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Sample records for plasma cell differentiation

  1. Differential effects of lenalidomide during plasma cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jourdan, Michel; Cren, Maïlys; Schafer, Peter; Robert, Nicolas; Duperray, Christophe; Vincent, Laure; Ceballos, Patrice; Cartron, Guillaume; Rossi, Jean-François; Moreaux, Jérôme; Chopra, Rajesh; Klein, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Thalidomide, lenalidomide and pomalidomide have greatly improved the outcome of patients with multiple myeloma. However, their effects on plasma cells, the healthy counterpart of myeloma cells, are unknown. Here, we investigated lenalidomide effects on normal human plasma cell generation using an in vitro model. Lenalidomide inhibited the generation of pre-plasmablasts and early plasma cells, while it moderately affected plasmablast production. It also reduced the expression level of Ikaros, Aiolos, and IRF4 transcription factors, in plasmablasts and early plasma cells. This suggests that their differential sensitivity to lenalidomide is not due to a difference in Ikaros or Aiolos degradation. Lenalidomide also inhibited long-lived plasma cell generation, but did not impair their long-term survival once generated. This last observation is in agreement with the finding that lenalidomide treatment for 3-18 months did not affect the bone marrow healthy plasma cell count in allografted patients with multiple myeloma. Our findings should prompt to investigate whether lenalidomide resistance in patients with multiple myeloma could be associated with the emergence of malignant plasmablasts or long-lived plasma cells that are less sensitive to lenalidomide. PMID:27057635

  2. Differential effects of lenalidomide during plasma cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Jourdan, Michel; Cren, Maïlys; Schafer, Peter; Robert, Nicolas; Duperray, Christophe; Vincent, Laure; Ceballos, Patrice; Cartron, Guillaume; Rossi, Jean-François; Moreaux, Jérôme; Chopra, Rajesh; Klein, Bernard

    2016-05-10

    Thalidomide, lenalidomide and pomalidomide have greatly improved the outcome of patients with multiple myeloma. However, their effects on plasma cells, the healthy counterpart of myeloma cells, are unknown. Here, we investigated lenalidomide effects on normal human plasma cell generation using an in vitro model. Lenalidomide inhibited the generation of pre-plasmablasts and early plasma cells, while it moderately affected plasmablast production. It also reduced the expression level of Ikaros, Aiolos, and IRF4 transcription factors, in plasmablasts and early plasma cells. This suggests that their differential sensitivity to lenalidomide is not due to a difference in Ikaros or Aiolos degradation. Lenalidomide also inhibited long-lived plasma cell generation, but did not impair their long-term survival once generated. This last observation is in agreement with the finding that lenalidomide treatment for 3-18 months did not affect the bone marrow healthy plasma cell count in allografted patients with multiple myeloma. Our findings should prompt to investigate whether lenalidomide resistance in patients with multiple myeloma could be associated with the emergence of malignant plasmablasts or long-lived plasma cells that are less sensitive to lenalidomide.

  3. Examination of the role of galectins in plasma cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chih-Ming; Lin, Kuo-I

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cells are terminally differentiated B cells that develop via the stimulation of mature B cells with various agents such as antigens and mitogens. Recently, we found that plasma cell differentiation can be modulated by galectin-1 and galectin-8; these galectins appear to play additive and redundant roles in promoting the production of antibody. Here, we describe the protocols for how to investigate the roles of galectins in plasma cell differentiation. These methods include the preparation of recombinant galectins from Escherichia coli for exogenously treating primary B cells, generation of galectin_Fc(m) fusion proteins for determining their binding to B cells, introduction of ectopic galectins in primary B cells using retroviral vectors, and inhibition of the binding of galectins to B cells by synthetic disaccharides.

  4. ULTRASTRUCTURAL LOCALIZATION OF ANTIBODY IN DIFFERENTIATING PLASMA CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Elizabeth H.; Avrameas, Stratis; Bouteille, Michel

    1968-01-01

    Antibody was localized by electron microscopy within differentiating and mature plasma cells of the spleens of hyperimmunized rabbits. Horseradish peroxidase was used as antigen. Intracellular antibody to peroxidase was revealed in glutaraldehyde-fixed tissue by coupling it with its antigen and then revealing the sites of peroxidase activity cytochemically. Antibody first appears in the perinuclear space of hemocytoblasts where it persists through differentiation into immature plasma cells, but it disappears from this site in mature plasma cells. Concomitant with the development of the ergastoplasm, antibody accumulates in many but not all of its cisternae. Antibody is present in the lamellar portion of the Golgi apparatus in all phases of plasmacytic differentiation. Mature plasma cells exhibit two types of antibody distribution, a concentration into large spherical intracisternal granules or an overflowing into all parts of the cytoplasm. PMID:5635036

  5. Progressively impaired proteasomal capacity during terminal plasma cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cenci, Simone; Mezghrani, Alexandre; Cascio, Paolo; Bianchi, Giada; Cerruti, Fulvia; Fra, Anna; Lelouard, Hugues; Masciarelli, Silvia; Mattioli, Laura; Oliva, Laura; Orsi, Andrea; Pasqualetto, Elena; Pierre, Philippe; Ruffato, Elena; Tagliavacca, Luigina; Sitia, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    After few days of intense immunoglobulin (Ig) secretion, most plasma cells undergo apoptosis, thus ending the humoral immune response. We asked whether intrinsic factors link plasma cell lifespan to Ig secretion. Here we show that in the late phases of plasmacytic differentiation, when antibody production becomes maximal, proteasomal activity decreases. The excessive load for the reduced proteolytic capacity correlates with accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins, stabilization of endogenous proteasomal substrates (including Xbp1s, IκBα, and Bax), onset of apoptosis, and sensitization to proteasome inhibitors (PI). These events can be reproduced by expressing Ig-μ chain in nonlymphoid cells. Our results suggest that a developmental program links plasma cell death to protein production, and help explaining the peculiar sensitivity of normal and malignant plasma cells to PI. PMID:16498407

  6. Differentiation stage of myeloma plasma cells: biological and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Paiva, B; Puig, N; Cedena, M T; de Jong, B G; Ruiz, Y; Rapado, I; Martinez-Lopez, J; Cordon, L; Alignani, D; Delgado, J A; van Zelm, M C; Van Dongen, J J M; Pascual, M; Agirre, X; Prosper, F; Martín-Subero, J I; Vidriales, M-B; Gutierrez, N C; Hernandez, M T; Oriol, A; Echeveste, M A; Gonzalez, Y; Johnson, S K; Epstein, J; Barlogie, B; Morgan, G J; Orfao, A; Blade, J; Mateos, M V; Lahuerta, J J; San-Miguel, J F

    2017-02-01

    The notion that plasma cells (PCs) are terminally differentiated has prevented intensive research in multiple myeloma (MM) about their phenotypic plasticity and differentiation. Here, we demonstrated in healthy individuals (n=20) that the CD19-CD81 expression axis identifies three bone marrow (BM)PC subsets with distinct age-prevalence, proliferation, replication-history, immunoglobulin-production, and phenotype, consistent with progressively increased differentiation from CD19+CD81+ into CD19-CD81+ and CD19-CD81- BMPCs. Afterwards, we demonstrated in 225 newly diagnosed MM patients that, comparing to normal BMPC counterparts, 59% had fully differentiated (CD19-CD81-) clones, 38% intermediate-differentiated (CD19-CD81+) and 3% less-differentiated (CD19+CD81+) clones. The latter patients had dismal outcome, and PC differentiation emerged as an independent prognostic marker for progression-free (HR: 1.7; P=0.005) and overall survival (HR: 2.1; P=0.006). Longitudinal comparison of diagnostic vs minimal-residual-disease samples (n=40) unraveled that in 20% of patients, less-differentiated PCs subclones become enriched after therapy-induced pressure. We also revealed that CD81 expression is epigenetically regulated, that less-differentiated clonal PCs retain high expression of genes related to preceding B-cell stages (for example: PAX5), and show distinct mutation profile vs fully differentiated PC clones within individual patients. Together, we shed new light into PC plasticity and demonstrated that MM patients harbouring less-differentiated PCs have dismal survival, which might be related to higher chemoresistant potential plus different molecular and genomic profiles.

  7. Differentiation stage of myeloma plasma cells: biological and clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, B; Puig, N; Cedena, MT; de Jong, BG; Ruiz, Y; Rapado, I; Martinez-Lopez, J; Cordon, L; Alignani, D; Delgado, JA; van Zelm, MC; Van Dongen, JJM; Pascual, M; Agirre, X; Prosper, F; Martín-Subero, JI; Vidriales, M-B; Gutierrez, NC; Hernandez, MT; Oriol, A; Echeveste, MA; Gonzalez, Y; Johnson, SK; Epstein, J; Barlogie, B; Morgan, GJ; Orfao, A; Blade, J; Mateos, MV; Lahuerta, JJ; San-Miguel, JF

    2017-01-01

    The notion that plasma cells (PCs) are terminally differentiated has prevented intensive research in multiple myeloma (MM) about their phenotypic plasticity and differentiation. Here, we demonstrated in healthy individuals (n = 20) that the CD19 − CD81 expression axis identifies three bone marrow (BM)PC subsets with distinct age-prevalence, proliferation, replication-history, immunoglobulin-production, and phenotype, consistent with progressively increased differentiation from CD19+CD81+ into CD19 − CD81+ and CD19 − CD81 − BMPCs. Afterwards, we demonstrated in 225 newly diagnosed MM patients that, comparing to normal BMPC counterparts, 59% had fully differentiated (CD19 − CD81 −) clones, 38% intermediate-differentiated (CD19 − CD81+) and 3% less-differentiated (CD19+CD81+) clones. The latter patients had dismal outcome, and PC differentiation emerged as an independent prognostic marker for progression-free (HR: 1.7; P = 0.005) and overall survival (HR: 2.1; P = 0.006). Longitudinal comparison of diagnostic vs minimal-residual-disease samples (n = 40) unraveled that in 20% of patients, less-differentiated PCs subclones become enriched after therapy-induced pressure. We also revealed that CD81 expression is epigenetically regulated, that less-differentiated clonal PCs retain high expression of genes related to preceding B-cell stages (for example: PAX5), and show distinct mutation profile vs fully differentiated PC clones within individual patients. Together, we shed new light into PC plasticity and demonstrated that MM patients harbouring less-differentiated PCs have dismal survival, which might be related to higher chemoresistant potential plus different molecular and genomic profiles. PMID:27479184

  8. Distinct T helper cell dependence of memory B-cell proliferation versus plasma cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zabel, Franziska; Fettelschoss, Antonia; Vogel, Monique; Johansen, Pål; Kündig, Thomas M; Bachmann, Martin F

    2017-03-01

    Several memory B-cell subclasses with distinct functions have been described, of which the most effective is the class-switched (CS) memory B-cell population. We have previously shown, using virus-like particles (VLPs), that the proliferative potential of these CS memory B cells is limited and they fail to re-enter germinal centres (GCs). However, VLP-specific memory B cells quickly differentiated into secondary plasma cells (PCs) with the virtue of elevated antibody production compared with primary PCs. Whereas the induction of VLP(+) memory B cells was strongly dependent on T helper cells, we were wondering whether re-stimulation of VLP(+) memory B cells and their differentiation into secondary PCs would also require T helper cells. Global absence of T helper cells led to strongly impaired memory B cell proliferation and PC differentiation. In contrast, lack of interleukin-21 receptor-dependent follicular T helper cells or CD40 ligand signalling strongly affected proliferation of memory B cells, but differentiation into mature secondary PCs exhibiting increased antibody production was essentially normal. This contrasts with primary B-cell responses, where a strong dependence on CD40 ligand but limited importance of interleukin-21 receptor was seen. Hence, T helper cell dependence differs between primary and secondary B-cell responses as well as between memory B-cell proliferation and PC differentiation.

  9. Plasma cell differentiation is coupled to division-dependent DNA hypomethylation and gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bally, Alexander P.R.; Boss, Jeremy M.

    2016-01-01

    The epigenetic processes that regulate antibody secreting plasma cells are not well understood. Here, analysis of plasma cell differentiation revealed DNA hypomethylation of 10% of CpG loci that were overrepresented at enhancers. Inhibition of DNA methylation enhanced plasma cell commitment in a cell division-dependent manner. Examination of in vivo differentiating B cells stratified by cell division revealed a 5-fold increase in mRNA transcription coupled to DNA hypomethylation. Demethylation occurred first at binding motifs of NF-κB and AP-1 and later at those for IRF and Oct-2, and were coincident with activation and differentiation gene expression programs. These data provide mechanistic insight into the cell-division coupled transcriptional and epigenetic reprogramming and suggest DNA hypomethylation reflects the cis-regulatory history of plasma cell differentiation. PMID:27500631

  10. PAX-5 is invariably expressed in B-cell lymphomas without plasma cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dong, H Y; Browne, P; Liu, Z; Gangi, M

    2008-09-01

    The B-cell-specific transcription factor PAX-5 is physiologically expressed in normal B cells and silenced in plasma cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether PAX-5 expression is universal among B-cell malignancies. A wide spectrum of B-cell malignancies were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis for PAX-5 expression. The study was especially focused on cases lacking CD20, such as precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (preB-ALL), CD20- B-cell lymphomas, classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (CHL) and B-cell lymphomas with significant plasmacytic differentiation. Strong PAX-5 expression was identified, without exception, in all cases of CD20+ B-lymphoproliferative disorders. It was also invariably detected in 31/31 cases of preB-ALL, 14/14 cases of CD20- diffuse large B-cell lymphoma without plasmacytic differentiation and 26/26 CD20- B-cell lymphoma status post rituximab treatment. The vast majority of CHLs had unequivocal PAX-5 expression of varying intensity (80/86). However, variants of B-cell malignancies with characteristic plasmacytic differentiation exhibited no detectable PAX-5 expression (0/17). PAX-5 is the most sensitive and reliable immunohistochemical marker for B-cell malignancies. Lack of PAX-5 expression correlates with the presence of marked plasma cell differentiation.

  11. Atmospheric-pressure plasma-irradiation inhibits mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation to mesoderm and endoderm but promotes ectoderm differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Taichi; Hamaguchi, Satoshi; Nishihara, Shoko

    2016-04-01

    Recently, various effects of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma irradiation on living cells have been demonstrated, such as tissue sterilization, blood coagulation, angiogenesis, wound healing, and tumor elimination. However, the effect of plasma-irradiation on the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) has not yet been clarified. A large number of reactive species are generated by plasma-irradiation in medium, of which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the main species generated. Here, we investigated the effect of plasma-irradiation on the differentiation of mESCs using an embryoid body (EB) formation assay with plasma-irradiated medium or H2O2-supplemented non-irradiated medium. Our findings demonstrated that plasma-irradiated medium potently inhibits the differentiation from mESCs to mesoderm and endoderm by inhibiting Wnt signaling as determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting analyses. In contrast, both the plasma-irradiated medium and H2O2-supplemented non-irradiated medium enhanced the differentiation to epiblastoid, ectodermal, and neuronal lineages by activation of fibroblast growth factor 4 (FGF4) signaling, suggesting that these effects are caused by the H2O2 generated by plasma-irradiation in medium. However, in each case, the differentiation to glial cells remained unaffected. This study is the first demonstration that plasma-irradiation affects the differentiation of mESCs by the regulation of Wnt and FGF4 signaling pathways.

  12. Appearance of Human Plasma Cells Following Differentiation of Human B Cells in NOD/SCID Mouse Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Kentaro; Lian, Zhe-Xiong; He, Xiao-Song; Ansari, Aftab A.; Ishibashi, Miyuki; Miyakawa, Hiroshi; Shultz, Leonard D.; Ikehara, Susumu; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2003-01-01

    Relatively little is known for the differentiation and maturation process of human B cells to plasma cells. This is particularly important in reconstitution work involving transfer of autoantibodies. To address this issue, we transplanted human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) directly into the spleen of irradiated NOD/SCID mice depleted of natural killer cell activity. Within 6 weeks, naïve B cells differentiated into memory B cells and, importantly, the numbers of human CD138+ plasma cells in spleen increased by 100 fold after transplantation. Plasma cell numbers correlated with the detection of human IgM and IgG in serum, indicating that human B cells had differentiated into mature plasma cells in the murine spleen. In addition to CD19+ plasma cells, a distinct CD19- plasma cell population was detected, suggesting that downregulation of CD19 associated with maturation of plasma cells occurred. When purified human B cells were transplanted, those findings were not observed. Our results indicate that differentiation and maturation of human B cells and plasma cells can be investigated by transplantation of human PBMC into the spleen of NOD/SCID mice. The model will be useful for studying the differentiation of human B cells and generation of plasma cells. PMID:14768952

  13. The transcription factors IRF8 and PU.1 negatively regulate plasma cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Carotta, Sebastian; Willis, Simon N.; Hasbold, Jhagvaral; Inouye, Michael; Pang, Swee Heng Milon; Emslie, Dianne; Light, Amanda; Chopin, Michael; Shi, Wei; Wang, Hongsheng; Morse, Herbert C.; Tarlinton, David M.; Corcoran, Lynn M.; Hodgkin, Philip D.

    2014-01-01

    Activated B cells undergo immunoglobulin class-switch recombination (CSR) and differentiate into antibody-secreting plasma cells. The distinct transcriptomes of B cells and plasma cells are maintained by the antagonistic influences of two groups of transcription factors: those that maintain the B cell program, including BCL6 and PAX5, and plasma cell–promoting factors, such as IRF4 and BLIMP-1. We show that the complex of IRF8 and PU.1 controls the propensity of B cells to undergo CSR and plasma cell differentiation by concurrently promoting the expression of BCL6 and PAX5 and repressing AID and BLIMP-1. As the PU.1–IRF8 complex functions in a reciprocal manner to IRF4, we propose that concentration-dependent competition between these factors controls B cell terminal differentiation. PMID:25288399

  14. Skeletal cell differentiation is enhanced by atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Steinbeck, Marla J; Chernets, Natalie; Zhang, Jun; Kurpad, Deepa S; Fridman, Gregory; Fridman, Alexander; Freeman, Theresa A

    2013-01-01

    Enhancing chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation is of paramount importance in providing effective regenerative therapies and improving the rate of fracture healing. This study investigated the potential of non-thermal atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge plasma (NT-plasma) to enhance chondrocyte and osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. Although the exact mechanism by which NT-plasma interacts with cells is undefined, it is known that during treatment the atmosphere is ionized generating extracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) and an electric field. Appropriate NT-plasma conditions were determined using lactate-dehydrogenase release, flow cytometric live/dead assay, flow cytometric cell cycle analysis, and Western blots to evaluate DNA damage and mitochondrial integrity. We observed that specific NT-plasma conditions were required to prevent cell death, and that loss of pre-osteoblastic cell viability was dependent on intracellular ROS and RNS production. To further investigate the involvement of intracellular ROS, fluorescent intracellular dyes Mitosox (superoxide) and dihydrorhodamine (peroxide) were used to assess onset and duration after NT-plasma treatment. Both intracellular superoxide and peroxide were found to increase immediately post NT-plasma treatment. These increases were sustained for one hour but returned to control levels by 24 hr. Using the same treatment conditions, osteogenic differentiation by NT-plasma was assessed and compared to peroxide or osteogenic media containing β-glycerolphosphate. Although both NT-plasma and peroxide induced differentiation-specific gene expression, neither was as effective as the osteogenic media. However, treatment of cells with NT-plasma after 24 hr in osteogenic or chondrogenic media significantly enhanced differentiation as compared to differentiation media alone. The results of this study show that NT-plasma can selectively initiate and amplify ROS signaling to enhance

  15. Skeletal Cell Differentiation Is Enhanced by Atmospheric Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Kurpad, Deepa S.; Fridman, Gregory; Fridman, Alexander; Freeman, Theresa A.

    2013-01-01

    Enhancing chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation is of paramount importance in providing effective regenerative therapies and improving the rate of fracture healing. This study investigated the potential of non-thermal atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge plasma (NT-plasma) to enhance chondrocyte and osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. Although the exact mechanism by which NT-plasma interacts with cells is undefined, it is known that during treatment the atmosphere is ionized generating extracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) and an electric field. Appropriate NT-plasma conditions were determined using lactate-dehydrogenase release, flow cytometric live/dead assay, flow cytometric cell cycle analysis, and Western blots to evaluate DNA damage and mitochondrial integrity. We observed that specific NT-plasma conditions were required to prevent cell death, and that loss of pre-osteoblastic cell viability was dependent on intracellular ROS and RNS production. To further investigate the involvement of intracellular ROS, fluorescent intracellular dyes Mitosox (superoxide) and dihydrorhodamine (peroxide) were used to assess onset and duration after NT-plasma treatment. Both intracellular superoxide and peroxide were found to increase immediately post NT-plasma treatment. These increases were sustained for one hour but returned to control levels by 24 hr. Using the same treatment conditions, osteogenic differentiation by NT-plasma was assessed and compared to peroxide or osteogenic media containing β-glycerolphosphate. Although both NT-plasma and peroxide induced differentiation-specific gene expression, neither was as effective as the osteogenic media. However, treatment of cells with NT-plasma after 24 hr in osteogenic or chondrogenic media significantly enhanced differentiation as compared to differentiation media alone. The results of this study show that NT-plasma can selectively initiate and amplify ROS signaling to enhance

  16. Plasma treatment of biomaterials to direct the differentiation of embryonic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, Erik

    In this work, we explore how embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation patterns are affected by surface interactions with plasma-processed materials. We hypothesize that mouse embryonic stem-cell exposure to certain plasma-polymerized tetraglyme surfaces will direct their differentiation into endothelial cells. R1 mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells were plated on surfaces onto which tetraglyme was deposited by plasma polymerization. In addition, tissue-treated polystyrene and control glass cover slips were also examined. Some samples were fixed three days after plating and immunofluorescence stained with platelet endothelial-cell adhesion molecule, while the others were fixed seven days after plating and immunofluorescence stained with von Willebrand Factor. Positive results seen by ES cell derivatives precociously expressing the vWF and PECAM genetic markers on the plasma-polymerized tetraglyme treated surfaces suggest that the plasma-polymerized surfaces direct differentiation of ES cells into endothelial cells. Research goals of this dissertation include: characterization of the material properties of the plasma-polymerized tetraglyme surfaces that induce directed differentiation of ES cells into endothelial cells, optimization of the plasma-polymerization process to maximize the number of endothelial cells derived from R1 ES cells, and biological experimentation to characterize properties of the mechanism of directed differentiation. A potential application of this work is in the design and construction of an artificial blood vessel. Current small-scale arterial substitutes have proved inadequate because of thrombogenicity and infection. Moreover, the lower blood flow velocities of smaller vessels pose a different set of design criteria and introduce new problems not encountered in large arterial substitutes. By utilizing a tissue engineering approach that incorporates embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells, the longevity of the prosthesis can be ensured.

  17. [Proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in hydrogels of human blood plasma].

    PubMed

    Linero, Itali M; Doncel, Adriana; Chaparro, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    The use of mesenchymal stem cells in clinical practice has increased considerably in the last decade because they play a supporting role in the processes of tissue repair and regeneration, becoming the main tool of cell therapy for the treatment of diseases functionally affecting bone and cartilage tissue . To evaluate in vitro the proliferative and osteogenic differentiation ability of mesenchymal stem cells derived from human adipose tissue in a blood plasma hydrogel. Mesenchymal stem cells were obtained from human adipose tissue explants and characterized by flow cytometry. Their multipotentiality was demonstrated by their ability to differentiate to adipogenic and osteogenic lineages. Cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation ability of the cells cultured in blood plasma hydrogels were also evaluated. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from human adipose tissue growing in human blood plasma hydrogels showed a pattern of proliferation similar to that of the cells cultured in monolayer and also maintained their ability to differentiate to osteogenic lineage. Human blood plasma hydrogels are a suitable support for proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells derived from human adipose tissue and provides a substrate that is autologous, biocompatible, reabsorbable, easy to use, potentially injectable and economic, which could be used as a successful strategy for the management and clinical application of cell therapy in regenerative medicine.

  18. Gammaherpesvirus-driven plasma cell differentiation regulates virus reactivation from latently infected B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaozhen; Collins, Christopher M; Mendel, Justin B; Iwakoshi, Neal N; Speck, Samuel H

    2009-11-01

    Gammaherpesviruses chronically infect their host and are tightly associated with the development of lymphoproliferative diseases and lymphomas, as well as several other types of cancer. Mechanisms involved in maintaining chronic gammaherpesvirus infections are poorly understood and, in particular, little is known about the mechanisms involved in controlling gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells in vivo. Recent evidence has linked plasma cell differentiation with reactivation of the human gammaherpesviruses EBV and KSHV through induction of the immediate-early viral transcriptional activators by the plasma cell-specific transcription factor XBP-1s. We now extend those findings to document a role for a gammaherpesvirus gene product in regulating plasma cell differentiation and thus virus reactivation. We have previously shown that the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) gene product M2 is dispensable for virus replication in permissive cells, but plays a critical role in virus reactivation from latently infected B cells. Here we show that in mice infected with wild type MHV68, virus infected plasma cells (ca. 8% of virus infected splenocytes at the peak of viral latency) account for the majority of reactivation observed upon explant of splenocytes. In contrast, there is an absence of virus infected plasma cells at the peak of latency in mice infected with a M2 null MHV68. Furthermore, we show that the M2 protein can drive plasma cell differentiation in a B lymphoma cell line in the absence of any other MHV68 gene products. Thus, the role of M2 in MHV68 reactivation can be attributed to its ability to manipulate plasma cell differentiation, providing a novel viral strategy to regulate gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells. We postulate that M2 represents a new class of herpesvirus gene products (reactivation conditioners) that do not directly participate in virus replication, but rather facilitate virus reactivation by

  19. A balance between B cell receptor and inhibitory receptor signaling controls plasma cell differentiation by maintaining optimal Ets1 levels.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Mayeux, Jessica; Gutierrez, Toni; Russell, Lisa; Getahun, Andrew; Müller, Jennifer; Tedder, Thomas; Parnes, Jane; Rickert, Robert; Nitschke, Lars; Cambier, John; Satterthwaite, Anne B; Garrett-Sinha, Lee Ann

    2014-07-15

    Signaling through the BCR can drive B cell activation and contribute to B cell differentiation into Ab-secreting plasma cells. The positive BCR signal is counterbalanced by a number of membrane-localized inhibitory receptors that limit B cell activation and plasma cell differentiation. Deficiencies in these negative signaling pathways may cause autoantibody generation and autoimmune disease in both animal models and human patients. We have previously shown that the transcription factor Ets1 can restrain B cell differentiation into plasma cells. In this study, we tested the roles of the BCR and inhibitory receptors in controlling the expression of Ets1 in mouse B cells. We found that Ets1 is downregulated in B cells by BCR or TLR signaling through a pathway dependent on PI3K, Btk, IKK2, and JNK. Deficiencies in inhibitory pathways, such as a loss of the tyrosine kinase Lyn, the phosphatase Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP1) or membrane receptors CD22 and/or Siglec-G, result in enhanced BCR signaling and decreased Ets1 expression. Restoring Ets1 expression in Lyn- or SHP1-deficient B cells inhibits their enhanced plasma cell differentiation. Our findings indicate that downregulation of Ets1 occurs in response to B cell activation via either BCR or TLR signaling, thereby allowing B cell differentiation and that the maintenance of Ets1 expression is an important function of the inhibitory Lyn → CD22/SiglecG → SHP1 pathway in B cells.

  20. Autophagy, a new determinant of plasma cell differentiation and antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Cenci, Simone

    2014-12-01

    Plasma cells, the terminal effectors of the B lymphoid lineage, are responsible for the humoral arm of adaptive immunity. Their differentiation from B cells entails a profound cellular reshaping inherently associated with stress. Autophagy is a conserved adaptive cellular strategy recently implicated in differentiation and immunity. We identified a novel autophagic function in plasma cells. Autophagy restricts the expression of the transcriptional repressor Blimp-1 and immunoglobulins through a selective negative control on the endoplasmic reticulum and its stress signaling response, thereby optimizing energy and viability. As a result, autophagy in vivo sustains antibody responses, and is an essential intrinsic determinant of the bone marrow long-lived plasma cell niche. Here, I discuss several immune and biomedical implications, and experimental issues to be addressed in the near future. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma shows epigenetic features of abortive plasma cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Volkhard; Thomas, Philippe E.; Zimmermann, Karin; Paul, Ulrike; Ehlers, Anke; Joosten, Maria; Dimitrova, Lora; Lenze, Dido; Sommerfeld, Anke; Oker, Elisabeth; Leser, Ulf; Stein, Harald; Hummel, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background Epigenetic changes are involved in the extinction of the B-cell gene expression program of classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma. However, little is known regarding epigenetic similarities between cells of classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma and plasma cell myeloma, both of which share extinction of the gene expression program of mature B cells. Design and Methods Global histone H3 acetylation patterns were determined in cell lines derived from classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma, plasma cell myeloma and B-cell lymphoma by chromatin immunoprecipitation and subsequent hybridization onto promoter tiling arrays. H3K27 trimethylation was analyzed by chromatin immunoprecipitation and real-time DNA polymerase chain reaction for selected genes. Epigenetic modifications were compared to gene expression data. Results Characteristic B-cell genes were hypoacetylated in classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma and plasma cell myeloma cell lines as demonstrated by comparison of their histone H3 acetylation patterns to those of B-cell lines. However, the number of genes jointly hyperacetylated and expressed in classical Hodgkin’ lymphoma and plasma cell myeloma cell lines, such as IRF4/MUM1 and RYBP, is limited. Moreover, H3K27 trimethylation for selected characteristic B-cell genes revealed that this additional epigenetic silencing is much more prevalent in classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma than in plasma cell myeloma. Conclusions Our epigenetic data support the view that classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma is characterized by abortive plasma cell differentiation with a down-regulation of characteristic B-cell genes but without activation of most genes typical of plasma cells. PMID:21393330

  2. Production of nitric oxide using a microwave plasma torch and its application to fungal cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Young Ho; Kumar, Naresh; Kang, Min-Ho; Cho, Guang Sup; Choi, Eun Ha; Park, Gyungsoon; Uhm, Han Sup

    2015-03-01

    The generation of nitric oxide by a microwave plasma torch is proposed for its application to cell differentiation. A microwave plasma torch was developed based on basic kinetic theory. The analytical theory indicates that nitric oxide density is nearly proportional to oxygen molecular density and that the high-temperature flame is an effective means of generating nitric oxide. Experimental data pertaining to nitric oxide production are presented in terms of the oxygen input in units of cubic centimeters per minute. The apparent length of the torch flame increases as the oxygen input increases. The various levels of nitric oxide are observed depending on the flow rate of nitrogen gas, the mole fraction of oxygen gas, and the microwave power. In order to evaluate the potential of nitric oxide as an activator of cell differentiation, we applied nitric oxide generated from the microwave plasma torch to a model microbial cell (Neurospora crassa: non-pathogenic fungus). Germination and hyphal differentiation of fungal cells were not dramatically changed but there was a significant increase in spore formation after treatment with nitric oxide. In addition, the expression level of a sporulation related gene acon-3 was significantly elevated after 24 h upon nitric oxide treatment. Increase in the level of nitric oxide, nitrite and nitrate in water after nitric oxide treatment seems to be responsible for activation of fungal sporulation. Our results suggest that nitric oxide generated by plasma can be used as a possible activator of cell differentiation and development.

  3. Plasma cell and terminal B-cell differentiation in mantle cell lymphoma mainly occur in the SOX11-negative subtype.

    PubMed

    Ribera-Cortada, Inmaculada; Martinez, Daniel; Amador, Virginia; Royo, Cristina; Navarro, Alba; Beà, Silvia; Gine, Eva; de Leval, Laurence; Serrano, Sergio; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Colomer, Dolors; Martinez, Antonio; Campo, Elías

    2015-11-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma is a mature lymphoid neoplasm characterized by the t(11;14)(q13;q32) and cyclin D1 overexpression. SOX11 is a transcription factor commonly overexpressed in these tumors but absent in most other mature B-cell lymphomas whose function is not well understood. Experimental studies have shown that silencing of SOX11 in mantle cell lymphoma cells promotes the shift from a mature B cell into an early plasmacytic differentiation phenotype, suggesting that SOX11 may contribute to tumor development by blocking the B-cell differentiation program. The relationship between SOX11 expression and terminal B-cell differentiation in primary mantle cell lymphoma and its relationship to the plasmacytic differentiation observed in occasional cases is not known. In this study we have investigated the terminal B-cell differentiation phenotype in 60 mantle cell lymphomas, 41 SOX11-positive and 19 SOX11-negative. Monotypic plasma cells and lymphoid cells with plasmacytic differentiation expressing cyclin D1 were observed in 7 (37%) SOX11-negative but in none of 41 SOX11-positive mantle cell lymphomas (P<0.001). Intense cytoplasmic expression of a restricted immunoglobulin light chain was significantly more frequent in SOX11-negative than -positive tumors (58 vs 13%) (P=0.001). Similarly, BLIMP1 and XBP1 expression was also significantly more frequent in SOX11-negative than in -positive cases (83 vs 34% and 75 vs 11%, respectively) (P=0.001). However, no differences in the expression of IRF4/MUM1 were observed among these subtypes of mantle cell lymphoma. In conclusion, these results indicate that SOX11-negative mantle cell lymphoma may be a particular subtype of this tumor characterized by more frequent morphological and immunophenotypic terminal B-cell differentiation features that may be facilitated by the absence of SOX11 transcription factor.

  4. Exogenous nitric oxide (NO) generated by NO-plasma treatment modulates osteoprogenitor cells early differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsaadany, Mostafa; Subramanian, Gayathri; Ayan, Halim; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we investigated whether nitric oxide (NO) generated using a non-thermal plasma system can mediate osteoblastic differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells without creating toxicity. Our objective was to create an NO delivery mechanism using NO-dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma that can generate and transport NO with controlled concentration to the area of interest to regulate osteoprogenitor cell activity. We built a non-thermal atmospheric pressure DBD plasma nozzle system based on our previously published design and similar designs in the literature. The electrical and spectral analyses demonstrated that N2 dissociated into NO under typical DBD voltage-current characteristics. We treated osteoprogenitor cells (MC3T3-E1) using NO-plasma treatment system. Our results demonstrated that we could control NO concentration within cell culture media and could introduce NO into the intracellular space using NO-plasma treatment with various treatment times. We confirmed that NO-plasma treatment maintained cell viability and did not create any toxicity even with prolonged treatment durations. Finally, we demonstrated that NO-plasma treatment induced early osteogenic differentiation in the absence of pro-osteogenic growth factors/proteins. These findings suggest that through the NO-plasma treatment system we are able to generate and transport tissue-specific amounts of NO to an area of interest to mediate osteoprogenitor cell activity without subsequent toxicity. This opens up the possibility to develop DBD plasma-assisted tissue-specific NO delivery strategies for therapeutic intervention in the prevention and treatment of bone diseases.

  5. CTCF orchestrates the germinal centre transcriptional program and prevents premature plasma cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-García, Arantxa; Marina-Zárate, Ester; Álvarez-Prado, Ángel F.; Ligos, Jose M.; Galjart, Niels; Ramiro, Almudena R.

    2017-01-01

    In germinal centres (GC) mature B cells undergo intense proliferation and immunoglobulin gene modification before they differentiate into memory B cells or long-lived plasma cells (PC). GC B-cell-to-PC transition involves a major transcriptional switch that promotes a halt in cell proliferation and the production of secreted immunoglobulins. Here we show that the CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is required for the GC reaction in vivo, whereas in vitro the requirement for CTCF is not universal and instead depends on the pathways used for B-cell activation. CTCF maintains the GC transcriptional programme, allows a high proliferation rate, and represses the expression of Blimp-1, the master regulator of PC differentiation. Restoration of Blimp-1 levels partially rescues the proliferation defect of CTCF-deficient B cells. Thus, our data reveal an essential function of CTCF in maintaining the GC transcriptional programme and preventing premature PC differentiation. PMID:28677680

  6. Viral particles drive rapid differentiation of memory B cells into secondary plasma cells producing increased levels of antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zabel, Franziska; Mohanan, Deepa; Bessa, Juliana; Link, Alexander; Fettelschoss, Antonia; Saudan, Philippe; Kündig, Thomas M; Bachmann, Martin F

    2014-06-15

    Extensive studies have been undertaken to describe naive B cells differentiating into memory B cells at a cellular and molecular level. However, relatively little is known about the fate of memory B cells upon Ag re-encounter. We have previously established a system based on virus-like particles (VLPs), which allows tracking of VLP-specific B cells by flow cytometry as well as histology. Using allotype markers, it is possible to adoptively transfer memory B cells into a naive mouse and track responses of naive and memory B cells in the same mouse under physiological conditions. We have observed that VLP-specific memory B cells quickly differentiated into plasma cells that drove the early onset of a strong humoral IgG response. However, neither IgM(+) nor IgG(+) memory B cells proliferated extensively or entered germinal centers. Remarkably, plasma cells derived from memory B cells preferentially homed to the bone marrow earlier and secreted increased levels of Abs when compared with primary plasma cells derived from naive B cells. Hence, memory B cells have the unique phenotype to differentiate into highly effective secondary plasma cells.

  7. The effect of plasma-nitrided titanium surfaces on osteoblastic cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Emanuela P; Sa, Juliana C; de Oliveira, Paulo T; Alves, Clodomiro; Beloti, Marcio M; Rosa, Adalberto L

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of new plasma-nitrided Ti surfaces on the progression of osteoblast cultures, including cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. Ti surfaces were treated using two plasma-nitriding protocols, hollow cathode for 3 h (HC 3 h) and 1 h (HC 1 h) and planar for 1 h. Untreated Ti surfaces were used as control. Cells derived from human alveolar and rat calvarial bones were cultured on Ti surfaces for periods of up to 14 days and the following parameters were evaluated: cell morphology, adhesion, spreading and proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, extracellular matrix mineralization, and gene expression of key osteoblast markers. Plasma-nitriding treatments resulted in Ti surfaces with distinct physicochemical characteristics. The cell adhesion and ALP activity were higher on plasma-nitrided Ti surfaces compared with untreated one, whereas cell proliferation and extracellular matrix mineralization were not affected by the treatments. In addition, the plasma-nitrided Ti surfaces increased the ALP, reduced the osteocalcin and did not affect the Runx2 gene expression. We have shown that HC 3 h and planar Ti surfaces slightly favored the osteoblast differentiation process, and then these surfaces should be considered for further investigation using preclinical models. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Application of atmospheric plasma sources in growth and differentiation of plant and mammalian stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puac, Nevena

    2014-10-01

    The expansion of the plasma medicine and its demand for in-vivo treatments resulted in fast development of various plasma devices that operate at atmospheric pressure. These sources have to fulfill all demands for application on biological samples. One of the sources that meet all the requirements needed for treatment of biological material is plasma needle. Previously, we have used this device for sterilization of planctonic samples of bacteria, MRSA biofilm, for improved differentiation of human periodontal stem cells into osteogenic line and for treatment of plant meristematic cells. It is well known that plasma generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that strongly affect metabolism of living cells. One of the open issues is to correlate external plasma products (electrons, ions, RNS, ROS, photons, strong fields etc.) with the immediate internal response which triggers or induces effects in the living cell. For that purpose we have studied the kinetics of enzymes which are typical indicators of the identity of reactive species from the plasma created environment that can trigger signal transduction in the cell and ensue cell activity. In collaboration with Suzana Zivkovicm, Institute for Biological Research ``Sinisa Stankovic,'' University of Belgrade; Nenad Selakovic, Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade; Milica Milutinovic, Jelena Boljevic, Institute for Biological Research ``Sinisa Stankovic,'' University of Belgrade; and Gordana Malovic, Zoran Lj. Petrovic, Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade. Grants III41011, ON171037 and ON173024, MESTD, Serbia.

  9. Differential effects of plasma membrane electric excitation on H+ fluxes and photosynthesis in characean cells.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, Alexander A; Kamzolkina, Natalia A

    2006-10-01

    Cells of characean algae exposed to illumination arrange plasma-membrane H(+) fluxes and photosynthesis in coordinated spatial patterns (bands). This study reveals that H(+) transport and photosynthesis patterns in these excitable cells are affected not only by light conditions but also by electric excitation of the plasma membrane. It is shown that generation of action potential (AP) temporally eliminates alkaline bands, suppresses O(2) evolution, and differentially affects primary reactions of photosystem II (PSII) in different cell regions. The quantum yield of PSII electron transport decreased after AP in the alkaline but not in acidic cell regions. The effects of electric excitation on fluorescence and the PSII electron flow were most pronounced at light-limiting conditions. Evidence was obtained that the shift in chlorophyll fluorescence after AP is due to the increase in DeltapH at thylakoid membranes. It is concluded that the AP-triggered pathways affecting ion transport and photosynthetic energy conversion are linked but not identical.

  10. A balance between BCR and inhibitory receptor signaling controls plasma cell differentiation by maintaining optimal Ets1 levels1

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei; Mayeux, Jessica; Gutierrez, Toni; Russell, Lisa; Getahun, Andrew; Müller, Jennifer; Tedder, Thomas; Parnes, Jane; Rickert, Robert; Nitschke, Lars; Cambier, John; Garrett-Sinha, Lee Ann

    2014-01-01

    Signaling through the B cell receptor (BCR) can drive B cell activation and contribute to B cell differentiation into antibody-secreting plasma cells. The positive BCR signal is counterbalanced by a number of membrane-localized inhibitory receptors that limit B cell activation and plasma cell differentiation. Deficiencies in these negative signaling pathways may cause autoantibody generation and autoimmune disease in both animal models and human patients. We have previously shown that the transcription factor Ets1 can restrain B cell differentiation into plasma cells. Here, we tested the roles of the BCR and inhibitory receptors in controlling the expression of Ets1 in mouse B cells. We found that Ets1 is down regulated in B cells by BCR or TLR signaling through a pathway dependent on PI3 kinase, Btk, IKK2 and JNK. Deficiencies in inhibitory pathways, such as a loss of the tyrosine kinase Lyn, the phosphatase SHP1 or membrane receptors CD22 and/or Siglec-G, result in enhanced BCR signaling and decreased Ets1 expression. Restoring Ets1 expression in Lyn- or SHP1-deficient B cells inhibits their enhanced plasma cell differentiation. Our findings indicate that downregulation of Ets1 occurs in response to B cell activation via either BCR or TLR signaling thereby allowing B cell differentiation and that the maintenance of Ets1 expression is an important function of the inhibitory Lyn → CD22/SiglecG → SHP1 pathway in B cells. PMID:24929000

  11. Mast cells enhance proliferation of B lymphocytes and drive their differentiation toward IgA-secreting plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Merluzzi, Sonia; Frossi, Barbara; Gri, Giorgia; Parusso, Serena; Tripodo, Claudio; Pucillo, Carlo

    2010-04-08

    The evidence of a tight spatial interaction between mast cells (MCs) and B lymphocytes in secondary lymphoid organs, along with the data regarding the abundance of MCs in several B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders prompted us to investigate whether MCs could affect the proliferation and differentiation of B cells. To this aim, we performed coculture assays using mouse splenic B cells and bone marrow-derived MCs. Both nonsensitized and activated MCs proved able to induce a significant inhibition of cell death and an increase in proliferation of naive B cells. Such proliferation was further enhanced in activated B cells. This effect relied on cell-cell contact and MC-derived interleukin-6 (IL-6). Activated MCs could regulate CD40 surface expression on unstimulated B cells and the interaction between CD40 with CD40 ligand (CD40L) on MCs, together with MC-derived cytokines, was involved in the differentiation of B cells into CD138(+) plasma cells and in selective immunoglobulin A (IgA) secretion. These data were corroborated by in vivo evidence of infiltrating MCs in close contact with IgA-expressing plasma cells within inflamed tissues. In conclusion, we reported here a novel role for MCs in sustaining B-cell expansion and driving the development of IgA-oriented humoral immune responses.

  12. Power source effects of soft plasma jet and the differential response of skin cancer and normal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Nathaniel; Dobrynin, Danil; Fridman, Alexander; Choi, Eun Ha

    2014-10-01

    The effects of pulsed power direct current energy sources were compared using an indirect discharge plasma jet applied to treat cancerous and normal skin cells. Two power supplies with different voltage and current profiles were compared and optimized through the measurement of physical parameters and evaluated through the treatment of skin cells using an atmospheric pressure nitrogen gas plasma jet. Plasma density and temperature, power output, gas output temperature, and reactive species production were measured. Cell morphology, viability, and ROS generation were investigated using staining. A differential response has been shown between the normal and cancerous cell lines. The cancer cells viability reduced while normal cells did not over the same treatment time.

  13. Proliferation and differentiation of osteoblastic cells on titanium modified by ammonia plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; Li, Bin; Sun, Junying; Li, Hongwei; Wang, Bing; Zhang, Shailin

    2012-03-01

    We report here a new method of titanium surface modification through ammonia (NH3) plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technique and its effect on the cellular behaviors of MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells. The NH3 PIII-treated titanium substrates (NH3-Ti) were characterized by X-ray photoelectron (XPS), which showed that NH3-Ti had a nitrogen-rich surface. However, there was no significant difference between the surface morphology of NH3-Ti and unmodified Ti. When MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured on NH3-Ti substrates, it was found that cell proliferation was accelerated at 4 and 7 days of culture. Meanwhile, cell differentiation was evaluated using type I collagen (COL I), osteocalcin (OC) and bone sialoprotein (BSP) as differentiation markers. It was found that expression of COL I and OC genes was up-regulated on NH3-Ti substrates. However, no significant difference was found in BSP gene expression between NH3-Ti and unmodified Ti substrates. Therefore, findings from this study indicate that surface modification of titanium through NH3 PIII favors osteoblastic proliferation and differentiation and as a result, it may be used to improve the biocompatibility of Ti implants in vivo.

  14. Differential effects of platelet rich plasma and washed platelets on the proliferation of mouse MSC cells.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jianmin; Kuang, Wei; Tan, Jiali; Li, Hongtao; Zhang, Yi; Hirotaka, Kikuchi; Tadashi, Katayama

    2011-04-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapies are being tested clinically for a variety of disorders. However, despite the remarkable clinical advancements in this field, most applications still use traditional culture media containing fetal bovine serum. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) appears as a novel application for tissue engineering and its effect on bone healing is thought to be mainly dependent on the proliferation promoting function, with the molecular mechanisms largely unknown. In this study, mouse osteogenic progenitor mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were cultured in PRP or washed platelet (WPLT)-treated wells or in untreated wells, and analyzed on cycloxygenase 2 (COX2) expression (qRT-PCR), cell growth (MTT assay) and cell differentiation (alkaline phosphatase activity). The results showed that PRP and WPLT stimulated cell growth similarly in the first 6 days, together with the steady induction of COX2 and PGE2. 10 μmol/l celecoxib (an inhibitor of COX2) significantly inhibited the pro-proliferation effects. Interestingly, WPLT had stronger effects than PRP in proliferation at the later time points (6-9 days). ALP activity assay and collagen 1a expression revealed PRP had a mild but statistically significant pro-differentiation effect, while no obvious effects observed in WLPT group. In summary, PRP stimulates initial growth of MSCs in a COX2 partially dependent manner and the less obvious osteogenic differentiation promoting effects of WPLT strongly indicates WPLT rather than the PRP should be the optional choice for expanding MSCs in vitro for clinical use.

  15. The effect of platelet-rich plasma on the differentiation of synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon Kyu; Lee, Sahnghoon; Han, Sun Ae; Seong, Sang Cheol; Lee, Myung Chul

    2014-10-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP), the plasma portion of blood with a high platelet concentration, has been reported to be helpful in stem cell chondrogenesis due to large amount of growth factors it contains. Here, we examined the influence of PRP on the differentiation of synovium-derived stem cells (SDSCs) and also evaluated if PRP alone was sufficient to induce SDSCs differentiation. First, the cell proliferation in various differentiation media was analyzed using the MTT assay and it was significantly higher in groups cultured with media that contained PRP. Then, We performed Safranin-O staining and type I, II, and X collagen immunohistochemistry (chondrogenesis), von Kossa staining (osteogenesis), and Oil Red O staining (adipogenesis). The staining was most prominent in groups cultured with optimized differentiation media without PRP in all three lineages of differentiation. The mRNA expression levels of typical differentiation markers were also analyzed using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Although, culture in optimized differentiation media increased the mRNA expression of the typical differentiation marker genes, they were significantly reduced when cultured in the media supplemented with PRP. PRP has negative effects on SDSC differentiation in all three differentiation lineages and PRP alone does not induce SDSC differentiation. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The BTB-ZF transcription factor Zbtb20 is driven by Irf4 to promote plasma cell differentiation and longevity

    PubMed Central

    Chevrier, Stéphane; Emslie, Dianne; Shi, Wei; Kratina, Tobias; Wellard, Cameron; Karnowski, Alexander; Erikci, Erdem; Smyth, Gordon K.; Chowdhury, Kamal; Tarlinton, David

    2014-01-01

    The transcriptional network regulating antibody-secreting cell (ASC) differentiation has been extensively studied, but our current understanding is limited. The mechanisms of action of known “master” regulators are still unclear, while the participation of new factors is being revealed. Here, we identify Zbtb20, a Bcl6 homologue, as a novel regulator of late B cell development. Within the B cell lineage, Zbtb20 is specifically expressed in B1 and germinal center B cells and peaks in long-lived bone marrow (BM) ASCs. Unlike Bcl6, an inhibitor of ASC differentiation, ectopic Zbtb20 expression in primary B cells facilitates terminal B cell differentiation to ASCs. In plasma cell lines, Zbtb20 induces cell survival and blocks cell cycle progression. Immunized Zbtb20-deficient mice exhibit curtailed humoral responses and accelerated loss of antigen-specific plasma cells, specifically from the BM pool. Strikingly, Zbtb20 induction does not require Blimp1 but depends directly on Irf4, acting at a newly identified Zbtb20 promoter in ASCs. These results identify Zbtb20 as an important player in late B cell differentiation and provide new insights into this complex process. PMID:24711583

  17. A Temporal Switch in the Germinal Center Determines Differential Output of Memory B and Plasma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weisel, Florian J; Zuccarino-Catania, Griselda; Chikina, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary There is little insight into or agreement about the signals that control differentiation of memory B cells (MBC) and long-lived plasma cells (LLPC). By performing BrdU pulse-labeling studies, we found that MBC formation preceded the formation of LLPC in an adoptive transfer immunization system, which allowed for a synchronized Ag-specific response with homogeneous Ag-receptor, yet at natural precursor frequencies. We confirmed observations in wild type (WT) mice and extended them with germinal center (GC) disruption experiments and variable region gene sequencing. We thus show that the GC response undergo a temporal switch in its output as it matures, revealing that the reaction engenders both MBC subsets with different immune effector function and, ultimately, LLPC at largely separate points in time. These data demonstrate the kinetics of the formation of the cells that provide stable humoral immunity and therefore have implications for autoimmunity, vaccine development, and for understanding long-term pathogen resistance. PMID:26795247

  18. RNA-binding protein hnRNPLL regulates mRNA splicing and stability during B-cell to plasma-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xing; Li, Bin; Rao, Anjana

    2015-04-14

    Posttranscriptional regulation is a major mechanism to rewire transcriptomes during differentiation. Heterogeneous nuclear RNA-binding protein LL (hnRNPLL) is specifically induced in terminally differentiated lymphocytes, including effector T cells and plasma cells. To study the molecular functions of hnRNPLL at a genome-wide level, we identified hnRNPLL RNA targets and binding sites in plasma cells through integrated Photoactivatable-Ribonucleoside-Enhanced Cross-Linking and Immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP) and RNA sequencing. hnRNPLL preferentially recognizes CA dinucleotide-containing sequences in introns and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs), promotes exon inclusion or exclusion in a context-dependent manner, and stabilizes mRNA when associated with 3' UTRs. During differentiation of primary B cells to plasma cells, hnRNPLL mediates a genome-wide switch of RNA processing, resulting in loss of B-cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl6) expression and increased Ig production--both hallmarks of plasma-cell maturation. Our data identify previously unknown functions of hnRNPLL in B-cell to plasma-cell differentiation and demonstrate that the RNA-binding protein hnRNPLL has a critical role in tuning transcriptomes of terminally differentiating B lymphocytes.

  19. Comparative proteomics reveals novel components at the plasma membrane of differentiated HepaRG cells and different distribution in hepatocyte- and biliary-like cells.

    PubMed

    Petrareanu, Catalina; Macovei, Alina; Sokolowska, Izabela; Woods, Alisa G; Lazar, Catalin; Radu, Gabriel L; Darie, Costel C; Branza-Nichita, Norica

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a human pathogen causing severe liver disease and eventually death. Despite important progress in deciphering HBV internalization, the early virus-cell interactions leading to infection are not known. HepaRG is a human bipotent liver cell line bearing the unique ability to differentiate towards a mixture of hepatocyte- and biliary-like cells. In addition to expressing metabolic functions normally found in liver, differentiated HepaRG cells support HBV infection in vitro, thus resembling cultured primary hepatocytes more than other hepatoma cells. Therefore, extensive characterization of the plasma membrane proteome from HepaRG cells would allow the identification of new cellular factors potentially involved in infection. Here we analyzed the plasma membranes of non-differentiated and differentiated HepaRG cells using nanoliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to identify the differences between the proteomes and the changes that lead to differentiation of these cells. We followed up on differentially-regulated proteins in hepatocytes- and biliary-like cells, focusing on Cathepsins D and K, Cyclophilin A, Annexin 1/A1, PDI and PDI A4/ERp72. Major differences between the two proteomes were found, including differentially regulated proteins, protein-protein interactions and intracellular localizations following differentiation. The results advance our current understanding of HepaRG differentiation and the unique properties of these cells.

  20. Comparative Proteomics Reveals Novel Components at the Plasma Membrane of Differentiated HepaRG Cells and Different Distribution in Hepatocyte- and Biliary-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Alisa G.; Lazar, Catalin; Radu, Gabriel L.; Darie, Costel C.; Branza-Nichita, Norica

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a human pathogen causing severe liver disease and eventually death. Despite important progress in deciphering HBV internalization, the early virus-cell interactions leading to infection are not known. HepaRG is a human bipotent liver cell line bearing the unique ability to differentiate towards a mixture of hepatocyte- and biliary-like cells. In addition to expressing metabolic functions normally found in liver, differentiated HepaRG cells support HBV infection in vitro, thus resembling cultured primary hepatocytes more than other hepatoma cells. Therefore, extensive characterization of the plasma membrane proteome from HepaRG cells would allow the identification of new cellular factors potentially involved in infection. Here we analyzed the plasma membranes of non-differentiated and differentiated HepaRG cells using nanoliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to identify the differences between the proteomes and the changes that lead to differentiation of these cells. We followed up on differentially-regulated proteins in hepatocytes- and biliary-like cells, focusing on Cathepsins D and K, Cyclophilin A, Annexin 1/A1, PDI and PDI A4/ERp72. Major differences between the two proteomes were found, including differentially regulated proteins, protein-protein interactions and intracellular localizations following differentiation. The results advance our current understanding of HepaRG differentiation and the unique properties of these cells. PMID:23977166

  1. Combination of platelet-rich plasma within periodontal ligament stem cell sheets enhances cell differentiation and matrix production.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiu; Li, Bei; Yuan, Lin; Dong, Zhiwei; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Han; Sun, Jin; Ge, Song; Jin, Yan

    2017-03-01

    The longstanding goal of periodontal therapy is to regenerate periodontal tissues. Although platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been gaining increasing popularity for use in the orofacial region, whether PRP is useful for periodontal regeneration is still unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a mixture of periodontal ligament stem cell (PDLSC) sheets and PRP promoted bone regeneration, one of the most important measurement indices of periodontal tissue regenerative capability in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we evaluated the effects of different doses of PRP on the differentiation of human PDLSCs. Then cell sheet formation, extracellular matrix deposition and osteogenic gene expression in response to different doses of PRP treatment during sheet grafting was investigated. Furthermore, we implanted PDLSC sheets treated with 1% PRP subcutaneously into immunocompromised mice to evaluate their bone-regenerative capability. The results revealed that 1% PRP significantly enhanced the osteogenic differentiation of PDLSCs. Based on the production of extracellular matrix proteins, the results of scanning electron microscopy and the expression of the osteogenic genes ALP, Runx2, Col-1 and OCN, the provision of 1% PRP for PDLSC sheets was the most effective PRP administration mode for cell sheet formation. The results of in vivo transplantation showed that 1% PRP-mediated PDLSC sheets exhibited better periodontal tissue regenerative capability than those obtained without PRP intervention. These data suggest that a suitable concentration of PRP stimulation may enhance extracellular matrix production and positively affect cell behaviour in PDLSC sheets. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Active suppression of major histocompatibility complex class II gene expression during differentiation from B cells to plasma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Latron, F.; Maffei, A.; Scarpellino, L.; Bernard, M.; Accolla, R.S. ); Jotterand-Bellomo, M. ); Strominger, J.L. )

    1988-04-01

    Constitutive expression of major histocompatibility complex class II genes is acquired very early in B-cell ontogeny and is maintained up to the B-cell blast stage. Terminal differentiation in plasma cells is, however, accompanied by a loss of class II gene expression. In B cells this gene system is under the control of several loci encoding transacting factors with activator function, one of which, the aIr-1 gene product, operates across species barriers. In this report human class II gene expression is shown to be extinguished in somatic cell hybrids between the human class II-positive B-cell line Raji and the mouse class-II negative plasmacytoma cell line P3-U1. Since all murine chromosomes are retained in these hybrids and no preferential segregation of a specific human chromosome is observed, the results are compatible with the presence of suppressor factors of mouse origin, operating across species barriers and inhibiting class II gene expression. Suppression seems to act at the level of transcription or accumulation of class II-specific mRNA, since no human, and very few murine, class II transcripts are detectable in the hybrids.

  3. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Enhance the Differentiation of Human Switched Memory B Lymphocytes into Plasma Cells in Serum-Free Medium

    PubMed Central

    Gervais-St-Amour, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The differentiation of human B lymphocytes into plasma cells is one of the most stirring questions with regard to adaptive immunity. However, the terminal differentiation and survival of plasma cells are still topics with much to be discovered, especially when targeting switched memory B lymphocytes. Plasma cells can migrate to the bone marrow in response to a CXCL12 gradient and survive for several years while secreting antibodies. In this study, we aimed to get closer to niches favoring plasma cell survival. We tested low oxygen concentrations and coculture with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from human bone marrow. Besides, all cultures were performed using an animal protein-free medium. Overall, our model enables the generation of high proportions of CD38+CD138+CD31+ plasma cells (≥50%) when CD40-activated switched memory B lymphocytes were cultured in direct contact with mesenchymal stem cells. In these cultures, the secretion of CXCL12 and TGF-β, usually found in the bone marrow, was linked to the presence of MSC. The level of oxygen appeared less impactful than the contact with MSC. This study shows for the first time that expanded switched memory B lymphocytes can be differentiated into plasma cells using exclusively a serum-free medium. PMID:27872867

  4. mTOR activation promotes plasma cell differentiation and bypasses XBP-1 for immunoglobulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Benhamron, Sandrine; Pattanayak, Shakti P; Berger, Michael; Tirosh, Boaz

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cells (PCs) are responsible for the secretion of antibodies. The development of fully functional PCs relies on the activation of the inositol-requiring enzyme 1/X-box binding protein 1 (IRE1/XBP-1) arm of the unfolded protein response (UPR). XBP-1-deficient PCs secrete antibodies poorly and exhibit distensions of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) promotes anabolic activities and is negatively regulated by the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Deletion of TSC1 renders mTOR hyperactive. To explore the relationship between mTOR and the UPR in PC development and function, mice with conditional deletions of XBP-1 and/or TSC1 in their B cell lineage were generated. Deletion of TSC1 enhanced Ig synthesis and promoted differentiation into PCs independently of XBP-1, as evidenced by comparison of TSC1/XBP-1 double-knockout (DKO) PCs to XBP-1 knockout (KO) PCs. The typical morphological abnormalities of the ER in XBP-1 KO PCs were alleviated in the DKO PCs. Expression profiling identified the glycoprotein Ly6C as an mTOR target. Ly6C expression contributed to the enhanced Ig secretion from DKO PCs. Our data reveal a functional overlap between mTOR and the UPR in promoting PC development. In addition to the classical mTOR role in promoting protein synthesis, the mechanism entails transcription regulation of accessory molecules, such as Ly6C. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Cold atmospheric plasma enhances osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Tominami, Kanako; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Sasaki, Shota; Mokudai, Takayuki; Kaneko, Toshiro; Niwano, Yoshimi

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the effects of cold atmospheric plasma on osteoblastic differentiation in pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. Plasma was irradiated directly to a culture medium containing plated cells for 5 s or 10 s. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity assay and alizarin red staining were applied to assess osteoblastic differentiation. The plasma-generated radicals were detected directly using an electron spin resonance-spin trapping technique. Results show that plasma irradiation under specific conditions increased ALP activity and enhanced mineralization, and demonstrated that the yield of radicals was increased in an irradiation-time-dependent manner. Appropriate plasma irradiation stimulated the osteoblastic differentiation of the cells. This process offers the potential of promoting bone regeneration.

  6. TACI is required for efficient plasma cell differentiation in response to T-independent type 2 antigens.

    PubMed

    Mantchev, George T; Cortesão, Catarina S; Rebrovich, Michelle; Cascalho, Marilia; Bram, Richard J

    2007-08-15

    The control of systemic infection by encapsulated microorganisms requires T-independent type II (TI-2) Ab responses to bacterial polysaccharides. To understand how such responses evolve, we explored the function of transmembrane activator calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI), a member of the TNFR family, required for TI-2 Ab production. Quasimonoclonal (QM) mice produce robust TI-2 responses to 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetate (NP)-Ficoll, owing to the high precursor frequency of NP-specific B cells in the marginal zone of the spleen. QM mice that lack TACI produce decreased numbers of IgM (2-fold) and IgG (1.6-fold) NP-specific ASCs, compared with TACI-positive QM mice in response to immunization with NP-Ficoll. Our studies indicate that TACI acts at a remote time from activation because TACI is not necessary for activation and proliferation of B cells both in vitro and in vivo. Instead, TACI-deficient QM B cells remained in the cell cycle longer than TACI-proficient QM cells and had impaired plasma cell differentiation in response to NP-Ficoll. We conclude that TACI has dual B cell-autonomous functions, inhibiting prolonged B cell proliferation and stimulating plasma cell differentiation, thus resolving the longstanding paradox that TACI may have both B cell-inhibitory and -stimulatory functions. By promoting plasma cell differentiation earlier during clonal expansion, TACI may decrease the chances of autoantibody production by somatic hypermutation of Ig genes in response to T-independent Ags.

  7. The agonists of TLR4 and 9 are sufficient to activate memory B cells to differentiate into plasma cells in vitro but not in vivo.

    PubMed

    Richard, Katharina; Pierce, Susan K; Song, Wenxia

    2008-08-01

    Memory B cells can persist for a lifetime and be reactivated to yield high affinity, isotype switched plasma cells. The generation of memory B cells by Ag immunization requires adjuvants that generally contain TLR agonists. However, requirements for memory B cell activation and the role of TLRs in this activation are not well understood. In this study, we analyzed the response of memory B cells from immunized mice to TLR9 and 4 agonists CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) and LPS. Mouse memory B cells express both TLR9 and 4, and respond to both CpG ODN and LPS in vitro by differentiating into high affinity IgG secreting plasma cells. In contrast, neither CpG ODN nor LPS alone is sufficient to activate memory B cells in vivo. Ag is required for the clonal expansion of Ag-specific memory B cells, the differentiation of memory B cells to high affinity IgG secreting plasma cells, and the recall of high affinity Ab responses. The Ag-specific B cells that have not yet undergone isotype switching showed a relatively higher expression of TLR4 than memory B cells, which was reflected in a heightened response to LPS, but in both cases yielded mostly low affinity IgM secreting plasma cells. Thus, although memory B cells are sensitive to TLR agonists in vitro, TLR agonists alone appear to have little affect on B cell memory in vivo.

