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Sample records for plaque radiation therapy

  1. Risk Factors for Cataract After Palladium-103 Ophthalmic Plaque Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, Paul T.; Chin, Kimberly J.; Yu Guopei; Patel, Neil S.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To examine how tumor characteristics and dose affect cataract development after plaque radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Three hundred and eighty-four patients were diagnosed with uveal melanoma and treated with palladium-103 ({sup 103}Pd) plaque radiation therapy. Of these, 282 (74%) inclusion met exclusion criteria for follow-up time, tumor location, and phakic status. Then patient-, ophthalmic-, and radiation-specific factors (patient age, diabetes, hypertension, tumor location, tumor dimensions, and lens dose) were examined (by a Cox proportional regression model) as predictors for the development of radiation-related cataract. Results: Radiation cataract developed in 76 (24%) of patients at a mean follow-up of 39.8 months (range, 1-192). Patients with anteriorly located tumors were noted to have a higher incidence of cataract at 43.0% (43 of 100 patients) vs. 18.1% (33 cataracts per 182 patients) for posteriorly located tumors (p <0.0001). However, multivariate Cox proportional modeling showed that increasing patient age at time of treatment (p for trend = 0.0003) and higher lens dose (p for trend = 0.001) were the best predictors (biomarkers) for radiation cataract. Conclusions: Although anterior tumor location, greater tumor height, and increased patient age (at treatment) were associated with significantly greater risk for radiation cataract, dose to lens was the most significant factor.

  2. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Radiation Therapy KidsHealth > For Teens > Radiation Therapy A A ... how to cope with side effects. What Is Radiation Therapy? Cancer is a disease that causes cells ...

  3. [{sup 18}F]Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT) Physiologic Imaging of Choroidal Melanoma: Before and After Ophthalmic Plaque Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, Paul T.; Chin, Kimberly J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate changes in [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) standardized uptake values (SUV) in uveal melanoma before and after plaque brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 217 patients diagnosed with uveal melanoma and eligible for ophthalmic plaque brachytherapy underwent preoperative PET/CT to evaluate their intraocular tumor and screen for metastasis. Subsequent to undergoing plaque brachytherapy, patients' PET/CT SUV were periodically reevaluated over 42 months. Results: In this series, 37 (17%) choroidal melanoma patients were found to have an SUV of >2.0. Of these, 18 patients were able to undergo interval follow-up PET/CT scanning. There were 3 patients with T2, 11 patients with T3, and 4 patients with T4 melanomas according to 7th edition AJCC-UICC criteria. Mean apical thickness was 8.8 mm (range, 3-12.3 mm), and the largest mean tumor diameter was 15.1 mm (range, 12-19.9 mm). The mean initial SUV was 3.7 (range, 2.1-7.3). Patients were followed for a median 16 months (range, 6-42 months). The median time to a tumor SUV of 0 was 8.0 months (range, 6-18 months). There was one case of one interval increase in SUV that diminished after circumferential laser treatment. Conclusions: Intraocular PET/CT imaging provides a physiological assessment of tumor metabolism that can be used to evaluate changes after treatment. In this study, ophthalmic plaque radiation therapy was associated with extinguished tumor PET/CT SUV over time. PET/CT imaging can be used to assess choroidal melanomas for their response to treatment.

  4. Radiation therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) Proton therapy is another kind of radiation used to ... than using x-rays to destroy cancer cells, proton therapy uses a beam of special particles called ...

  5. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... can watch you during the procedure. As you go through radiation treatment, you may feel like you're all ... treatment. Avoid exposing the treated area to the sun during the weeks you're getting radiation therapy. And when the treatment's over, wear sunscreen ...

  6. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... them from spreading. About half of all cancer patients receive it. The radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, from radioactive substances that a doctor places inside your body. The type of radiation therapy you receive depends on many factors, including The ...

  7. Dosimetric Benefit of a New Ophthalmic Radiation Plaque

    SciTech Connect

    Marwaha, Gaurav; Wilkinson, Allan; Bena, James; Macklis, Roger; Singh, Arun D.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the computed dosimetry of a new ophthalmic plaque, EP917, when compared with the standard Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS) plaques, could reduce radiation exposure to vision critical structures of the eye. Methods and Materials: One hundred consecutive patients with uveal melanoma treated with COMS radiation plaques between 2007 and 2010 were included in this study. These treatment plans were generated with the use of Bebig Plaque Simulator treatment-planning software, both for COMS plaques and for EP917 plaques using I-125. Dose distributions were calculated for a prescription of 85 Gy to the tumor apex. Doses to the optic disc, opposite retina, lens, and macula were obtained, and differences between the 2 groups were analyzed by standard parametric methods. Results: When compared with the COMS plaques, the EP917 plaques used fewer radiation seeds by an average difference of 1.94 (P<.001; 95% confidence interval [CI], -2.8 to -1.06) and required less total strength of radiation sources by an average of 17.74 U (air kerma units) (P<.001; 95% CI, -20.16 to -15.32). The total radiation doses delivered to the optic disc, opposite retina, and macula were significantly less by 4.57 Gy, 0.50 Gy, and 11.18 Gy, respectively, with the EP917 plaques vs the COMS plaques. Conclusion: EP917 plaques deliver less overall radiation exposure to critical vision structures than COMS treatment plaques while still delivering the same total therapeutic dose to the tumor.

  8. Identifying Vulnerable Plaques with Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Joshua Ryan

    The rupture of arterial plaques is the most common cause of ischemic complications including stroke, the fourth leading cause of death and number one cause of long term disability in the United States. Unfortunately, because conventional diagnostic tools fail to identify plaques that confer the highest risk, often a disabling stroke and/or sudden death is the first sign of disease. A diagnostic method capable of characterizing plaque vulnerability would likely enhance the predictive ability and ultimately the treatment of stroke before the onset of clinical events. This dissertation evaluates the hypothesis that Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging can noninvasively identify lipid regions, that have been shown to increase a plaque's propensity to rupture, within carotid artery plaques in vivo. The work detailed herein describes development efforts and results from simulations and experiments that were performed to evaluate this hypothesis. To first demonstrate feasibility and evaluate potential safety concerns, finite- element method simulations are used to model the response of carotid artery plaques to an acoustic radiation force excitation. Lipid pool visualization is shown to vary as a function of lipid pool geometry and stiffness. A comparison of the resulting Von Mises stresses indicates that stresses induced by an ARFI excitation are three orders of magnitude lower than those induced by blood pressure. This thesis also presents the development of a novel pulse inversion harmonic tracking method to reduce clutter-imposed errors in ultrasound-based tissue displacement estimates. This method is validated in phantoms and was found to reduce bias and jitter displacement errors for a marked improvement in image quality in vivo. Lastly, this dissertation presents results from a preliminary in vivo study that compares ARFI imaging derived plaque stiffness with spatially registered composition determined by a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) gold standard

  9. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumors In Children Pediatric Brain Tumor Diagnosis Family Impact Late Effects After Treatment Returning to School Pediatric ... Una publicación de ABTA en español. Radiation Imaging Technology Information on Radiation and Imaging Technology Home Donor and ...

  10. Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Radiation therapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Learn about the types of radiation, why side effects happen, which ones you might have, and more.

  11. {sup 106}Ruthenium Plaque Therapy (RPT) for Retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Naoya; Suzuki, Shigenobu; Ito, Yoshinori; Yoshimura, Ryoichi; Inaba, Koji; Kuroda, Yuki; Morota, Madoka; Mayahara, Hiroshi; Sakudo, Mototake; Wakita, Akihisa; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Sumi, Minako; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Ohtomo, Kuni; Itami, Jun

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of episcleral {sup 106}ruthenium plaque therapy (RPT) in the management of retinoblastoma. Methods and Materials: One hundred one RPTs were retrospectively analyzed that were performed in 90 eyes of 85 patients with retinoblastoma at National Cancer Center Hospital between 1998 and 2008. Each RPT had a corresponding tumor and 101 tumors were considered in the analysis of local control. Median follow-up length was 72.8 months. Median patient age at the RPT was 28 months. Median prescribed doses at reference depth and outer surface of the sclera were 47.4 Gy and 162.3 Gy, respectively. Results: Local control rate (LCR) and ocular retention rate (ORR) at 2 years were 33.7% and 58.7%, respectively. Unilateral disease, International Classification of Retinoblastoma group C or more advanced at the first presentation or at the time of RPT, vitreous and/or subretinal seeding, tumor size greater than 5 disc diameter (DD), reference depth greater than 5 mm, dose rate at reference depth lower than 0.7 Gy/hour, dose at the reference depth lower than 35 Gy, and (biologically effective dose with an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 10 Gy) at the reference depth lower than 40 Gy{sub 10} were associated with unfavorable LCR. Two patients died of metastatic disease. Radiation complications included retinal detachment in 12 eyes (13.3%), proliferative retinopathy in 6 (6.7%), rubeosis iris in 2 (2.2%), and posterior subcapsular cataract in 23 (25.6%). Conclusion: RPT is an effective eye-preserving treatment for retinoblastoma.

  12. Radiation Therapy: Additional Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Upper GI What is Radiation Therapy? Find a Radiation Oncologist Last Name: Facility: City: State: Zip Code: ... infections. This is refered to as immunotherapy . Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy given during surgery is called ...

  13. Prostate Cancer (Radiation Therapy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to three years. If I choose surgery, will radiation treatment still be required? If your surgery is ... option with your physician team. If I choose radiation therapy, will surgical treatment still be an option? ...

  14. Radiation Therapy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... alike, but remember that many kids treated with radiation therapy go on to live healthy, full lives. Don't hesitate to discuss your questions and concerns with the doctor. The more you know about how radiation therapy will affect and help your child, the ...

  15. Radiation complications and tumor control after {sup 125}I plaque brachytherapy for ocular melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Ashley W.; Petersen, Ivy A. . E-mail: petersen.ivy@mayo.edu; Kline, Robert W.; Stafford, Scott L.; Schomberg, Paula J.; Robertson, Dennis M.

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the outcome of {sup 125}I plaque brachytherapy at our institution and identify the risk factors associated with the development of radiation complications, tumor recurrence, and metastasis. Patients and Methods: From 1986 to 2000, 156 patients underwent {sup 125}I episcleral plaque (COMS design) application for the treatment of ocular melanoma. Chart analysis of follow-up ophthalmologic appointments assessed the incidence of ocular side effects after therapy. Statistical analysis assessed outcomes and significant influencing factors. Results: With a median follow-up of 6.2 years, the 5-year overall survival was 83%. The 5-year disease-specific survival was 91%. Initial local control at 5 years was 92%, with 100% ultimate local control after secondary therapy that included 9 enucleations. The risk of metastasis was 10% at 5 years and 27% at 10 years. Vision stayed the same or improved in 25% of patients, and 44% of patients maintained visual acuity better than 20/200. Thirteen percent of patients experienced chronic pain or discomfort in the treated eye. Dose rates to the tumor apex greater than 90 to 100 cGy/h were associated with increased systemic control but worse radiation toxicity. Conclusion: Patients in our series experienced excellent local tumor control. Higher dose rates to the tumor apex were associated with reduced rates of distant metastases but worse ocular function.

  16. Radiation therapy in horses.

    PubMed

    Fidel, Janean L

    2010-04-01

    Although the diagnosis of cancer is relatively uncommon in horses, tumors do occur in this species. Surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy are traditional cancer treatments in all species. In equine patients, surgery has often been the only treatment offered; however, not all tumors can be controlled with surgery alone. In small animal oncology, newer and better therapies are in demand and available. Radiation therapy is often used to control or palliate tumors locally, especially to satisfy clients who demand sophisticated treatments. The large size of equine patients can make radiation therapy difficult, but it is a valuable tool for treating cancer and should not be overlooked when treating horses.

  17. Microenvironment and Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Michio; Itasaka, Satoshi; Harada, Hiroshi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    Dependency on tumor oxygenation is one of the major features of radiation therapy and this has led many radiation biologists and oncologists to focus on tumor hypoxia. The first approach to overcome tumor hypoxia was to improve tumor oxygenation by increasing oxygen delivery and a subsequent approach was the use of radiosensitizers in combination with radiation therapy. Clinical use of some of these approaches was promising, but they are not widely used due to several limitations. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is a transcription factor that is activated by hypoxia and induces the expression of various genes related to the adaptation of cellular metabolism to hypoxia, invasion and metastasis of cancer cells and angiogenesis, and so forth. HIF-1 is a potent target to enhance the therapeutic effects of radiation therapy. Another approach is antiangiogenic therapy. The combination with radiation therapy is promising, but several factors including surrogate markers, timing and duration, and so forth have to be optimized before introducing it into clinics. In this review, we examined how the tumor microenvironment influences the effects of radiation and how we can enhance the antitumor effects of radiation therapy by modifying the tumor microenvironment. PMID:23509762

  18. Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... being studied as potential radioprotectors. The use of carbon ion beams in radiation therapy is being investigated ... time, the use of these beams remains experimental. Carbon ion beams are available at only a few ...

  19. Radiation Therapy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... temporary, it can be permanent. Sore Mouth and Tooth Decay The tissues of the mouth may be sore ... and there may be an increased risk of tooth decay if a child received radiation therapy to the ...

  20. Complications of radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dalinka, M.K.; Mazzeo, V.P. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The skeletal effects of radiation are dependent upon many variables, but the pathologic features are consistent. Radiation may cause immediate or delayed cell death, cellular injury with recovery, arrest of cellular division, or abnormal repair with neoplasia. Radiation necrosis and radiation-induced neoplasm still occur despite the use of supervoltage therapy. Complications of radiotherapy are well known and have led to more judicious use of this therapeutic modality. With few exceptions, benign bone tumors are no longer treated with irradiation. Radiation necrosis may be difficult to differentiate from sarcoma arising in irradiated bone. They both occur within the field of irradiation. Radiation necrosis often has a long latent period which is, of course, the rule in radiation-induced neoplasia. A soft tissue mass favors the diagnosis of neoplasia, while its absence suggests radiation necrosis. Lack of pain favors necrosis. Calcification may occur in radiation necrosis and does not indicate neoplasia. A lack of progression on serial roentgenograms also favors radiation necrosis. 76 references.

  1. Bile Duct (Cholangiocarcinoma) Cancer: Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Situation Bile Duct Cancer Treating Bile Duct Cancer Radiation Therapy for Bile Duct Cancer Radiation therapy uses ... of radiation for bile duct cancer. External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) This type of radiation therapy uses ...

  2. Efficacy of Statin Therapy in Inducing Coronary Plaque Regression in Patients with Low Baseline Cholesterol Levels

    PubMed Central

    Nozue, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Shingo; Tohyama, Shinichi; Fukui, Kazuki; Umezawa, Shigeo; Onishi, Yuko; Kunishima, Tomoyuki; Sato, Akira; Miyake, Shogo; Morino, Yoshihiro; Yamauchi, Takao; Muramatsu, Toshiya; Hibi, Kiyoshi; Terashima, Mitsuyasu; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Michishita, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The efficacy of statin therapy in inducing coronary plaque regression may depend on baseline cholesterol levels. We aimed to determine the efficacy of statin therapy in inducing coronary plaque regression in statin-naïve patients with low cholesterol levels using serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) data from the treatment with statin on atheroma regression evaluated by virtual histology IVUS (TRUTH) study. Methods: The TRUTH study is a prospective, multicenter trial, comparing the efficacies of pitavastatin and pravastatin in coronary plaque regression in 164 patients. All patients were statin-naïve and received statin therapy only after study enrollment. The primary endpoint was the observation of coronary plaque progression, despite statin therapy. Results: Serial IVUS data, at baseline and after an 8-month follow-up, were available for 119 patients. The patients were divided into three groups based on non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels—low: ≤ 140 mg/dl, n = 38; moderate: 141–169 mg/dl, n = 42; and high: ≥ 170 mg/dl, n = 39. Coronary plaque progression was noted in the low cholesterol group, whereas plaque regression was noted in the moderate and high cholesterol groups [%Δplaque volume: 2.3 ± 7.4 vs. − 2.7 ± 10.7 vs. − 3.2 ± 7.5, p = 0.004 (analysis of variance)]. After adjusting for all variables, a low non-HDLC level (≤ 140 mg/dl) was identified as an independent predictor of coronary plaque progression [odds ratio, 3.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.5–9.1, p = 0.004]. Conclusion: Serial IVUS data analysis indicated that statin therapy was less effective in inducing coronary plaque regression in patients with low cholesterol levels but more effective in those with high cholesterol levels at baseline. University Hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN) (UMIN ID: C000000311). PMID:27040362

  3. Radiation Therapy: Professions in Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and typically one to two years of clinical physics training. They are certified by the American Board of Radiology or the American Board of Medical Physics . Radiation Therapist Radiation therapists work with radiation oncologists. ...

  4. Microbeam radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laissue, Jean A.; Lyubimova, Nadia; Wagner, Hans-Peter; Archer, David W.; Slatkin, Daniel N.; Di Michiel, Marco; Nemoz, Christian; Renier, Michel; Brauer, Elke; Spanne, Per O.; Gebbers, Jan-Olef; Dixon, Keith; Blattmann, Hans

    1999-10-01

    The central nervous system of vertebrates, even when immature, displays extraordinary resistance to damage by microscopically narrow, multiple, parallel, planar beams of x rays. Imminently lethal gliosarcomas in the brains of mature rats can be inhibited and ablated by such microbeams with little or no harm to mature brain tissues and neurological function. Potentially palliative, conventional wide-beam radiotherapy of malignant brain tumors in human infants under three years of age is so fraught with the danger of disrupting the functional maturation of immature brain tissues around the targeted tumor that it is implemented infrequently. Other kinds of therapy for such tumors are often inadequate. We suggest that microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) might help to alleviate the situation. Wiggler-generated synchrotron x-rays were first used for experimental microplanar beam (microbeam) radiation therapy (MRT) at Brookhaven National Laboratory's National Synchrotron Light Source in the early 1990s. We now describe the progress achieved in MRT research to date using immature and adult rats irradiated at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France, and investigated thereafter at the Institute of Pathology of the University of Bern.

  5. Antioxidants attenuate atherosclerotic plaque development in a balloon-denuded and -radiated hypercholesterolemic rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Leborgne, Laurent; Fournadjiev, Jana; Pakala, Rajbabu; Dilcher, Christian; Cheneau, Edouard; Wolfram, Roswitha; Hellinga, David; Seaborn, Rufus; O'Tio, Fermin; Waksman, Ron

    2003-03-01

    Background: Oxidation of lipoproteins is considered to be a key contributor to atherogenesis. Antioxidants are potential antiatherogenic agents because they can inhibit lipoprotein oxidation. Radiation has been shown to increase oxidative stress leading to increased atherogenesis. This study is designed to test the potential of antioxidants to inhibit atherosclerotic plaque progression in balloon-denuded and -radiated rabbits. Methods and Results: Two groups of New Zealand white rabbits (n=36) were fed with 1% cholesterol diet (control diet) or with 1% cholesterol diet containing a mixture of various antioxidants for 1 week. Iliac arteries in all the animals were balloon denuded and continued to fed with 0.15% cholesterol diet or 0.15% cholesterol diet containing antioxidants (antioxidant diet). Four weeks after balloon denudation one iliac artery in 12 animals from each group was radiated and all the animals were continued to be fed with the same diet. Four weeks after radiation animals were sacrificed and morphometric analysis of iliac arteries (n=12) in nonradiated and radiated animals were performed. Plaque area (PA) in the rabbits that were fed with cholesterol diet is 0.2{+-}0.12 mm{sup 2}, and it is increased by 2.75-fold (P<.05) in the radiated arteries of animals fed with cholesterol diet. Plaque area in the animals fed with antioxidant diet is 50% less then the one in the animals fed with cholesterol diet. Similarly, plaque area in radiated arteries of the animals fed with antioxidant diet is 50% less then the animals fed with cholesterol diet. Conclusion: Antioxidants significantly attenuate atherosclerotic plaque progression in balloon-injured and -radiated hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

  6. Radiation Therapy: Professions in Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the equipment works properly. They also take precise measurements of radiation beam characteristics and do other safety ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  7. Radiation Therapy for Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... make sure they are safe to use during radiation therapy. • Eat a balanced diet. If food tastes ... your fluid intake. • Treat the skin exposed to radiation with special care. Stay out of the sun, ...

  8. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer, surgery has been the standard. However, in patients medically not able to tolerate surgery, focused radiation, called stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a good treatment option. For large ...

  9. Radiation Therapy for Testicular Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Therapy for Testicular Cancer Radiation therapy uses a beam of high-energy rays (such as gamma rays or x-rays) or particles (such as electrons, protons, or neutrons) to destroy cancer cells or ...

  10. Effect of selective antimicrobial therapy on plaque and gingivitis in the dog.

    PubMed

    Heijl, L; Lindhe, J

    1980-12-01

    The present investigation was performed to assess the effect of selective antibiotic therapy on developing plaque and gingivitis in dogs, which at the start of the study had normal gingiva. Fifteen beagle dogs were used. Throughout the entire observation period the animals were fed a diet which favored plaque accumulation. A baseline examination involved assessments of plaque, gingivitis and gingival exudate. The subgingival bacterial flora was assessed by dark-field microscopy. Subsequently the teeth of the right jaws were allowed to accumulate plaque. A careful tooth-cleaning program was maintained in the left jaws. Plaque and gingivitis assessments were repeated and subgingival plaque sampled in the right jaws after 14 and 28 days. On experimental day 28 the second part of the study was initiated. The dogs were randomly distributed into three groups of five animals each. A new baseline examination was performed in the left jaws, after which all tooth cleanings were terminated. During the subsequent 28 days each group of dogs was treated with one of three antimicrobial compounds (vancomycin, metronidazole or clindamycin). Examinations were repeated after 14 and 28 days. The results demonstrated that systemic administration of antimicrobial substances can reduce the rate of plaque formation, change the composition of the developing subgingival microbiota and prevent (or retard) the onset of gingivitis. A comparison of the ability of the three compounds to prevent the formation of a "gingivitis-inducing" plaque revealed that metronidazole and clindamycin were markedly more effective than vancomycin. In fact, in dogs receiving metronidazole and clindamycin treatment, the initiation of gingivitis was almost entirely prevented during the 28 days of treatment.

  11. The antibacterial effect of photodynamic therapy in dental plaque-derived biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, C. R.; Abernethy, A. D.; Som, S.; Ruggiero, K.; Doucette, S.; Marcantonio, R. C.; Boussios, C. I.; Kent, R.; Goodson, J. M.; Tanner, A. C. R.; Soukos, N. S.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objective Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been advocated as an alternative to antimicrobial agents to suppress subgingival species and treat periodontitis. Bacteria located within dense biofilms, such as those encountered in dental plaques, have been found to be relatively resistant to antimicrobial therapy. In the present study, we investigated the ability of PDT to affect bacteria resistant in biofilms by comparing the photodynamic effects of methylene blue (MB) on human dental plaque microorganisms in planktonic phase and in biofilms. Material and Methods Dental plaque samples were obtained from 10 subjects with chronic periodontitis. Suspensions of plaque microorganisms from 5 subjects were sensitized with MB (25 μg/ml) for 5 minutes followed by exposure to red light. Multi-species microbial biofilms developed from the same plaque samples were also exposed to MB (25 μg/ml) and the same light conditions as their planktonic counterparts. In a second set of experiments, biofilms were developed with plaque bacteria from 5 subjects and sensitized with 25 and 50 μg/ml MB followed by exposure to light as above. After PDT, survival fractions were calculated from colony-forming unit counts. Results In suspension, PDT produced approximately 63% killing of bacteria. In biofilms, the effect of PDT resulted in much lower reductions of microorganisms (32% maximal killing). Conclusion Oral bacteria in biofilms are less affected by PDT than bacteria in planktonic phase. The antibacterial effect of PDT is reduced in biofilm bacteria but not to the same degree as has been reported for treatment with antibiotics under similar conditions. PMID:19602126

  12. Radiation Therapy: Additional Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... SNIPEND SNIPSTART Find A Radiation Oncologist SNIPEND Additional Treatment Options SNIPSTART A A SNIPEND Chemotherapy Medicines prescribed ... such as antibodies, to fight cancer. Novel Targeted Therapies Cancer doctors now know much more about how ...

  13. Radiation Therapy for Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... than in African-Americans. TYPES OF SKIN CANCER Basal cell carcinoma: This is the most common form of skin ... epidermis ). Radiation therapy is very effective for treating basal cell cancers that have not spread elsewhere. Other common treatments ...

  14. Radiation therapy in the horse.

    PubMed

    Théon, A P

    1998-12-01

    This article covers the principles and applications of radiation therapy in horses. The goal in treating tumors by irradiation is tumor control with minimum treatment complications. Various treatment techniques are available to achieve this goal. The prognosis depends on many factors such as the extent and location of the tumor, tumor type and tumor cell proliferation. Radiation therapy is a very effective treatment modality for equine tumors but logistical reasons limit its impact in equine oncology.

  15. Method for microbeam radiation therapy

    DOEpatents

    Slatkin, Daniel N.; Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Spanne, Per O.

    1994-01-01

    A method of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation, in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue.

  16. Method for microbeam radiation therapy

    DOEpatents

    Slatkin, D.N.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Spanne, P.O.

    1994-08-16

    A method is disclosed of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation. The dose is in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. No Drawings

  17. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Goffman, Thomas E; Glatstein, Eli

    2002-07-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is an increasingly popular technical means of tightly focusing the radiation dose around a cancer. As with stereotactic radiotherapy, IMRT uses multiple fields and angles to converge on the target. The potential for total dose escalation and for escalation of daily fraction size to the gross cancer is exciting. The excitement, however, has greatly overshadowed a range of radiobiological and clinical concerns.

  18. Lack of Radiation Maculopathy After Palladium-103 Plaque Radiotherapy for Iris Melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yousef, Yacoub A.; Finger, Paul T.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To report on the risk of radiation maculopathy for iris and iridociliary melanomas treated by {sup 103}Pd plaque radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective clinical case series of 30 eyes in 30 patients with melanomas limited to the iris or invading the ciliary body. The main outcome measures included demographic information, laterality, tumor size, location, visual acuity, radiation dose, local control, retinal evaluation, and duration of follow-up. Results: Thirty patients were followed for a median 36 months (range, 12-90 months). Sixteen of 30 tumors (53%) were pure iris melanomas, and 14 (47%) were primary iris melanomas extending into the ciliary body. Radiation dosimetry showed that the median tumor apex dose was 85 Gy (range, 75-100 Gy), lens dose 43.5 Gy (range, 17.8-60 Gy), fovea dose 1.8 Gy (range, 1.3-5 Gy), and central optic disc dose 1.7 Gy (range, 1.3-4.7 Gy). Cataracts developed in 20 of the 28 phakic eyes (71.4%). No patient in this series developed radiation maculopathy or radiation optic neuropathy. Last best-corrected visual acuity was {>=}20/25 in 28 patients (93%) at a median 36 months' follow-up. Conclusion: Though visual acuities were transiently affected by radiation cataract, no radiation maculopathy or optic neuropathy has been noted after {sup 103}Pd treatment of iris and iridociliary melanomas.

  19. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) uses linear ... and after this procedure? What is Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and how is it used? Intensity-modulated ...

  20. Radiation therapy - questions to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about radiation therapy ... National Cancer Institute. Radiation therapy and you: support for people with cancer. Cancer.gov. www.cancer.gov/publications/patient-education/radiationttherapy.pdf . Updated May 2007. ...

  1. Radiation therapy of esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, S.L.; Glatstein, E.

    1984-06-01

    Radiation therapy has been used extensively in the management of patients with cancer of the esophagus. It has demonstrated an ability to cure a small minority of patients. Cure is likely to be limited to patients who have lesions less than 5 cm in length and have minimal, if any, involvement of lymph nodes. Esophagectomy is likely to cure a similar, small percentage of patients with the same presentation of minimal disease but has a substantial acute postoperative mortality rate and greater morbidity than irradiation. Combining surgery and either preoperative or postoperative irradiation may cure a small percentage of patients beyond the number cured with either modality alone. Radiation has demonstrated benefit as an adjuvant to surgery following the resection of minimal disease. However, radiation alone has never been compared directly with surgery for the highly select, minimal lesions managed by surgery. Radiation provides good palliation of dysphagia in the majority of patients, and roughly one third may have adequate swallowing for the duration of their illness when ''radical'' doses have been employed. Surgical bypass procedures have greater acute morbidity but appear to provide more reliable, prolonged palliation of dysphagia. Several approaches to improving the efficacy of irradiation are currently under investigation. These approahces include fractionation schedules, radiosensitizers, neutron-beam therapy, and helium-ion therapy.

  2. Enhancing radiation therapy for patients with glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Brian M; Ligon, Keith L; Wen, Patrick Y

    2013-05-01

    Radiation therapy has been the foundation of therapy following maximal surgical resection in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma for decades and the primary therapy for unresected tumors. Using the standard approach with radiation and temozolomide, however, outcomes are poor, and glioblastoma remains an incurable disease with the majority of recurrences and progression within the radiation treatment field. As such, there is much interest in elucidating the mechanisms of resistance to radiation therapy and in developing novel approaches to overcoming this treatment resistance.

  3. Radiation Therapy and Hearing Loss

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandare, Niranjan; Jackson, Andrew; Eisbruch, Avraham; Pan, Charlie C.; Flickinger, John C.; Antonelli, Patrick; Mendenhall, William M.

    2010-03-01

    A review of literature on the development of sensorineural hearing loss after high-dose radiation therapy for head-and-neck tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for the treatment of vestibular schwannoma is presented. Because of the small volume of the cochlea a dose-volume analysis is not feasible. Instead, the current literature on the effect of the mean dose received by the cochlea and other treatment- and patient-related factors on outcome are evaluated. Based on the data, a specific threshold dose to cochlea for sensorineural hearing loss cannot be determined; therefore, dose-prescription limits are suggested. A standard for evaluating radiation therapy-associated ototoxicity as well as a detailed approach for scoring toxicity is presented.

  4. [Radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Huguet, F; Mornex, F; Orthuon, A

    2016-09-01

    Currently, the use of radiation therapy for patients with pancreatic cancer is subject to discussion. In adjuvant setting, the standard treatment is 6 months of chemotherapy with gemcitabine and capecitabine. Chemoradiation (CRT) may improve the survival of patients with incompletely resected tumors (R1). This should be confirmed by a prospective trial. Neoadjuvant CRT is a promising treatment especially for patients with borderline resectable tumors. For patients with locally advanced tumors, there is no a standard. An induction chemotherapy followed by CRT for non-progressive patients reduces the rate of local relapse. Whereas in the first trials of CRT large fields were used, the treated volumes have been reduced to improve tolerance. Tumor movements induced by breathing should be taken in account. Intensity modulated radiation therapy allows a reduction of doses to the organs at risk. Whereas widely used, this technique is not recommended.

  5. Pulp innervation after radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, J.C.; Chalian, V.A.; Shidnia, H.

    1986-12-01

    Decreased sensitivity was observed in teeth within and adjacent to an irradiated field. Mandibular teeth outside the field and distal to the irradiated mandibular nerve trunk showed an immediate decrease in sensitivity, Maxillary teeth outside the field showed a delayed decrease in sensitivity. Blood flow rates and nutrition were also related to time. Neurons are though to be relatively radio-resistant and few changes were seen histologically after radiation therapy. However, functional impairment was observed in histologically normal tissue.

  6. Targeted Radiation Therapy for Cancer Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    and whether this difference changed the outcome for palliative patients, 6) use of the Calypso system, and other advanced radiation therapy equipment...use of advanced technology radiation therapy techniques, such as IMRT and VMAT, in treating palliative patients. The main obstacle to overcome in...treating low-to-intermediate risk prostate cancer with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using an electromagnetic localization system. IMRT

  7. Missed Radiation Therapy and Cancer Recurrence

    Cancer.gov

    Patients who miss radiation therapy sessions during cancer treatment have an increased risk of their disease returning, even if they eventually complete their course of radiation treatment, according to a new study.

  8. Long-term Results of the UCSF-LBNL Randomized Trial: Charged Particle With Helium Ion Versus Iodine-125 Plaque Therapy for Choroidal and Ciliary Body Melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Kavita K.; Quivey, Jeanne M.; Daftari, Inder K.; Weinberg, Vivian; Cole, Tia B.; Patel, Kishan; Castro, Joseph R.; Phillips, Theodore L.; Char, Devron H.

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Relevant clinical data are needed given the increasing national interest in charged particle radiation therapy (CPT) programs. Here we report long-term outcomes from the only randomized, stratified trial comparing CPT with iodine-125 plaque therapy for choroidal and ciliary body melanoma. Methods and Materials: From 1985 to 1991, 184 patients met eligibility criteria and were randomized to receive particle (86 patients) or plaque therapy (98 patients). Patients were stratified by tumor diameter, thickness, distance to disc/fovea, anterior extension, and visual acuity. Tumors close to the optic disc were included. Local tumor control, as well as eye preservation, metastases due to melanoma, and survival were evaluated. Results: Median follow-up times for particle and plaque arm patients were 14.6 years and 12.3 years, respectively (P=.22), and for those alive at last follow-up, 18.5 and 16.5 years, respectively (P=.81). Local control (LC) for particle versus plaque treatment was 100% versus 84% at 5 years, and 98% versus 79% at 12 years, respectively (log rank: P=.0006). If patients with tumors close to the disc (<2 mm) were excluded, CPT still resulted in significantly improved LC: 100% versus 90% at 5 years and 98% versus 86% at 12 years, respectively (log rank: P=.048). Enucleation rate was lower after CPT: 11% versus 22% at 5 years and 17% versus 37% at 12 years, respectively (log rank: P=.01). Using Cox regression model, likelihood ratio test, treatment was the most important predictor of LC (P=.0002) and eye preservation (P=.01). CPT was a significant predictor of prolonged disease-free survival (log rank: P=.001). Conclusions: Particle therapy resulted in significantly improved local control, eye preservation, and disease-free survival as confirmed by long-term outcomes from the only randomized study available to date comparing radiation modalities in choroidal and ciliary body melanoma.

  9. Nasal mucociliary clearance after radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Stringer, S P; Stiles, W; Slattery, W H; Krumerman, J; Parsons, J T; Mendenhall, W M; Cassisi, N J

    1995-04-01

    Irradiation has been demonstrated to cause decreased mucociliary clearance in animal models. We sought to verify this effect clinically by using the saccharin transport test to evaluate nasal mucociliary clearance in 9 patients previously treated with radiation therapy to the nasal cavity. The patients also completed a questionnaire examining the prevalence of nasal symptoms before and after radiation therapy. Patients who received radiation therapy had no clearance of saccharin from the nasal cavity at a minimum of 20 minutes. The controls had a median clearance time of 5 minutes. The patients noted a higher prevalence of nasal congestion, drainage, and facial pain after radiation therapy. This study demonstrates that radiation therapy to the nasal cavity causes a decrease in nasal mucociliary clearance. This alteration should be considered when selecting therapy for malignancies in the nasal area.

  10. Microsystems technology in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Maleki, T; Ziaie, B

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present several implantable micro-devices targeted towards improving the efficacy of radiation therapy. Three micro-devices are discussed: a self-biased solid state dosimeter to be used for wireless monitoring of the delivered dose, an electromagnetic tracking system to locate the position of tumor in real-time, and a Guyton-chamber-embedded capacitive pressure sensor for wireless measurement of interstitial pressure inside a tumor. Dosimeter and tracking systems are developed to be integrated together to achieve a track-able radiation sensor. Guyton chamber of the pressure sensor will eliminate the sensor drift due to the interaction of cells and fibrous tissue with sensor's membrane. The dosimeter has a sensitivity of up to 9 kΩ/Gy and a dynamic range of 10 Gy, when operating with a zero bias voltage. The tracking system is able to track a tumor that is 60 cm away with a resolution of 2 mm and a dynamic range of up to 5 cm. Finally, the capacitive pressure sensor has a sensitivity of 75 fF/kPa and a dynamic range of 60 mmHg.

  11. Radiation therapy for head and neck neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    This book presents the clinical manifestations of disease, applied anatomy pertaining to the management of head and neck tumors, and results of conventional radiation therapy for uncommon tumors have been explored. It also contains an additional chapter on altered fractionation radiation therapy pertaining to irradiation of major head and neck tumors.

  12. Profiling of subgingival plaque biofilm microbiota in adolescents after completion of orthodontic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Li, Shuxiang; Zhang, Yujie; Liu, Jianwei; Wang, Chunling; Xiao, Shuiqing

    2017-01-01

    Background Fixed orthodontic treatment is the most common method for malocclusion but has the potential risk of periodontal complication with unclear outcomes of whether microbiologic and clinical changes could be reversible in adolescents after orthodontic therapy. Methods Twenty adolescents with orthodontic treatment were enrolled in the study as the case group at end of the therapy, while 19 periodontally healthy adolescents were involved in the control group. At baseline (T0), clinical parameters including gingival index, probing depth and sulcus bleeding index were tested, and subgingival plaque samples were collected from the lower incisors. The counts of A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, P. intermedia, T. forsythia and total bacteria were determined by real-time PCR. All parameters were reassessed after 1 month (T1) and 3 months (T2) in the case group and compared with that of the controls. Results At baseline (T0), clinical parameters (including GI, PD, SBI) of the test sites in the case group were significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.05 or P<0.01). At 3 months (T2), no differences were noticed in GI and SBI between two groups. The prevalence and counts of periodontopathogens tend to be normal (P>0.05), while PD and the amount of P.intermedia were still significantly higher compared with that of the control group (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Conclusion After removal of appliances, the periodontal changes induced by orthodontic therapy are only partially reversible at 3 months after removal. PMID:28158292

  13. Radiation therapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, K E; Giraud, P

    2017-02-01

    The treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma with radiation has always been a technical challenge. For many years, conventional radiation therapy was delivered after extrapleural pneumonectomy with acceptable results. Novel radiation treatment techniques, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were introduced, but the early experience with IMRT demonstrated troubling toxicity. Recent reports from institutions have demonstrated that with greater experience, IMRT, both in the setting of extrapleural pneumonectomy or pleurectomy, can be delivered safely. A recent study, SAKK 17/04, questions the role of using radiation after extrapleural pneumonectomy.

  14. Antivascular Endothelial Growth Factor Bevacizumab for Radiation Optic Neuropathy: Secondary to Plaque Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, Paul T.; Chin, Kimberly J.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the intravitreal antivascular endothelial growth factor, bevacizumab, for treatment of radiation optic neuropathy (RON). Methods and Materials: A prospective interventional clinical case series was performed of 14 patients with RON related to plaque radiotherapy for choroidal melanoma. The RON was characterized by optic disc edema, hemorrhages, microangiopathy, and neovascularization. The entry criteria included a subjective or objective loss of vision, coupled with findings of RON. The study subjects received a minimum of two initial injections of intravitreal bevacizumab (1.25 mg in 0.05 mL) every 6-8 weeks. The primary objectives included safety and tolerability. The secondary objectives included the efficacy as measured using the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study chart for visual acuity, fundus photography, angiography, and optical coherence tomography/scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. Results: Reductions in optic disc hemorrhage and edema were noted in all patients. The visual acuity was stable or improved in 9 (64%) of the 14 patients. Of the 5 patients who had lost vision, 2 had relatively large posterior tumors, 1 had had the vision decrease because of intraocular hemorrhage, and 1 had developed optic atrophy. The fifth patient who lost vision was noncompliant. No treatment-related ocular or systemic side effects were observed. Conclusions: Intravitreal antivascular endothelial growth factor bevacizumab was tolerated and generally associated with improved vision, reduced papillary hemorrhage, and resolution of optic disc edema. Persistent optic disc neovascularization and fluorescein angiographic leakage were invariably noted. The results of the present study support additional evaluation of antivascular endothelial growth factor medications as treatment of RON.

  15. Understanding Radiation Therapy: A Guide for Patients and Families

    MedlinePlus

    ... Effects Treatment Types Radiation Therapy A Guide to Radiation Therapy You’ve been told you have cancer. ... and you and your doctor have agreed that radiation therapy is your best choice – either alone or ...

  16. Topical therapies for the treatment of plaque psoriasis: systematic review and network meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Samarasekera, E J; Sawyer, L; Wonderling, D; Tucker, R; Smith, C H

    2013-05-01

    The majority of people with psoriasis have localized disease, where topical therapy forms the cornerstone of treatment. We set out to summarize evidence on the relative efficacy, safety and tolerability of different topical treatments used in plaque psoriasis. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analyses of randomized trial data of U.K.-licensed topical therapies. The primary outcome was clear or nearly clear status stratified for (i) trunk and limbs; and (ii) scalp. Network meta-analyses allowed ranking of treatment efficacy. In total, 48 studies were available for trunk and limb psoriasis, and 17 for scalp psoriasis (22,028 patients in total); the majority included people with at least moderate severity psoriasis. Strategies containing potent corticosteroids (alone or in combination with a vitamin D analogue) or very potent corticosteroids dominated the treatment hierarchy at both sites (trunk and limbs, scalp); coal tar and retinoids were no better than placebo. No significant differences in achievement of clear or nearly clear status were observed between twice- and once-daily application of the same intervention or between any of the following: combined vitamin D analogue and potent corticosteroid (applied separately or in a single product), very potent corticosteroids, or potent corticosteroids (applied twice daily). Investigator and patient assessment of response differed significantly for some interventions (response rates to very potent corticosteroids: 78% and 39%, respectively). No significant differences were noted for tolerability or steroid atrophy, but data were limited. In conclusion, corticosteroids are highly effective in psoriasis when used continuously for up to 8 weeks and intermittently for up to 52 weeks. Coal tar and retinoids are of limited benefit. There is a lack of long-term efficacy and safety data available on topical interventions used for psoriasis.

  17. Radiation Sensitization in Cancer Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstock, Clive L.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses various aspects of radiation damage to biological material, including free radical mechanisms, radiation sensitization and protection, tumor hypoxia, mechanism of hypoxic cell radiosensitization, redox model for radiation modification, sensitizer probes of cellular radiation targets, pulse radiolysis studies of free radical kinetics,…

  18. Radiation Therapy Physics, 3rd Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendee, William R.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Hendee, Eric G.

    2004-08-01

    The Third Edition of Radiation Therapy Physics addresses in concise fashion the fundamental diagnostic radiologic physics principles as well as their clinical implications. Along with coverage of the concepts and applications for the radiation treatment of cancer patients, the authors have included reviews of the most up-to-date instrumentation and critical historical links. The text includes coverage of imaging in therapy planning and surveillance, calibration protocols, and precision radiation therapy, as well as discussion of relevant regulation and compliance activities. It contains an updated and expanded section on computer applications in radiation therapy and electron beam therapy, and features enhanced user-friendliness and visual appeal with a new, easy-to-follow format, including sidebars and a larger trim size. With its user-friendly presentation and broad, comprehensive coverage of radiotherapy physics, this Third Edition doubles as a medical text and handy professional reference.

  19. The Effect of Statin Therapy on Coronary Plaque Composition Using Virtual Histology Intravascular Ultrasound: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guian; Li, Yuxin; Huang, Huishan; Wang, Jinghan; Hirayama, Atsushi; Lin, Jinxiu

    2015-01-01

    Objective Previous studies have indicated that statin therapy may promote plaque regression. However, the impact of statin therapy on plaque composition has not been clearly elucidated. We performed a meta-analysis to investigate the effect of statin therapy on coronary plaque composition as assessed by virtual histology intravascular ultrasound (VH-IVUS). Methods Online databases were searched from inception to March 1, 2015. Studies providing VH-IVUS volumetric analyses of coronary plaque composition at baseline and follow-up in patients receiving statin therapy were included. Weighted mean difference (WMD) using a random-effects model was used. Results Ten studies involving 682 patients were included. There was a substantial reduction in fibrous volume between baseline and follow-up (WMD: -2.37 mm3, 95% confidence interval (CI) -4.01 to -0.74 mm3, P=0.004), and a significant increase in dense calcium (DC) volume (WMD: 0.89 mm3, 95% CI 0.70 to 1.08 mm3, P<0.00001). No significant change was seen in fibro-fatty and necrotic core (NC) volumes. In stratified analyses, the fibrous volume was decreased significantly (WMD: -3.39 mm3, 95% CI -6.56 to -0.21 mm3, P=0.04) and the absolute DC volume (WMD: 0.99 mm3, 95% CI 0.23 to 1.76 mm3, P=0.01) was increased in the subgroup with ≥12 months follow-up, whereas no significant change was observed in the subgroup with < 12 months follow-up. Similarly, a substantial decrease in fibrous volume (WMD: -2.01 mm3, 95% CI -3.05 to -0.96 mm3, P< 0.0002) and an increase in DC volume (WMD: 0.90 mm3, 95% CI 0.70 to 1.10 mm3, P< 0.00001) were observed in the subgroup with high-intensive statin therapy, while the change in fibrous and DC volumes approached statistical significance (P=0.05 and P=0.05, respectively) in the subgroup with low-intensive statin therapy. Conclusions Statin treatment, particularly of high-intensity and long-term duration, induced a marked modification in coronary plaque composition including a decrease in

  20. Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chun, Stephen G; Skinner, Heath D; Minsky, Bruce D

    2017-04-01

    The treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer is controversial. For patients who are candidates for surgical resection, multiple prospective clinical trials have demonstrated the advantages of neoadjuvant chemoradiation. For patients who are medically inoperable, definitive chemoradiation is an alternative approach with survival rates comparable to trimodality therapy. Although trials of dose escalation are ongoing, the standard radiation dose remains 50.4 Gy. Modern radiotherapy techniques such as image-guided radiation therapy with motion management and intensity-modulated radiation therapy are strongly encouraged with a planning objective to maximize conformity to the intended target volume while reducing dose delivered to uninvolved normal tissues.

  1. [Therapy of radiation enteritis--current challenges].

    PubMed

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Sinkó, Dániel; Jósa, Valéria; Zaránd, Attila; Teknos, Dániel

    2011-07-10

    Radiation enteritis is one of the most feared complications after abdominal and pelvic radiation therapy. The incidence varies from 0.5 to 5%. It is not rare that the slowly progressing condition will be fatal. During a period of 13 years 24 patients were operated due to the complication of radiation enteritis. Despite different types of surgery repeated operation was required in 25% of cases and finally 4 patients died. Analyzing these cases predisposing factors and different therapeutic options of this condition are discussed. Treatment options of radiation induced enteritis are limited; however, targeted therapy significantly improves the outcome. Cooperation between oncologist, gastroenterologist and surgeon is required to establish adequate therapeutic plan.

  2. Comparing Postoperative Radiation Therapies for Brain Metastases

    Cancer.gov

    In this clinical trial, patients with one to four brain metastases who have had at least one of the metastatic tumors removed surgically will be randomly assigned to undergo whole-brain radiation therapy or stereotactic radiosurgery.

  3. Nursing care update: Internal radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lowdermilk, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    Internal radiation therapy has been used in treating gynecological cancers for over 100 years. A variety of radioactive sources are currently used alone and in combination with other cancer treatments. Nurses need to be able to provide safe, comprehensive care to patients receiving internal radiation therapy while using precautions to keep the risks of exposure to a minimum. This article discusses current trends and issues related to such treatment for gynecological cancers.20 references.

  4. Hypofractionation in radiation therapy and its impact

    SciTech Connect

    Papiez, Lech; Timmerman, Robert

    2008-01-15

    A brief history of the underlying principles of the conventional fractionation in radiation therapy is discussed, followed by the formulation of the hypothesis for hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Subsequently, consequences of the hypothesis for SBRT dose shaping and dose delivery techniques are sketched. A brief review of the advantages of SBRT therapy in light of the existing experience is then provided. Finally, the need for new technological developments is advocated to make SBRT therapies more practical, safer, and clinically more effective. It is finally concluded that hypofractionated SBRT treatment will develop into a new paradigm that will shape the future of radiation therapy by providing the means to suppress the growth of most carcinogen-induced carcinomas and by supporting the cure of the disease.

  5. Radiation Therapy for Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    MedlinePlus

    ... the impact on healthy tissue. In some centers, proton beam radiation is an option. This uses streams of protons instead of x-ray beams to treat the ... be a better treatment for soft tissue sarcoma. Proton beam therapy is not widely available. Intraoperative radiation ...

  6. Particle Radiation Therapy: Requiem or Reveille

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Leslie L.; Goldson, Alfred L.; Alexander, George A.

    1979-01-01

    The 1960s and 1970s witnessed a surge of many institutions devoted to electron therapy. Currently, many facilities are adding or have added particle types of radiation to their armamentarium against cancer. The authors review the concepts, problems, and potentials of this form of therapy. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:423289

  7. In search of the "vulnerable plaque": can it be localized and will focal regional therapy ever be an option for cardiac prevention?

    PubMed

    Ambrose, John A

    2008-04-22

    The search to find the location of future plaque ruptures or plaque erosions leading to myocardial infarction (so-called "vulnerable plaques") is an important area of cardiovascular research. Systemic therapy, including use of statins, targets the vulnerable patient. However, adverse events cannot be completely eliminated with the appropriate application of systemic therapies and thus has given rise to the possibility of local or regional therapy of "vulnerable plaques" to prevent future events. Until now, no criteria have been developed for consideration of this therapy. For such a strategy to work, there should be several prerequisites. These involve the identification of susceptible lesions, the number of lesions, their natural history, and proof that an interventional technique is preferable to medical therapy alone. The greatest deficiency relates to the fact that until the natural history of presumed "vulnerable plaques" is known one can never truly identify what constitutes a "vulnerable plaque." Much work needs to be done in this area, but ongoing and new trials should provide important information that could potentially change drastically how coronary artery disease is diagnosed and treated.

  8. 42 CFR 410.35 - X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services: Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services... Other Health Services § 410.35 X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services: Scope. Medicare Part B pays for X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services, including radium therapy...

  9. 42 CFR 410.35 - X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services: Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services... Other Health Services § 410.35 X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services: Scope. Medicare Part B pays for X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services, including radium therapy...

  10. 42 CFR 410.35 - X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services: Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services... Other Health Services § 410.35 X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services: Scope. Medicare Part B pays for X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services, including radium therapy...

  11. 42 CFR 410.35 - X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services: Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services... Other Health Services § 410.35 X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services: Scope. Medicare Part B pays for X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services, including radium therapy...

  12. 42 CFR 410.35 - X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services: Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services... Other Health Services § 410.35 X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services: Scope. Medicare Part B pays for X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services, including radium therapy...

  13. Carotid plaque regression following 6-month statin therapy assessed by 3T cardiovascular magnetic resonance: comparison with ultrasound intima media thickness

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) allows volumetric carotid plaque measurement that has advantage over 2-dimensional ultrasound (US) intima-media thickness (IMT) in evaluating treatment response. We tested the hypothesis that 6-month statin treatment in patients with carotid plaque will lead to plaque regression when measured by 3 Tesla CMR but not by IMT. Methods Twenty-six subjects (67 ± 2 years, 7 females) with known carotid plaque (> 1.1 mm) and coronary or cerebrovascular atherosclerotic disease underwent 3T CMR (T1, T2, proton density and time of flight sequences) and US at baseline and following 6 months of statin therapy (6 had initiation, 7 had increase and 13 had maintenance of statin dosing). CMR plaque volume (PV) was measured in the region 12 mm below and up to 12 mm above carotid flow divider using software. Mean posterior IMT in the same region was measured. Baseline and 6-month CMR PV and US IMT were compared. Change in lipid rich/necrotic core (LR/NC) and calcification plaque components from CMR were related to change in PV. Results Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased (86 ± 6 to 74 ± 4 mg/dL, p = 0.046). CMR PV decreased 5.8 ± 2% (1036 ± 59 to 976 ± 65 mm3, p = 0.018). Mean IMT was unchanged (1.12 ± 0.06 vs. 1.14 ± 0.06 mm, p = NS). Patients with initiation or increase of statins had -8.8 ± 2.8% PV change (p = 0.001) while patients with maintenance of statin dosing had -2.7 ± 3% change in PV (p = NS). There was circumferential heterogeneity in CMR plaque thickness with greatest thickness in the posterior carotid artery, in the region opposite the flow divider. Similarly there was circumferential regional difference in change of plaque thickness with significant plaque regression in the anterior carotid region in region of the flow divider. Change in LR/NC (R = 0.62, p = 0.006) and calcification (R = 0.45, p = 0.03) correlated with PV change. Conclusions Six month statin therapy in patients with carotid plaque

  14. How Should I Care for Myself During Radiation Therapy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Upper GI What is Radiation Therapy? Find a Radiation Oncologist Last Name: Facility: City: State: Zip Code: ... information How Should I Care for Myself During Radiation Therapy? Get plenty of rest. Many patients experience ...

  15. Impaired skin integrity related to radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ratliff, C.

    1990-09-01

    Skin reactions associated with radiation therapy require frequent nursing assessment and intervention. Preventive interventions and early management can minimize the severity of the skin reaction. With the understanding of the pathogenesis of radiation skin reactions, the ET nurse can determine who is at risk and then implement preventive measures. Because radiation treatment is fractionated, skin reactions do not usually occur until midway through the course of therapy and will subside within a few weeks after completion of radiation. Many patients and their families still fear that radiation causes severe burns. Teaching and anticipatory guidance by the ET nurse is needed to assist patients and their families to overcome this fear, and to educate them on preventive skin care regimens.

  16. Review of image-guided radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Jaffray, David; Kupelian, Patrick; Djemil, Toufik; Macklis, Roger M

    2007-01-01

    Image-guided radiation therapy represents a new paradigm in the field of high-precision radiation medicine. A synthesis of recent technological advances in medical imaging and conformal radiation therapy, image-guided radiation therapy represents a further expansion in the recent push for maximizing targeting capabilities with high-intensity radiation dose deposition limited to the true target structures, while minimizing radiation dose deposited in collateral normal tissues. By improving this targeting discrimination, the therapeutic ratio may be enhanced significantly. The principle behind image-guided radiation therapy relies heavily on the acquisition of serial image datasets using a variety of medical imaging platforms, including computed tomography, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. These anatomic and volumetric image datasets are now being augmented through the addition of functional imaging. The current interest in positron-emitted tomography represents a good example of this sort of functional information now being correlated with anatomic localization. As the sophistication of imaging datasets grows, the precise 3D and 4D positions of the target and normal structures become of great relevance, leading to a recent exploration of real- or near-real-time positional replanning of the radiation treatment localization coordinates. This 'adaptive' radiotherapy explicitly recognizes that both tumors and normal tissues change position in time and space during a multiweek course of treatment, and even within a single treatment fraction. As targets and normal tissues change, the attenuation of radiation beams passing through these structures will also change, thus adding an additional level of imprecision in targeting unless these changes are taken into account. All in all, image-guided radiation therapy can be seen as further progress in the development of minimally invasive highly targeted cytotoxic therapies with the goal of substituting remote

  17. [Laser radiations in medical therapy].

    PubMed

    Richand, P; Boulnois, J L

    1983-06-30

    The therapeutic effects of various types of laser beams and the various techniques employed are studied. Clinical and experimental research has shown that Helio-Neon laser beams are most effective as biological stimulants and in reducing inflammation. For this reasons they are best used in dermatological surgery cases (varicose ulcers, decubital and surgical wounds, keloid scars, etc.). Infrared diode laser beams have been shown to be highly effective painkillers especially in painful pathologies like postherpetic neuritis. The various applications of laser therapy in acupuncture, the treatment of reflex dermatologia and optic fibre endocavital therapy are presented. The neurophysiological bases of this therapy are also briefly described.

  18. When the Synchrotron radiations highlight the Randall's plaques and kidney concretions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daudon, M.; Bazin, D.

    2013-03-01

    In western countries, a dramatic increase in papilla calcifications (Randall's Plaque or RP) is observed as a major cause of calcium oxalate kidney stones. Through ex vivo X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we give for the first time direct structural evidence of the presence of amorphous carbonated calcium phosphate in these Randall's plaques (RP). Such chemical composition of RP present in increasingly young subjects raises a major question regarding alimentation: does nutrient-enriched food especially aimed at young children affect the physiology of the kidney? Moreover, lithogenic diseases may induce intratubular crystallization and end-stage renal failure. We show that Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy is able to characterize such pathological microcalcifications giving their chemical composition and their spatial distribution, thus providing invaluable information for the diagnosis of the disease and the treatment of the patients.

  19. Radiation sensitization in cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Greenstock, C.L.

    1981-02-01

    One possible benefit of stimulated oxygen consumption rendering aerobic cancer cells hypoxic, and the reductive sensitizer drug metabolism which has been found to be selective for hypoxic tissue, is that the resulting reductive metabolites are selectively toxic and may be useful in chemotherapy to kill sensitive hypoxic tumor cells. Radiation chemical, biochemical and pharmacological studies are continuing to provide additional information on drug delivery, metabolism and cytotoxicity, in order to select and evaluate clinically acceptable sensitizer drugs. Radiation chemical studies over the past decade have led to the development and selection of the nitroimidazoles, metronidazole and misonidazole for clinical evaluation in terms of improved cancer treatments. The results of ongoing clinical trials will, within the next few years, indicate how successful this application of basic radiation chemical research has been. 39 references are included. (JMT)

  20. Radiation therapy in cholangiocellular carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Thomas B; Seufferlein, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma can arise in all parts of the biliary tract and this has implications for therapy. Surgery is the mainstay of therapy however local relapse is a major problem. Therefore, adjuvant treatment with chemoradiotherapy was tested in trials. The SWOG-S0809 trial regimen of chemoradiotherapy which was tested in extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and in gallbladder cancer can currently be regarded as highest level of evidence for this indication. In contrast to adjuvant therapy where only conventionally fractionated radiotherapy plays a role, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) today has become a powerful alternative to chemoradiotherapy for definitive treatment due to the ability to administer higher doses of radiotherapy to improve local control. Sequential combinations with chemotherapy are also frequently employed. Nevertheless, in general cholangiocarcinoma is an orphan disease and future clinical trials will have to improve the available level of evidence.

  1. Stereotactic radiation therapy for hepatic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Jeffrey

    2016-12-01

    Management of primary and secondary tumors of the liver is a complex undertaking involving multi‑disciplinary input. Radiation therapy has played a relatively marginal role in the treatment of liver tumors, but with technological innovations and the growth of the field of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), this role is evolving. In this review, I discuss the issues of radiation‑induced hepatic toxicity, the planning of liver SBRT treatments, clinical results with SBRT, its place amongst other non‑surgical ablative treatments, and potential future avenues of investigation.

  2. Building immunity to cancer with radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Haikerwal, Suresh J; Hagekyriakou, Jim; MacManus, Michael; Martin, Olga A; Haynes, Nicole M

    2015-11-28

    Over the last decade there has been a dramatic shift in the focus of cancer research toward understanding how the body's immune defenses can be harnessed to promote the effectiveness of cytotoxic anti-cancer therapies. The ability of ionizing radiation to elicit anti-cancer immune responses capable of controlling tumor growth has led to the emergence of promising combination-based radio-immunotherapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancer. Herein we review the immunoadjuvant properties of localized radiation therapy and discuss how technological advances in radio-oncology and developments in the field of tumor-immunotherapy have started to revolutionize the therapeutic application of radiotherapy.

  3. Radiation Therapy for Pilocytic Astrocytomas of Childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Mansur, David B.; Rubin, Joshua B.; Kidd, Elizabeth A.; King, Allison A.; Hollander, Abby S.; Smyth, Matthew D.; Limbrick, David D.; Park, T.S.; Leonard, Jeffrey R.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Though radiation therapy is generally considered the most effective treatment for unresectable pilocytic astrocytomas in children, there are few data to support this claim. To examine the efficacy of radiation therapy for pediatric pilocytic astrocytomas, we retrospectively reviewed the experience at our institution. Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients 18 years old or younger with unresectable tumors and without evidence of neurofibromatosis have been treated since 1982. Patients were treated with local radiation fields to a median dose of 54 Gy. Six patients were treated with radiosurgery to a median dose of 15.5 Gy. Five patients were treated with initial chemotherapy and irradiated after progression. Results: All patients were alive after a median follow-up of 5.0 years. However, progression-free survival was 68.7%. None of 11 infratentorial tumors progressed compared with 6 of 20 supratentorial tumors. A trend toward improved progression-free survival was seen with radiosurgery (80%) compared with external beam alone (66%), but this difference did not reach statistical significance. Eight of the 9 patients progressing after therapy did so within the irradiated volume. Conclusions: Although the survival of these children is excellent, almost one third of patients have progressive disease after definitive radiotherapy. Improvements in tumor control are needed in this patient population, and the optimal therapy has not been fully defined. Prospective trials comparing initial chemotherapy to radiation therapy are warranted.

  4. Anesthesia for intraoperative radiation therapy in children

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, R.H.; Morrison, J.E. Jr.; Verbrugge, J.J.; Daniel, W.E.; Aarestad, N.O.; Burrington, J.D.

    1987-06-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is a relatively new mode of cancer treatment which is being used with increasing frequency. IORT presents several challenges to the anesthesiologist, including patients who are debilitated from their disease or chemotherapy, operations involving major tumor resections, intraoperative interdepartmental transport of patients, and remote monitoring of patients during electron beam therapy. This report discusses the anesthetic management of ten children undergoing IORT. With adequate preparation and interdepartmental communication, complications can be avoided during these challenging cases.

  5. Apremilast in the therapy of moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Gisondi, Paolo; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2016-01-01

    Chronic plaque psoriasis presents clinically as an inflammatory disease of the skin, which is often associated with comorbidities and responsible for a poor quality of life. It can widely vary among patients because of different age of onset, type of symptoms, areas of involvement, and disease severity. The choice of the treatment of psoriasis should be personalized according to the specific needs of the patients. Apremilast is a well-tolerated and effective phosphodiesterase type 4 inhibitor that is indicated for the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. In this article, the pharmacological, clinical, and safety aspects of apremilast are reviewed. Based on these data, apremilast could be indicated for patients with a Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score <10 but with a significant impact on quality of life and seems to be an appropriate treatment for elderly patients also. PMID:27307707

  6. Bullous pemphigoid after radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Duschet, P.; Schwarz, T.; Gschnait, F.

    1988-02-01

    Electron beam therapy applied to a lymph node metastasis from a squamous cell carcinoma was followed by the development of histologically and immunologically typical bullous pemphigoid, the lesions being initially strictly confined to the irradiation area. This observation suggests that the bullous pemphigoid antigen may be altered or unmasked by electron beam radiotherapy, leading subsequently to the production of autoantibodies. The disease in this case effectively responded to the administration of tetracycline and niacinamide, a therapeutic regimen described recently.

  7. Radiation therapy communication: equine hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Kleiter, Miriam; Velde, Karsten; Hainisch, Edmund; Auer, Ulrike; Reifinger, Martin

    2009-01-01

    A 13-month-old Standardbred Colt had a recurrent hemangioma at the level of the coronary band. Multiple excisions had led to a nonhealing skin and hoof defect. Using 14 MV electrons, a total dose of 36 Gy was administered, given as six fractions of 6 Gy twice a week. Wound healing by second intention was achieved over the next 4 months and the colt began race training 6 months after the end of therapy. Twenty months later the colt is sound and there is no evidence of tumor recurrence.

  8. Radiation therapy for orbital lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Ping . E-mail: pzhou@partners.org; Ng, Andrea K.; Silver, Barbara; Li Sigui; Hua Ling; Mauch, Peter M.

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To describe radiation techniques and evaluate outcomes for orbital lymphoma. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients (and 62 eyes) with orbital lymphoma treated with radiotherapy between 1987 and 2003 were included. The majority had mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (48%) or follicular (30%) lymphoma. Seventeen patients had prior lymphoma at other sites, and 29 had primary orbital lymphoma. Median follow-up was 46 months. Results: The median dose was 30.6 Gy; one-third received <30 Gy. Electrons were used in 9 eyes with disease confined to the conjunctiva or eyelid, and photons in 53 eyes with involvement of intraorbital tissues to cover entire orbit. Local control rate was 98% for all patients and 100% for those with indolent lymphoma. Three of the 26 patients with localized primary lymphoma failed distantly, resulting in a 5-year freedom-from-distant-relapse rate of 89%. The 5-year disease-specific and overall survival rates were 95% and 88%, respectively. Late toxicity was mainly cataract formation in patients who received radiation without lens block. Conclusions A dose of 30 Gy is sufficient for indolent orbital lymphoma. Distant relapse rate in patients with localized orbital lymphoma was lower than that reported for low-grade lymphoma presenting in other sites. Orbital radiotherapy can be used for salvage of recurrent indolent lymphoma.

  9. Process of Coping with Radiation Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jean E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Evaluated ability of self-regulation and emotional-drive theories to explain effects of informational intervention entailing objective descriptions of experience on outcomes of coping with radiation therapy among 84 men with prostate cancer. Consistent with self-regulation theory, similarity between expectations and experience and degree of…

  10. Glossodynia after radiation therapy and chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Naylor, G.D.; Marino, G.G.; Shumway, R.C.

    1989-10-01

    Radiation therapy and chemotherapy have decreased the mortality rates of cancer patients, but the morbidity associated with oral complications is high in many cases. A pretreatment oral evaluation and institution of a preventive care program reduce oral symptoms such as glossodynia considerably. When oral symptoms are minimized, the dentist can improve the patient's quality of life.40 references.

