin, Dmitry; Mostowfi, Farshid

    2011-06-07

    Pressure drop in a gas-liquid slug flow through a long microchannel of rectangular cross-section was investigated. Pressure measurements in a lengthy (∼0.8 m) microchannel determined the pressure gradient to be constant in a flow where gas bubbles progressively expanded and the flow velocity increased due to a significant pressure drop. Most of the earlier studies of slug flow in microchannels considered systems where the expansion of the gas bubbles was negligible in the channel. In contrast, we investigated systems where the volume of the gas phase increased significantly due to a large pressure drop (up to 1811 kPa) along the channel. This expansion of the gas phase led to a significant increase in the void fraction, causing considerable flow acceleration. The pressure drop in the microchannel was studied for three gas-liquid systems; water-nitrogen, dodecane-nitrogen, and pentadecane-nitrogen. Inside the microchannel, local pressure was measured using a series of embedded membranes acting as pressure sensors. Our investigation of the pressure drop showed a linear trend over a wide range of void fractions and flow conditions in the two-phase flow. The lengths and the velocities of the liquid slugs and the gas bubbles were also studied along the microchannel by employing a video imaging technique. Furthermore, a model describing the gas-liquid slug flow in a long microchannel was developed to calculate the pressure drop under conditions similar to the experiments. An excellent agreement between the developed model and the experimental data was obtained.

  10. Experimental microbubble generation by sudden pressure drop and fluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco Gutierrez, Fernando; Figueroa Espinoza, Bernardo; Aguilar Corona, Alicia; Vargas Correa, Jesus; Solorio Diaz, Gildardo

    2014-11-01

    Mass and heat transfer, as well as chemical species in bubbly flow are of importance in environmental and industrial applications. Microbubbles are well suited to these applications due to the large interface contact area and residence time. The objective of this investigation is to build devices to produce microbubbles using two methods: pressure differences and fluidics. Some characteristics, advantages and drawbacks of both methods are briefly discussed, as well as the characterization of the bubbly suspensions in terms of parameters such as the pressure jump and bubble equivalent diameter distribution. The authors acknowledge the support of Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología.

  11. Novel cyclone empirical pressure drop and emissions with heterogeneous particulate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New cyclone designs equally effective at controlling emissions that have smaller pressure losses would reduce both the financial and the environmental cost of procuring electricity. Tests were conducted with novel and industry standard 30.5 cm diameter cyclones at inlet velocities from 8 to 18 m s-...

  12. Investigation of pressure drop in capillary tube for mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardhapurkar, P. M.; Sridharan, Arunkumar; Atrey, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    A capillary tube is commonly used in small capacity refrigeration and air-conditioning systems. It is also a preferred expansion device in mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson (MR J-T) cryocoolers, since it is inexpensive and simple in configuration. However, the flow inside a capillary tube is complex, since flashing process that occurs in case of refrigeration and air-conditioning systems is metastable. A mixture of refrigerants such as nitrogen, methane, ethane, propane and iso-butane expands below its inversion temperature in the capillary tube of MR J-T cryocooler and reaches cryogenic temperature. The mass flow rate of refrigerant mixture circulating through capillary tube depends on the pressure difference across it. There are many empirical correlations which predict pressure drop across the capillary tube. However, they have not been tested for refrigerant mixtures and for operating conditions of the cryocooler. The present paper assesses the existing empirical correlations for predicting overall pressure drop across the capillary tube for the MR J-T cryocooler. The empirical correlations refer to homogeneous as well as separated flow models. Experiments are carried out to measure the overall pressure drop across the capillary tube for the cooler. Three different compositions of refrigerant mixture are used to study the pressure drop variations. The predicted overall pressure drop across the capillary tube is compared with the experimentally obtained value. The predictions obtained using homogeneous model show better match with the experimental results compared to separated flow models.

  13. Pressure drop characteristics of cryogenic mixed refrigerant at macro and micro channel heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Seungwhan; Jeong, Sangkwon; Hwang, Gyuwan

    2012-12-01

    Mixed Refrigerant-Joule Thomson (MR-JT) refrigerators are widely used in various kinds of cryogenic systems these days. The temperature glide effect is one of the major features of using mixed refrigerants since a recuperative heat exchanger in a MR-JT refrigerator is utilized for mostly two-phase flow. Although a pressure drop estimation for a multi-phase and multi-component fluid in the cryogenic temperature range is necessarily required in MR-JT refrigerator heat exchanger designs, it has been rarely discussed so far. In this paper, macro heat exchangers and micro heat exchangers are compared in order to investigate the pressure drop characteristics in the experimental MR-JT refrigerator operation. The tube in tube heat exchanger (TTHE) is a well-known macro-channel heat exchanger in MR-JT refrigeration. Printed Circuit Heat Exchangers (PCHEs) have been developed as a compact heat exchanger with micro size channels. Several two-phase pressure drop correlations are examined to discuss the experimental pressure measurement results. The result of this paper shows that cryogenic mixed refrigerant pressure drop can be estimated with conventional two-phase pressure drop correlations if an appropriate flow pattern is identified.

  14. Investigation of pressure drop in capillary tube for mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler

    SciTech Connect

    Ardhapurkar, P. M.; Sridharan, Arunkumar; Atrey, M. D.

    2014-01-29

    A capillary tube is commonly used in small capacity refrigeration and air-conditioning systems. It is also a preferred expansion device in mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson (MR J-T) cryocoolers, since it is inexpensive and simple in configuration. However, the flow inside a capillary tube is complex, since flashing process that occurs in case of refrigeration and air-conditioning systems is metastable. A mixture of refrigerants such as nitrogen, methane, ethane, propane and iso-butane expands below its inversion temperature in the capillary tube of MR J-T cryocooler and reaches cryogenic temperature. The mass flow rate of refrigerant mixture circulating through capillary tube depends on the pressure difference across it. There are many empirical correlations which predict pressure drop across the capillary tube. However, they have not been tested for refrigerant mixtures and for operating conditions of the cryocooler. The present paper assesses the existing empirical correlations for predicting overall pressure drop across the capillary tube for the MR J-T cryocooler. The empirical correlations refer to homogeneous as well as separated flow models. Experiments are carried out to measure the overall pressure drop across the capillary tube for the cooler. Three different compositions of refrigerant mixture are used to study the pressure drop variations. The predicted overall pressure drop across the capillary tube is compared with the experimentally obtained value. The predictions obtained using homogeneous model show better match with the experimental results compared to separated flow models.

  15. Large scale steam flow test: Pressure drop data and calculated pressure loss coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, J.B.; Spears, J.R.; Feder, A.R.; Moore, B.P.; Young, C.E.

    1993-12-01

    This report presents the result of large scale steam flow testing, 3 million to 7 million lbs/hr., conducted at approximate steam qualities of 25, 45, 70 and 100 percent (dry, saturated). It is concluded from the test data that reasonable estimates of piping component pressure loss coefficients for single phase flow in complex piping geometries can be calculated using available engineering literature. This includes the effects of nearby upstream and downstream components, compressibility, and internal obstructions, such as splitters, and ladder rungs on individual piping components. Despite expected uncertainties in the data resulting from the complexity of the piping geometry and two-phase flow, the test data support the conclusion that the predicted dry steam K-factors are accurate and provide useful insight into the effect of entrained liquid on the flow resistance. The K-factors calculated from the wet steam test data were compared to two-phase K-factors based on the Martinelli-Nelson pressure drop correlations. This comparison supports the concept of a two-phase multiplier for estimating the resistance of piping with liquid entrained into the flow. The test data in general appears to be reasonably consistent with the shape of a curve based on the Martinelli-Nelson correlation over the tested range of steam quality.

  16. Detection of bubble nucleation event in superheated drop detector by the pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Mala; Biswas, Nilanjan

    2017-01-01

    Superheated drop detector consisting of drops of superheated liquid suspended in polymer or gel matrix is of great demand, mainly because of its insensitivity to ß-particles and ?-rays and also because of the low cost. The bubble nucleation event is detected by measuring the acoustic shock wave released during the nucleation process. The present work demonstrates the detection of bubble nucleation events by using the pressure sensor. The associated circuits for the measurement are described in this article. The detection of events is verified by measuring the events with the acoustic sensor. The measurement was done using drops of various sizes to study the effect of the size of the drop on the pressure recovery time. Probability of detection of events has increased for larger size of the superheated drops and lesser volume of air in contact with the gel matrix. The exponential decay fitting to the pressure sensor signals shows the dead time for pressure recovery of such a drop detector to be a few microseconds.

  17. Negative Pressures and Spallation in Water Drops Subjected to Nanosecond Shock Waves.

    PubMed

    Stan, Claudiu A; Willmott, Philip R; Stone, Howard A; Koglin, Jason E; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew L; Robinson, Joseph S; Gumerlock, Karl L; Blaj, Gabriel; Sierra, Raymond G; Boutet, Sébastien; Guillet, Serge A H; Curtis, Robin H; Vetter, Sharon L; Loos, Henrik; Turner, James L; Decker, Franz-Josef

    2016-06-02

    Most experimental studies of cavitation in liquid water at negative pressures reported cavitation at tensions significantly smaller than those expected for homogeneous nucleation, suggesting that achievable tensions are limited by heterogeneous cavitation. We generated tension pulses with nanosecond rise times in water by reflecting cylindrical shock waves, produced by X-ray laser pulses, at the internal surface of drops of water. Depending on the X-ray pulse energy, a range of cavitation phenomena occurred, including the rupture and detachment, or spallation, of thin liquid layers at the surface of the drop. When spallation occurred, we evaluated that negative pressures below -100 MPa were reached in the drops. We model the negative pressures from shock reflection experiments using a nucleation-and-growth model that explains how rapid decompression could outrun heterogeneous cavitation in water, and enable the study of stretched water close to homogeneous cavitation pressures.

  18. Negative pressures and spallation in water drops subjected to nanosecond shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Stan, Claudiu A.; Willmott, Philip R.; Stone, Howard A.; Koglin, Jason E.; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew L.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Gumerlock, Karl L.; Blaj, Gabriel; Sierra, Raymond G.; Boutet, Sebastien; Guillet, Serge A. H.; Curtis, Robin H.; Vetter, Sharon L.; Loos, Henrik; Turner, James L.; Decker, Franz -Josef

    2016-05-16

    Most experimental studies of cavitation in liquid water at negative pressures reported cavitation at tensions significantly smaller than those expected for homogeneous nucleation, suggesting that achievable tensions are limited by heterogeneous cavitation. We generated tension pulses with nanosecond rise times in water by reflecting cylindrical shock waves, produced by X-ray laser pulses, at the internal surface of drops of water. Depending on the X-ray pulse energy, a range of cavitation phenomena occurred, including the rupture and detachment, or spallation, of thin liquid layers at the surface of the drop. When spallation occurred, we evaluated that negative pressures below –100 MPa were reached in the drops. As a result, we model the negative pressures from shock reflection experiments using a nucleation-and-growth model that explains how rapid decompression could outrun heterogeneous cavitation in water, and enable the study of stretched water close to homogeneous cavitation pressures.

  19. Negative pressures and spallation in water drops subjected to nanosecond shock waves

    DOE PAGES

    Stan, Claudiu A.; Willmott, Philip R.; Stone, Howard A.; ...

    2016-05-16

    Most experimental studies of cavitation in liquid water at negative pressures reported cavitation at tensions significantly smaller than those expected for homogeneous nucleation, suggesting that achievable tensions are limited by heterogeneous cavitation. We generated tension pulses with nanosecond rise times in water by reflecting cylindrical shock waves, produced by X-ray laser pulses, at the internal surface of drops of water. Depending on the X-ray pulse energy, a range of cavitation phenomena occurred, including the rupture and detachment, or spallation, of thin liquid layers at the surface of the drop. When spallation occurred, we evaluated that negative pressures below –100 MPamore » were reached in the drops. As a result, we model the negative pressures from shock reflection experiments using a nucleation-and-growth model that explains how rapid decompression could outrun heterogeneous cavitation in water, and enable the study of stretched water close to homogeneous cavitation pressures.« less

  20. Effect of flameholder pressure drop on emissions and performance of premixed-prevaporized combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duerr, R. A.; Lyons, V. J.

    1983-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted to determine the effects of flameholder pressure drop on the emissions and performance of lean premixed-prevaporized combustors. A conical flameholder mounted in a diverging duct was tested with two values of flameholder blockage. Emissions of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and unburned hydrocarbons were measured for combustor entrance conditions of 600 to 800 K air temperature, 0.3 MPa to 0.5 MPa pressure, and 20 m/sec to 35 m/sec reference velocity. Jet A fuel was injected at flow rates corresponding to an equivalence ratio range from 0.8 down to the lean stability limit. Emission results for the high-blockage flameholder were a substantial improvement over the low-blockage emission results. A correlation of combustion efficiency with flameholder pressure drop was developed for pressure drops less than 9 percent.

  1. Fast and accurate pressure-drop prediction in straightened atherosclerotic coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Schrauwen, Jelle T C; Koeze, Dion J; Wentzel, Jolanda J; van de Vosse, Frans N; van der Steen, Anton F W; Gijsen, Frank J H

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerotic disease progression in coronary arteries is influenced by wall shear stress. To compute patient-specific wall shear stress, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is required. In this study we propose a method for computing the pressure-drop in regions proximal and distal to a plaque, which can serve as a boundary condition in CFD. As a first step towards exploring the proposed method we investigated ten straightened coronary arteries. First, the flow fields were calculated with CFD and velocity profiles were fitted on the results. Second, the Navier-Stokes equation was simplified and solved with the found velocity profiles to obtain a pressure-drop estimate (Δp (1)). Next, Δp (1) was compared to the pressure-drop from CFD (Δp CFD) as a validation step. Finally, the velocity profiles, and thus the pressure-drop were predicted based on geometry and flow, resulting in Δp geom. We found that Δp (1) adequately estimated Δp CFD with velocity profiles that have one free parameter β. This β was successfully related to geometry and flow, resulting in an excellent agreement between Δp CFD and Δp geom: 3.9 ± 4.9% difference at Re = 150. We showed that this method can quickly and accurately predict pressure-drop on the basis of geometry and flow in straightened coronary arteries that are mildly diseased.

  2. Flow rate-pressure drop relation for deformable shallow microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christov, Ivan C.; Cognet, Vincent; Stone, Howard A.

    2013-11-01

    Laminar flow in devices fabricated from PDMS causes deformation of the passage geometry, which affects the flow rate-pressure drop relation. Having an accurate flow rate-pressure drop relation for deformable microchannels is of importance given that the flow rate for a given pressure drop can be as much as 500% of the flow rate predicted by Poiseuille's law for a rigid channel. proposed a successful model of the latter phenomenon by heuristically coupling linear elasticity with the lubrication approximation for Stokes flow. However, their model contains a fitting parameter that must be found for each channel shape by performing an experiment. We present a perturbative derivation of the flow rate-pressure drop relation in a shallow deformable microchannel using Kirchoff-Love theory of isotropic quasi-static plate bending and Stokes' equations under a ``double lubrication'' approximation (i.e., the ratio of the channel's height to its width and of the channel's width to its length are both assumed small). Our result contains no free parameters and confirms Gervais et al.'s observation that the flow rate is a quartic polynomial of the pressure drop. ICC was supported by NSF Grant DMS-1104047 and the U.S. DOE through the LANL/LDRD Program; HAS was supported by NSF Grant CBET-1132835.

  3. A Validated All-Pressure Fluid Drop Model and Lewis Number Effects for a Binary Mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K.; Bellan, J.

    1999-01-01

    The differences between subcritical liquid drop and supercritical fluid drop behavior are discussed. Under subcritical, evaporative high emission rate conditions, a film layer is present in the inner part of the drop surface which contributes to the unique determination of the boundary conditions; it is this film layer which contributes to the solution's convective-diffusive character. In contrast, under supercritical condition as the boundary conditions contain a degree of arbitrariness due to the absence of a surface, and the solution has then a purely diffusive character. Results from simulations of a free fluid drop under no-gravity conditions are compared to microgravity experimental data from suspended, large drop experiments at high, low and intermediary temperatures and in a range of pressures encompassing the sub-and supercritical regime. Despite the difference between the conditions of the simulations and experiments (suspension vs. free floating), the time rate of variation of the drop diameter square is remarkably well predicted in the linear curve regime. The drop diameter is determined in the simulations from the location of the maximum density gradient, and agrees well with the data. It is also shown that the classical calculation of the Lewis number gives qualitatively erroneous results at supercritical conditions, but that an effective Lewis number previously defined gives qualitatively correct estimates of the length scales for heat and mass transfer at all pressures.

  4. Mineral matter transformations in a pressurized drop-tube furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, M.L.; Tibbetts, J.E.

    1992-12-31

    To meet the objectives of the program, a pressurized combustion vessel was built to allow the operating parameters of a direct-fired gas turbine combustor to be simulated. One goal in building this equipment was to design the gas turbine simulator as small as possible to reduce the quantity of test fuel needed, while not undersizing the combustor such that wall effects had a significant effect on the measured combustion performance. Based on computer modeling, a rich-lean, two-stage, nonslagging combustor was constructed to simulate a direct-fired gas turbine. This design was selected to maximize the information that could be obtained on the impact of low-rank coal`s unique properties on the gas turbine combustor, its turbomachinery, and the required hot-gas cleanup devices (such as high-temperature/high-pressure (HTHP) cyclones). Seventeen successful combustion tests using coal-water fuels were completed. These tests included seven tests with a commercially available Otisca Industries-produced, Taggart seam bituminous fuel and five tests each with physically and chemically cleaned Beulah-Zap lignite and a chemically cleaned Kemmerer subbituminous fuel. LRC-fueled heat engine testing conducted at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) has indicated that LRC fuels perform very well in short residence time heat engine combustion systems. Analyses of the emission and fly ash samples highlighted the superior burnout experienced by the LRC fuels as compared to the bituminous fuel even under a longer residence time profile for the bituminous fuel.

  5. Mineral matter transformations in a pressurized drop-tube furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, M.L.; Tibbetts, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    To meet the objectives of the program, a pressurized combustion vessel was built to allow the operating parameters of a direct-fired gas turbine combustor to be simulated. One goal in building this equipment was to design the gas turbine simulator as small as possible to reduce the quantity of test fuel needed, while not undersizing the combustor such that wall effects had a significant effect on the measured combustion performance. Based on computer modeling, a rich-lean, two-stage, nonslagging combustor was constructed to simulate a direct-fired gas turbine. This design was selected to maximize the information that could be obtained on the impact of low-rank coal's unique properties on the gas turbine combustor, its turbomachinery, and the required hot-gas cleanup devices (such as high-temperature/high-pressure (HTHP) cyclones). Seventeen successful combustion tests using coal-water fuels were completed. These tests included seven tests with a commercially available Otisca Industries-produced, Taggart seam bituminous fuel and five tests each with physically and chemically cleaned Beulah-Zap lignite and a chemically cleaned Kemmerer subbituminous fuel. LRC-fueled heat engine testing conducted at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) has indicated that LRC fuels perform very well in short residence time heat engine combustion systems. Analyses of the emission and fly ash samples highlighted the superior burnout experienced by the LRC fuels as compared to the bituminous fuel even under a longer residence time profile for the bituminous fuel.

  6. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 5

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. Nineteen test series and a total of 178 tests were performed. Testing addressed the effects of: Heat flux; pressure; helium gas; power tilt; ribs; asymmetric heat flux. This document consists solely of the plato file index from 11/87 to 11/90.

  7. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 2

    SciTech Connect

    Block, J.A.; Crowley, C.; Dolan, F.X.; Sam, R.G.; Stoedefalke, B.H.

    1992-11-01

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. Nineteen test series and a total of 178 tests were performed. Testing addressed the effects of: Heat flux; pressure; helium gas; power tilt; ribs; asymmetric heat flux.

  8. Modeling of Leaching Filter Pressure Drop and Fouling Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, David R.; Stewart, Mark L.

    2010-04-01

    A new simulation capability has been developed for modeling the flow and thermal performance of chemical processes that involve multiphase, chemically-complex flows. This capability is applied to the ultrafiltration process which will be used in conjunction with caustic and/or oxidative leaching to concentrate high level waste in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the US DOE Hanford site. The separation of supernatant from undissolved solids is an important aspect of these processes. The design and likely operational performance of the proposed ultrafiltration system for the WTP facility have been called into question by external reviewers. Lattice methods are used to model both the pore scale filtration mechanisms in the filter material and the filter device scale performance. Simulation results are compared with data from experiments.

  9. Pressure drops during low void volume combustion retorting of oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    McLendon, T.R.

    1986-01-01

    Stacks of cut oil shale bricks were combustion retorted in a batch, pilot scale sized retort at low void volumes (overall voids ranged from 8.4% to 18.4%). Retort pressure drops increased during retorting at least one order of magnitude. The Ergun equation and Darcy's law have been used by several researchers and organizations as diagnostic tools on oil shale retorts. These equations were tested on the uniformly packed retort reported in this paper to evaluate how well the equations represented the experimental conditions. Use of the Ergun equation to estimate the average particle size from retort pressure drops gave answers that were only approximately correct. Calculation of retort pressure drops from Darcy's law during retorting at low void volumes will probably give answers that are several times too small. Thermal expansion of the shale during retorting decreases retort permeability greatly and calculation of the decreased permeability is not possible at the present level of technology.

  10. Investigation of lean combustion stability and pressure drop in porous media burners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobhani, Sadaf; Haley, Bret; Bartz, David; Dunnmon, Jared; Sullivan, John; Ihme, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    The stability and thermal durability of combustion in porous media burners (PMBs) is examined experimentally and computationally. For this, two burner concepts are considered, which consist of different pore topologies, porous materials, and matrix arrangements. Long-term material durability tests at constant and cycled on-off conditions are performed, along with a characterization of combustion stability, pressure drop and pollutant emissions for a range of equivalence ratios and mass flow rates. Experimental thermocouple temperature measurements and pressure drop data are presented and compared to results obtained from one-dimensional volume-averaged simulations. Experimental and model results show reasonable agreement for temperature profiles and pressure drop evaluated using Ergun's equations. Enhanced flame stability is illustrated for burners with Yttria-stabilized Zirconia Alumina upstream and Silicon Carbide in the downstream combustion zone. Results reinforce concepts in PMB design and optimization, and demonstrate the potential of PMBs to overcome technological barriers associated with conventional free-flame combustion technologies.

  11. Low pressure drop filtration of airborne molecular organic contaminants using open-channel networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallas, Andrew J.; Joriman, Jon; Ding, Lefei; Weineck, Gerald; Seguin, Kevin

    2007-03-01

    Airborne molecular contamination (AMC) continues to play a very decisive role in the performance of many microelectronic devices and manufacturing processes. Besides airborne acids and bases, airborne organic contaminants such as 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP), hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO), trimethylsilanol (TMS), perfluoroalkylamines and condensables are of primary concern in these applications. Currently, the state of the filtration industry is such that optimum filter life and removal efficiency for organics is offered by granular carbon filter beds. However, the attributes that make packed beds of activated carbon extremely efficient also impart issues related to elevated filter weight and pressure drop. Most of the lower pressure drop AMC filters currently offered are quite expensive and are simply pleated combinations of various adsorptive and reactive media. On the other hand, low pressure drop filters, such as those designed as open-channel networks (OCN's), offer good filter life and removal efficiency with the additional benefits of significant reductions in overall filter weight and pressure drop. Equally important for many applications, the OCN filters can reconstruct the airflow so as to enhance the operation of a tool or process. For tool mount assemblies and fan filter units (FFUs) this can result in reduced fan and blower speeds, which subsequently can provide reduced vibration and energy costs. Additionally, these low pressure drop designs can provide a cost effective way of effectively removing AMC in full fab (or HVAC) filtration applications without significantly affecting air-handling requirements. Herein, we will present a new generation of low pressure drop OCN filters designed for the removal of airborne organics in a wide range of applications.

  12. Fundamental study of transpiration cooling. [pressure drop and heat transfer data from porous metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J. C. Y.; Dutton, J. L.; Benson, B. A.

    1973-01-01

    Isothermal and non-isothermal pressure drop data and heat transfer data generated on porous 304L stainless steel wire forms, sintered spherical stainless steel powder, and sintered spherical OFHC copper powder are reported and correlated. Pressure drop data was collected over a temperature range from 500 R to 2000 R and heat transfer data collected over a heat flux range from 5 to 15 BTU/in2/sec. It was found that flow data could be correlated independently of transpirant temperature and type (i.e., H2, N2). It was also found that no simple relation between heat transfer coefficient and specimen porosity was obtainable.

  13. Prediction of pressure drops accompanying the evaporation of refrigerants inside horizontal tubes. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Stoneham, H.G.; Saluja, S.N.; Dunn, A.

    1980-01-01

    Four of the more widely used correlations for the prediction of pressure drops were compared with published experimental data using statistical techniques. None of the correlations examined were found to be suitably accurate over the range of conditions normally encountered in direct expansion evaporators. A new correlation was developed and is presented here, that can be used with an acceptable degree of accuracy by the design engineer. The correlation is presented in a form that can be easily written into a program for solution on a programmable calculator leading to quick and accurate evaluation of the pressure drop that accompanies a refrigerant evaporatoring inside a horontal tube evaporator.

  14. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 4

    SciTech Connect

    Block, J.A.; Crowley, C.; Dolan, F.X.; Sam, R.G.; Stoedefalke, B.H.

    1992-11-01

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. This document consists of data plots and summary files of temperature measurements.

  15. Comparison of Pressure Drop between Calculation and Experiment for a Two-phase Carbon Dioxide Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, D.-C.; Xiao, W.-J.; Huang, Z.-C.; Sun, X.-H.; Chen, Y.; Lu, S.-S.; Li, T.-X.; Qi, X.-M.; Wang, Z.-X.; Pauw, A.; Bsibsi, M.; Gargiulo, C.; van Es, J.; He, Z.-H.

    2008-09-01

    Tracker thermal control system (TTCS) is an active-pumped two-phase carbon dioxide cooling loop, which is developed for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer tracker front-end electronics. The maintenance-free centrifugal pump is a critical component in the design mainly due to the limited pressure head with small mass flows. Therefore a correct pressure drop is required to predict the pressure drop for dynamic modeling. As the normal operational temperature of the carbon dioxide in the TTCS is from - 15°C to +15°C, which is very close to its critical point, 33°C, and many two-phase pressure drop correlations may not fit well here. In this paper, we attempt to correlate the pressure drops between the calculations and the experiment of the two-phase CO2 loop. The comparison will focus on one evaporator. Here, the Lockhart/Martinelli correlation is recorrelated with different definition C value for CO2 according to the test results. Comparison shows that, the new correlation can fit the test results well.

  16. A steady state pressure drop model for screen channel liquid acquisition devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, J. W.; Darr, S. R.; McQuillen, J. B.; Rame, E.; Chato, D. J.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the derivation of a simplified one dimensional (1D) steady state pressure drop model for flow through a porous liquid acquisition device (LAD) inside a cryogenic propellant tank. Experimental data is also presented from cryogenic LAD tests in liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LOX) to compare against the simplified model and to validate the model at cryogenic temperatures. The purpose of the experiments was to identify the various pressure drop contributions in the analytical model which govern LAD channel behavior during dynamic, steady state outflow. LH2 pipe flow of LAD screen samples measured the second order flow-through-screen (FTS) pressure drop, horizontal LOX LAD outflow tests determined the relative magnitude of the third order frictional and dynamic losses within the channel, while LH2 inverted vertical outflow tests determined the magnitude of the first order hydrostatic pressure loss and validity of the full 1D model. When compared to room temperature predictions, the FTS pressure drop is shown to be temperature dependent, with a significant increase in flow resistance at LH2 temperatures. Model predictions of frictional and dynamic losses down the channel compare qualitatively with LOX LADs data. Meanwhile, the 1D model predicted breakdown points track the trends in the LH2 inverted outflow experimental results, with discrepancies being due to a non-uniform injection velocity across the LAD screen not accounted for in the model.

  17. Pressure drop and arterial compliance - Two arterial parameters in one measurement.

    PubMed

    Rotman, Oren M; Zaretsky, Uri; Shitzer, Avraham; Einav, Shmuel

    2017-01-04

    Coronary artery pressure-drop and distensibility (compliance) are two major, seemingly unrelated, parameters in the cardiovascular clinical setting, which are indicative of coronary arteries patency and atherosclerosis severity. While pressure drop is related to flow, and therefore serves as a functional indicator of a stenosis severity, the arterial distensibility is indicative of the arterial stiffness, and hence the arterial wall composition. In the present study, we hypothesized that local pressure drops are dependent on the arterial distensibility, and hence can provide information on both indices. The clinical significance is that a single measurement of pressure drop could potentially provide both functional and bio-mechanical metrics of lesions, and thus assist in real-time decision making prior to stenting. The goal of the current study was to set the basis for understanding this relationship, and define the accuracy and sensitivity required from the pressure measurement system. The investigation was performed using numerical fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulations, validated experimentally using our high accuracy differential pressure measurement system. Simplified silicone mock coronary arteries with zero to intermediate size stenoses were used, and various combinations of arterial distensibility, diameter, and flow rate were simulated. Results of hyperemic flow cases were also compared to fractional flow reserve (FFR). The results indicate the potential clinical superiority of a high accuracy pressure drop-based parameter over FFR, by: (i) being more lesion-specific, (ii) the possibility to circumvent the FFR dependency on pharmacologically-induced hyperemia, and, (iii) by providing both functional and biomechanical lesion-specific information.

  18. An experimental investigation of pressure drop in forced-convection condensation and evaporation of oil-refrigerant mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Tichy, J.A.; Duque-Rivera, J.; Macken, N.A.; Duval, W.M.B.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental measurements of pressure drop have been made for forced-convection evaporation and condensation of oil-refrigerant (R-12) mixtures inside a horizontal tube. Data were compared to a wide range of frictional pressure drop and void fraction relationships. The best representations for the oil-free data were then modified to better correlate both oil-free and oil-refrigerant results. For condensation, a modification of the prediction given by the Lockhart-Martinelli relation for frictional pressure drop and the homogeneous void fraction model is presented. For evaporation, the prediction given by the Dukler II frictional pressure-drop correlation and the homogeneous void fraction is modified. These relationships predict the pressure drop for 85% of the data to within +- 35%. The added oil increased the pressure drop 2% to 6% for condensation and 63% to 86% for evaporation.

  19. Intraocular pressure in cats is lowered by drops of hornet venom.

    PubMed

    Kam, J; Waron, M; Barishak, Y R; Schachner, E; Ishay, J S

    1989-01-01

    1. Nine cats were given an intravenous injection of the Oriental hornet (Vespa orientalis, Vespinae; Hymenoptera) venom sac extract (VSE) and seven cats had the same VSE administered as eye drops. 2. When injected intravenously, the hornet VSE decreased the intraocular pressure in both eyes sharply during the first 20 min and with a slower rate later on until the end of the 3 hr experiment. The intraocular pressure dropped to zero in some cases. 3. VSE eye drops decreased the intraocular pressure only in the treated eye, while in the second eye (left as a control) the intraocular pressure remained the same throughout the experiment. 4. The decrease in the intraocular pressure was sharp during the first 20 min and slowed down afterwards until the end of the experiment. 5. The intraocular pressure did not reduce to zero. 6. This study shows that the active components of the hornet venom which caused a decrease in the intraocular pressure can cross the cornea and exert a hypotensive effect in the eye.

  20. Testing of a 4 K to 2 K heat exchanger with an intermediate pressure drop

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, Peter N.; Ganni, Venkatarao

    2015-12-01

    Most large sub-atmospheric helium refrigeration systems incorporate a heat exchanger at the load, or in the distribution system, to counter-flow the sub-atmospheric return with the super-critical or liquid supply. A significant process improvement is theoretically obtainable by handling the exergy loss across the Joule-Thompson throttling valve supplying the flow to the load in a simple but different manner. As briefly outlined in previous publications, the exergy loss can be minimized by allowing the supply flow pressure to decrease to a sub-atmospheric pressure concurrent with heat exchange flow from the load. One practical implementation is to sub-divide the supply flow pressure drop between two heat exchanger sections, incorporating an intermediate pressure drop. Such a test is being performed at Jefferson Lab's Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF). This paper will briefly discuss the theory, practical implementation and test results and analysis obtained to date.

  1. Evaluation of membrane oxygenators and reservoirs in terms of capturing gaseous microemboli and pressure drops.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yulong; Palanzo, David; Kunselman, Allen; Undar, Akif

    2009-11-01

    An increasing amount of evidence points to cerebral embolization during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) as the principal etiologic factor of neurologic complications. In this study, the capability of capturing and classification of gaseous emboli and pressure drop of three different membrane oxygenators (Sorin Apex, Terumo Capiox SX25, Maquet QUADROX) were measured in a simulated adult model of CPB using a novel ultrasound detection and classification quantifier system. The circuit was primed with 1000 mL heparinized human packed red blood cells and 1000 mL lactated Ringer's solution (total volume 2000 mL, corrected hematocrit 26-28%). After the injection of 5 mL air into the venous line, an Emboli Detection and Classification Quantifier was used to simultaneously record microemboli counts at post-pump, post-oxygenator, and post-arterial filter sites. Trials were conducted at normothermic (35 degrees C) and hypothermic (25 degrees C) conditions. Pre-oxygenator and post-oxygenator pressure were recorded in real time and pressure drop was calculated. Maquet QUADROX membrane oxygenator has the lowest pressure drops compared to the other two oxygenators (P < 0.001). The comparison among the three oxygenators indicated better capability of capturing gaseous emboli with the Maquet QUADROX and Terumo Capiox SX25 membrane oxygenator and more emboli may pass through the Sorin Apex membrane oxygenator. Microemboli counts uniformly increased with hypothermic perfusion (25 degrees C). Different types of oxygenators and reservoirs have different capability of capturing gaseous emboli and transmembrane pressure drop. Based on this investigation, Maquet QUADROX membrane oxygenator has the lowest pressure drop and better capability for capturing gaseous microemboli.

  2. Determining Seed Cotton Mass Flow Rate by Pressure Drop Across a Blowbox: Gin Testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate measurement of the mass flow rate of seed cotton is needed for control and monitoring purposes in gins. A system was developed that accurately predicted mass flow rate based on the static pressure drop measured across the blowbox and the air velocity and temperature entering the blowbox. Ho...

  3. An experimental study of heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of divergent wavy minichannels using nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominic, A.; Sarangan, J.; Suresh, S.; Devahdhanush, V. S.

    2016-07-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of an array of wavy divergent minichannels and the results were compared with wavy minichannels with constant cross-section. The experiment was conducted in hydro dynamically developed and thermally developing laminar and transient regimes. The minichannel heat sink array consisted of 15 rectangular channels machined on a 30 × 30 mm2 and 11 mm thick Aluminium substrate. Each minichannel was of 0.9 mm width, 1.8 mm pitch and the depth was varied from 1.3 mm at entrance to 3.3 mm at exit for the divergent channels. DI water and 0.5 and 0.8 % concentrations of Al2O3/water nanofluid were used as working fluids. The Reynolds number was varied from 700 to 3300 and the heat flux was maintained at 45 kW/m2. The heat transfer and pressure drop of these minichannels were analyzed based on the experimental results obtained. It was observed that the heat transfer performance of divergent wavy minichannels was 9 % higher and the pressure drop was 30-38 % lesser than that of the wavy minichannels with constant cross-section, in the laminar regime. Hence, divergent channel flows can be considered one of the better ways to reduce pressure drop. The performance factor of divergent wavy minichannels was 115-126 % for water and 110-113 % for nanofluids.

  4. Pressure drop and gas distribution in compost based biofilters: medium mixing and composition effects.

    PubMed

    Morgan-Sagastume, J M; Revah, S; Noyola, A

    2003-07-01

    The pressure drop and gas distribution in four different filter media for compost biofilters were studied as a function of three superficial loading rates of moist air and by carrying out the filter medium homogenization by mixing. The filter media used were compost, compost with cane bagasse, lava rock and aerobic sludge previously dried to 60% of water content. The pressure drop increased when lava rock and cane bagasse were used as bulking agents. The same trend was observed when water was added to the filter medium. Pressure drop tended to decrease with time as flow channels were formed inthe filter media. Tracer studies were carried out to quantify the gas distribution and the effect of channel formation. For the biofilters submitted to an airflow of 10, 40 and 70 l min(-1), an average normalized time of 0.96, 0.89 and 0.82, respectively were obtained. The results showed that channel formation was increased as the superficial loading rate was also increased. An operational practice that this work proposes and evaluates to improve gas distribution and medium moisture control is to carry out intermittent medium mixing. The medium moisture and void volume achieved under mixing condition were around 50% and 0.40, respectively with an average constant pressure drop of 11, 45 and 78 cm of water m(-1) for air velocities of 75, 300 and 525 m h(-1).

  5. Determining Seed Cotton Mass Flow Rate by Pressure Drop Across the Blowbox: Gin Testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate measurement of the mass flow rate of seed cotton is needed for control and monitoring purposes in gins. A system was developed that accurately predicted mass flow rate based on the static pressure drop measured across the blowbox and the air velocity and temperature entering the blowbox usi...

  6. Pressure Drop and Heat Transfer of Water Flowing Shell-Side of Multitube Heat Exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Yukio; Hashizume, Kenichi

    Experimental studies on heat transfer augmentation in water-flowing shell sides of counter flow multitube exchangers are presented. Various kinds of augmented tube bundles have been examined to obtain the characteristics of pressure drop and heat transfer. Data for a smooth tube bundle were a little different from those for the tube side. The pressure drop in the shell side depended on Re-0.4 and deviated from the tube side pressure drop to within +30%, while the shell side heat transfer coefficient depended on Re0.8 but about 35%. larger than that of the tube side. Furthermore the augmented tube bundles have been evaluated and compared using 21 evaluation criteria. Enhanced tube bundles, low-finned tube bundles and those with twisted tapes inserted had especially good performances. The ratios of increase in heat transfer were larger than those in pressure drop. In case of low-finned tube bundles, there seem to exist an optimum fin-pitch and an optimum relation between the fin-pitch and the pitch of twisted tapes inserted.

  7. New Results in Two-Phase Pressure Drop Calculations at Reduced Gravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braisted, Jon; Kurwitz, Cable; Best, Frederick

    2004-02-01

    The mass, power, and volume energy savings of two-phase systems for future spacecraft creates many advantages over current single-phase systems. Current models of two-phase phenomena such as pressure drop, void fraction, and flow regime prediction are still not well defined for space applications. Commercially available two-phase modeling software has been developed for a large range of acceleration fields including reduced-gravity conditions. Recently, a two-phase experiment has been flown to expand the two-phase database. A model of the experiment was created in the software to determine how well the software could predict the pressure drop observed in the experiment. Of the simulations conducted, the computer model shows good agreement of the pressure drop in the experiment to within 30%. However, the software does begin to over-predict pressure drop in certain regions of a flow regime map indicating that some models used in the software package for reduced-gravity modeling need improvement.

  8. An experimental study of heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of divergent wavy minichannels using nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominic, A.; Sarangan, J.; Suresh, S.; Devahdhanush, V. S.

    2017-03-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of an array of wavy divergent minichannels and the results were compared with wavy minichannels with constant cross-section. The experiment was conducted in hydro dynamically developed and thermally developing laminar and transient regimes. The minichannel heat sink array consisted of 15 rectangular channels machined on a 30 × 30 mm2 and 11 mm thick Aluminium substrate. Each minichannel was of 0.9 mm width, 1.8 mm pitch and the depth was varied from 1.3 mm at entrance to 3.3 mm at exit for the divergent channels. DI water and 0.5 and 0.8 % concentrations of Al2O3/water nanofluid were used as working fluids. The Reynolds number was varied from 700 to 3300 and the heat flux was maintained at 45 kW/m2. The heat transfer and pressure drop of these minichannels were analyzed based on the experimental results obtained. It was observed that the heat transfer performance of divergent wavy minichannels was 9 % higher and the pressure drop was 30-38 % lesser than that of the wavy minichannels with constant cross-section, in the laminar regime. Hence, divergent channel flows can be considered one of the better ways to reduce pressure drop. The performance factor of divergent wavy minichannels was 115-126 % for water and 110-113 % for nanofluids.

  9. In vivo validation of the in silico predicted pressure drop across an arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Browne, Leonard D; Griffin, Philip; Bashar, Khalid; Walsh, Stewart R; Kavanagh, Eamon G; Walsh, Michael T

    2015-06-01

    The creation of an arteriovenous fistula offers a unique example of vascular remodelling and adaption. Yet, the specific factors which elicit remodelling events which determine successful maturation or failure have not been unambiguously determined. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations are increasingly been employed to investigate the interaction between local hemodynamics and remodelling and can potentially be used to assist in clinical risk assessment of maturation or failure. However, these simulations are inextricably linked to their prescribed boundary conditions and are reliant on in vivo measurements of flow and pressure to ensure their validity. The study compares in vivo measurements of the pressure distribution across arteriovenous fistulae against a representative numerical model. The results of the study indicate relative agreement (error ≈ 8-10%) between the in vivo and CFD prediction of the mean pressure drop across the AVFs. The large pressure drop across the AVFs coincided with a palpable thrill (perivascular vibration) in vivo and fluctuations were observed in the numerical pressure drop signal due to flow instabilities arising at the anastomosis. This study provides a benchmark of the pressure distribution within an AVF and validates that CFD solutions are capable of replicating the abnormal physiological flow conditions induced by fistula creation.

  10. Pressure drop reduction and heat transfer deterioration of slush nitrogen in triangular and circular pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Katsuhide; Kurose, Kizuku; Okuyama, Jun; Saito, Yutaro; Takahashi, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    Slush fluids such as slush hydrogen and slush nitrogen are characterized by superior properties as functional thermal fluids due to their density and heat of fusion. In addition to allowing efficient hydrogen transport and storage, slush hydrogen can serve as a refrigerant for high-temperature superconducting (HTS) equipment using MgB2, with the potential for synergistic effects. In this study, pressure drop reduction and heat transfer deterioration experiments were performed on slush nitrogen flowing in a horizontal triangular pipe with sides of 20 mm under the conditions of three different cross-sectional orientations. Experimental conditions consisted of flow velocity (0.3-4.2 m/s), solid fraction (0-25 wt.%), and heat flux (0, 10, and 20 kW/m2). Pressure drop reduction became apparent at flow velocities exceeding about 1.3-1.8 m/s, representing a maximum amount of reduction of 16-19% in comparison with liquid nitrogen, regardless of heating. Heat transfer deterioration was seen at flow velocities of over 1.2-1.8 m/s, for a maximum amount of deterioration of 13-16%. The authors of the current study compared the results for pressure drop reduction and heat transfer deterioration in triangular pipe with those obtained previously for circular and square pipes, clarifying differences in flow and heat transfer properties. Also, a correlation equation was obtained between the slush Reynolds number and the pipe friction factor, which is important in the estimation of pressure drop in unheated triangular pipe. Furthermore, a second correlation equation was derived between the modified slush Reynolds number and the pipe friction factor, enabling the integrated prediction of pressure drop in both unheated triangular and circular pipes.

  11. Calculation of pressure drop in the developmental stages of the medaka fish heart and microvasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Sreyashi; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2016-11-01

    Peristaltic contraction of the developing medaka fish heart produces temporally and spatially varying pressure drop across the atrioventricular (AV) canal. Blood flowing through the tail vessels experience a slug flow across the developmental stages. We have performed a series of live imaging experiments over 14 days post fertilization (dpf) of the medaka fish egg and cross-correlated the red blood cell (RBC) pattern intensities to obtain the two-dimensional velocity fields. Subsequently we have calculated the pressure field by integrating the pressure gradient in the momentum equation. Our calculations show that the pressure drop across the AV canal increases from 0.8mm Hg during 3dpf to 2.8 mm Hg during 14dpf. We have calculated the time-varying wall shear stress for the blood vessels by assuming a spatially constant velocity magnitude in each vessel. The calculated wall shear stress matches the wall shear stress sensed by human endothelial cells (10-12 dyne/sq. cm). The pressure drop per unit length of the vessel is obtained by doing a control volume analysis of flow in the caudal arteries and veins. The current results can be extended to investigate the effect of the fluid dynamic parameters on the vascular and cardiac morphogenesis.

  12. Blood Pressure Drop Prediction by using HRV Measurements in Orthostatic Hypotension.

    PubMed

    Sannino, Giovanna; Melillo, Paolo; Stranges, Saverio; De Pietro, Giuseppe; Pecchia, Leandro

    2015-11-01

    Orthostatic Hypotension is defined as a reduction of systolic and diastolic blood pressure within 3 minutes of standing, and may cause dizziness and loss of balance. Orthostatic Hypotension has been considered an important risk factor for falls since 1960. This paper presents a model to predict the systolic blood pressure drop due to orthostatic hypotension, relying on heart rate variability measurements extracted from 5 minute ECGs recorded before standing. This model was developed and validated with the leave-one-out cross-validation technique involving 10 healthy subjects, and finally tested with an additional 5 healthy subjects, whose data were not used during the training and cross-validation process. The results show that the model predicts correctly the systolic blood pressure drop in 80 % of all experiments, with an error rate below the measurement error of a sphygmomanometer digital device.

  13. Effects of phosphoric acid sprayed into an incinerator furnace on the flue gas pressure drop at fabric filters.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shigetoshi; Hwang, In-Hee; Matsuto, Toshihiko

    2016-06-01

    Fabric filters are widely used to remove dust from flue gas generated by waste incineration. However, a pressure drop occurs at the filters, caused by growth of a dust layer on the filter fabric despite regular cleaning by pulsed-jet air. The pressure drop at the fabric filters leads to energy consumption at induced draft fan to keep the incinerator on negative pressure, so that its proper control is important to operate incineration facility efficiently. The pressure drop at fabric filters decreased whenever phosphoric acid wastewater (PAW) was sprayed into an incinerator for treating industrial waste. Operational data obtained from the incineration facility were analyzed to determine the short- and long-term effects of PAW spraying on the pressure drop. For the short-term effect, it was confirmed that the pressure drop at the fabric filters always decreased to 0.3-1.2kPa within about 5h after spraying PAW. This effect was expected to be obtained by about one third of present PAW spraying amount. However, from the long-term perspective, the pressure drop showed an increase in the periods of PAW spraying compared with periods for which PAW spraying was not performed. The pressure drop increase was particularly noticeable after the initial PAW spraying, regardless of the age and type of fabric filters used. These results suggest that present PAW spraying causes a temporary pressure drop reduction, leading to short-term energy consumption savings; however, it also causes an increase of the pressure drop over the long-term, degrading the overall operating conditions. Thus, appropriate PAW spraying conditions are needed to make effective use of PAW to reduce the pressure drop at fabric filters from a short- and long-term point of view.

  14. Experimental characterization of pressure drops and channel instabilities in helical coil SG tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Colombo, M.; Cammi, A.; De Amicis, J.; Ricotti, M. E.

    2012-07-01

    Helical tube heat exchangers provide better heat transfer characteristics, an improved capability to accommodate stresses due to thermal expansions and a more compact design with respect to straight tube heat exchangers. For these advantages they are considered as an option for the Steam Generator (SG) of many new reactor projects of Generation III+ and Generation IV. In particular, their compactness fits well with the requirements of Small-medium Modular Reactors (SMRs) of integral design, where all the primary system components are located inside the reactor vessel. In this framework, thermal hydraulics of helical pipes has been studied in recent years by Politecnico di Milano in different experimental campaigns. Experiments have been carried out in a full-scale open loop test facility installed at SIET labs in Piacenza (Italy)), to simulate the SG of a typical SMR. The facility includes two helical pipes (1 m coil diameter, 32 m length, 8 m height), connected via lower and upper headers. Following recently completed experimental campaigns dedicated to pressure drops and density wave instabilities, this paper deals with a new experimental campaign focused on both pressure drops (single-phase flow and two-phase flow, laminar and turbulent regimes) and flow instabilities. The availability of a large number of experimental data, in particular on two-phase flow, is of fundamental interest for correlation development, model validation and code assessment. Two-phase pressure drops have been measured in adiabatic conditions, ranging from 200 to 600 kg/m{sup 2}s for the mass flux, from 30 to 60 bar for the pressure and from 0.1 to 1.0 for the flow quality. The channel characteristics mass flow rate - pressure drop has been determined experimentally in the range 10-40 bar, varying the mass flow rate at a fixed value of the thermal flux. In addition, single-phase pressure drops have been measured in both laminar and turbulent conditions. Density wave instabilities have

  15. Effects of vascular structures on the pressure drop in stenotic coronary arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaerim; Choi, Haecheon; Kweon, Jihoon; Kim, Young-Hak; Yang, Dong Hyun; Kim, Namkug

    2016-11-01

    A stenosis, which is a narrowing of a blood vessel, of the coronary arteries restricts the flow to the heart and it may lead to sudden cardiac death. Therefore, the accurate determination of the severity of a stenosis is a critical issue. Due to the convenience of visual assessments, geometric parameters such as the diameter stenosis and area stenosis have been used, but the decision based on them sometimes under- or overestimates the functional severity of a stenosis, i.e., pressure drop. In this study, patient-specific models that have similar area stenosis but different pressure drops are considered, and their geometries are reconstructed from the coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). Both steady and pulsatile inflows are considered for the simulations. Comparison between two models that have a bifurcation right after a stenosis shows that the parent to daughter vessel angle results in different secondary flow patterns and wall shear stress distributions which affect the pressure downstream. Thus, the structural features of the lower and upper parts of a stenosis significantly affect the pressure drop. Supported by 20152020105600.

  16. An experimental investigation of pressure drop of aqueous foam in laminar tube flow

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, B.F.; Sobolik, K.B.

    1987-04-01

    This report is the first of two detailing pressure-drop and heat-transfer measurements made at the Foam Flow Heat Transfer Loop. The work was motivated by a desire to extend the application of aqueous foam from petroleum drilling to geothermal drilling. Pressure-drop measurements are detailed in this report; a forthcoming report (SAND85-1922) will describe the heat-transfer measurements. The pressure change across a 2.4-m (8-ft) length of the 2.588-cm (1.019-in.) ID test section was measured for liquid volume fractions between 0.05 and 0.35 and average velocities between 0.12 and 0.80 m/s (0.4 and 2.6 ft/s). The resulting pressure-drop/flow-rate data were correlated to a theoretical model for a Bingham plastic. Simple expressions for the dynamic viscosity and the yield stress as a function of liquid volume fraction were estimated.

  17. Pressure-Drop Considerations in the Characterization of Dew-Point Transfer Standards at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitter, H.; Böse, N.; Benyon, R.; Vicente, T.

    2012-09-01

    During calibration of precision optical dew-point hygrometers (DPHs), it is usually necessary to take into account the pressure drop induced by the gas flow between the "point of reference" and the "point of use" (mirror or measuring head of the DPH) either as a correction of the reference dew-point temperature or as part of the uncertainty estimation. At dew-point temperatures in the range of ambient temperature and below, it is sufficient to determine the pressure drop for the required gas flow, and to keep the volumetric flow constant during the measurements. In this case, it is feasible to keep the dry-gas flow into the dew-point generator constant or to measure the flow downstream the DPH at ambient temperature. In normal operation, at least one DPH in addition to the monitoring DPH are used, and this operation has to be applied to each instrument. The situation is different at high dew-point temperatures up to 95 °C, the currently achievable upper limit reported in this paper. With increasing dew-point temperatures, the reference gas contains increasing amounts of water vapour and a constant dry-gas flow will lead to a significant enhanced volume flow at the conditions at the point of use, and therefore, to a significantly varying pressure drop depending on the applied dew-point temperature. At dew-point temperatures above ambient temperature, it is also necessary to heat the reference gas and the mirror head of the DPH sufficiently to avoid condensation which will additionally increase the volume flow and the pressure drop. In this paper, a method is provided to calculate the dry-gas flow rate needed to maintain a known wet-gas flow rate through a chilled mirror for a range of temperature and pressures.

  18. Microfluidic analysis of pressure drop and flow behavior in hypertensive micro vessels.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruiqing; Li, Fen; Lv, Jiaqi; He, Ying; Lu, Detang; Yamada, Takashi; Ono, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    The retinal arterial network is the only source of the highly nutrient-consumptive retina, thus any insult on the arteries can impair the retinal oxygen and nutrient supply and affect its normal function. The aim of this work is to study the influences of vascular structure variation on the flow and pressure characteristics via microfluidic devices. Two sets of micro-channel were designed to mimic the stenosed microvessels and dichotomous branching structure in the retinal arteries. Three working fluids including red blood cell (RBC) suspension were employed to investigate the pressure drop in the stenosed channel. The flow behaviors of RBC suspensions inside the micro channels were observed using high speed camera system. Pressure drop of different working fluids and RBC velocity profiles in the stenosed channel were obtained. Moreover, hematocrit levels of RBC suspensions inside the bifurcated channels were analyzed from the sequential images of RBC flow. The results of the flow in the stenosed channel show that RBCs drift from the center of the channels, and RBC velocity is influenced not only by the inlet flow rate but also the interaction between RBCs. The measured pressure drops in the stenosed channel increase notably with the increase of fluid viscosity. Furthermore, the dimensionless pressure drop due to the stenosis decreases with Reynolds number. On the other hand, the results of flow through the bifurcated channels show that as the ratio of the daughter-branch width to the mother-channel width increases, the ratio of hematocrit in two connected branches (Ht/Hd) decreases, which is in favorable agreement with the available analysis results.

  19. Ppi results from the balloon drop experiment of the hasi pressure profile instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkinen, T.; Lehto, A.; Salminen, P.; Leppelmeier, G.; Harri, A. M.

    1998-10-01

    At December 1995 a balloon drop experiment was conducted at León, Spain, for the HASI (Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument) instrument of the Huygens probe. A part of HASI is the Pressure Profile Instrument (PPI) which will measure the atmospheric pressure profile of Titan during the descent at November 2004. The experiment platform was carried by a balloon to an altitude of 30 km and it made a subsequent parachute-assisted descent. The pressure instrument functioned basically as expected. The vertical flight trajectory and pressure profile was reconstructed by using the collected data of the pressure instrument and the simultaneous temperature measurements. The calculated flight trajectory was in agreement with independent measurements with Omega and GPS. Some turbulence was detected near the surface and other dynamic behaviour in the upper part of the trajectory. The experiment demonstrated the nominal performance of the PPI instrument and serves as a real-like test flight for the actual mission.

  20. Numerical vs experimental pressure drops for Boger fluids in sharp-corner contraction flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Aguilar, J. E.; Tamaddon-Jahromi, H. R.; Webster, M. F.; Walters, K.

    2016-10-01

    This paper addresses the problem of matching experimental findings with numerical prediction for the extreme experimental levels of pressure-drops observed in the 4:1 sharp-corner contraction flows, as reported by Nigen and Walters ["Viscoelastic contraction flows: Comparison of axisymmetric and planar configurations," J. Non- Newtonian Fluid Mech. 102, 343-359 (2002)]. In this connection, we report on significant success in achieving quantitative agreement between predictions and experiments. This has been made possible by using a new swanINNFM model, employing an additional dissipative function. Notably, one can observe that extremely large pressure-drops may be attained with a suitable selection of the extensional viscous time scale. In addition, and on vortex structure, the early and immediate vortex enhancement for Boger fluids in axisymmetric contractions has also been reproduced, which is shown to be absent in planar counterparts.

  1. Theoretical investigation of pressure drop in combined cyclone and fabric filter systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirgo, John A.; Cooper, Douglas W.

    Computer simulations were conducted to investigate potential pressure drop reductions obtainable by combining cyclones, as pre-collectors, with fabric filters. The Leith-Licht model was used to characterize cyclone emissions and the specific resistance ( K2) of the fabric filter dust cake was calculated from an empirical correlation. Several important dimensionless groups were identified and evaluated. One group, the product of the ratio of the dust cake specific resistances expected with and without the cyclone and the mass penetration of the cyclone, ( K2/ K2) Pn, indicates whether a pressure drop reduction is possible. A correlation was developed for this group as a function of the size properties of the inlet dust (particle mass median diameter and geometric standard deviation) and the cyclone particle cut diameter. Expressions were derived for the break-even time, the duration of filtration with the cyclone needed to show a pressure drop reduction in comparison with filtration without the cyclone. It is shown that in previously reported experiments and simulations indicating an advantage for the combined cyclone-fabric filter system, filtration cycles were typically longer than the break-even time; those showing no improvement typically had filtration times shorter than the break-even time.

  2. Heat transfer and pressure drop in pin-fin trapezoidal ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, J.J.; Lai, D.Y.; Tsia, Y.P.

    1999-04-01

    Experiments are conducted to determine the log-mean averaged Nusselt number and overall pressure-drop coefficient in a pin-fin trapezoidal duct that models the cooling passages in modern gas turbine blades. The effects of pin arrangement (in-line and staggered), flow Reynolds number (6,000 {le} Re {le}40,000) and ratio of lateral-to-total flow rate (0 {le} {var_epsilon} {le} 1.0) are examined. The results of smooth trapezoidal ducts without pin arrays are also obtained for comparison. It is found that, for the single-outlet-flow duct, the log-mean averaged Nusselt number in the pin-fin trapezoidal duct with lateral outlet is insensitive to the pin arrangement, which is higher than that in straight-outlet-flow duct with the corresponding pin array. As for the trapezoidal ducts having both outlets, the log-mean averaged Nusselt number has a local minimum value at about {var_epsilon} = 0.3. After about {var_epsilon} {ge} 0.8, the log-mean averaged Nusselt number is nearly independent of the pin configuration. Moreover, the staggered pin array pays more pressure-drop penalty as compared with the in-line pin array in the straight-outlet-flow duct; however, in the lateral-outlet-flow duct, the in-line and staggered pin arrays yield almost the same overall pressure drop.

  3. Heat transfer and pressure drop in rectangular channels with crossing fins (a Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, N. P.; Polishchuk, V. G.; Andreev, K. D.; Rassokhin, V. A.; Zabelin, N. A.

    2015-06-01

    Channels with crossing finning find wide use in the cooling paths of high-temperature gas turbine blade systems. At different times, different institutions carried out experimental investigations of heat transfer and pressure drop in channels with coplanar finning of opposite walls for obtaining semiempirical dependences of Nusselt criteria (dimensionless heat-transfer coefficients) and pressure drop coefficients on the operating Reynolds number and relative geometrical parameters (or their complexes). The shape of experimental channels, the conditions of experiments, and the used variables were selected so that they would be most suited for solving particular practical tasks. Therefore, the results obtained in processing the experimental data have large scatter and limited use. This article considers the results from experimental investigations of different authors. In comparing the results, additional calculations were carried out for bringing the mathematical correlations to the form of dependences from the same variables. Generalization of the results is carried out. In the final analysis, universal correlations are obtained for determining the pressure drop coefficients and Nusselt number values for the flow of working medium in channels with coplanar finning.

  4. Pressure drop in fully developed, duct flow of dispersed liquid-vapor mixture at zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, K. R.; Chao, B. T.; Soo, S. L.

    1990-01-01

    The dynamics of steady, fully developed dispersed liquid-vapor flow in a straight duct at 0-g is simulated by flowing water containing n-butyl benzoate droplets. Water and benzoate are immiscible and have identical density at room temperature. The theoretical basis of the simulation is given. Experiments showed that, for a fixed combined flow rate of water and benzoate, the frictional pressure drop is unaffected by large changes in the volume fraction of benzoate drops and their size distribution. Measured power spectra of the static wall pressure fluctuations induced by the turbulent water-benzoate flow also revealed that their dynamics is essentially unaltered by the presence of the droplets. These experimental findings, together with the theoretical analysis, led to the conclusion that the pressure drop in fully developed, dispersed liquid-vapor flow in straight ducts of constant cross section at 0-g is identical to that due to liquid flowing alone at the same total volumetric flow rate of the liquid-vapor mixture and, therefore, can be readily determined.

  5. Effects of sudden expansion and contraction flow on pressure drops in the Stirling engine regenerator

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaguchi, K.; Yamashita, I.; Hirata, K.