  8. An analysis of myeloma plasma cell phenotype using antibodies defined at the IIIrd International Workshop on Human Leucocyte Differentiation Antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, N; Ling, N R; Ball, J; Bromidge, E; Nathan, P D; Franklin, I M

    1988-01-01

    Fresh bone marrow from 43 cases of myeloma and three cases of plasma cell leukaemia has been phenotyped both by indirect immune-rosetting and, on fixed cytospin preparations, by indirect immunofluorescence. Both clustered and unclustered B cell associated antibodies from the IIIrd International Workshop on Human Leucocyte Differentiation Antigens were used. The results confirm the lack of many pan-B antigens on the surface of myeloma plasma cells, i.e. CD19-23, 37, 39, w40. Strong surface reactivity is seen with CD38 antibodies and with one CD24 antibody (HB8). Weak reactions are sometimes obtained with CD9, 10 and 45R. On cytospin preparations CD37, 39 and w40 are sometimes weakly positive, and anti-rough endoplasmic reticulum antibodies are always strongly positive. Specific and surface-reacting antiplasma cell antibodies are still lacking. PMID:3048803

  9. The rise and fall of long-lived humoral immunity: terminal differentiation of plasma cells in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Brian P.; Gleeson, Michael W.; Noelle, Randolph J.; Erickson, Loren D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Long-lived humoral immune responses are a hallmark of thymus-dependent immunity. The cellular basis for enduring antibody-mediated immunity is long-lived memory B cells and plasma cells (PCs). Both of these cell populations acquire longevity as a result of antigen-specific, CD40–dependent, cognate interactions with helper T cells within germinal centers (GCs). At the molecular level, defined functional domains of CD40 control the post-GC fate of B cells. PC precursors that emerge from these GC reactions are highly proliferative and terminally differentiate to end-stage cells within the bone marrow (BM). The striking phenotypic similarities between the PC precursors and the putative malignant cell in multiple myeloma (MM) suggests that MM may result from the transformation of PC precursors. Within the domain of autoimmune disease, recent studies have shown that dysregulated migration of PCs to the BM may impact immune homeostasis and the development of lupus. Understanding the processes of normal PC differentiation will provide strategic insights into identifying therapeutic targets for the treatment of differentiated B-cell disorders. PMID:12846808

  10. Rat embryonic liver cell expansion and differentiation on NH3 plasma-grafted PEEK-WC-PU membranes.

    PubMed

    Pavlica, Sanja; Piscioneri, Antonella; Peinemann, Frank; Keller, Mario; Milosevic, Javorina; Staeudte, Andrea; Heilmann, Andreas; Schulz-Siegmund, Michaela; Laera, Stefania; Favia, Pietro; De Bartolo, Loredana; Bader, Augustinus

    2009-11-01

    Biomaterials can potentially influence stem and progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation in both a positive and a negative way. Herein, we report on the expansion and differentiation of rat embryonic (E17) liver (RLC-18) cells on new bioactive membrane made of PEEK-WC-PU, whose surface was grafted with nitrogen functionalities by means of NH(3) glow discharges. The performance of the developed membrane was evaluated by analyzing the expression of the liver specific functions of cells cultured in a 6-well gas-permeable bioreactor. It was found that native and NH(3) plasma-grafted PEEK-WC-PU membranes enabled expansion of liver cells in the bioreactor. Liver embryonic cells on the membranes exhibited higher functional activities compared to those cultured on conventional culture dishes as demonstrated by higher albumin and urea production. They showed gene expression of alpha-fetoprotein and albumin in a time-dependent manner of the hepatic differentiation process. LDH assay and SEM analyses revealed that a high number of viable liver stem cells attached to the membranes. Unexpectedly, liver progenitors cultured on membranes had higher telomerase activity than ones in the plates, preventing cell senescence. Thus, membranes are able to sustain in vitro the same in vivo liver functions and to allow the expansion of progenitor cells.

  11. Differentiation of cancer cell origin and molecular subtype by plasma membrane N-glycan profiling.

    PubMed

    Hua, Serenus; Saunders, Mary; Dimapasoc, Lauren M; Jeong, Seung Hyup; Kim, Bum Jin; Kim, Suhee; So, Minkyung; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Kim, Jae Han; Lam, Kit S; Lebrilla, Carlito B; An, Hyun Joo

    2014-02-07

    In clinical settings, biopsies are routinely used to determine cancer type and grade based on tumor cell morphology, as determined via histochemical or immunohistochemical staining. Unfortunately, in a significant number of cases, traditional biopsy results are either inconclusive or do not provide full subtype differentiation, possibly leading to inefficient or ineffective treatment. Glycomic profiling of the cell membrane offers an alternate route toward cancer diagnosis. In this study, isomer-sensitive nano-LC/MS was used to directly obtain detailed profiles of the different N-glycan structures present on cancer cell membranes. Membrane N-glycans were extracted from cells representing various subtypes of breast, lung, cervical, ovarian, and lymphatic cancer. Chip-based porous graphitized carbon nano-LC/MS was used to separate, identify, and quantify the native N-glycans. Structure-sensitive N-glycan profiling identified hundreds of glycan peaks per cell line, including multiple isomers for most compositions. Hierarchical clusterings based on Pearson correlation coefficients were used to quickly compare and separate each cell line according to originating organ and disease subtype. Based simply on the relative abundances of broad glycan classes (e.g., high mannose, complex/hybrid fucosylated, complex/hybrid sialylated, etc.), most cell lines were readily differentiated. More closely related cell lines were differentiated based on several-fold differences in the abundances of individual glycans. Based on characteristic N-glycan profiles, primary cancer origins and molecular subtypes could be distinguished. These results demonstrate that stark differences in cancer cell membrane glycosylation can be exploited to create an MS-based biopsy, with potential applications toward cancer diagnosis and direction of treatment.

  12. Identification of nucleotide pyrophosphatase/alkaline phosphodiesterase I activity associated with the mouse plasma cell differentiation antigen PC-1.

    PubMed Central

    Rebbe, N F; Tong, B D; Finley, E M; Hickman, S

    1991-01-01

    The protein responsible for both nucleotide pyrophosphatase (EC 3.6.1.9) and alkaline phosphodiesterase I (EC 3.1.4.1) activities was purified from MOPC 315 plasmacytoma cells. A single SDS/PAGE-purified 115-kDa protein band was used to produce a rabbit polyclonal antiserum. This antibody preparation precipitated alkaline phosphodiesterase I activity, indicating that the SDS/PAGE-purified protein was nucleotide pyrophosphatase/alkaline phosphodiesterase I. When used for Western blot analysis, the antiserum detected a 115-kDa protein as well as a 220-kDa protein band. Multiple overlapping cDNA clones were isolated from a cDNA expression library screened with this anti-nucleotide pyrophosphatase/alkaline phosphodiesterase I antiserum. Sequence analysis indicated that the isolated cDNA clones encoded PC-1, a murine plasma cell differentiation antigen. To confirm the suspected enzymatic identity of PC-1, a recombinant PC-1 fusion protein was expressed in bacteria, purified, and used to produce another rabbit polyclonal antiserum. This antiserum likewise immunoprecipitated alkaline phosphodiesterase I activity and recognized the 115-kDa and 220-kDa proteins in Western blot analyses of cell extracts. Furthermore, expression of nucleotide pyrophosphatase/alkaline phosphodiesterase I corresponded directly with mRNA and protein levels of PC-1 in cells known to express different levels of nucleotide pyrophosphatase/alkaline phosphodiesterase I activity. Finally, steroid induction of enzymatic activity was mirrored by levels of PC-1 mRNA and protein expression. Together, these data indicate that the plasma cell differentiation antigen PC-1 is a membrane-bound enzyme, nucleotide pyrophosphatase/alkaline phosphodiesterase I. Images PMID:1647027

  13. The role of non-thermal atmospheric pressure biocompatible plasma in the differentiation of osteoblastic precursor cells, MC3T3-E1.

    PubMed

    Han, Ihn; Choi, Eun Ha

    2017-05-30

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is ionized matter, composed of highly reactive species that include positive ions, negative ions, free radicals, neutral atoms, and molecules. Recent reports have suggested that non-thermal biocompatible plasma (NBP) can selectively kill a variety of cancer cells, and promote stem cell differentiation. However as of yet, the regulation of proliferation and differentiation potential of NBP has been poorly understood.Here, we investigated the effects of NBP on the osteogenic differentiation of precursor cell lines of osteoblasts, MC3T3 E1 and SaOS-2. For in vitro osteogenic differentiation, precursor cell lines were treated with NBP, and cultured with osteogenic induction medium. After 10 days of treatment, the NBP was shown to be effective in osteogenic differentiation in MC3T3 E1 cells by von Kossa and Alizarin Red S staining assay. Real-time PCR was then performed to investigate the expression of osteogenic specific genes, Runx2, OCN, COL1, ALP and osterix in MC3T3 E1 cells after treatment with NBP for 4 days. Furthermore, analysis of the protein expression showed that NBP treatment significantly reduced PI3K/AKT signaling and MAPK family signaling. However, p38 controlled phosphorylation of transcription factor forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) that related to cell differentiation with increased phosphorylated p38. These results suggest that non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma can induce osteogenic differentiation, and enhance bone formation.

  14. Partial plasma cell differentiation as a mechanism of lost major histocompatibility complex class II expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Sarah T; Vanpatten, Kristie A; Fernandez, Diane R; Brunhoeber, Patrick; Garsha, Karl E; Glinsmann-Gibson, Betty J; Grogan, Thomas M; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Rimsza, Lisa M

    2012-02-09

    Loss of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) expression is associated with poor patient outcome in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). As MHC II molecules are lost with plasmacytic differentiation in normal cells, we asked whether MHC II loss in DLBCL is associated with an altered differentiation state. We used gene expression profiling, quantum dots, and immunohistochemistry to study the relationship between MHC II and plasma cell markers in DLBCL and plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL). Results demonstrate that MHC II(-) DLBCL immunophenotypically overlap with PBL and demonstrate an inverse correlation between MHC II and plasma cell markers MUM1, PRDM1/Blimp1, and XBP1s. In addition, MHC II expression is significantly higher in germinal center-DLBCL than activated B cell-DLBCL. A minor subset of cases with an unusual pattern of mislocalized punctate MHC II staining and intermediate levels of mRNA is also described. Finally, we show that PBL is negative for MHC II. The results imply a spectrum of MHC II expression that is more frequently diminished in tumors derived from B cells at the later stages of differentiation (with complete loss in PBL). Our observations provide a possible unifying concept that may contribute to the poor outcome reported in all MHC II(-) B-cell tumors.

  15. Influence of platelet-rich plasma on proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of skeletal muscle satellite cells: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shengyun; Wang, Zuolin

    2010-10-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a new application of tissue engineering and a developing area for researchers and clinicians. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of PRP on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of skeletal muscle satellite cell (MSC) population and the ability of PRP to induce the production of some osteogeneic-related factors in vitro. The PRP was obtained from Sprague-Dawley rats using 2 centrifugation techniques. Primary cultures of rat MSCs were exposed to various concentrations of PRP (0.16 × 10(8), 0.625 × 10(8), and 2.5 × 10(8) thrombocytes/carrier) on MSC proliferation using an MTT proliferation assay. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, Alizarin red S (AR) staining, calcium analyses and real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of osteogenic-related genes were performed to study the effect of PRP on osteogenic differentiation of cultured MSCs population. The platelet concentration and growth factors (GFs) in our PRP preparations were significantly higher than in the whole blood. PRP showed a dose-dependent stimulation of cell proliferation. The maximum effect was achieved with a concentration of 0.625 × 10(8) thrombocytes/carrier. ALP activity, AR staining, and calcium analyses showed enhanced cell osteogenic differentiation in the PRP group. The real-time RT-PCR results showed that PRP up-regulated osteocalcin at day 14 and type I collagen and osteopontin at day 7 compared with the control group. The results of this study suggest that PRP containing osteoinductive GFs stimulates cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of rat-derived MSCs in vitro. Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Osteogenic differentiation of muscle satellite cells induced by platelet-rich plasma encapsulated in three-dimensional alginate scaffold.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shengyun; Jia, Shanshan; Liu, Guijun; Fang, Dong; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2012-11-01

    Osteogenic potential of muscle satellite cells (MSCs) makes them a possible source of seeding cells for bone tissue engineering. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs by encapsulation of PRP into 3-dimensional alginate hydrogel in vitro and in vivo. PRP was obtained from Sprague-Dawley rats using 2 centrifugation techniques. MSCs were expanded and differentiated in the presence or absence of PRP in monolayer and 3-dimensional cultures. Cell viability was evaluated with the use of an MTT proliferation assay after 1, 7, 14, and 21 days of stimulation. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, calcium deposition, and real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of osteogenic-related genes were performed to study the effects of PRP on osteogenic differentiation of cultured MSCs by encapsulation of PRP in alginate gel. For in vivo study, the PRP-MSCs-alginate gel mixture was implanted in subcutaneous pockets of nude mice to examine the ectopic bone formation at 2 weeks. After 1, 7, 14, and 21 days of stimulation, PRP significantly promoted MSC proliferation in PRP-alginate gel mixture cultures. ALP activity, calcium deposition, and real-time RT-PCR showed enhanced cell osteogenic differentiation in the PRP-alginate group. Histologic examination demonstrated that large amount of fibrous tissue capsule, collagen, and new vascular growth were detected in the PRP-MSCs-alginate group compared with the alginate and MSCs-alginate groups. The results of this study suggest that MSCs induced by PRP encapsulated in an alginate gel mixture can undergo induction into osteoblastic phenotype both in vitro and in vivo, which makes the production of PRP-enhanced tissue-engineered bone using MSCs possible. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Plasma B-Lymphocyte Stimulator (BLyS) and B-cell Differentiation in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Patients*

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jianmin; Kass, Daniel J.; Bon, Jessica; Vuga, Louis; Tan, Jiangning; Csizmadia, Eva; Otterbein, Leo; Soejima, Makoto; Levesque, Marc C.; Gibson, Kevin F.; Kaminski, Naftali; Pilewski, Joseph M.; Donahoe, Michael; Sciurba, Frank C.; Duncan, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    We hypothesized B-cells are involved in the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a progressive, restrictive lung disease that is refractory to glucocorticoids and other nonspecific therapies, and almost invariably lethal. Accordingly, we sought to identify clinically-associated B-cell-related abnormalities in these patients. Phenotypes of circulating B-cells were characterized by flow cytometry. Intrapulmonary processes were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Plasma B-lymphocyte stimulating factor (BLyS) was assayed by ELISA. Circulating B-cells of IPF subjects were more antigen-differentiated, with greater plasmablast proportions (3.1±0.8%) than in normal controls (1.3±0.3%) (p<0.03), and the extent of this differentiation correlated with IPF patient lung volumes (r=0.44, p<0.03). CD20+ B-cell aggregates, diffuse parenchymal and perivascular immune complexes, and complement depositions were all prevalent in IPF lungs, but much less prominent or absent in normal lungs. Plasma concentrations of BLyS, an obligate factor for B-cell survival and differentiation, were significantly greater (p<0.0001) in 110 IPF (2.05±0.05 ng/ml) than among 53 normal (1.40±0.04 ng/ml) and 90 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) subjects (1.59±0.05 ng/ml). BLyS levels were uniquely correlated among IPF patients with pulmonary artery pressures (r=0.58, p<0.0001). The 25% of IPF subjects with the greatest BLyS values also had diminished one-year survival (46±11%), compared to those with lesser BLyS concentrations (81±5%) (HR=4.0, 95%CI=1.8-8.7, p=0.0002). Abnormalities of B-cells and BLyS are common in IPF patients, and highly associated with disease manifestations and patient outcomes. These findings have implications regarding IPF pathogenesis, and illuminate the potential for novel treatment regimens that specifically target B-cells in patients with this lung disease. PMID:23872052

  18. Differential expression of SLAMS and other modulatory molecules by human plasma cells during normal maturation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Bayona, Beatriz; Ramos-Amaya, Ana; Brieva, José A

    2011-01-30

    Plasma cells (PCs) are specialized in antibody (Ab) production and they are, therefore, responsible for maintaining humoral immune responses. The human PC compartment is heterogeneous. PCs from inductive secondary lymphoid organs and from peripheral blood (PB) show less capability for prolonged survival and Ab production than bone marrow (BM) PCs, a pool consisting of fully mature cells. The HLDA9 workshop has allowed the use of labeled-monoclonal Abs (moAbs) recognizing a variety of recently identified lymphocyte modulatory surface receptors. In this study, flow cytometry analysis has been used to define the presence of these receptors on human PCs obtained from human tonsil (as an example of inductive organ), from PB and from BM. It was found that human PCs commonly expressed SLAMF1 (CD150), SLAMF2 (CD48), SLAMF3 (CD229), SLAMF6 (CD352) and SLAMF7 (CD319), but not SLAMF4 (CD244). In addition, PCs distinctively showed a low level of SLAMF5 (CD84) and a very high level of SLAMF7 expression in comparison with earlier stages of B cell maturation. All PC subsets exhibited a similar pattern of expression of SLAMF receptors suggesting a stage-dependent role for these proteins. In addition, most circulating PCs clearly expressed TNFRSF14 (CD270), BTLA (CD272), B7-1 (CD80) and B7-2 (CD86), and a substantial fraction of them were also positive for TNFRSF18 (CD357), FCRL1 (CD307a) and LAIR-1 (CD305). In contrast, tonsil and BM PCs only exhibited partial expression of TNFRSF14 and B7-2, a pattern of molecular expression similar to that detected on germinal center (GC) B cells. Present results indicate that human PCs exhibit a common pattern of SLAMF proteins, but differ in the rest of the receptors examined; this difference might be associated with their distinctive homing and functional requirements. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Differential Epigenetic Effects of Atmospheric Cold Plasma on MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung-Bin; Kim, Byungtak; Bae, Hansol; Lee, Hyunkyung; Lee, Seungyeon; Choi, Eun H.; Kim, Sun Jung

    2015-01-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (plasma) has emerged as a novel tool for a cancer treatment option, having been successfully applied to a few types of cancer cells, as well as tissues. However, to date, no studies have been performed to examine the effect of plasma on epigenetic alterations, including CpG methylation. In this study, the effects of plasma on DNA methylation changes in breast cancer cells were examined by treating cultured MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, representing estrogen-positive and estrogen-negative cancer cells, respectively, with plasma. A pyrosequencing analysis of Alu indicated that a specific CpG site was induced to be hypomethylated from 23.4 to 20.3% (p < 0.05) by plasma treatment in the estrogen-negative MDA-MB-231 cells only. A genome-wide methylation analysis identified “cellular movement, connective tissue development and function, tissue development” and “cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cell death and survival, cellular development” as the top networks. Of the two cell types, the MDA-MB-231 cells underwent a higher rate of apoptosis and a decreased proliferation rate upon plasma treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that plasma induces epigenetic and cellular changes in a cell type-specific manner, suggesting that a careful screening of target cells and tissues is necessary for the potential application of plasma as a cancer treatment option. PMID:26042423

  20. In multiple myeloma, only a single stage of neoplastic plasma cell differentiation can be identified by VLA-5 and CD45 expression.

    PubMed

    Rawstron, A C; Barrans, S L; Blythe, D; English, A; Richards, S J; Fenton, J A; Davies, F E; Child, J A; Jack, A S; Morgan, G J

    2001-06-01

    The nature of the proliferating fraction in myeloma is still not known and understanding the characteristics of this fraction is central to the development of effective novel therapies. However, myeloma plasma cells typically show a very low rate of proliferation and this complicates accurate analysis. Although the level of CD45 and/or VLA-5 has been reported to identify proliferating 'precursor' plasma cells, there are discrepancies between these studies. We have therefore used a rigorous sequential gating strategy to simultaneously analyse cycle status and immunophenotype with respect to CD45, VLA-5 and a range of other integrin molecules. In 11 presentation myeloma patients, the proliferative fraction was distributed evenly between CD45+ and CD45- cells, however, cycling plasma cells were consistently VLA-5-. There was close correlation between the expression of VLA-5 and a range of other integrin molecules (CD11a, CD11c, CD103), as well as the immunoglobulin-associated molecules CD79a/b (Spearman, n = 10, P < 0.0001). In short-term culture, cells that were initially VLA-5-showed increasing VLA-5 expression with time. However, simultaneous analysis of the DNA-binding dye 7-amino-actinomycin D demonstrated that this was not as a result of differentiation, as VLA-5+ plasma cells were all non-viable. This was confirmed in freshly explanted plasma cells from nine patients. Discrete stages of plasma cell differentiation could not be distinguished by the level of CD45 or VLA-5 expression. The results indicate that there is a single stage of plasma cell differentiation, with the phenotype CD38+CD138+VLA-5-. These findings support the hypothesis that neoplastic bone marrow plasma cells represent an independent, self-replenishing population.

  1. Simplified flow cytometric immunophenotyping panel for multiple myeloma, CD56/CD19/CD138(CD38)/CD45, to differentiate neoplastic myeloma cells from reactive plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Tae-Dong; Park, Chan-Jeoung; Shim, Hyoeun; Jang, Seongsoo; Chi, Hyun-Sook; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Kim, Dae-Young; Lee, Jung-Hee; Lee, Je-Hwan; Suh, Cheolwon; Lee, Kyoo Hyung

    2012-12-01

    Flow cytometric immunophenotyping has been used to identify neoplastic plasma cell populations in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Previous reports have described the use of several antigens, including CD38, CD138, CD56, CD117, CD52, CD19 and CD45, to distinguish distinct populations of plasma cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate a simplified immunophenotyping panel for MM analysis. A total of 70 patients were enrolled in the study, 62 of which were newly diagnosed with MM (untreated), whereas the remaining 8 were undergoing bone marrow assessment as part of follow-up after treatment (treated). Treated cases included 3 patients with relapse and 5 patients with persistence of MM. Multiparametric flow cytometric immunophenotyping was performed using monoclonal antibodies against CD56, CD19, CD138 (CD38), and CD45. In differential counts, plasma cells in bone marrow (BM) accounted for 3.6-93.2% of the total nucleated cell count. The positive expression rates of CD56, CD19, CD138, and CD45 in neoplastic myeloma cells were 83.9%, 0%, 98.4%, and 37.1%, respectively, among the 62 untreated cases, and 75.0%, 0%, 87.5%, and 37.5%, respectively, among the 8 treated cases. CD19 expression of neoplastic plasma cells was negative in both untreated and treated cases. The simplified immunophenotyping panel, CD56/CD19/CD138(CD38)/CD45, is useful for distinguishing neoplastic myeloma cells from reactive plasma cells in clinical practice. In addition, CD19 represents the most valuable antigen for identifying neoplastic myeloma cells in patients with MM.

  2. XBP1 governs late events in plasma cell differentiation and is not required for antigen-specific memory B cell development

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Derrick J.; McHeyzer-Williams, Louise J.; Kowal, Czeslawa; Lee, Ann-Hwee; Volpe, Bruce T.; Diamond, Betty; McHeyzer-Williams, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a stress response pathway that is driven by the increased load of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum of highly secretory cells such as plasma cells (PCs). X box binding protein 1 (XBP1) is a transcription factor that mediates one branch of the UPR and is crucial for the development of antibody-secreting PCs. PCs represent only one class of terminally differentiated B cells, however, and little is known about the role for XBP1 in the other class: memory B cells. We have developed an XBP1fl/fl CD19+/cre conditional knockout (XBP1CD19) mouse to build upon our current understanding of the function of XBP1 in PC differentiation as well as to explore the role of XBP1 in memory cell development. Using this model, we show that XBP1CD19 mice are protected from disease in an autoantibody-mediated mouse lupus model. We also identify a novel developmental stage at which B cells express the traditional PC marker CD138 (syndecan-1) but have yet to undergo XBP1-dependent functional and morphological differentiation into antibody-secreting cells. Finally, we show that memory B cells develop normally in XBP1CD19 mice, demonstrating that XBP1-mediated functions occur independently of any memory cell lineage commitment. PMID:19752183

  3. Commitment to differentiation of murine erythroleukemia cells involves a modulated plasma membrane depolarization through Ca2+-activated K+ channels.

    PubMed

    Arcangeli, A; Ricupero, L; Olivotto, M

    1987-09-01

    The role of the plasma membrane potential (delta psi p) in the commitment to differentiation of murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells has been studied by analyzing the ionic basis and the time course of this potential in the absence or the presence of different types of inducers. delta psi p was determined by measuring the distribution of tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP+) across the plasma membrane and displayed a 22-hour depolarization phase (from -28 to +5 mV) triggered by factors contained in foetal calf serum (FCS) and followed by a nearly symmetrical repolarization phase. After measuring the electrochemical equilibrium potential of Na+, K+, and Cl-, the relative contribution of these ions to delta psi p was evaluated by means of ion substitution experiments and by the addition of ion flux inhibitors (tetrodotoxin [TTX], 4-acetoamide-4'-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate [SITS]) and ionophores (Valinomycin, A23187). The Na+ contribution to delta psi p appeared negligible, the potential being essentially generated by K+ and Cl- fluxes. When evaluated by a new mathematical approach, the effects of Valinomycin and A23187 at different times of incubation provided evidence that both the depolarization and the repolarization phase were due to variations of the K+ permeability across the plasma membrane (PK) mediated by Ca2+-activated K+ channels. All the inducers tested (dimethylsulfoxide [DMSO], hexamethylen-bis-acetamide [HMBA], diazepam), although they did not modify the ionic basis of delta psi p, strongly attenuated the depolarization rate of this potential. This attenuation was not brought about when the inducers were added to noninducible MEL cell clonal sublines. Cell commitment occurred only during the depolarization phase and increased proportionally to the attenuation of this phase up to a threshold beyond which the further increase of the attenuation was associated with the inhibition of commitment. The major role of the inducers apparently consisted of the

  4. Inflammation in Sickle Cell Disease: Differential and Down-Expressed Plasma Levels of Annexin A1 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Lidiane S.; Okumura, Jéssika V.; Silva, Danilo G. H.; Mimura, Kallyne K. O.; Belini-Júnior, Édis; Oliveira, Renan G.; Lobo, Clarisse L. C.; Oliani, Sonia M.; Bonini-Domingos, Claudia R.

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited hemolytic anemia whose pathophysiology is driven by polymerization of the hemoglobin S (Hb S), leading to hemolysis and vaso-occlusive events. Inflammation is a fundamental component in these processes and a continuous inflammatory stimulus can lead to tissue damages. Thus, pro-resolving pathways emerge in order to restore the homeostasis. For example there is the annexin A1 (ANXA1), an endogenous anti-inflammatory protein involved in reducing neutrophil-endothelial interactions, accelerating neutrophil apoptosis and stimulating macrophage efferocytosis. We investigated the expression of ANXA1 in plasma of SCD patients and its relation with anemic, hemolytic and inflammatory parameters of the disease. Three SCD genotypes were considered: the homozygous inheritance for Hb S (Hb SS) and the association between Hb S and the hemoglobin variants D-Punjab (Hb SD) and C (Hb SC). ANXA1 and proinflammatory cytokines were quantified by ELISA in plasma of SCD patients and control individuals without hemoglobinopathies. Hematological and biochemical parameters were analyzed by flow cytometry and spectrophotometer. The plasma levels of ANXA1 were about three-fold lesser in SCD patients compared to the control group, and within the SCD genotypes the most elevated levels were found in Hb SS individuals (approximately three-fold higher). Proinflammatory cytokines were higher in SCD groups than in the control individuals. Anemic and hemolytic markers were higher in Hb SS and Hb SD genotypes compared to Hb SC patients. White blood cells and platelets count were higher in Hb SS genotype and were positively correlated to ANXA1 levels. We found that ANXA1 is down-regulated and differentially expressed within the SCD genotypes. Its expression seems to depend on the inflammatory, hemolytic and vaso-occlusive characteristics of the diseased. These data may lead to new biological targets for therapeutic intervention in SCD. PMID:27802331

  5. Platelet-Rich Plasma Preparation Types Show Impact on Chondrogenic Differentiation, Migration, and Proliferation of Human Subchondral Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Kreuz, Peter Cornelius; Krüger, Jan Philipp; Metzlaff, Sebastian; Freymann, Undine; Endres, Michaela; Pruss, Axel; Petersen, Wolf; Kaps, Christian

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the chondrogenic potential of platelet concentrates on human subchondral mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) as assessed by histomorphometric analysis of proteoglycans and type II collagen. Furthermore, the migratory and proliferative effect of platelet concentrates were assessed. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) was prepared using preparation kits (Autologous Conditioned Plasma [ACP] Kit [Arthrex, Naples, FL]; Regen ACR-C Kit [Regen Lab, Le Mont-Sur-Lausanne, Switzerland]; and Dr.PRP Kit [Rmedica, Seoul, Republic of Korea]) by apheresis (PRP-A) and by centrifugation (PRP-C). In contrast to clinical application, freeze-and-thaw cycles were subsequently performed to activate platelets and to prevent medium coagulation by residual fibrinogen in vitro. MPCs were harvested from the cortico-spongious bone of femoral heads. Chondrogenic differentiation of MPCs was induced in high-density pellet cultures and evaluated by histochemical staining of typical cartilage matrix components. Migration of MPCs was assessed using a chemotaxis assay, and proliferation activity was measured by DNA content. MPCs cultured in the presence of 5% ACP, Regen, or Dr.PRP formed fibrous tissue, whereas MPCs stimulated with 5% PRP-A or PRP-C developed compact and dense cartilaginous tissue rich in type II collagen and proteoglycans. All platelet concentrates significantly (ACP, P = .00041; Regen, P = .00029; Dr.PRP, P = .00051; PRP-A, P < .0001; and PRP-C, P < .0001) stimulated migration of MPCs. All platelet concentrates but one (Dr.PRP, P = .63) showed a proliferative effect on MPCs, as shown by significant increases (ACP, P = .027; Regen, P = .0029; PRP-A, P = .00021; and PRP-C, P = .00069) in DNA content. Platelet concentrates obtained by different preparation methods exhibit different potentials to stimulate chondrogenic differentiation, migration, and proliferation of MPCs. Platelet concentrates obtained by commercially available preparation kits failed to induce

  6. Differential mechanisms of inorganic pyrophosphate production by plasma cell membrane glycoprotein-1 and B10 in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K; Vaingankar, S; Chen, Y; Moffa, A; Goldring, M B; Sano, K; Jin-Hua, P; Sali, A; Goding, J; Terkeltaub, R

    1999-09-01

    Increased nucleoside triphosphate pyrophosphohydrolase (NTPPPH) activity in chondrocytes is associated with cartilage matrix inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) supersaturation in chondrocalcinosis. This study compared the roles of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta)-inducible plasma cell membrane glycoprotein-1 (PC-1) and the closely related B10 NTPPPH activities in chondrocyte PPi metabolism. NTPPPH expression was studied using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Transmembrane PC-1 (tmPC-1), water-soluble secretory PC-1 (secPC-1), and transmembrane B10 were expressed by adenoviral gene transfer or plasmid transfection, and expression of PPi was assessed in cultured articular chondrocytes and immortalized NTPPPH-deficient costal chondrocytes (TC28 cells). PC-1 and B10 messenger RNA were demonstrated in articular cartilages in situ, in untreated cultured normal articular chondrocytes, and in TC28 cells. Expression of tmPC-1 and secPC-1, but not B10, rendered the NTPPPH-deficient TC28 cells able to increase expression of extracellular PPi, with or without addition of TGFbeta (10 ng/ml) to the media. More plasma membrane NTPPPH activity was detected in cells transfected with tmPC-1 than in cells transfected with B10. Furthermore, confocal microscopy with immunofluorescent staining of articular chondrocytes confirmed preferential plasma membrane localization of PC-1, relative to B10. Finally, both PC-1 and B10 increased the levels of intracellular PPi, but PC-1 and B10 appeared to act principally in different intracellular compartments (Golgi and post-Golgi versus pre-Golgi, respectively). PC-1 and B10 NTPPPH activities were not redundant in chondrocytes. Although increased PC-1 and B10 expression caused elevations in intracellular PPi, the major effects of PC-1 and B10 were exerted in distinct subcellular compartments. Moreover, PC-1 (transmembrane and secreted), but not B10, increased the levels of extracellular PPi

  7. Immunophenotypic features by multiparameter flow cytometry can help distinguish low grade B-cell lymphomas with plasmacytic differentiation from plasma cell proliferative disorders with an unrelated clonal B-cell process.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Flavia G; Morice, William G; He, Rong; Howard, Matthew T; Timm, Michael; McPhail, Ellen D

    2015-05-01

    Highly sensitive flow cytometry studies may incidentally identify B cell clones when used to assess plasma cell clonality in bone marrows. Clinical history, which can help differentiate related clones (low grade B cell lymphoma with plasmacytic differentiation/LBCL-PD) from unrelated ones (plasma cell proliferative disorder (PCPD) with an unrelated B cell clone), is often unavailable in referred specimens. We sought to identify morphologic or phenotypic features that would help predict the significance of these clones in the absence of history. We included only cases with identical light chain B and plasma cell clones, as determined by 6-color flow cytometry with additional DNA ploidy analysis, in which the relationship between clones could be established by review of medical records. There were 26 cases; 18 were related (14 were Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia) and eight were unrelated (seven multiple myeloma). Features seen exclusively in LBCL-PD include CD19+/CD45+ clonal plasma cell phenotype (66·7%, P = 0·0022) and morphologic features such as paratrabecular bone marrow involvement, increased mast cells, and plasma cells surrounding B-cell nodules. Aneuploidy was identified exclusively in PCPD cases (75%, P = 0·000028). We conclude that CD19+/CD45+ clonal plasma cell phenotype and aneuploidy are useful in distinguishing related clones (LBCL-PD) from unrelated clones (PCPD).

  8. Human breast adipose‑derived stem cells: characterization and differentiation into mammary gland‑like epithelial cells promoted by autologous activated platelet‑rich plasma.

    PubMed

    Cui, Shi-En; Li, Hong-Mian; Liu, Da-Lie; Nan, Hua; Xu, Kun-Ming; Zhao, Pei-Ran; Liang, Shuang-Wu

    2014-08-01

    Human adipose‑derived stem cells (ASCs) isolated from various body sites have been widely investigated in basic and clinical studies. However, ASCs derived from human breast tissue (hbASCs) have not been extensively investigated. In order to expand our understanding of hbASCs and examine their potential applications in stem cell research and cell‑based therapy, hbASCs were isolated from discarded surgical fat tissue following reduction mammoplasty and a comprehensive characterization of these hbASCs was performed, including analysis of their cellular morphology, growth features, cell surface protein markers and multilineage differentiation capacity. These hbASCs expressed cluster of differentiation (CD)44, CD49d, CD90 and CD105, but did not express CD31 and CD34. Subsequently, the hbASCs were differentiated into adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes in vitro. In order to examine the potential applications of hbASCs in breast reconstruction, an approach to promote in vitro differentiation of hbASCs into mammary gland‑like epithelial cells (MGECs) was developed using activated autologous platelet‑rich plasma (PRP). A proliferation phase and a subsequent morphological conversion phase were observed during this differentiation process. PRP significantly promoted the growth of hbASCs in the proliferation phase and increased the eventual conversion rate of hbASCs into MGECs. Thus, to the best of our knowledge, the present study provided the first comprehensive characterization of hbASCs and validated their multipotency. Furthermore, it was revealed that activated autologous PRP was able to enhance the differentiation efficiency of hbASCs into MGECs. The present study and other studies of hbASCs may aid the development of improved breast reconstruction strategies.

  9. Marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue with prominent plasma cell differentiation affecting the palatine tonsil: histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Carlos Bregni, Román; Nuyens, Michel; Vassallo, José; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Romañach, Mário José; León, Jorge Esquiche; Almeida, Oslei Paes

    2012-04-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) of the oral cavity and oropharynx constitute 13% of all primary extranodal NHLs. Marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma) in the palatine tonsil is rare, corresponding to 6% of the NHLs of the Waldeyer ring. Some cases of MALT lymphoma can present prominent plasma cell differentiation, and less commonly, monoclonal gammopathy. The differential diagnosis of these cases from other NHLs with plasmacytic differentiation or plasma cell neoplasms is very difficult. In this article, we describe a rare case of MALT lymphoma in a 34-year-old man presenting as a swelling of the palatine tonsil. The tumor mass was diagnosed as MALT lymphoma with prominent plasma cell differentiation. Systemic evaluation was noncontributory. This is the first report of MALT lymphoma showing extensive plasmacytic differentiation of the palatine tonsil, and reinforces a possible relationship between extramedullary plasmacytoma and MALT lymphoma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Metformin Suppresses Systemic Autoimmunity in Roquinsan/san Mice through Inhibiting B Cell Differentiation into Plasma Cells via Regulation of AMPK/mTOR/STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seon-Yeong; Moon, Su-Jin; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Seo, Hyeon-Beom; Yang, Eun-Ji; Son, Hye-Jin; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Min, Jun-Ki; Park, Sung-Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Circulating autoantibodies and immune complex deposition are pathological hallmarks of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). B cell differentiation into plasma cells (PCs) and some T cell subsets that function as B cell helpers can be therapeutic targets of SLE. Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is implicated in the formation of B cells and germinal centers (GCs). We assessed the effect of metformin, which inhibits mTOR, on the development of autoimmunity using Roquinsan/san mice. Oral administration of metformin inhibited the formation of splenic follicles and inflammation in kidney and liver tissues. It also decreased serum levels of anti-dsDNA Abs without affecting serum glucose levels. Moreover, metformin inhibited CD21highCD23low marginal zone B cells, B220+GL7+ GC B cells, B220−CD138+ PCs, and GC formation. A significant reduction in ICOS+ follicular helper T cells was found in the spleens of the metformin-treated group compared with the vehicle-treated group. In addition, metformin inhibited Th17 cells and induced regulatory T cells. These alterations in B and T cell subsets by metformin were associated with enhanced AMPK expression and inhibition of mTOR–STAT3 signaling. Furthermore, metformin induced p53 and NF erythroid-2–related factor-2 activity in splenic CD4+ T cells. Taken together, metformin-induced alterations in AMPK–mTOR–STAT3 signaling may have therapeutic value in SLE by inhibiting B cell differentiation into PCs and GCs. PMID:28242651

  11. Efficient isolation and proteomic analysis of cell plasma membrane proteins in gastric cancer reveal a novel differentiation and progression related cell surface marker, R-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Luo, Qi-Cong; Chen, Jian-Bo; Lin, Li-E; Luo, Ming-Xu; Ren, Hong-Yue; Chen, Pei-Qiong; Shi, Lian-Guo

    2016-09-01

    Cell plasma membrane proteins, playing a crucial role in cell malignant transformation and development, were the main targets of tumor detection and therapy. In this study, CyDye/biotin double-labeling proteomic approach was adopted to profile the membrane proteome of gastric cancer cell line BGC-823 and paired immortalized gastric epithelial cell GES-1. Real-time PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemical staining were used to validate the differential expression of a novel identified cell surface marker R-cadherin in gastric cancer cells and tissues. Clinicopathological study and survival analysis were performed to estimate its roles in tumor progression and outcome prediction. Real-time PCR and Western blotting showed that the expression level of R-cadherin in gastric cancer were significantly lower than non-cancerous epithelial cell and tissues. Clinicopathological study indicated that R-cadherin was dominantly expressed on cell surface of normal gastric epithelium, and its expression deletion in gastric cancer tissues was associated with tumor site, differentiation, lymph node metastasis, and pTNM (chi-square test, P < 0.05). Those patients with R-cadherin positive expression displayed better overall survivals than negative expression group (log-rank test, P = 0.000). Cox multivariate survival analysis revealed lacking the expression of R-cadherin was a main independent predictor for poor clinical outcome in gastric cancer (RR = 5.680, 95 % CI 2.250-14.341, P < 0.01). We have established a fundamental membrane proteome database for gastric cancer and identified R-cadherin as a tumor differentiation and progression-related cell surface marker of gastric cancer. Lacking the expression of R-cadherin indicates poor prognosis in patients with gastric cancer.

  12. Amide-linkage formed between ammonia plasma treated poly(D,L-lactide acid) scaffolds and bio-peptides: enhancement of cell adhesion and osteogenic differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zi-Xing; Li, Tao; Zhong, Zhao-Ming; Zha, Ding-Sheng; Wu, Song-Hui; Liu, Fu-Qiang; Xiao, Wen-De; Jiang, Xiao-Rui; Zhang, Xin-Xin; Chen, Jian-Ting

    2011-10-01

    The surface characteristics of scaffolds for bone tissue engineering must support cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation. In the study, poly(D,L-lactide acid) (PDLLA) scaffolds were modified by combing ammonia (NH(3) ) plasma pretreatment with Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (GRGDS)-peptides coupling technologies. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) survey spectra showed the peak of N1s at the surface of NH(3) plasma pretreated PDLLA, which was further raised after GRGDS conjugation. Furthermore, N1s and C1s in the high-resolution XPS spectra revealed the presence of -C=N(imine), -C-NH-(amine), and -C=O-NH- (amide) groups. The GRGDS conjugation increased amide groups and decreased amine groups in the plasma-treated PDLLA. Confocal microscope and high performance liquid chromatography verified the anchored peptides after the conjugation process. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were co-cultured with scaffolds. Fluorescent microscope and scanning electron microscope photographs revealed the best cell adhesion in NH(3) plasma pretreated and GRGDS conjugated scaffolds, and the least attachment in unmodified scaffolds. Real-time PCR demonstrated that expression of osteogenesis-related genes, such as osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, type I collagen, bone morphogenetic protein-2 and osteopontin, was upregulated in the single NH(3) plasma treated and NH(3) plasma pretreated scaffolds following GRGDS conjugation. The results show that NH(3) plasma treatment promotes the conjugation of GRGDS peptides to the PDLLA scaffolds via the formation of amide linkage, and combination of NH(3) plasma treatment and peptides conjugation may enhance the cell adhesion and osteogenic differentiation in the PDLLA scaffolds. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 95: 682-694, 2011. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Flow cytometric differentiation of abnormal and normal plasma cells in the bone marrow in patients with multiple myeloma and its precursor diseases.

    PubMed

    Tembhare, Prashant R; Yuan, Constance M; Venzon, David; Braylan, Raul; Korde, Neha; Manasanch, Elisabet; Zuchlinsky, Diamond; Calvo, Katherine; Kurlander, Roger; Bhutani, Manisha; Tageja, Nishant; Maric, Irina; Mulquin, Marcia; Roschewski, Mark; Kwok, Mary; Liewehr, David; Landgren, Ola; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice

    2014-03-01

    Flow cytometric (FC) enumeration of abnormal plasma cells (APCs) for diagnosis and prognostication of plasma cell dyscrasias (PCD) is challenging. We studied antigen expression in normal plasma cells (NPC) (N = 34) and APC in a series of unselected PCD (N = 59). NPC subpopulations often demonstrated CD19(-), CD20(+), CD45(-) or dim and CD56(+), an immunophenotype observed in PCD. However abnormal CD81 was only observed in APCs (APC detection sensitivity 95%; specificity 100%). We evaluated differences in antigen expression patterns among MGUS (N = 14), SMM (N = 35) and MM (N = 10), finding the combination of CD45 and CD56 helpful in differentiating MGUS from SMM and MM (p = 0.0002). Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. From lymphopoiesis to plasma cells differentiation, the age-related modifications of B cell compartment are influenced by "Inflamm-Ageing".

    PubMed

    Bulati, Matteo; Caruso, Calogero; Colonna-Romano, Giuseppina

    2017-04-07

    Ageing is a complex process characterized by a general decline in physiological functions with increasing morbidity and mortality. The most important aspect of ageing is the chronic inflammatory status, named "inflamm-ageing", strictly associated with the deterioration of the immune function, termed "immunosenescence". Both are causes of increased susceptibility of elderly to infectious diseases, cancer, dementia, cardiovascular diseases and autoimmunity, and of a decreased response to vaccination. It has been widely demonstrated that ageing has a strong impact on the remodelling of the B cell branch of immune system. The first evident effect is the significant decrease in circulating B cells, primarily due to the reduction of new B cell coming from bone marrow (BM) progenitors, as inflammation directly impacts on B lymphopoiesis. Besides, in aged individuals, there is a shift from naïve to memory immunoglobulins production, accompanied by the impaired ability to produce high affinity protective antibodies against newly encountered antigens. This is accompanied by the increase of expanded clones of B cells, which correlates with poor health status. Age-related modifications also occur in naïve/memory B cells subsets. Indeed, in the elderly, there is a reduction of naïve B cells, accompanied by the expansion of memory B cells that show a senescence-associated phenotype. Finally, elderly show the impaired ability of memory B cells to differentiate into plasma cells. It can be concluded that inflammation is the leading cause of the age-related impairment of B cell compartment, which play certainly a key role in the development of age-related diseases. This makes study of B cells in the aged an important tool for monitoring immunosenescence, chronic inflammatory disorders and the effectiveness of vaccines or pharmacological therapies.

  15. Selective upregulation of the expression of plasma membrane calcium ATPase isoforms upon differentiation and 1,25(OH)2D3-vitamin treatment of colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ribiczey, Polett; Papp, Béla; Homolya, László; Enyedi, Ágnes; Kovács, Tünde

    2015-08-14

    We have previously presented co-expression of the plasma membrane calcium ATPase isoforms 4b (PMCA4b) and 1b (PMCA1b) in colon carcinoma cells, and selective upregulation of PMCA4b during differentiation initiated by short chain fatty acids or post-confluent growth. Here we show that the induction of PMCA4b expression is a characteristic feature of the post-confluency-induced differentiation of both enterocyte-type and goblet cell-type colon cancer cells. Vitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) is a well-known regulator of intestinal Ca(2+) absorption and of basic cell functions such as growth and differentiation in various cell types. As PMCA proteins are involved both in intestinal Ca(2+) absorption and adenocarcinoma cell differentiation, we investigated the effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 on PMCA expression in enterocyte-like colon carcinoma cells, and monitored its effect on the expression of various differentiation markers. 1,25(OH)2D3 stimulated PMCA1b, but not PMCA4b expression without modulating the expression of the majority of the differentiation markers examined. Caco-2 cells differentiated in post-confluent cultures present normal enterocyte-like intestinal epithelial phenotype. To better understand the role of PMCA proteins in vectorial Ca(2+) transport by enterocytes, we also studied their subcellular localization in mature polarized Caco-2 cells. Both PMCA isoforms were located to the basolateral membrane, and the PMCA-specific immunofluorescent signal was significantly higher in vitamin D3-treated cells, underlining the 1,25(OH)2D3-induced upregulation of PMCA (presumably 1b isoform) expression in differentiated Caco-2 cells. We suggest that while PMCA1b has a housekeeping function in colon cancer cells, PMCA4b participates in the reorganization of the Ca(2+) signalling machinery during cell differentiation. The subcellular localization of PMCA1b and its selective 1,25(OH)2D3-dependent upregulation indicate that this isoform may have a specific role in 1,25(OH)2D3

  16. Chromosomal differentiation of cells

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 16, discusses the chromosomal differentiation of cells. The chromosomes of differentiated cells have been much less studies than those of meristematic or germline cells, probably because such cells do not usually divide spontaneously. However, in many cases they can be induced to undergo mitosis. 26 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Differential effect of plasma and red blood cell transfusion on acute lung injury and infection risk following liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Alexander B.; Burton, James R.; Austin, Gregory L.; Biggins, Scott W.; Zimmerman, Michael A.; Kam, Igal; Mandell, Susan; Silliman, Christopher C.; Rosen, Hugo; Moss, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Patients with chronic liver disease are at an increased risk of developing transfusion-associated acute lung injury (TRALI) from plasma containing blood products. Similarly, red blood cell transfusions have been associated with post-operative and nosocomial infections in surgical and critical care populations. Patients undergoing liver transplantation receive a large amount of cellular and plasma containing blood products, but it is presently unclear which blood components are associated with these post-operative complications. Results A retrospective cohort study of 525 consecutive liver transplant patients revealed a peri-operative TRALI incidence of 1.3% (7/525), 95%CI [0.6%–2.7%], associated with an increased hospital mortality (28.6% (2/7) vs. 2.9% (15/518), p=0.02) and intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay (2 days, [1–11] vs. 0 days [0–2], 0.03). Only high plasma containing blood products (plasma and platelets) were associated with the development of TRALI. A total of 14.3% (74/525) of patients developed a post-operative infection which was also associated with an increased in-hospital mortality (10.8% (8/74) vs. 2.0% (9/451), p < 0.01) and prolonged length of stay. Multivariate logistic regression identified the number of red blood cell units transfused (adj OR 1.08 95%CI [1.02–1.14], p<0.01), the presence of peri-operative renal dysfunction and re-operation to be significantly associated with post-operative infection. Conclusions Patients undergoing liver transplantation are at high risk of developing post-operative complications from blood transfusion. Plasma containing blood products were associated with the development of TRALI while red blood cells were associated with the development of post-operative infection in a dose dependent manner. PMID:21280188

  18. Phosphorylation and nucleotide-dependent dephosphorylation of hepatic polypeptides related to the plasma cell differentiation antigen PC-1.

    PubMed Central

    Uriarte, M; Stalmans, W; Hickman, S; Bollen, M

    1993-01-01

    A glycoprotein fraction was isolated from rat liver membranes by affinity chromatography on immobilized wheat-germ lectin. Incubation of this fraction with MgATP or MgGTP resulted in a sequential phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of a complex of three polypeptides (118, 128 and 197 kDa on SDS/PAGE) with N-linked sialyloligosaccharides. Each polypeptide was recognized by polyclonal antibodies against recombinant plasma cell differentiation antigen PC-1. The relationship of the 118 kDa and 128 kDa polypeptides with PC-1 was confirmed by observations that they are linked by disulphide bonds into a larger protein, and that they are exclusively phosphorylated on Thr residues. Phosphorylation of p118, p128 and p197 only occurred after a lag period (up to 90 min at 30 degrees C), which lasted until most of the ATP had been converted to adenosine and Pi, with ADP and AMP as intermediate products. The length of the latency period increased with the concentration of initially added ATP (5-1000 microM) and could be prolonged by a second addition of similar concentrations of ATP, ADP, AMP and various nucleotide analogues. Most potent were the alpha beta-methylene derivatives of ADP and ATP. Adenosine was poorly effective. AMP, ADP, and perhaps ATP, emerge as the direct determinants of the latency. After further purification of the lectin-purified membrane fraction on anion-exchange and molecular-sieve columns, the complex of p118, p128 and p197 was still capable of autophosphorylation and dephosphorylation. The dephosphorylation was not affected by classical inhibitors (NaF, okadaic acid, EDTA, EGTA, phenylalanine). It was stimulated about 20-fold by various adenine nucleotides and analogues, with the same order of efficiency as noted for the induction of the latency. A similar stimulation of dephosphorylation was caused by 0.5 mM Na3VO4, which also prevented the phosphorylation of the three polypeptides. The likely explanation for the latency that precedes the

  19. "Angular" plasma cell cheilitis.

    PubMed

    da Cunha Filho, Roberto Rheingantz; Tochetto, Lucas Baldissera; Tochetto, Bruno Baldissera; de Almeida, Hiram Larangeira; Lorencette, Nádia Aparecida; Netto, José Fillus

    2014-03-17

    Plasma cell cheilitis is an extremely rare disease, characterized by erythematous-violaceous, ulcerated and asymptomatic plaques, which evolve slowly. The histological characteristics include dermal infiltrate composed of mature plasmocytes. We report a case of Plasma cell angular cheilitis in a 58-year-old male, localized in the lateral oral commissure.

  20. [Acute plasma cell leukemia].

    PubMed

    Monsalbe, V; Domíngues, C; Roa, I; Busel, D; González, S

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Cell Leukemia is a very rare form of plasmocytic dyscrasia, whose clinical and pathological characteristics warrant its recognition as a distinct subentity. We report the case of a 60 years old man who presented a rapidly fatal acute plasma cell leukemia, with multiple osteolytic lesions, hipercalcemia, renal and cardiac failure.

  1. Tumor cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Aarbakke, J.; Chiang, P.K.; Koeffler, H.P

    1987-01-01

    This book contains four sections, each consisting of several papers. Some of the paper titles are: Studies of Gene Expression During Granulocyte Maturation; Proliferation and Differentiation of Human Leukemic Cells in Culture; Sequence-Specific DNA Methylation: Promoter Inactivation and Release of the Expression Block; Retinoic Acid-Induced Differentiation of HL-60: Studies In Vitro and In Vivo; and Differentiation of Human Leukemia Cells by Nucleoside Analogues.

  2. Cellular and Chromatin Dynamics of Antibody-Secreting Plasma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bortnick, Alexandra; Murre, Cornelis

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cells are terminally differentiated B cells responsible for maintaining protective serum antibody titers. Despite their clinical importance, our understanding of the linear genomic features and chromatin structure of plasma cells is incomplete. The plasma cell differentiation program can be triggered by different signals and in multiple, diverse peripheral B cell subsets. This heterogeneity raises questions about the gene regulatory circuits required for plasma cell specification. Recently, new regulators of plasma cell differentiation have been identified and the enhancer landscapes of naïve B cells have been described. Other studies have revealed that the bone marrow niche harbors heterogeneous plasma cell subsets. Still undefined are the minimal requirements to become a plasma cell and what molecular features make peripheral B cell subsets competent to become antibody-secreting plasma cells. New technologies promise to reveal underlying chromatin configurations that promote efficient antibody secretion. PMID:26488117

  3. Immunohistochemical analysis of IgA expression differentiates IgG4-related disease from plasma cell-type Castleman disease.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Akihiro; Igawa, Takuro; Takeuchi, Mai; Gion, Yuka; Yoshino, Tadashi; Sato, Yasuharu

    2017-03-01

    Plasma cell-type Castleman disease (PCD) is often encountered when differentiating IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD). Given that serum IgA is often elevated in Castleman disease, we investigated whether IgA expression levels in histological specimens can be used to differentiate between the two diseases. Lymph node lesions obtained from 12 IgG4-RD and 11 PCD patients were analysed by immunohistochemistry with anti-IgG, -IgG4, and -IgA antibodies. In addition to all 12 cases of IgG4-RD, 8/11 cases (72.7 %) of PCD also met the diagnostic criteria of IgG4-RD (serum IgG4 ≥135 mg/dl and IgG4/IgG-positive cells ≥40 %). IgA-positive cells were sparsely and densely distributed in IgG4-RD and PCD cases, respectively. The median number of IgA-positive cells ± SD in all 12 cases of IgG4-RD was 31 ± 37 cells per three high-powered fields (3HPFs) (range 4-118 cells/3HPFs). In contrast, the median number of IgA-positive cells, which was significantly higher in all 11 cases of PCD, was 303 ± 238 cells/3HPFs (range 74-737 cells/3HPFs) (P < 0.001). In conclusion, our findings indicate that in cases where serum analysis-based data are unavailable, anti-IgA immunostaining can be used for differential diagnosis of IgG4-RD.

  4. BCR Ligation antagonizes the IL-21 enhancement of anti-CD40/IL-4 Plasma cell differentiation and IgE production found in low density human B cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Caven, Timothy H.; Sturgill, Jamie L.; Conrad, Daniel H.

    2007-01-01

    We sought to discover the mechanisms explaining increased IgE production seen at low cell densities when IL-21 is added to human B cell cultures activated with anti-CD40 and IL-4. When cells were cultured in the absence of BCR ligation, qPCR demonstrated dramatic increases in mRNA for the plasma cell transcription factors BLIMP1 and XBP1. Furthermore, a majority of viable cells expressed high levels of CD38 while losing expression of surface IgD. In contrast, in the presence of BCR stimulation, both the XBP1 mRNA levels and CD38 cell surface expression were markedly reduced, and a large population of cells retained IgD expression, indicating reduced plasma cell differentiation. IgE levels were reduced in the BCR stimulated cultures by 90%, while IgG4 levels remained unchanged. In summary, IL-21 enhances IgE production at low densities through stimulating cell division and plasma cell differentiation and this activity is reduced upon BCR crosslinking. PMID:17888893

  5. BCR ligation antagonizes the IL-21 enhancement of anti-CD40/IL-4 plasma cell differentiation and IgE production found in low density human B cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Caven, Timothy H; Sturgill, Jamie L; Conrad, Daniel H

    2007-05-01

    We sought to discover the mechanisms explaining increased IgE production seen at low cell densities when IL-21 is added to human B cell cultures activated with anti-CD40 and IL-4. When cells were cultured in the absence of BCR ligation, qPCR demonstrated dramatic increases in mRNA for the plasma cell transcription factors BLIMP1 and XBP1. Furthermore, a majority of viable cells expressed high levels of CD38 while losing expression of surface IgD. In contrast, in the presence of BCR stimulation, both the XBP1 mRNA levels and CD38 cell surface expression were markedly reduced, and a large population of cells retained IgD expression, indicating reduced plasma cell differentiation. IgE levels were reduced in the BCR stimulated cultures by 90%, while IgG4 levels remained unchanged. In summary, IL-21 enhances IgE production at low densities through stimulating cell division and plasma cell differentiation and this activity is reduced upon BCR cross-linking.

  6. Platelet-rich plasma-derived growth factors promote osteogenic differentiation of rat muscle satellite cells: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shengyun; Wang, Zuolin

    2012-01-01

    PRP (platelet-rich plasma)-derived growth factors are a new application of tissue engineering and a developing area for researchers and clinicians. We have assessed the effects of PRP-derived growth factors on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of rMSCs (rat muscle satellite cells), and constructed a novel tissue engineering bone composed of PRP-derived growth factors and rMSCs. PRP were created by a freeze-thaw process. rMSCs were isolated from rat masticatory muscle using serial platings technique. Wst-1 assay, SEM (scanning electron microscopy), ALP (alkaline phosphatase) activity, total protein concentration, AR (Alizarin red S) staining, calcium analyses and RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR) of osteogenic-related genes were used to assess the effect of PRP-derived growth factors on proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of cultured rMSCs on scaffolds. The different composite scaffolds were implanted to the subcutaneous spaces of nude mice. H&E (haematoxylin and eosin) and Masson's trichrome staining were used to examine the ectopic bone formation. In vitro, we found that PRP-derived growth factors showed excellent cell compatibility and significantly enhanced cell proliferation over serum and control groups at 48 and 72 h. SEM, ALP activity, AR staining, calcium analyses and RT-PCR showed that PRP-derived growth factors significantly increased cells osteogenic differentiation when compared with other groups. In vivo examination showed that more fibrous tissue capsule and bone with lamellar structures appeared in PRP-derived growth factors groups. These results suggest that the PRP-derived growth factors significantly promote rMSCs proliferation, osteogenic differentiation compared with serum and scaffolds alone, and may be suitable for stem cell growth factors delivery and bone tissue engineering.

  7. Investigation of modified platelet-rich plasma (mPRP) in promoting the proliferation and differentiation of dental pulp stem cells from deciduous teeth

    PubMed Central

    Wen, J.; Li, H.T.; Li, S.H.; Li, X.; Duan, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) have great potential to treat various dental-related diseases in regenerative medicine. They are usually maintained with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) in vitro. Modified platelet-rich plasma (mPRP) would be a safe alternative to 10% FBS during SHEDs culture. Therefore, our study aimed to compare the proliferation and differentiation of SHEDs cultured in mPRP and FBS medium to explore an optimal concentration of mPRP for SHEDs maintenance. Platelets were harvested by automatic blood cell analyzer and activated by repeated liquid nitrogen freezing and thawing. The platelet-related cytokines were examined and analyzed by ELISA. SHEDs were extracted and cultured with different concentrations of mPRP or 10% FBS medium. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was measured. Mineralization factors, RUNX2 and OCN, were measured by real-time PCR. SHEDs were characterized with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) markers including vimentin, CD44, and CD105. mPRP at different concentrations (2, 5, 10, and 20%) enhanced the growth of SHEDs. Moreover, mPRP significantly stimulated ALP activity and promoted expression of RUNX2 and OCN compared with 10% FBS. mPRP could efficiently facilitate proliferation and differentiation of SHEDs, and 2% mPRP would be an optimal substitute for 10% FBS during SHEDs expansion and differentiation in clinical scale manufacturing. PMID:27599200

  8. Spontaneous secretion of immunoglobulins and anti-HIV-1 antibodies by in vivo activated B lymphocytes from HIV-1-infected subjects: monocyte and natural killer cell requirement for in vitro terminal differentiation into plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Anne Marie; Fondere, Jean-Michel; Alix-Panabieres, Catherine; Merle, Corinne; Baillat, Vincent; Huguet, Marie-France; Taïb, Jacques; Ohayon, Viviane; Zembala, Marek; Reynes, Jacques; Vendrell, Jean Pierre

    2002-04-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-1-infected subjects secrete spontaneously in vitro immunoglobulins (Ig) and anti-HIV-1 antibodies (Ab). Purified B lymphocytes secrete only minute amounts of Ig and anti-HIV-1 Ab compared with unfractionated cells. Monocytes and natural killer cells enhanced both secretions by cell-to-cell contacts, involving adhesion and CD27, CD80 costimulatory molecules and IL-6. Cell interactions prolonged the survival and allowed the terminal maturation of in vivo activated B cells. The secreting cell precursors were highly differentiated B cells expressing a broad diversity of maturation markers (CD27(+), CD38(+), CD20(+/-), CD37(+/-), CD71(+/-), HLA-DQ(+/-), sIg(+/-)) but not sIgD, CD28, or CD40. This phenotype and the cytologic aspect of purified B cells suggest that these cells are early plasma cells originated from germinal center. Ex vivo secreting peripheral B cells had probably gone beyond the CD40/CD40 ligand interaction; then following CD28/CD80 and CD27/CD27 ligand (CD70) interactions in the presence of IL-6, they achieved in vitro their differentiation into plasma cells.

  9. Design of biomimetic and bioactive cold plasma-modified nanostructured scaffolds for enhanced osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mian; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Wei; Holmes, Benjamin; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to design a biomimetic and bioactive tissue-engineered bone construct via a cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) treatment for directed osteogenic differentiation of human bone morrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Porous nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite/chitosan scaffolds were fabricated via a lyophilization procedure. The nanostructured bone scaffolds were then treated with CAP to create a more favorable surface for cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation. The CAP-modified scaffolds were characterized via scanning electron microscope, Raman spectrometer, contact angle analyzer, and white light interferometer. In addition, optimal CAP treatment conditions were determined. Our in vitro study shows that MSC adhesion and infiltration were significantly enhanced on CAP modified scaffolds. More importantly, it was demonstrated that CAP-modified nanostructured bone constructs can greatly promote total protein, collagen synthesis, and calcium deposition after 3 weeks of culture, thus making them a promising implantable scaffold for bone regeneration. Moreover, the fibronectin and vitronection adsorption experiments by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated that more adhesion-mediated protein adsorption on the CAP-treated scaffolds. Since the initial specific protein absorption on scaffold surfaces can lead to further recruitment as well as activation of favorable cell functions, it is suggested that our enhanced stem cell growth and osteogenic function may be related to more protein adsorption resulting from surface roughness and wettability modification. The CAP modification method used in this study provides a quick one-step process for cell-favorable tissue-engineered scaffold architecture remodeling and surface property alteration.

  10. Differential Expression of Non-Shelterin Genes Associated with High Telomerase Levels and Telomere Shortening in Plasma Cell Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Panero, Julieta; Stella, Flavia; Schutz, Natalia; Fantl, Dorotea Beatriz; Slavutsky, Irma

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase, shelterin proteins and various interacting factors, named non-shelterin proteins, are involved in the regulation of telomere length (TL). Altered expression of any of these telomere-associated genes can lead to telomere dysfunction, causing genomic instability and disease development. In this study, we investigated the expression profile of a set of non-shelterin genes involved in essential processes such as replication (RPA1), DNA damage repair pathways (MRE11-RAD50-NBS1) and stabilization of telomerase complex (DKC1), in 35 patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and 40 cases with multiple myeloma (MM). Results were correlated with hTERT expression, TL and clinical parameters. Overall, a significant increase in DKC1, RAD50, MRE11, NBS1 and RPA1 expression along with an upregulation of hTERT in MM compared with MGUS was observed (p≤0.032). Interestingly, in both entities high mRNA levels of non-shelterin genes were associated with short TLs and increased hTERT expression. Significant differences were observed for DKC1 in MM (p ≤0.026), suggesting an important role for this gene in the maintenance of short telomeres by telomerase in myeloma plasma cells. With regard to clinical associations, we observed a significant increase in DKC1, RAD50, MRE11 and RPA1 expression in MM cases with high bone marrow infiltration (p≤0.03) and a tendency towards cases with advanced ISS stage, providing the first evidence of non-shelterin genes associated to risk factors in MM. Taken together, our findings bring new insights into the intricate mechanisms by which telomere-associated proteins collaborate in the maintenance of plasma cells immortalization and suggest a role for the upregulation of these genes in the progression of the disease. PMID:26366868

  11. SURFACE ALLOANTIGENS OF PLASMA CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Toshitada; Old, Lloyd J.; Boyse, Edward A.

    1970-01-01

    A serological study of immunoglobulin-forming cells of the mouse, normal and malignant, shows that they lack all known surface differentiation antigens of the thymocyte-lymphocyte axis: TL, θ, Ly-A, Ly-B, and MSLA. Two systems of normal alloantigens are expressed on these cells, H-2 and a new system named PC. The gene Pca (Plasma cell antigen) which specifies PC.1 alloantigen segregates as a mendelian dominant not closely linked with H-2. This cell surface antigen is absent from thymocytes, leukemias, and very probably from thymus-derived lymphocytes also; it is present on cells of the liver, kidney, brain, and lymph nodes as well as on hemolytic plaque-forming cells of the spleen, and on myelomas. So PC.1 is properly classified as a differentiation alloantigen. The strain distribution of PC.1 does not conform to that of any known immunoglobulin allotype or cell surface alloantigen previously described. Thus the cell surface antigens of immunoglobulin-producing cells are clearly different from those of cells belonging to the thymocyte-lymphocyte axis. Each family of cells has distinctive alloantigens, and the two families share alloantigens of only one known system, H-2. This implies that either immunoglobulin-producing cells are not derived from thymic lymphocytes, or if they are, the program responsible for the transition must include extensive revision of cell surface structure. PMID:5419273

  12. Enhancer mutations of Akv murine leukemia virus inhibit the induction of mature B-cell lymphomas and shift disease specificity towards the more differentiated plasma cell stage

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Kunder, Sandra; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Sorensen, Jonna; Schmidt, Joerg; Pedersen, Finn Skou . E-mail: fsp@mb.au.dk

    2007-05-25

    This study investigates the role of the proviral transcriptional enhancer for B-lymphoma induction by exogenous Akv murine leukemia virus. Infection of newborn inbred NMRI mice with Akv induced 35% plasma cell proliferations (PCPs) (consistent with plasmacytoma), 33% diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, 25% follicular B-cell lymphomas and few splenic marginal zone and small B-cell lymphomas. Deleting one copy of the 99-bp proviral enhancer sequence still allowed induction of multiple B-cell tumor types, although PCPs dominated (77%). Additional mutation of binding sites for the glucocorticoid receptor, Ets, Runx, or basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors in the proviral U3 region, however, shifted disease induction to almost exclusively PCPs, but had no major influence on tumor latency periods. Southern analysis of immunoglobulin rearrangements and ecotropic provirus integration patterns showed that many of the tumors/cell proliferations induced by each virus were polyclonal. Our results indicate that enhancer mutations weaken the ability of Akv to induce mature B-cell lymphomas prior to the plasma cell stage, whereas development of plasma cell proliferations is less dependent of viral enhancer strength.