  11. Very low-calorie ketogenic diet may allow restoring response to systemic therapy in relapsing plaque psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Castaldo, Giuseppe; Galdo, Giovanna; Rotondi Aufiero, Felice; Cereda, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic disease associated with overweight/obesity and related cardiometabolic complications. The link between these diseases is likely the inflammatory background associated with adipose tissue, particularly the visceral one. Accordingly, previous studies have demonstrated that in the long-term weight loss may improve the response to systemic therapies. We report a case report of a woman in her 40s suffering from relapsing moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis and obesity-related metabolic syndrome, in whom adequate response to ongoing treatment with biological therapy (adalimumab) was restored after only 4 weeks of very low-calorie, carbohydrate-free (ketogenic), protein-based diet. Accordingly, through rapid and consistent weight loss, very low calorie ketogenic diet may allow restoring a quick response to systemic therapy in a patient suffering from relapsing psoriasis. This intervention should be considered in overweight/obese patients before the rearrangement of systemic therapy. Nonetheless, studies are required to evaluate whether very low calorie ketogenic diets should be preferred to common low-calorie diets to improve the response to systemic therapy at least in patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis.

  12. Plaque regression and plaque stabilisation in cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Tarun; Ezhilan, J.; Vasnawala, Hardik; Somani, Vinod

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by formation of plaques on the inner walls of arteries that threatens to become the leading cause of death worldwide via its sequelae of myocardial infarction and stroke. Endothelial dysfunction leads to cholesterol uptake and accumulation of inflammatory markers within the plaque. The stability of a plaque eventually depends on the balance between vascular smooth muscle cells that stabilize it and the inflammatory cells like macrophages and T lymphocytes that make it prone to rupture. The current approach to manage atherosclerosis focuses on the treatment of a ruptured plaque and efforts have been made to reduce the risk of plaque rupture by identifying vulnerable plaques and treating them before they precipitate into clinical events. New diagnostic approaches such as IVUS and CIMT ultrasound are now being preferred over traditional coronary angiography because of their better accuracy in measuring plaque volume rather than the level of stenosis caused. The present review highlights the literature available on two prevalent approaches to manage a vulnerable plaque, namely, plaque stabilization and plaque regression, and their validation through various treatment modalities in recent plaque management studies. Plaque stabilization focuses on stabilizing the content of plaque and strengthening the overlying endothelium, while plaque regression focuses on the overall reduction in plaque volume and to reverse the arterial endothelium to its normal functional state. Although earlier studies contemplated the practicality of plaque regression and focused greatly on stabilization of a vulnerable plaque, our review indicated that, aided by the use of superior diagnostics tools, more intensive lipid modifying therapies have resulted in actual plaque regression. PMID:24381872

  13. Radiation Therapy -- What It Is, How It Helps

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types Radiation Therapy EASY READING Radiation Therapy -- What It Is, How It Helps This easy-to-read guide offers a ... Imagine a world free from cancer. Help make it a reality. DONATE Cancer Information Cancer Prevention & Detection ...

  14. Pulsed laser radiation therapy of skin tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, A.P.; Moskalik, K.G.

    1980-11-15

    Radiation from a neodymium laser was used to treat 846 patients with 687 precancerous lesions or benign tumors of the skin, 516 cutaneous carcinomas, 33 recurrences of cancer, 51 melanomas, and 508 metastatic melanomas in the skin. The patients have been followed for three months to 6.5 years. No relapses have been observed during this period. Metastases to regional lymph nodes were found in five patients with skin melanoma. Pulsed laser radiation may be successfully used in the treatment of precancerous lesions and benign tumors as well as for skin carcinoma and its recurrences, and for skin melanoma. Laser radiation is more effective in the treatment of tumors inaccessible to radiation therapy and better in those cases in which surgery may have a bad cosmetic or even mutilating effect. Laser beams can be employed in conjunction with chemo- or immunotherapy.

  15. Comparison of particle-radiation-therapy modalities

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P.

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics of dose distribution, beam alignment, and radiobiological advantages accorded to high LET radiation were reviewed and compared for various particle beam radiotherapeutic modalities (neutron, Auger electrons, p, ..pi../sup -/, He, C, Ne, and Ar ions). Merit factors were evaluated on the basis of effective dose to tumor relative to normal tissue, linear energy transfer (LET), and dose localization, at depths of 1, 4, and 10 cm. In general, it was found that neutron capture therapy using an epithermal neutron beam provided the best merit factors available for depths up to 8 cm. The position of fast neutron therapy on the Merit Factor Tables was consistently lower than that of other particle modalities, and above only /sup 60/Co. The largest body of clinical data exists for fast neutron therapy; results are considered by some to be encouraging. It then follows that if benefits with fast neutron therapy are real, additional gains are within reach with other modalities.

  16. Tolerability and cosmetic acceptability of liquor carbonis distillate (coal tar) solution 15% as topical therapy for plaque psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Brouda, Irina; Edison, Brenda; Van Cott, Alicia; Green, Barbara A

    2010-04-01

    Although generally recognized as an effective therapy for psoriasis, coal tar therapy lost appeal in modern clinical practice due to poor patient acceptability of its aesthetic properties. A new liquor carbonis distillate (LCD) solution 15% (equivalent to coal tar 2.3%) that uses an evaporative and transparent vehicle, fragrance, and a dab-on applicator was developed. Cosmetic acceptability of the LCD solution was compared to calcipotriene cream 0.005% during a randomized, active-controlled, investigator-blinded clinical trial. Participants with moderate plaque psoriasis applied LCD solution or calcipotriene cream twice daily to body lesions for 12 weeks and then were followed for 6 additional weeks without treatment. Participants completed a cosmetic acceptability survey about their medications after starting therapy. Mean ratings for aesthetic and product performance attributes were high in both groups; however, more participants treated with LCD solution versus calcipotriene cream rated their product as more convenient and beneficial compared to prior psoriasis therapies. Ratings of the scent, staining, drying time, and dab-on applicator for the LCD solution were favorable. Participant experience with LCD solution in this study suggests that it is a cosmetically acceptable psoriasis treatment that is comparable to calcipotriene cream.

  17. Intra-Arterial Drug and Light Delivery for Photodynamic Therapy Using Visudyne®: Implication for Atherosclerotic Plaque Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Manish; Zellweger, Matthieu; Frobert, Aurélien; Valentin, Jérémy; van den Bergh, Hubert; Wagnières, Georges; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), which is based on the activation of photosensitizers with light, can be used to reduce plaque burden. We hypothesized that intra-arterial photosensitizer administration and photo-activation will lead to high and rapid accumulation within the plaque with reduced systemic adverse effects. Thus, this “intra-arterial” PDT would be expected to have less side effects and due to the short time involved would be compatible with percutaneous coronary interventions. Aim: We characterized the dose-dependent uptake and efficacy of intra-arterial PDT using Liposomal Verteporfin (Visudyne®), efficient for cancer-PDT but not tested before for PDT of atherosclerosis. Methods and Results: Visudyne® (100, 200, and 500 ng/ml) was perfused for 5–30 min in atherosclerotic aorta isolated from ApoE−/− mice. The fluorescence Intensity (FI) after 15 min of Visudyne® perfusion increased with doses of 100 (FI-5.5 ± 1.8), 200 (FI-31.9 ± 1.9) or 500 ng/ml (FI-42.9 ± 1.2). Visudyne® (500 ng/ml) uptake also increased with the administration time from 5 min (FI-9.8 ± 2.5) to 10 min (FI-23.3 ± 3.0) and 15 min (FI-42.9 ± 3.4) before reaching saturation at 30 min (FI-39.3 ± 2.4) contact. Intra-arterial PDT (Fluence: 100 and 200 J/cm2, irradiance-334 mW/cm2) was applied immediately after Visudyne® perfusion (500 ng/ml for 15 min) using a cylindrical light diffuser coupled to a diode laser (690 nm). PDT led to an increase of ROS (Dihydroethidium; FI-6.9 ± 1.8, 25.3 ± 5.5, 43.4 ± 13.9) and apoptotic cells (TUNEL; 2.5 ± 1.6, 41.3 ± 15.3, 58.9 ± 6%), mainly plaque macrophages (immunostaining; 0.3 ± 0.2, 37.6 ± 6.4, 45.3 ± 5.4%) respectively without laser irradiation, or at 100 and 200 J/cm2. Limited apoptosis was observed in the medial wall (0.5 ± 0.2, 8.5 ± 4.7, 15.3 ± 12.7%). Finally, Visudyne®-PDT was found to be associated with reduced vessel functionality (Myogram). Conclusion: We demonstrated that sufficient accumulation of Visudyne

  18. [The role of blood-brain barrier in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer dementia--implications for immunological therapies for plaque dissolution].

    PubMed

    Pahnke, J; Krohn, M; Scheffler, K

    2009-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder affecting more than 27 million people worldwide and leading to severe social-economic problems. One characteristic hallmark of AD--the amyloid plaques--are still being discussed to be one important triggering factor. However, current animal and autopsy studies refer to soluble and highly toxic A block oligomers as the deadly agent for the neurons. Current therapies mainly rely on the abatement of symptoms without antagonizing the etiology of the disease. Potential new approaches address reduced production, increased degradation and/or evacuation of toxic A block peptides from the brain. Among others one important group of target-proteins are the ABC transporters of the blood-brain barrier which contribute importantly to the detoxification of the brain. Changes of specific transport functions evoke important alterations for the known pathogenesis and future therapies of AD, especially approaches that target plaque dissolution and plaque reduction.

  19. 21 CFR 892.5840 - Radiation therapy simulation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radiation therapy simulation system. 892.5840... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5840 Radiation therapy simulation system. (a) Identification. A radiation therapy simulation system is a fluoroscopic or radiographic...

  20. 21 CFR 892.5840 - Radiation therapy simulation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiation therapy simulation system. 892.5840... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5840 Radiation therapy simulation system. (a) Identification. A radiation therapy simulation system is a fluoroscopic or radiographic...

  1. 21 CFR 892.5840 - Radiation therapy simulation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radiation therapy simulation system. 892.5840... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5840 Radiation therapy simulation system. (a) Identification. A radiation therapy simulation system is a fluoroscopic or radiographic...

  2. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended...

  3. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended...

  4. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended...

  5. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended...

  6. 21 CFR 892.5840 - Radiation therapy simulation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiation therapy simulation system. 892.5840... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5840 Radiation therapy simulation system. (a) Identification. A radiation therapy simulation system is a fluoroscopic or radiographic...

  7. 21 CFR 892.5840 - Radiation therapy simulation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radiation therapy simulation system. 892.5840... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5840 Radiation therapy simulation system. (a) Identification. A radiation therapy simulation system is a fluoroscopic or radiographic...

  8. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended...

  9. 21 CFR 892.5750 - Radionuclide radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radionuclide radiation therapy system. 892.5750... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5750 Radionuclide radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A radionuclide radiation therapy system is a device intended to permit...

  10. Gastrointestinal toxicity associated to radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Mario López; Martín, Margarita Martín; Padellano, Laura Cerezo; Palomo, Alicia Marín; Puebla, Yamile Ibáñez

    2010-08-01

    Radiation therapy in combination with other treatments, such as surgery and chemotherapy, increases locoregional control and survival in patients with thoracic, abdominal and pelvic malignancies. Nevertheless, significant clinical toxicity with combined treatments may be seen in these patients. With the advent of tridimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), dose-volume histograms (DVH) can be generated to assess the dose received by the organs at risk. The possible relationship between these parameters and clinical, anatomical and, more recently, genetic factors has to be considered. Treatment options include initial conservative medical therapies, endoscopic procedures, hyperbaric oxygen and surgery. Some pharmacological agents to prevent gastrointestinal toxicity are under investigation.

  11. Targeted Radiation Therapy for Cancer Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    routine clinical use, 2) whether the use of Vac-Lok® immobilization devices are necessary when patients are treated using the Calypso system, 3...using breath-hold technique for left-sided breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant radiation therapy, with the benefit of confirmatory tracking...required for each patient thereby reducing the cost of care and increasing treatment capacity within the military delivery system; enabling research to

  12. Health systems analysis: radiation therapy services

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    A plan for the distribution of radiation therapy services within Health Services Area I (HSA I) is presented in this report. Four problems concerning health status or health system aspects of megavoltage radiation therapy services within HSA I are identified: (1) the health status of the populations residing in the area of Lexington, Winchester, Louisa and Fluvanna with respect to cancer; (2) the failure of Rockingham Memorial Hospital to meet minimum volume standards and the projection of a failure to meet this minimum volume standard by 1986; (3) the absence of the specialities of hematology or medical oncology on the medical staff of the hospital at Rockingham; and (4) a lack of registered nurses/licensed practical nurses and a docimetrist at Winchester Memorial Hospital, which could impact on the quality of care. An additional area of concern is the increase in charges on the linear accelerator at the University of Virginia. Preliminary findings do not indicate that radiation therapy services within HSA I are inappropriate. Recommendations for addressing problem areas are proposed.

  13. Radiation therapy at compact Compton sources.

    PubMed

    Jacquet, Marie; Suortti, Pekka

    2015-09-01

    The principle of the compact Compton source is presented briefly. In collision with an ultrarelativistic electron bunch a laser pulse is back-scattered as hard X-rays. The radiation cone has an opening of a few mrad, and the energy bandwidth is a few percent. The electrons that have an energy of the order of a few tens of MeV either circulate in storage ring, or are injected to a linac at a frequency of 10-100 MHz. At the interaction point the electron bunch collides with the laser pulse that has been amplified in a Fabry-Perot resonator. There are several machines in design or construction phase, and projected fluxes are 10(12) to 10(14) photons/s. The flux available at 80 keV from the ThomX machine is compared with that used in the Stereotactic Synchrotron Radiation Therapy clinical trials. It is concluded that ThomX has the potential of serving as the radiation source in future radiation therapy programs, and that ThomX can be integrated in hospital environment.

  14. Treatment planning for conformal proton radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Bussière, Mark R; Adams, Judith A

    2003-10-01

    Clinical results from various trials have demonstrated the viability of protons in radiation therapy and radiosurgery. This has motivated a few large medical centers to design and build expensive hospital based proton facilities based proton facilities (current cost estimates for a proton facility is around 100 million US dollars). Until this development proton therapy was done using retrofitted equipment originally designed for nuclear experiments. There are presently only three active proton therapy centers in the United States, 22 worldwide. However, more centers are under construction and being proposed in the US and abroad. The important difference between proton and x-ray therapy is in the dose distribution. X-rays deposit most of their dose at shallow depths of a few centimeters with a gradual decay with depth in the patient. Protons deliver most of their dose in the Bragg peak, which can be delivered at most clinically required depths followed by a sharp fall-off. This sharp falloff makes protons sensitive to variations in treatment depths within patients. Treatment planning incorporates all the knowledge of protons into a process, which allows patients to be treated accurately and reliably. This process includes patient immobilization, imaging, targeting, and modeling of planned dose distributions. Although the principles are similar to x-ray therapy some significant differences exist in the planning process, which described in this paper. Target dose conformality has recently taken on much momentum with the advent of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with photon beams. Proton treatments provide a viable alternative to IMRT because they are inherently conformal avoiding normal tissue while irradiating the intended targets. Proton therapy will soon bring conformality to a new high with the development of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Future challenges include keeping the cost down, increasing access to conventional proton therapy as

  15. Intraoperative radiation therapy in recurrent ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, O.W. Stephanie . E-mail: stbeast@stanford.edu; Kapp, Daniel S.; Teng, Nelson N.H.; Husain, Amreen

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate disease outcomes and complications in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer treated with cytoreductive surgery and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective study of 24 consecutive patients with ovarian carcinoma who underwent secondary cytoreduction and intraoperative radiation therapy at our institution between 1994 and 2002 was conducted. After optimal cytoreductive surgery, IORT was delivered with orthovoltage X-rays (200 kVp) using individually sized and beveled cone applications. Outcomes measures were local control of disease, progression-free interval, overall survival, and treatment-related complications. Results: Of these 24 patients, 22 were available for follow-up analysis. Additional treatment at the time of and after IORT included whole abdominopelvic radiation, 9; pelvic or locoregional radiation, 5; chemotherapy, 6; and no adjuvant treatment, 2. IORT doses ranged from 9-14 Gy (median, 12 Gy). The anatomic sites treated were pelvis (sidewalls, vaginal cuff, presacral area, anterior pubis), para-aortic and paracaval lymph node beds, inguinal region, or porta hepatitis. At a median follow-up of 24 months, 5 patients remain free of disease, whereas 17 patients have recurred, of whom 4 are alive with disease and 13 died from disease. Five patients recurred within the radiation fields for a locoregional relapse rate of 32% and 12 patients recurred at distant sites with a median time to recurrence of 13.7 months. Five-year overall survival was 22% with a median survival of 26 months from time of IORT. Nine patients (41%) experienced Grade 3 toxicities from their treatments. Conclusion: In carefully selected patients with locally recurrent ovarian cancer, combined IORT and tumor reductive surgery is reasonably tolerated and may contribute to achieving local control and disease palliation.

  16. The ASTEROID trial: coronary plaque regression with high-dose statin therapy.

    PubMed

    Chhatriwalla, Adnan K; Nicholls, Stephen J; Nissen, Steven E

    2006-11-01

    A Study To Evaluate the effect of Rosuvastatin On Intravascular ultrasound-Derived coronary atheroma burden (ASTEROID) investigated the impact of high-dose rosuvastatin therapy on the rate of atheroma progression in patients with coronary artery disease. Serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was performed in 349 patients at baseline and following 24 months of therapy with rosuvastatin 40 mg/day. Rosuvastatin therapy lowered low-density lipoprotein cholesterol to 60.8 mg/dl and raised high-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 14.7%. This was associated with a significant reduction in all IVUS measures of atheroma burden. These results suggest that intensive modification of lipid levels with high-dose statin therapy can promote atheroma regression. Further studies will be required to determine whether this benefit is associated with a reduction in clinical events.

  17. Pirfenidone enhances the efficacy of combined radiation and sunitinib therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Seo-Hyun; Nam, Jae-Kyung; Jang, Junho; Lee, Hae-June Lee, Yoon-Jin

    2015-06-26

    Radiotherapy is a widely used treatment for many tumors. Combination therapy using anti-angiogenic agents and radiation has shown promise; however, these combined therapies are reported to have many limitations in clinical trials. Here, we show that radiation transformed tumor endothelial cells (ECs) to fibroblasts, resulting in reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) response and increased Snail1, Twist1, Type I collagen, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β release. Irradiation of radioresistant Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) tumors greater than 250 mm{sup 3} increased collagen levels, particularly in large tumor vessels. Furthermore, concomitant sunitinib therapy did not show a significant difference in tumor inhibition versus radiation alone. Thus, we evaluated multimodal therapy that combined pirfenidone, an inhibitor of TGF-induced collagen production, with radiation and sunitinib treatment. This trimodal therapy significantly reduced tumor growth, as compared to radiation alone. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that radiation-induced collagen deposition and tumor microvessel density were significantly reduced with trimodal therapy, as compared to radiation alone. These data suggest that combined therapy using pirfenidone may modulate the radiation-altered tumor microenvironment, thereby enhancing the efficacy of radiation therapy and concurrent chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Radiation changes tumor endothelial cells to fibroblasts. • Radio-resistant tumors contain collagen deposits, especially in tumor vessels. • Pirfenidone enhances the efficacy of combined radiation and sunitinib therapy. • Pirfenidone reduces radiation-induced collagen deposits in tumors.

  18. Optical Tracking Technology in Stereotactic Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Thomas H. . E-mail: thomas.wagner@orhs.org; Meeks, Sanford L.; Bova, Frank J.; Friedman, William A.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Tome, Wolfgang

    2007-07-01

    The last decade has seen the introduction of advanced technologies that have enabled much more precise application of therapeutic radiation. These relatively new technologies include multileaf collimators, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning, and intensity modulated radiotherapy in radiotherapy. Therapeutic dose distributions have become more conformal to volumes of disease, sometimes utilizing sharp dose gradients to deliver high doses to target volumes while sparing nearby radiosensitive structures. Thus, accurate patient positioning has become even more important, so that the treatment delivered to the patient matches the virtual treatment plan in the computer treatment planning system. Optical and image-guided radiation therapy systems offer the potential to improve the precision of patient treatment by providing a more robust fiducial system than is typically used in conventional radiotherapy. The ability to accurately position internal targets relative to the linac isocenter and to provide real-time patient tracking theoretically enables significant reductions in the amount of normal tissue irradiated. This report reviews the concepts, technology, and clinical applications of optical tracking systems currently in use for stereotactic radiation therapy. Applications of radiotherapy optical tracking technology to respiratory gating and the monitoring of implanted fiducial markers are also discussed.

  19. Methods for implementing microbeam radiation therapy

    DOEpatents

    Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Morris, Gerard M.; Hainfeld, James F.

    2007-03-20

    A method of performing radiation therapy includes delivering a therapeutic dose such as X-ray only to a target (e.g., tumor) with continuous broad beam (or in-effect continuous) using arrays of parallel planes of radiation (microbeams/microplanar beams). Microbeams spare normal tissues, and when interlaced at a tumor, form a broad-beam for tumor ablation. Bidirectional interlaced microbeam radiation therapy (BIMRT) uses two orthogonal arrays with inter-beam spacing equal to beam thickness. Multidirectional interlaced MRT (MIMRT) includes irradiations of arrays from several angles, which interleave at the target. Contrast agents, such as tungsten and gold, are administered to preferentially increase the target dose relative to the dose in normal tissue. Lighter elements, such as iodine and gadolinium, are used as scattering agents in conjunction with non-interleaving geometries of array(s) (e.g., unidirectional or cross-fired (intersecting) to generate a broad beam effect only within the target by preferentially increasing the valley dose within the tumor.

  20. The Evolving Role of Radiation Therapy in the Management of Malignant Melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Niloufer; Khan, Mohammad K.; Almasan, Alex; Singh, Arun D.; Macklis, Roger

    2011-07-01

    The incidence of melanoma is rising in the United States, leading to an estimated 68,720 new diagnoses and 8,650 deaths annually. The natural history involves metastases to lymph nodes, lung, liver, brain, and often to other sites. Primary treatment for melanoma is surgical excision of the primary tumor and affected lymph nodes. The role of adjuvant or definitive radiation therapy in the treatment of melanoma remains controversial, because melanoma has traditionally been viewed as a prototypical radioresistant cancer. However, recent studies suggest that under certain clinical circumstances, there may be a significant role for radiation therapy in melanoma treatment. Stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases has shown effective local control. High dose per fraction radiation therapy has been associated with a lower rate of locoregional recurrence of sinonasal melanoma. Plaque brachytherapy has evolved into a promising alternative to enucleation at the expense of moderate reduction in visual acuity. Adjuvant radiation therapy following lymphadenectomy in node-positive melanoma prevents local and regional recurrence. The newer clinical data along with emerging radiobiological data indicate that radiotherapy is likely to play a greater role in melanoma management and should be considered as a treatment option.

  1. Personalized Radiation Therapy (PRT) for Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jian-Yue; Kong, Feng-Ming Spring

    2016-01-01

    This chapter reviews and discusses approaches and strategies of personalized radiation therapy (PRT) for lung cancers at four different levels: (1) clinically established PRT based on a patient's histology, stage, tumor volume and tumor locations; (2) personalized adaptive radiation therapy (RT) based on image response during treatment; (3) PRT based on biomarkers; (4) personalized fractionation schedule. The current RT practice for lung cancer is partially individualized according to tumor histology, stage, size/location, and combination with use of systemic therapy. During-RT PET-CT image guided adaptive treatment is being tested in a multicenter trial. Treatment response detected by the during-RT images may also provide a strategy to further personalize the remaining treatment. Research on biomarker-guided PRT is ongoing. The biomarkers include genomics, proteomics, microRNA, cytokines, metabolomics from tumor and blood samples, and radiomics from PET, CT, SPECT images. Finally, RT fractionation schedule may also be personalized to each individual patient to maximize therapeutic gain. Future PRT should be based on comprehensive considerations of knowledge acquired from all these levels, as well as consideration of the societal value such as cost and effectiveness.

  2. Numerical Modeling of Nitinol Stent Oversizing in Arteries with Clinically Relevant Levels of Peripheral Arterial Disease: The Influence of Plaque Type on the Outcomes of Endovascular Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gökgöl, Can; Diehm, Nicolas; Büchler, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    Oversizing of the Nitinol stents in the femoro-popliteal arterial tract is commonly performed by clinicians and further encouraged by stent manufacturers. However, in spite of the procedure's supposed benefits of strong wall apposition and increased luminal gain, its effects on the mechanical behavior of arteries with peripheral arterial disease are not fully clear. In this study, finite element (FE) analyses of endovascular revascularization of an idealized artery with 70% stenosis and three different plaque types have been performed to examine the influence of Nitinol stent oversizing on the arterial stresses and acute lumen gain. The analyses included the simulation of balloon angioplasty to model plaque failure, followed by stent implantation, in which four different oversizing ratios were investigated. Results showed that balloon angioplasty was crucial in determining the stress levels of the artery prior to stent implantation and heavily affected the outcome of endovascular therapy. For all plaque types, Nitinol stent oversizing was found to produce a marginal lumen gain in contrast to a significant increase in arterial stresses. For the arteries with lightly and moderately calcified plaques, oversizing was found to be non-critical; whereas for the arteries with heavily calcified plaques, the procedure should be avoided due to a risk of tissue failure.

  3. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Karyn A

    2016-01-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the management of pancreatic cancer represents an area of some controversy. However, local disease progression remains a significant cause of morbidity and even mortality for patients with this disease. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an emerging treatment option for pancreatic cancer, primarily for locally advanced (unresectable) disease as it can provide a therapeutic benefit with significant advantages for patients' quality of life over standard conventional chemoradiation. There may also be a role for SBRT as neoadjuvant therapy for patients with borderline resectable disease to allow conversion to resectability. The objective of this review is to present the data supporting SBRT in pancreatic cancer as well as the potential limitations and caveats of current studies.

  4. [Postoperative radiation therapy in lung carcinom].

    PubMed

    Bouchaab, H; Peters, S; Ozsahin, M; Peguret, N; Gonzales, M; Lovis, A

    2014-05-21

    Locally advanced non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is a very heterogeous disease, the role of postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) in pN2 patients with completly resected NSCLC remains controversial. Although an improvment in local control has been described in several studies, the effect on survival has been contradictory or inconclusive. Retrospective evaluation suggest a positive effect of PORT in high risk patients with pN2 disease: RI-resected NSCLC, bulky and multilevel N2. However further evaluation of PORT in prospectively randomized studies in completely resected pN2 NSCLC is needed.

  5. Clinical applications of continuous infusion chemotherapy ahd concomitant radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, C.J.; Rotman, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: theoretical basis and clinical applications of 5-FU as a radiosensitizer; treatment of hepatic metastases from gastro intestingal primaries with split course radiation therapy; combined modality therapy with 5-FU, Mitomycin-C and radiation therapy for sqamous cell cancers; treatment of bladder carcinoma with concomitant infusion chemotherapy and irradiation; a treatment of invasiv bladder cancer by the XRT/5FU protocol; concomitant radiation therapy and doxorubicin by continuous infusion in advanced malignancies; cis platin by continuous infusion with concurrent radiation therapy in malignant tumors; combination of radiation with concomitant continuous adriamycin infusion in a patient with partially excised pleomorphic soft tissue sarcoma of the lower extremeity; treatment of recurrent carcinoma of the paranasal sinuses using concomitant infusion cis-platinum and radiation therapy; hepatic artery infusion for hepatic metastases in combination with hepatic resection and hepatic radiation; study of simultaneous radiation therapy, continuous infusion, 5FU and bolus mitomycin-C; cancer of the esophagus; continuous infusion VP-16, bolus cis-platinum and simultaneous radiation therapy as salvage therapy in small cell bronchogenic carcinoma; and concomitant radiation, mitomycin-C and 5-FU infusion in gastro intestinal cancer.

  6. Mapping the literature of radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Delwiche, Frances A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study characterizes the literature of the radiation therapy profession, identifies the journals most frequently cited by authors writing in this discipline, and determines the level of coverage of these journals by major bibliographic indexes. Method: Cited references from three discipline-specific source journals were analyzed according to the Mapping the Literature of Allied Health Project Protocol of the Nursing and Allied Health Resources Section of the Medical Library Association. Bradford's Law of Scattering was applied to all journal references to identify the most frequently cited journal titles. Results: Journal references constituted 77.8% of the total, with books, government documents, Internet sites, and miscellaneous sources making up the remainder. Although a total of 908 journal titles were cited overall, approximately one-third of the journal citations came from just 11 journals. MEDLINE and Scopus provided the most comprehensive indexing of the journal titles in Zones 1 and 2. The source journals were indexed only by CINAHL and Scopus. Conclusion: The knowledgebase of radiation therapy draws heavily from the fields of oncology, radiology, medical physics, and nursing. Discipline-specific publications are not currently well covered by major indexing services, and those wishing to conduct comprehensive literature searches should search multiple resources. PMID:23646027

  7. Film Dosimetry for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benites-Rengifo, J.; Martínez-Dávalos, A.; Celis, M.; Lárraga, J.

    2004-09-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is an oncology treatment technique that employs non-uniform beam intensities to deliver highly conformal radiation to the targets while minimizing doses to normal tissues and critical organs. A key element for a successful clinical implementation of IMRT is establishing a dosimetric verification process that can ensure that delivered doses are consistent with calculated ones for each patient. To this end we are developing a fast quality control procedure, based on film dosimetry techniques, to be applied to the 6 MV Novalis linear accelerator for IMRT of the Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (INNN) in Mexico City. The procedure includes measurements of individual fluence maps for a limited number of fields and dose distributions in 3D using extended dose-range radiographic film. However, the film response to radiation might depend on depth, energy and field size, and therefore compromise the accuracy of measurements. In this work we present a study of the dependence of Kodak EDR2 film's response on the depth, field size and energy, compared with those of Kodak XV2 film. The first aim is to devise a fast and accurate method to determine the calibration curve of film (optical density vs. doses) commonly called a sensitometric curve. This was accomplished by using three types of irradiation techniques: Step-and-shoot, dynamic and static fields.

  8. Serum Oxidized LDL Decreases in Response to Statin Therapy and Relates Independently to Reductions in Coronary Plaque in Patients with HIV

    PubMed Central

    NOU, Eric; LU, Michael T.; LOOBY, Sara E.; FITCH, Kathleen V.; KIM, Elli A.; LEE, Hang; HOFFMANN, Udo; GRINSPOON, Steven K.; LO, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Objective Circulating oxidized LDL (oxLDL) levels are elevated in HIV-infected patients and have been associated with subclinical atherosclerosis. Statins have been shown to reduce plaque on coronary computed tomography angiography (cCTA) in HIV-infected individuals. Thus, we investigated the effect of statins on serum oxLDL levels and the relationship between changes in oxLDL and coronary atherosclerosis on cCTA in patients with HIV. Design We previously conducted a 12-month randomized, placebo-controlled trial with atorvastatin in forty HIV-infected subjects on stable anti-retroviral therapy with subclinical coronary atherosclerosis and LDL-cholesterol < 130 mg/dL. Methods In the current analysis, subjects underwent cCTA and measurements of serum oxLDL, sCD14, sCD163, lipoprotein phospholipase A2, and fasting lipids including direct LDL at baseline and end of the study. Results Nineteen subjects were randomized to atorvastatin and twenty-one subjects to placebo. Serum oxLDL decreased −22.7% [95% CI −28.7 to −16.7] in the atorvastatin group and increased 7.5% [95% CI −3.3 to 18.4] in the placebo group (p < 0.0001). Change in oxLDL significantly correlated with changes in non-calcified plaque volume, total plaque volume, positively remodeled plaque, and low attenuation plaque. The association between changes in oxLDL and non-calcified plaque volume was independent of the baseline 10-year Framingham risk, direct LDL, CD4 count, and viral load. Conclusions Statins lower oxLDL levels in HIV-infected patients, and reductions in oxLDL are related to improvements in coronary atherosclerosis, independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Reductions in oxLDL may be one mechanism through which statins exert beneficial effects on reducing atherosclerosis in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:26558731

  9. Galactic cosmic radiation leads to cognitive impairment and increased aβ plaque accumulation in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Jonathan D; Liu, Bin; Frost, Jeffrey L; Lemere, Cynthia A; Williams, Jacqueline P; Olschowka, John A; O'Banion, M Kerry

    2012-01-01

    Galactic Cosmic Radiation consisting of high-energy, high-charged (HZE) particles poses a significant threat to future astronauts in deep space. Aside from cancer, concerns have been raised about late degenerative risks, including effects on the brain. In this study we examined the effects of (56)Fe particle irradiation in an APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We demonstrated 6 months after exposure to 10 and 100 cGy (56)Fe radiation at 1 GeV/µ, that APP/PS1 mice show decreased cognitive abilities measured by contextual fear conditioning and novel object recognition tests. Furthermore, in male mice we saw acceleration of Aβ plaque pathology using Congo red and 6E10 staining, which was further confirmed by ELISA measures of Aβ isoforms. Increases were not due to higher levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP) or increased cleavage as measured by levels of the β C-terminal fragment of APP. Additionally, we saw no change in microglial activation levels judging by CD68 and Iba-1 immunoreactivities in and around Aβ plaques or insulin degrading enzyme, which has been shown to degrade Aβ. However, immunohistochemical analysis of ICAM-1 showed evidence of endothelial activation after 100 cGy irradiation in male mice, suggesting possible alterations in Aβ trafficking through the blood brain barrier as a possible cause of plaque increase. Overall, our results show for the first time that HZE particle radiation can increase Aβ plaque pathology in an APP/PS1 mouse model of AD.

  10. Galactic Cosmic Radiation Leads to Cognitive Impairment and Increased Aβ Plaque Accumulation in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Jonathan D.; Liu, Bin; Frost, Jeffrey L.; Lemere, Cynthia A.; Williams, Jacqueline P.; Olschowka, John A.; O’Banion, M. Kerry

    2012-01-01

    Galactic Cosmic Radiation consisting of high-energy, high-charged (HZE) particles poses a significant threat to future astronauts in deep space. Aside from cancer, concerns have been raised about late degenerative risks, including effects on the brain. In this study we examined the effects of 56Fe particle irradiation in an APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We demonstrated 6 months after exposure to 10 and 100 cGy 56Fe radiation at 1 GeV/µ, that APP/PS1 mice show decreased cognitive abilities measured by contextual fear conditioning and novel object recognition tests. Furthermore, in male mice we saw acceleration of Aβ plaque pathology using Congo red and 6E10 staining, which was further confirmed by ELISA measures of Aβ isoforms. Increases were not due to higher levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP) or increased cleavage as measured by levels of the β C-terminal fragment of APP. Additionally, we saw no change in microglial activation levels judging by CD68 and Iba-1 immunoreactivities in and around Aβ plaques or insulin degrading enzyme, which has been shown to degrade Aβ. However, immunohistochemical analysis of ICAM-1 showed evidence of endothelial activation after 100 cGy irradiation in male mice, suggesting possible alterations in Aβ trafficking through the blood brain barrier as a possible cause of plaque increase. Overall, our results show for the first time that HZE particle radiation can increase Aβ plaque pathology in an APP/PS1 mouse model of AD. PMID:23300905

  11. Radiation therapy in the management of pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Pashtan, Itai; Oh, Kevin S; Loeffler, Jay S

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy in the form of fractionated treatment or radiosurgery has an important role in the management of pituitary adenomas. Radiation is a reliable way of gaining local control for radiographically progressing pituitary adenomas. For functioning adenomas that are biochemically recurrent or persistent, radiation therapy is less consistent in offering biochemical normalization and often requires a latency period of years or decades. The decision of when to use radiation therapy is a delicate balance between its benefits and late sequelae, especially in the context of benign disease. Recent technological advances in radiation oncology hold the potential to minimize dose to uninvolved normal tissue and therefore reduce the risk of toxicity.

  12. Exposure Risks Among Children Undergoing Radiation Therapy: Considerations in the Era of Image Guided Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hess, Clayton B; Thompson, Holly M; Benedict, Stanley H; Seibert, J Anthony; Wong, Kenneth; Vaughan, Andrew T; Chen, Allen M

    2016-04-01

    Recent improvements in toxicity profiles of pediatric oncology patients are attributable, in part, to advances in the field of radiation oncology such as intensity modulated radiation (IMRT) and proton therapy (IMPT). While IMRT and IMPT deliver highly conformal dose to targeted volumes, they commonly demand the addition of 2- or 3-dimensional imaging for precise positioning--a technique known as image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). In this manuscript we address strategies to further minimize exposure risk in children by reducing effective IGRT dose. Portal X rays and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) are commonly used to verify patient position during IGRT and, because their relative radiation exposure is far less than the radiation absorbed from therapeutic treatment beams, their sometimes significant contribution to cumulative risk can be easily overlooked. Optimizing the conformality of IMRT/IMPT while simultaneously ignoring IGRT dose may result in organs at risk being exposed to a greater proportion of radiation from IGRT than from therapeutic beams. Over a treatment course, cumulative central-axis CBCT effective dose can approach or supersede the amount of radiation absorbed from a single treatment fraction, a theoretical increase of 3% to 5% in mutagenic risk. In select scenarios, this may result in the underprediction of acute and late toxicity risk (such as azoospermia, ovarian dysfunction, or increased lifetime mutagenic risk) in radiation-sensitive organs and patients. Although dependent on variables such as patient age, gender, weight, body habitus, anatomic location, and dose-toxicity thresholds, modifying IGRT use and acquisition parameters such as frequency, imaging modality, beam energy, current, voltage, rotational degree, collimation, field size, reconstruction algorithm, and documentation can reduce exposure, avoid unnecessary toxicity, and achieve doses as low as reasonably achievable, promoting a culture and practice of "gentle IGRT."

  13. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy and Dental Plaque: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Santin, G. C.; Oliveira, D. S. B.; Galo, R.; Borsatto, M. C.; Corona, S. A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review of the literature on the efficacy of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDTa) on cariogenic dental biofilm. Types of Studies Reviewed. Studies in vivo, in vitro, and in situ were included. Articles that did not address PDTa, those that did not involve cariogenic biofilm, those that used microorganisms in the plankton phase, and reviews were excluded. Data extraction and quality assessments were performed independently by two raters using a scale. Results. Two hundred forty articles were retrieved; only seventeen of them met the eligibility criteria and were analyzed in the present review. Considerable variability was found regarding the methodologies and application protocols for antimicrobial PDTa. Two articles reported unfavorable results. Practical Implications. The present systematic review does not allow drawing any concrete conclusions regarding the efficacy of antimicrobial PDTa, although this method seems to be a promising option. PMID:25379545

  14. Whole-brain hippocampal sparing radiation therapy: Volume-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy case study

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Katrina Lenards, Nishele; Holson, Janice

    2016-04-01

    The hippocampus is responsible for memory and cognitive function. An ongoing phase II clinical trial suggests that sparing dose to the hippocampus during whole-brain radiation therapy can help preserve a patient's neurocognitive function. Progressive research and advancements in treatment techniques have made treatment planning more sophisticated but beneficial for patients undergoing treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare hippocampal sparing whole-brain (HS-WB) radiation therapy treatment planning techniques using volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We randomly selected 3 patients to compare different treatment techniques that could be used for reducing dose to the hippocampal region. We created 2 treatment plans, a VMAT and an IMRT, from each patient's data set and planned on the Eclipse 11.0 treatment planning system (TPS). A total of 6 plans (3 IMRT and 3 VMAT) were created and evaluated for this case study. The physician contoured the hippocampus as per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0933 protocol atlas. The organs at risk (OR) were contoured and evaluated for the plan comparison, which included the spinal cord, optic chiasm, the right and left eyes, lenses, and optic nerves. Both treatment plans produced adequate coverage on the planning target volume (PTV) while significantly reducing dose to the hippocampal region. The VMAT treatment plans produced a more homogenous dose distribution throughout the PTV while decreasing the maximum point dose to the target. However, both treatment techniques demonstrated hippocampal sparing when irradiating the whole brain.

  15. Radiation Therapy For The Solitary Plasmacytoma.

    PubMed

    Koçak, Esengül; Ballerini, Giorgio; Zouhair, Abderrahim; Özşahin, Mahmut

    2010-06-05

    Plasma-cell neoplasms are classically categorized into four groups as: multiple myeloma (MM), plasma-cell leukemias, solitary plasmacytomas (SP) of the bone (SPB), and extramedullary plasmacytomas (EMP). These tumors may be described as localized or diffuse in presentation. Localized plasma-cell neoplasms are rare, and include SP of the skeletal system, accounting for 2-5% of all plasma-cell neoplasms, and EMP of soft tissue, accounting for approximately 3% of all such neoplasms. SP is defined as a solitary mass of neoplastic plasma cells either in the bone marrow or in various soft tissue sites. There appears to be a continuum in which SP often progresses to MM. The main treatment modality for SP is radiation therapy (RT). However, there are no conclusive data in the literature on the optimal RT dose for SP. This review describes the interrelationship of plasma-cell neoplasms, and attempts to determine the minimal RT dose required to obtain local control.

  16. Ultraviolet radiation therapy and UVR dose models.

    PubMed

    Grimes, David Robert

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has been an effective treatment for a number of chronic skin disorders, and its ability to alleviate these conditions has been well documented. Although nonionizing, exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is still damaging to deoxyribonucleic acid integrity, and has a number of unpleasant side effects ranging from erythema (sunburn) to carcinogenesis. As the conditions treated with this therapy tend to be chronic, exposures are repeated and can be high, increasing the lifetime probability of an adverse event or mutagenic effect. Despite the potential detrimental effects, quantitative ultraviolet dosimetry for phototherapy is an underdeveloped area and better dosimetry would allow clinicians to maximize biological effect whilst minimizing the repercussions of overexposure. This review gives a history and insight into the current state of UVR phototherapy, including an overview of biological effects of UVR, a discussion of UVR production, illness treated by this modality, cabin design and the clinical implementation of phototherapy, as well as clinical dose estimation techniques. Several dose models for ultraviolet phototherapy are also examined, and the need for an accurate computational dose estimation method in ultraviolet phototherapy is discussed.

  17. Ultraviolet radiation therapy and UVR dose models

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, David Robert

    2015-01-15

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has been an effective treatment for a number of chronic skin disorders, and its ability to alleviate these conditions has been well documented. Although nonionizing, exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is still damaging to deoxyribonucleic acid integrity, and has a number of unpleasant side effects ranging from erythema (sunburn) to carcinogenesis. As the conditions treated with this therapy tend to be chronic, exposures are repeated and can be high, increasing the lifetime probability of an adverse event or mutagenic effect. Despite the potential detrimental effects, quantitative ultraviolet dosimetry for phototherapy is an underdeveloped area and better dosimetry would allow clinicians to maximize biological effect whilst minimizing the repercussions of overexposure. This review gives a history and insight into the current state of UVR phototherapy, including an overview of biological effects of UVR, a discussion of UVR production, illness treated by this modality, cabin design and the clinical implementation of phototherapy, as well as clinical dose estimation techniques. Several dose models for ultraviolet phototherapy are also examined, and the need for an accurate computational dose estimation method in ultraviolet phototherapy is discussed.

  18. 21 CFR 892.5750 - Radionuclide radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radionuclide radiation therapy system. 892.5750 Section 892.5750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... system. (a) Identification. A radionuclide radiation therapy system is a device intended to permit...

  19. 21 CFR 892.5750 - Radionuclide radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radionuclide radiation therapy system. 892.5750 Section 892.5750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... system. (a) Identification. A radionuclide radiation therapy system is a device intended to permit...

  20. 21 CFR 892.5750 - Radionuclide radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radionuclide radiation therapy system. 892.5750 Section 892.5750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... system. (a) Identification. A radionuclide radiation therapy system is a device intended to permit...

  1. 21 CFR 892.5750 - Radionuclide radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radionuclide radiation therapy system. 892.5750 Section 892.5750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... system. (a) Identification. A radionuclide radiation therapy system is a device intended to permit...

  2. Response of feline eosinophilic plaques and lip ulcers to amoxicillin trihydrate-clavulanate potassium therapy: a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled prospective study.

    PubMed

    Wildermuth, Brett E; Griffin, Craig E; Rosenkrantz, Wayne S

    2012-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated the treatment of feline eosinophilic plaques and lip ulcers with amoxicillin trihydrate-potassium clavulanate (Clavamox(®); Pfizer Animal Health). Nineteen cats with clinical and cytological findings consistent with eosinophilic plaques and/or lip ulcers were enrolled. Lesions were photographed and their areas measured in square centimetres before and after 21 days of therapy with either flavoured amoxicillin-clavulanate suspension or flavoured placebo suspension. Sixteen cats completed the study, with nine plaque lesions (four treatment and five placebo) and eight lip ulcer lesions (four treatment and four placebo) included in the analysis. All lesions were shown to have infection, with bacterial phagocytosis present on cytological examination. Coagulase-positive staphylococci were the most commonly isolated bacteria. The amoxicillin-clavulanate-treated eosinophilic plaque group had a statistically significant 96.2% reduction in mean lesion size (-7.60 cm(2), P = 0.0078) and an 80% reduction in mean percentage of microscopic fields demonstrating evidence of bacterial infection (P < 0.0001), whereas the placebo group did not. The amoxicillin-clavulanate-treated lip ulcer group had a 42.6% decrease in mean lesion size (-0.25 cm(2), P = 0.4125) and the placebo group a 36.6% increase (+0.49 cm(2), P = 0.1575), although neither change was statistically significant. The amoxicillin-clavulanate-treated lip ulcer group had a statistically significant 65.0% reduction in mean percentage of microscopic fields demonstrating evidence of bacterial infection (P < 0.0001), while no significant reduction was observed in the placebo group. A suspension of amoxicillin trihydrate-potassium clavulanate is an effective monotherapy for the treatment of feline eosinophilic plaques.

  3. Coronary artery calcium in breast cancer survivors after radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Takx, Richard A P; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Schoepf, U Joseph; Pilz, Lothar R; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Morris, Pamela B; Henzler, Thomas; Apfaltrer, Paul

    2017-03-24

    The purpose of the current study is to investigate whether breast cancer survivors after radiation therapy have a higher burden of coronary artery calcium as a potential surrogate of radiation-induced accelerated coronary artery disease. 333 patients were included. 54 patients underwent chest CT ≥ 6 months after the start of radiation therapy (radiation therapy group), while 279 patients had a CT scan either prior to or without undergoing radiation therapy (RT). Coronary artery calcium was quantified from CT by applying a threshold-based automated algorithm. Mean age at diagnosis was similar (p = 0.771) between RT (57.4 ± 13.1 years) and NoRT (58.0 ± 11.9 years). Median time between radiation therapy and CT was 2 years. The groups showed no significant differences in race, smoking history, cancer laterality, or cancer stage. 39 (72.2%) of RT patients had a coronary artery calcium score of 0, compared to 201 (72.0%) in patients without radiation therapy. Median coronary artery calcium burden for both groups was not significantly different (p = 0.982), nor when comparing patients who underwent left- versus right-sided radiation therapy (p = 0.453). When adjusting for the time between diagnosis and CT, radiation therapy patients had a significantly lower risk of a positive coronary artery calcium score. In conclusion, breast cancer survivors after radiation therapy are not more likely to show coronary artery calcium on follow-up CT imaging. Our results thus do not support radiation-induced accelerated coronary artery disease as an explanation for higher rates of heart disease in this group.

  4. Localized fibrous mesothelioma of pleura following external ionizing radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bilbey, J.H.; Mueller, N.L.M.; Miller, R.R.; Nelems, B.

    1988-12-01

    Carcinogenesis is a well-known complication of radiation exposure. Ionizing radiation also leads to an increased incidence of benign tumors. A 36-year-old woman had a localized fibrous mesothelioma of the pleura and an ipsilateral breast carcinoma 23 years after receiving external radiation therapy for treatment of a chest wall keloid.

  5. Radiation Therapy for Chloroma (Granulocytic Sarcoma)

    SciTech Connect

    Bakst, Richard; Wolden, Suzanne; Yahalom, Joachim

    2012-04-01

    Objectives: Chloroma (granulocytic sarcoma) is a rare, extramedullary tumor of immature myeloid cells related to acute nonlymphocytic leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. Radiation therapy (RT) is often used in the treatment of chloromas; however, modern studies of RT are lacking. We reviewed our experience to analyze treatment response, disease control, and toxicity associated with RT to develop treatment algorithm recommendations for patients with chloroma. Patients and Methods: Thirty-eight patients who underwent treatment for chloromas at our institution between February 1990 and June 2010 were identified and their medical records were reviewed and analyzed. Results: The majority of patients that presented with chloroma at the time of initial leukemia diagnosis (78%) have not received RT because it regressed after initial chemotherapy. Yet most patients that relapsed or remained with chloroma after chemotherapy are in the RT cohort (90%). Thirty-three courses of RT were administered to 22 patients. Radiation subsite breakdown was: 39% head and neck, 24% extremity, 9% spine, 9% brain, 6% genitourinary, 6% breast, 3% pelvis, and 3% genitourinary. Median dose was 20 (6-36) Gy. Kaplan-Meier estimates of progression-free survival and overall survival in the RT cohort were 39% and 43%, respectively, at 5 years. At a median follow-up of 11 months since RT, only 1 patient developed progressive disease at the irradiated site and 4 patients developed chloromas at other sites. RT was well tolerated without significant acute or late effects and provided symptom relief in 95% of cases. Conclusions: The majority of patients with chloromas were referred for RT when there was extramedullary progression, marrow relapse, or rapid symptom relief required. RT resulted in excellent local disease control and palliation of symptoms without significant toxicity. We recommend irradiating chloromas to at least 20 Gy, and propose 24 Gy in 12 fractions as an appropriate regimen.

  6. Dosimetric and Late Radiation Toxicity Comparison Between Iodine-125 Brachytherapy and Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Juxtapapillary Choroidal Melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Krema, Hatem

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To compare the dose distributions and late radiation toxicities for {sup 125}I brachytherapy (IBT) and stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) in the treatment of juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma. Methods: Ninety-four consecutive patients with juxtapapillary melanoma were reviewed: 30 have been treated with IBT and 64 with SRT. Iodine-125 brachytherapy cases were modeled with plaque simulator software for dosimetric analysis. The SRT dosimetric data were obtained from the Radionics XKnife RT3 software. Mean doses at predetermined intraocular points were calculated. Kaplan-Meier estimates determined the actuarial rates of late toxicities, and the log–rank test compared the estimates. Results: The median follow-up was 46 months in both cohorts. The 2 cohorts were balanced with respect to pretreatment clinical and tumor characteristics. Comparisons of radiation toxicity rates between the IBT and SRT cohorts yielded actuarial rates at 50 months for cataracts of 62% and 75% (P=.1), for neovascular glaucoma 8% and 47% (P=.002), for radiation retinopathy 59% and 89% (P=.0001), and for radiation papillopathy 39% and 74% (P=.003), respectively. Dosimetric comparisons between the IBT and SRT cohorts yielded mean doses of 12.8 and 14.1 Gy (P=.56) for the lens center, 17.6 and 19.7 Gy (P=.44) for the lens posterior pole, 13.9 and 10.8 Gy (P=.30) for the ciliary body, 61.9 and 69.7 Gy (P=.03) for optic disc center, and 48.9 and 60.1 Gy (P<.0001) for retina at 5-mm distance from tumor margin, respectively. Conclusions: Late radiation-induced toxicities were greater with SRT, which is secondary to the high-dose exposure inherent to the technique as compared with IBT. When technically feasible, IBT is preferred to treat juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma.

  7. Virtual micro-intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Siochi, R A

    2000-11-01

    Virtual micro-intensity modulated radiation therapy (VMIMRT) combines a 10 x 5 mm2 intensity map with a 5 x 10 mm2 intensity map, delivered at orthogonal collimator settings. The superposition of these component maps (CM) yields a 5 x 5 mm2 virtual micro-intensity map (VMIM) that can be delivered with a 1 cm leaf width MLC. A pair of CMs with optimal delivery efficiency and quality must be chosen, since a given VMIM can be delivered using several different pairs. This is possible since, for each group of four VMIM cells that can be covered by an MLC leaf in either collimator orientation, the minimum intensity can be delivered from either collimator setting. By varying the proportions of the minimum values that go into each CM, one can simultaneously minimize the number of potential junction effects and the number of segments required to deliver the VMIM. The minimization is achieved by reducing high leaf direction gradients in the CMs. Several pseudoclinical and random VMIMs were studied to determine the applicability of this new technique. A nine level boost map was also studied to investigate dosimetric and spatial resolution issues. Finally, clinical issues for this technique are discussed.

  8. Adaptive Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ghilezan, Michel; Yan, Di; Martinez, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive radiotherapy has been introduced to manage an individual's treatment by, including patient-specific treatment variation identified and quantified during the course of radiotherapy in the treatment planning and delivering optimization. Early studies have demonstrated that this technique could significantly improve the therapeutic ratio by safely reducing the large target margin that has to be used in conventional radiotherapy for prostate cancer treatment. Clinical application of off-line image-guided adaptive radiotherapy for prostate cancer has demonstrated encouraging clinical outcome. Long-term clinical follow-up has shown significant improvement in terms of tumor control and low toxicity profile, emphasizing the beneficial effect of image-guidance and adaptive treatment. Continuous development in adaptive radiotherapy has made possible additional increases in target dose by further reducing target margin when using online image-guided adaptive intensity-modulated radiation therapy. However, clinical implementation of new techniques should be explored cautiously and should include a comprehensive management strategy to address uncertainties in target definition and delineation in the preclinical implementation studies. PMID:20219551

  9. Thymic cysts following radiation therapy for Hodgkin disease

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, R.L.; Sagel, S.S.; Baglan, R.J.

    1981-12-01

    In 3 patients, benign thymic cycsts developed following radiation therapy for Hodgkin disease. Autopsy or surgical specimens provided a diagnosis in all 3 cases; computed tomographic (CT) scans obtained in two of the patients provided a preoperative diagnosis. The etiology of these cysts is uncertain; they may arise following successful radiation treatment of Hodgkin disease involving the thymus. When an anterior mediastinal mass develops in a patient with Hodgkin disease following radiation therapy, careful evaluation to exclude a benign process is indicated prior to initiating additional therapy.

  10. Overview: Where does radiation therapy fit in the spectrum of liver cancer local-regional therapies?

    PubMed

    Dawson, Laura A

    2011-10-01

    Experience with radiation therapy for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and liver metastases has increased rapidly in the past decade. This is principally because of advances in imaging and radiation techniques that can conform high doses to focal cancers and to a better understanding of how to avoid radiation-induced liver toxicity. Guidelines on how to use radiation therapy safely are becoming more clearly established, and reports of tumor control at 2 to 5 years show the potential for cure after radiation therapy for early-stage HCC and liver metastases. For both HCC and liver metastases, the best outcomes after radiation therapy are found in patients with fewer than 3 lesions that are <6 cm in size, with intact liver function and no extrahepatic metastases. There is a strong rationale for using radiation therapy in patients unsuitable for or with expected poor outcomes after standard local-regional therapies. These patients tend to have advanced tumors (large, multifocal, or invading vessels) and/or impaired liver function, reducing the chance of cure and increasing the chance of toxicity. In these patients, the benefits of radiation therapy over systemic therapy or best supportive therapy should be established in randomized trials.

  11. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Risaku

    2016-01-01

    Acute radiation syndrome affects military personnel and civilians following the uncontrolled dispersal of radiation, such as that caused by detonation of nuclear devices and inappropriate medical treatments. Therefore, there is a growing need for medical interventions that facilitate the improved recovery of victims and patients. One promising approach may be cell therapy, which, when appropriately implemented, may facilitate recovery from whole body injuries. This editorial highlights the current knowledge regarding the use of mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome, the benefits and limitations of which are under investigation. Establishing successful therapies for acute radiation syndrome may require using such a therapeutic approach in addition to conventional approaches.

  12. Microwave plaque thermoradiotherapy for choroidal melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Finger, P. T.

    1992-01-01

    Microwave thermoradiotherapy was used as a primary treatment for 44 patients with choroidal melanoma. An episcleral dish-shaped microwave antenna was placed beneath the tumour at the time of plaque brachytherapy. While temperatures were measured at the sclera, the tumour's apex was targeted to receive a minimum of 42 degrees C for 45 minutes. In addition, the patients received full or reduced doses of plaque radiotherapy. No patients have been lost to follow-up. Two eyes have been enucleated: one for rubeotic glaucoma, and one for uveitic glaucoma. Though six patients have died, only one death was due to metastatic choroidal melanoma (39 months after treatment). Clinical observations suggest that the addition of microwave heating to plaque radiation therapy of choroidal melanoma has been well tolerated. There has been a 97.7% local control rate (with a mean follow-up of 22.2 months). We have reduced the minimum tumour radiation dose (apex dose) to levels used for thermoradiotherapy of cutaneous melanomas (50 Gy/5000 rad). Within the range of this follow-up period no adverse effects which might preclude the use of this microwave heat delivery system for treatment of choroidal melanoma have been noted. Images PMID:1622949

  13. Proton minibeam radiation therapy: Experimental dosimetry evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Peucelle, C.; Martínez-Rovira, I.; Prezado, Y.; Nauraye, C.; Patriarca, A.; Hierso, E.; Fournier-Bidoz, N.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Proton minibeam radiation therapy (pMBRT) is a new radiotherapy (RT) approach that allies the inherent physical advantages of protons with the normal tissue preservation observed when irradiated with submillimetric spatially fractionated beams. This dosimetry work aims at demonstrating the feasibility of the technical implementation of pMBRT. This has been performed at the Institut Curie - Proton Therapy Center in Orsay. Methods: Proton minibeams (400 and 700 μm-width) were generated by means of a brass multislit collimator. Center-to-center distances between consecutive beams of 3200 and 3500 μm, respectively, were employed. The (passive scattered) beam energy was 100 MeV corresponding to a range of 7.7 cm water equivalent. Absolute dosimetry was performed with a thimble ionization chamber (IBA CC13) in a water tank. Relative dosimetry was carried out irradiating radiochromic films interspersed in a IBA RW3 slab phantom. Depth dose curves and lateral profiles at different depths were evaluated. Peak-to-valley dose ratios (PVDR), beam widths, and output factors were also assessed as a function of depth. Results: A pattern of peaks and valleys was maintained in the transverse direction with PVDR values decreasing as a function of depth until 6.7 cm. From that depth, the transverse dose profiles became homogeneous due to multiple Coulomb scattering. Peak-to-valley dose ratio values extended from 8.2 ± 0.5 at the phantom surface to 1.08 ± 0.06 at the Bragg peak. This was the first time that dosimetry in such small proton field sizes was performed. Despite the challenge, a complete set of dosimetric data needed to guide the first biological experiments was achieved. Conclusions: pMBRT is a novel strategy in order to reduce the side effects of RT. This works provides the experimental proof of concept of this new RT method: clinical proton beams might allow depositing a (high) uniform dose in a brain tumor located in the center of the brain (7.5 cm depth

  14. Clobetasol propionate spray 0.05% add-on therapy to a stable regimen of biologic treatment in patients with moderate to very severe plaque psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Steven R; Koo, John Y M; Johnson, Lori A; Preston, Norman J

    2009-10-01

    Moderate to severe psoriasis often requires systemic treatment, but even biologic medications do not always induce complete clearing in patients. In many instances, physicians supplement biologic treatment with topical agents as adjunctive therapy to obtain additional clearing of plaques. To evaluate the effectiveness of the addition of a superpotent corticosteroid--clobetasol propionate spray 0.05%--to various psoriasis treatments, a phase 4, multicenter, open-label, community-based trial was conducted. In this study, clobetasol propionate spray 0.05% applied twice daily was added on to a variety of existing stable treatments including systemic biologic agents in participants with moderate, severe, or very severe plaque psoriasis. The decision to add clobetasol propionate spray 0.05% to stable psoriasis therapy was determined by each investigator based on his/her evaluation of a participant's needs. A total of 159 participants from the trial adhered to stable (> or = 3 months' duration) therapeutic regimens that included a biologic treatment. In this population, at the end of the study period, 81.0% of participants with moderate disease at baseline, 79.5% of participants with severe disease at baseline, and 58.8% of participants with very severe disease at baseline were rated as clear or almost clear (target plaque severity [TPS]). Worst skin tolerability response was assessed postbaseline and included erythema (20.3% mild, 8.9% moderate, 1.9% severe), peeling (26.6% mild, 7.0% moderate, 1.3% severe), dryness (34.8% mild, 8.9% moderate, 1.3% severe), and stinging (25.3% mild, 3.8% moderate, 0.6% severe). Telangiectasia and skin atrophy were reported in 1.3% of participants each at some point during the study (postbaseline). Pruritus was reported in 7.6% of participants and folliculitis was reported in 1.9% of participants. Eight participants experienced adverse events (AEs) that were regarded as probably related to the study medication (clobetasol propionate spray

  15. Adjuvant radiation therapy, local recurrence, and the need for salvage therapy in atypical meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Aizer, Ayal A.; Arvold, Nils D.; Catalano, Paul; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Golby, Alexandra J.; Johnson, Mark D.; Al-Mefty, Ossama; Wen, Patrick Y.; Reardon, David A.; Lee, Eudocia Q.; Nayak, Lakshmi; Rinne, Mikael L.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Weiss, Stephanie E.; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.; Abedalthagafi, Malak; Santagata, Sandro; Dunn, Ian F.; Alexander, Brian M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of adjuvant radiation in patients with atypical meningioma remains poorly defined. We sought to determine the impact of adjuvant radiation therapy in this population. Methods We identified 91 patients with World Health Organization grade II (atypical) meningioma managed at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center between 1997 and 2011. A propensity score model incorporating age at diagnosis, gender, Karnofsky performance status, tumor location, tumor size, reason for diagnosis, and era of treatment was constructed using logistic regression for the outcome of receipt versus nonreceipt of radiation therapy. Propensity scores were then used as continuous covariates in a Cox proportional hazards model to determine the adjusted impact of adjuvant radiation therapy on both local recurrence and the combined endpoint of use of salvage therapy and death due to progressive meningioma. Results The median follow-up in patients without recurrent disease was 4.9 years. After adjustment for pertinent confounding variables, radiation therapy was associated with decreased local recurrence in those undergoing gross total resection (hazard ratio, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.07–0.96; P = .04). No differences in overall survival were seen in patients who did and did not receive radiation therapy. Conclusion Patients who have had a gross total resection of an atypical meningioma should be considered for adjuvant radiation therapy given the improvement in local control. Multicenter, prospective trials are required to definitively evaluate the potential impact of radiation therapy on survival in patients with atypical meningioma. PMID:24891451

  16. What to Know about External Beam Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... wife and children.” U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health About the treatment: What is external beam radiation therapy? ■ It is a common cancer treatment that ...

  17. [Follow-up after radiation therapy for cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Cao, K I; Mazeron, R; Barillot, I

    2015-10-01

    Radiation therapy plays a central role in treatment strategies of cervical cancer. Follow-up after external pelvic radiation therapy and brachytherapy is based upon French and international specific recommendations. It aims to assess early tumour response, and to detect local or metastatic recurrences which can be suitable for salvage treatment. Follow-up after radiation therapy for cervical cancer should also assess gastro-intestinal, urinary and sexual toxicities which may have an impact on quality of life. This is a major concern in the evaluation of the results of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and MRI-guided brachytherapy, which should lead to a better local control and to a better bowel tolerance.

  18. Thyroid neoplasia following radiation therapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    McHenry, C.; Jarosz, H.; Calandra, D.; McCall, A.; Lawrence, A.M.; Paloyan, E.

    1987-06-01

    The question of thyroid neoplasia following high-dose radiation treatment to the neck and mediastinum for malignant neoplasms such as Hodgkin's lymphoma in children and young adults has been raised recently. Five patients, 19 to 39 years old, were operated on for thyroid neoplasms that developed following cervical and mediastinal radiation therapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma. Three patients had papillary carcinomas and two had follicular adenomas. The latency period between radiation exposure and the diagnosis of thyroid neoplasm ranged from eight to 16 years. This limited series provided strong support for the recommendation that children and young adults who are to receive high-dose radiation therapy to the head, neck, and mediastinum should receive suppressive doses of thyroxine prior to radiation therapy in order to suppress thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone) and then be maintained on a regimen of suppression permanently.

  19. Radiation therapy among atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    PubMed

    Kato, K; Antoku, S; Russell, W J; Fujita, S; Pinkston, J A; Hayabuchi, N; Hoshi, M; Kodama, K

    1998-06-01

    As a follow-up to the two previous surveys of radiation therapy among the atomic bomb survivors, a large-scale survey was performed to document (1) the number of radiation therapy treatments received by the atomic bomb survivors and (2) the types of radiation treatments conducted in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The previous two surveys covered the radiation treatments among the Radiation Effects Research Foundation Adult Health Study (AHS) population, which is composed of 20,000 persons. In the present survey, the population was expanded to include the Life Span Study (LSS), including 93,611 atomic bomb survivors and 26,517 Hiroshima and Nagasaki citizens who were not in the cities at the times of the bombings. The LSS population includes the AHS population. The survey was conducted from 1981 to 1984. The survey teams reviewed all the medical records for radiation treatments of 24,266 patients at 11 large hospitals in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Among them, the medical records for radiation treatments of 1556 LSS members were reviewed in detail. By analyzing the data obtained in the present and previous surveys, the number of patients receiving radiation therapy was estimated to be 4501 (3.7%) in the LSS population and 1026 (5.1%) in the AHS population between 1945-1980. During 1945-1965, 98% of radiation treatments used medium-voltage X rays, and 66% of the treatments were for benign diseases. During 1966-1980, 94% of the radiation treatments were for malignant neoplasms. During this period, 60Co gamma-ray exposure apparatus and high-energy electron accelerators were the prevalent mode of treatment in Hiroshima and in Nagasaki, respectively. The mean frequency of radiation therapy among the LSS population was estimated to have been 158 courses/year during 1945-1965 and 110 courses/year during 1966-1980. The present survey revealed that 377 AHS members received radiation therapy. The number was approximately twice the total number of cases found in the previous two surveys

  20. Advanced Interventional Therapy for Radiation-Induced Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the case of a 61-year-old woman who presented with dyspnea, aortic stenosis, and coronary artery disease—typical side effects of radiation therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma. A poor candidate for surgery, she underwent successful high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention and subsequent transcatheter aortic valve replacement. This report highlights some of the cardiovascular-specific sequelae of radiation therapy for cancer treatment; in addition, possible directions for future investigations are discussed. PMID:27547140

  1. [Reappraisal role of locoregional radiation therapy in metastatic cancers].