    1998-07-01

    The flow losses in the regenerators greatly influence the performance of the Stirling engine. The losses mainly depend on fluid friction through the regenerator matrix, but are also generated in sudden expansion and contraction flow at the regenerator ends. The latter losses can't be neglected in the case of small area ratio (entrance area/cross-sectional area in regenerator). The pressure drops in regenerators are usually estimated assuming a uniform velocity distribution of working gas in the matrices. The estimation results, however, are generally smaller than practical data. The cross-sectional flow areas of the heater and cooler of typical Stirling engines are smaller than the cross- sectional area of the regenerator. The effects of the small flow passage on the velocity distribution of working fluid in the matrix, that is, a flow transition from tubes or channels to a regenerator matrix, can be often confirmed by the discolored matrix. Especially, the lack of a uniform distribution of velocity in the matrix causes increased flow loss and decreased thermal performance. So, it is necessary to understand the quantitative effects of the sudden change in flow area at the regenerator ends on the velocity distribution and pressure drop. In this paper, using matrices made of stacks of wire screens, the effects of the entrance and exit areas and the length of the regenerator on pressure drops are examined by an unidirectional steady flow apparatus. The experimental data are arranged in an empirical equation. The lack of a uniformity of velocity distribution is visualized using smoke-wire methods. The empirical equation presented is applied to the estimation of pressure loss in an actual engine regenerator. The applicability of the equation is examined by comparison of estimated value with engine data in pressure loss.

  6. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy: a recurrent and bilateral foot drop case report.

    PubMed

    Flor-de-Lima, Filipa; Macedo, Liliana; Taipa, Ricardo; Melo-Pires, Manuel; Rodrigues, Maria Lurdes

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy is characterized by acute, painless, recurrent mononeuropathies secondary to minor trauma or compression. A 16-year-old boy had the first episode of right foot drop after minor motorcycle accident. Electromyography revealed conduction block and slowing velocity conduction of the right deep peroneal nerve at the fibular head. After motor rehabilitation, he fully recovered. Six months later he had the second episode of foot drop in the opposite site after prolonged squatting position. Electromyography revealed sensorimotor polyneuropathy of left peroneal, sural, posterior tibial, and deep peroneal nerves and also of ulnar, radial, and median nerves of both upper limbs. Histological examination revealed sensory nerve demyelination and focal thickenings of myelin fibers. The diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy was confirmed by PMP22 deletion of chromosome 17p11.2. He started motor rehabilitation and avoidance of stressing factors with progressive recovery. After one-year followup, he was completely asymptomatic. Recurrent bilateral foot drop history, "sausage-like" swellings of myelin in histological examination, and the results of electromyography led the authors to consider the diagnosis despite negative family history. The authors highlight this rare disease in pediatric population and the importance of high index of clinical suspicion for its diagnosis.

  7. Extraction of essential oils from Algerian myrtle leaves using instant controlled pressure drop technology.

    PubMed

    Berka-Zougali, Baya; Hassani, Aicha; Besombes, Colette; Allaf, Karim

    2010-10-01

    In the present work, the new extraction process of Détente Instantanée Contrôlée DIC (French, for instant controlled pressure drop) was studied, developed, quantitatively and qualitatively compared to the conventional hydrodistillation method for the extraction of essential oils from Algerian myrtle leaves. DIC was used as a thermomechanical treatment, DIC subjecting the product to a high-pressure saturated steam. The DIC cycle ends with an abrupt pressure drop towards vacuum, and this instantly leads to an autovaporization of myrtle volatile compounds. An immediate condensation in the vacuum tank produced a micro-emulsion of water and essential oils. Thus, an ultra-rapid cooling of residual leaves occurred, precluding any thermal degradation. An experimental protocol was designed with 3 independent variables: saturated steam pressure between 0.1 and 0.6 MPa, resulting in a temperature between 100 and 160°C, a total thermal processing time between 19 and 221 s, and between 2 and 6 DIC cycles. The essential oils yield was defined as the main dependent variable. This direct extraction gave high yields and high quality essential oil, as revealed by composition and antioxidant activity (results not shown). After this treatment, the myrtle leaves were recovered and hydrodistilled in order to quantify the essential oil content in residual DIC-treated samples. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed some modification of the structure with a slight destruction of cell walls after DIC treatment.

  8. Numerical investigation of cavitation flow inside spool valve with large pressure drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jian; Pan, Dingyi; Xie, Fangfang; Shao, Xueming

    2015-12-01

    Spool valves play an important role in fluid power system. Cavitation phenomena happen frequently inside the spool valves, which cause structure damages, noise and lower down hydrodynamic performance. A numerical tools incorporating the cavitation model, are developed to predict the flow structure and cavitation pattern in the spool valve. Two major flow states in the spool valve chamber, i.e. flow-in and flow-out, are studies. The pressure distributions along the spool wall are first investigated, and the results agree well with the experimental data. For the flow-in cases, the local pressure at the throttling area drops much deeper than the pressure in flow-out cases. Meanwhile, the bubbles are more stable in flow-in cases than those in flow-out cases, which are ruptured and shed into the downstream.

  9. The impact of mass flow and masking on the pressure drop of air filter in heavy-duty diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoseeinzadeh, Sepideh; Gorji-Bandpy, Mofid

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculation approach to predict and evaluate the impact of the mass-flow inlet on the pressure drop of turbocharger`s air filtfer in heavy-duty diesel engine. The numerical computations were carried out using a commercial CFD program whereas the inlet area of the air filter consisted of several holes connected to a channel. After entering through the channel, the air passes among the holes and enters the air filter. The effect of masking holes and hydraulic diameter is studied and investigated on pressure drop. The results indicate that pressure drop increase with decreasing of hydraulic diameter and masking of the holes has considerable affect on the pressure drop.

  10. Geometry-based pressure drop prediction in mildly diseased human coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Schrauwen, J T C; Wentzel, J J; van der Steen, A F W; Gijsen, F J H

    2014-06-03

    Pressure drop (△p) estimations in human coronary arteries have several important applications, including determination of appropriate boundary conditions for CFD and estimation of fractional flow reserve (FFR). In this study a △p prediction was made based on geometrical features derived from patient-specific imaging data. Twenty-two mildly diseased human coronary arteries were imaged with computed tomography and intravascular ultrasound. Each artery was modelled in three consecutive steps: from straight to tapered, to stenosed, to curved model. CFD was performed to compute the additional △p in each model under steady flow for a wide range of Reynolds numbers. The correlations between the added geometrical complexity and additional △p were used to compute a predicted △p. This predicted △p based on geometry was compared to CFD results. The mean △p calculated with CFD was 855±666Pa. Tapering and curvature added significantly to the total △p, accounting for 31.4±19.0% and 18.0±10.9% respectively at Re=250. Using tapering angle, maximum area stenosis and angularity of the centerline, we were able to generate a good estimate for the predicted △p with a low mean but high standard deviation: average error of 41.1±287.8Pa at Re=250. Furthermore, the predicted △p was used to accurately estimate FFR (r=0.93). The effect of the geometric features was determined and the pressure drop in mildly diseased human coronary arteries was predicted quickly based solely on geometry. This pressure drop estimation could serve as a boundary condition in CFD to model the impact of distal epicardial vessels.

  11. Dysfunctional vestibular system causes a blood pressure drop in astronauts returning from space.

    PubMed

    Hallgren, Emma; Migeotte, Pierre-François; Kornilova, Ludmila; Delière, Quentin; Fransen, Erik; Glukhikh, Dmitrii; Moore, Steven T; Clément, Gilles; Diedrich, André; MacDougall, Hamish; Wuyts, Floris L

    2015-12-16

    It is a challenge for the human body to maintain stable blood pressure while standing. The body's failure to do so can lead to dizziness or even fainting. For decades it has been postulated that the vestibular organ can prevent a drop in pressure during a position change--supposedly mediated by reflexes to the cardiovascular system. We show--for the first time--a significant correlation between decreased functionality of the vestibular otolith system and a decrease in the mean arterial pressure when a person stands up. Until now, no experiments on Earth could selectively suppress both otolith systems; astronauts returning from space are a unique group of subjects in this regard. Their otolith systems are being temporarily disturbed and at the same time they often suffer from blood pressure instability. In our study, we observed the functioning of both the otolith and the cardiovascular system of the astronauts before and after spaceflight. Our finding indicates that an intact otolith system plays an important role in preventing blood pressure instability during orthostatic challenges. Our finding not only has important implications for human space exploration; they may also improve the treatment of unstable blood pressure here on Earth.

  12. Dysfunctional vestibular system causes a blood pressure drop in astronauts returning from space

    PubMed Central

    Hallgren, Emma; Migeotte, Pierre-François; Kornilova, Ludmila; Delière, Quentin; Fransen, Erik; Glukhikh, Dmitrii; Moore, Steven T.; Clément, Gilles; Diedrich, André; MacDougall, Hamish; Wuyts, Floris L.

    2015-01-01

    It is a challenge for the human body to maintain stable blood pressure while standing. The body’s failure to do so can lead to dizziness or even fainting. For decades it has been postulated that the vestibular organ can prevent a drop in pressure during a position change – supposedly mediated by reflexes to the cardiovascular system. We show – for the first time – a significant correlation between decreased functionality of the vestibular otolith system and a decrease in the mean arterial pressure when a person stands up. Until now, no experiments on Earth could selectively suppress both otolith systems; astronauts returning from space are a unique group of subjects in this regard. Their otolith systems are being temporarily disturbed and at the same time they often suffer from blood pressure instability. In our study, we observed the functioning of both the otolith and the cardiovascular system of the astronauts before and after spaceflight. Our finding indicates that an intact otolith system plays an important role in preventing blood pressure instability during orthostatic challenges. Our finding not only has important implications for human space exploration; they may also improve the treatment of unstable blood pressure here on Earth. PMID:26671177

  13. Minimum rate of spouting and peak pressure-drop in a spouted bed

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Fumiaru; Zhang, Laiying; Maehashi, Yasuo . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-04-01

    Spouted beds are a type of fluidized bed, but one which has certain advantages, viz., (1) the capability of handling coarse particles; (2) the capability of handling particles with complicated shapes; (3) the absence of the need to have a high flow-rate; and (4) a small pressure drop. The first and second of these advantages, in particular, are responsible for spouted beds having found use in industry in the drying of powdered materials, in granulation apparatus, in the roasting of mineral ores, and in waste incinerators, while their application in coal gasification and shale pyrolysis is, also, examined.

  14. A New Population Dataset on Dust Devil Pressure Drops : Setting the Stage for Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R. D.

    2012-09-01

    A quarter of a century ago in the first in-situ study of dust devils on Mars, Ryan and Lucich (1983) rue that 'Unfortunately, we have been unable to find a terrestrial data set that permits a one-to-one comparison with our Mars data'. Remarkably, this state of affairs has largely persisted. Here I present a set of fixed station terrestrial field data, enabled by recent technological developments, which enables a direct comparison with dust devils (as indicated by vortex pressure drops) from Mars Pathfinder, Phoenix, and hopefully MSL Curiosity.

  15. Pressure drop and mass transfer in two-pass ribbed channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, P. R.; Han, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    The combined effects of the sharp 180-deg turn and of the rib configuration on the pressure drop and mass transfer characteristics in a two-pass square channel with a pair of opposite rib-roughened walls (to simulate turbine airfoil cooling passages) were determined for a Reynolds number range of 10,000-60,000. Heat transfer enhancements were compared for the first pass and for the two-pass channel with the sharp 180-deg turn. Correlations for the fully-developed friction factors and loss coefficients were obtained.

  16. The Interdependence of Plate Coupling Processes, Subduction Rate, and Asthenospheric Pressure Drop across Subducting Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royden, L.; Holt, A.; Becker, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    One advantage of analytical models, in which analytic expressions are used for the various components of the subduction system, is the efficient exploration of parameter space and identification of the physical mechanisms controlling a wide breadth of slab kinematics. We show that, despite subtle differences in how plate interfaces and boundary conditions are implemented, results for single subduction from a 3-D semi-analytical model for subduction FAST (Royden & Husson, 2006; Jagoutz et al., 2015) and from the numerical finite-element model CitcomCU (Moresi & Gurnis, 1996, Zhong et al., 2006) are in excellent agreement when plate coupling (via shear stress on the plate interface) takes place in the FAST without the development of topographic relief at the plate boundary. Results from the two models are consistent across a variety of geometries, with fixed upper plate, fixed lower plate, and stress-free plate ends. When the analytical model is modified to include the development of topography above the subduction boundary, subduction rates are greatly increased, indicating a strong sensitivity of subduction to the mode of plate coupling. Rates of subduction also correlate strongly with the asthenospheric pressure drop across the subducting slab, which drives toroidal flow of the asthenosphere around the slab. When the lower plate is fixed, subduction is relatively slow and the pressure drop from below to above the slab is large, inhibiting subduction and slab roll-back. When the upper plate is fixed and when the plate ends are stress-free, subduction rates are approximately 50% faster and the corresponding asthenospheric pressure drop from below to above the slab is small, facilitating rapid subduction. This qualitative correlation between plate coupling processes, asthenospheric pressure drop, and rates of subduction can be extended to systems with more than one subduction zone (Holt et al., 2015 AGU Fall Abstract). Jagoutz, O., Royden, L., Holt, A. & Becker, T. W

  17. Direct measurement of the differential pressure during drop formation in a co-flow microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Tostado, Chris P; Xu, Jian-Hong; Lu, Yang-Cheng; Luo, Guang-Sheng

    2014-04-07

    In this study, we developed a new method for the direct measurement of differential pressures in a co-flow junction microfluidic device using a Capillary Laplace Gauge (CLG). The CLG - used inside the microchannel device--was designed using a tapered glass-capillary set up in co-flow junction architecture with a three-phase liquid-liquid-gas system with two flowing liquid phases and an entrained gas phase. By taking advantage of the Laplace equation, basic geometric relations and an integrated image analysis program, the movement of the entrained gas phase with the flow of the liquid-phases is tracked and monitored, allowing the gauge to function as an ultra-sensitive, integrated, differential pressure sensor measuring fluctuations in the liquid-dispersed phase channel pressure as small as tens of Pascals caused by droplet formation. The gauge was used to monitor the drop formation and breakup process in a co-flow junction microfluidic device under different flow conditions across a large range (1 × 10(-3) to 2.0 × 10(-1)) of capillary numbers. In addition to being able to monitor short and long term dispersed phase pressure fluctuation trends for both single drop and large droplet populations, the gauge was also used to clearly identify a transition between the dripping and jetting flow regimes. Overall, the combination of a unique, integrated image analysis program with this new type of sensor serves as a powerful tool with great potential for a variety of different research and industrial applications requiring sensitive microchannel pressure measurements.

  18. Pressure Drop in Tortuosity/Kinking of the Internal Carotid Artery: Simulation and Clinical Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijun; Zhao, Feng; Wang, Daming; Hu, Shen; Liu, Jiachun; Zhou, Zhilun; Lu, Jun; Qi, Peng; Song, Shiying

    2016-01-01

    Background. Whether carotid tortuosity/kinking of the internal carotid artery leads to cerebral ischemia remains unclear. There is very little research about the hemodynamic variation induced by carotid tortuosity/kinking in the literature. The objective of this study was to research the blood pressure changes induced by carotid tortuosity/kinking. Methods. We first created a geometric model of carotid tortuosity/kinking. Based on hemodynamic boundary conditions, the hemodynamics of carotid tortuosity and kinking were studied via a finite element simulation. Then, an in vitro system was built to validate the numerical simulation results. The mean arterial pressure changes before and after carotid kinking were measured using pressure sensors in 12 patients with carotid kinking. Results. Numerical simulation revealed that the pressure drops increased with increases in the kinking angles. Clinical tests and in vitro experiments confirmed the numerical simulation results. Conclusions. Carotid kinking leads to blood pressure reduction. In certain conditions, kinking may affect the cerebral blood supply and be associated with cerebral ischemia. PMID:27195283

  19. Two-phase pressure drop with twisted-tape swirl generators

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, M.K.; Bensler, H.P.; Pourdoshti, M.

    1985-03-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to determine the effect of twisted-tape swirl generators on adiabatic and diabatic two-phase flow pressure drops in vertical straight tubes. Tape-twist ratios (length for 180/sup 0/ twist/inside tube diameter) of 3.94, 8.94, and 13.92 were tested with R-113 over a range of pressures, mass velocities, qualities, and heat fluxes. Empty tube reference data were successfully predicted with a correlation from the literature. The twisted tape data wer successfully correlated by using the hydraulic diameter and a single-phase swirl flow friction factor in the empty tube correlation. Data from the literature also were predicted well with this correlation.

  20. Pressure drop in fully developed, turbulent, liquid-vapor annular flows in zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, K. R.; Chao, B. T.; Soo, S. L.

    1992-01-01

    The prediction of frictional pressure drop in fully developed, turbulent, annular liquid-vapor flows in zero gravity using simulation experiments conducted on earth is described. The scheme extends the authors' earlier work on dispersed flows. The simulation experiments used two immiscible liquids of identical density, namely, water and n-butyl benzoate. Because of the lack of rigorous analytical models for turbulent, annular flows, the proposed scheme resorts to existing semiempirical correlations. Results based on two different correlations are presented and compared. Others may be used. It was shown that, for both dispersed and annular flow regimes, the predicted frictional pressure gradients in 0-g are lower than those in 1-g under otherwise identical conditions. The physical basis for this finding is given.

  1. Prediction of pressure drop of two-phase coal slurries in pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanghvi, S. M.; Tolan, J. S.

    1982-11-01

    Pressure drop and flow rate measurements through pipeline viscometers were analyzed using the power law, Bingham-plastic and Bowen non-Newtonian heological models in a computer program. Wall slip was corrected with Hanks' modification of the Rabinowitsch-Mooney equation. The possibility of solids settling was analyzed with the Oroskar-Turian correlation. The program relates shear stress to shear rate for Fort Lewis coal-slurry data to within 5% for flow without solids settling. Wilsonville coal-slurry data with solids settling were fit to within 17% by the Bowen model, but the Bowen parameters are very sensitive to operating conditions. Pressure drop is predicted in the program as a function of flow rate and pipe diameter, using the analysis of best-fit rheological parameters and literature correlations for friction factors. The effect of wall slip on shear stress decreased with increasing pipe diameter. A modification to the graphical criterion for turbulence was proposed that utilizes the numerical value of the slopes of the branched flow curves.

  2. Heat transfer and pressure drop in tube with broken twisted tape insert

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Shyy Woei; Yang, Tsun Lirng; Liou, Jin Shuen

    2007-11-15

    An experimental study measuring the axial heat transfer distributions and the pressure drop coefficients of the tube fitted with a broken twisted tape of twist ratio 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5 or {infinity} is performed in the Re range of 1000-40,000. This type of broken twisted tape is newly invented without previous investigations available. Local Nusselt numbers and mean Fanning friction factors in the tube fitted with the broken twisted tape increase as the twist ratio decreases. Heat transfer coefficients, mean Fanning friction factors and thermal performance factors in the tube fitted with the broken twisted tape are, respectively, augmented to 1.28-2.4, 2-4.7 and 0.99-1.8 times of those in the tube fitted with the smooth twisted tape. Empirical heat transfer and pressure drop correlations which evaluate the local Nusselt number and the mean Fanning friction factor for the tube with the broken twisted tape insert are generated to assist the industrial applications. (author)

  3. Heat transfer and pressure drop in hexagonal ducts with surface dimples

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.W.; Chiang, K.F.; Chou, T.C.

    2010-11-15

    Measurements of detailed Nusselt number (Nu) distributions and pressure drop coefficients (f) for four hexagonal ducts with smooth and dimpled walls are performed to comparatively examine the thermal performances of three sets of dimpled walls with concave-concave, convex-convex and concave-convex configurations at Reynolds numbers (Re) in the range of 900-30,000. A set of selected experimental data illustrates the influences of dimple configuration and Re on the detailed Nu distributions, the area-averaged Nu over developed flow region (Nu-bar) and the pressure drop coefficients. Relative enhancements of Nu and f from the smooth-walled references (Nu{sub {infinity}} and f{sub {infinity}}) along with the thermal performance factor ({eta}) defined as (Nu-bar/Nu{sub {infinity}})/(f/f{sub {infinity}}){sup 1/3} are examined. Nu-bar and f correlations are individually obtained for each tested hexagonal duct using Re as the controlling parameter. (author)

  4. Two-phase flow and pressure drop in flow passages of compact heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Wambsganss, M.W.; Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; France, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    Two-phase flow experiments were performed with air/water mixtures in a small rectangular channel measuring 9.52 {times} 1.59 mm (aspects ratio equal to 6), for applications to compact heat exchangers. Pressure drop and flow pattern definition data were obtained over a large range of mass qualities (0.0002 to 1), and in the case of flow pattern data, a large range of mass fluxes (50 to 2,000 kg/m{sup 2}s). A flow pattern map, based on visual observations and photographs of the flow patterns, is presented and compared with a map developed for a rectangular channel of the same aspect ratio but with dimensions twice those of the test channel, and with a map developed for a circular tube with the same hydraulic diameter of 3 mm. Pressure drop data are presented as a function of both mass quality and Martinelli parameter and are compared with state-of-the-art correlations and a modified Chisholm correlation. 13 refs.

  5. Two-phase flow and pressure drop in flow passages of compact heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Wambsganss, M.W.; Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; France, D.M.

    1992-02-01

    Two-phase flow experiments were performed with air/water mixtures in a small rectangular channel measuring 9.52 {times} 1.59 mm (aspects ratio equal to 6), for applications to compact heat exchangers. Pressure drop and flow pattern definition data were obtained over a large range of mass qualities (0.0002 to 1), and in the case of flow pattern data, a large range of mass fluxes (50 to 2,000 kg/m{sup 2}s). A flow pattern map, based on visual observations and photographs of the flow patterns, is presented and compared with a map developed for a rectangular channel of the same aspect ratio but with dimensions twice those of the test channel, and with a map developed for a circular tube with the same hydraulic diameter of 3 mm. Pressure drop data are presented as a function of both mass quality and Martinelli parameter and are compared with state-of-the-art correlations and a modified Chisholm correlation. 13 refs.

  6. Investigation of the different base fluid effects on the nanofluids heat transfer and pressure drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, Javad; Nikseresht, Amir Hossein

    2011-09-01

    A numerical study of laminar forced convective flows of three different nanofluids through a horizontal circular tube with a constant heat flux condition has been performed. The effect of Al2O3 volume concentration 0 ≤ φ ≤ 0.09 in the pure water, water-ethylene glycol mixture and pure ethylene glycol as base fluids, and Reynolds number of 100 ≤ Re ≤ 2,000 for different power inputs in the range of 10 ≤ Q( W) ≤ 400 have been investigated. In this study, all of the nanofluid properties are temperature and nanoparticle volume concentration dependent. The governing equations have been solved using finite volume approach with the SIMPLER algorithm. The results indicate an increase in the averaged heat transfer coefficient with increasing the mass of ethylene glycol in the water base fluid, solid concentration and Reynolds number. From the investigations it can be inferred that, the pressure drop and pumping power in the nanofluids at low solid volumetric concentration (φ < 3%) is approximately the same as in the pure base fluid in the various Reynolds numbers, but the higher solid nanoparticle volume concentration causes a penalty drop in the pressure. Moreover, this study shows it is possible to achieve a higher heat transfer rate with lower wall shear stress with the use of proper nanofluids.

  7. Heat transfer and pressure drop measurement in wavy channels with flow disturbers

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, S.; Veronesi, R.; Hryniewicz, E.V.

    1999-07-01

    In the current work, the transient method was employed to obtain the local heat transfer coefficient for a 6 in. x 3/8 in. x 12 in. (15.24cm x .9525cm x 30.48cm) Plexiglas {reg_sign} wavy channel with and without flow disturbers. A short duration transient test was performed to measure the heat transfer coefficient by introducing heated air over test specimen that had been sprayed with calibrated thermochromic liquid crystals. This technique allowed the experimenter to observe the temperature changes using a video camera. because a Plexiglas surface has a low thermal diffusivity, a one-dimensional assumption is a reasonable approximation because the surface temperature response is limited to a thin layer near the surface and lateral conduction is small. The heat transfer coefficient using the transient technique is then determined from the response of the surface temperature to a step change in the local temperature. Using this method, the axial variation in the heat transfer coefficient for Reynolds numbers in the laminar (1100) and turbulent region (2900) were obtained. These Reynolds numbers were based on the hydraulic diameter at the inlet of the wavy channel. Also, in this investigation, the region of greatest heat transfer and the pressure drop were both experimentally and analytically determined and the friction factor across an in-phase corrugated wall channel (wavy channel) at Reynolds numbers of 1100 and 2900 were obtained. A manometer and a pressure transducer were employed to measure pressure drop across the channel. The effect of flow disturbers mounted on each peak, alternate peaks and the first six peaks of a twelve-peak channel were also investigated. For all cases, the pressure drop and friction factor were shown to moderately increase with rib placement in the test section when compared to the results obtained from a similar smooth wavy channel without ribs. Additionally, for all cases, the friction factor also decreased with an increase in the

  8. Nuclear Power Plant Containment Pressure Boundary Research

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, J.L.; Chokshi, N.C.; Costello, J.F.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Naus, D.J.

    1999-09-15

    Research to address aging of the containment pressure boundary in light-water reactor plants is summarized. This research is aimed at understanding the significant factors relating occurrence of corrosion, efficacy of inspection, and structural capacity reduction of steel containment and liners of concrete containment. This understanding will lead to improvements in risk-informed regulatory decision making. Containment pressure boundary components are described and potential aging factors identified. Quantitative tools for condition assessments of aging structures to maintain an acceptable level of reliability over the service life of the plant are discussed. Finally, the impact of aging (i.e., loss of shell thickness due to corrosion) on steel containment fragility for a pressurized water reactor ice-condenser plant is presented.

  9. An improved method for simultaneous determination of frictional pressure drop and vapor volume fraction in vertical flow boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klausner, J. F.; Chao, B. T.; Soo, S. L.

    1990-01-01

    The two-phase frictional pressure drop and vapor volume fraction in the vertical boiling and adiabatic flow of the refrigerant, R11, have been simultaneously measured by a liquid balancing column and differential magnetic reluctance pressure transducers. An account is given of the experimental apparatus and procedure, data acquisition and analysis, and error estimation employed. All values of two-phase multipliers evaluated on the basis of the measured frictional pressure drop data in vertical upflow fall in the range bounded by the predictions of the Chisholm correlation and the homogeneous model.

  10. Pressure, temperature and density drops along supercritical fluid chromatography columns. I. Experimental results for neat carbon dioxide and columns packed with 3- and 5-micron particles.

    PubMed

    Poe, Donald P; Veit, Devon; Ranger, Megan; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Tarafder, Abhijit; Guiochon, Georges

    2012-08-10

    The pressure drop and temperature drop on columns packed with 3- and 5-micron particles were measured using neat CO(2) at a flow rate of 5 mL/min, at temperatures from 20°C to 100°C, and outlet pressures from 80 to 300 bar. The density drop was calculated based on the temperature and pressure at the column inlet and outlet. The columns were suspended in a circulating air bath either bare or covered with foam insulation. The results show that the pressure drop depends on the outlet pressure, the operating temperature, and the thermal environment. A temperature drop was observed for all conditions studied. The temperature drop was relatively small (less than 3°C) for combinations of low temperature and high pressure. Larger temperature drops and density drops occurred at higher temperatures and low to moderate pressures. Covering the column with thermal insulation resulted in larger temperature drops and corresponding smaller density drops. At 20°C the temperature drop was never more than a few degrees. The largest temperature drops occurred for both columns when insulated at 80°C and 80 bar, reaching a maximum value of 21°C for the 5-micron column, and 26°C for the 3-micron column. For an adiabatic column, the temperature drop depends on the pressure drop, the thermal expansion coefficient, and the density and the heat capacity of the mobile phase fluid, and can be described by a simple mathematical relationship. For a fixed operating temperature and outlet pressure, the temperature drop increases monotonically with the pressure drop.

  11. Effect of nonionic surfactant on wetting behavior of an evaporating drop under a reduced pressure environment.

    PubMed

    Sefiane, Khellil

    2004-04-15

    The evaporation of sessile drops at reduced pressure is investigated. The evaporation of water droplets on aluminum and PTFE surfaces at reduced pressure was compared. It was found that water droplets on an aluminum surface exhibit a 'depinning jump' at subatmospheric pressures. This is when a pinned droplet suddenly depins, with an increase in contact angle and a simultaneous decrease in the base width. The evaporation of sessile water droplets with a nonionic surfactant (Triton X-100) added to an aluminum surface was then studied. The initial contact angle exhibited a minimum at 0.001 wt% Triton X-100. A maximum in the evaporation rate was also observed at the same concentration. Droplets with low surfactant concentrations are found to exhibit the 'depinning jump.' It is thought that the local concentration of the surfactant causes a gradient of surface tension. The balance at the contact angle is dictated by complex phenomena, including surfactant diffusion and adsorption processes at interfaces. Due to the strong evaporation near the triple line, an accumulation of the surfactant will lead to a surface tension gradient along the interface. The gradient of surface tension will influence the wetting behavior (Marangoni effect). At low surfactant concentrations the contact line depins under the strong effect of surface tension gradient that develops spontaneously over the droplet interface due to surfactant accumulation near the triple line. The maximum evaporation rate corresponds to a minimum contact angle for a pinned droplet.

  12. Modeling pressure drop using generalized scaffold characteristics in an axial-flow bioreactor for soft tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Podichetty, Jagdeep T; Bhaskar, Prasana R; Khalf, Abdurizzagh; Madihally, Sundararajan V

    2014-06-01

    The goal of this study was to better understand how analytical permeability models based on scaffold architecture can facilitate a non-invasive technique to real time monitoring of pressure drop in bioreactors. In particular, we evaluated the permeability equations for electrospun and freeze dried scaffolds via pressure drop comparison in an axial-flow bioreactor using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) and experimentation. The polycaprolactone-cellulose acetate fibers obtained by co-axial electrospinning technique and Chitosan-Gelatin scaffolds prepared using freeze-drying techniques were utilized. Initially, the structural properties (fiber size, pore size and porosity) and mechanical properties (elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio) of scaffolds in phosphate buffered saline at 37 °C were evaluated. The CFD simulations were performed by coupling fluid flow, described by Brinkman equation, with structural mechanics using a moving mesh. The experimentally obtained pressure drop values for both 1 mm thick and 2 mm thick scaffolds agreed with simulation results. To evaluate the effect of permeability and elastic modulus on pressure drop, CFD predictions were extended to a broad range of permeabilities spanning synthetic scaffolds and tissues, elastic moduli, and Poisson's ratio. Results indicated an increase in pressure drop with increase in permeability. Scaffolds with higher elastic modulus performed better and the effect of Poisson's ratio was insignificant. Flow induced deformation was negligible in axial-flow bioreactor. In summary, scaffold permeabilities can be calculated using scaffold microarchitecture and can be used in non-invasive monitoring of tissue regeneration.

  13. Preliminary investigation of labyrinth packing pressure drops at onset of swirl-induced rotor instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. H.; Vohr, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Backward and forward subsynchronous instability was observed in a flexible model test rotor under the influence of swirl flow in a straight-through labyrinth packing. The packing pressure drop at the onset of instability was then measured for a range of operating speeds, clearances and inlet swirl conditions. The trend in these measurements for forward swirl and forward instability is generally consistent with the short packing rotor force formulations of Benchert and Wachter. Diverging clearances were also destabilizing and had a forward orbit with forward swirl and a backward orbit with reverse swirl. A larger, stiff rotor model system is now being assembled which will permit testing steam turbine-type straight-through and hi-lo labyrinth packings. With calibrated and adjustable bearings in this new apparatus, direct measure of the net destabilizing force generated by the packings can be made.

  14. Two-phase pressure drop across a hydrofoil-based micro pin device using R-123

    SciTech Connect

    Kosar, Ali

    2008-05-15

    The two-phase pressure drop in a hydrofoil-based micro pin fin heat sink has been investigated using R-123 as the working fluid. Two-phase frictional multipliers have been obtained over mass fluxes from 976 to 2349 kg/m{sup 2} s and liquid and gas superficial velocities from 0.38 to 1.89 m/s and from 0.19 to 24 m/s, respectively. It has been found that the two-phase frictional multiplier is strongly dependent on flow pattern. The theoretical prediction using Martinelli parameter based on the laminar fluid and laminar gas flow represented the experimental data fairly well for the spray-annular flow. For the bubbly and wavy-intermittent flow, however, large deviations from the experimental data were recorded. The Martinelli parameter was successfully used to determine the flow patterns, which were bubbly, wavy-intermittent, and spray-annular flow in the current study. (author)

  15. Pressure Drop in Cold Water Flow in Beds Packed with Several Kinds of Crushed Ice.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanadori, Michio; Ohira, Akiyoshi

    This paper deals with the pressure drop in cold water flow in the beds packed with crushed ice. 1n each case, ice-packed beds were filled with sevral kinds of crushed ice, and friction-loss coefficients were examined. The following results were obtained. (1) The friction factor of rectangular-type ice-packed beds is smaller than that of ideal sphere beds by about 1/4 to 1/2. (2) The friction factor of small-stone-type ice-packed beds is about twice as large as that of ideal sphere beds. (3) It is difficult to compare the flow model of water in restricted channel of particle-type ice-packed beds with that of ideal packed beds.

  16. Nonisothermal motion of an elastoviscoplastic medium through a pipe under a changing pressure drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burenin, A. A.; Kovtanyuk, L. V.; Panchenko, G. L.

    2015-09-01

    The solution of a sequence of coupled problems of thermoelastic plasticity on the nucleation and development of medium flow in a cylindrical pipe in conditions of varying pressure drop and material heating due to friction on the pipe wall and subsequent stagnation of flow under slow load removal and cooling of the layer material is derived based on the theory of large elastoplastic deformations generalized for the nonisothermal case. The thermal and deformation processes are interrelated with the temperature dependence of the yield point. The conditions of nucleation of the viscoplastic flow and regularities of motion of the elastoplastic boundaries over the layer are noted, and the flow rates and large strains, both irreversible and reversible, are calculated.

  17. Flow pattern and pressure drop of vertical upward gas-liquid flow in sinusoidal wavy channels

    SciTech Connect

    Nilpueng, Kitti; Wongwises, Somchai

    2006-06-15

    Flow patterns and pressure drop of upward liquid single-phase flow and air-water two-phase flow in sinusoidal wavy channels are experimentally studied. The test section is formed by a sinusoidal wavy wall of 1.00 m length with a wave length of 67.20mm, an amplitude of 5.76mm. Different phase shifts between the side walls of the wavy channel of 0{sup o}, 90{sup o} and 180{sup o} are investigated. The flow phenomena, which are bubbly flow, slug flow, churn flow, and dispersed bubbly flow are observed and recorded by high-speed camera. When the phase shifts are increased, the onset of the transition from the bubbly flow to the churn flow shifts to a higher value of superficial air velocity, and the regions of the slug flow and the churn flow are smaller. In other words, the regions of the bubbly flow and the dispersed bubbly flow are larger as the phase shift increases. The slug flow pattern is only found in the test sections with phase shifts of 0{sup o} and 90{sup o}. Recirculating gas bubbles are always found in the troughs of the corrugations. The recirculating is higher when the phase shifts are larger. The relationship between the two-phase multipliers calculated from the measured pressure drops, and the Martinelli parameter is compared with the Lockhart-Martinelli correlation. The correlation in the case of turbulent-turbulent condition is shown to fit the data very well for the phase shift of 0{sup o} but shows greater deviation when the phase shifts are higher. (author)

  18. Experimental study on the flow patterns and the two-phase pressure drops in a horizontal impacting T-Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertani, C.; Malandrone, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-04-01

    The present paper analyzes the experimental results concerning the flow patterns and pressure drops in two-phase flow through a horizontal impacting T-junction, whose outlet pipes are aligned and perpendicular to the inlet pipe. The test section consists of plexiglass pipes with inner diameter of 10 mm. A mixture of water and air at ambient temperature and pressures up to 2.4 bar flows through the T-junction, with different splitting of flow rates in the two outlet branches; superficial velocities of air and water in the inlet pipe have been varied up to a maximum of 35 m/s and 3.5 m/s respectively. The flow patterns occurring in the inlet and branch pipes are compared with the predictions of the Baker and Taitel - Dukler maps. The pressure drops along the branches have been measured relatively to different splitting of the flow rate through the two branches and the pressure loss coefficients in the junction have been evaluated. Friction pressure drops have allowed us to evaluate two-phase friction multipliers, which have then been compared to the predictions of Lockhart-Martinelli, and Friedel correlations. Local pressure drops have been extrapolated at the junction centre and analyzed; the two-phase multiplier has been evaluated and compared with the predictions of Chisholm correlation; the value of the empirical coefficient that minimizes the discrepancy has also been evaluated.

  19. A Fast Air-dry Dropping Chromosome Preparation Method Suitable for FISH in Plants.

    PubMed

    Aliyeva-Schnorr, Lala; Ma, Lu; Houben, Andreas

    2015-12-16

    Preparation of chromosome spreads is a prerequisite for the successful performance of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Preparation of high quality plant chromosome spreads is challenging due to the rigid cell wall. One of the approved methods for the preparation of plant chromosomes is a so-called drop preparation, also known as drop-spreading or air-drying technique. Here, we present a protocol for the fast preparation of mitotic chromosome spreads suitable for the FISH detection of single and high copy DNA probes. This method is an improved variant of the air-dry drop method performed under a relative humidity of 50%-55%. This protocol comprises a reduced number of washing steps making its application easy, efficient and reproducible. Obvious benefits of this approach are well-spread, undamaged and numerous metaphase chromosomes serving as a perfect prerequisite for successful FISH analysis. Using this protocol we obtained high-quality chromosome spreads and reproducible FISH results for Hordeum vulgare, H. bulbosum, H. marinum, H. murinum, H. pubiflorum and Secale cereale.

  20. High-Pressure Transport Properties Of Fluids: Theory And Data From Levitated Drops At Combustion-Relevant Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth; Ohsaka, Kenichi

    2003-01-01

    Although the high pressure multicomponent fluid conservation equations have already been derived and approximately validated for binary mixtures by this PI, the validation of the multicomponent theory is hampered by the lack of existing mixing rules for property calculations. Classical gas dynamics theory can provide property mixing-rules at low pressures exclusively. While thermal conductivity and viscosity high-pressure mixing rules have been documented in the literature, there is no such equivalent for the diffusion coefficients and the thermal diffusion factors. The primary goal of this investigation is to extend the low pressure mixing rule theory to high pressures and validate the new theory with experimental data from levitated single drops. The two properties that will be addressed are the diffusion coefficients and the thermal diffusion factors. To validate/determine the property calculations, ground-based experiments from levitated drops are being conducted.

  1. Cloud modification by man-made pollutants: Effects of a coal-fired power plant on cloud drop spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Barrett, E. W.; Wellman, D. L.; McGuire, J. A.

    1981-03-01

    Pollutants from coal-fired power plants increase the drop modal radii and broaden the drop spectra of stratocumulus clouds. Additional water from the coal combustion leads to a measurable increase of the liquid water content of polluted clouds. Implied consequences are an increase of the coalescence efficiency, and an increase in acidity, of affected clouds.

  2. Comparison of pressure drop and filtration efficiency of particulate respirators using welding fumes and sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun-Woo; Yoon, Chung-Sik; Lee, Jin-Ho; Lee, Seung-Joo; Viner, Andrew; Johnson, Erik W

    2011-07-01

    Respirators are used to help reduce exposure to a variety of contaminants in workplaces. Test aerosols used for certification of particulate respirators (PRs) include sodium chloride (NaCl), dioctyl phthalate, and paraffin oil. These aerosols are generally assumed to be worst case surrogates for aerosols found in the workplace. No data have been published to date on the performance of PRs with welding fumes, a hazardous aerosol that exists in real workplace settings. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of respirators and filters against a NaCl aerosol and a welding fume aerosol and determine whether or not a correlation between the two could be made. Fifteen commercial PRs and filters (seven filtering facepiece, two replaceable single-type filters, and six replaceable dual-type filters) were chosen for investigation. Four of the filtering facepiece respirators, one of the single-type filters, and all of the dual-type filters contained carbon to help reduce exposure to ozone and other vapors generated during the welding process. For the NaCl test, a modified National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health protocol was adopted for use with the TSI Model 8130 automated filter tester. For the welding fume test, welding fumes from mild steel flux-cored arcs were generated and measured with a SIBATA filter tester (AP-634A, Japan) and a manometer in the upstream and downstream sections of the test chamber. Size distributions of the two aerosols were measured using a scanning mobility particle sizer. Penetration and pressure drop were measured over a period of aerosol loading onto the respirator or filter. Photos and scanning electron microscope images of clean and exposed respirators were taken. The count median diameter (CMD) and mass median diameter (MMD) for the NaCl aerosol were smaller than the welding fumes (CMD: 74 versus 216 nm; MMD: 198 versus 528 nm, respectively). Initial penetration and peak penetration were higher with the NaCl aerosol

  3. Study of Critical Heat Flux and Two-Phase Pressure Drop Under Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdollahian, Davood; Quintal, Joseph; Barez, Fred; Zahm, Jennifer; Lohr, Victor

    1996-01-01

    The design of the two-phase flow systems which are anticipated to be utilized in future spacecraft thermal management systems requires a knowledge of two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena in reduced gravities. This program was funded by NASA headquarters in response to NRA-91-OSSA-17 and was managed by Lewis Research Center. The main objective of this program was to design and construct a two-phase test loop, and perform a series of normal gravity and aircraft trajectory experiments to study the effect of gravity on the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) and onset of instability. The test loop was packaged on two aircraft racks and was also instrumented to generate data for two-phase pressure drop. The normal gravity tests were performed with vertical up and downflow configurations to bound the effect of gravity on the test parameters. One set of aircraft trajectory tests was performed aboard the NASA DC-9 aircraft. These tests were mainly intended to evaluate the test loop and its operational performance under actual reduced gravity conditions, and to produce preliminary data for the test parameters. The test results were used to demonstrate the applicability of the normal gravity models for prediction of the two-phase friction pressure drop. It was shown that the two-phase friction multipliers for vertical upflow and reduced gravity conditions can be successfully predicted by the appropriate normal gravity models. Limited critical heat flux data showed that the measured CHF under reduced gravities are of the same order of magnitude as the test results with vertical upflow configuration. A simplified correlation was only successful in predicting the measured CHF for low flow rates. Instability tests with vertical upflow showed that flow becomes unstable and critical heat flux occurs at smaller powers when a parallel flow path exists. However, downflow tests and a single reduced gravity instability experiment indicated that the system actually became more stable with a

  4. Two-phase heat transfer and pressure drop of LNG during saturated flow boiling in a horizontal tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongsheng; Shi, Yumei

    2013-12-01

    Two-phase heat transfer and pressure drop of LNG (liquefied natural gas) have been measured in a horizontal smooth tube with an inner diameter of 8 mm. The experiments were conducted at inlet pressures from 0.3 to 0.7 MPa with a heat flux of 8-36 kW m-2, and mass flux of 49.2-201.8 kg m-2 s-1. The effect of vapor quality, inlet pressure, heat flux and mass flux on the heat transfer characteristic are discussed. The comparisons of the experimental data with the predicted value by existing correlations are analyzed. Zou et al. (2010) correlation shows the best accuracy with 24.1% RMS deviation among them. Moreover four frictional pressure drop methods are also chosen to compare with the experimental database.

  5. Two-Phase Pressure Drop in a Twisted Tape Boiler for a Microgravity Rankine Cycle Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oinuma, Ryoji; Bean, David; Neill, Charles; Supak, Kevin; Best, Frederick

    2006-01-01

    A once-through type boiler with twisted tape inserts has been proposed for a Rankine cycle power system in space since the 1960s. However, information regarding fluid dynamics such as pressure drop in the boiler is not established well. As a fundamental study of the system characteristics, adiabatic two-phase pressure drop is measured over the range of 0 to 175.4 kg/m2s for water and 0 to 25.4 kg/m2s for air and is compared using the Homogeneous model and correlations of two-phase multipliers. The Homogeneous model and the Lockhart-Martinelli correlations predict by 30 % of the experimental results. The Friedel correlation predicts much higher values and the Jensen correlation predicts much lower values. Flow regimes for each test point are observed by a high speed camera. To evaluate the diabatic pressure drop, a heat exchanger with a twisted tape insert is designed. R-11 is used as a working fluid and boiler is heated with hot water. For the diabatic pressure drop, the values predicted by the Homogeneous model are approximately 30% lower than the experimental results.

  6. The transmission of gas pressure to xylem fluid pressure when plants are inside a pressure bomb.

    PubMed

    Wei, C; Tyree, M T; Bennink, J P

    2000-02-01

    In earlier work tobacco leaves were placed in a Scholander-Hammel pressure bomb and the end of the petiole sealed with a pressure transducer in order to measure pressure transmission from the compressed gas (Pg) in the bomb to the xylem fluid (Px). Pressure bomb theory would predict a 1:1 relationship for Pg:Px when tobacco leaves start at a balance pressure of zero. Failure to observe the expected 1:1 relationship has cast doubt on the pressure-bomb technique in the measurement of the xylem pressure of plants. The experimental and theoretical relationship between Px and Pg was investigated in Tsuga canadensis (L) branches and Nicotiana rustica (L) leaves in this paper. It is concluded that the non 1:1 outcome was due to the compression of air bubbles in embolized xylem vessels, evaporation of water from the tissue, and the expansion of the sealed stem segment (or petiole) protruding beyond the seal of the pressure bomb. The expected 1:1 relationship could be obtained when xylem embolism was eliminated and stem expansion prevented. It is argued that the non 1:1 relationship in the positive pressure range does not invalidate the Scholander pressure bomb method of measuring xylem pressure in plants because Px never reaches positive values during the determination of the balance pressure.

  7. In Situ Measurement, Characterization, and Modeling of Two-Phase Pressure Drop Incorporating Local Water Saturation in PEMFC Gas Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, Evan J.

    Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs) have been an area of focus as an alternative for internal combustion engines in the transportation sector. Water and thermal management techniques remain as one of the key roadblocks in PEMFC development. The ability to model two-phase flow and pressure drop in PEMFCs is of significant importance to the performance and optimization of PEMFCs. This work provides a perspective on the numerous factors that affect the two-phase flow in the gas channels and presents a comprehensive pressure drop model through an extensive in situ fuel cell investigation. The study focused on low current density and low temperature operation of the cell, as these conditions present the most challenging scenario for water transport in the PEMFC reactant channels. Tests were conducted using two PEMFCs that were representative of the actual full scale commercial automotive geometry. The design of the flow fields allowed visual access to both cathode and anode sides for correlating the visual observations to the two-phase flow patterns and pressure drop. A total of 198 tests were conducted varying gas diffusion layer (GDL), inlet humidity, current density, and stoichiometry; this generated over 1500 average pressure drop measurements to develop and validate two-phase models. A two-phase 1+1 D modeling scheme is proposed that incorporates an elemental approach and control volume analysis to provide a comprehensive methodology and correlation for predicting two-phase pressure drop in PEMFC conditions. Key considerations, such as condensation within the channel, consumption of reactant gases, water transport across the membrane, and thermal gradients within the fuel cell, are reviewed and their relative importance illustrated. The modeling scheme is shown to predict channel pressure drop with a mean error of 10% over the full range of conditions and with a mean error of 5% for the primary conditions of interest. The model provides a unique and

  8. Measurement of heat transfer and pressure drop in rectangular channels with turbulence promoters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, J. C.; Park, J. S.; Ibrahim, M. Y.

    1986-01-01

    Periodic rib turbulators were used in advanced turbine cooling designs to enhance the internal heat transfer. The objective of the present project was to investigate the combined effects of the rib angle of attack and the channel aspect ratio on the local heat transfer and pressure drop in rectangular channels with two opposite ribbed walls for Reynolds number varied from 10,000 to 60,000. The channel aspect ratio (W/H) was varied from 1 to 2 to 4. The rib angle of attack (alpha) was varied from 90 to 60 to 45 to 30 degree. The highly detailed heat transfer coefficient distribution on both the smooth side and the ribbed side walls from the channel sharp entrance to the downstream region were measured. The results showed that, in the square channel, the heat transfer for the slant ribs (alpha = 30 -45 deg) was about 30% higher that of the transverse ribs (alpha = 90 deg) for a constant pumping power. However, in the rectangular channels (W/H = 2 and 4, ribs on W side), the heat transfer at alpha = 30 -45 deg was only about 5% higher than 90 deg. The average heat transfer and friction correlations were developed to account for rib spacing, rib angle, and channel aspect ratio over the range of roughness Reynolds number.

  9. Antimicrobial nanoparticle-coated electrostatic air filter with high filtration efficiency and low pressure drop.

    PubMed

    Sim, Kyoung Mi; Park, Hyun-Seol; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Jung, Jae Hee

    2015-11-15

    In this study, we demonstrated an antimicrobial nanoparticle-coated electrostatic (ES) air filter. Antimicrobial natural-product Sophora flavescens nanoparticles were produced using an aerosol process, and were continuously deposited onto the surface of air filter media. For the electrostatic activation of the filter medium, a corona discharge electrification system was used before and after antimicrobial treatment of the filter. In the antimicrobial treatment process, the deposition efficiency of S. flavescens nanoparticles on the ES filter was ~12% higher than that on the pristine (Non-ES) filter. In the evaluation of filtration performance using test particles (a nanosized KCl aerosol and submicron-sized Staphylococcus epidermidis bioaerosol), the ES filter showed better filtration efficiency than the Non-ES filter. However, antimicrobial treatment with S. flavescens nanoparticles affected the filtration efficiency of the filter differently depending on the size of the test particles. While the filtration efficiency of the KCl nanoparticles was reduced on the ES filter after the antimicrobial treatment, the filtration efficiency was improved after the recharging process. In summary, we prepared an antimicrobial ES air filter with >99% antimicrobial activity, ~92.5% filtration efficiency (for a 300-nm KCl aerosol), and a ~0.8 mmAq pressure drop (at 13 cm/s). This study provides valuable information for the development of a hybrid air purification system that can serve various functions and be used in an indoor environment.

  10. Relationships between biomass, pressure drop, and performance in a polyurethane biofilter.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hee Wook; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Chung, Dong Jin

    2010-03-01

    In biofilters for controlling volatile organic compounds (VOCs), clogging in the filter bed due to overgrowth of biomass causes the deterioration of biofilter performance. In this study, the relationships between biofilter performance, biomass concentration (X), and pressure drop (DeltaP) was qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated in a polyurethane (PU) biofilter. Benzene was used as a model VOC. The relationship between DeltaP and X at a moisture content of 80-90% was expressed as log DeltaP (mm H(2)Om(-1))=0.315+3.87 log X (g-dry cell weight (DCW) g-PU(-1)), 0.8

  11. Characterization of activated carbon fiber filters for pressure drop, submicrometer particulate collection, and mercury capture.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, T; Lee, T G; Hazelwood, M; Hedrick, E; Biswas, P

    2000-06-01

    The use of activated carbon fiber (ACF) filters for the capture of particulate matter and elemental Hg is demonstrated. The pressure drop and particle collection efficiency characteristics of the ACF filters were established at two different face velocities and for two different aerosols: spherical NaCl and combustion-generated silica particles. The clean ACF filter specific resistance was 153 kg m-2 sec-1. The experimental specific resistance for cake filtration was 1.6 x 10(6) sec-1 and 2.4 x 10(5) sec-1 for 0.5- and 1.5-micron mass median diameter particles, respectively. The resistance factor R was approximately 2, similar to that for the high-efficiency particulate air filters. There was a discrepancy in the measured particle collection efficiencies and those predicted by theory. The use of the ACF filter for elemental Hg capture was illustrated, and the breakthrough characteristic was established. The capacity of the ACF filter for Hg capture was similar to other powdered activated carbons.

  12. Heat transfer and pressure drop in blade cooling channels with turbulence promoters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, J. C.; Park, J. S.; Lei, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    Repeated rib roughness elements have been used in advanced turbine cooling designs to enhance the internal heat transfer. Often the ribs are perpendicular to the main flow direction so that they have an angle-of-attack of 90 deg. The objective of the project was to investigate the effect of rib angle-of-attack on the pressure drop and the average heat transfer coefficients in a square duct with two opposite rib-roughned walls for Reynolds number varied from 8000 to 80,000. The rib height-to-equivalent diameter ratio (e/D) was kept at a constant value of 0.063, the rib pitch-to-height ratio (P/e) was varied from 10 to 20, and the rib angle-of-attack (alpha) was varied from 90 deg to 60 deg to 45 deg to 30 deg respectively. Two types of entrance conditions were examined, namely, long duct and sudden contraction. The heat transfer coefficient distribution on the smooth side wall and the rough side wall at the entrance and the fully developed regions were measured. Thermal performance comparison indicated that the pumping power requirement for the rib with an oblique angle to the flow (alpha = 45 deg to 30 deg) was about 20 to 50 percent lower than the rib with a 90 deg angle to the flow for a given heat transfer duty.

  13. Impact of instantaneous controlled pressure drop on microstructural modification of green tea and its infusion quality.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuefei; Xu, Ping; Feng, Liyun; Yang, Xianqiang; Qian, Lisheng

    2014-01-01

    Instantaneous controlled pressure drop (DIC) was applied to obtain a suitable cell disruption extent as a technology in green tea processing. Microstructural observations showed that DIC increased cell disruption in an even manner as reflected from loosened palisade, distorted cells, widened space between cells, disrupted and rearranged cellular membrane in tea leaves. Color difference determination supported that DIC could facilitate the release and transport of cell contents. DIC sample showed a rise in redness, over 2.5 times greater than the control after spreading naturally for 24 h. Chemical determination revealed a better infusion behavior of tea polyphenols and amino acids in green tea manufactured by DIC method both at high and low temperature. The increase in tea polyphenols content in liquor for the first brew from twisted and needle tea was about 35% and that from flat tea was about 15% in DIC method over the traditional processing. These results suggest that DIC process can be applied in green tea processing for both a traditional product and a new kind of tea capable of making with cold water.

  14. Heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of nanofluids in a plate heat exchanger.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Y H; Kim, D; Li, C G; Lee, J K; Hong, D S; Lee, J G; Lee, S H; Cho, Y H; Kim, S H

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, the heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop of the ZnO and Al2O3 nanofluids in a plate heat exchanger were studied. The experimental conditions were 100-500 Reynolds number and the respective volumetric flow rates. The working temperature of the heat exchanger was within 20-40 degrees C. The measured thermophysical properties, such as thermal conductivity and kinematic viscosity, were applied to the calculation of the convective heat transfer coefficient of the plate heat exchanger employing the ZnO and Al2O3 nanofluids made through a two-step method. According to the Reynolds number, the overall heat transfer coefficient for 6 vol% Al2O3 increased to 30% because at the given viscosity and density of the nanofluids, they did not have the same flow rates. At a given volumetric flow rate, however, the performance did not improve. After the nanofluids were placed in the plate heat exchanger, the experimental results pertaining to nanofluid efficiency seemed inauspicious.

  15. Comparative study of heat transfer and pressure drop during flow boiling and flow condensation in minichannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikielewicz, Dariusz; Andrzejczyk, Rafał; Jakubowska, Blanka; Mikielewicz, Jarosław

    2014-09-01

    In the paper a method developed earlier by authors is applied to calculations of pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient for flow boiling and also flow condensation for some recent data collected from literature for such fluids as R404a, R600a, R290, R32,R134a, R1234yf and other. The modification of interface shear stresses between flow boiling and flow condensation in annular flow structure are considered through incorporation of the so called blowing parameter. The shear stress between vapor phase and liquid phase is generally a function of nonisothermal effects. The mechanism of modification of shear stresses at the vapor-liquid interface has been presented in detail. In case of annular flow it contributes to thickening and thinning of the liquid film, which corresponds to condensation and boiling respectively. There is also a different influence of heat flux on the modification of shear stress in the bubbly flow structure, where it affects bubble nucleation. In that case the effect of applied heat flux is considered. As a result a modified form of the two-phase flow multiplier is obtained, in which the nonadiabatic effect is clearly pronounced.

  16. Summary report for ITER Task-T19: MHD pressure drop and heat transfer study for liquid metal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, C.B.; Hua, T.Q.; Natesan, K.; Kirillov, I.R.; Vitkovski, I.V.; Anisimov, A.M.

    1995-03-01

    A key feasibility issue for the ITER Vanadium/Lithium breeding blanket is the question of insulator coatings. Design calculations show that an electrically insulating layer is necessary to maintain an acceptably low MHD pressure drop. To begin experimental investigations of the MHD performance of candidate insulator materials and the technology for putting them in place, a new test section was prepared. Aluminum oxide was chosen as the first candidate insulating material because it may be used in combination with NaK in the ITER vacuum vessel and/or the divertor. Details on the methods used to produce the aluminum oxide layer as well as the microstructures of the coating and the aluminide sublayer are presented and discussed. The overall MHD pressure drop, local MHD pressure gradient, local transverse MHD pressure difference, and surface voltage distributions in both the circumferential and the axial directions are reported and discussed. The positive results obtained here for high-temperature NaK have two beneficial implications for ITER. First, since NaK may be used in the vacuum vessel and/or the divertor, these results support the design approach of using electrically insulating coatings to substantially reduce MHD pressure drop. Secondly, while Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SS is not the same coating/base material combination which would be used in the advanced blanket, this work nonetheless shows that it is possible to produce a viable insulating coating which is stable in contact with a high temperature alkali metal coolant.

  17. Experimental sizing and assessment of two-phase pressure drop correlations for a capillary tube with transcritical and subcritical carbon dioxide flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinchieri, R.; Boccardi, G.; Calabrese, N.; Celata, G. P.; Zummo, G.

    2014-04-01

    In the last years, CO2 was proposed as an alternative refrigerant for different refrigeration applications (automotive air conditioning, heat pumps, refrigerant plants, etc.) In the case of low power refrigeration applications, as a household refrigerator, the use of too expensive components is not economically sustainable; therefore, even if the use of CO2 as the refrigerant is desired, it is preferable to use conventional components as much as possible. For these reasons, the capillary tube is frequently proposed as expansion system. Then, it is necessary to characterize the capillary in terms of knowledge of the evolving mass flow rate and the associate pressure drop under all possible operative conditions. For this aim, an experimental campaign has been carried out on the ENEA test loop "CADORE" to measure the performance of three capillary tubes having same inner diameter (0.55 mm) but different lengths (4, 6 and 8 meters). The test range of inlet pressure is between about 60 and 110 bar, whereas external temperatures are between about 20 to 42 °C. The two-phase pressure drop through the capillary tube is detected and experimental values are compared with the predictions obtained with the more widely used correlations available in the literature. Correlations have been tested over a wide range of variation of inlet flow conditions, as a function of different inlet parameters.

  18. Steady state boiling crisis in a helium vertically heated natural circulation loop - Part 2: Friction pressure drop lessening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furci, H.; Baudouy, B.; Four, A.; Meuris, C.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on a 2-m high two-phase helium natural circulation loop operating at 4.2 K and 1 atm. Two heated sections with different internal diameter (10 and 6 mm) were tested. The power applied on the heated section wall was controlled in increasing and decreasing sequences, and temperature along the section, mass flow rate and pressure drop evolutions were registered. The post-CHF regime was studied watching simultaneously the evolution of boiling crisis onset along the test section and the evolution of pressure drop and mass flow rate. A significant lessening of friction was observed simultaneous to the development of the post-CHF regime, accompanied by a mass flow rate increase, which lets suppose that the vapor film in the film boiling regime acts as a lubricant. A model was created based on this idea and on heat transfer considerations. The predictions by this model are satisfactory for the low quality post-CHF regime.

  19. Two Phase Flow Modeling: Summary of Flow Regimes and Pressure Drop Correlations in Reduced and Partial Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Rame, E.; Kizito, J.; Kassemi, M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of state-of-the-art predictions for two-phase flows relevant to Advanced Life Support. We strive to pick out the most used and accepted models for pressure drop and flow regime predictions. The main focus is to identify gaps in predictive capabilities in partial gravity for Lunar and Martian applications. Following a summary of flow regimes and pressure drop correlations for terrestrial and zero gravity, we analyze the fully developed annular gas-liquid flow in a straight cylindrical tube. This flow is amenable to analytical closed form solutions for the flow field and heat transfer. These solutions, valid for partial gravity as well, may be used as baselines and guides to compare experimental measurements. The flow regimes likely to be encountered in the water recovery equipment currently under consideration for space applications are provided in an appendix.

  20. Experimental studies on pressure drop characteristics of cryogenic cross-counter flow coiled finned tube heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Prabhat Kumar; Kush, P. K.; Tiwari, Ashesh

    2010-04-01

    Cross-counter flow coiled finned tube heat exchangers used in medium capacity helium liquefiers/refrigerators were developed in our lab. These heat exchangers were developed using integrated low finned tubes. Experimental studies have been performed to know the pressure drop characteristics of tube side and shell side flow of these heat exchangers. All experiments were performed at room temperature in the Reynolds number range of 3000-30,000 for tube side and 25-155 for shell side. The results of present experiments indicate that available correlations for tube side can not be used for prediction of tube side pressure drop data due to complex surface formation at inner side of tube during formation of fins over the outer surface. Results also indicate that surface roughness effect becomes more pronounced as the value of di/ D m increases. New correlations based on present experimental data are proposed for predicting the friction factors for tube side and shell side.