  13. Platelet-rich plasma improves expansion of human mesenchymal stem cells and retains differentiation capacity and in vivo bone formation in calcium phosphate ceramics.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Julia P; Szalay, Krisztian; Geiger, Florian; Kramer, Martin; Richter, Wiltrud; Kasten, Philip

    2006-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) applied to bone substitution materials can improve bone healing. Bone formation in biocomposites is highly dependent on the kind of biomaterial, its pre-treatment and the applied cells. Potentially immunogenic or infectious supplements such as fetal calf serum (FCS) should be avoided in cell expansion media. Therefore, we developed an expansion protocol free of xenogenic supplements. Cells expanded with two different media were tested on distinct biomaterials for their bone formation capacity after ectopic implantation in vivo, as well as for their growth rate and differentiation capacity in vitro. MSC of six donors were expanded with cell expansion medium containing FCS (2%) or platelet-rich plasma (PRP, 3%). Their growth rate and osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation capacity were compared in vitro. For the in vivo bone formation assay, expanded cells (2 x 105 or 2 x 106) were seeded on calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA; n = 12) and on beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP; n = 12) blocks, which had been coated with either fibronectin or human serum. They were then implanted subcutaneously in severe combined immunodeficient mice (SCID), harvested after 8 weeks and analysed by histology. Bone formation was assessed by a semi-quantitative bone score, after toluidine blue and alizarin red staining. Human cells were detected by an in situ hybridisation for human-specific alu sequences. PRP-supplemented expansion medium yielded two-fold higher cell numbers compared to medium with FCS (P = 0.046) after 3 weeks (four passages) and retained a similar capacity to differentiate towards the osteogenic, chondrogenic and adipogenic lineage. In vivo bone formation was equal for cells expanded with PRP and FCS and depended on the specific surface area of the carrier. CDHA (specific surface area (SSA) 48 m2/g) showed a significantly better bone formation in deep layers (P = 0.005) than beta-TCP (SSA 0.5 m2/g). Fibronectin

  14. Plasma membrane proteomes of differentially matured dendritic cells identified by LC–MS/MS combined with iTRAQ labelling

    PubMed Central

    Ferret-Bernard, Stéphanie; Castro-Borges, William; Dowle, Adam A.; Sanin, David E.; Cook, Peter C.; Turner, Joseph D.; MacDonald, Andrew S.; Thomas, Jerry R.; Mountford, Adrian P.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in polarising Th lymphocyte subsets but it is unclear what molecular events occur when DCs generate Th2-type responses. Here, we analysed plasma membrane-enriched fractions from immature, pro-Th1 and pro-Th2 DCs and used a combination of iTRAQ labelling and LC–MS/MS to quantify changes in the proteomes. Analysis was performed on triplicate biological samples and changes verified by flow cytometry. MHC class II molecules and CD29 were up-regulated in pro-Th1 DCs whilst CD18 and CD44 were up-regulated in pro-Th2 DCs. One of the most down-regulated molecules in pro-Th1 DCs was YM-1 whilst the greatest decrease in pro-Th2 DCs was NAP-22. Other molecules up-regulated in pro-Th2 DC compared to pro-Th1 DCs included some potentially involved in protein folding during antigen processing (clathrin and Rab-7), whilst other non-membrane proteins such as enzymes/transporters related to cell metabolism (malate dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase, and ATPase Na+/K+) were also recorded. This suggests that pro-Th2 DCs are more metabolically active while pro-Th1 DCs have a mature ‘end state’. Overall, although several molecules were preferentially expressed on pro-Th2 DCs, our proteomics data support the view of a ‘limited maturation’ of pro-Th2 DCs compared to pro-Th1 DCs. PMID:22040742

  15. Plasma Cell Disorders.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Jorge J

    2016-12-01

    Plasma cell disorders are benign, premalignant, and malignant conditions characterized by the presence of a monoclonal paraprotein detected in serum or urine. These conditions are biologically, pathologically, and clinically heterogeneous. There have been major advances in the understanding of the biology of these diseases, which are promoting the development of therapies with novel mechanisms of action. Novel agents such as proteasome inhibitors, immunomodulatory drugs, and monoclonal antibodies have gained approval in the United States and Europe for the treatment of plasma cell disorders. Such therapies are translating into higher rates of response and survival and better toxicity profiles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Impact of placental Plasmodium falciparum malaria infection on the Cameroonian maternal and neonate's plasma levels of some cytokines known to regulate T cells differentiation and function.

    PubMed

    Djontu, Jean Claude; Siewe Siewe, Stalone; Mpeke Edene, Yolande Delphine; Nana, Benderli Christine; Chomga Foko, Edwige Vanessa; Bigoga, Jude Daiga; Leke, Rose F G; Megnekou, Rosette

    2016-11-21

    The impact of placental malaria (PM) infection on the expression profile of some cytokines known to regulate T cell differentiation and function and their influence on birth weight remain unclear. Moreover, there are no reports showing the relationship between PM and IL-27 or IL-28A. This study therefore sought to investigate whether placental P. falciparum infection alters the expression profile of the cytokines IL-28A, IL-27, IL-17E and IL-6 in mothers and their new born. In a cross-sectional study conducted between 2013 and 2015 in Yaoundé, Cameroon, peripheral, placental and cord blood samples were collected from 108 women at delivery. Parasitaemia was determined microscopically and haemoglobin levels determined using a Coulter counter. Plasma levels of cytokines (IL-28A, IL-27, IL-17E and IL-6) were measured by Luminex magnetic screening assay. Malaria parasite density in placenta impression smear associated negatively with maternal haemoglobin level (P < 0.0001) and baby birth weight (P = 0.016). While IL-17E, IL-27 and IL-28A levels were significantly higher in placental and cord plasma than in peripheral (P < 0.0001, < 0.001 and P = 0.026, respectively), an opposite relationship was observed with IL-6 (P = 0.0018). Multivariate analysis confirmed results of univariate analysis where the presence of malaria parasites or pigments in placenta tissue impression smears correlated with decrease levels of maternal IL-17E, IL-27 and IL-28A and neonate levels of IL-28A and IL-17E (0.0001 ≤ P ≤ 0.02). Placental and peripheral parasitaemias also correlated positively with peripheral plasma levels of IL-6 (rs = 0.18, P = 0.05 and rs = 0.17, P = 0.07, respectively). In addition, high maternal haemoglobin level associated with increasing levels of IL-17E, IL-27 and IL-28A in peripheral plasma (0.002 ≤ P ≤ 0.018) and high placental and cord plasma levels of these cytokines associated with increasing birth weight (0.0001 ≤ P ≤ 0

  17. Effect of various concentrations of Ti in hydrocarbon plasma polymer films on the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandrovcova, Marta; Grinevich, Andrey; Drabik, Martin; Kylian, Ondrej; Hanus, Jan; Stankova, Lubica; Lisa, Vera; Choukourov, Andrei; Slavinska, Danka; Biederman, Hynek; Bacakova, Lucie

    2015-12-01

    Hydrocarbon polymer films (ppCH) enriched with various concentrations of titanium were deposited on microscopic glass slides by magnetron sputtering from a Ti target. The maximum concentration of Ti (about 20 at.%) was achieved in a pure argon atmosphere. The concentration of Ti decreased rapidly after n-hexane vapors were introduced into the plasma discharge, and reached zero values at n-hexane flow of 0.66 sccm. The decrease in Ti concentration was associated with decreasing oxygen and titanium carbide concentration in the films, decreasing wettability (the water drop contact angle increased from 20° to 91°) and decreasing root-mean-square roughness (from 3.3 nm to 1.0 nm). The human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells cultured on pure ppCH films and on films with 20 at.% of Ti showed relatively high concentrations of ICAM-1, a marker of cell immune activation. Lower concentrations of Ti (mainly 5 at.%) improved cell adhesion and osteogenic differentiation, as revealed by higher concentrations of talin, vinculin and osteocalcin. Higher Ti concentrations (15 at.%) supported cell growth, as indicated by the highest final cell population densities on day 7 after seeding. Thus, enrichment of ppCH films with appropriate concentrations of Ti makes these films more suitable for potential coatings of bone implants.

  18. Chemotherapy Agents Alter Plasma Lipids in Breast Cancer Patients and Show Differential Effects on Lipid Metabolism Genes in Liver Cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Monika; Tuaine, Jo; McLaren, Blair; Waters, Debra L; Black, Katherine; Jones, Lynnette M; McCormick, Sally P A

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications have emerged as a major concern for cancer patients. Many chemotherapy agents are cardiotoxic and some appear to also alter lipid profiles, although the mechanism for this is unknown. We studied plasma lipid levels in 12 breast cancer patients throughout their chemotherapy. Patients received either four cycles of doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by weekly paclitaxel or three cycles of epirubicin, cyclophosphamide and 5'-fluorouracil followed by three cycles of docetaxel. Patients demonstrated a significant reduction (0.32 mmol/L) in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1) levels (0.18 g/L) and an elevation in apolipoprotein B (apoB) levels (0.15 g/L) after treatment. Investigation of the individual chemotherapy agents for their effect on genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism in liver cells showed that doxorubicin decreased ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) via a downregulation of the peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and liver X receptor α (LXRα) transcription factors. In contrast, ABCA1 levels were not affected by cyclophosphamide or paclitaxel. Likewise, apoA1 levels were reduced by doxorubicin and remained unaffected by cyclophosphamide and paclitaxel. Doxorubicin and paclitaxel both increased apoB protein levels and paclitaxel also decreased low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) protein levels. These findings correlate with the observed reduction in HDL-C and apoA1 and increase in apoB levels seen in these patients. The unfavourable lipid profiles produced by some chemotherapy agents may be detrimental in the longer term to cancer patients, especially those already at risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This knowledge may be useful in tailoring effective follow-up care plans for cancer survivors.

  19. Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase isoforms composition regulates cellular pH homeostasis in differentiating PC12 cells in a manner dependent on cytosolic Ca2+ elevations.

    PubMed

    Boczek, Tomasz; Lisek, Malwina; Ferenc, Bozena; Kowalski, Antoni; Stepinski, Dariusz; Wiktorska, Magdalena; Zylinska, Ludmila

    2014-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) by extruding Ca(2+) outside the cell, actively participates in the regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Acting as Ca(2+)/H(+) counter-transporter, PMCA transports large quantities of protons which may affect organellar pH homeostasis. PMCA exists in four isoforms (PMCA1-4) but only PMCA2 and PMCA3, due to their unique localization and features, perform more specialized function. Using differentiated PC12 cells we assessed the role of PMCA2 and PMCA3 in the regulation of intracellular pH in steady-state conditions and during Ca(2+) overload evoked by 59 mM KCl. We observed that manipulation in PMCA expression elevated pHmito and pHcyto but only in PMCA2-downregulated cells higher mitochondrial pH gradient (ΔpH) was found in steady-state conditions. Our data also demonstrated that PMCA2 or PMCA3 knock-down delayed Ca(2+) clearance and partially attenuated cellular acidification during KCl-stimulated Ca(2+) influx. Because SERCA and NCX modulated cellular pH response in neglectable manner, and all conditions used to inhibit PMCA prevented KCl-induced pH drop, we considered PMCA2 and PMCA3 as mainly responsible for transport of protons to intracellular milieu. In steady-state conditions, higher TMRE uptake in PMCA2-knockdown line was driven by plasma membrane potential (Ψp). Nonetheless, mitochondrial membrane potential (Ψm) in this line was dissipated during Ca(2+) overload. Cyclosporin and bongkrekic acid prevented Ψm loss suggesting the involvement of Ca(2+)-driven opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore as putative underlying mechanism. The findings presented here demonstrate a crucial role of PMCA2 and PMCA3 in regulation of cellular pH and indicate PMCA membrane composition important for preservation of electrochemical gradient.

  20. Plasma Membrane Ca2+-ATPase Isoforms Composition Regulates Cellular pH Homeostasis in Differentiating PC12 Cells in a Manner Dependent on Cytosolic Ca2+ Elevations

    PubMed Central

    Ferenc, Bozena; Kowalski, Antoni; Stepinski, Dariusz; Wiktorska, Magdalena; Zylinska, Ludmila

    2014-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA) by extruding Ca2+ outside the cell, actively participates in the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Acting as Ca2+/H+ counter-transporter, PMCA transports large quantities of protons which may affect organellar pH homeostasis. PMCA exists in four isoforms (PMCA1-4) but only PMCA2 and PMCA3, due to their unique localization and features, perform more specialized function. Using differentiated PC12 cells we assessed the role of PMCA2 and PMCA3 in the regulation of intracellular pH in steady-state conditions and during Ca2+ overload evoked by 59 mM KCl. We observed that manipulation in PMCA expression elevated pHmito and pHcyto but only in PMCA2-downregulated cells higher mitochondrial pH gradient (ΔpH) was found in steady-state conditions. Our data also demonstrated that PMCA2 or PMCA3 knock-down delayed Ca2+ clearance and partially attenuated cellular acidification during KCl-stimulated Ca2+ influx. Because SERCA and NCX modulated cellular pH response in neglectable manner, and all conditions used to inhibit PMCA prevented KCl-induced pH drop, we considered PMCA2 and PMCA3 as mainly responsible for transport of protons to intracellular milieu. In steady-state conditions, higher TMRE uptake in PMCA2-knockdown line was driven by plasma membrane potential (Ψp). Nonetheless, mitochondrial membrane potential (Ψm) in this line was dissipated during Ca2+ overload. Cyclosporin and bongkrekic acid prevented Ψm loss suggesting the involvement of Ca2+-driven opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore as putative underlying mechanism. The findings presented here demonstrate a crucial role of PMCA2 and PMCA3 in regulation of cellular pH and indicate PMCA membrane composition important for preservation of electrochemical gradient. PMID:25014339

  1. PLASMA CELL LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    de Larrea, Carlos Fernandez; Kyle, Robert A.; Durie, Brian GM; Ludwig, Heinz; Usmani, Saad; Vesole, David H.; Hajek, Roman; Miguel, Jésus San; Sezer, Orhan; Sonneveld, Pieter; Kumar, Shaji K.; Mahindra, Anuj; Comenzo, Ray; Palumbo, Antonio; Mazumber, Amitabha; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Richardson, Paul G.; Badros, Ashraf Z.; Caers, Jo; Cavo, Michele; LeLeu, Xavier; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Chim, CS; Schots, Rik; Noeul, Amara; Fantl, Dorotea; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Landgren, Ola; Chanan-Khan, Asher; Moreau, Philippe; Fonseca, Rafael; Merlini, Giampaolo; Lahuerta, JJ; Bladé, Joan; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Shah, Jatin J.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic-pathologic entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (≥ 20%) and absolute number (≥ 2 × 10 9/L) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds for diagnosis be reexamined and consensus recommendations are made for diagnosis, as well as, response and progression criteria. Induction therapy needs to begin promptly and have high clinical activity leading to rapid disease control in an effort to minimize the risk of early death. Intensive chemotherapy regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem-cell transplantation (HDT/ASCT) if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding of the pathogenesis of PCL. PMID:23288300

  2. Plasma Membrane Ca2+-Permeable Channels are Differentially Regulated by Ethylene and Hydrogen Peroxide to Generate Persistent Plumes of Elevated Cytosolic Ca2+ During Transfer Cell Trans-Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui-ming; van Helden, Dirk F; McCurdy, David W; Offler, Christina E; Patrick, John W

    2015-09-01

    The enhanced transport capability of transfer cells (TCs) arises from their ingrowth wall architecture comprised of a uniform wall on which wall ingrowths are deposited. The wall ingrowth papillae provide scaffolds to amplify plasma membranes that are enriched in nutrient transporters. Using Vicia faba cotyledons, whose adaxial epidermal cells spontaneously and rapidly (hours) undergo a synchronous TC trans-differentiation upon transfer to culture, has led to the discovery of a cascade of inductive signals orchestrating deposition of ingrowth wall papillae. Auxin-induced ethylene biosynthesis initiates the cascade. This in turn drives a burst in extracellular H2O2 production that triggers uniform wall deposition. Thereafter, a persistent and elevated cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, resulting from Ca(2+) influx through plasma membrane Ca(2+)-permeable channels, generates a Ca(2+) signal that directs formation of wall ingrowth papillae to specific loci. We now report how these Ca(2+)-permeable channels are regulated using the proportionate responses in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration as a proxy measure of their transport activity. Culturing cotyledons on various combinations of pharmacological agents allowed the regulatory influence of each upstream signal on Ca(2+) channel activity to be evaluated. The findings demonstrated that Ca(2+)-permeable channel activity was insensitive to auxin, but up-regulated by ethylene through two independent routes. In one route ethylene acts directly on Ca(2+)-permeable channel activity at the transcriptional and post-translational levels, through an ethylene receptor-dependent pathway. The other route is mediated by an ethylene-induced production of extracellular H2O2 which then acts translationally and post-translationally to up-regulate Ca(2+)-permeable channel activity. A model describing the differential regulation of Ca(2+)-permeable channel activity is presented.

  3. Plasma cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Albarracin, Flavio; Fonseca, Rafael

    2011-05-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare, yet aggressive plasma cell (PC) neoplasm, variant of multiple myeloma (MM), characterized by high levels of PCs circulating in the peripheral blood. PCL can either originate de novo (primary PCL) or as a secondary leukemic transformation of MM (secondary PCL). Presenting signs and symptoms are similar to those seen in MM such as renal insufficiency, hypercalcemia, lytic bone lesions, anemia, and thrombocytopenia, but can also include hepatomegaly and splenomegaly. The diagnostic evaluation of a patient with suspected PCL should include a review of the peripheral blood smear, bone marrow aspiration and biopsy, serum protein electrophoresis (SPEP) with immunofixation, and protein electrophoresis of an aliquot from a 24h urine collection (UPEP). The diagnosis is made when a monoclonal population of PCs is present in the peripheral blood with an absolute PC count exceeding 2000/μL and PC comprising 20% or more of the peripheral blood white cells. The prognosis of PCL is poor with a median survival of 7 to 11 months. Survival is even shorter (2 to 7 months) when PCL occurs in the context of refractory or relapsing MM. There have been no prospective randomized trials investigating the treatment of PCL. Recommendations are primarily based upon data from small retrospective series, case reports, and extrapolation of data from patients with MM. In general, patients are treated with induction therapy followed by hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in those who are appropriate candidates for this approach. The best induction regimen for PCL is not known and there is great variability in clinical practice. Newer agents that are being incorporated into frontline and salvage therapy for MM have also demonstrated activity in PCL such as Immunomodulatory agents and the use of bortezomib with different combinations.

  4. Plasma cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Albarracin, Flavio; Fonseca, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare, yet aggressive plasma cell (PC) neoplasm, variant of multiple myeloma (MM), characterized by high levels of PCs circulating in the peripheral blood. PCL can either originate de novo (primary PCL) or as a secondary leukemic transformation of MM (secondary PCL). Presenting signs and symptoms are similar to those seen in MM such as renal insufficiency, hypercalcemia, lytic bone lesions, anemia, and thrombocytopenia, but can also include hepatomegaly and splenomegaly. The diagnostic evaluation of a patient with suspected PCL should include a review of the peripheral blood smear, bone marrow aspiration and biopsy, serum protein electrophoresis (SPEP) with immunofixation, and protein electrophoresis of an aliquot from a 24h urine collection (UPEP). The diagnosis is made when a monoclonal population of PCs is present in the peripheral blood with an absolute PC count exceeding 2000/μL and PC comprising 20% or more of the peripheral blood white cells. The prognosis of PCL is poor with a median survival of 7 to 11 months. Survival is even shorter (2 to 7 months) when PCL occurs in the context of refractory or relapsing MM. There have been no prospective randomized trials investigating the treatment of PCL. Recommendations are primarily based upon data from small retrospective series, case reports, and extrapolation of data from patients with MM. In general, patients are treated with induction therapy followed by hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in those who are appropriate candidates for this approach. The best induction regimen for PCL is not known and there is great variability in clinical practice. Newer agents that are being incorporated into frontline and salvage therapy for MM have also demonstrated activity in PCL such as Immunomodulatory agents and the use of bortezomib with different combinations. PMID:21295388

  5. Plasma cells in immunopathology: concepts and therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Tiburzy, Benjamin; Kulkarni, Upasana; Hauser, Anja Erika; Abram, Melanie; Manz, Rudolf Armin

    2014-05-01

    Plasma cells are terminally differentiated B cells that secrete antibodies, important for immune protection, but also contribute to any allergic and autoimmune disease. There is increasing evidence that plasma cell populations exhibit a considerable degree of heterogeneity with respect to their immunophenotype, migration behavior, lifetime, and susceptibility to immunosuppressive drugs. Pathogenic long-lived plasma cells are refractory to existing therapies. In contrast, short-lived plasma cells can be depleted by steroids and cytostatic drugs. Therefore, long-lived plasma cells are responsible for therapy-resistant autoantibodies and resemble a challenge for the therapy of antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases. Both lifetime and therapy resistance of plasma cells are supported by factors produced within their microenviromental niches. Current results suggest that plasma cell differentiation and survival factors such as IL-6 also signal via mammalian miRNAs within the plasma cell to modulate downstream transcription factors. Recent evidence also suggests that plasma cells and/or their immediate precursors (plasmablasts) can produce important cytokines and act as antigen-presenting cells, exhibiting so far underestimated roles in immune regulation and bone homeostasis. Here, we provide an overview on plasma cell biology and discuss exciting, experimental, and potential therapeutic approaches to eliminate pathogenic plasma cells.

  6. The influence of platelet-rich plasma on myogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    McClure, Michael J; Garg, Koyal; Simpson, David G; Ryan, John J; Sell, Scott A; Bowlin, Gary L; Ericksen, Jeffery J

    2016-04-01

    The ability to expand and direct both precursor and stem cells towards a differential fate is considered extremely advantageous in tissue engineering. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) possesses a milieu of growth factors and cytokines, which have the potential to have either a differentiative or proliferative influence on the cell type tested. Here, we investigated the effect of PRP on C2C12 myoblasts. A range of PRP concentrations in differentiation media was used to determine whether a concentration dependence existed, while PRP embedded in fibres of aligned electrospun polydioxanone and polycaprolactone was used to determine whether this presence of fibres would cause any differences in response. In both cases, it was found that late myogenic markers were suppressed after 7 days in culture. However, an early differentiation marker, MyoD, was upregulated during this same time period. The results from this study represent the ability of PRP to have an influence over both myogenic proliferation and differentiation, a factor which could prove useful in future studies involved with skeletal muscle tissue engineering.

  7. Closed inductively coupled plasma cell

    DOEpatents

    Manning, T.J.; Palmer, B.A.; Hof, D.E.

    1990-11-06

    A closed inductively coupled plasma cell generates a relatively high power, low noise plasma for use in spectroscopic studies is disclosed. A variety of gases can be selected to form the plasma to minimize spectroscopic interference and to provide a electron density and temperature range for the sample to be analyzed. Grounded conductors are placed at the tube ends and axially displaced from the inductive coil, whereby the resulting electromagnetic field acts to elongate the plasma in the tube. Sample materials can be injected in the plasma to be excited for spectroscopy. 1 fig.

  8. Closed inductively coupled plasma cell

    DOEpatents

    Manning, Thomas J.; Palmer, Byron A.; Hof, Douglas E.

    1990-01-01

    A closed inductively coupled plasma cell generates a relatively high power, low noise plasma for use in spectroscopic studies. A variety of gases can be selected to form the plasma to minimize spectroscopic interference and to provide a electron density and temperature range for the sample to be analyzed. Grounded conductors are placed at the tube ends and axially displaced from the inductive coil, whereby the resulting electromagnetic field acts to elongate the plasma in the tube. Sample materials can be injected in the plasma to be excited for spectroscopy.

  9. Urothelial cell detachment and differentiation in urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Jezernik, K; Romih, R; Veranic, P

    2000-01-01

    In developing and in repairing bladder, proliferation of the transitional urothelium is followed by cell detachment--desquamation or apoptosis. Proliferation results in formation of terminally differentiated superficial cells and this process may be followed by checking the cells on the presence of differentiation markers. The formation of an asymmetric unit membrane (AUM) structure (plaque) on the cell surface is in correlation with urothelial differentiation. Thus, the microstructure of the luminal surface of the urinary bladder provides a very convenient differentiation biomarker. The surface of immature cells showed a pattern of microvilli. The progress of differentiation was associated with microvili arranged in rows finally forming the characteristic pattern of ridges in terminally differentiated cells. These results demonstrate that the characteristic surface pattern and the AUM plaque formation in the apical plasma membrane of superficial urothelial cells are associated with specific morphology, and patterns and thus help detect differentiation level of cell.

  10. Modeling Stem Cell Myogenic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Rajiv S.; Spector, Alexander A.

    2017-01-01

    The process of stem cell myogenesis (transformation into skeletal muscle cells) includes several stages characterized by the expression of certain combinations of myogenic factors. The first part of this process is accompanied by cell division, while the second part is mainly associated with direct differentiation. The mechanical cues are known to enhance stem cell myogenesis, and the paper focuses on the stem cell differentiation under the condition of externally applied strain. The process of stem cell myogenic differentiation is interpreted as the interplay among transcription factors, targeted proteins and strain-generated signaling molecule, and it is described by a kinetic multi-stage model. The model parameters are optimally adjusted by using the available data from the experiment with adipose-derived stem cells subjected to the application of cyclic uniaxial strains of the magnitude of 10%. The modeling results predict the kinetics of the process of myogenic differentiation, including the number of cells in each stage of differentiation and the rates of differentiation from one stage to another for different strains from 4% to 16%. The developed model can help better understand the process of myogenic differentiation and the effects of mechanical cues on stem cell use in muscle therapies. PMID:28106095

  11. Co(II)-mediated effects of plain and plasma immersion ion implanted cobalt-chromium alloys on the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Schröck, Kathleen; Lutz, Johanna; Mändl, Stephan; Hacker, Michael C; Kamprad, Manja; Schulz-Siegmund, Michaela

    2015-03-01

    Medical CoCr is one of the main alloys used for metal-on-metal prosthesis in patients with total hip arthroplasty. CoCr surfaces modified by nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) are characterized by improved wear resistance but also showed increased Co(II) ion release under in vitro conditions. For the first time, CoCr modified by nitrogen PIII was evaluated with regard to its effect on the osteogenic differentiation of MSC. The activity of alkaline phosphatase, the expression of the osteogenic genes Runt-related transcription factor 2, osteopontin as well as integrin-binding bone sialoprotein and the production of osteocalcin and hydroxyapatite were determined. The results of our study demonstrate that Co(II) ions released from the alloy affected the osteogenic differentiation of MSC. Distinct differences in differentiation markers were found between pristine and modified alloys for osteocalcin but not for integrin-binding sialoprotein and hydroxyapatite. Interestingly, osteopontin was upregulated in naive and differentiated MSC by Co(II) ions and modified CoCr, likely through the induction of a cellular hypoxic response. The findings of this study contribute to a better understanding of possible risk factors with regard to a clinical applicability of surface modified CoCr implant materials.

  12. Spatiotemporal Analysis of Differential Akt Regulation in Plasma Membrane Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xinxin

    2008-01-01

    As a central kinase in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway, Akt has been the subject of extensive research; yet, spatiotemporal regulation of Akt in different membrane microdomains remains largely unknown. To examine dynamic Akt activity in membrane microdomains in living cells, we developed a specific and sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based Akt activity reporter, AktAR, through systematic testing of different substrates and fluorescent proteins. Targeted AktAR reported higher Akt activity with faster activation kinetics within lipid rafts compared with nonraft regions of plasma membrane. Disruption of rafts attenuated platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated Akt activity in rafts without affecting that in nonraft regions. However, in insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF)-1 stimulation, Akt signaling in nonraft regions is dependent on that in raft regions. As a result, cholesterol depletion diminishes Akt activity in both regions. Thus, Akt activities are differentially regulated in different membrane microdomains, and the overall activity of this oncogenic pathway is dependent on raft function. Given the increased abundance of lipid rafts in some cancer cells, the distinct Akt-activating characteristics of PDGF and IGF-1, in terms of both effectiveness and raft dependence, demonstrate the capabilities of different growth factor signaling pathways to transduce differential oncogenic signals across plasma membrane. PMID:18701703

  13. Plasma Etching Improves Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunyan, S. M.

    1982-01-01

    Etching front surfaces of screen-printed silicon photovoltaic cells with sulfur hexafluoride plasma found to increase cell performance while maintaining integrity of screen-printed silver contacts. Replacement of evaporated-metal contacts with screen-printed metal contacts proposed as one way to reduce cost of solar cells for terrestrial applications.

  14. Langmuir probe differential measurement technique in inductively coupled RF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djermanov, I.; Djermanova, N.; Kiss'ovski, Zh; Tsankov, Ts

    2007-04-01

    A differential measurement technique has been proposed in order to reduce noise level and stray capacitance leakage usually affecting Langmuir probe data. The technique employs two identically designed and biased Langmuir probes, connected to an instrumentation amplifier. Both probes are immersed in plasma of approximately the same space potential, one of them being plasma current collecting probe, and the second one being isolated from plasma and serving as a pick-up probe, detecting leakage currents from parasitic capacitive coupling and noise. Avoiding averaging of probe current data is the main advantage of the proposed differential technique. Experiments in the plasma expansion region of inductively driven RF source are shown to achieve lower electron temperature and higher electron density as measured by conventional single Langmuir probe. Obtaining more sharpness of the "knee" on the characteristic, thus lowering the uncertainty in plasma potential is another true merit of the differential Langmuir probe technique.

  15. Immunophenotypic characterization of plasma cells from monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance patients. Implications for the differential diagnosis between MGUS and multiple myeloma.

    PubMed Central

    Ocqueteau, M.; Orfao, A.; Almeida, J.; Bladé, J.; González, M.; García-Sanz, R.; López-Berges, C.; Moro, M. J.; Hernández, J.; Escribano, L.; Caballero, D.; Rozman, M.; San Miguel, J. F.

    1998-01-01

    Although the immunophenotype of plasma cells (PCs) from multiple myeloma (MM) patients has been extensively explored, information on the phenotypic characteristics of PCs in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) patients is scanty and frequently controversial. Thus, the question of whether or not PCs are phenotypically different in the two disorders and whether this criteria could be useful for the differential diagnosis between MGUS and MM remains to be explored. In the present study, the immunophenotypic profile of bone marrow PCs (BMPCs) from a group of 76 MGUS patients has been analyzed by flow cytometry and compared with that of BMPCs present in both MM patients (n = 65) and control subjects (n = 10). For that purpose, a large panel of monoclonal antibodies against PC-related antigens was used together with a sensitive methodology in which a minimum of 10(3) PCs were studied. In all MGUS cases studied, two clearly defined and distinct PC subpopulations could be identified. One PC subpopulation, population A (33 +/- 31% of total PCs), constantly displayed a high CD38 expression with low forward light scatter (FSC)/side light scatter (SSC) and was positive for CD19 and negative for CD56 (only a small proportion of these PCs were weakly positive for CD56). The other PC subpopulation, population B (67 +/- 31% of total PCs), showed the opposite pattern; the antigen CD56 was strongly positive and CD19 was constantly negative, and it showed a lower CD38 expression and higher FSC/SSC values than population A. Clonality studies (cytoplasmic light chain restriction, DNA content studies, and polymerase chain reaction assessment) confirmed the clonal nature of PCs from population B and the polyclonal origin of PCs from population A. Moreover, the polyclonal PCs from MGUS displayed a phenotypic profile identical to that found in PCs from healthy individuals. By contrast, clonal PCs from all MGUS patients displayed a similar antigenic profile to

  16. Raman spectroscopic characterization and differentiation of seminal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zufang; Chen, Xiwen; Chen, Yanping; Chen, Jinhua; Dou, Min; Feng, Shangyuan; Zeng, Haishan; Chen, Rong

    2011-11-01

    Raman spectroscopy (RS) was applied for the analysis of seminal plasma in order to detect spectral parameters, which might be used for differentiating the normal and abnormal semen samples. Raman spectra of seminal plasma separated from normal and abnormal semen samples, showed a distinct difference in peak ratios between 1449 and 1418 cm-1 (P < 0.05). More efficient alternative method of using principal component analysis-linear discriminate analysis based on Raman spectroscopic data yielded a diagnostic sensitivity of 73% and specificity of 82%. The results suggest that RS combined with the multivariate analysis method has the potential for differentiating semen samples by examination of the corresponding seminal plasma.

  17. Plasma Cell Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Examination (Video) Blood Clots: Plugging the Breaks (News) Drone Sets New Record for Transporting Blood Samples (News) ... cells Am I Correct? More Videos News HealthDay Drone Sets New Record for Transporting Blood Samples TUESDAY, ...

  18. A proliferation-inducing ligand sustains the proliferation of human naïve (CD27⁻) B cells and mediates their differentiation into long-lived plasma cells in vitro via transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor and B-cell mature antigen.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yoshiko; Haneda, Masataka; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Kobayashi, Takaaki

    2015-06-01

    Long-lived plasma cells (PCs) contribute to humoral immunity through an undefined mechanism. Memory B cells, but not human naïve B cells, can be induced to differentiate into long-lived PCs in vitro. Because evidence links a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL), a tumor necrosis factor family member, to the ability of bone marrow to mediate long-term PC survival, we reasoned that APRIL influences the proliferation and differentiation of naïve B cells. We describe here the development of a simple cell culture system that allowed us to show that APRIL sustained the proliferation of naïve human B cells and induced them to differentiate into long-lived PCs. Blocking the transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor or B-cell mature antigen shows they were required for the differentiation of naïve B cells into long-lived PCs in vitro. Our in vitro culture system will reveal new insights into the biology of long-lived PCs.

  19. The anti-cancer peptide, PNC-27, induces tumor cell necrosis of a poorly differentiated non-solid tissue human leukemia cell line that depends on expression of HDM-2 in the plasma membrane of these cells.

    PubMed

    Davitt, Katlin; Babcock, Blake D; Fenelus, Maly; Poon, Chi Kong; Sarkar, Abhishek; Trivigno, Vincent; Zolkind, Paul A; Matthew, Sheena M; Grin'kina, Natalia; Orynbayeva, Zulfiya; Shaikh, Mohammad F; Adler, Victor; Michl, Josef; Sarafraz-Yazdi, Ehsan; Pincus, Matthew R; Bowne, Wilbur B

    2014-01-01

    We have developed the anti-cancer peptide, PNC-27, which is a membrane-active peptide that binds to the HDM-2 protein expressed in the cancer cell membranes of solid tissue tumor cells and induces transmembrane pore formation in cancer, but not in normal cells, resulting in tumor cell necrosis that is independent of p53 activity in these cells. We now extend our study to non-solid tissue tumor cells, in this case, a primitive, possible stem cell human leukemia cell line (K562) that is also p53-homozygously deleted. Our purpose was twofold: to investigate if these cells likewise express HDM-2 in their plasma membranes and to determine if our anti-cancer peptide induces tumor cell necrosis in these non-solid tissue tumor cells in a manner that depends on the interaction between the peptide and membrane-bound HDM-2. The anti-cancer activity and mechanism of PNC-27, which carries a p53 aa12-26-leader sequence connected on its carboxyl terminal end to a trans-membrane-penetrating sequence or membrane residency peptide (MRP), was studied against p53-null K562 leukemia cells. Murine leukocytes were used as a non-cancer cell control. Necrosis was determined by measuring the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and apoptosis was determined by the detection of Caspases 3 and 7. Membrane colocalization of PNC-27 with HDM-2 was analyzed microscopically using fluorescently labeled antibodies against HDM-2 and PNC-27 peptides. We found that K562 cells strongly express HDM-2 protein in their membranes and that PNC-27 co-localizes with this protein in the membranes of these cells. PNC-27, but not the negative control peptide PNC-29, is selectively cytotoxic to K562 cells, inducing nearly 100 percent cell killing with LDH release. In contrast, this peptide had no effect on the lymphocyte control cells. The results suggest that HDM-2 is expressed in the membranes of non-solid tissue tumor cells in addition to the membranes of solid tissue tumor cells. Since K-562 cells appear to be

  20. Neural network differential equation and plasma equilibrium solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Milligen, B. Ph.; Tribaldos, V.; Jiménez, J. A.

    1995-11-01

    A new generally applicable method to solve differential equations, based on neural networks, is proposed. Straightforward to implement, finite differences and coordinate transformations are not used. The neural network provides a flexible and compact base for representing the solution, found through the global minimization of an error functional. As a proof of principle, a two-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic plasma equilibrium is solved. Since no particular topology is assumed, the technique is especially promising for the three-dimensional plasma equilibrium problem.

  1. Differentiation of photoreceptor cells and morphogenetic function of biomembranes.

    PubMed

    Vinnikov, Y A

    1974-01-01

    Photoreceptor cells of eyes in vertebrate animals have been chosen as an example to illustrate the morphogenetic function of biomembranes in differentiation of the eye outer segments -- rods and cones. Morphogenetic function of biomembranes in photoreceptor cells involves an insertion of the heterogeneous molecule of visual pigment into the original plasma membrane. Depending on some features of visual pigment in one case cones may be produced or rods as more complicated structures may be differentiated in the other one. Some evolution aspects of photoreceptor cell differentiation have also been under discussion.

  2. Germ Cell Differentiation from Pluripotent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Medrano, Jose V.; Pera, Renee A. Reijo; Simón, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Infertility is a medical condition with an increasing impact in Western societies with causes linked to toxins, genetics, and aging (primarily delay of motherhood). Within the different pathologies that can lead to infertility, poor quality or reduced quantity of gametes plays an important role. Gamete donation and therefore demand on donated sperm and eggs in fertility clinics is increasing. It is hoped that a better understanding of the conditions related to poor gamete quality may allow scientists to design rational treatments. However, to date, relatively little is known about human germ cell development in large part due to the inaccessibility of human development to molecular genetic analysis. It is hoped that pluripotent human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells may provide an accessible in vitro model to study germline development; these cells are able to differentiate to cells of all three primary embryonic germ layers, as well as to germ cells in vitro. We review the state of the art in germline differentiation from pluripotent stem cells. PMID:23329632

  3. Regulators of Tfh Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jogdand, Gajendra M.; Mohanty, Suchitra; Devadas, Satish

    2016-01-01

    The follicular helper T (Tfh) cells help is critical for activation of B cells, antibody class switching, and germinal center (GC) formation. The Tfh cells are characterized by the expression of CXC chemokine receptor 5 (CXCR5), ICOS, programed death 1 (PD-1), B cell lymphoma 6 (BCL-6), and IL-21. They are involved in clearing infections and are adversely linked with autoimmune diseases and also have a role in viral replication as well as clearance. On the one hand, Tfh cells are generated from naive CD4+ T cells with sequential steps involving cytokine signaling (IL-21, IL-6, IL-12, activin A), migration, and positioning in the GC by CXCR5, surface receptors (ICOS/ICOSL, signaling lymphocyte activation molecule-associated protein/signaling lymphocyte activation molecule) as well as transcription factor (BCL-6, c-Maf, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) signaling and repressor miR155. On the other hand, Tfh generation is negatively regulated at specific steps of Tfh generation by specific cytokine (IL-2, IL-7), surface receptor (PD-1, CTLA-4), transcription factors B lymphocyte maturation protein 1, signal transducer and activator of transcription 5, T-bet, KLF-2 signaling, and repressor miR 146a. Interestingly, miR-17–92 and FOXO1 act as a positive as well as a negative regulator of Tfh differentiation depending on the time of expression and disease specificity. Tfh cells are also generated from the conversion of other effector T cells as exemplified by Th1 cells converting into Tfh during viral infection. The mechanistic details of effector T cells conversion into Tfh are yet to be clear. To manipulate Tfh cells for therapeutic implication and or for effective vaccination strategies, it is important to know positive and negative regulators of Tfh generation. Hence, in this review, we have highlighted and interlinked molecular signaling from cytokines, surface receptors, transcription factors, ubiquitin ligase, and microRNA as positive and

  4. Plasma cell mucositis with gingival enlargement and severe periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shalini R.; Gupta, Rajiva; Saran, Ravindra K.; Krishnan, Sriram

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cell mucositis (PCM) is a very rare, chronic, multifocal, idiopathic, non-neoplastic plasma cell proliferative disorder of the upper aerodigestive tract. The classic clinical presentation is an intensely erythematous mucosa with surface changes described variously as papillomatous, cobblestone, nodular or velvety. It is a very rare condition <50 cases reported in literature. A 72-year-old male patient complained of sore throat, stomatodynia, dysphagia, multiple oral ulcers, enlarged swollen bleeding gums and mobile teeth. There was chronic inflammatory enlargement of the gingiva and palate with severe periodontitis. Histopathological examination revealed a hyperplastic epithelium with a dense infiltrate of mature polyclonal plasma cells in the superficial layer of the lamina propria. PCM is a diagnosis of exclusion, to be differentiated from other infective, reactive, autoimmune, allergic and neoplastic disorders with plasma cell infiltrates. Management with surgical and immunosuppressive therapy is mostly ineffective with short remissions and frequent relapses. PMID:25024555

  5. Probing Mechanoregulation of Neuronal Differentiation by Plasma Lithography Patterned Elastomeric Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Ki-Hwan; Jamilpour, Nima; Mfoumou, Etienne; Wang, Fei-Yue; Zhang, Donna D.; Wong, Pak Kin

    2014-01-01

    Cells sense and interpret mechanical cues, including cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions, in the microenvironment to collectively regulate various physiological functions. Understanding the influences of these mechanical factors on cell behavior is critical for fundamental cell biology and for the development of novel strategies in regenerative medicine. Here, we demonstrate plasma lithography patterning on elastomeric substrates for elucidating the influences of mechanical cues on neuronal differentiation and neuritogenesis. The neuroblastoma cells form neuronal spheres on plasma-treated regions, which geometrically confine the cells over two weeks. The elastic modulus of the elastomer is controlled simultaneously by the crosslinker concentration. The cell-substrate mechanical interactions are also investigated by controlling the size of neuronal spheres with different cell seeding densities. These physical cues are shown to modulate with the formation of focal adhesions, neurite outgrowth, and the morphology of neuroblastoma. By systematic adjustment of these cues, along with computational biomechanical analysis, we demonstrate the interrelated mechanoregulatory effects of substrate elasticity and cell size. Taken together, our results reveal that the neuronal differentiation and neuritogenesis of neuroblastoma cells are collectively regulated via the cell-substrate mechanical interactions. PMID:25376886

  6. Probing Mechanoregulation of Neuronal Differentiation by Plasma Lithography Patterned Elastomeric Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Ki-Hwan; Jamilpour, Nima; Mfoumou, Etienne; Wang, Fei-Yue; Zhang, Donna D.; Wong, Pak Kin

    2014-11-01

    Cells sense and interpret mechanical cues, including cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions, in the microenvironment to collectively regulate various physiological functions. Understanding the influences of these mechanical factors on cell behavior is critical for fundamental cell biology and for the development of novel strategies in regenerative medicine. Here, we demonstrate plasma lithography patterning on elastomeric substrates for elucidating the influences of mechanical cues on neuronal differentiation and neuritogenesis. The neuroblastoma cells form neuronal spheres on plasma-treated regions, which geometrically confine the cells over two weeks. The elastic modulus of the elastomer is controlled simultaneously by the crosslinker concentration. The cell-substrate mechanical interactions are also investigated by controlling the size of neuronal spheres with different cell seeding densities. These physical cues are shown to modulate with the formation of focal adhesions, neurite outgrowth, and the morphology of neuroblastoma. By systematic adjustment of these cues, along with computational biomechanical analysis, we demonstrate the interrelated mechanoregulatory effects of substrate elasticity and cell size. Taken together, our results reveal that the neuronal differentiation and neuritogenesis of neuroblastoma cells are collectively regulated via the cell-substrate mechanical interactions.

  7. Pancreatic Differentiation from Murine Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sakano, Daisuke; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Kume, Shoen

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are considered as a cell source for replacement therapies for pancreatic beta cells and other organs.We identified tetrabenazine (TBZ), vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) inhibitor as a promoter of late-stage differentiation of Pdx1-positive pancreatic progenitor cells into Ngn3-positive endocrine progenitor cells. A cell-permeable cAMP analog, dBu-cAMP promotes beta cell maturation in late stage of differentiation. The induced beta cells can secrete insulin in a glucose-dependent manner.Our protocol consists of a three -step differentiation process. ES cell recapitulate embryonic developmental processes in vitro. Therefore, the ES cell differentiation system is a useful model for the understanding of molecular mechanism of beta-cell differentiation and are useful for application for future regenerative medicine.

  8. Bach2 represses plasma cell gene regulatory network in B cells to promote antibody class switch.

    PubMed

    Muto, Akihiko; Ochiai, Kyoko; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Itoh-Nakadai, Ari; Calame, Kathryn L; Ikebe, Dai; Tashiro, Satoshi; Igarashi, Kazuhiko

    2010-12-01

    Two transcription factors, Pax5 and Blimp-1, form a gene regulatory network (GRN) with a double-negative loop, which defines either B-cell (Pax5 high) or plasma cell (Blimp-1 high) status as a binary switch. However, it is unclear how this B-cell GRN registers class switch DNA recombination (CSR), an event that takes place before the terminal differentiation to plasma cells. In the absence of Bach2 encoding a transcription factor required for CSR, mouse splenic B cells more frequently and rapidly expressed Blimp-1 and differentiated to IgM plasma cells as compared with wild-type cells. Genetic loss of Blimp-1 in Bach2(-/-) B cells was sufficient to restore CSR. These data with mathematical modelling of the GRN indicate that Bach2 achieves a time delay in Blimp-1 induction, which inhibits plasma cell differentiation and promotes CSR (Delay-Driven Diversity model for CSR). Reduction in mature B-cell numbers in Bach2(-/-) mice was not rescued by Blimp-1 ablation, indicating that Bach2 regulates B-cell differentiation and function through Blimp-1-dependent and -independent GRNs.

  9. Evaluation of non-thermal plasma-induced anticancer effects on human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae-Sun; Kim, Jeongho; Hong, Young-Jun; Bae, Woom-Yee; Choi, Eun Ha; Jeong, Joo-Won; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2017-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma has been introduced in various applications such as sterilization, wound healing, blood coagulation, and other biomedical applications. The most attractive application of non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma is in cancer treatment, where the plasma is used to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) to facilitate cell apoptosis. We investigate the effects of different durations of exposure to dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) plasma on colon cancer cells using measurement of cell viability and ROS levels, western blot, immunocytochemistry, and Raman spectroscopy. Our results suggest that different kinds of plasma-treated cells can be differentiated from control cells using the Raman data. PMID:28663896

  10. Platelet-rich plasma stimulates osteoblastic differentiation in the presence of BMPs

    SciTech Connect

    Tomoyasu, Akihiro; Higashio, Kanji; Kanomata, Kazuhiro; Goto, Masaaki; Kodaira, Kunihiko; Serizawa, Hiroko; Suda, Tatsuo; Nakamura, Atsushi; Nojima, Junya; Fukuda, Toru; Katagiri, Takenobu . E-mail: katagiri@saitama-med.ac.jp

    2007-09-14

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is clinically used as an autologous blood product to stimulate bone formation in vivo. In the present study, we examined the effects of PRP on proliferation and osteoblast differentiation in vitro in the presence of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). PRP and its soluble fraction stimulated osteoblastic differentiation of myoblasts and osteoblastic cells in the presence of BMP-2, BMP-4, BMP-6 or BMP-7. The soluble PRP fraction stimulated osteoblastic differentiation in 3D cultures using scaffolds made of collagen or hydroxyapatite. Moreover, heparin-binding fractions obtained from serum also stimulated osteoblastic differentiation in the presence of BMP-4. These results suggested that platelets contain not only growth factors for proliferation but also novel potentiator(s) for BMP-dependent osteoblastic differentiation.

  11. Nuclear Mechanics and Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xinjian; Gavara, Nuria; Song, Guanbin

    2015-12-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation potential. Stem cell differentiation is a prerequisite for the application of stem cells in regenerative medicine and clinical therapy. In addition to chemical stimulation, mechanical cues play a significant role in regulating stem cell differentiation. The integrity of mechanical sensors is necessary for the ability of cells to respond to mechanical signals. The nucleus, the largest and stiffest cellular organelle, interacts with the cytoskeleton as a key mediator of cell mechanics. Nuclear mechanics are involved in the complicated interactions of lamins, chromatin and nucleoskeleton-related proteins. Thus, stem cell differentiation is intimately associated with nuclear mechanics due to its indispensable role in mechanotransduction and mechanical response. This paper reviews several main contributions of nuclear mechanics, highlights the hallmarks of the nuclear mechanics of stem cells, and provides insight into the relationship between nuclear mechanics and stem cell differentiation, which may guide clinical applications in the future.

  12. Stem cell responses to plasma surface modified electrospun polyurethane scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zandén, Carl; Hellström Erkenstam, Nina; Padel, Thomas; Wittgenstein, Julia; Liu, Johan; Kuhn, H Georg

    2014-07-01

    The topographical effects from functional materials on stem cell behavior are currently of interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here we investigate the influence of argon, oxygen, and hydrogen plasma surface modification of electrospun polyurethane fibers on human embryonic stem cell (hESC) and rat postnatal neural stem cell (NSC) responses. The plasma gases were found to induce three combinations of fiber surface functionalities and roughness textures. On randomly oriented fibers, plasma treatments lead to substantially increased hESC attachment and proliferation as compared to native fibers. Argon plasma was found to induce the most optimal combination of surface functionality and roughness for cell expansion. Contact guided migration of cells and alignment of cell processes were observed on aligned fibers. Neuronal differentiation around 5% was found for all samples and was not significantly affected by the induced variations of surface functional group distribution or individual fiber topography. In this study the influence of argon, oxygen, and hydrogen plasma surface modification of electrospun polyurethane fibers on human embryonic stem cell and rat postnatal neural stem cell (NSC) responses is studied with the goal of clarifying the potential effects of functional materials on stem cell behavior, a topic of substantial interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Myb permits multilineage airway epithelial cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jie-hong; Adair-Kirk, Tracy L.; Patel, Anand C.; Huang, Tao; Yozamp, Nicholas S.; Xu, Jian; Reddy, E. Premkumar; Byers, Derek E.; Pierce, Richard A.; Holtzman, Michael J.; Brody, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    The epithelium of the pulmonary airway is specially differentiated to provide defense against environmental insults, but also subject to dysregulated differentiation that results in lung disease. The current paradigm for airway epithelial differentiation is a one-step program whereby a p63+ basal epithelial progenitor cell generates a ciliated or secretory cell lineage, but the cue for this transition and whether there are intermediate steps is poorly defined. Here we identify transcription factor Myb as a key regulator that permits early multilineage differentiation of airway epithelial cells. Myb+ cells were identified as p63− and therefore distinct from basal progenitor cells, but were still negative for markers of differentiation. Myb RNAi treatment of primary-culture airway epithelial cells and Myb gene deletion in mice resulted in a p63− population with failed maturation of Foxj1+ ciliated cells, as well as Scbg1a1+ and Muc5ac+ secretory cells. Consistent with these findings, analysis of whole genome expression of Myb-deficient cells identified Myb-dependent programs for ciliated and secretory cell differentiation. Myb+ cells were rare in human airways but were increased in regions of ciliated cells and mucous cell hyperplasia in samples from subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Together, the results show that a p63− Myb+ population of airway epithelial cells represents a distinct intermediate stage of differentiation that is required under normal conditions and may be heightened in airway disease. PMID:25103188

  14. Characterization of Human Lysosomal Membrane Glycoproteins and Evidence for their Differentiation-Related Expression in the Plasma Membrane of Myelomonocytic Leukemia Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    and Milstein, C. (1979) Eur. Imrun n1. 9, 301-306 52. Buys, SS., Keogh, E.A., and Kaplan, J. (1984) Cell 38, 569-576 27 53. Reeves , J.P. (1984) in...1988) 1. Cell Biol. 106, 61-68 56. Pfeffer, S.R., and Rothman , J.E. (1987) Ann. Rev. Biochem.󈧼, 829-852 57. Feizi, T. (1985) Nature 314, 53-57 58

  15. Differentiation of conductive cells: a matter of life and death.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jung-Ok; Blob, Bernhard; Helariutta, Ykä

    2017-02-01

    Two major conducting tissues in plants, phloem and xylem, are composed of highly specialized cell types adapted to long distance transport. Sieve elements (SEs) in the phloem display a thick cell wall, callose-rich sieve plates and low cytoplasmic density. SE differentiation is driven by selective autolysis combined with enucleation, after which the plasma membrane and some organelles are retained. By contrast, differentiation of xylem tracheary elements (TEs) involves complete clearance of the cellular components by programmed cell death followed by autolysis of the protoplast; this is accompanied by extensive deposition of lignin and cellulose in the cell wall. Emerging molecular data on TE and SE differentiation indicate a central role for NAC and MYB type transcription factors in both processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinically granulomatous cheilitis with plasma cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Somenath; Ghosh, Sarmistha; Sengupta, Dipayan

    2016-01-01

    Plasma cell cheilitis, also known as plasma cell orificial mucositis is a benign inflammatory condition clinically characterized by erythematous plaque on lips that may be ulcerated. Histopathologically it is characterized by dense plasma cell infiltrates in a band-like pattern in dermis, which corresponds to Zoon's plasma cell balanitis. On the other hand, granulomatous cheilitis, as a part of orofacial granulomatosis, manifests as sudden diffuse or nodular swelling involving lip and cheek. Initial swelling is soft to firm, but with recurrent episodes swelling gradually become firm rubbery in consistency. We hereby report a case of cheilitis in a 52-year-old man with diffuse swelling involving lower lip, which clinically resembles granulomatous cheilitis, but histopathological examination showed diffuse infiltrate of plasma cells predominantly in upper and mid-dermis. PMID:27057489

  17. Variety of RNAs in Peripheral Blood Cells, Plasma, and Plasma Fractions

    PubMed Central

    Kuligina, Elena V.; Bariakin, Dmitry N.; Kozlov, Vadim V.; Richter, Vladimir A.; Semenov, Dmitry V.

    2017-01-01

    Human peripheral blood contains RNA in cells and in extracellular membrane vesicles, microvesicles and exosomes, as well as in cell-free ribonucleoproteins. Circulating mRNAs and noncoding RNAs, being internalized, possess the ability to modulate vital processes in recipient cells. In this study, with SOLiD sequencing technology, we performed identification, classification, and quantification of RNAs from blood fractions: cells, plasma, plasma vesicles pelleted at 16,000g and 160,000g, and vesicle-depleted plasma supernatant of healthy donors and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. It was determined that 16,000g blood plasma vesicles were enriched with cell-free mitochondria and with a set of mitochondrial RNAs. The variable RNA set of blood plasma 160,000g pellets reflected the prominent contribution of U1, U5, and U6 small nuclear RNAs' fragments and at the same time was characterized by a remarkable depletion of small nucleolar RNAs. Besides microRNAs, the variety of fragments of mRNAs and snoRNAs dominated in the set of circulating RNAs differentially expressed in blood fractions of NSCLC patients. Taken together, our data emphasize that not only extracellular microRNAs but also circulating fragments of messenger and small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs represent prominent classes of circulating regulatory ncRNAs as well as promising circulating biomarkers for the development of disease diagnostic approaches. PMID:28127559

  18. Variety of RNAs in Peripheral Blood Cells, Plasma, and Plasma Fractions.

    PubMed

    Savelyeva, Anna V; Kuligina, Elena V; Bariakin, Dmitry N; Kozlov, Vadim V; Ryabchikova, Elena I; Richter, Vladimir A; Semenov, Dmitry V

    2017-01-01

    Human peripheral blood contains RNA in cells and in extracellular membrane vesicles, microvesicles and exosomes, as well as in cell-free ribonucleoproteins. Circulating mRNAs and noncoding RNAs, being internalized, possess the ability to modulate vital processes in recipient cells. In this study, with SOLiD sequencing technology, we performed identification, classification, and quantification of RNAs from blood fractions: cells, plasma, plasma vesicles pelleted at 16,000g and 160,000g, and vesicle-depleted plasma supernatant of healthy donors and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. It was determined that 16,000g blood plasma vesicles were enriched with cell-free mitochondria and with a set of mitochondrial RNAs. The variable RNA set of blood plasma 160,000g pellets reflected the prominent contribution of U1, U5, and U6 small nuclear RNAs' fragments and at the same time was characterized by a remarkable depletion of small nucleolar RNAs. Besides microRNAs, the variety of fragments of mRNAs and snoRNAs dominated in the set of circulating RNAs differentially expressed in blood fractions of NSCLC patients. Taken together, our data emphasize that not only extracellular microRNAs but also circulating fragments of messenger and small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs represent prominent classes of circulating regulatory ncRNAs as well as promising circulating biomarkers for the development of disease diagnostic approaches.

  19. [Differential scanning calorimetry of blood plasma in breast cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Zapf, István; Fekecs, Tamás; Moezzi, Medhi; Tizedes, György; Pavlovics, Gábor; Kálmán, Endre; Horváth, Péter Ors; Ferencz, Andrea

    2012-12-01

    Breast cancer is the commonest cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Its incidence has been increasing for many years in economically developed countries. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is a thermoanalytical technique which monitors small heat changes between sample and reference materials. This examination is a validly efficient method for the demonstration of structural changes not only in the physical sciences, but in numerous human oncological diseases. The goal of this study was to measure DSC thermogram of blood plasma in breast cancer patients with different stages. Nineteen women with different tumor diameter (0.5-7.5 mm) and with or without regional lymph node metastases were involved in the study. Preoperatively peripheral blood samples were collected from the patients and from healthy controls, and plasma components were analysed by SETARAM micro DSC-II calorimeter. The diameter of the tumor tissue and the number of metastatic lymph nodes were evaluated on the basis of postoperative histological results. In the current study we found difference in changes of the thermal parameters (transition temperature, calorimetric enthalpy) of breast cancer patients' plasma components. Moreover, a tendency has been found for association of these results with tumor size and with the degree of regional lymph node involvement. Preliminary study of the clinical utility of DSC technology arises, even though there is no data in the literature. In cases of breast cancer the blood plasma may be suitable for DSC analysis for diagnosis or staging as well. In order to clarify the relationships we are planning further studies.

  20. A Transcriptional Regulatory Switch Underlying B-Cell Terminal Differentiation and its Disruption by Dioxin

    EPA Science Inventory

    The terminal differentiation of B lymphocytes into antibody-secreting plasma cells upon antigen stimulation is a crucial step in the humoral immune response. The mutually-repressive interactions among three key regulatory transcription factors underlying B to plasma cell differe...

  1. A Transcriptional Regulatory Switch Underlying B-Cell Terminal Differentiation and its Disruption by Dioxin

    EPA Science Inventory

    The terminal differentiation of B lymphocytes into antibody-secreting plasma cells upon antigen stimulation is a crucial step in the humoral immune response. The mutually-repressive interactions among three key regulatory transcription factors underlying B to plasma cell differe...

  2. Mediators in cell growth and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, R.J.; Maizel, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers divided among seven sections. The section headings are: Cell Cycle and Control of Cell Growth, Growth Factors for Nonlymphoid Cells, Colony-Stimulating Factors, Stem Cells and Hematopoiesis, Lymphoid Growth Factors, Growth Factors in Neoplasia, Interferon, and Differentiation in Normal and Neoplastic Cells.

  3. Plasma Cell Pododermatitis in a Cat

    PubMed Central

    Drolet, R.; Bernard, J.

    1984-01-01

    Plasma cell pododermatitis, an uncommon disease of unknown etiology, is described in a six year old male domestic short-haired cat. The cat was referred with a history of lameness associated with swelling, softness and ulceration of the foot pads. The history suggested a seasonal occurrence of the condition. The dermis and subcutis of the foot pads were infiltrated by inflammatory cells which were mainly plasma cells. The large number of plasma cells present in the lesions suggests an immunological basis for the condition. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:17422486

  4. An Experimental System to Study Cell Differentiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzone, Donna M.

    1994-01-01

    Uses Dictyostelium discoideum to aid in introducing cell differentiation to students. Students engage in a laboratory exercise that allows them to investigate the means by which embryonic cells choose developmental pathways. (ZWH)

  5. An Experimental System to Study Cell Differentiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzone, Donna M.

    1994-01-01

    Uses Dictyostelium discoideum to aid in introducing cell differentiation to students. Students engage in a laboratory exercise that allows them to investigate the means by which embryonic cells choose developmental pathways. (ZWH)

  6. Novel Therapeutic Effects of Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma for Muscle Regeneration and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Won; Kang, Sung Un; Kim, Yang Eun; Park, Ju Kyeong; Yang, Sang Sik; Kim, Yeon Soo; Lee, Yun Sang; Lee, Yuijina; Kim, Chul-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle can repair muscle tissue damage, but significant loss of muscle tissue or its long-lasting chronic degeneration makes injured skeletal muscle tissue difficult to restore. It has been demonstrated that non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NTP) can be used in many biological areas including regenerative medicine. Therefore, we determined whether NTP, as a non-contact biological external stimulator that generates biological catalyzers, can induce regeneration of injured muscle without biomaterials. Treatment with NTP in the defected muscle of a Sprague Dawley (SD) rat increased the number of proliferating muscle cells 7 days after plasma treatment (dapt) and rapidly induced formation of muscle tissue and muscle cell differentiation at 14 dapt. In addition, in vitro experiments also showed that NTP could induce muscle cell proliferation and differentiation of human muscle cells. Taken together, our results demonstrated that NTP promotes restoration of muscle defects through control of cell proliferation and differentiation without biological or structural supporters, suggesting that NTP has the potential for use in muscle tissue engineering and regenerative therapies. PMID:27349181

  7. ISOLATION OF PLASMA MEMBRANE FRAGMENTS FROM HELA CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Charles W.; Ford, Lincoln E.; Bond, Howard E.; Stuart, Donald C.; Lorenz, Dianne

    1969-01-01

    A method for isolating plasma membrane fragments from HeLa cells is described. The procedure starts with the preparation of cell membrane "ghosts," obtained by gentle rupture of hypotonically swollen cells, evacuation of most of the cell contents by repeated washing, and isolation of the ghosts on a discontinuous sucrose density gradient. The ghosts are then treated by minimal sonication (5 sec) at pH 8.6, which causes the ghost membranes to pinch off into small vesicles but leaves any remaining larger intracellular particulates intact and separable by differential centrifugation. The ghost membrane vesicles are then subjected to isopycnic centrifugation on a 20–50% w/w continuous sucrose gradient in tris-magnesium buffer, pH 8.6. A band of morphologically homogeneous smooth vesicles, derived principally from plasma membrane, is recovered at 30–33% (peak density = 1.137). The plasma membrane fraction contained a Na-K-activated ATPase activity of 1.5 µmole Pi/hr per mg, 3% RNA, and 13.8% of the NADH-cytochrome c reductase activity of a heavier fraction from the same gradient which contained mitochondria and rough endoplasmic vesicles. The plasma membranes of viable HeLa cells were marked with 125I-labeled horse antibody and followed through the isolation procedure. The specific antibody binding of the plasma membrane vesicle fraction was increased 49-fold over that of the original whole cells. PMID:4239370

  8. Sumoylation differentially regulates Sp1 to control cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Lili; Ji, Wei-Ke; Hu, Xiao-Hui; Hu, Wen-Feng; Tang, Xiang-Cheng; Huang, Zhao-Xia; Li, Ling; Liu, Mugen; Xiang, Shi-Hua; Wu, Erxi; Woodward, Zachary; Liu, Yi-Zhi; Nguyen, Quan Dong; Li, David Wan-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) are actively involved in regulating differentiation of different cell types. However, the functional differences between SUMO isoforms and their mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. Using the ocular lens as a model system, we demonstrate that different SUMOs display distinct functions in regulating differentiation of epithelial cells into fiber cells. During lens differentiation, SUMO1 and SUMO2/3 displayed different expression, localization, and targets, suggesting differential functions. Indeed, overexpression of SUMO2/3, but not SUMO1, inhibited basic (b) FGF-induced cell differentiation. In contrast, knockdown of SUMO1, but not SUMO2/3, also inhibited bFGF action. Mechanistically, specificity protein 1 (Sp1), a major transcription factor that controls expression of lens-specific genes such as β-crystallins, was positively regulated by SUMO1 but negatively regulated by SUMO2. SUMO2 was found to inhibit Sp1 functions through several mechanisms: sumoylating it at K683 to attenuate DNA binding, and at K16 to increase its turnover. SUMO2 also interfered with the interaction between Sp1 and the coactivator, p300, and recruited a repressor, Sp3 to β-crystallin gene promoters, to negatively regulate their expression. Thus, stable SUMO1, but diminishing SUMO2/3, during lens development is necessary for normal lens differentiation. In support of this conclusion, SUMO1 and Sp1 formed complexes during early and later stages of lens development. In contrast, an interaction between SUMO2/3 and Sp1 was detected only during the initial lens vesicle stage. Together, our results establish distinct roles of different SUMO isoforms and demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that Sp1 acts as a major transcription factor target for SUMO control of cell differentiation. PMID:24706897

  9. Arsenic trioxide and melarsoprol induce apoptosis in plasma cell lines and in plasma cells from myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Rousselot, P; Labaume, S; Marolleau, J P; Larghero, J; Noguera, M H; Brouet, J C; Fermand, J P

    1999-03-01

    Recent data have renewed the interest for arsenic-containing compounds as anticancer agents. In particular, arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has been demonstrated to be an effective drug in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia by inducing programmed cell death in leukemic cells both in vitro and in vivo. This prompted us to study the in vitro effects of As2O3 and of another arsenical derivative, the organic compound melarsoprol, on human myeloma cells and on the plasma cell differentiation of normal B cells. At pharmacological concentrations (10(-8) to 10(-6) mol/L), As2O3 and melarsoprol caused a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of survival and growth in myeloma cell lines that was, in some, similar to that of acute promyelocytic leukemia cells. Both arsenical compounds induced plasma cell apoptosis, as assessed by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining, detection of phosphatidylserine at the cell surface using annexin V, and by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling assay. As2O3 and melarsoprol also inhibited viability and growth and induced apoptosis in plasma-cell enriched preparations from the bone marrow or blood of myeloma patients. In nonseparated bone marrow samples, both arsenical compounds triggered death in myeloma cells while sparing most myeloid cells, as demonstrated by double staining with annexin V and CD38 or CD15 antibodies. In primary myeloma cells as in cell lines, interleukin 6 did not prevent arsenic-induced cell death or growth inhibition, and no synergistic effect was observed with IFN-alpha. In contrast to As2O3, melarsoprol only slightly reduced the plasma cell differentiation of normal B cells induced by pokeweed mitogen. Both pokeweed mitogen-induced normal plasma cells and malignant plasma cells showed a normal nuclear distribution of PML protein, which was disrupted by As2O3 but not by melarsoprol, suggesting that the two arsenical derivatives acted by different mechanisms. These results point to the

  10. Plasma cell gingivitis: treatment with chlorpheniramine maleate.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Aravindhan Thiruputkuzhi; Chandran, Chitraa R; Prabhakar, Priya; Lakshmiganthan, Mahalingam; Parthasaradhi, Thakkalapati

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cell gingivitis is a benign lesion of unknown etiology characterized by massive and diffuse infiltration of plasma cells into the gingival connective tissue. Clinically, it can be seen as a diffuse, erythematous, and edematous swelling involving the marginal gingiva and extending into the attached gingiva. Although usually painless, the lesion can be esthetically unappealing, especially when anterior gingiva is involved. Although the usual line of management is removal of the offending agent, this report describes the treatment of plasma cell gingivitis with the topical application of chlorpheniramine maleate (25 mg) for a period of 10 days.