    PubMed

    Rancoule, Chloé; Pacaut-Vassal, Cécile; Vallard, Alexis; Mery, Benoite; Trone, Jane-Chloé; El Meddeb Hamrouni, Anis; Magné, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Recent innovations in oncology area helped to improve the prognosis of certain cancers including metastatic ones with a decrease in mortality. Recommendations describe the treatment of metastatic cancer as systemic therapy or complementary care and the role of locoregional treatment in the treatment plan only occurs in a palliative context. Currently, in the clinical practice, out of "the evidence based medicine", an early locoregional therapy (surgery or radiation therapy) can be proposed in several cases of metastatic cancers. The aim of the present review is to describe the role of the primary tumor radiation therapy in metastatic disease. In metastatic breast, prostate, cervix, rectal or nasopharyngeal cancers, locoregional treatment including radiation therapy can, in some cases, be discussed and decided in MDT. Ongoing clinical trials in these locations should soon precise the benefit of this locoregional treatment. It will also be important to define the specific criteria in order to select patients who could benefit from this treatment.

  2. Can radiation therapy treatment planning system accurately predict surface doses in postmastectomy radiation therapy patients?

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Sharon; Back, Michael; Tan, Poh Wee; Lee, Khai Mun; Baggarley, Shaun; Lu, Jaide Jay

    2012-07-01

    Skin doses have been an important factor in the dose prescription for breast radiotherapy. Recent advances in radiotherapy treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and new treatment schemes such as hypofractionated breast therapy have made the precise determination of the surface dose necessary. Detailed information of the dose at various depths of the skin is also critical in designing new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of surface dose calculation by a clinically used treatment planning system and those measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) in a customized chest wall phantom. This study involved the construction of a chest wall phantom for skin dose assessment. Seven TLDs were distributed throughout each right chest wall phantom to give adequate representation of measured radiation doses. Point doses from the CMS Xio Registered-Sign treatment planning system (TPS) were calculated for each relevant TLD positions and results correlated. There were no significant difference between measured absorbed dose by TLD and calculated doses by the TPS (p > 0.05 (1-tailed). Dose accuracy of up to 2.21% was found. The deviations from the calculated absorbed doses were overall larger (3.4%) when wedges and bolus were used. 3D radiotherapy TPS is a useful and accurate tool to assess the accuracy of surface dose. Our studies have shown that radiation treatment accuracy expressed as a comparison between calculated doses (by TPS) and measured doses (by TLD dosimetry) can be accurately predicted for tangential treatment of the chest wall after mastectomy.

  3. Pelvic Normal Tissue Contouring Guidelines for Radiation Therapy: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Atlas

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, Hiram A.; Barthold, H. Joseph; O'Meara, Elizabeth; Bosch, Walter R.; El Naqa, Issam; Al-Lozi, Rawan; Rosenthal, Seth A.; Lawton, Colleen; Lee, W. Robert; Sandler, Howard; Zietman, Anthony; Myerson, Robert; Dawson, Laura A.; Willett, Christopher; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Jhingran, Anuja; Portelance, Lorraine; Ryu, Janice; and others

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To define a male and female pelvic normal tissue contouring atlas for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Methods and Materials: One male pelvis computed tomography (CT) data set and one female pelvis CT data set were shared via the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center. A total of 16 radiation oncologists participated. The following organs at risk were contoured in both CT sets: anus, anorectum, rectum (gastrointestinal and genitourinary definitions), bowel NOS (not otherwise specified), small bowel, large bowel, and proximal femurs. The following were contoured in the male set only: bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb. The following were contoured in the female set only: uterus, cervix, and ovaries. A computer program used the binomial distribution to generate 95% group consensus contours. These contours and definitions were then reviewed by the group and modified. Results: The panel achieved consensus definitions for pelvic normal tissue contouring in RTOG trials with these standardized names: Rectum, AnoRectum, SmallBowel, Colon, BowelBag, Bladder, UteroCervix, Adnexa{sub R}, Adnexa{sub L}, Prostate, SeminalVesc, PenileBulb, Femur{sub R}, and Femur{sub L}. Two additional normal structures whose purpose is to serve as targets in anal and rectal cancer were defined: AnoRectumSig and Mesorectum. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusions: Consensus guidelines for pelvic normal tissue contouring were reached and are available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG Web site. This will allow uniformity in defining normal tissues for clinical trials delivering pelvic radiation and will facilitate future normal tissue complication research.

  4. An Investigation of Vascular Strategies to Augment Radiation Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kaffas, Ahmed Nagy

    Radiation therapy is administered to more than 50% of patients diagnosed with cancer. Mechanisms of interaction between radiation and tumour cells are relatively well understood on a molecular level, but much remains uncertain regarding how radiation interacts with the tumour as a whole. Recent studies have suggested that tumour response to radiation may in fact be regulated by endothelial cell response, consequently stressing the role of tumour blood vessels in radiation treatment response. As a result, various treatment regimens have been proposed to strategically combine radiation with vascular targeting agents. A great deal of effort has been aimed towards developing efficient vascular targeting agents. Nonetheless, no optimal method has yet been devised to strategically deliver such agents. Recent evidence suggesting that these drugs may "normalize" tumour blood vessels and enhance radiosensitivity, is supporting experiments where anti-angiogenic drugs are combined with cytotoxic therapies such as radiotherapy. In contrast, ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles have recently been demonstrated to enhance radiation therapy by biophysically interacting with endothelial cells. When combined with single radiation doses, these microbubbles are believed to cause localized vascular destruction followed by tumour cell death. Finally, a new form of 'pro-angiogenics' has also been demonstrated to induce a therapeutic tumour response. The overall aim of this thesis is to study the role of tumour blood vessels in treatment responses to single-dose radiation therapy and to investigate radiation-based vascular targeting strategies. Using pharmacological and biophysical agents, blood vessels were altered to determine how they influence tumour cell death, clonogenicity, and tumour growth, and to study how these may be optimally combined with radiation. Three-dimensional high-frequency power Doppler ultrasound was used throughout these studies to investigate vascular response to

  5. Persistence of endometrial activity after radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhill, D.; Heller, P.; Dames, J.; Hoskins, W.; Gallup, D.; Park, R.

    1985-12-01

    Radiation therapy is a proved treatment for cervical carcinoma; however, it destroys ovarian function and has been thought to ablate the endometrium. Estrogen replacement therapy is often prescribed for patients with cervical carcinoma after radiation therapy. A review of records of six teaching hospitals revealed 16 patients who had endometrial sampling for uterine bleeding after standard radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma. Fifteen patients underwent dilatation and curettage, and one patient underwent total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy when a dilatation and curettage was unsuccessful. Six patients had fibrosis and inflammation of the endometrial cavity, seven had proliferative endometrium, one had cystic hyperplasia, one had atypical adenomatous hyperplasia, and one had adenocarcinoma. Although the number of patients who have an active endometrium after radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma is not known, this report demonstrates that proliferative endometrium may persist, and these patients may develop endometrial hyperplasia or adenocarcinoma. Studies have indicated that patients with normal endometrial glands have an increased risk of developing endometrial adenocarcinoma if they are treated with unopposed estrogen. Patients who have had radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma should be treated with estrogen and a progestational agent to avoid endometrial stimulation from unopposed estrogen therapy.

  6. Image-Guidance for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fuss, Martin . E-mail: fussm@ohsu.edu; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Papanikolau, Nikos; Salter, Bill J.

    2007-07-01

    The term stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) describes a recently introduced external beam radiation paradigm by which small lesions outside the brain are treated under stereotactic conditions, in a single or few fractions of high-dose radiation delivery. Similar to the treatment planning and delivery process for cranial radiosurgery, the emphasis is on sparing of adjacent normal tissues through the creation of steep dose gradients. Thus, advanced methods for assuring an accurate relationship between the target volume position and radiation beam geometry, immediately prior to radiation delivery, must be implemented. Such methods can employ imaging techniques such as planar (e.g., x-ray) or volumetric (e.g., computed tomography [CT]) approaches and are commonly summarized under the general term image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). This review summarizes clinical experience with volumetric and ultrasound based image-guidance for SBRT. Additionally, challenges and potential limitations of pre-treatment image-guidance are presented and discussed.

  7. Cranial Radiation Therapy and Damage to Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monje, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Cranial radiation therapy is associated with a progressive decline in cognitive function, prominently memory function. Impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis is thought to be an important mechanism underlying this cognitive decline. Recent work has elucidated the mechanisms of radiation-induced failure of neurogenesis. Potential therapeutic…

  8. Radiation Therapy and You: Support for People with Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... treated. It also highlights ways you can manage side effects. PDF Kindle ePub Order Free Copy This booklet covers: Questions and Answers About Radiation Therapy. Answers common questions, such as ... therapy. Side Effects and Ways to Manage Them. Information about ...

  9. Music therapy CD creation for initial pediatric radiation therapy: a mixed methods analysis.

    PubMed

    Barry, Philippa; O'Callaghan, Clare; Wheeler, Greg; Grocke, Denise

    2010-01-01

    A mixed methods research design was used to investigate the effects of a music therapy CD (MTCD) creation intervention on pediatric oncology patients' distress and coping during their first radiation therapy treatment. The music therapy method involved children creating a music CD using interactive computer-based music software, which was "remixed" by the music therapist-researcher to extend the musical material. Eleven pediatric radiation therapy outpatients aged 6 to 13 years were randomly assigned to either an experimental group, in which they could create a music CD prior to their initial treatment to listen to during radiation therapy, or to a standard care group. Quantitative and qualitative analyses generated multiple perceptions from the pediatric patients, parents, radiation therapy staff, and music therapist-researcher. Ratings of distress during initial radiation therapy treatment were low for all children. The comparison between the two groups found that 67% of the children in the standard care group used social withdrawal as a coping strategy, compared to 0% of the children in the music therapy group; this trend approached significance (p = 0.076). MTCD creation was a fun, engaging, and developmentally appropriate intervention for pediatric patients, which offered a positive experience and aided their use of effective coping strategies to meet the demands of their initial radiation therapy treatment.

  10. Once-Daily Radiation Therapy for Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Lindsay; Harmsen, William; Blanchard, Miran; Goetz, Matthew; Jakub, James; Mutter, Robert; Petersen, Ivy; Rooney, Jessica; Stauder, Michael; Yan, Elizabeth; Laack, Nadia

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare and aggressive breast cancer variant treated with multimodality therapy. A variety of approaches intended to escalate the intensity and efficacy of radiation therapy have been reported, including twice-daily radiation therapy, dose escalation, and aggressive use of bolus. Herein, we examine our outcomes for patients treated with once-daily radiation therapy with aggressive bolus utilization, focusing on treatment technique. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of patients with nonmetastatic IBC treated from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2010, was performed. Locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS) and predictors thereof were assessed. Results: Fifty-two women with IBC were identified, 49 (94%) of whom were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. All underwent mastectomy followed by adjuvant radiation therapy. Radiation was delivered in once-daily fractions of 1.8 to 2.25 Gy (median, 2 Gy). Patients were typically treated with daily 1-cm bolus throughout treatment, and 33 (63%) received a subsequent boost to the mastectomy scar. Five-year Kaplan Meier survival estimates for LRC, DFS, and OS were 81%, 56%, and 64%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence was associated with poorer OS (P<.001; hazard ratio [HR], 4.1). Extracapsular extension was associated with worse LRC (P=.02), DFS (P=.007), and OS (P=.002). Age greater than 50 years was associated with better DFS (P=.03). Pathologic complete response was associated with a trend toward improved LRC (P=.06). Conclusions: Once-daily radiation therapy with aggressive use of bolus for IBC results in outcomes consistent with previous reports using various intensified radiation therapy regimens. LRC remains a challenge despite modern systemic therapy. Extracapsular extension, age ≤50 years, and lack of complete response to chemotherapy appear to be associated with worse outcomes. Novel strategies are needed in IBC

  11. Planning and delivery of intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Cedric X; Amies, Christopher J; Svatos, Michelle

    2008-12-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is an advanced form of external beam radiation therapy. IMRT offers an additional dimension of freedom as compared with field shaping in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy because the radiation intensities within a radiation field can be varied according to the preferences of locations within a given beam direction from which the radiation is directed to the tumor. This added freedom allows the treatment planning system to better shape the radiation doses to conform to the target volume while sparing surrounding normal structures. The resulting dosimetric advantage has shown to translate into clinical advantages of improving local and regional tumor control. It also offers a valuable mechanism for dose escalation to tumors while simultaneously reducing radiation toxicities to the surrounding normal tissue and sensitive structures. In less than a decade, IMRT has become common practice in radiation oncology. Looking forward, the authors wonder if IMRT has matured to such a point that the room for further improvement has diminished and so it is pertinent to ask what the future will hold for IMRT. This article attempts to look from the perspective of the current state of the technology to predict the immediate trends and the future directions. This article will (1) review the clinical experience of IMRT; (2) review what we learned in IMRT planning; (3) review different treatment delivery techniques; and finally, (4) predict the areas of advancements in the years to come.

  12. Prototype demonstration of radiation therapy planning code system

    SciTech Connect

    Little, R.C.; Adams, K.J.; Estes, G.P.; Hughes, L.S. III; Waters, L.S.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Radiation therapy planning is the process by which a radiation oncologist plans a treatment protocol for a patient preparing to undergo radiation therapy. The objective is to develop a protocol that delivers sufficient radiation dose to the entire tumor volume, while minimizing dose to healthy tissue. Radiation therapy planning, as currently practiced in the field, suffers from inaccuracies made in modeling patient anatomy and radiation transport. This project investigated the ability to automatically model patient-specific, three-dimensional (3-D) geometries in advanced Los Alamos radiation transport codes (such as MCNP), and to efficiently generate accurate radiation dose profiles in these geometries via sophisticated physics modeling. Modem scientific visualization techniques were utilized. The long-term goal is that such a system could be used by a non-expert in a distributed computing environment to help plan the treatment protocol for any candidate radiation source. The improved accuracy offered by such a system promises increased efficacy and reduced costs for this important aspect of health care.

  13. Functional imaging in treatment planning in radiation therapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Perez, Carlos A; Bradley, Jeffrey; Chao, Clifford K S; Grigsby, Perry W; Mutic, Sasa; Malyapa, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The remarkable technical developments obtained in radiation oncology have resulted in an increasing use of image-based treatment planning in radiation therapy for three-dimensional and intensity modulated radiation therapy, stereotactic irradiation and image-guided brachytherapy. There has been increased use of computer-based record and verify systems as well as electronic portal imaging to enhance treatment delivery. From the data presented it is evident that PET scanning and other functional imaging techniques play a major role in the definition of tumor extent and staging of patients with cancer. The recent introduction of a combined CT and PET scanner will substantially simplify image acquisition and treatment planning.

  14. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...) intended for use in radiation therapy. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and...

  15. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...) intended for use in radiation therapy. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and...

  16. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...) intended for use in radiation therapy. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and...

  17. [Current status and limitation of particle radiation therapy].

    PubMed

    Ogino, Takashi

    2009-11-01

    Almost 9,000 patients have been treated by particle radiation therapy as a highly advanced medical technology in Japan, and definitive evaluation of this technology might now be possible. The process of approval of medical equipment, the law of medical technologists, and the law of medicine for particle radiation therapy have also been prepared. Number of facilities is expected to increase, and time has come that the fee of this medicine would cover by social insurance. Much debate, however, has been published in English journals upon proton therapy. The National Cancer Institute has started to support clinical trials in the United States. In Japan, however, research funding is still quite small.

  18. Adjunctive dental therapy via tooth plaque reduction and gingivitis treatment by blue light-emitting diodes tooth brushing.

    PubMed

    Genina, Elina A; Titorenko, Vladimir A; Belikov, Andrey V; Bashkatov, Alexey N; Tuchin, Valery V

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of blue light-emitting toothbrushes (B-LETBs) (405 to 420 nm, power density 2  mW/cm(2)) for reduction of dental plaques and gingival inflammation has been evaluated. Microbiological study has shown the multifactor therapeutic action of the B-LETBs on oral pathological microflora: in addition to partial mechanical removal of bacteria, photodynamic action suppresses them up to 97.5%. In the pilot clinical studies, subjects with mild to moderate gingivitis have been randomly divided into two groups: a treatment group that used the B-LETBs and a control group that used standard toothbrushes. Indices of plaque, gingival bleeding, and inflammation have been evaluated. A significant improvement of all dental indices in comparison with the baseline (by 59%, 66%, and 82% for plaque, gingival bleeding, and inflammation, respectively) has been found. The treatment group has demonstrated up to 50% improvement relative to the control group. We have proposed the B-LETBs to serve for prevention of gingivitis or as an alternative to conventional antibiotic treatment of this disease due to their effectiveness and the absence of drug side effects and bacterial resistance.

  19. Adjunctive dental therapy via tooth plaque reduction and gingivitis treatment by blue light-emitting diodes tooth brushing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genina, Elina A.; Titorenko, Vladimir A.; Belikov, Andrey V.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2015-12-01

    The efficacy of blue light-emitting toothbrushes (B-LETBs) (405 to 420 nm, power density 2 mW/cm2) for reduction of dental plaques and gingival inflammation has been evaluated. Microbiological study has shown the multifactor therapeutic action of the B-LETBs on oral pathological microflora: in addition to partial mechanical removal of bacteria, photodynamic action suppresses them up to 97.5%. In the pilot clinical studies, subjects with mild to moderate gingivitis have been randomly divided into two groups: a treatment group that used the B-LETBs and a control group that used standard toothbrushes. Indices of plaque, gingival bleeding, and inflammation have been evaluated. A significant improvement of all dental indices in comparison with the baseline (by 59%, 66%, and 82% for plaque, gingival bleeding, and inflammation, respectively) has been found. The treatment group has demonstrated up to 50% improvement relative to the control group. We have proposed the B-LETBs to serve for prevention of gingivitis or as an alternative to conventional antibiotic treatment of this disease due to their effectiveness and the absence of drug side effects and bacterial resistance.

  20. Intravascular Photoacoustics for Image-Guidance and Temperature Monitoring During Plasmonic Photothermal Therapy of Atherosclerotic Plaques: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Yeager, Doug; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Litovsky, Silvio; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Recently, combined intravascular ultrasound and photoacoustic (IVUS/IVPA) imaging has been demonstrated as a novel imaging modality capable of visualizing both morphology (via IVUS) and cellular/molecular composition (via IVPA) of atherosclerotic plaques, using both endogenous tissue absorbers and exogenous contrast agents. Plasmonic gold nanoparticles were previously utilized as IVPA contrast agents which co-localize with atherosclerotic plaques, particularly phagocytically active macrophages. The present work demonstrates the use of IVUS/IVPA imaging as a tool for localized temperature monitoring during laser heating. The temperature dependent change in IVPA signal intensity of silica-coated gold nanorod contrast agents absorbing within the near-infrared optical wavelength range is evaluated and shown to have a linear relationship, with a slope greater than that of endogenous tissue. A continuous wave laser was subsequently incorporated into the IVUS/IVPA integrated catheter and utilized to selectively heat the nanoparticles with simultaneous IVPA temperature monitoring. IVUS/IVPA, therefore, provides a platform for detection and temperature monitoring of atherosclerotic plaques through the selective heating of plasmonic gold nanoparticle contrast agents. PMID:24396514

  1. Concurrent apatinib and local radiation therapy for advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming; Deng, Weiye; Cao, Xiaoci; Shi, Xiaoming; Zhao, Huanfen; Duan, Zheping; Lv, Bonan; Liu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Apatinib is a novel anti-angiogenic agent targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, which is effective in patients with chemotherapy-refractory gastric cancer. There are no reports of concurrent apatinib with local radiation therapy in elderly patients with advanced gastric cancer. Patient concerns and Diagnoses: we present the first published report of a 70-year-old male patient with advanced gastric cancer who received concurrent apatinib and local radiation therapy after failure of oxaliplatin and S-1 chemotherapy. Interventions and Outcomes: The patient received concurrent apatinib and local radiation therapy and was followed up 7 months after therapy without disease progress, 14 months later indicated extensive metastasis and this patient died of pulmonary infection. Lessons: Elderly patients with advanced gastric cancer may benefit from concurrent apatinib with local radiation therapy when chemotherapy is not tolerated or successful. Further studies are needed to investigate the clinical outcomes and toxicities associated with concurrent apatinib and radiation therapy in gastric cancer. PMID:28248891

  2. Radiation therapy for adjunctive treatment of adrenal cortical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Markoe, A.M.; Serber, W.; Micaily, B.; Brady, L.W. )

    1991-04-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare disease which is primarily approached surgically. There have been few reports of the efficacy of radiation therapy and, for the most part, these have been anecdotal. This paper reports on the potential adjuvant role of radiation therapy after surgical excision of primary adrenal cortical carcinoma and also comments about the efficacy of palliative radiation therapy for metastases. We have identified eight patients treated for adrenal cortical carcinomas at Hahnemann University Hospital (HUH) from 1962 until the present and have also identified five patients with the same diagnosis at Philadelphia General Hospital (PGH) from 1962 until its close in 1975. These two groups are examined separately. In the PGH group, in which two patients were diagnosed at autopsy and only one patient was treated by radiation therapy, the median survival was between 0 and 1 month for Stage IV disease with the only patient surviving to 6 months being that patient receiving radiation therapy. In the HUH group, five of eight patients were treated adjunctively after diagnosis, one was not and two received palliative therapy. The median survival for treated Stage III patients was between 34 months and 7 years. The suggestion, based on a limited patient series, is that patients treated postoperatively to the tumor bed and nodal areas in Stage III disease may have improved survival over historic series and improved local control.

  3. Radiation Therapy for Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Kishan, Amar U.; Modjtahedi, Bobeck S.; Morse, Lawrence S.; Lee, Percy

    2013-03-01

    In the enormity of the public health burden imposed by age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), much effort has been directed toward identifying effective and efficient treatments. Currently, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections have demonstrated considerably efficacy in treating neovascular ARMD, but patients require frequent treatment to fully benefit. Here, we review the rationale and evidence for radiation therapy of ARMD. The results of early photon external beam radiation therapy are included to provide a framework for the sequential discussion of evidence for the usage of stereotactic radiation therapy, proton therapy, and brachytherapy. The evidence suggests that these 3 modern modalities can provide a dose-dependent benefit in the treatment of ARMD. Most importantly, preliminary data suggest that all 3 can be used in conjunction with anti-VEGF therapeutics, thereby reducing the frequency of anti-VEGF injections required to maintain visual acuity.

  4. Application of Histogram Analysis in Radiation Therapy (HART) in Intensity Modulation Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyakuryal, Anil

    2009-03-01

    A carcinoma is a malignant cancer that emerges from epithelial cells in structures through out the body.It invades the critical organs, could metastasize or spread to lymph nodes.IMRT is an advanced mode of radiation therapy treatment for cancer. It delivers more conformal doses to malignant tumors sparing the critical organs by modulating the intensity of radiation beam.An automated software, HART (S. Jang et al.,2008,Med Phys 35,p.2812) was used for efficient analysis of dose volume histograms (DVH) for multiple targets and critical organs in four IMRT treatment plans for each patient. IMRT data for ten head and neck cancer patients were exported as AAPM/RTOG format files from a commercial treatment planning system at Northwestern Memorial Hospital (NMH).HART extracted DVH statistics were used to evaluate plan indices and to analyze dose tolerance of critical structures at prescription dose (PD) for each patient. Mean plan indices (n=10) were found to be in good agreement with published results for Linac based plans. The least irradiated volume at tolerance dose (TD50) was observed for brainstem and the highest volume for larynx in SIB treatment techniques. Thus HART, an open source platform, has extensive clinical implications in IMRT treatments.

  5. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... collaboration with the physician. top of page What equipment is used? A medical linear accelerator (LINAC) generates ... more information. top of page Who operates the equipment? The radiation therapist operates the equipment from a ...

  6. Complications following radiation therapy to the head

    SciTech Connect

    Helpin, M.L.; Krejmas, N.L.; Krolls, S.O.

    1986-03-01

    A case is presented in which a child who received therapeutic radiation as part of his treatment regimen for rhabdomyosarcoma of the infratemporal and parapharyngeal region demonstrated undesirable sequelae in the dentition and the mandible.

  7. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF HYPOFRACTIONATED RADIATION THERAPY FOR PROSTATE CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Zaorsky, Nicholas G; Ohri, Nitin; Showalter, Timothy N; Dicker, Adam P; Den, Robert B

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most prevalent solid tumor diagnosed in men in the United States and Western Europe. Conventionally fractionated external beam radiation therapy (1.8-2.0 Gy/fraction) is an established treatment modality for men in all disease risk groups. Emerging evidence from experimental and clinical studies suggests that the α/β ratio for prostate cancer may be as low as 1.5 Gy, which has prompted investigators around the world to explore moderately hypofractionated radiation therapy (2.1-3.5 Gy/fraction). We review the impetus behind moderate hypofractionation and the current clinical evidence supporting moderate hypofractionated radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Although hypofractionated radiation therapy has many theoretical advantages, there is no clear evidence from prospective, randomized, controlled trials showing that hypofractionated schedules have improved outcomes or lower toxicity than conventionally fractionated regimens. Currently, hypofractionated schedules should only be used in the context of clinical trials. High dose rate brachytherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy (fraction size 3.5 Gy and greater) are alternative approaches to hypofractionation, but are beyond the scope of this report. PMID:23453861

  8. Radiation therapy for localized duodenal low-grade follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Arisa; Oguchi, Masahiko; Terui, Yasuhito; Takeuchi, Kengo; Igarashi, Masahiro; Kozuka, Takuyo; Harada, Ken; Uno, Takashi; Hatake, Kiyohiko

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the initial treatment results and toxicities of radiation therapy for patients with early stage low-grade follicular lymphoma (FL) arising from the duodenum. We reviewed 21 consecutive patients with early stage duodenal FL treated with radiation therapy between January 2005 and December 2013 at the Cancer Institute Hospital, Tokyo. The characteristics of patients were: median age 62 years (range, 46–79 years), gender (male, 6; female, 15), clinical stage (I, 20; II1, 1), histological grade (I, 17; II, 4). All patients were treated with radiation therapy alone. The median radiation dose was 30.6 Gy (range, 30.6–39.6) in 17 fractions. The involved-site radiation therapy was delivered to the whole duodenum. The median follow-up time was 43.2 months (range 21.4–109.3). The 3-year overall survival (OS), relapse-free survival (RFS) and local control (LC) rates were 94.7%, 79.3% and 100%, respectively. There were four relapses documented outside the treated volumes: two in the gastrointestinal tract (jejunum, terminal ileum), one in an abdominal lymph node (mesenteric lymph node) and one in the bone marrow. None died of the disease; one death was due to acute myeloid leukemia. No toxicities greater than Grade 1 were observed during treatment and over the follow-up time. The 30.6 Gy of involved-site radiation therapy provided excellent local control with very low toxicities. Radiation therapy could be an effective and safe treatment option for patients with localized low grade FL arising from the duodenum. PMID:27009323

  9. [The impact of radiation therapy on sexual function].

    PubMed

    Leroy, T; Gabelle Flandin, I; Habold, D; Hannoun-Lévi, J-M

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of radiation therapy on sexual life. The analysis was based on a Pubmed literature review. The keywords used for this research were "sexual, radiation, oncology, and cancer". After a brief reminder on the anatomy and physiology, we explained the main complications of radiation oncology and their impact on sexual life. Preventive measures and therapeutic possibilities were discussed. Radiation therapy entails local, systematic and psychological after-effects. For women, vaginal stenosis and dyspareunia represent the most frequent side effects. For men, radiation therapy leads to erectile disorders for 25 to 75% of the patients. These complications have an echo often mattering on the patient quality of life of and on their sexual life post-treatment reconstruction. The knowledge of the indications and the various techniques of irradiation allow reducing its potential sexual morbidity. The information and the education of patients are essential, although often neglected. In conclusion, radiation therapy impacts in variable degrees on the sexual life of the patients. Currently, there are not enough preventive and therapeutic means. Patient information and the early screening of the sexual complications are at stake in the support of patients in the reconstruction of their sexual life.

  10. Extended-field radiation therapy for carcinoma of the cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Podczaski, E.; Stryker, J.A.; Kaminski, P.; Ndubisi, B.; Larson, J.; DeGeest, K.; Sorosky, J.; Mortel, R. )

    1990-07-15

    The survival of cervical carcinoma patients with paraaortic/high common iliac nodal metastases was evaluated by retrospective chart review during a 13-year interval. Thirty-three patients with cervical carcinoma and surgically documented nodal metastases received primary, extended-field radiation therapy. Overall 2-year and 5-year actuarial survival rates after diagnosis were 37% and 31%, respectively. Survival was analyzed in terms of the variables patient age, clinical stage, tumor histologic type, the presence of enlarged paraaortic/high common iliac lymph nodes, the extent of nodal involvement (microscopic versus macroscopic), the presence of intraperitoneal disease, and whether intracavitary brachytherapy was administered. The use of intracavitary radiation therapy was associated with improved local control and survival (P = 0.017). None of the other variables were statistically related to patient survival. Twenty-two of the patients died of cervical cancer and five are surviving without evidence of cancer. Four patients died of intercurrent disease. Two patients developed bowel-related radiation complications; both patients received chemotherapy concurrent with the radiation therapy. One of the two patients died of radiation enteritis. The use of extended-field radiation therapy does benefit a small group of patients and may result in extended patient survival.

  11. Plaque-hyaluronidase-responsive high-density-lipoprotein-mimetic nanoparticles for multistage intimal-macrophage-targeted drug delivery and enhanced anti-atherosclerotic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mengyuan; He, Jianhua; Jiang, Cuiping; Zhang, Wenli; Yang, Yun; Wang, Zhiyu; Liu, Jianping

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence has highlighted the pivotal role that intimal macrophage (iMΦ) plays in the pathophysiology of atherosclerotic plaques, which represents an attractive target for atherosclerosis treatment. In this work, to address the insufficient specificity of conventional reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (rHDL) for iMΦ and its limited cholesterol efflux ability, we designed a hyaluronan (HA)-anchored core–shell rHDL. This nanoparticle achieved efficient iMΦ-targeted drug delivery via a multistage-targeting approach, and excellent cellular cholesterol removal. It contained a biodegradable poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) core within a lipid bilayer, and apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) absorbing on the lipid bilayer was covalently decorated with HA. The covalent HA coating with superior stability and greater shielding was favorable for not only minimizing the liver uptake but also facilitating the accumulation of nanoparticles at leaky endothelium overexpressing CD44 receptors in atherosclerotic plaques. The ultimate iMΦ homing was achieved via apoA-I after HA coating degraded by hyaluronidase (HAase) (abundant in atherosclerotic plaque). The multistage-targeting mechanism was revealed on the established injured endothelium–macrophage co-culture dynamic system. Upon treatment with HAase in vitro, the nanoparticle HA-(C)-PLGA-rHDL exhibited a greater cholesterol efflux capacity compared with conventional rHDL (2.43-fold). Better targeting efficiency toward iMΦ and attenuated liver accumulation were further proved by results from ex vivo imaging and iMΦ-specific fluorescence localization. Ultimately, HA-(C)-PLGA-rHDL loaded with simvastatin realized the most potent anti-atherogenic efficacies in model animals over other preparations. Thus, the HAase-responsive HDL-mimetic nanoparticle was shown in this study to be a promising nanocarrier for anti-atherogenic therapy, in the light of efficient iMΦ-targeted drug delivery and excellent function of

  12. Radiation-induced fibrosis: mechanisms and implications for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Jeffrey M.; New, Jacob; Hamilton, Chase D.; Lominska, Chris; Shnayder, Yelizaveta

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) is a long-term side effect of external beam radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer. It results in a multitude of symptoms that significantly impact quality of life. Understanding the mechanisms of RIF-induced changes is essential to developing effective strategies to prevent long-term disability and discomfort following radiation therapy. In this review, we describe the current understanding of the etiology, clinical presentation, pathogenesis, treatment, and directions of future therapy for this condition. Methods A literature review of publications describing mechanisms or treatments of RIF was performed. Specific databases utilized included PubMed and clinicaltrials.gov, using keywords “Radiation-Induced Fibrosis,” “Radiotherapy Complications,” “Fibrosis Therapy,” and other closely related terms. Results RIF is the result of a misguided wound healing response. In addition to causing direct DNA damage, ionizing radiation generates reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that lead to localized inflammation. This inflammatory process ultimately evolves into a fibrotic one characterized by increased collagen deposition, poor vascularity, and scarring. Tumor growth factor beta serves as the primary mediator in this response along with a host of other cytokines and growth factors. Current therapies have largely been directed toward these molecular targets and their associated signaling pathways. Conclusion Although RIF is widely prevalent among patients undergoing radiation therapy and significantly impacts quality of life, there is still much to learn about its pathogenesis and mechanisms. Current treatments have stemmed from this understanding, and it is anticipated that further elucidation will be essential for the development of more effective therapies. PMID:25910988

  13. 3D treatment planning and intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Purdy, J A

    1999-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) image-based treatment planning and new delivery technologies have spurred the implementation of external beam radiation therapy techniques, in which the high-dose region is conformed much more closely to the target volume than previously possible, thus reducing the volume of normal tissues receiving a high dose. This form of external beam irradiation is referred to as 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT). 3DCRT is not just an add-on to the current radiation oncology process; it represents a radical change in practice, particularly for the radiation oncologist. Defining target volumes and organs at risk in 3D by drawing contours on CT images on a slice-by-slice basis, as opposed to drawing beam portals on a simulator radiograph, can be challenging, because radiation oncologists are generally not well trained in cross-sectional imaging. Currently, the 3DCRT approach will increase the time and effort required by physicians inexperienced with 3D treatment planning. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a more advanced form of 3DCRT, but there is considerable developmental work remaining. The instrumentation and methods used for IMRT quality assurance procedures and testing are not well established. Computer optimization cost functions are too simplistic, and thus time-consuming. Subjective plan evaluation by the radiation oncologist is still the norm. In addition, many fundamental questions regarding IMRT remain unanswered. For example, the radiobiophysical consequences of altered time-dose-fraction are unknown. Also, the fact that there is much greater dose heterogeneity for both the target and normal critical structures with IMRT compared to traditional irradiation techniques challenges current radiation oncology planning principles. However, this new process of planning and treatment delivery shows significant potential for improving the therapeutic ratio. In addition, while inefficient today, these systems, when fully developed

  14. Influence of radiation therapy on oral Candida albicans colonization: a quantitative assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Rossie, K.M.; Taylor, J.; Beck, F.M.; Hodgson, S.E.; Blozis, G.G.

    1987-12-01

    An increase in quantity of oral Candida albicans was documented in patients receiving head and neck radiation therapy during and after therapy, as assessed by an oral-rinse culturing technique. The amount of the increase was greater in denture wearers and directly related to increasing radiation dose and increasing volume of parotid gland included in the radiation portal. A significant number of patients who did not carry C. albicans prior to radiation therapy developed positive cultures by 1 month after radiation therapy. The percentage of patients receiving head and neck radiation therapy who carried C. albicans prior to radiation therapy did not differ significantly from matched dental patient controls.

  15. Radiation with or without Antiandrogen Therapy in Recurrent Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shipley, William U; Seiferheld, Wendy; Lukka, Himanshu R; Major, Pierre P; Heney, Niall M; Grignon, David J; Sartor, Oliver; Patel, Maltibehn P; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Zietman, Anthony L; Pisansky, Thomas M; Zeitzer, Kenneth L; Lawton, Colleen A F; Feng, Felix Y; Lovett, Richard D; Balogh, Alexander G; Souhami, Luis; Rosenthal, Seth A; Kerlin, Kevin J; Dignam, James J; Pugh, Stephanie L; Sandler, Howard M

    2017-02-02

    Background Salvage radiation therapy is often necessary in men who have undergone radical prostatectomy and have evidence of prostate-cancer recurrence signaled by a persistently or recurrently elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. Whether antiandrogen therapy with radiation therapy will further improve cancer control and prolong overall survival is unknown. Methods In a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted from 1998 through 2003, we assigned 760 eligible patients who had undergone prostatectomy with a lymphadenectomy and had disease, as assessed on pathological testing, with a tumor stage of T2 (confined to the prostate but with a positive surgical margin) or T3 (with histologic extension beyond the prostatic capsule), no nodal involvement, and a detectable PSA level of 0.2 to 4.0 ng per milliliter to undergo radiation therapy and receive either antiandrogen therapy (24 months of bicalutamide at a dose of 150 mg daily) or daily placebo tablets during and after radiation therapy. The primary end point was the rate of overall survival. Results The median follow-up among the surviving patients was 13 years. The actuarial rate of overall survival at 12 years was 76.3% in the bicalutamide group, as compared with 71.3% in the placebo group (hazard ratio for death, 0.77; 95% confidence interval, 0.59 to 0.99; P=0.04). The 12-year incidence of death from prostate cancer, as assessed by means of central review, was 5.8% in the bicalutamide group, as compared with 13.4% in the placebo group (P<0.001). The cumulative incidence of metastatic prostate cancer at 12 years was 14.5% in the bicalutamide group, as compared with 23.0% in the placebo group (P=0.005). The incidence of late adverse events associated with radiation therapy was similar in the two groups. Gynecomastia was recorded in 69.7% of the patients in the bicalutamide group, as compared with 10.9% of those in the placebo group (P<0.001). Conclusions The addition of 24 months of antiandrogen

  16. Determinants of job satisfaction among radiation therapy faculty.

    PubMed

    Swafford, Larry G; Legg, Jeffrey S

    2009-01-01

    Job satisfaction is one of the most significant predictors of employee retention in a variety of occupational settings, including health care and education. A national survey of radiation therapy educators (n = 90) has indicated that respondents are not satisfied with their jobs based on data collected using the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ). To predict the factors associated with job satisfaction or dissatisfaction, the authors used a nine-item questionnaire derived from the MSQ. Educators were grouped according to their job satisfaction scores, and multiple discriminant analysis was used to determine which factors were predictive of satisfaction among groups of educators. Statistical results indicate that ability utilization, institutional support, compensation, personnel, and job characteristics were key determinants of job satisfaction among radiation therapy educators. These results may better inform faculty and administration of important factors that can promote job satisfaction and retain faculty in radiation therapy education programs.

  17. Progress and controversies: Radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Martin, Neil E; D'Amico, Anthony V

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy remains a standard treatment option for men with localized prostate cancer. Alone or in combination with androgen-deprivation therapy, it represents a curative treatment and has been shown to prolong survival in selected populations. In this article, the authors review recent advances in prostate radiation-treatment techniques, photon versus proton radiation, modification of treatment fractionation, and brachytherapy-all focusing on disease control and the impact on morbidity. Also discussed are refinements in the risk stratification of men with prostate cancer and how these are better for matching patients to appropriate treatment, particularly around combined androgen-deprivation therapy. Many of these advances have cost and treatment burden implications, which have significant repercussions given the prevalence of prostate cancer. The discussion includes approaches to improve value and future directions for research.

  18. Cone positioning device for oral radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Mahanna, G K; Ivanhoe, J R; Attanasio, R A

    1994-06-01

    This article describes the fabrication and modification of a peroral cone-positioning device. The modification provides added cone stability and prevents tongue intrusion into the radiation field. This device provides a repeatable accurate cone/lesion relationship and the fabrication technique is simplified, accurate, and minimizes patient discomfort.

  19. The physical basis and future of radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bortfeld, T; Jeraj, R

    2011-01-01

    The remarkable progress in radiation therapy over the last century has been largely due to our ability to more effectively focus and deliver radiation to the tumour target volume. Physics discoveries and technology inventions have been an important driving force behind this progress. However, there is still plenty of room left for future improvements through physics, for example image guidance and four-dimensional motion management and particle therapy, as well as increased efficiency of more compact and cheaper technologies. Bigger challenges lie ahead of physicists in radiation therapy beyond the dose localisation problem, for example in the areas of biological target definition, improved modelling for normal tissues and tumours, advanced multicriteria and robust optimisation, and continuous incorporation of advanced technologies such as molecular imaging. The success of physics in radiation therapy has been based on the continued “fuelling” of the field with new discoveries and inventions from physics research. A key to the success has been the application of the rigorous scientific method. In spite of the importance of physics research for radiation therapy, too few physicists are currently involved in cutting-edge research. The increased emphasis on more “professionalism” in medical physics will tip the situation even more off balance. To prevent this from happening, we argue that medical physics needs more research positions, and more and better academic programmes. Only with more emphasis on medical physics research will the future of radiation therapy and other physics-related medical specialties look as bright as the past, and medical physics will maintain a status as one of the most exciting fields of applied physics. PMID:21606068

  20. The physical basis and future of radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Bortfeld, T; Jeraj, R

    2011-06-01

    The remarkable progress in radiation therapy over the last century has been largely due to our ability to more effectively focus and deliver radiation to the tumour target volume. Physics discoveries and technology inventions have been an important driving force behind this progress. However, there is still plenty of room left for future improvements through physics, for example image guidance and four-dimensional motion management and particle therapy, as well as increased efficiency of more compact and cheaper technologies. Bigger challenges lie ahead of physicists in radiation therapy beyond the dose localisation problem, for example in the areas of biological target definition, improved modelling for normal tissues and tumours, advanced multicriteria and robust optimisation, and continuous incorporation of advanced technologies such as molecular imaging. The success of physics in radiation therapy has been based on the continued "fuelling" of the field with new discoveries and inventions from physics research. A key to the success has been the application of the rigorous scientific method. In spite of the importance of physics research for radiation therapy, too few physicists are currently involved in cutting-edge research. The increased emphasis on more "professionalism" in medical physics will tip the situation even more off balance. To prevent this from happening, we argue that medical physics needs more research positions, and more and better academic programmes. Only with more emphasis on medical physics research will the future of radiation therapy and other physics-related medical specialties look as bright as the past, and medical physics will maintain a status as one of the most exciting fields of applied physics.

  1. Complications of head and neck radiation therapy and their management

    SciTech Connect

    Engelmeier, R.L.; King, G.E.

    1983-04-01

    Patients who receive radiation therapy to the head and neck suffer potential complications and undesirable side-effects of this therapy. The extent of undesirable responses is dependent on the source of irradiation, the fields of irradiation, and the dose. The radiotherapist determines these factors by the extent, location, and radiosensitivity of the tumor. The potential undesirable side-effects are xerostomia, mucositis, fibrosis, trismus, dermatitis, photosensitivity, radiation caries, soft tissue necrosis, and osteoradionecrosis. Each of these clinical entities and their proposed management have been discussed.

  2. Endometrial cancer following radiation therapy for cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gallion, H.H.; van Nagell, J.R. Jr.; Donaldson, E.S.; Powell, D.E.

    1987-05-01

    The clinical and histologic features of eight cases of carcinoma of the endometrium which developed following radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix are described. No patient had a well-differentiated tumor and significant myometrial invasion was present in all cases. Three of the eight tumors were papillary serous adenocarcinoma. Five of the eight patients developed recurrent tumor and died of their disease. The risk of endometrial cancer in patients previously radiated for cervical cancer is evaluated.

  3. Synchrotron Radiation Therapy from a Medical Physics point of view

    SciTech Connect

    Prezado, Y.; Berkvens, P.; Braeuer-Krisch, E.; Renier, M.; Bravin, A.; Adam, J. F.; Martinez-Rovira, I.; Fois, G.; Thengumpallil, S.; Edouard, M.; Deman, P.; Vautrin, M.

    2010-07-23

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) therapy is a promising alternative to treat brain tumors, whose management is limited due to the high morbidity of the surrounding healthy tissues. Several approaches are being explored by using SR at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), where three techniques are under development Synchrotron Stereotactic Radiation Therapy (SSRT), Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) and Minibeam Radiation Therapy (MBRT).The sucess of the preclinical studies on SSRT and MRT has paved the way to clinical trials currently in preparation at the ESRF. With this aim, different dosimetric aspects from both theoretical and experimental points of view have been assessed. In particular, the definition of safe irradiation protocols, the beam energy providing the best balance between tumor treatment and healthy tissue sparing in MRT and MBRT, the special dosimetric considerations for small field dosimetry, etc will be described. In addition, for the clinical trials, the definition of appropiate dosimetry protocols for patients according to the well established European Medical Physics recommendations will be discussed. Finally, the state of the art of the MBRT technical developments at the ESRF will be presented. In 2006 A. Dilmanian and collaborators proposed the use of thicker microbeams (0.36-0.68 mm). This new type of radiotherapy is the most recently implemented technique at the ESRF and it has been called MBRT. The main advantage of MBRT with respect to MRT is that it does not require high dose rates. Therefore it can be more easily applied and extended outside synchrotron sources in the future.

  4. Reversible, strokelike migraine attacks in patients with previous radiation therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Bartleson, J. D.; Krecke, Karl N.; O'Neill, Brian P.; Brown, Paul D.

    2003-01-01

    We report 2 adults with a past history of radiation therapy to the head for malignancy (one with primary B-cell lymphoma confined to the skull and the other with multiple hemangioendotheliomas) who developed episodes consistent with migraine with and without aura. In addition to more typical migraine attacks and beginning many years after their radiation therapy, both patients have experienced infrequent, stereotyped, prolonged, reversible neurologic deficits associated with headache, occasional seizures, and striking, transient, cortical gadolinium enhancement of the posterior cerebral gyri on MRI. Interictal MRI brain scans show stable abnormalities consistent with the patients' previous radiation therapy. The neurologic deficits often progressed over a few days, sometimes lasted weeks, and completely resolved. Electroencephalograms did not show epileptiform activity. Thorough investigation showed no residual or recurrent tumor and no recognized cause for the patients' attacks. We postulate a causal relationship between the patients' remote radiation therapy and their prolonged, strokelike migraine attacks. Radiation-induced vascular changes could provoke the episodes, with or without an underlying migraine diathesis. Recognition of this syndrome can help avoid invasive testing. PMID:12672284

  5. Radiation beam therapy evolution: From X-rays to hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Khoroshkov, V. S.

    2006-10-15

    The history of external radiation beam therapy (radiotherapy)-in particular, proton therapy (PT)-is brietly outlined. Two possible strategies in increasing the efficacy of radiotherapy are considered. The radiotherapy methods and techniques are brietly described. The possibilities of PT in providing effective treatment and the main achievements are demonstrated. The state of the art in the PT development involving the active creation of large clinical PT centers since 1990 is analyzed.

  6. Hypofractionated radiation therapy for prostate cancer: biologic and technical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Sanfilippo, Nicholas J; Cooper, Benjamin T

    2014-01-01

    The optimal radiation schedule for the curative treatment of prostate cancer is not known. The dose-response of tumors and normal tissues to fractionated irradiation can be described according to a parameter called the alpha-beta ratio (α/β). In the past several years numerous reports have been published that suggest that the alpha-beta ratio for prostate cancer may be quite low; between 1 and 3. If this hypothesis is true, then a radiation therapy schedule that employs less frequent and larger fractions, termed hypofractionation, may be more efficacious. Multiple randomized trials have been conducted comparing moderate (less than 5 Gy/day) hypofractionated radiation therapy and standard radiation therapy in men with prostate cancer. In the majority of these studies the moderate hypofractionated arm had equivalent efficacy with a similar or improved side effect profile. One area to use caution may be in patients with compromised (IPSS > 12) urinary function at baseline due to an increase in urinary toxicity observed in patients treated with hypofractionated radiation in one study. Extreme hypofractionation (greater than or equal to 5 Gy/day), is currently being compared in a randomized trial. Early prospectively collected data from multiple institutions demonstrates efficacy and toxicity that compares favorably with historical controls. The cost savings from hypofractionation could be profound on a national level and only increases the necessity of testing hypofractionated treatment schedules. Long term data and future trials will help radiation oncologists determine the ideal fractionation scheme based on cost, efficacy, and toxicity. PMID:25606574

  7. Pelvic radiation therapy: Between delight and disaster

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Kirsten AL; Haboubi, Najib Y

    2015-01-01

    In the last few decades radiotherapy was established as one of the best and most widely used treatment modalities for certain tumours. Unfortunately that came with a price. As more people with cancer survive longer an ever increasing number of patients are living with the complications of radiotherapy and have become, in certain cases, difficult to manage. Pelvic radiation disease (PRD) can result from ionising radiation-induced damage to surrounding non-cancerous tissues resulting in disruption of normal physiological functions and symptoms such as diarrhoea, tenesmus, incontinence and rectal bleeding. The burden of PRD-related symptoms, which impact on a patient’s quality of life, has been under appreciated and sub-optimally managed. This article serves to promote awareness of PRD and the vast potential there is to improve current service provision and research activities. PMID:26649150

  8. Phototherapy cabinet for ultraviolet radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, S.N.; Frost, P.

    1981-08-01

    A newly designed cabinet can be used for the treatment of psoriasis with fluorescent ultraviolet (UV) lamps. the new design provides more uniform distribution of UV radiation in both the horizontal and vertical axes, and several safety features have been added. The distribution and uniformity of UV output in this and in a previously described cabinet are compared. The UV output at the vertical center of the older UV light cabinet was six times greater than that at either the top or bottom, while the design of the present cabinet provides uniform UV radiation except for a slight increase at head height and at the level of the lower legs compared with the middle third of the cabinet. The variation in output of the older cabinet may, in part, explain the commonly encountered difficulty in the phototherapy of psoriasis of the scalp and lower extremities.

  9. Cancer of the breast. Radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Mercado, R; Deutsch, M

    1979-01-01

    There are many questions that have to be answered concerning the role of radiotherapy in the management of primary breast cancer. Hopefully, prospective clinical trials will provide some answers, but more basic research into the biology of breast cancer and the host-tumor relationship will be needed. There are indications that radiotherapy alone, or following minimal extirpative surgery in selected cases, may be as effective for control of breast cancer as conventional mastectomies. The role of radiotherapy following segmental mastectomy, with or without axillary dissection, needs to be clarified. The possibility exists that high LET (linear energy transfer) radiation such as neutron or pi meson beams may provide better local control than conventional radiation. Thus, it may be possible to treat effectively all primary breast cancers with such radiations and obviate the need for any type of mastectomy. It remains to be demonstrated whether adjuvant chemotherapy is as effective as radiotherapy in preventing chest wall and regional node recurrences. If it is not, there may be a place for both adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of operable cancer of the breast. Likewise, effective chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy may increase the local and regional control achieved with radiotherapy alone and make more primary lesions suitable for treatment without mastectomy. Meyer (1970) recently called attention to the leukopenia and cellualr immune deficiency produced by irradiation to the thorax and mediastinum. Further study is necessary to define exactly how much immunosuppression results from radiotherapy, its clinical significance and what can be done to avoid or counter it. If Stjervsward's thesis (1974) concerning the deleterious effects of radiotherapy on survival is correct, then it is of great importance to identify those patients most likely to be adversely affected by radiotherapy. Conversely, it may be possible in the future to identify a

  10. Pediatric urological complications with intraoperative radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchey, M.L.; Gunderson, L.L.; Smithson, W.A.; Kelalis, P.P.; Kaufman, B.H.; Telander, R.L.; Evans, R.G.; Kramer, S.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy with variable energy electrons has been used as a supplemental boost to treat 6 children with locally advanced retroperitoneal malignancies. Of the patients 4 had treatment-related injuries to portions of the urinary tract within the intraoperative and external radiation fields. Three patients had significant renal impairment requiring surgical correction. The pathogenesis and management of treatment-induced injury to the urinary tract are discussed.

  11. Novel Silicon Devices for Radiation Therapy Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzzi, Mara

    2016-02-01

    Modern radiotherapy techniques pose specific constraints in radiation-monitoring and dosimetry due to the occurrence of small radiation fields with high dose gradients, variation in space and time of the dose rate, variation in space and time of the beam energy spectrum. Novel devices coping with these strict conditions are needed. This paper reviews the most advanced technologies developed with silicon-based materials for clinical radiotherapy. Novel Si diodes as Pt-doped Si, epitaxial Si as well as thin devices have optimized performance, their response being independent of the accumulated dose, thus ensuring radiation tolerance and no need of recalibration. Monolithic devices based on segmented Si detectors can be easily tailored to optimize spatial resolution in the large active areas required in clinical radiotherapy. In particular, a monolithic device based on epitaxial p-type silicon, characterized by high spatial resolution and ability to directly measure temporal variations in dose modulation proved to be best viable solution for pre-treatment verifications in IMRT fields.

  12. Phenytoin Induced Erythema Multiforme after Cranial Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tekkök, İsmail Hakkı

    2015-01-01

    The prophylactic use of phenytoin during and after brain surgery and cranial irradiation is a common measure in brain tumor therapy. Phenytoin has been associated with variety of adverse skin reactions including urticaria, erythroderma, erythema multiforme (EM), Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis. EM associated with phenytoin and cranial radiation therapy (EMPACT) is a rare specific entity among patients with brain tumors receiving radiation therapy while on prophylactic anti-convulsive therapy. Herein we report a 41-year-old female patient with left temporal glial tumor who underwent surgery and then received whole brain radiation therapy and chemotherapy. After 24 days of continous prophylactic phenytoin therapy the patient developed minor skin reactions and 2 days later the patient returned with generalized erythamatous and itchy maculopapuler rash involving neck, chest, face, trunk, extremities. There was significant periorbital and perioral edema. Painful mucosal lesions consisting of oral and platal erosions also occurred and prevented oral intake significantly. Phenytoin was discontinued gradually. Systemic admistration of corticosteroids combined with topical usage of steroids for oral lesions resulted in complete resolution of eruptions in 3 weeks. All cutaneous lesions in patients with phenytoin usage with the radiotherapy must be evoluated with suspicion for EM. PMID:26361537

  13. Prostate angiosarcoma: is there any association with previous radiation therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Khaliq, Waseem; Meyer, Christian F.; Uzoaru, Ikechukwu; Wolf, Richard M.; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.

    2013-01-01

    For the current review a literature search was carried out using Pubmed, EmBase, and Cochrane databases. All cases of prostate angioscaroma reported to date and observational studies evaluating the radiation associated cancer occurrence were reviewed. Despite the rarity, prostate angiosarcomas display remarkable clinical and pathological heterogeneity, and a treatment challenge. We found the association of prostate angiosarcoma with radiation therapy to be weak based upon the results from observational studies and case reports. Although radiation exposure has been suggested etiology of prostate angiosarcomas, assumption of such association is not supported by the current literature. PMID:22583810

  14. The Application of FLUKA to Dosimetry and Radiation Therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Andersen, Victor; Pinsky, Lawrence; Ferrari, Alfredo; Battistoni, Giusenni

    2005-01-01

    Monte Carlo transport codes like FLUKA are useful for many purposes, and one of those is the simulation of the effects of radiation traversing the human body. In particular, radiation has been used in cancer therapy for a long time, and recently this has been extended to include heavy ion particle beams. The advent of this particular type of therapy has led to the need for increased capabilities in the transport codes used to simulate the detailed nature of the treatment doses to the Y O U S tissues that are encountered. This capability is also of interest to NASA because of the nature of the radiation environment in space.[l] While in space, the crew members bodies are continually being traversed by virtually all forms of radiation. In assessing the risk that this exposure causes, heavy ions are of primary importance. These arise both from the primary external space radiation itself, as well as fragments that result from interactions during the traversal of that radiation through any intervening material including intervening body tissue itself. Thus the capability to characterize the details of the radiation field accurately within a human body subjected to such external 'beams" is of critical importance.

  15. [Intensity-modulated radiation therapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy for head and neck tumors: evidence-based medicine].

    PubMed

    Lapierre, A; Martin, F; Lapeyre, M

    2014-10-01

    Over the last decade, there have been many technical advances in radiation therapy, such as the spread of intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy, and the rise of stereotactic body radiation therapy. By allowing better dose-to-target conformation and thus better organs at risk-sparing, these techniques seem very promising, particularly in the field of head and neck tumors. The present work aims at analyzing the level of evidence and recommendation supporting the use of high-technology radiotherapy in head and neck neoplasms, by reviewing the available literature.

  16. Radiation plus chemotherapy as adjuvant therapy for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2002-04-01

    The most common neo-adjuvant therapy for rectal cancer is chemotherapy and concurrent radiation therapy. In general, it is delivered pre-operatively for patients with clinical evidence of T(3-4) disease or post-operatively in patients who have undergone surgery and have T(3) and/or N(1-2) disease. This chapter reviews the rationale and results for neo-adjuvant therapy, the selection process for pre-operative versus post-operative treatment, and new approaches and controversies.

  17. QA in Radiation Therapy: The RPC Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibbott, G. S.

    2010-11-01

    The Radiological Physics Center (RPC) is charged with assuring the consistent delivery of radiation doses to patients on NCI-sponsored clinical trials. To accomplish this, the RPC conducts annual mailed audits of machine calibration, dosimetry audit visits to institutions, reviews of treatment records, and credentialing procedures requiring the irradiation of anthropomorphic phantoms. Through these measurements, the RPC has gained an understanding of the level of quality assurance practiced in this cohort of institutions, and a database of measurements of beam characteristics of a large number of treatment machines. The results of irradiations of phantoms have yielded insight into the delivery of advanced technology treatment procedures.

  18. Factors influencing radiation therapy student clinical placement satisfaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bridge, Pete; Carmichael, Mary-Ann

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Radiation therapy students at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) attend clinical placements at five different clinical departments with varying resources and support strategies. This study aimed to determine the relative availability and perceived importance of different factors affecting student support while on clinical placement. The purpose of the research was to inform development of future support mechanisms to enhance radiation therapy students’ experience on clinical placement. Methods: This study used anonymous Likert-style surveys to gather data from years 1 and 2 radiation therapy students from QUT and clinical educators from Queensland relating to availability and importance of support mechanisms during clinical placements in a semester. Results: The study findings demonstrated student satisfaction with clinical support and suggested that level of support on placement influenced student employment choices. Staff support was perceived as more important than physical resources; particularly access to a named mentor, a clinical educator and weekly formative feedback. Both students and educators highlighted the impact of time pressures. Conclusions: The support offered to radiation therapy students by clinical staff is more highly valued than physical resources or models of placement support. Protected time and acknowledgement of the importance of clinical education roles are both invaluable. Joint investment in mentor support by both universities and clinical departments is crucial for facilitation of effective clinical learning.

  19. Radiation and the Microenvironment - Tumorigenesis andTherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Park, Catherine; Wright, Eric G.

    2005-10-01

    Radiation rapidly and persistently alters the soluble and insoluble components of the tissue microenvironment. This affects the cell phenotype, tissue composition and the physical interactions and signaling between cells. These alterations in the microenvironment can contribute to carcinogenesis and alter the tissue response to anticancer therapy. Examples of these responses and their implications are discussed with a view to therapeutic intervention.

  20. Radiation therapy in the management of patients with mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, W. Jr.; Antman, K.H.; Greenberger, J.S.; Weichselbaum, R.R.; Chaffey, J.T.

    1982-01-01

    The results of radiation therapy in the management of 27 patients with malignant mesothelioma were reviewed. Eight patients were treated with a curative intent combining attempted surgical excision of tumor (thoracic in 6 and peritoneal in 2), aggressive radiation therapy, and combination chemotherapy using an adriamycin-containing regimen. One patient achieved a 2-year disease-free inteval followed by recurrence of tumor above the thoracic irradiation field. This patient was retreated with localized irradiation and is disease-free after 5 years of initial diagnosis. One patient has persistent abdominal disease at 18 months; the other 6 patients suffered local recurrence within 8-13 months of initiation of treatment. Radiation therapy was used in 19 other patients who received 29 courses for palliation of dyspnea, superior vena cava syndrome, dysphagia, or neurological symptoms of brain metastasis. A palliation index was used to determine the effectiveness of irradiation and revealed that relief of symptoms was complete or substantial in 5 treatment courses, moderately effective in 6 courses and inadequate in 18 treatment courses. Adequate palliation strongly correlated with a dose at or above 4,000 rad in 4 weeks. The management of patients with mesothelioma requires new and innovative approaches to increase the effectiveness of radiation therapy and minimize the significant potential combined toxicity of pulmonary irradiation and adriamycin.

  1. BRCA1 Mutation: A Predictive Marker for Radiation Therapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, Charlene; Zhang, Junran

    2015-10-01

    DNA repair, in particular, DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, is essential for the survival of both normal and cancer cells. An elaborate repair mechanism has been developed in cells to efficiently repair the damaged DNA. The pathways predominately involved in DSB repair are homologous recombination and classic nonhomologous end-joining, although the alternative NHEJ pathway, a third DSB repair pathway, could also be important in certain contexts. The protein of BRCA1 encoded by the tumor suppressor gene BRCA1 regulates all DSB repair pathways. Given that DSBs represent the most biologically significant lesions induced by ionizing radiation and that impaired DSB repair leads to radiation sensitivity, it has been expected that cancer patients with BRCA1 mutations should benefit from radiation therapy. However, the clinical data have been conflicting and inconclusive. We provide an overview about the current status of the data regarding BRCA1 deficiency and radiation therapy sensitivity in both experimental models and clinical investigations. In addition, we discuss a strategy to potentiate the effects of radiation therapy by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors, the pharmacologic drugs being investigated as monotherapy for the treatment of patients with BRCA1/2 mutations.

  2. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Patients With Lung Cancer Previously Treated With Thoracic Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Patrick; Balter, Peter A.; Rebueno, Neal; Sharp, Hadley J.; Liao Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides excellent local control with acceptable toxicity for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. However, the efficacy and safety of SBRT for patients previously given thoracic radiation therapy is not known. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed outcomes after SBRT for recurrent disease among patients previously given radiation therapy to the chest. Materials and Methods: A search of medical records for patients treated with SBRT to the thorax after prior fractionated radiation therapy to the chest at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center revealed 36 such cases. The median follow-up time after SBRT was 15 months. The endpoints analyzed were overall survival, local control, and the incidence and severity of treatment-related toxicity. Results: SBRT provided in-field local control for 92% of patients; at 2 years, the actuarial overall survival rate was 59%, and the actuarial progression-free survival rate was 26%, with the primary site of failure being intrathoracic relapse. Fifty percent of patients experienced worsening of dyspnea after SBRT, with 19% requiring oxygen supplementation; 30% of patients experienced chest wall pain and 8% Grade 3 esophagitis. No Grade 4 or 5 toxic effects were noted. Conclusions: SBRT can provide excellent in-field tumor control in patients who have received prior radiation therapy. Toxicity was significant but manageable. The high rate of intrathoracic failure indicates the need for further study to identify patients who would derive the most benefit from SBRT for this purpose.

  3. Gastrointestinal Toxicities With Combined Antiangiogenic and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pollom, Erqi L.; Deng, Lei; Pai, Reetesh K.; Brown, J. Martin; Giaccia, Amato; Loo, Billy W.; Shultz, David B.; Le, Quynh Thu; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2015-07-01

    Combining the latest targeted biologic agents with the most advanced radiation technologies has been an exciting development in the treatment of cancer patients. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is an ablative radiation approach that has become established for the treatment of a variety of malignancies, and it has been increasingly used in combination with biologic agents, including those targeting angiogenesis-specific pathways. Multiple reports have emerged describing unanticipated toxicities arising from the combination of SBRT and angiogenesis-targeting agents, particularly of late luminal gastrointestinal toxicities. In this review, we summarize the literature describing these toxicities, explore the biological mechanism of action of toxicity with the combined use of antiangiogenic therapies, and discuss areas of future research, so that this combination of treatment modalities can continue to be used in broader clinical contexts.

  4. Research Findings on Radiation Hormesis and Radon Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Sadao

    1999-06-06

    Radiation hormesis research in Japan to determine the validity of Luckey's claims has revealed information on the health effects of low-level radiation. The scientific data of animal tests we obtained and successful results actually brought by radon therapy on human patients show us a clearer understanding of the health effects of low-level radiation. We obtained many animal test results and epidemiological survey data through our research activities cooperating with more than ten universities in Japan, categorized as follows: 1. suppression of cancer by enhancement of the immune system based on gene activation; 2. rejuvenation and suppression of aging by increasing cell membrane permeability and enzyme syntheses; 3. adaptive response by activation of gene expression on DNA repair and cell apoptosis; 4. pain relief and stress moderation by hormone formation in the brain and central nervous system; 5. avoidance and therapy of obstinate diseases by enhancing damage control systems and form one formation.

  5. [Stereotactic body radiation therapy for spinal metastases].