  1. Experimental study of the effect of drag reducing agent on pressure drop and thermal efficiency of an air cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyghambarzadeh, S. M.; Hashemabadi, S. H.; Saffarian, H.; Shekari, F.

    2016-01-01

    Effect of polymeric drag reduction agents (DRAs) on pressure drop and heat transfer was studied. Aqueous solutions of carboxy methyl cellulose were used inside an air-finned heat exchanger. Despite the previous studies which indicated the importance of drag reduction just in turbulent flow, results of this study in laminar flow indicated that the addition of DRA increases drag reduction, and decreases the overall heat transfer coefficient.

  2. Smooth- and enhanced-tube heat transfer and pressure drop : Part II. The role of transition to turbulent flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Obot, N. T.; Das, L.; Rabas, T. J.

    2000-11-14

    The objectives of this presentation are two-fold: first, to demonstrate the connection between the attainable coefficients and transition to turbulent flow by using the transition-based corresponding states method to generalize results obtained with smooth tubes and enhanced tubes, and second, to provide guidelines on the calculation of heat transfer coefficients from pressure-drop data and vice versa by using the transition concept or the functional law of corresponding states.

  3. The role of water in the performance of biofilters: parameterization of pressure drop and sorption capacities for common packing materials.

    PubMed

    Dorado, Antonio D; Lafuente, Javier; Gabriel, David; Gamisans, Xavier

    2010-08-15

    The presence of water in a biofilter is critical in keeping microorganisms active and abating pollutants. In addition, the amount of water retained in a biofilter may drastically affect the physical properties of packing materials and packed beds. In this study, the influence of water on the pressure drop and sorption capacities of 10 different packing materials were experimentally studied and compared. Pressure drop was characterized as a function of dynamic hold-up, porosity and gas flow rate. Experimental data were fitted to a mathematical expression based on a modified Ergun correlation. Sorption capacities for toluene were determined for both wet and dry materials to obtain information about the nature of interactions between the contaminant, the packing materials and the aqueous phase. The experimental sorption capacities of materials were fitted to different isotherm models for gas adsorption in porous materials. The corresponding confidence interval was determined by the Fisher information matrix. The results quantified the dynamic hold-up effect resulting from the significant increase in the pressure drop throughout the bed, i.e. the financial cost of driving air, and the negative effect of this air on the total amount of hydrophobic pollutant that can be adsorbed by the supports. Furthermore, the results provided equations for ascertaining water presence and sorption capacities that could be widely used in the mathematical modeling of biofilters.

  4. Heat transfer and pressure drop measurements in an air/molten salt direct-contact heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, M.S.

    1988-11-01

    This paper presents a comparison of experimental data with a recently published model of heat exchange in irrigated packed beds. Heat transfer and pressure drop were measured in a 150 mm (ID) column with a 610-mm bed of metal Pall rings. Molten nitrate salt and preheated air were the working fluids with a salt inlet temperature of approximately 440{degree}C and air inlet temperatures of approximately 230{degree}C. A comparison between the experimental data and the heat transfer model is made on the basis of heat transfer from the salt. For the range of air and salt flow rates tested, 0.3 to 1.2 kg/m{sup 2} s air flow and 6 to 18 kg/m{sup 2} s salt flow, the data agree with the model within 22% standard deviation. In addition, a model for the column pressure drop was validated, agreeing with the experimental data within 18% standard deviation over the range of column pressure drop from 40 to 1250 Pa/m. 25 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Pressure drop of two-phase dry-plug flow in round mini-channels: Effect of moving contact line

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chi Young; Lee, Sang Yong

    2010-01-15

    In the present experimental study, the pressure drop of the two-phase dry-plug flow (dry wall condition at the gas portions) in round mini-channels was investigated. The air-water mixtures were flowed through the round mini-channels made of polyurethane and Teflon, respectively, with their inner diameters ranging from 1.62 to 2.16 mm. In the dry-plug flow regime, the pressure drop measured became larger either by increasing the liquid superficial velocity or by decreasing the gas superficial velocity due to the increase of the number of the moving contact lines in the test section. In such a case, the role of the moving contact lines turned out to be significant. Therefore, a pressure drop model of dry-plug flow was proposed through modification of the dynamic contact angle analysis taking account of the energy dissipation by the moving contact lines, which represents the experimental data within the mean deviation of 4%. (author)

  6. On axial temperature gradients due to large pressure drops in dense fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Colgate, Sam O; Berger, Terry A

    2015-03-13

    The effect of energy degradation (Degradation is the creation of net entropy resulting from irreversibility.) accompanying pressure drops across chromatographic columns is examined with regard to explaining axial temperature gradients in both high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). The observed effects of warming and cooling can be explained equally well in the language of thermodynamics or fluid dynamics. The necessary equivalence of these treatments is reviewed here to show the legitimacy of using whichever one supports the simpler determination of features of interest. The determination of temperature profiles in columns by direct application of the laws of thermodynamics is somewhat simpler than applying them indirectly by solving the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. Both disciplines show that the preferred strategy for minimizing the reduction in peak quality caused by temperature gradients is to operate columns as nearly adiabatically as possible (i.e. as Joule-Thomson expansions). This useful fact, however, is not widely familiar or appreciated in the chromatography community due to some misunderstanding of the meaning of certain terms and expressions used in these disciplines. In fluid dynamics, the terms "resistive heating" or "frictional heating" have been widely used as synonyms for the dissipation function, Φ, in the NS energy equation. These terms have been widely used by chromatographers as well, but often misinterpreted as due to friction between the mobile phase and the column packing, when in fact Φ describes the increase in entropy of the system (dissipation, ∫TdSuniv>0) due to the irreversible decompression of the mobile phase. Two distinctly different contributions to the irreversibility are identified; (1) ΔSext, viscous dissipation of work done by the external surroundings driving the flow (the pump) contributing to its warming, and (2) ΔSint, entropy change accompanying decompression of

  7. Characterization of surface roughness effects on pressure drop in single-phase flow in minichannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandlikar, Satish G.; Schmitt, Derek; Carrano, Andres L.; Taylor, James B.

    2005-10-01

    Roughness features on the walls of a channel wall affect the pressure drop of a fluid flowing through that channel. This roughness effect can be described by (i) flow area constriction and (ii) increase in the wall shear stress. Replotting the Moody's friction factor chart with the constricted flow diameter results in a simplified plot and yields a single asymptotic value of friction factor for relative roughness values of ɛ /D>0.03 in the fully developed turbulent region. After reviewing the literature, three new roughness parameters are proposed (maximum profile peak height Rp, mean spacing of profile irregularities RSm, and floor distance to mean line Fp). Three additional parameters are presented to consider the localized hydraulic diameter variation (maximum, minimum, and average) in future work. The roughness ɛ is then defined as Rp+Fp. This definition yields the same value of roughness as obtained from the sand-grain roughness [H. Darcy, Recherches Experimentales Relatives au Mouvement de L'Eau dans les Tuyaux (Mallet-Bachelier, Paris, France, 1857); J. T. Fanning, A Practical Treatise on Hydraulic and Water Supply Engineering (Van Nostrand, New York, 1877, revised ed. 1886); J. Nikuradse, "Laws of flow in rough pipes" ["Stromungsgesetze in Rauen Rohren," VDI-Forschungsheft 361 (1933)]; Beilage zu "Forschung auf dem Gebiete des Ingenieurwesens," Ausgabe B Band 4, English translation NACA Tech. Mem. 1292 (1937)]. Specific experiments are conducted using parallel sawtooth ridge elements, placed normal to the flow direction, in aligned and offset configurations in a 10.03mm wide rectangular channel with variable gap (resulting hydraulic diameters of 325μm-1819μm with Reynolds numbers ranging from 200 to 7200 for air and 200 to 5700 for water). The use of constricted flow diameter extends the applicability of the laminar friction factor equations to relative roughness values (sawtooth height) up to 14%. In the turbulent region, the aligned and offset

  8. Workplace field testing of the pressure drop of particulate respirators using welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun-Woo; Yoon, Chung-Sik

    2012-10-01

    In a previous study, we concluded that respirator testing with a sodium chloride aerosol gave a conservative estimate of filter penetration for welding fume aerosols. A rapid increase in the pressure drop (PD) of some respirators was observed as fumes accumulated on the filters. The present study evaluated particulate respirator PD based on workplace field tests. A field PD tester was designed and validated using the TSI 8130 Automatic Filter Tester, designed in compliance with National Institute for Occupational and Safety and Health regulation 42 CFR part 84. Three models (two replaceable dual-type filters and one replaceable single-type filter) were evaluated against CO(2) gas arc welding on mild steel in confined booths in the workplace. Field tests were performed under four airborne concentrations (27.5, 15.4, 7.9, and 2.1 mg m(-3)). The mass concentration was measured by the gravimetric method, and number concentration was monitored using P-Trak (Model 8525, TSI, USA). Additionally, photos and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to visualize and analyze the composition of welding fumes trapped in the filters. The field PD tester showed no significant difference compared with the TSI tester. There was no significant difference in the initial PD between laboratory and field results. The PD increased as a function of fume load on the respirator filters for all tested models. The increasing PD trend differed by models, and PD increased rapidly at high concentrations because greater amount of fumes accumulated on the filters in a given time. The increase in PD as a function of fume load on the filters showed a similar pattern as fume load varied for a particular model, but different patterns were observed for different models. Images and elemental analyses of fumes trapped on the respirator filters showed that most welding fumes were trapped within the first layer, outer web cover, and second layer, in order, while no fumes

  9. Effect of airstream velocity on mean drop diameters of water sprays produced by pressure and air atomizing nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning radiometer was used to determine the effect of airstream velocity on the mean drop diameter of water sprays produced by pressure atomizing and air atomizing fuel nozzles used in previous combustion studies. Increasing airstream velocity from 23 to 53.4 meters per second reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 50 percent with both types of fuel nozzles. The use of a sonic cup attached to the tip of an air assist nozzle reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 40 percent. Test conditions included airstream velocities of 23 to 53.4 meters per second at 293 K and atmospheric pressure.

  10. Pressure drop increase by biofilm accumulation in spiral wound RO and NF membrane systems: role of substrate concentration, flow velocity, substrate load and flow direction.

    PubMed

    Vrouwenvelder, J S; Hinrichs, C; Van der Meer, W G J; Van Loosdrecht, M C M; Kruithof, J C

    2009-01-01

    In an earlier study, it was shown that biofouling predominantly is a feed spacer channel problem. In this article, pressure drop development and biofilm accumulation in membrane fouling simulators have been studied without permeate production as a function of the process parameters substrate concentration, linear flow velocity, substrate load and flow direction. At the applied substrate concentration range, 100-400 microg l(-1) as acetate carbon, a higher concentration caused a faster and greater pressure drop increase and a greater accumulation of biomass. Within the range of linear flow velocities as applied in practice, a higher linear flow velocity resulted in a higher initial pressure drop in addition to a more rapid and greater pressure drop increase and biomass accumulation. Reduction of the linear flow velocity resulted in an instantaneous reduction of the pressure drop caused by the accumulated biomass, without changing the biofilm concentration. A higher substrate load (product of substrate concentration and flow velocity) was related to biomass accumulation. The effect of the same amount of accumulated biomass on the pressure drop increase was related to the linear flow velocity. A decrease of substrate load caused a gradual decline in time of both biomass concentration and pressure drop increase. It was concluded that the pressure drop increase over spiral wound reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane systems can be reduced by lowering both substrate load and linear flow velocity. There is a need for RO and NF systems with a low pressure drop increase irrespective of the biomass formation. Current efforts to control biofouling of spiral wound membranes focus in addition to pretreatment on membrane improvement. According to these authors, adaptation of the hydrodynamics, spacers and pressure vessel configuration offer promising alternatives. Additional approaches may be replacing heavily biofouled elements and flow direction reversal.

  11. Quadratic formula for determining the drop size in pressure-atomized sprays with and without swirl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T.-W.; An, Keju

    2016-06-01

    We use a theoretical framework based on the integral form of the conservation equations, along with a heuristic model of the viscous dissipation, to find a closed-form solution to the liquid atomization problem. The energy balance for the spray renders to a quadratic formula for the drop size as a function, primarily of the liquid velocity. The Sauter mean diameter found using the quadratic formula shows good agreements and physical trends, when compared with experimental observations. This approach is shown to be applicable toward specifying initial drop size in computational fluid dynamics of spray flows.

  12. Pressure, temperature and density drops along supercritical fluid chromatography columns in different thermal environments. III. Mixtures of carbon dioxide and methanol as the mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Poe, Donald P; Veit, Devon; Ranger, Megan; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Tarafder, Abhijit; Guiochon, Georges

    2014-01-03

    The pressure, temperature and density drops along SFC columns eluted with a CO2/methanol mobile phase were measured and compared with theoretical values. For columns packed with 3- and 5-μm particles the pressure and temperature drops were measured using a mobile phase of 95% CO2 and 5% methanol at a flow rate of 5mL/min, at temperatures from 20 to 100°C, and outlet pressures from 80 to 300bar. The density drop was calculated based on the temperature and pressure at the column inlet and outlet. The columns were suspended in a circulating air bath, either bare or covered with foam insulation. The experimental measurements were compared to theoretical results obtained by numerical simulation. For the convective air condition at outlet pressures above 100bar the average difference between the experimental and calculated temperature drops and pressure drops were 0.1°C and 0.7% for the bare 3-μm column, respectively, and were 0.6°C and 4.1% for the insulated column. The observed temperature drops for the insulated columns are consistent with those predicted by the Joule-Thomson coefficients for isenthalpic expansion. The dependence of the temperature and the pressure drops on the Joule-Thomson coefficient and kinematic viscosity are described for carbon dioxide mobile phases containing up to 20% methanol.

  13. Biological Control of Lettuce Drop and Host Plant Colonization by Rhizospheric and Endophytic Streptomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoyulong; Pizzatti, Cristina; Bonaldi, Maria; Saracchi, Marco; Erlacher, Armin; Kunova, Andrea; Berg, Gabriele; Cortesi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Lettuce drop, caused by the soil borne pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, is one of the most common and serious diseases of lettuce worldwide. Increased concerns about the side effects of chemical pesticides have resulted in greater interest in developing biocontrol strategies against S. sclerotiorum. However, relatively little is known about the mechanisms of Streptomyces spp. as biological control agents against S. sclerotiorum on lettuce. Two Streptomyces isolates, S. exfoliatus FT05W and S. cyaneus ZEA17I, inhibit mycelial growth of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum by more than 75% in vitro. We evaluated their biocontrol activity against S. sclerotiorum in vivo, and compared them to Streptomyces lydicus WYEC 108, isolated from Actinovate®. When Streptomyces spp. (106 CFU/mL) were applied to S. sclerotiorum inoculated substrate in a growth chamber 1 week prior lettuce sowing, they significantly reduced the risk of lettuce drop disease, compared to the inoculated control. Interestingly, under field conditions, S. exfoliatus FT05W and S. cyaneus ZEA17I protected lettuce from drop by 40 and 10% respectively, whereas S. lydicus WYEC 108 did not show any protection. We further labeled S. exfoliatus FT05W and S. cyaneus ZEA17I with the enhanced GFP (EGFP) marker to investigate their rhizosphere competence and ability to colonize lettuce roots using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The abundant colonization of young lettuce seedlings by both strains demonstrated Streptomyces' capability to interact with the host from early stages of seed germination and root development. Moreover, the two strains were detected also on 2-week-old roots, indicating their potential of long-term interactions with lettuce. Additionally, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations showed EGFP-S. exfoliatus FT05W endophytic colonization of lettuce root cortex tissues. Finally, we determined its viability and persistence in the rhizosphere and endorhiza up to 3 weeks by quantifying its

  14. Heat transfer, pressure drop and void fraction in two- phase, two-component flow in a vertical tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujumnong, Manit

    1998-09-01

    There are very few data existing in two-phase, two- component flow where heat transfer, pressure drop and void fraction have all been measured under the same conditions. Such data are very valuable for two-phase heat-transfer model development and for testing existing heat-transfer models or correlations requiring frictional pressure drop (or wall shear stress) and/or void fraction. An experiment was performed which adds markedly to the available data of the type described in terms of the range of gas and liquid flow rates and liquid Prandtl number. Heat transfer and pressure drop measurements were taken in a vertical 11.68-mm i.d. tube for two-phase (gas-liquid) flows covering a wide range of conditions. Mean void fraction measurements were taken, using quick- closing valves, in a 12.7-mm i.d. tube matching very closely pressures, temperatures, gas-phase superficial velocities and liquid-phase superficial velocities to those used in the heat-transfer and pressure-drop experiments. The gas phase was air while water and two aqueous solutions of glycerine (59 and 82% by mass) were used as the liquid phase. In the two-phase experiments the liquid Prandtl number varied from 6 to 766, the superficial liquid velocity from 0.05 to 8.5 m/s, and the superficial gas velocity from 0.02 to 119 m/s. The measured two-phase heat-transfer coefficients varied by a factor of approximately 1000, the two-phase frictional pressure drop ranged from small negative values (in slug flow) to 93 kPa and the void fraction ranged from 0.01 to 0.99; the flow patterns observed included bubble, slug, churn, annular, froth, the various transitions and annular-mist. Existing heat-transfer models or correlations requiring frictional pressure drop (or wall shear stress) and/or void fraction were: tested against the present data for mean heat-transfer coefficients. It was found that the methods with more restrictions (in terms of the applicable range of void fraction, liquid Prandtl number or liquid

  15. Special topics reports for the reference tandem mirror fusion breeder: liquid metal MHD pressure drop effects in the packed bed blanket. Vol. 1

    SciTech Connect

    McCarville, T.J.; Berwald, D.H.; Wong, C.P.C.

    1984-09-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects which result from the use of liquid metal coolants in magnetic fusion reactors include the modification of flow profiles (including the suppression of turbulence) and increases in the primary loop pressure drop and the hydrostatic pressure at the first wall of the blanket. In the reference fission-suppressed tandem mirror fusion breeder design concept, flow profile modification is a relatively minor concern, but the MHD pressure drop in flowing the liquid lithium coolant through an annular packed bed of beryllium/thorium pebbles is directly related to the required first wall structure thickness. As such, it is a major concern which directly impacts fissile breeding efficiency. Consequently, an improved model for the packed bed pressure drop has been developed. By considering spacial averages of electric fields, currents, and fluid flow velocities the general equations have been reduced to simple expressions for the pressure drop. The averaging approach results in expressions for the pressure drop involving a constant which reflects details of the flow around the pebbles. Such details are difficult to assess analytically, and the constant may eventually have to be evaluated by experiment. However, an energy approach has been used in this study to bound the possible values of the constant, and thus the pressure drop. In anticipation that an experimental facility might be established to evaluate the undetermined constant as well as to address other uncertainties, a survey of existing facilities is presented.

  16. High-fin staggered tube banks: Heat transfer and pressure drop for turbulent single phase gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-10-01

    This Data Item ESDU 86022 is an addition to the Heat Transfer Sub-series. New correlations are presented for external heat transfer coefficient and static pressure loss for single phase flow over plain circular fins of either retangular or tapered cross section on round tubes. The correlations were derived by a regression analysis of experimental results extracted from the literature for a wide range of tube bundle configurations. Fin densities of 4 to 11 per inch (equivalent to fin pitches of 6.4 to 2.3 mm) tube outside diameters of 3/8 to 2 inch (10 to 51 mm), fin heights of 1/4 to 5/8 inch (6 to 16 mm), and ratios of fin tip to fin root diameter of 1.2 to 2.4 were covered. For heat transfer the range of Reynolds number based on tube outer diameter was from 2,000 to 40,000 and for pressure drop from 5,000 to 50,000. Comparison of the prediction with experiment shows that for heat transfer 85% of the data points were within 10% of estimated and for pressure drop 72% were within 10%. A comprehensive worked example showing the use of the method for an air cooled heat exchanger bundle is included. The applicability of this method to nonintegral fins is considered and factors influencing the thermal resistance of the interface are discussed. Effects of fouling are also briefly covered.

  17. Impact of organic nutrient load on biomass accumulation, feed channel pressure drop increase and permeate flux decline in membrane systems.

    PubMed

    Bucs, Sz S; Valladares Linares, R; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Kruithof, J C; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2014-12-15

    The influence of organic nutrient load on biomass accumulation (biofouling) and pressure drop development in membrane filtration systems was investigated. Nutrient load is the product of nutrient concentration and linear flow velocity. Biofouling - excessive growth of microbial biomass in membrane systems - hampers membrane performance. The influence of biodegradable organic nutrient load on biofouling was investigated at varying (i) crossflow velocity, (ii) nutrient concentration, (iii) shear, and (iv) feed spacer thickness. Experimental studies were performed with membrane fouling simulators (MFSs) containing a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane and a 31 mil thick feed spacer, commonly applied in practice in RO and nanofiltration (NF) spiral-wound membrane modules. Numerical modeling studies were done with identical feed spacer geometry differing in thickness (28, 31 and 34 mil). Additionally, experiments were done applying a forward osmosis (FO) membrane with varying spacer thickness (28, 31 and 34 mil), addressing the permeate flux decline and biofilm development. Assessed were the development of feed channel pressure drop (MFS studies), permeate flux (FO studies) and accumulated biomass amount measured by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and total organic carbon (TOC). Our studies showed that the organic nutrient load determined the accumulated amount of biomass. The same amount of accumulated biomass was found at constant nutrient load irrespective of linear flow velocity, shear, and/or feed spacer thickness. The impact of the same amount of accumulated biomass on feed channel pressure drop and permeate flux was influenced by membrane process design and operational conditions. Reducing the nutrient load by pretreatment slowed-down the biofilm formation. The impact of accumulated biomass on membrane performance was reduced by applying a lower crossflow velocity and/or a thicker and/or a modified geometry feed spacer. The results indicate that cleanings can be delayed

  18. Plant adaptation to low atmospheric pressures: potential molecular responses.

    PubMed

    Ferl, Robert J; Schuerger, Andrew C; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Gurley, William B; Corey, Kenneth; Bucklin, Ray

    2002-01-01

    There is an increasing realization that it may be impossible to attain Earth normal atmospheric pressures in orbital, lunar, or Martian greenhouses, simply because the construction materials do not exist to meet the extraordinary constraints imposed by balancing high engineering requirements against high lift costs. This equation essentially dictates that NASA have in place the capability to grow plants at reduced atmospheric pressure. Yet current understanding of plant growth at low pressures is limited to just a few experiments and relatively rudimentary assessments of plant vigor and growth. The tools now exist, however, to make rapid progress toward understanding the fundamental nature of plant responses and adaptations to low pressures, and to develop strategies for mitigating detrimental effects by engineering the growth conditions or by engineering the plants themselves. The genomes of rice and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana have recently been sequenced in their entirety, and public sector and commercial DNA chips are becoming available such that thousands of genes can be assayed at once. A fundamental understanding of plant responses and adaptation to low pressures can now be approached and translated into procedures and engineering considerations to enhance plant growth at low atmospheric pressures. In anticipation of such studies, we present here the background arguments supporting these contentions, as well as informed speculation about the kinds of molecular physiological responses that might be expected of plants in low-pressure environments.

  19. Plant adaptation to low atmospheric pressures: potential molecular responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert J.; Schuerger, Andrew C.; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Gurley, William B.; Corey, Kenneth; Bucklin, Ray

    2002-01-01

    There is an increasing realization that it may be impossible to attain Earth normal atmospheric pressures in orbital, lunar, or Martian greenhouses, simply because the construction materials do not exist to meet the extraordinary constraints imposed by balancing high engineering requirements against high lift costs. This equation essentially dictates that NASA have in place the capability to grow plants at reduced atmospheric pressure. Yet current understanding of plant growth at low pressures is limited to just a few experiments and relatively rudimentary assessments of plant vigor and growth. The tools now exist, however, to make rapid progress toward understanding the fundamental nature of plant responses and adaptations to low pressures, and to develop strategies for mitigating detrimental effects by engineering the growth conditions or by engineering the plants themselves. The genomes of rice and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana have recently been sequenced in their entirety, and public sector and commercial DNA chips are becoming available such that thousands of genes can be assayed at once. A fundamental understanding of plant responses and adaptation to low pressures can now be approached and translated into procedures and engineering considerations to enhance plant growth at low atmospheric pressures. In anticipation of such studies, we present here the background arguments supporting these contentions, as well as informed speculation about the kinds of molecular physiological responses that might be expected of plants in low-pressure environments.

  20. Heat transfer and pressure drop of supercritical carbon dioxide flowing in several printed circuit heat exchanger channel patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, M.; Kruizenga, A.; Anderson, M.; Corradini, M.

    2012-07-01

    Closed-loop Brayton cycles using supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO{sub 2}) show potential for use in high-temperature power generation applications including High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR) and Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFR). Compared to Rankine cycles SCO{sub 2} Brayton cycles offer similar or improved efficiency and the potential for decreased capital costs due to a reduction in equipment size and complexity. Compact printed-circuit heat exchangers (PCHE) are being considered as part of several SCO{sub 2} Brayton designs to further reduce equipment size with increased energy density. Several designs plan to use a gas cooler operating near the pseudo-critical point of carbon dioxide to benefit from large variations in thermophysical properties, but further work is needed to validate correlations for heat transfer and pressure-drop characteristics of SCO{sub 2} flows in candidate PCHE channel designs for a variety of operating conditions. This paper presents work on experimental measurements of the heat transfer and pressure drop behavior of miniature channels using carbon dioxide at supercritical pressure. Results from several plate geometries tested in horizontal cooling-mode flow are presented, including a straight semi-circular channel, zigzag channel with a bend angle of 80 degrees, and a channel with a staggered array of extruded airfoil pillars modeled after a NACA 0020 airfoil with an 8.1 mm chord length facing into the flow. Heat transfer coefficients and bulk temperatures are calculated from measured local wall temperatures and local heat fluxes. The experimental results are compared to several methods for estimating the friction factor and Nusselt number of cooling-mode flows at supercritical pressures in millimeter-scale channels. (authors)

  1. In vitro comparison of Günther Tulip and Celect filters: testing filtering efficiency and pressure drop.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, M; Malvé, M; Peña, E; Martínez, M A; Leask, R

    2015-02-05

    In this study, the trapping ability of the Günther Tulip and Celect inferior vena cava filters was evaluated. Thrombus capture rates of the filters were tested in vitro in horizontal position with thrombus diameters of 3 and 6mm and tube diameter of 19mm. The filters were tested in centered and tilted positions. Sets of 30 clots were injected into the model and the same process was repeated 20 times for each different condition simulated. Pressure drop experienced along the system was also measured and the percentage of clots captured was recorded. The Günther Tulip filter showed superiority in all cases, trapping almost 100% of 6mm clots both in an eccentric and tilted position and trapping 81.7% of the 3mm clots in a centered position and 69.3% in a maximum tilted position. The efficiency of all filters tested decreased as the size of the embolus decreased and as the filter was tilted. The injection of 6 clots raised the pressure drop to 4.1mmHg, which is a reasonable value that does not cause the obstruction of blood flow through the system.

  2. Bed mixing and leachate recycling strategies to overcome pressure drop buildup in the biofiltration of hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Roshani, Babak; Torkian, Ayoob; Aslani, Hasan; Dehghanzadeh, Reza

    2012-04-01

    The effects of leachate recycling and bed mixing on the removal rate of H(2)S from waste gas stream were investigated. The experimental setup consisted of an epoxy-coated three-section biofilter with an ID of 8 cm and effective bed height of 120 cm. Bed material consisted of municipal solid waste compost and PVC bits with an overall porosity of 54% and dry bulk density of 0.456 g cm(-3). Leachate recycling had a positive effect of increasing elimination capacity (EC) up to 21 g S m(-3) bed h(-1) at recycling rates of 75 ml d(-1), but in the bed mixing period EC declined to 8 g S m(-3) bed h(-1). Pressure drop had a range of zero to 18 mm H(2)O m(-1) in the course of leachate recycling. Accumulation of sulfur reduced removal efficiency and increased pressure drop up to 110 mm H(2)O m(-1) filter during the bed mixing stage.

  3. A simple expression for pressure drops of water and other low molecular liquids in the flow through micro-orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Tomiichi; Ushida, Akiomi; Narumi, Takatsune

    2015-12-01

    Flows are generally divided into two types: shear flows and shear-free elongational (extensional) flows. Both are necessary for a thorough understanding of the flow properties of a fluid. Shear flows are easy to achieve in practice, for example, through Poiseuille or Couette flows. Shear-free elongational flows are experimentally hard to achieve, resulting in an incomplete understanding of the flow properties of fluids in micro-devices. Nevertheless, flows through micro-orifices are useful for probing the properties of elongational flows at high elongational rates; although these flows exhibit shear and elongation, the elongation is dominant and the shear is negligible in the central region of the flows. We previously reported an anomalous reduction in pressure drops in the flows of water, a 50/50 mixture of glycerol and water, and silicone oils through micro-orifices. In the present paper, we rearrange the data presented in the previous paper and reveal a simple relationship where the pressure drop is proportional to the velocity through the micro-orifices, independent of the orifice diameter and the viscosity of the liquids tested. We explain our observations by introducing a "fluid element" model, in which fluid elements are formed on entering the orifice. The model is based on the idea that low molecular liquids, including water, generate strong elongational stress, similar to a polymer solution, in the flow through micro-orifices.

  4. Pressure drop and heat transfer of Al2O3-H2O nanofluids through silicon microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xinyu; Wu, Huiying; Cheng, Ping

    2009-10-01

    Experimental investigations were performed on the single-phase flow and heat transfer characteristics through the silicon-based trapezoidal microchannels with a hydraulic diameter of 194.5 µm using Al2O3-H2O nanofluids with particle volume fractions of 0, 0.15% and 0.26% as the working fluids. The effects of the Reynolds number, Prandtl number and nanoparticle concentration on the pressure drop and convective heat transfer were investigated. Experimental results show that the pressure drop and flow friction of the nanofluids increased slightly when compared with that of the pure water, while the Nusselt number increased considerably. At the same pumping power, using nanofluids instead of pure water caused a reduction in the thermal resistance. It was also found that the Nusselt number increased with the increase in the particle concentration, Reynolds number and Prandtl number. Based on the experimental data, the dimensionless correlations for the flow friction and heat transfer of Al2O3-H2O nanofluids through silicon microchannels were proposed for the first time. The agglomeration and deposition of nanoparticles in the silicon microchannels were also examined in this paper. It was found that the Al2O3 nanoparticles deposited on the inner wall of microchannels more easily with increasing wall temperature, and once boiling commenced, there is a severe deposition and adhesion of nanoparticles to the inner wall, which makes the boiling heat transfer of nanofluids in silicon microchannels questionable.

  5. Effects of pressure drop, particle size and thermal conditions on retention and efficiency in supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Poe, Donald P; Schroden, Jonathan J

    2009-11-06

    The effects of particle size and thermal insulation on retention and efficiency in packed-column supercritical fluid chromatography with large pressure drops are described for the separation of a series of model n-alkane solutes. The columns were 2.0mm i.d.x150mm long and were packed with 3, 5, or 10-mum porous octylsilica particles. Separations were performed with pure carbon dioxide at 50 degrees C at average mobile phase densities of 0.47g/mL (107bar) and 0.70g/mL (151bar). The three principal causes of band broadening were the normal dispersion processes described by the van Deemter equation, changes in the retention factor due to the axial density gradient, and radial temperature gradients associated with expansion of the mobile phase. At the lower density the use of thermal insulation resulted in significant improvements in efficiency and decreased retention times at large pressure drops. The effects are attributed to the elimination of radial temperature gradients and the concurrent enhancement of the axial temperature gradient. Thermal insulation had no significant effect on chromatographic performance at the higher density. A simple expression to predict the onset of excess efficiency loss due to the radial temperature gradient is proposed.

  6. Evaluation of static pressure drops and PM10 and TSP emissions for modified 1D-3D cyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, G.A.; Baker, R.V.; Hughs, S.E.

    1999-12-01

    Five modifications of a standard 1D3D cyclone were tested and compared against the standard 1D3D design in the areas of particulate emissions and static pressure drop across the cyclone. The modifications to the 1D3D design included a 2D2D inlet, a 2D2D air outlet, a D/3 trash exit, an expansion chamber with a D/3 trash exit, and a tapered air outlet duct. The 1D3D modifications that exhibited a significant improvement in reducing both PM10 and total suspended particulate (TSP) emissions were the designs with the 2D2D inlet and air exhaust combined with either the conical D/3 tail cone or the expansion chamber. In reference to the standard 1D3D cyclone, the average reduction in PM10 emissions was 24 to 29% with a 29 to 35% reduction observed in TSP emissions. The modifications with the tapered air outlets did not show any significant improvements in controlling PM10 emissions. However, the modification with the tapered air outlet/expansion chamber combination exhibited statistical significance in reducing TSP emissions by 18% compared to the 1D3D cyclone. All modifications tested exhibited lower static pressure drops than the standard 1D3D.

  7. The effect of flexible tube vibration on pressure drop and heat transfer in heat exchangers considering viscous dissipation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokouhmand, H.; Sangtarash, F.

    2008-04-01

    The pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient in tube bundle of shell and tube heat exchangers are investigated considering viscous dissipation effects. The governing equations are solved numerically. Because of temperature-dependent viscosity the equations should be solved simultaneously. The flexible tubes vibration is modeled in a quasi-static method by taking the first tube of the row to be in 20 asymmetric positions with respect to the rest of the tubes which are assumed to be fixed and time averaging the steady state solutions corresponding to each one of these positions .The results show that the eccentricity of the first tube increases pressure drop and heat transfer coefficients significantly comparing to the case of rigid tube bundles, symmetrically placed. In addition, these vibrations not only compensate the effect of viscous dissipations on heat transfer coefficient but also increase heat transfer coefficient. The constant viscosity results obtained from our numerical method have a good agreement with the available experimental data of constant viscosity for flexible tube heat exchangers.

  8. Experimental and numerical investigation of pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient in converging-diverging microchannel heat sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarthii, M. K. Dheepan; Mutharasu, D.; Shanmugan, S.

    2017-01-01

    The major challenge in microelectronic chips is to eliminate the generated heat for stable and reliable operation of the devices. Microchannel heat sinks are efficient method to dissipate high heat flux. The pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient are the important parameters which determine the thermal-hydraulic performance of the microchannel heat sink. In this study, a converging-diverging (CD) microchannel heat sink was experimentally investigated for the variation of pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient. De-ionized water was considered as the working fluid. Experiments were conducted for single phase fluid flow with mass flow rate and heat flux ranging from 0.001232 to 0.01848 kg/s and 10-50 W/cm2 respectively. The fluid and solid temperature were measured to calculate the heat transfer coefficients. Numerical results were computed using the CFD software and validated against the experimental results. The CD microchannel possesses high heat transfer coefficient than the straight microchannels. Theoretical correlations were proposed for comparing the experimental Nusselt number of CD microchannel. Evaluation of thermal-hydraulic performance of CD microchannel is important to quantify its applications in electronics cooling.

  9. Condensation heat transfer and pressure drop of R-134a saturated vapour inside a brazed compact plate fin heat exchanger with serrated fin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramana Murthy, K. V.; Ranganayakulu, C.; Ashok Babu, T. P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop measured during R-134a saturated vapour condensation inside a small brazed compact plate fin heat exchanger with serrated fin surface. The effects of saturation temperature (pressure), refrigerant mass flux, refrigerant heat flux, effect of fin surface characteristics and fluid properties are investigated. The average condensation heat transfer coefficients and frictional pressure drops were determined experimentally for refrigerant R-134a at five different saturated temperatures (34, 38, 40, 42 and 44 °C). A transition point between gravity controlled and forced convection condensation has been found for a refrigerant mass flux around 22 kg/m2s. In the forced convection condensation region, the heat transfer coefficients show a three times increase and 1.5 times increase in frictional pressure drop for a doubling of the refrigerant mass flux. The heat transfer coefficients show weak sensitivity to saturation temperature (Pressure) and great sensitivity to refrigerant mass flux and fluid properties. The frictional pressure drop shows a linear dependence on the kinetic energy per unit volume of the refrigerant flow. Correlations are provided for the measured heat transfer coefficients and frictional pressure drops.

  10. Pressure drop testing of corrugated stainless steel pliable gas tubing (PLT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bharadwaj

    An experimental program was initiated to determine the Darcy friction factor in straight corrugated stainless steel pliable gas tubing (PLT). Pressure loss tests were conducted on PLT per I.S. EN 15266:2007. A power law least-squares curve fit was used to relate pressure loss per unit length as a function of volume flow rate. The calculated coefficient of determination values for the straight PLT exceeded 0.90 indicating suitable correlation. Darcy friction factors were calculated from test data for each case and plotted on a Moody diagram as a function of Reynolds number based on the minimum PLT cross section. For Reynolds numbers less than 2300 the pressure loss data for PLT yielded an inverse relationship between the Darcy friction factor and the Reynolds number, with a proportionality coefficient of 49. The measurement uncertainty estimates for straight sections was performed with a 95% confidence level. Straight PLT flow rates for air and representative fuel gases that would yield a pressure loss Deltap = 1 mbar were calculated as a function of PLT length and diameter. Fitting pressure loss tests were performed for elbows, tees, and bullhead tees. The loss coefficients were evaluated and tabulated. The calculated coefficient of determination values for the fittings was found to be low. The measurement uncertainty was calculated using the root sum square error method and was found to be very high because of the low flow rates considered in this experiment.

  11. Fluctuation emergence of bubbles under a rapid drop of pressure in a liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, P. A.; Vinogradov, V. E.

    2015-07-01

    Explosive cavitation at the front of a negative-pressure pulse has been studied. Conditions for the emergence of bubbles by the mechanism of homogeneous fluctuation nucleation were identified. Those conditions feature a high rate of the phase transformation, with the vapor formation process being concentrated in time at the instant of attainment of a certain pressure. Under such conditions, the liquid cavitation strength is maximal, and its value can be predicted by the homogeneous nucleation theory. For implementing the regime with high nucleation frequency, a method based on passing a negative-pressure pulse across a region with locally heated liquid was employed. The cavitation kinetics was examined by monitoring the perturbation of the heat flow from a miniature heater. The experimental data were generalized using the theory of explosive vapor formation in shock boiling mode. A method for calculating the cavitation in the regime of the fluctuation emergence of bubbles was approbated.

  12. Earthquake dynamics. Mapping pressurized volcanic fluids from induced crustal seismic velocity drops.

    PubMed

    Brenguier, F; Campillo, M; Takeda, T; Aoki, Y; Shapiro, N M; Briand, X; Emoto, K; Miyake, H

    2014-07-04

    Volcanic eruptions are caused by the release of pressure that has accumulated due to hot volcanic fluids at depth. Here, we show that the extent of the regions affected by pressurized fluids can be imaged through the measurement of their response to transient stress perturbations. We used records of seismic noise from the Japanese Hi-net seismic network to measure the crustal seismic velocity changes below volcanic regions caused by the 2011 moment magnitude (M(w)) 9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. We interpret coseismic crustal seismic velocity reductions as related to the mechanical weakening of the pressurized crust by the dynamic stress associated with the seismic waves. We suggest, therefore, that mapping seismic velocity susceptibility to dynamic stress perturbations can be used for the imaging and characterization of volcanic systems.

  13. Two-phase flow heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of R-22 and R-32/125

    SciTech Connect

    Wijaya, H.; Spatz, M.W.

    1995-08-01

    The two-phase heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop characteristics of refrigerants R-22 and R-32/125 (ASI 1990) (a mixture of 50 wt% R-32 and 50 wt% R-125 that exhibits azeotropic behavior) have been measured. The experiments were conducted without oil in the refrigerant loop. The condenser/evaporator test sections consist of smooth, horizontal copper tubes of 3/8-in. (9.53-mm) outer diameter (OD) and 0.305-in. (7.75-mm) inner diameter (ID). A lengths of the condenser and evaporator test sections are 10 ft (3.05 m) and 12 ft (3.66 m), respectively. The condenser is a counterflow heat exchanger with refrigerant flowing in the inner tube and a water-glycol mixture flowing in the annulus. The evaporator is a smooth copper tube sandwiched with aluminum blocks. Heating tapes are wrapped around the outer surface of these aluminum blocks. The average saturated condensing temperatures were 115 F (46.1 C) and 125 F (51.7 C), while the saturated evaporating temperature was 40 F (4.4 C). The average inlet and exit qualities for the condensation tests were 87% and 25%, respectively and for the evaporation tests they were 20% and 90%, respectively. The mass flux was varied from 118 klb/ft{sup 2}{minus}{center_dot}h (160 kg/s{center_dot}m{sup 2}) to 414 klb/ft{sup 2}{center_dot}h (561 kg/s{center_dot}m{sup 2}). A differential pressure transducer was used to measure the pressure drop across the test section. The results showed that at similar mass fluxes the condensation heat transfer coefficients for R-32/125 were slightly higher (about 2% to 6%) than those of R-22.

  14. Two-phase flow boiling frictional pressure drop of liquid nitrogen in horizontal circular mini-tubes: Experimental investigation and comparison with correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xingya; Chen, Shuangtao; Chen, Jun; Li, Jiapeng; Liu, Xiufang; Chen, Liang; Hou, Yu

    2017-04-01

    The two-phase flow boiling characteristics of liquid nitrogen (LN2) in horizontal circular mini-tubes were experimentally studied. Experiments were performed in a wide range of flow conditions, e.g. inlet pressure from 0.17 to 0.35 MPa, mass flux from 140 to 330 kg/m2 s, heat flux from 0.5 to 69.4 kW/m2 and tube diameters of 2.92 mm and 3.96 mm. The influences of mass flux, heat flux, and inlet pressure on the pressure drop were discussed. The results indicated that the pressure drop increases with the increasing mass flux and heat flux but decreases with the increasing inlet pressure. But the influence of heat flux on the frictional pressure drop of LN2 was weaker than mass flux and inlet pressure. The frictional pressure drop of two-phase flow of LN2 was compared with homogeneous model and several semi-empirical correlations. An improved correlation based on the Lockhart-Martinelli model, which used coefficient C as a function of Reynolds number and Weber number was proposed.

  15. Pressure Drop Across Woven Screens Under Uniform and Nonuniform Flow Conditions. [flow characteristics of water through Dutch twill and square weave fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludewig, M.; Omori, S.; Rao, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the experimental pressure drop and velocity data for water flowing through woven screens. The types of materials used are dutch twill and square weave fabrics. Pressure drop measures were made at four locations in a rectangular channel. The data are presented as change in pressure compared with the average entry velocity and the numerical relationship is determined by dividing the volumetric flow rate by the screen area open to flow. The equations of continuity and momentum are presented. A computer program listing an extension of a theoretical model and data from that computer program are included.

  16. Numerical simulation of blood flow and pressure drop in the pulmonary arterial and venous circulation

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, M. Umar; Vaughan, Gareth D.A.; Sainsbury, Christopher; Johnson, Martin; Peskin, Charles S.; Olufsen, Mette S.; Hill, N.A.

    2014-01-01

    A novel multiscale mathematical and computational model of the pulmonary circulation is presented and used to analyse both arterial and venous pressure and flow. This work is a major advance over previous studies by Olufsen and coworkers (Ottesen et al., 2003; Olufsen et al., 2012) which only considered the arterial circulation. For the first three generations of vessels within the pulmonary circulation, geometry is specified from patient-specific measurements obtained using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Blood flow and pressure in the larger arteries and veins are predicted using a nonlinear, cross-sectional-area-averaged system of equations for a Newtonian fluid in an elastic tube. Inflow into the main pulmonary artery is obtained from MRI measurements, while pressure entering the left atrium from the main pulmonary vein is kept constant at the normal mean value of 2 mmHg. Each terminal vessel in the network of ‘large’ arteries is connected to its corresponding terminal vein via a network of vessels representing the vascular bed of smaller arteries and veins. We develop and implement an algorithm to calculate the admittance of each vascular bed, using bifurcating structured trees and recursion. The structured-tree models take into account the geometry and material properties of the ‘smaller’ arteries and veins of radii ≥ 50µm. We study the effects on flow and pressure associated with three classes of pulmonary hypertension expressed via stiffening of larger and smaller vessels, and vascular rarefaction. The results of simulating these pathological conditions are in agreement with clinical observations, showing that the model has potential for assisting with diagnosis and treatment of circulatory diseases within the lung. PMID:24610385

  17. Short term Heart Rate Variability to predict blood pressure drops due to standing: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Standing from a bed or chair may cause a significant lowering of blood pressure (ΔBP), which may have severe consequences such as, for example, falls in older subjects. The goal of this study was to develop a mathematical model to predict the ΔBP due to standing in healthy subjects, based on their Heart Rate Variability, recorded in the 5 minutes before standing. Methods Heart Rate Variability was extracted from an electrocardiogram, recorded from 10 healthy subjects during the 5 minutes before standing. The blood pressure value was measured before and after rising. A mathematical model aiming to predict ΔBP based on Heart Rate Variability measurements was developed using a robust multi-linear regression and was validated with the leave-one-subject-out cross-validation technique. Results The model predicted correctly the ΔBP in 80% of experiments, with an error below the measurement error of sphygmomanometer digital devices (±4.5 mmHg), a false negative rate of 7.5% and a false positive rate of 10%. The magnitude of the ΔBP was associated with a depressed and less chaotic Heart Rate Variability pattern. Conclusions The present study showes that blood pressure lowering due to standing can be predicted by monitoring the Heart Rate Variability in the 5 minutes before standing. PMID:26391336

  18. Pressure-drop viscosity measurements for gamma-Al2O nanoparticles in water and PG-water mixtures (nanofluids).

    PubMed

    Lai, W Y; Phelan, P E; Prasher, R S

    2010-12-01

    Nanofluids have attracted wide attention because of their promising thermal applications. Compared with the base fluid, numerous experiments have generally indicated increases in effective thermal conductivity and convective heat transfer coefficient for suspensions having only a small amount of nanoparticles. It is also known that with the presence of nanoparticles, the viscosity of a nanofluid is greater than its base fluid and deviates from Einstein's classical prediction. However, only a few groups have reported nanofluid viscosity results to date. Therefore, relative viscosity data for gamma-Al2O3 nanoparticles in DI-water and propylene glycol/H2O mixtures are presented here based on pressure drop measurements of flowing nanofluids. Results indicate that with constant wall heat flux, the relative viscosities of nanofluid decrease with increasing volume flow rate. The results also show, based on Brenner's model, that the nanofluid viscosity can be explained in part by the aspect ratio of the aggregates.

  19. Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop Data for Circular Cylinders in Ducts and Various Arrangements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1951-09-01

    cities - and Constant Spacing iii Scinch, Duct - ~-^ - - -r =• -~ - -- - - - - 37;, Single, Cylinder’ and Three- Cylinders in line" with Yard...heating coils surrounded by .a 3/Scinch thicis shell of ^anslte, .an asbest -cs-cemens material; oo’CiSlstljig of 35 per cent Portland cement .and lä per...gradients did, not permit very accurate de-* teraiinationä--&t low flois veio- cities because of ihseösitivity af She fee generalization of the, pressure

  20. Dynamics of diffusivity and pressure drop in flow-through and parallel-flow bioreactors during tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Podichetty, Jagdeep T; Dhane, Dhananjay V; Madihally, Sundararajan V

    2012-07-01

    In this study, transport characteristics in flow-through and parallel-flow bioreactors used in tissue engineering were simulated using computational fluid dynamics. To study nutrient distribution and consumption by smooth muscle cells colonizing the 100 mm diameter and 2-mm thick scaffold, effective diffusivity of glucose was experimentally determined using a two-chambered setup. Three different concentrations of chitosan-gelatin scaffolds were prepared by freezing at -80°C followed by lyophilization. Experiments were performed in both bioreactors to measure pressure drop at different flow rates. At low flow rates, experimental results were in agreement with the simulation results for both bioreactors. However, increase in flow rate beyond 5 mL/min in flow-through bioreactor showed channeling at the circumference resulting in lower pressure drop relative to simulation results. The Peclet number inside the scaffold indicated nutrient distribution within the flow-through bioreactor to be convection-dependent, whereas the parallel-flow bioreactor was diffusion-dependent. Three alternative design modifications to the parallel-flow were made by (i) introducing an additional inlet and an outlet, (ii) changing channel position, and (iii) changing the hold-up volume. Simulation studies were performed to assess the effect of scaffold thickness, cell densities, and permeability. These new designs improved nutrient distribution for 2 mm scaffolds; however, parallel-flow configuration was found to be unsuitable for scaffolds more than 4-mm thick, especially at low porosities as tissues regenerate. Furthermore, operable flow rate in flow-through bioreactors is constrained by the mechanical strength of the scaffold. In summary, this study showed limitations and differences between flow-through and parallel-flow bioreactors used in tissue engineering.

  1. Condensation inside tubes: Computer program for pressure drop in straight tubes (horizontal and vertical with downflow)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-12-01

    ESDU 93014 introduces a Fortran program that implements the calculation procedures of ESDU 90024 and 91023 respectively for vertical and horizontal cases. Those documents should be consulted for details of the empirical correlation used. Since vapor density is an important variable in the calculation and is usually available as a function of saturation temperature, the relationship between pressure and saturation temperature is required at points along the tube, although a constant value of vapor density may be used if the user wishes. The program provides options to use an Antoine or Wagner equation, or to provide a set of values of saturation pressure and temperature; for the vapor density the options are to use the ideal gas law, to provide a set of values of saturation temperature and density or to use a specific correlation equation (log density as a fraction of critical as a five term polynomial function of reciprocal reduced temperature minus one). For a wide range of pure compounds the ESDU Physical Data, Chemical Engineering Sub-series provides values of the constants in the correlation equations for saturation temperature and vapor density. The program (ESDUpac A9314) is provided on disc (uncompiled) in the software volume, and also compiled within ESDUview, a user-friendly shell running under MS DOS that prompts on screen for the input data. A worked example illustrates the use of the program and the formats of the input data and the output.

  2. Steam-explosion pretreatment of wood: effect of chip size, acid, moisture content and pressure drop

    SciTech Connect

    Brownell, H.H.; Yu, E.K.C.; Saddler, J.N.

    1986-06-01

    Material balances for pentosan, lignin, and hexosan, during steam-explosion pretreatment of aspenwood, showed almost quantitative recovery of cellulose in the water-insoluble fraction. Dilute acid impregnation resulted in more selective hydrolysis of pentosan relative to undesirable pyrolysis, and gave a more accessible substrate for enzymatic hydrolysis. Thermocouple probes, located inside simulated aspenwood chips heated in 240 degrees C-saturated steam, showed rapid heating of air-dry wood, whereas green or impregnated wood heated slowly. Small chips, 3.2 mm in the fiber direction, whether green or air dry gave approximately equal rates of pentosan destruction and solubilization, and similar yields of glucose and of total reducing sugars on enzmatic hydrolysis with Trichoderma harzianum. Partial pyrolysis, destroying one-third of the pentosan of aspenwood at atmospheric pressure by dry steam at 276 degrees C, gave little increase in yield of reducing sugars on enzymatic hydrolysis. Treatment with saturated steam at 240 degrees C gave essentially the same yields of butanediol and ethanol on fermentation with Klebsiella pneumoniae, whether or not 80% of the steam was bled off before explosion and even if the chips remained intact, showing that explosion was unnecessary. 17 references.

  3. Mixed convective low flow pressure drop in vertical rod assemblies: I---Predictive model and design correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, K.Y.; Todreas, N.E.; Rohsenow, W.M. )

    1989-11-01

    A predicative theory has been developed for rod bundle frictional pressure drop characteristics under laminar and transitional mixed convection conditions on the basis of the intraassembly and intrasubchannel flow redistributions due to buoyancy for a wide spectrum of radial power profiles and for the geometric arrangements of practical design interest. Both the individual subchannel correlations and overall bundle design correlations have been formulated as multipliers applied to the isothermal friction factors at the same Reynolds numbers. Standard and modified subchannel friction factors have been obtained to be used with spatial-average and bulk-mean densities, respectively. A correlating procedure has been proposed to assess the effects of interacting subchannel flows, developing mixed convective flow, wire wrapping, power skew, rod number, and transition from laminar flow. In contrast to forced convection behavior, a strong rod number effect is present under mixed convection conditions in bundle geometries. The results of this study are of design importance in natural circulation conditions becasue the mixed convection frictional pressure losses exceed the corresponding isothermal values at the same Reynolds numbers.

  4. Surface tension and its temperature coefficient of molten tin determined with the sessile drop method at different oxygen partial pressures.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhang Fu; Mukai, Kusuhiro; Takagi, Katsuhiko; Ohtaka, Masahiko; Huang, Wen Lai; Liu, Qiu Sheng

    2002-10-15

    The surface tension of molten tin has been determined by the sessile drop method at temperatures ranging from 523 to 1033 K and in the oxygen partial pressure (P(O(2))) range from 2.85 x 10(-19) to 8.56 x 10(-6) MPa, and its dependence on temperature and oxygen partial pressure has been analyzed. At P(O(2))=2.85 x 10(-19) and 1.06 x 10(-15) MPa, the surface tension decreases linearly with the increase of temperature and its temperature coefficients are -0.151 and -0.094 mN m(-1) K(-1), respectively. However, at high P(O(2)) (3.17 x 10(-10), 8.56 x 10(-6) MPa), the surface tension increases with the temperature near the melting point (505 K) and decreases above 723 K. The surface tension decrease with increasing P(O(2)) is much larger near the melting point than at temperatures above 823 K. The contact angle between the molten tin and the alumina substrate is 158-173 degrees, and the wettability is poor.

  5. Effect of instant controlled pressure drop treatments on the oligosaccharides extractability and microstructure of Tephrosia purpurea seeds.

    PubMed

    Amor, Bouthaina Ben; Lamy, Cécile; Andre, Patrice; Allaf, Karim

    2008-12-12

    The study of the oligosaccharides extracted from Tephrosia purpurea seeds was undertaken using the instant controlled pressure drop (DIC) as a pre-treatment prior to conventional solvent extraction. This DIC procedure provided structural modification in terms of expansion, higher porosity and improvement of specific surface area; diffusion of solvent inside such seeds and availability of oligosaccharides increase notably. In this paper, we investigated and quantified the impact of the different DIC operative parameters on the yields of ciceritol and stachyose extracted from T. purpurea seeds. The treatment could be optimized with a steam pressure (P) (P=0.2 MPa), initial water content (W) (W=30% dry basis (DB)) and thermal treatment time (t) (t=30s). By applying DIC treatment in these conditions, the classic process of extraction was intensified in both aspects of yields (145% of ciceritol and 185% of stachyose), and kinetics (1h of extraction time instead of 4h for conventional process). The scanning electron microscopy micrographs provided evident modifications of structure of seeds due to the DIC treatment.

  6. Orbiter thermal pressure drop characteristics for shuttle orbiter thermal protection system components: High density tile, low density tile, densified low density tile, and strain isolation pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawing, P. L.; Nystrom, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Pressure drop tests were conducted on available samples of low and high density tile, densified low density tile, and strain isolation pads. The results are presented in terms of pressure drop, material thickness and volume flow rate. Although the test apparatus was only capable of a small part of the range of conditions to be encountered in a Shuttle Orbiter flight, the data serve to determine the type of flow characteristics to be expected for each material type tested; the measured quantities also should serve as input for initial venting and flow through analysis.

  7. Relationship between Arterial Stiffness and Blood Pressure Drop During the Sit-to-stand Test in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Hideo; Sumida, Koichiro; Suzuki, Shota; Kagimoto, Minako; Okuyama, Yuki; Ehara, Yosuke; Katsumata, Mari; Fujita, Megumi; Fujiwara, Akira; Saka, Sanae; Yatsu, Keisuke; Hashimoto, Tatsuo; Kuji, Tadashi; Hirawa, Nobuhito; Toya, Yoshiyuki; Yasuda, Gen; Umemura, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Patients with orthostatic hypotension (OH) have high arterial stiffness. Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) often have cardiac autonomic neuropathy that leads to OH; however, whether OH is an indicator of arterial stiffness progression is unclear. We aimed to investigate whether the cardioankle vascular index (CAVI) varies between DM patients with and without OH using the sit-to-stand test (STST). Methods: One hundred and fifty-nine patients with DM underwent CAVI assessment and blood pressure (BP) and heart rate change evaluation during the STST. OH was defined as a decline in systolic BP (SBP) and/or diastolic BP of at least 20 mmHg or 10 mmHg, respectively, in the initial and late upright positions compared with that in the sitting position. Results: OH was diagnosed in 42 patients (26.4%). DM patients with OH had significantly higher CAVI (9.36 ± 1.15 versus 8.89 ± 1.18, p = 0.026) than those without OH. CAVI was significantly inversely correlated with systolic and diastolic BP changes (R = −0.347, p <0.001 and R = −0.314, p <0.001, respectively) in the initial upright position. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that age, SBP changes, and low frequency component in the initial upright position were independent determinants of CAVI. Conclusion: Patients with DM having large BP drops occurring when moving from sitting to standing have high arterial stiffness. A significant BP drop during the STST necessitates careful evaluation of advanced arterial stiffness in patient with DM. PMID:27453255

  8. Define and Quantify the Physics of Air Flow, Pressure Drop and Aerosol Collection in Nuclear Grade HEPA Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Murray E.

    2015-02-23

    Objective: Develop a set of peer-review and verified analytical methods to adjust HEPA filter performance to different flow rates, temperatures and altitudes. Experimental testing will measure HEPA filter flow rate, pressure drop and efficiency to verify the analytical approach. Nuclear facilities utilize HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filters to purify air flow for workspace ventilation. However, the ASME AG-1 technical standard (Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment) does not adequately describe air flow measurement units for HEPA filter systems. Specifically, the AG-1 standard does not differentiate between volumetric air flow in ACFM (actual cubic feet per minute)compared to mass flow measured in SCFM (standard cubic feet per minute). More importantly, the AG-1 standard has an overall deficiency for using HEPA filter devices at different air flow rates, temperatures, and altitudes. Technical Approach: The collection efficiency and pressure drops of 18 different HEPA filters will be measured over a range of flow rates, temperatures and altitudes. The experimental results will be compared to analytical scoping calculations. Three manufacturers have allocated six HEPA filters each for this effort. The 18 filters will be tested at two different flow rates, two different temperatures and two different altitudes. The 36 total tests will be conducted at two different facilities: the ATI Test facilities (Baltimore MD) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos NM). The Radiation Protection RP-SVS group at Los Alamos has an aerosol wind tunnel that was originally designed to evaluate small air samplers. In 2010, modifications were started to convert the wind tunnel for HEPA filter testing. (Extensive changes were necessary for the required aerosol generators, HEPA test fixtures, temperature control devices and measurement capabilities.) To this date, none of these modification activities have been funded through a specific DOE or NNSA program. This is

  9. Optimal phenology of annual plants under grazing pressure.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Norio; Fujita, Noboru; Hayashi, Motoyuki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Yamauchi, Atsushi

    2007-06-07

    Plants show phenological responses to herbivory. Some enclosure experiments have demonstrated that the onset of the peak flowering season is dependent on grazing pressure. We constructed a mathematical model using Pontryargin's maximum principle to investigate changes in flowering time by examining shifts in resource allocation from vegetative to reproductive plant components. We represented a primary production of a plant individual by two types of function of vegetative part size, a linear function and a convex non-linear function. The results of a linear production model indicate that optimal phenology follows a schedule that switches from the production of vegetative parts to that of reproductive parts at a given time ('bang-bang' control). However, in a non-linear model, a singular control, wherein the plant invests in both productive and reproductive parts, may be included between obligate production and reproduction periods. We assumed that the peak of the flowering season occurs immediately following the exclusive investment in reproduction. In a linear production model, differential herbivory rates on the vegetative and reproductive parts of a plant resulted in shifts in the peak flowering time. A higher herbivory rate on the vegetative components advanced the peak, whereas it was delayed when grazing pressure focused on reproductive components of the plant. In the non-linear production model, increased grazing pressure tended to postpone the flowering peak. These results corresponded well with results of enclosure experiments, thus suggesting adaptive control of flowering time in plants.