  11. Utility of plasma fibrinogen in the differential diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Liu, Rui; Wu, Di; Miao, Wei; Chen, Qian; Li, Yushu; Guan, Haixia

    2015-01-01

    Background: A study had reported that a low TSH level is associated with elevated plasma fibrinogen (FIB) levels. Our purpose was to investigate the role of FIB in the differential diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis. Methods: The data of 104 patients with primary thyrotoxicosis at the First Hospital of China Medical University from July 2010 to March 2011 were analyzed and divided into three groups: 45 cases of subacute thyroiditis, 50 cases of Graves’ disease, and 9 cases of toxic multinodular goiter. The patients with subacute thyroiditis were followed up before and after the treatment. FIB levels of the three groups were compared. Results: There was no significant difference in serum TSH, FT3 and FT4 between the patients with three different causes of thyrotoxicosis (P > 0.05). The proportion of hyperfibrinogenemia in patients with subacute thyroiditis was 98%. The FIB levels of patients with subacute thyroiditis were significantly higher than those with Graves’ disease and toxic multinodular goiter (P < 0.05). Levels of ESR show a similar tendency. The FIB levels returned to normal with the remission of subacute thyroiditis. Conclusions: Elevated plasma fibrinogen is a common manifestation of the active phase of subacute thyroiditis. A FIB test can be used for the differential diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis. We can anticipate the outcome of subacute thyroiditis through the dynamic changes of FIB. PMID:25785116

  12. Nonthermal-plasma-mediated animal cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wanil; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Gyoo-Cheon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2011-01-01

    Animal cell death comprising necrosis and apoptosis occurred in a well-regulated manner upon specific stimuli. The physiological meanings and detailed molecular mechanisms of cell death have been continuously investigated over several decades. Necrotic cell death has typical morphological changes, such as cell swelling and cell lysis followed by DNA degradation, whereas apoptosis shows blebbing formation and regular DNA fragmentation. Cell death is usually adopted to terminate cancer cells in vivo. The current strategies against tumour are based on the induction of cell death by adopting various methods, including radiotherapy and chemotherapeutics. Among these, radiotherapy is the most frequently used treatment method, but it still has obvious limitations. Recent studies have suggested that the use of nonthermal air plasma can be a prominent method for inducing cancer cell death. Plasma-irradiated cells showed the loss of genomic integrity, mitochondrial dysfunction, plasma membrane damage, etc. Tumour elimination with plasma irradiation is an emerging concept in cancer therapy and can be accelerated by targeting certain tumour-specific proteins with gold nanoparticles. Here, some recent developments are described so that the mechanisms related to plasma-mediated cell death and its perspectives in cancer treatment can be understood.

  13. [Basal cell carcinoma with matrical differentiation].

    PubMed

    Goldman-Lévy, Gabrielle; Frouin, Eric; Soubeyran, Isabelle; Maury, Géraldine; Guillot, Bernard; Costes, Valérie

    2015-04-01

    Basal cell carcinoma with matrical differentiation is a very rare variant of basal cell carcinoma. To our knowledge, less than 30 cases have been reported. This tumor is composed of basaloid lobules showing a differentiation toward the pilar matrix cells. Recently, it has been demonstrated that beta-catenin would interfer with physiopathogenesis of matrical tumors, in particular pilomatricomas, but also basal cell carcinomas with matrical differentiation. This is a new case, with immunohistochemical and molecular analysis of beta-catenin, in order to explain its histogenesis.

  14. Study of plasma-induced peripheral blood mononuclear cells survival using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ranjit K; Salman, Ahmad; Mordechai, Shaul; Manor, Esther

    2013-11-01

    Components present in the acellular fraction of blood influence the blood cell survival and function and the response to biotic and abiotic factors. Human plasma and sera have been used as therapeutic agents and are known to increase cell survival. White blood cells in normal blood are exposed to plasma components in vivo, but the effect of such plasma components in vitro on adherent peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) that includes monocytes has not been fully investigated. We cultured human PBMCs with autologous plasma and observed structural variation due to plasma addition in PBMCs along with increased cell survival. Light microscopy of the cells showed increased granularity in plasma-treated cells. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to elucidate the possible mechanism by studying the changes in the biochemical composition of the cells that explained the observations. FTIR spectroscopy of plasma-treated cells show altered spectral pattern in the mid-IR region, indicating increased phospholipid levels. Heat-stable components in the plasma possibly increase the differentiation of PBMCs, as evident by increased phospholipid metabolism. The data suggest that plasma-stimulated membrane biogenesis may contribute to PBMC survival by inducing them to differentiate into antigen presenting cells (APCs) like macrophages and dendritic cells.

  15. Statistical analysis of plasma thermograms measured by differential scanning calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Fish, Daniel J; Brewood, Greg P; Kim, Jong Sung; Garbett, Nichola C; Chaires, Jonathan B; Benight, Albert S

    2010-11-01

    Melting curves of human plasma measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), known as thermograms, have the potential to markedly impact diagnosis of human diseases. A general statistical methodology is developed to analyze and classify DSC thermograms to analyze and classify thermograms. Analysis of an acquired thermogram involves comparison with a database of empirical reference thermograms from clinically characterized diseases. Two parameters, a distance metric, P, and correlation coefficient, r, are combined to produce a 'similarity metric,' ρ, which can be used to classify unknown thermograms into pre-characterized categories. Simulated thermograms known to lie within or fall outside of the 90% quantile range around a median reference are also analyzed. Results verify the utility of the methods and establish the apparent dynamic range of the metric ρ. Methods are then applied to data obtained from a collection of plasma samples from patients clinically diagnosed with SLE (lupus). High correspondence is found between curve shapes and values of the metric ρ. In a final application, an elementary classification rule is implemented to successfully analyze and classify unlabeled thermograms. These methods constitute a set of powerful yet easy to implement tools for quantitative classification, analysis and interpretation of DSC plasma melting curves.

  16. Cell division, differentiation and dynamic clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko; Yomo, Tetsuya

    1994-08-01

    A novel mechanism for cell differentiation is proposed, based on the dynamic clustering in a globally coupled nonlinear system. A simple model with metabolic reaction, active transport of chemicals from media, and cell division is found to show three successive stages with the growth of the number of cells; coherent growth, dynamic clustering, and fixed cell differentiation. At the last stage, disparity in activities, germ line segregation, somatic cell differentiation, and homeochaotic stability against external perturbation are found. Our results, providing a simple interpretation of the experiments of the preceding paper, imply that cell differentiation can occur without a spatial pattern. From dynamical systems viewpoint, the new concept of “open chaos” is proposed, as a novel and general scenario for systems with growing numbers of elements, also seen in economics and sociology.

  17. The Mechanisms of M-cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    KANAYA, Takashi; OHNO, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal M (microfold or membranous) cells are an enigmatic lineage of intestinal epithelial cells that initiate mucosal immune responses through the uptake and transcytosis of luminal antigens. Due to their rarity, the mechanisms of M-cell function and differentiation are poorly understood. To overcome this problem, experimental strategies to enrich for M-cells have been established. Transcriptome analyses have provided valuable insight, especially on the receptors for antigen uptake, and such studies have broadened our knowledge of M-cell function. In another line of investigation, we and others have begun to dissect the molecular pathways of M-cell differentiation. Among them, receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) has been identified as an essential factor for M-cell differentiation. We have focused on the M-cell inducible activity of RANKL and have been able to observe temporal transitions during M-cell differentiation by using in vivo ectopic M-cell differentiation induced by exogenous RANKL treatment. We have found that the ets-family transcription factor Spi-B is essential for functional maturation of M cells. In the absence of Spi-B, the immune response to Salmonella Typhimurium is severely impaired, suggesting that M cells are important for maintaining intestinal homeostasis. PMID:25032083

  18. Biomedical Applications of the Cold Atmospheric Plasma: Cell Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volotskova, Olga

    Current breakthrough research on cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) demonstrates that CAP has great potential in various areas, including medicine and biology, thus providing a new tool for living tissue treatment. Depending on the configuration the cold plasma sources can be used in the following areas: wound healing, skin diseases, hospital hygiene, sterilization, antifungal treatments, dental care, cosmetics targeted cell/tissue removal, and cancer treatments. This dissertation is focused on the studies of biomedical applications of cold atmospheric plasma jet based on helium flow and resultant cell responses to the cold plasma treatment. The studies were carried out on extra-cellular and intra-cellular levels in vitro. The main practical applications are wound healing and alternative to existing cancer therapy methods, areas of great interest and significant challenges. The CAP jet was built in the Micropropulsion and Nanotechnology Laboratory of Dr. Michael Keidar, as a part of multidisciplinary collaboration with the GW Medical School (Dr. M.A. Stepp) concerned with plasma medicine and bioengineering studies. Normal and cancer cells have two fundamental behavioral properties, proliferation and motility, which can be evaluated through cell migration rates and cell cycle progression. Various microscopic, spectroscopic and flow cytometry techniques were used to characterize cell responses to the cold plasma treatment. It was found that CAP effect on the cells is localized within the area of the treatment (of around ˜ 5mm in diameter). The migration rates of the normal skin cells can be reduced up to ˜ 40%. However, depending on the cell type the required treatment time is different, thus differential treatment of various cells presented in tissue is possible. The CAP effect on the migration was explained through the changes of the cell surface proteins/integrins. It was also found that normal and cancer cells respond differently to the CAP treatment under the same

  19. Schwann cells induce neuronal differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Zurita, Mercedes; Vaquero, Jesús; Oya, Santiago; Miguel, Miriam

    2005-04-04

    Bone marrow stromal cells are multipotent stem cells that have the potential to differentiate into bone, cartilage, fat and muscle. Recently, bone marrow stromal cells have been shown to have the capacity to differentiate into neurons under specific experimental conditions, using chemical factors. We now describe how bone marrow stromal cells can be induced to differentiate into neuron-like cells when they are co-cultured with Schwann cells. When compared with chemical differentiation, expression of neuronal differentiation markers begins later, but one week after beginning co-culture, most bone marrow stromal cells showed a typical neuronal morphology. Our present findings support the transdifferentiation of bone marrow stromal cells, and the potential utility of these cells for the treatment of degenerative and acquired disorders of the nervous system.

  20. Decreased Ferroportin Promotes Myeloma Cell Growth and Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhimin; Wang, He; Xia, Jiliang; Yang, Ye; Jin, Zhendong; Xu, Hongwei; Shi, Jumei; De Domenico, Ivana; Tricot, Guido; Zhan, Fenghuang

    2016-01-01

    Iron homeostasis is disrupted in multiple myeloma, a difficult-to-cure plasma cell malignancy with lytic bone lesions. Here, we systematically analyzed iron gene expression signature and demonstrated that mRNA expression of iron exporter ferroportin (FPN1) is significantly downregulated in myeloma cells and correlates negatively with clinic outcome. Restoring expression of FPN1 reduces intracellular liable iron pool, inhibits STAT3-MCL-1 signaling, and suppresses myeloma cells growth. Furthermore, we demonstrated that mRNA of FPN1 is also downregulated at the initial stages of osteoclast differentiation and suppresses myeloma cell–induced osteoclast differentiation through regulating iron regulator TFRC, NF-κB, and JNK pathways. Altogether, we demonstrated that downregulation of FPN1 plays critical roles in promoting myeloma cell growth and bone resorption in multiple myeloma. PMID:25855377

  1. Cisplatin Induces Differentiation of Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakaran, Praseetha; Hassiotou, Foteini; Blancafort, Pilar; Filgueira, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Breast tumors are heterogeneous including cells with stem cell properties and more differentiated cells. This heterogeneity is reflected into the molecular breast cancer subtypes. Breast cancer stem cells are resistant to chemotherapy, thus recent efforts are focusing on identifying treatments that shift them toward a more differentiated phenotype, making them more susceptible to chemotherapy. We examined whether the drug cisplatin induces differentiation in breast cancer cell lines that represent different breast cancer subtypes. We used three cell lines representing triple-negative breast cancers, BT-549 and MDA-MB-231 (claudin-low), and MDA-MB-468 (basal-like), along with estrogen and progesterone receptor positive MCF-7 cells (luminal). Cisplatin was applied at 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 μM, and cell viability and proliferation were measured using MTS and BrdU assays, respectively. The effect of cisplatin on the cellular hierarchy was examined by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and qRT-PCR. Cisplatin treatment of 10 and 20 μM reduced cell viability by 36–51% and proliferation capacity by 36–67%. Treatment with cisplatin resulted in 12–67% down-regulation of stem cell markers (CD49f, SSEA4) and 10–130% up-regulation of differentiation markers (CK18, SMA, β-tubulin). At the mRNA level, CD49f was down-regulated whilst β-tubulin was up-regulated in the claudin-low cell lines. SSEA4 protein expression decreased upon cisplatin treatment, but SSEA4 mRNA expression increased indicating a differential regulation of cisplatin at the post-transcriptional level. It is concluded that cisplatin reduces breast cancer cell survival and induces differentiation of stem/progenitor cell subpopulations within breast cancer cell lines. These effects indicate the potential of this drug to target specific chemotherapy-resistant cells within a tumor. PMID:23761858

  2. DNA repair in murine embryonic stem cells and differentiated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tichy, Elisia D. Stambrook, Peter J.

    2008-06-10

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are rapidly proliferating, self-renewing cells that have the capacity to differentiate into all three germ layers to form the embryo proper. Since these cells are critical for embryo formation, they must have robust prophylactic mechanisms to ensure that their genomic integrity is preserved. Indeed, several studies have suggested that ES cells are hypersensitive to DNA damaging agents and readily undergo apoptosis to eliminate damaged cells from the population. Other evidence suggests that DNA damage can cause premature differentiation in these cells. Several laboratories have also begun to investigate the role of DNA repair in the maintenance of ES cell genomic integrity. It does appear that ES cells differ in their capacity to repair damaged DNA compared to differentiated cells. This minireview focuses on repair mechanisms ES cells may use to help preserve genomic integrity and compares available data regarding these mechanisms with those utilized by differentiated cells.

  3. Activin A programs human TFH cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Locci, Michela; Wu, Jennifer; Arumemi, Fortuna; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Dahlberg, Carol; Miller, Andrew T.; Crotty, Shane

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Follicular helper T (TFH) cells are CD4+ T cells specialized in helping B cells and are associated both with protective antibody responses and autoimmune diseases. The promise of targeting TFH cells therapeutically has been limited by fragmentary understanding of extrinsic signals regulating human TFH cell differentiation. A screen of a human protein library identified activin A as new regulator of TFH cell differentiation. Activin A orchestrated expression of multiple TFH-associated genes, independently or in concert with additional signals. TFH programming by activin A was antagonized by the cytokine IL-2. Activin A’s capacity to drive TFH cell differentiation in vitro was conserved for non-human primates but not mice. Finally, activin A-induced TFH programming was dependent on SMAD2 and SMAD3 signaling and blocked by pharmacological inhibitors. PMID:27376469

  4. Differential plasma protein binding to metal oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhou J; Mortimer, Gysell; Schiller, Tara; Musumeci, Anthony; Martin, Darren; Minchin, Rodney F

    2009-11-11

    Nanoparticles rapidly interact with the proteins present in biological fluids, such as blood. The proteins that are adsorbed onto the surface potentially dictate the biokinetics of the nanomaterials and their fate in vivo. Using nanoparticles with different sizes and surface characteristics, studies have reported the effects of physicochemical properties on the composition of adsorbed plasma proteins. However, to date, few studies have been conducted focusing on the nanoparticles that are commonly exposed to the general public, such as the metal oxides. Using previously established ultracentrifugation approaches, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, the current study investigated the binding of human plasma proteins to commercially available titanium dioxide, silicon dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles. We found that, despite these particles having similar surface charges in buffer, they bound different plasma proteins. For TiO2, the shape of the nanoparticles was also an important determinant of protein binding. Agglomeration in water was observed for all of the nanoparticles and both TiO2 and ZnO further agglomerated in biological media. This led to an increase in the amount and number of different proteins bound to these nanoparticles. Proteins with important biological functions were identified, including immunoglobulins, lipoproteins, acute-phase proteins and proteins involved in complement pathways and coagulation. These results provide important insights into which human plasma proteins bind to particular metal oxide nanoparticles. Because protein absorption to nanoparticles may determine their interaction with cells and tissues in vivo, understanding how and why plasma proteins are adsorbed to these particles may be important for understanding their biological responses.

  5. Differential plasma protein binding to metal oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhou J.; Mortimer, Gysell; Schiller, Tara; Musumeci, Anthony; Martin, Darren; Minchin, Rodney F.

    2009-11-01

    Nanoparticles rapidly interact with the proteins present in biological fluids, such as blood. The proteins that are adsorbed onto the surface potentially dictate the biokinetics of the nanomaterials and their fate in vivo. Using nanoparticles with different sizes and surface characteristics, studies have reported the effects of physicochemical properties on the composition of adsorbed plasma proteins. However, to date, few studies have been conducted focusing on the nanoparticles that are commonly exposed to the general public, such as the metal oxides. Using previously established ultracentrifugation approaches, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, the current study investigated the binding of human plasma proteins to commercially available titanium dioxide, silicon dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles. We found that, despite these particles having similar surface charges in buffer, they bound different plasma proteins. For TiO2, the shape of the nanoparticles was also an important determinant of protein binding. Agglomeration in water was observed for all of the nanoparticles and both TiO2 and ZnO further agglomerated in biological media. This led to an increase in the amount and number of different proteins bound to these nanoparticles. Proteins with important biological functions were identified, including immunoglobulins, lipoproteins, acute-phase proteins and proteins involved in complement pathways and coagulation. These results provide important insights into which human plasma proteins bind to particular metal oxide nanoparticles. Because protein absorption to nanoparticles may determine their interaction with cells and tissues in vivo, understanding how and why plasma proteins are adsorbed to these particles may be important for understanding their biological responses.

  6. Platelet-Rich Plasma Greatly Potentiates Insulin-Induced Adipogenic Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Through a Serine/Threonine Kinase Akt-Dependent Mechanism and Promotes Clinical Fat Graft Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Cervelli, Valerio; Scioli, Maria G.; Gentile, Pietro; Doldo, Elena; Bonanno, Elena; Spagnoli, Luigi G.

    2012-01-01

    The potential plasticity and therapeutic utility in tissue regeneration of human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) isolated from adult adipose tissue have recently been highlighted. The use of autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) represents an alternative strategy in regenerative medicine for the local release of multiple endogenous growth factors. Here we investigated the signaling pathways and effects of PRP and human recombinant insulin on proliferation and adipogenic differentiation of ASCs in vitro. PRP stimulated proliferation (EC50 = 15.3 ± 1.3% vol/vol), whereas insulin's effect was the opposite (IC50 = 3.0 ± 0.5 μM). Although PRP alone did not increase adipogenesis, in association with insulin it prevented ASC proliferative arrest, greatly enhanced intracytoplasmic lipid accumulation, strongly increased serine/threonine kinase Akt phosphorylation and mouse monoclonal anti-sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 accumulation, and downregulated Erk-1 activity; adipogenic effects were markedly prevented by the Akt inhibitor wortmannin. PRP with insulin synergistically upregulated fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) and downregulated epidermal growth factor receptor (ErbB) expression; moreover, PRP in association prevented insulin-induced insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor and insulin receptor downregulation. The inhibition of FGFR-1, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (ErbB2) activity reduced ASC proliferation, but only that of FGFR-1 reduced adipogenesis and Akt phosphorylation, whereas the ErbB2 inhibition effects were the opposite. However, EGFR activity was needed for ErbB2-mediated inhibition of ASC adipogenesis. Clinically, the injection of insulin further ameliorated patients' 1-year PRP-induced fat graft volume maintenance and contour restoring. Our results ascertain that PRP in association with insulin greatly potentiates adipogenesis in human ASCs through a FGFR-1 and ErbB2-regulated Akt

  7. Extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue with plasma cell differentiation: Periodic acid-schiff reaction-positive Dutcher body is a diagnostic clue to distinguish it from plasmacytoma.

    PubMed

    Nasu, Atsuko; Igawa, Takuro; Sato, Hiaki; Yanai, Hiroyuki; Yoshino, Tadashi; Sato, Yasuharu

    2017-06-01

    We herein report a case of primary parotid extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma) with Dutcher bodies. An 82-year-old man presented with a 4 cm × 2.5 cm mass in the left parotid region. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) showed localized abnormal fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in the left parotid gland and lymph nodes of the left cervical region. Fine needle aspiration (FNA) cytology of the left parotid gland showed lymphoplasmacytoid cells with periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive Dutcher bodies. A subsequent excisional biopsy showed sheets of small- to medium-sized neoplastic B cells with abundant IgM in the cytoplasm as detected by immunohistochemistry. A diagnosis of stage II MALT lymphoma was made, but the patient did not receive therapeutic intervention. As previously reported, Dutcher bodies are mainly observed in B-cell neoplasms with IgM production. Because these characteristic intranuclear inclusions can be easily observed by PAS staining, the presence of PAS reaction-positive Dutcher bodies in FNA cytology can serve as a clue to differentially diagnose MALT lymphoma from plasmacytoma. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017;45:547-551. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Cell proliferation and differentiation in chemical leukemogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irons, R. D.; Stillman, W. S.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    In tissues such as bone marrow with normally high rates of cell division, proliferation is tightly coordinated with cell differentiation. Survival, proliferation and differentiation of early hematopoietic progenitor cells depend on the growth factors, interleukin 3 (IL-3) and/or granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and their synergism with other cytokines. We provide evidence that a characteristic shared by a diverse group of compounds with demonstrated leukemogenic potential is the ability to act synergistically with GM-CSF. This results in an increase in recruitment of a resting population of hematopoietic progenitor cells normally unresponsive to the cytokine and a twofold increase in the size of the proliferating cell population normally regarded to be at risk of transformation in leukemogenesis. These findings support the possibility that transient alterations in hematopoietic progenitor cell differentiation may be an important factor in the early stages of development of leukemia secondary to chemical or drug exposure.

  9. Cell proliferation and differentiation in chemical leukemogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irons, R. D.; Stillman, W. S.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    In tissues such as bone marrow with normally high rates of cell division, proliferation is tightly coordinated with cell differentiation. Survival, proliferation and differentiation of early hematopoietic progenitor cells depend on the growth factors, interleukin 3 (IL-3) and/or granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and their synergism with other cytokines. We provide evidence that a characteristic shared by a diverse group of compounds with demonstrated leukemogenic potential is the ability to act synergistically with GM-CSF. This results in an increase in recruitment of a resting population of hematopoietic progenitor cells normally unresponsive to the cytokine and a twofold increase in the size of the proliferating cell population normally regarded to be at risk of transformation in leukemogenesis. These findings support the possibility that transient alterations in hematopoietic progenitor cell differentiation may be an important factor in the early stages of development of leukemia secondary to chemical or drug exposure.

  10. Hepatic Differentiation from Human Ips Cells Using M15 Cells.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Kahoko; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Kume, Shoen

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a procedure of human iPS cells differentiation into the definitive endoderm, further into albumin-expressing and albumin-secreting hepatocyte, using M15, a mesonephros- derived cell line. Approximately 90 % of human iPS cells differentiated into SOX17-positive definitive endoderm then approximately 50 % of cells became albumin-positive cells, and secreted ALB protein. This M15 feeder system for endoderm and hepatic differentiation is a simple and efficient method, and useful for elucidating molecular mechanisms for hepatic fate decision, and could represent an attractive approach for a surrogate cell source for pharmaceutical studies.

  11. Nonthermal Plasma-Mediated Cancer Cell Death; Targeted Cancer Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byul-Bora; Choi, Yeon-Sik; Lee, Hae-Jun; Lee, Jae-Koo; Kim, Uk-Kyu; Kim, Gyoo-Cheon

    Non-thermal air plasma can kill cancer cells. However, there is no selectivity between normal and cancer cells. Therefore, cancer specific antibody conjugated gold nanoparticle (GNP) was pretreated before plasma irradiation. Stimulation of antibody conjugated GNP by plasma treatment resulted in a significant decrease in viability of cancer cells. This technology shows the feasibility of using plasma therapy for killing cancer cells selectively.

  12. Lichen Planus With Predominate Plasma Cell Infiltrate: Two Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Huyenlan; Seyffert, Jennifer; Lountzis, Nektarios I; Altman, Howard B; Oram, Christian; Purcell, Stephen M

    2017-02-01

    Lichen planus (LP) is a mucocutaneous inflammatory dermatitis of idiopathic origin that can involve the skin, mucous membranes, hair, and nails. LP has an associated set of characteristic histopathologic findings which include hyperkeratosis, vacuolization of the basal layer, Civatte bodies, wedge-shaped hypergranulosis, band-like lymphocytic infiltrate at the dermal epidermal junction, eosinophilic colloid bodies in the papillary dermis, and pigment incontinence. The infiltrate is usually composed of lymphocytes with few histiocytes, mast cells, and macrophages. The presence of plasma cell predominant infiltrate in LP has only been reported in four previous cases and 2 other cases of lichen nitidus. The authors report another 2 cases of LP with predominate plasma cell infiltrate in 2 female patients on the legs. The differential includes a drug-induced lichenoid reaction with predominate plasma cell infiltrate. However, there have been no case reports of that type of reaction. Because plasma cells are seen commonly in certain infectious diseases, malignancy, and macroglobulinemia, it is prudent to rule out those entities. Our patients responded well with a class 1 topical steroid, with improvement of their lower leg lesions within 1 month of treatment.

  13. Differentiation of programmed Arabidopsis cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, De-Yu; Shi, Ming-Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Plants express genes that encode enzymes that catalyse reactions to form plant secondary metabolites in specific cell types. However, the mechanisms of how plants decide their cellular metabolic fate and how cells diversify and specialise their specific secondary metabolites remains largely unknown. Additionally, whether and how an established metabolic program impacts genome-wide reprogramming of plant gene expression is unclear. We recently isolated PAP1-programmed anthocyanin-producing (red) and -free (white) cells from Arabidopsis thaliana; our previous studies have indicated that the PAP1 expression level is similar between these two different cell types. Transcriptional analysis showed that the red cells contain the TTG1-GL3/TT8-PAP1 regulatory complex, which controls anthocyanin biosynthesis; in contrast, the white cells and the wild-type cells lack this entire complex. These data indicate that different regulatory programming underlies the different metabolic states of these cells. In addition, our previous transcriptomic comparison indicated that there is a clear difference in the gene expression profiles of the red and wild-type cells, which is probably a consequence of cell-specific reprogramming. Based on these observations, in this report we discuss the potential mechanisms that underlie the programming and reprogramming of gene expression involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis. PMID:22126737

  14. Cancer stem cells and differentiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Sell, Stewart

    2006-01-01

    Cancers arise from stem cells in adult tissues and the cells that make up a cancer reflect the same stem cell --> progeny --> differentiation progression observed in normal tissues. All adult tissues are made up of lineages of cells consisting of tissue stem cells and their progeny (transit-amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells); the number of new cells produced in normal tissue lineages roughly equals the number of old cells that die. Cancers result from maturation arrest of this process, resulting in continued proliferation of cells and a failure to differentiate and die. The biological behavior, morphological appearance, and clinical course of a cancer depend on the stage of maturation at which the genetic lesion is activated. This review makes a comparison of cancer cells to embryonic stem cells and to adult tis sue stem cells while addressing two basic questions: (1) Where do cancers come from?, and (2) How do cancers grow? The answers to these questions are critical to the development of approaches to the detection, prevention, and treatment of cancer.

  15. A Transcriptional Regulatory Switch Underlying B-Cell Terminal Differentiation and Its Disruption by Dioxin (S)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The terminal differentiation of B cells in lymphoid organs into antibody-secreting plasma cells upon antigen stimulation is a crucial step in the humoral immune response. The architecture of the B-cell transcriptional regulatory network consists of coupled mutually-repressive fee...

  16. A Transcriptional Regulatory Switch Underlying B-Cell Terminal Differentiation and Its Disruption by Dioxin (S)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The terminal differentiation of B cells in lymphoid organs into antibody-secreting plasma cells upon antigen stimulation is a crucial step in the humoral immune response. The architecture of the B-cell transcriptional regulatory network consists of coupled mutually-repressive fee...

  17. Regulation of germinal center B-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Garcia-Ibanez, Laura; Toellner, Kai-Michael

    2016-03-01

    Germinal centers (GC) are the main sites where antigen-activated B-cell clones expand and undergo immunoglobulin gene hypermutation and selection. Iterations of this process will lead to affinity maturation, replicating Darwinian evolution on the cellular level. GC B-cell selection can lead to four different outcomes: further expansion and evolution, apoptosis (non-selection), or output from the GC with differentiation into memory B cells or plasma cells. T-helper cells in GC have been shown to have a central role in regulating B-cell selection by sensing the density of major histocompatibility complex (MHC):peptide antigen complexes. Antigen is provided on follicular dendritic cells in the form of immune complex. Antibody on these immune complexes regulates antigen accessibility by shielding antigen from B-cell receptor access. Replacement of antibody on immune complexes by antibody generated from GC-derived plasma cell output will gradually reduce the availability of antigen. This antibody feedback can lead to a situation where a slow rise in selection stringency caused by a changing environment leads to directional evolution toward higher affinity antibody.

  18. Differential expression of miRNAs in the seminal plasma and serum of testicular cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Pelloni, Marianna; Coltrinari, Giulia; Paoli, Donatella; Pallotti, Francesco; Lombardo, Francesco; Lenzi, Andrea; Gandini, Loredana

    2016-10-28

    Various microRNAs from the miR-371-3 and miR-302a-d clusters have recently been proposed as markers for testicular germ cell tumours. Upregulation of these miRNAs has been found in both the tissue and serum of testicular cancer patients, but they have never been studied in human seminal plasma. The aim of this study was, therefore, to assess the differences in the expression of miR-371-3 and miR-302a-d between the seminal plasma and serum of testicular cancer patients, and to identify new potential testicular cancer markers in seminal plasma. We investigated the serum and seminal plasma of 28 pre-orchiectomy patients subsequently diagnosed with testicular cancer, the seminal plasma of another 20 patients 30 days post-orchiectomy and a control group consisting of 28 cancer-free subjects attending our centre for an andrological check-up. Serum microRNA expression was analysed using RT-qPCR. TaqMan Array Card 3.0 platform was used for microRNA profiling in the seminal plasma of cancer patients. Results for both miR-371-3 and the miR-302 cluster in the serum of testicular cancer patients were in line with literature reports, while miR-371and miR-372 expression in seminal plasma showed the opposite trend to serum. On array analysis, 37 miRNAs were differentially expressed in the seminal plasma of cancer patients, and the upregulated miR-142 and the downregulated miR-34b were validated using RT-qPCR. Our study investigated the expression of miRNAs in the seminal plasma of patients with testicular cancer for the first time. Unlike in serum, miR-371-3 cannot be considered as markers in seminal plasma, whereas miR-142 levels in seminal plasma may be a potential marker for testicular cancer.

  19. IAA8 expression during vascular cell differentiation

    Treesearch

    Andrew T. Groover; Amy Pattishall; Alan M. Jones

    2003-01-01

    We report the characterization of a member of the auxin-induced IAA gene family from zinnia, designated zIAA8, which is expressed by mesophyll cells differentiating as tracheary elements in vitro. Transcription of zIAA8 is upregulated within 3 h after cell isolation in inductive medium,...

  20. Rethinking differentiation: Stem cells, regeneration, and plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2014-01-01

    Cell differentiation is an essential process for the development, growth, reproduction and longevity of all multicellular organisms, and its regulation has been the focus of intense investigation for the past 4 decades. The study of natural and induced stem cells has ushered an age of re-examination of what it means to be a stem or a differentiated cell. Past and recent discoveries in plants and animals, as well as novel experimental manipulations are beginning to erode many of these established concepts, and are forcing a re-evaluation of the experimental systems and paradigms presently being used to explore these and other biological process. PMID:24679530

  1. Effects of Nonequilibrium Plasmas on Eukaryotic Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    on Eukaryotic Cells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-06-1-0004 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr. Mounir Laroussi, P.I., and...plume in room air. is a dielectric barrier discharge riptions we first present the effects types of eukaryotic microalgae. e cells are presented...preliminary results on the effects 15. SUBJECT TERMS Glow discharge, Atmospheric pressure, air plasma, eukaryote , cell , non-equilibrium 19a. NAME

  2. Imaging stem cell differentiation for cell-based tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Lee, Zhenghong; Dennis, James; Alsberg, Eben; Krebs, Melissa D; Welter, Jean; Caplan, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can differentiate into a number of tissue lineages and possess great potential in tissue regeneration and cell-based therapy. For bone fracture or cartilage wear and tear, stem cells need to be delivered to the injury site for repair. Assessing engraftment of the delivered cells and their differentiation status is crucial for the optimization of novel cell-based therapy. A longitudinal and quantitative method is needed to track stem cells transplanted/implanted to advance our understanding of their therapeutic effects and facilitate improvements in cell-based therapy. Currently, there are very few effective noninvasive ways to track the differentiation of infused stem cells. A brief review of a few existing approaches, mostly using transgenic animals, is given first, followed by newly developed in vivo imaging strategies that are intended to track implanted MSCs using a reporter gene system. Specifically, marker genes are selected to track whether MSCs differentiate along the osteogenic lineage for bone regeneration or the chondrogenic lineage for cartilage repair. The general strategy is to use the promoter of a differentiation-specific marker gene to drive the expression of an established reporter gene for noninvasive and repeated imaging of stem cell differentiation. The reporter gene system is introduced into MSCs by way of a lenti-viral vector, which allows the use of human cells and thus offers more flexibility than the transgenic animal approach. Imaging osteogenic differentiation of implanted MSCs is used as a demonstration of the proof-of-principle of this differentiation-specific reporter gene approach. This framework can be easily extended to other cell types and for differentiation into any other cell lineage for which a specific marker gene (promoter) can be identified. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Transferrin is required for early T-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Macedo, M Fatima; de Sousa, Maria; Ned, Renee M; Mascarenhas, Claudia; Andrews, Nancy C; Correia-Neves, Margarida

    2004-08-01

    Transferrin, the major plasma iron carrier, mediates iron entry into cells through interaction with its receptor. Several in vitro studies have demonstrated that transferrin plays an essential role in lymphocyte division, a role attributed to its iron transport function. In the present study we used hypotransferrinaemic (Trf(hpx/hpx)) mice to investigate the possible involvement of transferrin in T lymphocyte differentiation in vivo. The absolute number of thymocytes was substantially reduced in Trf(hpx/hpx) mice, a result that could not be attributed to increased apoptosis. Moreover, the proportions of the four major thymic subpopulations were maintained and the percentage of dividing cells was not reduced. A leaky block in the differentiation of CD4(-) CD8(-) CD3(-) CD44(-) CD25(+) (TN3) into CD4(-) CD8(-) CD3(-) CD44(-) CD25(-) (TN4) cells was observed. In addition, a similar impairment of early thymocyte differentiation was observed in mice with reduced levels of transferrin receptor. The present study demonstrates, for the first time, that transferrin itself or a pathway triggered by the interaction of transferrin with its receptor is essential for normal early T-cell differentiation in vivo.

  4. Differentiation of germ cells and gametes from stem cells.

    PubMed

    Marques-Mari, A I; Lacham-Kaplan, O; Medrano, J V; Pellicer, A; Simón, C

    2009-01-01

    Advances in stem cell research have opened new perspectives for regenerative and reproductive medicine. Stem cells (SC) can differentiate under appropriate in vitro and in vivo conditions into different cell types. Several groups have reported their ability to differentiate SCs into germline cells, and some of them have been successful in obtaining male and female gamete-like cells by using different methodologies. This review summarizes the current knowledge in this field and emphasizes significant embryological, genetic and epigenetic aspects of germ cells and gametes in vitro differentiation in humans and other species, highlighting major obstacles that need to be overcome for successful gametogenesis in culture: studies reporting development of germ cell-like cells from murine and human embryonic (ESC) and somatic SCs are critically reviewed. Published studies indicate that germ cells can be consistently differentiated from mouse and human ESC. However, further differentiation of germ cells through gametogenesis still has important genetic and epigenetic obstacles to be efficient. Differentiation of germ cells from SCs has the potential of becoming a future source of gametes for research use, although further investigation is needed to understand and develop the appropriate niches and culture conditions. Additionally, if genetic and epigenetic methodological limitations could be solved, therapeutic opportunities could be also considered.

  5. Induction of differentiation in neoplastic cells.

    PubMed

    Freshney, R I

    1985-01-01

    There is now clear evidence that cells cultured from human and animal tumours can be induced to differentiate in vitro by recognised hormones, regulatory peptides, polar solvents and cytotoxic drugs. Examples can be found from several different types of tumour with the bulk of the data deriving from neuroblastoma and myeloid leukaemia. There is no clear correlation of inducer with cell type, other than some specific peptides like MSH, and agents such as dimethyl sulphoxide and dexamethasone have wide ranging activity. Steroid hormone action may require interaction between different cell types, and the inability of tumours to differentiate in situ may implicate reduced cell-cell interaction, possibly due to degradation of extracellular matrix, or to alteration of the stromal phenotype by tumour-derived factors such as peptides or prostaglandins. When differentiation has been demonstrated, it has been possible, in some cases, to correlate increased differentiation with reduced malignancy by in vitro characterisation or tumorigenicity. Conditions which induce differentiation in rat mammary carcinoma and mouse myeloma also reduce tumour growth in vivo. Clinical trials have not provided any conclusive evidence for a therapeutic benefit so far, but relatively few trials have been carried out. There is clearly a need for further investigation both in vitro and in vivo to select optimal conditions and combinations of agents for clinical evaluation.

  6. Modeling to optimize terminal stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gallicano, G Ian

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic stem cell (ESC), iPCs, and adult stem cells (ASCs) all are among the most promising potential treatments for heart failure, spinal cord injury, neurodegenerative diseases, and diabetes. However, considerable uncertainty in the production of ESC-derived terminally differentiated cell types has limited the efficiency of their development. To address this uncertainty, we and other investigators have begun to employ a comprehensive statistical model of ESC differentiation for determining the role of intracellular pathways (e.g., STAT3) in ESC differentiation and determination of germ layer fate. The approach discussed here applies the Baysian statistical model to cell/developmental biology combining traditional flow cytometry methodology and specific morphological observations with advanced statistical and probabilistic modeling and experimental design. The final result of this study is a unique tool and model that enhances the understanding of how and when specific cell fates are determined during differentiation. This model provides a guideline for increasing the production efficiency of therapeutically viable ESCs/iPSCs/ASC derived neurons or any other cell type and will eventually lead to advances in stem cell therapy.

  7. Modeling to Optimize Terminal Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gallicano, G. Ian

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic stem cell (ESC), iPCs, and adult stem cells (ASCs) all are among the most promising potential treatments for heart failure, spinal cord injury, neurodegenerative diseases, and diabetes. However, considerable uncertainty in the production of ESC-derived terminally differentiated cell types has limited the efficiency of their development. To address this uncertainty, we and other investigators have begun to employ a comprehensive statistical model of ESC differentiation for determining the role of intracellular pathways (e.g., STAT3) in ESC differentiation and determination of germ layer fate. The approach discussed here applies the Baysian statistical model to cell/developmental biology combining traditional flow cytometry methodology and specific morphological observations with advanced statistical and probabilistic modeling and experimental design. The final result of this study is a unique tool and model that enhances the understanding of how and when specific cell fates are determined during differentiation. This model provides a guideline for increasing the production efficiency of therapeutically viable ESCs/iPSCs/ASC derived neurons or any other cell type and will eventually lead to advances in stem cell therapy. PMID:24278782

  8. Endothelial Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Janeczek Portalska, Karolina; Leferink, Anne; Groen, Nathalie; Fernandes, Hugo; Moroni, Lorenzo; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) are increasingly used in regenerative medicine for restoring worn-out or damaged tissue. Newly engineered tissues need to be properly vascularized and current candidates for in vitro tissue pre-vascularization are endothelial cells and endothelial progenitor cells. However, their use in therapy is hampered by their limited expansion capacity and lack of autologous sources. Our approach to engineering large grafts is to use hMSCs both as a source of cells for regeneration of targeted tissue and at the same time as the source of endothelial cells. Here we investigate how different stimuli influence endothelial differentiation of hMSCs. Although growth supplements together with shear force were not sufficient to differentiate hMSCs with respect to expression of endothelial markers such as CD31 and KDR, these conditions did prime the cells to differentiate into cells with an endothelial gene expression profile and morphology when seeded on Matrigel. In addition, we show that endothelial-like hMSCs are able to create a capillary network in 3D culture both in vitro and in vivo conditions. The expansion phase in the presence of growth supplements was crucial for the stability of the capillaries formed in vitro. To conclude, we established a robust protocol for endothelial differentiation of hMSCs, including an immortalized MSC line (iMSCs) which allows for reproducible in vitro analysis in further studies. PMID:23056481

  9. Solar cell modules for plasma interaction evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A plasma interaction analysis in support of the solar electric propulsion subsystem examined the effects of a large high voltage solar array interacting with an ion thruster produced plasma. Two solar array test modules consisting of 36 large area wraparound contact solar cells welded to a flexible Kapton integrated circuit substrate were abricated. The modules contained certain features of the effects of insulation, din-holes, and bonding of the cell to the substrate and a ground plane. The possibility of a significant power loss occurring due to the collection of charged particles on the solar array interconnects was the focus of the research.

  10. Cell array fabrication by plasma nanotexturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontziampasis, Dimitrios; Bourkoula, Athanasia; Petrou, Panagiota; Tserepi, Angeliki; Kakabakos, Sotirios; Gogolides, Evangelos

    2013-05-01

    Cell behavior (i.e. attachment, proliferation, etc.) on nanostructured surfaces is currently a hot topic throughout the scientific community. However, studies often show diverging results due to differences in cells, local surface chemistry, and nanotopography fabrication methods. In this study, we use Oxygen plasma etching to both randomly nanotexture a PMMA surface and change its surface chemistry. We find that 3T3 cells behave quite differently on flat PMMA surfaces as compared to nanotextured ones, showing an on-off attachment behavior. Work is under progress to exploit this effect allowing selective cell capturing, and creation of cell arrays in adjacent plasma-nanotextured/smooth areas using a stencil mask during etching.

  11. Transdifferentiation of adipogenically differentiated cells into osteogenically or chondrogenically differentiated cells: phenotype switching via dedifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Mujib; Sittinger, Michael; Ringe, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Reprogramming is a new wave in cellular therapies to achieve the vital goals of regenerative medicine. Transdifferentiation, whereas the differentiated state of cells could be reprogrammed into other cell types, meaning cells are no more locked in their differentiated circle. Hence, cells of choice from abundant and easily available sources such as fibroblast and adipose tissue could be converted into cells of demand, to restore the diseased tissues. Before diverting this new approach into effective clinical use, transdifferentiation could not be simply overlooked, as it challenges the normal paradigms of biological laws, where mature cells transdifferentiate not only within same germ layers, but even across the lineage boundaries. How unipotent differentiated cells reprogram into another, and whether transdifferentiation proceeds via a direct cell-to-cell conversion or needs dedifferentiation. To address such questions, MSC were adipogenically differentiated followed by direct transdifferentiation, and subsequently examined by histology, immunohistochemistry, qPCR and single cell analysis. Direct cellular conversion of adipogenic lineage cells into osteogenic or chondrogenic resulted in mixed culture of both lineage cells (adipogenic and new acquiring osteogenic/chondrogenic phenotypes). On molecular level, such conversion was confirmed by significantly upregulated expression of PPARG, FABP4, SPP1 and RUNX2. Chondrogenic transdifferentiation was verified by significantly upregulated expression of PPARG, FABP4, SOX9 and COL2A1. Single cell analysis did not support the direct cell-to-cell conversion, rather described the involvement of dedifferentiation. Moreover, some differentiated single cells did not change their phenotype and were resistant to transdifferentiation, suggesting that differentiated cells behave differently during cellular conversion. An obvious characterization of differentiated cells could be helpful to understand the process of

  12. Signal transduction and Th17 cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    O’Shea, John J.; Steward-Tharp, Scott M.; Laurence, Arian; Watford, Wendy T.; Wei, Lai; Adamson, Adewole S.; Fan, Samuel

    2009-01-01

    The paradigm of effector T helper cell differentiation into either Th1 or Th2 lineages has been notably shaken by the discovery of a third lineage of cells that selectively produce interleukin (IL)-17. Characterization of this new subset, referred to as Th17, has provided exciting new insights into immunoregulation, host defense and the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Additionally, the discovery of this T cell subset has offered a fresh look at such concepts as lineage commitment and terminal differentiation. The transcriptional regulatory events and epigenetic modifications that control these processes are diverse and complex, and despite the rapid pace at which data continues to accumulate, many questions remain to be answered. Here we review our current understanding of the signaling pathways, molecular interactions and transcriptional events that lead to Th17 differentiation and effector function, as well as the epigenetic modifications that accompany them. PMID:19379825

  13. Differentiation of ICM cells into trophectoderm.

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, G. B.; Arechaga, J.; Muro, C.; Wells, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    It has been established previously that when inserted in the blastocyst E Ca 247 preferentially differentiates into trophectoderm in vitro. If the concept that tumors are caricatures of the process of tissue renewal is correct, then some cells from the inner cell mass (ICM), the normal counterpart of embryonal carcinoma, should be able to differentiate into trophectoderm. This has been a controversial issue. Four experiments are now reported that support the idea that ICM can differentiate into trophectoderm: 1) ICM from early blastocysts after classical immunosurgery made blastocysts in vitro; 2) ICM obtained from early blastocysts by immunosurgery using antigens other than histocompatibility ones made blastocysts in vitro; 3) ICM from early blastocysts, in which the trophectodermal cells had been labeled, contained no labeled cells following immunosurgery; and 4) In reconstruction experiments, polar and mural trophectodermal cells attached to ICM from late blastocysts failed to multiply and make blastocysts when cultured. It is concluded that like the embryonal carcinoma some ICM cells of early blastocysts have the potential to make trophectoderm. This fact is consistent with the concept that tumors are caricatures of the process of tissue renewal; and establishes E Ca 247 as a good model for study of trophectodermal differentiation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3400778

  14. Alternative splicing modulates stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ru-Huei; Liu, Shih-Ping; Ou, Chen-Wei; Yu, Hsiu-Hui; Li, Kuo-Wei; Tsai, Chang-Hai; Shyu, Woei-Cherng; Lin, Shinn-Zong

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells have the surprising potential to develop into many different cell types. Therefore, major research efforts have focused on transplantation of stem cells and/or derived progenitors for restoring depleted diseased cells in degenerative disorders. Understanding the molecular controls, including alternative splicing, that arise during lineage differentiation of stem cells is crucial for developing stem cell therapeutic approaches in regeneration medicine. Alternative splicing to allow a single gene to encode multiple transcripts with different protein coding sequences and RNA regulatory elements increases genomic complexities. Utilizing differences in alternative splicing as a molecular marker may be more sensitive than simply gene expression in various degrees of stem cell differentiation. Moreover, alternative splicing maybe provide a new concept to acquire induced pluripotent stem cells or promote cell-cell transdifferentiation for restorative therapies and basic medicine researches. In this review, we highlight the recent advances of alternative splicing regulation in stem cells and their progenitors. It will hopefully provide much needed knowledge into realizing stem cell biology and related applications.

  15. Th9 cells: differentiation and disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary CD4+ T-helper cells regulate immunity and inflammation through the acquisition of potential to secrete specific cytokines. The acquisition of cytokine-secreting potential, in a process termed T-helper cell differentiation, is a response to multiple environmental signals including the cytokine milieu. The most recently defined subset of T-helper cells are termed Th9 and are identified by the potent production of interleukin-9 (IL-9). Given the pleiotropic functions of IL-9, Th9 cells might be involved in pathogen immunity and immune-mediated disease. In this review, I focus on recent developments in understanding the signals that promote Th9 differentiation, the transcription factors that regulate IL-9 expression, and finally the potential roles for Th9 cells in immunity in vivo. PMID:23405898

  16. Blimp-1 controls plasma cell function through the regulation of immunoglobulin secretion and the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Tellier, Julie; Shi, Wei; Minnich, Martina; Liao, Yang; Crawford, Simon; Smyth, Gordon K; Kallies, Axel; Busslinger, Meinrad; Nutt, Stephen L

    2016-03-01

    Plasma cell differentiation requires silencing of B cell transcription, while it establishes antibody-secretory function and long-term survival. The transcription factors Blimp-1 and IRF4 are essential for the generation of plasma cells; however, their function in mature plasma cells has remained elusive. We found that while IRF4 was essential for the survival of plasma cells, Blimp-1 was dispensable for this. Blimp-1-deficient plasma cells retained their transcriptional identity but lost the ability to secrete antibody. Blimp-1 regulated many components of the unfolded protein response (UPR), including XBP-1 and ATF6. The overlap in the functions of Blimp-1 and XBP-1 was restricted to that response, with Blimp-1 uniquely regulating activity of the kinase mTOR and the size of plasma cells. Thus, Blimp-1 was required for the unique physiological ability of plasma cells that enables the secretion of protective antibody.

  17. Differentiation of Neural Lineage Cells from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Philip H.; Brick, David J.; Stover, Alexander E.; Loring, Jeanne F.; Müller, Franz Josef

    2008-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells have the unique properties of being able to proliferate indefinitely in their undifferentiated state and to differentiate into any somatic cell type. These cells are thus posited to be extremely useful for furthering our understanding of both normal and abnormal human development, providing a human cell preparation that can be used to screen for new reagents or therapeutic agents, and generating large numbers of differentiated cells that can be used for transplantation purposes. Critical among the applications for the latter are diseases and injuries of the nervous system, medical approaches to which have been, to date, primarily palliative in nature. Differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into cells of the neural lineage, therefore, has become a central focus of a number of laboratories. This has resulted in the description in the literature of several dozen methods for neural cell differentiation from human pluripotent stem cells. Among these are methods for the generation of such divergent neural cells as dopaminergic neurons, retinal neurons, ventral motoneurons, and oligodendroglial progenitors. In this review, we attempt to fully describe most of these methods, breaking them down into five basic subdivisions: 1) starting material, 2) induction of loss of pluripotency, 3) neural induction, 4) neural maintenance and expansion, and 5) neuronal/glial differentiation. We also show data supporting the concept that undifferentiated human pluripotent stem cells appear to have an innate neural differentiation potential. In addition, we evaluate data comparing and contrasting neural stem cells differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells with those derived directly from the human brain. PMID:18593611

  18. Differentiation within autologous fibrin scaffolds of porcine dermal cells with the mesenchymal stem cell phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Puente, Pilar de la

    2013-02-01

    Porcine mesenchymal stem cells (pMSCs) are an attractive source of cells for tissue engineering because their properties are similar to those of human stem cells. pMSCs can be found in different tissues but their dermal origin has not been studied in depth. Additionally, MSCs differentiation in monolayer cultures requires subcultured cells, and these cells are at risk of dedifferentiation when implanting them into living tissue. Following this, we attempted to characterize the MSCs phenotype of porcine dermal cells and to evaluate their cellular proliferation and differentiation in autologous fibrin scaffolds (AFSs). Dermal biopsies and blood samples were obtained from 12 pigs. Dermal cells were characterized by flow cytometry. Frozen autologous plasma was used to prepare AFSs. pMSC differentiation was studied in standard structures (monolayers and pellets) and in AFSs. The pMSCs expressed the CD90 and CD29 markers of the mesenchymal lineage. AFSs afforded adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. The porcine dermis can be proposed to be a good source of MSCs with adequate proliferative capacity and a suitable expression of markers. The pMSCs also showed optimal proliferation and differentiation in AFSs, such that these might serve as a promising autologous and implantable material for use in tissue engineering. -- Highlights: ► Low fibrinogen concentration provides a suitable matrix for cell migration and differentiation. ► Autologous fibrin scaffolds is a promising technique in tissue engineering. ► Dermal cells are an easily accessible mesenchymal stem cell source. ► Fibrin scaffolds afforded adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation.

  19. Differentiation within autologous fibrin scaffolds of porcine dermal cells with the mesenchymal stem cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    de la Puente, Pilar; Ludeña, Dolores; López, Marta; Ramos, Jennifer; Iglesias, Javier

    2013-02-01

    Porcine mesenchymal stem cells (pMSCs) are an attractive source of cells for tissue engineering because their properties are similar to those of human stem cells. pMSCs can be found in different tissues but their dermal origin has not been studied in depth. Additionally, MSCs differentiation in monolayer cultures requires subcultured cells, and these cells are at risk of dedifferentiation when implanting them into living tissue. Following this, we attempted to characterize the MSCs phenotype of porcine dermal cells and to evaluate their cellular proliferation and differentiation in autologous fibrin scaffolds (AFSs). Dermal biopsies and blood samples were obtained from 12 pigs. Dermal cells were characterized by flow cytometry. Frozen autologous plasma was used to prepare AFSs. pMSC differentiation was studied in standard structures (monolayers and pellets) and in AFSs. The pMSCs expressed the CD90 and CD29 markers of the mesenchymal lineage. AFSs afforded adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. The porcine dermis can be proposed to be a good source of MSCs with adequate proliferative capacity and a suitable expression of markers. The pMSCs also showed optimal proliferation and differentiation in AFSs, such that these might serve as a promising autologous and implantable material for use in tissue engineering.

  20. Sonic Hedgehog regulates thymic epithelial cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Saldaña, José Ignacio; Solanki, Anisha; Lau, Ching-In; Sahni, Hemant; Ross, Susan; Furmanski, Anna L.; Ono, Masahiro; Holländer, Georg; Crompton, Tessa

    2016-01-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the thymus, where it regulates T cell development. Here we investigated the influence of Shh on thymic epithelial cell (TEC) development. Components of the Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway were expressed by TEC, and use of a Gli Binding Site-green fluorescence protein (GFP) transgenic reporter mouse demonstrated active Hh-dependent transcription in TEC in the foetal and adult thymus. Analysis of Shh-deficient foetal thymus organ cultures (FTOC) showed that Shh is required for normal TEC differentiation. Shh-deficient foetal thymus contained fewer TEC than wild type (WT), the proportion of medullary TEC was reduced relative to cortical TEC, and cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules was increased on both cortical and medullary TEC populations. In contrast, the Gli3-deficient thymus, which shows increased Hh-dependent transcription in thymic stroma, had increased numbers of TEC, but decreased cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on both cortical and medullary TEC. Neutralisation of endogenous Hh proteins in WT FTOC led to a reduction in TEC numbers, and in the proportion of mature Aire-expressing medullary TEC, but an increase in cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on medullary TEC. Likewise, conditional deletion of Shh from TEC in the adult thymus resulted in alterations in TEC differentiation and consequent changes in T cell development. TEC numbers, and the proportion of mature Aire-expressing medullary TEC were reduced, and cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on medullary TEC was increased. Differentiation of mature CD4 and CD8 single positive thymocytes was increased, demonstrating the regulatory role of Shh production by TEC on T cell development. Treatment of human thymus explants with recombinant Shh or neutralising anti-Shh antibody indicated that the Hedgehog pathway is also involved in regulation of differentiation from DP to mature SP T cells in the human thymus. PMID

  1. Sonic Hedgehog regulates thymic epithelial cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Saldaña, José Ignacio; Solanki, Anisha; Lau, Ching-In; Sahni, Hemant; Ross, Susan; Furmanski, Anna L; Ono, Masahiro; Holländer, Georg; Crompton, Tessa

    2016-04-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the thymus, where it regulates T cell development. Here we investigated the influence of Shh on thymic epithelial cell (TEC) development. Components of the Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway were expressed by TEC, and use of a Gli Binding Site-green fluorescence protein (GFP) transgenic reporter mouse demonstrated active Hh-dependent transcription in TEC in the foetal and adult thymus. Analysis of Shh-deficient foetal thymus organ cultures (FTOC) showed that Shh is required for normal TEC differentiation. Shh-deficient foetal thymus contained fewer TEC than wild type (WT), the proportion of medullary TEC was reduced relative to cortical TEC, and cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules was increased on both cortical and medullary TEC populations. In contrast, the Gli3-deficient thymus, which shows increased Hh-dependent transcription in thymic stroma, had increased numbers of TEC, but decreased cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on both cortical and medullary TEC. Neutralisation of endogenous Hh proteins in WT FTOC led to a reduction in TEC numbers, and in the proportion of mature Aire-expressing medullary TEC, but an increase in cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on medullary TEC. Likewise, conditional deletion of Shh from TEC in the adult thymus resulted in alterations in TEC differentiation and consequent changes in T cell development. TEC numbers, and the proportion of mature Aire-expressing medullary TEC were reduced, and cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on medullary TEC was increased. Differentiation of mature CD4 and CD8 single positive thymocytes was increased, demonstrating the regulatory role of Shh production by TEC on T cell development. Treatment of human thymus explants with recombinant Shh or neutralising anti-Shh antibody indicated that the Hedgehog pathway is also involved in regulation of differentiation from DP to mature SP T cells in the human thymus.

  2. Plasma cell treatment device Plasma-on-Chip: Monitoring plasma-generated reactive species in microwells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jun-Seok; Kojima, Shinya; Sasaki, Minoru; Hatta, Akimitsu; Kumagai, Shinya

    2017-02-08

    We have developed a plasma cell treatment device called Plasma-on-Chip that enables the real-time monitoring of a single cell culture during plasma treatment. The device consists of three parts: 1) microwells for cell culture, 2) a microplasma device for generating reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) for use in cell treatment, and 3) through-holes (microchannels) that connect each microwell with the microplasma region for RONS delivery. Here, we analysed the delivery of the RONS to the liquid culture medium stored in the microwells. We developed a simple experimental set-up using a microdevice and applied in situ ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy with high sensitivity for detecting RONS in liquid. The plasma-generated RONS were delivered into the liquid culture medium via the through-holes fabricated into the microdevice. The RONS concentrations were on the order of 10-100 μM depending on the size of the through-holes. In contrast, we found that the amount of dissolved oxygen was almost constant. To investigate the process of RONS generation, we numerically analysed the gas flow in the through-holes. We suggest that the circulating gas flow in the through-holes promotes the interaction between the plasma (ionised gas) and the liquid, resulting in enhanced RONS concentrations.

  3. Plasma cell treatment device Plasma-on-Chip: Monitoring plasma-generated reactive species in microwells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jun-Seok; Kojima, Shinya; Sasaki, Minoru; Hatta, Akimitsu; Kumagai, Shinya

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a plasma cell treatment device called Plasma-on-Chip that enables the real-time monitoring of a single cell culture during plasma treatment. The device consists of three parts: 1) microwells for cell culture, 2) a microplasma device for generating reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) for use in cell treatment, and 3) through-holes (microchannels) that connect each microwell with the microplasma region for RONS delivery. Here, we analysed the delivery of the RONS to the liquid culture medium stored in the microwells. We developed a simple experimental set-up using a microdevice and applied in situ ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy with high sensitivity for detecting RONS in liquid. The plasma-generated RONS were delivered into the liquid culture medium via the through-holes fabricated into the microdevice. The RONS concentrations were on the order of 10-100 μM depending on the size of the through-holes. In contrast, we found that the amount of dissolved oxygen was almost constant. To investigate the process of RONS generation, we numerically analysed the gas flow in the through-holes. We suggest that the circulating gas flow in the through-holes promotes the interaction between the plasma (ionised gas) and the liquid, resulting in enhanced RONS concentrations.

  4. Plasma cell treatment device Plasma-on-Chip: Monitoring plasma-generated reactive species in microwells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jun-Seok; Kojima, Shinya; Sasaki, Minoru; Hatta, Akimitsu; Kumagai, Shinya

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a plasma cell treatment device called Plasma-on-Chip that enables the real-time monitoring of a single cell culture during plasma treatment. The device consists of three parts: 1) microwells for cell culture, 2) a microplasma device for generating reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) for use in cell treatment, and 3) through-holes (microchannels) that connect each microwell with the microplasma region for RONS delivery. Here, we analysed the delivery of the RONS to the liquid culture medium stored in the microwells. We developed a simple experimental set-up using a microdevice and applied in situ ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy with high sensitivity for detecting RONS in liquid. The plasma-generated RONS were delivered into the liquid culture medium via the through-holes fabricated into the microdevice. The RONS concentrations were on the order of 10–100 μM depending on the size of the through-holes. In contrast, we found that the amount of dissolved oxygen was almost constant. To investigate the process of RONS generation, we numerically analysed the gas flow in the through-holes. We suggest that the circulating gas flow in the through-holes promotes the interaction between the plasma (ionised gas) and the liquid, resulting in enhanced RONS concentrations. PMID:28176800

  5. Stem cell regulation: Implications when differentiated cells regulate symmetric stem cell division.

    PubMed

    Høyem, Marte Rørvik; Måløy, Frode; Jakobsen, Per; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2015-09-07

    We use a mathematical model to show that if symmetric stem cell division is regulated by differentiated cells, then changes in the population dynamics of the differentiated cells can lead to changes in the population dynamics of the stem cells. More precisely, the relative fitness of the stem cells can be affected by modifying the death rate of the differentiated cells. This result is interesting because stem cells are less sensitive than differentiated cells to environmental factors, such as medical therapy. Our result implies that stem cells can be manipulated indirectly by medical treatments that target the differentiated cells.

  6. Asymptotic phases in a cell differentiation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Avner; Kao, Chiu-Yen; Shih, Chih-Wen

    T cells of the immune system, upon maturation, differentiate into either Th1 or Th2 cells that have different functions. The decision to which cell type to differentiate depends on the concentrations of transcription factors T-bet ( x) and GATA-3 ( x). The population density of the T cells, ϕ(t,x,x), satisfies a conservation law ∂ϕ/∂t+(∂/∂x)(fϕ)+(∂/∂x)(fϕ)=gϕ where f depends on (t,x,x) and, in a nonlinear nonlocal way, on ϕ. It is proved that, as t→∞, ϕ(t,x,x) converges to a linear combination of 1, 2, or 4 Dirac measures. Numerical simulations and their biological implications are discussed.