    PubMed

    Pasquier, D; Martinage, G; Mirabel, X; Lacornerie, T; Makhloufi, S; Faivre, J-C; Thureau, S; Lartigau, É

    2016-10-01

    After the liver and lungs, bones are the third most common sites of cancer metastasis. Palliative radiotherapy for secondary bone tumours helps relieve pain, improve the quality of life and reduce the risk of fractures. Stereotactic body radiotherapy can deliver high radiation doses with very tight margins, which has significant advantages when treating tumours close to the spinal cord. Strict quality control is essential as dose gradient at the edge of the spinal cord is important. Optimal schedule is not defined. A range of dose-fractionation schedules have been used. Pain relief and local control are seen in over 80%. Toxicity rates are low, although vertebral fracture may occur. Ongoing prospective studies will help clarify its role in the management of oligometastatic patients.

  6. Radiation protection at Hadron therapy facilities.

    PubMed

    Pelliccioni, Maorizio

    2011-07-01

    The Italian National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy is currently under construction in Pavia. It is designed for the treatment of deep-seated tumours (up to a depth of 27 cm of water equivalent) with proton and C-ion beams as well as for both clinical and radiobiological research. The particles will be accelerated by a 7-MeV u(-1) LINAC injector and a 400-MeV u(-1) synchrotron. In the first phase of the project, three treatment rooms will be in operation, equipped with four fixed beams, three horizontal and one vertical. The accelerators are currently undergoing commissioning. The main radiation protection problems encountered (shielding, activation, etc.) are hereby illustrated and discussed in relation to the constraints set by the Italian national authorities.

  7. Radiation Therapy for Liver Tumors: Ready for Inclusion in Guidelines?

    PubMed Central

    Tanguturi, Shyam K.; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Zhu, Andrew X.; Dawson, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the historically limited role of radiotherapy in the management of primary hepatic malignancies, modern advances in treatment design and delivery have renewed enthusiasm for radiation as a potentially curative treatment modality. Surgical resection and/or liver transplantation are traditionally regarded as the most effective forms of therapy, although the majority of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma present with locally advanced or unresectable disease on the basis of local vascular invasion or inadequate baseline hepatobiliary function. In this context, many efforts have focused on nonoperative treatment approaches including novel systemic therapies, transarterial chemoembolization, ethanol ablation, radiofrequency ablation, and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). This review aims to summarize modern advances in radiotherapy, particularly SBRT, in the treatment of primary hepatic malignancies. PMID:25001265

  8. Thyroid cancer radioiodine therapy: health service performance and radiation safety.

    PubMed

    Vogiatzi, S; Liossis, A; Lamprinakou, M

    2015-07-01

    Greek Atomic Energy Commission collected data related to radioiodine I-131 therapy (RAIT) delivery to differentiated thyroid carcinoma patients, for the period 2003-13, corresponding to 100 % of hospitals at national level. Radiation safety and health service performance outcome indicators were assessed. The numbers of hospitals and nuclear medicine (NM) therapy wards, as well as RAIT annual frequencies, have increased. Geographical inhomogeneous distribution of existing infrastructure is recorded. In some cases, the observed inefficient use of NM therapy wards seems to be due to lack of human resources (e.g. nurses). Regular assessment of appropriate key indicators could serve as a useful tool for radiation safety monitoring and health service performance improvement.

  9. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Kamran A.; Stauder, Michael C.; Miller, Robert C.; Bauer, Heather J.; Rose, Peter S.; Olivier, Kenneth R.; Brown, Paul D.; Brinkmann, Debra H.; Laack, Nadia N.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Based on reports of safety and efficacy, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for treatment of malignant spinal tumors was initiated at our institution. We report prospective results of this population at Mayo Clinic. Materials and Methods: Between April 2008 and December 2010, 85 lesions in 66 patients were treated with SBRT for spinal metastases. Twenty-two lesions (25.8%) were treated for recurrence after prior radiotherapy (RT). The mean age of patients was 56.8 {+-} 13.4 years. Patients were treated to a median dose of 24 Gy (range, 10-40 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). Radiation was delivered with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and prescribed to cover 80% of the planning target volume (PTV) with organs at risk such as the spinal cord taking priority over PTV coverage. Results: Tumor sites included 48, 22, 12, and 3 in the thoracic, lumbar, cervical, and sacral spine, respectively. The mean actuarial survival at 12 months was 52.2%. A total of 7 patients had both local and marginal failure, 1 patient experienced marginal but not local failure, and 1 patient had local failure only. Actuarial local control at 1 year was 83.3% and 91.2% in patients with and without prior RT. The median dose delivered to patients who experienced local/marginal failure was 24 Gy (range, 18-30 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). No cases of Grade 4 toxicity were reported. In 1 of 2 patients experiencing Grade 3 toxicity, SBRT was given after previous radiation. Conclusion: The results indicate SBRT to be an effective measure to achieve local control in spinal metastases. Toxicity of treatment was rare, including those previously irradiated. Our results appear comparable to previous reports analyzing spine SBRT. Further research is needed to determine optimum dose and fractionation to further improve local control and prevent toxicity.

  10. Some computer graphical user interfaces in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Chow, James C L

    2016-03-28

    In this review, five graphical user interfaces (GUIs) used in radiation therapy practices and researches are introduced. They are: (1) the treatment time calculator, superficial X-ray treatment time calculator (SUPCALC) used in the superficial X-ray radiation therapy; (2) the monitor unit calculator, electron monitor unit calculator (EMUC) used in the electron radiation therapy; (3) the multileaf collimator machine file creator, sliding window intensity modulated radiotherapy (SWIMRT) used in generating fluence map for research and quality assurance in intensity modulated radiation therapy; (4) the treatment planning system, DOSCTP used in the calculation of 3D dose distribution using Monte Carlo simulation; and (5) the monitor unit calculator, photon beam monitor unit calculator (PMUC) used in photon beam radiation therapy. One common issue of these GUIs is that all user-friendly interfaces are linked to complex formulas and algorithms based on various theories, which do not have to be understood and noted by the user. In that case, user only needs to input the required information with help from graphical elements in order to produce desired results. SUPCALC is a superficial radiation treatment time calculator using the GUI technique to provide a convenient way for radiation therapist to calculate the treatment time, and keep a record for the skin cancer patient. EMUC is an electron monitor unit calculator for electron radiation therapy. Instead of doing hand calculation according to pre-determined dosimetric tables, clinical user needs only to input the required drawing of electron field in computer graphical file format, prescription dose, and beam parameters to EMUC to calculate the required monitor unit for the electron beam treatment. EMUC is based on a semi-experimental theory of sector-integration algorithm. SWIMRT is a multileaf collimator machine file creator to generate a fluence map produced by a medical linear accelerator. This machine file controls

  11. Some computer graphical user interfaces in radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chow, James C L

    2016-01-01

    In this review, five graphical user interfaces (GUIs) used in radiation therapy practices and researches are introduced. They are: (1) the treatment time calculator, superficial X-ray treatment time calculator (SUPCALC) used in the superficial X-ray radiation therapy; (2) the monitor unit calculator, electron monitor unit calculator (EMUC) used in the electron radiation therapy; (3) the multileaf collimator machine file creator, sliding window intensity modulated radiotherapy (SWIMRT) used in generating fluence map for research and quality assurance in intensity modulated radiation therapy; (4) the treatment planning system, DOSCTP used in the calculation of 3D dose distribution using Monte Carlo simulation; and (5) the monitor unit calculator, photon beam monitor unit calculator (PMUC) used in photon beam radiation therapy. One common issue of these GUIs is that all user-friendly interfaces are linked to complex formulas and algorithms based on various theories, which do not have to be understood and noted by the user. In that case, user only needs to input the required information with help from graphical elements in order to produce desired results. SUPCALC is a superficial radiation treatment time calculator using the GUI technique to provide a convenient way for radiation therapist to calculate the treatment time, and keep a record for the skin cancer patient. EMUC is an electron monitor unit calculator for electron radiation therapy. Instead of doing hand calculation according to pre-determined dosimetric tables, clinical user needs only to input the required drawing of electron field in computer graphical file format, prescription dose, and beam parameters to EMUC to calculate the required monitor unit for the electron beam treatment. EMUC is based on a semi-experimental theory of sector-integration algorithm. SWIMRT is a multileaf collimator machine file creator to generate a fluence map produced by a medical linear accelerator. This machine file controls

  12. Cytokines in therapy of radiation injury

    SciTech Connect

    Neta, R.; Oppenheim, J.J.

    1988-09-01

    Repeated injections or infusion of hematopoietic growth factors, such as interleukin-3 (IL-3), granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), or granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), accelerate restoration of hematopoiesis in animals compromised by sublethal doses of cytotoxic drugs or irradiation. Previous work by the investigators has shown that IL-1 induced circulating CSF in normal mice and, when used after sublethal irradiation, accelerated the recovery of endogenous splenic colonies. Therefore, IL-1, as well as IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), G-CSF, and GM-CSF, were evaluated as potential therapeutic agents in irradiated C3H-HeN mice. A single intraperitoneal injection, administered within three hours after a lethal dose (LD)95/30 of irradiation that would kill 95% of mice within 30 days, protected in a dose-dependent manner up to 100% of mice from radiation-induced death due to hematopoietic syndrome. Significant therapeutic effects were also achieved with a single dose of IFN-gamma or of TNF. In contrast, GM-CSF and G-CSF, administered shortly after irradiation, had no effect in the doses used on mice survival.

  13. Scope of nanotechnology-based radiation therapy and thermotherapy methods in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Bakht, Mohamadreza K; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Pourbaghi-Masouleh, Milad; Tenreiro, Claudio

    2012-10-01

    The main aim of nanomedicine is to revolutionize the health care system and find effective approaches to fighting fatal diseases. Therapeutic beams, which are employed in radiation therapy, do not discriminate between normal and cancerous cells and must rely on targeting the radiation beams to specific cells. Interestingly, the application of nanoscale particles in radiation therapy has aimed to improve outcomes in radiation therapy by increasing toxicity in tumors and reducing it in normal tissues. This review focuses on approaches to nanotechnology-based cancer radiation therapy methods such as radionuclide therapy, photodynamic therapy, and neutron capture therapy. Moreover, we have investigated nanotechnology-based thermotherapy methods, including hyperthermia and thermoablation, as non-ionizing modalities of treatment using thermal radiation. The results strongly demonstrate that nanotechnology-based cancer radiation therapy and thermotherapy methods hold substantial potential to improve the efficacy of anticancer radiation and thermotherapy modalities.

  14. Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kyrgias, George; Hajiioannou, Jiannis; Tolia, Maria; Kouloulias, Vassilios; Lachanas, Vasileios; Skoulakis, Charalambos; Skarlatos, Ioannis; Rapidis, Alexandros; Bizakis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Multimodality therapy constitutes the standard treatment of advanced and recurrent head and neck cancer. Since locoregional recurrence comprises a major obstacle in attaining cure, the role of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) as an add-on in improving survival and local control of the disease has been investigated. IORT allows delivery of a single tumoricidal dose of radiation to areas of potential residual microscopic disease while minimizing doses to normal tissues. Advantages of IORT include the conformal delivery of a large dose of radiation in an exposed and precisely defined tumor bed, minimizing the risk of a geographic miss creating the potential for subsequent dose reduction of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). This strategy allows for shortening overall treatment time and dose escalation. The aim of this review is to summarize recent published work on the use of IORT as an adjuvant modality to treat common head and neck cancer in the primary or recurrent setting. Methods: We searched the Medline, Scopus, Ovid, Cochrane, Embase, and ISI Web of Science databases for articles published from 1980 up to March 2016. Results: Based on relevant publications it appears that including IORT in the multimodal treatment may contribute to improved local control. However, the benefit in overall survival is not so clear. Conclusion: IORT seems to be a safe, promising adjunct in the management of head and neck cancer and yet further well organized clinical trials are required to determine its role more precisely. PMID:27977569

  15. Radiation therapy for advanced gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukiyama, I.; Akine, Y.; Kajiura, Y.; Ogino, T.; Yamashita, K.; Egawa, S.; Hijikata, J.; Kitagawa, T.

    1988-07-01

    A retrospective study of 75 patients with advanced inoperable gastric cancers, referred to the National Cancer Center Hospital between 1962 and 1982, was performed. According to the Borrmann classification based on X ray findings, Type 1 was found in 3 patients, Type 2 in 5, Type 3 in 40, and Type 4 in 15. Twelve patients could not be classified. The histological type was papillary adenocarcinoma in 7 patients, tubular adenocarcinoma in 23, mucinous carcinoma in 6, poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in 14, signet ring cell carcinoma in 12 and others in 13. The site of remote metastasis in 19 patients was Virchow's lymph node in 8 patients, Douglas pouch in 3, liver and lung in 2 each and others in 4. All patients were treated by a either telecobalt 60 unit or a linear accelerator using 6 Mv photon and the total dose to primary lesion was 4000 cGy in 5 weeks to 7000 cGy in 8-9 weeks. Complete response (CR) was achieved in 6 patients or 8.0%, partial response (PR) in 46 or 61.3%, and no change (NC) in 23 or 30.7%. The response rate based on the sum of CR and PR was about 70%. The 50% survival period in months was 26.5, 7.3, and 3.2, respectively for patients with CR, PR, and NC. For the response of advanced gastric cancer to chemotherapy in the National Cancer Center Hospital, the combined use of UFT and Mitomycin C gave the highest rate, 46%. As for as local response is concerned, the response rate to radiation was 70%, a better result than that of chemotherapy alone.

  16. Radiation therapy: state of the art and the future.

    PubMed

    Ikushima, Hitoshi

    2010-02-01

    Technical innovation in radiation therapy (RT) such as stereotactic irradiation, intensity modulated RT, image-guided RT, and brachytherapy using remote controlled after-loading system have made it possible to deliver ideally distributed radiation dose to the target with great accuracy, while sparing the adjacent organs at risk. As a result, tumor control rate by RT improved markedly and became excellent alternative to surgery for asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic brain tumors, early stage lung cancer, and low-risk prostate cancer. In locally advanced stage of cancer, randomized controlled trials established the chemoradiation therapy as a standard treatment option for patients with head and neck cancer, lung cancer, esophageal cancer, and cervical cancer. RT is also a valuable treatment for palliation of local symptoms caused by cancer with consistently high response rates. Minimally invasive therapy has come to be emphasized its needs in the background of increased tendency of elderly patients with cancer, and advances in conformal dose delivery technique raise the RT at a more important position in cancer therapy. However, adequate number of RT profession is indispensable to utilize highly-sophisticated RT technology. Substantiality of an education system for radiation oncologist, RT technologist, and medical physicists is our current most important issue.

  17. The Advantage of Cyclosporine A and Methotrexate Rotational Therapy in Long-Term Systemic Treatment for Chronic Plaque Psoriasis in a Real World Practice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chong Won; Kim, Bo Ri; Ohn, Jungyoon

    2017-01-01

    Background Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease. In the treatment of psoriasis, cyclosporine is commonly prescribed systemic agents. However, long-term use of cyclosporine is not recommended because of side effects such as nephrotoxicity or hypertension. Objective To ascertain the improved safety of rotational therapy using cyclosporine and methotrexate, we investigated the frequency of abnormal results in laboratory test after long term rotational therapy using cyclosporine and methotrexate. Methods From January 2009 to June 2014, patients who were treated with cyclosporine or methotrexate were enrolled. The clinical data and usage of medications were reviewed. Laboratory tests were conducted before starting the treatment and regularly follow-up. The occurrences of any laboratory abnormalities during the treatments were investigated. Results A total of 21 psoriatic patients were enrolled. The mean of medication period and cumulative dose of cyclosporine and methotrexate were 497.81±512.06 days and 115.68±184.34 g in cyclosporine and 264.19±264.71 days and 448.71±448.63 mg in methotrexate. Laboratory abnormalities were found in total two patients after rotational therapy: two patients (9.5%) in aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase and one patient (4.8%) in uric acid. No laboratory abnormalities were found in renal function test. Conclusion We found that the rotational approaches using cyclosporine and methotrexate reduced the possibility of the development of nephrotoxicity. In addition to other advantage such as quick switching from one agent to another, the rotational therapy using cyclosporine and methotrexate can minimize the adverse events during the systemic treatment of chronic plaque psoriasis. PMID:28223747

  18. Hepatocellular Carcinoma Radiation Therapy: Review of Evidence and Future Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Jonathan

    2013-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a leading cause of global cancer death. Curative therapy is not an option for most patients, often because of underlying liver disease. Experience in radiation therapy (RT) for HCC is rapidly increasing. Conformal RT can deliver tumoricidal doses to focal HCC with low rates of toxicity and sustained local control in HCC unsuitable for other locoregional treatments. Stereotactic body RT and particle therapy have been used with long-term control in early HCC or as a bridge to liver transplant. RT has also been effective in treating HCC with portal venous thrombosis. Patients with impaired liver function and extensive disease are at increased risk of toxicity and recurrence. More research on how to combine RT with other standard and novel therapies is warranted. Randomized trials are also needed before RT will be generally accepted as a treatment option for HCC. This review discusses the current state of the literature and opportunities for future research.

  19. Endobronchial radiation therapy (EBRT) in the management of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, M. III; Leidholdt, E.M. Jr.; Tatera, B.S.; Joseph, J. )

    1990-06-01

    Between October 1987 and November 1988, 19 endobronchial Iridium-192 line source placements were attempted in 17 patients with advanced incurable lung cancer. Approximately 30 Gy was delivered to the endobronchus using a low dose rate (LDR) afterloading technique delivering a mean dose of 70 cGy/hr at 5 mm. Improvement in subjective symptoms was noted in 67% of evaluable patients whereas objective responses defined by chest X ray and bronchoscopy were noted in 26% and 60%, respectively. No significant morbidity was observed. The radiation exposure to health care workers was low ranging from 10 to 40 mRem per treatment course with most of the staff receiving less than 10 mRem per treatment course (minimal detectable level 10 mRem). The results of this series are compared with selected series using low dose rate as well as intermediate dose rate (IDR) and high dose rate (HDR) endobronchial radiation therapy (EBRT). Based on bronchoscopic responses from the selected series reviewed, both HDR low total dose per treatment (range 7.5-10 Gy) and LDR high total dose per treatment (range 30-50 Gy) are effective in palliating the vast majority of patients with endobronchial lesions. Intermediate dose rate is also effective using fractions similar to high dose rate but total dose similar to low dose rate. The efficacy of endobronchial radiation therapy in the palliative setting suggest a possible role for endobronchial radiation therapy combined with external beam irradiation with or without chemotherapy in the initial management of localized lung cancer. Defining the optimal total dose, dose rate, and the exact role of endobronchial radiation therapy in the management of lung cancer will require large cooperative trials with standardization of techniques and definitions.

  20. The microbial community shifts of subgingival plaque in patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis following non-surgical periodontal therapy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Wang, Peng; Ge, Shaohua

    2017-02-07

    The object of this study is to characterize the bacterial community of subgingival plaque of two subjects with generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP) pre- and post-treatment. We picked two patients with GAgP and used high-throughput 16S rDNA sequencing. V4 hypervariable region was picked for PCR amplification of subgingival samples. Then, the PCR products were sequenced through Illumina MiSeq platform. One month after therapy, both the clinical features and periodontal parameters improved obviously. Moreover, the composition and structure of subgingival bacterial community changed after initial periodontal therapy. Also, the composition of the subgingival microbiota was highly individualized among different patients. Bacteroidetes, Spirochaetes and Fusobacteria were related to pathogenicity of GAgP while Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria seemed associated with clinical symptoms resolution. In this study, we found the subgingival bacterial community was high in species richness but dominated by a few species or phylotypes, with significant shifts of microbiota that occurred after treatment. This study demonstrated the shift of the subgingival bacterial community before and after treatment by high-throughput 16S rDNA sequencing, and provided a concise method for analysis of microbial community for periodontal diseases.

  1. Gold nanoparticles and their alternatives for radiation therapy enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Daniel R.; Bekah, Devesh; Nadeau, Jay L.

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy is one of the most commonly used treatments for cancer. The dose of delivered ionizing radiation can be amplified by the presence of high-Z materials via an enhancement of the photoelectric effect; the most widely studied material is gold (atomic number 79). However, a large amount is needed to obtain a significant dose enhancement, presenting a challenge for delivery. In order to make this technique of broader applicability, the gold must be targeted, or alternative formulations developed that do not rely solely on the photoelectric effect. One possible approach is to excite scintillating nanoparticles with ionizing radiation, and then exploit energy transfer between these particles and attached dyes in a manner analogous to photodynamic therapy (PDT). Doped rare-earth halides and semiconductor quantum dots have been investigated for this purpose. However, although the spectrum of emitted light after radiation excitation is usually similar to that seen with light excitation, the yield is not. Measurement of scintillation yields is challenging, and in many cases has been done only for bulk materials, with little understanding of how the principles translate to the nanoscale. Another alternative is to use local heating using gold or iron, followed by application of ionizing radiation. Hyperthermia pre-sensitizes the tumors, leading to an improved response. Another approach is to use chemotherapeutic drugs that can radiosensitize tumors. Drugs may be attached to high-Z nanoparticles or encapsulated. This article discusses each of these techniques, giving an overview of the current state of nanoparticle-assisted radiation therapy and future directions. PMID:25353018

  2. Gold Nanoparticles and Their Alternatives for Radiation Therapy Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Daniel; Bekah, Devesh; Nadeau, Jay

    2014-10-01

    Radiation therapy is one of the most commonly used treatments for cancer. The dose of delivered ionizing radiation can be amplified by the presence of high-Z materials via an enhancement of the photoelectric effect; the most widely studied material is gold (atomic number 79). However, a large amount is needed to obtain a significant dose enhancement, presenting a challenge for delivery. In order to make this technique of broader applicability, the gold must be targeted, or alternative formulations developed that do not rely solely on the photoelectric effect. One possible approach is to excite scintillating nanoparticles with ionizing radiation, and then exploit energy transfer between these particles and attached dyes in a manner analogous to photodynamic therapy. Doped rare-earth halides and semiconductor quantum dots have been investigated for this purpose. However, although the spectrum of emitted light after radiation excitation is usually similar to that seen with light excitation, the yield is not. Measurement of scintillation yields is challenging, and in many cases has been done only for bulk materials, with little understanding of how the principles translate to the nanoscale. Another alternative is to use local heating using gold or iron, followed by application of ionizing radiation. Hyperthermia pre-sensitizes the tumors, leading to an improved response. Another approach is to use chemotherapeutic drugs that can radiosensitize tumors. Drugs may be attached to high-Z nanoparticles or encapsulated. This article discusses each of these techniques, giving an overview of the current state of nanoparticle-assisted radiation therapy and future directions.

  3. Radiation therapy in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Onufrey, V.; Mohiuddin, M.

    1985-11-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the kidney is an unusual tumor, both in its biological behavior and in its response to radiation treatment. Historically, these tumors have been considered to be radioresistant, and the role of radiation therapy remains questionable in the primary management of this disease. However, radiation treatment is routinely used in the palliation of metastatic lesions for relief of symptoms. Therefore, we have undertaken a review of our experience in the treatment of this disease to determine the effectiveness of radiation in its palliation. From 1956 to 1981, 125 patients with metastatic lesions from hypernephroma have been treated in the Department of Radiation Therapy at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Most patients were referred for relief of bone pain (86), brain metastasis (12), spinal cord compression (9), and soft tissue masses (18). Total doses varied from 2000 rad to a maximum of 6000 rad. Response to treatment was evaluated on the basis of relief of symptoms, either complete, partial or no change. Our results indicate a significantly higher response rate of 65% for total doses equal to or greater than a TDF of 70, as compared to 25% for doses lower than a TDF of 70. No difference in response was observed either for bone or soft tissue metastasis or visceral disease. This leads us to believe that metastatic lesions from adenocarcinomas of the kidney should be treated to higher doses to obtain maximum response rates. Analysis of these results are presented in detail.

  4. 21 CFR 892.5770 - Powered radiation therapy patient support assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

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  5. 21 CFR 892.5710 - Radiation therapy beam-shaping block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

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  6. 21 CFR 892.5710 - Radiation therapy beam-shaping block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

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  7. 21 CFR 892.5900 - X-ray radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

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  8. 21 CFR 892.5900 - X-ray radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

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  9. 21 CFR 892.5770 - Powered radiation therapy patient support assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Powered radiation therapy patient support assembly... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5770 Powered radiation therapy patient support assembly. (a) Identification. A powered radiation therapy patient support...

  10. 21 CFR 892.5710 - Radiation therapy beam-shaping block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radiation therapy beam-shaping block. 892.5710... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5710 Radiation therapy beam-shaping block. (a) Identification. A radiation therapy beam-shaping block is a device made of a...

  11. 21 CFR 892.5900 - X-ray radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false X-ray radiation therapy system. 892.5900 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5900 X-ray radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. An x-ray radiation therapy system is a device intended to produce and control...

  12. 21 CFR 892.5710 - Radiation therapy beam-shaping block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiation therapy beam-shaping block. 892.5710... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5710 Radiation therapy beam-shaping block. (a) Identification. A radiation therapy beam-shaping block is a device made of a...

  13. 21 CFR 892.5770 - Powered radiation therapy patient support assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Powered radiation therapy patient support assembly... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5770 Powered radiation therapy patient support assembly. (a) Identification. A powered radiation therapy patient support...

  14. 21 CFR 892.5900 - X-ray radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false X-ray radiation therapy system. 892.5900 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5900 X-ray radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. An x-ray radiation therapy system is a device intended to produce and control...

  15. 21 CFR 892.5770 - Powered radiation therapy patient support assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Powered radiation therapy patient support assembly... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5770 Powered radiation therapy patient support assembly. (a) Identification. A powered radiation therapy patient support...

  16. 21 CFR 892.5770 - Powered radiation therapy patient support assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Powered radiation therapy patient support assembly... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5770 Powered radiation therapy patient support assembly. (a) Identification. A powered radiation therapy patient support...

  17. 21 CFR 892.5900 - X-ray radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false X-ray radiation therapy system. 892.5900 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5900 X-ray radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. An x-ray radiation therapy system is a device intended to produce and control...

  18. 21 CFR 892.5710 - Radiation therapy beam-shaping block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiation therapy beam-shaping block. 892.5710... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5710 Radiation therapy beam-shaping block. (a) Identification. A radiation therapy beam-shaping block is a device made of a...

  19. Shielding and Radiation Protection in Ion Beam Therapy Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wroe, Andrew J.; Rightnar, Steven

    Radiation protection is a key aspect of any radiotherapy (RT) department and is made even more complex in ion beam therapy (IBT) by the large facility size, secondary particle spectra and intricate installation of these centers. In IBT, large and complex radiation producing devices are used and made available to the public for treatment. It is thus the responsibility of the facility to put in place measures to protect not only the patient but also the general public, occupationally and nonoccupationally exposed personnel working within the facility, and electronics installed within the department to ensure maximum safety while delivering maximum up-time.

  20. Complementary Strategies for the Management of Radiation Therapy Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Stubbe, Christine E.; Valero, Meighan

    2013-01-01

    Patients with cancer utilize complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for a variety of purposes, one of which is the reduction of side effects of conventional treatment. With a large number of their patients using CAM, it is important for advanced practitioners in oncology to have an understanding of these therapies to better guide their patients. Side effects of radiation therapy that may have dose-limiting poten­tial include diarrhea, mucositis, skin toxicity, and xerostomia. A com­mon side effect that is not necessarily dose-limiting but considerably troublesome to patients is cancer- and treatment-related fatigue. The CAM therapies that may alleviate some of the side effects of radiation therapy include probiotics, psyllium, exercise, melatonin, honey, acu­puncture, and calendula. Therapies that require more research or have been shown to be ineffective include aloe vera, glutamine, and deglyc­yrrhizinated licorice. This article provides an overview of these thera­pies as well as related research and analysis. PMID:25032003

  1. Adaptive radiation therapy of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Ning

    standard deviation of markers after rigid registration in L-R direction was 0 and 1 mm. But the mean was 2--4 mm in the A-P and S-I direction and standard deviation was about 2 mm. After DIR, the mean in all three directions became 0 and standard deviation was within sub millimeter. UE images were generated for each CT set and carefully reviewed in the prostate region. DIR provided accurate transformation matrix to be used for dose reconstruction. The delivered dose was evaluated with radiobiological models. TCP for the CTV was calculated to evaluate tumor control in different margin settings. TCP calculated from the reconstructed dose agreed within 5% of the value in the plan for all patients with three different margins. EUD and NTCP were calculated to evaluate reaction of rectum to radiation. Similar biological evaluation was performed for bladder. EUD of actual dose was 3%--9% higher than that of planned dose of patient 1--3, 11%--20% higher of patient 4--5. Smaller margins could not reduce late GU toxicity effectively since bladder complication was directly related to Dmax which was at the same magnitude in the bladder no matter which margin was applied. Re-optimization was performed at the 10th, 20th , 30th, and 40th fraction to evaluate the effectiveness to limit OAR dose while maintaining the target coverage. Reconstructed dose was added to dose from remaining fractions after optimization to show the total dose patient would receive. It showed that if the plan was re-optimized at 10th or 20th fraction, total dose to rectum and bladder were very similar to planned dose with minor deviations. If the plan was re-optimized at the 30th fraction, since there was a large deviation between reconstructed dose and planned dose to OAR, optimization could not limit the OAR dose to the original plan with only 12 fractions left. If the re-optimization was done at the 40th fraction, it was impossible to compensate in the last 2 fractions. Large deviations of total dose to bladder

  2. Adaptive and robust radiation therapy in the presence of drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mar, Philip Allen; Chan, Timothy C. Y.

    2015-05-01

    Combining adaptive and robust optimization in radiation therapy has the potential to mitigate the negative effects of both intrafraction and interfraction uncertainty over a fractionated treatment course. A previously developed adaptive and robust radiation therapy (ARRT) method for lung cancer was demonstrated to be effective when the sequence of breathing patterns was well-behaved. In this paper, we examine the applicability of the ARRT method to less well-behaved breathing patterns. We develop a novel method to generate sequences of probability mass functions that represent different types of drift in the underlying breathing pattern. Computational results derived from applying the ARRT method to these sequences demonstrate that the ARRT method is effective for a much broader class of breathing patterns than previously demonstrated.

  3. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for metastasis to the adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Kevin; Song, Andrew; Teh, Bin S; Ellis, Rodney J; Yao, Min; Mayr, Nina A; Huang, Zhibin; Sohn, Jason; Machtay, Mitchell; Lo, Simon S

    2012-12-01

    Many primary cancers can metastasize to the adrenal glands. Adrenalectomy via an open or laparoscopic approach is the current definitive treatment, but not all patients are eligible or wish to undergo surgery. There are only limited studies on the use of conventional radiation therapy for palliation of symptoms from adrenal metastasis. However, the advent of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) - also named stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for primary lung cancer, metastases to the lung, and metastases to the liver - have prompted some investigators to consider the use of SBRT for metastases to the adrenal glands. This review focuses on the emerging data on SBRT of metastasis to the adrenal glands, while also providing a brief discussion of the overall management of adrenal metastasis.

  4. Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy: American Society for Radiation Oncology/American Urological Association Guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Valicenti, Richard K.; Thompson, Ian; Albertsen, Peter; Davis, Brian J.; Goldenberg, S. Larry; Wolf, J. Stuart; Sartor, Oliver; Klein, Eric; Hahn, Carol; Michalski, Jeff; Roach, Mack; Faraday, Martha M.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this guideline was to provide a clinical framework for the use of radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy as adjuvant or salvage therapy. Methods and Materials: A systematic literature review using PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane database was conducted to identify peer-reviewed publications relevant to the use of radiation therapy after prostatectomy. The review yielded 294 articles; these publications were used to create the evidence-based guideline statements. Additional guidance is provided as Clinical Principles when insufficient evidence existed. Results: Guideline statements are provided for patient counseling, use of radiation therapy in the adjuvant and salvage contexts, defining biochemical recurrence, and conducting a restaging evaluation. Conclusions: Physicians should offer adjuvant radiation therapy to patients with adverse pathologic findings at prostatectomy (ie, seminal vesicle invastion, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension) and salvage radiation therapy to patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or local recurrence after prostatectomy in whom there is no evidence of distant metastatic disease. The offer of radiation therapy should be made in the context of a thoughtful discussion of possible short- and long-term side effects of radiation therapy as well as the potential benefits of preventing recurrence. The decision to administer radiation therapy should be made by the patient and the multidisciplinary treatment team with full consideration of the patient's history, values, preferences, quality of life, and functional status. The American Society for Radiation Oncology and American Urological Association websites show this guideline in its entirety, including the full literature review.

  5. Carcinoma of the anal canal: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, Charlotte; Moloney, Phillip; Mathlum, Maitham

    2013-12-15

    Patients with anal canal carcinoma treated with standard conformal radiotherapy frequently experience severe acute and late toxicity reactions to the treatment area. Roohipour et al. (Dis Colon Rectum 2008; 51: 147–53) stated a patient's tolerance of chemoradiation to be an important prediction of treatment success. A new intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique for anal carcinoma cases has been developed at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre aimed at reducing radiation to surrounding healthy tissue. A same-subject repeated measures design was used for this study, where five anal carcinoma cases at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre were selected. Conformal and IMRT plans were generated and dosimetric evaluations were performed. Each plan was prescribed a total of 54 Gray (Gy) over a course of 30 fractions to the primary site. The IMRT plans resulted in improved dosimetry to the planning target volume (PTV) and reduction in radiation to the critical structures (bladder, external genitalia and femoral heads). Statistically there was no difference between the IMRT and conformal plans in the dose to the small and large bowel; however, the bowel IMRT dose–volume histogram (DVH) doses were consistently lower. The IMRT plans were superior to the conformal plans with improved dose conformity and reduced radiation to the surrounding healthy tissue. Anecdotally it was found that patients tolerated the IMRT treatment better than the three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy. This study describes and compares the planning techniques.

  6. Radiation therapy of lymphoblastic renal masses - benefit or hazard

    SciTech Connect

    Saarinen, U.M.

    1985-05-01

    A child with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and massively enlarged kidneys received a single dose of 300 rad (3 Gy) to the right kidney before initiation of chemotherapy. Measurement of the split renal function with 99m-Tc-DTPA four days postirradiation revealed that the function of the right kidney had substantially deteriorated, suggesting that hazards may be involved with the use of radiation therapy for lymphoblastic renal masses.

  7. Multiple Aperture Radiation Therapy (MART) for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    Original contains colored plates: ALL DTIC reproductions will be in black and white. 14. ABSTRACT Conventional breast radiotherapy utilizes two opposed...Modern advances in radiation therapy such as the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may be used to achieve dose distribution with superior tumor...conformality and normal tissue spare . However, the increased complexity of the treatment planning and delivery procedures is a problem in a busy

  8. WE-B-BRD-02: MR Simulation for Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, K.

    2015-06-15

    The use of MRI in radiation therapy is rapidly increasing. Applications vary from the MRI simulator, to the MRI fused with CT, and to the integrated MRI+RT system. Compared with the standard MRI QA, a broader scope of QA features has to be defined in order to maximize the benefits of using MRI in radiation therapy. These QA features include geometric fidelity, image registration, motion management, cross-system alignment, and hardware interference. Advanced MRI techniques require a specific type of QA, as they are being widely used in radiation therapy planning, dose calculations, post-implant dosimetry, and prognoses. A vigorous and adaptive QA program is crucial to defining the responsibility of the entire radiation therapy group and detecting deviations from the performance of high-quality treatment. As a drastic departure from CT simulation, MRI simulation requires changes in the work flow of treatment planning and image guidance. MRI guided radiotherapy platforms are being developed and commercialized to take the advantage of the advance in knowledge, technology and clinical experience. This symposium will from an educational perspective discuss the scope and specific issues related to MRI guided radiotherapy. Learning Objectives: Understand the difference between a standard and a radiotherapy-specific MRI QA program. Understand the effects of MRI artifacts (geometric distortion and motion) on radiotherapy. Understand advanced MRI techniques (ultrashort echo, fast MRI including dynamic MRI and 4DMRI, diffusion, perfusion, and MRS) and related QA. Understand the methods to prepare MRI for treatment planning (electron density assignment, multimodality image registration, segmentation and motion management). Current status of MRI guided treatment platforms. Dr. Jihong Wang has a research grant with Elekta-MRL project. Dr. Ke Sheng receives research grants from Varian Medical systems.

  9. Fibrosarcoma after high energy radiation therapy for pituitary adenoma

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, W.H.; Cail, W.S.; Morris, J.L.; Constable, W.C.

    1980-11-01

    Pituitary sarcoma is a rare late complication of radiotherapy for pituitary tumors. Although early case reports involved multiple courses of relatively low-energy radiation therapy, pituitary sarcoma has been seen with single courses of high-energy x-ray or heavy particle radiotherapy. This report describes a fibrosarcoma of the pituitary occurring 5 years after 4,500 rad (45 Gy) of x-irradiation delivered in 20 treatments over 3 weeks by an 8 MeV linear accelerator.

  10. The radiation biology of boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Coderre, J A; Morris, G M

    1999-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a targeted radiation therapy that significantly increases the therapeutic ratio relative to conventional radiotherapeutic modalities. BNCT is a binary approach: A boron-10 (10B)-labeled compound is administered that delivers high concentrations of 10B to the target tumor relative to surrounding normal tissues. This is followed by irradiation with thermal neutrons or epithermal neutrons which become thermalized at depth in tissues. The short range (5-9 microm) of the alpha and 7Li particles released from the 10B(n,alpha)7Li neutron capture reaction make the microdistribution of 10B of critical importance in therapy. The radiation field in tissues during BNCT consists of a mixture of components with differing LET characteristics. Studies have been carried out in both normal and neoplastic tissues to characterize the relative biological effectiveness of each radiation component. The distribution patterns and radiobiological characteristics of the two 10B delivery agents in current clinical use, the amino acid p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) and the sulfhydryl borane (BSH), have been evaluated in a range of normal tissues and tumor types. Considered overall, BSH-mediated BNCT elicits proportionately less damage to normal tissue than does BNCT mediated with BPA. However, BPA exhibits superior in vivo tumor targeting and has proven much more effective in the treatment of brain tumors in rats. In terms of fractionation effects, boron neutron capture irradiation modalities are comparable with other high-LET radiation modalities such as fast-neutron therapy. There was no appreciable advantage in increasing the number of daily fractions of thermal neutrons beyond two with regard to sparing of normal tissue in the rat spinal cord model. The experimental studies described in this review constitute the radiobiological basis for the new BNCT clinical trials for glioblastoma at Brookhaven National Laboratory, at the Massachusetts Institute of

  11. Sick sinus syndrome as a complication of mediastinal radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pohjola-Sintonen, S.; Toetterman, K.J.K.; Kupari, M. )

    1990-06-01

    A 33-year-old man who had received mediastinal radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease 12 years earlier developed a symptomatic sick sinus syndrome requiring the implantation of a permanent pacemaker. The sick sinus syndrome and a finding of an occult constrictive pericarditis were considered to be due to the previous mediastinal irradiation. A ventricular pacemaker was chosen because mediastinal radiotherapy also increases the risk of developing atrioventricular conduction defects.

  12. Three Cases of Levodopa-Resistant Parkinsonism After Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mehanna, Raja; Jimenez-Shahed, Joohi; Itin, Ilia

    2016-01-01

    Case series Patients: Male, 77 • Female, 44 • Male, 9 Final Diagnosis: Radiation induced parkinsonism Symptoms: Slowness Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Neurology Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Unequivocal brain radiation-induced parkinsonism has so far been reported in only in two pediatric patients. However, with the rising incidence rates for brain tumors in industrialized countries and the consequential increased exposure to cranial radiotherapy, clinicians might become more exposed to this entity. Case Report: Three patients were treated for intraparenchymal brain tumor with resection, chemotherapy, and whole brain radiation. One patient developed leukoencephalopathy and parkinsonism within one year of treatment, one developed it seven years after treatment completion, and one developed dementia, parkinsonism and cerebral infracts 40 years after whole brain radiation. Brain MRIs and a DaTscan were obtained. All patients failed a trial of carbidopa/levodopa. We suggest that the brain radiation exposure was responsible for levodopa resistant parkinsonism, cognitive decline, and diffuse leukoencephalopathy. Conclusions: Although rare, radiation therapy-induced parkinsonism might be responsible for levodopa-resistant parkinsonism. PMID:27909286

  13. Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia after radiation therapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cottin, V; Frognier, R; Monnot, H; Levy, A; DeVuyst, P; Cordier, J F

    2004-01-01

    The priming of bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia by radiation therapy (RT) to the breast is now a well recognised syndrome. This study describes the occurrence of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia following RT after surgery for breast cancer in five female patients, with a mean age of 68 yrs (range 49-77). All patients had a history of asthma and/or allergy. At the onset of eosinophilic pneumonia, all patients were symptomatic. Chest radiograph showed pulmonary infiltrates, unilateral and limited to the irradiated lung in three patients, and bilateral in two. Pulmonary opacities were migratory in one patient. All patients had blood eosinophilia >1.0 10(9) x L(-1) and/or eosinophilia >40% at bronchoalveolar lavage differential cell count. The median time interval between the end of radiation therapy and the onset of eosinophilic pneumonia was 3.5 months (range 1-10). All patients rapidly improved with oral corticosteroids without sequelae. Relapse occurred in two patients after treatment withdrawal. Priming of alveolitis by radiation therapy to the breast might promote either bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia or chronic eosinophilic pneumonia, with the latter depending on genetic or acquired characteristics of patients and/or further stimulation that may trigger a T-helper cell type 2 form of lymphocyte response, especially in patients with asthma or other atopic manifestations.

  14. Ultrasound Imaging in Radiation Therapy: From Interfractional to Intrafractional Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Western, Craig; Hristov, Dimitre

    2015-01-01

    External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) is included in the treatment regimen of the majority of cancer patients. With the proliferation of hypofractionated radiotherapy treatment regimens, such as stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), interfractional and intrafractional imaging technologies are becoming increasingly critical to ensure safe and effective treatment delivery. Ultrasound (US)-based image guidance systems offer real-time, markerless, volumetric imaging with excellent soft tissue contrast, overcoming the limitations of traditional X-ray or computed tomography (CT)-based guidance for abdominal and pelvic cancer sites, such as the liver and prostate. Interfractional US guidance systems have been commercially adopted for patient positioning but suffer from systematic positioning errors induced by probe pressure. More recently, several research groups have introduced concepts for intrafractional US guidance systems leveraging robotic probe placement technology and real-time soft tissue tracking software. This paper reviews various commercial and research-level US guidance systems used in radiation therapy, with an emphasis on hardware and software technologies that enable the deployment of US imaging within the radiotherapy environment and workflow. Previously unpublished material on tissue tracking systems and robotic probe manipulators under development by our group is also included. PMID:26180704

  15. Intraoperative radiation therapy in malignant glioma: early clinical results.

    PubMed

    Ortiz de Urbina, D; Santos, M; Garcia-Berrocal, I; Bustos, J C; Samblas, J; Gutierrez-Diaz, J A; Delgado, J M; Donckaster, G; Calvo, F A

    1995-08-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) with high energy electron beams is a treatment modality that has been included in multimodal programs in oncology to improve local tumor control. From August 1991 to December 1993, 17 patients with primary (8) or recurrent (9) high grade malignant gliomas, anaplastic astrocytoma (4), anaplastic oligodendroglioma (6) and glioblastoma multiforme (7), underwent surgical resection and a single dose of 10-20 Gy intraoperative radiation therapy was delivered in tumor bed. Fourteen patients received either pre-operative (8) or post-operative (6) external beam radiation therapy. Primary gliomas: 18-months actuarial survival rate has been 56% (range: 1-21+ months) and the median survival time has not yet been achieved. Four patients developed tumor progression (median time to tumor progression: 9 months). Recurrent gliomas: 18-months actuarial survival rate and median survival time has been 47% and 13 months (range: 6-32+ months) respectively. The median time to tumor progression was 11 months. No IORT related mortality has been observed. IORT is an attractive, tolerable and feasible treatment modality as antitumoral intensification procedure in high grade malignant gliomas.

  16. Postprostatectomy radiation therapy: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Mark V; Champ, Colin E; Den, Robert B; Scher, Eli D; Shen, Xinglei; Trabulsi, Edouard J; Lallas, Costas D; Knudsen, Karen E; Dicker, Adam P; Showalter, Timothy N

    2011-12-01

    While the majority of men with localized prostate cancer who undergo a radical prostatectomy will remain disease free, men with certain clinical and pathological features are known to be at an increased risk for developing a biochemical recurrence and, ultimately, distant metastatic disease. The optimal management of these patients continues to be a source of controversy. To date, three randomized Phase III trials have demonstrated that adjuvant radiation therapy (ART) for patients with certain adverse pathological features results in an improvement in several clinically-relevant end points, including biochemical recurrence-free survival and overall survival. Despite the evidence from these trials showing a benefit for ART, many believe that ART results in overtreatment and unwarranted treatment morbidity for a significant number of patients. Many physicians, therefore, instead advocate for close observation followed by early salvage radiation therapy (SRT) at the time of a biochemical recurrence. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the evidence for and to distinguish between ART and early SRT. We will also highlight current and future areas of research for this patient population, including radiation treatment dose escalation, hypofractionation and androgen deprivation therapy. We will also discuss the cost-effectiveness of ART and early SRT.

  17. Aesthetic results following partial mastectomy and radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Matory, W.E. Jr.; Wertheimer, M.; Fitzgerald, T.J.; Walton, R.L.; Love, S.; Matory, W.E.

    1990-05-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the aesthetic changes inherent in partial mastectomy followed by radiation therapy in the treatment of stage I and stage II breast cancer. A retrospective analysis of breast cancer patients treated according to the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast Project Protocol B-06 was undertaken in 57 patients from 1984 to the present. The size of mastectomy varied between 2 x 1 cm and 15 x 8 cm. Objective aesthetic outcome, as determined by physical and photographic examination, was influenced primarily by surgical technique as opposed to the effects of radiation. These technical factors included orientation of resections, breast size relative to size of resection, location of tumor, and extent and orientation of axillary dissection. Regarding cosmesis, 80 percent of patients treated in this study judged their result to be excellent or good, in comparison to 50 percent excellent or good as judged by the plastic surgeon. Only 10 percent would consider mastectomy with reconstruction for contralateral disease. Asymmetry and contour abnormalities are far more common than noted in the radiation therapy literature. Patients satisfaction with lumpectomy and radiation, however, is very high. This satisfaction is not necessarily based on objective criteria defining aesthetic parameters, but is strongly influenced by retainment of the breast as an original body part.

  18. TH-A-BRD-01: Radiation Biology for Radiation Therapy Physicists

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, C; Borras, C; Carlson, D

    2014-06-15

    Mechanisms by which radiation kills cells and ways cell damage can be repaired will be reviewed. The radiobiological parameters of dose, fractionation, delivery time, dose rate, and LET will be discussed. The linear-quadratic model for cell survival for high and low dose rate treatments and the effect of repopulation will be presented and discussed. The rationale for various radiotherapy techniques such as conventional fractionation, hyperfractionation, hypofractionation, and low and high dose rate brachytherapy, including permanent implants, will be presented. The radiobiological principles underlying radiation protection guidelines and the different radiation dosimetry terms used in radiation biology and in radiation protection will be reviewed. Human data on radiation induced cancer, including increases in the risk of second cancers following radiation therapy, as well as data on radiation induced tissue reactions, such as cardiovascular effects, for follow up times up to 20–40 years, published by ICRP, NCRP and BEIR Committees, will be examined. The latest risk estimates per unit dose will be presented. Their adoption in recent radiation protection standards and guidelines and their impact on patient and workers safety in radiotherapy will be discussed. Biologically-guided radiotherapy (BGRT) provides a systematic method to derive prescription doses that integrate patient-specific information about tumor and normal tissue biology. Treatment individualization based on patient-specific biology requires the identification of biological objective functions to facilitate the design and comparison of competing treatment modalities. Biological objectives provide a more direct approach to plan optimization instead of relying solely on dose-based surrogates and can incorporate factors that alter radiation response, such as DNA repair, tumor hypoxia, and relative biological effectiveness. We review concepts motivating biological objectives and provide examples of how

  19. Limited Stage Follicular Lymphoma: Current Role of Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Ciammella, Patrizia; Ricardi, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) alone has been considered for a long time as the standard therapeutic option for limited stage FL, due to its high efficacy in terms of local disease control with a quite significant proportion of “cured” patients (without further relapses at 10–15 years). Multiple therapeutic choices are currently accepted for the management of early stage FL at diagnosis, and better staging procedures as well as better systemic therapy partially modified the role of RT in this setting. RT has also changed in terms of prescribed dose as well as treatment volumes. In this review, we present and discuss the current role of RT for limited stage FL in light of the historical data and the modern RT concepts along with the possible combination with systemic therapy. PMID:27648204

  20. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT): A radiation oncology perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID )

    1994-03-30

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) offers considerable promise in the search for the ideal cancer therapy, a therapy which selectively and maximally damages malignant cells while sparing normal tissue. This bimodal treatment modality selectivity concentrates a boron compound in malignant cells, and then [open quotes]activates[close quotes] this compound with slow neutrons resulting in a highly lethal event within the cancer cell. This article reviews this treatment modality from a radiation oncology, biology, and physics perspective. The remainder of the articles in this special issue provide a survey of the current [open quotes]state-of-the-art[close quotes] in this rapidly expanding field, including information with regard to boron compounds and their localization. 118 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Prone Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: 5-Year Results

    SciTech Connect

    Osa, Etin-Osa O.; DeWyngaert, Keith; Roses, Daniel; Speyer, James; Guth, Amber; Axelrod, Deborah; Fenton Kerimian, Maria; Goldberg, Judith D.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a technique of prone breast radiation therapy delivered by a regimen of accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concurrent boost to the tumor bed. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2006, 404 patients with stage I-II breast cancer were prospectively enrolled into 2 consecutive protocols, institutional trials 03-30 and 05-181, that used the same regimen of 40.5 Gy/15 fractions delivered to the index breast over 3 weeks, with a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy (total dose 48 Gy). All patients were treated after segmental mastectomy and had negative margins and nodal assessment. Patients were set up prone: only if lung or heart volumes were in the field was a supine setup attempted and chosen if found to better spare these organs. Results: Ninety-two percent of patients were treated prone, 8% supine. Seventy-two percent had stage I, 28% stage II invasive breast cancer. In-field lung volume ranged from 0 to 228.27 cm{sup 3}, mean 19.65 cm{sup 3}. In-field heart volume for left breast cancer patients ranged from 0 to 21.24 cm{sup 3}, mean 1.59 cm{sup 3}. There was no heart in the field for right breast cancer patients. At a median follow-up of 5 years, the 5-year cumulative incidence of isolated ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was 0.82% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.65%-1.04%). The 5-year cumulative incidence of regional recurrence was 0.53% (95% CI 0.41%-0.69%), and the 5-year overall cumulative death rate was 1.28% (95% CI 0.48%-3.38%). Eighty-two percent (95% CI 77%-85%) of patients judged their final cosmetic result as excellent/good. Conclusions: Prone accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concomitant boost results in excellent local control and optimal sparing of heart and lung, with good cosmesis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 1005, a phase 3, multi-institutional, randomized trial is ongoing and is evaluating the equivalence of a similar dose and

  2. Imaging Changes in Pediatric Intracranial Ependymoma Patients Treated With Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Compared to Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gunther, Jillian R.; Sato, Mariko; Chintagumpala, Murali; Ketonen, Leena; Jones, Jeremy Y.; Allen, Pamela K.; Paulino, Arnold C.; Okcu, M. Fatih; Su, Jack M.; Weinberg, Jeffrey; Boehling, Nicholas S.; Khatua, Soumen; Adesina, Adekunle; Dauser, Robert; Whitehead, William E.; Mahajan, Anita

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The clinical significance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes after radiation therapy (RT) in children with ependymoma is not well defined. We compared imaging changes following proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) to those after photon-based intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients with nonmetastatic intracranial ependymoma who received postoperative RT (37 PBRT, 35 IMRT) were analyzed retrospectively. MRI images were reviewed by 2 neuroradiologists. Results: Sixteen PBRT patients (43%) developed postradiation MRI changes at 3.8 months (median) with resolution by 6.1 months. Six IMRT patients (17%) developed changes at 5.3 months (median) with 8.3 months to resolution. Mean age at radiation was 4.4 and 6.9 years for PBRT and IMRT, respectively (P=.06). Age at diagnosis (>3 years) and time of radiation (≥3 years) was associated with fewer imaging changes on univariate analysis (odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, P=.048; OR: 0.36, P=.05). PBRT (compared to IMRT) was associated with more frequent imaging changes, both on univariate (OR: 3.68, P=.019) and multivariate (OR: 3.89, P=.024) analyses. Seven (3 IMRT, 4 PBRT) of 22 patients with changes had symptoms requiring intervention. Most patients were treated with steroids; some PBRT patients also received bevacizumab and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. None of the IMRT patients had lasting deficits, but 2 patients died from recurrent disease. Three PBRT patients had persistent neurological deficits, and 1 child died secondarily to complications from radiation necrosis. Conclusions: Postradiation MRI changes are more common with PBRT and in patients less than 3 years of age at diagnosis and treatment. It is difficult to predict causes for development of imaging changes that progress to clinical significance. These changes are usually self-limiting, but some require medical intervention, especially those involving the brainstem.

  3. Influential Factors and Synergies for Radiation-Gene Therapy on Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mei; Huang, Junxing; Shi, Yujuan; Xiao, Yanhong; Guo, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-gene therapy, a dual anticancer strategy of radiation therapy and gene therapy through connecting radiation-inducible regulatory sequence to therapeutic gene, leading to the gene being induced to express by radiation while radiotherapy is performed and finally resulting in a double synergistic antitumor effect of radiation and gene, has become one of hotspots in the field of cancer treatment in recent years. But under routine dose of radiation, especially in the hypoxia environment of solid tumor, it is difficult for this therapy to achieve desired effect because of low activity of radiation-inducible regulatory elements, low level and transient expression of target gene induced by radiation, inferior target specificity and poor biosecurity, and so on. Based on the problems existing in radiation-gene therapy, many efforts have been devoted to the curative effect improvement of radiation-gene therapy by various means to increase radiation sensitivity or enhance target gene expression and the expression's controllability. Among these synergistic techniques, gene circuit, hypoxic sensitization, and optimization of radiation-induced sequence exhibit a good application potential. This review provides the main influential factors to radiation-gene therapy on cancer and the synergistic techniques to improve the anticancer effect of radiation-gene therapy. PMID:26783511

  4. Melanoma Therapy via Peptide-Targeted a-Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yubin; Hylarides, Mark; Fisher, Darrell R.; Shelton, Tiffani; Moore, Herbert A.; Wester, Dennis W.; Fritzberg, Alan R.; Winkelmann, Christopher T.; Hoffman, Timothy J.; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2005-08-01

    Malignant melanoma is the most lethal form of skin cancer. Current chemotherapy and external beam radiation therapy regimens are ineffective agents against melanoma, as shown by a 10-year survival rate for patients with disseminated disease of approximately 5% (reference?). In this study, the unique combination of a melanoma targeting peptide and an in vivo generated a-particle emitting radioisotope was investigated for its melanoma therapy potential. Alpha-radiation is densely ionizing and energy is locally absorbed, resulting in high concentrations of destructive free radicals and irreparable DNA double strand breaks. This high linear-energy-transfer overcomes radiation resistant tumor cells and oxygen-enhancement effects. The melanoma targeting peptide DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH was radiolabeled with 212Pb, the parent of 212Bi, which decays via alpha and beta decay. Biodistribution and therapy studies were performed in the B16/F1 melanoma bearing C57 mouse flank tumor model. 212Pb[DOTA]-R e(Arg11)CCMSH exhibited rapid tumor uptake and extended retention coupled with rapid whole body disappearance. Radiation dose delivered to the tumor was estimated to be 61 cGy/uCi 212Pb administered. Treatment of melanoma-bearing mice with 50, 100 and 200 uCi of 212Pb[DOTA]-Re(Arg11)CCMSH extended mean survival of mice to 22, 28, and 49.8 days, respectively, compared to the 14.6 day mean survival of the placebo control group. Forty-five percent of the mice receiving 200 uCi survived the study disease-free.

  5. Anonymization of DICOM electronic medical records for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Newhauser, Wayne; Jones, Timothy; Swerdloff, Stuart; Newhauser, Warren; Cilia, Mark; Carver, Robert; Halloran, Andy; Zhang, Rui

    2014-10-01

    Electronic medical records (EMR) and treatment plans are used in research on patient outcomes and radiation effects. In many situations researchers must remove protected health information (PHI) from EMRs. The literature contains several studies describing the anonymization of generic Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) files and DICOM image sets but no publications were found that discuss the anonymization of DICOM radiation therapy plans, a key component of an EMR in a cancer clinic. In addition to this we were unable to find a commercial software tool that met the minimum requirements for anonymization and preservation of data integrity for radiation therapy research. The purpose of this study was to develop a prototype software code to meet the requirements for the anonymization of radiation therapy treatment plans and to develop a way to validate that code and demonstrate that it properly anonymized treatment plans and preserved data integrity. We extended an open-source code to process all relevant PHI and to allow for the automatic anonymization of multiple EMRs. The prototype code successfully anonymized multiple treatment plans in less than 1min/patient. We also tested commercial optical character recognition (OCR) algorithms for the detection of burned-in text on the images, but they were unable to reliably recognize text. In addition, we developed and tested an image filtering algorithm that allowed us to isolate and redact alpha-numeric text from a test radiograph. Validation tests verified that PHI was anonymized and data integrity, such as the relationship between DICOM unique identifiers (UID) was preserved.

  6. Effects of radiation therapy and chemotherapy on testicular function

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, T.J. )

    1989-01-01

    Chemotherapy and radiation therapy are commonly used alone or in combination in the curative management of many malignancies in adolescent and adult males. Over the last 15-20 years, the striking success in the treatment of some common cancers in reproductive males has led to increasing concern for damage to normal tissues, such as the testes, resulting from curative cancer treatment. Indeed, a major future goal for cancer treatment will be to improve on the complication-free cure rate. Inherent in achieving this goal is to understand the pathophysiology and clinical expression of testicular injury. Both chemotherapy and radiation therapy result in germ cell depletion with the development of oligo- to azoospermia and testicular atrophy. The type of drug (particularly the alkylating agents), duration of treatment, intensity of treatment, and drug combination are major variables in determining the extent and duration of testicular injury. Testicular injury with chemotherapy also appears to vary with the age of the patient at the time of treatment. Newer drug combinations are now being used which appear to have curative potential in tumors such as Hodgkin's disease and germ cell testicular cancer with less potential for testicular injury. The most accurate and complete information on radiation injury to the testes is derived from two studies of normal volunteers who received graded single doses directly to the testes. A clear dose-response relationship of clinical and histological testicular damage was found with gradual recovery occurring following doses of up to 600 cGy. While these two studies provide an important clinical data base, radiation therapy used in treating cancers involves multiple daily treatments, usually 25-35 delivered over several weeks. Additionally, direct testicular irradiation is seldom used clinically. 37 references.

  7. Evaluation of selection criteria for graduate students in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Schneider-Kolsky, Michal; Wright, Caroline; Baird, Marilyn

    2006-12-01

    Selection of suitable students into graduate medical and specialist health professional courses can be difficult. Historically, selection of students was primarily based on prior academic performance. Recently, however, more emphasis has been placed on considering broader academic backgrounds and personal characteristics and attitudes of students, but no reliable measurement tool is available to predict student success and satisfaction with their choice of profession. The aim of this study was to survey practising radiation therapists in Australia to seek their opinions regarding suitable selection criteria for graduate entry radiation therapy (RT) students in order to optimize selection procedures for future applicants. Four hundred questionnaires were sent to nine RT centres in three states within Australia. All nine clinics participated in the survey and 189 questionnaires were returned. Results show that the majority of radiation therapists place a high level of importance upon a sound knowledge of physics and mathematics, as well as life experience, and agree that a visit to an RT clinic plus an interview comprise important components of the selection process. Humanities, psychology and a psychometric test were not viewed as essential entry requirements. Experienced radiation therapists placed less value on academic performance in the primary degree and were more likely to include an interview as a selection criterion than junior practitioners. Empathy for patients was identified as the most important personal attribute. It is thus recommended that not only cognitive but also personal skills be evaluated during the selection of prospective radiation therapists.

  8. Radiation hardness of the storage phosphor europium doped potassium chloride for radiation therapy dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Driewer, Joseph P.; Chen, Haijian; Osvet, Andres; Low, Daniel A.; Li, H. Harold

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: An important property of a reusable dosimeter is its radiation hardness, that is, its ability to retain its dosimetric merits after irradiation. The radiation hardness of europium doped potassium chloride (KCl:Eu{sup 2+}), a storage phosphor material recently proposed for radiation therapy dosimetry, is examined in this study. Methods: Pellet-style KCl:Eu{sup 2+} dosimeters, 6 mm in diameter, and 1 mm thick, were fabricated in-house for this study. The pellets were exposed by a 6 MV photon beam or in a high dose rate {sup 137}Cs irradiator. Macroscopic properties, such as radiation sensitivity, dose response linearity, and signal stability, were studied with a laboratory photostimulated luminescence (PSL) readout system. Since phosphor performance is related to the state of the storage centers and the activator, Eu{sup 2+}, in the host lattice, spectroscopic and temporal measurements were carried out in order to explore radiation-induced changes at the microscopic level. Results: KCl:Eu{sup 2+} dosimeters retained approximately 90% of their initial signal strength after a 5000 Gy dose history. Dose response was initially supralinear over the dose range of 100-700 cGy but became linear after 60 Gy. Linearity did not change significantly in the 0-5000 Gy dose history spanned in this study. Annealing high dose history chips resulted in a return of supralinearity and a recovery of sensitivity. There were no significant changes in the PSL stimulation spectra, PSL emission spectra, photoluminescence spectra, or luminescence lifetime, indicating that the PSL signal process remains intact after irradiation but at a reduced efficiency due to reparable radiation-induced perturbations in the crystal lattice. Conclusions: Systematic studies of KCl:Eu{sup 2+} material are important for understanding how the material can be optimized for radiation therapy dosimetry purposes. The data presented here indicate that KCl:Eu{sup 2+} exhibits strong radiation hardness and

  9. Medical factors influencing decision making regarding radiation therapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dilaveri, Christina A; Sandhu, Nicole P; Neal, Lonzetta; Neben-Wittich, Michelle A; Hieken, Tina J; Mac Bride, Maire Brid; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L; Ghosh, Karthik

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an important and effective adjuvant therapy for breast cancer. Numerous health conditions may affect medical decisions regarding tolerance of breast radiation therapy. These factors must be considered during the decision-making process after breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy for breast cancer. Here, we review currently available evidence focusing on medical conditions that may affect the patient–provider decision-making process regarding the use of radiation therapy. PMID:25429241

  10. Deciding on radiation therapy for prostate cancer: the physician's perspective.

    PubMed

    Krisch, E B; Koprowski, C D

    2000-08-01

    Multiple treatment options are available for the radiation therapy of prostate cancer including whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT), prostate-only radiotherapy (PORT), three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), as well as proton or neutron beam based therapies and brachytherapy. Numerous technical variations hamper objective assessment of these different treatment modalities. These variations are extensive and often subtle (dose to the prostate, the dose per fraction, number and size of fields, the photon energy, patient positioning, prostatic motion, the use of immobilization devices, 2D or 3D planning for treatment, and others) may cause interpretive uncertainty. Despite this confusion, there is some consensus. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadirs, as well as pretreatment PSA levels, significantly alter outcome. Low-risk patients do well no matter which treatment they receive, although the question of dose-escalation therapy to improve results remains unanswered. High-risk patients do poorly regardless of treatment, although the addition of androgen ablation and dose-escalation therapy may improve results. Quality of life (QOL) studies continue to show a problem for radical prostatectomy (RP) patients secondary to impotence and incontinence and a problem for radiotherapy patients due to gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances. Patients can have access to any specific study through technologies such as the Internet. Although this information can be useful, the subtleties of each different article are usually beyond the understanding of most patients. This report examines some of the new radiotherapy modalities as well as corrects some misconceptions regarding radiotherapy results and morbidity. In addition, we discuss some studies comparing surgery and radiotherapy and attempt to objectively compare different radiation therapy strategies for localized prostate cancer.