  10. Strain response and re-equilibration of CH4-rich synthetic aqueous fluid inclusions in calcite during pressure drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdet, Julien; Pironon, Jacques

    2008-06-01

    Aqueous fluids in sedimentary basins often contain dissolved methane, particularly in petroleum environments. PVTX (Pressure-Volume-Temperature-Composition) reconstructions performed using fluid inclusion data are largely based on the assumption that inclusions do not change from the time of trapping until the present. Many authors, however, consider that fluid inclusions can re-equilibrate, particularly in fragile minerals like calcite. In order to understand this re-equilibration phenomenon in the metamorphic domain, previous experiments have been performed under high PT conditions, but few have been performed at low to medium PT conditions such as those associated with sedimentary burial diagenesis, and no previous studies have examined CH4-bearing aqueous inclusions in calcite. An experimental study of the preservation/modification of CH4-rich synthetic fluid inclusions in calcite during isothermal decompression was conducted. An autoclave was used for accurate PTX control allowing equilibrium between liquid and vapour in the CH4-H2O system. PTX conditions were maintained at four stages of decreasing pressure, with each stage held for 7 days to simulate an isothermal pressure drop. In order of decreasing pressure, the pressure-temperature conditions monitored were 276 ± 10 bar at 180 ± 7 °C, 176 ± 10 bar at 180 ± 7 °C, 76 ± 10 bar at 180 ± 7 °C and 10 ± 3 bar at 180 ± 15 °C. At the end of the experiment, the calcite was recovered and analyzed by microthermometry and Raman microspectroscopy for PTX reconstruction. A careful procedure was adopted to limit re-equilibration of inclusions during analytical procedures. Four types of inclusion shapes and four types of strain patterns were differentiated. Classification of the petrographic strain patterns was carried out. These strain patterns were associated with inclusion stretching and/or leakage regarding CH4, Th and Ph compared to experimental conditions. Factors controlling the preservation or

  11. Headspace single drop microextraction coupled with microwave extraction of essential oil from plant materials.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yujuan; Sun, Shuo; Wang, Ziming; Zhang, Yupu; Liu, He; Sun, Ye; Zhang, Hanqi; Yu, Aimin

    2011-05-01

    Headspace single drop microextraction (HS-SDME) coupled with microwave extraction (ME) was developed and applied to the extraction of the essential oil from dried Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. et Perry and Cuminum cyminum L. The operational parameters, such as microdrop volume, microwave absorption medium (MAM), extraction time, and microwave power were optimized. Ten microliters of decane was used as the microextraction solvent. Ionic liquid and carbonyl iron powder were used as MAM. The extraction time was less than 7 min at the microwave power of 440 W. The proposed method was compared with hydrodistillation (HD). There were no obvious differences in the constituents of essential oils obtained by the two methods.

  12. The respective effect of under-rib convection and pressure drop of flow fields on the performance of PEM fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Qinglei; Shen, Shuiyun; Yan, Xiaohui; Zhu, Fengjuan; Cheng, Xiaojing; Zhang, Junliang

    2017-03-02

    The flow field configuration plays an important role on the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). For instance, channel/rib width and total channel cross-sectional area determine the under-rib convection and pressure drop respectively, both of which directly influence the water removal, in turn affecting the oxygen supply and cathodic oxygen reduction reaction. In this study, effects of under-rib convection and pressure drop on cell performance are investigated experimentally and numerically by adjusting the channel/rib width and channel cross-sectional area of flow fields. The results show that the performance differences with various flow field configurations mainly derive from the oxygen transport resistance which is determined by the water accumulation degree, and the cell performance would benefit from the narrower channels and smaller cross sections. It reveals that at low current densities when water starts to accumulate in GDL at under-rib regions, the under-rib convection plays a more important role in water removal than pressure drop does; in contrast, at high current densities when water starts to accumulate in channels, the pressure drop dominates the water removal to facilitate the oxygen transport to the catalyst layer.

  13. Bidirectional Glenn shunt as an adjunct to surgical repair of congenital heart disease associated with pulmonary outflow obstruction: relevance of the fluid pressure drop-flow relationship.

    PubMed

    Ascuitto, Robert; Ross-Ascuitto, Nancy; Wiesman, Joshua; Deleon, Serafin

    2008-09-01

    A bidirectional Glenn shunt (BGS) was successfully incorporated into a two-ventricle repair for 10 patients (age, 3-17 years) who had congenital heart disease associated with severe pulmonary outflow obstruction. The BGS was used to volume-unload the pulmonary ventricle faced with residual outflow obstruction, thereby avoiding the need for insertion of a ventricle-to-pulmonary artery conduit. Transthoracic Doppler flow velocity analysis was used to determine transpulmonary peak systolic pressure drops as a measure of obstruction. Preoperative values ranged from 70 to 100 mmHg, and postoperative values ranged from less than 10 to 16 mmHg. At this writing, all patients are doing well 15 to 52 months after surgery. To gain further insight into the reduced pressure drop that may be achieved by decreasing flow rate across obstruction, a computer-based description of fluid flow was used to simulate blood traversing circumferentially narrowed passages. Overall pressure drops and associated flow energy losses were determined from numeric solutions (using finite-element analysis) to the Navier-Stokes equations for the proposed fluid reactions. Pressure drops and flow energy losses were found to decrease dramatically as flow rate was progressively reduced. For selected patients, a BGS can be an effective adjunct to the surgical treatment of pulmonary outflow obstruction. This approach avoids the use of a ventricle-to-pulmonary artery conduit, and thus the inevitable need in most patients for reoperations because of somatic growth, conduit failure, or both.

  14. The respective effect of under-rib convection and pressure drop of flow fields on the performance of PEM fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Qinglei; Shen, Shuiyun; Yan, Xiaohui; Zhu, Fengjuan; Cheng, Xiaojing; Zhang, Junliang

    2017-01-01

    The flow field configuration plays an important role on the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). For instance, channel/rib width and total channel cross-sectional area determine the under-rib convection and pressure drop respectively, both of which directly influence the water removal, in turn affecting the oxygen supply and cathodic oxygen reduction reaction. In this study, effects of under-rib convection and pressure drop on cell performance are investigated experimentally and numerically by adjusting the channel/rib width and channel cross-sectional area of flow fields. The results show that the performance differences with various flow field configurations mainly derive from the oxygen transport resistance which is determined by the water accumulation degree, and the cell performance would benefit from the narrower channels and smaller cross sections. It reveals that at low current densities when water starts to accumulate in GDL at under-rib regions, the under-rib convection plays a more important role in water removal than pressure drop does; in contrast, at high current densities when water starts to accumulate in channels, the pressure drop dominates the water removal to facilitate the oxygen transport to the catalyst layer. PMID:28251983

  15. The respective effect of under-rib convection and pressure drop of flow fields on the performance of PEM fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Qinglei; Shen, Shuiyun; Yan, Xiaohui; Zhu, Fengjuan; Cheng, Xiaojing; Zhang, Junliang

    2017-03-01

    The flow field configuration plays an important role on the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). For instance, channel/rib width and total channel cross-sectional area determine the under-rib convection and pressure drop respectively, both of which directly influence the water removal, in turn affecting the oxygen supply and cathodic oxygen reduction reaction. In this study, effects of under-rib convection and pressure drop on cell performance are investigated experimentally and numerically by adjusting the channel/rib width and channel cross-sectional area of flow fields. The results show that the performance differences with various flow field configurations mainly derive from the oxygen transport resistance which is determined by the water accumulation degree, and the cell performance would benefit from the narrower channels and smaller cross sections. It reveals that at low current densities when water starts to accumulate in GDL at under-rib regions, the under-rib convection plays a more important role in water removal than pressure drop does; in contrast, at high current densities when water starts to accumulate in channels, the pressure drop dominates the water removal to facilitate the oxygen transport to the catalyst layer.

  16. The effect of twisted-tape width on heat transfer and pressure drop for fully developed laminar flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chakroun, W.M.; Al-Fahed, S.F.

    1996-07-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to study the effect of twisted-tape width on the heat transfer and pressure drop with laminar flow in tubes. Data for three twisted-tape wavelengths, each with five different widths, have been collected with constant wall temperature boundary condition. Correlations for the friction factor and Nusselt number are also available. The correlations predict the experimental data to within 10 to 15 percent for the heat transfer and friction factor, respectively. The presence of the twisted tape has caused the friction factor to increase by a factor of 3 to 7 depending on Reynolds number and the twisted-tape geometry. Heat transfer results have shown an increase of 1.5 to 3 times that of plain tubes depending on the flow conditions and the twisted-tape geometry. The width shows no effect on friction factor and heat transfer in the low range of Reynolds number but has a more pronounced effect on heat transfer at the higher range of Reynolds number. It is recommended to use loose-fit tapes for low Reynolds number flows instead of tight-fit in the design of heat exchangers because they are easier to install and remove for cleaning purposes.

  17. An empirical investigation on thermal characteristics and pressure drop of Ag-oil nanofluid in concentric annular tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasian Arani, A. A.; Aberoumand, H.; Aberoumand, S.; Jafari Moghaddam, A.; Dastanian, M.

    2016-08-01

    In this work an experimental study on Silver-oil nanofluid was carried out in order to present the laminar convective heat transfer coefficient and friction factor in a concentric annulus with constant heat flux boundary condition. Silver-oil nanofluid prepared by Electrical Explosion of Wire technique with no nanoparticles agglomeration during nanofluid preparation process and experiments. The average sizes of particles were 20 nm. Nanofluids with various particle Volume fractions of 0.011, 0.044 and 0.171 vol% were employed. The nanofluid flowing between the tubes is heated by an electrical heating coil wrapped around it. The effects of different parameters such as flow Reynolds number, tube diameter ratio and nanofluid particle concentration on heat transfer coefficient are studied. Results show that, heat transfer coefficient increased by using nanofluid instead of pure oil. Maximum enhancement of heat transfer coefficient occurs in 0.171 vol%. In addition the results showed that, there are slight increases in pressure drop of nanofluid by increasing the nanoparticle concentration of nanofluid in compared to pure oil.

  18. Experimental investigation of heat transfer and pressure drop of turbulent flow inside tube with inserted helical coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharafeldeen, M. A.; Berbish, N. S.; Moawed, M. A.; Ali, R. K.

    2016-08-01

    The heat transfer and pressure drop were experimentally investigated in a coiled wire inserted tube in turbulent flow regime in the range of Reynolds number of 14,400 ≤ Re ≤ 42,900. The present work aims to extend the experimental data available on wire coil inserts to cover wire diameter ratio of 0.044 ≤ e/d ≤ 0.133 and coil pitch ratio of 1 ≤ p/d ≤ 5. Uniform heat flux was applied to the external surface of the tube and air was selected as fluid. The effects of Reynolds number and wire diameter and coil pitch ratios on the Nusselt number and friction factor were studied. The enhancement efficiency and performance criteria ranges are of (46.9-82.6 %) and (100.1-128 %) within the investigated range of the different parameters, respectively. Correlations are obtained for the average Nusselt number and friction factor utilizing the present measurements within the investigated range of geometrical parameters and Re. The maximum deviation between correlated and experimental values for Nusselt number and friction factor are ±5 and ±6 %, respectively.

  19. Analysis of operational methane emissions from pressure relief valves from biogas storages of biogas plants.

    PubMed

    Reinelt, Torsten; Liebetrau, Jan; Nelles, Michael

    2016-10-01

    The study presents the development of a method for the long term monitoring of methane emissions from pressure relief valves (PRV(1)) of biogas storages, which has been verified during test series at two PRVs of two agricultural biogas plants located in Germany. The determined methane emission factors are 0.12gCH4kWhel(-1) (0.06% CH4-loss, within 106days, 161 triggering events, winter season) from biogas plant A and 6.80/7.44gCH4kWhel(-1) (3.60/3.88% CH4-loss, within 66days, 452 triggering events, summer season) from biogas plant B. Besides the operational state of the biogas plant (e.g. malfunction of the combined heat and power unit), the mode of operation of the biogas flare, which can be manually or automatically operated as well as the atmospheric conditions (e.g. drop of the atmospheric pressure) can also affect the biogas emission from PRVs.

  20. Designing Extraterrestrial Plant Growth Habitats With Low Pressure Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corey, Kenneth A.

    2001-01-01

    In-situ resource utilization, provision of human life support requirements by bioregenerative methods, and engineering constraints for construction and deployment of plant growth structures on the surface of Mars all suggest the need for plant growth studies at hypobaric pressures. Past work demonstrated that plants will likely tolerate and grow at pressures at or below 10 kPa. Based upon this premise, concepts are developed for the design of reduced pressure atmospheres in lightweight, inflatable structures for plant growth systems on Mars with the goals of maximizing design simplicity and the use of local resources. A modular pod design is proposed as it could be integrated with large-scale production systems. Atmospheric modification of pod clusters would be based upon a pulse and scrub system using mass flow methods for atmospheric transport. A specific modification and control scenario is developed for a lettuce pod to illustrate the dynamics of carbon dioxide and oxygen exchange within a pod. Considerations of minimal atmospheric crop requirements will aid in the development of engineering designs and strategies for extraterrestrial plant growth structures that employ rarefied atmospheres.

  1. Designing Extraterrestrial Plant Growth Habitats with Low Pressure Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corey, Kenneth A.

    2002-01-01

    In-situ resource utilization, provision of human life support requirements by bioregenerative methods, and engineering constraints for construction and deployment of plant growth structures on the surface of Mars all suggest the need for plant growth studies at hypobaric pressures. Past work demonstrated that plants will likely tolerate and grow at pressures at or below 10 kPa. Based upon this premise, concepts are developed for the design of reduced pressure atmospheres in lightweight, inflatable structures for plant growth systems on Mars with the goals of maximizing design simplicity and the use of local resources. A modular pod design is proposed as it could be integrated with large-scale production systems. Atmospheric modification of pod clusters would be based upon a pulse and scrub system using mass flow methods for atmospheric transport. A specific modification and control scenario is developed for a lettuce pod to illustrate the dynamics of carbon dioxide and oxygen exchange within a pod. Considerations of minimal atmospheric crop requirements will aid in the development of engineering designs and strategies for extraterrestrial plant growth structures that employ rarefied atmospheres.

  2. Instant controlled pressure drop technology and ultrasound assisted extraction for sequential extraction of essential oil and antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Allaf, Tamara; Tomao, Valérie; Ruiz, Karine; Chemat, Farid

    2013-01-01

    The instant controlled pressure drop (DIC) technology enabled both the extraction of essential oil and the expansion of the matrix itself which improved solvent extraction. The sequential use of DIC and Ultrasound Assisted Extraction (UAE) triggered complementary actions materialized by supplementary effects. We visualized these combination impacts by comparing them to standard techniques: Hydrodistillation (HD) and Solvent Extraction (SE). First, the extraction of orange peel Essential Oils (EO) was achieved by HD during 4h and DIC process (after optimization) during 2 min; EO yields was 1.97 mg/g dry material (dm) with HD compared to 16.57 mg/g d m with DIC. Second, the solid residue was recovered to extract antioxidant compounds (naringin and hesperidin) by SE and UAE. Scanning electron microscope showed that after HD the recovered solid shriveled as opposite to DIC treatment which expanded the product structure. HPLC analyses showed that the best kinetics and yields of naringin and hesperidin extraction was when DIC and UAE are combined. Indeed, after 1h of extraction, DIC treated orange peels with UAE were 0.825 ± 1.6 × 10(-2)g/g of dry material (dm) for hesperidin and 6.45 × 10(-2) ± 2.3 × 10(-4)g/g d m for naringin compared to 0.64 ± 2.7 × 10(-2)g/g of dry material (dm) and 5.7 × 10(-2) ± 1.6 × 10(-3)g/g d m, respectively with SE. By combining DIC to UAE, it was possible to enhance kinetics and yields of antioxidant extraction.

  3. Experimental study of single-phase pressure drop and heat transfer in a micro-fin tube

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiao-Wei; Meng, Ji-An; Li, Zhi-Xin

    2007-11-15

    The single-phase pressure drop and heat transfer in a micro-fin tube were measured using oil and water as the working fluids. The Prandtl number varied from 3.2 to 220 and the Reynolds number ranged from 2500 to 90,000. The results show that there is a critical Reynolds number, Re{sub cr}, for heat transfer enhancement. For Re

  4. Heat transfer and pressure drop correlations of microchannel heat exchangers with S-shaped and zigzag fins for carbon dioxide cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Ngo, Tri Lam; Kato, Yasuyoshi; Nikitin, Konstantin; Ishizuka, Takao

    2007-11-15

    A new microchannel heat exchanger (MCHE) with S-shaped fins was developed using the three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (3D CFD) FLUENT code. The MCHE provided 6-7 times lower pressure drop while maintaining heat-transfer performance that was almost equivalent to that of a conventional MCHE with zigzag fins. This study was done to confirm the simulation results of thermal-hydraulic performance using a supercritical carbon dioxide loop, and to propose empirical correlations of Nusselt numbers and pressure-drop factors for a new MCHE with S-shaped fins and a conventional one with zigzag fins. This study is also intended to confirm the independence of Pr obtained in the previous study by widely varying Pr from 0.75 to 2.2. Experimental results show that the pressure-drop factor of the MCHEs with S-shaped fins is 4-5 times less than that of MCHE with zigzag fins, although Nu is 24-34% less, depending on the Re within its range. The Nusselt number correlations are expressed, respectively as Nu{sub S-shaped} {sub fins} = 0.1740 Re{sup 0.593}Pr{sup 0.430} and Nu{sub zigzag} {sub fins} = 0.1696 Re{sup 0.629}Pr{sup 0.317} for the MCHE with S-shaped and zigzag fins, and their pressure-drop factors are given as f{sub S-shaped} {sub fins} = 0.4545 Re{sup -0.340} and f{sub zigzag} {sub fins} = 0.1924 Re{sup -0.091}. The Nu correlation of the MCHE with S-shaped fins reproduces the experimental data of overall heat transfer coefficients with a standard deviation (1 sigma) of {+-}2.3%, although it is {+-}3.0% for the MCHE with zigzag fins. The calculated pressure drops obtained from pressure-drop factor correlations agree with the experimental data within a standard deviation of {+-}16.6% and {+-}13.5% for the MCHEs with S-shaped and zigzag fins, respectively. (author)

  5. Measurement and modelling of forced convective heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop of Al2O3- and SiO2-water nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julia, J. E.; Hernández, L.; Martínez-Cuenca, R.; Hibiki, T.; Mondragón, R.; Segarra, C.; Jarque, J. C.

    2012-11-01

    Forced convective heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop of SiO2- and Al2O3-water nanofluids were characterized. The experimental facility was composed of thermal-hydraulic loop with a tank with an immersed heater, a centrifugal pump, a bypass with a globe valve, an electromagnetic flow-meter, a 18 kW in-line pre-heater, a test section with band heaters, a differential pressure transducer and a heat exchanger. The test section consists of a 1000 mm long aluminium pipe with an inner diameter of 31.2 mm. Eighteen band heaters were placed all along the test section in order to provide a uniform heat flux. Heat transfer coefficient was calculated measuring fluid temperature using immersed thermocouples (Pt100) placed at both ends of the test section and surface thermocouples in 10 axial locations along the test section (Pt1000). The measurements have been performed for different nanoparticles (Al2O3 and SiO2 with primary size of 11 nm and 12 nm, respectively), volume concentrations (1% v., 5% v.), and flow rates (3 103Re<105). Maximum heat transfer coefficient enhancement (300%) and pressure drop penalty (1000%) is obtained with 5% v. SiO2 nanofluid. Existing correlations can predict, at least in a first approximation, the heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop of nanofluids if thermal conductivity, viscosity and specific heat were properly modelled.

  6. Sliding mode control application in ABWR plant pressure regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhengyu; Edwards, Robert M.

    2002-07-01

    A sliding mode controller is designed for an ABWR nuclear power plant turbine throttle pressure regulation. To avoid chattering problem, which is common to conventional sliding mode controllers, and estimation of uncertainties and disturbances, the recursive-form sliding mode control algorithm is developed. To apply the sliding mode control technique, the original plant's 11.-order dynamics model is first transformed to a canonical form differential equation of a relative order of 2 for turbine throttle pressure's dynamics. Simulation results show that the design objectives are achieved and the resulting controller is superior to the existing PI controller in many aspects, including settling time, overshoot/undershoot in response to setpoint step input and fluctuation amplitude in the presence of external disturbances. (authors)

  7. A comparison of the heat transfer and pressure drop performance of R-134a-lubricant mixtures in different diameter smooth tubes and micro-fin tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Eckels, S.J.; Doerr, T.M.; Pate, M.B.

    1998-10-01

    The average heat transfer coefficients and pressure drops during evaporation and condensation are reported for mixtures of R-134a and an ester lubricant in tubes of 12.7 mm (1/2 in.) outer diameter. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the performance of the R-134a-lubricant mixtures in these tubes and determine the performance benefits of the micro-fin tube. The performance benefits of the tubes with 12.7 mm (1/2 in.) outer diameter are compared to those of smaller tubes with 9.52 mm (3/8 in.) outer diameter. The lubricant used was a 169 SUS penta erythritol ester mixed-acid lubricant. The lubricant concentration was varied from 0--5.1% in the mixture. The average heat transfer coefficients in the 12.7 mm (1/2 in.) micro-fin tube were 50--150% higher than those for the 12.7 mm (1/2 in.) smooth tube, while pressure drops in the micro-fin tube were 5% to 50% higher than in the smooth tube. The addition of lubricant degraded the average heat transfer coefficients in all cases except during evaporation at low lubricant concentrations. Pressure drops were always increased with the addition of lubricant. The experimental results also indicate that tube diameter has some effect on the performance benefits of the micro-fin tube over that of the smooth tube.

  8. A critical review of forced convection heat transfer and pressure drop of Al2O3, TiO2 and CuO nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurana, Deepak; Choudhary, Rajesh; Subudhi, Sudhakar

    2017-01-01

    Nanofluid is the colloidal suspension of nanosized solid particles like metals or metal oxides in some conventional fluids like water and ethylene glycol. Due to its unique characteristics of enhanced heat transfer compared to conventional fluid, it has attracted the attention of research community. The forced convection heat transfer of nanofluid is investigated by numerous researchers. This paper critically reviews the papers published on experimental studies of forced convection heat transfer and pressure drop of Al2O3, TiO2 and CuO based nanofluids dispersed in water, ethylene glycol and water-ethylene glycol mixture. Most of the researchers have shown a little rise in pressure drop with the use of nanofluids in plain tube. Literature has reported that the pumping power is appreciably high, only at very high particle concentration i.e. more than 5 %. As nanofluids are able to enhance the heat transfer at low particle concentrations so most of the researchers have used less than 3 % volume concentration in their studies. Almost no disagreement is observed on pressure drop results of different researchers. But there is not a common agreement in magnitude and mechanism of heat transfer enhancement. Few studies have shown an anomalous enhancement in heat transfer even at low particle concentration. On the contrary, some researchers have shown little heat transfer enhancement at the same particle concentration. A large variation (2-3 times) in Nusselt number was observed for few studies under similar conditions.

  9. Heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of a plate heat exchanger using a propylene-glycol/water mixture as the working fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Talik, A.C.; Fletcher, L.S.; Anand, N.K.; Swanson, L.W.

    1995-12-31

    Plate heat exchangers are becoming increasingly important because of their potential applications in industrial processes, especially in terms of their thermal performance and their limited pressure drop. An experimental investigation to acquire both heat-transfer and pressure-drop data for a plate heat exchanger was conducted in order to respond to these interests. A propylene-glycol/water mixture was used as the working fluid in order to provide lower Reynolds numbers than those provided by water at similar test conditions. The plate heat exchanger was composed of 31 plates, each with a chevron angle of 30 degrees. The isothermal pressure drop data were taken in the fully laminar flow regime for Reynolds numbers from 10 to 80. The heat transfer data were taken in the fully laminar flow regime for Reynolds numbers of 80 to 720 with heat transfer rates of 1.1 {times} 10{sup 5} to 6.5 {times} 10{sup 5} W. The experimental data for the friction factor and Nusselt number were correlated using a standard power-law function. Other published heat-transfer and friction factor correlations for plate heat exchangers with similar plates at selected conditions are compared to the data.

  10. Effect of airstream velocity on mean drop diameters of water sprays produced by pressure and air atomizing nozzles. [for combustion studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning radiometer was used to determine the effect of airstream velocity on the mean drop diameter of water sprays produced by pressure atomizing and air atomizing fuel nozzles used in previous combustion studies. Increasing airstream velocity from 23 to 53.4 meters per second reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 50 percent with both types of fuel nozzles. The use of a sonic cup attached to the tip of an air assist nozzle reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 40 percent. Test conditions included airstream velocities of 23 to 53.4 meters per second at 293 K and atmospheric pressure.

  11. Demonstration plant for pressurized gasification of biomass feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Trenka, A.R. ); Kinoshita, C.M.; Takahashi, P.K.; Phillips, V.D. ); Caldwell, C. Co., Pasadena, CA ); Kwok, R. ); Onischak, M.; Babu, S.P. (Institute of Gas Technology

    1991-01-01

    A project to design, construct, and operate a pressurized biomass gasification plant in Hawaii will begin in 1991. Negotiations are underway with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) which is co-funding the project with the state of Hawaii and industry. The gasifier is a scale-up of the pressurized fluidized-bed RENUGAS process developed by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT). The project team consists of Pacific International Center for High Technology Research (PICHTR), Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) of the University of Hawaii, Hawaiian Commercial and Sugar Company (HC S), The Ralph M. Parsons Company, and IGT. The gasifier will be designed for 70 tons per day of sugarcane fiber (bagasse) and will be located at the Paia factory of HC S on the island of Maui. In addition to bagasse, other feedstocks such as wood, biomass wastes, and refuse-derived-fuel may be evaluated. The demonstration plant will ultimately supply part of the process energy needs for the sugar factory. The operation and testing phase will provide process information for both air- and oxygen-blown gasification, and at both low and high pressures. The process will be evaluated for both fuel gas and synthesis gas production, and for electrical power production with advanced power generation schemes. 6 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Determination of molybdenum in plants by vortex-assisted emulsification solidified floating organic drop microextraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oviedo, Jenny A.; Fialho, Lucimar L.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.

    2013-08-01

    A fast and sensitive procedure for extraction and preconcentration of molybdenum in plant samples based on solidified floating organic drop microextraction combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry and discrete nebulization was developed. 8-Hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) was used as complexing agent. The experimental conditions established were: 0.5% m v- 1 of 8-HQ, 60 μL of 1-undecanol as the extractant phase, 2 min vortex extraction time, centrifugation for 2 min at 2000 rpm, 10 min into an ice bath and discrete nebulization by introducing 200 μL of solution. The calibration curve was linear from 0.02 to 4.0 mg L- 1 with a limit of detection of 4.9 μg L- 1 and an enhancement factor of 67. The relative standard deviations for ten replicate measurements of 0.05 and 1.0 mg L- 1 Mo were 6.0 and 14.5%, respectively. The developed procedure was applied for determining molybdenum in corn samples and accuracy was proved using certified reference materials.

  13. Fiber optic pressure sensors for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemian, H.M.; Black, C.L.

    1995-04-01

    In the last few years, the nuclear industry has experienced some problems with the performance of pressure transmitters and has been interested in new sensors based on new technologies. Fiber optic pressure sensors offer the potential to improve on or overcome some of the limitations of existing pressure sensors. Up to now, research has been motivated towards development and refinement of fiber optic sensing technology. In most applications, reliability studies and failure mode analyses remain to be exhaustively conducted. Fiber optic sensors have currently penetrated certain cutting edge markets where they possess necessary inherent advantages over other existing technologies. In these markets (e.g. biomedical, aerospace, automotive, and petrochemical), fiber optic sensors are able to perform measurements for which no alternate sensor previously existed. Fiber optic sensing technology has not yet been fully adopted into the mainstream sensing market. This may be due to not only the current premium price of fiber optic sensors, but also the lack of characterization of their possible performance disadvantages. In other words, in conservative industries, the known disadvantages of conventional sensors are sometimes preferable to unknown or not fully characterized (but potentially fewer and less critical) disadvantages of fiber optic sensors. A six-month feasibility study has been initiated under the auspices of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assess the performance and reliability of existing fiber optic pressure sensors for use in nuclear power plants. This assessment will include establishment of the state of the art in fiber optic pressure sensing, characterization of the reliability of fiber optic pressure sensors, and determination of the strengths and limitations of these sensors for nuclear safety-related services.

  14. Flow pattern, pressure drop and void fraction of two-phase gas-liquid flow in an inclined narrow annular channel

    SciTech Connect

    Wongwises, Somchai; Pipathattakul, Manop

    2006-03-01

    Two-phase flow pattern, pressure drop and void fraction in horizontal and inclined upward air-water two-phase flow in a mini-gap annular channel are experimentally studied. A concentric annular test section at the length of 880mm with an outer diameter of 12.5mm and inner diameter of 8mm is used in the experiments. The flow phenomena, which are plug flow, slug flow, annular flow, annular/slug flow, bubbly/plug flow, bubbly/slug-plug flow, churn flow, dispersed bubbly flow and slug/bubbly flow, are observed and recorded by high-speed camera. A slug flow pattern is found only in the horizontal channel while slug/bubbly flow patterns are observed only in inclined channels. When the inclination angle is increased, the onset of transition from the plug flow region to the slug flow region (for the horizontal channel) and from the plug flow region to slug/bubbly flow region (for inclined channels) shift to a lower value of superficial air velocity. Small shifts are found for the transition line between the dispersed bubbly flow and the bubbly/plug flow, the bubbly/plug flow and the bubbly/slug-plug flow, and the bubbly/plug flow and the plug flow. The rest of the transition lines shift to a higher value of superficial air velocity. Considering the effect of flow pattern on the pressure drop in the horizontal tube at low liquid velocity, the occurrence of slug flow stops the rise of pressure drop for a short while, before rising again after the air velocity has increased. However, the pressure does not rise abruptly in the tubes with {theta}=30{sup o} and 60{sup o} when the slug/bubbly flow occurs. At low gas and liquid velocity, the pressure drop increases, when the inclination angles changes from horizontal to 30{sup o} and 60{sup o}. Void fraction increases with increasing gas velocity and decreases with increasing liquid velocity. After increasing the inclination angle from horizontal to {theta}=30{sup o} and 60{sup o}, the void fraction appears to be similar, with a

  15. Ultra high pressure liquid chromatography for crude plant extract profiling.

    PubMed

    Eugster, Philippe J; Guillarme, Davy; Rudaz, Serge; Veuthey, Jean-Luc; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Wolfender, Jean-Luc

    2011-01-01

    Ultra high pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) systems operating at very high pressures and using sub-2 microm packing columns have allowed a remarkable decrease in analysis time and increase in peak capacity, sensitivity, and reproducibility compared to conventional HPLC. This technology has rapidly been widely accepted by the analytical community and is being gradually applied to various fields of plant analysis such as QC, profiling and fingerprinting, dereplication, and metabolomics. For many applications, an important improvement of the overall performances has been reported. In this review, the basic principles of UHPLC are summarized, and practical information on the type of columns used and phase chemistry available is provided. An overview of the latest applications to natural product analysis in complex mixtures is given, and the potential and limitations as well as some new trends in the development of UHPLC are discussed.

  16. Influence of Atmospheric Pressure Torch Plasma Irradiation on Plant Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyoshi, Yusuke; Hayashi, Nobuya; Kitazaki, Satoshi; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2011-10-01

    Growth stimulation characteristics of plants seeds are investigated by an atmospheric discharge irradiation into plasma seeds. Atmospheric pressure plasma torch is consisted of alumina ceramics tube and the steel mesh electrodes wind inside and outside of the tube. When AC high voltage (8 kHz) is applied to the electrode gap, the barrier discharge plasma is produced inside the alumina ceramics tube. The barrier discharge plasma is blown outside with the gas flow in ceramics tube. Radish sprouts seeds locate at 1 cm from the torch edge. The growth stimulation was observed in the length of a stem and a root after the plasma irradiation. The stem length increases approximately 2.8 times at the cultivation time of 24 h. And the growth stimulation effect is found to be maintained for 40 h, after sowing seeds. The mechanism of the growth stimulation would be the redox reaction inside plant cells induced by oxygen radicals.

  17. Electric utility second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion plants

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A. ); Bonk, D. )

    1992-01-01

    In the search for a more efficient, less costly, and more environmentally responsible method for generating electrical power from coal, research and development has turned to advanced pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) and coal gasification technologies. A logical extension of this work is the second-generation PFBC plant, which incorporates key components of each of these technologies. In this new type of plant, coal is devolatilized/carbonized before it is injected into the PFB combustor bed, and the low-Btu fuel gas produced by this process is burned in a gas turbine topping combustor. By integrating coal carbonization with PFB coal/char combustion, gas turbine inlet temperatures higher than 1149{degrees}C (2100{degrees}F) can be achieved. The carbonizer, PFB combustor, and particulate-capturing hot gas cleanup systems operate at 871{degrees}C (1600{degrees}F), permitting sulfur capture by lime-based sorbents and minimizing the release of coal contaminants to the gases. This paper presents the performance and economics of this new type of plant and provides a brief overview of the pilot plant test programs being conducted to support its development.

  18. Study on measurement of the coal powder concentration in pneumatic pipes of a boiler with relationship between air velocity and pressure drop

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, W.; Shen, F.; Lin, W.; Chen, L.; Zhang, D.; Wang, Q.; Ke, J.; Quan, W.

    1999-07-01

    According to the theoretical relationship between air velocity and pressure drop in different solid-air mass flow in vertical pipes with the condition of upward air-solid flowing, the experimental research on measuring the coal powder concentration is directed against the pneumatic pipes of a boiler's combustion system in the energy industry. Through analyzing the experimental results, a mathematical model for measuring the coal powder concentration in pneumatic pipes is obtained. Then, the error analysis is done, and the method of on-line measurement and its function are provided.

  19. Noninvasive estimation of transmitral pressure drop across the normal mitral valve in humans: importance of convective and inertial forces during left ventricular filling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Vandervoort, P. M.; Greenberg, N. L.; Smedira, N. G.; McCarthy, P. M.; Garcia, M. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We hypothesized that color M-mode (CMM) images could be used to solve the Euler equation, yielding regional pressure gradients along the scanline, which could then be integrated to yield the unsteady Bernoulli equation and estimate noninvasively both the convective and inertial components of the transmitral pressure difference. BACKGROUND: Pulsed and continuous wave Doppler velocity measurements are routinely used clinically to assess severity of stenotic and regurgitant valves. However, only the convective component of the pressure gradient is measured, thereby neglecting the contribution of inertial forces, which may be significant, particularly for nonstenotic valves. Color M-mode provides a spatiotemporal representation of flow across the mitral valve. METHODS: In eight patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting, high-fidelity left atrial and ventricular pressure measurements were obtained synchronously with transmitral CMM digital recordings. The instantaneous diastolic transmitral pressure difference was computed from the M-mode spatiotemporal velocity distribution using the unsteady flow form of the Bernoulli equation and was compared to the catheter measurements. RESULTS: From 56 beats in 16 hemodynamic stages, inclusion of the inertial term ([deltapI]max = 1.78+/-1.30 mm Hg) in the noninvasive pressure difference calculation significantly increased the temporal correlation with catheter-based measurement (r = 0.35+/-0.24 vs. 0.81+/-0.15, p< 0.0001). It also allowed an accurate approximation of the peak pressure difference ([deltapc+I]max = 0.95 [delta(p)cathh]max + 0.24, r = 0.96, p<0.001, error = 0.08+/-0.54 mm Hg). CONCLUSIONS: Inertial forces are significant components of the maximal pressure drop across the normal mitral valve. These can be accurately estimated noninvasively using CMM recordings of transmitral flow, which should improve the understanding of diastolic filling and function of the heart.

  20. Evaluation of Capiox FX05 oxygenator with an integrated arterial filter on trapping gaseous microemboli and pressure drop with open and closed purge line.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Feng; Peng, Sophia; Kunselman, Allen; Ündar, Akif

    2010-11-01

    Gaseous microemboli (GME) remain a challenge for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) because there is a positive correlation between microemboli exposure during CPB and postoperative neurological injury. Thus, minimizing the number of GME delivered to pediatric patients undergoing CPB procedures would lead to better clinical outcomes. In this study, we used a simulated CPB model to evaluate the effectiveness of capturing GME and the degree of membrane pressure drop for a new membrane oxygenator, Capiox Baby FX05 (Terumo Corporation,Tokyo, Japan), which has an integrated arterial filter with open and closed purge line.We used identical components in this study as our clinical CPB circuit. Three emboli detection and classification quantifier transducers were placed at prepump, preoxygenator, and postoxygenator sites in the circuit.Two flow probes as well as three pressure transducers were placed upstream and downstream of the oxygenator. The system was primed with human blood titrated to 30% hematocrit with Lactated Ringer’s solution.A bolus of air (1 mL) was injected in the prepump site under nonpulsatile perfusion mode at three flow rates (500,750, and 1000 mL/min) and with the purge line either open or closed. Six trials were performed for each unique set-up for a total of 36 trials.All trials were conducted at 35°C. The circuit pressure was kept constant at 100 mm Hg. Both the size and quantity of microemboli detected at postoxygenator site were recorded for 5 min postair injection. It was found that total counts of GME were significantly reduced with the purge line open when compared to keeping the purge line closed (P < 0.0001 at 1000 mL/min). At all flow rates, most of the GME were under 20 microns in size. In terms of microemboli greater than 40 microns, the counts were significantly higher with the purge line closed compared to keeping the purge line open at flow rates of 750 mL/min and 1000 mL/min (P < 0.01). At all flow rates,there is a tiny difference of less

  1. Flow pattern, void fraction and pressure drop of two-phase air-water flow in a horizontal circular micro-channel

    SciTech Connect

    Saisorn, Sira; Wongwises, Somchai

    2008-01-15

    Adiabatic two-phase air-water flow characteristics, including the two-phase flow pattern as well as the void fraction and two-phase frictional pressure drop, in a circular micro-channel are experimentally studied. A fused silica channel, 320 mm long, with an inside diameter of 0.53 mm is used as the test section. The test runs are done at superficial velocity of gas and liquid ranging between 0.37-16 and 0.005-3.04 m/s, respectively. The flow pattern map is developed from the observed flow patterns i.e. slug flow, throat-annular flow, churn flow and annular-rivulet flow. The flow pattern map is compared with those of other researchers obtained from different working fluids. The present single-phase experiments also show that there are no significant differences in the data from the use of air or nitrogen gas, and water or de-ionized water. The void fraction data obtained by image analysis tends to correspond with the homogeneous flow model. The two-phase pressure drops are also used to calculate the frictional multiplier. The multiplier data show a dependence on flow pattern as well as mass flux. A new correlation of two-phase frictional multiplier is also proposed for practical application. (author)

  2. High Pressure, Transport Properties of Fluids: Theory and Data from Levitated Fluid-Drops at Combustion-Relevant Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, J.; Ohaska, K.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to derive a set of consistent mixing rules for calculating diffusivities and thermal diffusion factors over a thermodynamic regime encompassing the subcritical and supercritical ranges. These should serve for modeling purposes, and therefore for accurate simulations of high pressure phenomena such as fluid disintegration, turbulent flows and sprays. A particular consequence of this work will be the determination of effective Lewis numbers for supercritical conditions, thus enabling the examination of the relative importance of heat and mass transfer at supercritical pressures.

  3. Drop dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    The drop dynamics module is a Spacelab-compatible acoustic positioning and control system for conducting drop dynamics experiments in space. It consists basically of a chamber, a drop injector system, an acoustic positioning system, and a data collection system. The principal means of collecting data is by a cinegraphic camera. The drop is positioned in the center of the chamber by forces created by standing acoustic waves generated in the nearly cubical chamber (about 12 cm on a side). The drop can be spun or oscillated up to fission by varying the phse and amplitude of the acoustic waves. The system is designed to perform its experiments unattended, except for start-up and shutdown events and other unique events that require the attention of the Spacelab payload specialist.

  4. Effect of oscillation frequency on wall shear stress and pressure drop in a rectangular channel for heat transfer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blythman, R.; Persoons, T.; Jeffers, N.; Murray, DB

    2016-09-01

    The exploitation of flow unsteadiness in microchannels is a potentially useful technique for enhancing cooling of future photonics systems. Pulsation is thought to alter the thickness of the hydrodynamic and thermal boundary layers, and hence affect the overall thermal resistance of the heat sink. While the mechanical and thermal problems are inextricably linked, it is useful to decouple the parameters to better understand the mechanisms underlying any heat transfer enhancement. The current work characterises the behaviour of the wall shear stress and pressure gradient with frequency, using experimental particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements and the analytical solution for oscillatory flow in a two-dimensional rectangular channel. Both wall shear stress and pressure gradient are augmented with frequency compared to steady flow, though the pressure gradient increases more significantly as a result of growing inertial losses. The three distinct regimes of unsteadiness are shown to display unique relationships between the parameters pertinent to heat transfer and should therefore be considered independently with respect to thermal enhancement capability. To this end, the regime boundaries are estimated at Womersley number Wo = 1.6 and 28.4 in a rectangular channel, based on the contribution of viscous and inertial losses.

  5. Air atmospheric pressure plasma jet pretreatment for drop-wise loading of dexamethasone on hydroxyapatite scaffold for increase of osteoblast attachment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Kwon, Jae-Sung; Kim, Yong Hee; Choi, Eun Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2014-10-01

    Periodontal disease affects alveolar bone resorption around the involved teeth. To gain bone height, bone graft materials have been widely used with drug carriers. Application of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) treatment is widely studied due to its ability to change surface characteristics without topographical change. The aim of this study is to identify whether the air APPJ (AAPPJ) treatment before drop-wise loading performance could change loaded amount of dexamethasone, and induce increase of cell attachment and proliferation. The results suggested that AAPPJ treatment decreased the contact angle down to about 13 degrees, which increased gradually but significantly lowered at least 4 days compared to no-treated group. After AAPPJ treatment, hydrocarbon was removed with change of zeta potential into positive charge. However, the AAPPJ treatment did not change the quantity or releasing profile of dexamethasone (p > 0.05). Confocal analysis combined with DNA proliferation analysis showed increase of osteoblast attachment and proliferation. Hence, AAPPJ could be a useful pretreatment method before drop-wise loading on HA scaffold with dexamethasone for increase of osteoblast attachment.

  6. Smooth- and enhanced-tube heat transfer and pressure drop : Part I. Effect of Prandtl number with air, water, and glycol/water mixtures.

    SciTech Connect

    Obot, N. T.; Das, L.; Rabas, T. J.

    2000-11-14

    An extensive experimental investigation was carried out to determine the pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics in laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow through one smooth tube and twenty-three enhanced tubes. The working fluids for the experiments were air, water, ethylene glycol, and ethylene glycol/water mixtures; Prandtl numbers (Pr) ranged from 0.7 to 125.3. The smooth-tube experiments were carried out with Pr values of 0.7, 6.8, 24.8, 39.1, and 125.3; Pr values of 0.7, 6.8, and 24.8 were tested with enhanced tubes. Reynolds number (Re) range (based on the maximum internal diameter of a tube) was 200 to 55,000, depending on Prandtl number and tube geometry. The results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  7. Investigations of Pressure Drops during Piston Flow Pneumatic Conveying of Ice Cubes and Applying It to High Density Conveying of Cold Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Akiyoshi; Yanadori, Michio; Tsubota, Yuji

    To overcome the defect of conventional chilled water systems, we propose pneumatic conveying of ice cubes. We conducted experiments to investigate the pressure drops during pneumatic conveying of ice cubes in a prototype conveyance pipe, and obtained the following results : (1)The mean velocity of the ice cubes is proportional to the mean velocity of the conveying air flow regardless of balls in the pipe or the volume fraction of the ice cubes. (2) Difference in the velocity of the air flow cause variations in the density of ice cubes. If we convey ice cubes with balls, it is possible to convey a higher density. (3) The volume fraction of this method is about 10 times that of the previous experimental results. (4)The pump power of this proposed conveyance system is reduced to about 0.71 to 0.59 times that of the conventional chilled water systems.

  8. Heat transfer and pressure drop in a compact pin-fin heat exchanger with pin orientation at 18 deg to the flow direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    The heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of a novel, compact heat exchanger in helium gas were measured at 3.5 MPa and Reynolds numbers of 450 to 12,000. The pin-fin specimen consisted of pins, 0.51 mm high and spaced 2.03 mm on centers, spanning a channel through which the helium flows; the angle of the row of pins to the flow direction was 18 deg. The specimen was radiatively heated on the top side at heat fluxes up to 74 W/sq cm and insulated on the back side. Correlations were developed for the friction factor and Nusselt number. The Nusselt number compares favorably to those of past studies of staggered pin-fins, when the measured temperatures are extrapolated to the temperature of the wall-fluid interface.

  9. Overall heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop in a typical tubular exchanger employing alumina nano-fluid as the tube side hot fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabeel, A. E.; Abdelgaied, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    Nano-fluids are used to improve the heat transfer rates in heat exchangers, especially; the shell-and-tube heat exchanger that is considered one of the most important types of heat exchangers. In the present study, an experimental loop is constructed to study the thermal characteristics of the shell-and-tube heat exchanger; at different concentrations of Al2O3 nonmetallic particles (0.0, 2, 4, and 6 %). This material concentrations is by volume concentrations in pure water as a base fluid. The effects of nano-fluid concentrations on the performance of shell and tube heat exchanger have been conducted based on the overall heat transfer coefficient, the friction factor, the pressure drop in tube side, and the entropy generation rate. The experimental results show that; the highest heat transfer coefficient is obtained at a nano-fluid concentration of 4 % of the shell side. In shell side the maximum percentage increase in the overall heat transfer coefficient has reached 29.8 % for a nano-fluid concentration of 4 %, relative to the case of the base fluid (water) at the same tube side Reynolds number. However; in the tube side the maximum relative increase in pressure drop has recorded the values of 12, 28 and 48 % for a nano-material concentration of 2, 4 and 6 %, respectively, relative to the case without nano-fluid, at an approximate value of 56,000 for Reynolds number. The entropy generation reduces with increasing the nonmetallic particle volume fraction of the same flow rates. For increase the nonmetallic particle volume fraction from 0.0 to 6 % the rate of entropy generation decrease by 10 %.

  10. Experimental study of the effects of bleed holes on heat transfer and pressure drop in trapezoidal passages with tapered turbulators

    SciTech Connect

    Taslim, M.E.; Li, T.; Spring, S.D.

    1995-04-01

    Trailing edge cooling cavities in modern gas turbine blades often have trapezoidal cross-sectional areas of relatively low aspect ratio. To enhance cooling effectiveness in these passages, they are roughened with tapered turbulators. Furthermore, to provide additional cooling for the trailing edge, the cooling air may be ejected through trailing edge slots as it moves radially along the cooling passage. The tapered turbulators, in conjunction with the presence of these slots along the smaller base of the trapezoidal cavity, create both spanwise and longitudinal variations in heat transfer coefficient on the turbulated walls. Moreover, the continuous variation of cooling air velocity along these passages causes a continuous change in static pressure, which also requires investigation. Liquid crystals are used in this experimental investigation to study the effects of tapered turbulators on heat transfer coefficients in trailing edge passages with and without bleed holes. The tapered turbulators are configured on two opposite walls of the trapezoidal test section in a staggered arrangement with an angle of attack to the mainstream flow, {alpha}, of 90 deg. Nine different test geometries consisting of two passage aspect ratios, AR, were tested over a range of turbulator aspect ratios, AR{sub t}, blockage ratios, e{sub max}/D{sub h}, pitch-to-height ratios, S/e{sub max}, and Reynolds numbers. Channel pressure losses were also measured and both heat transfer and friction factor results for several geometries are compared. It is concluded that (a) there exists a large spanwise variation in heat transfer coefficient in test sections with no bleed holes, (b) adding bleed holes to the smaller base of the trapezoidal cavity gives a spanwise velocity component to the mainstream flow and reduces this variation, and (c) Nusselt numbers measured in the test sections with bleed holes correlate well with local Reynolds number.

  11. Flow rate/pressure drop data gathered from testing a sample of the Space Shuttle Strain Isolation Pad (SIP): Effects of ambient pressure combined with tension and compression conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springfield, R. D.; Lawing, P. L.

    1983-01-01

    Tests were conducted on a sample of strain isolation pad (SIP) typical of that used in the shuttle orbiter thermal protection system to determine the characteristics of SIP internal flow. Data obtained were pressure drop as a function of flow rate for a range of ambient pressures representing various points along the Shuttle trajectory and for stretched and compressed conditions of the SIP. Flow was in the direction of the weave parallel to most of the fibers. The data are plotted in several standard engineering formats in order to be of maximum utility to the user. In addition to providing support to the Space Shuttle Program, these data are a source of experimental information on flow through fiberous (rather than the more usual sand bed type) porous media.

  12. Experimental investigation of heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of water and glycol-water mixture in multi-port serpentine microchannel slab heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Md Mesbah-ul Ghani

    Microchannels have several advantages over traditional large tubes. Heat transfer using microchannels recently have attracted significant research and industrial design interests. Open literatures leave with question on the applicability of classical macroscale theory in microchannels. Better understanding of heat transfer in various microchannel geometries and building experimental database are continuously urged. The purpose of this study is to contribute the findings and data to this emerging area through carefully designed and well controlled experimental works. The commercially important glycol-water mixture heat transfer fluid and multiport slab serpentine heat exchangers are encountered in heating and cooling areas, e.g. in automotive, aircraft, and HVAC industries. For a given heat duty, the large diameter tubes experience turbulent flow whereas the narrow channels face laminar flow and often developing flow. Study of low Reynolds number developing glycol-water mixture laminar flow in serpentine microchannel heat exchanger with parallel multi-port slab is not available in the open literature. Current research therefore experimentally investigates glycol-water mixture and water in simultaneously developing laminar flows. Three multiport microchannel heat exchangers; straight and serpentine slabs, are used for each fluid. Friction factors of glycol-water mixture and water flows in straight slabs are higher than conventional fully developed laminar flow. If a comprehensive pressure balance is introduced, the results are well compared with conventional Poiseuille theory. Similar results are found in serpentine slab. The pressure drop for the straight core is the highest, manifolds are the intermediate, and serpentine is the least; which are beneficial for heat exchangers. The heat transfer results in serpentine slab for glycol-water mixture and water are higher and could not be compared with conventional fully developed and developing flow correlations. New

  13. [Effect of plant-associated methanolic bacteria on methane and methanol concentration dynamics in atmosphere of pressurized chamber].

    PubMed

    Berkovich, Iu A; Doronina, N V; Fedorov, D N; Mukhamedieva, L N; Mikos, K N; Krivobock, N M; Smolianin, V G; Smolianina, S O; Shanturin, N A

    2010-01-01

    Stability of Chinese cabbage crop colonization by methanolic bacteria Methylovorus mays, Methylomonas methanica and Methylosinus trichosporium inoculated using a space-applicable method was evaluated. Besides, trends of methane and methanol concentrations in the pressurized chamber with inoculated and uninoculated crops were calculated. Methylovorus mays and Methylosinus trichosporium were shown to establish more stable colonization as compared to Methylomonas methanica. Also, stable association of methanolic bacteria with plants reduced airborne methanol 75% faster owing to its uptake by bacteria. Therefore, inoculation of these microorganisms can be viewed as a promising method of controlling volatile pollutants in space vehicle atmosphere. Methane drop after 6-hour exposure to inoculated control and test crops was not significant.

  14. A novel target-type low pressure drop bidirectional optoelectronic air flow sensor for infant artificial ventilation: Measurement principle and static calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano; Silvestri, Sergio

    2011-02-01

    An optoelectronic target-type volumetric air flow-rate transducer for bidirectional measurements is presented. The sensor is composed of a T-shaped target and two nominally identical LED-photodiode couples which are operated in differential mode. The sensitive surfaces of the photodiodes are differentially shadowed by the deflection of the target, which in turn depends on the gas flow-rate. The principle of operation is described in mathematical terms and the design parameters have been optimized in order to obtain the highest sensitivity along with minimal pressure drop and reduced dimensions. The sensor is placed in a 20 mm diameter hose and was tested with air flow-rate in the typical temperature range of mechanical ventilation between 20 and 40 °C. The theoretical model was validated through experiments carried out in the volumetric flow range from -7.0 to +7.0 l min-1. The nonlinear behavior allows sensitivities equal to 0.6 V l-1 min for flow rates ranging from -2.0 to +2.0 l min-1, equal to 2.0 V l-1 min for flow rates ranging from -3.0 to -2.0 l min-1 and from +2.0 to +3.0 l min-1, up to 5.7 V l-1 min at higher flow rates ranging from -7.0 to -3.0 l min-1 and from +3.0 to +7.0 l min-1. The linear range extends from 3.0 to 7.0 l min-1 with constant sensitivity equal to 5.7 V l-1 min. The sensor is able to detect a flow-rate equal to 1.0 l min-1 with a sensitivity of about 400 mV l-1 min. The differential nature of the output minimizes the influence of the LEDs' power supply variations and allows to obtain a repeatability in the order of 3% of full scale output. The small pressure drop produced by the sensor placed in-line the fluid stream, of about 2.4 Pa at 7 l min-1, corresponds to a negligible fluid dynamic resistance lower than 0.34 Pa l-1 min.

  15. A novel target-type low pressure drop bidirectional optoelectronic air flow sensor for infant artificial ventilation: Measurement principle and static calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano; Silvestri, Sergio

    2011-02-15

    An optoelectronic target-type volumetric air flow-rate transducer for bidirectional measurements is presented. The sensor is composed of a T-shaped target and two nominally identical LED-photodiode couples which are operated in differential mode. The sensitive surfaces of the photodiodes are differentially shadowed by the deflection of the target, which in turn depends on the gas flow-rate. The principle of operation is described in mathematical terms and the design parameters have been optimized in order to obtain the highest sensitivity along with minimal pressure drop and reduced dimensions. The sensor is placed in a 20 mm diameter hose and was tested with air flow-rate in the typical temperature range of mechanical ventilation between 20 and 40 deg. C. The theoretical model was validated through experiments carried out in the volumetric flow range from -7.0 to +7.0 l min{sup -1}. The nonlinear behavior allows sensitivities equal to 0.6 V l{sup -1} min for flow rates ranging from -2.0 to +2.0 l min{sup -1}, equal to 2.0 V l{sup -1} min for flow rates ranging from -3.0 to -2.0 l min{sup -1} and from +2.0 to +3.0 l min{sup -1}, up to 5.7 V l{sup -1} min at higher flow rates ranging from -7.0 to -3.0 l min{sup -1} and from +3.0 to +7.0 l min{sup -1}. The linear range extends from 3.0 to 7.0 l min{sup -1} with constant sensitivity equal to 5.7 V l{sup -1} min. The sensor is able to detect a flow-rate equal to 1.0 l min{sup -1} with a sensitivity of about 400 mV l{sup -1} min. The differential nature of the output minimizes the influence of the LEDs' power supply variations and allows to obtain a repeatability in the order of 3% of full scale output. The small pressure drop produced by the sensor placed in-line the fluid stream, of about 2.4 Pa at 7 l min{sup -1}, corresponds to a negligible fluid dynamic resistance lower than 0.34 Pa l{sup -1} min.

  16. A novel target-type low pressure drop bidirectional optoelectronic air flow sensor for infant artificial ventilation: measurement principle and static calibration.

    PubMed

    Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano; Silvestri, Sergio

    2011-02-01

    An optoelectronic target-type volumetric air flow-rate transducer for bidirectional measurements is presented. The sensor is composed of a T-shaped target and two nominally identical LED-photodiode couples which are operated in differential mode. The sensitive surfaces of the photodiodes are differentially shadowed by the deflection of the target, which in turn depends on the gas flow-rate. The principle of operation is described in mathematical terms and the design parameters have been optimized in order to obtain the highest sensitivity along with minimal pressure drop and reduced dimensions. The sensor is placed in a 20 mm diameter hose and was tested with air flow-rate in the typical temperature range of mechanical ventilation between 20 and 40 °C. The theoretical model was validated through experiments carried out in the volumetric flow range from -7.0 to +7.0 l min(-1). The nonlinear behavior allows sensitivities equal to 0.6 V l(-1) min for flow rates ranging from -2.0 to +2.0 l min(-1), equal to 2.0 V l(-1) min for flow rates ranging from -3.0 to -2.0 l min(-1) and from +2.0 to +3.0 l min(-1), up to 5.7 V l(-1) min at higher flow rates ranging from -7.0 to -3.0 l min(-1) and from +3.0 to +7.0 l min(-1). The linear range extends from 3.0 to 7.0 l min(-1) with constant sensitivity equal to 5.7 V l(-1) min. The sensor is able to detect a flow-rate equal to 1.0 l min(-1) with a sensitivity of about 400 mV l(-1) min. The differential nature of the output minimizes the influence of the LEDs' power supply variations and allows to obtain a repeatability in the order of 3% of full scale output. The small pressure drop produced by the sensor placed in-line the fluid stream, of about 2.4 Pa at 7 l min(-1), corresponds to a negligible fluid dynamic resistance lower than 0.34 Pa l(-1) min.

  17. Laminar flow heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of power-law fluids inside tubes with varying width twisted tape inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, A.G.

    2000-02-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of heat transfer and flow friction of a generalized power-law fluid in tape generated swirl flow inside a 25.0 mm i.d. circular tube, are presented. In order to reduce excessive pressure drops associated with full width twisted tapes, with less corresponding reduction in heat transfer coefficients, reduced width twisted tapes of widths ranging from 11.0 to 23.8 mm, which are lower than the tube inside diameter are used. Reduced width twisted tape inserts give 18%--56% lower isothermal friction factors than the full width tapes. Uniform wall temperature Nusselt numbers decrease only slightly by 5%--25%, for tape widths of 19.7 and 11.0 mm, respectively. Based on the constant pumping power criterion, the tapes of width 19.7 mm perform more or less like full width tapes. Correlations are presented for isothermal and heating friction factors and Nusselt numbers (under uniform wall temperature condition) for a fully developed laminar swirl flow, which are applicable to full width as well as reduced width twisted tapes, using a modified twist ratio as pitch to width ratio of the tape. The reduced width tapes offer 20%--50% savings in the tape material as compared to the full width tapes.

  18. Pressure Reducer for Coal Gasifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, James M., Sr.

    1983-01-01

    Quasi-porous-plug pressure reducer is designed for gases containing abrasive particles. Gas used to generate high pressure steam to drive electric power generators. In giving up heat to steam, gas drops in temperature. Device used for coal gasification plants.

  19. A single recessive gene conferring short leaves in romaine x Latin type lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) crosses, and its effect on plant morphology and resistance to lettuce drop caused by Sclerotinia minor Jagger.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the relationship between plant morphology and disease resistance is crucial to successful breeding, particularly resistance to lettuce drop caused by Sclerotinia minor. Latin type lettuce cultivars are small plants with upright leaves longer than they are wide, similar to romaine type...

  20. Ultrahigh pressure extraction of bioactive compounds from plants-A review.

    PubMed

    Xi, Jun

    2017-04-13

    Extraction of bioactive compounds from plants is one of the most important research areas for pharmaceutical and food industries. Conventional extraction techniques are usually associated with longer extraction times, lower yields, more organic solvent consumption, and poor extraction efficiency. A novel extraction technique, ultrahigh pressure extraction, has been developed for the extraction of bioactive compounds from plants, in order to shorten the extraction time, decrease the solvent consumption, increase the extraction yields, and enhance the quality of extracts. The mild processing temperature of ultrahigh pressure extraction may lead to an enhanced extraction of thermolabile bioactive ingredients. A critical review is conducted to introduce the different aspects of ultrahigh pressure extraction of plants bioactive compounds, including principles and mechanisms, the important parameters influencing its performance, comparison of ultrahigh pressure extraction with other extraction techniques, advantages, and disadvantages. The future opportunities of ultrahigh pressure extraction are also discussed.

  1. Drop-on-demand sample introduction system coupled with the flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow for direct molecular analysis of complex liquid microvolume samples.