  7. Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie; Fardel, Olivier; Vernhet, Laurent

    2013-01-15

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the antileukemic trivalent inorganic arsenic prevents the development of severe pro-inflammatory diseases mediated by excessive Th1 and Th17 cell responses. Differentiation of Th1 and Th17 subsets is mainly regulated by interleukins (ILs) secreted from dendritic cells (DCs) and the ability of inorganic arsenic to impair interferon-γ and IL-17 secretion by interfering with the physiology of DCs is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that high concentrations of sodium arsenite (As(III), 1–2 μM) clinically achievable in plasma of arsenic-treated patients, block differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytes into immature DCs (iDCs) by inducing their necrosis. Differentiation of monocytes in the presence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) (0.1 to 0.5 μM) only slightly impacts endocytotic activity of iDCs or expression of co-stimulatory molecules in cells activated with lipopolysaccharide. However, this differentiation in the presence of As(III) strongly represses secretion of IL-12p70 and IL-23, two major regulators of Th1 and Th17 activities, from iDCs stimulated with different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in metalloid-free medium. Such As(III)-exposed DCs also exhibit reduced mRNA levels of IL12A and/or IL12B genes when activated with TLR agonists. Finally, differentiation of monocytes with non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) subsequently reduces the ability of activated DCs to stimulate the release of interferon-γ and IL-17 from Th cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that clinically relevant concentrations of inorganic arsenic markedly impair in vitro differentiation and functions of DCs, which may contribute to the putative beneficial effects of the metalloid towards inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Highlights: ► Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells (DCs) ► Arsenite (> 1 μM) blocks differentiation of dendritic cells by

  8. Tcf15 Primes Pluripotent Cells for Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Owen R.; Lin, Chia-Yi; Radzisheuskaya, Aliaksandra; Zhou, Xinzhi; Taube, Jessica; Blin, Guillaume; Waterhouse, Anna; Smith, Andrew J.H.; Lowell, Sally

    2013-01-01

    Summary The events that prime pluripotent cells for differentiation are not well understood. Inhibitor of DNA binding/differentiation (Id) proteins, which are inhibitors of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor activity, contribute to pluripotency by blocking sequential transitions toward differentiation. Using yeast-two-hybrid screens, we have identified Id-regulated transcription factors that are expressed in embryonic stem cells (ESCs). One of these, Tcf15, is also expressed in the embryonic day 4.5 embryo and is specifically associated with a novel subpopulation of primed ESCs. An Id-resistant form of Tcf15 rapidly downregulates Nanog and accelerates somatic lineage commitment. We propose that because Tcf15 can be held in an inactive state through Id activity, it may prime pluripotent cells for entry to somatic lineages upon downregulation of Id. We also find that Tcf15 expression is dependent on fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling, providing an explanation for how FGF can prime for differentiation without driving cells out of the pluripotent state. PMID:23395635

  9. Differentiated human stem cells resemble fetal, not adult, β cells.

    PubMed

    Hrvatin, Sinisa; O'Donnell, Charles W; Deng, Francis; Millman, Jeffrey R; Pagliuca, Felicia Walton; DiIorio, Philip; Rezania, Alireza; Gifford, David K; Melton, Douglas A

    2014-02-25

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have the potential to generate any human cell type, and one widely recognized goal is to make pancreatic β cells. To this end, comparisons between differentiated cell types produced in vitro and their in vivo counterparts are essential to validate hPSC-derived cells. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of sorted insulin-expressing (INS(+)) cells derived from three independent hPSC lines, human fetal pancreata, and adult human islets points to two major conclusions: (i) Different hPSC lines produce highly similar INS(+) cells and (ii) hPSC-derived INS(+) (hPSC-INS(+)) cells more closely resemble human fetal β cells than adult β cells. This study provides a direct comparison of transcriptional programs between pure hPSC-INS(+) cells and true β cells and provides a catalog of genes whose manipulation may convert hPSC-INS(+) cells into functional β cells.

  10. Semen promotes the differentiation of tolerogenic dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Remes Lenicov, Federico; Rodriguez Rodrigues, Christian; Sabatté, Juan; Cabrini, Mercedes; Jancic, Carolina; Ostrowski, Matías; Merlotti, Antonela; Gonzalez, Heidi; Alonso, Andrea; Pasqualini, Rodolfo A; Davio, Carlos; Geffner, Jorge; Ceballos, Ana

    2012-11-15

    Seminal plasma is not just a carrier for spermatozoa. It contains high concentrations of cytokines, chemokines, and other biological compounds that are able to exert potent effects on the immune system of the receptive partner. Previous studies have shown that semen induces an acute inflammatory response at the female genital mucosa after coitus. Moreover, it induces regulatory mechanisms that allow the fetus (a semiallograft) to grow and develop in the uterus. The mechanisms underlying these regulatory mechanisms, however, are poorly understood. In this study, we show that seminal plasma redirects the differentiation of human dendritic cells (DCs) toward a regulatory profile. DCs differentiated from human monocytes in the presence of high dilutions of seminal plasma did not express CD1a but showed high levels of CD14. They were unable to develop a fully mature phenotype in response to LPS, TNF-α, CD40L, Pam2CSK4 (TLR2/6 agonist), or Pam3CSK4 (TLR1/2 agonist). Upon activation, they produced low amounts of the inflammatory cytokines IL-12p70, IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6, but expressed a high ability to produce IL-10 and TGF-β. Inhibition of the PG receptors E-prostanoid receptors 2 and 4 prevented the tolerogenic effect induced by seminal plasma on the phenotype and function of DCs, suggesting that E-series PGs play a major role. By promoting a tolerogenic profile in DCs, seminal plasma might favor fertility, but might also compromise the capacity of the receptive partner to mount an effective immune response against sexually transmitted pathogens.

  11. Immunohistological analysis in diagnosis of plasma cell myeloma based on cytoplasmic kappa/lambda ratio of CD38-positive plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shoko; Yokote, Taiji; Hirata, Yuji; Iwaki, Kazuki; Akioka, Toshikazu; Miyoshi, Takuji; Nishiwaki, Uta; Masuda, Yuki; Hiraoka, Nobuya; Takayama, Ayami; Nishimura, Yasuichiro; Tsuji, Motomu; Hanafusa, Toshiaki

    2012-11-01

    The accurate determination of cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (cIg) light chain (LC) expression is important to differentiate reactive plasmacytosis from a clonal plasma cell neoplasm such as plasma cell myeloma (PCM). Through retrospective analysis, we studied the cytoplasmic kappa/lambda ratio of CD38-positive plasma cells in the bone marrow from 19 PCM patients and 19 controls. To demonstrate cIg LC expression, the bone marrow was immunostained for IgA, IgG, IgM, kappa, and lambda. The kappa/lambda ratio was defined as the ratio of the kappa-positive cell to the lambda-positive cell in plasma cells. PCM cells were distinguished from normal plasma cells by cut-off levels between 0.59 and 4.0, a sensitivity of 94.7%, and a specificity of 94.7%. The detection of the cytoplasmic kappa/lambda ratio of CD38-positive plasma cells may be a useful tool in the diagnosis of PCM and the correct diagnosis of PCM may be achieved more simply.

  12. Differential diagnosis of azoospermia with proteomic biomarkers ECM1 and TEX101 quantified in seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Drabovich, Andrei P; Dimitromanolakis, Apostolos; Saraon, Punit; Soosaipillai, Antoninus; Batruch, Ihor; Mullen, Brendan; Jarvi, Keith; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2013-11-20

    Male fertility problems range from diminished production of sperm, or oligozoospermia, to nonmeasurable levels of sperm in semen, or azoospermia, which is diagnosed in nearly 2% of men in the general population. Testicular biopsy is the only definitive diagnostic method to distinguish between obstructive (OA) and nonobstructive (NOA) azoospermia and to identify the NOA subtypes of hypospermatogenesis, maturation arrest and Sertoli cell-only syndrome. We measured by selected reaction monitoring assay 18 biomarker candidates in 119 seminal plasma samples from men with normal spermatogenesis and azoospermia, and identified two proteins, epididymis-expressed ECM1 and testis-expressed TEX101, which differentiated OA and NOA with high specificities and sensitivities. The performance of ECM1 was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. On the basis of a cutoff level of 2.3 μg/ml derived from the current data, we could distinguish OA from normal spermatogenesis with 100% specificity, and OA from NOA with 73% specificity, at 100% sensitivity. Immunohistochemistry and an immunoenrichment mass spectrometry-based assay revealed the differential expression of TEX101 in distinct NOA subtypes. TEX101 semen concentrations differentiated Sertoli cell-only syndrome from the other categories of NOA. As a result, we propose a simple two-biomarker decision tree for the differential diagnosis of OA and NOA and, in addition, for the differentiation of NOA subtypes. Clinical assays for ECM1 and TEX101 have the potential to replace most of the diagnostic testicular biopsies and facilitate the prediction of outcome of sperm retrieval procedures, thus increasing the reliability and success of assisted reproduction techniques.

  13. Incidentally detected clear cell renal cell carcinoma with rhabdoid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Venkatesh; Gowda, Kiran Krishne; Rao, Raman Narayana

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma with rhabdoid differentiation (RCC-R) has an aggressive biologic behavior and poor prognosis. A recent consensus statement of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) proposed a nucleolar grading system (ISUP grade) for RCC to replace Fuhrman system and recommended reporting the presence of rhabdoid differentiation and considering tumors with rhabdoid differentiation to be ISUP Grade 4. We report a case of incidentally detected clear cell RCC-R in a 52-year-old man. This is one of the earliest cases of RCC-R (pT1b) detected and first such case from Indian subcontinent.

  14. BCOR regulates myeloid cell proliferation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Qi; Gearhart, Micah D.; Gery, Sigal; Shojaee, Seyedmehdi; Yang, Henry; Sun, Haibo; Lin, De-chen; Bai, Jing-wen; Mead, Monica; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Chen, Qi; Chien, Wen-wen; Alkan, Serhan; Alpermann, Tamara; Haferlach, Torsten; Müschen, Markus; Bardwell, Vivian J.; Koeffler, H. Phillip

    2016-01-01

    BCOR is a component of a variant Polycomb group repressive complex 1 (PRC1). Recently, we and others reported recurrent somatic BCOR loss-of-function mutations in myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML). However, the role of BCOR in normal hematopoiesis is largely unknown. Here, we explored the function of BCOR in myeloid cells using myeloid murine models with Bcor conditional loss-of-function or overexpression alleles. Bcor mutant bone marrow cells showed significantly higher proliferation and differentiation rates with upregulated expression of Hox genes. Mutation of Bcor reduced protein levels of RING1B, an H2A ubiquitin ligase subunit of PRC1 family complexes and reduced H2AK119ub upstream of upregulated HoxA genes. Global RNA expression profiling in murine cells and AML patient samples with BCOR loss-of-function mutation suggested that loss of BCOR expression is associated with enhanced cell proliferation and myeloid differentiation. Our results strongly suggest that BCOR plays an indispensable role in hematopoiesis by inhibiting myeloid cell proliferation and differentiation and offer a mechanistic explanation for how BCOR regulates gene expression such as Hox genes. PMID:26847029

  15. Plasma-Sprayed Titanium Patterns for Enhancing Early Cell Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yunqi; Xie, Youtao; Pan, Houhua; Zheng, Xuebin; Huang, Liping; Ji, Fang; Li, Kai

    2016-06-01

    Titanium coating has been widely used as a biocompatible metal in biomedical applications. However, the early cell responses and long-term fixation of titanium implants are not satisfied. To obviate these defects, in this paper, micro-post arrays with various widths (150-1000 μm) and intervals (100-300 μm) were fabricated on the titanium substrate by template-assisted plasma spraying technology. In vitro cell culture experiments showed that MC3T3-E1 cells exhibited significantly higher osteogenic differentiation as well as slightly improved adhesion and proliferation on the micro-patterned coatings compared with the traditional one. The cell number on the pattern with 1000 µm width reached 130% after 6 days of incubation, and the expressions of osteopontin (OPN) as well as osteocalcin (OC) were doubled. No obvious difference was found in cell adhesion on various size patterns. The present micro-patterned coatings proposed a new modification method for the traditional plasma spraying technology to enhance the early cell responses and convenience for the bone in-growth.

  16. Biclonal IgD and IgM Plasma Cell Myeloma: A Report of Two Cases and a Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongchuan W; Kotsikogianni, Ioanna; Raval, Jay S; Roth, Christine G; Rollins-Raval, Marian A

    2013-01-01

    Biclonal plasma cell myelomas producing two different isotypes of immunoglobulins are extremely rare entities; to date, the combination of IgD and IgM secretion by a biclonal plasma cell myeloma has not been reported. Bone marrow biopsy immunohistochemical studies in two cases revealed neoplastic plasma cells coexpressing IgD and IgM, but serum protein electrophoresis identified only the IgM monoclonal paraprotein in both cases. Biclonal plasma cell myelomas, while currently not well characterized in terms of their clinical behavior, should be distinguished from B-cell lymphoma with plasmacytic differentiation, given the different therapeutic implications. Both cases reported herein demonstrated chemotherapy-resistant clinical courses.

  17. Rethinking differentiation: stem cells, regeneration, and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2014-03-27

    Cell differentiation is an essential process for the development, growth, reproduction, and longevity of all multicellular organisms, and its regulation has been the focus of intense investigation for the past four decades. The study of natural and induced stem cells has ushered an age of re-examination of what it means to be a stem or a differentiated cell. Past and recent discoveries in plants and animals, as well as novel experimental manipulations, are beginning to erode many of these established concepts and are forcing a re-evaluation of the experimental systems and paradigms presently being used to explore these and other biological process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Importance of symplasmic communication in cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Marzec, Marek; Kurczynska, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Symplasmic communication via plasmodesmata (PD) is part of the system of information exchange between plant cells. Molecules that pass through the PD include ions, some hormones, minerals, amino acids, and sugars but also proteins, transcription factors, and different classes of RNA, and as such PD can participate in the coordination of plant growth and development. This review summarizes the current literature on this subject and the role of PD in signal exchange, the importance of symplasmic communication and symplasmic domains in plant cell differentiation, and highlights the future prospective in the exploration of PD functions in plants. Moreover, this review also describes the potential use of barley root epidermis and non-zygotic embryogenesis in study of symplasmic communication during cell differentiation.

  19. Importance of symplasmic communication in cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Marzec, Marek; Kurczynska, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Symplasmic communication via plasmodesmata (PD) is part of the system of information exchange between plant cells. Molecules that pass through the PD include ions, some hormones, minerals, amino acids, and sugars but also proteins, transcription factors, and different classes of RNA, and as such PD can participate in the coordination of plant growth and development. This review summarizes the current literature on this subject and the role of PD in signal exchange, the importance of symplasmic communication and symplasmic domains in plant cell differentiation, and highlights the future prospective in the exploration of PD functions in plants. Moreover, this review also describes the potential use of barley root epidermis and non-zygotic embryogenesis in study of symplasmic communication during cell differentiation. PMID:24476959

  20. Differentiation of Club Cells to Alveolar Epithelial Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Dahai; Soh, Boon-Seng; Yin, Lu; Hu, Guangan; Chen, Qingfeng; Choi, Hyungwon; Han, Jongyoon; Chow, Vincent T. K.; Chen, Jianzhu

    2017-01-01

    Club cells are known to function as regional progenitor cells to repair the bronchiolar epithelium in response to lung damage. By lineage tracing in mice, we have shown recently that club cells also give rise to alveolar type 2 cells (AT2s) and alveolar type 1 cells (AT1s) during the repair of the damaged alveolar epithelium. Here, we show that when highly purified, anatomically and phenotypically confirmed club cells are seeded in 3-dimensional culture either in bulk or individually, they proliferate and differentiate into both AT2- and AT1-like cells and form alveolar-like structures. This differentiation was further confirmed by transcriptomic analysis of freshly isolated club cells and their cultured progeny. Freshly isolated club cells express Sca-1 and integrin α6, markers commonly used to characterize lung stem/progenitor cells. Together, current study for the first time isolated highly purified club cells for in vitro study and demonstrated club cells’ capacity to differentiate into alveolar epithelial cells at the single-cell level. PMID:28128362

  1. Replication of prions in differentiated muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Allen; Aiken, Judd M; McKenzie, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated that prions accumulate to high levels in non-proliferative C2C12 myotubes. C2C12 cells replicate as myoblasts but can be differentiated into myotubes. Earlier studies indicated that C2C12 myoblasts are not competent for prion replication. (1) We confirmed that observation and demonstrated, for the first time, that while replicative myoblasts do not accumulate PrP(Sc), differentiated post-mitotic myotube cultures replicate prions robustly. Here we extend our observations and describe the implication and utility of this system for replicating prions.

  2. Cytomegalovirus causes a latent infection in undifferentiated cells and is activated by induction of cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Dutko, FJ; Oldstone, MBA

    1981-01-01

    Murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) does not productively infect OTT6050AF1 BrdU, F9, or PCC4 undifferentiated murine teratocarcinoma cell lines, as shown by immunofluorescence assays for viral antigens and by plaque assays for infectious virus. However, these cells were infected by a variety of other viruses. MCMV does productively infect PYS2 and OTT F12 differentiated murine teratocarcinoma cell lines. The replication of MCMV in the pluripotent PCC4 cell line was examined in detail. Undifferentiated PCC4 cells could be differentiated when propagated in the presence of dimethylacetamide, as judged by changes in the expression of H-2 antigens on the cell surface. Several viruses, including lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, herpes simplex virus type 1, and vesicular stomatitis virus, replicated to a similar extent in differentiated and undifferentiated PCC4 cells. MCMV did productively infect differentiated PCC4 cells. In contrast, MCMV did not produce infectious virus, viral antigens, or substantial viral RNA in undifferentiated PCC4 cells. The molecular block of MCMV replication occurred at the level of MCMV RNA transcription. Undifferentiated PCC4 cells have receptors for MCMV and bind similar amounts of radiolabeled virus as differentiated PCC4 cells. After MCMV binds to its receptors on undifferentiated cells, MCMV penetrates the plasma membrane and is transported to the cells' nuclei. MCMV DNA was present in the cytoplasm, and small amounts of MCMV RNA (less than 17 percent of that found in MCMV-infected differentiated PCC4 cells) were found in the nucleus. However, MCMV RNA was not detected in the cytoplasm of undifferentiated cells. A latent infection was established by infecting undifferentiated PCC4 cells with MCMV, inactivating residual infectivity with antibodies to MCMV, and propagating cells under conditions that maintained the undifferentiated state. These MCMV-infected undifferentiated cells did not produce infectious virus, viral antigens, or viral RNA

  3. Differential white cell count by centrifugal microfluidics.

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, Gregory Jon; Tentori, Augusto M.; Schaff, Ulrich Y.

    2010-07-01

    We present a method for counting white blood cells that is uniquely compatible with centrifugation based microfluidics. Blood is deposited on top of one or more layers of density media within a microfluidic disk. Spinning the disk causes the cell populations within whole blood to settle through the media, reaching an equilibrium based on the density of each cell type. Separation and fluorescence measurement of cell types stained with a DNA dye is demonstrated using this technique. The integrated signal from bands of fluorescent microspheres is shown to be proportional to their initial concentration in suspension. Among the current generation of medical diagnostics are devices based on the principle of centrifuging a CD sized disk functionalized with microfluidics. These portable 'lab on a disk' devices are capable of conducting multiple assays directly from a blood sample, embodied by platforms developed by Gyros, Samsung, and Abaxis. [1,2] However, no centrifugal platform to date includes a differential white blood cell count, which is an important metric complimentary to diagnostic assays. Measuring the differential white blood cell count (the relative fraction of granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes) is a standard medical diagnostic technique useful for identifying sepsis, leukemia, AIDS, radiation exposure, and a host of other conditions that affect the immune system. Several methods exist for measuring the relative white blood cell count including flow cytometry, electrical impedance, and visual identification from a stained drop of blood under a microscope. However, none of these methods is easily incorporated into a centrifugal microfluidic diagnostic platform.

  4. Epigenetic Mechanisms Regulating Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Campo, Flor M.; Riancho, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs) have emerged in the last few years as one of the most promising therapeutic cell sources and, in particular, as an important tool for regenerative medicine of skeletal tissues. Although they present a more restricted potency than Embryonic Stem (ES) cells, the use of hMCS in regenerative medicine avoids many of the drawbacks characteristic of ES cells or induced pluripotent stem cells. The challenge in using these cells lies into developing precise protocols for directing cellular differentiation to generate a specific cell lineage. In order to achieve this goal, it is of the upmost importance to be able to control de process of fate decision and lineage commitment. This process requires the coordinate regulation of different molecular layers at transcriptional, posttranscriptional and translational levels. At the transcriptional level, switching on and off different sets of genes is achieved not only through transcriptional regulators, but also through their interplay with epigenetic modifiers. It is now well known that epigenetic changes take place in an orderly way through development and are critical in the determination of lineage-specific differentiation. More importantly, alteration of these epigenetic changes would, in many cases, lead to disease generation and even tumour formation. Therefore, it is crucial to elucidate how epigenetic factors, through their interplay with transcriptional regulators, control lineage commitment in hMSCs. PMID:27019612

  5. Mechanisms Regulating Plasma Cell Persistence in Health and Autoimmunity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    of lupus . Task 1: Determine whether RANKL expression accompanies the emergence of autoantibody-producing plasma cells. Approach: Infuse mice...Cell Memory." American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy Annual Meeting; Washington, DC May, 2010 "Commensal Cross-talk between Plasma Cells and...plasma cell survival. To explore this suggestion, we used a Transwell system that physically separates the two cell types, but presents no barrier

  6. Differing Requirements for MALT1 Function in Peripheral B Cell Survival and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Peishan; Zhu, Zilu; Hachmann, Janna; Nojima, Takuya; Kitamura, Daisuke; Salvesen, Guy; Rickert, Robert C

    2017-02-01

    During a T cell-dependent immune response, formation of the germinal center (GC) is essential for the generation of high-affinity plasma cells and memory B cells. The canonical NF-κB pathway has been implicated in the initiation of GC reaction, and defects in this pathway have been linked to immune deficiencies. The paracaspase MALT1 plays an important role in regulating NF-κB activation upon triggering of Ag receptors. Although previous studies have reported that MALT1 deficiency abrogates the GC response, the relative contribution of B cells and T cells to the defective phenotype remains unclear. We used chimeric mouse models to demonstrate that MALT1 function is required in B cells for GC formation. This role is restricted to BCR signaling where MALT1 is critical for B cell proliferation and survival. Moreover, the proapoptotic signal transmitted in the absence of MALT1 is dominant to the prosurvival effects of T cell-derived stimuli. In addition to GC B cell differentiation, MALT1 is required for plasma cell differentiation, but not mitogenic responses. Lastly, we show that ectopic expression of Bcl-2 can partially rescue the GC phenotype in MALT1-deficient animals by prolonging the lifespan of BCR-activated B cells, but plasma cell differentiation and Ab production remain defective. Thus, our data uncover previously unappreciated aspects of MALT1 function in B cells and highlight its importance in humoral immunity.

  7. Plasma Cell Gingivitis: An Occasional Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mishra, M B; Sharma, Swati; Sharma, Alok

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cell gingivitis, an infrequently observed oral condition, has been clinically characterized by diffuse gingival enlargement, erythema and sometimes desquamation. These lesions are usually asymptomatic, but invariably the patient will complain of a burning sensation in the gingiva and bleeding from the mouth. The diagnosis requires hematological screening in addition to clinical and histopathological examinations. This case report outlines one such case of plasma cell gingivitis in a 15-year-old female caused by use of an herbal, homemade toothpowder. The case presented here highlights the adverse effects and irrational use of herbal agents in dentifrices. At the same time, it emphasizes the need for comprehensive history taking, careful clinical examination and appropriate diagnostic tests in order to arrive at a definitive diagnosis and treatment plan for gingival conditions that are refractory to conventional therapy and to exclude certain malignancies and oral manifestations of systemic diseases.

  8. Cluster of differentiation antibody microarrays on plasma immersion ion implanted polycarbonate.

    PubMed

    Kosobrodova, E; Mohamed, A; Su, Y; Kondyurin, A; dos Remedios, C G; McKenzie, D R; Bilek, M M M

    2014-02-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) modifies the surface properties of polymers, enabling them to covalently immobilize proteins without using linker chemistry. We describe the use of PIII treated polycarbonate (PC) slides as a novel platform for producing microarrays of cluster of differentiation (CD) antibodies. We compare their performance to identical antibody microarrays printed on nitrocellulose-coated glass slides that are currently the industry standard. Populations of leukocytes are applied to the CD microarrays and unbound cells are removed revealing patterns of differentially immobilized cells that are detected in a simple label-free approach by scanning the slides with visible light. Intra-slide and inter-slide reproducibility, densities of bound cells, and limits of detection were determined. Compared to the nitrocellulose-coated glass slides, PIII treated PC slides have a lower background noise, better sensitivity, and comparable or better reproducibility. They require three-fold lower antibody concentrations to yield equivalent signal strength, resulting in significant reductions in production cost. The improved transparency of PIII treated PC in the near-UV and visible wavelengths combined with superior immobilization of biomolecules makes them an attractive platform for a wide range of microarray applications.

  9. Plasma membrane calcium ATPase regulates bone mass by fine-tuning osteoclast differentiation and survival.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Joon; Prasad, Vikram; Hyung, Seok-Won; Lee, Zang Hee; Lee, Sang-Won; Bhargava, Aditi; Pearce, David; Lee, Youngkyun; Kim, Hong-Hee

    2012-12-24

    The precise regulation of Ca(2+) dynamics is crucial for proper differentiation and function of osteoclasts. Here we show the involvement of plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase (PMCA) isoforms 1 and 4 in osteoclastogenesis. In immature/undifferentiated cells, PMCAs inhibited receptor activator of NF-κB ligand-induced Ca(2+) oscillations and osteoclast differentiation in vitro. Interestingly, nuclear factor of activated T cell c1 (NFATc1) directly stimulated PMCA transcription, whereas the PMCA-mediated Ca(2+) efflux prevented NFATc1 activation, forming a negative regulatory loop. PMCA4 also had an anti-osteoclastogenic effect by reducing NO, which facilitates preosteoclast fusion. In addition to their role in immature cells, increased expression of PMCAs in mature osteoclasts prevented osteoclast apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. Mice heterozygous for PMCA1 or null for PMCA4 showed an osteopenic phenotype with more osteoclasts on bone surface. Furthermore, PMCA4 expression levels correlated with peak bone mass in premenopausal women. Thus, our results suggest that PMCAs play important roles for the regulation of bone homeostasis in both mice and humans by modulating Ca(2+) signaling in osteoclasts.

  10. Neuroendocrine differentiation in basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Houcine, Yoldez; Chelly, Ines; Zehani, Alia; Belhaj Kacem, Linda; Azzouz, Haifa; Rekik, Wafa; C, Hend; Haouet, Slim; Kchir, Nidhameddine

    2017-05-26

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the prototypical basaloid tumor of the skin. It may show various patterns simulating other cutaneous tumors due to its pleomorphism. It may have an unusal pattern of differentiation such as squamous, sebaceous, apocrine, eccrine, pilar, and endocrine differentiation. In order to establish the relative frequency of neuroendocrine differentiation in BCC, we performed a retrospective study of 33 consecutive BCCs using conventional immunohistochemistry with two neuroendocrine antibodies: Chromogranine A and synaptophysine. The age of the patients ranged from 17-83 years with mean of 65 years. The male to female ratio was 16:17. In immunohistochimestry, Chromogranine A was seen in 72.2% (24/33) while Synaptophysine was positive in 9.09% (3/33). Their expression was cytoplasmic and membranous and was seen in the periphery of these tumors in the overlying cells. Positive staining of chromogranine A was high (75-100% of tumors cells) in 9%, intermediate (25-75% of tumors cells) in 33% of cases and relatively low (<25%) in 30.3% of cases.

  11. A compact non-differential approach for modeling laser ablation plasma dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irimiciuc, S. A.; Gurlui, S.; Nica, P.; Focsa, C.; Agop, M.

    2017-02-01

    Various differentiable physical models are frequently used to describe the dynamics of laser-produced plasma plumes (e.g., kinetic models, two-fluid models, etc.). Given the complexity of all the phenomena involved in the laser-matter interactions, it is required to introduce the laser ablation plasma dynamic variable dependencies both on the space-time coordinates and on the resolution scales. Therefore, an adequate theoretical approach may be the use of non-differentiable physical models (fractal models). Continuing our previous work on the fractal hydrodynamic model for laser ablation plasma dynamics, we propose here a compact version for the analysis of the spatial and temporal evolution of some plasma dynamic variables, such as velocities, currents, number densities, or temperatures. Moreover, the influence of external factors on the ablation plasma dynamics is considered. The predictions of this model are compared with the experimental data obtained by using a Langmuir probe on an Aluminum laser-produced plasma.

  12. Metabolism in T cell activation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Erika L

    2015-01-01

    When naïve or memory T cells encounter foreign antigen along with proper co-stimulation they undergo rapid and extensive clonal expansion. In mammals, this type of proliferation is fair1y unique to cells of the adaptive immune system and requires a considerable expenditure of energy and cellular resources. While research has often focused on the roles of cytokines, antigenic signals, and co-stimulation in guiding T cell responses, data indicate that, at a fundamental level, it is cellular metabolism that regulates T cell function and differentiation and therefore influences the final outcome of the adaptive immune response. This review will focus on some earlier fundamental observations regarding T cell bioenergetics and its role in regulating cellular function, as well as recent work that suggests that manipulating the immune response by targeting lymphocyte metabolism could prove useful in treatments against infection and cancer. PMID:20189791

  13. Differential Light Scattering from Spherical Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brunsting, Albert; Mullaney, Paul F.

    1974-01-01

    The differential scattered light intensity patterns of spherical mammalian cells were measured with a new photometer which uses high-speed film as the light detector. The scattering objects, interphase and mitotic Chinese hamster ovary cells and HeLa cells, were modeled as (a) a coated sphere, accounting for nucleus and cytoplasm, and (b) a homogeneous sphere when no cellular nucleus was present. The refractive indices and size distribution of the cells were measured for an accurate comparison of the theoretical model with the light-scattering measurements. The light scattered beyond the forward direction is found to contain information about internal cellular morphology, provided the size distribution of the cells is not too broad. ImagesFIGURE 1 PMID:4134589

  14. Directed differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells into thyroid follicular cells.

    PubMed

    Arufe, Maria C; Lu, Min; Kubo, Atsushi; Keller, Gordon; Davies, Terry F; Lin, Reigh-Yi

    2006-06-01

    Elucidating the molecular mechanisms leading to the induction and specification of thyroid follicular cells is important for our understanding of thyroid development. To characterize the key events in this process, we previously established an experimental embryonic stem (ES) cell model system, which shows that wild-type mouse CCE ES cells can give rise to thyrocyte-like cells in vitro. We extend our analysis in this report by using a genetically manipulated ES cell line in which green fluorescent protein (GFP) cDNA is targeted to the TSH receptor (TSHR) gene, linking GFP expression to the transcription of the endogenous TSHR gene. The appearance of GFP-positive cells was dependent on the formation of embryoid bodies from undifferentiated ES cells and was greatly enhanced by TSH treatment during the first 2-4 d of differentiation. With the support of Matrigel, highly enriched ES cell-derived GFP-positive cells formed thyroid follicle-like clusters in a serum-free medium supplemented with TSH. Importantly, these clusters display the characteristics of thyroid follicular cells. Immunofluorescent studies confirmed the colocalization of TSHR with the Na+/I- symporter in the clusters and indicated that Na+/I- symporter was expressed exclusively in the plasma membrane. In addition, I- uptake activity was observed in these cells. Our results indicate that ES cells can be induced to differentiate into thyroid follicular cells, providing a powerful tool to study embryonic thyroid development and function.

  15. Directed Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells into Thyroid Follicular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arufe, Maria C.; Lu, Min; Kubo, Atsushi; Keller, Gordon; Davies, Terry F.; Lin, Reigh-Yi

    2006-01-01

    Elucidating the molecular mechanisms leading to the induction and specification of thyroid follicular cells is important for our understanding of thyroid development. To characterize the key events in this process, we previously established an experimental embryonic stem (ES) cell model system, which shows that wild-type mouse CCE ES cells can give rise to thyrocyte-like cells in vitro. We extend our analysis in this report by using a genetically manipulated ES cell line in which green fluorescent protein (GFP) cDNA is targeted to the TSH receptor (TSHR) gene, linking GFP expression to the transcription of the endogenous TSHR gene. The appearance of GFP-positive cells was dependent on the formation of embryoid bodies from undifferentiated ES cells and was greatly enhanced by TSH treatment during the first 2–4 d of differentiation. With the support of Matrigel, highly enriched ES cell-derived GFP-positive cells formed thyroid follicle-like clusters in a serum-free medium supplemented with TSH. Importantly, these clusters display the characteristics of thyroid follicular cells. Immunofluorescent studies confirmed the colocalization of TSHR with the Na+/I− symporter in the clusters and indicated that Na+/I− symporter was expressed exclusively in the plasma membrane. In addition, I− uptake activity was observed in these cells. Our results indicate that ES cells can be induced to differentiate into thyroid follicular cells, providing a powerful tool to study embryonic thyroid development and function. PMID:16497809

  16. 21 CFR 864.5220 - Automated differential cell counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Automated differential cell counter. 864.5220... § 864.5220 Automated differential cell counter. (a) Identification. An automated differential cell... have the capability to flag, count, or classify immature or abnormal hematopoietic cells of the blood...

  17. 21 CFR 864.5220 - Automated differential cell counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Automated differential cell counter. 864.5220... § 864.5220 Automated differential cell counter. (a) Identification. An automated differential cell... have the capability to flag, count, or classify immature or abnormal hematopoietic cells of the blood...

  18. 21 CFR 864.5220 - Automated differential cell counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Automated differential cell counter. 864.5220... § 864.5220 Automated differential cell counter. (a) Identification. An automated differential cell... have the capability to flag, count, or classify immature or abnormal hematopoietic cells of the blood...

  19. 21 CFR 864.5220 - Automated differential cell counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Automated differential cell counter. 864.5220... § 864.5220 Automated differential cell counter. (a) Identification. An automated differential cell... have the capability to flag, count, or classify immature or abnormal hematopoietic cells of the blood...

  20. Deletion(20q) as the sole abnormality in plasma cell myeloma is not associated with plasma cells as identified by cIg FISH.

    PubMed

    White, Joanne S; Zordan, Adrian; Batzios, Crisoula; Campbell, Lynda J

    2012-12-01

    Deletion of 20q is a common finding in myeloid disorders but it is also observed in plasma cell myeloma (PCM). As a del(20q) in a patient receiving treatment for myeloma may indicate therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS), it is important to differentiate chromosome abnormalities associated with myeloma from those reflecting t-MDS. We performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a 20q12 probe (D20S108) in conjunction with cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (cIg) staining in 20 PCM cases with a del(20q) in order to confirm the cell type involved. Of the nine cases studied with a clone showing a del(20q) as the sole abnormality, 8 of 9 demonstrated loss of the D20S108 signals in non-plasma cells only and 5 of 9 had either a confirmed myeloid malignancy in addition to PCM or showed evidence of dysplastic changes in the marrow; however, of the 11 patients with a del(20q) within a complex PCM karyotype, 4 of 11 showed loss of the D20S108 signals in plasma cells only and 7 of 11 showed no significant loss in either plasma cells or non-plasma cells. Therefore, our results indicate that a del(20q) as the sole abnormality in PCM is present in non-plasma cells and, therefore, suggests the presence of an associated myeloid malignancy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Differential radiosensitivity among B cell subpopulations

    SciTech Connect

    Riggs, J.E.; Lussier, A.M.; Lee, S.K.; Appel, M.C.; Woodland, R.T.

    1988-09-15

    We have previously shown that low doses of ionizing radiation selectively impair a functionally defined B cell subpopulation. Normal mice, after exposure to 200 rad of ionizing radiation, have normal or near normal splenic plaque-forming cell responses to thymus-independent type 1 Ag, but reduced responses to thymus-independent type 2 Ag. Here, we confirm and extend the original findings by using hapten-specific serum RIA to demonstrate this differential radiosensitivity is systemic. We also examined splenocytes stained with a panel of lymphocyte surface Ag by FACS analysis to determine if these functional changes are accompanied by a physical alteration of the B cell pool of irradiated mice. Single-parameter FACS analyses demonstrate a diminution in both B cell number and the heterogeneity of membrane Ag expression within the surviving B cell pool after irradiation. In contrast, T cells are relatively radioresistant as the relative percentage of T cells in the irradiated splenocyte pool increases, whereas the heterogeneity of membrane Ag expression remains constant. Multiparameter FACS analyses indicate that B cells with the sIgM much greater than sIgD phenotype are more radiosensitive than B cells of the sIgM much less than sIgD phenotype. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis of splenic sections stained with anti-IgM or anti-IgD reveal the enhanced radiosensitivity of marginal zone B cells.

  2. Dynamic changes in Id3 and E-protein activity orchestrate germinal center and plasma cell development

    PubMed Central

    Gloury, Renee; Zotos, Dimitra; Zuidscherwoude, Malou; Masson, Frederick; Liao, Yang; Hasbold, Jhaguaral; Corcoran, Lynn M.; Hodgkin, Phil D.; Belz, Gabrielle T.; Shi, Wei; Nutt, Stephen L.; Tarlinton, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of high-affinity antibodies requires germinal center (GC) development and differentiation of long-lived plasma cells in a multilayered process that is tightly controlled by the activity of multiple transcription factors. Here, we reveal a new layer of complexity by demonstrating that dynamic changes in Id3 and E-protein activity govern both GC and plasma cell differentiation. We show that down-regulation of Id3 in B cells is essential for releasing E2A and E2-2, which in a redundant manner are required for antigen-induced B cell differentiation. We demonstrate that this pathway controls the expression of multiple key factors, including Blimp1, Xbp1, and CXCR4, and is therefore critical for establishing the transcriptional network that controls GC B cell and plasma cell differentiation. PMID:27217539

  3. Association of mesenchymal cells and immunoglobulins with differentiating epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Bukovsky, Antonin; Caudle, Michael R; Keenan, Jeffrey A; Upadhyaya, Nirmala B; Van Meter, Stuart E; Wimalasena, Jay; Elder, Robert F

    2001-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal-epithelial interactions play an important role in the physiology and pathology of epithelial tissues. Mesenchymal cells either associate with epithelium basement membrane [pericytes and perivascular monocyte-derived cells (MDC)] or reside within epithelium (MDC and T cells). Although intraepithelial mesenchymal cells were suggested to contribute to the epithelium physiology, their association with particular steps in differentiation of epithelial cells, interactions among themselves, and their fate remain unclear. We studied epitopes of mesenchymal cells and their products (immunoglobulins) in stratified epithelium of uterine ectocervix, which is one of the prototypes of complete cellular differentiation from stem into the aged cells. Results Perivascular CD14 primitive MDC associated with basal (stem) epithelial cells. Thy-1 pericytes of microvasculature secreted intercellular vesicles, which associated with Ki67 postmitotic epithelial cells expressing MHC class I. Intraepithelial T cells showed an association with veiled type MDC [dendritic cell (DC) precursors] among parabasal cells, and exhibited fragmentation after entering intermediate (mature) epithelial layers. Mature DC secreted CD68 and exhibited fragmentation after reaching mid intermediate layers. Binding of IgM was detected at the top of each layer: in the upper parabasal, upper intermediate, and most surface epithelial cells. IgG was confined to the entire superficial layer. Conclusions These data suggest that the phylogenetically and ontogenetically developed hierarchy of mesenchymal cells (MDC, pericytes, T cells) and immunoglobulins (IgM, IgG) accompanies differentiation of epithelial cells from immature into the mature and aged phenotype. Further studies of an involvement of mesenchymal cells in the regulation of tissue homeostasis may bring novel approaches to the prevention and therapy of tissue dysfunctions characterized by permanent tissue immaturity (muscular dystrophy

  4. Cell differentiation mediated by co-culture of human umbilical cord blood stem cells with murine hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Stecklum, Maria; Wulf-Goldenberg, Annika; Purfürst, Bettina; Siegert, Antje; Keil, Marlen; Eckert, Klaus; Fichtner, Iduna

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, purified human cord blood stem cells were co-cultivated with murine hepatic alpha mouse liver 12 (AML12) cells to compare the effect on endodermal stem cell differentiation by either direct cell-cell interaction or by soluble factors in conditioned hepatic cell medium. With that approach, we want to mimic in vitro the situation of preclinical transplantation experiments using human cells in mice. Cord blood stem cells, cultivated with hepatic conditioned medium, showed a low endodermal differentiation but an increased connexin 32 (Cx32) and Cx43, and cytokeratin 8 (CK8) and CK19 expression was monitored by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Microarray profiling indicated that in cultivated cord blood cells, 604 genes were upregulated 2-fold, with the highest expression for epithelial CK19 and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin). On ultrastructural level, there were no major changes in the cellular morphology, except a higher presence of phago(ly)some-like structures observed. Direct co-culture of AML12 cells with cord blood cells led to less incisive differentiation with increased sex-determining region Y-box 17 (SOX17), Cx32 and Cx43, as well as epithelial CK8 and CK19 expressions. On ultrastructural level, tight cell contacts along the plasma membranes were revealed. FACS analysis in co-cultivated cells quantified dye exchange on low level, as also proved by time relapse video-imaging of labelled cells. Modulators of gap junction formation influenced dye transfer between the co-cultured cells, whereby retinoic acid increased and 3-heptanol reduced the dye transfer. The study indicated that the cell-co-cultured model of human umbilical cord blood cells and murine AML12 cells may be a suitable approach to study some aspects of endodermal/hepatic cell differentiation induction.

  5. Interaction between clonal plasma cells and the immune system in plasma cell dyscrasias.

    PubMed

    Perez-Andres, M; Almeida, J; Martin-Ayuso, M; Moro, M J; Garcia-Marcos, M A; Moreno, I; Dominguez, M; Galende, J; Heras, N; Gonzalez, M I; San Miguel, J F; Orfao, A

    2004-01-01

    The term "monoclonal gammopathy" (MG) includes a group of clonal plasma cell disorders, which show heterogeneous clinical behavior. While multiple myeloma (MM) and plasma cell leukemia (PCL) are incurable malignant diseases, most patients with MG of undetermined significance (MGUS) show an indolent/benign clinical course. Evidence has accumulated which supports the role of the bone marrow microenvironment in MG. Accordingly, the survival, drug-resistance and proliferation of MM cells have been shown to be largely dependent on a supportive microenvironment. Among the different environment-associated parameters, those related to the status/activity of the immune system are particularly relevant. This review focuses on the different ways clonal plasma cells (PC) interact with the immune system in different models of MG, to characterize crucial events in the development and progression of MG. These advances may support the design of novel therapeutic approaches in patients with MG.

  6. Mechanical regulation of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Steward, Andrew J; Kelly, Daniel J

    2015-12-01

    Biophysical cues play a key role in directing the lineage commitment of mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent stromal cells (MSCs), but the mechanotransductive mechanisms at play are still not fully understood. This review article first describes the roles of both substrate mechanics (e.g. stiffness and topography) and extrinsic mechanical cues (e.g. fluid flow, compression, hydrostatic pressure, tension) on the differentiation of MSCs. A specific focus is placed on the role of such factors in regulating the osteogenic, chondrogenic, myogenic and adipogenic differentiation of MSCs. Next, the article focuses on the cellular components, specifically integrins, ion channels, focal adhesions and the cytoskeleton, hypothesized to be involved in MSC mechanotransduction. This review aims to illustrate the strides that have been made in elucidating how MSCs sense and respond to their mechanical environment, and also to identify areas where further research is needed.

  7. Differentiation of human B lymphocyte subpopulations induced by an alloreactive helper T-cell clone

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.J.; Hummell, D.S.; Lawton, A.R.

    1988-07-01

    We have used cloned alloreactive helper T cells to determine if direct T cell-B cell interaction can induce differentiation of human peripheral blood B cells which do not respond to pokeweed mitogen (PWM). T-cell clone 2F8 was derived from a one-way mixed lymphocyte reaction. 2F8 cells are T3+T4+T8-IL-2R+ and proliferate in response to irradiated stimulator cells, but not autologous cells, in the absence of exogenous interleukin-2. 2F8 cells provide allospecific help for polyclonal proliferation and differentiation of B cells in the absence of any other stimulus. The magnitude of this response is comparable to that of the response of the same B cells to PWM and fresh autologous T cells. 2F8 cells could also provide nonspecific help for unrelated donor B cells in the presence of PWM, with no requirement for costimulation by irradiated stimulator cells. Allospecific stimulation of B cells was completely inhibited by antibodies to class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) framework determinants and was abrogated by 1000-rad irradiation. Cloned 2F8 T cells stimulated differentiation of both small, high-density B cells and larger B cells, generating up to 30% plasma cells with either fraction. B cells forming rosettes with mouse erythrocytes were also induced to differentiate by the helper T cell clone. As found previously, neither small, high-density B cells nor mouse rosette+ B cells responded well to PWM. Direct interaction with allospecific T cells induces differentiation of a broader spectrum of B cells than soluble growth and differentiation factors in conjunction with polyclonal activators such as PWM and protein A containing staphylococci.

  8. Plant GSK3 proteins regulate xylem cell differentiation downstream of TDIF-TDR signalling.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yuki; Ito, Tasuku; Nakagami, Hirofumi; Hirakawa, Yuki; Saito, Masato; Tamaki, Takayuki; Shirasu, Ken; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2014-03-24

    During plant radial growth typically seen in trees, procambial and cambial cells act as meristematic cells in the vascular system to self-proliferate and differentiate into xylem cells. These two processes are regulated by a signalling pathway composed of a peptide ligand and its receptor; tracheary element differentiation inhibitory factor (TDIF) and TDIF RECEPTOR (TDR). Here we show that glycogen synthase kinase 3 proteins (GSK3s) are crucial downstream components of the TDIF signalling pathway suppressing xylem differentiation from procambial cells. TDR interacts with GSK3s at the plasma membrane and activates GSK3s in a TDIF-dependent fashion. Consistently, a specific inhibitor of plant GSK3s strongly induces xylem cell differentiation through BRI1-EMS SUPPRESSOR 1 (BES1), a well-known target transcription factor of GSK3s. Our findings provide insight into the regulation of cell fate determination in meristem maintenance.

  9. Plant GSK3 proteins regulate xylem cell differentiation downstream of TDIF-TDR signalling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Yuki; Ito, Tasuku; Nakagami, Hirofumi; Hirakawa, Yuki; Saito, Masato; Tamaki, Takayuki; Shirasu, Ken; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2014-03-01

    During plant radial growth typically seen in trees, procambial and cambial cells act as meristematic cells in the vascular system to self-proliferate and differentiate into xylem cells. These two processes are regulated by a signalling pathway composed of a peptide ligand and its receptor; tracheary element differentiation inhibitory factor (TDIF) and TDIF RECEPTOR (TDR). Here we show that glycogen synthase kinase 3 proteins (GSK3s) are crucial downstream components of the TDIF signalling pathway suppressing xylem differentiation from procambial cells. TDR interacts with GSK3s at the plasma membrane and activates GSK3s in a TDIF-dependent fashion. Consistently, a specific inhibitor of plant GSK3s strongly induces xylem cell differentiation through BRI1-EMS SUPPRESSOR 1 (BES1), a well-known target transcription factor of GSK3s. Our findings provide insight into the regulation of cell fate determination in meristem maintenance.

  10. GATA2 regulates dendritic cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Koichi; Fujiwara, Tohru; Onishi, Yasushi; Itoh-Nakadai, Ari; Okitsu, Yoko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Shimizu, Ritsuko; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are critical immune response regulators; however, the mechanism of DC differentiation is not fully understood. Heterozygous germ line GATA2 mutations induce GATA2-deficiency syndrome, characterized by monocytopenia, a predisposition to myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia, and a profoundly reduced DC population, which is associated with increased susceptibility to viral infections, impaired phagocytosis, and decreased cytokine production. To define the role of GATA2 in DC differentiation and function, we studied Gata2 conditional knockout and haploinsufficient mice. Gata2 conditional deficiency significantly reduced the DC count, whereas Gata2 haploinsufficiency did not affect this population. GATA2 was required for the in vitro generation of DCs from Lin−Sca-1+Kit+ cells, common myeloid-restricted progenitors, and common dendritic cell precursors, but not common lymphoid-restricted progenitors or granulocyte-macrophage progenitors, suggesting that GATA2 functions in the myeloid pathway of DC differentiation. Moreover, expression profiling demonstrated reduced expression of myeloid-related genes, including mafb, and increased expression of T-lymphocyte–related genes, including Gata3 and Tcf7, in Gata2-deficient DC progenitors. In addition, GATA2 was found to bind an enhancer element 190-kb downstream region of Gata3, and a reporter assay exhibited significantly reduced luciferase activity after adding this enhancer region to the Gata3 promoter, which was recovered by GATA sequence deletion within Gata3 +190. These results suggest that GATA2 plays an important role in cell-fate specification toward the myeloid vs T-lymphocyte lineage by regulating lineage-specific transcription factors in DC progenitors, thereby contributing to DC differentiation. PMID:27259979

  11. GATA2 regulates dendritic cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Koichi; Fujiwara, Tohru; Onishi, Yasushi; Itoh-Nakadai, Ari; Okitsu, Yoko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Shimizu, Ritsuko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Harigae, Hideo

    2016-07-28

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are critical immune response regulators; however, the mechanism of DC differentiation is not fully understood. Heterozygous germ line GATA2 mutations induce GATA2-deficiency syndrome, characterized by monocytopenia, a predisposition to myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia, and a profoundly reduced DC population, which is associated with increased susceptibility to viral infections, impaired phagocytosis, and decreased cytokine production. To define the role of GATA2 in DC differentiation and function, we studied Gata2 conditional knockout and haploinsufficient mice. Gata2 conditional deficiency significantly reduced the DC count, whereas Gata2 haploinsufficiency did not affect this population. GATA2 was required for the in vitro generation of DCs from Lin(-)Sca-1(+)Kit(+) cells, common myeloid-restricted progenitors, and common dendritic cell precursors, but not common lymphoid-restricted progenitors or granulocyte-macrophage progenitors, suggesting that GATA2 functions in the myeloid pathway of DC differentiation. Moreover, expression profiling demonstrated reduced expression of myeloid-related genes, including mafb, and increased expression of T-lymphocyte-related genes, including Gata3 and Tcf7, in Gata2-deficient DC progenitors. In addition, GATA2 was found to bind an enhancer element 190-kb downstream region of Gata3, and a reporter assay exhibited significantly reduced luciferase activity after adding this enhancer region to the Gata3 promoter, which was recovered by GATA sequence deletion within Gata3 +190. These results suggest that GATA2 plays an important role in cell-fate specification toward the myeloid vs T-lymphocyte lineage by regulating lineage-specific transcription factors in DC progenitors, thereby contributing to DC differentiation.

  12. Differential expression of plasma microRNA in preeclamptic patients at delivery and 1 year postpartum.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Malia Su-Qin; Casselman, Richard Cary; Tayade, Chandrakant; Smith, Graeme Neil

    2015-09-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy characterized by widespread maternal endothelial dysfunction. Although clinical signs subside following delivery, long-term risks associated with PE include hypertension, stroke, and cardiovascular disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are emerging as critical regulators of biological function, and while alterations to the miRNAome have been described in the context of pregnancy and PE, the postpartum implications of PE on miRNA expression is unknown. The goal of this study was to characterize circulating miRNA profiles at the time of delivery and at 1 year postpartum for women who did and did not develop PE. Using a targeted reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction approach, selected miRNAs putatively involved in the pathophysiology of PE were examined in 17 normotensive control and 13 PE maternal plasma samples at the time of delivery and 1 year postpartum. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis was used to map putative messenger RNA targets of differentially expressed miRNA to global molecular networks based on gene function. Significant increases (P < .05) in 7 miRNAs with antiangiogenic, inflammatory, and apoptotic functions (miR-98-5p, miR-222-3p, miR-210-3p, miR-155-5p, miR-296-3p, miR-181a-5p, miR-29b-3p) were evident in maternal plasma at the time of severe PE compared to time-matched controls. Plasma samples from individuals who developed mild PE exhibited no changes compared to control samples for the subset of miRNAs analyzed here. Differential expression of plasma miRNA at the time of delivery for women with PE were largely resolved at 1 year postpartum, and reduced expression of only miR-221-3p (P < .05) was evident. Network analysis of putative targets of differentially regulated miRNA identified 11 interacting networks with enrichment for proteins involved in cardiovascular disease, organ system development and function, and cell signaling and interaction. The systemic effect of PE on maternal systems is

  13. The epigenomics of embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kraushaar, Daniel C; Zhao, Keji

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) possess an open and highly dynamic chromatin landscape, which underlies their plasticity and ultimately maintains ESC pluripotency. The ESC epigenome must not only maintain the transcription of pluripotency-associated genes but must also, through gene priming, facilitate rapid and cell type-specific activation of developmental genes upon lineage commitment. Trans-generational inheritance ensures that the ESC chromatin state is stably transmitted from one generation to the next; yet at the same time, epigenetic marks are highly dynamic, reversible and responsive to extracellular cues. Once committed to differentiation, the ESC epigenome is remodeled and resolves into a more compact chromatin state. A thorough understanding of the role of chromatin modifiers in ESC fate and differentiation will be important if they are to be used for therapeutic purposes. Recent technical advances, particularly in next-generation sequencing technologies, have provided a genome-scale view of epigenetic marks and chromatin modifiers. More affordable and faster sequencing platforms have led to a comprehensive characterization of the ESC epigenome and epigenomes of differentiated cell types. In this review, we summarize and discuss the recent progress that has highlighted the central role of histone modifications, histone variants, DNA methylation and chromatin modifiers in ESC pluripotency and ESC fate. We provide a detailed and comprehensive discussion of genome-wide studies that are pertinent to our understanding of mammalian development.

  14. Molecular mechanisms of male germ cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hecht, N B

    1998-07-01

    During spermatogenesis, diploid stem cells differentiate, undergo meiosis, and transform into haploid spermatozoa. As this precisely timed series of events proceeds, chromosomal ploidy is reduced and the nucleosomes of the chromatin are replaced by a transcriptionally quiescent protamine-containing nucleus. The premature termination of transcription during the haploid phase of spermatogenesis necessitates an especially prominent role for posttranscriptional regulation in the temporal and spatial expression of many testis-specific proteins and isozymes. In this review article, discussion will focus on novel mechanisms regulating gene expression in mammalian male germ cells from genome to protein.

  15. FLOCK cluster analysis of plasma cell flow cytometry data predicts bone marrow involvement by plasma cell neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Dorfman, David M; LaPlante, Charlotte D; Li, Betty

    2016-09-01

    We analyzed plasma cell populations in bone marrow samples from 353 patients with possible bone marrow involvement by a plasma cell neoplasm, using FLOCK (FLOw Clustering without K), an unbiased, automated, computational approach to identify cell subsets in multidimensional flow cytometry data. FLOCK identified discrete plasma cell populations in the majority of bone marrow specimens found by standard histologic and immunophenotypic criteria to be involved by a plasma cell neoplasm (202/208 cases; 97%), including 34 cases that were negative by standard flow cytometric analysis that included clonality assessment. FLOCK identified discrete plasma cell populations in only a minority of cases negative for involvement by a plasma cell neoplasm by standard histologic and immunophenotypic criteria (38/145 cases; 26%). Interestingly, 55% of the cases negative by standard analysis, but containing a FLOCK-identified discrete plasma cell population, were positive for monoclonal gammopathy by serum protein electrophoresis and immunofixation. FLOCK-identified and quantitated plasma cell populations accounted for 3.05% of total cells on average in cases positive for involvement by a plasma cell neoplasm by standard histologic and immunophenotypic criteria, and 0.27% of total cells on average in cases negative for involvement by a plasma cell neoplasm by standard histologic and immunophenotypic criteria (p<0.0001; area under the curve by ROC analysis=0.96). The presence of a FLOCK-identified discrete plasma cell population was predictive of the presence of plasma cell neoplasia with a sensitivity of 97%, compared with only 81% for standard flow cytometric analysis, and had specificity of 74%, PPV of 84% and NPV of 95%. FLOCK analysis, which has been shown to provide useful diagnostic information for evaluating patients with suspected systemic mastocytosis, is able to identify neoplastic plasma cell populations analyzed by flow cytometry, and may be helpful in the diagnostic

  16. Using Tissue Culture To Investigate Plant Cell Differentiation and Dedifferentiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzone, Donna M.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an experimental project that uses plant tissue culture techniques to examine cell differentiation in the carrot. Allows students to gain experience in some important techniques and to explore fundamental questions about cell differentiation. (DDR)

  17. Using Tissue Culture To Investigate Plant Cell Differentiation and Dedifferentiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzone, Donna M.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an experimental project that uses plant tissue culture techniques to examine cell differentiation in the carrot. Allows students to gain experience in some important techniques and to explore fundamental questions about cell differentiation. (DDR)

  18. Dynamic and Static Exercises Differentially Affect Plasma Cytokine Content in Elite Endurance- and Strength-Trained Athletes and Untrained Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kapilevich, Leonid V; Zakharova, Anna N; Kabachkova, Anastasia V; Kironenko, Tatyana A; Orlov, Sergei N

    2017-01-01

    Extensive exercise increases the plasma content of IL-6, IL-8, IL-15, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), and several other cytokines via their augmented transcription in skeletal muscle cells. However, the relative impact of aerobic and resistant training interventions on cytokine production remains poorly defined. In this study, we compared effects of dynamic and static load on cytokine plasma content in elite strength- and endurance-trained athletes vs. healthy untrained volunteers. The plasma cytokine content was measured before, immediately after, and 30 min post-exercise using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Pedaling on a bicycle ergometer increased IL-6 and IL-8 content in the plasma of trained athletes by about 4- and 2-fold, respectively. In contrast to dynamic load, weightlifting had negligible impact on these parameters in strength exercise-trained athletes. Unlike IL-6 and IL-8, dynamic exercise had no impact on IL-15 and LIF, whereas static load increases the content of these cytokines by ~50%. Two-fold increment of IL-8 content seen in athletes subjected to dynamic exercise was absent in untrained individuals, whereas the ~50% increase in IL-15 triggered by static load in the plasma of weightlifting athletes was not registered in the control group. Thus, our results show the distinct impact of static and dynamic exercises on cytokine content in the plasma of trained athletes. They also demonstrate that both types of exercises differentially affect cytokine content in plasma of athletes and untrained persons.

  19. Dynamic and Static Exercises Differentially Affect Plasma Cytokine Content in Elite Endurance- and Strength-Trained Athletes and Untrained Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Kapilevich, Leonid V.; Zakharova, Anna N.; Kabachkova, Anastasia V.; Kironenko, Tatyana A.; Orlov, Sergei N.

    2017-01-01

    Extensive exercise increases the plasma content of IL-6, IL-8, IL-15, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), and several other cytokines via their augmented transcription in skeletal muscle cells. However, the relative impact of aerobic and resistant training interventions on cytokine production remains poorly defined. In this study, we compared effects of dynamic and static load on cytokine plasma content in elite strength- and endurance-trained athletes vs. healthy untrained volunteers. The plasma cytokine content was measured before, immediately after, and 30 min post-exercise using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Pedaling on a bicycle ergometer increased IL-6 and IL-8 content in the plasma of trained athletes by about 4- and 2-fold, respectively. In contrast to dynamic load, weightlifting had negligible impact on these parameters in strength exercise-trained athletes. Unlike IL-6 and IL-8, dynamic exercise had no impact on IL-15 and LIF, whereas static load increases the content of these cytokines by ~50%. Two-fold increment of IL-8 content seen in athletes subjected to dynamic exercise was absent in untrained individuals, whereas the ~50% increase in IL-15 triggered by static load in the plasma of weightlifting athletes was not registered in the control group. Thus, our results show the distinct impact of static and dynamic exercises on cytokine content in the plasma of trained athletes. They also demonstrate that both types of exercises differentially affect cytokine content in plasma of athletes and untrained persons. PMID:28194116

  20. Continuous differential impedance spectroscopy of single cells

    PubMed Central

    Nevill, J. Tanner; Lee, Luke P.; Morgan, Hywel

    2009-01-01

    A device for continuous differential impedance analysis of single cells held by a hydrodynamic cell trapping is presented. Measurements are accomplished by recording the current from two closely-situated electrode pairs, one empty (reference) and one containing a cell. We demonstrate time-dependent measurement of single cell impedance produced in response to dynamic chemical perturbations. First, the system is used to assay the response of HeLa cells to the effects of the surfactant Tween, which reduces the impedance of the trapped cells in a concentration dependent way and is interpreted as gradual lysis of the cell membrane. Second, the effects of the bacterial pore-forming toxin, Streptolysin-O are measured: a transient exponential decay in the impedance is recorded as the cell membrane becomes increasingly permeable. The decay time constant is inversely proportional to toxin concentration (482, 150, and 30 s for 0.1, 1, and 10 kU/ml, respectively). Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10404-009-0534-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20927185

  1. Differential cargo mobilisation within Weibel-Palade bodies after transient fusion with the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Kiskin, Nikolai I; Babich, Victor; Knipe, Laura; Hannah, Matthew J; Carter, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory chemokines can be selectively released from Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs) during kiss-and-run exocytosis. Such selectivity may arise from molecular size filtering by the fusion pore, however differential intra-WPB cargo re-mobilisation following fusion-induced structural changes within the WPB may also contribute to this process. To determine whether WPB cargo molecules are differentially re-mobilised, we applied FRAP to residual post-fusion WPB structures formed after transient exocytosis in which some or all of the fluorescent cargo was retained. Transient fusion resulted in WPB collapse from a rod to a spheroid shape accompanied by substantial swelling (>2 times by surface area) and membrane mixing between the WPB and plasma membranes. Post-fusion WPBs supported cumulative WPB exocytosis. To quantify diffusion inside rounded organelles we developed a method of FRAP analysis based on image moments. FRAP analysis showed that von Willebrand factor-EGFP (VWF-EGFP) and the VWF-propolypeptide-EGFP (Pro-EGFP) were immobile in post-fusion WPBs. Because Eotaxin-3-EGFP and ssEGFP (small soluble cargo proteins) were largely depleted from post-fusion WPBs, we studied these molecules in cells preincubated in the weak base NH4Cl which caused WPB alkalinisation and rounding similar to that produced by plasma membrane fusion. In these cells we found a dramatic increase in mobilities of Eotaxin-3-EGFP and ssEGFP that exceeded the resolution of our method (∼ 2.4 µm2/s mean). In contrast, the membrane mobilities of EGFP-CD63 and EGFP-Rab27A in post-fusion WPBs were unchanged, while P-selectin-EGFP acquired mobility. Our data suggest that selective re-mobilisation of chemokines during transient fusion contributes to selective chemokine secretion during transient WPB exocytosis. Selective secretion provides a mechanism to regulate intravascular inflammatory processes with reduced risk of thrombosis.

  2. Differentiation of human keratinocytes: changes in lipid synthesis, plasma membrane lipid composition, and /sup 125/I-EGF binding upon administration of 25-hydroxycholesterol and mevinolin

    SciTech Connect

    Ponec, M.; Kempenaar, J.; Weerheim, A.; Boonstra, J.

    1987-11-01

    We have studied the relationship between differentiation capacity, plasma membrane composition, and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor expression of normal keratinocytes in vitro. The plasma membrane composition of the cells was modulated experimentally by cholesterol depletion, using specific inhibitors of cholesterol synthesis, such as 25-hydroxycholesterol and mevinolin. Exposure of the cells towards these inhibitors resulted in a drastic decrease of cholesterol biosynthesis, as determined from /sup 14/C-acetate incorporation into the various lipid fractions. This effect on cholesterol biosynthesis was reflected by changes in plasma membrane composition, as determined by lipid analysis of isolated plasma membrane fractions, these resulting in a decreased cholesterol-phospholipid ratio. The experimental modulation of plasma membrane composition by 25-hydroxycholesterol or mevinolin were accompanied by a decreased cornified envelope formation and by high expression of EGF binding sites. These phenomena were more pronounced in cells induced to differentiate by exposure of cells grown under low Ca2+ to normal Ca2+ concentrations, as compared to cells grown persistently under low Ca2+ concentrations. These results suggest a close correlation between plasma membrane composition, differentiation capacity, and EGF receptor expression.

  3. Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) marks adult myogenic cells committed to differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Capkovic, Katie L.; Stevenson, Severin; Johnson, Marc C.; Thelen, Jay J.; Cornelison, D.D.W.

    2008-04-15

    Although recent advances in broad-scale gene expression analysis have dramatically increased our knowledge of the repertoire of mRNAs present in multiple cell types, it has become increasingly clear that examination of the expression, localization, and associations of the encoded proteins will be critical for determining their functional significance. In particular, many signaling receptors, transducers, and effectors have been proposed to act in higher-order complexes associated with physically distinct areas of the plasma membrane. Adult muscle stem cells (satellite cells) must, upon injury, respond appropriately to a wide range of extracellular stimuli: the role of such signaling scaffolds is therefore a potentially important area of inquiry. To address this question, we first isolated detergent-resistant membrane fractions from primary satellite cells, then analyzed their component proteins using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Transmembrane and juxtamembrane components of adhesion-mediated signaling pathways made up the largest group of identified proteins; in particular, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), a multifunctional cell-surface protein that has previously been associated with muscle regeneration, was significant. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that not only is NCAM localized to discrete areas of the plasma membrane, it is also a very early marker of commitment to terminal differentiation. Using flow cytometry, we have sorted physically homogeneous myogenic cultures into proliferating and differentiating fractions based solely upon NCAM expression.