  11. Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Radiation Therapy: Does Breast Size Matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Hannan, Raquibul; Thompson, Reid F.; Chen Yu; Bernstein, Karen; Kabarriti, Rafi; Skinner, William; Chen, Chin C.; Landau, Evan; Miller, Ekeni; Spierer, Marnee; Hong, Linda; Kalnicki, Shalom

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of breast size on dose-volume histogram parameters and clinical toxicity in whole-breast hypofractionated radiation therapy using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, all patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy between 2005 and 2009 were screened, and qualifying consecutive patients were included in 1 of 2 cohorts: large-breasted patients (chest wall separation >25 cm or planning target volume [PTV] >1500 cm{sub 3}) (n=97) and small-breasted patients (chest wall separation <25 cm and PTV <1500 cm{sub 3}) (n=32). All patients were treated prone or supine with hypofractionated IMRT to the whole breast (42.4 Gy in 16 fractions) followed by a boost dose (9.6 Gy in 4 fractions). Dosimetric and clinical toxicity data were collected and analyzed using the R statistical package (version 2.12). Results: The mean PTV V95 (percentage of volume receiving >= 95% of prescribed dose) was 90.18% and the mean V105 percentage of volume receiving >= 105% of prescribed dose was 3.55% with no dose greater than 107%. PTV dose was independent of breast size, whereas heart dose and maximum point dose to skin correlated with increasing breast size. Lung dose was markedly decreased in prone compared with supine treatments. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 0, 1, and 2 skin toxicities were noted acutely in 6%, 69%, and 25% of patients, respectively, and at later follow-up (>3 months) in 43%, 57%, and 0% of patients, respectively. Large breast size contributed to increased acute grade 2 toxicity (28% vs 12%, P=.008). Conclusions: Adequate PTV coverage with acceptable hot spots and excellent sparing of organs at risk was achieved by use of IMRT regardless of treatment position and breast size. Although increasing breast size leads to increased heart dose and maximum skin dose, heart dose remained within our institutional constraints and the incidence of overall skin toxicity was comparable

  12. Strategies for quality assurance of intensity modulated radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedek, Hunor; Isacsson, Ulf; Olevik-Dunder, Maria; Westermark, Mathias; Hållström, Per; Olofsson, Jörgen; Gustafsson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    In late 2011 The Swedish Society of Radiation Physics formed a working group to concentrate on the Quality Assurance of modern radiation therapy techniques. The given task was to identify and summarise the different QA strategies in Sweden and also the international recommendations. This was used to formulate recommendations for practical guidelines within Sweden. In this paper a brief summery of the group's work is presented. All the Swedish radiation therapy centres do a pre treatment verification measurement as QA for every new IMRT and VMAT plan. Physicists do it and they believe it to be time consuming. A general standpoint from all the centres was that new guidelines and legislation is needed to allow QA that does not require a measurement. Based on various international publications and recommendations the working group has presented two strategies, one where all new plans are checked through measurement and one where no measurement is needed. The measurement- based strategy is basically the same as the one used today with an extended machine QA part. The other presented strategy is process oriented where all the different parts of the treatment chain are checked separately. The final report can be found in Swedish on http://www.radiofysik.org.

  13. Peripheral Doses from Noncoplanar IMRT for Pediatric Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, Monica W.K.; Leung, Lucullus H.T.; Kwong, Dora L.W.; Wong, Wicger; Lam, Nelson

    2010-01-01

    The use of noncoplanar intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) might result in better sparing of some critical organs because of a higher degree of freedom in beam angle optimization. However, this can lead to a potential increase in peripheral dose compared with coplanar IMRT. The peripheral dose from noncoplanar IMRT has not been previously quantified. This study examines the peripheral dose from noncoplanar IMRT compared with coplanar IMRT for pediatric radiation therapy. Five cases with different pediatric malignancies in head and neck were planned with both coplanar and noncoplanar IMRT techniques. The plans were performed such that the tumor coverage, conformality, and dose uniformity were comparable for both techniques. To measure the peripheral doses of the 2 techniques, thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) were placed in 10 different organs of a 5-year-old pediatric anthropomorphic phantom. With the use of noncoplanar beams, the peripheral doses to the spinal cord, bone marrow, lung, and breast were found to be 1.8-2.5 times of those using the coplanar technique. This is mainly because of the additional internal scatter dose from the noncoplanar beams. Although the use of noncoplanar technique can result in better sparing of certain organs such as the optic nerves, lens, or inner ears depending on how the beam angles were optimized on each patient, oncologists should be alert of the possibility of significantly increasing the peripheral doses to certain radiation-sensitive organs such as bone marrow and breast. This might increase the secondary cancer risk to patients at young age.

  14. Combining molecular targeted agents with radiation therapy for malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Scaringi, Claudia; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi; Minniti, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The expansion in understanding the molecular biology that characterizes cancer cells has led to the rapid development of new agents to target important molecular pathways associated with aberrant activation or suppression of cellular signal transduction pathways involved in gliomagenesis, including epidermal growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, mammalian target of rapamycin, and integrins signaling pathways. The use of antiangiogenic agent bevacizumab, epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib and erlotinib, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors temsirolimus and everolimus, and integrin inhibitor cilengitide, in combination with radiation therapy, has been supported by encouraging preclinical data, resulting in a rapid translation into clinical trials. Currently, the majority of published clinical studies on the use of these agents in combination with radiation and cytotoxic therapies have shown only modest survival benefits at best. Tumor heterogeneity and genetic instability may, at least in part, explain the poor results observed with a single-target approach. Much remains to be learned regarding the optimal combination of targeted agents with conventional chemoradiation, including the use of multipathways-targeted therapies, the selection of patients who may benefit from combined treatments based on molecular biomarkers, and the verification of effective blockade of signaling pathways. PMID:23966794

  15. The Role of a Prone Setup in Breast Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Huppert, Nelly; Jozsef, Gabor; DeWyngaert, Keith; Formenti, Silvia Chiara

    2011-01-01

    Most patients undergoing breast conservation therapy receive radiotherapy in the supine position. Historically, prone breast irradiation has been advocated for women with large pendulous breasts in order to decrease acute and late toxicities. With the advent of CT planning, the prone technique has become both feasible and reproducible. It was shown to be advantageous not only for women with larger breasts but in most patients since it consistently reduces, if not eliminates, the inclusion of heart and lung within the field. The prone setup has been accepted as the best localizing position for both MRI and stereotactic biopsy, but its adoption has been delayed in radiotherapy. New technological advances including image-modulated radiation therapy and image-guided radiation therapy have made possible the exploration of accelerated fractionation schemes with a concomitant boost to the tumor bed in the prone position, along with better imaging and verification of reproducibility of patient setup. This review describes some of the available techniques for prone breast radiotherapy and the available experience in their application. The NYU prone breast radiotherapy approach is discussed, including a summary of the results from several prospective trials. PMID:22655240

  16. The role of a prone setup in breast radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Huppert, Nelly; Jozsef, Gabor; Dewyngaert, Keith; Formenti, Silvia Chiara

    2011-01-01

    Most patients undergoing breast conservation therapy receive radiotherapy in the supine position. Historically, prone breast irradiation has been advocated for women with large pendulous breasts in order to decrease acute and late toxicities. With the advent of CT planning, the prone technique has become both feasible and reproducible. It was shown to be advantageous not only for women with larger breasts but in most patients since it consistently reduces, if not eliminates, the inclusion of heart and lung within the field. The prone setup has been accepted as the best localizing position for both MRI and stereotactic biopsy, but its adoption has been delayed in radiotherapy. New technological advances including image-modulated radiation therapy and image-guided radiation therapy have made possible the exploration of accelerated fractionation schemes with a concomitant boost to the tumor bed in the prone position, along with better imaging and verification of reproducibility of patient setup. This review describes some of the available techniques for prone breast radiotherapy and the available experience in their application. The NYU prone breast radiotherapy approach is discussed, including a summary of the results from several prospective trials.

  17. Extrapleural pneumonectomy, photodynamic therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy for the treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Du, Kevin L; Both, Stefan; Friedberg, Joseph S; Rengan, Ramesh; Hahn, Stephen M; Cengel, Keith A

    2010-09-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has recently been proposed for the treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Here, we describe our experience with a multimodality approach for the treatment of mesothelioma, incorporating extrapleural pneumonectomy, intraoperative photodynamic therapy and postoperative hemithoracic IMRT. From 2004-2007, we treated 11 MPM patients with hemithoracic IMRT, 7 of whom had undergone porfimer sodium-mediated PDT as an intraoperative adjuvant to surgical debulking. The median radiation dose to the planning treatment volume (PTV) ranged from 45.4-54.5 Gy. For the contralateral lung, V20 ranged from 1.4-28.5%, V5 from 42-100% and MLD from 6.8-16.5 Gy. In our series, 1 patient experienced respiratory failure secondary to radiation pneumonitis that did not require mechanical ventilation. Multimodality therapy combining surgery with increased doses of radiation using IMRT, and newer treatment modalities such as PDT , appears safe. Future prospective analysis will be needed to demonstrate efficacy of this approach in the treatment of malignant mesothelioma. Efforts to reduce lung toxicity and improve dose delivery are needed and provide the promise of improved local control and quality of life in a carefully chosen multidisciplinary approach.

  18. Implementation of Remote 3-Dimensional Image Guided Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Yunfeng; Galvin, James M.; Parker, William; Breen, Stephen; Yin Fangfang; Cai Jing; Papiez, Lech S.; Li, X. Allen; Bednarz, Greg; Chen Wenzhou; Xiao Ying

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report the process and initial experience of remote credentialing of three-dimensional (3D) image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) as part of the quality assurance (QA) of submitted data for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trials; and to identify major issues resulting from this process and analyze the review results on patient positioning shifts. Methods and Materials: Image guided radiation therapy datasets including in-room positioning CT scans and daily shifts applied were submitted through the Image Guided Therapy QA Center from institutions for the IGRT credentialing process, as required by various RTOG trials. A centralized virtual environment is established at the RTOG Core Laboratory, containing analysis tools and database infrastructure for remote review by the Physics Principal Investigators of each protocol. The appropriateness of IGRT technique and volumetric image registration accuracy were evaluated. Registration accuracy was verified by repeat registration with a third-party registration software system. With the accumulated review results, registration differences between those obtained by the Physics Principal Investigators and from the institutions were analyzed for different imaging sites, shift directions, and imaging modalities. Results: The remote review process was successfully carried out for 87 3D cases (out of 137 total cases, including 2-dimensional and 3D) during 2010. Frequent errors in submitted IGRT data and challenges in the review of image registration for some special cases were identified. Workarounds for these issues were developed. The average differences of registration results between reviewers and institutions ranged between 2 mm and 3 mm. Large discrepancies in the superior-inferior direction were found for megavoltage CT cases, owing to low spatial resolution in this direction for most megavoltage CT cases. Conclusion: This first experience indicated that remote review for 3D IGRT as part of QA

  19. Cherenkov imaging and biochemical sensing in vivo during radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongxiao

    While Cherenkov emission was discovered more than eighty years ago, the potential applications of imaging this during radiation therapy have just recently been explored. With approximately half of all cancer patients being treated by radiation at some point during their cancer management, there is a constant challenge to ensure optimal treatment efficiency is achieved with maximal tumor to normal tissue therapeutic ratio. To achieve this, the treatment process as well as biological information affecting the treatment should ideally be effective and directly derived from the delivery of radiation to the patient. The value of Cherenkov emission imaging was examined here, primarily for visualization of treatment monitoring and then secondarily for Cherenkov-excited luminescence for tissue biochemical sensing within tissue. Through synchronized gating to the short radiation pulses of a linear accelerator (200Hz & 3 micros pulses), and applying a gated intensified camera for imaging, the Cherenkov radiation can be captured near video frame rates (30 frame per sec) with dim ambient room lighting. This procedure, sometimes termed Cherenkoscopy, is readily visualized without affecting the normal process of external beam radiation therapy. With simulation, phantoms and clinical trial data, each application of Cherenkoscopy was examined: i) for treatment monitoring, ii) for patient position monitoring and motion tracking, and iii) for superficial dose imaging. The temporal dynamics of delivered radiation fields can easily be directly imaged on the patient's surface. Image registration and edge detection of Cherenkov images were used to verify patient positioning during treatment. Inter-fraction setup accuracy and intra-fraction patient motion was detectable to better than 1 mm accuracy. Cherenkov emission in tissue opens up a new field of biochemical sensing within the tissue environment, using luminescent agents which can be activated by this light. In the first study of

  20. Dynamic Lung Tumor Tracking for Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kunos, Charles A.; Fabien, Jeffrey M.; Shanahan, John P.; Collen, Christine; Gevaert, Thierry; Poels, Kenneth; Van den Begin, Robbe; Engels, Benedikt; De Ridder, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Physicians considering stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SBRT) for the treatment of extracranial cancer targets must be aware of the sizeable risks for normal tissue injury and the hazards of physical tumor miss. A first-of-its-kind SBRT platform achieves high-precision ablative radiation treatment through a combination of versatile real-time imaging solutions and sophisticated tumor tracking capabilities. It uses dual-diagnostic kV x-ray units for stereoscopic open-loop feedback of cancer target intrafraction movement occurring as a consequence of respiratory motions and heartbeat. Image-guided feedback drives a gimbaled radiation accelerator (maximum 15 x 15 cm field size) capable of real-time ±4 cm pan-and-tilt action. Robot-driven ±60° pivots of an integrated ±185° rotational gantry allow for coplanar and non-coplanar accelerator beam set-up angles, ultimately permitting unique treatment degrees of freedom. State-of-the-art software aids real-time six dimensional positioning, ensuring irradiation of cancer targets with sub-millimeter accuracy (0.4 mm at isocenter). Use of these features enables treating physicians to steer radiation dose to cancer tumor targets while simultaneously reducing radiation dose to normal tissues. By adding respiration correlated computed tomography (CT) and 2-[18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-ᴅ-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) images into the planning system for enhanced tumor target contouring, the likelihood of physical tumor miss becomes substantially less1. In this article, we describe new radiation plans for the treatment of moving lung tumors. PMID:26131774

  1. Sparing of tissue by using micro-slit-beam radiation therapy reduces neurotoxicity compared with broad-beam radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mukumoto, Naritoshi; Nakayama, Masao; Akasaka, Hiroaki; Shimizu, Yasuyuki; Osuga, Saki; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Yoshida, Kenji; Ejima, Yasuo; Miura, Yasushi; Umetani, Keiji; Kondoh, Takeshi; Sasaki, Ryohei

    2017-01-01

    Micro-slit-beam radiation therapy (MRT) using synchrotron-generated X-ray beams allows for extremely high-dose irradiation. However, the toxicity of MRT in central nervous system (CNS) use is still unknown. To gather baseline toxicological data, we evaluated mortality in normal mice following CNS-targeted MRT. Male C57BL/6 J mice were head-fixed in a stereotaxic frame. Synchrotron X-ray-beam radiation was provided by the SPring-8 BL28B2 beam-line. For MRT, radiation was delivered to groups of mice in a 10 × 12 mm unidirectional array consisting of 25-μm-wide beams spaced 100, 200 or 300 μm apart; another group of mice received the equivalent broad-beam radiation therapy (BRT) for comparison. Peak and valley dose rates of the MRT were 120 and 0.7 Gy/s, respectively. Delivered doses were 96–960 Gy for MRT, and 24–120 Gy for BRT. Mortality was monitored for 90 days post-irradiation. Brain tissue was stained using hematoxylin and eosin to evaluate neural structure. Demyelination was evaluated by Klüver–Barrera staining. The LD50 and LD100 when using MRT were 600 Gy and 720 Gy, respectively, and when using BRT they were 80 Gy and 96 Gy, respectively. In MRT, mortality decreased as the center-to-center beam spacing increased from 100 μm to 300 μm. Cortical architecture was well preserved in MRT, whereas BRT induced various degrees of cerebral hemorrhage and demyelination. MRT was able to deliver extremely high doses of radiation, while still minimizing neuronal death. The valley doses, influenced by beam spacing and irradiated dose, could represent important survival factors for MRT. PMID:27422939

  2. Monitoring the radiation dose to a multiprogrammable pacemaker during radical radiation therapy: A case report

    SciTech Connect

    Muller-Runkel, R.; Orsolini, G.; Kalokhe, U.P. )

    1990-11-01

    Multiprogrammable pacemakers, using complimentary metaloxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuitry, may fail during radiation therapy. We report about a patient who received 6,400 cGy for unresectable carcinoma of the left lung. In supine treatment position, arms raised above the head, the pacemaker was outside the treated area by a margin of at least 1 cm, shielded by cerrobend blocking mounted on a tray. From thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements, we estimate that the pacemaker received 620 cGy in scatter doses. Its function was monitored before, during, and after completion of radiation therapy. The pacemaker was functioning normally until the patient's death 5 months after completion of treatment. The relevant electrocardiograms (ECGs) are presented.

  3. Arc binary intensity modulated radiation therapy (AB IMRT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun

    The state of the art Intensity Modulate Radiation Therapy (IMRT) has been one of the most significant breakthroughs in the cancer treatment in the past 30 years. There are two types of IMRT systems. The first system is the binary-based tomotherapy, represented by the Peacock (Nomos Corp) and Tomo unit (TomoTherapy Inc.), adopting specific binary collimator leafs to deliver intensity modulated radiation fields in a serial or helical fashion. The other uses the conventional dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) to deliver intensity modulated fields through a number of gantry positions. The proposed Arc Binary IMRT attempts to deliver Tomo-like IMRT with conventional dynamic MLC and combines the advantages of the two types of IMRT techniques: (1) maximizing the number of pencil beams for better dose optimization, (2) enabling conventional linear accelerator with dynamic MLC to deliver Tomo-like IMRT. In order to deliver IMRT with conventional dynamic MLC in a binary fashion, the slice-by-slice treatment with limited slice thickness has been proposed in the thesis to accommodate the limited MLC traveling speed. Instead of moving the patient to subsequent treatment slices, the proposed method offsets MLC to carry out the whole treatment, slice by slice sequentially, thus avoid patient position error. By denoting one arc pencil beam set as a gene, genetic algorithm (GA) is used as the searching engine for the dose optimization process. The selection of GA parameters is a crucial step and has been studied in depth so that the optimization process will converge with reasonable speed. Several hypothetical and clinical cases have been tested with the proposed IMRT method. The comparison of the dose distribution with other commercially available IMRT systems demonstrates the clear advantage of the new method. The proposed Arc Binary Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy is not only theoretically sound but practically feasible. The implementation of this method would expand the

  4. Change in Seroma Volume During Whole-Breast Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Rajiv; Spierer, Marnee Mutyala, Subhakar; Thawani, Nitika; Cohen, Hillel W.; Hong, Linda; Garg, Madhur K.; Kalnicki, Shalom

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: After breast-conserving surgery, a seroma often forms in the surgical cavity. If not drained, it may affect the volume of tumor bed requiring a boost after whole-breast radiation therapy (WBRT). Our objective was to evaluate the change in seroma volume that occurs during WBRT, before boost planning. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed of women receiving breast-conserving therapy with evidence of seroma at the time of WBRT planning. Computed tomography (CT) simulation was performed before WBRT and before the tumor bed boost. All patients received either a hypofractionated (42.4 Gy/16 fraction + 9.6 Gy/4 fraction boost) or standard fractionated (50.4 Gy/28 fraction + 10 Gy/5 fraction boost) regimen. Seroma volumes were contoured and compared on CT at the time of WBRT simulation and tumor bed boost planning. Results: Twenty-four patients with evidence of seroma were identified and all patients received WBRT without drainage of the seroma. Mean seroma volume before WBRT and at boost planning were significantly different at 65.7 cm{sup 3} (SD, 50.5 cm{sup 3}) and 35.6 cm{sup 3} (SD, 24.8 cm{sup 3}), respectively (p < 0.001). Mean and median reduction in seroma volume during radiation were 39.6% (SD, 23.8%) and 46.2% (range, 10.7-76.7%), respectively. Fractionation schedule was not correlated with change in seroma volume. Length of time from surgery to start of radiation therapy showed an inverse correlation with change in seroma volume (Pearson correlation r = -0.53, p < 0.01). Conclusions: The volume of seroma changes significantly during WBRT. Consequently, the accuracy of breast boost planning is likely affected, as is the volume of normal breast tissue irradiated. CT-based boost planning before boost irradiation is suggested to ensure appropriate coverage.

  5. A Method for Evaluating Quality Assurance Needs in Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huq, M. Saiful Fraass, Benedick A.; Dunscombe, Peter B.; Gibbons, John P.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Medin, Paul M.; Mundt, Arno; Mutic, Sassa; Palta, Jatinder R.; Thomadsen, Bruce R.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Yorke, Ellen D.

    2008-05-01

    The increasing complexity of modern radiation therapy planning and delivery techniques challenges traditional prescriptive quality control and quality assurance programs that ensure safety and reliability of treatment planning and delivery systems under all clinical scenarios. Until now quality management (QM) guidelines published by concerned organizations (e.g., American Association of Physicists in Medicine [AAPM], European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology [ESTRO], International Atomic Energy Agency [IAEA]) have focused on monitoring functional performance of radiotherapy equipment by measurable parameters, with tolerances set at strict but achievable values. In the modern environment, however, the number and sophistication of possible tests and measurements have increased dramatically. There is a need to prioritize QM activities in a way that will strike a balance between being reasonably achievable and optimally beneficial to patients. A systematic understanding of possible errors over the course of a radiation therapy treatment and the potential clinical impact of each is needed to direct limited resources in such a way to produce maximal benefit to the quality of patient care. Task Group 100 of the AAPM has taken a broad view of these issues and is developing a framework for designing QM activities, and hence allocating resources, based on estimates of clinical outcome, risk assessment, and failure modes. The report will provide guidelines on risk assessment approaches with emphasis on failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) and an achievable QM program based on risk analysis. Examples of FMEA to intensity-modulated radiation therapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy are presented. Recommendations on how to apply this new approach to individual clinics and further research and development will also be discussed.

  6. A method for evaluating quality assurance needs in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Huq, M Saiful; Fraass, Benedick A; Dunscombe, Peter B; Gibbons, John P; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Medin, Paul M; Mundt, Arno; Mutic, Sassa; Palta, Jatinder R; Thomadsen, Bruce R; Williamson, Jeffrey F; Yorke, Ellen D

    2008-01-01

    The increasing complexity of modern radiation therapy planning and delivery techniques challenges traditional prescriptive quality control and quality assurance programs that ensure safety and reliability of treatment planning and delivery systems under all clinical scenarios. Until now quality management (QM) guidelines published by concerned organizations (e.g., American Association of Physicists in Medicine [AAPM], European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology [ESTRO], International Atomic Energy Agency [IAEA]) have focused on monitoring functional performance of radiotherapy equipment by measurable parameters, with tolerances set at strict but achievable values. In the modern environment, however, the number and sophistication of possible tests and measurements have increased dramatically. There is a need to prioritize QM activities in a way that will strike a balance between being reasonably achievable and optimally beneficial to patients. A systematic understanding of possible errors over the course of a radiation therapy treatment and the potential clinical impact of each is needed to direct limited resources in such a way to produce maximal benefit to the quality of patient care. Task Group 100 of the AAPM has taken a broad view of these issues and is developing a framework for designing QM activities, and hence allocating resources, based on estimates of clinical outcome, risk assessment, and failure modes. The report will provide guidelines on risk assessment approaches with emphasis on failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) and an achievable QM program based on risk analysis. Examples of FMEA to intensity-modulated radiation therapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy are presented. Recommendations on how to apply this new approach to individual clinics and further research and development will also be discussed.

  7. Reversible neurotoxicity following hyperfractionated radiation therapy of brain stem glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Griebel, M.; Friedman, H.S.; Halperin, E.C.; Wiener, M.D.; Marks, L.; Oakes, W.J.; Hoffman, J.M.; DeLong, G.R.; Schold, S.C.; Hockenberger, B. )

    1991-01-01

    Two patients with brain stem gliomas were treated with hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFR) (7,020 and 7,560 cGy, respectively). Despite initial clinical improvement during irradiation, both patients demonstrated clinical deterioration approximately 3 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a progressive increase in distribution of abnormal brain stem signal consistent with either tumor or edema. {sup 18}FDG positron emission tomography (PET) was obtained in one patient and demonstrated a hypermetabolic lesion at diagnosis and a hypometabolic lesion at the time of clinical deterioration postirradiation. Management with a tapering dose of dexamethasone alone resulted in marked clinical (both patients) and radiographic (one patient) improvement, allowing reduction or discontinuation of this medication. These results suggest that patients with brain stem tumors demonstrating clinical and radiographic evidence of progressive tumor shortly after completion of HFR should be initially managed conservatively with dexamethasone, since these findings may be manifestations of reversible radiation-related neurotoxicity.

  8. Hematopoietic bone marrow recovery after radiation therapy: MRI evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Casamassima, F.; Ruggiero, C.; Caramella, D.; Tinacci, E.; Villari, N.; Ruggiero, M. )

    1989-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is able to detect the increase of adipocytes in the hematopoietic bone marrow that occurs as a consequence of radiotherapy and is indicative of the loss of myeloid tissue. By monitoring this process, it is also possible to determine the recovery of the bone marrow. The amount of viable hematopoietic tissue plays a fundamental role in determining whether the patient is able to undergo further antineoplastic therapy, particularly chemotherapy. We examined 35 patients who had been treated with radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma (12), uterine cervix carcinoma (nine), ovarian dysgerminoma (six), testicular seminoma (four), and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (four). We observed that radiation-induced modifications of the MRI pattern in the bone marrow are tightly linked to two parameters; the administered radiation dose and the length of time passed after the treatment. Bone marrow recovery was observed only when patients were treated with doses lower than 50 Gy. The earlier radiation-induced modifications of the bone marrow MRI pattern occurred 6 to 12 months after irradiation, and they were most evident 5 to 6 years after the treatment. From 2 to 9 years after radiotherapy, we observed partial recovery. Complete recovery, when it occurred, was observed only 10 to 23 years after the treatment. Our results indicate that MRI studies are likely to be useful in the assessment of radiation-induced injuries.

  9. Hypofractionated radiation therapy of oral melanoma in five cats.

    PubMed

    Farrelly, John; Denman, David L; Hohenhaus, Ann E; Patnaik, Amiya K; Bergman, Philip J

    2004-01-01

    Five cats with melanoma involving the oral cavity were treated with hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT). Cobalt photons were used to administer three fractions of 8.0 Gray (Gy) for a total dose of 24 Gy. Four cats received radiation on days 0, 7, and 21 and one cat received radiation on days 0, 7, and 13. One of the cats received additional irradiation following the initial treatment course. Two cats received chemotherapy. Their age ranged from 11 to 15 years with a median age of 12 years. Three cats had a response to radiation, including one complete response and two partial responses. All five cats were euthanized due to progression of disease, with one cat having evidence of metastatic disease at the time of euthanasia. The median survival time for the five cats was 146 days (range 66-224 days) from the start of RT. The results of this study suggest that oral melanoma in cats may be responsive to hypofractionated RT, but response does not seem to be durable.

  10. Cancer stem cells, cancer cell plasticity and radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Since the first prospective identification of cancer stem cells in solid cancers the cancer stem cell hypothesis has reemerged as a research topic of increasing interest. It postulates that solid cancers are organized hierarchically with a small number of cancer stem cells driving tumor growth, repopulation after injury and metastasis. They give rise to differentiated progeny, which lack these features. The model predicts that for any therapy to provide cure, all cancer stem cells have to be eliminated while the survival of differentiated progeny is less critical. In this review we discuss recent reports challenging the idea of a unidirectional differentiation of cancer cells. These reports provide evidence supporting the idea that non-stem cancer cells exhibit a remarkable degree of plasticity that allows them to re-acquire cancer stem cell traits, especially in the context of radiation therapy. We summarize conditions under which differentiation is reversed and discuss the current knowledge of the underlying mechanisms.

  11. Novel Multicompartment 3-Dimensional Radiochromic Radiation Dosimeters for Nanoparticle-Enhanced Radiation Therapy Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Alqathami, Mamdooh; Blencowe, Anton; Yeo, Un Jin; Doran, Simon J.; Qiao, Greg; Geso, Moshi

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Gold nanoparticles (AuNps), because of their high atomic number (Z), have been demonstrated to absorb low-energy X-rays preferentially, compared with tissue, and may be used to achieve localized radiation dose enhancement in tumors. The purpose of this study is to introduce the first example of a novel multicompartment radiochromic radiation dosimeter and to demonstrate its applicability for 3-dimensional (3D) dosimetry of nanoparticle-enhanced radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A novel multicompartment phantom radiochromic dosimeter was developed. It was designed and formulated to mimic a tumor loaded with AuNps (50 nm in diameter) at a concentration of 0.5 mM, surrounded by normal tissues. The novel dosimeter is referred to as the Sensitivity Modulated Advanced Radiation Therapy (SMART) dosimeter. The dosimeters were irradiated with 100-kV and 6-MV X-ray energies. Dose enhancement produced from the interaction of X-rays with AuNps was calculated using spectrophotometric and cone-beam optical computed tomography scanning by quantitatively comparing the change in optical density and 3D datasets of the dosimetric measurements between the tissue-equivalent (TE) and TE/AuNps compartments. The interbatch and intrabatch variability and the postresponse stability of the dosimeters with AuNps were also assessed. Results: Radiation dose enhancement factors of 1.77 and 1.11 were obtained using 100-kV and 6-MV X-ray energies, respectively. The results of this study are in good agreement with previous observations; however, for the first time we provide direct experimental confirmation and 3D visualization of the radiosensitization effect of AuNps. The dosimeters with AuNps showed small (<3.5%) interbatch variability and negligible (<0.5%) intrabatch variability. Conclusions: The SMART dosimeter yields experimental insights concerning the spatial distributions and elevated dose in nanoparticle-enhanced radiation therapy, which cannot be performed using any of

  12. 3D Monte Carlo radiation transfer modelling of photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, C. Louise; Christison, Craig; Brown, C. Tom A.; Wood, Kenneth; Valentine, Ronan M.; Moseley, Harry

    2015-06-01

    The effects of ageing and skin type on Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) for different treatment methods have been theoretically investigated. A multilayered Monte Carlo Radiation Transfer model is presented where both daylight activated PDT and conventional PDT are compared. It was found that light penetrates deeper through older skin with a lighter complexion, which translates into a deeper effective treatment depth. The effect of ageing was found to be larger for darker skin types. The investigation further strengthens the usage of daylight as a potential light source for PDT where effective treatment depths of about 2 mm can be achieved.

  13. Linear algebraic methods applied to intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Crooks, S M; Xing, L

    2001-10-01

    Methods of linear algebra are applied to the choice of beam weights for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). It is shown that the physical interpretation of the beam weights, target homogeneity and ratios of deposited energy can be given in terms of matrix equations and quadratic forms. The methodology of fitting using linear algebra as applied to IMRT is examined. Results are compared with IMRT plans that had been prepared using a commercially available IMRT treatment planning system and previously delivered to cancer patients.

  14. 3D measurement of absolute radiation dose in grid therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trapp, J. V.; Warrington, A. P.; Partridge, M.; Philps, A.; Leach, M. O.; Webb, S.

    2004-01-01

    Spatially fractionated radiotherapy through a grid is a concept which has a long history and was routinely used in orthovoltage radiation therapy in the middle of last century to minimize damage to the skin and subcutaneous tissue. With the advent of megavoltage radiotherapy and its skin sparing effects the use of grids in radiotherapy declined in the 1970s. However there has recently been a revival of the technique for use in palliative treatments with a single fraction of 10 to 20 Gy. In this work the absolute 3D dose distribution in a grid irradiation is measured for photons using a combination of film and gel dosimetry.

  15. Obstructive ureteropathy following radiation therapy for carcinoma of the cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Parliament, M.; Genest, P.; Girard, A.; Gerig, L.; Prefontaine, M.

    1989-05-01

    Between January 1959 and December 1986, 10 of 328 patients (3%) treated with curative intent using primary radiation therapy for carcinoma of the cervix developed obstructive ureteropathy due to fibrosis. The mean age of the patients with obstructive ureteropathy was 45 years and the median time to obstruction was 26 months. The obstruction was unilateral in 8 cases and involved the parametrial portion of the ureter in at least 5 cases. No predisposing risk factor was found to be associated with the development of obstructive ureteropathy. After corrective surgery, renal function remained normal in 8 patients, and resolution of the hydronephrosis occurred in 4 patients.

  16. Fast Monte Carlo for radiation therapy: the PEREGRINE Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann Siantar, C.L.; Bergstrom, P.M.; Chandler, W.P.; Cox, L.J.; Daly, T.P.; Garrett, D.; House, R.K.; Moses, E.I.; Powell, C.L.; Patterson, R.W.; Schach von Wittenau, A.E.

    1997-11-11

    The purpose of the PEREGRINE program is to bring high-speed, high- accuracy, high-resolution Monte Carlo dose calculations to the desktop in the radiation therapy clinic. PEREGRINE is a three- dimensional Monte Carlo dose calculation system designed specifically for radiation therapy planning. It provides dose distributions from external beams of photons, electrons, neutrons, and protons as well as from brachytherapy sources. Each external radiation source particle passes through collimator jaws and beam modifiers such as blocks, compensators, and wedges that are used to customize the treatment to maximize the dose to the tumor. Absorbed dose is tallied in the patient or phantom as Monte Carlo simulation particles are followed through a Cartesian transport mesh that has been manually specified or determined from a CT scan of the patient. This paper describes PEREGRINE capabilities, results of benchmark comparisons, calculation times and performance, and the significance of Monte Carlo calculations for photon teletherapy. PEREGRINE results show excellent agreement with a comprehensive set of measurements for a wide variety of clinical photon beam geometries, on both homogeneous and heterogeneous test samples or phantoms. PEREGRINE is capable of calculating >350 million histories per hour for a standard clinical treatment plan. This results in a dose distribution with voxel standard deviations of <2% of the maximum dose on 4 million voxels with 1 mm resolution in the CT-slice plane in under 20 minutes. Calculation times include tracking particles through all patient specific beam delivery components as well as the patient. Most importantly, comparison of Monte Carlo dose calculations with currently-used algorithms reveal significantly different dose distributions for a wide variety of treatment sites, due to the complex 3-D effects of missing tissue, tissue heterogeneities, and accurate modeling of the radiation source.

  17. Delineation of Supraclavicular Target Volumes in Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Lindsay C.; Diehn, Felix E.; Boughey, Judy C.; Childs, Stephanie K.; Park, Sean S.; Yan, Elizabeth S.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Mutter, Robert W.

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: To map the location of gross supraclavicular metastases in patients with breast cancer, in order to determine areas at highest risk of harboring subclinical disease. Methods and Materials: Patients with axial imaging of gross supraclavicular disease were identified from an institutional breast cancer registry. Locations of the metastatic lymph nodes were transferred onto representative axial computed tomography images of the supraclavicular region and compared with the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) breast cancer atlas for radiation therapy planning. Results: Sixty-two patients with 161 supraclavicular nodal metastases were eligible for study inclusion. At the time of diagnosis, 117 nodal metastases were present in 44 patients. Forty-four nodal metastases in 18 patients were detected at disease recurrence, 4 of whom had received prior radiation to the supraclavicular fossa. Of the 161 nodal metastases, 95 (59%) were within the RTOG consensus volume, 4 nodal metastases (2%) in 3 patients were marginally within the volume, and 62 nodal metastases (39%) in 30 patients were outside the volume. Supraclavicular disease outside the RTOG consensus volume was located in 3 regions: at the level of the cricoid and thyroid cartilage (superior to the RTOG volume), in the posterolateral supraclavicular fossa (posterolateral to the RTOG volume), and in the lateral low supraclavicular fossa (lateral to the RTOG volume). Only women with multiple supraclavicular metastases had nodal disease that extended superiorly to the level of the thyroid cartilage. Conclusions: For women with risk of harboring subclinical supraclavicular disease warranting the addition of supraclavicular radiation, coverage of the posterior triangle and the lateral low supraclavicular region should be considered. For women with known supraclavicular disease, extension of neck coverage superior to the cricoid cartilage may be warranted.

  18. A case of radiation retinopathy of left eye after radiation therapy of right brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kwon Ho; Chang, Sung Dong

    2009-06-01

    A 37-year-old female, who had received modified radical mastectomy for cancer of her right breast, presented with decreased visual acuity in the left eye after radiation therapy for the management of the metastasis to her right brain 14 months ago. After ocular examination, we diagnosed her as radiation retinopathy. At the time of the first visit, the corrected best visual acuity was 0.4 in the left eye, and fundus examination revealed cotton wool spots and cystoid macular edema (CME). The findings in the right eye were normal except for cotton wool spots in the superior major arch. Fluorescein angiography (FA) showed marked telangiectasia and microaneurysms in her left eye but tiny microaneurysms in her right eye. Subsequent optical coherent tomography (OCT) showed CME. We injected intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide (TA). Two weeks after treatment, the visual acuity was improved to 0.6 and the retinal thickness was decreased. Three months later, the visual acuity in the left eye was dropped to 0.3 due to the recurrence of CME, so we injected intravitreal TA again. Five months later, visual acuity was improved to 0.5 and OCT revealed the improvement of CME. The incidence of radiation retinopathy is higher in the side nearer to radiation, but careful radiation blocking is also required on the opposite side of irradiation site considering the possibility of radiation retinopathy and careful observation is required on both sides of the eyes when performing fundus examination.

  19. Surgery and radiation therapy for extramedullary plasmacytoma of the penile mucosa in a dog.

    PubMed

    Wypij, Jackie M; de Lorimier, Louis-Philippe

    2012-09-01

    A 10-year-old neutered male Italian greyhound dog was presented because it had a penile plasmacytoma. Surgery followed by radiation therapy resulted in local control and survival for 1688 days. This is the first report of surgery and definitive radiation therapy for curative intent therapy of extramedullary penile plasmacytoma in a dog.

  20. Monte Carlo dose enhancement studies in microbeam radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Rovira, I.; Prezado, Y.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: A radical radiation therapy treatment for gliomas requires extremely high absorbed doses resulting in subsequent deleterious side effects in healthy tissue. Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is an innovative technique based on the fact that normal tissue can withstand high radiation doses in small volumes without any significant damage. The synchrotron-generated x-ray beam is collimated and delivered to an array of narrow micrometer-sized planar rectangular fields. Several preclinical experiments performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) confirmed that MRT yields a higher therapeutic index than nonsegmented beams of the same characteristics. This index can be greatly improved by loading the tumor with high atomic number (Z) contrast agents. The aim of this work is to find the high-Z element that provides optimum dose enhancement. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations (PENELOPE/penEasy) were performed to assess the peak and valley doses as well as their ratio (PVDR) in healthy tissue and in the tumor, loaded with different contrast agents. The optimization criteria used were maximization of the ratio between the PVDR values in healthy tissue respect to the PVDR in the tumor and minimization of bone and brain valley doses. Results: Dose enhancement factors, PVDR, and valley doses were calculated for different high-Z elements. A significant decrease of PVDR values in the tumor, accompanied by a gain in the valley doses, was found in the presence of high-Z elements. This enables the deposited dose in the healthy tissue to be reduced. The optimum high-Z element depends on the irradiation configuration. As a general trend, the best outcome is provided by the highest Z contrast agents considered, i.e., gold and thallium. However, lanthanides (especially Lu) and hafnium also offer a satisfactory performance. Conclusions: The remarkable therapeutic index in microbeam radiation therapy can be further

  1. Radiation-Induced Leukemia at Doses Relevant to Radiation Therapy: Modeling Mechanisms and Estimating Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuryak, Igor; Sachs, Rainer K.; Hlatky, Lynn; Mark P. Little; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Brenner, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Because many cancer patients are diagnosed earlier and live longer than in the past, second cancers induced by radiation therapy have become a clinically significant issue. An earlier biologically based model that was designed to estimate risks of high-dose radiation induced solid cancers included initiation of stem cells to a premalignant state, inactivation of stem cells at high radiation doses, and proliferation of stem cells during cellular repopulation after inactivation. This earlier model predicted the risks of solid tumors induced by radiation therapy but overestimated the corresponding leukemia risks. Methods: To extend the model to radiation-induced leukemias, we analyzed in addition to cellular initiation, inactivation, and proliferation a repopulation mechanism specific to the hematopoietic system: long-range migration through the blood stream of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from distant locations. Parameters for the model were derived from HSC biologic data in the literature and from leukemia risks among atomic bomb survivors v^ ho were subjected to much lower radiation doses. Results: Proliferating HSCs that migrate from sites distant from the high-dose region include few preleukemic HSCs, thus decreasing the high-dose leukemia risk. The extended model for leukemia provides risk estimates that are consistent with epidemiologic data for leukemia risk associated with radiation therapy over a wide dose range. For example, when applied to an earlier case-control study of 110000 women undergoing radiotherapy for uterine cancer, the model predicted an excess relative risk (ERR) of 1.9 for leukemia among women who received a large inhomogeneous fractionated external beam dose to the bone marrow (mean = 14.9 Gy), consistent with the measured ERR (2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.2 to 6.4; from 3.6 cases expected and 11 cases observed). As a corresponding example for brachytherapy, the predicted ERR of 0.80 among women who received an inhomogeneous low

  2. Has the use of computers in radiation therapy improved the accuracy in radiation dose delivery?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dyk, J.; Battista, J.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: It is well recognized that computer technology has had a major impact on the practice of radiation oncology. This paper addresses the question as to how these computer advances have specifically impacted the accuracy of radiation dose delivery to the patient. Methods: A review was undertaken of all the key steps in the radiation treatment process ranging from machine calibration to patient treatment verification and irradiation. Using a semi-quantitative scale, each stage in the process was analysed from the point of view of gains in treatment accuracy. Results: Our critical review indicated that computerization related to digital medical imaging (ranging from target volume localization, to treatment planning, to image-guided treatment) has had the most significant impact on the accuracy of radiation treatment. Conversely, the premature adoption of intensity-modulated radiation therapy has actually degraded the accuracy of dose delivery compared to 3-D conformal radiation therapy. While computational power has improved dose calibration accuracy through Monte Carlo simulations of dosimeter response parameters, the overall impact in terms of percent improvement is relatively small compared to the improvements accrued from 3-D/4-D imaging. Conclusions: As a result of computer applications, we are better able to see and track the internal anatomy of the patient before, during and after treatment. This has yielded the most significant enhancement to the knowledge of "in vivo" dose distributions in the patient. Furthermore, a much richer set of 3-D/4-D co-registered dose-image data is thus becoming available for retrospective analysis of radiobiological and clinical responses.

  3. Mertk on tumor macrophages is a therapeutic target to prevent tumor recurrence following radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Crittenden, Marka R.; Baird, Jason; Friedman, David; Savage, Talicia; Uhde, Lauren; Alice, Alejandro; Cottam, Benjamin; Young, Kristina; Newell, Pippa; Nguyen, Cynthia; Bambina, Shelly; Kramer, Gwen; Akporiaye, Emmanuel; Malecka, Anna; Jackson, Andrew; Gough, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy provides a means to kill large numbers of cancer cells in a controlled location resulting in the release of tumor-specific antigens and endogenous adjuvants. However, by activating pathways involved in apoptotic cell recognition and phagocytosis, irradiated cancer cells engender suppressive phenotypes in macrophages. We demonstrate that the macrophage-specific phagocytic receptor, Mertk is upregulated in macrophages in the tumor following radiation therapy. Ligation of Mertk on macrophages results in anti-inflammatory cytokine responses via NF-kB p50 upregulation, which in turn limits tumor control following radiation therapy. We demonstrate that in immunogenic tumors, loss of Mertk is sufficient to permit tumor cure following radiation therapy. However, in poorly immunogenic tumors, TGFb inhibition is also required to result in tumor cure following radiation therapy. These data demonstrate that Mertk is a highly specific target whose absence permits tumor control in combination with radiation therapy. PMID:27602953

  4. Pioneer F Plaque Location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Pioneer F spacecraft, destined to be the first man made object to escape from the solar system into interstellar space, carries this pictorial plaque. It is designed to show scientifically educated inhabitants of some other star system, who might intercept it millions of years from now, when Pioneer was launched, from where, and by what kind of beings. (Hopefully, any aliens reading the plaque will not use this knowledge to immediately invade Earth.) The design is etched into a 6 inch by 9 inch gold-anodized aluminum plate, attached to the spacecraft's attenna support struts in a position to help shield it from erosion by interstellar dust. The radiating lines at left represents the positions of 14 pulsars, a cosmic source of radio energy, arranged to indicate our sun as the home star of our civilization. The '1-' symbols at the ends of the lines are binary numbers that represent the frequencies of these pulsars at the time of launch of Pioneer F relative of that to the hydrogen atom shown at the upper left with a '1' unity symbol. The hydrogen atom is thus used as a 'universal clock,' and the regular decrease in the frequencies of the pulsars will enable another civilization to determine the time that has elapsed since Pioneer F was launched. The hydrogen is also used as a 'universal yardstick' for sizing the human figures and outline of the spacecraft shown on the right. The hydrogen wavelength, about 8 inches, multiplied by the binary number representing '8' shown next to the woman gives her height, 64 inches. The figures represent the type of creature that created Pioneer. The man's hand is raised in a gesture of good will. Across the bottom are the planets, ranging outward from the Sun, with the spacecraft trajectory arching away from Earth, passing Mars, and swinging by Jupiter.

  5. Subacute brain atrophy after radiation therapy for malignant brain tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, A.; Matsutani, M.; Kohno, T.; Nakamura, O.; Tanaka, H.; Fujimaki, T.; Funada, N.; Matsuda, T.; Nagata, K.; Takakura, K.

    1989-05-15

    Brain atrophy with mental and neurologic deterioration developing a few months after radiation therapy in patients without residual or recurrent brain tumors has been recognized. Two illustrative case reports of this pathologic entity are presented. Six autopsy cases with this entity including the two cases were reviewed neurologically, radiographically, and histopathologically. All patients presented progressive disturbances of mental status and consciousness, akinesia, and tremor-like involuntary movement. Computerized tomography (CT) demonstrated marked enlargement of the ventricles, moderate widening of the cortical sulci, and a moderately attenuated CT number for the white matter in all six patients. Four of the six patients had CSF drainage (ventriculoperitoneal shunt or continuous lumbar drainage), however, none of them improved. Histologic examination demonstrated swelling and loss of the myelin sheath in the white matter in all patients, and reactive astrocytosis in three of the six patients. Neither prominent neuronal loss in the cerebral cortex or basal ganglia, nor axonal loss in the white matter was generally identified. The blood vessels of the cerebral cortex and white matter were normal. Ependymal layer and the surrounding brain tissue were normal in all patients. These findings suggested that this pathologic condition results from demyelination secondary to direct neurotoxic effect of irradiation. The authors' previous report was reviewed and the differential diagnoses, the risk factors for this pathologic entity, and the indication for radiation therapy in aged patients with a malignant brain tumor are discussed.

  6. Interference detection in implantable defibrillators induced by therapeutic radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Uiterwaal, G.J.; Springorum, B.G.F.; Scheepers, E.; de Ruiter, G.S.; Hurkmans, C.W.

    2006-01-01

    Background Electromagnetic fields and ionising radiation during radiotherapy can influence the functioning of ICDs. Guidelines for radiotherapy treatment were published in 1994, but only based on experience with pacemakers. Data on the influence of radiotherapy on ICDs is limited. Objectives We determined the risk to ICDs of interference detection induced by radiotherapy. Methods In our study we irradiated 11 ICDs. The irradiation was performed with a 6 megavolt photon beam. In each individual device test, a total of 20 Gray was delivered in a fractionated fashion. During each irradiation the output stimulation rate was monitored and electrogram storage was activated. In case of interference the test was repeated with the ICD outside and the lead(s) inside and outside the irradiation field. Results With the ICD inside the irradiation field, interference detection was observed in all ICDs. This caused pacing inhibition or rapid ventricular pacing. Ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF) detection occurred, which would have caused tachycardia-terminating therapy. If the ICD was placed outside the irradiation field, no interference was observed. Conclusion Interference by ionising radiation on the ICDs is demonstrated both on bradycardia and tachycardia therapy. This can have consequences for patients. Recommendations for radiotherapy are presented in this article. ImagesFigure 1Figure 5 PMID:25696559

  7. Image-guided radiation therapy in lymphoma management

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is a process of incorporating imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Positron emission tomography (PET), and ultrasound (US) during radiation therapy (RT) to improve treatment accuracy. It allows real-time or near real-time visualization of anatomical information to ensure that the target is in its position as planned. In addition, changes in tumor volume and location due to organ motion during treatment can be also compensated. IGRT has been gaining popularity and acceptance rapidly in RT over the past 10 years, and many published data have been reported on prostate, bladder, head and neck, and gastrointestinal cancers. However, the role of IGRT in lymphoma management is not well defined as there are only very limited published data currently available. The scope of this paper is to review the current use of IGRT in the management of lymphoma. The technical and clinical aspects of IGRT, lymphoma imaging studies, the current role of IGRT in lymphoma management and future directions will be discussed. PMID:26484299

  8. Outcome and Prognostic Factors of Radiation Therapy for Medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Stefan; Mohr, Angela; Habermehl, Daniel; Welzel, Thomas; Lindel, Katja; Witt, Olaf; Kulozik, Andreas E.; Wick, Wolfgang; Debus, Juergen; Combs, Stephanie E.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate treatment outcome and prognostic factors after radiation therapy in patients with medulloblastomas (MB). Methods and Materials: Sixty-six patients with histologically confirmed MB were treated at University Hospital of Heidelberg between 1985 and 2009. Forty-two patients (64%) were pediatric ({<=}18 years), and 24 patients (36%) were adults. Tumor resection was performed in all patients and was complete in 47%. All patients underwent postoperative craniospinal irradiation (CSI) delivering a median craniospinal dose of 35.5 Gy with additional boosts to the posterior fossa up to 54.0 Gy. Forty-seven patients received chemotherapy, including 21 in whom chemotherapy was administered before CSI. Statistical analysis was performed using the log-rank test and the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median follow-up was 93 months. Overall survival (OS) and local and distant progression-free survival (LPFS and DPFS) were 73%, 62%, and 77% at 60 months. Both local and distant recurrence predisposed for significantly reduced OS. Macroscopic complete tumor resection, desmoplastic histology and early initiation of postoperative radiation therapy within 28 days were associated with improved outcome. The addition of chemotherapy did not improve survival rates. Toxicity was moderate. Conclusions: Complete resection of MB followed by CSI yields long survival rates in both children and adults. Delayed initiation of CSI is associated with poor outcome. Desmoplastic histology is associated with improved survival. The role of chemotherapy, especially in the adult population, must be further investigated in clinical studies.

  9. Intraluminal radiation therapy in the management of malignant biliary obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Molt, P.; Hopfan, S.; Watson, R.C.; Botet, J.F.; Brennan, M.F.

    1986-02-01

    Fifteen patients with malignant biliary obstruction from carcinoma of the bile ducts, gallbladder, and pancreas (Group I) or metastatic disease (Group II) were treated with intraluminal radiation therapy (ILRT) at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. In 11 cases ILRT was used as a central boost in combination with 3000 cGy external beam radiation therapy (ERT). No significant treatment toxicity was observed. Cholangiographic response was observed in 2 of 12 evaluable patients. In no patient was long-term relief of jaundice without indwelling biliary stent achieved. Survival from treatment in eight Group I patients treated with ILRT +/- ERT was 3 to 13 months (median, 4.5). Survival in seven similarly treated Group II patients was 0.5 to 8 months (median, 4.0). Additional data for ten similar patients referred for ILRT but treated with ERT alone are presented. Analysis of this and other reports indicate the need for prospective controlled trials of the role of this regimen in the management of malignant biliary obstruction before wider application can be recommended.

  10. Inflammatory bowel diseases activity in patients undergoing pelvic radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Seisen, Thomas; Klotz, Caroline; Mazeron, Renaud; Maroun, Pierre; Petit, Claire; Deutsch, Eric; Bossi, Alberto; Haie-Meder, Christine; Chargari, Cyrus; Blanchard, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Background Few studies with contradictory results have been published on the safety of pelvic radiation therapy (RT) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods From 1989 to 2015, a single center retrospective analysis was performed including all IBD patients who received pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or brachytherapy (BT) for a pelvic malignancy. Treatment characteristics, IBD activity and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were examined. Results Overall, 28 patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) (n=13) or ulcerative colitis (n=15) were included in the present study. Median follow-up time after irradiation was 5.9 years. Regarding IBD activity, only one and two patients experienced a severe episode within and after 6 months of follow-up, respectively. Grade 3/4 acute GI toxicity occurred in 3 (11%) patients, whereas one (3.6%) patient experienced late grade 3/4 GI toxicity. Only patients with rectal IBD location (P=0.016) or low body mass index (BMI) (P=0.012) experienced more severe IBD activity within or after 6 months following RT, respectively. Conclusions We report an acceptable tolerance of RT in IBD patients with pelvic malignancies. Specifically, a low risk of uncontrolled flare-up was observed. PMID:28280621

  11. Managing Radiation Therapy Side Effects: What to Do When You Have Loose Stools (Diarrhea)

    MedlinePlus

    ... rice • White toast Fruits and other foods • Applesauce • Bananas • Canned fruit, such as peaches and pears • Gelatin ( ... series of 9 Radiation Therapy Side Effects Fact Sheets at: www. cancer. gov/ radiation- side- effects

  12. Molecular Pathways: Targeted α-Particle Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Yong, Kwon; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2012-01-01

    An α-particle, a 4He nucleus, is exquisitely cytotoxic, and indifferent to many limitations associated with conventional chemo- and radiotherapy. The exquisite cytotoxicity of α radiation, the result of its high mean energy deposition (high linear energy transfer, LET) and limited range in tissue, provides for a highly controlled therapeutic modality that can be targeted to selected malignant cells (targeted α-therapy (TAT)) with minimal normal tissue effects. There is a burgeoning interest in the development of TAT that is buoyed by the increasing number of ongoing clinical trials worldwide. The short path length renders α-emitters suitable for treatment and management of minimal disease such as micrometastases or residual tumor after surgical debulking, hematological cancers, infections, and compartmental cancers such as ovarian cancer or neoplastic meningitis. Yet, despite decades of study of high-LET radiation, the mechanistic pathways of the effects of this modality remain not well defined. The modality is effectively presumed to follow a simple therapeutic mechanism centered on catastrophic double strand (ds) DNA breaks without full examination of the actual molecular pathways and targets that are activated that directly impact cell survival or death. This Molecular Pathways article provides an overview of the mechanisms and pathways that are involved in the response to and repair of TAT induced DNA damage as currently understood. Finally, this article highlights the current state of clinical translation of TAT as well as other high-LET radionuclide radiation therapy using α-emitters such as 225Ac, 211At, 213Bi, 212Pb and 223Ra. PMID:23230321

  13. Molecular pathways: targeted α-particle radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Baidoo, Kwamena E; Yong, Kwon; Brechbiel, Martin W

    2013-02-01

    An α-particle, a (4)He nucleus, is exquisitely cytotoxic and indifferent to many limitations associated with conventional chemo- and radiotherapy. The exquisite cytotoxicity of α-radiation, the result of its high mean energy deposition [high linear energy transfer (LET)] and limited range in tissue, provides for a highly controlled therapeutic modality that can be targeted to selected malignant cells [targeted α-therapy (TAT)] with minimal normal tissue effects. A burgeoning interest in the development of TAT is buoyed by the increasing number of ongoing clinical trials worldwide. The short path length renders α-emitters suitable for treatment and management of minimal disease such as micrometastases or residual tumor after surgical debulking, hematologic cancers, infections, and compartmental cancers such as ovarian cancer or neoplastic meningitis. Yet, despite decades of study of high LET radiation, the mechanistic pathways of the effects of this modality remain not well defined. The modality is effectively presumed to follow a simple therapeutic mechanism centered on catastrophic double-strand DNA breaks without full examination of the actual molecular pathways and targets that are activated that directly affect cell survival or death. This Molecular Pathways article provides an overview of the mechanisms and pathways that are involved in the response to and repair of TAT-induced DNA damage as currently understood. Finally, this article highlights the current state of clinical translation of TAT as well as other high-LET radionuclide radiation therapy using α-emitters such as (225)Ac, (211)At, (213)Bi, (212)Pb, and (223)Ra.

  14. Ultrasound Thermometry for Therapy-level Radiation Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Courtney

    2010-03-01

    Radiation oncology is the process of administering a specified dose of radiation to a patient currently receiving treatment for a form of cancer. In this process, it is vital to know the delivered dose for a given radiation beam to correctly treat a patient. The primary reference standard for absorbed dose is established using water calorimetry. The absorbed dose, typically of order 1 Gy (J/kg) at therapy levels, is realized by measuring sub-millikelvin temperature changes using a thermistor in a sensitive Wheatstone bridge. Ultrasound technology has been investigated as an alternative to thermistor measurements since the speed of sound propagation in water varies with temperature. With ultrasonic time-of-flight and highly sensitive phase detection techniques, temperature sensitivity comparable to that of the thermistor bridge has been achieved without introducing non-water materials into the test area. A single ultrasound transducer transmitting and receiving at 5.0 MHz throughout the length of the water phantom, and the phase change of the sound wave was used to determine temperature increase from an irradiative source at specified depths of the phantom. In this experiment, the exposure period was varied from 15s to 160s cyclically by modulating a heat lamp, and a profile of the measured temperature response as a function of the period was obtained using Fourier analysis. Due to the large temperature gradient in the water phantom, measurements are prone to convection which was indeed observed and will be discussed.

  15. Skeletal sequelae of radiation therapy for malignant childhood tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M.S.; Robertson, W.W. Jr.; Rate, W.; D'Angio, G.J.; Drummond, D.S. )

    1990-02-01

    One hundred forty-three patients who received radiation therapy for childhood tumors, and survived to the age of skeletal maturity, were studied by retrospective review of oncology records and roentgenograms. Diagnoses for the patients were the following: Hodgkin's lymphoma (44), Wilms's tumor (30), acute lymphocytic leukemia (26), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (18), Ewing's sarcoma (nine), rhabdomyosarcoma (six), neuroblastoma (six), and others (four). Age at the follow-up examination averaged 18 years (range, 14-28 years). Average length of follow-up study was 9.9 years (range, two to 18 years). Asymmetry of the chest and ribs was seen in 51 (36%) of these children. Fifty (35%) had scoliosis; 14 had kyphosis. In two children, the scoliosis was treated with a brace, while one developed significant kyphosing scoliosis after laminectomy and had spinal fusion. Twenty-three (16%) patients complained of significant pain at the radiation sites. Twelve of the patients developed leg-length inequality; eight of those were symptomatic. Three patients developed second primary tumors. Currently, the incidence of significant skeletal sequelae is lower and the manifestations are less severe than reported in the years from 1940 to 1970. The reduction in skeletal complications may be attributed to shielding of growth centers, symmetric field selection, decreased total radiation doses, and sequence changes in chemotherapy.

  16. In vivo modification of Abeta plaque toxicity as a novel neuroprotective lithium-mediated therapy for Alzheimer’s disease pathology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by the abnormal accumulation of extracellular beta-amyloid (Abeta) plaques, intracellular hyperphosphorylated tau, progressive synaptic alterations, axonal dystrophies, neuronal loss and the deterioration of cognitive capabilities of patients. However, no effective disease-modifying treatment has been yet developed. In this work we have evaluated whether chronic lithium treatment could ameliorate the neuropathology evolution of our well characterized PS1M146LxAPPSwe-London mice model. Results Though beneficial effects of lithium have been previously described in different AD models, here we report a novel in vivo action of this compound that efficiently ameliorated AD-like pathology progression and rescued memory impairments by reducing the toxicity of Abeta plaques. Transgenic PS1M146LxAPPSwe-London mice, treated before the pathology onset, developed smaller plaques characterized by higher Abeta compaction, reduced oligomeric-positive halo and therefore with attenuated capacity to induce neuronal damage. Importantly, neuronal loss in hippocampus and entorhinal cortex was fully prevented. Our data also demonstrated that the axonal dystrophic area associated with lithium-modified plaques was highly reduced. Moreover, a significant lower accumulation of phospho-tau, LC3-II and ubiquitinated proteins was detected in treated mice. Our study highlights that this switch of plaque quality by lithium could be mediated by astrocyte activation and the release of heat shock proteins, which concentrate in the core of the plaques. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that the pharmacological in vivo modulation of the extracellular Abeta plaque compaction/toxicity is indeed possible and, in addition, might constitute a novel promising and innovative approach to develop a disease-modifying therapeutic intervention against AD. PMID:24252759

  17. TH-F-202-03: Advances in MRI for Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cai, J

    2016-06-01

    MRI has excellent soft tissue contrast and can provide both anatomical and physiological information. It is becoming increasingly important in radiation therapy for treatment planning, image-guided radiation therapy, and treatment assessment. It is critically important at this time point to educate and update our medical physicists about MRI to prepare for the upcoming surge of MRI applications in radiation therapy. This session will review important basics of MR physics, pulse sequence designs, and current radiotherapy application, as well as showcase exciting new developments in MRI that can be potentially useful in radiation therapy.

  18. Combination Regimens of Radiation Therapy and Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines: Mechanisms and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Garnett-Benson, Charlie; Hodge, James W.; Gameiro, Sofia R.

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy is widely used with curative or palliative intent in the clinical management of multiple cancers. Although mainly aimed at direct tumor cell killing, mounting evidence suggests that radiation can alter the tumor to become an immunostimulatory milieu. Data suggest that the immunogenic effects of radiation can be exploited to promote synergistic antitumor effects in combination with immunotherapeutic agents. Here we review concepts associated with the immunogenic consequences of radiation therapy, and highlight how preclinical findings are translating into clinical benefit for patients receiving combination regimens of radiation therapy and therapeutic cancer vaccines. PMID:25481266

  19. Academic Career Selection and Retention in Radiation Oncology: The Joint Center for Radiation Therapy Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Balboni, Tracy A. . E-mail: tbalboni@partners.org; Chen, M.-H.; Harris, Jay R.; Recht, Abram; Stevenson, Mary Ann; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: The United States healthcare system has witnessed declining reimbursement and increasing documentation requirements for longer than 10 years. These have decreased the time available to academic faculty for teaching and mentorship. The impact of these changes on the career choices of residents is unknown. The purpose of this report was to determine whether changes have occurred during the past decade in the proportion of radiation oncology trainees from a single institution entering and staying in academic medicine. Methods and Materials: We performed a review of the resident employment experience of Harvard Joint Center for Radiation Therapy residents graduating during 13 recent consecutive years (n = 48 residents). The outcomes analyzed were the initial selection of an academic vs. nonacademic career and career changes during the first 3 years after graduation. Results: Of the 48 residents, 65% pursued an academic career immediately after graduation, and 44% remained in academics at the last follow-up, after a median of 6 years. A later graduation year was associated with a decrease in the proportion of graduates immediately entering academic medicine (odds ratio, 0.78; 95% confidence interval, 0.65-0.94). However, the retention rate at 3 years of those who did immediately enter academics increased with a later graduation year (p = 0.03). Conclusion: During a period marked by notable changes in the academic healthcare environment, the proportion of graduating Harvard Joint Center for Radiation Therapy residents pursuing academic careers has been declining; however, despite this decline, the retention rates in academia have increased.

  20. Scatter correction for cone-beam CT in radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lei; Xie, Yaoqin; Wang, Jing; Xing, Lei

    2009-01-01

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) is being increasingly used in modern radiation therapy for patient setup and adaptive replanning. However, due to the large volume of x-ray illumination, scatter becomes a rather serious problem and is considered as one of the fundamental limitations of CBCT image quality. Many scatter correction algorithms have been proposed in literature, while a standard practical solution still remains elusive. In radiation therapy, the same patient is scanned repetitively during a course of treatment, a natural question to ask is whether one can obtain the scatter distribution on the first day of treatment and then use the data for scatter correction in the subsequent scans on different days. To realize this scatter removal scheme, two technical pieces must be in place: (i) A strategy to obtain the scatter distribution in on-board CBCT imaging and (ii) a method to spatially match a prior scatter distribution with the on-treatment CBCT projection data for scatter subtraction. In this work, simple solutions to the two problems are provided. A partially blocked CBCT is used to extract the scatter distribution. The x-ray beam blocker has a strip pattern, such that partial volume can still be accurately reconstructed and the whole-field scatter distribution can be estimated from the detected signals in the shadow regions using interpolation∕extrapolation. In the subsequent scans, the patient transformation is determined using a rigid registration of the conventional CBCT and the prior partial CBCT. From the derived patient transformation, the measured scatter is then modified to adapt the new on-treatment patient geometry for scatter correction. The proposed method is evaluated using physical experiments on a clinical CBCT system. On the Catphan©600 phantom, the errors in Hounsfield unit (HU) in the selected regions of interest are reduced from about 350 to below 50 HU; on an anthropomorphic phantom, the error is reduced from 15.7% to 5.4%. The proposed

  1. Scatter correction for cone-beam CT in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Lei; Xie Yaoqin; Wang Jing; Xing Lei

    2009-06-15

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) is being increasingly used in modern radiation therapy for patient setup and adaptive replanning. However, due to the large volume of x-ray illumination, scatter becomes a rather serious problem and is considered as one of the fundamental limitations of CBCT image quality. Many scatter correction algorithms have been proposed in literature, while a standard practical solution still remains elusive. In radiation therapy, the same patient is scanned repetitively during a course of treatment, a natural question to ask is whether one can obtain the scatter distribution on the first day of treatment and then use the data for scatter correction in the subsequent scans on different days. To realize this scatter removal scheme, two technical pieces must be in place: (i) A strategy to obtain the scatter distribution in on-board CBCT imaging and (ii) a method to spatially match a prior scatter distribution with the on-treatment CBCT projection data for scatter subtraction. In this work, simple solutions to the two problems are provided. A partially blocked CBCT is used to extract the scatter distribution. The x-ray beam blocker has a strip pattern, such that partial volume can still be accurately reconstructed and the whole-field scatter distribution can be estimated from the detected signals in the shadow regions using interpolation/extrapolation. In the subsequent scans, the patient transformation is determined using a rigid registration of the conventional CBCT and the prior partial CBCT. From the derived patient transformation, the measured scatter is then modified to adapt the new on-treatment patient geometry for scatter correction. The proposed method is evaluated using physical experiments on a clinical CBCT system. On the Catphan(c)600 phantom, the errors in Hounsfield unit (HU) in the selected regions of interest are reduced from about 350 to below 50 HU; on an anthropomorphic phantom, the error is reduced from 15.7% to 5.4%. The proposed method

  2. Intraoperative radiation therapy using mobile electron linear accelerators: report of AAPM Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group No. 72.