    PubMed

    Schaper, J Niklas; Pfeuffer, Kevin P; Shelley, Jacob T; Bings, Nicolas H; Hieftje, Gary M

    2012-11-06

    One of the fastest developing fields in analytical spectrochemistry in recent years is ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS). This burgeoning interest has been due to the demonstrated advantages of the method: simple mass spectra, little or no sample preparation, and applicability to samples in the solid, liquid, or gaseous state. One such ADI-MS source, the flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA), is capable of direct analysis of solids just by aiming the source at the solid surface and sampling the produced ions into a mass spectrometer. However, direct introduction of significant volumes of liquid samples into this source has not been possible, as solvent loads can quench the afterglow and, thus, the formation of reagent ions. As a result, the analysis of liquid samples is preferably carried out by analyzing dried residues or by desorbing small amounts of liquid samples directly from the liquid surface. In the former case, reproducibility of sample introduction is crucial if quantitative results are desired. In the present study, introduction of liquid samples as very small droplets helps overcome the issues of sample positioning and reduced levels of solvent intake. A recently developed "drop-on-demand" (DOD) aerosol generator is capable of reproducibly producing very small volumes of liquid (∼17 pL). In this paper, the coupling of FAPA-MS and DOD is reported and applications are suggested. Analytes representing different classes of substances were tested and limits of detections were determined. Matrix tolerance was investigated for drugs of abuse and their metabolites by analyzing raw urine samples and quantification without the use of internal standards. Limits of detection below 2 μg/mL, without sample pretreatment, were obtained.

  2. Effects of elevated pressure on rate of photosynthesis during plant growth.

    PubMed

    Takeishi, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Jun; Okazawa, Atsushi; Harada, Kazuo; Hirata, Kazumasa; Kobayashi, Akio; Akamatsu, Fumiteru

    2013-10-20

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of an artificially controlled environment, particularly elevated total pressure, on net photosynthesis and respiration during plant growth. Pressure directly affects not only cells and organelles in leaves but also the diffusion coefficients and degrees of solubility of CO2 and O2. In this study, the effects of elevated total pressure on the rates of net photosynthesis and respiration of a model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, were investigated in a chamber that newly developed in this study to control the total pressure. The results clearly showed that the rate of respiration decreased linearly with increasing total pressure at a high humidity. The rate of respiration decreased linearly with increasing total pressure up to 0.2 MPa, and increased with increasing total pressure from 0.3 to 0.5 MPa at a low humidity. The rate of net photosynthesis decreased linearly with increasing total pressure under a constant partial pressure of CO2 at 40 Pa. On the other hand, the rate of net photosynthesis was clearly increased by up to 1.6-fold with increasing total pressure and partial pressure of CO2.

  3. Investigations of levitated helium drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, Dwight Lawrence

    1999-11-01

    We report on the development of two systems capable of levitating drops of liquid helium. Helium drops of ˜20 mum have been levitated with the radiation pressure from two counter-propagating Nd:YAG laser beams. Drops are produced with a submerged piezoelectric transducer, and could be held for up to three minutes in our optical trap. Calculations show that Brillouin and Raman scattering of the laser light in the liquid helium produces a negligible rate of evaporation of the drop. Evaporation caused by the enhanced vapor pressure of the curved drop surfaces appears to be a significant effect limiting the drop lifetimes. Helium drops as large as 2 cm in diameter have been suspended in the earth's gravitational field with a magnetic field. A commercial superconducting solenoid provides the necessary field, field-gradient product required to levitate the drops. Drops are cooled to 0.5 K with a helium-3 refrigerator, and can be held in the trap indefinitely. We have found that when two or more drops are levitated in the same magnetic trap, the drops often remain in a state of apparent contact without coalescing. This effect is a result of the evaporation of liquid from between the two drops, and is found to occur only for normal fluid drops. We can induce shape oscillations in charged, levitated drops with an applied ac electric field. We have measured the resonance frequencies and damping rates for the l = 2 mode of oscillation as function of temperature. We have also developed a theory to describe the small amplitude shape oscillations of a He II drop surrounded by its saturated vapor. In our theory, we have considered two sets of boundary conditions---one where the drop does not evaporate and another in which the liquid and vapor are in thermodynamic equilibrium. We have found that both solutions give a frequency that agrees well with experiment, but that the data for the damping rate agree better with the solution without evaporation.

  4. Fire as an evolutionary pressure shaping plant traits.

    PubMed

    Keeley, Jon E; Pausas, Juli G; Rundel, Philip W; Bond, William J; Bradstock, Ross A

    2011-08-01

    Traits, such as resprouting, serotiny and germination by heat and smoke, are adaptive in fire-prone environments. However, plants are not adapted to fire per se but to fire regimes. Species can be threatened when humans alter the regime, often by increasing or decreasing fire frequency. Fire-adaptive traits are potentially the result of different evolutionary pathways. Distinguishing between traits that are adaptations originating in response to fire or exaptations originating in response to other factors might not always be possible. However, fire has been a factor throughout the history of land-plant evolution and is not strictly a Neogene phenomenon. Mesozoic fossils show evidence of fire-adaptive traits and, in some lineages, these might have persisted to the present as fire adaptations.

  5. Power generation plant integrating concentrated solar power receiver and pressurized heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Sakadjian, Bartev B; Flynn, Thomas J; Hu, Shengteng; Velazquez-Vargas, Luis G; Maryamchik, Mikhail

    2016-10-04

    A power plant includes a solar receiver heating solid particles, a standpipe receiving solid particles from the solar receiver, a pressurized heat exchanger heating working fluid by heat transfer through direct contact with heated solid particles flowing out of the bottom of the standpipe, and a flow path for solid particles from the bottom of the standpipe into the pressurized heat exchanger that is sealed by a pressure P produced at the bottom of the standpipe by a column of heated solid particles of height H. The flow path may include a silo or surge tank comprising a pressure vessel connected to the bottom of the standpipe, and a non-mechanical valve. The power plant may further include a turbine driven by heated working fluid discharged from the pressurized heat exchanger, and a compressor driven by the turbine.

  6. Pressurized thermal shock evaluation of the Calvert Cliffs Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, L

    1985-09-01

    An evaluation of the risk to the Calvert Cliffs Unit 1 nuclear power plant due to pressurized thermal shock (PTS) has been completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the assistance of several other organizations. This evaluation was part of a Nuclear Regulatory Commission program designed to study the PTS risk to three nuclear plants, the other two plants being Oconee Unit 1 and H.B. Robinson Unit 2. The specific objectives of the program were to (1) provide a best estimate of the frequency of a through-the-wall crack in the pressure vessel at each of the three plants, together with the uncertainty in the estimated frequency and its sensitivity to the variables used in the evaluation; (2) determine the dominant overcooling sequences contributing to the estimated frequency and the associated failures in the plant systems or in operator actions; and (3) evaluate the effectiveness of potential corrective measures.

  7. Fluidic origami with embedded pressure dependent multi-stability: a plant inspired innovation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Suyi; Wang, K. W.

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by the impulsive movements in plants, this research investigates the physics of a novel fluidic origami concept for its pressure-dependent multi-stability. In this innovation, fluid-filled tubular cells are synthesized by integrating different Miura-Ori sheets into a three-dimensional topological system, where the internal pressures are strategically controlled similar to the motor cells in plants. Fluidic origami incorporates two crucial physiological features observed in nature: one is distributed, pressurized cellular organization, and the other is embedded multi-stability. For a single fluidic origami cell, two stable folding configurations can coexist due to the nonlinear relationships among folding, crease material deformation and internal volume change. When multiple origami cells are integrated, additional multi-stability characteristics could occur via the interactions between pressurized cells. Changes in the fluid pressure can tailor the existence and shapes of these stable folding configurations. As a result, fluidic origami can switch between being mono-stable, bistable and multi-stable with pressure control, and provide a rapid ‘snap-through’ type of shape change based on the similar principles as in plants. The outcomes of this research could lead to the development of new adaptive materials or structures, and provide insights for future plant physiology studies at the cellular level. PMID:26400197

  8. Fluidic origami with embedded pressure dependent multi-stability: a plant inspired innovation.

    PubMed

    Li, Suyi; Wang, K W

    2015-10-06

    Inspired by the impulsive movements in plants, this research investigates the physics of a novel fluidic origami concept for its pressure-dependent multi-stability. In this innovation, fluid-filled tubular cells are synthesized by integrating different Miura-Ori sheets into a three-dimensional topological system, where the internal pressures are strategically controlled similar to the motor cells in plants. Fluidic origami incorporates two crucial physiological features observed in nature: one is distributed, pressurized cellular organization, and the other is embedded multi-stability. For a single fluidic origami cell, two stable folding configurations can coexist due to the nonlinear relationships among folding, crease material deformation and internal volume change. When multiple origami cells are integrated, additional multi-stability characteristics could occur via the interactions between pressurized cells. Changes in the fluid pressure can tailor the existence and shapes of these stable folding configurations. As a result, fluidic origami can switch between being mono-stable, bistable and multi-stable with pressure control, and provide a rapid 'snap-through' type of shape change based on the similar principles as in plants. The outcomes of this research could lead to the development of new adaptive materials or structures, and provide insights for future plant physiology studies at the cellular level.

  9. Features of erosion-corrosion wear in low-pressure evaporators of combined-cycle plant heat-recovery boilers at high void factor values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galetsky, N. S.; Schwarz, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    The features of erosion-corrosion wear (ECW) in a low-pressure evaporator (LPE) combinedcycle plant (CCP) at high void factor values in the heat carrier are considered. It is shown that if the medium pressure in the evaporator is less than 1 MPa and steam quality x ≈ 0.5, the void fraction β is close to 1, at the outlet of the evaporator almost dry saturated steam moves, and the formation of liquid films is excluded. Under these conditions, the wear of the evaporator coil sections has an erosive nature, caused by high velocity steam, carrying the dense particles of corrosion products and large drops of water, previously plucked from the surface of the liquid films.

  10. The effect of hydrostatic vs. shock pressure treatment on plant seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustey, Adrian; Leighs, James; Appleby-Thomas, Gareth; Wood, David; Hazael, Rachael; McMillan, Paul; Hazell, Paul

    2013-06-01

    The hydrostatic pressure and shock response of plant seeds have both been previously investigated (primarily driven by an interest in reducing bacterial contamination of crops and the theory of panspermia respectively). However, comparisons have not previously been made between these two methods of applying pressure to plant seeds. Here such a comparison has been undertaken based on the premise that any correlations in such data may provide a route to inform understanding of damage mechanisms in the seeds under test. In this work two varieties of plant seeds were subjected to hydrostatic pressure via a non-end-loaded piston cylinder set-up and shock compression via employment of a 50-mm bore, single stage gas gun using the flyer-plate technique. Results from germination tests of recovered seed samples have been compared and contrasted, and initial conclusions made regarding causes of trends in the resultant data-set.

  11. Worldwide assessment of steam-generator problems in pressurized-water-reactor nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, H.H.; Lu, S.C.

    1981-09-15

    Objective is to assess the reliability of steam generators of pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plants in the United States and abroad. The assessment is based on operation experience of both domestic and foreign PWR plants. The approach taken is to collect and review papers and reports available from the literature as well as information obtained by contacting research institutes both here and abroad. This report presents the results of the assessment. It contains a general background of PWR plant operations, plant types, and materials used in PWR plants. A review of the worldwide distribution of PWR plants is also given. The report describes in detail the degradation problems discovered in PWR steam generators: their causes, their impacts on the performance of steam generators, and the actions to mitigate and avoid them. One chapter is devoted to operating experience of PWR steam generators in foreign countries. Another discusses the improvements in future steam generator design.

  12. Selective Pressure along a Latitudinal Gradient Affects Subindividual Variation in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sobral, Mar; Guitián, José; Guitián, Pablo; Larrinaga, Asier R.

    2013-01-01

    Individual plants produce repeated structures such as leaves, flowers or fruits, which, although belonging to the same genotype, are not phenotypically identical. Such subindividual variation reflects the potential of individual genotypes to vary with micro-environmental conditions. Furthermore, variation in organ traits imposes costs to foraging animals such as time, energy and increased predation risk. Therefore, animals that interact with plants may respond to this variation and affect plant fitness. Thus, phenotypic variation within an individual plant could be, in part, an adaptive trait. Here we investigated this idea and we found that subindividual variation of fruit size of Crataegus monogyna, in different populations throughout the latitudinal gradient in Europe, was explained at some extent by the selective pressures exerted by seed-dispersing birds. These findings support the hypothesis that within-individual variation in plants is an adaptive trait selected by interacting animals which may have important implications for plant evolution. PMID:24069297

  13. Characterization of pressurized fluidized bed and pulverized coal fired power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, H.S.; Pietruszkiewicz, J.; Thomas, G.O.; Hamm, J.R.; Bezella, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents the major technical and economic characteristics of a steam-cooled and an air-cooled pressurized fluidized bed (PFB) power plant concept along with the characteristics of a pulverized coal fired power plant equipped with an adipic acid enhanced wet-limestone flue gas desulfurization system. The conceptual designs were prepared to satisfy a set of common groundrules that were developed for the study. The power plants are of the grassroots type, located on a generic plant site. The designs incorporate technological advances available for commercialization in the 1990 time frame. The net power outputs of the base case plants, using Illinois No. 6 coal, range from 502 MWe for the pulverized coal fired plant to 554 MWe for the air-cooled PFB plant. The net power plant heat rates vary from 9725 Btu/kWh for the pulverized coal fired plant to 8710 Btu/kWh for the steam-cooled PFB plant. For the economic groundrules set for the study, the pulverized coal fired plant utilizing an advanced flue gas desulfurization concept had the lowest specific capital cost and lowest levelized cost of electricity. However, utility and site specific conditions could materially alter the relative merits of the various concepts in a given utility application.

  14. Water cycle and its management for plant habitats at reduced pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rygalov, Vadim Y.; Fowler, Philip A.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Bucklin, Ray A.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental and mathematical models were developed for describing and testing temperature and humidity parameters for plant production in bioregenerative life support systems. A factor was included for analyzing systems operating at low (10-101.3 kPa) pressure to reduce gas leakage and structural mass (e.g., inflatable greenhouses for space application). The expected close relationship between temperature and relative humidity was observed, along with the importance of heat exchanger coil temperature and air circulation rate. The presence of plants in closed habitats results in increased water flux through the system. Changes in pressure affect gas diffusion rates and surface boundary layers, and change convective transfer capabilities and water evaporation rates. A consistent observation from studies with plants at reduced pressures is increased evapotranspiration rates, even at constant vapor pressure deficits. This suggests that plant water status is a critical factor for managing low-pressure production systems. The approach suggested should help space mission planners design artificial environments in closed habitats.

  15. Design of Plant Gas Exchange Experiments in a Variable Pressure Growth Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corey, Kenneth A.

    1996-01-01

    Sustainable human presence in extreme environments such as lunar and martian bases will require bioregenerative components to human life support systems where plants are used for generation of oxygen, food, and water. Reduced atmospheric pressures will be used to minimize mass and engineering requirements. Few studies have assessed the metabolic and developmental responses of plants to reduced pressure and varied oxygen atmospheres. The first tests of hypobaric pressures on plant gas exchange and biomass production at the Johnson Space Center will be initiated in January 1996 in the Variable Pressure Growth Chamber (VPGC), a large, closed plant growth chamber rated for 10.2 psi. Experiments were designed and protocols detailed for two complete growouts each of lettuce and wheat to generate a general database for human life support requirements and to answer questions about plant growth processes in reduced pressure and varied oxygen environments. The central objective of crop growth studies in the VPGC is to determine the influence of reduced pressure and reduced oxygen on the rates of photosynthesis, dark respiration, evapotranspiration and biomass production of lettuce and wheat. Due to the constraint of one experimental unit, internal controls, called pressure transients, will be used to evaluate rates of CO2 uptake, O2 evolution, and H2O generation. Pressure transients will give interpretive power to the results of repeated growouts at both reduced and ambient pressures. Other experiments involve the generation of response functions to partial pressures of O2 and CO2 and to light intensity. Protocol for determining and calculating rates of gas exchange have been detailed. In order to build these databases and implement the necessary treatment combinations in short time periods, specific requirements for gas injections and removals have been defined. A set of system capability checks will include determination of leakage rates conducted prior to the actual crop

  16. The development of the fast-running simulation pressurized water reactor plant analyzer code (NUPAC-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, K.; Terashita, N.; Ogino, T. . Central Research Lab.)

    1989-06-01

    This article discusses a pressurized water reactor plant analyzer code (NUPAC-1) has been developed to apply to an operator support system or an advanced training simulator. The simulation code must produce reasonably accurate results as well as fun in a fast mode for realizing functions such as anomaly detection, estimation of unobservable plant internal states, and prediction of plant state trends. The NUPAC-1 code adopts fast computing methods, i.e., the table fitting method of the state variables, time-step control, and calculation control of heat transfer coefficients, in order to attain accuracy and fast-running capability.

  17. Exploding Water Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Water has the unusual property that it expands on freezing, so that ice has a specific gravity of 0.92 compared to 1.0 for liquid water. The most familiar demonstration of this property is ice cubes floating in a glass of water. A more dramatic demonstration is the ice bomb shown in Fig. 1. Here a cast iron flask is filled with water and tightly stoppered. The flask is then cooled, either by leaving it outdoors in winter or by immersing it in a cryogenic fluid, until the water freezes. As the water freezes and expands, the pressure inside the flask increases dramatically, eventually becoming sufficient to fracture the metal walls of the enclosure. A related, but much less familiar, phenomenon is the explosive fracturing of small water drops upon freezing. That water drops can fracture in this way has been known for many years, and the phenomenon has been described in detail in the atmospheric sciences literature, where it is seen as relevant to the freezing of raindrops as they fall through cold air. Carefully controlled experiments have been done documenting how the character and frequency of fracture is affected by such variables as drop size, rate of cooling, chemistry of dissolved gases, etc. Here I describe instead a simple demonstration of fracture suitable for video analysis and appropriate for study at the introductory physics level. Readers may also be interested in other characteristics of freezing and fragmenting water drops, for example, charge separation upon fracture and the appearance of spikes and bulges on the surface.

  18. Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion: Small gas turbine induustrial plant study

    SciTech Connect

    Shenker, J.; Garland, R.; Horazak, D.; Seifert, F.; Wenglarz, R.

    1992-07-01

    Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) plants provide a coal-fired, high-efficiency, combined-cycle system for the generation of electricity and steam. The plants use lime-based sorbents in PFB combustors to meet environmental air standards without back-end gas desulfurization equipment. The second-generation system is an improvement over earlier PFBC concepts because it can achieve gas temperatures of 2100[degrees]F and higher for improved cycle efficiency while maintaining the fluidized beds at 1600[degrees]F for enhanced sulfur capture and minimum alkali release. Second-generation PFBC systems are capable of supplying the electric and steam process needs of industrial plants. The basic second-generation system can be applied in different ways to meet a variety of process steam and electrical requirements. To evaluate the potential of these systems in the industrial market, conceptual designs have been developed for six second-generation PFBC plants. These plants cover a range of electrical outputs from 6.3 to 41.5 MWe and steam flows from 46,067 to 442,337 lb/h. Capital and operating costs have been estimated for these six plants and for equivalent (in size) conventional, coal-fired atmospheric fluidized bed combustion cogeneration plants. Economic analyses were conducted to compare the cost of steam for both the second-generation plants and the conventional plants.

  19. Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion: Small gas turbine industrial plant study

    SciTech Connect

    Shenker, J.; Garland, R.; Horazak, D.; Seifert, F.; Wenglarz, R.

    1992-07-01

    Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) plants provide a coal-fired, high-efficiency, combined-cycle system for the generation of electricity and steam. The plants use lime-based sorbents in PFB combustors to meet environmental air standards without back-end gas desulfurization equipment. The second-generation system is an improvement over earlier PFBC concepts because it can achieve gas temperatures of 2100{degrees}F and higher for improved cycle efficiency while maintaining the fluidized beds at 1600{degrees}F for enhanced sulfur capture and minimum alkali release. Second-generation PFBC systems are capable of supplying the electric and steam process needs of industrial plants. The basic second-generation system can be applied in different ways to meet a variety of process steam and electrical requirements. To evaluate the potential of these systems in the industrial market, conceptual designs have been developed for six second-generation PFBC plants. These plants cover a range of electrical outputs from 6.3 to 41.5 MWe and steam flows from 46,067 to 442,337 lb/h. Capital and operating costs have been estimated for these six plants and for equivalent (in size) conventional, coal-fired atmospheric fluidized bed combustion cogeneration plants. Economic analyses were conducted to compare the cost of steam for both the second-generation plants and the conventional plants.

  20. Dilating Eye Drops

    MedlinePlus

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Dilating Eye Drops En Español Read in Chinese What are dilating eye drops? Dilating eye drops contain medication to enlarge ( ...

  1. Role of turgor pressure and solute transport in plant cell growth: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cosgrove, D.J.

    1987-10-15

    Plant cell expansion requires coordinationion of three distinct processes: wall relaxation and synthesis, water uptake, and solute uptake. Wall relaxation reduces cell turgor pressure and thereby generates the reduced water for water potential needed uptake. Our studies with pea (Pisum sativum L.) and soybean (Glycine max Merr.) seedlings have shown that water uptake is rapid and is not a major control point for growth. Our current focus is on the processes of wall relaxation and solute transport, and how they are influenced by water stress. One major goal of this project is to examine in detail the dependence of wall yielding on turgor pressure. This is being done by detailed measurements of wall relaxation in living cells, using a computer-assisted pressure microprobe and the new pressure-block technique. Our pressure-block results indicate that wall relaxation is more dynamic than expected. Rapid changes in wall yielding appear to compensate for minor fluctuations in cell turgor pressure, thus maintaining stable growth rates. A second major goal of this project is to determine the interrelationship between cell expansion and solute transport into expanding cells. We will selectively block either cell expansion or solute transport, and measure the effect of such blockage on the unblocked process. A third goal is to examine the basis for reduced cell expansion when plants are water stressed. Our results indicate that growth is retarded in part because of reduced turgor pressure, and in part because of reduced cell wall relaxation. The alteration in wall relaxation will be examined by in-vivo relaxation methods. Thus studies will provide insight into the basic cellular and physical processes controlling plant growth, and how they are perturbed by water stress. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Pressure and Flow Relations in Vascular Bundles of the Tomato Plant

    PubMed Central

    Dimond, A. E.

    1966-01-01

    In the tomato plant water flows through primary xylem in accordance with Poiseuille's law. This relation and the analogy between Poiseuille's and Ohm's law were employed to calculate rates of flow and differences in pressure within vascular bundles when transpiration rates from individual leaves were known. The resistance of vascular bundles to flow was calculated from a modification of Poiseuille's law and from measurements of vessels in all bundles. The rates of flow in all bundles were derived from a set of simultaneous linear equations of flow, written to correspond with the nature of the vascular network. Values of the difference in pressure associated with flow in bundles were derived from resistances and flow rates in individual bundles. These agreed substantially with values observed in a comparable plant. In large bundles, vessels occur in a frequency distribution that is approximately normal with respect either to the logarithms of their radii or to the fourth power of their radii. The largest vessels in a bundle transport most of the water when they are functioning. The tomato plant contains 2 types of vascular bundle. The large bundles of the stem form a network by joining above each node in combinations of 2 at a time. The small bundles of the stem and petiolar bundles are independent of other bundles from their origins at junctions to their termini. The small bundles offer high resistance to flow, whereas the resistance of large bundles is low. The average conductance of large bundles decreases from the base to the apex of the stem. That of small vascular bundles remains low and more or less constant throughout the plant. Only a small difference in pressure is required to maintain flow in large bundles. For lower leaves, the driving pressure required to move water to the base of a petiole is considerably less than that which moves water through petioles. The difference in pressure that maintains flow increases steadily for successively higher nodes

  3. The effect of hydrostatic vs. shock pressure treatment of plant seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustey, A.; Leighs, J. A.; Appleby-Thomas, G. J.; Wood, D. C.; Hazael, R.; McMillan, P. F.; Hazell, P. J.

    2014-05-01

    The hydrostatic pressure and shock response of plant seeds has been investigated antecedently, primarily driven by interest in reducing bacterial contamination of crops and the theory of panspermia, respectively. However, comparisons have not previously been made between these two methods ofapplying pressure to plant seeds. Here such a comparison has been undertaken based on the premise that any correlations in collected data may provide a route to inform understanding of damage mechanisms in the seeds under test. In this work two varieties of plant seeds were subjected to hydrostatic pressure via a non-end-loaded piston cylinder setup and shock compression via employment of a 50 mm bore, single stage gas gun using the flyer plate technique. Results from germination tests of recovered seed samples have been compared and contrasted, and initial conclusions made regarding causes of trends in the resultant data-set. Data collected has shown that cress seeds are extremely resilient to static loading, whereas the difference in the two forms of loading is negligible for lettuce seeds. Germination time has been seen to extend dramatically following static loading of cress seeds to greater than 0.4 GPa. In addition, the cut-off pressure previously seen to cause 0% germination in dynamic experiments performed on cress seeds has now also been seen in lettuce seeds.

  4. Static Magnetowetting of Ferrofluid Drops.

    PubMed

    Rigoni, Carlo; Pierno, Matteo; Mistura, Giampaolo; Talbot, Delphine; Massart, René; Bacri, Jean-Claude; Abou-Hassan, Ali

    2016-08-02

    We report results of a comprehensive study of the wetting properties of sessile drops of ferrofluid water solutions at various concentrations deposited on flat substrates and subjected to the action of permanent magnets of different sizes and strengths. The amplitude and the gradient of the magnetic field experienced by the ferrofluid are changed by varying the magnets and their distance to the surface. Magnetic forces up to 100 times the gravitational one and magnetic gradients up to 1 T/cm are achieved. A rich phenomenology is observed, ranging from flattened drops caused by the magnetic attraction to drops extended normally to the substrate because of the normal traction of the magnetic field. We find that the former effect can be conveniently described in terms of an effective Bond number that compares the effective drop attraction with the capillary force, whereas the drop's vertical elongation is effectively expressed by a dimensionless number S, which compares the pressure jump at the ferrofluid interface because of the magnetization with the capillary pressure.

  5. Injector Element which Maintains a Constant Mean Spray Angle and Optimum Pressure Drop During Throttling by Varying the Geometry of Tangential Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P. (Inventor); Myers, William Neill (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method for determining the optimum inlet geometry of a liquid rocket engine swirl injector includes obtaining a throttleable level phase value, volume flow rate, chamber pressure, liquid propellant density, inlet injector pressure, desired target spray angle and desired target optimum delta pressure value between an inlet and a chamber for a plurality of engine stages. The tangential inlet area for each throttleable stage is calculated. The correlation between the tangential inlet areas and delta pressure values is used to calculate the spring displacement and variable inlet geometry. An injector designed using the method includes a plurality of geometrically calculated tangential inlets in an injection tube; an injection tube cap with a plurality of inlet slots slidably engages the injection tube. A pressure differential across the injector element causes the cap to slide along the injection tube and variably align the inlet slots with the tangential inlets.

  6. Coalescence of a Drop inside another Drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugundhan, Vivek; Jian, Zhen; Yang, Fan; Li, Erqiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2016-11-01

    Coalescence dynamics of a pendent drop sitting inside another drop, has been studied experimentally and in numerical simulations. Using an in-house fabricated composite micro-nozzle, a smaller salt-water drop is introduced inside a larger oil drop which is pendent in a tank containing the same liquid as the inner drop. On touching the surface of outer drop, the inner drop coalesces with the surrounding liquid forming a vortex ring, which grows in time to form a mushroom-like structure. The initial dynamics at the first bridge opening up is quantified using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), while matching the refractive index of the two liquids. The phenomenon is also numerically simulated using the open-source code Gerris. The problem is fully governed by two non-dimensional parameters: the Ohnesorge number and the diameter ratios of the two drops. The validated numerical model is used to better understand the dynamics of the phenomenon. In some cases a coalescence cascade is observed with liquid draining intermittently and the inner drop reducing in size.

  7. Nanosize-induced drastic drop in equilibrium hydrogen pressure for hydride formation and structural stabilization in Pd-Rh solid-solution alloys.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Morita, Hitoshi; Yamauchi, Miho; Ikeda, Ryuichi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Kubota, Yoshiki; Kato, Kenichi; Takata, Masaki; Toh, Shoichi; Matsumura, Syo

    2012-08-01

    We have synthesized and characterized homogeneous solid-solution alloy nanoparticles of Pd and Rh, which are immiscible with each other in the equilibrium bulk state at around room temperature. The Pd-Rh alloy nanoparticles can absorb hydrogen at ambient pressure and the hydrogen pressure of Pd-Rh alloys for hydrogen storage is dramatically decreased by more than 4 orders of magnitude from the corresponding pressure in the metastable bulk state. The solid-solution state is still maintained in the nanoparticles even after hydrogen absorption/desorption, in contrast to the metastable bulks which are separated into Pd and Rh during the process.

  8. Effect of very high pressure on life of plants and animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, F.; Mori, Y.; Sougawa, M.; Takarabe, K.; Hada, Y.; Nishihira, N.; Motose, H.; Saigusa, M.; Matsushima, Y.; Yamazaki, D.; Ito, E.; Saini, N. L.

    2012-07-01

    We studied the tolerance of living organisms, such as a small animal (Milnesium tardigradum), a small crustacean (Artemia), non-vascular plants or moss (Ptichomitrium and Venturiella), and a vascular plant (Trifolium) to the extremely high hydrostatic pressure of 7.5 GPa. It turned out that most of the high pressure exposed seeds of white clover were alive. Those exposed to 7.5 GPa for up to 1 day and seeded on agar germinated roots. Those exposed for up to 1 hour and seeded on soil germinated stems and leaves. Considering the fact that proteins begins to unfold around 0.3 GPa, it seems difficult to understand that all the living samples which have been investigated can survive after exposure to 7.5 GPa.

  9. A survey of repair practices for nuclear power plant containment metallic pressure boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Oland, C.B.; Naus, D.J.

    1998-05-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide assistance in their assessment of the effects of potential degradation on the structural integrity and leaktightness of metal containment vessels and steel liners of concrete containments in nuclear power plants. One of the program objectives is to identify repair practices for restoring metallic containment pressure boundary components that have been damaged or degraded in service. This report presents issues associated with inservice condition assessments and continued service evaluations and identifies the rules and requirements for the repair and replacement of nonconforming containment pressure boundary components by welding or metal removal. Discussion topics include base and welding materials, welding procedure and performance qualifications, inspection techniques, testing methods, acceptance criteria, and documentation requirements necessary for making acceptable repairs and replacements so that the plant can be returned to a safe operating condition.

  10. Tandem High-pressure Freezing and Quick Freeze Substitution of Plant Tissues for Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bobik, Krzysztof; Dunlap, John R.; Burch-Smith, Tessa M.

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1940s transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been providing biologists with ultra-high resolution images of biological materials. Yet, because of laborious and time-consuming protocols that also demand experience in preparation of artifact-free samples, TEM is not considered a user-friendly technique. Traditional sample preparation for TEM used chemical fixatives to preserve cellular structures. High-pressure freezing is the cryofixation of biological samples under high pressures to produce very fast cooling rates, thereby restricting ice formation, which is detrimental to the integrity of cellular ultrastructure. High-pressure freezing and freeze substitution are currently the methods of choice for producing the highest quality morphology in resin sections for TEM. These methods minimize the artifacts normally associated with conventional processing for TEM of thin sections. After cryofixation the frozen water in the sample is replaced with liquid organic solvent at low temperatures, a process called freeze substitution. Freeze substitution is typically carried out over several days in dedicated, costly equipment. A recent innovation allows the process to be completed in three hours, instead of the usual two days. This is typically followed by several more days of sample preparation that includes infiltration and embedding in epoxy resins before sectioning. Here we present a protocol combining high-pressure freezing and quick freeze substitution that enables plant sample fixation to be accomplished within hours. The protocol can readily be adapted for working with other tissues or organisms. Plant tissues are of special concern because of the presence of aerated spaces and water-filled vacuoles that impede ice-free freezing of water. In addition, the process of chemical fixation is especially long in plants due to cell walls impeding the penetration of the chemicals to deep within the tissues. Plant tissues are therefore particularly challenging, but

  11. Tandem high-pressure freezing and quick freeze substitution of plant tissues for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bobik, Krzysztof; Dunlap, John R; Burch-Smith, Tessa M

    2014-10-13

    Since the 1940s transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been providing biologists with ultra-high resolution images of biological materials. Yet, because of laborious and time-consuming protocols that also demand experience in preparation of artifact-free samples, TEM is not considered a user-friendly technique. Traditional sample preparation for TEM used chemical fixatives to preserve cellular structures. High-pressure freezing is the cryofixation of biological samples under high pressures to produce very fast cooling rates, thereby restricting ice formation, which is detrimental to the integrity of cellular ultrastructure. High-pressure freezing and freeze substitution are currently the methods of choice for producing the highest quality morphology in resin sections for TEM. These methods minimize the artifacts normally associated with conventional processing for TEM of thin sections. After cryofixation the frozen water in the sample is replaced with liquid organic solvent at low temperatures, a process called freeze substitution. Freeze substitution is typically carried out over several days in dedicated, costly equipment. A recent innovation allows the process to be completed in three hours, instead of the usual two days. This is typically followed by several more days of sample preparation that includes infiltration and embedding in epoxy resins before sectioning. Here we present a protocol combining high-pressure freezing and quick freeze substitution that enables plant sample fixation to be accomplished within hours. The protocol can readily be adapted for working with other tissues or organisms. Plant tissues are of special concern because of the presence of aerated spaces and water-filled vacuoles that impede ice-free freezing of water. In addition, the process of chemical fixation is especially long in plants due to cell walls impeding the penetration of the chemicals to deep within the tissues. Plant tissues are therefore particularly challenging, but

  12. Nurse plants, tree saplings and grazing pressure: changes in facilitation along a biotic environmental gradient.

    PubMed

    Smit, Christian; Vandenberghe, Charlotte; den Ouden, Jan; Müller-Schärer, Heinz

    2007-05-01

    Current conceptual models predict that an increase in stress shifts interactions between plants from competitive to facilitative; hence, facilitation is expected to gain in ecological importance with increasing stress. Little is known about how facilitative interactions between plants change with increasing biotic stress, such as that incurred by consumer pressure or herbivory (i.e. disturbance sensu Grime). In grazed ecosystems, the presence of unpalatable plants is reported to protect tree saplings against cattle grazing and enhance tree establishment. In accordance with current conceptual facilitation-stress models, we hypothesised a positive relationship between facilitation and grazing pressure. We tested this hypothesis in a field experiment in which tree saplings of four different species (deciduous Fagus sylvatica, Acer pseudoplatanus and coniferous Abies alba, Picea abies) were planted either inside or outside of the canopy of the spiny nurse shrub Rosa rubiginosa in enclosures differing in grazing pressure (low and high) and in exclosures. During one grazing season we followed the survival of the different tree saplings and the level of browsing on these; we also estimated browsing damage to the nurse shrubs. Shrub damage was highest at the higher grazing pressure. Correspondingly, browsing increased and survival decreased in saplings located inside the canopy of the shrubs at the high grazing pressure compared to the low grazing pressure. Saplings of both deciduous species showed a higher survival than the evergreens, while sapling browsing did not differ between species. The relative facilitation of sapling browsing and sapling survival - i.e. the difference between saplings inside and outside the shrub canopy - decreased at high grazing pressure as the facilitative species became less protective. Interestingly, these findings do not agree with current conceptual facilitation-stress models predicting increasing facilitation with abiotic stress. We used

  13. Effects of EHD on heat transfer enhancement and pressure drop during two-phase condensation of pure R-134a at high mass flux in a horizontal micro-fin tube

    SciTech Connect

    Laohalertdecha, Suriyan; Wongwises, Somchai

    2006-07-15

    Effects of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) on the two-phase heat transfer enhancement and pressure drop of pure R-134a condensing inside a horizontal micro-fin tube are experimentally investigated. The test section is a 2.5m long counter flow tube-in-tube heat exchanger with refrigerant flowing in the inner tube and cooling water flowing in the annulus. The inner tube is made from micro-fin horizontal copper tubing of 9.52mm outer diameter. The electrode is made from cylindrical stainless steel of 1.47mm diameter. Positive high voltage is supplied to the electrode wire, with the micro-fin tube grounded. In the presence of the electrode, a maximum heat transfer enhancement of 1.15 is obtained at a heat flux of 10kW/m{sup 2}, mass flux of 200kg/m{sup 2}s and saturation temperature of 40{sup o}C, while the application of an EHD voltage of 2.5kV only slightly increases the pressure drop. New correlations of the experimental data based on the data gathered during this work for predicting the condensation heat transfer coefficients are proposed for practical application. (author)

  14. Behavior of plant plasma membranes under hydrostatic pressure as monitored by fluorescent environment-sensitive probes.

    PubMed

    Roche, Yann; Klymchenko, Andrey S; Gerbeau-Pissot, Patricia; Gervais, Patrick; Mély, Yves; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Perrier-Cornet, Jean-Marie

    2010-08-01

    We monitored the behavior of plasma membrane (PM) isolated from tobacco cells (BY-2) under hydrostatic pressures up to 3.5kbar at 30 degrees C, by steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy using the newly introduced environment-sensitive probe F2N12S and also Laurdan and di-4-ANEPPDHQ. The consequences of sterol depletion by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin were also studied. We found that application of hydrostatic pressure led to a marked decrease of hydration as probed by F2N12S and to an increase of the generalized polarization excitation (GPex) of Laurdan. We observed that the hydration effect of sterol depletion was maximal between 1 and 1.5 kbar but was much less important at higher pressures (above 2 kbar) where both parameters reached a plateau value. The presence of a highly dehydrated gel state, insensitive to the sterol content, was thus proposed above 2.5 kbar. However, the F2N12S polarity parameter and the di-4-ANEPPDHQ intensity ratio showed strong effect on sterol depletion, even at very high pressures (2.5-3.5 kbar), and supported the ability of sterols to modify the electrostatic properties of membrane, notably its dipole potential, in a highly dehydrated gel phase. We thus suggested that BY-2 PM undergoes a complex phase behavior in response to the hydrostatic pressure and we also emphasized the role of phytosterols to regulate the effects of high hydrostatic pressure on plant PM.

  15. [Recovery of CO from an ammonia plant tail gas with pressure swing adsorption process].

    PubMed

    Yi, Hong-hong; Ning, Ping; Hao, Ji-ming; Yang, Hao

    2004-09-01

    Ammonia plant tail gas is an important CO source for C1 chemistry if an efficient separation/purification technology is available. Presented is pressure swing adsorption using a home made catalyst PU1 for recovery of CO from ammonia plant tail gas. A performance comparison of PU1 with a commercial zeolite was also presented. The pilot plant experiments were carried out in an intermission one-bed PSA unit with ammonia plant tail gas and a feed flow rate of 0.2-0.8 m3/h. The purity and recovery of CO was studied under various operating conditions. The operating conditions for the process were optimized and an optimum cyclic sequence of operation steps was proposed. A good performance of PU1 in the process was experimentally demonstrated. Product gas with a CO purity over 98% could be produced at a CO recovery of 75% for a feed gas CO concentration of 30% and gas pressure of 0.3 MPa.

  16. Interactions between abiotic constraint, propagule pressure, and biotic resistance regulate plant invasion.

    PubMed

    Byun, Chaeho; de Blois, Sylvie; Brisson, Jacques

    2015-05-01

    With multiple species introductions and rapid global changes, there is a need for comprehensive invasion models that can predict community responses. Evidence suggests that abiotic constraint, propagule pressure, and biotic resistance of resident species each determine plant invasion success, yet their interactions are rarely tested. To understand these interactions, we conducted community assembly experiments simulating situations in which seeds of the invasive grass species Phragmites australis (Poaceae) land on bare soil along with seeds of resident wetland plant species. We used structural equation models to measure both direct abiotic constraint (here moist vs. flooded conditions) on invasion success and indirect constraint on the abundance and, therefore, biotic resistance of resident plant species. We also evaluated how propagule supply of P. australis interacts with the biotic resistance of resident species during invasion. We observed that flooding always directly reduced invasion success but had a synergistic or antagonistic effect on biotic resistance depending on the resident species involved. Biotic resistance of the most diverse resident species mixture remained strong even when abiotic conditions changed. Biotic resistance was also extremely effective under low propagule pressure of the invader. Moreover, the presence of a dense resident plant cover appeared to lower the threshold at which invasion success became stable even when propagule supply increased. Our study not only provides an analytical framework to quantify the effect of multiple interactions relevant to community assembly and species invasion, but it also proposes guidelines for innovative invasion management strategies based on a sound understanding of ecological processes.

  17. Role of turgor pressure and solute transport in plant cell growth: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cosgrove, D.J.

    1988-10-20

    Plant cell expansion involves simultaneous water absorption, solute uptake, and wall relaxation and synthesis. Our studies have shown that water absorption by the growing stems of pea (Pisum sativum L.) and other young seedlings is fast and is regulated primarily by wall yielding, which generates the lower water potential necessary for water absorption. Our current focus is on the nature of wall yielding, its dependence on cell turgor pressure, and the mechanism by which cell turgor is maintained in expanding cells. We have developed new relaxation methods to study wall yielding. With the pressure-probe technique we find that wall yielding in excised growing tissues is proportional to cell turgor pressure and exhibits a definite yield threshold. With the pressure-block method we can measure relaxation in intact growing tissues and find that such tissues show more complicated growth and relaxation responses than excised ones. Rapid feedback-regulation of growth is apparent from the pressure-block experiments. With these methods we have examined how drought-stress, light and growth retardants modulate stem elongation. The last two agents acts exclusively on cell wall yielding properties. With droughted pea plants, inhibition is partly through reduced cell turgor pressure and partly through reduced wall relaxation. Drought appears to alter feedback-regulation of cell expansion. Experiments are currently underway to characterize such regulation. In a related line of study we find close correspondence between rates of solute uptake from the phloem and rates of cell expansion. Work is underway to determine the nature of such coupling. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Analyses of High Pressure Molten Debris Dispersion for a Typical PWR Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Osamu KAawabata; Mitsuhiro Kajimoto

    2006-07-01

    In such severe core damage accident, as small LOCAs with no ECCS injection or station blackout, in which the primary reactor system remains pressurized during core melt down, certain modes of vessel failure would lead to a high pressure ejection of molten core material. In case of a local failure of the lower head, the molten materials would initially be ejected into the cavity beneath the pressure vessel may subsequently be swept out from the cavity to the containment atmosphere and it might cause the early containment failure by direct contact of containment steel liner with core debris. When the contribution of a high-pressure scenario in a core damage frequency increases, early conditional containment failure probability may become large. In the present study, the verification analysis of PHOENICS code and the combining analysis with MELCOR and PHOENICS codes were performed to examine the debris dispersion behavior during high pressure melt ejection. The PHOENICS code which can treat thermal hydraulic phenomena, was applied to the verification analysis for melt dispersion experiments conducted by the Purdue university in the United States. A low pressure melt dispersion experiment at initial pressure 1.4 MPas used metal woods as a molten material was simulated. The analytical results with molten debris dispersion mostly from the model reactor cavity compartment showed an agreement with the experimental result, but the analysis result of a volumetric median diameter of the airborne debris droplets was estimated about 1.5 times of the experimental result. The injection rates of molten debris and steam after reactor vessel failure for a typical PWR plant were analyzed using the MELCOR code. In addition, PHOENICS was applied to a 3D analysis for debris dispersion with low primary pressure at the reactor vessel failure. The analysis result showed that almost all the molten debris were dispersed from the reactor vessel cavity compartment by about 45 seconds after the

  19. Second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion plants for electric power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A. ); Bonk, D. ); Horazak, D. ); Newby, R. . Science and Technology Center); Rehmat, A.

    1992-01-01

    In the search for a more efficient, less costly, and more environmentally responsible method for generating electrical power from coal, research and development has turned to advanced pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) and coal gasification technologies. A logical extension of this work is the second-generation PFBC plant, which incorporates key components of each of these technologies. In this new type of plant, coal is devolatilized/carbonized before it is injected into the PFB combustor bed, and the low-Btu fuel gas produced by this process is burned in a gas turbine topping combustor. By integrating coal carbonization with PFB[degree]C (2300[degree]F) and higher can be achieved. When integrated with a conventional 16.5-MPa gage/538[degree]C/538[degree]C/8.5-kPa Hg (2400- psig/1000[degree]F/1000[degree]F/2.5-in. Hg) steam cycle, a plant electrical generating efficiency of 45-percent is predicted. Concomitant advantages, among others, are a 20-percent lower cost of electricity (compared with a conventional pulverized-coal-fired plant with stack gas scrubbing), reduced stack emissions, and components that can be shipped by barge. This paper presents a conceptual design and economic analysis of Pittsburgh No. 8 and Texas lignite coal-fired 500-MWe second-generation PFB combustion plants.

  20. Eye Drop Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... Involved News About Us Donate In This Section Eye Drop Tips en Español email Send this article ... the reach of children. Steps For Putting In Eye Drops: Start by tilting your head backward while ...

  1. Attracting Water Drops

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronauts Cady Coleman and Ron Garan perform the Attracting Water Drops experiment from Chabad Hebrew Academy in San Diego, Calif. This research determines if a free-floating water drop can be att...

  2. Instability of development and fractal architecture in dryland plants as an index of grazing pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alados, C.L.; Emlen, J.M.; Wachocki, B.; Freeman, D.C.

    1998-01-01

    Developmental instability has been used to monitor the well-being of natural populations exposed to physical, chemical and biological stressors. Here, we use developmental instability to assess the impact of grazing on Chrysothamnus greenii and Seriphidium novumshrubs, and Oryzopsis hymenoidesgrass, common in the arid intermountain west of the U.S.A. Statistical noise in allometric relations was used as an indicator of developmental instability arising from grazing-induced stress. Unpalatable species that are not grazed (Chrysothamnus greenii) or species that are dormant during the winter–spring grazing period (Oryzopsis hymenoides) show lower allometric variability under high grazing pressure. Palatable species (Seriphidium novum) exhibit high developmental instability under low and high grazing pressure. Grazing pressure imposed by presumably co-adapted wild herbivores enhances developmental stability in species habituated to moderate grazing, likeOryzopsis hymenoides, but stresses plants such as Chrysothamnus greenii that prefer disturbed environments. These grazing effects are probably due to the impact grazing has on competitive relationships and not to the direct action of the herbivore on the plants.

  3. Linking Turgor with ABA Biosynthesis: Implications for Stomatal Responses to Vapor Pressure Deficit across Land Plants.

    PubMed

    McAdam, Scott A M; Brodribb, Timothy J

    2016-07-01

    Stomatal responses to changes in vapor pressure deficit (VPD) constitute the predominant form of daytime gas-exchange regulation in plants. Stomatal closure in response to increased VPD is driven by the rapid up-regulation of foliar abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis and ABA levels in angiosperms; however, very little is known about the physiological trigger for this increase in ABA biosynthesis at increased VPD Using a novel method of modifying leaf cell turgor by the application of external pressures, we test whether changes in turgor pressure can trigger increases in foliar ABA levels over 20 min, a period of time most relevant to the stomatal response to VPD We found in angiosperm species that the biosynthesis of ABA was triggered by reductions in leaf turgor, and in two species tested, that a higher sensitivity of ABA synthesis to leaf turgor corresponded with a higher stomatal sensitivity to VPD In contrast, representative species from nonflowering plant lineages did not show a rapid turgor-triggered increase in foliar ABA levels, which is consistent with previous studies demonstrating passive stomatal responses to changes in VPD in these lineages. Our method provides a new tool for characterizing the response of stomata to water availability.

  4. Nuclear power plant containment metallic pressure boundary materials and plans for collecting and presenting their properties

    SciTech Connect

    Oland, C.B.

    1995-04-01

    A program is being conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL to assist the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)) in their assessment of the effects of degradation (primarily corrosion) on the structural capacity and leaktight integrity of metal containments and steel liners of reinforced concrete structures in nuclear power plants. One of the program objectives is to characterize and quantify manifestations of corrosion on the properties of steels used to construct containment pressure boundary components. This report describes a plan for use in collecting and presenting data and information on ferrous alloys permitted for use in construction of pressure retaining components in concrete and metal containments. Discussions about various degradation mechanisms that could potentially affect the mechanical properties of these materials are also included. Conclusions and recommendations presented in this report will be used to guide the collection of data and information that will be used to prepare a material properties data base for containment steels.

  5. Dosimetry assessments for the reactor pressure vessel and core barrel in UK PWR plant

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, D.A.; Allen, D.A.; Huggon, A.P.; Picton, D.J.; Robinson, A.T.; Steadman, R.J.; Seren, T.; Lipponen, M.; Kekki, T.

    2011-07-01

    Specimens for the Sizewell B reactor pressure vessel (RPV) inservice steels surveillance program are irradiated inside eight capsules located within the reactor pressure vessel and loaded prior to commissioning. The periodic removal of these capsules and testing of their contents provides material properties data at intervals during the lifetime of the plant. Neutron activation measurements and radiation transport calculations play an essential role in assessing the neutron exposure of the specimens and RPV. Following the most recent withdrawal, seven capsules have now been removed covering nine cycles of reactor operation. This paper summarizes the dosimetry results of the Sizewell B surveillance program obtained to date. In addition to an overview of the calculational methodology it includes a review of the measurements. Finally, it describes an extension of the methodology to provide dosimetry recommendations for the core barrel and briefly discusses the results that were obtained. (authors)

  6. Demonstrating Structural Adequacy of Nuclear Power Plant Containment Structures for Beyond Design-Basis Pressure Loadings

    SciTech Connect

    Braverman, J.I.; Morante, R.

    2010-07-18

    ABSTRACT Demonstrating the structural integrity of U.S. nuclear power plant (NPP) containment structures, for beyond design-basis internal pressure loadings, is necessary to satisfy Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements and performance goals. This paper discusses methods for demonstrating the structural adequacy of the containment for beyond design-basis pressure loadings. Three distinct evaluations are addressed: (1) estimating the ultimate pressure capacity of the containment structure (10 CFR 50 and US NRC Standard Review Plan, Section 3.8) ; (2) demonstrating the structural adequacy of the containment subjected to pressure loadings associated with combustible gas generation (10 CFR 52 and 10 CFR 50); and (3) demonstrating the containment structural integrity for severe accidents (10 CFR 52 as well as SECY 90-016, SECY 93-087, and related NRC staff requirements memoranda (SRMs)). The paper describes the technical basis for specific aspects of the methods presented. It also presents examples of past issues identified in licensing activities related to these evaluations.

  7. Plant growth modeling at the JSC variable pressure growth chamber - An application of experimental design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Adam M.; Edeen, Marybeth; Sirko, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the approach and results of an effort to characterize plant growth under various environmental conditions at the Johnson Space Center variable pressure growth chamber. Using a field of applied mathematics and statistics known as design of experiments (DOE), we developed a test plan for varying environmental parameters during a lettuce growth experiment. The test plan was developed using a Box-Behnken approach to DOE. As a result of the experimental runs, we have developed empirical models of both the transpiration process and carbon dioxide assimilation for Waldman's Green lettuce over specified ranges of environmental parameters including carbon dioxide concentration, light intensity, dew-point temperature, and air velocity. This model also predicts transpiration and carbon dioxide assimilation for different ages of the plant canopy.

  8. Pressure drop, heat transfer, critical heat flux, and flow stability of two-phase flow boiling of water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures - final report for project "Efficent cooling in engines with nucleate boiling."

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, W.; France, D. M.; Routbort, J. L.

    2011-01-19

    Because of its order-of-magnitude higher heat transfer rates, there is interest in using controllable two-phase nucleate boiling instead of conventional single-phase forced convection in vehicular cooling systems to remove ever increasing heat loads and to eliminate potential hot spots in engines. However, the fundamental understanding of flow boiling mechanisms of a 50/50 ethylene glycol/water mixture under engineering application conditions is still limited. In addition, it is impractical to precisely maintain the volume concentration ratio of the ethylene glycol/water mixture coolant at 50/50. Therefore, any investigation into engine coolant characteristics should include a range of volume concentration ratios around the nominal 50/50 mark. In this study, the forced convective boiling heat transfer of distilled water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures with volume concentration ratios of 40/60, 50/50, and 60/40 in a 2.98-mm-inner-diameter circular tube has been investigated in both the horizontal flow and the vertical flow. The two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux of the test fluids were determined experimentally over a range of the mass flux, the vapor mass quality, and the inlet subcooling through a new boiling data reduction procedure that allowed the analytical calculation of the fluid boiling temperatures along the experimental test section by applying the ideal mixture assumption and the equilibrium assumption along with Raoult's law. Based on the experimental data, predictive methods for the two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux under engine application conditions were developed. The results summarized in this final project report provide the necessary information for designing and implementing nucleate-boiling vehicular cooling systems.

  9. Micro-explosion of compound drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Kuei; Lin, Ta-Hui

    2014-08-01

    Introducing water into spray combustion systems, by either water-in-oil emulsification or supplementary water injection, is one of the major techniques for combustion improvement and NOx reduction. Plentiful researches are available on combustion of water-in-oil emulsion fuel drops. The emulsified liquid is a heterogeneous mixture of immiscible liquids. One component forms the continuous phase and the other component forms the discrete phase. The discrete phase consists of globules of the one fluid that are suspended in the continuous phase fluid. Water-in-oil emulsions are commonly considered for combustion applications because emulsions can result in micro-explosion, thereby reducing the average drop diameter to enhance liquid vaporization, and suppressing the formation of soot and NOx. However, the water addition generally does not exceed about 20% for smooth engine operations[!, 21. The combustion characteristics and micro-explosion of emulsion drop were studied by many researchers. The micro-explosion of water in fuel emulsion drops was caused by very fast growth of superheated water vapor bubbles, its superheat limits must be lower than the boiling point temperature of the fuel. These bubbles were primarily governed by the pressure difference between the superheated vapor and the liquid, and by the inertia imparted to the liquid by the motion of the bubble surface[3 6 In this study, we used a coaxial nozzle to generation the multi-component drop. The different type of water-in-oil fuel drops called the compound drops. Unlike an emulsion drop, a compound drop consists of a water core and a fuel shell, which can originate from the phase separation of emulsion[7, 81 or a water drop colliding with a fuel drop[9, 101 Burning and micro-explosion of compound drops have been found to be distinct from those of emulsion drops[9-111 Wang et al.[9 , 101 studied the combustion characteristics of collision merged alkane-water drops. The merged drops appeared in adhesive

  10. Climate and Human Pressure Constraints Co-Explain Regional Plant Invasion at Different Spatial Scales

    PubMed Central

    García-Baquero, Gonzalo; Caño, Lidia; Biurrun, Idoia; García-Mijangos, Itziar; Loidi, Javier; Herrera, Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    Alien species invasion represents a global threat to biodiversity and ecosystems. Explaining invasion patterns in terms of environmental constraints will help us to assess invasion risks and plan control strategies. We aim to identify plant invasion patterns in the Basque Country (Spain), and to determine the effects of climate and human pressure on that pattern. We modeled the regional distribution of 89 invasive plant species using two approaches. First, distance-based Moran’s eigenvector maps were used to partition variation in the invasive species richness, S, into spatial components at broad and fine scales; redundancy analysis was then used to explain those components on the basis of climate and human pressure descriptors. Second, we used generalized additive mixed modeling to fit species-specific responses to the same descriptors. Climate and human pressure descriptors have different effects on S at different spatial scales. Broad-scale spatially structured temperature and precipitation, and fine-scale spatially structured human population density and percentage of natural and semi-natural areas, explained altogether 38.7% of the total variance. The distribution of 84% of the individually tested species was related to either temperature, precipitation or both, and 68% was related to either population density or natural and semi-natural areas, displaying similar responses. The spatial pattern of the invasive species richness is strongly environmentally forced, mainly by climate factors. Since individual species responses were proved to be both similarly constrained in shape and explained variance by the same environmental factors, we conclude that the pattern of invasive species richness results from individual species’ environmental preferences. PMID:27741276

  11. Climate and Human Pressure Constraints Co-Explain Regional Plant Invasion at Different Spatial Scales.

    PubMed

    Campos, Juan Antonio; García-Baquero, Gonzalo; Caño, Lidia; Biurrun, Idoia; García-Mijangos, Itziar; Loidi, Javier; Herrera, Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    Alien species invasion represents a global threat to biodiversity and ecosystems. Explaining invasion patterns in terms of environmental constraints will help us to assess invasion risks and plan control strategies. We aim to identify plant invasion patterns in the Basque Country (Spain), and to determine the effects of climate and human pressure on that pattern. We modeled the regional distribution of 89 invasive plant species using two approaches. First, distance-based Moran's eigenvector maps were used to partition variation in the invasive species richness, S, into spatial components at broad and fine scales; redundancy analysis was then used to explain those components on the basis of climate and human pressure descriptors. Second, we used generalized additive mixed modeling to fit species-specific responses to the same descriptors. Climate and human pressure descriptors have different effects on S at different spatial scales. Broad-scale spatially structured temperature and precipitation, and fine-scale spatially structured human population density and percentage of natural and semi-natural areas, explained altogether 38.7% of the total variance. The distribution of 84% of the individually tested species was related to either temperature, precipitation or both, and 68% was related to either population density or natural and semi-natural areas, displaying similar responses. The spatial pattern of the invasive species richness is strongly environmentally forced, mainly by climate factors. Since individual species responses were proved to be both similarly constrained in shape and explained variance by the same environmental factors, we conclude that the pattern of invasive species richness results from individual species' environmental preferences.

  12. Membrane associated qualitative differences in cell ultrastructure of chemically and high pressure cryofixed plant cells.

    PubMed

    Zechmann, Bernd; Müller, Maria; Zellnig, Günther

    2007-06-01

    Membrane contrast can sometimes be poor in biological samples after high pressure freezing (HPF) and freeze substitution (FS). The addition of water to the FS-medium has been shown to improve membrane contrast in animal tissue and yeast. In the present study we tested the effects of 1% and 5% water added to the FS-medium (2% osmium with 0.2% uranyl acetate in anhydrous acetone) on the quality and visibility of membranes in high pressure frozen leaf samples of Cucurbita pepo L. plants and compared them to chemically fixed cells (3% glutaraldehyde post-fixed with 1% osmium tetroxide). The addition of water to the FS-medium drastically decreased the amounts of well preserved cells and did not significantly improve the quality nor visibility of membranes. In samples that were freeze substituted in FS-media containing 1% and 5% water the width of thylakoid membranes was found to be significantly increased of about 20% and the perinuclear space was up to 76% wider in comparison to what was found in samples which were freeze substituted without water. No differences were found in the thickness of membranes between chemically and cryofixed cells that were freeze substituted in the FS-medium without water. Nevertheless, in chemically fixed cells the intrathylakoidal space was about 120% wider than in cryofixed cells that were freeze substituted with or without water. The present results demonstrate that the addition of water to the FS-medium does not improve membrane contrast but changes the width of thylakoid membranes and the perinuclear space in the present plant material. The addition of water to the FS-medium is therefore not as essential for improved membrane contrast in the investigated plant samples as it was observed in cells of animal tissues and yeast cells.

  13. Role of turgor pressure and solute transport in plant cell growth: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cosgrove, D.J.

    1987-10-15

    We have worked on three major areas, as outlined in the major grant proposal of last year. These are measurement of wall relaxation by pressurization, coupling between cell expansion and solute uptake, and experiments with severed aphids. We have advanced very rapidly in the first area, reasonably well in the second area, and have been delayed in the third area. A new method, termed the pressure-block technique, was developed this past year to measure the yielding characteristics of growing plant cell walls. The way it works is as follows. Our first approach in studying the relationship between solute uptake and growth was to reduce the solute supply to elongating pea stems of etiolated seedlings by excising the cotyledons. Solute import was effectively stopped over the 5 h period after excision; no net change in dry weight of a 0.5 cm segment occurred 5 h after cotyledon removal, compared to an increase of 0.3 mg in intact seedlings. We constructed a radio frequency microcautery device, and succeeded in excising the stylets from pea aphids feeding on pea epicotyls, but exudation quickly ceased. It may prove more practical to probe into the phloem directly with the pressure probe, without using the aphid stylet.

  14. Generalized Charts for Determination of Pressure Drop of a High-speed Compressible Fluid in Heat-exchanger Passages I : Air Heated in Smooth Passages of Constant Area with Constant Wall Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valerino, Michael F

    1948-01-01

    In the present paper an analysis is made of the compressible-flow variations occurring in heat-exchanger passages. The results of the analysis describe the flow and heating characteristics for which specific flow passages can be treated as segments of generalized flow systems. The graphical representation of the flow variations in the generalized flow systems can then be utilized as working charts to determine directly the pressure changes occurring in any specific flow passage. On the basis of these results, working charts are constructed to handle the case of air heated at constant wall temperature under turbulent-flow conditions. A method is given of incorporating the effect on the heat-exchanger flow process of high temperature differential between passage wall and fluid as based on recent NACA experimental data. Good agreement is obtained between the experimental and the chart pressure-drop values for passage-wall average temperatures as high as 1752 degrees R (experimental limit) and for flow Mach numbers ranging from 0.32 to 1.00 (choke) at the passage exit.