  4. Regulatory T Cells in Skin Facilitate Epithelial Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ali, Niwa; Zirak, Bahar; Rodriguez, Robert Sanchez; Pauli, Mariela L; Truong, Hong-An; Lai, Kevin; Ahn, Richard; Corbin, Kaitlin; Lowe, Margaret M; Scharschmidt, Tiffany C; Taravati, Keyon; Tan, Madeleine R; Ricardo-Gonzalez, Roberto R; Nosbaum, Audrey; Bertolini, Marta; Liao, Wilson; Nestle, Frank O; Paus, Ralf; Cotsarelis, George; Abbas, Abul K; Rosenblum, Michael D

    2017-06-01

    The maintenance of tissue homeostasis is critically dependent on the function of tissue-resident immune cells and the differentiation capacity of tissue-resident stem cells (SCs). How immune cells influence the function of SCs is largely unknown. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) in skin preferentially localize to hair follicles (HFs), which house a major subset of skin SCs (HFSCs). Here, we mechanistically dissect the role of Tregs in HF and HFSC biology. Lineage-specific cell depletion revealed that Tregs promote HF regeneration by augmenting HFSC proliferation and differentiation. Transcriptional and phenotypic profiling of Tregs and HFSCs revealed that skin-resident Tregs preferentially express high levels of the Notch ligand family member, Jagged 1 (Jag1). Expression of Jag1 on Tregs facilitated HFSC function and efficient HF regeneration. Taken together, our work demonstrates that Tregs in skin play a major role in HF biology by promoting the function of HFSCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The interleukin-6 receptor alpha-chain (CD126) is expressed by neoplastic but not normal plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Rawstron, A C; Fenton, J A; Ashcroft, J; English, A; Jones, R A; Richards, S J; Pratt, G; Owen, R; Davies, F E; Child, J A; Jack, A S; Morgan, G

    2000-12-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is reported to be central to the pathogenesis of myeloma, inducing proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis in neoplastic plasma cells. Therefore, abrogating IL-6 signaling is of therapeutic interest, particularly with the development of humanized anti-IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) antibodies. The use of such antibodies clinically requires an understanding of IL-6R expression on neoplastic cells, particularly in the cycling fraction. IL-6R expression levels were determined on plasma cells from patients with myeloma (n = 93) and with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) or plasmacytoma (n = 66) and compared with the levels found on normal plasma cells (n = 11). In addition, 4-color flow cytometry was used to assess the differential expression by stage of differentiation and cell cycle status of the neoplastic plasma cells. IL-6R alpha chain (CD126) was not detectable in normal plasma cells, but was expressed in approximately 90% of patients with myeloma. In all groups, the expression levels showed a normal distribution. In patients with MGUS or plasmacytoma, neoplastic plasma cells expressed significantly higher levels of CD126 compared with phenotypically normal plasma cells from the same marrow. VLA-5(-) "immature" plasma cells showed the highest levels of CD126 expression, but "mature" VLA-5(+) myeloma plasma cells also overexpressed CD126 when compared with normal subjects. This study demonstrates that CD126 expression is restricted to neoplastic plasma cells, with little or no detectable expression by normal cells. Stromal cells in the bone marrow microenvironment do not induce the overexpression because neoplastic cells express higher levels of CD126 than normal plasma cells from the same bone marrow in individuals with MGUS. (Blood. 2000;96:3880-3886)

  6. Prognostic impact of circulating plasma cells in patients with multiple myeloma: implications for plasma cell leukaemia definition.

    PubMed

    Granell, Miquel; Calvo, Xavier; Garcia-Guiñón, Antoni; Escoda, Lourdes; Abella, Eugènia; Martínez, Clara M; Teixidó, Montserrat; Gimenez, Maria Teresa; Senín, Alicia; Sanz, Patricia; Campoy, Desirée; Vicent, Ana; Arenillas, Leonor; Rosiñol, Laura; Sierra, Jorge; Blade, Joan; Fernández de Larrea, Carlos

    2017-03-02

    The presence of circulating plasma cells in patients with multiple myeloma is considered a marker for highly proliferative disease. In the present study, the impact of circulating plasma cells assessed by cytology on survival of patients with multiple myeloma was analysed. Wright-Giemsa stained peripheral blood smears of 482 patients with newly diagnosed myeloma or plasma cell leukaemia were reviewed and patients were classified in four categories according to the percentage of circulating plasma cells: 0%, 1-4%, 5-20% and plasma cell leukemia with the following frequencies: 382 (79.2%), 83 (17.2%), 12 (2.5%) and 5 (1.0%) respectively. Median overall survival according to the circulating plasma cells group was 47, 50, 6 and 14 months, respectively. At multivariate analysis, presence of 5 to 20% circulating plasma cells was associated with a worse overall survival (relative risk 4.9, 95%CI 2.6-9.3) independently of age, creatinine, Durie-Salmon and international stage. Patients with ≥5% circulating plasma cells had lower platelet counts (median 86x109/L vs. 214x109/L, p<0.0001) and higher bone marrow plasma cells (median 53% vs. 36%, p=0.004). The presence of ≥5% circulating plasma cells in patients with multiple myeloma has similar adverse prognostic impact as plasma cell leukemia.

  7. Epigenetic inheritance of cell differentiation status.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ray K; Gurdon, John B

    2008-05-01

    Epigenetic modifications influence gene expression pattern and provide a unique signature of a cell differentiation status. Without external stimuli or signalling events, this cell identity remains stable and unlikely to change over many cell divisions. The epigenetic signature of a particular cell fate therefore needs to be replicated faithfully in daughter cells; otherwise a cell lineage cannot be maintained. However, the mechanism of transmission of cellular memory from mother to daughter cells remains unclear. It has been suggested that the inheritance of an active or silent gene state involves different kinds of epigenetic mechanisms, e.g. DNA methylation, histone modifications, replacement of histone variants, Polycomb group (PcG) and Trithorax group (TrxG) proteins. Emerging evidence supports the role of histone variant H3.3 in maintaining an active gene status and in remodelling nucleosomal composition. Here we discuss some recent findings on the propagation of epigenetic memory and propose a model for the inheritance of an active gene state through the interaction of H3.3 with other epigenetic components.

  8. Activated platelets inhibit hepatocellular carcinoma cell differentiation and promote tumor progression via platelet-tumor cell binding

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingchao; Li, Bing; Liu, Yue-Jian; Cheng, Cheng; Zhou, Chunyan; Zhao, Yongfu; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Lack of differentiation in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is associated with increased circulating platelet size. We measured platelet activation and plasma adenosine diphosphate (ADP) levels in HCC patients based on differentiation status. Local platelet accumulation and platelet-hepatoma cell binding were measured using immunohistochemistry (IHC) or flow cytometry. Using a xenograft assay in NON/SCID mice, we tested the effects of the anti-platelet drug clopidogrel on platelet activation, platelet infiltration, platelet-tumor cell binding and tumor cell differentiation. HCC patients with poor differentiation status displayed elevated platelet activation and higher ADP levels. Platelets accumulated within poorly differentiated tissues and localized at hepatoma cell membranes. Platelet-tumor cell binding was existed in carcinoma tissues, largely mediated by P-selectin on platelets. NOD/SCID mice with xenograft tumors also exhibited increased platelet activation and platelet-tumor cell binding. Clopidogrel therapy triggered hepatoma cell differentiation by attenuating platelet activation and platelet-tumor cell binding. TCF4 knockdown promoted HepG-2 cell differentiation and inhibited tumor formation, and TCF4 could be the potential downstream target for clopidogrel therapy. PMID:27542264

  9. Effects of non-thermal atmospheric plasma on human periodontal ligament mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miletić, M.; Mojsilović, S.; Okić Đorđević, I.; Maletić, D.; Puač, N.; Lazović, S.; Malović, G.; Milenković, P.; Petrović, Z. Lj; Bugarski, D.

    2013-08-01

    Here we investigate the influences of non-thermal atmospheric plasma on human mesenchymal stem cells isolated from periodontal ligament (hPDL-MSCs). A specially redesigned plasma needle was used as the source of low-temperature plasma and its effects on different hPDL-MSC functions were investigated. Cell cultures were obtained from extracted normal impacted third molars and characterized for their phenotype and multi-potential differentiation. The hPDL-MSCs possessed all the typical MSC properties, including clonogenic ability, high proliferation rate, specific phenotype and multilineage differentiation. The data regarding the interaction of plasma with hPDL-MSCs demonstrated that plasma treatment inhibited the migration of hPDL-MSCs and induced some detachment, while not affecting their viability. Additionally, plasma significantly attenuated hPDL-MSCs' proliferation, but promoted their osteogenic differentiation. The results of this study indicated that a non-thermal plasma offers specific activity with non-destructive properties that can be advantageous for future dental applications.

  10. Hematopoietic cell differentiation from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells, both embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, are undifferentiated cells that can self-renew and potentially differentiate into all hematopoietic lineages, such as hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), hematopoietic progenitor cells and mature hematopoietic cells in the presence of a suitable culture system. Establishment of pluripotent stem cells provides a comprehensive model to study early hematopoietic development and has emerged as a powerful research tool to explore regenerative medicine. Nowadays, HSC transplantation and hematopoietic cell transfusion have successfully cured some patients, especially in malignant hematological diseases. Owing to a shortage of donors and a limited number of the cells, hematopoietic cell induction from pluripotent stem cells has been regarded as an alternative source of HSCs and mature hematopoietic cells for intended therapeutic purposes. Pluripotent stem cells are therefore extensively utilized to facilitate better understanding in hematopoietic development by recapitulating embryonic development in vivo, in which efficient strategies can be easily designed and deployed for the generation of hematopoietic lineages in vitro. We hereby review the current progress of hematopoietic cell induction from embryonic stem/induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:23796405

  11. [Application of small molecule compounds inducing differentiation of stem cells].

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Shan, Lei; Li, Wen-lin; Zhang, Shou-de; Zhang, Wei-dong

    2011-02-01

    With the development of stem cells and regenerative medicine (treatment of various diseases using stem cells) research, the induction of differentiation of human stem cell technology has also made significant progress. The development of chemical biology offers a variety of small biological molecules for stem cell biology. This review focuses on how small molecule compounds (natural and synthetic) induce differentiation of stem cells.

  12. Temporal stability and molecular persistence of the bone marrow plasma cell antibody repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Gabriel C.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.; Georgiou, George; Marcotte, Edward M.; Ippolito, Gregory C.

    2016-01-01

    Plasma cells in human bone marrow (BM) are thought to be responsible for sustaining lifelong immunity, but its underlying basis is controversial. Here we use high-throughput sequence analysis of the same individual across 6.5 years to show that the BM plasma cell immunoglobulin heavy chain repertoire is remarkably stable over time. We find a nearly static bias in individual and combinatorial gene usage across time. Analysis of a second donor corroborates these observations. We also report the persistence of numerous BM plasma cell clonotypes (∼2%) identifiable at all points assayed across 6.5 years, supporting a model of serological memory based upon intrinsic longevity of human plasma cells. Donors were adolescents who completely recovered from neuroblastoma prior to the start of this study. Our work will facilitate differentiation between healthy and diseased antibody repertoires, by serving as a point of comparison with future deep-sequencing studies involving immune intervention. PMID:28000661

  13. Normal and neoplastic plasma cell membrane phenotype: studies with new monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Tazzari, P L; Gobbi, M; Dinota, A; Bontadini, A; Grassi, G; Cerato, C; Cavo, M; Pileri, S; Caligaris-Cappio, F; Tura, S

    1987-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies (MoAb), named 8A, 8F6 and 62B1, reacting with plasma cell-associated antigens, were characterized. 8A was found to be positive throughout the B cell lineage maturation steps from the immature B-committed CD10+ cell to the plasma cells. 8F6 and 62B1 reactivity is restricted to more mature cells and related lymphoid malignancies. In particular 62B1 appears to be limited to hairy cells and plasma cells. The results show that it is possible to obtain reagents reacting with plasma cells by immunizing mice with cells derived from human multiple myelomas. Furthermore, the obtained results suggest that it is possible to elicit antibodies against antigens which are present throughout all the differentiation steps of the B cell lineage. These new MoAb could help in elucidating the phenotype of the plasma cells and the relationships of multiple myelomas with other B cell proliferative disorders. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3319299

  14. Cell adhesion to plasma-coated PVC.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Elidiane C; de Souza, Eduardo S; de Moraes, Francine S; Duek, Eliana A R; Lucchesi, Carolina; Schreiner, Wido H; Durrant, Steven F; Cruz, Nilson C

    2014-01-01

    To produce environments suitable for cell culture, thin polymer films were deposited onto commercial PVC plates from radiofrequency acetylene-argon plasmas. The proportion of argon in the plasmas, P(Ar), was varied from 5.3 to 65.8%. The adhesion and growth of Vero cells on the coated surfaces were examined for different incubation times. Cytotoxicity tests were performed using spectroscopic methods. Carbon, O, and N were detected in all the samples using XPS. Roughness remained almost unchanged in the samples prepared with 5.3 and 28.9% but tended to increase for the films deposited with P(Ar) between 28.9 and 55.3%. Surface free energy increased with increasing P(Ar), except for the sample prepared at 28.9% of Ar, which presented the least reactive surface. Cells proliferated on all the samples, including the bare PVC. Independently of the deposition condition there was no evidence of cytotoxicity, indicating the viability of such coatings for designing biocompatible devices.

  15. Cell Adhesion to Plasma-Coated PVC

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Elidiane C.; de Souza, Eduardo S.; de Moraes, Francine S.; Duek, Eliana A. R.; Lucchesi, Carolina; Schreiner, Wido H.; Durrant, Steven F.; Cruz, Nilson C.

    2014-01-01

    To produce environments suitable for cell culture, thin polymer films were deposited onto commercial PVC plates from radiofrequency acetylene-argon plasmas. The proportion of argon in the plasmas, PAr, was varied from 5.3 to 65.8%. The adhesion and growth of Vero cells on the coated surfaces were examined for different incubation times. Cytotoxicity tests were performed using spectroscopic methods. Carbon, O, and N were detected in all the samples using XPS. Roughness remained almost unchanged in the samples prepared with 5.3 and 28.9% but tended to increase for the films deposited with PAr between 28.9 and 55.3%. Surface free energy increased with increasing PAr, except for the sample prepared at 28.9% of Ar, which presented the least reactive surface. Cells proliferated on all the samples, including the bare PVC. Independently of the deposition condition there was no evidence of cytotoxicity, indicating the viability of such coatings for designing biocompatible devices. PMID:25247202

  16. An approach for plasma cell myeloma diagnosis by two-color flow cytometry based on kappa/lambda ratios of CD38-gated plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, S; Yokote, T; Hirata, Y; Iwaki, K; Akioka, T; Miyoshi, T; Takayama, A; Nishiwaki, U; Masuda, Y; Ikemoto, T; Tanaka, H; Nishimura, Y; Tsuji, M; Hanafusa, T

    2013-01-01

    Criteria from the World Health Organization (WHO) are commonly used to diagnose plasma cell myeloma (PCM), but they are complex and require several laboratory parameters. To differentiate reactive plasmacytosis from clonal plasma cell neoplasms, such as PCM, it is important to accurately determine the expression of the cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (cIg) light chain (LC). Through retrospective analyses, we selected the patients with PCM, and analyzed records of 52 PCM patients, who underwent bone biopsies, and final diagnosis of PCM was established according to WHO criteria, and 22 controls. In the present study, all samples were analyzed by flow cytometry (FC) in the side scatter vs CD38 histogram mode, and the CD38-gated plasma cell population was identified. The positive cell ratios of kappa and lambda to plasma cell populations were analyzed. PCM cells were distinguished from normal plasma cells by a cut-off level between 0.80 and 3.3, a sensitivity of 90.3 percent, and a specificity of 81.1 percent. Two-color FC analysis is simple to perform, inexpensive, and clinically relevant data are obtained soon after completion of the FC measurements. It could be one of the helpful tools in the diagnosis of PCM. The correct diagnosis of PCM can be achieved more simply, efficiently, and rapidly by combining this method.

  17. Differentiation-stimulating potency of differentiated HL60 cells after drug treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Zhang, Qun; Gou, Bao-Di; Zhang, Tian-Lan; Wang, Kui

    2014-06-01

    Differentiation therapy in the treatment of leukemia is often hampered by limitations on using certain pharmaceutical regents or on the required doses due to various reasons, such as drug-resistance and retinoic acid syndrome. To circumvent these problems, a strategy might be developed on the basis of the ability of drug-differentiated cells to stimulate differentiation in leukemia cells. Using the promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL60 as a cell model, we assessed the differentiation-stimulating potency of differentiated granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages after treatments with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), respectively. ATRA- and TPA-differentiated cells were able to stimulate differentiation in fresh HL60 cells, accompanied by inhibition on cell growth to various extents. The differentiated cells of the second generation, especially those originated from TPA treatment, were as potent as the drugs themselves in stimulating differentiation in fresh HL60 cells. On the basis of "differentiation induced by differentiated cells", we explored the feasibility of ex vivo therapy.

  18. Assessment of bone marrow plasma cell infiltrates in multiple myeloma: the added value of CD138 immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Al-Quran, Samer Z; Yang, Lijun; Magill, James M; Braylan, Raul C; Douglas-Nikitin, Vonda K

    2007-12-01

    Assessment of bone marrow involvement by malignant plasma cells is an important element in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with multiple myeloma and other plasma cell dyscrasias. Microscope-based differential counts of bone marrow aspirates are used as the primary method to evaluate bone marrow plasma cell percentages. However, multiple myeloma is often a focal process, a fact that impacts the accuracy and reliability of the results of bone marrow plasma cell percentages obtained by differential counts of bone marrow aspirate smears. Moreover, the interobserver and intraobserver reproducibility of counting bone marrow plasma cells microscopically has not been adequately tested. CD138 allows excellent assessment of plasma cell numbers and distribution in bone marrow biopsies. We compared estimates of plasma cell percentages in bone marrow aspirates and in hematoxylin-eosin- and CD138-stained bone marrow biopsy sections (CD138 sections) in 79 bone marrows from patients with multiple myeloma. There was a notable discrepancy in bone marrow plasma cell percentages using the different methods of observation. In particular, there was a relatively poor concordance of plasma cell percentage estimation between aspirate smears and CD138 sections. Estimates of plasma cell percentage using CD138 sections demonstrated the highest interobserver concordance. This observation was supported by computer-assisted image analysis. In addition, CD138 expression highlighted patterns of plasma cell infiltration indicative of neoplasia even in the absence of plasmacytosis. We conclude that examination of CD138 sections should be considered for routine use in the estimation of plasma cell load in the bone marrow.

  19. Organization of organelles and VAMP-associated vesicular transport systems in differentiating skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Tajika, Yuki; Takahashi, Maiko; Ueno, Hitoshi; Murakami, Tohru; Yorifuji, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Vesicular transport plays an important role in the regulation of cellular function and differentiation of the cell, and intracellular vesicles play a role in the delivery of membrane components and in sorting membrane proteins to appropriate domains in organelles and the plasma membrane. Research on vesicular transport in differentiating cells has mostly focused on neurons and epithelial cells, and few such studies have been carried out on skeletal muscle cells. Skeletal muscle cells have specialized organelles and plasma membrane domains, including T-tubules, sarcoplasmic reticulum, neuromuscular junctions, and myotendinous junctions. The differentiation of skeletal muscle cells is achieved by multiple steps, i.e., proliferation of myoblasts, formation of myotubes by cell-cell fusion, and maturation of myotubes into myofibers. Systematic vesicular transport is expected to play a role in the maintenance and development of skeletal muscle cells. Here, we review a map of the vesicular transport system during the differentiation of skeletal muscle cells. The characteristics of organelle arrangement in myotubes are described according to morphological studies. Vesicular transport in myotubes is explained by the expression profiles of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor proteins.

  20. MYC protein expression is detected in plasma cell myeloma but not in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ruobing; Cerny, Jan; Devitt, Katherine; Dresser, Karen; Nath, Rajneesh; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Rodig, Scott J; Chen, Benjamin J; Woda, Bruce A; Yu, Hongbo

    2014-06-01

    It has been recognized that monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) precedes a diagnosis of plasma cell myeloma in most patients. Recent gene expression array analysis has revealed that an MYC activation signature is detected in plasma cell myeloma but not in MGUS. In this study, we performed immunohistochemical studies using membrane CD138 and nuclear MYC double staining on bone marrow biopsies from patients who met the diagnostic criteria of plasma cell myeloma or MGUS. Our study demonstrated nuclear MYC expression in CD138-positive plasma cells in 22 of 26 (84%) plasma cell myeloma samples and in none of the 29 bone marrow samples from patients with MGUS. In addition, our data on the follow-up biopsies from plasma cell myeloma patients with high MYC expression demonstrated that evaluation of MYC expression in plasma cells can be useful in detecting residual disease. We also demonstrated that plasma cells gained MYC expression in 5 of 8 patients (62.5%) when progressing from MGUS to plasma cell myeloma. Analysis of additional lymphomas with plasmacytic differentiation, including lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma, marginal zone lymphoma, and plasmablastic lymphoma, reveals that MYC detection can be a useful tool in the diagnosis of plasma cell myeloma.

  1. Probing stem cell differentiation using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaobin; Shi, Xuetao; Ostrovidov, Serge; Wu, Hongkai; Nakajima, Ken

    2016-03-01

    A real-time method using atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation by measuring the mechanical properties of cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. It is clear that AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring the differentiation of stem cells in a non-invasive manner.

  2. Iodine Affects Differentiation and Migration Process in Trophoblastic Cells.

    PubMed

    Olivo-Vidal, Zendy Evelyn; Rodríguez, Roció Coutiño; Arroyo-Helguera, Omar

    2016-02-01

    Iodine deficiency is associated with oxidative stress increase and preeclampsia during gestation, suggesting that iodine concentration plays an important role in the normal placenta physiology. The question raised is to analyze the effect of iodine deficiency on oxidative stress, viability, differentiation, and migration process and changes in the expression of differentiation and migration markers. Iodine deprivation was done using potassium perchlorate (KCLO4) to block sodium iodide symporter (NIS) transporter and 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid DIDS to inhibit pendrine (PEN) transport for 3-48 h. Then trophoblast cells were treated with low iodine doses of 5-500 μM and high iodine doses of 100-5000 μM. Oxidative stress, viability, and human chorionic gonadotropin (hGC) were measured by colorimetric methods. Migration throphoblast cells were evaluated by both wound healing and Boyden chamber assays. Changes in mRNA expression were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. Iodine deprivation induces a significant increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS), viability, and migration process vs control cells. We found a significant overregulation in the mRNA's peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-gamma), Snail, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) mRNA's in cells deprived of iodine, as well as a down glial cell missing-1 (GCM-1) regulation, hGC, pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A), and E-cadherin mRNA expression. The expression of hypoxic induction factor alpha (HIFα) mRNA does not change with iodine deprivation. In cells deprived of iodine, supplementing low iodine doses (5-500 μM) does not induce any significant changes in viability. However, ROS and migration process were decreased, although we found an increased human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) secretion as a differentiation marker. In addition, we found that PPAR-gamma, Snail, and MPP-9 mRNAs expression are downregulated with low iodine doses, in contrast with GCM-1, PAPP

  3. Limited Diagnostic Utility of Plasma Adrenocorticotropic Hormone for Differentiation between Adrenal Cushing Syndrome and Cushing Disease.

    PubMed

    Hong, A Ram; Kim, Jung Hee; Hong, Eun Shil; Kim, I Kyeong; Park, Kyeong Seon; Ahn, Chang Ho; Kim, Sang Wan; Shin, Chan Soo; Kim, Seong Yeon

    2015-09-01

    Measurement of the plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level has been recommended as the first diagnostic test for differentiating between ACTH-independent Cushing syndrome (CS) and ACTH-dependent CS. When plasma ACTH values are inconclusive, a differential diagnosis of CS can be made based upon measurement of the serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) level and results of the high-dose dexamethasone suppression test (HDST). The aim of this study was to assess the utility of plasma ACTH to differentiate adrenal CS from Cushing' disease (CD) and compare it with that of the HDST results and serum DHEA-S level. We performed a retrospective, multicenter study from January 2000 to May 2012 involving 92 patients with endogenous CS. The levels of plasma ACTH, serum cortisol, 24-hour urine free cortisol (UFC) after the HDST, and serum DHEA-S were measured. Fifty-seven patients had adrenal CS and 35 patients had CD. The area under the curve of plasma ACTH, serum DHEA-S, percentage suppression of serum cortisol, and UFC after HDST were 0.954, 0.841, 0.950, and 0.997, respectively (all P<0.001). The cut-off values for plasma ACTH, percentage suppression of serum cortisol, and UFC after HDST were 5.3 pmol/L, 33.3%, and 61.6%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of plasma ACTH measurement were 84.2% and 94.3%, those of serum cortisol were 95.8% and 90.6%, and those of UFC after the HDST were 97.9% and 96.7%, respectively. Significant overlap in plasma ACTH levels was seen between patients with adrenal CS and those with CD. The HDST may be useful in differentiating between these forms of the disease, especially when the plasma ACTH level alone is not conclusive.

  4. CREG1 Interacts with Sec8 to Promote Cardiomyogenic Differentiation and Cell-Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Qi, Yanmei; Li, Shaohua; Hsu, Shu-Chan; Saadat, Siavash; Hsu, June; Rahimi, Saum A; Lee, Leonard Y; Yan, Chenghui; Tian, Xiaoxiang; Han, Yanling

    2016-06-22

    Understanding the regulation of cell-cell interactions during the formation of compact myocardial structures is important for achieving true cardiac regeneration through enhancing the integration of stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes into the recipient myocardium. In this study, we found that cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes 1 (CREG1) is highly expressed in both embryonic and adult hearts. Gain- and loss-of-function analyses demonstrated that CREG1 is required for differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell into cardiomyocytes and the formation of cohesive myocardium-like structures in a cell-autonomous fashion. Furthermore, CREG1 directly interacts with Sec8 of the exocyst complex, which tethers vesicles to the plasma membrane. Site-directed mutagenesis and rescue of CREG1 knockout ES cells showed that CREG1 binding to Sec8 is required for cardiomyocyte differentiation and cohesion. Mechanistically, CREG1, Sec8, and N-cadherin colocalize at intercalated discs in vivo and are enriched at cell-cell junctions in cultured cardiomyocytes. CREG1 overexpression enhances the assembly of adherens and gap junctions. By contrast, its knockout inhibits the Sec8-N-cadherin interaction and induces their degradation. These results suggest that the CREG1 binding to Sec8 enhances the assembly of intercellular junctions and promotes cardiomyogenesis. Stem Cells 2016.

  5. Smooth muscle differentiation in scleroderma fibroblastic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sappino, A. P.; Masouyé, I.; Saurat, J. H.; Gabbiani, G.

    1990-01-01

    Using antibodies to alpha-smooth muscle actin and desmin on paraffin-embedded formalin-fixed tissue sections, the authors demonstrate that fibroblastic cells of localized and systemic scleroderma lesions express features of smooth muscle differentiation. Eleven of eleven skin specimens of systemic sclerosis patients and two of four skin specimens of localized scleroderma displayed the presence of fibroblasts expressing alpha-smooth muscle actin, a cell population that predominated in areas of prominent collagen deposition. A similar fibroblastic phenotype was found in the esophagus, the liver, and the lung specimens obtained from four patients who died of progressive systemic sclerosis. Immunostaining for desmin, performed on adjacent tissue sections, demonstrated that a minority of these fibroblastic cells present in skin and visceral lesions contained this protein. The authors' observations indicate that scleroderma fibroblasts are phenotypically related to the stromal cells previously identified in hypertrophic scars, fibromatoses, and desmoplasia; they might provide novel criteria for the characterization of scleroderma lesions and help to identify the factors responsible for phenotypic modulations in fibroblastic cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1698026

  6. Staying alive: regulation of plasma cell survival.

    PubMed

    Tangye, Stuart G

    2011-12-01

    On describing the catastrophic effect of the plague during the Peloponnesian War, Greek historian Thucydides (c ∼450 BC) made the prescient observation that the "same man was never attacked twice - never at least fatally". This is probably the first description of the mammalian immune systems' remarkable ability to elicit a pathogen-specific response that potentially protects the host for its lifetime. This protection is largely mediated by plasma cells (PCs) that produce copious quantities of antibodies for extended periods of time, even after pathogen clearance. Here, I review the requirements for PC longevity in mice and humans, in particular the roles of survival niches in bone marrow and other tissues, and the "dialogue" between PCs and other cells that are crucial for long-lived humoral immunity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Neuronal Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using Exosomes Derived from Differentiating Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Yuji S.; Xu, Qiaobing

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes deliver functional proteins and genetic materials to neighboring cells, and have potential applications for tissue regeneration. One possible mechanism of exosome-promoted tissue regeneration is through the delivery of microRNA (miRNA). In this study, we hypothesized that exosomes derived from neuronal progenitor cells contain miRNAs that promote neuronal differentiation. We treated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) daily with exosomes derived from PC12 cells, a neuronal cell line, for 1 week. After the treatment with PC12-derived exosomes, MSCs developed neuron-like morphology, and gene and protein expressions of neuronal markers were upregulated. Microarray analysis showed that the expression of miR-125b, which is known to play a role in neuronal differentiation of stem cells, was much higher in PC12-derived exosomes than in exosomes from B16-F10 melanoma cells. These results suggest that the delivery of miRNAs contained in PC12-derived exosomes is a possible mechanism explaining the neuronal differentiation of MSC. PMID:26248331

  8. Leukemia Cutis Associated with Secondary Plasma Cell Leukemia.

    PubMed

    DeMartinis, Nicole C; Brown, Megan M; Hinds, Brian R; Cohen, Philip R

    2017-05-09

    Plasma cell leukemia is an uncommon, aggressive variant of leukemia that may occur de novo or in association with multiple myeloma. Leukemia cutis is the cutaneous manifestation of leukemia, and indicates an infiltration of the skin by malignant leukocytes or their precursors. Plasma cell leukemia cutis is a rare clinical presentation of leukemia. We present a man who developed plasma cell leukemia cutis in association with multiple myeloma. Cutaneous nodules developed on his arms and legs 50 days following an autologous stem cell transplant. Histopathologic examination showed CD138-positive nodular aggregates of atypical plasma cells with kappa light chain restriction, similar to the phenotype of his myeloma. In spite of systemic treatment of his underlying disease, he died 25 days after the presentation of leukemia cutis. Pub-Med was searched for the following terms: cutaneous plasmacytomas, leukemia cutis, plasma cell leukemia nodules, plasma cell leukemia cutis, and secondary cutaneous plasmacytoma. Papers were reviewed and appropriate references evaluated. Leukemia cutis in plasma cell leukemia patients is an infrequent occurrence. New skin lesions in patients with plasma cell leukemia should be biopsied for pathology and for tissue cultures to evaluate for cancer or infection, respectively. The diagnosis plasma cell leukemia cutis is associated with a very poor prognosis.

  9. Unfolded protein response inducers tunicamycin and dithiothreitol promote myeloma cell differentiation mediated by XBP-1.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hua; Zou, Jianfeng; Zhang, Hui; Fu, Weijun; Zeng, Tianmei; Huang, Hejing; Zhou, Fan; Hou, Jian

    2015-02-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an essential pathway for both normal and malignant plasma cells to maintain endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis in response to the large amount of immunoglobulin (Ig) output. The inositol-requiring enzyme 1-X-box binding protein-1 (IRE1-XBP-1) arm of the UPR pathway has been shown to play crucial roles not only in relieving the ER stress by up-regulating a series of genes favoring ER-associated protein degradation and protein folding, but in mediating terminal plasmacytic differentiation and maturation. Myeloma cells comprise various subsets arrested in diverse differentiated phases, and the immaturity of myeloma cells has been taken as a marker for poor prognosis, suggesting that differentiation induction would be a promising therapeutic strategy for myeloma. Herein, we used low-dose pharmacological UPR inducers such as tunicamycin (TM) and dithiothreitol (DTT) to efficiently activate the IRE1-XBP-1 pathway in myeloma cells characterized by transcriptional expression increase in spliced XBP-1 and molecular chaperons, accompanied by significant differentiation and maturation of these myeloma cells, without concomitant cytotoxicity. These differentiated myeloma cells exhibited a more mature appearance with well-developed cytoplasm and a reduced nucleocytoplasmic ratio, and a further differentiated phenotype with markedly increased expression of CD49e together with significantly elevated cellular secretion of Ig light chain as shown by flow cytometry and ELISA, in contrast to the control myeloma cells without exposed to TM or DTT. Moreover, siRNA knockdown of XBP-1 disrupted TM- or DTT-induced myeloma cell differentiation and maturation. Our study, for the first time, validated that the modest activation of the UPR pathway enables myeloma cells to further differentiate, and identified that XBP-1 plays an indispensable role in UPR-mediated myeloma cell differentiation and maturation. Thus, we provided the rationale and

  10. Directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells to kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Lam, Albert Q; Freedman, Benjamin S; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2014-07-01

    Regenerative medicine affords a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease. Nephron progenitor cell populations exist only during embryonic kidney development. Understanding the mechanisms by which these populations arise and differentiate is integral to the challenge of generating new nephrons for therapeutic purposes. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), comprising embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from adults, have the potential to generate functional kidney cells and tissue. Studies in mouse and human PSCs have identified specific approaches to the addition of growth factors, including Wnt and fibroblast growth factor, that can induce PSC differentiation into cells with phenotypic characteristics of nephron progenitor populations with the capacity to form kidney-like structures. Although significant progress has been made, further studies are necessary to confirm the production of functional kidney cells and to promote their three-dimensional organization into bona fide kidney tissue. Human PSCs have been generated from patients with kidney diseases, including polycystic kidney disease, Alport syndrome, and Wilms tumor, and may be used to better understand phenotypic consequences of naturally occurring genetic mutations and to conduct "clinical trials in a dish". The capability to generate human kidney cells from PSCs has significant translational applications, including the bioengineering of functional kidney tissue, use in drug development to test compounds for efficacy and toxicity, and in vitro disease modeling.

  11. Differentiated cells are more efficient than adult stem cells for cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Sung, Li-Ying; Gao, Shaorong; Shen, Hongmei; Yu, Hui; Song, Yifang; Smith, Sadie L; Chang, Ching-Chien; Inoue, Kimiko; Kuo, Lynn; Lian, Jin; Li, Ao; Tian, X Cindy; Tuck, David P; Weissman, Sherman M; Yang, Xiangzhong; Cheng, Tao

    2006-11-01

    Since the creation of Dolly via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), more than a dozen species of mammals have been cloned using this technology. One hypothesis for the limited success of cloning via SCNT (1%-5%) is that the clones are likely to be derived from adult stem cells. Support for this hypothesis comes from the findings that the reproductive cloning efficiency for embryonic stem cells is five to ten times higher than that for somatic cells as donors and that cloned pups cannot be produced directly from cloned embryos derived from differentiated B and T cells or neuronal cells. The question remains as to whether SCNT-derived animal clones can be derived from truly differentiated somatic cells. We tested this hypothesis with mouse hematopoietic cells at different differentiation stages: hematopoietic stem cells, progenitor cells and granulocytes. We found that cloning efficiency increases over the differentiation hierarchy, and terminally differentiated postmitotic granulocytes yield cloned pups with the greatest cloning efficiency.

  12. Superficial treatment of mammalian cells using plasma needle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffels, E.; Kieft, I. E.; Sladek, R. E. J.

    2003-12-01

    Interactions of a small-size, non-thermal plasma (plasma needle) with living cells in culture are studied. We have demonstrated the non-destructive character of the plasma needle: under moderate conditions (low-power and low concentration of molecular species) the plasma needle does not heat biological samples and does not induce cell death. Treatment of living cells is restricted to the cell exterior (membrane). As a result of the interactions of plasma radicals with cell adhesion molecules, cell attachment is temporarily interrupted; the loose cells can be removed, reattached or transferred. This effect may prove very useful in fine surgery, where a part of the tissue must be removed with high-precision, without damage to the adjacent cells and without inflammatory reaction.

  13. Soft matrix supports osteogenic differentiation of human dental follicle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Viale-Bouroncle, Sandra; Voellner, Florian; Moehl, Christoph; Kuepper, Kevin; Brockhoff, Gero; Reichert, Torsten E.; Schmalz, Gottfried; Morsczeck, Christian

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Rigid stiffness supports osteogenic differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). {yields} Our study examined stiffness and differentiation of dental follicle cells (DFCs). {yields} Soft ECMs have a superior capacity to support the osteogenic differentiation of DFCs. {yields} DFCs and MSCs react contrarily to soft and rigid surface stiffness. -- Abstract: The differentiation of stem cells can be directed by the grade of stiffness of the developed tissue cells. For example a rigid extracellular matrix supports the osteogenic differentiation in bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). However, less is known about the relation of extracellular matrix stiffness and cell differentiation of ectomesenchymal dental precursor cells. Our study examined for the first time the influence of the surface stiffness on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human dental follicle cells (DFCs). Cell proliferation of DFCs was only slightly decreased on cell culture surfaces with a bone-like stiffness. The osteogenic differentiation in DFCs could only be initiated with a dexamethasone based differentiation medium after using varying stiffness. Here, the softest surface improved the induction of osteogenic differentiation in comparison to that with the highest stiffness. In conclusion, different to bone marrow derived MSCs, soft ECMs have a superior capacity to support the osteogenic differentiation of DFCs.

  14. Ependymal cell differentiation, from monociliated to multiciliated cells.

    PubMed

    Delgehyr, Nathalie; Meunier, Alice; Faucourt, Marion; Bosch Grau, Montserrat; Strehl, Laetitia; Janke, Carsten; Spassky, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Primary and motile cilia differ in their structure, composition, and function. In the brain, primary cilia are immotile signalling organelles present on neural stem cells and neurons. Multiple motile cilia are found on the surface of ependymal cells in all brain ventricles, where they contribute to the flow of cerebrospinal fluid. During development, monociliated ependymal progenitor cells differentiate into multiciliated ependymal cells, thus providing a simple system for studying the transition between these two stages. In this chapter, we provide protocols for immunofluorescence staining of developing ependymal cells in vivo, on whole mounts of lateral ventricle walls, and in vitro, on cultured ependymal cells. We also provide a list of markers we currently use to stain both types of cilia, including proteins at the ciliary membrane and tubulin posttranslational modifications of the axoneme.

  15. Bam and Bgcn in Drosophila germline stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Perinthottathil, Sreejith; Kim, Changsoo

    2011-01-01

    The female Drosophila reproductive organ, the ovary, has provided researchers with an incisive genetic system with which principle regulation of stem cell maintenance and differentiation has been delineated. An environmental niche regulates a stem cell's asymmetric self-renewal division that produces a daughter stem cell and a differentiated daughter cell, which further differentiate into eggs. A number of extrinsic and intrinsic factors have been identified that are required either for stem cell maintenance or differentiation. Bam/Bgcn complex plays a pivotal role in promoting stem cell differentiation. Recent papers suggest that Bam/Bgcn complex regulates translation of important maintenance factors and is also involved in the regulation of microRNA-dependent translational repression. Here, we focus on Bam and Bgcn repression of stem cell maintenance factors in the differentiation of germline stem cells (GSCs).

  16. Balance between cell division and differentiation during plant development.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Parra, Elena; Desvoyes, Bénédicte; Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2005-01-01

    The processes which make possible that a cell gives rise to two daughter cells define the cell division cycle. In individual cells, this is strictly controlled both in time and space. In multicellular organisms extra layers of regulation impinge on the balance between cell proliferation and cell differentiation within particular ontogenic programs. In contrast to animals, organogenesis in plants is a post-embryonic process that requires developmentally programmed reversion of sets of cells from different differentiated states to a pluripotent state followed by regulated proliferation and progression through distinct differentiation patterns. This implies a fine coupling of cell division control, cell cycle arrest and reactivation, endoreplication and differentiation. The emerging view is that cell cycle regulators, in addition to controlling cell division, also function as targets for maintaining cell homeostasis during development. The mechanisms and cross talk among different cell cycle regulatory pathways are discussed here in the context of a developing plant.

  17. Stochasticity and Spatial Interaction Govern Stem Cell Differentiation Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Smith, Quinton; Stukalin, Evgeny; Kusuma, Sravanti; Gerecht, Sharon; Sun, Sean X

    2015-07-31

    Stem cell differentiation underlies many fundamental processes such as development, tissue growth and regeneration, as well as disease progression. Understanding how stem cell differentiation is controlled in mixed cell populations is an important step in developing quantitative models of cell population dynamics. Here we focus on quantifying the role of cell-cell interactions in determining stem cell fate. Toward this, we monitor stem cell differentiation in adherent cultures on micropatterns and collect statistical cell fate data. Results show high cell fate variability and a bimodal probability distribution of stem cell fraction on small (80-140 μm diameter) micropatterns. On larger (225-500 μm diameter) micropatterns, the variability is also high but the distribution of the stem cell fraction becomes unimodal. Using a stochastic model, we analyze the differentiation dynamics and quantitatively determine the differentiation probability as a function of stem cell fraction. Results indicate that stem cells can interact and sense cellular composition in their immediate neighborhood and adjust their differentiation probability accordingly. Blocking epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) can diminish this cell-cell contact mediated sensing. For larger micropatterns, cell motility adds a spatial dimension to the picture. Taken together, we find stochasticity and cell-cell interactions are important factors in determining cell fate in mixed cell populations.

  18. Stochasticity and Spatial Interaction Govern Stem Cell Differentiation Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Quinton; Stukalin, Evgeny; Kusuma, Sravanti; Gerecht, Sharon; Sun, Sean X.

    2015-07-01

    Stem cell differentiation underlies many fundamental processes such as development, tissue growth and regeneration, as well as disease progression. Understanding how stem cell differentiation is controlled in mixed cell populations is an important step in developing quantitative models of cell population dynamics. Here we focus on quantifying the role of cell-cell interactions in determining stem cell fate. Toward this, we monitor stem cell differentiation in adherent cultures on micropatterns and collect statistical cell fate data. Results show high cell fate variability and a bimodal probability distribution of stem cell fraction on small (80-140 μm diameter) micropatterns. On larger (225-500 μm diameter) micropatterns, the variability is also high but the distribution of the stem cell fraction becomes unimodal. Using a stochastic model, we analyze the differentiation dynamics and quantitatively determine the differentiation probability as a function of stem cell fraction. Results indicate that stem cells can interact and sense cellular composition in their immediate neighborhood and adjust their differentiation probability accordingly. Blocking epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) can diminish this cell-cell contact mediated sensing. For larger micropatterns, cell motility adds a spatial dimension to the picture. Taken together, we find stochasticity and cell-cell interactions are important factors in determining cell fate in mixed cell populations.

  19. Stochasticity and Spatial Interaction Govern Stem Cell Differentiation Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Quinton; Stukalin, Evgeny; Kusuma, Sravanti; Gerecht, Sharon; Sun, Sean X.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell differentiation underlies many fundamental processes such as development, tissue growth and regeneration, as well as disease progression. Understanding how stem cell differentiation is controlled in mixed cell populations is an important step in developing quantitative models of cell population dynamics. Here we focus on quantifying the role of cell-cell interactions in determining stem cell fate. Toward this, we monitor stem cell differentiation in adherent cultures on micropatterns and collect statistical cell fate data. Results show high cell fate variability and a bimodal probability distribution of stem cell fraction on small (80–140 μm diameter) micropatterns. On larger (225–500 μm diameter) micropatterns, the variability is also high but the distribution of the stem cell fraction becomes unimodal. Using a stochastic model, we analyze the differentiation dynamics and quantitatively determine the differentiation probability as a function of stem cell fraction. Results indicate that stem cells can interact and sense cellular composition in their immediate neighborhood and adjust their differentiation probability accordingly. Blocking epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) can diminish this cell-cell contact mediated sensing. For larger micropatterns, cell motility adds a spatial dimension to the picture. Taken together, we find stochasticity and cell-cell interactions are important factors in determining cell fate in mixed cell populations. PMID:26227093

  20. Effect of BCD Plasma on a Bacteria Cell Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasrin, Navabsafa; Hamid, Ghomi; Maryam, Nikkhah; Soheila, Mohades; Hossein, Dabiri; Saeed, Ghasemi

    2013-07-01

    Abstract Cell membrane rupture is considered to be one of the probable mechanisms for bacterial inactivation using barrier corona discharge (BCD) plasma. In this paper, the effect of the BCD plasma on the Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria cell wall was investigated through two analytical methods; Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) assay and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The ATP assay results indicate an increase in the ATP content of samples which were exposed to the BCD plasma. This implies the bacteria cell rupture. Moreover, AFM images confirm a serious damage of the bacteria cell wall under the influence of the bactericidal agents of the plasma.

  1. Nuclear receptor regulation of stemness and stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Yangsik

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells include a diverse number of toti-, pluri-, and multi-potent cells that play important roles in cellular genesis and differentiation, tissue development, and organogenesis. Genetic regulation involving various transcription factors results in the self-renewal and differentiation properties of stem cells. The nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily is composed of 48 ligand-activated transcription factors involved in diverse physiological functions such as metabolism, development, and reproduction. Increasing evidence shows that certain NRs function in regulating stemness or differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells and tissue-specific adult stem cells. Here, we review the role of the NR superfamily in various aspects of stem cell biology, including their regulation of stemness, forward- and trans-differentiation events; reprogramming of terminally differentiated cells; and interspecies differences. These studies provide insights into the therapeutic potential of the NR superfamily in stem cell therapy and in treating stem cell-associated diseases (e.g., cancer stem cell). PMID:19696553

  2. Development of plasma-on-chip: Plasma treatment for individual cells cultured in media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Shinya; Chang, Chun-Yao; Jeong, Jonghyeon; Kobayashi, Mime; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Sasaki, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    A device consisting of Si microwells and microplasma sources has been fabricated for plasma treatment of individual cells cultured in media. We named the device plasma-on-chip. The microwells have through-holes at the bottom where gas-liquid interfaces form when they are filled with media containing biological samples. The microplasma sources, which supply reactive species, are located on the back of each microwell. Through the gas-liquid interface, the reactive species are supplied to the cells. Chlorella cells were used to demonstrate the feasibility of the device and after three minutes of plasma treatment, the fluorescence intensity of Chlorella cells appeared to be decreased. Optical emission spectroscopy identified O and OH radicals in the plasma, which can affect the cells. In the analysis of biological samples such as human cells or tissues, this device raises the possibility of revealing the mechanisms of plasma medicine in more detail.

  3. A differential model of the complex cell.

    PubMed

    Hansard, Miles; Horaud, Radu

    2011-09-01

    The receptive fields of simple cells in the visual cortex can be understood as linear filters. These filters can be modeled by Gabor functions or gaussian derivatives. Gabor functions can also be combined in an energy model of the complex cell response. This letter proposes an alternative model of the complex cell, based on gaussian derivatives. It is most important to account for the insensitivity of the complex response to small shifts of the image. The new model uses a linear combination of the first few derivative filters, at a single position, to approximate the first derivative filter, at a series of adjacent positions. The maximum response, over all positions, gives a signal that is insensitive to small shifts of the image. This model, unlike previous approaches, is based on the scale space theory of visual processing. In particular, the complex cell is built from filters that respond to the 2D differential structure of the image. The computational aspects of the new model are studied in one and two dimensions, using the steerability of the gaussian derivatives. The response of the model to basic images, such as edges and gratings, is derived formally. The response to natural images is also evaluated, using statistical measures of shift insensitivity. The neural implementation and predictions of the model are discussed.

  4. Bestatin inhibits cell growth, cell division, and spore cell differentiation in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Poloz, Yekaterina; Catalano, Andrew; O'Day, Danton H

    2012-04-01

    Bestatin methyl ester (BME) is an inhibitor of Zn(2+)-binding aminopeptidases that inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in normal and cancer cells. We have used Dictyostelium as a model organism to study the effects of BME. Only two Zn(2+)-binding aminopeptidases have been identified in Dictyostelium to date, puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase A and B (PsaA and PsaB). PSA from other organisms is known to regulate cell division and differentiation. Here we show that PsaA is differentially expressed throughout growth and development of Dictyostelium, and its expression is regulated by developmental morphogens. We present evidence that BME specifically interacts with PsaA and inhibits its aminopeptidase activity. Treatment of cells with BME inhibited the rate of cell growth and the frequency of cell division in growing cells and inhibited spore cell differentiation during late development. Overexpression of PsaA-GFP (where GFP is green fluorescent protein) also inhibited spore cell differentiation but did not affect growth. Using chimeras, we have identified that nuclear versus cytoplasmic localization of PsaA affects the choice between stalk or spore cell differentiation pathway. Cells that overexpressed PsaA-GFP (primarily nuclear) differentiated into stalk cells, while cells that overexpressed PsaAΔNLS2-GFP (cytoplasmic) differentiated into spores. In conclusion, we have identified that BME inhibits cell growth, division, and differentiation in Dictyostelium likely through inhibition of PsaA.

  5. Differential form of the collision integral for a relativistic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Braams, B.J.; Karney, C.F.F.

    1987-08-01

    A differential formulation for the Beliaev and Budker relativistic collision integral is presented. This permits the rapid numerical evaluation of the collision integral. The decomposition into spherical harmonics allows the collision operator to be expressed in terms of one-dimensional integrals for simple background distributions. This is useful in carrying out analytical work. It also provides a convenient method for calculating the boundary conditions for the potentials. 6 refs.

  6. Identifying microRNAs that Regulate Neuroblastoma Cell Differentiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0241 TITLE: Identifying that Regulate Neuroblastoma Cell Differentiation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Liqin Du...inducing miRNA, miR- 449a. We examined the differentiation-inducing function of miR-449a in multiple neuroblastoma cell lines. We have demonstrated that...miR-449a functions as an inducer of cell differentiation in neuroblastoma cell lines with distinct genetic backgrounds, including the MYCN

  7. Bioinformatic analysis of neural stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Goff, Loyal A; Davila, Jonathan; Jörnsten, Rebecka; Keles, Sunduz; Hart, Ronald P

    2007-09-01

    Regulated mRnAs during differentiation of rat neural stem cells were analyzed using the ABi1700 microarray platform. This microarray, while technically advanced, suffers from the difficulty of integrating hybridization results into public databases for systems-level analysis. This is particularly true for the rat array, since many of the probes were designed for transcripts based on predicted human and mouse homologs. using several strategies, we increased the public annotation of the 27,531 probes from 43% to over 65%. To increase the dynamic range of annotation, probes were mapped to numerous public keys from several data sources. consensus annotation from multiple sources was determined for well-scoring alignments, and a confidence-based ranking system established for probes with less agreement across multiple data sources. previous attempts at genomic interpretation using the celera annotation model resulted in poor overlap with expected genomic sequences. since the public keys are more precisely mapped to the genome, we could now analyze the relationships between predicted transcription-factor binding sites and expression clusters. Results collected from a differentiation time course of two neural stem cell clones were clustered using a model-based algorithm. Transcription-factor binding sites were predicted from upstream regions of mapped transcripts using position weight matrices from either JAspAR or TRAnsFAc, and the resulting scores were used to discriminate between observed expression clusters. A classification and regression tree analysis was conducted using cluster numbers as gene identifiers and TFBs scores as predictors, pruning back to obtain a tree with the lowest gene class prediction error rate. Results identify several transcription factors, the presence or absence of which are sufficient to describe clusters of mRnAs changing over time-those that are static, as well as clusters describing cell line differences. public annotation of the AB1700

  8. Differential drift of plasma clouds in the magnetosphere: an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire, J. F.

    2001-07-01

    First, Brice's (Journal of Geophysical Research 72 (1967) 5193) original theory for the formation of the plasmapause is recalled. Next, the motivation for writing a modification to this early theory is pointed out. The key aspects of Brice's manuscript are outlined and discussed. The mechanism of interchange driven by gravitational forces, centrifugal effects and kinetic pressure is considered in the cases when the integrated Pedersen conductivity is (i) negligibly small (as in Chandrasekhar's, Plasma Physics, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1960, 217 pp. and Longmire's, Elementary Plasma Physics, Wiley Interscience, New York, 1963, 296 pp., textbooks), (ii) infinitely large (as in many magnetospheric convection models), or (iii) has a finite value of the order of 0.2 mho, as in the Earth's ionosphere. Updates of this theory of interchange resulting from the existence of weak double layers, from quasi-interchange, or from the effects of an additional population of energetic ring-current particles forming the extended tail of the velocity distribution function, have also been reexamined.

  9. Prospective Review of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Differentiation into Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Garg, Priyanka; Mazur, Matthew M; Buck, Amy C; Wandtke, Meghan E; Liu, Jiayong; Ebraheim, Nabil A

    2017-02-01

    Stem cell research has been a popular topic in the past few decades. This review aims to discuss factors that help regulate, induce, and enhance mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation into osteoblasts for bone regeneration. The factors analyzed include bone morphogenic protein (BMP), transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1), insulin-like growth factor type 1 (IGF-1), histone demethylase JMJD3, cyclin dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), fucoidan, Runx2 transcription factor, and TAZ transcriptional coactivator. Methods promoting bone healing are also evaluated in this review that have shown promise in previous studies. Methods tested using animal models include low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) with MSC, micro motion, AMD3100 injections, BMP delivery, MSC transplantation, tissue engineering utilizing scaffolds, anti-IL-20 monoclonal antibody, low dose photodynamic therapy, and bone marrow stromal cell transplants. Human clinical trial methods analyzed include osteoblast injections, bone marrow grafts, bone marrow and platelet rich plasma transplantation, tissue engineering using scaffolds, and recombinant human BMP-2. These methods have been shown to promote and accelerate new bone formation. These various methods for enhanced bone regeneration have the potential to be used, following further research, in clinical practice.

  10. Capillary flow of blood in a microchannel with differential wetting for blood plasma separation and on-chip glucose detection.

    PubMed

    Maria, M Sneha; Rakesh, P E; Chandra, T S; Sen, A K

    2016-09-01

    We report capillary flow of blood in a microchannel with differential wetting for the separation of a plasma from sample blood and subsequent on-chip detection of glucose present in a plasma. A rectangular polydimethylsiloxane microchannel with hydrophilic walls (on three sides) achieved by using oxygen plasma exposure enables capillary flow of blood introduced at the device inlet through the microchannel. A hydrophobic region (on all four sides) in the microchannel impedes the flow of sample blood, and the accumulated blood cells at the region form a filter to facilitate the separation of a plasma. The modified wetting property of the walls and hence the device performance could be retained for a few weeks by covering the channels with deionised water. The effects of the channel cross-section, exposure time, waiting time, and location and length of the hydrophobic region on the volume of the collected plasma are studied. Using a channel cross-section of 1000 × 400 μm, an exposure time of 2 min, a waiting time of 10 min, and a hydrophobic region of width 1.0 cm located at 10 mm from the device inlet, 450 nl of plasma was obtained within 15 min. The performance of the device was found to be unaffected (provides 450 nl of plasma in 15 min) even after 15 days. The purification efficiency and plasma recovery of the device were measured and found to be comparable with that obtained using the conventional centrifugation process. Detection of glucose at different concentrations in whole blood of normal and diabetic patients was performed (using 5 μl of sample blood within 15 min) to demonstrate the compatibility of the device with integrated detection modules.

  11. Tyrosine kinase c-Abl regulates the survival of plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Feng; Xu, Shengli; Huang, Yuhan; Ou, Xijun; Lam, Kong-Peng

    2017-01-06

    Tyrosine kinase c-Abl plays an important role in early B cell development. Its deletion leads to reduced pro- and pre-B cell generation in mice. However, its function in B cell terminal differentiation remains unexplored. Here, we used c-Abl(f/f) Aicda(cre/+) mice, in which c-Abl is ablated only in antigen-activated B cells, to study the role of c-Abl in germinal center (GC) B and antibody-secreting plasma cell formation. Upon challenge with a model antigen, we found normal GC and memory B but reduced plasma cells and antigen-specific antibody response in the mutant mice. In-vitro studies revealed that plasma cells lacking c-Abl could be generated but did not accumulate in culture, indicative of survival defect. They also exhibited impaired STAT3 phosphorylation. The plasma cell defects could be rectified by introduction of Bim-deficiency or delivery of colivelin, a STAT3 activator, into c-Abl(f/f) Aicda(cre/+) mice. Hence, c-Abl signalling regulates the survival of plasma cells.

  12. Tyrosine kinase c-Abl regulates the survival of plasma cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-Feng; Xu, Shengli; Huang, Yuhan; Ou, Xijun; Lam, Kong-Peng

    2017-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase c-Abl plays an important role in early B cell development. Its deletion leads to reduced pro- and pre-B cell generation in mice. However, its function in B cell terminal differentiation remains unexplored. Here, we used c-Ablf/f Aicdacre/+ mice, in which c-Abl is ablated only in antigen-activated B cells, to study the role of c-Abl in germinal center (GC) B and antibody-secreting plasma cell formation. Upon challenge with a model antigen, we found normal GC and memory B but reduced plasma cells and antigen-specific antibody response in the mutant mice. In-vitro studies revealed that plasma cells lacking c-Abl could be generated but did not accumulate in culture, indicative of survival defect. They also exhibited impaired STAT3 phosphorylation. The plasma cell defects could be rectified by introduction of Bim-deficiency or delivery of colivelin, a STAT3 activator, into c-Ablf/f Aicdacre/+ mice. Hence, c-Abl signalling regulates the survival of plasma cells. PMID:28057924

  13. Towards Stratified Medicine in Plasma Cell Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Philip; Drain, Stephen; Conway, Caroline; Bjourson, Anthony J.; Alexander, H. Denis

    2016-01-01

    Plasma cell myeloma is a clinically heterogeneous malignancy accounting for approximately one to 2% of newly diagnosed cases of cancer worldwide. Treatment options, in addition to long-established cytotoxic drugs, include autologous stem cell transplant, immune modulators, proteasome inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, plus further targeted therapies currently in clinical trials. Whilst treatment decisions are mostly based on a patient’s age, fitness, including the presence of co-morbidities, and tumour burden, significant scope exists for better risk stratification, sub-classification of disease, and predictors of response to specific therapies. Clinical staging, recurring acquired cytogenetic aberrations, and serum biomarkers such as β-2 microglobulin, and free light chains are in widespread use but often fail to predict the disease progression or inform treatment decision making. Recent scientific advances have provided considerable insight into the biology of myeloma. For example, gene expression profiling is already making a contribution to enhanced understanding of the biology of the disease whilst Next Generation Sequencing has revealed great genomic complexity and heterogeneity. Pathways involved in the oncogenesis, proliferation of the tumour and its resistance to apoptosis are being unravelled. Furthermore, knowledge of the tumour cell surface and its interactions with bystander cells and the bone marrow stroma enhance this understanding and provide novel targets for cell and antibody-based therapies. This review will discuss the development in understanding of the biology of the tumour cell and its environment in the bone marrow, the implementation of new therapeutic options contributing to significantly improved outcomes, and the progression towards more personalised medicine in this disorder. PMID:27775669

  14. Towards Stratified Medicine in Plasma Cell Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Egan, Philip; Drain, Stephen; Conway, Caroline; Bjourson, Anthony J; Alexander, H Denis

    2016-10-21

    Plasma cell myeloma is a clinically heterogeneous malignancy accounting for approximately one to 2% of newly diagnosed cases of cancer worldwide. Treatment options, in addition to long-established cytotoxic drugs, include autologous stem cell transplant, immune modulators, proteasome inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, plus further targeted therapies currently in clinical trials. Whilst treatment decisions are mostly based on a patient's age, fitness, including the presence of co-morbidities, and tumour burden, significant scope exists for better risk stratification, sub-classification of disease, and predictors of response to specific therapies. Clinical staging, recurring acquired cytogenetic aberrations, and serum biomarkers such as β-2 microglobulin, and free light chains are in widespread use but often fail to predict the disease progression or inform treatment decision making. Recent scientific advances have provided considerable insight into the biology of myeloma. For example, gene expression profiling is already making a contribution to enhanced understanding of the biology of the disease whilst Next Generation Sequencing has revealed great genomic complexity and heterogeneity. Pathways involved in the oncogenesis, proliferation of the tumour and its resistance to apoptosis are being unravelled. Furthermore, knowledge of the tumour cell surface and its interactions with bystander cells and the bone marrow stroma enhance this understanding and provide novel targets for cell and antibody-based therapies. This review will discuss the development in understanding of the biology of the tumour cell and its environment in the bone marrow, the implementation of new therapeutic options contributing to significantly improved outcomes, and the progression towards more personalised medicine in this disorder.

  15. Transplantation and differentiation of donor cells in the cloned pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Arata; Tomii, Ryo; Kano, Koichiro; Nagashima, Hiroshi . E-mail: hnagas@isc.meiji.ac.jp

    2006-06-02

    The application of nuclear transfer technology is an interesting approach to investigate stem and progenitor cell transplantation therapy. If stem cells are used as a nuclear donor, donor cells can engraft into cloned animals without histocompatible problems. However, it is still uncertain whether donor cells can engraft to cloned animal and differentiate in vivo. To address this problem, we transplanted donor cells to dermal tissues of cloned pigs developed by using preadipocytes as donor cells. Preadipocytes are adipocytic progenitor which can differentiate to mature adipocytes in vitro. We showed that the donor preadipocytes were successfully transplanted into the cloned pigs without immune rejection and they differentiated into mature adipocytes in vivo 3 weeks after transplantation. In contrast, allogenic control preadipocytes, which can differentiate in vitro, did not differentiate in vivo. These results indicate that donor progenitor cells can differentiate in cloned animal.

  16. A study of the effect on human mesenchymal stem cells of an atmospheric pressure plasma source driven by different voltage waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurita, R.; Alviano, F.; Marchionni, C.; Abruzzo, P. M.; Bolotta, A.; Bonsi, L.; Colombo, V.; Gherardi, M.; Liguori, A.; Ricci, F.; Rossi, M.; Stancampiano, A.; Tazzari, P. L.; Marini, M.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of an atmospheric pressure non-equilibrium plasma on human mesenchymal stem cells was investigated. A dielectric barrier discharge non-equilibrium plasma source driven by two different high-voltage pulsed generators was used and cell survival, senescence, proliferation, and differentiation were evaluated. Cells deprived of the culture medium and treated with nanosecond pulsed plasma showed a higher mortality rate, while higher survival and retention of proliferation were observed in cells treated with microsecond pulsed plasma in the presence of the culture medium. While a few treated cells showed the hallmarks of senescence, unexpected delayed apoptosis ensued in cells exposed to plasma-treated medium. The plasma treatment did not change the expression of OCT4, a marker of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation.

  17. Spatial modeling of dimerization reaction dynamics in the plasma membrane: Monte Carlo vs. continuum differential equations.

    PubMed

    Mayawala, Kapil; Vlachos, Dionisios G; Edwards, Jeremy S

    2006-06-01

    Bimolecular reactions in the plasma membrane, such as receptor dimerization, are a key signaling step for many signaling systems. For receptors to dimerize, they must first diffuse until a collision happens, upon which a dimerization reaction may occur. Therefore, study of the dynamics of cell signaling on the membrane may require the use of a spatial modeling framework. Despite the availability of spatial simulation methods, e.g., stochastic spatial Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and partial differential equation (PDE) based approaches, many biological models invoke well-mixed assumptions without completely evaluating the importance of spatial organization. Whether one is to utilize a spatial or non-spatial simulation framework is therefore an important decision. In order to evaluate the importance of spatial effects a priori, i.e., without performing simulations, we have assessed the applicability of a dimensionless number, known as second Damköhler number (Da), defined here as the ratio of time scales of collision and reaction, for 2-dimensional bimolecular reactions. Our study shows that dimerization reactions in the plasma membrane with Da approximately >0.1 (tested in the receptor density range of 10(2)-10(5)/microm(2)) require spatial modeling. We also evaluated the effective reaction rate constants of MC and simple deterministic PDEs. Our simulations show that the effective reaction rate constant decreases with time due to time dependent changes in the spatial distribution of receptors. As a result, the effective reaction rate constant of simple PDEs can differ from that of MC by up to two orders of magnitude. Furthermore, we show that the fluctuations in the number of copies of signaling proteins (noise) may also depend on the diffusion properties of the system. Finally, we used the spatial MC model to explore the effect of plasma membrane heterogeneities, such as receptor localization and reduced diffusivity, on the dimerization rate. Interestingly, our

  18. Differential scanning calorimetry of blood plasma for clinical diagnosis and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Garbett, Nichola C; Mekmaysy, Chongkham S; Helm, C William; Jenson, A Bennett; Chaires, Jonathan B

    2009-06-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) provides a useful method to study the unfractionated plasma proteome. Plasma from healthy individuals yields a reproducible signature thermogram which results from the weighted sum of the thermal denaturation of the most abundant plasma proteins. Further investigation of the thermogram for healthy individuals showed it to be sensitive to ethnicity and gender. DSC analysis of plasma from diseased individuals revealed significant changes in the thermogram which are suggested to result not from changes in the concentration of the major plasma proteins but from interactions of small molecules or peptides with these proteins. Closer examination of the diseased thermograms showed a thermogram characteristic of each disease. For cervical cancer, the DSC method yields a progressively shifted thermogram as the disease advances from pre-invasive conditions to late stage cancer. Our application of the DSC method has provided a potential tool for the early diagnosis, monitoring and screening of cancer patients.

  19. Development of motorized plasma lithography for cell patterning.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Shinji; Nagasawa, Yohei; Saito, Akira C; Matsui, Tsubasa S; Yokoyama, Sho; Sato, Masaaki

    2014-03-01

    The micropatterning of cells, which restricts the adhesive regions on the substrate and thus controls cell geometry, is used to study mechanobiology-related cell functions. Plasma lithography is a means of providing such patterns and uses a spatially-selective plasma treatment. Conventional plasma lithography employs a positionally-fixed mask with which the geometry of the patterns is determined and thus is not suited for producing on-demand geometries of patterns. To overcome this, we have manufactured a new device with a motorized mask mounted in a vacuum chamber of a plasma generator, which we designate motorized plasma lithography. Our pilot tests indicate that various pattern geometries can be obtained with the control of a shielding mask during plasma treatment. Our approach can thus omit the laborious process of preparing photolithographically microfabricated masks required for the conventional plasma lithography.