    PubMed

    Beddar, A Sam; Biggs, Peter J; Chang, Sha; Ezzell, Gary A; Faddegon, Bruce A; Hensley, Frank W; Mills, Michael D

    2006-05-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) has been customarily performed either in a shielded operating suite located in the operating room (OR) or in a shielded treatment room located within the Department of Radiation Oncology. In both cases, this cancer treatment modality uses stationary linear accelerators. With the development of new technology, mobile linear accelerators have recently become available for IORT. Mobility offers flexibility in treatment location and is leading to a renewed interest in IORT. These mobile accelerator units, which can be transported any day of use to almost any location within a hospital setting, are assembled in a nondedicated environment and used to deliver IORT. Numerous aspects of the design of these new units differ from that of conventional linear accelerators. The scope of this Task Group (TG-72) will focus on items that particularly apply to mobile IORT electron systems. More specifically, the charges to this Task Group are to (i) identify the key differences between stationary and mobile electron linear accelerators used for IORT, (ii) describe and recommend the implementation of an IORT program within the OR environment, (iii) present and discuss radiation protection issues and consequences of working within a nondedicated radiotherapy environment, (iv) describe and recommend the acceptance and machine commissioning of items that are specific to mobile electron linear accelerators, and (v) design and recommend an efficient quality assurance program for mobile systems.

  3. Investigation of Radiation Protection Methodologies for Radiation Therapy Shielding Using Monte Carlo Simulation and Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanny, Sean

    The advent of high-energy linear accelerators for dedicated medical use in the 1950's by Henry Kaplan and the Stanford University physics department began a revolution in radiation oncology. Today, linear accelerators are the standard of care for modern radiation therapy and can generate high-energy beams that can produce tens of Gy per minute at isocenter. This creates a need for a large amount of shielding material to properly protect members of the public and hospital staff. Standardized vault designs and guidance on shielding properties of various materials are provided by the National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) Report 151. However, physicists are seeking ways to minimize the footprint and volume of shielding material needed which leads to the use of non-standard vault configurations and less-studied materials, such as high-density concrete. The University of Toledo Dana Cancer Center has utilized both of these methods to minimize the cost and spatial footprint of the requisite radiation shielding. To ensure a safe work environment, computer simulations were performed to verify the attenuation properties and shielding workloads produced by a variety of situations where standard recommendations and guidance documents were insufficient. This project studies two areas of concern that are not addressed by NCRP 151, the radiation shielding workload for the vault door with a non-standard design, and the attenuation properties of high-density concrete for both photon and neutron radiation. Simulations have been performed using a Monte-Carlo code produced by the Los Alamos National Lab (LANL), Monte Carlo Neutrons, Photons 5 (MCNP5). Measurements have been performed using a shielding test port designed into the maze of the Varian Edge treatment vault.

  4. Automatic CT simulation optimization for radiation therapy: A general strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hua Chen, Hsin-Chen; Tan, Jun; Gay, Hiram; Michalski, Jeff M.; Mutic, Sasa; Yu, Lifeng; Anastasio, Mark A.; Low, Daniel A.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: In radiation therapy, x-ray computed tomography (CT) simulation protocol specifications should be driven by the treatment planning requirements in lieu of duplicating diagnostic CT screening protocols. The purpose of this study was to develop a general strategy that allows for automatically, prospectively, and objectively determining the optimal patient-specific CT simulation protocols based on radiation-therapy goals, namely, maintenance of contouring quality and integrity while minimizing patient CT simulation dose. Methods: The authors proposed a general prediction strategy that provides automatic optimal CT simulation protocol selection as a function of patient size and treatment planning task. The optimal protocol is the one that delivers the minimum dose required to provide a CT simulation scan that yields accurate contours. Accurate treatment plans depend on accurate contours in order to conform the dose to actual tumor and normal organ positions. An image quality index, defined to characterize how simulation scan quality affects contour delineation, was developed and used to benchmark the contouring accuracy and treatment plan quality within the predication strategy. A clinical workflow was developed to select the optimal CT simulation protocols incorporating patient size, target delineation, and radiation dose efficiency. An experimental study using an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom with added-bolus layers was used to demonstrate how the proposed prediction strategy could be implemented and how the optimal CT simulation protocols could be selected for prostate cancer patients based on patient size and treatment planning task. Clinical IMRT prostate treatment plans for seven CT scans with varied image quality indices were separately optimized and compared to verify the trace of target and organ dosimetry coverage. Results: Based on the phantom study, the optimal image quality index for accurate manual prostate contouring was 4.4. The optimal tube

  5. Combinations of Radiation Therapy and Immunotherapy for Melanoma: A Review of Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Christopher A.; Postow, Michael A.

    2014-04-01

    Radiation therapy has long played a role in the management of melanoma. Recent advances have also demonstrated the efficacy of immunotherapy in the treatment of melanoma. Preclinical data suggest a biologic interaction between radiation therapy and immunotherapy. Several clinical studies corroborate these findings. This review will summarize the outcomes of studies reporting on patients with melanoma treated with a combination of radiation therapy and immunotherapy. Vaccine therapies often use irradiated melanoma cells, and may be enhanced by radiation therapy. The cytokines interferon-α and interleukin-2 have been combined with radiation therapy in several small studies, with some evidence suggesting increased toxicity and/or efficacy. Ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody which blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, has been combined with radiation therapy in several notable case studies and series. Finally, pilot studies of adoptive cell transfer have suggested that radiation therapy may improve the efficacy of treatment. The review will demonstrate that the combination of radiation therapy and immunotherapy has been reported in several notable case studies, series and clinical trials. These clinical results suggest interaction and the need for further study.

  6. Neutron, proton, and photonuclear cross-sections for radiation therapy and radiation protection.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, M B

    1998-12-01

    I review recent work at Los Alamos undertaken to evaluate neutron, proton, and photonuclear cross-sections up to 150 MeV (to 250 MeV for protons), based on experimental data and nuclear model calculations. These data are represented in the ENDF format and can be used in computer codes to simulate radiation transport. They permit calculations of absorbed dose in the body from therapy beams, and through use of kerma coefficients allow absorbed dose to be estimated for a given neutron energy distribution. In radiation protection, these data can be used to determine shielding requirements in accelerator environments and to calculate neutron, proton, gamma-ray, and radionuclide production. Illustrative comparisons of the evaluated cross-section and kerma coefficient data with measurements are given.

  7. Radiation-Induced Lymphocyte Apoptosis to Predict Radiation Therapy Late Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Schnarr, Kara; Boreham, Douglas; Sathya, Jinka; Julian, Jim; Dayes, Ian S.

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: To examine a potential correlation between the in vitro apoptotic response of lymphocytes to radiation and the risk of developing late gastrointestinal (GI)/genitourinary (GU) toxicity from radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Prostate cancer patients formerly enrolled in a randomized study were tested for radiosensitivity by using a radiation-induced lymphocyte apoptosis assay. Apoptosis was measured using flow cytometry-based Annexin-FITC/7AAD and DiOC{sub 6}/7AAD assays in subpopulations of lymphocytes (total lymphocytes, CD4+, CD8+ and CD4-/CD8-) after exposure to an in vitro dose of 0, 2, 4, or 8 Gy. Results: Patients with late toxicity after radiotherapy showed lower lymphocyte apoptotic responses to 8 Gy than patients who had not developed late toxicity (p = 0.01). All patients with late toxicity had apoptosis levels that were at or below the group mean. The negative predictive value in both apoptosis assays ranged from 95% to 100%, with sensitivity values of 83% to 100%. Apoptosis at lower dose points and in lymphocyte subpopulations had a weaker correlation with the occurrence of late toxicity. Conclusions: Lymphocyte apoptosis after 8 Gy of radiation has the potential to predict which patients will be spared late toxicity after radiation therapy. Further research should be performed to identify the specific subset of lymphocytes that correlates with late toxicity, followed by a corresponding prospective study.

  8. [Benchmark experiment to verify radiation transport calculations for dosimetry in radiation therapy].

    PubMed

    Renner, Franziska

    2016-09-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are regarded as the most accurate method of solving complex problems in the field of dosimetry and radiation transport. In (external) radiation therapy they are increasingly used for the calculation of dose distributions during treatment planning. In comparison to other algorithms for the calculation of dose distributions, Monte Carlo methods have the capability of improving the accuracy of dose calculations - especially under complex circumstances (e.g. consideration of inhomogeneities). However, there is a lack of knowledge of how accurate the results of Monte Carlo calculations are on an absolute basis. A practical verification of the calculations can be performed by direct comparison with the results of a benchmark experiment. This work presents such a benchmark experiment and compares its results (with detailed consideration of measurement uncertainty) with the results of Monte Carlo calculations using the well-established Monte Carlo code EGSnrc. The experiment was designed to have parallels to external beam radiation therapy with respect to the type and energy of the radiation, the materials used and the kind of dose measurement. Because the properties of the beam have to be well known in order to compare the results of the experiment and the simulation on an absolute basis, the benchmark experiment was performed using the research electron accelerator of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), whose beam was accurately characterized in advance. The benchmark experiment and the corresponding Monte Carlo simulations were carried out for two different types of ionization chambers and the results were compared. Considering the uncertainty, which is about 0.7 % for the experimental values and about 1.0 % for the Monte Carlo simulation, the results of the simulation and the experiment coincide.

  9. Nanoparticles for Radiation Therapy Enhancement: the Key Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Retif, Paul; Pinel, Sophie; Toussaint, Magali; Frochot, Céline; Chouikrat, Rima; Bastogne, Thierry; Barberi-Heyob, Muriel

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the radiosensitization strategies that use high-Z nanoparticles. It does not establish an exhaustive list of the works in this field but rather propose constructive criticisms pointing out critical factors that could improve the nano-radiation therapy. Whereas most reviews show the chemists and/or biologists points of view, the present analysis is also seen through the prism of the medical physicist. In particular, we described and evaluated the influence of X-rays energy spectra using a numerical analysis. We observed a lack of standardization in preclinical studies that could partially explain the low number of translation to clinical applications for this innovative therapeutic strategy. Pointing out the critical parameters of high-Z nanoparticles radiosensitization, this review is expected to contribute to a larger preclinical and clinical development. PMID:26155318

  10. [Radiation therapy in simultaneous choroidal and brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Conill, C; Jorcano, S; Planas, I; Marruecos, J; Casas, F; Fontenla, J R

    2005-09-01

    Choroidal metastases from lung cancer can be the initial clinical manifestation of metastasic disease, although they generally coexist with at least two more metastasic sites. The most common symptom is decreased vision, however 20% of brain metastases can present with visual alterations. A differential diagnosis within brain metastases and/or choroidal is necessary. We present the case of a patient with lung cancer and decreased vision who was diagnosed as simultaneous choroidal and brain metastases. Radiation therapy (20Gy/5fractions) significantly improves decreased vision. This case shows that, although life expectancy of patients with metastasic lung cancer is short, an adequate diagnosis and treatment, can improve the quality of life of those patients.

  11. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group clinical trials with misonidazole

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, T.H.; Stetz, J.; Phillips, T.L.

    1981-05-15

    This paper presents a review of the progressive clinical trials of the hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, misonidazole, in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Presentation is made of all the schemas of the recently completed and currently active RTOG Phase II and Phase III studies. Detailed information is provided on the clinical toxicity of the Phase II trials, specifically regarding neurotoxicity. With limitations in drug total dose, a variety of dose schedules have proven to be tolerable, with a moderate incidence of nausea and vomiting and mild peripheral neuropathy or central neuropathy. No other organ toxicity has been seen, specifically no liver, renal or bone marrow toxicities. An additional Phase III malignant glioma trial in the Brain Tumor Study Group is described.

  12. [Big data and their perspectives in radiation therapy].

    PubMed

    Guihard, Sébastien; Thariat, Juliette; Clavier, Jean-Baptiste

    2017-02-01

    The concept of big data indicates a change of scale in the use of data and data aggregation into large databases through improved computer technology. One of the current challenges in the creation of big data in the context of radiation therapy is the transformation of routine care items into dark data, i.e. data not yet collected, and the fusion of databases collecting different types of information (dose-volume histograms and toxicity data for example). Processes and infrastructures devoted to big data collection should not impact negatively on the doctor-patient relationship, the general process of care or the quality of the data collected. The use of big data requires a collective effort of physicians, physicists, software manufacturers and health authorities to create, organize and exploit big data in radiotherapy and, beyond, oncology. Big data involve a new culture to build an appropriate infrastructure legally and ethically. Processes and issues are discussed in this article.

  13. Effects of radiation therapy on skeletal growth in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Goldwein, J.W. )

    1991-01-01

    Ionizing radiation was used to treat childhood cancer long before the advent of chemotherapy, and it took little time for physicians to appreciate the deleterious effects it had on skeletal growth. The cause of this complication results predominantly from alteration of chondroblastic activity. This may stem directly from irradiation at the epiphyseal plate or indirectly from irradiation of glands that secrete growth-mediating hormones. The complication can go far beyond the obvious physical afflictions and extend into the psychologic domain, rendering deeper, more permanent scars. Presently, many of these effects are predictable, reducible, and treatable without compromising the cure that so often depends on the use of irradiation. Because of the complexities of childhood cancer therapy, strategies aimed at diminishing these effects are challenging. It is imperative that these effects be understood so that they can be reduced in current patients and prevented in future patients.33 references.

  14. Palliative intensity modulated radiation therapy for symptomatic adrenal metastasis.

    PubMed

    Mod, H; Patel, V

    2013-05-01

    Metastasis to the adrenal glands is quite common; especially from melanomas, breast, lung, renal and gastro-intestinal tumours. The most common tumour found in the adrenals in post mortem series is a metastatic tumour; incidence ranging from 13 to 27%. The diagnosis of adrenal metastasis is now more common and easier due to staging and subsequent follow up with Computed tomography /Magnetic resonance imaging and or positron emission tomography-computed tomography imaging studies. Most of the times these metastatic lesions are clinically occult and those that do have clinical symptoms complain of pain, nausea, vomiting and early satiety. We irradiated a patient of non small cell lung cancer with adrenal metastasis with palliative Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and achieved a good response in terms of pain relief, stable disease and no side effects of the treatment.

  15. Low Level Laser Therapy: laser radiation absorption in biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Giacomo, Paola; Orlando, Stefano; Dell'Ariccia, Marco; Brandimarte, Bruno

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we report the results of an experimental study in which we have measured the transmitted laser radiation through dead biological tissues of various animals (chicken, adult and young bovine, pig) in order to evaluate the maximum thickness through which the power density could still produce a reparative cellular effect. In our experiments we have utilized a pulsed laser IRL1 ISO model (based on an infrared diode GaAs, λ=904 nm) produced by BIOMEDICA s.r.l. commonly used in Low Level Laser Therapy. Some of the laser characteristics have been accurately studied and reported in this paper. The transmission results suggest that even with tissue thicknesses of several centimeters the power density is still sufficient to produce a cell reparative effect.

  16. Implementation of Image-Guidance Techniques in Radiation Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Michael; Clark, Brenda; MacPherson, Miller; Montgomery, Lynn; Gerig, Lee

    2008-06-01

    For more than 100 years, physicists have been a vital part of the medical team required to deliver radiation therapy. Their role encompasses the verification of dose accuracy to the development and implementation of new techniques, the most recent of which is the incorporation of daily image guidance to account for inter- and intra-fraction target changes. For example, computed tomography (CT) integrated into radiotherapy treatment units allows the image-guided treatment of the prostate where the target location depends on the degree of rectal filling--a parameter that changes on timescales from minutes to weeks. Different technology is required for the adequate treatment of small lung tumours since respiration occurs on timescales of seconds. This presentation will review current image-guided techniques.

  17. Effects of Radiation Therapy on Established Neurogenic Heterotopic Ossification

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is frequently seen on rehabilitation units after spinal cord injuries, fractures, brain injuries, and limb amputations. Currently, there is no effective treatment for HO other than prophylaxis with anti-inflammatory medications, irradiation, and bisphosphonate administration. These prophylactic treatments are not effective for managing ectopic bone once it has formed. Here we describe three cases of established neurogenic HO treated with radiation therapy (RT). All patients had decreased serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bone-specific ALP levels with decreased pain but increased range of motion immediately after RT. Post-treatment X-rays revealed no further growth of the HO. All patients maintained clinical and laboratory improvements 4 or 6 months after the RT. Our results suggest that RT is safe and effective in decreasing pain and activity of neurogenic HO. PMID:28119846

  18. Head and Neck Soft Tissue Sarcomas Treated with Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Vitzthum, Lucas K.; Brown, Lindsay C.; Rooney, Jessica W.; Foote, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck soft tissue sarcomas (HNSTSs) are rare and heterogeneous cancers in which radiation therapy (RT) has an important role in local tumor control (LC). The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcomes and patterns of treatment failure in patients with HNSTS treated with RT. A retrospective review was performed of adult patients with HNSTS treated with RT from January 1, 1998, to December 31, 2012. LC, locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and predictors thereof were assessed. Forty-eight patients with HNSTS were evaluated. Five-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of LC, LRC, DFS, and OS were 87, 73, 63, and 83%, respectively. Angiosarcomas were found to be associated with worse LC, LRC, DFS, and OS. Patients over the age of 60 had lower rates of DFS. HNSTSs comprise a diverse group of tumors that can be managed with various treatment regimens involving RT. Angiosarcomas have higher recurrence and mortality rates. PMID:27441072

  19. Modern Radiation Therapy for Primary Cutaneous Lymphomas: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, Lena; Dabaja, Bouthaina; Illidge, Tim; Wilson, Lynn D.; Hoppe, Richard T.

    2015-05-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases. They often remain localized, and they generally have a more indolent course and a better prognosis than lymphomas in other locations. They are highly radiosensitive, and radiation therapy is an important part of the treatment, either as the sole treatment or as part of a multimodality approach. Radiation therapy of primary cutaneous lymphomas requires the use of special techniques that form the focus of these guidelines. The International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group has developed these guidelines after multinational meetings and analysis of available evidence. The guidelines represent an agreed consensus view of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group steering committee on the use of radiation therapy in primary cutaneous lymphomas in the modern era.

  20. Commissioning and implementation of an implantable dosimeter for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Buzurovic, Ivan; Showalter, Timothy N; Studenski, Matthew T; Den, Robert B; Dicker, Adam P; Cao, Junsheng; Xiao, Ying; Yu, Yan; Harrison, Amy

    2013-03-04

    In this article we describe commissioning and implementation procedures for the Dose Verification System (DVS) with permanently implanted in vivo wireless, telemetric radiation dosimeters for absolute dose measurements. The dosimeter uses a semiconductor device called a metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) to measure radiation dose. A MOSFET is a transistor that is generally used for amplifying or switching electronic signals. The implantable dosimeter was implemented with the goal of verifying the dose delivered to radiation therapy patients. For the purpose of acceptance testing, commissioning, and clinical implementation and to evaluate characteristics of the dosimeter, the following tests were performed: 1) temperature dependence, 2) reproducibility,3) field size dependence, 4) postirradiation signal drift, 5) dependence on average dose rate, 6) linearity test, 7) angular dependence (different gantry angle position), 8) angular dependence (different DVS angle position), 9) dose rate dependence,10) irradiation depth dependence, 11) effect of cone-beam exposure to the dosimeter, and 12) multiple reading effect. The dosimeter is not currently calibrated for use in the kV range; nonetheless, the effect of the cone-beam procedure on the MOSFET dosimeter was investigated. Phantom studies were performed in both air and water using an Elekta Synergy S Beam-Modulator linear accelerator. Commissioning and clinical implementation for prostate cancer patients receiving external-beam radiation therapy were performed in compliance with the general recommendations given for in vivo dosimetry devices. The reproducibility test in water at human body temperature (37°C) showed a 1.4% absolute difference, with a standard deviation of 5.72 cGy (i.e., SD = 2.9%). The constancy test shows that the average readings at room temperature were 3% lower compared to the readings at human body temperature, with a SD = 2%. Measurements were not dependent upon field size

  1. Dosimetrically Triggered Adaptive Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Karen; Stewart, James; Kelly, Valerie; Xie, Jason; Brock, Kristy K.; Moseley, Joanne; Cho, Young-Bin; Fyles, Anthony; Lundin, Anna; Rehbinder, Henrik; Löf, Johan; Jaffray, David A.; Milosevic, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: The widespread use of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for cervical cancer has been limited by internal target and normal tissue motion. Such motion increases the risk of underdosing the target, especially as planning margins are reduced in an effort to reduce toxicity. This study explored 2 adaptive strategies to mitigate this risk and proposes a new, automated method that minimizes replanning workload. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with cervical cancer participated in a prospective clinical study and underwent pretreatment and weekly magnetic resonance (MR) scans over a 5-week course of daily external beam radiation therapy. Target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) were contoured on each of the scans. Deformable image registration was used to model the accumulated dose (the real dose delivered to the target and OARs) for 2 adaptive replanning scenarios that assumed a very small PTV margin of only 3 mm to account for setup and internal interfractional motion: (1) a preprogrammed, anatomy-driven midtreatment replan (A-IMRT); and (2) a dosimetry-triggered replan driven by target dose accumulation over time (D-IMRT). Results: Across all 30 patients, clinically relevant target dose thresholds failed for 8 patients (27%) if 3-mm margins were used without replanning. A-IMRT failed in only 3 patients and also yielded an additional small reduction in OAR doses at the cost of 30 replans. D-IMRT assured adequate target coverage in all patients, with only 23 replans in 16 patients. Conclusions: A novel, dosimetry-triggered adaptive IMRT strategy for patients with cervical cancer can minimize the risk of target underdosing in the setting of very small margins and substantial interfractional motion while minimizing programmatic workload and cost.

  2. Proton-minibeam radiation therapy: A proof of concept

    SciTech Connect

    Prezado, Y.; Fois, G. R.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: This Monte Carlo simulation work aims at studying a new radiotherapy approach called proton-minibeam radiation therapy (pMBRT). The main objective of this proof of concept was the evaluation of the possible gain in tissue sparing, thanks to the spatial fractionation of the dose, which could be used to deposit higher and potentially curative doses in clinical cases where tissue tolerances are a limit for conventional methods. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations (GATE v.6) have been used as a method to calculate the ratio of the peak-to-valley doses (PVDR) for arrays of proton minibeams of 0.7 mm width and several center-to-center distances, at different depths in a water phantom. The beam penumbras were also evaluated as an important parameter for tissue sparing, for example, in the treatment of non-cancer diseases like epilepsy. Two proton energies were considered in this study: a clinically relevant energy (105 MeV) and a very high energy (1 GeV), to benefit from a reduced lateral scattering. For the latter case, an interlaced geometry was also evaluated. Results: Higher or similar PVDR than the ones obtained in x-rays minibeam radiation therapy were achieved in several pMBRT configurations. In addition, for the two energies studied, the beam penumbras are smaller than in the case of Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Conclusions: The high PVDR obtained for some configurations and the small penumbras in comparison with existing radiosurgery techniques, suggest a potential gain in healthy tissue sparing in this new technique. Biological studies are warranted to assess the effects of pMBRT on both normal and tumoral tissues.

  3. Direct aperture optimization for online adaptive radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mestrovic, Ante; Milette, Marie-Pierre; Nichol, Alan; Clark, Brenda G.; Otto, Karl

    2007-05-15

    This paper is the first investigation of using direct aperture optimization (DAO) for online adaptive radiation therapy (ART). A geometrical model representing the anatomy of a typical prostate case was created. To simulate interfractional deformations, four different anatomical deformations were created by systematically deforming the original anatomy by various amounts (0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00 cm). We describe a series of techniques where the original treatment plan was adapted in order to correct for the deterioration of dose distribution quality caused by the anatomical deformations. We found that the average time needed to adapt the original plan to arrive at a clinically acceptable plan is roughly half of the time needed for a complete plan regeneration, for all four anatomical deformations. Furthermore, through modification of the DAO algorithm the optimization search space was reduced and the plan adaptation was significantly accelerated. For the first anatomical deformation (0.25 cm), the plan adaptation was six times more efficient than the complete plan regeneration. For the 0.50 and 0.75 cm deformations, the optimization efficiency was increased by a factor of roughly 3 compared to the complete plan regeneration. However, for the anatomical deformation of 1.00 cm, the reduction of the optimization search space during plan adaptation did not result in any efficiency improvement over the original (nonmodified) plan adaptation. The anatomical deformation of 1.00 cm demonstrates the limit of this approach. We propose an innovative approach to online ART in which the plan adaptation and radiation delivery are merged together and performed concurrently--adaptive radiation delivery (ARD). A fundamental advantage of ARD is the fact that radiation delivery can start almost immediately after image acquisition and evaluation. Most of the original plan adaptation is done during the radiation delivery, so the time spent adapting the original plan does not

  4. Models for the risk of secondary cancers from radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Dasu, Alexandru; Toma-Dasu, Iuliana

    2017-02-24

    The interest in the induction of secondary tumours following radiotherapy has greatly increased as developments in detecting and treating the primary tumours have improved the life expectancy of cancer patients. However, most of the knowledge on the current levels of risk comes from patients treated many decades ago. As developments of irradiation techniques take place at a much faster pace than the progression of the carcinogenesis process, the earlier results could not be easily extrapolated to modern treatments. Indeed, the patterns of irradiation from historically-used orthovoltage radiotherapy and from contemporary techniques like conformal radiotherapy with megavoltage radiation, intensity modulated radiation therapy with photons or with particles are quite different. Furthermore, the increased interest in individualised treatment options raises the question of evaluating and ranking the different treatment plan options from the point of view of the risk for cancer induction, in parallel with the quantification of other long-term effects. It is therefore inevitable that models for risk assessment will have to be used to complement the knowledge from epidemiological studies and to make predictions for newer forms of treatment for which clinical evidence is not yet available. This work reviews the mathematical models that could be used to predict the risk of secondary cancers from radiotherapy-relevant dose levels, as well as the approaches and factors that have to be taken into account when including these models in the clinical evaluation process. These include the effects of heterogeneous irradiation, secondary particles production, imaging techniques, interpatient variability and other confounding factors.

  5. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Young Seok; Kim, Mi-Sook; Yoo, Sung Yul; Cho, Chul Koo; Yang, Kwang Mo; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Choi, Chul Won; Lee, Dong Han; Kim, Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kang, Hye Jin; Kim, YoungHan

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical application of a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost in locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients with a focus on local efficacy and toxicity. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 30 patients with locally advanced and nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer who had been treated between 2004 and 2006. Follow-up duration ranged from 4 to 41 months (median, 14.5 months). A total dose of 40 Gy was delivered in 20 fractions using a conventional three-field technique, and then a single fraction of 14, 15, 16, or 17 Gy SBRT was administered as a boost without a break. Twenty-one patients received chemotherapy. Overall and local progression-free survival were calculated and prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: One-year overall survival and local progression-free survival rates were 60.0% and 70.2%, respectively. One patient (3%) developed Grade 4 toxicity. Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 response was found to be an independent prognostic factor for survival. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that a SBRT boost provides a safe means of increasing radiation dose. Based on the results of this study, we recommend that a well controlled Phase II study be conducted on locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  6. Radiation therapy of conjunctival and orbital lymphoid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Jereb, B.; Lee, H.; Jakobiec, F.A.; Kutcher, J.

    1984-07-01

    Lymphoid tumors of the conjuctiva and orbit are rare and remain localized in the majority of cases. Sometimes it is not possible either clinically or histologically to differentiate between a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and benign lymphoid hyperplasia. A series of 24 patients is reported. Nineteen were classified as having malignant NHL and 5 benign hyperplasia; 1 of these 5 later developed metastases, however. All patients had systemic work-up: 18 had Stage I, 1 had Stage II, and 5 had Stage IV disease. All patients received local radiation therapy with doses of 2400 to 2750 rad in 2-3 weeks for lesions of the eyelid and conjunctiva, and between 3000 and 3750 rad in 3-4 weeks for retrobulbar lesions. A method of shielding the lens with a lead block mounted on a low vac lens is described, and the dose distribution within the eye and orbit is presented. Patients who were treated with doses higher than 3000 rad experienced conjunctivitis and skin erythema that resolved completely. No other effects of radiation on normal structures of the ocular adnexa were observed in the 20 patients who are alive and without signs of tumor 10-46 months with a median follow-up time of 22 months.

  7. Pitfalls in normalization for intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Greg . E-mail: greg.williams@hci.utah.edu; Tobler, Matt; Leavitt, Dennis

    2005-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning often involves complex combinations of beam energies, treatment fields, and beam modifying devices. Even when a plan is devised that meets many treatment-planning objectives, limitations in the planner's ability to further adjust beam characteristics may require the radiation dose prescription to be normalized to an isodose level that best covers the target volume. While these normalizations help meet the volume coverage goals, they also result in adjustment of the dose delivered to the normal tissues and must be carefully evaluated. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning allows combinations of complex dose patterns, in order to achieve the desired treatment planning goals. These dose patterns are created by defining a set of treatment planning objectives and then allowing the treatment planning computer to create intensity patterns, through the use of moving multileaf collimation that will meet the requested goals. Often, when an IMRT treatment plan is created that meets many of the treatment planning goals but falls short of volume coverage requirements, the planner is tempted to apply normalization principles similar to those utilized with 3D treatment planning. Again, these normalizations help meet the volume coverage goals, but unlike 3D planning situations, may result in avoidable delivery of additional doses to the normal tissues. The focus of this study is to evaluate the effect of application of normalization for IMRT planning using multiple patient situations. Recommendations would favor re-optimization over normalization in most planning situations.

  8. Assessment of a linear accelerator for segmented conformal radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Zacarias, A S; Lane, R G; Rosen, I I

    1993-01-01

    Segmented conformal radiation therapy is a new computer-controlled treatment technique under investigation in which the target volume is subdivided into thick transverse segments each of which is then treated individually by rectangular transverse abutting fields. In order to obtain uniform dose at abutments, the machine isocenter remains fixed in the patient and field edges are defined by independently moving focused collimator jaws to give matching geometric divergence. Mechanical variation in jaw and gantry positioning will create some dose variation at field abutments. Film dosimetry was used to study the radiation field positioning accuracy and precision of a commercial linear accelerator. A method of field position calibration was developed using multiple nonabutting fields exposed on the same radiograph. Verification of collimator jaw calibration measurements was performed using multiple abutting fields exposed on a single radiograph. Measurements taken over 5 months of clinical accelerator operation studied the effects of simple jaw motion, simple gantry motion, and combined jaw/gantry motion on jaw position precision and accuracy. The inherent precision and accuracy of radiation field positioning was found to be better than +/- 0.3 mm for both jaws with all types of motions except for the Y2 jaw under combined jaw/gantry motion. When the ability to deliver abutting beams was verified in clinical mode, the average dose variation at abutments was less than 6% at all gantry angles except for one. However, due to accelerator software limitations in clinical mode, the settings for collimator positions could not take advantage of the maximum accuracy of which the hardware is capable.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. On bolus for megavoltage photon and electron radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Vedang; Palmer, Lisa; Mudge, Ray; Jiang, Runqing; Fleck, Andre; Schaly, Bryan; Osei, Ernest; Charland, Paule

    2013-10-01

    Frequently, in radiation therapy one must treat superficial lesions on cancer patients; these are at or adjacent to the skin. Megavoltage photon radiotherapy penetrates through the skin to irradiate deep-seated tumors, with skin-sparing property. Hence, to treat superficial lesions, one must use a layer of scattering material to feign as the skin surface. Although megavoltage electron beams are used for superficial treatments, one occasionally needs to enhance the dose near the surface. Such is the function of a “bolus,” a natural or synthetically developed material that acts as a layer of tissue to provide a more effective treatment to the superficial lesions. Other uses of boluses are to correct for varying surface contours and to add scattering material around the patient's surface. Materials used as bolus vary from simple water to metal and include various mixtures and compounds. Even with the modernization of the technology for external-beam therapy and the emergence of various commercial boluses, the preparation and utilization of a bolus in clinical radiotherapy remains an art. Considering the varying experiences and practices, this paper briefly summarizes available boluses that have been proposed and are employed in clinical radiotherapy. Although this review is not exhaustive, it provides some initial guidance and answers questions that may arise in clinical practice.

  10. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Treating Long-Term Gastrointestinal Adverse Effects Caused by Radiation Therapy in Patients With Pelvic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-07-14

    Bladder Cancer; Cervical Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Gastrointestinal Complications; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Adults; Ovarian Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Radiation Toxicity; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Vaginal Cancer

  11. Stroke-like migraine attack after cranial radiation therapy: the SMART syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sue Yin; Brooke, Jonathan; Dineen, Robert; O'Donoghue, Michael

    2016-10-01

    We describe a patient who experienced a prolonged episode of headache, drowsiness, seizure, unilateral weakness, delusion and hallucination due to a stroke-like migraine attack after cranial radiation therapy. Stroke-like migraine attack after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome is a rare complication of therapeutic brain irradiation.

  12. [Modalities of breast cancer irradiation in 2016: Aims and indications of intensity modulated radiation therapy].

    PubMed

    Bourgier, C; Fenoglietto, P; Lemanski, C; Ducteil, A; Charissoux, M; Draghici, R; Azria, D

    2016-10-01

    Irradiation techniques for breast cancer (arctherapy, tomotherapy) are evolving and intensity-modulated radiation therapy is being increasingly considered for the management of these tumours. Here, we propose a review of intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning issues, clinical toxicities and indications for breast cancer.

  13. Primary radiation therapy for locally advanced breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldon, T.; Hayes, D.F.; Cady, B.; Parker, L.; Osteen, R.; Silver, B.; Recht, A.; Come, S.; Henderson, I.C.; Harris, J.R.

    1987-09-15

    The optimal local-regional treatment for patients with Stage III breast cancer has not been determined. To evaluate the effectiveness of radiation therapy as local treatment for such patients, the results of 192 patients (five with bilateral disease) treated with radiation therapy without mastectomy between July 1, 1968 and December 31, 1981 were reviewed. Excisional biopsy (gross tumor removal) was performed in only 54 of the 197 breasts. Patients typically received 4500 to 5000 cGy in 5 weeks to the breast and draining lymph nodes; a local boost to areas of gross disease was delivered to 157 patients. Multi-agent chemotherapy was given to 53 patients. The median follow-up was 65 months. The actuarial probability of survival for the entire group was 41% at 5 years and 23% at 10 years. The probability of relapse-free survival (RFS) was 30% at 5 years and 19% at 10 years. The addition of multi-agent chemotherapy was associated with a significantly improved 5-year RFS (40% versus 26%, P = 0.02). The 5-year survival rate was 51% for patients who received adjuvant multi-agent chemotherapy and 38% for patients who did not (P = 0.16). The actuarial rate of local-regional tumor control (not censored for distant failure) for all patients was 73% at 5 years and 68% at ten years, and the crude incidence of local-regional control was 78%. Local-regional tumor control was principally influenced by radiation dose. Patients who received 6000 cGy or greater to the primary site had a better 5-year rate of control in the breast than did patients who received less than 6000 cGy (83% versus 70%, P = 0.06). Significant complications were seen in 15 patients (8%); these included moderate or severe arm edema in six patients and brachial plexopathy in four patients. Cosmetic results at last evaluation were excellent or good in 56% of evaluable patients, fair in 25%, and poor in 19%.

  14. The Role of Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy with Photons, Protons, and Heavy Ions for Treating Extracranial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Aaron Michael; Pompos, Arnold; Timmerman, Robert; Jiang, Steve; Story, Michael D.; Pistenmaa, David; Choy, Hak

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the ability to deliver large doses of ionizing radiation to a tumor has been limited by radiation-induced toxicity to normal surrounding tissues. This was the initial impetus for the development of conventionally fractionated radiation therapy, where large volumes of healthy tissue received radiation and were allowed the time to repair the radiation damage. However, advances in radiation delivery techniques and image guidance have allowed for more ablative doses of radiation to be delivered in a very accurate, conformal, and safe manner with shortened fractionation schemes. Hypofractionated regimens with photons have already transformed how certain tumor types are treated with radiation therapy. Additionally, hypofractionation is able to deliver a complete course of ablative radiation therapy over a shorter period of time compared to conventional fractionation regimens making treatment more convenient to the patient and potentially more cost-effective. Recently, there has been an increased interest in proton therapy because of the potential further improvement in dose distributions achievable due to their unique physical characteristics. Furthermore, with heavier ions the dose conformality is increased and, in addition, there is potentially a higher biological effectiveness compared to protons and photons. Due to the properties mentioned above, charged particle therapy has already become an attractive modality to further investigate the role of hypofractionation in the treatment of various tumors. This review will discuss the rationale and evolution of hypofractionated radiation therapy, the reported clinical success with initially photon and then charged particle modalities, and further potential implementation into treatment regimens going forward. PMID:26793619

  15. A review on photoneutrons characteristics in radiation therapy with high-energy photon beams.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Alireza; Mesbahi, Asghar

    2010-09-22

    In radiation therapy with high-energy photon beams (E > 10 MeV) neutrons are generated mainly in linacs head thorough (γ,n) interactions of photons with nuclei of high atomic number materials that constitute the linac head and the beam collimation system. These neutrons affect the shielding requirements in radiation therapy rooms and also increase the out-of-field radiation dose of patients undergoing radiation therapy with high-energy photon beams. In the current review, the authors describe the factors influencing the neutron production for different medical linacs based on the performed measurements and Monte Carlo studies in the literature.

  16. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy for Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, Joseph C.; Beg, Muhammad S.; Das, Prajnan; Meyer, Jeffrey

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To compare the cost-effectiveness of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for anal cancer and determine disease, patient, and treatment parameters that influence the result. Methods and Materials: A Markov decision model was designed with the various disease states for the base case of a 65-year-old patient with anal cancer treated with either IMRT or 3D-CRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Health states accounting for rates of local failure, colostomy failure, treatment breaks, patient prognosis, acute and late toxicities, and the utility of toxicities were informed by existing literature and analyzed with deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Results: In the base case, mean costs and quality-adjusted life expectancy in years (QALY) for IMRT and 3D-CRT were $32,291 (4.81) and $28,444 (4.78), respectively, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $128,233/QALY for IMRT compared with 3D-CRT. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis found that IMRT was cost-effective in 22%, 47%, and 65% of iterations at willingness-to-pay thresholds of $50,000, $100,000, and $150,000 per QALY, respectively. Conclusions: In our base model, IMRT was a cost-ineffective strategy despite the reduced acute treatment toxicities and their associated costs of management. The model outcome was sensitive to variations in local and colostomy failure rates, as well as patient-reported utilities relating to acute toxicities.

  17. Adaptive Radiation Therapy for Postprostatectomy Patients Using Real-Time Electromagnetic Target Motion Tracking During External Beam Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Mingyao; Bharat, Shyam; Michalski, Jeff M.; Gay, Hiram A.; Hou, Wei-Hsien; Parikh, Parag J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Using real-time electromagnetic (EM) transponder tracking data recorded by the Calypso 4D Localization System, we report inter- and intrafractional target motion of the prostate bed, describe a strategy to evaluate treatment adequacy in postprostatectomy patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and propose an adaptive workflow. Methods and Materials: Tracking data recorded by Calypso EM transponders was analyzed for postprostatectomy patients that underwent step-and-shoot IMRT. Rigid target motion parameters during beam delivery were calculated from recorded transponder positions in 16 patients with rigid transponder geometry. The delivered doses to the clinical target volume (CTV) were estimated from the planned dose matrix and the target motion for the first 3, 5, 10, and all fractions. Treatment adequacy was determined by comparing the delivered minimum dose (D{sub min}) with the planned D{sub min} to the CTV. Treatments were considered adequate if the delivered CTV D{sub min} is at least 95% of the planned CTV D{sub min}. Results: Translational target motion was minimal for all 16 patients (mean: 0.02 cm; range: −0.12 cm to 0.07 cm). Rotational motion was patient-specific, and maximum pitch, yaw, and roll were 12.2, 4.1, and 10.5°, respectively. We observed inadequate treatments in 5 patients. In these treatments, we observed greater target rotations along with large distances between the CTV centroid and transponder centroid. The treatment adequacy from the initial 10 fractions successfully predicted the overall adequacy in 4 of 5 inadequate treatments and 10 of 11 adequate treatments. Conclusion: Target rotational motion could cause underdosage to partial volume of the postprostatectomy targets. Our adaptive treatment strategy is applicable to post-prostatectomy patients receiving IMRT to evaluate and improve radiation therapy delivery.

  18. Quality of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans Using a {sup 60}Co Magnetic Resonance Image Guidance Radiation Therapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Wooten, H. Omar Green, Olga; Yang, Min; DeWees, Todd; Kashani, Rojano; Olsen, Jeff; Michalski, Jeff; Yang, Deshan; Tanderup, Kari; Hu, Yanle; Li, H. Harold; Mutic, Sasa

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: This work describes a commercial treatment planning system, its technical features, and its capabilities for creating {sup 60}Co intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans for a magnetic resonance image guidance radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. Methods and Materials: The ViewRay treatment planning system (Oakwood Village, OH) was used to create {sup 60}Co IMRT treatment plans for 33 cancer patients with disease in the abdominal, pelvic, thorax, and head and neck regions using physician-specified patient-specific target coverage and organ at risk (OAR) objectives. Backup plans using a third-party linear accelerator (linac)-based planning system were also created. Plans were evaluated by attending physicians and approved for treatment. The {sup 60}Co and linac plans were compared by evaluating conformity numbers (CN) with 100% and 95% of prescription reference doses and heterogeneity indices (HI) for planning target volumes (PTVs) and maximum, mean, and dose-volume histogram (DVH) values for OARs. Results: All {sup 60}Co IMRT plans achieved PTV coverage and OAR sparing that were similar to linac plans. PTV conformity for {sup 60}Co was within <1% and 3% of linac plans for 100% and 95% prescription reference isodoses, respectively, and heterogeneity was on average 4% greater. Comparisons of OAR mean dose showed generally better sparing with linac plans in the low-dose range <20 Gy, but comparable sparing for organs with mean doses >20 Gy. The mean doses for all {sup 60}Co plan OARs were within clinical tolerances. Conclusions: A commercial {sup 60}Co MR-IGRT device can produce highly conformal IMRT treatment plans similar in quality to linac IMRT for a variety of disease sites. Additional work is in progress to evaluate the clinical benefit of other novel features of this MR-IGRT system.

  19. A Phase III Study of Conventional Radiation Therapy Plus Thalidomide Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy for Multiple Brain Metastases (RTOG 0118)

    SciTech Connect

    Knisely, Jonathan P.S. Berkey, Brian; Chakravarti, Arnab; Yung, Al W.K.; Curran, Walter J.; Robins, H. Ian; Movsas, Benjamin; Brachman, David G.; Henderson, Randall H.; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To compare whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) with WBRT combined with thalidomide for patients with brain metastases not amenable to resection or radiosurgery. Patients and Methods: Patients with Zubrod performance status 0-1, MRI-documented multiple (>3), large (>4 cm), or midbrain brain metastases arising from a histopathologically confirmed extracranial primary tumor, and an anticipated survival of >8 weeks were randomized to receive WBRT to a dose of 37.5 Gy in 15 fractions with or without thalidomide during and after WBRT. Prerandomization stratification used Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Recursive Partitioning Analysis (RPA) Class and whether post-WBRT chemotherapy was planned. Endpoints included overall survival, progression-free survival, time to neurocognitive progression, the cause of death, toxicities, and quality of life. A protocol-planned interim analysis documented that the trial had an extremely low probability of ever showing a significant difference favoring the thalidomide arm given the results at the time of the analysis, and it was therefore closed on the basis of predefined statistical guidelines. Results: Enrolled in the study were 332 patients. Of 183 accrued patients, 93 were randomized to receive WBRT alone and 90 to WBRT and thalidomide. Median survival was 3.9 months for both arms. No novel toxicities were seen, but thalidomide was not well tolerated in this population. Forty-eight percent of patients discontinued thalidomide because of side effects. Conclusion: Thalidomide provided no survival benefit for patients with multiple, large, or midbrain metastases when combined with WBRT; nearly half the patients discontinued thalidomide due to side effects.

  20. Surgical treatment and radiation therapy of frontal lobe meningiomas in 7 dogs.

    PubMed

    Uriarte, Ane; Moissonnier, Pierre; Thibaud, Jean-Laurent; Reyes-Gomez, Edouard; Devauchelle, Patrick; Blot, Stéphane

    2011-07-01

    The cases of 7 adult dogs with generalized seizures managed by surgical excision and radiation therapy for frontal lobe meningiomas were reviewed. The neurological examination was unremarkable in 6 of the 7 dogs. Five dogs were operated on using a bilateral transfrontal sinus approach and 2 using a unilateral sinotemporal approach to the frontal lobe. One dog was euthanized 14 d after surgery; radiation therapy was initiated 3 wk after surgery in the remaining 6 dogs. Long-term follow-up consisted of neurological examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and/or computed tomography (CT) scan after radiation therapy. The mean survival time for dogs that had surgery and radiation therapy was 18 mo after surgery. Frontal lobe meningiomas have been associated with poor prognosis. However, the surgical approaches used in these cases, combined with radiation therapy, allow a survival rate for frontal lobe meningiomas similar to that for meningiomas located over the cerebral convexities.

  1. Pathological fracture of the femur ten years after successful radiation therapy for metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Hiroshi; Morita, Tetsuro; Kobayashi, Hiroto; Ito, Takui; Segawa, Hiroyuki; Saito, Mari

    2004-01-01

    We describe a case involving a 75-year-old woman presenting with a femur fracture 10 years after radiation therapy for metastatic breast cancer, which developed in the right femur. The lesion showed complete response with bone healing following radiation therapy; however, the patient sustained a femur fracture ten years later. Histological examination of the specimens obtained from the lesion revealed features of radiation osteonecrosis, but there was no histological evidence of tumor. To our knowledge, there has been no reported case of pathological fracture ten years after radiation therapy from radiation osteonecrosis rather than progression of the metastatic lesion. Late complications of radiation therapy should be considered with care, even when metastatic lesions demonstrate complete response to treatment.

  2. Applications of Cherenkov Light Emission for Dosimetry in Radiation Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Adam Kenneth

    Since its discovery in the 1930's, the Cherenkov effect has been paramount in the development of high-energy physics research. It results in light emission from charged particles traveling faster than the local speed of light in a dielectric medium. The ability of this emitted light to describe a charged particle's trajectory, energy, velocity, and mass has allowed scientists to study subatomic particles, detect neutrinos, and explore the properties of interstellar matter. However, only recently has the phenomenon been considered in the practical context of medical physics and radiation therapy dosimetry, where Cherenkov light is induced by clinical x-ray photon, electron, and proton beams. To investigate the relationship between this phenomenon and dose deposition, a Monte Carlo plug-in was developed within the Geant4 architecture for medically-oriented simulations (GAMOS) to simulate radiation-induced optical emission in biological media. Using this simulation framework, it was determined that Cherenkov light emission may be well suited for radiation dosimetry of clinically used x-ray photon beams. To advance this application, several novel techniques were implemented to realize the maximum potential of the signal, such as time-gating for maximizing the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and Cherenkov-excited fluorescence for generating isotropic light release in water. Proof of concept experiments were conducted in water tanks to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method for two-dimensional (2D) projection imaging, three-dimensional (3D) parallel beam tomography, large field of view 3D cone beam tomography, and video-rate dynamic imaging of treatment plans for a number of common radiotherapy applications. The proposed dosimetry method was found to have a number of unique advantages, including but not limited to its non-invasive nature, water-equivalence, speed, high-resolution, ability to provide full 3D data, and potential to yield data in-vivo. Based on

  3. Role of Definitive Radiation Therapy in Carcinoma of Unknown Primary in the Abdomen and Pelvis

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Patrick; Das, Prajnan; Varadhachary, Gauri R.; Fontanilla, Hiral P.; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E.; Jhingran, Anuja; Eifel, Patricia J.; Crane, Christopher H.

    2012-04-01

    Objectives: Carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP) in the abdomen and pelvis is a heterogeneous group of cancers with no standard treatment. Considered by many to be incurable, these patients are often treated with chemotherapy alone. In this study, we determined the effectiveness of radiation therapy in combination with chemotherapy in patients with CUP in the abdomen and pelvis. Patients and Methods: Medical records were reviewed for 37 patients with CUP treated with radiation therapy for disease located in the soft tissues and/or nodal basins of the abdomen and pelvis at University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer between 2002 and 2009. All patients underwent chemotherapy, either before or concurrent with radiation therapy. Patients were selected for radiation therapy on the basis of histologic type, disease extent, and prior therapy response. Twenty patients underwent definitive radiation therapy (defined as radiation therapy targeting all known disease sites with at least 45 Gy) and 17 patients underwent palliative radiation therapy. Only 6 patients had surgical resection of their disease. Patient and treatment characteristics were extracted and the endpoints of local disease control, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and treatment-related toxicity incidence were analyzed. Results: The 2-year PFS and OS rates for the entire cohort were 32% and 57%, respectively. However, in patients treated with definitive radiation therapy, the rates were 48% and 76%, and 7 patients lived more than 3 years after treatment with no evidence of disease progression. Nevertheless, radiation-associated toxicity was significant in this cohort, as 40% experienced Grade 2 or higher late toxicities. Conclusions: The use of definitive radiation therapy should be considered in selected patients with CUP in the soft tissues or nodal basins of the abdomen and pelvis.

  4. The Potential Use of Glycine to Enhance Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Brian Kavanagh CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Colorado...Enhance Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0363 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Betty Diamond...radiation-induced Hif-1α expression and created a favorable growth delay in the xenograft model. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate cancer , hif-1

  5. High-dose fractionated radiation therapy for select patients with brain metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Pezner, R.D.; Lipsett, J.A.; Archambeau, J.O.; Fine, R.M.; Moss, W.T.

    1981-08-01

    Four patients with metastases to the brain were treated by high-dose fractionated radiation therapy. In all four cases, a complete response and prolonged disease-free survival could be documented. Unlike the standard therapy for such patients (i.e., craniotomy and postoperative irradiation), high-dose fractionated radiation therapy carries no operative risk and can encompass multiple brain metastases and metastases in deep or critical intracranial sites. The risk of radiotherapy side effects in the brain is discussed.

  6. Mometasone Furoate Cream Reduces Acute Radiation Dermatitis in Patients Receiving Breast Radiation Therapy: Results of a Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Hindley, Andrew; Zain, Zakiyah; Wood, Lisa; Whitehead, Anne; Sanneh, Alison; Barber, David; Hornsby, Ruth

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: We wanted to confirm the benefit of mometasone furoate (MF) in preventing acute radiation reactions, as shown in a previous study (Boström et al, Radiother Oncol 2001;59:257-265). Methods and Materials: The study was a double-blind comparison of MF with D (Diprobase), administered daily from the start of radiation therapy for 5 weeks in patients receiving breast radiation therapy, 40 Gy in 2.67-Gy fractions daily over 3 weeks. The primary endpoint was mean modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) score. Results: Mean RTOG scores were significantly less for MF than for D (P=.046). Maximum RTOG and mean erythema scores were significantly less for MF than for D (P=.018 and P=.012, respectively). The Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) score was significantly less for MF than for D at weeks 4 and 5 when corrected for Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) questionnaire scores. Conclusions: MF cream significantly reduces radiation dermatitis when applied to the breast during and after radiation therapy. For the first time, we have shown a significantly beneficial effect on quality of life using a validated instrument (DLQI), for a topical steroid cream. We believe that application of this cream should be the standard of care where radiation dermatitis is expected.

  7. Radiation therapy for Bowen's disease of the skin

    SciTech Connect

    Lukas VanderSpek, Lauren A. . E-mail: lauren.vanderspek@lrcc.on.ca; Pond, Gregory R.; Wells, Woodrow; Tsang, Richard W.

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical outcome in the radiation therapy (RT) of squamous carcinoma in situ of the skin (Bowen's disease). We focused on the local control rate and the toxicity according to the biologically effective dose (BED). Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed on 44 patients with Bowen's disease treated at Princess Margaret Hospital from April 1985 to November 2000. RT was the primary treatment for 32 patients, whereas 12 received RT for residual disease after local ablative therapy. Lesions were located as follows: scalp, 9 patients (20%); face, 12 (27%); trunk, 6 (14%), extremity, 12 (27%), perianal, 3 (7%), and penis, 2 (5%). Orthovoltage X-rays were used in the majority (39 of 44, 89%). There was no standard fractionation regimen: some physicians prescribed high doses, as for invasive skin cancer, whereas others prescribed lower doses because of the noninvasive nature of the disease, a sensitive anatomic location (e.g., extremity), or large treatment area. Because of the variations in fractionation regimens, BED was used as a common metric for biologic effect in the comparison of different regimens and analyzed for correlation with recurrence and toxicity. Local control was defined as the lack of persistent or recurrent disease at the treated site for the follow-up period. Grade 4 toxicity was defined as necrosis (cartilage/bone damage) and/or ulceration for a duration of >3 months. Results: The mean patient age was 67.7 years, and the male/female ratio was 29:15. The median pretreatment lesion size was 2.65 cm{sup 2} (range, 0.07-34.56 cm{sup 2}). Complete remission was achieved in 42 patients, with follow-up unavailable for the remaining 2 patients. Subsequently, 3 patients experienced recurrences at 0.2, 1.1, and 1-1.5 years after complete remission. One recurrence was Bowen's disease (local); the others were squamous cell carcinoma (one local, one marginal). Four patients experienced a new squamous lesion at a distant

  8. SU-C-16A-06: Optimum Radiation Source for Radiation Therapy of Skin Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Safigholi, Habib; Meigooni, A S.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Recently, different applicators are designed for treatment of the skin cancer such as scalp and legs, using Ir-192 HDR Brachytherapy Sources (IR-HDRS), Miniature Electronic Brachytherapy Sources (MEBXS), and External Electron Beam Radiation Therapy (EEBRT). Although, all of these methodologies may deliver the desired radiation dose to the skin, the dose to the underlying bone may become the limiting factor for selection of the optimum treatment technique. In this project the radiation dose delivered to the underlying bone has been evaluated as a function of the radiation source and thickness of the underlying bone. Methods: MC simulations were performed using MCNP5 code. In these simulations, the mono-energetic and non-divergent photon beams of 30 keV, 50 keV, and 70 keV for MEBXS, 380 keV photons for IR-HDRS, and 6 MeV mono-energetic electron beam for EEBRT were modeled. A 0.5 cm thick soft tissue (0.3 cm skin and 0.2 cm adipose) with underlying 0.5 cm cortical bone followed by 14 cm soft tissue are utilized for simulations. Results: Dose values to bone tissue as a function of beam energy and beam type, for a delivery of 5000 cGy dose to skin, were compared. These results indicate that for delivery of 5000 cGy dose to the skin surface with 30 keV, 50 keV, 70 keV of MEBXS, IR-HDRS, and EEBRT techniques, bone will receive 31750 cGy, 27450 cGy, 18550 cGy, 4875 cGy, and 10450 cGy, respectively. Conclusion: The results of these investigations indicate that, for delivery of the same skin dose, average doses received by the underlying bone are 5.2 and 2.2 times larger with a 50 keV MEBXS and EEBRT techniques than IR-HDRS, respectively.

  9. A comprehensive dosimetric study of pancreatic cancer treatment using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT), and passive-scattering and modulated-scanning proton therapy (PT)

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Xuanfeng; Dionisi, Francesco; Tang, Shikui; Ingram, Mark; Hung, Chun-Yu; Prionas, Evangelos; Lichtenwalner, Phil; Butterwick, Ian; Zhai, Huifang; Yin, Lingshu; Lin, Haibo; Kassaee, Alireza; Avery, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    With traditional photon therapy to treat large postoperative pancreatic target volume, it often leads to poor tolerance of the therapy delivered and may contribute to interrupted treatment course. This study was performed to evaluate the potential advantage of using passive-scattering (PS) and modulated-scanning (MS) proton therapy (PT) to reduce normal tissue exposure in postoperative pancreatic cancer treatment. A total of 11 patients with postoperative pancreatic cancer who had been previously treated with PS PT in University of Pennsylvania Roberts Proton Therapy Center from 2010 to 2013 were identified. The clinical target volume (CTV) includes the pancreatic tumor bed as well as the adjacent high-risk nodal areas. Internal (iCTV) was generated from 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT), taking into account target motion from breathing cycle. Three-field and 4-field 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy, 2-arc volumetric-modulated radiation therapy, and 2-field PS and MS PT were created on the patients’ average CT. All the plans delivered 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). Overall, 98% of PTV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose and 99% of iCTV received 98% prescription dose. The results show that all the proton plans offer significant lower doses to the left kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), stomach (mean and V{sub 20} {sub Gy}), and cord (maximum dose) compared with all the photon plans, except 3-field 3DCRT in cord maximum dose. In addition, MS PT also provides lower doses to the right kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), liver (mean dose), total bowel (V{sub 20} {sub Gy} and mean dose), and small bowel (V{sub 15} {sub Gy} absolute volume ratio) compared with all the photon plans and PS PT. The dosimetric advantage of PT points to the possibility of treating tumor bed and comprehensive nodal areas while providing a more tolerable treatment course that could be used for dose

  10. Image-guided radiation therapy for treatment delivery and verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Leah Kayomi

    Target conformity and normal tissue sparing provided by modern radiation therapy techniques often result in steep dose gradients, which increase the need for more accurate patient setup and treatment delivery. Image guidance is starting to play a major role in determining the accuracy of treatment setup. A typical objective of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is to minimize differences between planned and delivered treatment by imaging the patient prior to delivery. This step verifies and corrects for patient setup and is referred to as setup verification. This dissertation evaluates the efficacy of daily imaging for setup verification and investigates new uses of IGRT for potential improvements in treatment delivery. The necessity of daily imaging can first be determined by assessing differences in setup corrections between patient groups. Therefore, the first objective of this investigation was to evaluate the application of IGRT for setup verification by quantifying differences in patient positioning for several anatomical disease sites. Detailed analysis of setup corrections for brain, head and neck, lung, and prostate treatments is presented. In this analysis, large setup errors were observed for prostate treatments. Further assessment of prostate treatments was performed, and patient-specific causes of setup errors investigated. Setup corrections are applied via rigid shifts or rotations of the patient or machine, but anatomical deformations occur for which rigid shifts cannot correct. Fortunately, IGRT provides images on which anatomical changes occurring throughout the course of treatment can be detected. From those images, the efficacy of IGRT in ensuring accurate treatment delivery can be evaluated and improved by determining delivered doses and adapting the plan during treatment. The second objective of this dissertation was to explore new applications of IGRT to further improve treatment. By utilizing daily IGRT images, a retrospective analysis of

  11. A practical three-dimensional dosimetry system for radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Pengyi; Adamovics, John; Oldham, Mark

    2006-10-15

    There is a pressing need for a practical three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry system, convenient for clinical use, and with the accuracy and resolution to enable comprehensive verification of the complex dose distributions typical of modern radiation therapy. Here we introduce a dosimetry system that can achieve this challenge, consisting of a radiochromic dosimeter (PRESAGE trade mark sign ) and a commercial optical computed tomography (CT) scanning system (OCTOPUS trade mark sign ). PRESAGE trade mark sign is a transparent material with compelling properties for dosimetry, including insensitivity of the dose response to atmospheric exposure, a solid texture negating the need for an external container (reducing edge effects), and amenability to accurate optical CT scanning due to radiochromic optical contrast as opposed to light-scattering contrast. An evaluation of the performance and viability of the PRESAGE trade mark sign /OCTOPUS, combination for routine clinical 3D dosimetry is presented. The performance of the two components (scanner and dosimeter) was investigated separately prior to full system test. The optical CT scanner has a spatial resolution of {<=}1 mm, geometric accuracy within 1 mm, and high reconstruction linearity (with a R{sup 2} value of 0.9979 and a standard error of estimation of {approx}1%) relative to independent measurement. The overall performance of the PRESAGE trade mark sign /OCTOPUS system was evaluated with respect to a simple known 3D dose distribution, by comparison with GAFCHROMIC[reg] EBT film and the calculated dose from a commissioned planning system. The 'measured' dose distribution in a cylindrical PRESAGE trade mark sign dosimeter (16 cm diameter and 11 cm height) was determined by optical-CT, using a filtered backprojection reconstruction algorithm. A three-way Gamma map comparison (4% dose difference and 4 mm distance to agreement), between the PRESAGE trade mark sign , EBT and calculated dose distributions, showed full

  12. A practical three-dimensional dosimetry system for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Pengyi; Adamovics, John; Oldham, Mark

    2006-10-01

    There is a pressing need for a practical three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry system, convenient for clinical use, and with the accuracy and resolution to enable comprehensive verification of the complex dose distributions typical of modern radiation therapy. Here we introduce a dosimetry system that can achieve this challenge, consisting of a radiochromic dosimeter (PRESAGE) and a commercial optical computed tomography (CT) scanning system (OCTOPUS). PRESAGE is a transparent material with compelling properties for dosimetry, including insensitivity of the dose response to atmospheric exposure, a solid texture negating the need for an external container (reducing edge effects), and amenability to accurate optical CT scanning due to radiochromic optical contrast as opposed to light-scattering contrast. An evaluation of the performance and viability of the PRESAGE/OCTOPUS, combination for routine clinical 3D dosimetry is presented. The performance of the two components (scanner and dosimeter) was investigated separately prior to full system test. The optical CT scanner has a spatial resolution of < or = 1 mm, geometric accuracy within 1 mm, and high reconstruction linearity (with a R2 value of 0.9979 and a standard error of estimation of approximately 1%) relative to independent measurement. The overall performance of the PRESAGE/OCTOPUS system was evaluated with respect to a simple known 3D dose distribution, by comparison with GAFCHROMIC EBT film and the calculated dose from a commissioned planning system. The "measured" dose distribution in a cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeter (16 cm diameter and 11 cm height) was determined by optical-CT, using a filtered backprojection reconstruction algorithm. A three-way Gamma map comparison (4% dose difference and 4 mm distance to agreement), between the PRESAGE, EBT and calculated dose distributions, showed full agreement in measurable region of PRESAGE dosimeter (approximately 90% of radius). The EBT and PRESAGE distributions agreed

  13. [Surgical therapy of late radiation sequelae of the gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Miholić, J; Schlappack, O; Kölbl, H; Szepesi, T; Möschl, P

    1986-03-01

    Fifty-six operations for intestinal complications of radiation therapy were performed in 48 patients at the Second Surgical Clinic, University of Vienna between 1971 and 1985. The lesions were located in the small bowel (n = 32), the colon and rectum (n = 27) and the duodenum (n = 2). The incidence of the operations increased during the fifteen-years-period, 48.2% being performed in the last five years. 96% of the patients were females, the most frequent cause for irradiation was ovarian cancer (39.6%), followed by cervical (27%) and endometrial cancer (16.7%). 20 Patients (39.6%) had also been treated by chemotherapy. Ovarian cancer as underlying disease (56%) and chemotherapy (56%) were more frequent in small bowel lesions, than in other locations. The radiation damage presented as stenoses (n = 38), fistulas (n = 13), perforations (n = 3), one rectal ulcer and one hemorrhagic proctitis. Resection with end-to-end-anastomosis (n = 15) and bypass (n = 14) were the operations most frequently performed on the small bowel, whereas most colonic and rectal lesions were treated by colostomy alone (n = 14). The postoperative course was complicated by fistulas in 7 patients, by peritonitis in 5, by pulmonary embolism in one and duodenal ulcer perforation in another case. Six patients died postoperatively (10.7%), 5 because of peritonitis. After small bowel resection complications occurred in 4 cases, and two (13%) of the patients died. Bypass in small bowel lesions performed as well as resection: 5 complications and one death (7%) occurred. Single layer suture technique performed better than two layer anastomoses. Eighteen operations with single layer anastomoses resulted in 16.7% complications and no death.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Proton Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mouw, Kent W.; Sethi, Roshan V.; Yeap, Beow Y.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.; Munzenrider, John E.; Adams, Judith; Grabowski, Eric; Mukai, Shizuo; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate long-term disease and toxicity outcomes for pediatric retinoblastoma patients treated with proton radiation therapy (PRT). Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective analysis of 49 retinoblastoma patients (60 eyes) treated with PRT between 1986 and 2012. Results: The majority (84%) of patients had bilateral disease, and nearly half (45%) had received prior chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 8 years (range, 1-24 years), no patients died of retinoblastoma or developed metastatic disease. The post-PRT enucleation rate was low (18%), especially in patients with early-stage disease (11% for patients with International Classification for Intraocular Retinoblastoma [ICIR] stage A-B disease vs 23% for patients with ICIR stage C-D disease). Post-PRT ophthalmologic follow-up was available for 61% of the preserved eyes (30 of 49): 14 of 30 eyes (47%) had 20/40 visual acuity or better, 7 of 30 (23%) had moderate visual acuity (20/40-20/600), and 9 of 30 (30%) had little or no useful vision (worse than 20/600). Twelve of 60 treated eyes (20%) experienced a post-PRT event requiring intervention, with cataracts the most common (4 eyes). No patients developed an in-field second malignancy. Conclusions: Long-term follow-up of retinoblastoma patients treated with PRT demonstrates that PRT can achieve high local control rates, even in advanced cases, and many patients retain useful vision in the treated eye. Treatment-related ocular side effects were uncommon, and no radiation-associated malignancies were observed.

  15. Three-Dimensional Display Of Radiation Therapy Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, L. T.; Lee, K. R.; Cytacki, E. P.; Dwyer, S. J.