  15. Drag on Sessile Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Andrew J. B.; Fleck, Brian; Nobes, David; Sen, Debjyoti; Amirfazli, Alidad; University of Alberta Mechanical Engineering Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    We present the first ever direct measurements of the coefficient of drag on sessile drops at Reynolds numbers from the creeping flow regime up to the point of incipient motion, made using a newly developed floating element differential drag sensor. Surfaces of different wettabilities (PMMA, Teflon, and a superhydrophobic surface (SHS)), wet by water, hexadecane, and various silicone oils, are used to study the effects of drop shape, and fluid properties on drag. The relation between drag coefficient and Reynolds number (scaled by drop height) varies slightly with liquid-solid system and drop volume with results suggesting the drop experiences increased drag compared to similar shaped solid bodies due to drop oscillation influencing the otherwise laminar flow. Drops adopting more spherical shapes are seen to experience the greatest force at any given airspeed. This indicates that the relative exposed areas of drops is an important consideration in terms of force, with implications for the shedding of drops in applications such as airfoil icing and fuel cell flooding. The measurement technique used in this work can be adapted to measure drag force on other deformable, lightly adhered objects such as dust, sand, snow, vesicles, foams, and biofilms. The authours acknowledge NSERC, Alberta Innovates Technology Futures, and the Killam Trusts.

  16. Aging of the containment pressure boundary in light-water reactor plants

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    Research is being conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to address aging of the containment pressure boundary in light-water reactor plants. The objectives of this work are to (1) identify the significant factors related to occurrence of corrosion, efficacy of inspection, and structural capacity reduction of steel containments and liners of concrete containments, and to make recommendations on use of risk models in regulatory decisions; (2) provide NRC reviewers a means of establishing current structural capacity margins for steel containments, and concrete containments as limited by liner integrity; and (3) provide recommendations, as appropriate, on information to be requested of licensees for guidance that could be utilized by NRC reviewers in assessing the seriousness of reported incidences of containment degradation. In meeting these objectives research is being conducted in two primary task areas - pressure boundary condition assessment and root-cause resolution practices, and reliability-based condition assessments. Under the first task area a degradation assessment methodology was developed for use in characterizing the in-service condition of metal and concrete containment pressure boundary components and quantifying the amount of damage that is present. An assessment of available destructive and nondestructive techniques for examining steel containments and liners is ongoing. Under the second task area quantitative structural reliability analysis methods are being developed for application to degraded metallic pressure boundaries to provide assurances that they will be able to withstand future extreme loads during the desired service period with a level of reliability that is sufficient for public safety. To date, mathematical models that describe time-dependent changes in steel due to aggressive environmental factors have been identified, and statistical data supporting their use in time-dependent reliability analysis have been summarized.

  17. The photosynthetic response of tobacco plants overexpressing ice plant aquaporin McMIPB to a soil water deficit and high vapor pressure deficit.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Miki; Hanba, Yuko T; Katsuhara, Maki

    2013-07-01

    We investigated the photosynthetic capacity and plant growth of tobacco plants overexpressing ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L.) aquaporin McMIPB under (1) a well-watered growth condition, (2) a well-watered and temporal higher vapor pressure deficit (VPD) condition, and (3) a soil water deficit growth condition to investigate the effect of McMIPB on photosynthetic responses under moderate soil and atmospheric humidity and water deficit conditions. Transgenic plants showed a significantly higher photosynthesis rate (by 48 %), higher mesophyll conductance (by 52 %), and enhanced growth under the well-watered growth condition than those of control plants. Decreases in the photosynthesis rate and stomatal conductance from ambient to higher VPD were slightly higher in transgenic plants than those in control plants. When plants were grown under the soil water deficit condition, decreases in the photosynthesis rate and stomatal conductance were less significant in transgenic plants than those in control plants. McMIPB is likely to work as a CO2 transporter, as well as control the regulation of stomata to water deficits.

  18. Youth Crime Drop. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butts, Jeffrey A.

    This report examines the recent drop in violent crime in the United States, discussing how much of the decrease seen between 1995-99 is attributable to juveniles (under age 18 years) and older youth (18-24 years). Analysis of current FBI arrest data indicates that not only did America's violent crime drop continue through 1999, but falling youth…

  19. Drop Tower Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittrich, William A.

    2014-01-01

    The drop towers of yesteryear were used to make lead shot for muskets, as described in "The Physics Teacher" in April 2012. However, modern drop towers are essentially elevators designed so that the cable can "break" on demand, creating an environment with microgravity for a short period of time, currently up to nine seconds at…

  20. Axisymmetric Liquid Hanging Drops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meister, Erich C.; Latychevskaia, Tatiana Yu

    2006-01-01

    The geometry of drops hanging on a circular capillary can be determined by numerically solving a dimensionless differential equation that is independent on any material properties, which enables one to follow the change of the height, surface area, and contact angle of drops hanging on a particular capillary. The results show that the application…

  1. Inhibition of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme, Angiotensin II Receptor Blocking, and Blood Pressure Lowering Bioactivity across Plant Families.

    PubMed

    Patten, Glen S; Abeywardena, Mahinda Y; Bennett, Louise E

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease, kidney disease, and stroke. Interest in medicinal or nutraceutical plant bioactives to reduce hypertension has increased dramatically. The main biological regulation of mammalian blood pressure is via the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. The key enzyme is angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) that converts angiotensin I into the powerful vasoconstrictor, angiotensin II. Angiotensin II binds to its receptors (AT1) on smooth muscle cells of the arteriole vasculature causing vasoconstriction and elevation of blood pressure. This review focuses on the in vitro and in vivo reports of plant-derived extracts that inhibit ACE activity, block angiotensin II receptor binding and demonstrate hypotensive activity in animal or human studies. We describe 74 families of plants that exhibited significant ACE inhibitory activity and 16 plant families with potential AT1 receptor blocking activity, according to in vitro studies. From 43 plant families including some of those with in vitro bioactivity, the extracts from 73 plant species lowered blood pressure in various normotensive or hypertensive in vivo models by the oral route. Of these, 19 species from 15 families lowered human BP when administered orally. Some of the active plant extracts, isolated bioactives and BP-lowering mechanisms are discussed.

  2. Ball tonometry: a rapid, nondestructive method for measuring cell turgor pressure in thin-walled plant cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lintilhac, P. M.; Wei, C.; Tanguay, J. J.; Outwater, J. O.

    2000-01-01

    In this article we describe a new method for the determination of turgor pressures in living plant cells. Based on the treatment of growing plant cells as thin-walled pressure vessels, we find that pressures can be accurately determined by observing and measuring the area of the contact patch formed when a spherical glass probe is lowered onto the cell surface with a known force. Within the limits we have described, we can show that the load (determined by precalibration of the device) divided by the projected area of the contact patch (determined by video microscopy) provides a direct, rapid, and accurate measure of the internal turgor pressure of the cell. We demonstrate, by parallel measurements with the pressure probe, that our method yields pressure data that are consistent with those from the pressure probe. Also, by incubating target tissues in stepped concentrations of mannitol to incrementally reduce the turgor pressure, we show that the pressures measured by tonometry accurately reflect the predicted changes from the osmotic potential of the bathing medium. The advantages of this new method over the pressure probe are considerable, however, in that we can move rapidly from cell to cell, taking measurements every 20 s. In addition, the nondestructive nature of the method means that we can return to the same cell repeatedly for periodic pressure measurements. The limitations of the method lie in the fact that it is suitable only for superficial cells that are directly accessible to the probe and to cells that are relatively thin walled and not heavily decorated with surface features. It is also not suitable for measuring pressures in flaccid cells.

  3. Propagule Pressure, Habitat Conditions and Clonal Integration Influence the Establishment and Growth of an Invasive Clonal Plant, Alternanthera philoxeroides.

    PubMed

    You, Wen-Hua; Han, Cui-Min; Fang, Long-Xiang; Du, Dao-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Many notorious invasive plants are clonal, spreading mainly by vegetative propagules. Propagule pressure (the number of propagules) may affect the establishment, growth, and thus invasion success of these clonal plants, and such effects may also depend on habitat conditions. To understand how propagule pressure, habitat conditions and clonal integration affect the establishment and growth of the invasive clonal plants, an 8-week greenhouse with an invasive clonal plant, Alternanthera philoxeroides was conducted. High (five fragments) or low (one fragment) propagule pressure was established either in bare soil (open habitat) or dense native vegetation of Jussiaea repens (vegetative habitat), with the stolon connections either severed from or connected to the relatively older ramets. High propagule pressure greatly increased the establishment and growth of A. philoxeroides, especially when it grew in vegetative habitats. Surprisingly, high propagule pressure significantly reduced the growth of individual plants of A. philoxeroides in open habitats, whereas it did not affect the individual growth in vegetative habitats. A shift in the intraspecific interaction on A. philoxeroides from competition in open habitats to facilitation in vegetative habitats may be the main reason. Moreover, clonal integration significantly improved the growth of A. philoxeroides only in open habitats, especially with low propagule pressure, whereas it had no effects on the growth and competitive ability of A. philoxeroides in vegetative habitats, suggesting that clonal integration may be of most important for A. philoxeroides to explore new open space and spread. These findings suggest that propagule pressure may be crucial for the invasion success of A. philoxeroides, and such an effect also depends on habitat conditions.

  4. Propagule Pressure, Habitat Conditions and Clonal Integration Influence the Establishment and Growth of an Invasive Clonal Plant, Alternanthera philoxeroides

    PubMed Central

    You, Wen-Hua; Han, Cui-Min; Fang, Long-Xiang; Du, Dao-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Many notorious invasive plants are clonal, spreading mainly by vegetative propagules. Propagule pressure (the number of propagules) may affect the establishment, growth, and thus invasion success of these clonal plants, and such effects may also depend on habitat conditions. To understand how propagule pressure, habitat conditions and clonal integration affect the establishment and growth of the invasive clonal plants, an 8-week greenhouse with an invasive clonal plant, Alternanthera philoxeroides was conducted. High (five fragments) or low (one fragment) propagule pressure was established either in bare soil (open habitat) or dense native vegetation of Jussiaea repens (vegetative habitat), with the stolon connections either severed from or connected to the relatively older ramets. High propagule pressure greatly increased the establishment and growth of A. philoxeroides, especially when it grew in vegetative habitats. Surprisingly, high propagule pressure significantly reduced the growth of individual plants of A. philoxeroides in open habitats, whereas it did not affect the individual growth in vegetative habitats. A shift in the intraspecific interaction on A. philoxeroides from competition in open habitats to facilitation in vegetative habitats may be the main reason. Moreover, clonal integration significantly improved the growth of A. philoxeroides only in open habitats, especially with low propagule pressure, whereas it had no effects on the growth and competitive ability of A. philoxeroides in vegetative habitats, suggesting that clonal integration may be of most important for A. philoxeroides to explore new open space and spread. These findings suggest that propagule pressure may be crucial for the invasion success of A. philoxeroides, and such an effect also depends on habitat conditions. PMID:27200041

  5. Lead exposure and blood pressure among workers in diverse industrial plants in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Were, Faridah H; Moturi, M Charles; Gottesfeld, P; Wafula, Godfrey A; Kamau, Geoffrey N; Shiundu, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    The study evaluated airborne exposures and blood lead (BPb) levels in 233 production workers at six diverse industrial plants in Kenya. Blood and personal breathing zone air samples were collected and analyzed for lead (Pb) using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Blood pressure (BP) levels were measured using a standard mercury sphygmomanometer. The results indicated mean airborne Pb levels ± standard deviation (SD) as follows: 183.2 ± 53.6 μg/m(3) in battery recycling, 133.5 ± 39.6 μg/m(3) in battery manufacturing, 126.2 ± 39.9 μg/m(3) in scrap metal welding, 76.3 ± 33.2 μg/m(3) in paint manufacturing, 27.3 ± 12.1 μg/m(3) in a leather manufacturing, and 5.5 ± 3.6 μg/m(3) in a pharmaceutical plant. The mean airborne Pb levels exceeded the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 8-hr time-weighted average (TWA) permissible exposure limit (PEL) for Pb of 50 μg/m(3) in the battery manufacturing, battery recycling, welding, and paint manufacturing plants. Similarly, mean BPb concentrations exceeded the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH®) biological exposure index (BEI) for Pb of 30 μg/dl. A significant positive association was observed between BPb and breathing zone air Pb (R(2) = 0.73, P < 0.001). Approximately 30% of the production workers (N = 233) were in the hypertensive range with an average systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) of 134.7 ± 12.7 mmHg and 86.4 ± 8.9 mmHg, respectively. In the multivariate regression analysis, age, duration of work, airborne Pb and BPb levels were significantly associated (P < 0.05) with a change in BP. We recommend improved engineering controls, work practices, and personal hygiene to reduce Pb exposures. In addition, workers should undergo comprehensive medical surveillance to include BPb and BP testing, and airborne Pb assessments in all industries with significant lead exposures.

  6. Intelligent Prediction of Fan Rotation Stall in Power Plants Based on Pressure Sensor Data Measured In-Situ

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaogang; Wang, Songling; Liu, Jinlian; Liu, Xinyu

    2014-01-01

    Blower and exhaust fans consume over 30% of electricity in a thermal power plant, and faults of these fans due to rotation stalls are one of the most frequent reasons for power plant outage failures. To accurately predict the occurrence of fan rotation stalls, we propose a support vector regression machine (SVRM) model that predicts the fan internal pressures during operation, leaving ample time for rotation stall detection. We train the SVRM model using experimental data samples, and perform pressure data prediction using the trained SVRM model. To prove the feasibility of using the SVRM model for rotation stall prediction, we further process the predicted pressure data via wavelet-transform-based stall detection. By comparison of the detection results from the predicted and measured pressure data, we demonstrate that the SVRM model can accurately predict the fan pressure and guarantee reliable stall detection with a time advance of up to 0.0625 s. This superior pressure data prediction capability leaves significant time for effective control and prevention of fan rotation stall faults. This model has great potential for use in intelligent fan systems with stall prevention capability, which will ensure safe operation and improve the energy efficiency of power plants. PMID:24854057

  7. Intelligent prediction of fan rotation stall in power plants based on pressure sensor data measured in-situ.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaogang; Wang, Songling; Liu, Jinlian; Liu, Xinyu

    2014-05-19

    Blower and exhaust fans consume over 30% of electricity in a thermal power plant, and faults of these fans due to rotation stalls are one of the most frequent reasons for power plant outage failures. To accurately predict the occurrence of fan rotation stalls, we propose a support vector regression machine (SVRM) model that predicts the fan internal pressures during operation, leaving ample time for rotation stall detection. We train the SVRM model using experimental data samples, and perform pressure data prediction using the trained SVRM model. To prove the feasibility of using the SVRM model for rotation stall prediction, we further process the predicted pressure data via wavelet-transform-based stall detection. By comparison of the detection results from the predicted and measured pressure data, we demonstrate that the SVRM model can accurately predict the fan pressure and guarantee reliable stall detection with a time advance of up to 0.0625 s. This superior pressure data prediction capability leaves significant time for effective control and prevention of fan rotation stall faults. This model has great potential for use in intelligent fan systems with stall prevention capability, which will ensure safe operation and improve the energy efficiency of power plants.

  8. Millikan "oil drop" stabilized by growth.

    PubMed

    Sun, L K; Gertler, A W; Reiss, H

    1979-01-26

    A diffusion cloud chamber has been used to qualitatively study some dynamic properties of liquid drops by suspending them in an electric field at the plane of saturation (p/ps = 1, where p is the actual partial pressure of the vapor at a given elevation and ps is the equilibrium pressure at that temperature characteristic of that elevation). By varying the strength of the electric field, it is possible to change the size of the suspended droplets and even, if desired, to isolate a single drop.

  9. Modeling of drop breakup in the bag breakup regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Chang, S.; Wu, H.; Xu, J.

    2014-04-01

    Several analytic models for predicting the drop deformation and breakup have been developed over the last three decades, but modeling drop breakup in the bag-type regime is less reported. In this Letter, a breakup model has been proposed to predict the drop deformation length and breakup time in the bag-type breakup regime in a more accurate manner. In the present model, the drop deformation which is approximately as the displacement of the centre of mass (c. m.) along the axis located at the centre of the drop, and the movement of c. m. is obtained by solving the pressure balance equation. The effects of the drop deformation on the drop external aerodynamic force are considered in this model. Drop breakup occurs when the deformation length reaches the maximum value and the maximum deformation length is a function of Weber number. The performance and applicability of the proposed breakup model are tested against the published experimental data.

  10. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)

    SciTech Connect

    J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

    2008-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program is responsible for performing research and development on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. Studies of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels have been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual design studies. These design studies generally focus on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Three realistic candidate materials have been identified by this process: conventional light water reactor RPV steels A508/533, 2¼Cr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and modified 9Cr 1Mo ferritic martenistic steel. Based on superior strength and higher temperature limits, the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has been identified by the majority of design engineers as the preferred choice for the RPV. All of the vendors have

  11. Drop Tower Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David

    2013-01-01

    Ground based microgravity facilities are an important proving ground for space experiments, ground-based research and space hardware risk mitigation. An overview of existing platforms will be discussed with an emphasis on drop tower capabilities. The potential for extension to partial gravity conditions will be discussed. Input will be solicited from attendees for their potential to use drop towers in the future and the need for enhanced capabilities (e.g. partial gravity)

  12. DNA barcodes for Mexican Cactaceae, plants under pressure from wild collecting.

    PubMed

    Yesson, Chris; Bárcenas, Rolando T; Hernández, Héctor M; Ruiz-Maqueda, María de la Luz; Prado, Alberto; Rodríguez, Víctor M; Hawkins, Julie A

    2011-09-01

    DNA barcodes could be a useful tool for plant conservation. Of particular importance is the ability to identify unknown plant material, such as from customs seizures of illegally collected specimens. Mexican cacti are an example of a threatened group, under pressure because of wild collection for the xeriscaping trade and private collectors. Mexican cacti also provide a taxonomically and geographically coherent group with which to test DNA barcodes. Here, we sample the matK barcode for 528 species of Cactaceae including approximately 75% of Mexican species and test the utility of the matK region for species-level identification. We find that the matK DNA barcode can be used to identify uniquely 77% of species sampled, and 79-87% of species of particular conservation importance. However, this is far below the desired rate of 95% and there are significant issues for PCR amplification because of the variability of primer sites. Additionally, we test the nuclear ITS regions for the cactus subfamily Opuntioideae and for the genus Ariocarpus (subfamily Cactoideae). We observed higher rates of variation for ITS (86% unique for Opuntioideae sampled) but a much lower PCR success, encountering significant intra-individual polymorphism in Ariocarpus precluding the use of this marker in this taxon. We conclude that the matK region should provide useful information as a DNA barcode for Cactaceae if the problems with primers can be addressed, but matK alone is not sufficiently variable to achieve species-level identification. Additional complementary regions should be investigated as ITS is shown to be unsuitable.

  13. Increasing the efficiency of geothermal power plants using optimum pressures for turbocompressors and steam jet ejectors in gas extraction systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harns, Karsten Franz

    Geothermal power plants generate electricity by extracting energy from the earth's interior. The radioactive decay of the earth's core causes heat to conduct towards the surface. When water flows into the fissures of this hot rock a naturally occurring geothermal well is formed. Geothermal power plants use the steam in these wells to drive a turbine and thus generate electricity. The steam in the earth however, is always accompanied by a small fraction of non-condensable gases that build up in the power plant's condenser unless actively removed by some gas extraction system. Because these gases contribute significantly to the total backpressure on the turbine, it is in the interest of power generation to remove them from the condenser. The industry standard for removing these non-condensable gases has been steam jet ejectors or a hybrid system of steam jet ejectors and liquid ring vacuum pumps. This thesis focuses on finding the optimum operating pressures for a hybrid steam jet ejector system and a hybrid turbocompressor system. It was found that plants with steam jet ejectors and liquid ring vacuum pumps provide maximum power output when the liquid ring vacuum pump is operated at its maximum pressure ratio. However, plants with a turbocompressor and liquid ring vacuum pump were found to provide maximum power output when the turbocompressor was operated at its maximum pressure ratio.

  14. Rain Drop Charge Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Sreekanth T.

    begin{center} Large Large Rain Drop Charge Sensor Sreekanth T S*, Suby Symon*, G. Mohan Kumar (1) , S. Murali Das (2) *Atmospheric Sciences Division, Centre for Earth Science Studies, Thiruvananthapuram 695011 (1) D-330, Swathi Nagar, West Fort, Thiruvananthapuram 695023 (2) Kavyam, Manacaud, Thiruvananthapuram 695009 begin{center} ABSTRACT To study the inter-relations with precipitation electricity and precipitation microphysical parameters a rain drop charge sensor was designed and developed at CESS Electronics & Instrumentation Laboratory. Simultaneous measurement of electric charge and fall speed of rain drops could be done using this charge sensor. A cylindrical metal tube (sensor tube) of 30 cm length is placed inside another thick metal cover opened at top and bottom for electromagnetic shielding. Mouth of the sensor tube is exposed and bottom part is covered with metal net in the shielding cover. The instrument is designed in such a way that rain drops can pass only through unhindered inside the sensor tube. When electrically charged rain drops pass through the sensor tube, it is charged to the same magnitude of drop charge but with opposite polarity. The sensor tube is electrically connected the inverted input of a current to voltage converter operational amplifier using op-amp AD549. Since the sensor is electrically connected to the virtual ground of the op-amp, the charge flows to the ground and the generated current is converted to amplified voltage. This output voltage is recorded using a high frequency (1kHz) voltage recorder. From the recorded pulse, charge magnitude, polarity and fall speed of rain drop are calculated. From the fall speed drop diameter also can be calculated. The prototype is now under test running at CESS campus. As the magnitude of charge in rain drops is an indication of accumulated charge in clouds in lightning, this instrument has potential application in the field of risk and disaster management. By knowing the charge

  15. Preliminary materials selection issues for the next generation nuclear plant reactor pressure vessel.

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Majumdar, S.; Shankar, P. S.; Shah, V. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-03-21

    In the coming decades, the United States and the entire world will need energy supplies to meet the growing demands due to population increase and increase in consumption due to global industrialization. One of the reactor system concepts, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), with helium as the coolant, has been identified as uniquely suited for producing hydrogen without consumption of fossil fuels or the emission of greenhouse gases [Generation IV 2002]. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected this system for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, to demonstrate emissions-free nuclear-assisted electricity and hydrogen production within the next 15 years. The NGNP reference concepts are helium-cooled, graphite-moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactors with a design goal outlet helium temperature of {approx}1000 C [MacDonald et al. 2004]. The reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. The use of molten salt coolant, especially for the transfer of heat to hydrogen production, is also being considered. The NGNP is expected to produce both electricity and hydrogen. The process heat for hydrogen production will be transferred to the hydrogen plant through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). The basic technology for the NGNP has been established in the former high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) and demonstration plants (DRAGON, Peach Bottom, AVR, Fort St. Vrain, and THTR). In addition, the technologies for the NGNP are being advanced in the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) project, and the South African state utility ESKOM-sponsored project to develop the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). Furthermore, the Japanese HTTR and Chinese HTR-10 test reactors are demonstrating the feasibility of some of the planned components and materials. The proposed high operating temperatures in the VHTR place significant constraints on the choice of material selected for the reactor pressure vessel for

  16. Naturalization of central European plants in North America: species traits, habitats, propagule pressure, residence time.

    PubMed

    Pyšek, Petr; Manceur, Ameur M; Alba, Christina; McGregor, Kirsty F; Pergl, Jan; Stajerová, Katerina; Chytrý, Milan; Danihelka, Jiří; Kartesz, John; Klimesova, Jitka; Lucanova, Magdalena; Moravcová, Lenka; Nishino, Misako; Sadlo, Jiri; Suda, Jan; Tichy, Lubomir; Kühn, Ingolf

    2015-03-01

    The factors that promote invasive behavior in introduced plant species occur across many scales of biological and ecological organization. Factors that act at relatively small scales, for example, the evolution of biological traits associated with invasiveness, scale up to shape species distributions among different climates and habitats, as well as other characteristics linked to invasion, such as attractiveness for cultivation (and by extension propagule pressure). To identify drivers of invasion it is therefore necessary to disentangle the contribution of multiple factors that are interdependent. To this end, we formulated a conceptual model describing the process of invasion of central European species into North America based on a sequence of "drivers." We then used confirmatory path analysis to test whether the conceptual model is supported by a statistical model inferred from a comprehensive database containing 466 species. The path analysis revealed that naturalization of central European plants in North America, in terms of the number of North American regions invaded, most strongly depends on residence time in the invaded range and the number of habitats occupied by species in their native range. In addition to the confirmatory path analysis, we identified the effects of various biological traits on several important drivers of the conceptualized invasion process. The data supported a model that included indirect effects of biological traits on invasion via their effect on the number of native range habitats occupied and cultivation in the native range. For example, persistent seed banks and longer flowering periods are positively correlated with number of native habitats, while a stress-tolerant life strategy is negatively correlated with native range cultivation. However, the importance of the biological traits is nearly an order of magnitude less than that of the larger scale drivers and highly dependent on the invasion stage (traits were associated

  17. Drying drops of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brutin, David; Sobac, Benjamin; Loquet, Boris; Sampol, José.

    2010-11-01

    The drying of a drop of human blood is fascinating by the complexity of the physical mechanisms that occur as well as the beauty of the phenomenon which has never been previously evidenced in the literature. The final stage of full blood evaporation reveals for a healthy person the same regular pattern with a good reproducibility. Other tests on anemia and hyperlipidemic persons were performed and presented different patterns. By means of digital camera, the influence of the motion of red blood cells (RBCs) which represent about 50% of the blood volume, is revealed as well as its consequences on the final stages of drying. The mechanisms which lead to the final pattern of dried blood drops are presented and explained on the basis of fluid and solid mechanics in conjunction with the principles of hematology. Our group is the first to evidence that the specific regular patterns characteristic of a healthy individual do not appear in a dried drop of blood from a person with blood disease. Blood is a complex colloidal suspension for which the flow motion is clearly non-Newtonian. When drops of blood evaporate, all the colloids are carried by the flow motion inside the drop and interact.

  18. Complex Drop Impact Morphology.

    PubMed

    Grishaev, Viktor; Iorio, Carlo Saverio; Dubois, Frank; Amirfazli, A

    2015-09-15

    The aim of this work is to understand the changes in the observed phenomena during particle-laden drop impact. The impact of millimeter-size drops was investigated onto hydrophilic (glass) and hydrophobic (polycarbonate) substrates. The drops were dispersions of water and spherical and nearly iso-dense hydrophobic particles with diameters of 200 and 500 μm. The impact was studied by side and bottom view images in the range 150 ≤ We ≤ 750 and 7100 ≤ Re ≤ 16400. The particles suppressed the appearance of singular jetting and drop partial rebound but promoted splashing, receding breakup, and rupture. The drops with 200 μm particles spread in two phases: fast and slow, caused by inertial and capillary forces, respectively. Also, the increase in volume fraction of 200 μm particle led to a linear decrease in the maximum spreading factor caused by the inertia force on both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates. The explanation of this reduction was argued to be the result of energy dissipation through frictional losses between particles and the substrate.

  19. An analysis of problems arising during operation of the perm district power plant 800-MW power unit at sliding pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrutsky, G. D.; Zakharov, A. E.; Sargsyan, V. A.; Frolov, M. S.; Schwartz, A. L.; Adamov, A. S.

    2015-09-01

    The occurrence of cracks at locations in which bottoms are welded to the high-pressure heaters' headers was revealed during planned repairs of the Perm district power plant units. Specialists of the All-Russia Thermal Engineering Institute carried out investigations aimed at obtaining more detailed data on the effect the loading cyclicity and sliding-pressure operating modes have on the reliability of power-generating equipment. Another aim of those investigations was to elaborate recommendations for achieving more reliable operation of power-generating equipment under the conditions of cyclic variation of its load. The state of the main and auxiliary equipment of the Perm district power plant units is analyzed for determining the possibility and advisability of their further operation in sliding-pressure modes. The results obtained from calculating the permissible number of load variation cycles for the headers used in the Perm district power plant units operating under the conditions of startup-shutdown modes are analyzed, and the headers' residual cyclic service life is estimated. The results obtained from a metallographic investigation of the high-pressure header's bottom in the welded joint of which a through crack was revealed are presented. Recommendations for examining the header bottoms and for modifying their design in order to improve their operational reliability are given.

  20. Drop dynamics on a stretched viscoelastic filament: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peixinho, Jorge; Renoult, Marie-Charlotte; Crumeyrolle, Olivier; Mutabazi, Innocent

    2016-11-01

    Capillary pressure can destabilize a thin liquid filament during breakup into a succession of drops. Besides, the addition of a linear, high molecular weight, flexible and soluble polymer is enough to modify the morphology of this instability. In the time period preceding the breakup, the development of beads-on-a-string structures where drops are connected by thin threads is monitored. The drops dynamics involve drop formation, drop migration and drop coalescence. Experiments using a high-speed camera on stretched bridges of viscoelastic polymeric solutions were conducted for a range of viscosities and polymer concentrations. The rheological properties of the solutions are also quantified through conventional shear rheology and normal stress difference. The overall goal of this experimental investigation is to gain more insight into the formation and time evolution of the drops. The project BIOENGINE is co-financed by the European Union with the European regional development fund and by the Normandie Regional Council.

  1. Pressure-control purge panel for automatic butt welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, E. J.; Van Wagner, B. H.

    1969-01-01

    Modification of a purge panel for use in an automatic butt weld reduces the drop in pressure between the regulators and the weld head and tube purge fitting. The invention affects air regulators for plants, regulating circuits for pneumatic valves, and automatic welding machines.

  2. An investigation of temperature measurement methods in nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Acton, R.U.; Gill, W.; Sais, D.J.; Schulze, D.H.; Nakos, J.T.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this project was to provide an assessment of several methods by which the temperature of a commercial nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel (RPV) could be measured during an annealing process. This project was a coordinated effort between DOE`s Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology; DOE`s Light Water Reactor Technology Center at Sandia National Laboratories; and the Electric Power Research Institute`s Non- Destructive Evaluation Center. Ball- thermocouple probes similar to those described in NUREG/CR-5760, spring-loaded, metal- sheathed thermocouple probes, and 1778 air- suspended thermocouples were investigated in experiments that heated a section of an RPV wall to simulate a thermal annealing treatment. A parametric study of ball material, emissivity, thermal conductivity, and thermocouple function locations was conducted. Also investigated was a sheathed thermocouple failure mode known as shunting (electrical breakdown of insulation separating the thermocouple wires). Large errors were found between the temperature as measured by the probes and the true RPV wall temperature during heat-up and cool-down. At the annealing soak temperature, in this case 454{degrees}C [850`F], all sensors measured the same temperature within about {plus_minus}5% (23.6{degrees}C [42.5{degrees}F]). Because of these errors, actual RPV wall heating and cooling rates differed from those prescribed (by up to 29%). Shunting does not appear to be a problem under these conditions. The large temperature measurement errors led to the development of a thermal model that predicts the RPV wall temperature from the temperature of a ball- probe. Comparisons between the model and the experimental data for ball-probes indicate that the model could be a useful tool in predicting the actual RPV temperature based on the indicated ball- probe temperature. The model does not predict the temperature as well for the spring-loaded and air suspended probes.

  3. Removal plan for Shippingport pressurized water reactor core 2 blanket fuel assemblies form T plant to the canister storage building

    SciTech Connect

    Lata

    1996-09-26

    This document presents the current strategy and path forward for removal of the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies from their existing storage configuration (wet storage within the T Plant canyon) and transport to the Canister Storage Building (designed and managed by the Spent Nuclear Fuel. Division). The removal plan identifies all processes, equipment, facility interfaces, and documentation (safety, permitting, procedures, etc.) required to facilitate the PWR Core 2 assembly removal (from T Plant), transport (to the Canister storage Building), and storage to the Canister Storage Building. The plan also provides schedules, associated milestones, and cost estimates for all handling activities.

  4. Purge gas protected transportable pressurized fuel cell modules and their operation in a power plant

    DOEpatents

    Zafred, P.R.; Dederer, J.T.; Gillett, J.E.; Basel, R.A.; Antenucci, A.B.

    1996-11-12

    A fuel cell generator apparatus and method of its operation involves: passing pressurized oxidant gas and pressurized fuel gas into modules containing fuel cells, where the modules are each enclosed by a module housing surrounded by an axially elongated pressure vessel, and where there is a purge gas volume between the module housing and pressure vessel; passing pressurized purge gas through the purge gas volume to dilute any unreacted fuel gas from the modules; and passing exhaust gas and circulated purge gas and any unreacted fuel gas out of the pressure vessel; where the fuel cell generator apparatus is transportable when the pressure vessel is horizontally disposed, providing a low center of gravity. 11 figs.

  5. Purge gas protected transportable pressurized fuel cell modules and their operation in a power plant

    DOEpatents

    Zafred, Paolo R.; Dederer, Jeffrey T.; Gillett, James E.; Basel, Richard A.; Antenucci, Annette B.

    1996-01-01

    A fuel cell generator apparatus and method of its operation involves: passing pressurized oxidant gas, (O) and pressurized fuel gas, (F), into fuel cell modules, (10 and 12), containing fuel cells, where the modules are each enclosed by a module housing (18), surrounded by an axially elongated pressure vessel (64), where there is a purge gas volume, (62), between the module housing and pressure vessel; passing pressurized purge gas, (P), through the purge gas volume, (62), to dilute any unreacted fuel gas from the modules; and passing exhaust gas, (82), and circulated purge gas and any unreacted fuel gas out of the pressure vessel; where the fuel cell generator apparatus is transpatable when the pressure vessel (64) is horizontally disposed, providing a low center of gravity.

  6. Acoustic forcing of a liquid drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyell, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The development of systems such as acoustic levitation chambers will allow for the positioning and manipulation of material samples (drops) in a microgravity environment. This provides the capability for fundamental studies in droplet dynamics as well as containerless processing work. Such systems use acoustic radiation pressure forces to position or to further manipulate (e.g., oscillate) the sample. The primary objective was to determine the effect of a viscous acoustic field/tangential radiation pressure forcing on drop oscillations. To this end, the viscous acoustic field is determined. Modified (forced) hydrodynamic field equations which result from a consistent perturbation expansion scheme are solved. This is done in the separate cases of an unmodulated and a modulated acoustic field. The effect of the tangential radiation stress on the hydrodynamic field (drop oscillations) is found to manifest as a correction to the velocity field in a sublayer region near the drop/host interface. Moreover, the forcing due to the radiation pressure vector at the interface is modified by inclusion of tangential stresses.

  7. Microautoradiography of Water-Soluble Compounds in Plant Tissue after Freeze-Drying and Pressure Infiltration with Epoxy Resin

    PubMed Central

    Vogelmann, Thomas C.; Dickson, Richard E.

    1982-01-01

    It is difficult to retain and localize radioactive, water-soluble compounds within plant cells. Existing techniques retain water-soluble compounds with varying rates of efficiency and are limited to processing only a few samples at one time. We developed a modified pressure infiltration technique for the preparation of microautoradiographs of 14C-labeled, water-soluble compounds in plant tissue. Samples from cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh.) labeled with 14C were excised, quick frozen in liquid N2, freeze-dried at −50°C, and pressure-infiltrated with epoxy resin without intermediate solvents or prolonged incubation times. The technique facilitates the mass processing of samples for microautoradiography, gives good cellular retention of labeled water-soluble compounds, and is highly reproducible. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16662542

  8. Effect of High Pressure Homogenization on the Physicochemical Properties of Natural Plant-based Model Emulsion Applicable for Dairy Products

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Hee; Min, Sang-Gi; Jo, Yeon-Ji; Chun, Ji-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    In the dairy industry, natural plant-based powders are widely used to develop flavor and functionality. However, most of these ingredients are water-insoluble; therefore, emulsification is essential. In this study, the efficacy of high pressure homogenization (HPH) on natural plant (chocolate or vanilla)-based model emulsions was investigated. The particle size, electrical conductivity, Brix, pH, and color were analyzed after HPH. HPH significantly decreased the particle size of chocolate-based emulsions as a function of elevated pressures (20-100 MPa). HPH decreased the mean particle size of chocolate-based emulsions from 29.01 μm to 5.12 μm, and that of vanilla-based emulsions from 4.18 μm to 2.44 μm. Electrical conductivity increased as a function of the elevated pressures after HPH, for both chocolate- and vanilla-based model emulsions. HPH at 100 MPa increased the electrical conductivity of chocolate-based model emulsions from 0.570 S/m to 0.680 S/m, and that of vanilla-based model emulsions from 0.573 S/m to 0.601 S/m. Increased electrical conductivity would be attributed to colloidal phase modification and dispersion of oil globules. Brix of both chocolate- and vanilla-based model emulsions gradually increased as a function of the HPH pressure. Thus, HPH increased the solubility of plant-based powders by decreasing the particle size. This study demonstrated the potential use of HPH for enhancing the emulsification process and stability of the natural plant powders for applications with dairy products. PMID:26761891

  9. Interpretation of in-situ pressure and flow measurements of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Howarth, S.M.; Peterson, E.W.; Lagus, P.L.; Lie, K.; Finley, S.J.; Nowak, E.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes preliminary interpretation of in-situ pressure and flow measurements of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The WIPP facility is located 660 m underground in the Salado, a bedded salt deposit. Shut-in pressure tests were conducted prior to, and subsequent to, the mining of a circular drift in order to evaluate excavation effects on pore pressure, permeability, and host rock heterogeneity. Borehole deformation was measured during these tests and used to correct for changes in the test region volume due to salt creep effects. Preliminary pre-excavation results indicate that the flow properties of this layered host rock are heterogeneous. Resulting pore pressures range from 1 to 14 MPa and permeabilities range from below measurable to about 1 nanodarcy. Normalized borehole diameter change rates were between {minus}4 and 63 microstrains/day. Shut-in pressures and borehole diameters in all test boreholes were affected by the excavation of Room Q coincident with the advances of the boring machine. Preliminary results from post-excavation test results show decreased pore pressures compared to pre-excavation values.

  10. Analysis and selection of high pressure heaters design for a new generation of NPP with BN-1200 reactor plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, A. Yu.; Sukhorukov, Yu. G.; Trifonov, N. N.; Grigor'eva, E. B.; Esin, S. B.; Svyatkin, F. A.; Nikolaenkova, E. K.; Prikhod'ko, P. Yu.; Nazarov, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    In the development of advanced high-power steam-turbine plants (STP), special attention is placed on the design of reliable and economical high-pressure heater (HPH) capable to maintain the specified thermal hydraulic performance during the entire service life. Comparative analysis of the known designs of HPH, such as the spiral-collector HPH, the collector-coiled HPH, the collector-platen HPH, modular HPH, and the chamber HPH, was carried out. The advantages and disadvantages of each design were pointed. For better comparison, the heaters are separated into two groups—horizontal and vertical ones. The weight and dimension characteristics, the materials and features of the basic elements, and operating features of variety HPH are presented. At operating the spiral-collector HPH used in the majority of regenerative schemes of high-pressure STP of thermal and nuclear power plants, the disadvantages reducing the economy and reliability of their operation were revealed. The recommendations directed to the reliability growth of HPH, the decrease of subcooling the feed water, the increase of compactness are stated. Some of these were developed by the specialists of OAO NPO TsKTI and are successfully implemented on the thermal power plants and nuclear power plants. Technical solutions to reduce the cost of regeneration system and the weight of chamber HPH, reduce the thickness of the tube plate of HPH, and reliability assurance of the cooler of steam and condensate built in the HPH casing under all operating conditions were proposed. Three types of feed water chambers for vertical and horizontal chamber HPH are considered in detail, the constructive solutions that have been implemented in HPH of the regeneration system of turbines of 1000 and 1200 MW capacity with water-moderated water-cooled power reactor (WMWCPR) are described. The optimal design of HPH for the regeneration system of high-pressure turbine plant with BN-1200 reactor was selected.

  11. The effect of meat products enriched with plant sterols and minerals on serum lipids and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Tapola, Niina S; Lyyra, Mari L; Karvonen, Henna M; Uusitupa, Matti I; Sarkkinen, Essi S

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of non-esterified plant sterol-enriched and mineral-enriched low-fat and low-salted meat products compared with control meat products, on serum total and lipoprotein lipids and blood pressure in subjects with mildly to moderately elevated serum cholesterol concentration. A randomised, placebo-controlled, single-blind, repeated measure design was used. Altogether 21 volunteers completed the study. The study began with a pre-trial period of 1-2 weeks, which was followed by three different test periods in the following order: meat products enriched with plant sterols (1.2 g/day), potassium, calcium and magnesium (MP1); meat products with no added plant sterols and minerals (control); and meat products with plant sterols (2.1 g/day), potassium, calcium and magnesium (MP2). Each test period lasted for 3 weeks. During the MP2 period, the serum total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration decreased 4.9+/-7.5% (P<0.05) and 4.6+/-11.3% (not significant), respectively, compared with the control period. No differences in the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and total triglyceride concentrations or in systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure were found among the test periods. In conclusion, the present study showed that frankfurters and cold cuts enriched with plant sterols from tall oil, potassium, calcium and magnesium, as part of habitual Finnish diet reduced the serum total cholesterol concentration in hypercholesterolemic subjects when the intake of sitosterols was 2.1 g/day, but not with the lower dose.

  12. Computerized simulation of the dynamic response of a coal-fired power plant with pressurized fluidized bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plackmeyer, J.

    1982-07-01

    The simple way of desulfurizing, the efficient combustion of coal, and low carbon monoxide flue gas content of a fluidized bed combustion installation were studied. The dynamic response of a pressurized fluidized bed should also be studied before any construction is started. The physical-mathematical models of all single components were developed and combined in a total computer program. Starting point was the planned pilot plant with gas turbine engine. Various modifications of the purely air cooled plant as well as the extension to a combined cycle with additional steam turbine were considered. Operating cases were simulated: starting up, increasing from partial load to full load and vice versa, shut down and breakdowns. Results show that all operating cases could be brought under control as well as breakdowns. The constructive precautions and correct plant practice are described.

  13. Low blood pressure

    MedlinePlus

    Hypotension; Blood pressure - low; Postprandial hypotension; Orthostatic hypotension; Neurally mediated hypotension; NMH ... Blood pressure varies from one person to another. A drop as little as 20 mmHg, can cause problems for ...

  14. Drop tube technical tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    Criteria, using fundamental thermochemical dynamics, were developed to assist a scientist using the Drop Tube Facility in designing a good experiment. The types of parameters involved in designing the experiments include the type of furnace, the type of atmosphere, and in general which materials are better behaved than others as determined by past experience in the facility. One of the major advantages of the facility lies in its ability to provide large undercoolings in the cooling curve during the drops. A beginning was to consider the effect of oxygen and other gases upon the amount of undercooling observed. The starting point of the thermochemistry was given by Ellingham and later transformed into what is known as the Richardson Chart. The effect of surface oxidations upon the nucleation phenomena can be observed in each specimen.

  15. The new Drop Tower catapult system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Kampen, Peter; Kaczmarczik, Ulrich; Rath, Hans J.

    2006-07-01

    The Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM) was founded in 1985 as an institute of the University Bremen, which focuses on research on gravitational and space-related phenomena. In 1988, the construction of the "Drop Tower" began. Since then, the eye-catching tower with a height of 146 m and its characteristic glass roof has become the emblem of the technology centre in Bremen. The Drop Tower Bremen provides a facility for experiments under conditions of weightlessness. Items are considered weightless, when they are in "free fall", i.e. moving without propulsion within the gravity field of the earth. The height of the tower limits the simple "free fall" experiment period to max. 4.74 s. With the inauguration of the catapult system in December 2004, the ZARM is entering a new dimension. This world novelty will meet scientists' demands of extending the experiment period up to 9.5 s. Since turning the first sod on May 3rd, 1988, the later installation of the catapult system has been taken into account by building the necessary chamber under the tower. The catapult system is located in a chamber 10 m below the base of the tower. This chamber is almost completely occupied by 12 huge pressure tanks. These tanks are placed around the elongation of the vacuum chamber of the drop tube. In its centre there is the pneumatic piston that accelerates the drop capsule by the pressure difference between the vacuum inside the drop tube and the pressure inside the tanks. The acceleration level is adjusted by means of a servo hydraulic breaking system controlling the piston velocity. After only a quarter of a second the drop capsule achieves its lift-off speed of 175 km/h. With this exact speed, the capsule will rise up to the top of the tower and afterwards fall down again into the deceleration unit which has been moved under the drop tube in the meantime. The scientific advantages of the doubled experiment time are obvious: during almost 10 s of high

  16. INTERIOR OFFICE SPACE WITH ORIGINAL SKYLIGHT SET ABOVE DROP CEILING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OFFICE SPACE WITH ORIGINAL SKYLIGHT SET ABOVE DROP CEILING, FACING SOUTH. - Douglas Aircraft Company Long Beach Plant, Administration Building, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. Electrostatic drops in orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Isabel J.; Schmidt, Erin; Weislogel, Mark M.; Pettit, Donald

    2016-11-01

    We present what we think are the first intentional electrostatic orbits in the near-weightless environment of a drop tower. Classical physics problems involving Coulombic forces in orbital mechanics have traditionally been confined to thought experiments due to practical terrestrial experimental limitations, namely, the preponderance of gravity. However, the use of a drop tower as an experimental platform can overcome this challenge for brief periods. We demonstrate methanol-water droplets in orbit around a variety of charged objects- some of which can be used to validate special cases of N-body systems. Footage collected via a high-speed camera is analyzed and orbital trajectories are compared with existing theoretical predictions. Droplets of diameters 0.5 to 2mm in a variety of obits are observed. Due to the repeatability of drop tower initial conditions and effective low-g environment, such experiments may be used to construct empirical analogues and confirm analyses toward the benefit of other fields including space and planetary science. NASA Cooperative Agreement NNX12A047A, Portland State LSAMP, Robert E. McNair Scholars Program.

  18. Invasive plant Alternanthera philoxeroides suffers more severe herbivory pressure than native competitors in recipient communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shufeng; Yu, Haihao; Dong, Xianru; Wang, Ligong; Chen, Xiuwen; Yu, Dan; Liu, Chunhua

    2016-11-01

    Host-enemy interactions are vital mechanisms that explain the success or failure of invasive plants in new ranges. We surveyed the defoliation of invasive Alternanthera philoxeroides and co-occurring native plants on two islands during different seasons over three consecutive years and measured the leaf nitrogen content and the C/N ratio of each plant species. To evaluate the effects of herbivory on A. philoxeroides, an herbivore exclosure experiment was conducted. We found that the mean defoliation of A. philoxeroides was higher than that of native plants, regardless of whether the dominant species was A. philoxeroides or native plants. A. philoxeroides defoliation increased significantly as the months progressed, whereas the defoliation of the total population of native plants was constant. The leaf nitrogen content was positively correlated with defoliation, and it was highest in A. philoxeroides. Additionally, A. philoxeroides in the herbivore exclusion treatment showed an increase in shoot biomass and total shoot length. Our study revealed that native generalist herbivores prefer the invasive plant to the natives because of the higher leaf nitrogen content. These results support the biotic resistance hypothesis, suggesting that native herbivore species can limit the population spread of invasive plants.

  19. Invasive plant Alternanthera philoxeroides suffers more severe herbivory pressure than native competitors in recipient communities

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shufeng; Yu, Haihao; Dong, Xianru; Wang, Ligong; Chen, Xiuwen; Yu, Dan; Liu, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Host-enemy interactions are vital mechanisms that explain the success or failure of invasive plants in new ranges. We surveyed the defoliation of invasive Alternanthera philoxeroides and co-occurring native plants on two islands during different seasons over three consecutive years and measured the leaf nitrogen content and the C/N ratio of each plant species. To evaluate the effects of herbivory on A. philoxeroides, an herbivore exclosure experiment was conducted. We found that the mean defoliation of A. philoxeroides was higher than that of native plants, regardless of whether the dominant species was A. philoxeroides or native plants. A. philoxeroides defoliation increased significantly as the months progressed, whereas the defoliation of the total population of native plants was constant. The leaf nitrogen content was positively correlated with defoliation, and it was highest in A. philoxeroides. Additionally, A. philoxeroides in the herbivore exclusion treatment showed an increase in shoot biomass and total shoot length. Our study revealed that native generalist herbivores prefer the invasive plant to the natives because of the higher leaf nitrogen content. These results support the biotic resistance hypothesis, suggesting that native herbivore species can limit the population spread of invasive plants. PMID:27827418

  20. Drop Testing Representative Multi-Canister Overpacks

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Spencer D.; Morton, Dana K.

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the work reported herein was to determine the ability of the Multi- Canister Overpack (MCO) canister design to maintain its containment boundary after an accidental drop event. Two test MCO canisters were assembled at Hanford, prepared for testing at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), drop tested at Sandia National Laboratories, and evaluated back at the INEEL. In addition to the actual testing efforts, finite element plastic analysis techniques were used to make both pre-test and post-test predictions of the test MCOs structural deformations. The completed effort has demonstrated that the canister design is capable of maintaining a 50 psig pressure boundary after drop testing. Based on helium leak testing methods, one test MCO was determined to have a leakage rate not greater than 1x10-5 std cc/sec (prior internal helium presence prevented a more rigorous test) and the remaining test MCO had a measured leakage rate less than 1x10-7 std cc/sec (i.e., a leaktight containment) after the drop test. The effort has also demonstrated the capability of finite element methods using plastic analysis techniques to accurately predict the structural deformations of canisters subjected to an accidental drop event.

  1. Spreading of liquid drops over porous substrates.

    PubMed

    Starov, V M; Zhdanov, S A; Kosvintsev, S R; Sobolev, V D; Velarde, M G

    2003-07-01

    the other is a combination of permeability and effective capillary pressure inside the porous layer. Two additional experiments were used for an independent determination of these two parameters. The system of differential equations does not include any fitting parameter after these two parameters were determined. Experiments were carried out on the spreading of silicone oil drops over various dry nitrocellulose microfiltration membranes (permeable in both normal and tangential directions). The time evolution of the radii of both the drop base and the wetted region inside the porous layer was monitored. In agreement with our theory all experimental data fell on two universal curves if appropriate scales were used with a plot of the dimensionless radii of the drop base and of the wetted region inside the porous layer using a dimensionless time scale. Theory predicts that (a). the dynamic contact angle dependence on the dimensionless time should be a universal function, (b). the dynamic contact angle should change rapidly over an initial short stage of spreading and should remain a constant value over the duration of the rest of the spreading process. The constancy of the contact angle on this stage has nothing to do with hysteresis of the contact angle: there is no hysteresis in our system. These predictions are in the good agreement with our experimental observations. In the case of spreading of liquid drops over thick porous substrates (complete wetting) the spreading process goes in two similar stages as in the case of thin porous substrates. In this case also both the drop base and the radii of the wetted area on the surface of the porous substrates were monitored. Spreading of oil drops (with a wide range of viscosities) on dry porous substrates having similar porosity and average pore size shows universal behavior as in the case of thin porous substrates. However, the spreading behavior on porous substrates having different average pore sizes deviates from the

  2. Thermal, High Pressure, and Electric Field Processing Effects on Plant Cell Membrane Integrity and Relevance to Fruit and Vegetable Quality

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Maria E; Barrett, Diane M

    2010-01-01

    Advanced food processing methods that accomplish inactivation of microorganisms but minimize adverse thermal exposure are of great interest to the food industry. High pressure (HP) and pulsed electric field (PEF) processing are commercially applied to produce high quality fruit and vegetable products in the United States, Europe, and Japan. Both microbial and plant cell membranes are significantly altered following exposure to heat, HP, or PEF. Our research group sought to quantify the degree of damage to plant cell membranes that occurs as a result of exposure to heat, HP, or PEF, using the same analytical methods. In order to evaluate whether new advanced processing methods are superior to traditional thermal processing methods, it is necessary to compare them. In this review, we describe the existing state of knowledge related to effects of heat, HP, and PEF on both microbial and plant cells. The importance and relevance of compartmentalization in plant cells as it relates to fruit and vegetable quality is described and various methods for quantification of plant cell membrane integrity are discussed. These include electrolyte leakage, cell viability, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR). PMID:20492210

  3. Thermal, high pressure, and electric field processing effects on plant cell membrane integrity and relevance to fruit and vegetable quality.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Maria E; Barrett, Diane M

    2010-09-01

    Advanced food processing methods that accomplish inactivation of microorganisms but minimize adverse thermal exposure are of great interest to the food industry. High pressure (HP) and pulsed electric field (PEF) processing are commercially applied to produce high quality fruit and vegetable products in the United States, Europe, and Japan. Both microbial and plant cell membranes are significantly altered following exposure to heat, HP, or PEF. Our research group sought to quantify the degree of damage to plant cell membranes that occurs as a result of exposure to heat, HP, or PEF, using the same analytical methods. In order to evaluate whether new advanced processing methods are superior to traditional thermal processing methods, it is necessary to compare them. In this review, we describe the existing state of knowledge related to effects of heat, HP, and PEF on both microbial and plant cells. The importance and relevance of compartmentalization in plant cells as it relates to fruit and vegetable quality is described and various methods for quantification of plant cell membrane integrity are discussed. These include electrolyte leakage, cell viability, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (¹H-NMR).

  4. Leidenfrost Drop on a Step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagubeau, Guillaume; Le Merrer, Marie; Clanet, Christophe; Quere, David

    2008-11-01

    When deposited on a hot plate, a water droplet evaporates quickly. However, a vapor film appears under the drop above a critical temperature, called Leidenfrost temperature, which insulates the drop from its substrate. Linke & al (2006) reported a spontaneous movement of such a drop, when deposited on a ratchet. We study here the case of a flat substrate decorated with a single micrometric step. The drop is deposited on the lower part of the plate and pushed towards the step at small constant velocity. If the kinetic energy of the drop is sufficient, it can climb up the step. In that case, depending on the substrate temperature, the drop can either be decelerated or accelerated by the step. We try to understand the dynamics of these drops, especially the regime where they accelerate. Taking advantage of this phenomenon, we could then build a multiple-step setup, making it possible for a Leidenfrost drop to climb stairs.

  5. Gravimetric phenotyping of whole plant transpiration responses to atmospheric vapour pressure deficit identifies genotypic variation in water use efficiency.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Annette C; Dodd, Ian C; Rothwell, Shane A; Jones, Ros; Tardieu, Francois; Draye, Xavier; Davies, William J

    2016-10-01

    There is increasing interest in rapidly identifying genotypes with improved water use efficiency, exemplified by the development of whole plant phenotyping platforms that automatically measure plant growth and water use. Transpirational responses to atmospheric vapour pressure deficit (VPD) and whole plant water use efficiency (WUE, defined as the accumulation of above ground biomass per unit of water used) were measured in 100 maize (Zea mays L.) genotypes. Using a glasshouse based phenotyping platform with naturally varying VPD (1.5-3.8kPa), a 2-fold variation in WUE was identified in well-watered plants. Regression analysis of transpiration versus VPD under these conditions, and subsequent whole plant gas exchange at imposed VPDs (0.8-3.4kPa) showed identical responses in specific genotypes. Genotype response of transpiration versus VPD fell into two categories: 1) a linear increase in transpiration rate with VPD with low (high WUE) or high (low WUE) transpiration rate at all VPDs, 2) a non-linear response with a pronounced change point at low VPD (high WUE) or high VPD (low WUE). In the latter group, high WUE genotypes required a significantly lower VPD before transpiration was restricted, and had a significantly lower rate of transpiration in response to VPD after this point, when compared to low WUE genotypes. Change point values were significantly positively correlated with stomatal sensitivity to VPD. A change point in stomatal response to VPD may explain why some genotypes show contradictory WUE rankings according to whether they are measured under glasshouse or field conditions. Furthermore, this novel use of a high throughput phenotyping platform successfully reproduced the gas exchange responses of individuals measured in whole plant chambers, accelerating the identification of plants with high WUE.

  6. Induction of Silencing in Plants by High-Pressure Spraying of In vitro-Synthesized Small RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Dalakouras, Athanasios; Wassenegger, Michèle; McMillan, John N.; Cardoza, Vinitha; Maegele, Ira; Dadami, Elena; Runne, Miriam; Krczal, Gabi; Wassenegger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we describe a method for the delivery of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) into plant cells. In vitro synthesized siRNAs that were designed to target the coding region of a GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN (GFP) transgene were applied by various methods onto GFP-expressing transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants to trigger RNA silencing. In contrast to mere siRNA applications, including spraying, syringe injection, and infiltration of siRNAs that all failed to induce RNA silencing, high pressure spraying of siRNAs resulted in efficient local and systemic silencing of the GFP transgene, with comparable efficiency as was achieved with biolistic siRNA introduction. High-pressure spraying of siRNAs with sizes of 21, 22, and 24 nucleotides (nt) led to local GFP silencing. Small RNA deep sequencing revealed that no shearing of siRNAs was detectable by high-pressure spraying. Systemic silencing was basically detected upon spraying of 22 nt siRNAs. Local and systemic silencing developed faster and more extensively upon targeting the apical meristem than spraying of mature leaves. PMID:27625678

  7. Linking Turgor with ABA Biosynthesis: Implications for Stomatal Responses to Vapor Pressure Deficit across Land Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    McAdam, Scott A.M.; Brodribb, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Stomatal responses to changes in vapor pressure deficit (VPD) constitute the predominant form of daytime gas-exchange regulation in plants. Stomatal closure in response to increased VPD is driven by the rapid up-regulation of foliar abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis and ABA levels in angiosperms; however, very little is known about the physiological trigger for this increase in ABA biosynthesis at increased VPD. Using a novel method of modifying leaf cell turgor by the application of external pressures, we test whether changes in turgor pressure can trigger increases in foliar ABA levels over 20 min, a period of time most relevant to the stomatal response to VPD. We found in angiosperm species that the biosynthesis of ABA was triggered by reductions in leaf turgor, and in two species tested, that a higher sensitivity of ABA synthesis to leaf turgor corresponded with a higher stomatal sensitivity to VPD. In contrast, representative species from nonflowering plant lineages did not show a rapid turgor-triggered increase in foliar ABA levels, which is consistent with previous studies demonstrating passive stomatal responses to changes in VPD in these lineages. Our method provides a new tool for characterizing the response of stomata to water availability. PMID:27208264

  8. Reducing the effect of penstock pressure pulsations on hydro electric plant power system stabilizer signals

    SciTech Connect

    Nettleton, L.D.; Gurney, J.H.; Bollinger, K.E.

    1993-12-01

    A characteristic trait of Francis turbines operating at low-head is pressure pulsations that occur during certain load levels of the generator. These stem from pressure variations across the turbine due to pulsating flow in the draft-tube. This surging action of the water column is related to draft-tube geometry and flow-rate of water in the penstock. The pressure pulsations cause torque variations on the turbine and corresponding electric power pulsations. If electric power is used as a feedback signal to the Power System Stabilizer (PSS), then Mvar and terminal voltage pulsations will occur when the generator is operating in the ``rough zone``. This paper describes field test results for investigating feedforward control from the penstock, draft tube and spiral case pressure to reduce the effects of Mw pulsations on PSS output signals. This investigation involved a PSS with generator power as the feedback signal and the PSS tuned for local and inter-area damping.

  9. Drop foot corrective device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deis, B. C. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A light weight, economical device to alleviate a plurality of difficulties encountered in walking by a victim suffering from a drop foot condition is discussed. A legband girdles the leg below the knee and above the calf providing an anchor point for the upper end of a ligament having its lower end attached to a toe of a shoe or a toe on the foot. The ligament is of such length that the foot is supported thereby and retained in a normal position during walking.

  10. Trapped liquid drop at the end of capillary.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengjia; Yen, Hung-Yu; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2013-10-01

    The liquid drop captured at the capillary end, which is observed in capillary valve and pendant drop technique, is investigated theoretically and experimentally. Because of contact line pinning of the lower meniscus, the lower contact angle is able to rise from the intrinsic contact angle (θ*) so that the external force acting on the drop can be balanced by the capillary force. In the absence of contact angle hysteresis (CAH), the upper contact angle remains at θ*. However, in the presence of CAH, the upper contact angle can descend to provide more capillary force. The coupling between the lower and upper contact angles determines the equilibrium shape of the captured drop. In a capillary valve, the pinned contact line can move across the edge as the pressure difference exceeds the valving pressure, which depends on the geometrical characteristic and wetting property of the valve opening. When CAH is considered, the valving pressure is elevated because the capillary force is enhanced by the receding contact angle. For a pendant drop under gravity, the maximal capillary force is achieved as the lower contact angle reaches 180° in the absence of CAH. However, in the presence of CAH, four regimes can be identified by three critical drop volumes. The lower contact angle can exceed 180°, and therefore the drop takes on the shape of a light bulb, which does not exist in the absence of CAH. The comparisons between Surface Evolver simulations and experiments are quite well.