  20. Inhibition of DEPDC1A, a bad prognostic marker in multiple myeloma, delays growth and induces mature plasma cell markers in malignant plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Kassambara, Alboukadel; Schoenhals, Matthieu; Moreaux, Jérôme; Veyrune, Jean-Luc; Rème, Thierry; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Hose, Dirk; Klein, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    High throughput DNA microarray has made it possible to outline genes whose expression in malignant plasma cells is associated with short overall survival of patients with Multiple Myeloma (MM). A further step is to elucidate the mechanisms encoded by these genes yielding to drug resistance and/or patients' short survival. We focus here on the biological role of the DEP (for Disheveled, EGL-10, Pleckstrin) domain contained protein 1A (DEPDC1A), a poorly known protein encoded by DEPDC1A gene, whose high expression in malignant plasma cells is associated with short survival of patients. Using conditional lentiviral vector delivery of DEPDC1A shRNA, we report that DEPDC1A knockdown delayed the growth of human myeloma cell lines (HMCLs), with a block in G2 phase of the cell cycle, p53 phosphorylation and stabilization, and p21(Cip1) accumulation. DEPDC1A knockdown also resulted in increased expression of mature plasma cell markers, including CXCR4, IL6-R and CD38. Thus DEPDC1A could contribute to the plasmablast features of MMCs found in some patients with adverse prognosis, blocking the differentiation of malignant plasma cells and promoting cell cycle.

  1. Differential Responses of Plasma Adropin Concentrations To Dietary Glucose or Fructose Consumption In Humans.

    PubMed

    Butler, Andrew A; St-Onge, Marie-Pierre; Siebert, Emily A; Medici, Valentina; Stanhope, Kimber L; Havel, Peter J

    2015-10-05

    Adropin is a peptide hormone encoded by the Energy Homeostasis Associated (ENHO) gene whose physiological role in humans remains incompletely defined. Here we investigated the impact of dietary interventions that affect systemic glucose and lipid metabolism on plasma adropin concentrations in humans. Consumption of glucose or fructose as 25% of daily energy requirements (E) differentially affected plasma adropin concentrations (P < 0.005) irrespective of duration, sex or age. Glucose consumption reduced plasma adropin from 3.55 ± 0.26 to 3.28 ± 0.23 ng/ml (N = 42). Fructose consumption increased plasma adropin from 3.63 ± 0.29 to 3.93 ± 0.34 ng/ml (N = 45). Consumption of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) as 25% E had no effect (3.43 ± 0.32 versus 3.39 ± 0.24 ng/ml, N = 26). Overall, the effect of glucose, HFCS and fructose on circulating adropin concentrations were similar to those observed on postprandial plasma triglyceride concentrations. Furthermore, increases in plasma adropin levels with fructose intake were most robust in individuals exhibiting hypertriglyceridemia. Individuals with low plasma adropin concentrations also exhibited rapid increases in plasma levels following consumption of breakfasts supplemented with lipids. These are the first results linking plasma adropin levels with dietary sugar intake in humans, with the impact of fructose consumption linked to systemic triglyceride metabolism. In addition, dietary fat intake may also increase circulating adropin concentrations.

  2. Mitochondrial respiration regulates adipogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanmin; Marsboom, Glenn; Toth, Peter T; Rehman, Jalees

    2013-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult multipotent stem cells which can be isolated from bone marrow, adipose tissue as well as other tissues and have the capacity to differentiate into a variety of mesenchymal cell types such as adipocytes, osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Differentiation of stem cells into mature cell types is guided by growth factors and hormones, but recent studies suggest that metabolic shifts occur during differentiation and can modulate the differentiation process. We therefore investigated mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial respiration and the mitochondrial membrane potential during adipogenic differentiation of human MSCs. In addition, we inhibited mitochondrial function to assess its effects on adipogenic differentiation. Our data show that mitochondrial biogenesis and oxygen consumption increase markedly during adipogenic differentiation, and that reducing mitochondrial respiration by hypoxia or by inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain significantly suppresses adipogenic differentiation. Furthermore, we used a novel approach to suppress mitochondrial activity using a specific siRNA-based knockdown of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), which also resulted in an inhibition of adipogenic differentiation. Taken together, our data demonstrates that increased mitochondrial activity is a prerequisite for MSC differentiation into adipocytes. These findings suggest that metabolic modulation of adult stem cells can maintain stem cell pluripotency or direct adult stem cell differentiation.

  3. An adhesion-based method for plasma membrane isolation: evaluating cholesterol extraction from cells and their membranes.

    PubMed

    Bezrukov, Ludmila; Blank, Paul S; Polozov, Ivan V; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2009-11-15

    A method to isolate large quantities of directly accessible plasma membrane from attached cells is presented. The method is based on the adhesion of cells to an adsorbed layer of polylysine on glass plates, followed by hypotonic lysis with ice-cold distilled water and subsequent washing steps. Optimal conditions for coating glass plates and time for cell attachment were established. No additional chemical or mechanical treatments were used. Contamination of the isolated plasma membrane by cell organelles was less than 5%. The method uses inexpensive, commercially available polylysine and reusable glass plates. Plasma membrane preparations can be made in 15 min. Using this method, we determined that methyl-beta-cyclodextrin differentially extracts cholesterol from fibroblast cells and their plasma membranes and that these differences are temperature dependent. Determination of the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio from intact cells does not reflect methyl-beta-cyclodextrin plasma membrane extraction properties.

  4. Epigenetic heterochromatin markers distinguish terminally differentiated leukocytes from incompletely differentiated leukemia cells in human blood.

    PubMed

    Popova, Evgenya Y; Claxton, David F; Lukasova, Emilie; Bird, Phillip I; Grigoryev, Sergei A

    2006-04-01

    During terminal cell differentiation, nuclear chromatin becomes condensed and the repertoire of epigentic heterochromatin proteins responsible for chromatin condensation is dramatically changed. In order to identify the chromatin regulatory factors associated with incomplete cell differentiation and impaired chromatin condensation in hematological malignancies, we examined expression levels of major heterochromatin proteins in normal blood cells and cells derived from a number of chronic and acute myeloid leukemia patients exhibiting different degrees of differentiation. We used immunoblotting and immunofluorescence to examine the levels and localization of epigenetic heterochromatin factors in isolated cell nuclei and fractionated peripheral blood cells. While the major epigenetic heterochromatin factor, histone H3 methylated at lysine 9, is present in all cell types, its main counterparts, nonhistone proteins, heterochromatin proteins 1 (HP1) alpha, beta, and gamma, are dramatically reduced in peripheral blood leukocytes of normal donors and chronic myeloid leukemia patients, but are substantially increased in the blood of accelerated phase and blast crisis patients. In the terminally differentiated cells, nuclear chromatin accumulates a nucleocytoplasmic serpin, monocyte and neutrophil elastase inhibitor (MNEI). HP1 and MNEI levels inversely correlate in a number of normal and leukemia myeloid cells and show strikingly opposite coordinated changes during differentiation of U937 cell line induced by retinoic acid. Our results suggest that repression of HP1 and accumulation of MNEI are linked to terminal cell differentiation and that their levels may be monitored in blood cell populations to detect transitions in cell differentiation associated with leukemia progression and treatment.

  5. Multistep process of squamous differentiation in tracheobronchial epithelial cells in vitro: analogy with epidermal differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Jetten, A M

    1989-01-01

    The lung, in particular the bronchial epithelium, is a major site for tumor formation in humans. Environmental factors, such as cigarette smoke, in conjunction with genetic factors are important determinants in this disease. Malignant cells exhibit alterations in their control of proliferation and differentiation. It is believed that the acquisition of defects in the regulation of these processes is important in the process of carcinogenesis. A clear insight into the basic mechanisms of the regulation of proliferation and differentiation is required to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in tumor development and in other pathological conditions. Studies using in vitro cell culture systems of tracheobronchial epithelial cells provide useful models in which to study the regulation of differentiation and proliferation. The clonogenic cells derived from the treacheobronchial epithelium are pluripotent: They have self-renewal capacity and can differentiate along either a normal, mucosecretory, or a squamous cell pathway. Squamous differentiation in tracheobronchial epithelial cells has many morphological, biochemical, and regulatory properties in common with epidermal differentiation. This pathway of differentiation is a multistep process consisting of at least three stages. In the initial stage, cells become committed to terminal cell division. This is followed by the expression of the squamous differentiated phenotype and finally cornification. Various factors, such as several growth factors, retinoids, calcium ions, and phorbol esters, regulate the program of differentiation at different stages. Studies have indicated that the controls of proliferation and differentiation are interrelated. Cell lines established from tracheobronchial epithelial cells expressing SV 40 large T-antigen, as well as carcinoma cell lines, exhibit altered responses to growth and differentiation regulatory factors. Alterations in the commitment to terminal cell division must be a

  6. Differential scanning calorimetry of plant cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Liangshiou; Varner, J.E. ); Yuen, H.K. )

    1991-03-15

    High-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry has been used to study the phase transition of cell wall preparations of the elongating and mature regions of soybean hypocotyls and of celery epidermis and collenchyma strands. A step-like transition believed to be glass transition was observed in walls isolated from the elongating region of soybean hypocotyls at 52.9C. Addition of 1 mM CaCl{sub 2} to the cell wall preparation increased the transition temperature to 60.8C and greatly reduced the transition magnitude. In walls from the mature region, the transition was small and occurred at a higher temperature (60.1C). Addition of calcium to the mature region cell wall had little effect on the transition. Based on the known interactions between calcium and pectin, the authors propose that calcium affects the glass transition by binding to the polygalacturonate backbone of wall pectin, resulting in a more rigid wall with a smaller transition at a higher temperature. The mature region either has more calcium in the wall or has more methyl-esterified pectin, making it less responsive to added calcium.

  7. Differential scanning calorimetry of plant cell walls.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, L S; Yuen, H K; Varner, J E

    1991-01-01

    High-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry has been used to study the phase transition of cell wall preparations of the elongating and mature regions of soybean hypocotyls and of celery epidermis and collenchyma strands. A step-like transition believed to be glass transition was observed in walls isolated from the elongating region of soybean hypocotyls at 52.9 degrees C. Addition of 1 mM CaCl2 to the cell wall preparation increased the transition temperature to 60.8 degrees C and greatly reduced the transition magnitude. In walls from the mature region, the transition was small and occurred at a higher temperature (60.1 degrees C). Addition of calcium to the mature region cell wall had little effect on the transition. Based on the known interactions between calcium and pectin, we propose that calcium affects the glass transition by binding to the polygalacturonate backbone of wall pectin, resulting in a more rigid wall with a smaller transition at a higher temperature. The mature region either has more calcium in the wall or has more methyl-esterified pectin, making it less responsive to added calcium. PMID:11607163

  8. Side Effects of Culture Media Antibiotics on Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Llobet, Laura; Montoya, Julio; López-Gallardo, Ester; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    Besides the advance in scientific knowledge and the production of different compounds, cell culture can now be used to obtain cells for regenerative medicine. To avoid microbial contamination, antibiotics were usually incorporated into culture media. However, these compounds affect cell biochemistry and may modify the differentiation potential of cultured cells. To check this possibility, we grew human adipose tissue-derived stem cells and differentiated them to adipocyte with or without antibiotics commonly used in these culture protocols, such as a penicillin-streptomycin-amphotericin mix or gentamicin. We show that these antibiotics affect cell differentiation. Therefore, antibiotics should not be used in cell culture because aseptic techniques make these compounds unnecessary.

  9. Mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into chondrocyte-Like cells.

    PubMed

    Narakornsak, Suteera; Poovachiranon, Naree; Peerapapong, Lamaiporn; Pothacharoen, Peeraphan; Aungsuchawan, Sirinda

    2016-05-01

    Among the stem cells contained in human amniotic fluid (hAF), the human amniotic fluid derived-mesenchymal stem cells (hAF-MSCs) are derived from fetal membranes and tissues that are produced during fetal development. The aim of this study was to characterize the 'stem-ness' properties of hAF-MSCs and their potency with regard to the chondrogenic differentiations using the scaffold cultivation method. This study revealed that the easily accessed and isolated MSCs were highly cell prolific and there were fewer ethical concerns regarding their usage. The MSCs were studied through the use of the alamar blue technique. In addition, after cell isolation, hAF-MSCs displayed typical MSCs morphologies including MSCs biomarker characteristics and immune privilege properties (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105 and HLA-ABC) through immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. Interestingly, this result indicated a negative expression when using the C-Kit (CD117, tyrosine kinase receptor type III ligand for cytokine stem cell factor). This expression can be found at the cell's surface of the amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSCs). This study found evidence that hAF-MSCs had the ability to differentiate the cells into the chondrogenic lineage by exhibiting chondrogenic related genes and proteins (SOX9, AGC, COL2A1 and COMP) through RT-qPCR, immunoenzymatic assays and immunofluorescence analysis. Furthermore, MSCs presented sGAGs accumulation, which was confirmed by histological analysis and SEM. Therefore, this study showed that the MSCs characteristics are contained in AF and are of significant value for further research. It appears that MSCs possess the potential for use in treatments that would necessitate the use of regenerative cell therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Surface nanotopography guides kidney-derived stem cell differentiation into podocytes.

    PubMed

    MacGregor-Ramiasa, Melanie; Hopp, Isabel; Bachhuka, Akash; Murray, Patricia; Vasilev, Krasimir

    2017-02-21

    Stem cells have enormous potential for developing novel therapies for kidney disease but our current inability to direct their differentiation to specialised renal cells presents a barrier to their use in renal bioengineering and drug development programmes. Here, a plasma-based technology was used to produce a range of biocompatible substrates comprising controlled surface nanotopography and tailored outermost chemical functionalities. These novel substrata were used to investigate the response of mouse kidney-derived stem cells to changes in both substrate nanotopography and surface chemistry. The stem cells proliferated to a similar extent on all substrates, but specific combinations of nanotopography and surface chemistry promoted differentiation into either podocyte or proximal tubule-like cells. The data reveal that high density of surface nanodefects in association with amine rich chemistry primarily lead to differentiation into podocytes while surfaces with low amine content constituted better substrates for differentiation into proximal tubule cells regardless of the surface nanotopographic profile. Thus plasma coated nanorough substrate may provide useful platform for guiding the fate kidney stem cell in vitro.

  11. Successful differentiation to T cells, but unsuccessful B-cell generation, from B-cell-derived induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wada, Haruka; Kojo, Satoshi; Kusama, Chie; Okamoto, Naoki; Sato, Yorino; Ishizuka, Bunpei; Seino, Ken-ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Forced expression of certain transcription factors in somatic cells results in generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, which differentiate into various cell types. We investigated T-cell and B-cell lineage differentiation from iPS cells in vitro. To evaluate the impact of iPS cell source, murine splenic B-cell-derived iPS (B-iPS) cells were generated after retroviral transduction of four transcription factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc). B-iPS cells were identical to embryonic stem (ES) cells and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF)-derived iPS cells in morphology, ES cell marker expression as well as teratoma and chimera mouse formation. Both B-iPS and MEF-derived iPS cells differentiated into lymphocytes in OP9 co-culture systems. Both efficiently differentiated into T-cell lineage that produced IFN-γ on T-cell receptor stimulation. However, iPS cells including B-iPS cells were relatively resistant to B-cell lineage differentiation. One of the reasons of the failure of B-cell lineage differentiation seemed due to a defect of Pax5 expression in the differentiated cells. Therefore, current in vitro differentiation systems using iPS cells are sufficient for inducing T-cell but not B-cell lineage.

  12. Responses of cells in plasma-activated medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Takeda, Keigo; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kano, Hiroyuki; Okazaki, Yasumasa; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-09-01

    Plasma consists of electrons, ions, radicals, and lights, and produces various reactive species in gas and liquid phase. Cells receive various inputs from their circumstances, and induce several physiological outputs. Our goal is to clarify the relationships between plasma inputs and physiological outputs. Plasma-activated medium (PAM) is a circumstance that plasma provides cells and our previous studies suggest that PAM is a promising tool for cancer therapy. However, the mode of actions remains to be elucidated. We propose survival and proliferation signaling networks as well as redox signaling networks are key factors to understand cellular responses of PAM-treated glioblastoma cells.

  13. Downregulation of rRNA transcription triggers cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yuki; Kuroda, Takao; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Wang, Changshan; Iwama, Atsushi; Kimura, Keiji

    2014-01-01

    Responding to various stimuli is indispensable for the maintenance of homeostasis. The downregulation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription is one of the mechanisms involved in the response to stimuli by various cellular processes, such as cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Cell differentiation is caused by intra- and extracellular stimuli and is associated with the downregulation of rRNA transcription as well as reduced cell growth. The downregulation of rRNA transcription during differentiation is considered to contribute to reduced cell growth. However, the downregulation of rRNA transcription can induce various cellular processes; therefore, it may positively regulate cell differentiation. To test this possibility, we specifically downregulated rRNA transcription using actinomycin D or a siRNA for Pol I-specific transcription factor IA (TIF-IA) in HL-60 and THP-1 cells, both of which have differentiation potential. The inhibition of rRNA transcription induced cell differentiation in both cell lines, which was demonstrated by the expression of the common differentiation marker CD11b. Furthermore, TIF-IA knockdown in an ex vivo culture of mouse hematopoietic stem cells increased the percentage of myeloid cells and reduced the percentage of immature cells. We also evaluated whether differentiation was induced via the inhibition of cell cycle progression because rRNA transcription is tightly coupled to cell growth. We found that cell cycle arrest without affecting rRNA transcription did not induce differentiation. To the best of our knowledge, our results demonstrate the first time that the downregulation of rRNA levels could be a trigger for the induction of differentiation in mammalian cells. Furthermore, this phenomenon was not simply a reflection of cell cycle arrest. Our results provide a novel insight into the relationship between rRNA transcription and cell differentiation.

  14. Hemorheological alterations of red blood cells induced by non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeongho; Kim, Jae Hyung; Chang, Boksoon; Choi, Eun Ha; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2016-11-01

    Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma has been introduced in various applications such as wound healing, sterilization of infected tissues, blood coagulation, delicate surgeries, and so on. The non-thermal plasma generates reactive oxygen species (ROS), including ozone. Various groups have reported that the produced ROS influence proliferation and differentiation of cells, as well as apoptosis and growth arrest of tumor cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of non-thermal plasma on rheological characteristics of red blood cells (RBC). We experimentally measured the extent of hemolysis, deformability, and aggregation of red blood cells (RBC) with respect to exposure times of non-thermal plasma. RBC morphology was also examined using field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The absorbance of hemoglobin released from the RBCs increased with increasing exposure time of the non-thermal plasma. Values of the elongation index and aggregation index were shown to decrease significantly with increasing plasma exposure times. Therefore, hemorheological properties of RBCs could be utilized to assess the performance of various non-thermal plasmas.

  15. Oral mucosal progenitor cell clones resist in vitro myogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Locke, Matthew; Davies, Lindsay C; Stephens, Phil

    2016-10-01

    Progenitor cells derived from the oral mucosa lamina propria (OMLP-PCs) demonstrate an ability to differentiate into tissue lineages removed from their anatomical origin. This clonally derived population of neural-crest cells have demonstrated potential to differentiate along mesenchymal and neuronal cell lineages.

  16. Sphingomyelin metabolism is involved in the differentiation of MDCK cells induced by environmental hypertonicity

    PubMed Central

    Favale, Nicolás Octavio; Santacreu, Bruno Jaime; Pescio, Lucila Gisele; Marquez, Maria Gabriela; Sterin-Speziale, Norma Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids (SLs) are relevant lipid components of eukaryotic cells. Besides regulating various cellular processes, SLs provide the structural framework for plasma membrane organization. Particularly, SM is associated with detergent-resistant microdomains. We have previously shown that the adherens junction (AJ) complex, the relevant cell-cell adhesion structure involved in cell differentiation and tissue organization, is located in an SM-rich membrane lipid domain. We have also demonstrated that under hypertonic conditions, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells acquire a differentiated phenotype with changes in SL metabolism. For these reasons, we decided to evaluate whether SM metabolism is involved in the acquisition of the differentiated phenotype of MDCK cells. We found that SM synthesis mediated by SM synthase 1 is involved in hypertonicity-induced formation of mature AJs, necessary for correct epithelial cell differentiation. Inhibition of SM synthesis impaired the acquisition of mature AJs, evoking a disintegration-like process reflected by the dissipation of E-cadherin and β- and α-catenins from the AJ complex. As a consequence, MDCK cells did not develop the hypertonicity-induced differentiated epithelial cell phenotype. PMID:25670801

  17. Magnetron cathodes in plasma electrode Pockels cells

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, M.A.

    1995-04-25

    Magnetron cathodes, which produce high current discharges, form greatly improved plasma electrodes on each side of an electro-optic crystal. The plasma electrode has a low pressure gas region on both sides of the crystal. When the gas is ionized, e.g., by a glow discharge in the low pressure gas, the plasma formed is a good conductor. The gas electrode acts as a highly uniform conducting electrode. Since the plasma is transparent to a high energy laser beam passing through the crystal, the plasma is transparent. A crystal exposed from two sides to such a plasma can be charged up uniformly to any desired voltage. A typical configuration utilizes helium at 50 millitorr operating pressure and 2 kA discharge current. The magnetron cathode produces a more uniform plasma and allows a reduced operating pressure which leads to lower plasma resistivity and a more uniform charge on the crystal. 5 figs.

  18. Magnetron cathodes in plasma electrode pockels cells

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetron cathodes, which produce high current discharges, form greatly improved plasma electrodes on each side of an electro-optic crystal. The plasma electrode has a low pressure gas region on both sides of the crystal. When the gas is ionized, e.g., by a glow discharge in the low pressure gas, the plasma formed is a good conductor. The gas electrode acts as a highly uniform conducting electrode. Since the plasma is transparent to a high energy laser beam passing through the crystal, the plasma is transparent. A crystal exposed from two sides to such a plasma can be charged up uniformly to any desired voltage. A typical configuration utilizes helium at 50 millitorr operating. pressure and 2 kA discharge current. The magnetron cathode produces a more uniform plasma and allows a reduced operating pressure which leads to lower plasma resistivity and a more uniform charge on the crystal.

  19. Regulation of pluripotent cell differentiation by a small molecule, staurosporine.

    PubMed

    Hughes, James Nicholas; Wong, Chong Kum Edwin; Lau, Kevin Xiuwen; Rathjen, Peter David; Rathjen, Joy

    2014-01-01

    Research in the embryo and in culture has resulted in a sophisticated understanding of many regulators of pluripotent cell differentiation. As a consequence, protocols for the differentiation of pluripotent cells generally rely on a combination of exogenous growth factors and endogenous signalling. Little consideration has been given to manipulating other pathways to achieve pluripotent cell differentiation. The integrity of cell:cell contacts has been shown to influence lineage choice during pluripotent cell differentiation, with disruption of cell:cell contacts promoting mesendoderm formation and maintenance of cell:cell contacts resulting in the preferential formation of neurectoderm. Staurosporine is a broad spectrum inhibitor of serine/threonine kinases which has several effects on cell function, including interruption of cell:cell contacts, decreasing focal contact size, inducing epithelial to mesenchyme transition (EMT) and promoting cell differentiation. The possibility that staurosporine could influence lineage choice from pluripotent cells in culture was investigated. The addition of staurosporine to differentiating mouse EPL resulted in preferential formation of mesendoderm and mesoderm populations, and inhibited the formation of neurectoderm. Addition of staurosporine to human ES cells similarly induced primitive streak marker gene expression. These data demonstrate the ability of staurosporine to influence lineage choice during pluripotent cell differentiation and to mimic the effect of disrupting cell:cell contacts. Staurosporine induced mesendoderm in the absence of known inducers of formation, such as serum and BMP4. Staurosporine induced the expression of mesendoderm markers, including markers that were not induced by BMP4, suggesting it acted as a broad spectrum inducer of molecular gastrulation. This approach has identified a small molecule regulator of lineage choice with potential applications in the commercial development of ES cell

  20. Differential expression of Ran GTPase during HMBA-induced differentiation in murine erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Vanegas, N; García-Sacristán, A; López-Fernández, L A; Párraga, M; del Mazo, J; Hernández, P; Schvartzman, J B; Krimer, D B

    2003-07-01

    Murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells undergo erythroid differentiation in vitro when treated with hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA). To identify genes involved in the commitment of MEL cells to differentiate, we screened a cDNA library constructed from HMBA-induced cells by differential hybridization and isolated GTPase Ran as a down-regulated gene. We observed that Ran was expressed in a biphasic mode. Following a decrease in mRNA level during the initial hours of induction, Ran re-expressed at 24-48 h, and gradually declined again. To investigate the role of Ran during MEL differentiation we constructed MEL transfectants capable to express or block Ran mRNA production constitutively. No effects were observed on cell growth and proliferation. Blockage of Ran, however, interfered with MEL cell differentiation resulting in a decrease of cell survival in the committed population.

  1. [Monoclonal Gammopathy in the General Practioners’s Office. Diagnosis and Treatment of Plasma Cell Myeloma].

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Ivo; Gerber, Bernhard; Samaras, Panagiotis

    2015-10-14

    A monoclonal gammopathy is a common finding in the general practitioner’s office. An active search for a paraproteinemia is indicated in case of suspected malignancy, evidence of end organ damage (e.g. anemia, renal insufficiency) or in case of recurrent infections or prolonged fatigue. Plasma cell myeloma is an important differential diagnosis of a monoclonal gammopathy and implies a broad spectrum of diagnostic as well as therapeutic consequences for the patient. Plasma cell myeloma is still being considered an incurable disease, but its prognosis could be significantly improved with the introduction of new drugs.

  2. Flow Cytometry Assessment of In Vitro Generated CD138+ Human Plasma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Itoua Maïga, Rayelle; Lemieux, Jennifer; Roy, Annie; Simard, Carl; Néron, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    The in vitro CD40-CD154 interaction promotes human B lymphocytes differentiation into plasma cells. Currently, CD138 is the hallmark marker enabling the detection of human plasma cells, both in vitro and in vivo; its presence can be monitored by flow cytometry using a specific antibody. We have developed a culture system allowing for the differentiation of memory B lymphocytes. In order to detect the newly formed plasma cells, we have compared their staining using five anti-CD138 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). As a reference, we also tested human cell lines, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and bone marrow samples. The five anti-CD138 mAbs stained RPMI-8226 cells (>98%) with variable stain index (SI). The highest SI was obtained with B-A38 mAb while the lowest SI was obtained with DL-101 and 1D4 mAbs. However, the anti-CD138 mAbs were not showing equivalent CD138+ cells frequencies within the generated plasma cells. B-A38, B-B4, and MI-15 were similar (15–25%) while DL-101 mAb stained a higher proportion of CD138-positive cells (38–42%). DL-101 and B-A38 mAbs stained similar populations in bone marrow samples but differed in their capacity to bind to CD138high and CD138lo cell lines. In conclusion, such cellular fluctuations suggest heterogeneity in human plasma cell populations and/or in CD138 molecules. PMID:24689045

  3. Flow cytometry assessment of in vitro generated CD138+ human plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Itoua Maïga, Rayelle; Lemieux, Jennifer; Roy, Annie; Simard, Carl; Néron, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    The in vitro CD40-CD154 interaction promotes human B lymphocytes differentiation into plasma cells. Currently, CD138 is the hallmark marker enabling the detection of human plasma cells, both in vitro and in vivo; its presence can be monitored by flow cytometry using a specific antibody. We have developed a culture system allowing for the differentiation of memory B lymphocytes. In order to detect the newly formed plasma cells, we have compared their staining using five anti-CD138 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). As a reference, we also tested human cell lines, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and bone marrow samples. The five anti-CD138 mAbs stained RPMI-8226 cells (>98%) with variable stain index (SI). The highest SI was obtained with B-A38 mAb while the lowest SI was obtained with DL-101 and 1D4 mAbs. However, the anti-CD138 mAbs were not showing equivalent CD138(+) cells frequencies within the generated plasma cells. B-A38, B-B4, and MI-15 were similar (15-25%) while DL-101 mAb stained a higher proportion of CD138-positive cells (38-42%). DL-101 and B-A38 mAbs stained similar populations in bone marrow samples but differed in their capacity to bind to CD138(high) and CD138(lo) cell lines. In conclusion, such cellular fluctuations suggest heterogeneity in human plasma cell populations and/or in CD138 molecules.

  4. Facilitated Anion Transport Induces Hyperpolarization of the Cell Membrane That Triggers Differentiation and Cell Death in Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Soto-Cerrato, Vanessa; Manuel-Manresa, Pilar; Hernando, Elsa; Calabuig-Fariñas, Silvia; Martínez-Romero, Alicia; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Sahlholm, Kristoffer; Knöpfel, Thomas; García-Valverde, María; Rodilla, Ananda M; Jantus-Lewintre, Eloisa; Farràs, Rosa; Ciruela, Francisco; Pérez-Tomás, Ricardo; Quesada, Roberto

    2015-12-23

    Facilitated anion transport potentially represents a powerful tool to modulate various cellular functions. However, research into the biological effects of small molecule anionophores is still at an early stage. Here we have used two potent anionophore molecules inspired in the structure of marine metabolites tambjamines to gain insight into the effect induced by these compounds at the cellular level. We show how active anionophores, capable of facilitating the transmembrane transport of chloride and bicarbonate in model phospholipid liposomes, induce acidification of the cytosol and hyperpolarization of plasma cell membranes. We demonstrate how this combined effect can be used against cancer stem cells (CSCs). Hyperpolarization of cell membrane induces cell differentiation and loss of stemness of CSCs leading to effective elimination of this cancer cell subpopulation.

  5. Extracellular Matrix and Integrins in Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han; Luo, Xie; Leighton, Jake

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are pluripotent cells with great therapeutic potentials. The in vitro differentiation of ESC was designed by recapitulating embryogenesis. Significant progress has been made to improve the in vitro differentiation protocols by toning soluble maintenance factors. However, more robust methods for lineage-specific differentiation and maturation are still under development. Considering the complexity of in vivo embryogenesis environment, extracellular matrix (ECM) cues should be considered besides growth factor cues. ECM proteins bind to cells and act as ligands of integrin receptors on cell surfaces. Here, we summarize the role of the ECM and integrins in the formation of three germ layer progenies. Various ECM–integrin interactions were found, facilitating differentiation toward definitive endoderm, hepatocyte-like cells, pancreatic beta cells, early mesodermal progenitors, cardiomyocytes, neuroectoderm lineages, and epidermal cells, such as keratinocytes and melanocytes. In the future, ECM combinations for the optimal ESC differentiation environment will require substantial study. PMID:26462244

  6. A Change In Nuclear Pore Complex Composition Regulates Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Maximiliano A.; Gomez-Cavazos, J. Sebastian; Mei, Arianna; Lackner, Daniel H.; Hetzer, Martin W.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are built from ~30 different proteins called nucleoporins. Previous studies have shown that several Nups exhibit cell-type-specific expression and that mutations in NPC components result in tissue-specific diseases. Here we show that a specific change in NPC composition is required for both myogenic and neuronal differentiation. The transmembrane nucleoporin Nup210 is absent in proliferating myoblasts and embryonic stem (ES) cells but becomes expressed and incorporated into NPCs during cell differentiation. Preventing Nup210 production by RNAi blocks myogenesis and the differentiation of ES cells into neuroprogenitors. We found that the addition of Nup210 to NPCs does not affect nuclear transport but is required for the induction of genes that are essential for cell differentiation. Our results identify a single change in NPC composition as an essential step in cell differentiation and establish a role for Nup210 in gene expression regulation and cell fate determination. PMID:22264802

  7. Rationale of anti-CD19 immunotherapy: an option to target autoreactive plasma cells in autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Anti-CD20 therapy using rituximab directly targeting B cells has been approved for treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, rheumatoid arthritis and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitides and has led to reappreciation of B-lineage cells for anti-rheumatic treatment strategies. Moreover, blocking B-cell activating factor with belimumab, a drug that is licensed for treatment of active, seropositive systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), represents an alternative, indirect anti-B-cell approach interfering with proper B-cell development. While these approaches apparently have no substantial impact on antibody-secreting plasma cells, challenges to improve the treatment of difficult-to-treat patients with SLE remain. In this context, anti-CD19 antibodies have the promise to directly target autoantibody-secreting plasmablasts and plasma cells as well as early B-cell differentiation stages not covered by anti-CD20 therapy. Currently known distinct expression profiles of CD19 by human plasma cell subsets, experiences with anti-CD19 therapies in malignant conditions as well as the rationale of targeting autoreactive plasma cells in patients with SLE are discussed in this review. PMID:23281743

  8. Factors Regulating Immunoglobulin Production by Normal and Disease-Associated Plasma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, David A.; Elsawa, Sherine F.

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulins are molecules produced by activated B cells and plasma cells in response to exposure to antigens. Upon antigen exposure, these molecules are secreted allowing the immune system to recognize and effectively respond to a myriad of pathogens. Immunoglobulin or antibody secreting cells are the mature form of B lymphocytes, which during their development undergo gene rearrangements and selection in the bone marrow ultimately leading to the generation of B cells, each expressing a single antigen-specific receptor/immunoglobulin molecule. Each individual immunoglobulin molecule has an affinity for a unique motif, or epitope, found on a given antigen. When presented with an antigen, activated B cells differentiate into either plasma cells (which secrete large amounts of antibody that is specific for the inducing antigen), or memory B cells (which are long-lived and elicit a stronger and faster response if the host is re-exposed to the same antigen). The secreted form of immunoglobulin, when bound to an antigen, serves as an effector molecule that directs other cells of the immune system to facilitate the neutralization of soluble antigen or the eradication of the antigen-expressing pathogen. This review will focus on the regulation of secreted immunoglobulin by long-lived normal or disease-associated plasma cells. Specifically, the focus will be on signaling and transcriptional events that regulate the development and homeostasis of long-lived immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells. PMID:25615546

  9. SETD7 Regulates the Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Castaño, Julio; Morera, Cristina; Sesé, Borja; Boue, Stephanie; Bonet-Costa, Carles; Martí, Merce; Roque, Alicia; Jordan, Albert; Barrero, Maria J.

    2016-01-01

    The successful use of specialized cells in regenerative medicine requires an optimization in the differentiation protocols that are currently used. Understanding the molecular events that take place during the differentiation of human pluripotent cells is essential for the improvement of these protocols and the generation of high quality differentiated cells. In an effort to understand the molecular mechanisms that govern differentiation we identify the methyltransferase SETD7 as highly induced during the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells and differentially expressed between induced pluripotent cells and somatic cells. Knock-down of SETD7 causes differentiation defects in human embryonic stem cell including delay in both the silencing of pluripotency-related genes and the induction of differentiation genes. We show that SETD7 methylates linker histone H1 in vitro causing conformational changes in H1. These effects correlate with a decrease in the recruitment of H1 to the pluripotency genes OCT4 and NANOG during differentiation in the SETD7 knock down that might affect the proper silencing of these genes during differentiation. PMID:26890252

  10. Modeling and experiments on differential pumping in linear plasma generators operating at high gas flows

    SciTech Connect

    Eck, H. J. N. van; Koppers, W. R.; Rooij, G. J. van; Goedheer, W. J.; Cardozo, N. J. Lopes; Kleyn, A. W.; Engeln, R.; Schram, D. C.

    2009-03-15

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method was used to investigate the efficiency of differential pumping in linear plasma generators operating at high gas flows. Skimmers are used to separate the neutrals from the plasma beam, which is guided from the source to the target by a strong axial magnetic field. In this way, the neutrals are prevented to reach the target region. The neutral flux to the target must be lower than the plasma flux to enable ITER relevant plasma-surface interaction (PSI) studies. It is therefore essential to control the neutral gas dynamics. The DSMC method was used to model the expansion of a hot gas in a low pressure vessel where a small discrepancy in shock position was found between the simulations and a well-established empirical formula. Two stage differential pumping was modeled and applied in the linear plasma devices Pilot-PSI and PLEXIS. In Pilot-PSI a factor of 4.5 pressure reduction for H{sub 2} has been demonstrated. Both simulations and experiments showed that the optimum skimmer position depends on the position of the shock and therefore shifts for different gas parameters. The shape of the skimmer has to be designed such that it has a minimum impact on the shock structure. A too large angle between the skimmer and the forward direction of the gas flow leads to an influence on the expansion structure. A pressure increase in front of the skimmer is formed and the flow of the plasma beam becomes obstructed. It has been shown that a skimmer with an angle around 53 deg. gives the best performance. The use of skimmers is implemented in the design of the large linear plasma generator Magnum-PSI. Here, a three stage differentially pumped vacuum system is used to reach low enough neutral pressures near the target, opening a door to PSI research in the ITER relevant regime.

  11. Differentiation of pluripotent stem cells for regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Kong, Yan; Zhang, Mingliang; Xie, Fei; Liu, Peng; Xu, Shaohua

    2016-02-26

    A long-standing goal in regenerative medicine is to obtain scalable functional cells on demand to replenish cells lost in various conditions, including relevant diseases, injuries, and aging. As an unlimited cell source, pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are invaluable for regenerative medicine, because they have the potential to give rise to any cell type in an organism. For therapeutic purposes, it is important to develop specific approach to directing PSC differentiation towards desired cell types efficiently. Through directed differentiation, PSCs could give rise to scalable, clinically relevant cells for in vivo transplantation, as well as for studying diseases in vitro and discovering drugs to treat them. Over the past few years, significant progress has been made in directing differentiation of PSCs into a variety of cell types. In this review, we discuss recent progress in directed differentiation of PSCs, clinical translation of PSC-based cell replacement therapies, and remaining challenges.

  12. Derivation and spontaneous differentiation of human embryonic stem cells*

    PubMed Central

    Amit, Michal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Embryonic stem (ES) cells are unique cells derived from the inner cell mass of the mammalian blastocyst. These cells are immortal and pluripotent, retain their developmental potential after prolonged culture, and can be continuously cultured in an undifferentiated state. Many in vitro differentiation systems have been developed for mouse ES cells, including reproducible methods for mouse ES cell differentiation into haematopoietic and neural precursors, cardiomyocytes, insulin-secreting cells, endothelial cells and various other cell types. The derivation of new human ES cell lines provides the opportunity to develop unique models for developmental research and for cell therapies. In this review we consider the derivation and spontaneous differentiation of human ES cells. PMID:12033726

  13. Non-genetic heterogeneity, criticality and cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Mainak; Ghosh, Sayantari; Bose, Indrani

    2015-02-01

    The different cell types in a living organism acquire their identity through the process of cell differentiation in which multipotent progenitor cells differentiate into distinct cell types. Experimental evidence and analysis of large-scale microarray data establish the key role played by a two-gene motif in cell differentiation in a number of cell systems. The two genes express transcription factors which repress each other's expression and autoactivate their own production. A number of theoretical models have recently been proposed based on the two-gene motif to provide a physical understanding of how cell differentiation occurs. In this paper, we study a simple model of cell differentiation which assumes no cooperativity in the regulation of gene expression by the transcription factors. The latter repress each other's activity directly through DNA binding and indirectly through the formation of heterodimers. We specifically investigate how deterministic processes combined with stochasticity contribute in bringing about cell differentiation. The deterministic dynamics of our model give rise to a supercritical pitchfork bifurcation from an undifferentiated stable steady state to two differentiated stable steady states. The stochastic dynamics of our model are studied using the approaches based on the Langevin equations and the linear noise approximation. The simulation results provide a new physical understanding of recent experimental observations. We further propose experimental measurements of quantities like the variance and the lag-1 autocorrelation function in protein fluctuations as the early signatures of an approaching bifurcation point in the cell differentiation process.

  14. Chemically induced bidirectional differentiation of embryonal carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Speers, W. C.; Birdwell, C. R.; Dixon, F. J.

    1979-01-01

    N,N-dimethylacetamide, hexamethylene bisacetamide, and Polybrene induced rapid and extensive differentiation in vitro in an otherwise slowly differentiating subline of embryonal carcinoma cells. The type of differentiated cell induced was dependent on the spatial organization of the stem cells during drug treatment. In monalayer culture "epithelial" cells were produced exclusively. However, treatment of aggregated suspension cultures yielded predominantly "fibroblast-like" cells. The undifferentiated embryonal carcinoma cells and the two differentiated cell types were morphologically distinct when examined by light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy; and they had differences in cell surface antigens. Both differential cell types produced large amounts of fibronectin, whereas the embryonal carcinoma cells produced only minimal amounts. This system provides a convenient way to induce relatively synchronous differentiation of embryonal carcinoma cells into specific differentiated cell types. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:507191

  15. Plasma polymerization for cell adhesive/anti-adhesive implant coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meichsner, Juergen; Testrich, Holger; Rebl, Henrike; Nebe, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Plasma polymerization of ethylenediamine (C2H8N2, EDA) and perfluoropropane (C3F8, PFP) with admixture of argon and hydrogen, respectively, was studied using an asymmetric 13.56 MHz CCP. The analysis of the plasma chemical gas phase processes for stable molecules revealed consecutive reactions: C2H8N2 consumption, intermediate product NH3, and main final product HCN. In C3F8- H2 plasma the precursor molecule C3F8 and molecular hydrogen are consumed and HF as well as CF4 and C2F6 are found as main gaseous reaction products. The deposited plasma polymer films on the powered electrode are strongly cross-linked due to ion bombardment. The stable plasma polymerized films from EDA are characterized by high content of nitrogen with N/C ratio of about 0.35. The plasma polymerized fluorocarbon film exhibit a reduced F/C ratio of about 1.2. Adhesion tests with human osteoblast cell line MG-63 on coated Ti6Al4V samples (polished) compared with uncoated reference sample yielded both, the enhanced cell adhesion for plasma polymerized EDA and significantly reduced cell adhesion for fluorocarbon coating, respectively. Aging of the plasma polymerized EDA film, in particular due to the reactions with oxygen from air, showed no significant change in the cell adhesion. The fluorocarbon coating with low cell adhesion is of interest for temporary implants. Funded by the Campus PlasmaMed.

  16. ECHIDNA-mediated post-Golgi trafficking of auxin carriers for differential cell elongation.

    PubMed

    Boutté, Yohann; Jonsson, Kristoffer; McFarlane, Heather E; Johnson, Errin; Gendre, Delphine; Swarup, Ranjan; Friml, Jirí; Samuels, Lacey; Robert, Stéphanie; Bhalerao, Rishikesh P

    2013-10-01

    The plant hormone indole-acetic acid (auxin) is essential for many aspects of plant development. Auxin-mediated growth regulation typically involves the establishment of an auxin concentration gradient mediated by polarly localized auxin transporters. The localization of auxin carriers and their amount at the plasma membrane are controlled by membrane trafficking processes such as secretion, endocytosis, and recycling. In contrast to endocytosis or recycling, how the secretory pathway mediates the localization of auxin carriers is not well understood. In this study we have used the differential cell elongation process during apical hook development to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the post-Golgi trafficking of auxin carriers in Arabidopsis. We show that differential cell elongation during apical hook development is defective in Arabidopsis mutant echidna (ech). ECH protein is required for the trans-Golgi network (TGN)-mediated trafficking of the auxin influx carrier AUX1 to the plasma membrane. In contrast, ech mutation only marginally perturbs the trafficking of the highly related auxin influx carrier LIKE-AUX1-3 or the auxin efflux carrier PIN-FORMED-3, both also involved in hook development. Electron tomography reveals that the trafficking defects in ech mutant are associated with the perturbation of secretory vesicle genesis from the TGN. Our results identify differential mechanisms for the post-Golgi trafficking of de novo-synthesized auxin carriers to plasma membrane from the TGN and reveal how trafficking of auxin influx carriers mediates the control of differential cell elongation in apical hook development.

  17. Symbiotic Cell Differentiation and Cooperative Growth in Multicellular Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Jumpei F; Saito, Nen; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2016-01-01

    As cells grow and divide under a given environment, they become crowded and resources are limited, as seen in bacterial biofilms and multicellular aggregates. These cells often show strong interactions through exchanging chemicals, as evident in quorum sensing, to achieve mutualism and division of labor. Here, to achieve stable division of labor, three characteristics are required. First, isogenous cells differentiate into several types. Second, this aggregate of distinct cell types shows better growth than that of isolated cells without interaction and differentiation, by achieving division of labor. Third, this cell aggregate is robust with respect to the number distribution of differentiated cell types. Indeed, theoretical studies have thus far considered how such cooperation is achieved when the ability of cell differentiation is presumed. Here, we address how cells acquire the ability of cell differentiation and division of labor simultaneously, which is also connected with the robustness of a cell society. For this purpose, we developed a dynamical-systems model of cells consisting of chemical components with intracellular catalytic reaction dynamics. The reactions convert external nutrients into internal components for cellular growth, and the divided cells interact through chemical diffusion. We found that cells sharing an identical catalytic network spontaneously differentiate via induction from cell-cell interactions, and then achieve division of labor, enabling a higher growth rate than that in the unicellular case. This symbiotic differentiation emerged for a class of reaction networks under the condition of nutrient limitation and strong cell-cell interactions. Then, robustness in the cell type distribution was achieved, while instability of collective growth could emerge even among the cooperative cells when the internal reserves of products were dominant. The present mechanism is simple and general as a natural consequence of interacting cells with

  18. The plastic liver: differentiated cells, stem cells, every cell?

    PubMed Central

    Hindley, Christopher J.; Mastrogiovanni, Gianmarco; Huch, Meritxell

    2014-01-01

    The liver is capable of full regeneration following several types and rounds of injury, ranging from hepatectomy to toxin-mediated damage. The source of this regenerative capacity has long been a hotly debated topic. The damage response that occurs when hepatocyte proliferation is impaired is thought to be mediated by oval/dedifferentiated progenitor cells, which replenish the hepatocyte and ductal compartments of the liver. Recently, reports have questioned whether these oval/progenitor cells truly serve as the facultative stem cell of the liver following toxin-mediated damage. In this issue of the JCI, Kordes and colleagues use lineage tracing to follow transplanted rat hepatic stellate cells, a resident liver mesenchymal cell population, in hosts that have suffered liver damage. Transplanted stellate cells repopulated the damaged rat liver by contributing to the oval cell response. These data establish yet another cell type of mesenchymal origin as the progenitor for the oval/ductular response in the rat. The lack of uniformity between different damage models, the extent of the injury to the liver parenchyma, and potential species-specific differences might be at the core of the discrepancy between different studies. Taken together, these data imply a considerable degree of plasticity in the liver, whereby several cell types can contribute to regeneration. PMID:25401467

  19. Molecular Characteristics of Mantle Cell Lymphoma Presenting with Clonal Plasma Cell Component

    PubMed Central

    Visco, Carlo; Hoeller, Sylvia; Malik, Jeffrey T.; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y.; Wiggins, Michele L.; Liu, Jessica; Sanger, Warren G.; Liu, Zhongfeng; Chang, Julie; Ranheim, Erik A.; Gradowski, Joel F.; Serrrano, Sergio; Wang, Huan-You; Liu, Qingquan; Dave, Sandeep; Olsen, Brian; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Campo, Elias; Swerdlow, Steven H.; Chan, Wing C.; Tzankov, Alexander; Young, Ken H.

    2011-01-01

    The normal counterparts of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) are naïve quiescent B-cells that have not been processed through the germinal center (GC). For this reason, while lymphomas arising from GC or post-GC B-cells often exhibit plasmacytic differentiation, MCL rarely presents with plasmacytic features. Seven cases of MCL with a monotypic plasma cell (PC) population were collected from six centers and studied by immunohistochemistry, FICTION (Fluorescence immunophenotyping and Interphase Cytogenetics as a Tool for the Investigation of Neoplasms), capillary gel electrophoresis, and restriction fragment length polymorphism of immunoglobulin heavy chain analysis (RFLP/IgH) of microdissections of each of the MCL and PC populations to assess their clonal relationship. Clinical presentation was rather unusual compared to typical MCL, with two cases arising from extranodal soft-tissues of the head. All MCL cases were morphologically and immunohistochemically typical, bearing the t(11;14)(q13;q32). In all cases PC populations were clonal. In 5 of the 7 cases, the MCL and PC clones showed identical restriction fragments, indicating a common clonal origin of the neoplastic populations. The two cases with clonal diversity denoted the coexistence of two different tumors in a composite lymphoma/plasma cell neoplasm. Our findings suggest that MCL can present with a PC component that is often clonally related to the lymphoma, representing a rare but unique biological variant of this tumor. PMID:21263238

  20. Factors regulating immunoglobulin production by normal and disease-associated plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Jackson, David A; Elsawa, Sherine F

    2015-01-21

    Immunoglobulins are molecules produced by activated B cells and plasma cells in response to exposure to antigens. Upon antigen exposure, these molecules are secreted allowing the immune system to recognize and effectively respond to a myriad of pathogens. Immunoglobulin or antibody secreting cells are the mature form of B lymphocytes, which during their development undergo gene rearrangements and selection in the bone marrow ultimately leading to the generation of B cells, each expressing a single antigen-specific receptor/immunoglobulin molecule. Each individual immunoglobulin molecule has an affinity for a unique motif, or epitope, found on a given antigen. When presented with an antigen, activated B cells differentiate into either plasma cells (which secrete large amounts of antibody that is specific for the inducing antigen), or memory B cells (which are long-lived and elicit a stronger and faster response if the host is re-exposed to the same antigen). The secreted form of immunoglobulin, when bound to an antigen, serves as an effector molecule that directs other cells of the immune system to facilitate the neutralization of soluble antigen or the eradication of the antigen-expressing pathogen. This review will focus on the regulation of secreted immunoglobulin by long-lived normal or disease-associated plasma. Specifically, the focus will be on signaling and transcriptional events that regulate the development and homeostasis of long-lived immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells.

  1. Graphene Oxide promotes embryonic stem cell differentiation to haematopoietic lineage

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Alegria, Eva; Iluit, Maria; Stefanska, Monika; Silva, Claudio; Heeg, Sebastian; Kimber, Susan J.; Kouskoff, Valerie; Lacaud, Georges; Vijayaraghavan, Aravind; Batta, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells represent a promising source of differentiated tissue-specific stem and multipotent progenitor cells for regenerative medicine and drug testing. The realisation of this potential relies on the establishment of robust and reproducible protocols of differentiation. Several reports have highlighted the importance of biomaterials in assisting directed differentiation. Graphene oxide (GO) is a novel material that has attracted increasing interest in the field of biomedicine. In this study, we demonstrate that GO coated substrates significantly enhance the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells to both primitive and definitive haematopoietic cells. GO does not affect cell proliferation or survival of differentiated cells but rather enhances the transition of haemangioblasts to haemogenic endothelial cells, a key step during haematopoietic specification. Importantly, GO also improves, in addition to murine, human ES cell differentiation to blood cells. Taken together, our study reveals a positive role for GO in haematopoietic differentiation and suggests that further functionalization of GO could represent a valid strategy for the generation of large numbers of functional blood cells. Producing these cells would accelerate haematopoietic drug toxicity testing and treatment of patients with blood disorders or malignancies. PMID:27197878

  2. Graphene Oxide promotes embryonic stem cell differentiation to haematopoietic lineage.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Alegria, Eva; Iluit, Maria; Stefanska, Monika; Silva, Claudio; Heeg, Sebastian; Kimber, Susan J; Kouskoff, Valerie; Lacaud, Georges; Vijayaraghavan, Aravind; Batta, Kiran

    2016-05-20

    Pluripotent stem cells represent a promising source of differentiated tissue-specific stem and multipotent progenitor cells for regenerative medicine and drug testing. The realisation of this potential relies on the establishment of robust and reproducible protocols of differentiation. Several reports have highlighted the importance of biomaterials in assisting directed differentiation. Graphene oxide (GO) is a novel material that has attracted increasing interest in the field of biomedicine. In this study, we demonstrate that GO coated substrates significantly enhance the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells to both primitive and definitive haematopoietic cells. GO does not affect cell proliferation or survival of differentiated cells but rather enhances the transition of haemangioblasts to haemogenic endothelial cells, a key step during haematopoietic specification. Importantly, GO also improves, in addition to murine, human ES cell differentiation to blood cells. Taken together, our study reveals a positive role for GO in haematopoietic differentiation and suggests that further functionalization of GO could represent a valid strategy for the generation of large numbers of functional blood cells. Producing these cells would accelerate haematopoietic drug toxicity testing and treatment of patients with blood disorders or malignancies.

  3. Development of plasma apparatus for plasma irradiation to living cell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Ryo; Tanoue, Hideto; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Tero, Ryugo

    2012-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma has been studied for the industrial applications of biotechnology and medical care. For the development of these fields, understanding the influence of atmospheric pressure plasma on living cell and the mechanism of cell death is necessary. We focus on a basic structure of cell membrane, called lipid bilayer. Lipid bilayer is composed of lipid molecules with an amphipathic property and can be formed on hydrophilic substrates. In this paper, we report the development of the plasma apparatus for the treatment of lipid bilayer. The plasma apparatus uses a typical dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) system and employs parallel plate electrodes with a gap distance of 1 mm [1]. Each electrode is covered with a quartz plate and the substrate temperature is kept constant by cooling medium. The lower quartz electrode has a dimple, in which the substrate coated with a lipid bilayer and buffer fluid are mounted. [4pt] [1] Y. Sugioka, et al, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., in press

  4. Cell differentiation under the influence of rh-BMP-2.

    PubMed

    Wilke, A; Traub, F; Kienapfel, H; Griss, P

    2001-06-29

    Bioactive bone growth factors will likely play an important role in the regeneration of bone. BMP-2 is known to promote osteoblastic cell differentiation and osteogenesis. Whether the BMPs act on human osteoblastic cells by increasing immature cell growth and/or differentiation is unknown. The goal of this study was to analyse possible effects of rhBMP-2 on cell differentiation using a human bone marrow cell culture. rhBMP-2 was added to the culture medium once. Fourteen days after addition of rhBMP-2 the cells were incubated with monoclonal antibodies. The cells were counted and analysed in a fluorescence-activating cell sorter (FACS). Compared to the controls there was an increasing effect on granulocytes, B cells and stem cells. The T-cells and monocytes show no increase or decrease after rhBMP-2 treatment.

  5. Laboratory astrophysics using differential rotation of unmagnetized plasma at large magnetic Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisberg, David

    2016-10-01

    Differentially rotating plasma flow has been measured in the Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment (MPDX). Spherical cusp-confined plasmas have been stirred both from the plasma boundary using electrostatic stirring in the magnetized edge and in the plasma core using weak global fields and cross-field currents to impose a body-force torque. Laminar velocity profiles conducive to shear-driven MHD instabilities like the dynamo and the MRI are now being generated and controlled with magnetic Reynolds numbers of Rm < 250 and fluid Reynolds numbers of Re < 200 . The measured plasma confinement contradicts existing theories for magnetic cusp confinement, and a new quasi-1D ambipolar diffusion model is presented to explain measurements of cusp loss widths that do not fit the classic hybrid gyroradius theory. Emissive electrode discharge is shown to be an efficient method for plasma heating, but limits on input heating power have been observed (believed to be caused by the formation of double-layers at anodes). These confinement studies have culminated in large (R = 1.4 m), warm (Te < 20 eV), dense (ne < 5 ×1018 m-3), unmagnetized (MA > 1), steady-state plasmas. Results of the ambipolar transport model are good fits to measurements of pressure gradients and fluid drifts in the cusp, and offer a predictive tool for future cusp-confined devices. Hydrodynamic modeling is shown to be a good description for measured plasma flows, where ion viscosity proves to be an efficient mechanism for transporting momentum from the magnetized edge into the unmagnetized core. In addition, the body-force stirring technique produces velocity profiles conducive to MRI experiments where dΩ / dr < 0 . Measured values of Rm and Re are significantly higher than previous flow experiments in cusp-confined plasmas, setting the stage for future progress in laboratory research of flow-driven astrophysical MHD instabilities.

  6. Initiating Differentiation in Immortalized Multipotent Otic Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jadali, Azadeh; Song, Zhichao; Ruiz-Laureano, Alejandra S.; Toro-Ramos, Alana

    2017-01-01

    Use of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) or embryonic stem cells (ESC) for cell replacement therapies holds great promise. Several limitations including low yields and heterogeneous populations of differentiated cells hinder the progress of stem cell therapies. A fate restricted immortalized multipotent otic progenitor (iMOP) cell line was generated to facilitate efficient differentiation of large numbers of functional hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) for inner ear cell replacement therapies. Starting from dissociated cultures of single iMOP cells, protocols that promote cell cycle exit and differentiation by growth factor (bFGF) withdrawal were described. A significant decrease in proliferating cells after bFGF withdrawal was confirmed using an EdU cell proliferation assay. Concomitant with a decrease in proliferation, successful differentiation resulted in expression of molecular markers and morphological changes. Immunostaining of Cdkn1b (p27KIP) and Cdh1 (E-cadherin) in iMOP-derived otospheres was used as an indicator for differentiation into inner ear sensory epithelia while immunostaining of Cdkn1b and Tubb3 (neuronal β-tubulin) was used to identify iMOP-derived neurons. Use of iMOP cells provides an important tool for understanding cell fate decisions made by inner ear neurosensory progenitors and will help develop protocols for generating large numbers of iPSC or ESC-derived hair cells and SGNs. These methods will accelerate efforts for generating otic cells for replacement therapies. PMID:26780605

  7. Ratio control in a cascade model of cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu

    2009-05-01

    We propose a kind of reaction-diffusion equations for cell differentiation, which exhibits the Turing instability. If the diffusivity of some variables is set to be infinity, we get coupled competitive reaction-diffusion equations with a global feedback term. The size ratio of each cell type is controlled by a system parameter in the model. Finally, we extend the model to a cascade model of cell differentiation. A hierarchical spatial structure appears as a result of the cell differentiation. The size ratio of each cell type is also controlled by the system parameter.

  8. Ovarian follicle selection and granulosa cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A L

    2015-04-01

    The reproductive strategy for avian species that produce a sequence (or clutch) of eggs is dependent upon the maintenance of a small cohort of viable, undifferentiated (prehierarchal) follicles. It is from this cohort that a single follicle is selected on an approximate daily basis to initiate rapid growth and final differentiation before ovulation. This review describes a working model in which follicles within this prehierarchal cohort are maintained in an undifferentiated state by inhibitory cell signaling until the time of selection. Ultimately, follicle selection represents a process in which a single undifferentiated follicle per day is predicted to escape such inhibitory mechanisms to begin rapid growth and final maturation before ovulation. Several processes initiated within the granulosa cell layer at selection are dependent upon G protein-coupled receptors signaling via cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), and several critical processes are described herein. Finally, reference is made to several practical outcomes that can result from understanding the process of selection, including applications within the poultry industry. Proximal factors and processes that mediate follicle selection can either extend or decrease the length of the laying sequence, and thus directly influence overall egg production. In particular, any aberration that results in the selection of more than one follicle per day will result in decreased egg production. More generally, in wild birds these processes are modified by prevailing environmental conditions and by social interactions to influence clutch size. The elucidation of cellular processes that regulate follicle selection can assist in the development of assisted reproductive technologies for application in threatened and endangered avian species. © 2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  9. Controlled surface morphology and hydrophilicity of polycaprolactone toward selective differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to neural like cells.

    PubMed

    Jahani, Hoda; Jalilian, Farid Azizi; Wu, Chia-Yu; Kaviani, Saeid; Soleimani, Masoud; Abassi, Naghmeh; Ou, Keng-Liang; Hosseinkhani, Hossein

    2015-05-01

    Differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into neuron cells has great potential in therapy of damaged nerve tissue. It has been shown that three-dimensional biomaterials have great ability to up regulate the expression of neuronal proteins. In this study, O2 plasma technology was used to enhance hydrophilicity of poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) toward selective differentiation of MSCs into neural cells. Random and aligned PCL nanofibers scaffolds were fabricated by electrospinning method and their physicochemical and mechanical properties were carried out by scanning electron microscope (SEM), contact angle, and tensile measurements. Contact angle studies of PCL and plasma treated PCL (p-PCL) nanofibers revealed significant change on the surface properties PCL nanofibers from the view point of hydrophilicity. Physiochemical studies revealed that p-PCL nanofibers were extremely hydrophilic compared with untreated PCL nanofibers which were highly hydrophobic and nonabsorbent to water. Differentiation of MSCs were carried out by inducing growth factors including basic fibroblast growth factor, nerve growth factor, and brain derived growth factor, NT3, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/F12 media. Differentiated MSCs on nanofibrous scaffold were examined by immunofluorescence assay and was found to express the neuronal proteins; β-tubulin III and Map2, on day 15 after cell culture. The real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that p-PCL nanofibrous scaffold could upregulate expression of Map-2 and downregulate expression of Nestin genes in nerve cells differentiated from MSCs. This study indicates that mesenchymal stem cell cultured on nanofibrous scaffold have potential differentiation to neuronal cells on and could apply in nerve tissue repair. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Differential levels of Neurod establish zebrafish endocrine pancreas cell fates

    PubMed Central

    Dalgin, Gökhan; Prince, Victoria E.

    2015-01-01

    During development a network of transcription factors functions to differentiate foregut cells into pancreatic endocrine cells. Differentiation of appropriate numbers of each hormone-expressing endocrine cell type is essential for the normal development of the pancreas and ultimately for effective maintenance of blood glucose levels. A fuller understanding of the details of endocrine cell differentiation may contribute to development of cell replacement therapies to treat diabetes. In this study, by using morpholino and gRNA/Cas9 mediated knockdown we establish that differential levels of the basic-helix loop helix (bHLH) transcription factor Neurod are required for the differentiation of distinct endocrine cell types in developing zebrafish. While Neurod plays a role in the differentiation of all endocrine cells, we find that differentiation of glucagon-expressing alpha cells is disrupted by a minor reduction in Neurod levels, whereas differentiation of insulin-expressing beta cells is less sensitive to Neurod depletion. The endocrine cells that arise during embryonic stages to produce the primary islet, and those that arise subsequently during larval stages from the intra-pancreatic duct (IPD) to ultimately contribute to the secondary islets, show similar dependence on differential Neurod levels. Intriguingly, Neurod-deficiency triggers premature formation of endocrine precursors from the IPD during early larval stages. However, the Neurod-deficient endocrine precursors fail to differentiate appropriately, and the larvae are unable to maintain normal glucose levels. In summary, differential levels of Neurod are required to generate endocrine pancreas subtypes from precursors during both embryonic and larval stages, and Neurod function is in turn critical to endocrine function. PMID:25797153

  11. Plasma membrane proteomics of human embryonic stem cells and human embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Dormeyer, Wilma; van Hoof, Dennis; Braam, Stefan R; Heck, Albert J R; Mummery, Christine L; Krijgsveld, Jeroen

    2008-07-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are of immense interest in regenerative medicine as they can self-renew indefinitely and can give rise to any adult cell type. Human embryonal carcinoma cells (hECCs) are the malignant counterparts of hESCs found in testis tumors. hESCs that have acquired chromosomal abnormalities in culture are essentially indistinguishable from hECC. Direct comparison of karyotypically normal hESCs with hECCs could lead to understanding differences between their mechanisms of growth control and contribute to implementing safe therapeutic use of stem cells without the development of germ cell cancer. While several comparisons of hECCs and hESCs have been reported, their cell surface proteomes are largely unknown, partly because plasma membrane proteomics is still a major challenge. Here, we present a strategy for the identification of plasma membrane proteins that has been optimized for application to the relatively small numbers of stem cells normally available, and that does not require tedious cell fractionation. The method led to the identification of 237 and 219 specific plasma membrane proteins in the hESC line HUES-7 and the hECC line NT2/D1, respectively. In addition to known stemness-associated cell surface markers like ALP, CD9, and CTNNB, a large number of receptors, transporters, signal transducers, and cell-cell adhesion proteins were identified. Our study revealed that several Hedgehog and Wnt pathway members are differentially expressed in hESCs and hECCs including NPC1, FZD2, FZD6, FZD7, LRP6, and SEMA4D, which play a pivotal role in stem cell self-renewal and cancer growth. Various proteins encoded on chromosome 12p, duplicated in testicular cancer, were uniquely identified in hECCs. These included GAPDH, LDHB, YARS2, CLSTN3, CSDA, LRP6, NDUFA9, and NOL1, which are known to be upregulated in testicular cancer. Distinct HLA molecules were revealed on the surface of hESCs and hECCs, despite their low abundance. Results were

  12. Identifying microRNAs that Regulate Neuroblastoma Cell Differentiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0241 TITLE: Identifying that Regulate Neuroblastoma ...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We identified 14 microRNA candidates that induce neuroblastoma cell differentiation based on a high...content screening of neurite outgrowth — the morphological differentiation marker of neuroblastoma cells. We further validated that the identified

  13. Cooperative transcriptional repression by BCL6 and BACH2 in germinal center B-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chuanxin; Geng, Huimin; Boss, Isaac; Wang, Ling; Melnick, Ari

    2014-02-13

    The transcriptional repressors BCL6 and BACH2 are crucial regulators of germinal center (GC) B-cell fate, and are known to interact and repress transcription of PRDM1, a key driver of plasma cell differentiation. How these factors cooperate is not fully understood. Herein, we show that GC formation is only minimally impaired in Bcl6(+/-) or Bach2(+/-) mice, although double heterozygous Bcl6(+/-)Bach2(+/-) mice exhibit profound reduction in GC formation. Splenic B cells from Bcl6(+/-) Bach2(+/-) mice display accelerated plasmacytic differentiation and high expression of key plasma cell genes such as Prdm1, Xbp1, and CD138. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing revealed that in B cells, BACH2 is mostly bound to genes together with its heterodimer partner MAFK. The BACH2-MAFK complex binds to sets of genes known to be involved in the GC response, 60% of which are also targets of BCL6. Approximately 30% of BACH2 peaks overlap with BCL6, including cis-regulatory sequences of the PRDM1 gene. BCL6 also modulates BACH2 protein stability and their protein levels are positively correlated in GC B cells. Therefore, BCL6 and BACH2 cooperate to orchestrate gene expression patterning in GC B cells through both transcriptional and biochemical mechanisms, which collectively determine the proper initiation and timing of terminal differentiation.