    1987-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) treatment planning has been widely recognized as the ultimate method for radiation therapy for several decades. Recently, interest in developing 3-D treatment planning has been stimulated by the advent of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, and advanced computer technology. A 3-D treatment planning system requires an interactive computer system which is capable of performing the following functions: Demonstration of the tumor volume and normal anatomy in three dimensions, Calculation of the tumor volume, Definition of the target volume, Measurement of the distance and angles from outer surface reference points (e.g., external meatus) to specific anatomic points of interest (e.g., center of tumor), Projection of the spatial relationship between the therapy beam and normal anatomy, and calculation and display of dose distribution in three-dimensions. We have used a commercially available computer display system with a host microcomputer (M68000) to satisfy the above display and interaction requirements except for the calculation of 3-D dose distributions. The system has been applied to several cases which used CT as the imaging modality. A scanning protocol was established which called for contiguous 5mm thick slices from 2 cm above to 2 cm below the skin markers for the designated treatment field. Each patient was scanned in the treatment position, possibly using a fixation device. The outer skin contours, the tumor and adjacent contours were manually traced using a digitizing pen. The surfaces of the skin, the tumor, and normal anatomic structures were reconstructed in the display computer which then allowed a variety of interactions with the data, including beam definition and the real time positioning of the beam. After beam positions were established, the dose distribution within the treatment volume was computed, reconstructed, and then displayed along with the anatomic structures.

  16. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wen-Yen; Jen, Yee-Min; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Chang, Li-Ping; Chen, Chang-Ming; Ko, Kai-Hsiung; Lin, Kuen-Tze; Lin, Jang-Chun; Chao, Hsing-Lung; Lin, Chun-Shu; Su, Yu-Fu; Fan, Chao-Yueh; Chang, Yao-Wen

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To examine the safety and efficacy of Cyberknife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and its effect on survival in patients of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: This was a matched-pair study. From January 2008 to December 2009, 36 patients with 42 lesions of unresectable recurrent HCC were treated with SBRT. The median prescribed dose was 37 Gy (range, 25 to 48 Gy) in 4-5 fractions over 4-5 consecutive working days. Another 138 patients in the historical control group given other or no treatments were selected for matched analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 14 months for all patients and 20 months for those alive. The 1- and 2-year in-field failure-free rates were 87.6% and 75.1%, respectively. Out-field intrahepatic recurrence was the main cause of failure. The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate was 64.0%, and median time to progression was 8.0 months. In the multivariable analysis of all 174 patients, SBRT (yes vs. no), tumor size ({<=}4 cm vs. >4 cm), recurrent stage (stage IIIB/IV vs. I) and Child-Pugh classification (A vs. B/C) were independent prognostic factors for OS. Matched-pair analysis revealed that patients undergoing SBRT had better OS (2-year OS of 72.6% vs. 42.1%, respectively, p = 0.013). Acute toxicities were mild and tolerable. Conclusion: SBRT is a safe and efficacious modality and appears to be well-tolerated at the dose fractionation we have used, and its use correlates with improved survival in this cohort of patients with recurrent unresectable HCC. Out-field recurrence is the major cause of failure. Further studies of combinations of SBRT and systemic therapies may be reasonable.

  17. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for Breast Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Hathout, Lara; Hijal, Tarek; Théberge, Valérie; Fortin, Bernard; Vulpe, Horia; Hogue, Jean-Charles; Lambert, Christine; Bahig, Houda; and others

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Conventional radiation therapy (RT) administered in 25 fractions after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is the standard treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. Although accelerated hypofractionated regimens in 16 fractions have been shown to be equivalent to conventional RT for invasive breast cancer, few studies have reported results of using hypofractionated RT in DCIS. Methods and Materials: In this multicenter collaborative effort, we retrospectively reviewed the records of all women with DCIS at 3 institutions treated with BCS followed by hypofractionated whole-breast RT (WBRT) delivered in 16 fractions. Results: Between 2003 and 2010, 440 patients with DCIS underwent BCS followed by hypofractionated WBRT in 16 fractions for a total dose of 42.5 Gy (2.66 Gy per fraction). Boost RT to the surgical bed was given to 125 patients (28%) at a median dose of 10 Gy in 4 fractions (2.5 Gy per fraction). After a median follow-up time of 4.4 years, 14 patients had an ipsilateral local relapse, resulting in a local recurrence-free survival of 97% at 5 years. Positive surgical margins, high nuclear grade, age less than 50 years, and a premenopausal status were all statistically associated with an increased occurrence of local recurrence. Tumor hormone receptor status, use of adjuvant hormonal therapy, and administration of additional boost RT did not have an impact on local control in our cohort. On multivariate analysis, positive margins, premenopausal status, and nuclear grade 3 tumors had a statistically significant worse local control rate. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT using 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions provides excellent local control for patients with DCIS undergoing BCS.

  18. Projections onto the Pareto surface in multicriteria radiation therapy optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Bokrantz, Rasmus E-mail: rasmus.bokrantz@raysearchlabs.com; Miettinen, Kaisa

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To eliminate or reduce the error to Pareto optimality that arises in Pareto surface navigation when the Pareto surface is approximated by a small number of plans. Methods: The authors propose to project the navigated plan onto the Pareto surface as a postprocessing step to the navigation. The projection attempts to find a Pareto optimal plan that is at least as good as or better than the initial navigated plan with respect to all objective functions. An augmented form of projection is also suggested where dose–volume histogram constraints are used to prevent that the projection causes a violation of some clinical goal. The projections were evaluated with respect to planning for intensity modulated radiation therapy delivered by step-and-shoot and sliding window and spot-scanned intensity modulated proton therapy. Retrospective plans were generated for a prostate and a head and neck case. Results: The projections led to improved dose conformity and better sparing of organs at risk (OARs) for all three delivery techniques and both patient cases. The mean dose to OARs decreased by 3.1 Gy on average for the unconstrained form of the projection and by 2.0 Gy on average when dose–volume histogram constraints were used. No consistent improvements in target homogeneity were observed. Conclusions: There are situations when Pareto navigation leaves room for improvement in OAR sparing and dose conformity, for example, if the approximation of the Pareto surface is coarse or the problem formulation has too permissive constraints. A projection onto the Pareto surface can identify an inaccurate Pareto surface representation and, if necessary, improve the quality of the navigated plan.

  19. The Roles and Controversies of Radiation Therapy in Breast Conserving Therapy for Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka; Mitsumori; Kokubo

    1997-10-31

    Breast conserving therapy (BCT) is defined as a combination of conservative surgery for resection of the primary tumor, followed by radiation therapy (RT) for the eradication of residual microscopic disease in the breast. At NIH Consensus Development Conference in 1990, BCT was recognized as the preferred treatment for the majority of women with Stage I and II breast cancer. RT is a potent locoregional treament and its role in BCT in reducing local recurrence is already established. On the other hand, the influence of RT on survival outcome has not yet been closely demonstrated so far. RT appears to be useful as neoadjuvant therapy, and also as exclusive local treatment for patients achieving complete regression (CR) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The other possible role of RT is to use it as an alternative to axillary dissection in patients with clinically uninvolved nodes. The question of the appropriateness of using RT in all BCT cases is raised. Since the subgroup of patients who would not deserve any benefit by RT has not yet identified, RT should be delivered as standard treatment following breast conserving surgery for early stage breast cancer.

  20. Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) as Conversion Therapy for Unresectable Primary Liver Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Cucchetti, Alessandro; Cappelli, Alberta; Ercolani, Giorgio; Mosconi, Cristina; Cescon, Matteo; Golfieri, Rita; Pinna, Antonio Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Background Many patients with primary liver cancers are not candidates for surgery, and systemic therapies are seldom effective. Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) has been shown to obtain partial and even complete response in unresectable primary tumors. As a “side effect”, SIRT can induce contra-lateral liver hypertrophy. Tumor response to SIRT can be sufficient to allow disengagement from normal vital structures whose involvement is the cause of the initial unresectability. The contra-lateral hypertrophy can thereby increase the future liver remnant (FLR) volume to over the safe threshold so that extended hepatectomy can be performed. Summary A review of the available literature was performed to assess the tumor response and liver hypertrophy that can be expected after SIRT, in order to delineate whether SIRTcan play a role in conversion therapy for resectability of primary liver malignancies. Key Message Available data suggest that SIRT in unresectable hepatocellular and cholangiocellular carcinomas can provide a considerable down-sizing of the tumors to possibly allow resection. Hypertrophy of the contra-lateral lobe represents a favorable collateral effect that can help in achieving safer subsequent major hepatectomy. In patients whose FLR volume represents the only surgical concern, portal vein embolization remains the treatment of choice. PMID:27781202

  1. Cherenkov Video Imaging Allows for the First Visualization of Radiation Therapy in Real Time

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, Lesley A.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Gladstone, David J.; Jiang, Shudong; Hitchcock, Whitney; Friedman, Oscar D.; Glaser, Adam K.; Jermyn, Michael; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To determine whether Cherenkov light imaging can visualize radiation therapy in real time during breast radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: An intensified charge-coupled device (CCD) camera was synchronized to the 3.25-μs radiation pulses of the clinical linear accelerator with the intensifier set × 100. Cherenkov images were acquired continuously (2.8 frames/s) during fractionated whole breast irradiation with each frame an accumulation of 100 radiation pulses (approximately 5 monitor units). Results: The first patient images ever created are used to illustrate that Cherenkov emission can be visualized as a video during conditions typical for breast radiation therapy, even with complex treatment plans, mixed energies, and modulated treatment fields. Images were generated correlating to the superficial dose received by the patient and potentially the location of the resulting skin reactions. Major blood vessels are visible in the image, providing the potential to use these as biological landmarks for improved geometric accuracy. The potential for this system to detect radiation therapy misadministrations, which can result from hardware malfunction or patient positioning setup errors during individual fractions, is shown. Conclusions: Cherenkoscopy is a unique method for visualizing surface dose resulting in real-time quality control. We propose that this system could detect radiation therapy errors in everyday clinical practice at a time when these errors can be corrected to result in improved safety and quality of radiation therapy.

  2. A Cooperatively Controlled Robot for Ultrasound Monitoring of Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tutkun Şen, H.; Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Iordachita, Iulian; Wong, John; Kazanzides, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) involves two main procedures, performed in different rooms on different days: (1) treatment planning in the simulator room on the first day, and (2) radiotherapy in the linear accelerator room over multiple subsequent days. Both the simulator and the linear accelerator include CT imaging capabilities, which enables both treatment planning and reproducible patient setup, but does not provide good soft tissue contrast or allow monitoring of the target during treatment. We propose a cooperatively-controlled robot to reproducibly position an ultrasound (US) probe on the patient during simulation and treatment, thereby improving soft tissue visualization and allowing real-time monitoring of the target. A key goal of the robotic system is to produce consistent tissue deformations for both CT and US imaging, which simplifies registration of these two modalities. This paper presents the robotic system design and describes a novel control algorithm that employs virtual springs to implement guidance virtual fixtures during “hands on” cooperative control. PMID:26823988

  3. Intensity modulated radiation therapy for breast cancer: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Buwenge, Milly; Cammelli, Silvia; Ammendolia, Ilario; Tolento, Giorgio; Zamagni, Alice; Arcelli, Alessandra; Macchia, Gabriella; Deodato, Francesco; Cilla, Savino; Morganti, Alessio G

    2017-01-01

    Background Owing to highly conformed dose distribution, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has the potential to improve treatment results of radiotherapy (RT). Postoperative RT is a standard adjuvant treatment in conservative treatment of breast cancer (BC). The aim of this review is to analyze available evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on IMRT in BC, particularly in terms of reduction of side effects. Methods A literature search of the bibliographic database PubMed, from January 1990 through November 2016, was performed. Only RCTs published in English were included. Results Ten articles reporting data from 5 RCTs fulfilled the selection criteria and were included in our review. Three out of 5 studies enrolled only selected patients in terms of increased risk of toxicity. Three studies compared IMRT with standard tangential RT. One study compared the results of IMRT in the supine versus the prone position, and one study compared standard treatment with accelerated partial breast IMRT. Three studies reported reduced acute and/or late toxicity using IMRT compared with standard RT. No study reported improved quality of life. Conclusion IMRT seems able to reduce toxicity in selected patients treated with postoperative RT for BC. Further analyses are needed to better define patients who are candidates for this treatment modality. PMID:28293119

  4. Deformation field validation and inversion applied to adaptive radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vercauteren, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; Olteanu, Luiza A. M.; Madani, Indira; Duprez, Fréderic; Berwouts, Dieter; Speleers, Bruno; De Neve, Wilfried

    2013-08-01

    Development and implementation of chronological and anti-chronological adaptive dose accumulation strategies in adaptive intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. An algorithm based on Newton iterations was implemented to efficiently compute inverse deformation fields (DFs). Four verification steps were performed to ensure a valid dose propagation: intra-cell folding detection finds zero or negative Jacobian determinants in the input DF; inter-cell folding detection is implemented on the resolution of the output DF; a region growing algorithm detects undefined values in the output DF; DF domains can be composed and displayed on the CT data. In 2011, one patient with nonmetastatic head and neck cancer selected from a three phase adaptive DPBN study was used to illustrate the algorithms implemented for adaptive chronological and anti-chronological dose accumulation. The patient received three 18F-FDG-PET/CTs prior to each treatment phase and one CT after finalizing treatment. Contour propagation and DF generation between two consecutive CTs was performed in Atlas-based autosegmentation (ABAS). Deformable image registration based dose accumulations were performed on CT1 and CT4. Dose propagation was done using combinations of DFs or their inversions. We have implemented a chronological and anti-chronological dose accumulation algorithm based on DF inversion. Algorithms were designed and implemented to detect cell folding.

  5. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Childhood Ependymoma

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Thomas M.; Chintagumpala, Murali; Okcu, M. Fatih; Chiu, J. Kam; Teh, Bin S.; Woo, Shiao Y.; Paulino, Arnold C.

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the patterns of failure after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for localized intracranial ependymoma. Methods and Materials: From 1994 to 2005, 22 children with pathologically proven, localized, intracranial ependymoma were treated with adjuvant IMRT. Of the patients, 12 (55%) had an infratentorial tumor and 14 (64%) had anaplastic histology. Five patients had a subtotal resection (STR), as evidenced by postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. The clinical target volume encompassed the tumor bed and any residual disease plus margin (median dose 54 Gy). Median follow-up for surviving patients was 39.8 months. Results: The 3-year overall survival rate was 87% {+-} 9%. The 3-year local control rate was 68% {+-} 12%. There were six local recurrences, all in the high-dose region of the treatment field. Median time to recurrence was 21.7 months. Of the 5 STR patients, 4 experienced recurrence and 3 died. Patients with a gross total resection had significantly better local control (p = 0.024) and overall survival (p = 0.008) than those with an STR. At last follow-up, no patient had developed visual loss, brain necrosis, myelitis, or a second malignancy. Conclusions: Treatment with IMRT provides local control and survival rates comparable with those in historic publications using larger treatment volumes. All failures were within the high-dose region, suggesting that IMRT does not diminish local control. The degree of surgical resection was shown to be significant for local control and survival.

  6. Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy: What Do Clinicians Have to Know?

    PubMed Central

    Van Limbergen, Evert J.; van Lin, Emile N.; van Roermund, Joep G. H.; Lambin, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer (PC) has steadily evolved over the last decades, with improving biochemical disease-free survival. Recently population based research also revealed an association between overall survival and doses ≥ 75.6 Gray (Gy) in men with intermediate- and high-risk PC. Examples of improved RT techniques are image-guided RT, intensity-modulated RT, volumetric modulated arc therapy, and stereotactic ablative body RT, which could facilitate further dose escalation. Brachytherapy is an internal form of RT that also developed substantially. New devices such as rectum spacers and balloons have been developed to spare rectal structures. Newer techniques like protons and carbon ions have the intrinsic characteristics maximising the dose on the tumour while minimising the effect on the surrounding healthy tissue, but clinical data are needed for confirmation in randomised phase III trials. Furthermore, it provides an overview of an important discussion issue in PC treatment between urologists and radiation oncologists: the comparison between radical prostatectomy and RT. Current literature reveals that all possible treatment modalities have the same cure rate, but a different toxicity pattern. We recommend proposing the possible different treatment modalities with their own advantages and side-effects to the individual patient. Clinicians and patients should make treatment decisions together (shared decision-making) while using patient decision aids. PMID:28116302

  7. Nuclear data needs for radiation protection and therapy dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, M.B.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Haight, R.C.

    1995-12-31

    New nuclear data are required for improved neutron and proton radiotherapy treatment planning as well as future applications of high-energy particle accelerators. Modern neutron radiotherapy employs energies extending to 70 MeV, while industrial applications such as transmutation and tritium breeding may generate neutrons exceeding energies of 100 MeV. Secondary neutrons produced by advanced proton therapy facilities can have energies as high as 250 MeV. Each use requires nuclear data for transport calculations and analysis of radiation effects (dosimetry). We discuss the nuclear data needs supportive of these applications including the different information requirements. As data in this energy region are sparse and likely to remain so, advanced nuclear model calculations can provide some of the needed information. ln this context, we present new evaluated nuclear data for C, N, and O. Additional experimental information, including integral and differential data, are required to confirm these results and to bound further calculations. We indicate the required new data to be measured and the difficulties in carrying out such experiments.

  8. Radiant{trademark} Liquid Radioisotope Intravascular Radiation Therapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Eigler, N.; Whiting, J.; Chernomorsky, A.; Jackson, J.; Knapp, F.F., Jr.; Litvack, F.

    1998-01-16

    RADIANT{trademark} is manufactured by United States Surgical Corporation, Vascular Therapies Division, (formerly Progressive Angioplasty Systems). The system comprises a liquid {beta}-radiation source, a shielded isolation/transfer device (ISAT), modified over-the-wire or rapid exchange delivery balloons, and accessory kits. The liquid {beta}-source is Rhenium-188 in the form of sodium perrhenate (NaReO{sub 4}), Rhenium-188 is primarily a {beta}-emitter with a physical half-life of 17.0 hours. The maximum energy of the {beta}-particles is 2.1 MeV. The source is produced daily in the nuclear pharmacy hot lab by eluting a Tungsten-188/Rhenium-188 generator manufactured by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Using anion exchange columns and Millipore filters the effluent is concentrated to approximately 100 mCi/ml, calibrated, and loaded into the (ISAT) which is subsequently transported to the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The delivery catheters are modified Champion{trademark} over-the-wire, and TNT{trademark} rapid exchange stent delivery balloons. These balloons have thickened polyethylene walls to augment puncture resistance; dual radio-opaque markers and specially configured connectors.

  9. Acid ceramidase in prostate cancer radiation therapy resistance and relapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Joseph C.

    Prostate tumor cell escape from ionizing radiation (IR)-induced killing can lead to disease progression and relapse. Sphingolipids such as ceramide and sphingosine 1-phosphate influence signal transduction pathways that regulate stress response in cancer cells. In particular, metabolism of apoptotic ceramide constitutes an important survival adaptation. Assessments of enzyme activity, mRNA, and protein demonstrated preferential upregulation of the ceramide deacylating enzyme acid ceramidase (AC) in irradiated cancer cells. Promoter-reporter and ChIP-qPCR assays revealed AC transcription by activator protein 1 (AP-1) is sensitive to pharmacological inhibition of de novo ceramide biosynthesis, identifying a protective feedback mechanism that mitigates the effects of IR-induced ceramide. Deregulation of c-Jun, in particular, induced marked radiosensitization in vitro and in vivo, which was rescued by ectopic AC over-expression. AC over-expression in prostate cancer clonogens surviving 80 Gray fractionated irradiation was associated with increased radioresistance and proliferation, suggesting a role in radiotherapy failure and relapse. Indeed, immunohistochemical analysis of human prostate cancer tissues revealed higher levels of AC after radiotherapy failure than therapy-naive adenocarcinoma, PIN, or benign tissues. By genetically downregulating AC with small interfering RNA (siRNA), we observed radiosensitization of cells using clonogenic and cytotoxicity assays. Finally, treatment with lysosomotropic small molecule inhibitors of AC, LCL385 or LCL521, induced prostate cancer xenograft radiosensitization and long-term suppression, suggesting AC is a tractable target for adjuvant radiotherapy.

  10. Adeno-associated Virus Gene Therapy With Cholesterol 24-Hydroxylase Reduces the Amyloid Pathology Before or After the Onset of Amyloid Plaques in Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hudry, Eloise; Van Dam, Debby; Kulik, Wim; De Deyn, Peter P; Stet, Femke S; Ahouansou, Ornella; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Delacourte, André; Bougnères, Pierre; Aubourg, Patrick; Cartier, Nathalie

    2009-01-01

    The development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is closely connected with cholesterol metabolism. Cholesterol increases the production and deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides that result in the formation of amyloid plaques, a hallmark of the pathology. In the brain, cholesterol is synthesized in situ but cannot be degraded nor cross the blood–brain barrier. The major exportable form of brain cholesterol is 24S-hydroxycholesterol, an oxysterol generated by the neuronal cholesterol 24-hydroxylase encoded by the CYP46A1 gene. We report that the injection of adeno-associated vector (AAV) encoding CYP46A1 in the cortex and hippocampus of APP23 mice before the onset of amyloid deposits markedly reduces Aβ peptides, amyloid deposits and trimeric oligomers at 12 months of age. The Morris water maze (MWM) procedure also demonstrated improvement of spatial memory at 6 months, before the onset of amyloid deposits. AAV5-wtCYP46A1 vector injection in the cortex and hippocampus of amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 (APP/PS) mice after the onset of amyloid deposits also reduced markedly the number of amyloid plaques in the hippocampus, and to a less extent in the cortex, 3 months after the injection. Our data demonstrate that neuronal overexpression of CYP46A1 before or after the onset of amyloid plaques significantly reduces Aβ pathology in mouse models of AD. PMID:19654569

  11. Fluence field modulated CT on a clinical TomoTherapy radiation therapy machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczykutowicz, Timothy P.; Hermus, James

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: The multi-leaf collimator (MLC) assembly present on TomoTherapy (Accuray, Madison WI) radiation therapy (RT) and mega voltage CT machines is well suited to perform fluence field modulated CT (FFMCT). In addition, there is a demand in the RT environment for FFMCT imaging techniques, specifically volume of interest (VOI) imaging. Methods: A clinical TomoTherapy machine was programmed to deliver 30% imaging dose outside predefined VOIs. Four different size ROIs were placed at varying distances from isocenter. Projections intersecting the VOI received "full dose" while those not intersecting the VOI received 30% of the dose (i.e. the incident fluence for non VOI projections was 30% of the incident fluence for projections intersecting the VOI). Additional scans without fluence field modulation were acquired at "full" and 30% dose. The noise (pixel standard deviation) was measured inside the VOI region and compared between the three scans. Results: The VOI-FFMCT technique produced an image noise 1.09, 1.05, 1.05, and 1.21 times higher than the "full dose" scan for ROI sizes of 10 cm, 13 cm, 10 cm, and 6 cm respectively within the VOI region. Conclusions: Noise levels can be almost unchanged within clinically relevant VOIs sizes for RT applications while the integral imaging dose to the patient can be decreased, and/or the image quality in RT can be dramatically increased with no change in dose relative to non-FFMCT RT imaging. The ability to shift dose away from regions unimportant for clinical evaluation in order to improve image quality or reduce imaging dose has been demonstrated. This paper demonstrates that FFMCT can be performed using the MLC on a clinical TomoTherapy machine for the first time.

  12. Variation in the Cost of Radiation Therapy Among Medicare Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paravati, Anthony J.; Boero, Isabel J.; Triplett, Daniel P.; Hwang, Lindsay; Matsuno, Rayna K.; Xu, Beibei; Mell, Loren K.; Murphy, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy represents a major source of health care expenditure for patients with cancer. Understanding the sources of variability in the cost of radiation therapy is critical to evaluating the efficiency of the current reimbursement system and could shape future policy reform. This study defines the magnitude and sources of variation in the cost of radiation therapy for a large cohort of Medicare beneficiaries. Patients and Methods: We identified 55,288 patients within the SEER database diagnosed with breast, lung, or prostate cancer between 2004 and 2009. The cost of radiation therapy was estimated from Medicare reimbursements. Multivariable linear regression models were used to assess the influence of patient, tumor, and radiation therapy provider characteristics on variation in cost of radiation therapy. Results: For breast, lung, and prostate cancers, the median cost (interquartile range) of a course of radiation therapy was $8,600 ($7,300 to $10,300), $9,000 ($7,500 to $11,100), and $18,000 ($11,300 to $25,500), respectively. For all three cancer subtypes, patient- or tumor-related factors accounted for < 3% of the variation in cost. Factors unrelated to the patient, including practice type, geography, and individual radiation therapy provider, accounted for a substantial proportion of the variation in cost, ranging from 44% with breast, 43% with lung, and 61% with prostate cancer. Conclusion: In this study, factors unrelated to the individual patient accounted for the majority of variation in the cost of radiation therapy, suggesting potential inefficiency in health care expenditure. Future research should determine whether this variability translates into improved patient outcomes for further evaluation of current reimbursement practices. PMID:26265172

  13. Optimization and quality assurance of an image-guided radiation therapy system for intensity-modulated radiation therapy radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jen-San; Micaily, Bizhan; Miyamoto, Curtis

    2012-01-01

    To develop a quality assurance (QA) of XVI cone beam system (XVIcbs) for its optimal imaging-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) implementation, and to construe prostate tumor margin required for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) if IGRT is unavailable. XVIcbs spatial accuracy was explored with a humanoid phantom; isodose conformity to lesion target with a rice phantom housing a soap as target; image resolution with a diagnostic phantom; and exposure validation with a Radcal ion chamber. To optimize XVIcbs, rotation flexmap on coincidency between gantry rotational axis and that of XVI cone beam scan was investigated. Theoretic correlation to image quality of XVIcbs rotational axis stability was elaborately studied. Comprehensive QA of IGRT using XVIcbs has initially been explored and then implemented on our general IMRT treatments, and on special IMRT radiotherapies such as head and neck (H and N), stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT), stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Fifteen examples of prostate setup accounted for 350 IGRT cone beam system were analyzed. IGRT accuracy results were in agreement ± 1 mm. Flexmap 0.25 mm met the manufacturer's specification. Films confirmed isodose coincidence with target (soap) via XVIcbs, otherwise not. Superficial doses were measured from 7.2-2.5 cGy for anatomic diameters 15-33 cm, respectively. Image quality was susceptible to rotational stability or patient movement. IGRT using XVIcbs on general IMRT treatments such as prostate, SRT, SRS, and SBRT for setup accuracy were verified; and subsequently coordinate shifts corrections were recorded. The 350 prostate IGRT coordinate shifts modeled to Gaussian distributions show central peaks deviated off the isocenter by 0.6 ± 3.0 mm, 0.5 ± 4.5 mm in the X(RL)- and Z(SI)-coordinates, respectively; and 2.0 ± 3.0 mm in the Y(AP)-coordinate as a result of belly and bladder capacity variations. Sixty-eight percent of confidence was within

  14. Optimization and quality assurance of an image-guided radiation therapy system for intensity-modulated radiation therapy radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Jen-San; Micaily, Bizhan; Miyamoto, Curtis

    2012-10-01

    To develop a quality assurance (QA) of XVI cone beam system (XVIcbs) for its optimal imaging-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) implementation, and to construe prostate tumor margin required for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) if IGRT is unavailable. XVIcbs spatial accuracy was explored with a humanoid phantom; isodose conformity to lesion target with a rice phantom housing a soap as target; image resolution with a diagnostic phantom; and exposure validation with a Radcal ion chamber. To optimize XVIcbs, rotation flexmap on coincidency between gantry rotational axis and that of XVI cone beam scan was investigated. Theoretic correlation to image quality of XVIcbs rotational axis stability was elaborately studied. Comprehensive QA of IGRT using XVIcbs has initially been explored and then implemented on our general IMRT treatments, and on special IMRT radiotherapies such as head and neck (H and N), stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT), stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Fifteen examples of prostate setup accounted for 350 IGRT cone beam system were analyzed. IGRT accuracy results were in agreement {+-} 1 mm. Flexmap 0.25 mm met the manufacturer's specification. Films confirmed isodose coincidence with target (soap) via XVIcbs, otherwise not. Superficial doses were measured from 7.2-2.5 cGy for anatomic diameters 15-33 cm, respectively. Image quality was susceptible to rotational stability or patient movement. IGRT using XVIcbs on general IMRT treatments such as prostate, SRT, SRS, and SBRT for setup accuracy were verified; and subsequently coordinate shifts corrections were recorded. The 350 prostate IGRT coordinate shifts modeled to Gaussian distributions show central peaks deviated off the isocenter by 0.6 {+-} 3.0 mm, 0.5 {+-} 4.5 mm in the X(RL)- and Z(SI)-coordinates, respectively; and 2.0 {+-} 3.0 mm in the Y(AP)-coordinate as a result of belly and bladder capacity variations. Sixty-eight percent of confidence was

  15. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Treatment Time Impacts Overall Survival in Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, Matthew T.; Ojerholm, Eric; Roses, Robert E.; Plastaras, John P.; Metz, James M.; Mamtani, Ronac; Stripp, Diana; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Datta, Jashodeep

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Prolonged radiation therapy treatment time (RTT) is associated with worse survival in several tumor types. This study investigated whether delays during adjuvant radiation therapy impact overall survival (OS) in gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was queried for patients with resected gastric cancer who received adjuvant radiation therapy with National Comprehensive Cancer Network–recommended doses (45 or 50.4 Gy) between 1998 and 2006. RTT was classified as standard (45 Gy: 33-36 days, 50.4 Gy: 38-41 days) or prolonged (45 Gy: >36 days, 50.4 Gy: >41 days). Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the association between the following factors and OS: RTT, interval from surgery to radiation therapy initiation, interval from surgery to radiation therapy completion, radiation therapy dose, demographic/pathologic and operative factors, and other elements of adjuvant multimodality therapy. Results: Of 1591 patients, RTT was delayed in 732 (46%). Factors associated with prolonged RTT were non-private health insurance (OR 1.3, P=.005) and treatment at non-academic facilities (OR 1.2, P=.045). Median OS and 5-year actuarial survival were significantly worse in patients with prolonged RTT compared with standard RTT (36 vs 51 months, P=.001; 39 vs 47%, P=.005); OS worsened with each cumulative week of delay (P<.0004). On multivariable analysis, prolonged RTT was associated with inferior OS (hazard ratio 1.2, P=.002); the intervals from surgery to radiation therapy initiation or completion were not. Prolonged RTT was particularly detrimental in patients with node positivity, inadequate nodal staging (<15 nodes examined), and those undergoing a cycle of chemotherapy before chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: Delays during adjuvant radiation therapy appear to negatively impact survival in gastric cancer. Efforts to minimize cumulative interruptions to <7 days should be considered.

  16. Age Disparity in Palliative Radiation Therapy Among Patients With Advanced Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jonathan; Xu, Beibei; Yeung, Heidi N.; Roeland, Eric J.; Martinez, Maria Elena; Le, Quynh-Thu; Mell, Loren K.; Murphy, James D.

    2014-09-01

    Purpose/Objective: Palliative radiation therapy represents an important treatment option among patients with advanced cancer, although research shows decreased use among older patients. This study evaluated age-related patterns of palliative radiation use among an elderly Medicare population. Methods and Materials: We identified 63,221 patients with metastatic lung, breast, prostate, or colorectal cancer diagnosed between 2000 and 2007 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Receipt of palliative radiation therapy was extracted from Medicare claims. Multivariate Poisson regression analysis determined residual age-related disparity in the receipt of palliative radiation therapy after controlling for confounding covariates including age-related differences in patient and demographic covariates, length of life, and patient preferences for aggressive cancer therapy. Results: The use of radiation decreased steadily with increasing patient age. Forty-two percent of patients aged 66 to 69 received palliative radiation therapy. Rates of palliative radiation decreased to 38%, 32%, 24%, and 14% among patients aged 70 to 74, 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and over 85, respectively. Multivariate analysis found that confounding covariates attenuated these findings, although the decreased relative rate of palliative radiation therapy among the elderly remained clinically and statistically significant. On multivariate analysis, compared to patients 66 to 69 years old, those aged 70 to 74, 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and over 85 had a 7%, 15%, 25%, and 44% decreased rate of receiving palliative radiation, respectively (all P<.0001). Conclusions: Age disparity with palliative radiation therapy exists among older cancer patients. Further research should strive to identify barriers to palliative radiation among the elderly, and extra effort should be made to give older patients the opportunity to receive this quality of life-enhancing treatment at the end

  17. Reirradiation After Radical Radiation Therapy: A Survey of Patterns of Practice Among Canadian Radiation Oncologists

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, Kurian Jones Al-Mandhari, Zahid; Pervez, Nadeem; Parliament, Matthew; Wu, Jackson; Ghosh, Sunita; Tai, Patricia; Lian Jidong; Levin, Wilfred

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to survey the use of reirradiation (Re-RT) for in-field failures after previous radical radiation treatment (RT) among Canadian radiation oncologists (ROs). Methods and Materials: An electronic survey was sent to 271 ROs in Canada. The completed surveys were received electronically via e-mail and the data were analyzed using SAS 9.1.3 software. Results: A total of 183 ROs (67.5%) completed and returned the survey. The majority of the respondents were involved in the practice of either breast (48%) or genitourinary (43%) tumor sites. A total of 49% of the participants were interested in using Re-RT for the management of in-field recurrences. The goals of the therapy would be improvement of quality of life (99%), locoregional control (80%), or cure (32%). Most of the physicians believed that patients should have a minimum Karnofsky performance status of 50 or Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 3, a minimum life expectancy of 3 months, and a minimum interval from initial treatment of 3 months if Re-RT were to be given with curative intent. Conclusions: This survey showed that a wide variation existed among ROs in their approach to Re-RT. Newer technologies in RT planning and delivery would be employed to facilitate normal tissue avoidance. The results of this study suggested that a consensus meeting was needed to establish guidelines for the practice and prospective evaluation of Re-RT.

  18. Importance of Radiation Oncologist Experience Among Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Boero, Isabel J.; Paravati, Anthony J.; Xu, Beibei; Cohen, Ezra E.W.; Mell, Loren K.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Over the past decade, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has replaced conventional radiation techniques in the management of head-and-neck cancers (HNCs). We conducted this population-based study to evaluate the influence of radiation oncologist experience on outcomes in patients with HNC treated with IMRT compared with patients with HNC treated with conventional radiation therapy. Methods We identified radiation providers from Medicare claims of 6,212 Medicare beneficiaries with HNC treated between 2000 and 2009. We analyzed the impact of provider volume on all-cause mortality, HNC mortality, and toxicity end points after treatment with either conventional radiation therapy or IMRT. All analyses were performed by using either multivariable Cox proportional hazards or Fine-Gray regression models controlling for potential confounding variables. Results Among patients treated with conventional radiation, we found no significant relationship between provider volume and patient survival or any toxicity end point. Among patients receiving IMRT, those treated by higher-volume radiation oncologists had improved survival compared with those treated by low-volume providers. The risk of all-cause mortality decreased by 21% for every additional five patients treated per provider per year (hazard ratio [HR], 0.79; 95% CI, 0.67 to 0.94). Patients treated with IMRT by higher-volume providers had decreased HNC-specific mortality (subdistribution HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.50 to 0.91) and decreased risk of aspiration pneumonia (subdistribution HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.52 to 0.99). Conclusion Patients receiving IMRT for HNC had improved outcomes when treated by higher-volume providers. These findings will better inform patients and providers when making decisions about treatment, and emphasize the critical importance of high-quality radiation therapy for optimal treatment of HNC. PMID:26729432

  19. Radiation Therapy Is Associated With Improved Survival in the Adjuvant and Definitive Treatment of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, Eric T. Mitra, Nandita; Guo Mengye; Metz, James M.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (IHC) are rare tumors for which large randomized studies regarding the use of radiation are not available. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of adjuvant and definitive radiation therapy in the treatment of IHC in a large group of patients. Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective analysis of 3,839 patients with IHC collected from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Results: Patients received either surgery alone (25%), radiation therapy alone (10%), surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy (7%) or no treatment (58%). The median age of the patient population was 73 years (range, 22-102 years); 52% of patients were male and 81% were Caucasian. Median OS was 11 (95% confidence interval [CI], 9-13), 6 (95% CI, 5-6), 7 (95% CI, 6-8), and 3 months for surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy, sugery alone, radiation therapy alone, and no treatment, respectively. The OS was significantly different between surgery alone and surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy (p = 0.014) and radiation therapy alone and no treatment (p < 0.0001). Use of surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy conferred the greatest benefit on OS (HR = 0.40; 95% CI, 0.34-0.47), followed by surgery alone (hazard ratio [HR], 0.49; 95% CI, 0.44-0.54) and radiation therapy alone (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.59-0.77) compared with no treatment, on multivariate analysis. Propensity score adjusted hazard ratios (controlling for age, race/ethnicity, stage, and year of diagnosis) were also significant (surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy vs. surgery alone (HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.70-0.96); radiation therapy alone vs. no treatment (HR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.58-0.76)). Conclusions: The study results suggest that adjuvant and definitive radiation treatment prolong survival, although cure rates remain low. Future studies should evaluate the addition of chemotherapy and biologics to the treatment of

  20. Modern Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG)

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, Lena; Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Constine, Louis S.; Eich, Hans Theodor; Girinsky, Theodore; Hoppe, Richard T.; Mauch, Peter; Mikhaeel, N. George; Ng, Andrea

    2014-07-15

    Radiation therapy (RT) is the most effective single modality for local control of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and an important component of therapy for many patients. These guidelines have been developed to address the use of RT in HL in the modern era of combined modality treatment. The role of reduced volumes and doses is addressed, integrating modern imaging with 3-dimensional (3D) planning and advanced techniques of treatment delivery. The previously applied extended field (EF) and original involved field (IF) techniques, which treated larger volumes based on nodal stations, have now been replaced by the use of limited volumes, based solely on detectable nodal (and extranodal extension) involvement at presentation, using contrast-enhanced computed tomography, positron emission tomography/computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or a combination of these techniques. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements concepts of gross tumor volume, clinical target volume, internal target volume, and planning target volume are used for defining the targeted volumes. Newer treatment techniques, including intensity modulated radiation therapy, breath-hold, image guided radiation therapy, and 4-dimensional imaging, should be implemented when their use is expected to decrease significantly the risk for normal tissue damage while still achieving the primary goal of local tumor control. The highly conformal involved node radiation therapy (INRT), recently introduced for patients for whom optimal imaging is available, is explained. A new concept, involved site radiation therapy (ISRT), is introduced as the standard conformal therapy for the scenario, commonly encountered, wherein optimal imaging is not available. There is increasing evidence that RT doses used in the past are higher than necessary for disease control in this era of combined modality therapy. The use of INRT and of lower doses in early-stage HL is supported by available data. Although the

  1. Imaging and characterization of primary and secondary radiation in ion beam therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granja, Carlos; Martisikova, Maria; Jakubek, Jan; Opalka, Lukas; Gwosch, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    Imaging in ion beam therapy is an essential and increasingly significant tool for treatment planning and radiation and dose deposition verification. Efforts aim at providing precise radiation field characterization and online monitoring of radiation dose distribution. A review is given of the research and methodology of quantum-imaging, composition, spectral and directional characterization of the mixed-radiation fields in proton and light ion beam therapy developed by the IEAP CTU Prague and HIT Heidelberg group. Results include non-invasive imaging of dose deposition and primary beam online monitoring.

  2. Optimization of Radiation Therapy Techniques for Prostate Cancer With Prostate-Rectum Spacers: A Systematic Review

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, Gary; Benz, Eileen; Vallee, Jean-Paul; Miralbell, Raymond; Zilli, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Dose-escalated radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer improves disease control but is also associated with worse rectal toxicity. A spacer placed between the prostate and rectum can be used to displace the anterior rectal wall outside of the high-dose radiation regions and potentially minimize radiation-induced rectal toxicity. This systematic review focuses on the published data regarding the different types of commercially available prostate-rectum spacers. Dosimetric results and preliminary clinical data using prostate-rectum spacers in patients with localized prostate cancer treated by curative radiation therapy are compared and discussed.

  3. Combination radiation-adriamycin therapy: renoprival growth, functional and structural effects in the immature mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, S.S.; Moskowitz, P.S.; Canty, E.L.; Fajardo, L.F.

    1980-07-01

    The normal tissue effects of radiation-adriamycin combination therapy were studied in the renoprival weanling mouse in an attempt to determine whether compensatory renal growth inhibition from radiation and chemotherapy could be associated with structural or functional abnormalities. Weanling BLc/sub Fl/ mice underwent unilateral nephrectomy, then single fraction renal irradiation, LD 1/21 doses of adriamycin in 5 daily doses, or combination therapy with radiation and adriamycin. Animals were sacrificed at 3, 12, and 24 weeks. Compensatory renal growth, body growth, serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and renal morphology by light microscopy were evaluated. Significant compensatory renal growth inhibition from radiation-adriamycin therapy exceeded that produced by adriamycin alone and radiation alone, at all time periods (p < 0.005). Body growth inhibition from radiation-adriamycin therapy or adriamycin alone significantly exceeded that produced by radiation alone (p < 0.005). Kidney and body growth inhibition from radiation-adriamycin therapy was proportionately severe. Kidney growth inhibition proportionately exceeded body growth inhibition with radiation alone; body growth inhibition proportionately exceeded kidney growth inhibition with adriamycin alone. Comparable azotemia developed by 24 weeks in both the radiation alone (p < .005) and radiation-adriamycin animals (p < 0.005), but not in the adriamycin only animals. Morphologic alterations consisting of increased glomerular density, tubular atrophy, and stromal fibrosis occurred with greater severity in the radiation-adriamycin animals than in the radiation only animals by 24 weeks; no alterations were seen in the adriamycin only animals. Using histologic criteria 750 rad plus adriamycin produced comparable injury as seen with 1000 rad alone, thus adriamycin produced an apparent dose-modifying factor of 1.33.

  4. Dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy with robotic stereotactic radiation therapy in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Eun Kyung; Choi, Chul Won; Jang, Won Il; Lee, Sung Hyun; Choi, Sang Hyoun; Kim, Kum Bae; Lee, Dong Han

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare volumetric modulated arc therapy of RapidArc with robotic stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of CyberKnife in the planning and delivery of SBRT for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment by analyzing dosimetric parameters. Materials and Methods Two radiation treatment plans were generated for 29 HCC patients, one using Eclipse for the RapidArc plan and the other using Multiplan for the CyberKnife plan. The prescription dose was 60 Gy in 3 fractions. The dosimetric parameters of planning target volume (PTV) coverage and normal tissue sparing in the RapidArc and the CyberKnife plans were analyzed. Results The conformity index was 1.05 ± 0.02 for the CyberKnife plan, and 1.13 ± 0.10 for the RapidArc plan. The homogeneity index was 1.23 ± 0.01 for the CyberKnife plan, and 1.10 ± 0.03 for the RapidArc plan. For the normal liver, there were significant differences between the two plans in the low-dose regions of V1 and V3. The normalized volumes of V60 for the normal liver in the RapidArc plan were drastically increased when the mean dose of the PTVs in RapidArc plan is equivalent to the mean dose of the PTVs in the CyberKnife plan. Conclusion CyberKnife plans show greater dose conformity, especially in small-sized tumors, while RapidArc plans show good dosimetric distribution of low dose sparing in the normal liver and body. PMID:26484307

  5. [Setup accuracy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) using virtual isocenter in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT)].

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Hisato; Uchiyama, Yukio; Komori, Masataka; Hagiwara, Masahiro; Mori, Yoshimasa

    2012-01-01

    We use Novalis Body system for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in lung and liver tumors. Novalis system is dedicated to SBRT with image-guided patient setup system ExacTrac. The spinal bone is the main landmark in patient setup during SBRT using ExacTrac kV X-ray system. When the target tumor is located laterally distant from the spinal bone at the midline, it is difficult to ensure the accuracy of the setup, especially if there are rotational gaps (yaw, pitch and roll) in the setup. For this, we resolve the problem by using a virtual isocenter (VIC) different from isocenter (IC) .We evaluated the setup accuracy in a rand phantom by using VIC and checked the setup errors using rand phantom and patient cases by our original method during the setup for IC. The accuracy of setup using VIC was less than 1.0 mm. Our original method was useful for checking patient setup when VIC used.

  6. Evaluation of dog owners' perceptions concerning radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Denneberg, Nanna Åkerlund; Egenvall, Agneta

    2009-01-01

    Background External radiation therapy (RT) has been available for small animals in Sweden since 2006. This study was designed to obtain information on owner experiences and perceptions related to RT of cancer in their dogs. Another survey was used to determine the attitudes about use of RT in a group of Swedish veterinarians. Their responses were analyzed and compared to their level of knowledge of oncology and RT. Methods Owners of all dogs (n = 23) who had undergone RT for malignancy at Jönköping Small Animal Hospital between March 2006 to September 2007 were interviewed. A questionnaire was given to a selected group of veterinarians. Results All 23 owners responded. All owners thought that their dog did well during RT and most that their dog was also fine during the following phase when acute RT-related skin reactions occur and heal. Three owners stated that their dog had pain that negatively impacted quality of life because of radiation dermatitis. Five owners reported that RT positively impacted quality of life of the dog during the first weeks after RT because palliation was achieved. The owners were not disturbed by the efforts required of them. All but one owner (22 of 23) stated that they would make the same decision about RT again if a similar situation occurred. The most important factor for this decision was the chance to delay occurrence of tumour-related discomfort. The chance for cure was of less importance but still essential, followed by expected side effects. Time commitments, travel, number of treatments required and financial cost; all had low impact. The veterinarian survey showed that less background knowledge of small animal oncology/RT was associated with more negative expectations of RT for small animals. Conclusion The results show that for these owners, RT was a worthwhile treatment modality and that the discomfort for the dog was manageable and acceptable relative to the benefits. Improved continuing education about small animal RT in

  7. Facile preparation of hybrid core-shell nanorods for photothermal and radiation combined therapy.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yaoyao; Li, Erdong; Cheng, Xiaju; Zhu, Jing; Lu, Shuanglong; Ge, Cuicui; Gu, Hongwei; Pan, Yue

    2016-02-21

    The hybrid platinum@iron oxide core-shell nanorods with high biocompatibility were synthesized and applied for combined therapy. These hybrid nanorods exhibit a good photothermal effect on cancer cells upon irradiation with a NIR laser. Furthermore, due to the presence of a high atomic number element (platinum core), the hybrid nanorods show a synergistic effect between photothermal and radiation therapy. Therefore, the as-prepared core-shell nanorods could play an important role in facilitating synergistic therapy between photothermal and radiation therapy to achieve better therapeutic efficacy.

  8. [Prognostic Impact of Radiation Therapy and Molecular Classification of Infant Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumors].

    PubMed

    Otani, Yoshihiro; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Yasuhara, Takao; Washio, Kana; Shimada, Akira; Katayama, Norihisa; Katsui, Kuniaki; Yanai, Hiroyuki; Date, Isao

    2017-02-01

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor(AT/RT)is a rare and lethal childhood cancer. Although radiation therapy in children less than three years of age is generally deferred because of its neural toxicity, recent studies have shown that multimodal therapies, including radiation therapy, are effective in pediatric patients with AT/RT less than three years of age. We treated four infant AT/RT patients and investigated the impact of radiation therapy and genetic classification on the prognosis. The mean age at the time of the operation was 9.3 months and all patients were female. All patients underwent surgical resection. Of the four patients, two received combined irradiation and chemotherapy. Specifically, one patient received conformal craniospinal radiation therapy and the other received craniospinal irradiation with proton beams. Immunohistochemical analyses of tumor specimens revealed that the two patients were positive for ASCL1, a regulator of Notch signaling. Patients who received radiation therapy and exhibited ASCL1-positive tumors had a better prognosis. We conclude that radiation therapy may prolong survival in AT/RT patients who are less than 3 years of age. However, further study is required to evaluate long-term functional outcomes.

  9. Gold Nanoparticles Enhance the Radiation Therapy of a Murine Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hainfeld, J.F.; Zhong, Z.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Slatkin, D.N.; Kalef-Ezra, J.A.; Smilowitz, H.

    2010-05-12

    The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that gold nanoparticle (AuNP, nanogold)-enhanced radiation therapy (nanogold radiation therapy, NRT) is efficacious when treating the radiation resistant and highly aggressive mouse head and neck squamous cell carcinoma model, SCCVII, and to identify parameters influencing the efficacy of NRT. Subcutaneous (sc) SCCVII leg tumors in mice were irradiated with x-rays at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) with and without prior intravenous (iv) administration of AuNPs. Variables studied included radiation dose, beam energy, temporal fractionation and hyperthermia. AuNP-mediated NRT was shown to be effective for the sc SCCVII model. AuNPs were more effective at 42 Gy than at 30 Gy (both at 68 keV median beam energy) compared to controls without gold. Similarly, at 157 keV median beam energy, 50.6 Gy NRT was more effective than 44 Gy NRT. At the same radiation dose (42 Gy), 68 keV was more effective than 157 keV. Hyperthermia and radiation therapy (RT) were synergistic and AuNPs enhanced this synergy, thereby further reducing TCD50 s (tumor control dose 50%) and increasing long-term survivals. It is concluded that gold nanoparticles enhance the radiation therapy of a radioresistant mouse squamous cell carcinoma. The data show that radiation dose, energy and hyperthermia influence efficacy and better define the potential utility of gold nanoparticles for cancer x-ray therapy.

  10. Phase II Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trial of conventional radiation therapy followed by treatment with recombinant interferon-{beta} for supratentorial glioblastoma: Results of RTOG 9710

    SciTech Connect

    Colman, Howard . E-mail: hcolman@mdanderson.org; Berkey, Brian A.; Maor, Moshe H.; Groves, Morris D.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Vermeulen, Sandra; Mehta, Minesh P.; Yung, W.K. Alfred

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether recombinant human interferon {beta}-1a (rhIFN-{beta}), when given after radiation therapy, improves survival in glioblastoma. Methods and Materials: After surgery, 109 patients with newly diagnosed supratentorial glioblastoma were enrolled and treated with radiation therapy (60 Gy). A total of 55 patients remained stable after radiation and were treated with rhIFN-{beta} (6 MU/day i.m., 3 times/week). Outcomes were compared with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group glioma historical database. Results: RhIFN-{beta} was well tolerated, with 1 Grade 4 toxicity and 8 other patients experiencing Grade 3 toxicity. Median survival time (MST) of the 55 rhIFN-{beta}-treated patients was 13.4 months. MST for the 34 rhIFN-{beta}-treated in RPA Classes III and IV was 16.9 vs. 12.4 months for historical controls (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.89-1.81). There was also a trend toward improved survival across all RPA Classes comparing the 55 rhIFN-{beta} treated patients and 1,658 historical controls (HR = 1.24, 95% CI = 0.94-1.63). The high rate of early failures (54/109) after radiation and before initiation of rhIFN-{beta} was likely caused by stricter interpretation of early radiographic changes in the current study. Matched-pair and intent-to-treat analyses performed to try to address this bias showed no difference in survival between study patients and controls. Conclusion: RhIFN-{beta} given after conventional radiation therapy was well tolerated, with a trend toward survival benefit in patients who remained stable after radiation therapy. These data suggest that rhIFN-{beta} warrants further evaluation in additional studies, possibly in combination with current temozolomide-based regimens.

  11. Hematopoietic toxicity of regional radiation therapy. Correlations for combined modality therapy with systemic chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, R.A.; Lichter, A.S.; Bromer, R.H.; Minna, J.D.; Cohen, M.H.; Deisseroth, A.B.

    1985-04-01

    Using circulating granulocyte-monocyte precursor colony-forming units in culture (CFUc) numbers as a probe along with standard blood count (CBC), the authors have quantitatively examined the hematopoietic toxicity of conventionally fractionated radiation therapy (RT) when combined with concurrent systemic chemotherapy or when used alone. Among 20 patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer receiving systemic chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, CCNU, and methotrexate, the addition of involved field chest RT resulted in increased hematopoietic toxicity as judged by increased need for platelet transfusion (P less than 0.05) and decreased frequency of measurable CFUc (P less than 0.04). Among 22 patients receiving regional radiotherapy alone consistent hematopoietic toxicity was also observed. This toxicity, although generally of only mild to moderate clinical significance, was detected earlier and to a greater degree in patients who required radiation to larger treatment volumes, who had significant amounts of bone marrow in the port, and who had a high percentage of cardiac output flowing through the port. These data suggest that the hematopoietic toxicity of regional radiotherapy may be additive to that of concurrent systemic chemotherapy and may occur more promptly and to a greater degree when treatment volumes are larger or incorporate increased amounts of marrow volume or cardiac output.

  12. Paclitaxel Through the Ages of Anticancer Therapy: Exploring Its Role in Chemoresistance and Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Barbuti, Anna Maria; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Paclitaxel (Taxol®) is a member of the taxane class of anticancer drugs and one of the most common chemotherapeutic agents used against many forms of cancer. Paclitaxel is a microtubule-stabilizer that selectively arrests cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, and found to induce cytotoxicity in a time and concentration-dependent manner. Paclitaxel has been embedded in novel drug formulations, including albumin and polymeric micelle nanoparticles, and applied to many anticancer treatment regimens due to its mechanism of action and radiation sensitizing effects. Though paclitaxel is a major anticancer drug which has been used for many years in clinical treatments, its therapeutic efficacy can be limited by common encumbrances faced by anticancer drugs. These encumbrances include toxicities, de novo refraction, and acquired multidrug resistance (MDR). This article will give a current and comprehensive review of paclitaxel, beginning with its unique history and pharmacology, explore its mechanisms of drug resistance and influence in combination with radiation therapy, while highlighting current treatment regimens, formulations, and new discoveries. PMID:26633515

  13. Does Hormone Therapy Reduce Disease Recurrence in Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy? An Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 94-06

    SciTech Connect

    Valicenti, Richard K.; Bae, Kwounghwa; Michalski, Jeff; Sandler, Howard; Shipley, William; Lin, Alex; Cox, James

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect on freedom from biochemical failure (bNED) or disease-free survival (DFS) by adding hormone therapy (HT) to dose-escalated radiation therapy (HDRT). Methods and Materials: We used 883 analyzable prostate cancer patients who enrolled on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 94-06, a Phase I/II dose escalation trial, and whose mean planning target volume dose exceeded 73.8 Gy (mean, 78.5 Gy; maximum, 84.3 Gy). We defined biochemical failure according to the Phoenix definition. Results: A total of 259 men started HT 2 to 3 months before HDRT, but not longer than 6 months, and 66 men with high-risk prostate cancer received HT for a longer duration. At 5 years, the biochemical failure rates after HDRT alone were 12%, 18%, and 29% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, respectively (p < 0.0001). Cox proportional hazards regression analysis adjusted for covariates revealed that pretreatment PSA level was a significant factor, whereas risk group, Gleason score, T-stage, and age were not. When the patients were stratified by risk groups, the Cox proportion hazards regression model (after adjusting for pretreatment PSA, biopsy Gleason score, and T stage) did not reveal a significant effect on bNED or DFS by adding HT to HDRT Conclusion: The addition of HT did not significantly improve bNED survival or DFS in all prostate cancer patients receiving HDRT, but did approach significance in high-risk patient subgroup. The result of this study is hypothesis generating and requires testing in a prospective randomized trial.

  14. Modern radiation therapy for extranodal lymphomas: field and dose guidelines from the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Specht, Lena; Hoppe, Richard T; Li, Ye-Xiong; Tsang, Richard; Wirth, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Extranodal lymphomas (ENLs) comprise about a third of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used as either primary therapy (particularly for indolent ENL), consolidation after systemic therapy, salvage treatment, or palliation. The wide range of presentations of ENL, involving any organ in the body and the spectrum of histological sub-types, poses a challenge both for routine clinical care and for the conduct of prospective and retrospective studies. This has led to uncertainty and lack of consistency in RT approaches between centers and clinicians. Thus far there is a lack of guidelines for the use of RT in the management of ENL. This report presents an effort by the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) to harmonize and standardize the principles of treatment of ENL, and to address the technical challenges of simulation, volume definition and treatment planning for the most frequently involved organs. Specifically, detailed recommendations for RT volumes are provided. We have applied the same modern principles of involved site radiation therapy as previously developed and published as guidelines for Hodgkin lymphoma and nodal NHL. We have adopted RT volume definitions based on the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), as has been widely adopted by the field of radiation oncology for solid tumors. Organ-specific recommendations take into account histological subtype, anatomy, the treatment intent, and other treatment modalities that may be have been used before RT.

  15. Modern Radiation Therapy for Extranodal Lymphomas: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect

    Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Specht, Lena; Hoppe, Richard T.; Li, Ye-Xiong; Tsang, Richard; Wirth, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Extranodal lymphomas (ENLs) comprise about a third of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used as either primary therapy (particularly for indolent ENL), consolidation after systemic therapy, salvage treatment, or palliation. The wide range of presentations of ENL, involving any organ in the body and the spectrum of histological sub-types, poses a challenge both for routine clinical care and for the conduct of prospective and retrospective studies. This has led to uncertainty and lack of consistency in RT approaches between centers and clinicians. Thus far there is a lack of guidelines for the use of RT in the management of ENL. This report presents an effort by the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) to harmonize and standardize the principles of treatment of ENL, and to address the technical challenges of simulation, volume definition and treatment planning for the most frequently involved organs. Specifically, detailed recommendations for RT volumes are provided. We have applied the same modern principles of involved site radiation therapy as previously developed and published as guidelines for Hodgkin lymphoma and nodal NHL. We have adopted RT volume definitions based on the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), as has been widely adopted by the field of radiation oncology for solid tumors. Organ-specific recommendations take into account histological subtype, anatomy, the treatment intent, and other treatment modalities that may be have been used before RT.

  16. Auto-propagation of contours for adaptive prostate radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Ming; Xie, Yaoqin; Xing, Lei

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an effective technique to automatically propagate contours from planning CT to cone beam CT (CBCT) to facilitate CBCT-guided prostate adaptive radiation therapy. Different from other disease sites, such as the lungs, the contour mapping here is complicated by two factors: (i) the physical one-to-one correspondence may not exist due to the insertion or removal of some image contents within the region of interest (ROI); and (ii) reduced contrast to noise ratio of the CBCT images due to increased scatter. To overcome these issues, we investigate a strategy of excluding the regions with variable contents by a careful design of a narrow shell signifying the contour of an ROI. For rectum, for example, a narrow shell with the delineated contours as its interior surface was constructed to avoid the adverse influence of the day-to-day content change inside the rectum on the contour mapping. The corresponding contours in the CBCT were found by warping the narrow shell through the use of BSpline deformable model. Both digital phantom experiments and clinical case testing were carried out to validate the proposed ROI mapping method. It was found that the approach was able to reliably warp the constructed narrow band with an accuracy better than 1.3 mm. For all five clinical cases enrolled in this study, the method yielded satisfactory results even when there were significant rectal content changes between the planning CT and CBCT scans. The overlapped area of the auto-mapped contours over 90% to the manually drawn contours is readily achievable. The proposed approach permits us to take advantage of the regional calculation algorithm yet avoiding the nuisance of rectum/bladder filling and provide a useful tool for adaptive radiotherapy of prostate in the future.

  17. Commissioning of Peacock System for intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Saw, C B; Ayyangar, K M; Thompson, R B; Zhen, W; Enke, C A

    2001-01-01

    The Peacock System was introduced to perform tomographic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Commissioning of the Peacock System included the alignment of the multileaf intensity-modulating collimator (MIMiC) to the beam axis, the alignment of the RTA device for immobilization, and checking the integrity of the CRANE for indexing the treatment couch. In addition, the secondary jaw settings, couch step size, and transmission through the leaves were determined. The dosimetric data required for the CORVUS planning system were divided into linear accelerator-specific and MIMiC-specific. The linear accelerator-specific dosimetric data were relative output in air, relative output in phantom, percent depth dose for a range of field sizes, and diagonal dose profiles for a large field size. The MIMiC-specific dosimetric data were the in-plane and cross-plane dose profiles of a small and a large field size to derive the penumbra fit. For each treatment unit, the Beam Utility software requires the data be entered into the CORVUS planning system in modular forms. These modules were treatment unit information, angle definition, configuration, gantry and couch angles range, dosimetry, results, and verification plans. After the appropriate machine data were entered, CORVUS created a dose model. The dose model was used to create known simple dose distribution for evaluation using the verification tools of the CORVUS. The planned doses for phantoms were confirmed using an ion chamber for point dose measurement and film for relative dose measurement. The planning system calibration factor was initially set at 1.0 and will be changed after data on clinical cases are acquired. The treatment unit was released for clinical use after the approval icon was checked in the verification plans module.

  18. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Dose Painting to Treat Rhabdomyosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Joanna C.; Dharmarajan, Kavita V.; Wexler, Leonard H.; La Quaglia, Michael P.; Happersett, Laura; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To examine local control and patterns of failure in rhabdomyosarcoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (RT) with dose painting (DP-IMRT). Patients and Methods: A total of 41 patients underwent DP-IMRT with chemotherapy for definitive treatment. Nineteen also underwent surgery with or without intraoperative RT. Fifty-six percent had alveolar histologic features. The median interval from beginning chemotherapy to RT was 17 weeks (range, 4-25). Very young children who underwent second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT received reduced doses of 24-36 Gy in 1.4-1.8-Gy fractions. Young adults received 50.4 Gy to the primary tumor and lower doses of 36 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to at-risk lymph node chains. Results: With 22 months of median follow-up, the actuarial local control rate was 90%. Patients aged {<=}7 years who received reduced overall and fractional doses had 100% local control, and young adults had 79% (P=.07) local control. Three local failures were identified in young adults whose primary target volumes had received 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions. Conclusions: DP-IMRT with lower fractional and cumulative doses is feasible for very young children after second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT. DP-IMRT is also feasible in adolescents and young adults with aggressive disease who would benefit from prophylactic RT to high-risk lymph node chains, although dose escalation might be warranted for improved local control. With limited follow-up, it appears that DP-IMRT produces local control rates comparable to those of sequential IMRT in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma.

  19. Auto-propagation of contours for adaptive prostate radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ming; Xie, Yaoqin; Xing, Lei

    2008-09-07

    The purpose of this work is to develop an effective technique to automatically propagate contours from planning CT to cone beam CT (CBCT) to facilitate CBCT-guided prostate adaptive radiation therapy. Different from other disease sites, such as the lungs, the contour mapping here is complicated by two factors: (i) the physical one-to-one correspondence may not exist due to the insertion or removal of some image contents within the region of interest (ROI); and (ii) reduced contrast to noise ratio of the CBCT images due to increased scatter. To overcome these issues, we investigate a strategy of excluding the regions with variable contents by a careful design of a narrow shell signifying the contour of an ROI. For rectum, for example, a narrow shell with the delineated contours as its interior surface was constructed to avoid the adverse influence of the day-to-day content change inside the rectum on the contour mapping. The corresponding contours in the CBCT were found by warping the narrow shell through the use of BSpline deformable model. Both digital phantom experiments and clinical case testing were carried out to validate the proposed ROI mapping method. It was found that the approach was able to reliably warp the constructed narrow band with an accuracy better than 1.3 mm. For all five clinical cases enrolled in this study, the method yielded satisfactory results even when there were significant rectal content changes between the planning CT and CBCT scans. The overlapped area of the auto-mapped contours over 90% to the manually drawn contours is readily achievable. The proposed approach permits us to take advantage of the regional calculation algorithm yet avoiding the nuisance of rectum/bladder filling and provide a useful tool for adaptive radiotherapy of prostate in the future.

  20. Ovarian cancer: contribution of radiation therapy to patient management: Erskine Memorial Lecture, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, R.S.

    1984-10-01

    Ovarian cancer may be treated with radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, or a combination. To evaluate the contribution of radiation therapy to patient management the cure rate must be estimated; data are presented suggesting that the 5-year survival rate provides a reasonable estimate of the cure rate. A study of patients treated since 1971 showed that stage and postoperative residuum could be used to divide patients into two subgroups, a poor prognosis group and a good prognosis group; a multifactorial grouping of patients in the good prognosis group who were treated postoperatively with radiation therapy only was further able to divide patients into low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk groups. Studies of radiation therapy for different subgroups are discussed; abdominopelvic irradiation has been shown to improve survival for approximately one-third of patients with cancer of the ovary.

  1. Smokers May Be Prone to Risks from Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Smokers May Be Prone to Risks From Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy Long-term chances of heart attack, ... 29, 2017 WEDNESDAY, March 29, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer patients who smoke have an increased risk for ...

  2. Should supplemental antioxidant administration be avoided during chemotherapy and radiation therapy?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite nearly two decades of research investigating the use of dietary antioxidant supplementation during conventional chemotherapy and radiation therapy, controversy remains about the efficacy and safety of this complementary treatment. Several studies of concurrent antioxidant administration with...

  3. The role of Cobalt-60 in modern radiation therapy: Dose delivery and image guidance.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, L John; Joshi, Chandra P; Darko, Johnson; Kerr, Andrew; Salomons, Greg; Dhanesar, Sandeep

    2009-07-01

    The advances in modern radiation therapy with techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy and image-guided radiation therapy (IMRT and IGRT) have been limited almost exclusively to linear accelerators. Investigations of modern Cobalt-60 (Co-60) radiation delivery in the context of IMRT and IGRT have been very sparse, and have been limited mainly to computer-modeling and treatment-planning exercises. In this paper, we report on the results of experiments using a tomotherapy benchtop apparatus attached to a conventional Co-60 unit. We show that conformal dose delivery is possible and also that Co-60 can be used as the radiation source in megavoltage computed tomography imaging. These results complement our modeling studies of Co-60 tomotherapy and provide a strong motivation for continuing development of modern Cobalt-60 treatment devices.