  11. Quantifying the plant actin cytoskeleton response to applied pressure using nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Branco, Rémi; Pearsall, Eliza-Jane; Rundle, Chelsea A; White, Rosemary G; Bradby, Jodie E; Hardham, Adrienne R

    2017-03-01

    Detection of potentially pathogenic microbes through recognition by plants and animals of both physical and chemical signals associated with the pathogens is vital for host well-being. Signal perception leads to the induction of a variety of responses that augment pre-existing, constitutive defences. The plant cell wall is a highly effective preformed barrier which becomes locally reinforced at the infection site through delivery of new wall material by the actin cytoskeleton. Although mechanical stimulation can produce a reaction, there is little understanding of the nature of physical factors capable of triggering plant defence. Neither the magnitude of forces nor the contact time required has been quantified. In the study reported here, mechanical stimulation with a tungsten microneedle has been used to quantify the response of Arabidopsis plants expressing an actin-binding protein tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) to reveal the organisation of the actin cytoskeleton. Using confocal microscopy, the response time for actin reorganisation in epidermal cells of Arabidopsis hypocotyls was shown to be 116 ± 49 s. Using nanoindentation and a diamond spherical tip indenter, the magnitude of the forces capable of triggering an actin response has been quantified. We show that Arabidopsis hypocotyl cells can detect a force as small as 4 μN applied for as short a time as 21.6 s to trigger reorganisation of the actin cytoskeleton. This force is an order of magnitude less than the potential invasive force determined for a range of fungal and oomycete plant pathogens. To our knowledge, this is the first quantification of the magnitude and duration of mechanical forces capable of stimulating a structural defence response in a plant cell.

  12. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Pressurized water reactors. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This document provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators and senior reactor operators. The examinations developed using the PWR catalog will cover those topics listed under Title 10, (ode of Federal Regulations Part 55. The PWR catalog contains approximately 5100 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for reactor operators and senior reactor operators. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Catalog Organization; Generic Knowledge and Abilities; Plant Systems; Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions; Components and Theory.

  13. On the wind force needed to dislodge a drop adhered to a surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, Paul A.

    1988-01-01

    The dislodging by dynamic pressure forces of a drop adhered by surface tension to a plane is considered. The method involves the numerical solution of the integrodifferential equation describing the drop shape and the obtaining of the critical Weber number as a function of contact angle hysteresis. The study assumes high-Reynolds-number free-streamline separation from the drop.

  14. Technology of eye drops containing aloe (Aloe arborescens Mill.--Liliaceae) and eye drops containing both aloe and neomycin sulphate.

    PubMed

    Kodym, A; Marcinkowski, A; Kukuła, H

    2003-01-01

    Eye drops made of aloe are a sterile, aqueous extract of fresh leaves of Aloe arborescens Mill., containing necessary additives and neomycin sulphate. The aim of the studies was to establish the technology of eye drops containing biologically active aloe substances and those containing both chemical constituents of aloe and neomycin sulphate. Within the studies, the formulary content and the way of preparing eye drops were determined, criteria were defined and methods of qualitative assessment of drops were proposed. On the basis of the proposed analytical methods, the physicochemical and microbiological stability of the eye drops stored at a temperature of 20-25 degrees C was studied. As the criteria of qualitative assessment of the eye drops, the following analyses were considered: sterility, appearance of the eye drops (clarity), pH, osmotic pressure, density, viscosity, TLC analysis, content of aloenin and aloin, studies of anti-microbial activity of neomycin in the drops, and preservative efficiency of thiomersal in the eye drops. The studies showed that the additives such as: sodium chloride, benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine diacetate and digluconate, phenylmercuric borate and Nipagins M and P could not be used to prepare the eye drops because they were involved in pharmaceutical interactions with chemical constituents of aloe in the eye drops. The eye drops containing: aqueous extract of fresh leaves of aloe, boric acid, thiomersal, sodium pyrosulphite, disodium EDTA, beta-phenylethyl alcohol and neomycin sulphate, both freshly prepared and after two years of storage, met the requirements of the Polish Pharmacopoeia (PPh V) mentioned in the monograph Guttae ophthalmicae. They were sterile, clear, their osmotic pressure approximated the osmotic pressure of lacrimal fluid and they were characterized by appropriate pH. Aloenin in the drops was much more stable than aloin. Neomycin after two years of storage retained almost 98% of its starting antimicrobial

  15. A novel Caulimovirus associated with a complete fruit drop symptom in ‘Bluecrop’ blueberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we describe the nucleotide sequence and genome organization of a novel virus in the family Caulimoviridae from ‘Bluecrop’ blueberry plants that exhibited fruit drop symptoms. The virus is tentatively named Blueberry fruit drop associated virus (BFDaV). Blueberry fruit drop disease (BFDD) was fi...

  16. The influence of purge times on the yields of essential oil components extracted from plants by pressurized liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Wianowska, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    The influence of different purge times on the yield of the main essential oil constituents of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), and chamomile (Chamomilla recutita L.) was investigated. The pressurized liquid extraction process was performed by applying different extraction temperatures and solvents. The results presented in the paper show that the estimated yield of essential oil components extracted from the plants in the pressurized liquid extraction process is purge time-dependent. The differences in the estimated yields are mainly connected with the evaporation of individual essential oil components and the applied solvent during the purge; the more volatile an essential oil constituent is, the greater is its loss during purge time, and the faster the evaporation of the solvent during the purge process is, the higher the concentration of less volatile essential oil components in the pressurized liquid extraction receptacle. The effect of purge time on the estimated yield of individual essential oil constituents is additionally differentiated by the extraction temperature and the extraction ability of the applied solvent.

  17. Systems Engineering of Chemical Hydrogen Storage, Pressure Vessel and Balance of Plant for Onboard Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Weimar, Mark R.

    2014-09-02

    This is the annual report for the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence project as required by DOE EERE's Fuel Cell Technologies Office. We have been provided with a specific format. It describes the work that was done with cryo-sorbent based and chemical-based hydrogen storage materials. Balance of plant components were developed, proof-of-concept testing performed, system costs estimated, and transient models validated as part of this work.

  18. Plants Survive Rapid Depressurization: Implications for Bioregenerative Life Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Raymond; Wehkamp, Cara Ann; Stasiak, Michael; Dixon, Mike

    Understanding the risks and failures of life support technologies will be critical for future space missions. Among the possible system failures would be a loss of pressure in a habitat or containment vessel. Any damage to system components following a loss of pressure must be considered in terms of contingency, repair, or resupply. Plants are the centerpiece to bioregenerative life support approaches proposed for future missions, but have sometimes been criticized as being fragile entities and hence more prone to failure. To test this, we grew radish, wheat, and lettuce plants at two pressures, 97 and 33 kPa, for 21 days, then subjected them to a rapid pressure drop to 1.5 kPa where they were held for 30 min. Each test was repeated three times. Temperatures were maintained near 22 C throughout, although some adiabatic cooling occurred to depressurization. Thus the 1.5 kPa pressure was below the boiling pressure for water. Following this pressures were restored to the original levels and the plants allowed to grow for another 6 days. Immediate inspections of the plants via video camera and photosynthetic gas analysis showed no obvious damage following the low pressure event, with the exception a few wheat leaves that began to droop downward, suggesting a loss of turgor and mild water stress. Comparisons of fresh and dry mass values at final harvest for all three species showed no difference between controls and plants exposed to the rapid pressure drop, and this was true for plants grown either at 97 or 33 kPa. The results demonstrate a remarkable resilience of food crops to a catastrophic pressure loss that would be lethal to humans. Further testing should be conducted to determine how long plants could endure such low pressure to estimate required response times. Related testing should be conducted with all life support technologies, including physico-chemical components, to assess their risks under rapid pressure changes.

  19. The Use of High Pressure Freezing and Freeze Substitution to Study Host-Pathogen Interactions in Fungal Diseases of Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mims, C. W.; Celio, Gail J.; Richardson, Elizabeth A.

    2003-12-01

    This article reports on the use of high pressure freezing followed by freeze substitution (HPF/FS) to study ultrastructural details of host pathogen interactions in fungal diseases of plants. The specific host pathogen systems discussed here include a powdery mildew infection of poinsettia and rust infections of daylily and Indian strawberry. The three pathogens considered here all attack the leaves of their hosts and produce specialized hyphal branches known as haustoria that invade individual host cells without killing them. We found that HPF/FS provided excellent preservation of both haustoria and host cells for all three host pathogen systems. Preservation of fungal and host cell membranes was particularly good and greatly facilitated the detailed study of host pathogen interfaces. In some instances, HPF/FS provided information that was not available in samples prepared for study using conventional chemical fixation. On the other hand, we did encounter various problems associated with the use of HPF/FS. Examples included freeze damage of samples, inconsistency of fixation in different samples, separation of plant cell cytoplasm from cell walls, breakage of cell walls and membranes, and splitting of thin sections. However, we believe that the outstanding preservation of ultrastructural details afforded by HPF/FS significantly outweighs these problems and we highly recommend the use of this fixation protocol for future studies of fungal host-plant interactions.

  20. As-placed contact angles for sessile drops.

    PubMed

    Tadmor, Rafael; Yadav, Preeti S

    2008-01-01

    As-placed contact angle is the contact angle a drop adapts as a result of its placement on a surface. As expected, the as-placed contact angle, thetaAP, of a sessile drop on a horizontal surface decreases with the drop size due to the increase in hydrostatic pressure. We present a theoretical prediction for thetaAP which shows that it is a unique function of the advancing contact angle, thetaA, drop size, and material properties (surface tensions and densities). We test our prediction with published and new data. The theory agrees with the experiments. From the relation of the as-placed contact angle to drop size the thermodynamic equilibrium contact angle is also calculated.

  1. Simulations of Coulombic Fission of Charged Inviscid Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, J. C.; Taborek, P.

    2011-04-01

    We present boundary-integral simulations of the evolution of critically charged droplets. For such droplets, small perturbations are unstable and eventually lead to the formation of a lemon-shaped drop with very sharp tips. For perfectly conducting drops, the tip forms a self-similar cone shape with a subtended angle identical to that of a Taylor cone, and quantities such as pressure and velocity diverge in time with power-law scaling. In contrast, when charge transport is described by a finite conductivity, we find that small progeny drops are formed at the tips, whose size decreases as the conductivity is increased. These small progeny drops are of nearly critical charge, and are precursors to the emission of a sustained flow of liquid from the tips as observed in experiments of isolated charged drops.

  2. Large amplitude drop shape oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Wang, T. G.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental study of large amplitude drop shape oscillation was conducted in immiscible liquids systems and with levitated free liquid drops in air. In liquid-liquid systems the results indicate the existence of familiar characteristics of nonlinear phenomena. The resonance frequency of the fundamental quadrupole mode of stationary, low viscosity Silicone oil drops acoustically levitated in water falls to noticeably low values as the amplitude of oscillation is increased. A typical, experimentally determined relative frequency decrease of a 0.5 cubic centimeters drop would be about 10% when the maximum deformed shape is characterized by a major to minor axial ratio of 1.9. On the other hand, no change in the fundamental mode frequency could be detected for 1 mm drops levitated in air. The experimental data for the decay constant of the quadrupole mode of drops immersed in a liquid host indicate a slight increase for larger oscillation amplitudes. A qualitative investigation of the internal fluid flows for such drops revealed the existence of steady internal circulation within drops oscillating in the fundamental and higher modes. The flow field configuration in the outer host liquid is also significantly altered when the drop oscillation amplitude becomes large.

  3. Leaf drop affects herbivory in oaks.

    PubMed

    Pearse, Ian S; Karban, Richard

    2013-11-01

    Leaf phenology is important to herbivores, but the timing and extent of leaf drop has not played an important role in our understanding of herbivore interactions with deciduous plants. Using phylogenetic general least squares regression, we compared the phenology of leaves of 55 oak species in a common garden with the abundance of leaf miners on those trees. Mine abundance was highest on trees with an intermediate leaf retention index, i.e. trees that lost most, but not all, of their leaves for 2-3 months. The leaves of more evergreen species were more heavily sclerotized, and sclerotized leaves accumulated fewer mines in the summer. Leaves of more deciduous species also accumulated fewer mines in the summer, and this was consistent with the idea that trees reduce overwintering herbivores by shedding leaves. Trees with a later leaf set and slower leaf maturation accumulated fewer herbivores. We propose that both leaf drop and early leaf phenology strongly affect herbivore abundance and select for differences in plant defense. Leaf drop may allow trees to dispose of their herbivores so that the herbivores must recolonize in spring, but trees with the longest leaf retention also have the greatest direct defenses against herbivores.

  4. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)

    SciTech Connect

    J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

    2010-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production, with an outlet gas temperature in the range of 750°C, and a design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. This technology development plan details the additional research and development (R&D) required to design and license the NGNP RPV, assuming that A 508/A 533 is the material of construction. The majority of additional information that is required is related to long-term aging behavior at NGNP vessel temperatures, which are somewhat above those commonly encountered in the existing database from LWR experience. Additional data are also required for the anticipated NGNP environment. An assessment of required R&D for a Grade 91 vessel has been retained from the first revision of the R&D plan in Appendix B in somewhat less detail. Considerably more development is required for this steel compared to A 508/A 533 including additional irradiation testing for expected NGNP operating temperatures, high-temperature mechanical properties, and extensive studies of long-term microstructural stability.

  5. Design of power-plant installations pressure-loss characteristics of duct components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, John R

    1944-01-01

    A correlation of what are believed to be the most reliable data available on duct components of aircraft power-plant installations is presented. The information is given in a convenient form and is offered as an aid in designing duct systems and, subject to certain qualifications, as a guide in estimating their performance. The design and performance data include those for straight ducts; simple bends of square, circular, and elliptical cross sections; compound bends; diverging and converging bends; vaned bends; diffusers; branch ducts; internal inlets; and an angular placement of heat exchangers. Examples are included to illustrate methods of applying these data in analyzing duct systems. (author)

  6. Diversity of regenerating plants and seed dispersal in two canopy trees from Colombian Amazon forests with different hunting pressure.

    PubMed

    Barrera Zambrano, Victoria Andrea; Zambrano Moncada, Jenny; Stevenson, Pablo R

    2008-09-01

    Hunting may have drastic effects on some populations of frugivores and seed dispersal agents, which in turn may affect patterns of forest regeneration and plant diversity. However, when a species disappears, it is possible that the population of other species increases due to competition release, compensating or not, their ecological roles. The main aim of this study was to measure density compensation in primate communities, their possible effects on seedling and sapling diversity, and compensation of seed removal rates in two canopy trees (Apeiba aspera and Hymenaea oblongifolia). The study site was Amacayacu National Park (Colombian Amazon), where we carried out a census of mammal species using line transect methods in two forests with different levels of hunting pressure. Vegetation plots were used to quantify plant diversity for seedlings and saplings (4 m2 and 25 m2 respectively), and fruit traps were set up to estimate seed removal of A. aspera and H. oblongifolia. Large primates were less frequently encountered near human settlements, while small primates exhibited the opposite pattern, suggesting a density compensation effect. The diversity of regenerating plants was higher in the forest where large primates occur. Seed removal was higher in forests with large primates for A. aspera, but not for H. oblongifolia. Overall, the results support the hypothesis of density compensation on the primate community; however, there is no strong evidence of ecological compensation in terms of seed dispersal and regeneration in the species studied. Finally, the presence of large seed dispersers (e.g. Lagothrix lagothricha) was associated with higher plant diversity.

  7. Cellulose δ18O is an index of leaf-to-air vapor pressure difference (VPD) in tropical plants

    PubMed Central

    Kahmen, Ansgar; Sachse, Dirk; Arndt, Stefan K.; Tu, Kevin P.; Farrington, Heraldo; Vitousek, Peter M.; Dawson, Todd E.

    2011-01-01

    Cellulose in plants contains oxygen that derives in most cases from precipitation. Because the stable oxygen isotope composition, δ18O, of precipitation is associated with environmental conditions, cellulose δ18O should be as well. However, plant physiological models using δ18O suggest that cellulose δ18O is influenced by a complex mix of both climatic and physiological drivers. This influence complicates the interpretation of cellulose δ18O values in a paleo-context. Here, we combined empirical data analyses with mechanistic model simulations to i) quantify the impacts that the primary climatic drivers humidity (ea) and air temperature (Tair) have on cellulose δ18O values in different tropical ecosystems and ii) determine which environmental signal is dominating cellulose δ18O values. Our results revealed that ea and Tair equally influence cellulose δ18O values and that distinguishing which of these factors dominates the δ18O values of cellulose cannot be accomplished in the absence of additional environmental information. However, the individual impacts of ea and Tair on the δ18O values of cellulose can be integrated into a single index of plant-experienced atmospheric vapor demand: the leaf-to-air vapor pressure difference (VPD). We found a robust relationship between VPD and cellulose δ18O values in both empirical and modeled data in all ecosystems that we investigated. Our analysis revealed therefore that δ18O values in plant cellulose can be used as a proxy for VPD in tropical ecosystems. As VPD is an essential variable that determines the biogeochemical dynamics of ecosystems, our study has applications in ecological-, climate-, or forensic-sciences. PMID:21245322

  8. Theoretical Exploration of Barrel-Shaped Drops on Cactus Spines.

    PubMed

    Luo, Cheng

    2015-11-03

    To survive an arid environment, desert cacti are capable of harvesting water from fog by transporting condensed water drops using their spines. Cactus spines have a conical shape. In this work, on the basis of the difference of liquid pressure, a new theoretical model has been developed for a barrel-shaped liquid drop on a conical wire. This model is further simplified to interpret the effects of contact angles, conical angle, surface microgrooves, and gravity on the drop movement along a cactus spine.

  9. Nectar and pollination drops: how different are they?

    PubMed Central

    Nepi, Massimo; von Aderkas, Patrick; Wagner, Rebecca; Mugnaini, Serena; Coulter, Andrea; Pacini, Ettore

    2009-01-01

    Background Pollination drops and nectars (floral nectars) are secretions related to plant reproduction. The pollination drop is the landing site for the majority of gymnosperm pollen, whereas nectar of angiosperm flowers represents a common nutritional resource for a large variety of pollinators. Extrafloral nectars also are known from all vascular plants, although among the gymnosperms they are restricted to the Gnetales. Extrafloral nectars are not generally involved in reproduction but serve as ‘reward’ for ants defending plants against herbivores (indirect defence). Scope Although very different in their task, nectars and pollination drops share some features, e.g. basic chemical composition and eventual consumption by animals. This has led some authors to call these secretions collectively nectar. Modern techniques that permit chemical analysis and protein characterization have very recently added important information about these sugary secretions that appear to be much more than a ‘reward’ for pollinating (floral nectar) and defending animals (extrafloral nectar) or a landing site for pollen (pollination drop). Conclusions Nectar and pollination drops contain sugars as the main components, but the total concentration and the relative proportions are different. They also contain amino acids, of which proline is frequently the most abundant. Proteomic studies have revealed the presence of common functional classes of proteins such as invertases and defence-related proteins in nectar (floral and extrafloral) and pollination drops. Invertases allow for dynamic rearrangement of sugar composition following secretion. Defence-related proteins provide protection from invasion by fungi and bacteria. Currently, only few species have been studied in any depth. The chemical composition of the pollination drop must be investigated in a larger number of species if eventual phylogenetic relationships are to be revealed. Much more information can be provided from

  10. The origin of star-shaped oscillations of Leidenfrost drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaolei; Burton, Justin C.

    We experimentally investigate the oscillations of Leidenfrost drops of water, liquid nitrogen, ethanol, methanol, acetone and isopropyl alcohol. The drops levitate on a cushion of evaporated vapor over a hot, curved surface which keeps the drops stationary. We observe star-shaped modes along the periphery of the drop, with mode numbers n = 2 to 13. The number of observed modes is sensitive to the properties of the liquid. The pressure oscillation frequency in the vapor layer under the drop is approximately twice that of the drop frequency, which is consistent with a parametric forcing mechanism. However, the Rayleigh and thermal Marangoni numbers are of order 10,000, indicating that convection should play a dominating role as well. Surprisingly, we find that the wavelength and frequency of the oscillations only depend on the thickness of the liquid, which is twice the capillary length, and do not depend on the mode number, substrate temperature, or the substrate curvature. This robust behavior suggests that the wavelength for the oscillations is set by thermal convection inside the drop, and is less dependent on the flow in the vapor layer under the drop

  11. Axisymmetric model of drop spreading on a horizontal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistry, Aashutosh; Muralidhar, K.

    2015-09-01

    Spreading of an initially spherical liquid drop over a textured surface is analyzed by solving an integral form of the governing equations. The mathematical model extends Navier-Stokes equations by including surface tension at the gas-liquid boundary and a force distribution at the three phase contact line. While interfacial tension scales with drop curvature, the motion of the contact line depends on the departure of instantaneous contact angle from its equilibrium value. The numerical solution is obtained by discretizing the spreading drop into disk elements. The Bond number range considered is 0.01-1. Results obtained for sessile drops are in conformity with limiting cases reported in the literature [J. C. Bird et al., "Short-time dynamics of partial wetting," Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 234501 (2008)]. They further reveal multiple time scales that are reported in experiments [K. G. Winkels et al., "Initial spreading of low-viscosity drops on partially wetting surfaces," Phys. Rev. E 85, 055301 (2012) and A. Eddi et al., "Short time dynamics of viscous drop spreading," Phys. Fluids 25, 013102 (2013)]. Spreading of water and glycerin drops over fully and partially wetting surfaces is studied in terms of excess pressure, wall shear stress, and the dimensions of the footprint. Contact line motion is seen to be correctly captured in the simulations. Water drops show oscillations during spreading while glycerin spreads uniformly over the surface.

  12. Hanging drop crystal growth apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, Robert J. (Inventor); Witherow, William K. (Inventor); Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor); Bugg, Charles E. (Inventor); Suddath, Fred L. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    This invention relates generally to control systems for controlling crystal growth, and more particularly to such a system which uses a beam of light refracted by the fluid in which crystals are growing to detect concentration of solutes in the liquid. In a hanging drop apparatus, a laser beam is directed onto drop which refracts the laser light into primary and secondary bows, respectively, which in turn fall upon linear diode detector arrays. As concentration of solutes in drop increases due to solvent removal, these bows move farther apart on the arrays, with the relative separation being detected by arrays and used by a computer to adjust solvent vapor transport from the drop. A forward scattering detector is used to detect crystal nucleation in drop, and a humidity detector is used, in one embodiment, to detect relative humidity in the enclosure wherein drop is suspended. The novelty of this invention lies in utilizing angular variance of light refracted from drop to infer, by a computer algorithm, concentration of solutes therein. Additional novelty is believed to lie in using a forward scattering detector to detect nucleating crystallites in drop.

  13. Automatic Magnetic Particle Inspection System for the Bracket Welds of Atucha i Nuclear Power Plant Pressure Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katchadjian, P.; Desimone, C.; Garcia, A.; Antonaccio, C.; Schroeter, F.; Mastroleonardo, P.

    2011-06-01

    The present work refers to the welding inspection of the brackets of Atucha I Nuclear Power Plant's Pressure Vessel (RPV) using the wet fluorescent magnetic particles technique (MT). Due to limited access and high radiation levels in the inspection area, it was necessary to automate the testing and use non conventional magnetization techniques. This paper describes the design and implementation of an automated inspection device and the tests carried out on the mock-up to set up the system. Also, magnetization techniques used are described, explaining in detail the non conventional technique of magnetization by current plates and the use of magnetic field concentrators to increase the field values in the area of interest. Finally, the device mounted on the RPV, used to inspect the bracket's weld, and the results achieved from the inspection are shown.

  14. Rapid quantification of cyanamide by ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography in fertilizer, soil or plant samples.

    PubMed

    Nagumo, Yoshifumi; Tanaka, Kazuya; Tewari, Kaushal; Thiraporn, Khwankaew; Tsuchida, Toru; Honma, Toshimitsu; Ohtake, Norikuni; Sueyoshi, Kuni; Takahashi, Yoshihiko; Ohyama, Takuji

    2009-07-17

    A rapid and simple method for determination of cyanamide in fertilizer, soil and plants has been developed. In this method, cyanamide is extracted with 2% acetic acid and the extract separated by centrifugation. It is then purified by passing through a membrane filter. The extract was derivatized with 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-carbamate and the derivatized compound separated by ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography. It is then detected with a UV detector at 260 nm by the same method as is used for amino acid analysis. The proposed method is fast, simple and cheap and also has good selectivity and sensitivity for the determination of cyanamide in a wide range of biotic and abiotic materials.

  15. Determination of glucosinolates in 19 Chinese medicinal plants with spectrophotometry and high-pressure liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ye; Liang, Hao; Yuan, Qipeng; Hong, Yuancheng

    2010-08-01

    Glucosinolates were evaluated in 19 traditional Chinese medicinal plants involved in seven different families: Brassicaceae, Capparaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Phytolaccaceae, Tropaeolaceae, Caricaceae and Rubiaceae. The total glucosinolate contents were determined by spectrophotometry. Results showed that the high contents of total glucosinolates were found in some herbs of Brassicaceae, Capparaceae and Euphorbiaceae families, while low total glucosinolate contents were observed in two Rubiaceae herbs. In addition, eight glucosinolates (glucoraphanin, glucoraphenin, sinalbin, sinigrin, progoitrin, 4-hydroglucobrassicin, glucoiberin and glucoibervirin) in these herbs were measured using HPLC, and the data showed that individual glucosinolates and their contents varied at different degrees among the distinct species. The highest contents of cancer-protective compounds were found in the seeds of Raphanus sativus L. (glucoraphenin), Sinapis alba (sinalbin) and Phyllanthus emblica L. (sinigrin).

  16. Impact of radiation embrittlement on integrity of pressure vessel supports for two PWR plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.; Pennell, W.E.; Robinson, G.C.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    Recent data from the HFIR vessel surveillance program indicate a substantial radiation embrittlement rate effect at low irradiation temperatures (/approximately/120/degree/F) for A212-B, A350-LF3, A105-II, and corresponding welds. PWR vessel supports are fabricated of similar materials and are subjected to the same low temperatures and fast neutron fluxes (10/sup 8/ to 10/sup 9/ neutrons/cm/sup 2//center dot/s, E > 1.0 MeV) as those in the HFIR vessel. Thus, the embrittlement rate of these structures may be greater than previously anticipated. A study sponsored by the NRC is under way at ORNL to determine the impact of the rate effect on PWR vessel-support life expectancy. The scope includes the interpretation and application of the HFIR data, a survey of all light-water-reactor vessel support designs, and a structural and fracture-mechanics analysis of the supports for two specific PWR plants of particular interest with regard to a potential for support failure as a result of propagation of flaws. Calculations performed thus far indicate best-estimate critical flaw sizes, corresponding to 32 EFPY, of /approximately/0.2 in. for one plant and /approximately/0.4 in. for the other. These flaw sizes are small enough to be of concern. However, it appears that low-cycle fatigue is not a viable mechanism for creation of flaws of this size, and thus, presumably, such flaws would have to exist at the time of fabrication. 59 refs., 128 figs., 49 tabs.

  17. Effects of compost and phosphate on plant arsenic accumulation from soils near pressure-treated wood.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinde; Ma, Lena Q

    2004-12-01

    Leaching of arsenic (As) from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood may elevate soil arsenic levels. Thus, an environmental concern arises regarding accumulation of As in vegetables grown in these soils. In this study, a greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate As accumulation by vegetables from the soils adjacent to the CCA-treated utility poles and fences and examine the effects of soil amendments on plant As accumulation. Carrot (Daucus carota L.) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) were grown for ten weeks in the soil with or without compost and phosphate amendments. As expected, elevated As concentrations were observed in the pole soil (43 mg kg(-1)) and in the fence soil (27 mg kg(-1)), resulting in enhanced As accumulation of 44 mg kg(-1) in carrot and 32 mg kg(-1) in lettuce. Addition of phosphate to soils increased As accumulation by 4.56-9.3 times for carrot and 2.45-10.1 for lettuce due to increased soil water-soluble As via replacement of arsenate by phosphate in soil. However, biosolid compost application significantly reduced plant As uptake by 79-86%, relative to the untreated soils. This suppression is possibly because of As adsorbed by biosolid organic mater, which reduced As phytoavailability. Fractionation analysis showed that biosolid decreased As in soil water-soluble, exchangeable, and carbonate fraction by 45%, whereas phosphate increased it up to 2.61 times, compared to the untreated soils. Our results indicate that growing vegetables in soils near CCA-treated wood may pose a risk of As exposure for humans. Compost amendment can reduce such a risk by reducing As accumulation by vegetables and can be an important strategy for remediating CCA-contaminated soils. Caution should be taken for phosphate application since it enhances As accumulation.

  18. Effect of Atmospheric Pressure on Wet Bulb Depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Raymond; Stasiak, Michael; Lawson, Jamie; Wehkamp, Cara Ann; Dixon, Mike

    Future space exploration missions will likely operate at pressures less than 1 atm ( 100 kPa) to reduce gas leakage and structural mass, and facilitate rapid EVAs. Understanding environmental monitoring, control, and physiological responses to reduced pressures will be required to assure mission success. Wet / dry bulb psychrometers are useful devices for monitoring humidity and provide insights into cooling phenomena for wet, evaporating surfaces. To study the effects of pressure on psychrometers we conducted a series of tests in a hypobaric chamber. Chamber RH monitoring and control were based on capacitance type devices, which previous testing and manufacturer's specifications have shown to be unaffected by pressure. Test data were gathered using an Enercorp model HT-WD-A psychrometer with matched platinum RTD temperature probes positioned side-by-side with a dew point (chilled mirror) device and two capacitance RH sensors. The chamber was kept dark and measurements were taken at three RHs (30, 50, and 70) and four pressures (10, 25, 50, and 97 kPa). Results showed an increase in wet bulb depression (i.e., a drop in wet bulb temperature) for a given RH as the pressure decreased, with the largest changes occurring as pressure dropped from 25 and 10 kPa. At a dry bulb temperature of 25 C, the normal wet bulb temperature for 30 RH and 97 kPa is 15 C, but this dropped to 8 C at 10 kPa. These observations are consistent with previous reports of increased evaporation rates at reduced pressure and match recently published psychrometric models for different pressures. The results suggest that psychrometers need direct calibration at the target pressures or that pressure corrected charts are required. Moreover, for a given vapor pressure deficit, any moist surfaces, including transpiring plant leaves, will be cooler at lower pressures due to the increased evaporation rates.

  19. Acidified pressurized hot water for the continuous extraction of cadmium and lead from plant materials prior to ETAAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Muñoz, S.; Luque-García, J. L.; Luque de Castro, M. D.

    2003-01-01

    Acidified and pressurized hot water is proposed for the continuous leaching of Cd and Pb from plants prior to determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Beech leaves (a certified reference material—CRM 100—where the analytes were not certified) were used for optimizing the method by a multivariate approach. The samples (0.5 g) were subjected to dynamic extraction with water modified with 1% v/v HNO 3 at 250 °C as leachant. A kinetics study was performed in order to know the pattern of the extraction process. The method was validated with a CRM (olive leaves, 062 from the BCR) where the analytes had been certified. The agreement between the certified values and those found using the proposed method demonstrates its usefulness. The repeatability and within-laboratory reproducibility were 3.7 and 2.3% for Cd and 1.04% and 6.3% for Pb, respectively. The precision of the method, together with its efficiency, rapidity, and environmental acceptability, makes it a good alternative for the determination of trace metals in plant material.

  20. Instant freezing of impacting wax drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarenko, Alexandre; Virot, Emmanuel; Rubinstein, Shmuel

    2015-11-01

    We present the impact of hot liquid drops of wax on surfaces whose temperature is below the solidifying temperature of the drops. During the fall the drops remain mostly liquid, but upon impact, their temperature quickly decreases resulting in the solidification of the drop. Depending on the impact energy, drops size and the temperature difference between the drop and the surface this results in plethora of solid shapes: simple lenses, triangular drops, spherical caps and popped popcorn shapes.

  1. Evaluation of cracking in feedwater piping adjacent to the steam generators in Nine Pressurized Water Reactor Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, A.; Streit, R.D.; Scott, R.G.

    1980-06-25

    Cracking in ASTM A106-B and A106-C feedwater piping was detected near the inlet to the steam generators in a number of pressurized water reactor plants. We received sections with cracks from nine of the plants with the objective of identifying the cracking mechanism and assessing various factors that might contribute to this cracking. Variations were observed in piping surface irregularities, corrosion-product, pit, and crack morphology, surface elmental and crystal structure analyses, and steel microstructures and mechanical properties. However, with but two exceptions, namely, arrest bands and major surface irregularities, we were unable to relate the extent of cracking to any of these factors. Tensile and fracture toughness (J/sub Ic/ and tearing modulus) properties were measured over a range of temperatures and strain rates. No unusual properties or microstructures were observed that could be related to the cracking problem. All crack surfaces contained thick oxide deposits and showed evidence of cyclic events in the form of arrest bands. Transmission electron microscopy revealed fatigue striations on replicas of cleaned crack surfaces from one plant and possibly from three others. Calculations based on the observed striation spacings gave a value of ..delta..sigma = 150 MPa (22 ksi) for one of the major cracks. The direction of crack propagation was invariably related to the piping surface and not to the piping axis. These two factors are consistent with the proposed concept of thermally induced, cyclic, tensile surface stresses. Although surface irregularities and corrosion pits were sources for crack initiation and corrosion may have contributed to crack propagation, it is proposed that the overriding factor in the cracking problem is the presence of unforeseen cyclic loads.

  2. Environmental selection pressures related to iron utilization are involved in the loss of the flavodoxin gene from the plant genome.

    PubMed

    Pierella Karlusich, Juan J; Ceccoli, Romina D; Graña, Martín; Romero, Héctor; Carrillo, Néstor

    2015-02-16

    Oxidative stress and iron limitation represent the grim side of life in an oxygen-rich atmosphere. The versatile electron transfer shuttle ferredoxin, an iron-sulfur protein, is particularly sensitive to these hardships, and its downregulation under adverse conditions severely compromises survival of phototrophs. Replacement of ferredoxin by a stress-resistant isofunctional carrier, flavin-containing flavodoxin, is a widespread strategy employed by photosynthetic microorganisms to overcome environmental adversities. The flavodoxin gene was lost in the course of plant evolution, but its reintroduction in transgenic plants confers increased tolerance to environmental stress and iron starvation, raising the question as to why a genetic asset with obvious adaptive value was not kept by natural selection. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that the evolutionary history of flavodoxin is intricate, with several horizontal gene transfer events between distant organisms, including Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea. The flavodoxin gene is unevenly distributed in most algal lineages, with flavodoxin-containing species being overrepresented in iron-limited regions and scarce or absent in iron-rich environments. Evaluation of cyanobacterial genomic and metagenomic data yielded essentially the same results, indicating that there was little selection pressure to retain flavodoxin in iron-rich coastal/freshwater phototrophs. Our results show a highly dynamic evolution pattern of flavodoxin tightly connected to the bioavailability of iron. Evidence presented here also indicates that the high concentration of iron in coastal and freshwater habitats may have facilitated the loss of flavodoxin in the freshwater ancestor of modern plants during the transition of photosynthetic organisms from the open oceans to the firm land.

  3. Environmental Selection Pressures Related to Iron Utilization Are Involved in the Loss of the Flavodoxin Gene from the Plant Genome

    PubMed Central

    Pierella Karlusich, Juan J.; Ceccoli, Romina D.; Graña, Martín; Romero, Héctor; Carrillo, Néstor

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress and iron limitation represent the grim side of life in an oxygen-rich atmosphere. The versatile electron transfer shuttle ferredoxin, an iron-sulfur protein, is particularly sensitive to these hardships, and its downregulation under adverse conditions severely compromises survival of phototrophs. Replacement of ferredoxin by a stress-resistant isofunctional carrier, flavin-containing flavodoxin, is a widespread strategy employed by photosynthetic microorganisms to overcome environmental adversities. The flavodoxin gene was lost in the course of plant evolution, but its reintroduction in transgenic plants confers increased tolerance to environmental stress and iron starvation, raising the question as to why a genetic asset with obvious adaptive value was not kept by natural selection. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that the evolutionary history of flavodoxin is intricate, with several horizontal gene transfer events between distant organisms, including Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea. The flavodoxin gene is unevenly distributed in most algal lineages, with flavodoxin-containing species being overrepresented in iron-limited regions and scarce or absent in iron-rich environments. Evaluation of cyanobacterial genomic and metagenomic data yielded essentially the same results, indicating that there was little selection pressure to retain flavodoxin in iron-rich coastal/freshwater phototrophs. Our results show a highly dynamic evolution pattern of flavodoxin tightly connected to the bioavailability of iron. Evidence presented here also indicates that the high concentration of iron in coastal and freshwater habitats may have facilitated the loss of flavodoxin in the freshwater ancestor of modern plants during the transition of photosynthetic organisms from the open oceans to the firm land. PMID:25688107

  4. Instabilities of volatile films and drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murisic, Nebojsa

    2008-12-01

    We report on instabilities during spreading of volatile liquids, with emphasis on the novel instability observed when isopropyl alcohol (IPA) is deposited on a monocrystalline silicon (Si) wafer. This instability is characterized by emission of drops ahead of the expanding front, with each drop followed by smaller, satellite droplets, forming the structures which we nickname "octopi" due to their appearance. A less volatile liquid, or a substrate of larger heat conductivity, suppress this instability. In addition, we examine the spreading of drops of water (DIW)-IPA mixtures on both Si wafers and plain glass slides, and describe the variety of contact line instabilities which appear. We find that the decrease of IPA concentration in mixtures leads to transition from "octopi" to mushroom-like instabilities. Through manipulation of our experimental set up, we also find that the mechanism responsible for these instabilities appears to be mostly insensitive to both the external application of convection to the gas phase, and the doping of the gas phase with vapor in order to create the saturated environment. In order to better understand the "octopi" instability, we develop a theoretical model for evaporation of a pure liquid drop on a thermally conductive solid substrate. This model includes all relevant physical effects, including evaporation, thermal conductivity in both liquid and solid, (thermocapillary) Marangoni effect, vapor recoil, disjoining pressure, and gravity. The crucial ingredient in this problem is the evaporation model, since it influences both the motion of the drop contact line, and the temperature profiles along the liquid-solid and liquid-gas interfaces. We consider two evaporation models: the equilibrium "lens" model and the non-equilibrium one-sided (NEOS) model. Along with the assumption of equilibrium at the liquid-gas interface, the "lens" model also assumes that evaporation proceeds in a (vapor) diffusion-limited regime, therefore bringing

  5. The analysis of cracks in high-pressure piping and their effects on strength and lifetime of construction components at the Ignalina nuclear plant

    SciTech Connect

    Aleev, A.; Petkevicius, K.; Senkus, V.

    1997-04-01

    A number of cracks and damages of other sorts have been identified in the high-pressure parts at the Ignalina Nuclear Plant. They are caused by inadequate production- and repair technologies, as well as by thermal, chemical and mechanical processes of their performance. Several techniques are available as predictions of cracks and other defects of pressurized vessels. The choice of an experimental technique should be based on the level of its agreement with the actual processes.

  6. Pool impacts of Leidenfrost drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbois Texier, Baptiste; Maquet, Laurent; Dorbolo, Stephane; Dehandschoewercker, Eline; Pan, Zhao; Truscott, Tadd

    2015-11-01

    This work concerns the impact of a droplet made of a volatile liquid (typically HFE) on a pool of an other liquid (typically silicone oil) which temperature is above the boiling point of the drop. Depending on the properties of the two liquids and the impacting conditions, four different regimes are observed. For low impacting speeds, the droplet bounces on the surface of the bath and finally levitates above it in a Leidenfrost state. Such a regime occurs as soon as the pool temperature exceeds the boiling point of the drop. This observation means that there is no threshold in temperature for a Leidenfrost effect on a liquid surface contrary to the case of a solid substrate. For intermediate impacting velocities, the pinch-off of the surface of the pool entraps the drop in the liquid bulk. The entrapped drop is separated from the pool by a layer of its own vapour in a similar way of antibulles. For increasing impacting speeds, the vapour layer between the drop and the pool does not hold during the pinch-off event. The contact of the drop with the hot liquid provokes a sudden and intense evaporation. At very large impacting speeds, the drop rapidely contacts the pool, spreads and finally induces a hemi-spherical cavity. In the end, these four different regimes are summarized in a Froud-Weber diagram which boundaries are discussed.

  7. Liquid drops on soft solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubbers, Luuk A.; Weijs, Joost H.; Das, Siddhartha; Botto, Lorenzo; Andreotti, Bruno; Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2014-03-01

    A sessile drop can elastically deform a substrate by the action of capillary forces. The typical size of the deformation is given by the ratio of surface tension and the elastic modulus, γ / E , which can reach up to 10-100 microns for soft elastomers. In this talk we theoretically show that the contact angles of drops on such a surface exhibit two transitions when increasing γ / E : (i) the microsocopic geometry of the contact line first develops a Neumann-like cusp when γ / E is of the order of few nanometers, (ii) the macroscopic angle of the drop is altered only when γ / E reaches the size of the drop. Using the same framework we then show that two neighboring drops exhibit an effective interaction, mediated by the deformation of the elastic medium. This is in analogy to the well-known Cheerios effect, where small particles at a liquid interface attract each other due to the meniscus deformations. Here we reveal the nature of drop-drop interactions on a soft substrate by combining numerical and analytical calculations.

  8. Coalescence and noncoalescence of sessile drops: impact of surface forces.

    PubMed

    Karpitschka, Stefan; Hanske, Christoph; Fery, Andreas; Riegler, Hans

    2014-06-17

    Due to capillarity, sessile droplets of identical liquids will instantaneously fuse when they come in contact at their three-phase lines. However, with drops of different, completely miscible liquids, instantaneous coalescence can be suppressed. Instead, the drops remain in a state of noncoalescence for some time, with the two drop bodies connected only by a thin neck. The reason for this noncoalescence is the surface tension difference, Δγ, between the liquids. If Δγ is sufficiently large, then it induces a sufficiently strong Marangoni flow, which keeps the main drop bodies temporarily separated. Studies with spreading drops have revealed that the boundary between instantaneous coalescence and noncoalescence is sharp (Karpitschka, S.; Riegler, H. J. Fluid. Mech. 2014, 743, R1). The boundary is a function of two parameters only: Δγ and Θ(a), the arithmetic mean of the contact angles in the moment of drop-drop contact. It appears plausible that surface forces (the disjoining pressure) could also influence the coalescence behavior. However, in experiments with spreading drops, surface forces always promote coalescence and their influence might be obscured. Therefore, we present here coalescence experiments with partially wetting liquids and compare the results to the spreading case. We adjust different equilibrium contact angles (i.e., different surface forces) with different substrate surface coatings. As for spreading drops, we observe a sharp boundary between regimes of coalescence and noncoalescence. The boundary follows the same power law relation for both partially and completely wetting cases. Therefore, we conclude that surface forces have no significant, explicit influence on the coalescence behavior of sessile drops from different miscible liquids.

  9. Method of and apparatus for preheating pressurized fluidized bed combustor and clean-up subsystem of a gas turbine power plant

    DOEpatents

    Cole, Rossa W.; Zoll, August H.

    1982-01-01

    In a gas turbine power plant having a pressurized fluidized bed combustor, gas turbine-air compressor subsystem and a gas clean-up subsystem interconnected for fluid flow therethrough, a pipe communicating the outlet of the compressor of the gas turbine-air compressor subsystem with the interior of the pressurized fluidized bed combustor and the gas clean-up subsystem to provide for flow of compressed air, heated by the heat of compression, therethrough. The pressurized fluidized bed combustor and gas clean-up subsystem are vented to atmosphere so that the heated compressed air flows therethrough and loses heat to the interior of those components before passing to the atmosphere.

  10. Orion Capsule Mockup is Dropped

    NASA Video Gallery

    An Orion capsule mockup is dropped from a plane 25,000 feet above the Arizona desert to test its parachute design. Orion will return to Earth at speeds faster than previous human spacecraft, and wi...

  11. On the derivation of Young's equation for sessile drops: nonequilibrium effects due to evaporation.

    PubMed

    Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Golovko, Dmytro S; Bonaccurso, Elmar

    2007-05-17

    Sessile liquid drops have a higher vapor pressure than planar liquid surfaces, as quantified by Kelvin's equation. In classical derivations of Young's equation, this fact is often not taken into account. For an open system, a sessile liquid drop is never in thermodynamic equilibrium and will eventually evaporate. Practically, for macroscopic drops the time of evaporation is so long that nonequilibrium effects are negligible. For microscopic drops evaporation cannot be neglected. When a liquid is confined to a closed system, real equilibrium can be established. Experiments on the evaporation of water drops confirm the calculations.

  12. Coalescence of Drops of a Power-law Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamat, Pritish; Thete, Sumeet; Basaran, Osman

    2014-11-01

    Drop coalescence is crucial in a host of industrial, household, and natural processes that involve dispersions. Coalescence is a rate-controlling process in breaking emulsions and strongly influences drop-size-distributions in sprays. In a continuum approach, coalescence begins by the formation of a microscopic, non-slender bridge connecting the two drops. Indefinitely large axial curvature at the neck results in local lowering of pressure that drives fluid from the bulk of the drops toward the neck, thereby causing the bridge radius r (t) and height z (t) to increase in time t. The coalescence of Newtonian drops in air has heretofore been thoroughly studied. Here, we extend these earlier studies by analyzing the coalescence of drops of power-law fluids because many fluids encountered in real applications, including cosmetic creams, shampoos, grease, and paint, exhibit power-law (deformation-rate thinning) rheology. On account of the non-slender geometry of the liquid bridge connecting the two drops (z << r) , we analyze the resulting free surface flow problem by numerical simulation. Among other results, we present and discuss the nature of flows and scaling behaviors for r and z as functions of the initial viscosity and power-law index (0 < n <= 1) .

  13. The role of surfactants in drop formation and thread breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamat, Pritish; Wagoner, Brayden; Thete, Sumeet; Basaran, Osman

    2016-11-01

    The ability of surfactants to adsorb onto and lower the surface tension of water-air and water-oil interfaces is exploited in industrial applications, nature, and everyday life. An important example is provided by drop formation where a thinning liquid thread connects an about-to-form globular, primary drop to the rest of the liquid that remains on the nozzle when the primary drop falls from it. Surfactants can affect pinch-off in two ways: first, by lowering surface tension they lower capillary pressure (which equals, to highest order, surface tension divided by thread radius), and second, as surfactant concentration along the interface can be non-uniform, they cause the interface to be subjected to a gradient of surface tension, or Marangoni stress. By means of high-accuracy simulations and supporting experiments, we clarify the role played by surfactants on drop formation and thread breakup.

  14. Instituting a filtration/pressurization system to reduce dust concentrations in a control room at a mineral processing plant

    PubMed Central

    Noll, J.; Cecala, A.; Hummer, J.

    2016-01-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has observed that many control rooms and operator compartments in the U.S. mining industry do not have filtration systems capable of maintaining low dust concentrations in these areas. In this study at a mineral processing plant, to reduce respirable dust concentrations in a control room that had no cleaning system for intake air, a filtration and pressurization system originally designed for enclosed cabs was modified and installed. This system was composed of two filtering units: one to filter outside air and one to filter and recirculate the air inside the control room. Eighty-seven percent of submicrometer particles were reduced by the system under static conditions. This means that greater than 87 percent of respirable dust particles should be reduced as the particle-size distribution of respirable dust particles is greater than that of submicrometer particles, and filtration systems usually are more efficient in capturing the larger particles. A positive pressure near 0.02 inches of water gauge was produced, which is an important component of an effective system and minimizes the entry of particles, such as dust, into the room. The intake airflow was around 118 cfm, greater than the airflow suggested by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) for acceptable indoor air quality. After one year, the loading of the filter caused the airflow to decrease to 80 cfm, which still produces acceptable indoor air quality. Due to the loading of the filters, the reduction efficiency for submicrometer particles under static conditions increased to 94 percent from 87 percent. PMID:26834293

  15. Instituting a filtration/pressurization system to reduce dust concentrations in a control room at a mineral processing plant.

    PubMed

    Noll, J; Cecala, A; Hummer, J

    2015-12-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has observed that many control rooms and operator compartments in the U.S. mining industry do not have filtration systems capable of maintaining low dust concentrations in these areas. In this study at a mineral processing plant, to reduce respirable dust concentrations in a control room that had no cleaning system for intake air, a filtration and pressurization system originally designed for enclosed cabs was modified and installed. This system was composed of two filtering units: one to filter outside air and one to filter and recirculate the air inside the control room. Eighty-seven percent of submicrometer particles were reduced by the system under static conditions. This means that greater than 87 percent of respirable dust particles should be reduced as the particle-size distribution of respirable dust particles is greater than that of submicrometer particles, and filtration systems usually are more efficient in capturing the larger particles. A positive pressure near 0.02 inches of water gauge was produced, which is an important component of an effective system and minimizes the entry of particles, such as dust, into the room. The intake airflow was around 118 cfm, greater than the airflow suggested by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) for acceptable indoor air quality. After one year, the loading of the filter caused the airflow to decrease to 80 cfm, which still produces acceptable indoor air quality. Due to the loading of the filters, the reduction efficiency for submicrometer particles under static conditions increased to 94 percent from 87 percent.

  16. Estimation of the Drop Size in Dispersed Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agafonova, N. D.; Paramonova, I. L.

    2016-07-01

    The formulas for calculating the characteristic drop size for the mean Sauter diameter have been compared. The question on various forms of the size distribution of drops has been considered. To substantiate the applicability of the compared formulas for calculating the thermohydrodynamics in the circuits of nuclear power plants, experimental data on the wall temperature in a dispersed flow have been used. It has been shown that the Sauter diameter values calculated using the wall temperature in the supercritical region are in good agreement with sparse direct measurements of the drop size in steam-water flows. The drop sizes calculated using the tested formulas obtained for two-component gas-liquid flows or for single-component flows of coolants (various kinds of freons) and liquefied nitrogen turned out to be much lower. It has been shown that it is necessary to recalculate the numerical coefficients in the considered formulas in using them for steam-water flows.

  17. Insects at low pressure: applications to artificial ecosystems and implications for global windborne distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockell, C.; Catling, D.; Waites, H.

    1999-01-01

    Insects have a number of potential roles in closed-loop life support systems. In this study we examined the tolerance of a range of insect orders and life stages to drops in atmospheric pressure using a terrestrial atmosphere. We found that all insects studied could tolerate pressures down to 100 mb. No effects on insect respiration were noted down to 500 mb. Pressure toleration was not dependent on body volume. Our studies demonstrate that insects are compatible with plants in low-pressure artificial and closed-loop ecosystems. The results also have implications for arthropod colonization and global distribution on Earth.

  18. Forced Oscillations of Supported Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Edward D.; Basaran, Osman A.

    1996-01-01

    Oscillations of supported liquid drops are the subject of wide scientific interest, with applications in areas as diverse as liquid-liquid extraction, synthesis of ceramic powders, growing of pure crystals in low gravity, and measurement of dynamic surface tension. In this research, axisymmetric forced oscillations of arbitrary amplitude of viscous liquid drops of fixed volume which are pendant from or sessile on a rod with a fixed or moving contact line and surrounded by an inviscid ambient gas are induced by moving the rod in the vertical direction sinusiodally in time. In this paper, a preliminary report is made on the computational analysis of the oscillations of supported drops that have 'clean' interfaces and whose contact lines remain fixed throughout their motions. The relative importance of forcing to damping can be increased by either increasing the amplitude of rod motion A or Reynolds number Re. It is shown that as the ratio of forcing to damping rises, for drops starting from an initial rest state a sharp increase in deformation can occur when they are forced to oscillate in the vicinity of their resonance frequencies, indicating the incipience of hysteresis. However, it is also shown that the existence of a second stable limit cycle and the occurrence of hysteresis can be observed if the drop is subjected to a so-called frequency sweep, where the forcing frequency is first increased and then decreased over a suitable range. Because the change in drop deformation response is abrupt in the vicinity of the forcing frequencies where hysteresis occurs, it should be possible to exploit the phenomenon to accurately measure the viscosity and surface tension of the drop liquid.

  19. Barriers Keep Drops Of Water Out Of Infrared Gas Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Sean K.

    1996-01-01

    Infrared-sensor cells used for measuring partial pressures of CO(2) and other breathable gases modified to prevent entry of liquid water into sensory optical paths of cells. Hydrophobic membrane prevents drops of water entrained in flow from entering optical path from lamp to infrared detectors.

  20. Preliminary development of an integrated approach to the evaluation of pressurized thermal shock as applied to the Oconee Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, T J; Cheverton, R D; Flanagan, G F; White, J D; Ball, D G; Lamonica, L B; Olson, R

    1986-05-01

    An evaluation of the risk to the Oconee-1 nuclear plant due to pressurized thermal shock (PTS) has been Completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This evaluaion was part of a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) program designed to study the PTS risk to three nuclear plants: Oconee-1, a Babcock and Wilco reactor plant owned and operated by Duke Power Company; Calvert Cliffs-1, a Combustion Engineering reactor plant owned and operated by Baltimore Gas and Electric company; and H.B. Robinson-2, a Westinghouse reactor plant owned and operated by Carolina Power and Light Company. Studies of Calvert Cliffs-1 and H.B. Robinson-2 are still underway. The specific objectives of the Oconee-1 study were to: (1) provide a best estimate of the probability of a through-the-wall crack (TWC) occurring in the reactor pressure vessel as a result of PTS; (2) determine dominant accident sequences, plant features, operator and control actions and uncertainty in the PTS risk; and (3) evaluate effectiveness of potential corrective measures.

  1. Drop spreading with random viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Jensen, Oliver E.

    2016-10-01

    We examine theoretically the spreading of a viscous liquid drop over a thin film of uniform thickness, assuming the liquid's viscosity is regulated by the concentration of a solute that is carried passively by the spreading flow. The solute is assumed to be initially heterogeneous, having a spatial distribution with prescribed statistical features. To examine how this variability influences the drop's motion, we investigate spreading in a planar geometry using lubrication theory, combining numerical simulations with asymptotic analysis. We assume diffusion is sufficient to suppress solute concentration gradients across but not along the film. The solute field beneath the bulk of the drop is stretched by the spreading flow, such that the initial solute concentration immediately behind the drop's effective contact lines has a long-lived influence on the spreading rate. Over long periods, solute swept up from the precursor film accumulates in a short region behind the contact line, allowing patches of elevated viscosity within the precursor film to hinder spreading. A low-order model provides explicit predictions of the variances in spreading rate and drop location, which are validated against simulations.

  2. Drop Spreading with Random Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Jensen, Oliver

    2016-11-01

    Airway mucus acts as a barrier to protect the lung. However as a biological material, its physical properties are known imperfectly and can be spatially heterogeneous. In this study we assess the impact of these uncertainties on the rate of spreading of a drop (representing an inhaled aerosol) over a mucus film. We model the film as Newtonian, having a viscosity that depends linearly on the concentration of a passive solute (a crude proxy for mucin proteins). Given an initial random solute (and hence viscosity) distribution, described as a Gaussian random field with a given correlation structure, we seek to quantify the uncertainties in outcomes as the drop spreads. Using lubrication theory, we describe the spreading of the drop in terms of a system of coupled nonlinear PDEs governing the evolution of film height and the vertically-averaged solute concentration. We perform Monte Carlo simulations to predict the variability in the drop centre location and width (1D) or area (2D). We show how simulation results are well described (at much lower computational cost) by a low-order model using a weak disorder expansion. Our results show for example how variability in the drop location is a non-monotonic function of the solute correlation length increases. Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

  3. Surfactant and nonlinear drop dynamics in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankovsky, Joseph Charles

    2000-11-01

    Large amplitude drop dynamics in microgravity were conducted during the second United States Microgravity Laboratory mission carried onboard the Space Shuttle Columbia (20 October-5 November 1995). Centimeter- sized drops were statically deformed by acoustic radiation pressure and released to oscillate freely about a spherical equilibrium. Initial aspect ratios of up to 2.0 were achieved. Experiments using pure water and varying aqueous concentrations of Triton-X 100 and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were performed. The axisymmetric drop shape oscillations were fit using the degenerate spherical shape modes. The frequency and decay values of the fundamental quadrupole and fourth order shape mode were analyzed. Several large amplitude nonlinear oscillation dynamics were observed. Shape entrainment of the higher modes by the fundamental quadrupole mode occurred. Amplitude- dependent effects were observed. The nonlinear frequency shift, where the oscillation frequency is found to decrease with larger amplitudes, was largely unaffected by the presence of surfactants. The percentage of time spent in the prolate shape over one oscillation cycle was found to increase with oscillation amplitude. This prolate shape bias was also unaffected by the addition of surfactants. These amplitude-dependent effects indicate that the nonlinearities are a function of the bulk properties and not the surface properties. BSA was found to greatly enhance the surface viscoelastic properties by increasing the total damping of the oscillation, while Triton had only a small influence on damping. The surface concentration of BSA was found to be diffusion-controlled over the time of the experiments, while the Triton diffusion rate was very rapid. Using the experimental frequency and decay values, the suface viscoelastic properties of surface dilatational viscosity ( ks ) and surface shear viscosity ( ms ) were found for varying surfactant concentrations using the transcendental equation of Lu

  4. Apparent contact angle of an evaporating drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, S. J. S.

    2012-11-01

    In experiments by Poulard et al. (2005), a sessile drop of perfectly wetting liquid evaporates from a non-heated substrate into an under-saturated mixture of vapour with an inert gas; evaporation is limited by vapour diffusion. The system exhibits an apparent contact angle θ that is a flow property. Under certain conditions, the apparent contact line was stationary relative to the substrate; we predict θ for this case. Observed values of θ are small, allowing lubrication analysis of the liquid film. The liquid and vapour flows are coupled through conditions holding at the phase interface; in particular, vapour partial pressure there is related to the local value of liquid pressure through the Kelvin condition. Because the droplet is shallow, the interfacial conditions can be transferred to the solid-liquid interface at y = 0 . We show that the dimensionless partial pressure p (x , y) and the film thickness h (x) are determined by solving ∇2 p = 0 for y > 0 subject to a matching condition at infinity, and the conditions - p = L hxx +h-3 and (h3px) x + 3py = 0 at y = 0 . The parameter L controls the ratio of Laplace to disjoining pressure. We analyse this b.v.p. for the experimentally-relevant case L --> 0 .

  5. Second-generation pressurized fluidized-bed combustion plant: Conceptual design and optimization of a second-generation PFB combustion plant. Phase 2, Annual report, October 1991--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A.; Domeracki, W.; Newby, R.; Rehmat, A.; Horazak, D.

    1992-10-01

    After many years of experimental testing and development work, coal-fired pressurized fluidized bed (PFB) combustion combined-cycle power plants are moving toward reality. Under the US Department of Energy`s Clean Coal Technology Program, a 70-MWe PFB combustion retrofit, utilizing a 1525{degrees}F gas turbine inlet temperature, has been built and operated as a demonstration plant at the American Electric Power Company`s Tidd Plant in Brilliant, Ohio. As PFB combustion technology moves closer and closer to commercialization, interest is turning toward the development of an even more efficient and more cost-effective PFB combustion plant. The targeted goals of this ``second-generation`` plant are a 45-percent efficiency and a cost of electricity (COE) that is at least 20 percent lower than the COE of a conventional pulverized-coal (PC)-fired plant with stack gas scrubbing. In addition, plant emissions should be within New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and the plant should have high availability, be able to burn different ranks of coal, and incorporate modular construction technologies. In response to this need, a team of companies led by Foster Wheeler Development Corporation (FWDC). The key components in the proposed second-generation plant are the carbonizer, CPFBC, ceramic cross-flow filter, and topping combustor. Unfortunately, none of these components has been operated at proposed plant operating conditions, and experimental tests must be conducted to explore/determine their performance throughout the proposed plant operating envelope. The major thrust of Phase 2 is to design, construct, test, and evaluate the performance of the key components of the proposed plant.

  6. Drop stability in wind: theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungyon

    2015-11-01

    Water drops may remain pinned on a solid substrate against external forcing due to contact angle hysteresis. Schmucker and White investigated this phenomenon experimentally in a high Reynolds number regime, by measuring the critical wind velocity at which partially wetting water drops depin inside a wind tunnel. Due to the unsteady turbulent boundary layer, droplets are observed to undergo vortex-shedding induced oscillations. By contrast, the overall elongation of the drop prior to depinning occurs on a much slower timescale with self-similar droplet shapes at the onset. Based on these observations, a simple, quasi-static model of depinning droplet is developed by implementing the phenomenological description of the boundary layer. The resultant model successfully captures the critical onset of droplet motion and is the first of on-going studies that connect the classical boundary layer theory with droplet dynamics.

  7. Isoelectric focusing in a drop.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Noah G; Hayes, Mark A; Garcia, Antonio A; Ansari, Rafat R

    2011-01-04

    A novel approach to molecular separations is investigated using a technique termed droplet-based isoelectric focusing. Drops are manipulated discretely on a superhydrophobic surface, subjected to low voltages for isoelectric focusing, and split-resulting in a preparative separation. A universal indicator dye demonstrates the generation of stable, reversible pH gradients (3-10) in ampholyte buffers, and these gradients lead to protein focusing within the drop length. Focusing was visually characterized, spectroscopically verified, and assessed quantitatively by noninvasive light scattering measurements. It was found to correlate with a quantitative model based on 1D steady-state theory. This work illustrates that molecular separations can be deployed within a single open drop, and the differential fractions can be separated into new discrete liquid elements.

  8. Buoyancy-induced squeezing of a deformable drop through an axisymmetric ring constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratcliffe, Thomas; Zinchenko, Alexander Z.; Davis, Robert H.

    2010-08-01

    Axisymmetric boundary-integral (BI) simulations were made for buoyancy-induced squeezing of a deformable drop through a ring constriction. The algorithm uses the Hebeker representation for the solid-particle contribution. A high-order, near-singularity subtraction technique is essential for near-critical squeezing. The drop velocity and minimum drop-solid spacing were determined for different ring and hole sizes, viscosity ratios, and Bond numbers, where the latter is a dimensionless ratio of gravitational to interfacial forces. The drop velocity decelerates typically 100-fold or more, and the drop-solid spacing reduces to typically 0.1%-1% of the nondeformed drop radius as the drop passes through the constriction. The critical Bond number (below which trapping occurs) was determined for different conditions. For supercritical conditions, the nondimensional time required for the drop to pass through the ring increases for a fixed drop-to-hole size with increasing viscosity ratio and decreasing Bond number, but it has a nonmonotonic dependence on the ratio of the radii of the drop and ring cross section. Numerical results indicate that the square of the drop squeezing time is inversely proportional to the Bond number minus the critical Bond number for near-critical squeezing. The critical Bond number, determined from dynamic BI calculations, compares favorably to that obtained precisely from a static algorithm. The static algorithm uses the Young-Laplace equation to calculate the pendant and sessile portions of the drop interface coupled through the conditions of global pressure continuity and total drop volume conservation. Over a limited parameter space, the critical Bond number increases almost linearly with the drop-to-hole ratio and is a weak function of the ratio of the ring cross-sectional radius to the hole radius. Another dynamic phenomenon, in addition to drop squeezing, is a drop "dripping" around the outer edge of the ring constriction, and a critical

  9. Interfacial Instabilities in Evaporating Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, Ross; Sefiane, Khellil; Matar, Omar

    2007-11-01

    We study the effect of substrate thermal properties on the evaporation of sessile drops of various liquids. An infra-red imaging technique was used to record the interfacial temperature. This technique illustrates the non-uniformity in interfacial temperature distribution that characterises the evaporation process. Our results also demonstrate that the evaporation of methanol droplets is accompanied by the formation of wave-trains in the interfacial temperature field; similar patterns, however, were not observed in the case of water droplets. More complex patterns are observed for FC-72 refrigerant drops. The effect of substrate thermal conductivity on the structure of the complex pattern formation is also elucidated.

  10. Dynamics of drops – Formation, growth, oscillation, detachment, and coalescence.

    PubMed

    Karbaschi, M; Taeibi Rahni, M; Javadi, A; Cronan, C L; Schano, K H; Faraji, S; Won, J Y; Ferri, J K; Krägel, J; Miller, R

    2015-08-01

    Single drops or bubbles are frequently used for the characterization of liquid-fluid interfaces. Their advantage is the small volume and the various protocols of their formation. Thus, several important methods are based on single drops and bubbles, such as capillary pressure and profile analysis tensiometry. However, these methods are often applied under dynamic conditions, although their principles are defined under equilibrium conditions. Thus, specific attention has to be paid when these methods are used beyond certain limits. In many cases, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations have allowed researchers, to extend these limits and to gain important information on the interfacial dynamics. Examples discussed here are the capillary pressure tensiometry used for short time and profile analysis tensiometry for long time dynamic interfacial tension measurements, the oscillating drop methods for measuring dilational visco-elasticity. For measuring the coalescence of two drops the liquid dynamics of the subsequently formed liquid bridges have to be considered. In this paper, a thorough review of important experimental and computational findings, related to the dynamics of drops, including its formation, growth, oscillation, detachment, and coalescence is presented. Emphasis is however on some selected important developments. In addition, the paper tries to predict the main directions of advancement in interfacial research for the near future.

  11. Liquid drops and surface tension with smoothed particle applied mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugent, S.; Posch, H. A.

    2000-10-01

    Smoothed particle applied mechanics (SPAM), also referred to as smoothed particle hydrodynamics, is a Lagrangian particle method for the simulation of continuous flows. Here we apply it to the formation of a liquid drop, surrounded by its vapor, for a van der Waals (vdW) fluid in two dimensions. The cohesive pressure of the vdW equation of state gives rise to an attractive, central force between the particles with an interaction range which is assumed to exceed the interaction range of all the other smoothed forces in the SPAM equations of motion. With this assumption, stable drops are formed, and the vdW phase diagram is well reproduced by the simulations. Below the critical temperature, the surface tension for equilibrated drops may be computed from the pressure excess in their centers. It agrees very well with the surface tension independently determined from the vibrational frequency of weakly excited drops. We also study strongly deformed drops performing large-amplitude oscillations, which are reminiscent of the oscillations of a large ball of water under microgravity conditions. In an appendix we comment on the limitations of SPAM by studying the violation of angular momentum conservation, which is a consequence of noncentral forces contributed by the full Newtonian viscous stress tensor.

  12. Drop tests of the Three Mile Island knockout canister

    SciTech Connect

    Box, W.D.; Aaron, W.S.; Shappert, L.B.; Childress, P.C.; Quinn, G.J.; Smith, J.V.

    1986-09-01

    A type of Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) defueling canister, called a ''knockout'' canister, was subjected to a series of drop tests at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Drop Test Facility. These tests were designed to confirm the structural integrity of internal fixed neutron poisons in support of a request for NRC licensing of this type of canister for the shipment of TMI-2 reactor fuel debris to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the Core Examination R and D Program. Work conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory included (1) precise physical measurements of the internal poison rod configuration before assembly, (2) canister assembly and welding, (3) nondestructive examination (an initial hydrostatic pressure test and an x-ray profile of the internals before and after each drop test), (4) addition of a simulated fuel load, (5) instrumentation of the canister for each drop test, (6) fabrication of a cask simulation vessel with a developed and tested foam impact limiter, (7) use of refrigeration facilities to cool the canister to well below freezing prior to three of the drops, (8) recording the drop test with still, high-speed, and normal-speed photography, (9) recording the accelerometer measurements during impact, (10) disassembly and post-test examination with precise physical measurements, and (11) preparation of the final report.

  13. Ultrasonic atomization of liquids in drop-chain acoustic fountains.

    PubMed

    Simon, Julianna C; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Khokhlova, Vera A; Crum, Lawrence A; Bailey, Michael R

    2015-03-01

    When focused ultrasound waves of moderate intensity in liquid encounter an air interface, a chain of drops emerges from the liquid surface to form what is known as a drop-chain fountain. Atomization, or the emission of micro-droplets, occurs when the acoustic intensity exceeds a liquid-dependent threshold. While the cavitation-wave hypothesis, which states that atomization arises from a combination of capillary-wave instabilities and cavitation bubble oscillations, is currently the most accepted theory of atomization, more data on the roles of cavitation, capillary waves, and even heat deposition or boiling would be valuable. In this paper, we experimentally test whether bubbles are a significant mechanism of atomization in drop-chain fountains. High-speed photography was used to observe the formation and atomization of drop-chain fountains composed of water and other liquids. For a range of ultrasonic frequencies and liquid sound speeds, it was found that the drop diameters approximately equalled the ultrasonic wavelengths. When water was exchanged for other liquids, it was observed that the atomization threshold increased with shear viscosity. Upon heating water, it was found that the time to commence atomization decreased with increasing temperature. Finally, water was atomized in an overpressure chamber where it was found that atomization was significantly diminished when the static pressure was increased. These results indicate that bubbles, generated by either acoustic cavitation or boiling, contribute significantly to atomization in the drop-chain fountain.

  14. Ultrasonic atomization of liquids in drop-chain acoustic fountains

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Julianna C.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    When focused ultrasound waves of moderate intensity in liquid encounter an air interface, a chain of drops emerges from the liquid surface to form what is known as a drop-chain fountain. Atomization, or the emission of micro-droplets, occurs when the acoustic intensity exceeds a liquid-dependent threshold. While the cavitation-wave hypothesis, which states that atomization arises from a combination of capillary-wave instabilities and cavitation bubble oscillations, is currently the most accepted theory of atomization, more data on the roles of cavitation, capillary waves, and even heat deposition or boiling would be valuable. In this paper, we experimentally test whether bubbles are a significant mechanism of atomization in drop-chain fountains. High-speed photography was used to observe the formation and atomization of drop-chain fountains composed of water and other liquids. For a range of ultrasonic frequencies and liquid sound speeds, it was found that the drop diameters approximately equalled the ultrasonic wavelengths. When water was exchanged for other liquids, it was observed that the atomization threshold increased with shear viscosity. Upon heating water, it was found that the time to commence atomization decreased with increasing temperature. Finally, water was atomized in an overpressure chamber where it was found that atomization was significantly diminished when the static pressure was increased. These results indicate that bubbles, generated by either acoustic cavitation or boiling, contribute significantly to atomization in the drop-chain fountain. PMID:25977591

  15. Blueberry fruit drop associated virus: A new member of the family Caulimoviridae isolated from blueberry exhibiting fruit drop symptoms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study describes the nucleotide sequence and genome organization of a new DNA virus isolated from ‘Bluecrop’ blueberry plants named Blueberry fruit drop associated virus (BFDaV). Infected bushes lose nearly 100% of their fruit prior to harvest, and in springtime young leaves and flowers develop ...

  16. 49 CFR 178.965 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drop test. 178.965 Section 178.965 Transportation... Packagings § 178.965 Drop test. (a) General. The drop test must be conducted for the qualification of all...) Special preparation for the drop test. Large Packagings must be filled in accordance with § 178.960....

  17. 49 CFR 178.810 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drop test. 178.810 Section 178.810 Transportation... Drop test. (a) General. The drop test must be conducted for the qualification of all IBC design types... the drop test. (1) Metal, rigid plastic, and composite IBCs intended to contain solids must be...

  18. 49 CFR 178.1045 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drop test. 178.1045 Section 178.1045... Containers § 178.1045 Drop test. (a) General. The drop test must be conducted for the qualification of all... subpart. (b) Special preparation for the drop test. Flexible Bulk Containers must be filled to...

  19. 49 CFR 178.603 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drop test. 178.603 Section 178.603 Transportation... Packagings and Packages § 178.603 Drop test. (a) General. The drop test must be conducted for the... than flat drops, the center of gravity of the test packaging must be vertically over the point...

  20. Vapor layer evolution during drop impact on a heated surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sanghyeon; Lee, Sangjun; Lee, Jisan; Fezzaa, Kamel; Je, Jung Ho

    2015-11-01

    When a liquid drop impacts on a sufficiently hot surface above the boiling point, a vapor layer is formed between the drop and the surface, preventing direct contact between them and as a result levitating the drop, known as the Leidenfrost effect. Understanding the evolution of the vapor layer is largely unexplored despite its importance in estimating heat transfer in cooling systems of thermal or nuclear power plants. The side-profile visualization of the vapor layer, as absolutely required for investigating its evolution, has been however unavailable by conventional optical microscopy. In this study, by employing ultrafast X-ray phase contrast imaging, we directly visualize the profiles of the vapor layers during liquid drop impact on a hot surface and elucidate the evolution of the vapor layers during spreading and retraction of the drop as functions of impact height and surface temperature. We reveal that the evolution is governed by the propagation of capillary waves generated in retraction and the wavelength of capillary waves λ is inversely proportional to the impact height h with a relation ~σ/ρh ~We-1 where We is weber number. Capillary waves that converge at the center of the vapor layers are linked to the bouncing behavior of the drop.

  1. Dispersion in Spherical Water Drops.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliason, John C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a laboratory exercise simulating the paths of light rays through spherical water drops by applying principles of ray optics and geometry. Describes four parts: determining the output angles, computer simulation, explorations, model testing, and solutions. Provides a computer program and some diagrams. (YP)

  2. Getting the Drop on Sediment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galindez, Peter

    1977-01-01

    In this exercise, students examine Aristotle's weight hypothesis by testing variously shaped marble chips. These chips are weighed and dropped down a water tube. Average fall times and weights are recorded and graphed. Students are asked to apply this information to rock and soil deposition by streams. (MA)

  3. Self-assembly of nanoparticles in evaporating particle-laden emulsion drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pack, Min; Yang, Xin; Sun, Ying

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the scalable fabrication of nanostructures (e.g., nanomesh and nanoring arrays) via inkjet printing of oil-in-water emulsion drops containing nanoparticles in water. Nanoscale oil drops dispersed in water are used here as templates for assembly of nanoparticles on a substrate. The effect of oil vapor pressure on particle deposition morphologies is studied by using a variety of oils. For oil drops with a lower vapor pressure, non-uniform evaporation rate along the air-water interface drives dispersed oil drops to move and accumulate near the air/water/substrate contact line. These oil drops remain on the substrate while water is evaporating enabling nanoparticles to self-assemble into nanomeshes. While keeping the same oil concentration, oil drops with a higher vapor pressure completely evaporates near the contact line before water dries out, leading to nanoparticle deposition of coffee-ring structures. If nanoparticles are confined inside the dispersed oil drops, nanoring arrays are formed as the emulsion evaporates. The characteristics of the nanomeshes and nanorings are controlled by tuning the size and concentration of oil drops and nanoparticles, substrate wettability, surfactant concentration, and vapor pressure of oil.

  4. Free-streamline analysis of deformation and dislodging by wind force of drops on a surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    Free-streamline theory is used to analyze the deformation and dislodging by wind pressure of drops of liquid adhered by surface tension to a solid surface. The critical Weber number for droplets to be dislodged is determined as a function of advancing and receding contact angle. Graphical results for drop shape are in good agreement with observation.

  5. Transport-related phenomena for clusters of drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, J.; Harstad, K.

    1989-01-01

    Calculations for n-decane drops evaporating in a spherical cluster surrounded by unvitiated ambient air at atmospheric pressure were performed using two previously proposed cluster models. Both cluster models predict that turbulent transport effects are more important in the case of small clusters. This is due to the smaller volume to surface ratio and thus to the greater transport of hot unvitiated gas to the drops in order to promote evaporation. The results obtained are compared with those of two turbulent models for each one of the 'trapping factors' and similarity models.

  6. Microgravity containerless processing in long drop tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayuzick, R. J.; Evans, N. D.; Hofmeister, W. H.; Robinson, M. B.

    1984-01-01

    Extensive experience in utilizing long drop tubes for studying effects of microgravity on the solidification of alloys was obtained. While some modifications are necessary to improve versatility, the facility proved to be most useful. Both an electron beam furnace and an electromagnetic levitation furnace can be used. The electron beam furnace is used with vacuum environments (0.00001 torr), whereas the levitation furnace is presently used only in inert gas environments (above 100 torr). Experiments are best applied to refractory alloys because of the sensitivity of the detectors now being used to observe solidification. Processing of lower melting point metals and alloys simply cannot be recorded. On the other hand, expected improvements in detector sensitivity will allow experimentation with relatively low melting alloys. In such cases, solidification will occur in flight only if higher inert gas pressure is used (100 to 760 torr) to increase heat loss by convection. Under these conditions microgravity conditions no longer apply. However, as shown by results to date, it is not microgravity as such that is important in drop tube solidification. Instead it is the containerless nature of the process that is significant, leading to large degrees of undercooling before solidification and therefore to unique alloys.

  7. Plants survive rapid decompression: Implications for bioregenerative life support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Wehkamp, C. A.; Stasiak, M. A.; Dixon, M. A.; Rygalov, V. Y.

    2011-05-01

    Radish (Raphanus sativus), lettuce (Latuca sativa), and wheat (Triticum aestivum) plants were grown at either 98 kPa (ambient) or 33 kPa atmospheric pressure with constant 21 kPa oxygen and 0.12 kPa carbon dioxide in atmospherically closed pressure chambers. All plants were grown rockwool using recirculating hydroponics with a complete nutrient solution. At 20 days after planting, chamber pressures were pumped down as rapidly as possible, reaching 5 kPa after about 5 min and ˜1.5 kPa after about 10 min. The plants were held at 1.5 kPa for 30 min and then pressures were restored to their original settings. Temperature (22 °C) and humidity (65% RH) controls were engaged throughout the depressurization, although temperatures dropped to near 16 °C for a brief period. CO2 and O2 were not detectable at the low pressure, suggesting that most of the 1.5 kPa atmosphere consisted of water vapor. Following re-pressurization, plants were grown for another 7 days at the original pressures and then harvested. The lettuce, radish, and wheat plants showed no visible effects from the rapid decompression, and there were no differences in fresh or dry mass when compared to control plants maintained continuously at 33 or 98 kPa. But radish storage root fresh mass and lettuce head fresh and dry masses were less at 33 kPa compared to 98 kPa for both the controls and decompression treatment. The results suggest that plants are extremely resilient to rapid decompression, provided they do not freeze (from evaporative cooling) or desiccate. The water of the hydroponic system was below the boiling pressure during these tests and this may have protected the plants by preventing pressures from dropping below 1.5 kPa and maintaining humidity near 1.5 kPa. Further testing is needed to determine how long plants can withstand such low pressure, but the results suggest there are at least 30 min to respond to catastrophic pressure losses in a plant production chamber that might be used for life

  8. Bubble and Drop Nonlinear Dynamics experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Bubble and Drop Nonlinear Dynamics (BDND) experiment was designed to improve understanding of how the shape and behavior of bubbles respond to ultrasound pressure. By understanding this behavior, it may be possible to counteract complications bubbles cause during materials processing on the ground. This 12-second sequence came from video downlinked from STS-94, July 5 1997, MET:3/19:15 (approximate). The BDND guest investigator was Gary Leal of the University of California, Santa Barbara. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced fluid dynamics experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (189KB JPEG, 1293 x 1460 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300163.html.

  9. Horizontal Drop of 21- PWR Waste Package

    SciTech Connect

    A.K. Scheider

    2007-01-31

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of the waste package (WP) dropped horizontally from a specified height. The WP used for that purpose is the 21-Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) WP. The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in-terms of stress intensities. This calculation is associated with the WP design and was performed by the Waste Package Design group in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 16). AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'' (Ref. 1 1) is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. The sketches attached to this calculation provide the potential dimensions and materials for the 21-PWR WP design.

  10. Energy requirement for alkali assisted microwave and high pressure reactor pretreatments of cotton plant residue and its hydrolysis for fermentable sugar production for biofuel application.

    PubMed

    Vani, Sankar; Binod, Parameswaran; Kuttiraja, Mathiyazhakan; Sindhu, Raveendran; Sandhya, Soolamkandath Variem; Preeti, Varghese Elizabeth; Sukumaran, Rajeev Kumar; Pandey, Ashok

    2012-05-01

    In the present work, alkali assisted microwave pretreatment (AAMP) of cotton plant residue (CPR) with high pressure reactor pretreatment was compared. Further, modeling of AAMP was attempted. AAMP, followed by enzymatic saccharification was evaluated and the critical parameters were identified to be exposure time, particle size and enzyme loading. The levels of these parameters were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) to enhance sugar yield. AAMP of CPR (1mm average size) for 6 min at 300 W yielded solid fractions that on hydrolysis resulted in maximum reducing sugar yield of 0.495 g/g. The energy required for AAMP at 300 W for 6 min was 108 kJ whereas high pressure pretreatment (180°C, 100 rpm for 45 min) requires 5 times more energy i.e., 540 kJ. Physiochemical characterization of native and pretreated feedstock revealed differences between high pressure pretreatment and AAMP.

  11. Aging and service wear of spring-loaded pressure relief valves used in safety-related systems at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Staunton, R.H.; Cox, D.F.

    1995-03-01

    Spring-loaded pressure relief valves (PRVS) are used in some safety-related applications at nuclear power plants. In general, they are used in systems where, during accidents, pressures may rise to levels where pressure safety relief is required for protection of personnel, system piping, and components. This report documents a study of PRV aging and considers the severity and causes of service wear and how it is discovered and corrected in various systems, valve sizes, etc. Provided in this report are results of the examination of the recorded failures and identification of trends and relationships/correlations in the failures when all failure-related parameters are considered. Components that comprise a typical PRV, how those components fail, when they fail, and the current testing frequencies and methods are also presented in detail.

  12. Effects of light intensity and air velocity on air temperature, water vapor pressure, and CO2 concentration inside a plant canopy under an artificial lighting condition.

    PubMed

    Kitaya, Y; Shibuya, T; Kozai, T; Kubota, C

    1998-01-01

    In order to characterize environmental variables inside a plant canopy under artificial lighting in the CELSS, we investigated the effects of light intensity and air velocity on air temperature, water vapor pressure, and CO2 concentration inside a plant canopy. Under a PPF of 500 micromoles m-2 s-1, air temperature was 2-3 degrees C higher, water vapor pressure was 0.6 kPa higher, and CO2 concentration was 25-35 micromoles mol-1 lower at heights ranging from 0 to 30 mm below the canopy than at a height 60 mm above the canopy. Increasing the PPF increased air temperature and water vapor pressure and decreased CO2 concentration inside the canopy. The air temperature was lower and the CO2 concentration was higher inside the canopy at an air velocity of 0.3 m s-1 than at an air velocity of 0.1 m s-1. The environmental variables inside the canopy under a high light intensity were characterized by higher air temperature, higher vapor pressure, and lower CO2 concentration than those outside the canopy.

  13. "allometry" Deterministic Approaches in Cell Size, Cell Number and Crude Fiber Content Related to the Physical Quality of Kangkong (Ipomoea reptans) Grown Under Different Plant Density Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selamat, A.; Atiman, S. A.; Puteh, A.; Abdullah, N. A. P.; Mohamed, M. T. M.; Zulkeefli, A. A.; Othman, S.

    Kangkong, especially the upland type (Ipomoea reptans) is popularly consumed as a vegetable dish in the South East Asian countries for its quality related to Vitamins (A and C) and crude fiber contents. Higher fiber contents would prevent from the occurrence of colon cancer and diverticular disease. With young stem edible portion, its cell number and size contribute to the stem crude fiber content. The mathematical approach of allometry of cell size, number, and fiber content of stem could be used in determining the 'best' plant density pressure in producing the quality young stem to be consumed. Basically, allometry is the ratio of relative increment (growth or change) rates of two parameters, or the change rate associated to the log of measured variables relationship. Kangkog grown equal or lower than 55 plants m-2 produced bigger individual plant and good quality (physical) kangkong leafy vegetable, but with lower total yield per unit area as compared to those grown at higher densities.

  14. Universal Behavior of the Initial Stage of Drop Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaseboer, Evert; Manica, Rogerio; Chan, Derek Y. C.

    2014-11-01

    During the early stages of the impact of a drop on a solid surface, pressure builds up in the intervening thin lubricating air layer and deforms the drop. The extent of the characteristic deformation is determined by the competition between capillary, gravitational, and inertial forces that has been encapsulated in a simple analytic scaling law. For millimetric drops, variations of the observed deformation with impact velocity V exhibit a maximum defined by the Weber and Eötvös numbers: We =1 +Eo . The deformation scales as V1 /2 at the low-velocity capillary regime and as V-1 /2 at the high-velocity inertia regime, in excellent agreement with a variety of experimental systems.

  15. Response of driven sessile drops with contact-line dissipation.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, Joshua B; Steen, Paul H

    2016-11-04

    A partially-wetting sessile drop is driven by a sinusoidal pressure field that produces capillary waves on the liquid/gas interface. Response diagrams and phase shifts for the droplet, whose contact-line moves with contact-angle that is a smooth function of the contact line speed, are reported. Contact-line dissipation originating from the contact-line speed condition leads to damping for drops with finite contact-line mobility, even for inviscid fluids. The critical mobility and associated driving frequency to generate the largest contact-line dissipation is computed. Viscous dissipation is approximated using the irrotational flow and the critical Ohnesorge number bounding regions beyond which a given mode becomes over-damped is computed. Regions of modal coexistence where two modes can be simultaneously excited by a single forcing frequency are identified. Predictions compare favorably to related experiments on vibrated drops.

  16. Drop impact on a fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Gil; Kim, Wonjung

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of drop impact on a thin fiber. Using high-speed videography, we analyze the dynamics of droplet collision with a fiber. Based on the systematic experiments, we identify three outcomes of collision: capturing, single drop falling, and splitting. The outcomes are presented in a regime map, where the regime boundaries are explained through a scale analysis of forces. We also measure the liquid retention on the fiber after the droplet impact. By considering a liquid film on the fiber, we develop a mechanical model that predicts the residual water mass. Our model reveals that the residual mass depends critically on the fiber thickness and less on the impact speed. Our study can be extended to predicting the remaining droplet, critical problems in air filtration, water collection, and fiber coating.

  17. Dropped head syndrome in mitochondriopathy.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, J

    2004-11-01

    In a 63-year-old, 165-cm-tall woman with a history of repeated tick bites, dilative cardiomyopathy, osteoporosis, progressive head ptosis with neck stiffness and cervical pain developed. The family history was positive for thyroid dysfunction and neuromuscular disorders. Neurological examination revealed prominent forward head drop, weak anteflexion and retroflexion, nuchal rigidity, weakness of the shoulder girdle, cogwheel rigidity, and tetraspasticity. The lactate stress test was abnormal. Electromyograms of various muscles were myogenic. Muscle biopsy showed non-specific myogenic abnormalities and generally weak staining for cytochrome oxydase. Mitochondriopathy with multi-organ involvement was suspected. The response to anti-Parkinson medication was poor. In conclusion, dropped head syndrome (DHS) may be due to multi-organ mitochondriopathy, manifesting as Parkinsonism, tetraspasticity, dilative cardiomyopathy, osteoporosis, short stature, and myopathy. Anti-Parkinson medication is of limited effect.

  18. Reusable Material for Drop Tower

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution A. Approved for public release. REUSABLE MATERIAL FOR DROP TOWER A thesis written at TANK AUTOMOTIVE RESEARCH AND...ABSTRACT This thesis represents the capstone of my five years combined academic work at Kettering University and job experience at Tank Automotive ...NUMBER OF PAGES 57 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form

  19. Drop spreading with random viscosity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We examine theoretically the spreading of a viscous liquid drop over a thin film of uniform thickness, assuming the liquid’s viscosity is regulated by the concentration of a solute that is carried passively by the spreading flow. The solute is assumed to be initially heterogeneous, having a spatial distribution with prescribed statistical features. To examine how this variability influences the drop’s motion, we investigate spreading in a planar geometry using lubrication theory, combining numerical simulations with asymptotic analysis. We assume diffusion is sufficient to suppress solute concentration gradients across but not along the film. The solute field beneath the bulk of the drop is stretched by the spreading flow, such that the initial solute concentration immediately behind the drop’s effective contact lines has a long-lived influence on the spreading rate. Over long periods, solute swept up from the precursor film accumulates in a short region behind the contact line, allowing patches of elevated viscosity within the precursor film to hinder spreading. A low-order model provides explicit predictions of the variances in spreading rate and drop location, which are validated against simulations. PMID:27843398

  20. Thermocapillary motion of deformable drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haj-Hariri, Hossein; Shi, Qingping; Borhan, Ali

    1994-08-01

    The thermocapillary motion of initially spherical drops/bubbles driven by a constant temperature gradient in an unbounded liquid medium is simulated numerically. Effects of convection of momentum and energy, as well as shape deformations, are addressed. The method used is based on interface tracking on a base cartesian grid, and uses a smeared color or indicator function for the determination of the surface topology. Quad-tree adaptive refinement of the cartesian grid is implemented to enhance the fidelity of the surface tracking. It is shown that convection of energy results in a slowing of the drop, as the isotherms get wrapped around the front of the drop. Shape deformation resulting from inertial effects affect the migration velocity. The physical results obtained are in agreement with the existing literature. Furthermore, remarks are made on the sensitivity of the calculated solutions to the smearing of the fluid properties. Analysis and simulations show that the migration velocity depends very strongly on the smearing of the interfacial force whereas it is rather insensitive to the smearing of other properties, hence the adaptive grid.

  1. How to freeze drop oscillations with powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Jeremy; Zhu, Ying; Vakarelski, Ivan; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2012-11-01

    We present experiments that show when a water drop impacts onto a bed of fine, hydrophobic powder, the final form of the drop can be very different from the spherical form with which it impacts. For all drop impact speeds, the drop rebounds due to the hydrophobic nature of the powder. However, we observe that above a critical impact speed, the drop undergoes a permanent deformation to a highly non-spherical shape with a complete coverage of powder, thus creating a deformed liquid marble. This powder coating acts to freeze the drop oscillations during rebound.

  2. Experiments of drops impacting a smooth solid surface: a model of the critical impact speed for drop splashing.

    PubMed

    Riboux, Guillaume; Gordillo, José Manuel

    2014-07-11

    Making use of experimental and theoretical considerations, in this Letter we deduce a criterion to determine the critical velocity for which a drop impacting a smooth dry surface either spreads over the substrate or disintegrates into smaller droplets. The derived equation, which expresses the splash threshold velocity as a function of the material properties of the two fluids involved, the drop radius, and the mean free path of the molecules composing the surrounding gaseous atmosphere, has been thoroughly validated experimentally at normal atmospheric conditions using eight different liquids with viscosities ranging from μ=3×10(-4) to μ=10(-2)  Pa s, and interfacial tension coefficients varying between σ=17 and σ=72  mN m(-1). Our predictions are also in fair agreement with the measured critical speed of drops impacting in different gases at reduced pressures given by Xu et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 184505 (2005).

  3. Evaporation of sessile water/ethanol drops in a controlled environment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuanjun; Bonaccurso, Elmar; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2008-12-21

    The evaporation of water/ethanol drops with different mixing ratios was investigated at controlled vapor pressure of water (relative humidity) and ethanol in the background gas. Therefore, a drop of about 1 microL was deposited on a hydrophobized silicon substrate at room temperature in a closed cell. With a microscope camera we monitored the contact angle, the volume and the contact radius of the drops as function of time. Pure water drops evaporated in constant contact angle mode. The evaporation rate of water decreased with increasing humidity. In mixed drops ethanol did not evaporate completely at first, but a fraction still remained in the drop until the end of evaporation. Depending on ethanol concentration in the drop and on relative humidity in the background gas, water vapor condensed at the beginning of the evaporation of mixed drops. Also, at a high vapor pressure of ethanol, ethanol condensed at the beginning of the evaporation. The presence of ethanol vapor accelerated the total evaporation time of water drops.

  4. Flame propagation in heterogeneous mixtures of fuel drops and air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, G. D.; Lefebvre, A. H.

    1984-01-01

    Photographic methods are used to measure flame speeds in flowing mixtures of fuel props and air at atmospheric pressure. The fuels employed include a conventional fuel oil plus various blends JP 7 with stocks containing single-ring and mullti-ring aromatics. The results for stoichiometric mixtures show that flame propagation cannot occur in mixtures containing mean drop sizes larger than 300 to 400 microns, depending on the fuel type. For smaller drop sizes, down to around 60 microns, flame speed is inversely proportional to drop size, indicating that evaporation rates are limiting to flame speed. Below around 60 microns, the curves of flame speed versus mean drop size flatten out, thereby demonstrating that for finely atomized sprays flame speeds are much less dependent on evaporation rates, and are governed primarily by mixing and/or chemical reaction rates. The fuels exhibiting the highest flame speeds are those containing multi-ring aromatics. This is attributed to the higher radiative heat flux emanating from their soot-bearing flames which enhances the rate of evaporation of the fuel drops approaching the flame front.

  5. Vaporization response of evaporating drops with finite thermal conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agosta, V. D.; Hammer, S. S.

    1975-01-01

    A numerical computing procedure was developed for calculating vaporization histories of evaporating drops in a combustor in which travelling transverse oscillations occurred. The liquid drop was assumed to have a finite thermal conductivity. The system of equations was solved by using a finite difference method programmed for solution on a high speed digital computer. Oscillations in the ratio of vaporization of an array of repetitivity injected drops in the combustor were obtained from summation of individual drop histories. A nonlinear in-phase frequency response factor for the entire vaporization process to oscillations in pressure was evaluated. A nonlinear out-of-phase response factor, in-phase and out-of-phase harmonic response factors, and a Princeton type 'n' and 'tau' were determined. The resulting data was correlated and is presented in graphical format. Qualitative agreement with the open literature is obtained in the behavior of the in-phase response factor. Quantitatively the results of the present finite conductivity spray analysis do not correlate with the results of a single drop model.

  6. Perturbation solution of the shape of a nonaxisymmetric sessile drop.

    PubMed

    Prabhala, Bharadwaj; Panchagnula, Mahesh; Subramanian, Venkat R; Vedantam, Srikanth

    2010-07-06

    We develop an approximate analytical solution for the shape of a nonaxisymmetric sessile drop using regular perturbation methods and ignoring gravity. We assume that the pinned, contorted triple-line shape is known and is a small perturbation of the circular footprint of a spherical cap. We obtain an analytical solution using regular perturbation methods that we validate by comparing to the numerical solution of the Young-Laplace equation obtained using publicly available Surface Evolver software. In this process, we also show that the pressure inside the perturbed drop is unchanged and relate this to the curvature of the drop using the Young-Laplace equation. The rms error between the perturbation and Evolver solutions is calculated for a range of contact angles and amplitudes of triple-line perturbations. We show that the perturbation solution matches the numerical results well for a wide range of contact angles. In addition, we calculate the extent to which the drop surface is affected by triple-line contortions. We discuss the applicability of this solution to the possibility of real time hybrid experimental/computational characterization of the 3D sessile drop shapes, including obtaining local contact angle information.

  7. Optimizing modes of a small-scale combined-cycle power plant with atmospheric-pressure gasifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donskoi, I. G.; Marinchenko, A. Yu.; Kler, A. M.; Ryzhkov, A. F.

    2015-09-01

    The scheme of an integrated coal gasification combined-cycle power plant with small capacity is proposed. Using the built mathematical model a feasibility study of this unit was performed, taking into account the kinetics of physical and chemical transformations in the fuel bed. The estimates of technical and economic efficiency of the plant have been obtained and compared with the alternative options.

  8. Whole-plant growth and N utilization in transgenic rice plants with increased or decreased Rubisco content under different CO2 partial pressures.

    PubMed

    Sudo, Emi; Suzuki, Yuji; Makino, Amane

    2014-11-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) strongly limits photosynthesis at lower CO2 concentration [CO2] whereas [corrected] Rubisco limitation is cancelled by elevated [CO2]. Therefore, increase or reduction in Rubisco content by transformation with a sense or an antisense RBCS construct are expected to alter the biomass production under different CO2 levels. RBCS-sense (125% Rubisco of wild-type) and -antisense (35% Rubisco of wild-type) rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants were grown for 63 days at three different CO2 levels: low [CO2] (28 Pa), normal [CO2] (40 Pa) and elevated [CO2] (120 Pa). The biomass of RBCS-sense plants was 32% and 15% greater at low [CO2] and normal [CO2] than that of the wild-type plants, respectively, but did not differ at elevated [CO2]. Conversely, the biomass of RBCS-antisense plants was the smallest at low [CO2]. Thus, overproduction of Rubisco was effective for biomass production at low [CO2]. Greater biomass production at low [CO2] in RBCS-sense plants was caused by an increase in the net assimilation rate, and associated with an increase in the amount of N uptake. Furthermore, Rubisco overproduction in RBCS-sense plants was also promoted at low [CO2]. Although it seems that low [CO2]-growth additionally stimulates the effect of RBCS overexpression, such a phenomenon observed at low [CO2] was mediated through an increase in total leaf N content. Thus, the dependence of the growth improvement in RBCS-sense rice on growth [CO2] was closely related to the degree of Rubisco overproduction which was accompanied not only by leaf N content but also by whole plant N content.

  9. Impact of ultra-viscous drops on a smooth solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langley, Kenneth; Li, E. Q.; Thoroddsen, S. T.

    2016-11-01

    As an impacting drop approaches a solid surface, the gas layer between the drop and surface must be pushed aside. The lubrication pressure in this gas layer is sufficient to deform the droplet. For low-viscosity drops ( 1 cSt) a kink develops at the edge of the deformation, which results in contact being made along a ring, entraining a disc of air inside the drop. At higher viscosities, the kink is less pronounced due to the viscous stresses allowing the drop to glide on a thin layer of air ( 150 nm) for an extended time. When the thin air layer ruptures, numerous contacts are made that grow substantially faster than the predicted capillary-viscous balance. The evolution of the air layer and the subsequent growth of the contacts are investigated experimentally using two-color interferometry and high-speed imaging for a 7 orders of magnitude range of drop viscosities.

  10. Constant-Pressure Hydraulic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galloway, C. W.

    1982-01-01

    Constant output pressure in gas-driven hydraulic pump would be assured in new design for gas-to-hydraulic power converter. With a force-multiplying ring attached to gas piston, expanding gas would apply constant force on hydraulic piston even though gas pressure drops. As a result, pressure of hydraulic fluid remains steady, and power output of the pump does not vary.

  11. Critical point wetting drop tower experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Tcherneshoff, L. M.; Straits, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary results for the Critical Point Wetting CPW Drop Tower Experiment are produced with immiscible systems. Much of the observed phenomena conformed to the anticipated behavior. More drops will be needed to test the CPW theory with these immiscible systems.

  12. Propagation and Introduction of Arnica montana L. into Cultivation: A Step to Reduce the Pressure on Endangered and High-Valued Medicinal Plant Species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Arnica montana (L.) is an endangered and endemic medicinal plant species in Europe. The pressure on natural sources of this plant is alleviated by a suitable use of arnica resources in the European region and introduction into cultivation. The objective of this study was to describe the impact of different ways of plant propagation and introduction on the growth and reproduction mode of this species. During the six consecutive years of the field experiment, the vegetative and reproductive traits were monitored, and survival time was assessed. The particular ways of arnica plant propagation and introduction determined all the intrinsic species traits and plant survival. The values of the characteristics studied indicated good acclimatization of the arnica ecotype to the climatic conditions of eastern Poland. Practical implications from the data presented here include the possibility of using the presented modes of arnica propagation and introduction in the short- and long-term perspective of arnica cultivation, which can give a possibility of better adjustment of raw material production. PMID:24282381

  13. Propagation and introduction of Arnica montana L. into cultivation: a step to reduce the pressure on endangered and high-valued medicinal plant species.

    PubMed

    Sugier, Danuta; Sugier, Piotr; Gawlik-Dziki, Urszula

    2013-01-01

    Arnica montana (L.) is an endangered and endemic medicinal plant species in Europe. The pressure on natural sources of this plant is alleviated by a suitable use of arnica resources in the European region and introduction into cultivation. The objective of this study was to describe the impact of different ways of plant propagation and introduction on the growth and reproduction mode of this species. During the six consecutive years of the field experiment, the vegetative and reproductive traits were monitored, and survival time was assessed. The particular ways of arnica plant propagation and introduction determined all the intrinsic species traits and plant survival. The values of the characteristics studied indicated good acclimatization of the arnica ecotype to the climatic conditions of eastern Poland. Practical implications from the data presented here include the possibility of using the presented modes of arnica propagation and introduction in the short- and long-term perspective of arnica cultivation, which can give a possibility of better adjustment of raw material production.

  14. Vapour pressure deficit during growth has little impact on genotypic differences of transpiration efficiency at leaf and whole-plant level: an example from Populus nigra L.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Fahad; Dreyer, Erwin; Richard, Béatrice; Brignolas, Franck; Brendel, Oliver; Le Thiec, Didier

    2015-04-01

    Poplar genotypes differ in transpiration efficiency (TE) at leaf and whole-plant level under similar conditions. We tested whether atmospheric vapour pressure deficit (VPD) affected TE to the same extent across genotypes. Six Populus nigra genotypes were grown under two VPD. We recorded (1) (13)C content in soluble sugars; (2) (18)O enrichment in leaf water; (3) leaf-level gas exchange; and (4) whole-plant biomass accumulation and water use. Whole-plant and intrinsic leaf TE and (13)C content in soluble sugars differed significantly among genotypes. Stomatal conductance contributed more to these differences than net CO2 assimilation rate. VPD increased water use and reduced whole-plant TE. It increased intrinsic leaf-level TE due to a decline in stomatal conductance. It also promoted higher (18)O enrichment in leaf water. VPD had no genotype-specific effect. We detected a deviation in the relationship between (13)C in leaf sugars and (13)C predicted from gas exchange and the standard discrimination model. This may be partly due to genotypic differences in mesophyll conductance, and to its lack of sensitivity to VPD. Leaf-level (13)C discrimination was a powerful predictor of the genetic variability of whole-plant TE irrespective of VPD during growth.

  15. Two touching spherical drops in a uniaxial compressional flow: The effect of interfacial slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Sachin; Ramachandran, Arun

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a semi-analytical solution for the problem of two touching drops with slipping interfaces pushed against each other in a uniaxial compressional flow at low capillary and Reynolds numbers. The jump in the tangential velocity at the liquid-liquid interface is modeled using the Navier slip condition. Analytical solutions of the contact force, the drop-scale stresses, and the drop-scale pressure are provided as functions of the slip coefficient (" separators=" α ) , the viscosity ratio (" separators=" κ ) , and the drop size ratio (" separators=" k ) . Since unequal drop sizes are considered, two problems are solved in the tangent sphere co-ordinate system to determine the steady state position: a pair of touching drops with its contact point at the origin of an axisymmetric straining flow, and two touching drops placed in a uniform flow parallel to the axis of symmetry of the drops. A general observation is that the effect of slip is manifested most strongly for drops whose viscosity is much greater than the suspending fluid (" separators=" κ ≫ 1 ) . For highly viscous drops, the flow and stress fields transition from those corresponding to solid particles for ακ ≪ 1, to those for inviscid drops in the limit ακ ≫ 1. The analytical expressions provided here for the contact force and the stress distributions will serve to provide the restrictions that complete the definition of the lubrication flow problem in the thin film between the two colliding drops. While the contact force that drains fluid out of the thin film is relatively unaffected by slip, the tangential stress and pressure in the near-contact region are mitigated significantly for ακ ≫ 1. The latter is expected to assist coalescence at high capillary numbers.

  16. Dropped head syndrome. Three case-reports.

    PubMed

    Chaouat, D; Belange, G

    1999-01-01

    Dropped head syndrome is characterized by gradual forward sagging of the head due to weakness of the neck extensor muscles. We report three cases in elderly patients seen by rheumatologists at our institution. There was some evidence suggestive of a neurogenic process, whereas most reported cases of dropped head syndrome have been ascribed to myopathy. Dropped head syndrome can probably be produced by multiple causes. The close ties between dropped head syndrome and acquired camptocormia in adults are discussed.

  17. 49 CFR 572.102 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drop test. 572.102 Section 572.102 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Free Motion Headform § 572.102 Drop test. (a) When the headform is dropped from a height of 14.8 inches in accordance with paragraph (b)...

  18. 49 CFR 572.102 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Drop test. 572.102 Section 572.102 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Free Motion Headform § 572.102 Drop test. (a) When the headform is dropped from a height of 14.8 inches in accordance with paragraph (b)...

  19. 49 CFR 572.102 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Drop test. 572.102 Section 572.102 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Free Motion Headform § 572.102 Drop test. (a) When the headform is dropped from a height of 14.8 inches in accordance with paragraph (b)...

  20. Electrohydrodynamics of a particle-covered drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouriemi, Malika; Vlahovska, Petia

    2014-11-01

    We study the dynamics of a drop nearly-completely covered with a particle monolayer in a uniform DC electric field. The weakly conducting fluid system consists of a silicon oil drop suspended in castor oil. A broad range of particle sizes, conductivities, and shapes is explored. In weak electric fields, the presence of particles increases drop deformation compared to a particle-free drop and suppresses the electrohydrodynamic flow. Very good agreement is observed between the measured drop deformation and the small deformation theory derived for surfactant-laden drops (Nganguia et al., 2013). In stronger electric fields, where drops are expected to undergo Quincke rotation (Salipante and Vlahovska, 2010), the presence of the particles greatly decreases the threshold for rotation and the stationary tilted drop configuration observed for clean drop is replaced by a spinning drop with either a wobbling inclination or a very low inclination. These behaviors resemble the predicted response of rigid ellipsoids in uniform electric fields. At even stronger electric fields, the particles can form dynamic wings or the drop implodes. The similar behavior of particle-covered and surfactant-laden drops provides new insights into understanding stability of Pickering emulsions. Supported by NSF-CBET 1437545.

  1. Evaluation of operational control strategies applicable to solar chimney power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardes, Marco Aurelio dos Santos; von Backstroem, Theodor W.

    2010-02-15

    Numerical simulations are carried out to study the performance of two schemes of power output control applicable to solar chimney power plants. Either the volume flow or the turbine pressure drop is used as independent control variable. Values found in the literature for the optimum ratio of turbine pressure drop to pressure potential vary between 2/3 and 0.97. It is shown that the optimum ratio is not constant during the whole day and it is dependent of the heat transfer coefficients applied to the collector. This study is a contribution towards understanding solar chimney power plant performance and control and may be useful in the design of solar chimney turbines. (author)

  2. Drop Tower and Aircraft Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation is a brief introduction to existing capabilities in drop towers and low-gravity aircraft that will be presented as part of a Symposium: Microgravity Platforms Other Than the ISS, From Users to Suppliers which will be a half day program to bring together the international community of gravity-dependent scientists, program officials and technologists with the suppliers of low gravity platforms (current and future) to focus on the future requirements and use of platforms other than the International Space Station (ISS).

  3. Nor Any Drop To Drink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehr, Jay H.

    In Nor Any Drop To Drink author William Ashworth displays an exceptional grasp of the hydrologic cycle for one trained as a writer rather than as an earth scientist. Especially remarkable for a popular book is the no-nonsense manner in which he handles popular misconceptions about underground water. Authors of similar books generally mollify readers who hold fallacious, mysterious beliefs concerning groundwater flow. Ashworth gets their attention with the proverbial two-by-four between the eyes by declaring such fallacies to be 100% hogwash. He describes the groundwater system in an exceptionally accurate manner using precise analogies which benefit from his literary skill.

  4. Drag and drop display & builder

    SciTech Connect

    Bolshakov, Timofei B.; Petrov, Andrey D.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    The Drag and Drop (DnD) Display & Builder is a component-oriented system that allows users to create visual representations of data received from data acquisition systems. It is an upgrade of a Synoptic Display mechanism used at Fermilab since 2002. Components can be graphically arranged and logically interconnected in the web-startable Project Builder. Projects can be either lightweight AJAX- and SVG-based web pages, or they can be started as Java applications. The new version was initiated as a response to discussions between the LHC Controls Group and Fermilab.

  5. Low pressure drop, multi-slit virtual impactor

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Werner

    2002-01-01

    Fluid flow is directed into a multiplicity of slit nozzles positioned so that the fluid flow is directed into a gap between the nozzles and (a) a number of receiving chambers and (b) a number of exhaust chambers. The nozzles and chambers are select so that the fluid flow will be separated into a first particle flow component with larger and a second particle flow component with the smaller particles.

  6. Pneumatic Conveying of Seed Cotton: Minimum Velocity and Pressure Drop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electricity is a major cost for cotton gins, representing approximately 20% of variable costs. Fans used for pneumatic conveying consume the majority of electricity at cotton gins. Development of control systems to reduce the air velocity used for conveying seed cotton could significantly decrease e...

  7. Pneumatic Conveying of Seed Cotton: Minimum Velocity and Pressure Drop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electricity is major cost for cotton gins, representing approximately 20% of the industry’s variable costs. Fans used for pneumatic conveying consume the majority of electricity at cotton gins. Development of control systems to reduce the air velocity used for conveying seed cotton could significant...

  8. Small drops from large nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castrejon-Pita, Alfonso Arturo; Said Mohamed, Ahmed; Castrejon-Pita, Jose Rafael; Herrada, Miguel Angel

    2015-11-01

    We report experimental and numerical results of the generation of drops which are significantly smaller than the nozzle from which they are generated. The system consists of a cylindrical reservoir and two endplates. One plate is a thin metal sheet with a small orifice in its centre which acts as the nozzle. The other end consists of a piston which moves by the action of an elecromechanical actuator which in turn is driven by sine-shape pull-mode pulses. The meniscus (formed at the nozzle) is thus first overturned, forming a cavity. This cavity collapses and a thin and fast jet emerges from its centre. Under appropriate conditions the tip of this jet breaks up and produces a single diminutive drop. A good agreement between the experimental and numerical results was found. Also, a series of experiments were performed in order to study the effects that the pulse amplitude and width, together with variations in the liquid properties, have over the final size of the droplet. Based on these experiments, a predictive law for the droplet size has been derived. This work was funded by the Royal Society (University Research Fellowship and Research Grant), the John Fell Fund (Oxford University Press), the Ministry of Science and Education (DPI2013-46485 Spain), and the Junta de Andalucia (P08-TEP-31704128 Spain).

  9. Charged drop levitators and their applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W. K.; Chung, S. K.; Hyson, M. T.; Elleman, D. D.

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of the charged drop levitation characteristics of two different devices: (1) a feedback-controlled electrostatic levitator able to lift a several mm-diameter drop in 1g conditions, which is applicable to drop dynamics, crystal growth, and supercooling/solidification experiments; and (2) a linear quadrupole levitator, whose advantages are demonstrated in light of the results obtained for the charged drop instability experiment. The cause of the premature drop burstings observed is suggested to be an electron avalanche in the surrounding gaseous medium rather than the Rayleigh limit.

  10. Solid-Fueled Pressurized Chemical Looping with Flue-Gas Turbine Combined Cycle for Improved Plant Efficiency and CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kunlei; Chen, Liangyong; Zhang, Yi; Richburg, Lisa; Simpson, James; White, Jay; Rossi, Gianalfredo

    2013-12-31

    The purpose of this document is to report the final result of techno-economic analysis for the proposed 550MWe integrated pressurized chemical looping combustion combined cycle process. An Aspen Plus based model is delivered in this report along with the results from three sensitivity scenarios including the operating pressure, excess air ratio and oxygen carrier performance. A process flow diagram and detailed stream table for the base case are also provided with the overall plant energy balance, carbon balance, sulfur balance and water balance. The approach to the process and key component simulation are explained. The economic analysis (OPEX and CAPX) on four study cases via DOE NETL Reference Case 12 are presented and explained.

  11. Spatial Distribution of Large Cloud Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Larsen, Michael; Wiscombe, Warren

    2004-01-01

    The analysis of aircraft measurements of individual drop sizes in clouds suggests that for sufficiently small volumes the mean number of cloud drops with a given radius is proportional to volume powered by a drop-size dependent exponent. For abundant small drops present, the exponent is 1 as assumed in conventional approach. However, for rarer large drops, the exponents fall below unity. We show striking examples of the spatial distribution of large cloud drops using models that simulate the observed power laws. In contrast to currently used models that assume homogeneity and therefore a Poisson distribution of cloud drops, these models show strong drop clustering, the more so the larger the drops. The degree of clustering is determined by the observed exponents. The strong clustering of large drops arises naturally from the observed power-law statistics. This clustering has vital consequences for rain physics explaining how rain can form so fast and also helps explain why remotely sensed cloud drop size is generally biased.

  12. Drop short control of electrode gap

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, Robert W.; Maroone, James P.; Tipping, Donald W.; Zanner, Frank J.

    1986-01-01

    During vacuum consumable arc remelting the electrode gap between a consumable electrode and a pool of molten metal is difficult to control. The present invention monitors drop shorts by detecting a decrease in the voltage between the consumable electrode and molten pool. The drop shorts and their associated voltage reductions occur as repetitive pulses which are closely correlated to the electrode gap. Thus, the method and apparatus of the present invention controls electrode gap based upon drop shorts detected from the monitored anode-cathode voltage. The number of drop shorts are accumulated, and each time the number of drop shorts reach a predetermined number, the average period between drop shorts is calculated from this predetermined number and the time in which this number is accumulated. This average drop short period is used in a drop short period electrode gap model which determines the actual electrode gap from the drop short. The actual electrode gap is then compared with a desired electrode gap which is selected to produce optimum operating conditions and the velocity of the consumable error is varied based upon the gap error. The consumable electrode is driven according to any prior art system at this velocity. In the preferred embodiment, a microprocessor system is utilized to perform the necessary calculations and further to monitor the duration of each drop short. If any drop short exceeds a preset duration period, the consumable electrode is rapidly retracted a predetermined distance to prevent bonding of the consumable electrode to the molten remelt.

  13. Footprint geometry and sessile drop resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun-Ti; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul H.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we examine experimentally the resonance of a sessile drop with a square footprint (square drop) on a flat plate. Two families of modal behaviors are reported. One family is identified with the modes of sessile drops with circular footprints (circular drop), denoted as "spherical modes." The other family is associated with Faraday waves on a square liquid bath (square Faraday waves), denoted as "grid modes." The two families are distinguished based on their dispersion behaviors. By comparing the occurrence of the modes, we recognize spherical modes as the characteristic of sessile drops, and grid modes as the constrained response. Within a broader context, we further discuss the resonance modes of circular sessile drops and free spherical drops, and we recognize various modal behaviors as surface waves under different extents of constraint. From these, we conclude that sessile drops resonate according to how wave-number selection by footprint geometry and capillarity compete. For square drops, a dominant effect of footprint constraint leads to grid modes; otherwise, the drops exhibit spherical modes, the characteristic of sessile drops on flat plates.

  14. Dropping Behavior in the Pea Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae): How Does Environmental Context Affect Antipredator Responses?

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Katharine V.; Preisser, Evan L.

    2016-01-01

    The pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisumHarris (Hemiptera: Aphididae) is a phloem-feeding insect whose antipredator defenses include kicking, walking away, and dropping from the plant. Aphid dropping, a risky and energetically costly antipredator behavior, can be increased by the release of aphid alarm pheromone; there is also evidence that insect density and plant health can affect the likelihood of aphids engaging in this behavior. We investigated whether interactions between alarm cues, insect density, and plant health can alter the dropping behavior of aphids in response to an artificial disturbance. The presence of the alarm pheromone E-β-farnesene resulted in a nearly 15-fold increase in aphid dropping behavior; the other two factors, however, did not affect dropping and none of the two- or three-way interactions were significant. This was surprising because aphids affected plant health: production of new plant biomass after 5 d of exposure to high aphid densities was 50% lower than in the control treatment. This research adds to our understanding of the factors affecting aphid antipredator behavior; the fact that neither aphid density nor feeding period impacted dropping may reflect the high energetic costs of this activity and an unwillingness to use it in any but the riskiest situations. PMID:27638950

  15. Investigations to determine whether Section XI of the ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code should include PLEX (plant life extension) baseline inspection guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Bustard, L.D.

    1988-01-01

    A plant life extension (PLEX) issue repeatedly mentioned is whether special PLEX supplemental inspection requirements should be added to Section XI of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. To assist the ASME answer this question, the DOE Technology Management Center performed an industry survey to assess whether there was a technical consensus regarding the desirability and scope of a supplemental PLEX baseline inspection. This survey demonstrated the lack of an initial industry consensus. In response to the survey results, ASME has formed a task group to investigate various PLEX supplemental inspection strategies and to assess their value and liabilities. The results of the survey and initial task group activities are reviewed.

  16. Large charged drop levitation against gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Chung, Sang Kun; Hyson, Michael T.; Trinh, Eugene H.; Elleman, Daniel D.

    1987-01-01

    A hybrid electrostatic-acoustic levitator that can levitate and manipulate a large liquid drop in one gravity is presented. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time such large drops (up to 4 mm in diameter in the case of water) have been levitated against 1-gravity. This makes possible, for the first time, many new experiments both in space and in ground-based laboratories, such as 1)supercooling and superheating, 2) containerless crystal growth from various salt solutions or melts, 3) drop dynamics of oscillating or rotating liquid drops, 4) drop evaporation and Rayleigh bursting, and 5) containerless material processing in space. The digital control system, liquid drop launch process, principles of electrode design, and design of a multipurpose room temperature levitation chamber are described. Preliminary results that demonstrate drop oscillation and rotation, and crystal growth from supersaturated salt solutions are presented.

  17. Inhibition of Condensation Frosting by Arrays of Hygroscopic Antifreeze Drops.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoda; Damle, Viraj G; Uppal, Aastha; Linder, Rubin; Chandrashekar, Sriram; Mohan, Ajay R; Rykaczewski, Konrad

    2015-12-29

    The formation of frost and ice can have negative impacts on travel and a variety of industrial processes and is typically addressed by dispensing antifreeze substances such as salts and glycols. Despite the popularity of this anti-icing approach, some of the intricate underlying physical mechanisms are just being unraveled. For example, recent studies have shown that in addition to suppressing ice formation within its own volume, an individual salt saturated water microdroplet forms a region of inhibited condensation and condensation frosting (RIC) in its surrounding area. This occurs because salt saturated water, like most antifreeze substances, is hygroscopic and has water vapor pressure at its surface lower than water saturation pressure at the substrate. Here, we demonstrate that for macroscopic drops of propylene glycol and salt saturated water, the absolute RIC size can remain essentially unchanged for several hours. Utilizing this observation, we demonstrate that frost formation can be completely inhibited in-between microscopic and macroscopic arrays of propylene glycol and salt saturated water drops with spacing (S) smaller than twice the radius of the RIC (δ). Furthermore, by characterizing condensation frosting dynamics around various hygroscopic drop arrays, we demonstrate that they can delay complete frosting over of the samples 1.6 to 10 times longer than films of the liquids with equivalent volume. The significant delay in onset of ice nucleation achieved by dispensing propylene glycol in drops rather than in films is likely due to uniform dilution of the drops driven by thermocapillary flow. This transport mode is absent in the films, leading to faster dilution, and with that facilitated homogeneous nucleation, near the liquid-air interface.

  18. The Root Pressure Phenomenon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, A. R.

    1972-01-01

    Describes experiments demonstrating that root pressure in plants is probably controlled by a circadian rhythm (biological clock). Root pressure phenomenon plays significant part in water transport in contradiction with prevalent belief. (PS)

  19. [Effect of infrared laser irradiation on the arterial blood pressure in liquidators of the accident at the Chernobyl power plant].

    PubMed

    Korkushko, O O

    2003-01-01

    Liquidators of Tchernobyl accident with discirculatory post-irradiation encephalopathy were treated with infra-red lazer irradiation together with a half doze of pharmacological agents usually used. Infra-red lazer irradiation has been shown to result in a significant reduce in the arterial pressure level, so it can be effective in correcting the disturbances in haemodynamics.

  20. Magnetically focused liquid drop radiator

    DOEpatents

    Botts, Thomas E.; Powell, James R.; Lenard, Roger

    1986-01-01

    A magnetically focused liquid drop radiator for application in rejecting rgy from a spacecraft, characterized by a magnetizable liquid or slurry disposed in operative relationship within the liquid droplet generator and its fluid delivery system, in combination with magnetic means disposed in operative relationship around a liquid droplet collector of the LDR. The magnetic means are effective to focus streams of droplets directed from the generator toward the collector, thereby to assure that essentially all of the droplets are directed into the collector, even though some of the streams may be misdirected as they leave the generator. The magnetic focusing means is also effective to suppress splashing of liquid when the droplets impinge on the collector.