  4. Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Reduces Time Spent With Acute Dermatitis for Women of All Breast Sizes During Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Gary M. Li Tianyu; Nicolaou, Nicos; Chen Yan; Ma, Charlie C.-M.; Anderson, Penny R.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To study the time spent with radiation-induced dermatitis during a course of radiation therapy for breast cancer in women treated with conventional or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 804 consecutive women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation from 2001 to 2006. All patients were treated with whole-breast radiation followed by a boost to the tumor bed. Whole-breast radiation consisted of conventional wedged photon tangents (n = 405) earlier in the study period and mostly of photon IMRT (n = 399) in later years. All patients had acute dermatitis graded each week of treatment. Results: The breakdown of the cases of maximum acute dermatitis by grade was as follows: 3%, Grade 0; 34%, Grade 1; 61%, Grade 2; and 2%, Grade 3. The breakdown of cases of maximum toxicity by technique was as follows: 48%, Grade 0/1, and 52%, Grade 2/3, for IMRT; and 25%, Grade 0/1, and 75%, Grade 2/3, for conventional radiation therapy (p < 0.0001). The IMRT patients spent 82% of weeks during treatment with Grade 0/1 dermatitis and 18% with Grade 2/3 dermatitis, compared with 29% and 71% of patients, respectively, treated with conventional radiation (p < 0.0001). Furthermore, the time spent with Grade 2/3 toxicity was decreased in IMRT patients with small (p = 0.0015), medium (p < 0.0001), and large (p < 0.0001) breasts. Conclusions: Breast IMRT is associated with a significant decrease both in the time spent during treatment with Grade 2/3 dermatitis and in the maximum severity of dermatitis compared with that associated with conventional radiation, regardless of breast size.

  5. Benchmark IMRT evaluation of a Co-60 MRI-guided radiation therapy system.

    PubMed

    Wooten, H Omar; Rodriguez, Vivian; Green, Olga; Kashani, Rojano; Santanam, Lakshmi; Tanderup, Kari; Mutic, Sasa; Li, H Harold

    2015-03-01

    A device for MRI-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) that uses cobalt-60 sources to deliver intensity modulated radiation therapy is now commercially available. We investigated the performance of the treatment planning and delivery system against the benchmark recommended by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 119 for IMRT commissioning and demonstrated that the device plans and delivers IMRT treatments within recommended confidence limits and with similar accuracy as linac IMRT.

  6. Successful imiquimod treatment of multiple basal cell carcinomas after radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Beyeler, Mirjam; Urosevic, Mirjana; Pestalozzi, Bernhard; Dummer, Reinhard

    2005-01-01

    We present a case of a 55-year-old male patient who developed five basal cell carcinomas 23 years after radiation therapy of Hodgkin's disease. In 1980 he received radiation therapy twice. Due to relapses, he was treated with aggressive polychemotherapy and underwent autologous stem cell transplantation, which then led to complete remission. Until now he is in complete remission. However, multiple superficial basal cell carcinomas have developed on irradiation fields that have been successfully treated by imiquimod.

  7. Assessment of Lymphedema Risk Following Lymph Node Dissection and Radiation Therapy for Primary Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    AD_ Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0622 TITLE: Assessment of Lymphedema Risk Following Lymph Node Dissection and Radiation Therapy for Primary Breast...NUMBERS Assessment of Lymphedema Risk Following Lymph Node DAMDI7-03-1-0622 Dissection and Radiation Therapy for Primary Breast Cancer 6. AUThOR(S...axillary lymph nodes critical for upper extremity drainage predicts the development of lymphedema . In addition to funding this research project, the

  8. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Acute Radiation Syndrome: Innovative Medical Approaches in Military Medicine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-30

    lymphoblastic leukemia: a randomized phase III trial. Blood. 1995;86(2):444–50. 36. Hu KX, Sun QY, Guo M, Ai HS. The radiation protection and therapy effects of...Literature 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for acute radiation syndrome: innovative medical...MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13

  9. Probabilities of Radiation Myelopathy Specific to Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy to Guide Safe Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Sahgal, Arjun; Weinberg, Vivian; Ma, Lijun; Chang, Eric; Chao, Sam; Muacevic, Alexander; Gorgulho, Alessandra; Soltys, Scott; Gerszten, Peter C.; Ryu, Sam; Angelov, Lilyana; Gibbs, Iris; Wong, C. Shun; Larson, David A.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Dose-volume histogram (DVH) results for 9 cases of post spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) radiation myelopathy (RM) are reported and compared with a cohort of 66 spine SBRT patients without RM. Methods and Materials: DVH data were centrally analyzed according to the thecal sac point maximum (Pmax) volume, 0.1- to 1-cc volumes in increments of 0.1 cc, and to the 2 cc volume. 2-Gy biologically equivalent doses (nBED) were calculated using an {alpha}/{beta} = 2 Gy (units = Gy{sub 2/2}). For the 2 cohorts, the nBED means and distributions were compared using the t test and Mann-Whitney test, respectively. Significance (P<.05) was defined as concordance of both tests at each specified volume. A logistic regression model was developed to estimate the probability of RM using the dose distribution for a given volume. Results: Significant differences in both the means and distributions at the Pmax and up to the 0.8-cc volume were observed. Concordant significance was greatest for the Pmax volume. At the Pmax volume the fit of the logistic regression model, summarized by the area under the curve, was 0.87. A risk of RM of 5% or less was observed when limiting the thecal sac Pmax volume doses to 12.4 Gy in a single fraction, 17.0 Gy in 2 fractions, 20.3 Gy in 3 fractions, 23.0 Gy in 4 fractions, and 25.3 Gy in 5 fractions. Conclusion: We report the first logistic regression model yielding estimates for the probability of human RM specific to SBRT.

  10. Ceiling art in a radiation therapy department: its effect on patient treatment experience

    PubMed Central

    Bonett, Jotham

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A new initiative has been implemented at the Sunshine Hospital Radiation Therapy Centre, to provide a calming and comforting environment for patients attending radiation therapy treatment. As part of this initiative, the department's computed tomography (CT) room and radiation therapy bunkers were designed to incorporate ceiling art that replicates a number of different visual scenes. The study was undertaken to determine if ceiling art in the radiation therapy treatment CT and treatment bunkers had an effect on a patient's experience during treatment at the department. Additionally, the study aimed to identify which of the visuals in the ceiling art were most preferred by patients. Methods Patients were requested to complete a 12-question survey. The survey solicited a patient's opinion/perception on the unit's unique ceiling display with emphasis on aesthetic appeal, patient treatment experience and the patient's engagement due to the ceiling display. The responses were dichotomised to ‘positive’ or ‘negative’. Every sixth patient who completed the survey was invited to have a general face-to-face discussion to provide further information about their thoughts on the displays. Results The results demonstrate that the ceiling artwork solicited a positive reaction in 89.8% of patients surveyed. This score indicates that ceiling artwork contributed positively to patients’ experiences during radiation therapy treatment. Conclusion The study suggests that ceiling artwork in the department has a positive effect on patient experience during their radiation therapy treatment at the department. PMID:26451241

  11. Improving Quality and Access to Radiation Therapy-An IAEA Perspective.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahab, May; Zubizarreta, Eduardo; Polo, Alfredo; Meghzifene, Ahmed

    2017-04-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been involved in radiation therapy since soon after its creation in 1957. In response to the demands of Member States, the IAEA׳s activities relating to radiation therapy have focused on supporting low- and middle-income countries to set up radiation therapy facilities, expand the scope of treatments, or gradually transition to new technologies. In addition, the IAEA has been very active in providing internationally harmonized guidelines on clinical, dosimetry, medical physics, and safety aspects of radiation therapy. IAEA clinical research has provided evidence for treatment improvement as well as highly effective resource-sparing interventions. In the process, training of researchers occurs through this program. To provide this support, the IAEA works with its Member States and multiple partners worldwide through several mechanisms. In this article, we review the main activities conducted by the IAEA in support to radiation therapy. IAEA support has been crucial for achieving tangible results in many low- and middle-income countries. However, long-term sustainability of projects can present a challenge, especially when considering health budget constraints and the brain drain of skilled professionals. The need for support remains, with more than 90% of patients in low-income countries lacking access to radiotherapy. Thus, the IAEA is expected to continue its support and strengthen quality radiation therapy treatment of patients with cancer.

  12. Ceiling art in a radiation therapy department: its effect on patient treatment experience

    SciTech Connect

    Bonett, Jotham

    2015-09-15

    A new initiative has been implemented at the Sunshine Hospital Radiation Therapy Centre, to provide a calming and comforting environment for patients attending radiation therapy treatment. As part of this initiative, the department's computed tomography (CT) room and radiation therapy bunkers were designed to incorporate ceiling art that replicates a number of different visual scenes. The study was undertaken to determine if ceiling art in the radiation therapy treatment CT and treatment bunkers had an effect on a patient's experience during treatment at the department. Additionally, the study aimed to identify which of the visuals in the ceiling art were most preferred by patients. Patients were requested to complete a 12-question survey. The survey solicited a patient's opinion/perception on the unit's unique ceiling display with emphasis on aesthetic appeal, patient treatment experience and the patient's engagement due to the ceiling display. The responses were dichotomised to ‘positive’ or ‘negative’. Every sixth patient who completed the survey was invited to have a general face-to-face discussion to provide further information about their thoughts on the displays. The results demonstrate that the ceiling artwork solicited a positive reaction in 89.8% of patients surveyed. This score indicates that ceiling artwork contributed positively to patients’ experiences during radiation therapy treatment. The study suggests that ceiling artwork in the department has a positive effect on patient experience during their radiation therapy treatment at the department.

  13. Measurements of the neutron dose equivalent for various radiation qualities, treatment machines and delivery techniques in radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hälg, R. A.; Besserer, J.; Boschung, M.; Mayer, S.; Lomax, A. J.; Schneider, U.

    2014-05-01

    In radiation therapy, high energy photon and proton beams cause the production of secondary neutrons. This leads to an unwanted dose contribution, which can be considerable for tissues outside of the target volume regarding the long term health of cancer patients. Due to the high biological effectiveness of neutrons in regards to cancer induction, small neutron doses can be important. This study quantified the neutron doses for different radiation therapy modalities. Most of the reports in the literature used neutron dose measurements free in air or on the surface of phantoms to estimate the amount of neutron dose to the patient. In this study, dose measurements were performed in terms of neutron dose equivalent inside an anthropomorphic phantom. The neutron dose equivalent was determined using track etch detectors as a function of the distance to the isocenter, as well as for radiation sensitive organs. The dose distributions were compared with respect to treatment techniques (3D-conformal, volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for photons; spot scanning and passive scattering for protons), therapy machines (Varian, Elekta and Siemens linear accelerators) and radiation quality (photons and protons). The neutron dose equivalent varied between 0.002 and 3 mSv per treatment gray over all measurements. Only small differences were found when comparing treatment techniques, but substantial differences were observed between the linear accelerator models. The neutron dose equivalent for proton therapy was higher than for photons in general and in particular for double-scattered protons. The overall neutron dose equivalent measured in this study was an order of magnitude lower than the stray dose of a treatment using 6 MV photons, suggesting that the contribution of the secondary neutron dose equivalent to the integral dose of a radiotherapy patient is small.

  14. Measurements of the neutron dose equivalent for various radiation qualities, treatment machines and delivery techniques in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Hälg, R A; Besserer, J; Boschung, M; Mayer, S; Lomax, A J; Schneider, U

    2014-05-21

    In radiation therapy, high energy photon and proton beams cause the production of secondary neutrons. This leads to an unwanted dose contribution, which can be considerable for tissues outside of the target volume regarding the long term health of cancer patients. Due to the high biological effectiveness of neutrons in regards to cancer induction, small neutron doses can be important. This study quantified the neutron doses for different radiation therapy modalities. Most of the reports in the literature used neutron dose measurements free in air or on the surface of phantoms to estimate the amount of neutron dose to the patient. In this study, dose measurements were performed in terms of neutron dose equivalent inside an anthropomorphic phantom. The neutron dose equivalent was determined using track etch detectors as a function of the distance to the isocenter, as well as for radiation sensitive organs. The dose distributions were compared with respect to treatment techniques (3D-conformal, volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for photons; spot scanning and passive scattering for protons), therapy machines (Varian, Elekta and Siemens linear accelerators) and radiation quality (photons and protons). The neutron dose equivalent varied between 0.002 and 3 mSv per treatment gray over all measurements. Only small differences were found when comparing treatment techniques, but substantial differences were observed between the linear accelerator models. The neutron dose equivalent for proton therapy was higher than for photons in general and in particular for double-scattered protons. The overall neutron dose equivalent measured in this study was an order of magnitude lower than the stray dose of a treatment using 6 MV photons, suggesting that the contribution of the secondary neutron dose equivalent to the integral dose of a radiotherapy patient is small.

  15. The Arginine/ADMA Ratio Is Related to the Prevention of Atherosclerotic Plaques in Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits When Giving a Combined Therapy with Atorvastatine and Arginine

    PubMed Central

    Brinkmann, Saskia J. H.; Wörner, Elisabeth A.; Buijs, Nikki; Richir, Milan; Cynober, Luc; van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.; Couderc, Rémy

    2015-01-01

    Supplementation with arginine in combination with atorvastatin is more efficient in reducing the size of an atherosclerotic plaque than treatment with a statin or arginine alone in homozygous Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits. We evaluated the mechanism behind this feature by exploring the role of the arginine/asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) ratio, which is the substrate and inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and thereby nitric oxide (NO), respectively. Methods: Rabbits were fed either an arginine diet (group A, n = 9), standard rabbit chow plus atorvastatin (group S, n = 8), standard rabbit chow plus an arginine diet with atorvastatin (group SA, n = 8) or standard rabbit chow (group C, n = 9) as control. Blood was sampled and the aorta was harvested for topographic and histological analysis. Plasma levels of arginine, ADMA, cholesterol and nitric oxide were determined and the arginine/ADMA ratio was calculated. Results: The decrease in ADMA levels over time was significantly correlated to fewer aortic lesions in the distal aorta and total aorta. The arginine/ADMA ratio was correlated to cholesterol levels and decrease in cholesterol levels over time in the SA group. A lower arginine/ADMA ratio was significantly correlated to lower NO levels in the S and C group. Discussion: A balance between arginine and ADMA is an important indicator in the prevention of the development of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:26035753

  16. Radiation-induced caries as the late effect of radiation therapy in the head and neck region.

    PubMed

    Dobroś, Katarzyna; Hajto-Bryk, Justyna; Wróblewska, Małgorzata; Zarzecka, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Overall improvement in the nationwide system of medical services has consequently boosted the number of successfully treated patients who suffer from head and neck cancer. It is essential to effectively prevent development of radiation-induced caries as the late effect of radiation therapy. Incidence and severity of radiationinduced changes within the teeth individually vary depending on the patient's age, actual radiation dose, size of radiation exposure field, patient's general condition and additional risk factors. Inadequately managed treatment of caries may lead to loss of teeth, as well as prove instrumental in tangibly diminishing individual quality of life in patients. Furthermore, the need to have the teeth deemed unyielding or unsuitable for the application of conservative methods of treatment duly extracted is fraught for a patient with an extra hazard of developing osteoradionecrosis (ORN), while also increasing all attendant therapeutic expenditures. The present paper aims to offer some practical insights into currently available methods of preventing likely development of radiation-induced caries.

  17. Adverse Outcomes After Palliative Radiation Therapy for Uncomplicated Spine Metastases: Role of Spinal Instability and Single-Fraction Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Tai-Chung; Krishnan, Monica; Groff, Michael; Cheney, Matthew; Balboni, Tracy

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Level I evidence demonstrates equivalent pain response after single-fraction (SF) or multifraction (MF) radiation therapy (RT) for bone metastases. The purpose of this study is to provide additional data to inform the incidence and predictors of adverse outcomes after RT for spine metastases. Methods and Materials: At a single institution, 299 uncomplicated spine metastases (without cord compression, prior RT, or surgery) treated with RT from 2008 to 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. The spinal instability neoplastic score (SINS) was used to assess spinal instability. The primary outcome was time to first spinal adverse event (SAE) at the site, including symptomatic vertebral fracture, hospitalization for site-related pain, salvage surgery, interventional procedure, new neurologic symptoms, or cord compression. Fine and Gray's multivariable model assessed associations of the primary outcome with SINS, SF RT, and other significant baseline factors. Propensity score matched analysis further assessed the relationship of SF RT to first SAEs. Results: The cumulative incidence of first SAE after SF RT (n=66) was 6.8% at 30 days, 16.9% at 90 days, and 23.6% at 180 days. For MF RT (n=233), the incidence was 3.5%, 6.4%, and 9.2%, respectively. In multivariable analysis, SF RT (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5-5.2, P=.001) and SINS ≥11 (HR=2.5 , 95% CI 1.3-4.9, P=.007) were predictors of the incidence of first SAE. In propensity score matched analysis, first SAEs had developed in 22% of patients with SF RT versus 6% of those with MF RT cases (HR=3.9, 95% CI 1.6-9.6, P=.003) at 90 days after RT. Conclusion: In uncomplicated spinal metastases treated with RT alone, spinal instability with SINS ≥11 and SF RT were associated with a higher rate of SAEs.

  18. Radiation dosimetry predicts IQ after conformal radiation therapy in pediatric patients with localized ependymoma

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant, Thomas E. . E-mail: thomas.merchant@stjude.org; Kiehna, Erin N.; Li Chenghong; Xiong Xiaoping; Mulhern, Raymond K.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the effects of radiation dose-volume distribution on the trajectory of IQ development after conformal radiation therapy (CRT) in pediatric patients with ependymoma. Methods and Materials: The study included 88 patients (median age, 2.8 years {+-} 4.5 years) with localized ependymoma who received CRT (54-59.4 Gy) that used a 1-cm margin on the postoperative tumor bed. Patients were evaluated with tests that included IQ measures at baseline (before CRT) and at 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months. Differential dose-volume histograms (DVH) were derived for total-brain, supratentorial-brain, and right and left temporal-lobe volumes. The data were partitioned into three dose intervals and integrated to create variables that represent the fractional volume that received dose over the specified intervals (e.g., V{sub 0-20Gy}, V{sub 20-40Gy}, V{sub 40-65Gy}) and modeled with clinical variables to develop a regression equation to estimate IQ after CRT. Results: A total of 327 IQ tests were performed in 66 patients with infratentorial tumors and 20 with supratentorial tumors. The median follow-up was 29.4 months. For all patients, IQ was best estimated by age (years) at CRT; percent volume of the supratentorial brain that received doses between 0 and 20 Gy, 20 and 40 Gy, and 40 and 65 Gy; and time (months) after CRT. Age contributed significantly to the intercept (p > 0.0001), and the dose-volume coefficients were statistically significant (V{sub 0-20Gy}, p = 0.01; V{sub 20-40Gy}, p < 0.001; V{sub 40-65Gy}, p = 0.04). A similar model was developed exclusively for patients with infratentorial tumors but not supratentorial tumors. Conclusion: Radiation dosimetry can be used to predict IQ after CRT in patients with localized ependymoma. The specificity of models may be enhanced by grouping according to tumor location.

  19. Reduction in stray radiation dose using a body-shielding device during external radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuxu; Jiang, Shaohui; Zhang, Quanbin; Lin, Shengqu; Wang, Ruihao; Zhou, Xiang; Zhang, Guoqian; Lei, Huaiyu; Yu, Hui

    2017-03-01

    With the purpose of reducing stray radiation dose (SRD) in out-of-field region (OFR) during radiotherapy with 6 MV intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), a body-shielding device (BSD) was prepared according to the measurements obtained in experimental testing. In experimental testing, optimal shielding conditions, such as 1 mm lead, 2 mm lead, and 1 mm lead plus 10 mm bolus, were investigated along the medial axis of a phantom using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The SRDs at distances from field edge were then measured and analyzed for a clinical IMRT treatment plan for nasopharyngeal carcinoma before and after shielding using the BSD. In addition, SRDs in anterior, posterior, left and right directions of phantom were investigated with and without shielding, respectively. Also, the SRD at the bottom of treatment couch was measured. SRD decreased exponentially to a constant value with increasing distance from field edge. The shielding rate was 50%-80%; however, there were no significant differences in SRDs when shielded by 1 mm lead, 2 mm lead, or 1 mm lead plus 10 mm bolus (P>0.05). Importantly, the 10 mm bolus absorbed back-scattering radiation due to the interaction between photons and lead. As a result, 1 mm lead plus 10 mm bolus was selected to prepare the BSD. After shielding with BSD, total SRDs in the OFR decreased to almost 50% of those without shielding when irradiated with IMRT beams. Due to the effects of treatment couch and gantry angle, SRDs at distances were not identical in anterior, posterior, left and right direction of phantom without BSD. As higher dose in anterior and lower dose in posterior, SRDs were substantial similarities after shielding. There was no significant difference in SRDs for left and right directions with or without shielding. Interestingly, SRDs in the four directions were similar after shielding. From these results, the BSD developed in this study may significantly reduce SRD in the OFR during

  20. Expression of NPP1 is regulated during atheromatous plaque calcification

    PubMed Central

    Nitschke, Yvonne; Hartmann, Simone; Torsello, Giovanni; Horstmann, Rüdiger; Seifarth, Harald; Weissen-Plenz, Gabriele; Rutsch, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Mutations of the ENPP1 gene encoding ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 (NPP1) are associated with medial calcification in infancy. While the inhibitory role of matrix proteins such as osteopontin (OPN) with respect to atherosclerotic plaque calcification has been established, the role of NPP1 in plaque calcification is not known. We assessed the degree of plaque calcification (computed tomography), NPP1 and OPN localization (immunohistochemistry) and expression (RT-PCR) in a cohort of 45 patients undergoing carotid endatherectomy for significant stenosis of the internal carotid artery and in normal arteries (N= 50). We correlated NPP1 and OPN expression levels to the degree of plaque calcification, to pro-atherogenic factors and statin therapy. NPP1 was demonstrated in the base and in the shoulder of atherosclerotic plaques. Compared to normal arteries and non-calcified plaques, in calcified plaques NPP1 mRNA was decreased (P < 0.0001). OPN mRNA levels were up-regulated in carotid atheroma. NPP1 and OPN expression levels positively correlated with the degree of plaque calcification (R= 0.54, P= 0.00019 and R= 0.46, P= 0.017, respectively) and with risk factors of atherosclerosis. Expression of the calcification inhibitor NPP1 is down-regulated in calcified atherosclerotic plaques. Our correlation data point to a counter-active mechanism, which in the end turns out to be insufficient to prevent further progression of calcification. PMID:20015201

  1. Combination of internal radiation therapy and hyperthermia to treat liver cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, E.D.; McLaren, J.; Auda, S.P.; McGinley, P.H.

    1983-09-01

    Sixteen patients were treated for liver cancer (primary and metastatic) by a combination of internal radiation therapy with intra-arterial yttrium 90 microspheres and regional hyperthermia with electromagnetic radiation. Four patients have their liver disease apparently controlled; two had a partial regression of more than 50%; and two had a partial regression of less than 50%. The complications consisted of one case of radiation hepatitis and one of peptic ulcer.

  2. Redox-Modulated Phenomena and Radiation Therapy: The Central Role of Superoxide Dismutases

    PubMed Central

    Holley, Aaron K.; Miao, Lu; St. Clair, Daret K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Ionizing radiation is a vital component in the oncologist's arsenal for the treatment of cancer. Approximately 50% of all cancer patients will receive some form of radiation therapy as part of their treatment regimen. DNA is considered the major cellular target of ionizing radiation and can be damaged directly by radiation or indirectly through reactive oxygen species (ROS) formed from the radiolysis of water, enzyme-mediated ROS production, and ROS resulting from altered aerobic metabolism. Recent Advances: ROS are produced as a byproduct of oxygen metabolism, and superoxide dismutases (SODs) are the chief scavengers. ROS contribute to the radioresponsiveness of normal and tumor tissues, and SODs modulate the radioresponsiveness of tissues, thus affecting the efficacy of radiotherapy. Critical Issues: Despite its prevalent use, radiation therapy suffers from certain limitations that diminish its effectiveness, including tumor hypoxia and normal tissue damage. Oxygen is important for the stabilization of radiation-induced DNA damage, and tumor hypoxia dramatically decreases radiation efficacy. Therefore, auxiliary therapies are needed to increase the effectiveness of radiation therapy against tumor tissues while minimizing normal tissue injury. Future Directions: Because of the importance of ROS in the response of normal and cancer tissues to ionizing radiation, methods that differentially modulate the ROS scavenging ability of cells may prove to be an important method to increase the radiation response in cancer tissues and simultaneously mitigate the damaging effects of ionizing radiation on normal tissues. Altering the expression or activity of SODs may prove valuable in maximizing the overall effectiveness of ionizing radiation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1567–1589. PMID:24094070

  3. Assessment of Lymphedema Risk Following Lymph Node Dissection and Radiation Therapy for Primary Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0622 TITLE: Assessment of Lymphedema Risk...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Assessment of Lymphedema Risk Following Lymph Node Dissection and Radiation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Therapy for Primary Breast Cancer...ABSTRACT: Lymphedema is a common complication of primary breast cancer therapy. It is a chronic, insidiously progressive, and potentially

  4. SMART syndrome: a late reversible complication after radiation therapy for brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Kerklaan, Joost P; Lycklama á Nijeholt, Geert J; Wiggenraad, Ruud G J; Berghuis, Bianca; Postma, Tjeerd J; Taphoorn, Martin J B

    2011-06-01

    With intensified treatment leading to longer survival, complications of therapy for brain tumours are more frequently observed. Regarding radiation therapy, progressive and irreversible white matter disease with cognitive decline is most feared. We report on four patients with reversible clinical and radiological features occurring years after radiation for brain tumours, suggestive for the so called SMART syndrome (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy). All four patients (males, age 36-60 years) had been treated with focal brain radiation for a primary brain tumour or with whole-brain radiation therapy for brain metastases. Ranging from 2 to 10 years following radiation therapy patients presented with headache and focal neurological deficits, suggestive for tumour recurrence. Two patients also presented with focal seizures. MRI demonstrated typical cortical swelling and contrast enhancement, primarily in the parieto-occipital region. On follow-up both clinical and MRI features improved spontaneously. Three patients eventually proved to have tumour recurrence. The clinical and radiological picture of these patients is compatible with the SMART syndrome, a rare complication of radiation therapy which is probably under recognized in brain tumour patients. The pathophysiology of the SMART syndrome is poorly understood but bears similarities with the posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). These four cases underline that the SMART syndrome should be considered in patients formerly treated with radiation therapy for brain tumours, who present with new neurologic deficits. Before the diagnosis of SMART syndrome can be established other causes, such as local tumour recurrence, leptomeningeal disease or ischemic disease should be ruled out.

  5. Tobacco Smoking During Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer Is Associated With Unfavorable Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Chen, Leon M.; Vaughan, Andrew; Sreeraman, Radhika; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Lau, Derick H.; Stuart, Kerri; Purdy, James A.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of continued cigarette smoking among patients undergoing radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer by comparing the clinical outcomes among active smokers and quitters. Methods and Materials: A review of medical records identified 101 patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck who continued to smoke during radiation therapy. Each active smoker was matched to a control patient who had quit smoking before initiation of radiation therapy. Matching was based on tobacco history (pack-years), primary site, age, sex, Karnofsky Performance Status, disease stage, radiation dose, chemotherapy use, year of treatment, and whether surgical resection was performed. Outcomes were compared by use of Kaplan-Meier analysis. Normal tissue effects were graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for the Treatment of Cancer toxicity criteria. Results: With a median follow-up of 49 months, active smokers had significantly inferior 5-year overall survival (23% vs. 55%), locoregional control (58% vs. 69%), and disease-free survival (42% vs. 65%) compared with the former smokers who had quit before radiation therapy (p < 0.05 for all). These differences remained statistically significant when patients treated by postoperative or definitive radiation therapy were analyzed separately. The incidence of Grade 3 or greater late complications was also significantly increased among active smokers compared with former smokers (49% vs. 31%, p = 0.01). Conclusions: Tobacco smoking during radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer is associated with unfavorable outcomes. Further studies analyzing the biologic and molecular reasons underlying these differences are planned.

  6. Dosimetric evaluation of whole-breast radiation therapy: Clinical experience

    SciTech Connect

    Osei, Ernest; Darko, Johnson; Fleck, Andre; White, Jana; Kiciak, Alexander; Redekop, Rachel; Gopaul, Darin

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy of the intact breast is the standard therapy for preventing local recurrence of early-stage breast cancer following breast conservation surgery. To improve patient standard of care, there is a need to define a consistent and transparent treatment path for all patients that reduces significance variations in the acceptability of treatment plans. There is lack of consistency among institutions or individuals about what is considered an acceptable treatment plan: target coverage vis-à-vis dose to organs at risk (OAR). Clinical trials usually resolve these issues, as the criteria for an acceptable plan within the trial (target coverage and doses to OAR) are well defined. We developed an institutional criterion for accepting breast treatment plans in 2006 after analyzing treatment data of approximately 200 patients. The purpose of this article is to report on the dosimetric review of 623 patients treated in the last 18 months to evaluate the effectiveness of the previously developed plan acceptability criteria and any possible changes necessary to further improve patient care. The mean patient age is 61.6 years (range: 25.2 to 93.0 years). The mean breast separation for all the patients is 21.0 cm (range: 12.4 to 34.9 cm), and the mean planning target volume (PTV-eval) (breast volume for evaluation) is 884.0 cm{sup 3} (range: 73.6 to 3684.6 cm{sup 3}). Overall, 314 (50.4%) patients had the disease in the left breast and 309 (49.6%) had it in the right breast. A total of 147 (23.6%) patients were treated using the deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique. The mean normalized PTV-eval receiving at least 92% (V{sub 92%} {sub PD}) and 95% (V{sub 95%} {sub PD}) of the prescribed dose (PD) are more than 99% and 97%, respectively, for all patients. The mean normalized PTV-eval receiving at least 105% (V{sub 105%} {sub PD}) of the PD is less than 1% for all groups. The mean homogeneity index (HI), uniformity index (UI), and conformity index (CI) for the

  7. Assessing Adverse Events of Postprostatectomy Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Evaluation of Outcomes in the Regione Emilia-Romagna, Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Showalter, Timothy N.; Hegarty, Sarah E.; Rabinowitz, Carol; Maio, Vittorio; Hyslop, Terry; Dicker, Adam P.; Louis, Daniel Z.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Although the likelihood of radiation-related adverse events influences treatment decisions regarding radiation therapy after prostatectomy for eligible patients, the data available to inform decisions are limited. This study was designed to evaluate the genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and sexual adverse events associated with postprostatectomy radiation therapy and to assess the influence of radiation timing on the risk of adverse events. Methods: The Regione Emilia-Romagna Italian Longitudinal Health Care Utilization Database was queried to identify a cohort of men who received radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer during 2003 to 2009, including patients who received postprostatectomy radiation therapy. Patients with prior radiation therapy were excluded. Outcome measures were genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and sexual adverse events after prostatectomy. Rates of adverse events were compared between the cohorts who did and did not receive postoperative radiation therapy. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were developed for each class of adverse events, including models with radiation therapy as a time-varying covariate. Results: A total of 9876 men were included in the analyses: 2176 (22%) who received radiation therapy and 7700 (78%) treated with prostatectomy alone. In multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, the additional exposure to radiation therapy after prostatectomy was associated with increased rates of gastrointestinal (rate ratio [RR] 1.81; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44-2.27; P<.001) and urinary nonincontinence events (RR 1.83; 95% CI 1.83-2.80; P<.001) but not urinary incontinence events or erectile dysfunction. The addition of the time from prostatectomy to radiation therapy interaction term was not significant for any of the adverse event outcomes (P>.1 for all outcomes). Conclusion: Radiation therapy after prostatectomy is associated with an increase in gastrointestinal and genitourinary adverse events. However

  8. Adaptive Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Planning for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Yujiao; Zhang, Fan; Yoo, David S.; Kelsey, Chris R.; Yin, Fang-Fang; Cai, Jing

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric effects of adaptive planning on lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Forty of 66 consecutive lung SBRT patients were selected for a retrospective adaptive planning study. CBCT images acquired at each fraction were used for treatment planning. Adaptive plans were created using the same planning parameters as the original CT-based plan, with the goal to achieve comparable comformality index (CI). For each patient, 2 cumulative plans, nonadaptive plan (P{sub NON}) and adaptive plan (P{sub ADP}), were generated and compared for the following organs-at-risks (OARs): cord, esophagus, chest wall, and the lungs. Dosimetric comparison was performed between P{sub NON} and P{sub ADP} for all 40 patients. Correlations were evaluated between changes in dosimetric metrics induced by adaptive planning and potential impacting factors, including tumor-to-OAR distances (d{sub T-OAR}), initial internal target volume (ITV{sub 1}), ITV change (ΔITV), and effective ITV diameter change (Δd{sub ITV}). Results: 34 (85%) patients showed ITV decrease and 6 (15%) patients showed ITV increase throughout the course of lung SBRT. Percentage ITV change ranged from −59.6% to 13.0%, with a mean (±SD) of −21.0% (±21.4%). On average of all patients, P{sub ADP} resulted in significantly (P=0 to .045) lower values for all dosimetric metrics. Δd{sub ITV}/d{sub T-OAR} was found to correlate with changes in dose to 5 cc (ΔD5cc) of esophagus (r=0.61) and dose to 30 cc (ΔD30cc) of chest wall (r=0.81). Stronger correlations between Δd{sub ITV}/d{sub T-OAR} and ΔD30cc of chest wall were discovered for peripheral (r=0.81) and central (r=0.84) tumors, respectively. Conclusions: Dosimetric effects of adaptive lung SBRT planning depend upon target volume changes and tumor-to-OAR distances. Adaptive lung SBRT can potentially reduce dose to adjacent OARs if patients present large tumor volume shrinkage during the treatment.

  9. Optimizing global liver function in radiation therapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Victor W.; Epelman, Marina A.; Wang, Hesheng; Romeijn, H. Edwin; Feng, Mary; Cao, Yue; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Matuszak, Martha M.

    2016-09-01

    Liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) patients differ in both pre-treatment liver function (e.g. due to degree of cirrhosis and/or prior treatment) and radiosensitivity, leading to high variability in potential liver toxicity with similar doses. This work investigates three treatment planning optimization models that minimize risk of toxicity: two consider both voxel-based pre-treatment liver function and local-function-based radiosensitivity with dose; one considers only dose. Each model optimizes different objective functions (varying in complexity of capturing the influence of dose on liver function) subject to the same dose constraints and are tested on 2D synthesized and 3D clinical cases. The normal-liver-based objective functions are the linearized equivalent uniform dose (\\ell \\text{EUD} ) (conventional ‘\\ell \\text{EUD} model’), the so-called perfusion-weighted \\ell \\text{EUD} (\\text{fEUD} ) (proposed ‘fEUD model’), and post-treatment global liver function (GLF) (proposed ‘GLF model’), predicted by a new liver-perfusion-based dose-response model. The resulting \\ell \\text{EUD} , fEUD, and GLF plans delivering the same target \\ell \\text{EUD} are compared with respect to their post-treatment function and various dose-based metrics. Voxel-based portal venous liver perfusion, used as a measure of local function, is computed using DCE-MRI. In cases used in our experiments, the GLF plan preserves up to 4.6 % ≤ft(7.5 % \\right) more liver function than the fEUD (\\ell \\text{EUD} ) plan does in 2D cases, and up to 4.5 % ≤ft(5.6 % \\right) in 3D cases. The GLF and fEUD plans worsen in \\ell \\text{EUD} of functional liver on average by 1.0 Gy and 0.5 Gy in 2D and 3D cases, respectively. Liver perfusion information can be used during treatment planning to minimize the risk of toxicity by improving expected GLF; the degree of benefit varies with perfusion pattern. Although fEUD model optimization is computationally inexpensive and

  10. Couch height–based patient setup for abdominal radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Shingo; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Nishiyama, Kinji; Miyazaki, Masayoshi; Isono, Masaru; Tsujii, Katsutomo; Takashina, Masaaki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Kawanabe, Kiyoto; Teshima, Teruki

    2016-04-01

    There are 2 methods commonly used for patient positioning in the anterior-posterior (A-P) direction: one is the skin mark patient setup method (SMPS) and the other is the couch height–based patient setup method (CHPS). This study compared the setup accuracy of these 2 methods for abdominal radiation therapy. The enrollment for this study comprised 23 patients with pancreatic cancer. For treatments (539 sessions), patients were set up by using isocenter skin marks and thereafter treatment couch was shifted so that the distance between the isocenter and the upper side of the treatment couch was equal to that indicated on the computed tomographic (CT) image. Setup deviation in the A-P direction for CHPS was measured by matching the spine of the digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) of a lateral beam at simulation with that of the corresponding time-integrated electronic portal image. For SMPS with no correction (SMPS/NC), setup deviation was calculated based on the couch-level difference between SMPS and CHPS. SMPS/NC was corrected using 2 off-line correction protocols: no action level (SMPS/NAL) and extended NAL (SMPS/eNAL) protocols. Margins to compensate for deviations were calculated using the Stroom formula. A-P deviation > 5 mm was observed in 17% of SMPS/NC, 4% of SMPS/NAL, and 4% of SMPS/eNAL sessions but only in one CHPS session. For SMPS/NC, 7 patients (30%) showed deviations at an increasing rate of > 0.1 mm/fraction, but for CHPS, no such trend was observed. The standard deviations (SDs) of systematic error (Σ) were 2.6, 1.4, 0.6, and 0.8 mm and the root mean squares of random error (σ) were 2.1, 2.6, 2.7, and 0.9 mm for SMPS/NC, SMPS/NAL, SMPS/eNAL, and CHPS, respectively. Margins to compensate for the deviations were wide for SMPS/NC (6.7 mm), smaller for SMPS/NAL (4.6 mm) and SMPS/eNAL (3.1 mm), and smallest for CHPS (2.2 mm). Achieving better setup with smaller margins, CHPS appears to be a reproducible method for abdominal patient setup.

  11. Technological Advancements and Error Rates in Radiation Therapy Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Margalit, Danielle N.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Technological advances in radiation therapy (RT) delivery have the potential to reduce errors via increased automation and built-in quality assurance (QA) safeguards, yet may also introduce new types of errors. Intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) is an increasingly used technology that is more technically complex than three-dimensional (3D)-conformal RT and conventional RT. We determined the rate of reported errors in RT delivery among IMRT and 3D/conventional RT treatments and characterized the errors associated with the respective techniques to improve existing QA processes. Methods and Materials: All errors in external beam RT delivery were prospectively recorded via a nonpunitive error-reporting system at Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Errors are defined as any unplanned deviation from the intended RT treatment and are reviewed during monthly departmental quality improvement meetings. We analyzed all reported errors since the routine use of IMRT in our department, from January 2004 to July 2009. Fisher's exact test was used to determine the association between treatment technique (IMRT vs. 3D/conventional) and specific error types. Effect estimates were computed using logistic regression. Results: There were 155 errors in RT delivery among 241,546 fractions (0.06%), and none were clinically significant. IMRT was commonly associated with errors in machine parameters (nine of 19 errors) and data entry and interpretation (six of 19 errors). IMRT was associated with a lower rate of reported errors compared with 3D/conventional RT (0.03% vs. 0.07%, p = 0.001) and specifically fewer accessory errors (odds ratio, 0.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.01-0.78) and setup errors (odds ratio, 0.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.79). Conclusions: The rate of errors in RT delivery is low. The types of errors differ significantly between IMRT and 3D/conventional RT, suggesting that QA processes must be uniquely adapted for each technique. There

  12. Optimizing Timing of Immunotherapy Improves Control of Tumors by Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Jason R.; Savage, Talicia; Cottam, Benjamin; Friedman, David; Bambina, Shelly; Messenheimer, David J.; Fox, Bernard; Newell, Pippa; Bahjat, Keith S.; Gough, Michael J.; Crittenden, Marka R.

    2016-01-01

    The anecdotal reports of promising results seen with immunotherapy and radiation in advanced malignancies have prompted several trials combining immunotherapy and radiation. However, the ideal timing of immunotherapy with radiation has not been clarified. Tumor bearing mice were treated with 20Gy radiation delivered only to the tumor combined with either anti-CTLA4 antibody or anti-OX40 agonist antibody. Immunotherapy was delivered at a single timepoint around radiation. Surprisingly, the optimal timing of these therapies varied. Anti-CTLA4 was most effective when given prior to radiation therapy, in part due to regulatory T cell depletion. Administration of anti-OX40 agonist antibody was optimal when delivered one day following radiation during the post-radiation window of increased antigen presentation. Combination treatment of anti-CTLA4, radiation, and anti-OX40 using the ideal timing in a transplanted spontaneous mammary tumor model demonstrated tumor cures. These data demonstrate that the combination of immunotherapy and radiation results in improved therapeutic efficacy, and that the ideal timing of administration with radiation is dependent on the mechanism of action of the immunotherapy utilized. PMID:27281029

  13. Metalloporphyrins and their uses as radiosensitizers for radiation therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    2004-07-06

    The present invention covers radiosensitizers containing as an active ingredient halogenated derivatives of boronated porphyrins containing multiple carborane cages having the structure ##STR1## which selectively accumulate in neoplastic tissue within the irradiation volume and thus can be used in cancer therapies including, but not limited to, boron neutron--capture therapy and photodynamic therapy. The present invention also covers methods for using these radiosensitizers in tumor imaging and cancer treatment.

  14. Flashes of light-radiation therapy to the brain.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Deborah T; Corn, Benjamin W; Shtraus, Natan

    2015-08-01

    We present a series of three patients who received therapeutic external beam radiation to the brain and experienced a phenomenon of the sensation of flashes of bright or blue light, simultaneous with radiation delivery. We relate this benign phenomenon to low-dose exposure to the eye fields and postulate that the occurrence is underreported in this treated population.

  15. Palliative Radiation Therapy for Symptomatic Control of Inoperable Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, Anatoly; Benda, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is traditionally considered to be resistant to conventional low dose radiation therapy (RT). The emergence of image-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) made it possible to deliver much higher doses of radiation. Recent clinical trials of SBRT for RCC showed improvement in local control rates and acceptable toxicity. Here we report a case of inoperable symptomatic RCC that was managed with SBRT. Strikingly, the presenting symptoms of gross hematuria and severe anemia were completely resolved following a course of SBRT. Thus, our case report highlights the potential benefit of this technique for patients with inoperable RCC.

  16. Palliative Radiation Therapy for Symptomatic Control of Inoperable Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaev, Anatoly; Benda, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is traditionally considered to be resistant to conventional low dose radiation therapy (RT). The emergence of image-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) made it possible to deliver much higher doses of radiation. Recent clinical trials of SBRT for RCC showed improvement in local control rates and acceptable toxicity. Here we report a case of inoperable symptomatic RCC that was managed with SBRT. Strikingly, the presenting symptoms of gross hematuria and severe anemia were completely resolved following a course of SBRT. Thus, our case report highlights the potential benefit of this technique for patients with inoperable RCC. PMID:26793580

  17. TU-CD-303-02: Beyond Radiation Induced Double Strand Breaks - a New Horizon for Radiation Therapy Research

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.

    2015-06-15

    Recent advances in cancer research have shed new light on the complex processes of how therapeutic radiation initiates changes at cellular, tissue, and system levels that may lead to clinical effects. These new advances may transform the way we use radiation to combat certain types of cancers. For the past two decades many technological advancements in radiation therapy have been largely based on the hypothesis that direct radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks cause cell death and thus tumor control and normal tissue damage. However, new insights have elucidated that in addition to causing cellular DNA damage, localized therapeutic radiation also initiates cascades of complex downstream biological responses in tissue that extend far beyond where therapeutic radiation dose is directly deposited. For instance, studies show that irradiated dying tumor cells release tumor antigens that can lead the immune system to a systemic anti-cancer attack throughout the body of cancer patient; targeted irradiation to solid tumor also increases the migration of tumor cells already in bloodstream, the seeds of potential metastasis. Some of the new insights may explain the long ago discovered but still unexplained non-localized radiation effects (bystander effect and abscopal effect) and the efficacy of spatially fractionated radiation therapy (microbeam radiation therapy and GRID therapy) where many “hot” and “cold” spots are intentionally created throughout the treatment volume. Better understanding of the mechanisms behind the non-localized radiation effects creates tremendous opportunities to develop new and integrated cancer treatment strategies that are based on radiotherapy, immunology, and chemotherapy. However, in the multidisciplinary effort to advance new radiobiology, there are also tremendous challenges including a lack of multidisciplinary researchers and imaging technologies for the microscopic radiation-induced responses. A better grasp of the essence of

  18. The retina dose-area histogram: a metric for quantitatively comparing rival eye plaque treatment options

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Episcleral plaques have a history of over a half century in the delivery of radiation therapy to intraocular tumors such as choroidal melanoma. Although the tumor control rate is high, vision-impairing complications subsequent to treatment remain an issue. Notable, late complications are radiation retinopathy and maculopathy. The obvious way to reduce the risk of radiation damage to the retina is to conform the prescribed isodose surface to the tumor base and to reduce the dose delivered to the surrounding healthy retina, especially the macula. Using a fusion of fundus photography, ultrasound and CT images, tumor size, shape and location within the eye can be accurately simulated as part of the radiation planning process. In this work an adaptation of the dose-volume histogram (DVH), the retina dose-area histogram (RDAH) is introduced as a metric to help compare rival plaque designs and conformal treatment planning options with the goal of reducing radiation retinopathy. Material and methods The RDAH is calculated by transforming a digitized fundus-photo collage of the tumor into a rasterized polar map of the retinal surface known as a retinal diagram (RD). The perimeter of the tumor base is digitized on the RD and its area computed. Area and radiation dose are calculated for every pixel in the RD. Results The areal resolution of the RDAH is a function of the pixel resolution of the raster image used to display the RD and the number of polygon edges used to digitize the perimeter of the tumor base. A practical demonstration is presented. Conclusions The RDAH provides a quantitative metric by which episcleral plaque treatment plan options may be evaluated and compared in order to confirm adequate dosimetric coverage of the tumor and margin, and to help minimize dose to the macula and retina. PMID:23634152

  19. Radiation burden from secondary doses to patients undergoing radiation therapy with photons and light ions and radiation doses from imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Gudowska, I; Ardenfors, O; Toma-Dasu, I; Dasu, A

    2014-10-01

    Ionising radiation is increasingly used for the treatment of cancer, being the source of a considerable fraction of the medical irradiation to patients. With the increasing success rate of cancer treatments and longer life expectancy of the treated patients, the issue of secondary cancer incidence is of growing concern, especially for paediatric patients who may live long after the treatment and be more susceptible to carcinogenesis. Also, additional imaging procedures like computed tomography, kilovoltage and megavoltage imaging and positron emission tomography, alone or in conjunction with radiation therapy, may add to the radiation burden associated with the risk of occurrence of secondary cancers. This work has been based on literature studies and is focussed on the assessment of secondary doses to healthy tissues that are delivered by the use of modern radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging modalities in the clinical environment.

  20. Isolated Unilateral Tongue Atrophy: A Possible Late Complication of Juxta Cephalic Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alqahtani, Saeed A.; Agha, Caroline; Rothstein, Ted

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 51 Final Diagnosis: Radiation therapy induced unilateral tongue atrophy Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: EMG Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: Isolated unilateral hypoglossal nerve injury is extremely rare. It may be caused by radiation therapy targeting neoplasms of the cephalic region. Case Report: A 51-year-old man with synovial sarcoma of the left upper arm status post extensive radiation therapy in 1980 presented in late 2014 with gradual onset of speech difficulty and difficulty moving his tongue for a couple of weeks. Neurological examination revealed isolated left-sided unilateral tongue atrophy. Postradiation residual extensive cicatrix with erythema over the whole left upper extremity extending to the neck on the affected side was noticed. On head magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and after administration of gadolinium, he was found to have asymmetrically fatty striations, atrophy, and fibrosis in the left tongue consistent with radiation toxicity. The patient’s tongue weakness persisted without improvement. Conclusions: The diagnosis of unilateral hypoglossal nerve injury is usually difficult. Detailed neurological examinations and thorough investigations including head MRI are very helpful. Previous exposure to radiation therapy is a potential cause of hypoglossal nerve injury. To our knowledge, this is the first case report that presents isolated unilateral tongue atrophy as a late complication of juxta cephalic radiation therapy. PMID:27458010

  1. Systematic review of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the treatment of radiation-induced skin necrosis.

    PubMed

    Borab, Zachary; Mirmanesh, Michael D; Gantz, Madeleine; Cusano, Alessandro; Pu, Lee L Q

    2017-04-01

    Every year, 1.2 million cancer patients receive radiation therapy in the United States. Late radiation tissue injury occurs in an estimated 5-15% of these patients. Tissue injury can include skin necrosis, which can lead to chronic nonhealing wounds. Despite many treatments available to help heal skin necrosis such as hyperbaric oxygen therapy, no clinical guidelines exist and evidence is lacking. The purpose of this review is to identify and comprehensively summarize studies published to date to evaluate the effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the treatment of radiation-induced skin necrosis. Adhering to PRISMA guidelines, a systematic review of currently published articles was performed, evaluating the use of hyperbaric oxygen to treat skin necrosis. Eight articles were identified, including one observational cohort, five case series, and two case reports. The articles describe changes in symptoms and alteration in wound healing of radiation-induced skin necrosis after treatment with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a safe intervention with promising outcomes; however, additional evidence is needed to endorse its application as a relevant therapy in the treatment of radiation-induced skin necrosis.

  2. Stereotactic body radiation therapy planning with duodenal sparing using volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: A dosimetric analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rachit; Wild, Aaron T.; Ziegler, Mark A.; Hooker, Ted K.; Dah, Samson D.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Kang, Jun; Smith, Koren; Zeng, Jing; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Tryggestad, Erik; Ford, Eric; Herman, Joseph M.

    2013-10-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) achieves excellent local control for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), but may increase late duodenal toxicity. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivers intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a rotating gantry rather than multiple fixed beams. This study dosimetrically evaluates the feasibility of implementing duodenal constraints for SBRT using VMAT vs IMRT. Non–duodenal sparing (NS) and duodenal-sparing (DS) VMAT and IMRT plans delivering 25 Gy in 1 fraction were generated for 15 patients with LAPC. DS plans were constrained to duodenal D{sub max} of<30 Gy at any point. VMAT used 1 360° coplanar arc with 4° spacing between control points, whereas IMRT used 9 coplanar beams with fixed gantry positions at 40° angles. Dosimetric parameters for target volumes and organs at risk were compared for DS planning vs NS planning and VMAT vs IMRT using paired-sample Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Both DS VMAT and DS IMRT achieved significantly reduced duodenal D{sub mean}, D{sub max}, D{sub 1cc}, D{sub 4%}, and V{sub 20} {sub Gy} compared with NS plans (all p≤0.002). DS constraints compromised target coverage for IMRT as demonstrated by reduced V{sub 95%} (p = 0.01) and D{sub mean} (p = 0.02), but not for VMAT. DS constraints resulted in increased dose to right kidney, spinal cord, stomach, and liver for VMAT. Direct comparison of DS VMAT and DS IMRT revealed that VMAT was superior in sparing the left kidney (p<0.001) and the spinal cord (p<0.001), whereas IMRT was superior in sparing the stomach (p = 0.05) and the liver (p = 0.003). DS VMAT required 21% fewer monitor units (p<0.001) and delivered treatment 2.4 minutes faster (p<0.001) than DS IMRT. Implementing DS constraints during SBRT planning for LAPC can significantly reduce duodenal point or volumetric dose parameters for both VMAT and IMRT. The primary consequence of implementing DS constraints for VMAT is increased dose to other organs at

  3. Radiation therapy, an important mode of treatment for head and neck chemodectomas.

    PubMed

    Verniers, D A; Keus, R B; Schouwenburg, P F; Bartelink, H

    1992-01-01

    Between 1970 and 1990, 22 patients with 44 chemodectomas in the head and neck region were seen at the Netherlands Cancer Institute in Amsterdam. All patients were treated with radiation therapy (17 patients with radiation therapy only and 5 in combination with surgery). One patient was treated two times with an interval of 12 years at each side of the neck. Standard dose was 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks. A radiation portal arrangement with oblique fields with paired wedges was used most frequently. The follow-up period ranged from 1 year to 20 years. Two recurrences at 2 and 9 years after treatment were observed. The actuarial local control rate was 88% at 10 years follow-up. Comparison of the results of surgery and radiotherapy demonstrates that radiation therapy is an effective treatment modality without mutilation or severe late morbidity for chemodectomas in the head and neck region.

  4. Planning mantle radiation therapy in patients with Hodgkin disease: role of gallium-67 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Jochelson, M.S.; Herman, T.S.; Stomper, P.C.; Mauch, P.M.; Kaplan, W.D.

    1988-12-01

    Detection of all sites of lymphoma is imperative for accurate planning of radiation therapy. In patients with Hodgkin disease, mantle radiation is used to treat the thoracic lymph nodes; in those with early-stage or nonbulky disease, mantle and paraaortic radiation may be the only treatment given. CT scanning of the chest adds important information to that obtained from chest radiographs. Gallium-67 scintigraphy has also been used to provide additional information on sites of active tumor. To determine the usefulness of 67Ga-citrate scintigraphy in planning the portals for radiation therapy, we analyzed the radiation treatment plans in 26 consecutive patients with Hodgkin disease; in all 26 patients, the disease had been staged by chest radiographs, chest CT scans, and gallium-67 images. Gallium-67 imaging alone provided unique information that affected the treatment plans in three patients (12%). The combined results of gallium-67 imaging and CT scans influenced the planning of radiation therapy in eight patients (31%). Gallium-67 imaging was found to be an important adjunctive study for optimal planning of radiation therapy in patients with Hodgkin disease.

  5. [Brain metastases: Focal treatment (surgery and radiation therapy) and cognitive consequences].

    PubMed

    Reygagne, Emmanuelle; Du Boisgueheneuc, Foucaud; Berger, Antoine

    2017-04-01

    Brain metastases represent the first cause of malignant brain tumor. Without radiation therapy, prognosis was poor with fast neurological deterioration, and a median overall survival of one month. Nowadays, therapeutic options depend on brain metastases presentation, extra brain disease, performance status and estimated prognostic (DS GPA). Therefore, for oligometastatic brain patients with a better prognosis, this therapeutic modality is controversial. In fact, whole-brain radiation therapy improves neurological outcomes, but it can also induce late neuro-cognitive sequelae for long-term survivors of brain metastases. Thus, in this strategy for preserving good cognitive functions, stereotactic radiation therapy is a promising treatment. Delivering precisely targeted radiation in few high-doses in one to four brain metastases, allows to reduce radiation damage to normal tissues and it should allow to decrease radiation-induced cognitive decline. In this paper, we will discuss about therapeutic strategies (radiation therapy and surgery) with their neuro-cognitive consequences for brain metastases patients and future concerning preservation of cognitive functions.

  6. Bevacizumab as Therapy for Radiation Necrosis in Four Children With Pontine Gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Arthur K.; Macy, Margaret E.; Foreman, Nicholas K.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Diffuse pontine gliomas are a pediatric brain tumor that is fatal in nearly all patients. Given the poor prognosis for patients with this tumor, their quality of life is very important. Radiation therapy provides some palliation, but can result in radiation necrosis and associated neurologic decline. The typical treatment for this necrosis is steroid therapy. Although the steroids are effective, they have numerous side effects that can often significantly compromise quality of life. Bevacizumab, an antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor, has been suggested as a treatment for radiation necrosis. We report on our initial experience with bevacizumab therapy for radiation necrosis in pediatric pontine gliomas. Materials and Methods: Four children with pontine gliomas treated at the Children's Hospital in Denver and the University of Colorado Denver developed evidence of radiation necrosis both clinically and on imaging. Those 4 children then received bevacizumab as a treatment for the radiation necrosis. We reviewed the clinical outcome and imaging findings. Results: After bevacizumab therapy, 3 children had significant clinical improvement and were able to discontinue steroid use. One child continued to decline, and, in retrospect, had disease progression, not radiation necrosis. In all cases, bevacizumab was well tolerated. Conclusions: In children with pontine gliomas, bevacizumab may provide both therapeutic benefit and diagnostic information. More formal evaluation of bevacizumab in these children is needed.

  7. The Vulnerable Plaque: the Real Villain in Acute Coronary Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Michael; Puri, Aniket; Devlin, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    The term "vulnerable plaque" refers to a vascular lesion that is prone to rupture and may result in life-threatening events which include myocardial infarction. It consists of thin-cap fibroatheroma and a large lipid core which is highly thrombogenic. Acute coronary syndromes often result from rupture of vulnerable plaques which frequently are only moderately stenosed and not visible by conventional angiography. Several invasive and non-invasive strategies have been developed to assess the burden of vulnerable plaques. Intravascular ultrasound provides a two-dimensional cross-sectional image of the arterial wall and can help assess the plaque burden and composition. Optical coherent tomography offers superior resolution over intravascular ultrasound. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging provides non-invasive imaging for visualizing fibrous cap thickness and rupture in plaques. In addition, it may be of value in assessing the effects of treatments, such as lipid-lowering therapy. Technical issues however limit its clinical applicability. The role of multi-slice computed tomography, a well established screening tool for coronary artery disease, remains to be determined. Fractional flow reserve (FFR) may provide physiological functional assessment of plaque vulnerability; however, its role in the management of vulnerable plaque requires further studies. Treatment of the vulnerable patient may involve systemic therapy which currently include statins, ACE inhibitors, beta-blockers, aspirin, and calcium-channel blockers and in the future local therapeutic options such as drug-eluting stents or photodynamic therapy. PMID:21673834

  8. Thyroxine administration during radiation therapy to the neck does not prevent subsequent thyroid dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Bantle, J.P.; Lee, C.K.; Levitt, S.H.

    1985-11-01

    In an attempt to reduce the incidence of hypothyroidism following irradiation of the neck, we administered oral L-thyroxine in doses sufficient to suppress serum TSH to 20 patients receiving radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease or other lymphomas. L-thyroxine was discontinued when radiation therapy was completed. Twenty similar patients who did not receive L-thyroxine during radiation therapy served as a control group. After a mean follow-up period of 33 months, seven patients (35%) in the L-thyroxine group developed elevation of serum TSH and were started on chronic L-thyroxine therapy. In the control group, after mean follow-up of 19 months, five patients (25%) developed elevation of TSH and were started on chronic L-thyroxine. We conclude that suppression of serum TSH during neck irradiation does not prevent subsequent thyroid dysfunction.

  9. Acupuncture in Treating Dry Mouth Caused By Radiation Therapy in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    RATIONALE: Acupuncture may help relieve dry mouth caused by radiation therapy. PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying to see how well one set of acupuncture points work in comparison to a different set of acupuncture points or standard therapy in treating dry mouth caused by radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancer. |

  10. The Clinical Development of Molecularly Targeted Agents in Combination With Radiation Therapy: A Pharmaceutical Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Ataman, Ozlem U.; Sambrook, Sally J.; Wilks, Chris; Lloyd, Andrew; Taylor, Amanda E.; Wedge, Stephen R.

    2012-11-15

    Summary: This paper explores historical and current roles of pharmaceutical industry sponsorship of clinical trials testing radiation therapy combinations with molecularly targeted agents and attempts to identify potential solutions to expediting further combination studies. An analysis of clinical trials involving a combination of radiation therapy and novel cancer therapies was performed. Ongoing and completed trials were identified by searching the (clinicaltrials.gov) Web site, in the first instance, with published trials of drugs of interest identified through American Society of Clinical Oncology, European CanCer Organisation/European Society for Medical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology/European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, and PubMed databases and then cross-correlated with (clinicaltrials.gov) protocols. We examined combination trials involving radiation therapy with novel agents and determined their distribution by tumor type, predominant molecular mechanisms examined in combination to date, timing of initiation of trials relative to a novel agent's primary development, and source of sponsorship of such trials. A total of 564 studies of targeted agents in combination with radiation therapy were identified with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Most studies were in phase I/II development, with only 36 trials in phase III. The tumor site most frequently studied was head and neck (26%), followed by non-small cell lung cancer. Pharmaceutical companies were the sponsors of 33% of studies overall and provided support for only 16% of phase III studies. In terms of pharmaceutical sponsorship, Genentech was the most active sponsor of radiation therapy combinations (22%), followed by AstraZeneca (14%). Most radiation therapy combination trials do not appear to be initiated until after drug approval. In phase III studies, the most common (58%) primary endpoint was overall survival. Collectively, this analysis suggests that such

  11. Refusal of Curative Radiation Therapy and Surgery Among Patients With Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aizer, Ayal A.; Chen, Ming-Hui; Parekh, Arti; Choueiri, Toni K.; Kim, Simon P.; Martin, Neil E.; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Nguyen, Paul L.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Surgery and radiation therapy represent the only curative options for many patients with solid malignancies. However, despite the recommendations of their physicians, some patients refuse these therapies. This study characterized factors associated with refusal of surgical or radiation therapy as well as the impact of refusal of recommended therapy on patients with localized malignancies. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program to identify a population-based sample of 925,127 patients who had diagnoses of 1 of 8 common malignancies for which surgery and/or radiation are believed to confer a survival benefit between 1995 and 2008. Refusal of oncologic therapy, as documented in the SEER database, was the primary outcome measure. Multivariable logistic regression was used to investigate factors associated with refusal. The impact of refusal of therapy on cancer-specific mortality was assessed with Fine and Gray's competing risks regression. Results: In total, 2441 of 692,938 patients (0.4%) refused surgery, and 2113 of 232,189 patients (0.9%) refused radiation, despite the recommendations of their physicians. On multivariable analysis, advancing age, decreasing annual income, nonwhite race, and unmarried status were associated with refusal of surgery, whereas advancing age, decreasing annual income, Asian American race, and unmarried status were associated with refusal of radiation (P<.001 in all cases). Refusal of surgery and radiation were associated with increased estimates of cancer-specific mortality for all malignancies evaluated (hazard ratio [HR], 2.80, 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.59-3.03; P<.001 and HR 1.97 [95% CI, 1.78-2.18]; P<.001, respectively). Conclusions: Nonwhite, less affluent, and unmarried patients are more likely to refuse curative surgical and/or radiation-based oncologic therapy, raising concern that socioeconomic factors may drive some patients to forego potentially life-saving care.

  12. Twice-a-day radiation therapy for cancer of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.C.; Blitzer, P.H.; Suit, H.D.

    1985-05-01

    Experience with the twice-a-day (BID) radiation therapy program for carcinomas of the head and neck areas is presented. The program consists of 1.6 Gy per fraction, two fractions per day with 4 hours between fractions, for 12 days, 5 days a week. After 38.4 Gy, the patient is given a 2-week break for symptoms of acute mucositis to subside and then twice-a-day radiation therapy is resumed with similar fraction size, two fractions a day for an additional 8 days to bring the total dose to 64 Gy. In some instances the primary site was boosted to an additional BID day with a maximum of 67.2 Gy. The spinal cord dose was limited to 38.4 Gy. A subset of 321 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (61 patients), oropharynx (74 patients), and larynx (186 patients) treated by this program is reported. Marked improvement in local control rate at 36 months was observed for advanced tumors (T3 and T4) and with nodal disease by BID radiation therapy program as compared to conventional once-a-day (QD) radiation therapy program. The improvement in local control for early lesions, T1 and T2 when treated with BID radiation therapy was not noted to reach a statistically significant level. However, the successful results are quite different when compared to QD radiation therapy program, with a trend suggesting that significant differences might exist if additional patients had been entered into the studies. Acute mucosal reactions are generally more severe than those produced by QD continuous radiation therapy, but the duration of symptoms is shorter.

  13. Radical hysterectomy versus radiation therapy for stage IB squamous cell cancer of the cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, M.P.; Morley, G.W. )

    1991-07-15

    Three hundred forty-five patients with Stage IB squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix were treated at the University of Michigan Medical Center from 1970 to 1985. The overall cumulative 5-year survival rate was 89% and the mean age was 44.6 years. In 213 patients undergoing radical hysterectomy the cumulative 5-year survival rate was 92%; 14 patients were explored for radical hysterectomy that was not performed due to high risk features and their survival rate was 50%. Ninety-seven patients underwent radiation therapy as initial treatment and had a 5-year survival rate of 86%. There was no significant difference when radiation therapy was compared with radical hysterectomy (P = 0.098). The survival rates for lesions 3 cm or smaller were 94% for radical hysterectomy and 88% for radiation therapy. When the lesion was larger than 3 cm, the survival rates were 82% with radical surgery and 73% with radiation therapy. Metastatic disease to lymph nodes was present in 26 of the 213 patients undergoing radical hysterectomy. When 1 to 3 nodes were involved 16 of 19 patients survived and when 4 to 10 nodes were involved 3 of 7 patients survived. The addition of radiation therapy did not influence survival. Complications were similar in both treatment groups. Fistulas occurred in 4 of 213 patients undergoing radical hysterectomy and 1 of 111 undergoing radiation. Second surgery for a complication was required in 6 of 213 patients undergoing radical hysterectomy and 7 of 111 undergoing radiation. Survival and complication rates in early stage squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix are equal with either radical surgery or radiation therapy.

  14. Altered radiation responses of breast cancer cells resistant to hormonal therapy.

    PubMed

    Luzhna, Lidiya; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2015-01-30

    Endocrine therapy agents (the selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulators such as tamoxifen or the selective ER down-regulators such as ICI 182,780) are key treatment regimens for hormone receptor-positive breast cancers. While these drugs are very effective in controlling ER-positive breast cancer, many tumors that initially respond well to treatment often acquire drug resista