  14. Syntaxin-4 is essential for IgE secretion by plasma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Arman; DeCourcey, Joseph; Larbi, Nadia Ben; Loughran, Sinéad T.; Walls, Dermot; Loscher, Christine E.

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •Knock-down of syntaxin-4 in U266 plasma cells resulted in reduction of IgE secretion. •Knock-down of syntaxin-4 also leads to the accumulation of IgE in the cell. •Immuno-fluorescence staining shows co-localisation of IgE and syntaxin-4 in U266 cells. •Findings suggest a critical requirement for syntaxin-4 in IgE secretion from plasma cells. -- Abstract: The humoral immune system provides a crucial first defense against the invasion of microbial pathogens via the secretion of antigen specific immunoglobulins (Ig). The secretion of Ig is carried out by terminally differentiated B-lymphocytes called plasma cells. Despite the key role of plasma cells in the immune response, the mechanisms by which they constitutively traffic large volumes of Ig out of the cell is poorly understood. The involvement of Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins in the regulation of protein trafficking from cells has been well documented. Syntaxin-4, a member of the Qa SNARE syntaxin family has been implicated in fusion events at the plasma membrane in a number of cells in the immune system. In this work we show that knock-down of syntaxin-4 in the multiple myeloma U266 human plasma cell line results in a loss of IgE secretion and accumulation of IgE within the cells. Furthermore, we show that IgE co-localises with syntaxin-4 in U266 plasma cells suggesting direct involvement in secretion at the plasma membrane. This study demonstrates that syntaxin-4 plays a critical role in the secretion of IgE from plasma cells and sheds some light on the mechanisms by which these cells constitutively traffic vesicles to the surface for secretion. An understanding of this machinery may be beneficial in identifying potential therapeutic targets in multiple myeloma and autoimmune disease where over-production of Ig leads to severe pathology in patients.

  15. Electrical Property Characterization of Neural Stem Cells in Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, He; Chen, Deyong; Li, Zhaohui; Fan, Beiyuan; George, Julian; Xue, Chengcheng; Cui, Zhanfeng; Wang, Junbo

    2016-01-01

    Electrical property characterization of stem cells could be utilized as a potential label-free biophysical approach to evaluate the differentiation process. However, there has been a lack of technology or tools that can quantify the intrinsic cellular electrical markers (e.g., specific membrane capacitance (Cspecific membrane) and cytoplasm conductivity (σcytoplasm)) for a large amount of stem cells or differentiated cells. In this paper, a microfluidic platform enabling the high-throughput quantification of Cspecific membrane and σcytoplasm from hundreds of single neural stem cells undergoing differentiation was developed to explore the feasibility to characterize the neural stem cell differentiation process without biochemical staining. Experimental quantification using biochemical markers (e.g., Nestin, Tubulin and GFAP) of neural stem cells confirmed the initiation of the differentiation process featured with gradual loss in cellular stemness and increased cell markers for neurons and glial cells. The recorded electrical properties of neural stem cells undergoing differentiation showed distinctive and unique patterns: 1) in the suspension culture before inducing differentiation, a large distribution and difference in σcytoplasm among individual neural stem cells was noticed, which indicated heterogeneity that may result from the nature of suspension culture of neurospheres; and 2) during the differentiation in adhering monolayer culture, significant changes and a large difference in Cspecific membrane were located indicating different expressions of membrane proteins during the differentiation process, and a small distribution difference in σcytoplasm was less significant that indicated the relatively consistent properties of cytoplasm during the culture. In summary, significant differences in Cspecific membrane and σcytoplasm were observed during the neural stem cell differentiation process, which may potentially be used as label-free biophysical markers

  16. Control of the Proliferation of Mammalian Cells by the Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hae June; Ha, Chang Seung; Ma, Yonghao; Lee, Jungyeol; Song, Kiwon

    2012-10-01

    Recent development of the atmospheric pressure plasmas (APPs) reported dramatic achievement on the applications to sterilization, wound healing, blood coagulation, and so on. These effects are coming from the abundant electrons, various ions, radicals, and neutral atoms which cause specific interactions with cells. However, the application of APPs to human cells has been mainly focused on cell death, but not so much on cell proliferation. In this study, the effects of a non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) were investigated for three different human cell lines. It was observed that the exposure of APP to human adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) and the primary lung fibroblast IMR-90 cells induced increased cell proliferation in a specific condition. On the other hand, the same exposure of APP to HeLa cells dramatically decreased their viability. These observations suggest that different types of human cells differentially respond to the exposure of APP.

  17. Interleukin 6 dependence of spontaneous in vitro differentiation of B cells from patients with IgM gammapathy.

    PubMed

    Levy, Y; Fermand, J P; Navarro, S; Schmitt, C; Vainchenker, W; Seligmann, M; Brouet, J C

    1990-05-01

    Blood B cells from eight patients with clonal lymphoid disorders characterized by monoclonal IgM secretion (four with malignant plasmacytic proliferation typical of Waldenström macroglobulinemia and four without overt lymphoid neoplasia) were found to spontaneously differentiate in vitro into plasma cells. In all instances, monoclonal plasma cells (8-45% of the cells) were generated from extensively purified B cells or T-cell-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells after a 7-day culture period, with a corresponding high rate of IgM secretion into the culture medium. This differentiation occurred in the absence of any cell proliferation process as measured by [3H]thymidine uptake at day 2 or 4. Normal B cells did not differentiate under the same experimental conditions. Detection of interleukin 6 (IL-6) bioactivity in all patients' B-cell culture supernatants as well as of IL-6 mRNA in freshly prepared, uncultured B cells in the two cases studied by in situ hybridization suggested that IL-6 secretion by B cells may play a role in this process. Moreover, in the four patients without overt lymphoid proliferation, B-cell differentiation was significantly inhibited (60-80%) in the presence of anti-IL-6 antibodies. In contrast, anti-IL-6 antibodies did not preclude the differentiation into plasma cells of B cells from the four patients with bona fide Waldenström macroglobulinemia. These results suggest a two-step pathogenesis for such human lymphoplasmacytic clonal proliferations, the initial stage being characterized by an IL-6-dependent autocrine differentiation pathway.

  18. JAB1 accelerates odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lian, Min; Zhang, Ye; Shen, Qijie; Xing, Jing; Lu, Xiaohui; Huang, Dan; Cao, Peipei; Shen, Shuling; Zheng, Ke; Zhang, Jinlong; Chen, Jie; Wang, Yi; Feng, Guijuan; Feng, Xingmei

    2016-06-01

    Jun activation domain-binding protein 1 (JAB1) is a multifunctional protein that participates in the control of cell proliferation and the stability of multiple proteins. JAB1 regulates several key proteins, and thereby produces varied effects on cell cycle progression, genome stability and cell survival. Some studies have shown that the loss of JAB1 in osteochondral progenitor cells severely impairs embryonic limb development in mice. However, the biological significance of JAB1 activity in the odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) remains unclear. This study aimed to determine the role of JAB1, a key player in tooth development, in reparative dentin formation, especially odontogenic differentiation. We found that increased expression of JAB1 promoted odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs via Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The role of JAB1 in the odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs was further confirmed by knocking down JAB1. Our findings provide novel insights on odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs.

  19. The topographical regulation of embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Patricia; Edgar, David

    2004-01-01

    The potential use of pluripotent stem cells for tissue repair or replacement is now well recognized. While the ability of embryonic stem (ES) cells to differentiate into all cells of the body is undisputed, their use is currently restricted by our limited knowledge of the mechanisms controlling their differentiation. This review discusses recent work by ourselves and others investigating the intercellular signalling events that occur within aggregates of mouse ES cells. The work illustrates that the processes of ES cell differentiation, epithelialization and programmed cell death are dependent upon their location within the aggregates and coordinated by the extracellular matrix. Establishment of the mechanisms involved in these events is not only of use for the manipulation of ES cells themselves, but it also throws light on the ways in which differentiation is coordinated during embryogenesis. PMID:15306413

  20. Nitric oxide-cyclic GMP signaling in stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mujoo, Kalpana; Krumenacker, Joshua S.; Murad, Ferid

    2011-01-01

    The nitric oxide-cyclic GMP (NO-cGMP) pathway mediates important physiological functions associated with various integrative body systems including the cardiovascular and nervous systems. Furthermore, NO regulates cell growth, survival, apoptosis, proliferation and differentiation at the cellular level. To understand the significance of the NO-cGMP pathway in development and differentiation, studies have been conducted both in developing embryos and stem cells. Manipulation of the NO-cGMP pathway by employing activators and inhibitors as pharmacological probes and/or genetic manipulation of NO signaling components has implicated the involvement of this pathway in regulation of stem cell differentiation. This review will focus on some of the work pertaining to the role of NO-cGMP in differentiation of stem cells into cells of various lineages particularly into myocardial cells and stem cell based therapy. PMID:22019632

  1. Diclofenac and triamcinolone acetonide impair tenocytic differentiation and promote adipocytic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tendinopathies are often empirically treated with oral/topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications and corticosteroid injections despite their unclear effects on tendon regeneration. Recent studies indicate that tendon progenitors exhibit stem cell-like properties, i.e., differentiation to osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes, in addition to tenocytes. Our present study aims at understanding the effects of triamcinolone acetonide and diclofenac on tenocytic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Methods The murine fibroblast C3H10T1/2 cell line was induced to tenocytic differentiation by growth differentiation factor-7. Cell proliferation and differentiation with the exposure of different concentrations of triamcinolone acetonide and diclofenac were measured by WST-1 assay and real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis, respectively. Results Cell proliferation was decreased in a concentration-dependent manner when exposed to triamcinolone acetonide and diclofenac. In addition to tenocytic differentiation, adipocyte formation was observed, both at gene expression and microscopic level, when the cells were exposed to triamcinolone acetonide or high concentrations of diclofenac. Conclusions Our results indicate that triamcinolone acetonide and diclofenac might alter mesenchymal stem cell differentiation in a nonfavorable way regarding tendon regeneration; therefore, these medications should be used with more caution clinically. PMID:24004657

  2. Differential Responses of Plasma Adropin Concentrations To Dietary Glucose or Fructose Consumption In Humans

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Andrew A.; St-Onge, Marie-Pierre; Siebert, Emily A.; Medici, Valentina; Stanhope, Kimber L.; Havel, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Adropin is a peptide hormone encoded by the Energy Homeostasis Associated (ENHO) gene whose physiological role in humans remains incompletely defined. Here we investigated the impact of dietary interventions that affect systemic glucose and lipid metabolism on plasma adropin concentrations in humans. Consumption of glucose or fructose as 25% of daily energy requirements (E) differentially affected plasma adropin concentrations (P < 0.005) irrespective of duration, sex or age. Glucose consumption reduced plasma adropin from 3.55 ± 0.26 to 3.28 ± 0.23 ng/ml (N = 42). Fructose consumption increased plasma adropin from 3.63 ± 0.29 to 3.93 ± 0.34 ng/ml (N = 45). Consumption of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) as 25% E had no effect (3.43 ± 0.32 versus 3.39 ± 0.24 ng/ml, N = 26). Overall, the effect of glucose, HFCS and fructose on circulating adropin concentrations were similar to those observed on postprandial plasma triglyceride concentrations. Furthermore, increases in plasma adropin levels with fructose intake were most robust in individuals exhibiting hypertriglyceridemia. Individuals with low plasma adropin concentrations also exhibited rapid increases in plasma levels following consumption of breakfasts supplemented with lipids. These are the first results linking plasma adropin levels with dietary sugar intake in humans, with the impact of fructose consumption linked to systemic triglyceride metabolism. In addition, dietary fat intake may also increase circulating adropin concentrations. PMID:26435060

  3. Bidirectional KCNQ1:β-catenin interaction drives colorectal cancer cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Rapetti-Mauss, Raphael; Bustos, Viviana; Thomas, Warren; McBryan, Jean; Harvey, Harry; Lajczak, Natalia; Madden, Stephen F.; Pellissier, Bernard; Borgese, Franck; Soriani, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    The K+ channel KCNQ1 has been proposed as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer (CRC). We investigated the molecular mechanisms regulating KCNQ1:β-catenin bidirectional interactions and their effects on CRC differentiation, proliferation, and invasion. Molecular and pharmacologic approaches were used to determine the influence of KCNQ1 expression on the Wnt/β-catenin signaling and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in human CRC cell lines of varying stages of differentiation. The expression of KCNQ1 was lost with increasing mesenchymal phenotype in poorly differentiated CRC cell lines as a consequence of repression of the KCNQ1 promoter by β-catenin:T-cell factor (TCF)-4. In well-differentiated epithelial CRC cell lines, KCNQ1 was localized to the plasma membrane in a complex with β-catenin and E-cadherin. The colocalization of KCNQ1 with adherens junction proteins was lost with increasing EMT phenotype. ShRNA knock-down of KCNQ1 caused a relocalization of β-catenin from the plasma membrane and a loss of epithelial phenotype in CRC spheroids. Overexpression of KCNQ1 trapped β-catenin at the plasma membrane, induced a patent lumen in CRC spheroids, and slowed CRC cell invasion. The KCNQ1 ion channel inhibitor chromanol 293B caused membrane depolarization, redistribution of β-catenin into the cytosol, and a reduced transepithelial electrical resistance, and stimulated CRC cell proliferation. Analysis of human primary CRC tumor patient databases showed a positive correlation between KCNQ1:KCNE3 channel complex expression and disease-free survival. We conclude that the KCNQ1 ion channel is a target gene and regulator of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, and its repression leads to CRC cell proliferation, EMT, and tumorigenesis. PMID:28373572

  4. Bidirectional KCNQ1:β-catenin interaction drives colorectal cancer cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rapetti-Mauss, Raphael; Bustos, Viviana; Thomas, Warren; McBryan, Jean; Harvey, Harry; Lajczak, Natalia; Madden, Stephen F; Pellissier, Bernard; Borgese, Franck; Soriani, Olivier; Harvey, Brian J

    2017-04-03

    The K(+) channel KCNQ1 has been proposed as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer (CRC). We investigated the molecular mechanisms regulating KCNQ1:β-catenin bidirectional interactions and their effects on CRC differentiation, proliferation, and invasion. Molecular and pharmacologic approaches were used to determine the influence of KCNQ1 expression on the Wnt/β-catenin signaling and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in human CRC cell lines of varying stages of differentiation. The expression of KCNQ1 was lost with increasing mesenchymal phenotype in poorly differentiated CRC cell lines as a consequence of repression of the KCNQ1 promoter by β-catenin:T-cell factor (TCF)-4. In well-differentiated epithelial CRC cell lines, KCNQ1 was localized to the plasma membrane in a complex with β-catenin and E-cadherin. The colocalization of KCNQ1 with adherens junction proteins was lost with increasing EMT phenotype. ShRNA knock-down of KCNQ1 caused a relocalization of β-catenin from the plasma membrane and a loss of epithelial phenotype in CRC spheroids. Overexpression of KCNQ1 trapped β-catenin at the plasma membrane, induced a patent lumen in CRC spheroids, and slowed CRC cell invasion. The KCNQ1 ion channel inhibitor chromanol 293B caused membrane depolarization, redistribution of β-catenin into the cytosol, and a reduced transepithelial electrical resistance, and stimulated CRC cell proliferation. Analysis of human primary CRC tumor patient databases showed a positive correlation between KCNQ1:KCNE3 channel complex expression and disease-free survival. We conclude that the KCNQ1 ion channel is a target gene and regulator of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, and its repression leads to CRC cell proliferation, EMT, and tumorigenesis.

  5. Use of Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Immunoaffinity Chromatography to Identify Disease Induced Changes in Human Blood Plasma Proteome.

    PubMed

    Brudar, Sandi; Černigoj, Urh; Podgornik, Helena; Kržan, Mojca; Prislan, Iztok

    2017-09-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry provides unique signatures of blood plasma samples. Plasma samples from diseased individuals yield specific thermograms, which differ from each other and from plasma samples of healthy individuals. Thermograms from individuals suffering from chronic lymphocytic leukemia, multiple myeloma and acute myeloid leukemia were measured with DSC. To obtain additional information about thermal behaviour of plasma proteins immunoaffinity chromatography was introduced. An immunoextraction of HSA using a chromatographic column with immobilized anti-HSA was carried out in order to enrich less abundant plasma proteins, which could provide a further insight into disease development. Efficiency of HSA depletion and protein composition of fractionated plasma was validated by SDS-PAGE.

  6. NOV/CCN3 impairs muscle cell commitment and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Calhabeu, Frederico; Lafont, Jerome; Le Dreau, Gwenvael; Laurent, Maryvonne; Kazazian, Chantal; Schaeffer, Laurent; Dubois, Catherine . E-mail: dubois@st-antoine.inserm.frs

    2006-06-10

    NOV (nephroblastoma overexpressed) is a member of a family of proteins which encodes secreted matrix-associated proteins. NOV is expressed during development in dermomyotome and limb buds, but its functions are still poorly defined. In order to understand the role of NOV in myogenic differentiation, C2C12 cells overexpressing NOV (C2-NOV) were generated. These cells failed to engage into myogenic differentiation, whereas they retained the ability to differentiate into osteoblasts. In differentiating conditions, C2-NOV cells remained proliferative, failed to express differentiation markers and lost their ability to form myotubes. Inhibition of differentiation by NOV was also observed with human primary muscle cells. Further examination of C2-NOV cells revealed a strong downregulation of the myogenic determination genes MyoD and Myf5 and of IGF-II expression. MyoD forced expression in C2-NOV was sufficient to restore differentiation and IGF-II induction whereas 10{sup -6} M insulin treatment had no effects. NOV therefore acts upstream of MyoD and does not affect IGF-II induction and signaling. HES1, a target of Notch, previously proposed to mediate NOV action, was not implicated in the inhibition of differentiation. We propose that NOV is a specific cell fate regulator in the myogenic lineage, acting negatively on key myogenic genes thus controlling the transition from progenitor cells to myoblasts.

  7. A case of immunodeficiency with decreased serum IgA levels and impaired polyclonal B cell differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sakano, T; Hosokawa, A; Horino, N; Hyodo, S; Kishi, T; Suzawa, T; Kittaka, E; Sakura, N; Usui, T

    1983-09-01

    We report a patient with low serum IgA levels and persistent pulmonary infection. In spite of the normal contents of serum IgG and IgM, the patient had a deficiency for plasma cell differentiation of all major classes of immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA and IgM). Cross culture systems between normal T or B cells and the patient's T or B cells showed a defect of both T and B cell function.

  8. p38 MAPK α and β isoforms differentially regulate plasma membrane localization of MRP2

    PubMed Central

    Schonhoff, Christopher M.; Park, Se Won; Webster, Cynthia R.L.

    2016-01-01

    In hepatocytes, cAMP both activates p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and increases the amount of multidrug resistance-associated protein-2 (MRP2) in the plasma membrane (PM-MRP2). Paradoxically, taurolithocholate (TLC) activates p38 MAPK but decreases PM-MRP2 in hepatocytes. These opposing effects of cAMP and TLC could be mediated via different p38 MAPK isoforms (α and β) that are activated differentially by upstream kinases (MKK3, MKK4, and MKK6). Thus we tested the hypothesis that p38α MAPK and p38β MAPK mediate increases and decreases in PM-MRP2 by cAMP and TLC, respectively. Studies were conducted in hepatocytes isolated from C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and MKK3-knockout (MKK3−/−) mice and in a hepatoma cell line (HuH7) that overexpresses sodium-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) (HuH-NTCP). Cyclic AMP activated MKK3, p38 MAPK, and p38α MAPK and increased PM-MRP2 in WT hepatocytes, but failed to activate p38α MAPK or increase PM-MRP2 in MKK3−/− hepatocytes. In contrast to cAMP, TLC activated total p38 MAPK but decreased PM-MRP2, and did not activate MKK3 or p38α MAPK in WT hepatocytes. In MKK3−/− hepatocytes, TLC still decreased PM-MRP2 and activated p38 MAPK, indicating that these effects are not MKK3-dependent. Additionally, TLC activated MKK6 in MKK3−/− hepatocytes, and small interfering RNA knockdown of p38β MAPK abrogated TLC-mediated decreases in PM-MRP2 in HuH-NTCP cells. Taken together, these results suggest that p38α MAPK facilitates plasma membrane insertion of MRP2 by cAMP, whereas p38β MAPK mediates retrieval of PM-MRP2 by TLC. PMID:27012769

  9. The discovery of plasma cells: An historical note.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2017-08-01

    The name plasma cell was introduced by the anatomist Heinrich H. von Hartz-Waldeyer in 1875. Plasma cells derive from small B lymphocytes after their activation. A fully mature plasma cell lacks surface immunoglobulin expression. Its form is round or oval, with characteristic basophilic cytoplasm and an eccentric nucleus that contains coarse heterochromatin. Antigen activation of mature B cells leads initially to germinal center development, the transient generation of plasmablasts that secrete antibody while still dividing, and short-lived extrafollicular plasma cells that secrete antigen-specific germ line-encoded antibodies. Plasma cells are characterized by the co-expression of CD138 and CD38, which allows their identification in flow cytometry in bone marrow, peripheral blood, or cell suspensions from tissues. The identification of plasma cells as antibody producers was a key discovery that paved the way for the development of monoclonal antibodies. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Differential cytotoxicity of selenite for tumor cells can be achieved by differential depletion of cellular glutathione

    SciTech Connect

    Caffrey, P.B.; Abdullaev, F.; Frenkel, G.D. )

    1991-03-11

    The authors have previously shown with HeLa cells that the inhibitory effect of selenite on nucleic acid synthesis and colony formation can be decreased by lowering the level of cellular sulfhydryl (SH) compounds, suggesting that this level can be a determining factor in the sensitivity of a cell to selenite. To investigate whether manipulation of cellular SH levels could be used to achieve a differential effect of selenite on tumor cells vs normal cells, the authors utilized two human cell lines: A549 cells and 210 cells. The level of SH compounds in A549 cells is normally 5 times that of 210 cells. However, since A549 cells are less sensitive than 210 cells to depletion of glutathione by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), after BSO treatment, A549 cells contain 70 times more SH than 210 cells. The authors have found that under normal conditions the two cell types had the same sensitivity to the inhibitory effect of selenite on colony formation. However, after BSO treatment the A549 cells were significantly more sensitive than the 210 cells to the inhibition of colony formation by selenite. Thus, differential depletion of intracellular glutathione resulted in a differential sensitivity of the tumor cells to selenite cytotoxicity.

  11. Differentiation of embryonic stem cells into corneal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhichong; Ge, Jian; Huang, Bing; Gao, Qianying; Liu, Bingqian; Wang, Linghua; Yu, Ling; Fan, Zhigang; Lu, Xiaoming; Liu, Jingbo

    2005-10-01

    Our project was to determine whether embryonic stem (ES) cells could be induced to differentiate into corneal epithelia by superficial corneoscleral limbal stroma. To achieve this goal, ES-GFP cell line D3 was pre-induced by retinoic acid (RA). The pre-induced cells were seeded on deepithelialized superficial corneoscleral slices (SCSS) to form a monolayer, and divided into three groups. Group 1 was cultured and passaged in vitro for direct detection. Group 2 was exposed to air-liquid interfaces for 10 days and implanted into the subcutaneous layer of nude mice for 2 weeks for further induction in vivo. Group 3 was cultured in vitro without any inducing factors for control. There were no teratomas found in nude mice which were implanted with differentiated ES cells after two weeks. The differentiated cells showed an appearance of epithelia both in vitro and in vivo. Expression of CK3, P63 and PCNA was detected by immunohistochemical staining in the differentiated cells in group 1 and 2. Microvillis and zonula occludens were observed on the surface of the differentiated cells under an electron microscope. In the control group, ES cells differentiated freely without any inducing factors. Most cells were shed and formed a neuronal dendrite-like structure, and a minority of cells appeared polymorphic. These results demonstrate that ES cells can differentiate into corneal epithelia on the surface of SCSS under the controlled condition. Differentiated ES cells could be used as epithelial seeding cells for the reconstruction of ocular surface and corneal tissue engineering in the future.

  12. Concise Review: Plasma and Nuclear Membranes Convey Mechanical Information to Regulate Mesenchymal Stem Cell Lineage.

    PubMed

    Uzer, Gunes; Fuchs, Robyn K; Rubin, Janet; Thompson, William R

    2016-06-01

    Numerous factors including chemical, hormonal, spatial, and physical cues determine stem cell fate. While the regulation of stem cell differentiation by soluble factors is well-characterized, the role of mechanical force in the determination of lineage fate is just beginning to be understood. Investigation of the role of force on cell function has largely focused on "outside-in" signaling, initiated at the plasma membrane. When interfaced with the extracellular matrix, the cell uses integral membrane proteins, such as those found in focal adhesion complexes to translate force into biochemical signals. Akin to these outside-in connections, the internal cytoskeleton is physically linked to the nucleus, via proteins that span the nuclear membrane. Although structurally and biochemically distinct, these two forms of mechanical coupling influence stem cell lineage fate and, when disrupted, often lead to disease. Here we provide an overview of how mechanical coupling occurs at the plasma and nuclear membranes. We also discuss the role of force on stem cell differentiation, with focus on the biochemical signals generated at the cell membrane and the nucleus, and how those signals influence various diseases. While the interaction of stem cells with their physical environment and how they respond to force is complex, an understanding of the mechanical regulation of these cells is critical in the design of novel therapeutics to combat diseases associated with aging, cancer, and osteoporosis. Stem Cells 2016;34:1455-1463. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  13. Cancer cell differentiation heterogeneity and aggressive behavior in solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Jögi, Annika; Vaapil, Marica; Johansson, Martin; Påhlman, Sven

    2012-05-01

    The differentiation stage of tumors is a central aspect in the histopathological classification of solid malignancies. The differentiation stage is strongly associated with tumor behavior, and generally an immature tumor is more aggressive than the more differentiated counterpart. While this is common knowledge in surgical pathology, the contribution of differentiation-related gene expression and functions to tumor behavior is often overlooked in the experimental, tumor biological setting. The mechanisms by which tumor cell differentiation stages are perturbed or affected are poorly explored but have recently come into focus with the introduction.of the tumor stem cell concept. While developmental biologists view the differentiation as a unidirectional event, pathologists and tumor biologists have introduced the concept of dedifferentiation to explain phenotypic changes occurring in solid tumors. In this review we discuss the impact of the tumor cell differentiation stage as used in surgical pathology. We further discuss knowledge gained from exploring the molecular basis of the differentiation and dedifferentiation processes in neuroblastoma and breast cancer, two tumor forms where the tumor cell differentiation concept is used in the clinical diagnostic work and where the tumor stem cell theory has been applied.

  14. YY1 plays an essential role at all stages of B-cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kleiman, Eden; Jia, Haiqun; Loguercio, Salvatore; Su, Andrew I.; Feeney, Ann J.

    2016-01-01

    Ying Yang 1 (YY1) is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor shown to be essential for pro–B-cell development. However, the role of YY1 in other B-cell populations has never been investigated. Recent bioinformatics analysis data have implicated YY1 in the germinal center (GC) B-cell transcriptional program. In accord with this prediction, we demonstrated that deletion of YY1 by Cγ1-Cre completely prevented differentiation of GC B cells and plasma cells. To determine if YY1 was also required for the differentiation of other B-cell populations, we deleted YY1 with CD19-Cre and found that all peripheral B-cell subsets, including B1 B cells, require YY1 for their differentiation. Transitional 1 (T1) B cells were the most dependent upon YY1, being sensitive to even a half-dosage of YY1 and also to short-term YY1 deletion by tamoxifen-induced Cre. We show that YY1 exerts its effects, in part, by promoting B-cell survival and proliferation. ChIP-sequencing shows that YY1 predominantly binds to promoters, and pathway analysis of the genes that bind YY1 show enrichment in ribosomal functions, mitochondrial functions such as bioenergetics, and functions related to transcription such as mRNA splicing. By RNA-sequencing analysis of differentially expressed genes, we demonstrated that YY1 normally activates genes involved in mitochondrial bioenergetics, whereas it normally down-regulates genes involved in transcription, mRNA splicing, NF-κB signaling pathways, the AP-1 transcription factor network, chromatin remodeling, cytokine signaling pathways, cell adhesion, and cell proliferation. Our results show the crucial role that YY1 plays in regulating broad general processes throughout all stages of B-cell differentiation. PMID:27335461

  15. Altered SDF-1-mediated differentiation of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Elena; Avitabile, Daniele; Totta, Pierangela; Straino, Stefania; Spallotta, Francesco; Cencioni, Chiara; Torella, Anna Rita; Rizzi, Roberto; Porcelli, Daniele; Zacheo, Antonella; Vito, Luca Di; Pompilio, Giulio; Napolitano, Monica; Melillo, Guido; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Pesce, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    In diabetic patients and animal models of diabetes mellitus (DM), circulating endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) number is lower than in normoglycaemic conditions and EPC angiogenic properties are inhibited. Stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) plays a key role in bone marrow (BM) c-kit+ stem cell mobilization into peripheral blood (PB), recruitment from PB into ischemic tissues and differentiation into endothelial cells. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of DM in vivo and in vitro, on murine BM-derived c-kit+ cells and on their response to SDF-1. Acute hindlimb ischemia was induced in streptozotocin-treated DM and control mice; circulating c-kit+ cells exhibited a rapid increase followed by a return to control levels which was significantly faster in DM than in control mice. CXCR4 expression by BM c-kit+ cells as well as SDF-1 protein levels in the plasma and in the skeletal muscle, both before and after the induction of ischemia, were similar between normoglycaemic and DM mice. However, BM-derived c-kit+ cells from DM mice exhibited an impaired differentiation towards the endothelial phenotype in response to SDF-1; this effect was associated with diminished protein kinase phosphorylation. Interestingly, SDF-1 ability to induce differentiation of c-kit+ cells from DM mice was restored when cells were cultured under normoglycaemic conditions whereas c-kit+ cells from normoglycaemic mice failed to differentiate in response to SDF-1 when they were cultured in hyperglycaemic conditions. These results show that DM diminishes circulating c-kit+ cell number following hindlimb ischemia and inhibits SDF-1-mediated AKT phosphorylation and differentiation towards the endothelial phenotype of BM-derived c-kit+ cells. PMID:20196780

  16. ON THE ACCURACY OF THE DIFFERENTIAL EMISSION MEASURE DIAGNOSTICS OF SOLAR PLASMAS. APPLICATION TO SDO/AIA. II. MULTITHERMAL PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Guennou, C.; Auchere, F.; Soubrie, E.; Bocchialini, K.; Barbey, N.

    2012-12-15

    Differential emission measure (DEM) analysis is one of the most used diagnostic tools for solar and stellar coronae. Being an inverse problem, it has limitations due to the presence of random and systematic errors. We present in this series of papers an analysis of the robustness of the inversion in the case of SDO/AIA observations. We completely characterize the DEM inversion and its statistical properties, providing all the solutions consistent with the data along with their associated probabilities, and a test of the suitability of the assumed DEM model. While Paper I focused on isothermal conditions, we now consider multithermal plasmas and investigate both isothermal and multithermal solutions. We demonstrate how the ambiguity between noises and multithermality fundamentally limits the temperature resolution of the inversion. We show that if the observed plasma is multithermal, isothermal solutions tend to cluster on a constant temperature whatever the number of passbands or spectral lines. The multithermal solutions are also found to be biased toward near-isothermal solutions around 1 MK. This is true even if the residuals support the chosen DEM model, possibly leading to erroneous conclusions on the observed plasma. We propose tools for identifying and quantifying the possible degeneracy of solutions, thus helping the interpretation of DEM inversion.

  17. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis of cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Kimura, Akinori; Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Awazu, Kunio

    2007-02-01

    Stem cells and its differentiations have got a lot of attentions in regenerative medicine. The process of differentiations, the formation of tissues, has become better understood by the study using a lot of cell types progressively. These studies of cells and tissue dynamics at molecular levels are carried out through various approaches like histochemical methods, application of molecular biology and immunology. However, in case of using regenerative sources (cells, tissues and biomaterials etc.) clinically, they are measured and quality-controlled by non-invasive methods from the view point of safety. Recently, the use of Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) has been used to monitor biochemical changes in cells, and has gained considerable importance. The objective of this study is to establish the infrared spectroscopy of cell differentiation as a quality control of cell sources for regenerative medicine. In the present study, as a basic study, we examined the adipose differentiation kinetics of preadipocyte (3T3-L1) and the osteoblast differentiation kinetics of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (Kusa-A1) to analyze the infrared absorption spectra. As a result, we achieved to analyze the adipose differentiation kinetics using the infrared absorption peak at 1739 cm-1 derived from ester bonds of triglyceride and osteoblast differentiation kinetics using the infrared absorption peak at 1030 cm-1 derived from phosphate groups of calcium phosphate.

  18. At the border: the plasma membrane-cell wall continuum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zengyu; Persson, Staffan; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Clara

    2015-03-01

    Plant cells rely on their cell walls for directed growth and environmental adaptation. Synthesis and remodelling of the cell walls are membrane-related processes. During cell growth and exposure to external stimuli, there is a constant exchange of lipids, proteins, and other cell wall components between the cytosol and the plasma membrane/apoplast. This exchange of material and the localization of cell wall proteins at certain spots in the plasma membrane seem to rely on a particular membrane composition. In addition, sensors at the plasma membrane detect changes in the cell wall architecture, and activate cytoplasmic signalling schemes and ultimately cell wall remodelling. The apoplastic polysaccharide matrix is, on the other hand, crucial for preventing proteins diffusing uncontrollably in the membrane. Therefore, the cell wall-plasma membrane link is essential for plant development and responses to external stimuli. This review focuses on the relationship between the cell wall and plasma membrane, and its importance for plant tissue organization. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Mesenchymal stromal cells revert multiple myeloma cells to less differentiated phenotype by the combined activities of adhesive interactions and interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Dezorella, Nili; Pevsner-Fischer, Meirav; Deutsch, Varda; Kay, Sigi; Baron, Shoshana; Stern, Ruth; Tavor, Sigal; Nagler, Arnon; Naparstek, Elizabeth; Zipori, Dov; Katz, Ben-Zion

    2009-07-01

    Multiple myeloma is characterized by the malignant growth of immunoglobulin producing plasma cells, predominantly in the bone marrow. The effects of primary human mesenchymal stromal cells on the differentiation phenotype of multiple myeloma cells were studied by co-culture experiments. The incubation of multiple myeloma cells with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells resulted in significant reduction of the expression of the predominant plasma cell differentiation markers CD38 and CD138, and cell surface immunoglobulin light chain. While the down-regulation of CD138 by stromal cells was completely dependent on their adhesive interactions with the multiple myeloma cells, interleukin-6 induced specific down-regulation of CD38. Mesenchymal stromal cells or their conditioned media inhibited the growth of multiple myeloma cell line, thereby reducing the overall amounts of secreted light chains. Analysis of primary multiple myeloma bone marrow samples reveled that the expression of CD38 on multiple myeloma cells was not affected by adhesive interactions. The ex vivo propagation of primary multiple myeloma cells resulted in significant increase in their differentiation markers. Overall, the data indicate that the bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells revert multiple myeloma cells to less differentiated phenotype by the combined activities of adhesive interactions and interleukin-6.

  20. Regulation of Human Helper T Cell Subset Differentiation by Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Nathalie; Ueno, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of Th1 and Th2 cells in the late 80’s, the family of effector CD4+ helper T (Th) cell subsets has expanded. The differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells is largely determined when they interact with dendritic cells in lymphoid organs, and cytokines play a major role in the regulation of Th differentiation in the early stages. Recent studies show that the developmental mechanism of certain Th subsets is not fully shared between mice and humans. Here we will review recent discoveries on the roles of cytokines in the regulation of Th differentiation in humans, and discuss the differences between mice and humans in the developmental mechanisms of several Th subsets, including Th17 cells and T follicular helper (Tfh) cells. We propose that the differentiation of human Th subsets is largely regulated by the three cytokines, IL-12, IL-23, and TGF-β. PMID:25879814

  1. Epigenetic stability increases extensively during Drosophila follicle stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Skora, Andrew D; Spradling, Allan C

    2010-04-20

    Stem and embryonic cells facilitate programming toward multiple daughter cell fates, whereas differentiated cells resist reprogramming and oncogenic transformation. How alterations in the chromatin-based machinery of epigenetic inheritance contribute to these differences remains poorly known. We observed random, heritable changes in GAL4/UAS transgene programming during Drosophila ovarian follicle stem cell differentiation and used them to measure the stage-specific epigenetic stability of gene programming. The frequency of GAL4/UAS reprogramming declines more than 100-fold over the nine divisions comprising this stem cell lineage. Stabilization acts in cis, suggesting that it is chromatin-based, and correlates with increased S phase length. Our results suggest that stem/early progenitor cells cannot accurately transmit nongenetic information to their progeny; full epigenetic competence is acquired only gradually during early differentiation. Modulating epigenetic inheritance may be a critical process controlling transitions between the pleuripotent and differentiated states.

  2. Insulin acts as a myogenic differentiation signal for neural stem cells with multilineage differentiation potential.

    PubMed

    Bani-Yaghoub, Mahmud; Kendall, Stephen E; Moore, Daniel P; Bellum, Stephen; Cowling, Rebecca A; Nikopoulos, George N; Kubu, Chris J; Vary, Calvin; Verdi, Joseph M

    2004-09-01

    Reports of non-neural differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) have been challenged by alternative explanations for expanded differentiation potentials. In an attempt to demonstrate the plasticity of NSC, neurospheres were generated from single retrovirally labeled embryonic cortical precursors. In a defined serum-free insulin-containing media, 40% of the neurospheres contained both myogenic and neurogenic differentiated progeny. The number of NSCs displaying multilineage differentiation potential declines through gestation but does exist in the adult animal. In this system, insulin appears to function as a survival and dose-dependent myogenic differentiation signal for multilineage NSCs (MLNSC). MLNSC-derived cardiomyocytes contract synchronously, respond to sympathetic and parasympathetic stimulation, and regenerate injured heart tissues. These studies provide support for the hypothesis that MLNSCs exist throughout the lifetime of the animal, and potentially provide a population of stem cells for cell-based regenerative medicine strategies inside and outside of the nervous system.

  3. T follicular helper cell differentiation, function, and roles in disease

    PubMed Central

    Crotty, Shane

    2014-01-01

    Summary Follicular helper T (Tfh) cells are specialized providers of T cell help to B cells, and are essential for germinal center formation, affinity maturation, and the development of most high affinity antibodies and memory B cells. Tfh cell differentiation is a multi-stage, multi-factorial process involving B cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl6) and other transcription factors. This article reviews understanding of Tfh cell biology, including their differentiation, migration, transcriptional regulation, and B cell help functions. Tfh cells are critical components of many protective immune responses against pathogens. As such, there is strong interest in harnessing Tfh cells to improve vaccination strategies. Tfh cells also have roles in a range of other diseases, particularly autoimmune diseases. Overall, there have been dramatic advances in this young field, but there is much to be learned about Tfh cell biology in the interest of applying that knowledge to biomedical needs. PMID:25367570

  4. Mechanistic insights into the impact of Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma on human epithelial cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Dezest, Marlène; Chavatte, Laurent; Bourdens, Marion; Quinton, Damien; Camus, Mylène; Garrigues, Luc; Descargues, Pascal; Arbault, Stéphane; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Casteilla, Louis; Clément, Franck; Planat, Valérie; Bulteau, Anne-Laure

    2017-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma (CAPP) has potential as a new cancer therapy. However, knowledge about cellular signaling events and toxicity subsequent to plasma treatment is still poorly documented. The aim of this study was to focus on the interaction between 3 different types of plasma (He, He-O2, He-N2) and human epithelial cell lines to gain better insight into plasma-cell interaction. We provide evidence that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) are inducing cell death by apoptosis and that the proteasome, a major intracellular proteolytic system which is important for tumor cell growth and survival, is a target of (He or He-N2) CAPP. However, RONS are not the only actors involved in cell death; electric field and charged particles could play a significant role especially for He-O2 CAPP. By differential label-free quantitative proteomic analysis we found that CAPP triggers antioxidant and cellular defense but is also affecting extracellular matrix in keratinocytes. Moreover, we found that malignant cells are more resistant to CAPP treatment than normal cells. Taken together, our findings provide insight into potential mechanisms of CAPP-induced proteasome inactivation and the cellular consequences of these events. PMID:28120925

  5. Mechanistic insights into the impact of Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma on human epithelial cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezest, Marlène; Chavatte, Laurent; Bourdens, Marion; Quinton, Damien; Camus, Mylène; Garrigues, Luc; Descargues, Pascal; Arbault, Stéphane; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Casteilla, Louis; Clément, Franck; Planat, Valérie; Bulteau, Anne-Laure

    2017-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma (CAPP) has potential as a new cancer therapy. However, knowledge about cellular signaling events and toxicity subsequent to plasma treatment is still poorly documented. The aim of this study was to focus on the interaction between 3 different types of plasma (He, He-O2, He-N2) and human epithelial cell lines to gain better insight into plasma-cell interaction. We provide evidence that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) are inducing cell death by apoptosis and that the proteasome, a major intracellular proteolytic system which is important for tumor cell growth and survival, is a target of (He or He-N2) CAPP. However, RONS are not the only actors involved in cell death; electric field and charged particles could play a significant role especially for He-O2 CAPP. By differential label-free quantitative proteomic analysis we found that CAPP triggers antioxidant and cellular defense but is also affecting extracellular matrix in keratinocytes. Moreover, we found that malignant cells are more resistant to CAPP treatment than normal cells. Taken together, our findings provide insight into potential mechanisms of CAPP-induced proteasome inactivation and the cellular consequences of these events.

  6. Role of lipid rafts in neuronal differentiation of dental pulp-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Vincenzo; Santacroce, Costantino; Tasciotti, Vincenzo; Martellucci, Stefano; Santilli, Francesca; Manganelli, Valeria; Piccoli, Luca; Misasi, Roberta; Sorice, Maurizio; Garofalo, Tina

    2015-12-10

    Human dental pulp-derived stem cells (hDPSCs) are characterized by a typical fibroblast-like morphology. They express specific markers for mesenchymal stem cells and are capable of differentiation into osteoblasts, adipoblasts and neurons in vitro. Previous studies showed that gangliosides are involved in the induction of early neuronal differentiation of hDPSCs. This study was undertaken to investigate the role of lipid rafts in this process. Lipid rafts are signaling microdomains enriched in glycosphingolipids, cholesterol, tyrosine kinase receptors, mono- or heterotrimeric G proteins and GPI-anchored proteins. We preliminary showed that established cells expressed multipotent mesenchymal stromal-specific surface antigens. Then, we analyzed the distribution of lipid rafts, revealing plasma membrane microdomains with GM2 and EGF-R enrichment. Following stimulation with EGF/bFGF, neuronal differentiation was observed. To analyze the functional role of lipid rafts in EGF/bFGF-induced hDPSCs differentiation, cells were preincubated with lipid raft affecting agents, i.e. [D]-PDMP or methyl-β-cyclodextrin. These compounds significantly prevented neuronal-specific antigen expression, as well as Akt and ERK 1/2 phosphorylation, induced by EGF/bFGF, indicating that lipid raft integrity is essential for EGF/bFGF-induced hDPSCs differentiation. These results suggest that lipid rafts may represent specific chambers, where multimolecular signaling complexes, including lipids (gangliosides, cholesterol) and proteins (EGF-R), play a role in hDPSCs differentiation.

  7. Differential proteomic analysis of virus-enriched fractions obtained from plasma pools of patients with dengue fever or severe dengue.

    PubMed

    Fragnoud, Romain; Flamand, Marie; Reynier, Frederic; Buchy, Philippe; Duong, Vasna; Pachot, Alexandre; Paranhos-Baccala, Glaucia; Bedin, Frederic

    2015-11-14

    Dengue is the most widespread mosquito-borne viral disease of public health concern. In some patients, endothelial cell and platelet dysfunction lead to life-threatening hemorrhagic dengue fever or dengue shock syndrome. Prognostication of disease severity is urgently required to improve patient management. The pathogenesis of severe dengue has not been fully elucidated, and the role of host proteins associated with viral particles has received little exploration. The proteomes of virion-enriched fractions purified from plasma pools of patients with dengue fever or severe dengue were compared. Virions were purified by ultracentrifugation combined with a water-insoluble polyelectrolyte-based technique. Following in-gel hydrolysis, peptides were analyzed by nano-liquid chromatography coupled to ion trap mass spectrometry and identified using data libraries. Both dengue fever and severe dengue viral-enriched fractions contained identifiable viral envelope proteins and host cellular proteins. Canonical pathway analysis revealed the identified host proteins are mainly involved in the coagulation cascade, complement pathway or acute phase response signaling pathway. Some host proteins were over- or under-represented in plasma from patients with severe dengue compared to patients with dengue fever. ELISAs were used to validate differential expression of a selection of identified host proteins in individual plasma samples of patients with dengue fever compared to patients with severe dengue. Among 22 host proteins tested, two could differentiate between dengue fever and severe dengue in two independent cohorts (olfactomedin-4: area under the curve (AUC), 0.958; and platelet factor-4: AUC, 0.836). A novel technique of virion-enrichment from plasma has allowed to identify two host proteins that have prognostic value for classifying patients with acute dengue who are more likely to develop a severe dengue. The impact of these host proteins on pathogenicity and disease outcome

  8. A molecular switch for initiating cell differentiation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sanmartín, Maite; Sauer, Michael; Muñoz, Alfonso; Zouhar, Jan; Ordóñez, Angel; van de Ven, Wilhelmina T G; Caro, Elena; de la Paz Sánchez, María; Raikhel, Natasha V; Gutiérrez, Crisanto; Sánchez-Serrano, José J; Rojo, Enrique

    2011-06-21

    The onset of differentiation entails modifying the gene expression state of cells, to allow activation of developmental programs that are maintained repressed in the undifferentiated precursor cells [1, 2]. This requires a mechanism to change gene expression on a genome-scale. Recent evidence suggests that in mammalian stem cells, derepression of developmental regulators during differentiation involves a shift from stalled to productive elongation of their transcripts [3-5], but factors mediating this shift have not been identified and the evidence remains correlative. We report the identification of the MINIYO (IYO) gene, a positive regulator of transcriptional elongation that is essential for cells to initiate differentiation in Arabidopsis. IYO interacts with RNA polymerase II and the Elongator complex and is required to sustain global levels of transcriptional elongation activity, specifically in differentiating tissues. Accordingly, IYO is expressed in embryos, meristems, and organ primordia and not in mature tissues. Moreover, differential subcellular protein distribution further refines the domain of IYO function by directing nuclear accumulation, and thus its transcriptional activity, to cells initiating differentiation. Importantly, IYO overexpression induces premature cell differentiation and leads to meristem termination phenotypes. These findings identify IYO as a necessary and sufficient factor for initiating differentiation in Arabidopsis and suggest that the targeted nuclear accumulation of IYO functions as a transcriptional switch for this fate transition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of peptidase substrates in human plasma by FTMS based differential mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Nathan A.; Deyanova, Ekaterina G.; Geissler, Wayne; Wiener, Matthew C.; Sachs, Jeffrey R.; Wong, Kenny K.; Thornberry, Nancy A.; Sinha Roy, Ranabir; Settlage, Robert E.; Hendrickson, Ronald C.

    2007-01-01

    Approximately 2% of the human genome encodes for proteases. Unfortunately, however, the biological roles of most of these enzymes remain poorly defined, since the physiological substrates are typically unknown and are difficult to identify using traditional methods. We have developed a proteomics experiment based on FTMS profiling and differential mass spectrometry (dMS) to identify candidate endogenous substrates of proteases using fractionated human plasma as the candidate substrate pool. Here we report proof-of-concept experiments for identifying in vitro substrates of aminopeptidase P2, (APP2) and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4), a peptidase of therapeutic interest for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. For both proteases, previously validated peptide substrates spiked into the human plasma pool were identified. Of note, the differential mass spectrometry experiments also identified novel substrates for each peptidase in the subfraction of human plasma. Targeted MS/MS analysis of these peptides in the complex human plasma pool and manual confirmation of the amino acid sequences led to the identification of these substrates. The novel DPP-4 substrate EPLGRQLTSGP was chemically synthesized and cleavage kinetics were determined in an in vitro DPP-4 enzyme assay. The apparent second order rate constant (kcat/KM) for DPP-4-mediated cleavage was determined to be 2.3 x 105 M-1 s-1 confirming that this peptide is efficiently processed by the peptidase in vitro. Collectively, these results demonstrate that differential mass spectrometry has the potential to identify candidate endogenous substrates of target proteases from a human plasma pool. Importantly, knowledge of the endogenous substrates can provide useful insight into the biology of these enzymes and provides useful biomarkers for monitoring their activity in vivo.

  10. Neural stem cells: balancing self-renewal with differentiation.

    PubMed

    Doe, Chris Q

    2008-05-01

    Stem cells are captivating because they have the potential to make multiple cell types yet maintain their undifferentiated state. Recent studies of Drosophila and mammalian neural stem cells have shed light on how stem cells regulate self-renewal versus differentiation and have revealed the proteins, processes and pathways that all converge to regulate neural progenitor self-renewal. If we can better understand how stem cells balance self-renewal versus differentiation, we will significantly advance our knowledge of embryogenesis, cancer biology and brain evolution, as well as the use of stem cells for therapeutic purposes.

  11. Plasma needle: treatment of living cells and tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffels, Eva

    2003-10-01

    Non-thermal plasmas are capable of refined treatment of heat sensitive surfaces. Recently, many non-thermal sources working under atmospheric pressure have been constructed. Their main applications are various surface treatments: cleaning, etching, changing the wettability/adhesion, and bacterial decontamination. A new research at the Eindhoven University of Technology focuses on in vivo treatment by means of a novel non-thermal plasma source (the plasma needle). At present, a fundamental study has been undertaken to identify all possible responses of living objects exposed to the plasma. Plasma treatment does not lead to cell death (necrosis), which is a cause of inflammation. On the contrary, we observe various sophisticated reactions of mammalian cells, e.g. cell detachment (loss of cell contact) and programmed cell death (apoptosis). Moreover, under certain conditions the plasma is capable of killing bacteria, while eukaryotic cells remain unharmed. These findings may result in development of new techniques, like bacterial sterilization of infected (living) tissues or removal of cells without inflammatory response, and on a longer time scale to new methods in the health care. Possible applications include treatment of skin ailments, aiding wound healing and sterilization of dental cavities.

  12. B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas with Plasmacytic Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Charles M; Smith, Lauren B

    2016-03-01

    B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas with plasmacytic differentiation are a diverse group of entities with extremely variable morphologic features. Diagnostic challenges can arise in differentiating lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma from marginal zone lymphoma and other low-grade B-cell lymphomas. In addition, plasmablastic lymphomas can be difficult to distinguish from diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or other high-grade lymphomas. Judicious use of immunohistochemical studies and molecular testing can assist in appropriate classification.

  13. Differential proteomics of human seminal plasma: A potential target for searching male infertility marker proteins.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Anil Kumar; Sooch, Balwinder Singh; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita

    2012-04-01

    The clinical fertility tests, available in the market, fail to define the exact cause of male infertility in almost half of the cases and point toward a crucial need of developing better ways of infertility investigations. The protein biomarkers may help us toward better understanding of unknown cases of male infertility that, in turn, can guide us to find better therapeutic solutions. Many clinical attempts have been made to identify biomarkers of male infertility in sperm proteome but only few studies have targeted seminal plasma. Human seminal plasma is a rich source of proteins that are essentially required for development of sperm and successful fertilization. This viewpoint article highlights the importance of human seminal plasma proteome in reproductive physiology and suggests that differential proteomics integrated with functional analysis may help us in searching potential biomarkers of male infertility.

  14. Directed stem cell differentiation: the role of physical forces.

    PubMed

    Clause, Kelly C; Liu, Li J; Tobita, Kimimasa

    2010-04-01

    A number of factors contribute to the control of stem cell fate. In particular, the evidence for how physical forces control the stem cell differentiation program is now accruing. In this review, the authors discuss the types of physical forces: mechanical forces, cell shape, extracellular matrix geometry/properties, and cell-cell contacts and morphogenic factors, which evidence suggests play a role in influencing stem cell fate.

  15. Lipaemic plasma induces haemolysis in resuspended red cell concentrate.

    PubMed

    Bashir, S; Wiltshire, M; Cardigan, R; Thomas, S

    2013-04-01

    We investigated whether haemolysis in red cells suspended in plasma was affected by the lipid content and/or methylene blue (MB) treatment of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP). We also investigated whether haemolysis was affected by the conditions under which lipaemic plasma was stored. Study 1: Visibly lipaemic (n = 22) or nonlipaemic FFP (n = 24) units were thawed, pooled and split into identical pairs, one of which was MB treated. These units were used to resuspend red cell concentrates (RCC) and tested for haemolysis immediately and after 24 and 48 h of storage at 2-6°C. Study 2: Fresh plasma was aliquoted into 15-ml tubes and stored in one of four ways as follows: room temperature; 2-6°C; frozen and thawed; or twice frozen and thawed. A sample of RCC was resuspended in each of these plasmas and haemolysis measured after 2 h. Study 3: Plasma was divided into 15-ml tubes and stored as in study 2 followed by storage left standing upright in a refrigerator (2-6°C) for 24 h (with the exception of the room temperature sample). Plasma was separated into top, middle and bottom fractions and used to resuspend RCC that were assessed for haemolysis after 2 h. The levels of haemolysis in RCC were immediately greater when suspended in lipaemic plasma (0·70 ± 0·53% v 0·05 ± 0·06% for nonlipaemic plasma), which increased further on subsequent storage for 48 h (1·22 ± 0·40% v 0·15 ± 0·14% for nonlipaemic plasma). This was irrespective of whether plasma was MB treated. Lipaemic plasma stored frozen and then thawed resulted in the greatest haemolysis. In lipaemic plasma stored at 2-6°C, the chylomicron-rich top fraction caused the highest level of haemolysis. Haemolysis in red cells is increased in those suspended in lipaemic plasma and is dependent upon the storage conditions of that plasma prior to suspension. These data are relevant to the choice of plasma used to suspend red cells for neonatal exchange transfusion. © 2012 The Author(s). Vox Sanguinis © 2012

  16. Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma: stem cell transplantation methods that enhance stemness.

    PubMed

    Tobita, Morikuni; Tajima, Satoshi; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2015-11-05

    Because of their ease of isolation and relative abundance, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) are a particularly attractive autologous cell source for various therapeutic purposes. ASCs retain a high proliferation capacity in vitro and have the ability to undergo extensive differentiation into multiple cell lineages. Moreover, ASCs secrete a wide range of growth factors that can stimulate tissue regeneration. Therefore, the clinical use of ASCs is feasible. However, the potential of ASCs differs depending on the donor's medical condition, including diseases such as diabetes. Recent studies demonstrated that ASCs from diabetic donors exhibit reduced proliferative potential and a smaller proportion of stem cell marker-positive cells. Therefore, to ensure the success of regenerative medicine, tissue engineering methods must be improved by the incorporation of factors that increase the proliferation and differentiation of stem/progenitor cells when autologous cells are used. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP), which contains high levels of diverse growth factors that can stimulate stem cell proliferation and cell differentiation in the context of tissue regeneration, has recently been identified as a biological material that could be applied to tissue regeneration. Thus, co-transplantation of ASCs and PRP represents a promising novel approach for cell therapy in regenerative medicine. In this review, we describe the potential benefits of adding PRP to ASCs and preclinical and clinical studies of this approach in various medical fields. We also discuss the mechanisms of PRP action and future cell-based therapies using co-transplantation of ASCs and PRP.

  17. Procoagulant snake venoms have differential effects in animal plasmas: Implications for antivenom testing in animal models.

    PubMed

    Maduwage, Kalana P; Scorgie, Fiona E; Lincz, Lisa F; O'Leary, Margaret A; Isbister, Geoffrey K

    2016-01-01

    Animal models are used to test toxic effects of snake venoms/toxins and the antivenom required to neutralise them. However, venoms that cause clinically relevant coagulopathy in humans may have differential effects in animals. We aimed to investigate the effect of different procoagulant snake venoms on various animal plasmas. Prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen and D-dimer levels were measured in seven animal plasmas (human, rabbit, cat, guinea pig, pig, cow and rat). In vitro clotting times were then used to calculate the effective concentration (EC50) in each plasma for four snake venoms with different procoagulant toxins: Pseudonaja textilis, Daboia russelli, Echis carinatus and Calloselasma rhodostoma. Compared to human, PT and aPTT were similar for rat, rabbit and pig, but double for cat and cow, while guinea pig had similar aPTT but double PT. Fibrinogen and D-dimer levels were similar for all species. Human and rabbit plasmas had the lowest EC50 for P. textilis (0.1 and 0.4 μg/ml), D. russelli (0.4 and 0.1 μg/ml), E. carinatus (0.6 and 0.1 μg/ml) venoms respectively, while cat plasma had the lowest EC50 for C. rhodostoma (11 μg/ml) venom. Cow, rat, pig and guinea pig plasmas were highly resistant to all four venoms with EC50 10-fold that of human. Different animal plasmas have varying susceptibility to procoagulant venoms, and excepting rabbits, animal models are not appropriate to test procoagulant activity. In vitro assays on human plasma should instead be adopted for this purpose. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Effect of Spaceflight on Cartilage Cell Cycle and Differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Stephen B.; Stiner, Dalina; Telford, William G.

    2000-01-01

    In vivo studies have shown that spaceflight results in loss of bone and muscle. In an effort to understand the mechanisms of these changes, cell cultures of cartilage, bone and muscle have been subjected to spaceflight to study the microgravity effects on differentiated cells. However it now seems possible that the cell differentiation process itself may be the event(s) most affected by spaceflight. For example, osteoblast-like cells have been shown to have reduced cellular activity in microgravity due to an underdifferentiated state (Carmeliet, et al, 1997). And reduced human lymphocyte growth in spaceflight was related to increased apoptosis (Lewis, et al, 1998). Which brings us to the question of whether reduced cellular activity in space is due to an effect on the differentiated cell, an effect on the cell cycle and cell proliferation, or an effect on cell death. This question has not been specifically addressed on previous flights and was the question behind die present study.

  19. Epigenomics of T cell activation, differentiation and memory

    PubMed Central

    Cuddapah, Suresh; Barski, Artem; Zhao, Keji

    2010-01-01

    Activation of T cells is an essential step in the immunological response to infection. While activation of naïve T cells results in proliferation and slow differentiation into cytokine-producing effector cells, antigen engagement with memory cells leads to cytokine production immediately. Even though the cell surface signaling events are similar in both the cases, the outcome is different, suggesting that distinct regulatory mechanisms may exist downstream of the activation signals. Recent advances in the understanding of global epigenetic patterns in T cells have resulted in the appreciation of the role of epigenetic mechanisms in processes such as activation and differentiation. In this review we discuss recent data suggesting that naïve T cell activation, differentiation and lineage commitment results in epigenetic changes and a fine balance between different histone modifications is required. On the other hand, memory T cells are poised and do not require epigenetic changes for short-term activation. PMID:20226645

  20. Regulation of cell differentiation by Eph receptor and ephrin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, David G

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that in addition to having major roles in morphogenesis, in some tissues Eph receptor and ephrin signaling regulates the differentiation of cells. In one mode of deployment, cell contact dependent Eph-ephrin activation induces a distinct fate of cells at the interface of their expression domains, for example in early ascidian embryos and in the vertebrate hindbrain. In another mode, overlapping Eph receptor and ephrin expression underlies activation within a cell population, which promotes or inhibits cell differentiation in bone remodelling, neural progenitors and keratinocytes. Eph-ephrin activation also contributes to formation of the appropriate number of progenitor cells by increasing or decreasing cell proliferation. These multiple roles of Eph receptor and ephrin signaling may enable a coupling between morphogenesis and the differentiation and proliferation of cells. PMID:25482623

  1. Rapid Preparation of a Plasma Membrane Fraction: Western Blot Detection of Translocated Glucose Transporter 4 from Plasma Membrane of Muscle and Adipose Cells and Tissues.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Norio; Yamashita, Yoko; Yoshioka, Yasukiyo; Nishiumi, Shin; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2016-08-01

    Membrane proteins account for 70% to 80% of all pharmaceutical targets, indicating their clinical relevance and underscoring the importance of identifying differentially expressed membrane proteins that reflect distinct disease properties. The translocation of proteins from the bulk of the cytosol to the plasma membrane is a critical step in the transfer of information from membrane-embedded receptors or transporters to the cell interior. To understand how membrane proteins work, it is important to separate the membrane fraction of cells. This unit provides a protocol for rapidly obtaining plasma membrane fractions for western blot analysis. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Id2 reinforces TH1 cell differentiation and inhibits E2A to repress TFH cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Laura A.; Bélanger, Simon; Omilusik, Kyla D.; Cho, Sunglim; Scott-Browne, James P.; Nance, J. Philip; Goulding, John; Lasorella, Anna; Lu, Li-Fan; Crotty, Shane; Goldrath, Ananda W.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation of T helper (TH) effector subsets is critical for host protection. E protein transcription factors and Id proteins are important arbiters of T cell development, but their role in differentiation of TH1 and TFH cells is not well understood. TH1 cells showed robust Id2 expression compared to TFH cells, and RNAi depletion of Id2 increased TFH cell frequencies. Further, TH1 cell differentiation was blocked by Id2 deficiency, leading to E protein-dependent accumulation of effector cells with mixed characteristics during viral infection and severely impaired generation of TH1 cells following Toxoplasma gondii infection. The TFH-defining transcriptional repressor Bcl6 bound the Id2 locus, providing a mechanism for the bimodal Id2 expression and reciprocal development of TH1 and TFH cell fates. PMID:27213691

  3. Hypercholesterolemia Induces Differentiation of Regulatory T Cells in the Liver.

    PubMed

    Mailer, Reiner K W; Gisterå, Anton; Polyzos, Konstantinos A; Ketelhuth, Daniel F J; Hansson, Göran K

    2017-05-26

    The liver is the central organ that responds to dietary cholesterol intake and facilitates the release and clearance of lipoprotein particles. Persistent hypercholesterolemia leads to immune responses against lipoprotein particles that drive atherosclerosis. However, the effect of hypercholesterolemia on hepatic T-cell differentiation remains unknown. To investigate hepatic T-cell subsets upon hypercholesterolemia. We observed that hypercholesterolemia elevated the intrahepatic regulatory T (Treg) cell population and increased the expression of transforming growth factor-β1 in the liver. Adoptive transfer experiments revealed that intrahepatically differentiated Treg cells relocated to the inflamed aorta in atherosclerosis-prone low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient (Ldlr(-/-)) mice. Moreover, hypercholesterolemia induced the differentiation of intrahepatic, but not intrasplenic, Th17 cells in wild-type mice, whereas the disrupted liver homeostasis in hypercholesterolemic Ldlr(-/-) mice led to intrahepatic Th1 cell differentiation and CD11b(+)CD11c(+) leukocyte accumulation. Our results elucidate a new mechanism that controls intrahepatic T-cell differentiation during atherosclerosis development and indicates that intrahepatically differentiated T cells contribute to the CD4(+) T-cell pool in the atherosclerotic aorta. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Fibronectin and stem cell differentiation – lessons from chondrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Purva; Schwarzbauer, Jean E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The extracellular matrix (ECM) is an intricate network of proteins that surrounds cells and has a central role in establishing an environment that is conducive to tissue-specific cell functions. In the case of stem cells, this environment is the stem cell niche, where ECM signals participate in cell fate decisions. In this Commentary, we describe how changes in ECM composition and mechanical properties can affect cell shape and stem cell differentiation. Using chondrogenic differentiation as a model, we examine the changes in the ECM that occur before and during mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. In particular, we focus on the main ECM protein fibronectin, its temporal expression pattern during chondrogenic differentiation, its potential effects on functions of differentiating chondrocytes, and how its interactions with other ECM components might affect cartilage development. Finally, we discuss data that support the possibility that the fibronectin matrix has an instructive role in directing cells through the condensation, proliferation and/or differentiation stages of cartilage formation. PMID:22976308

  5. Quantitative phosphoproteome analysis of embryonic stem cell differentiation toward blood

    PubMed Central

    Piazzi, Manuela; Williamson, Andrew; Lee, Chia-Fang; Pearson, Stella; Lacaud, Georges; Kouskoff, Valerie; McCubrey, James A.; Cocco, Lucio; Whetton, Anthony D.

    2015-01-01

    Murine embryonic stem (ES) cells can differentiate in vitro into three germ layers (endodermic, mesodermic, ectodermic). Studies on the differentiation of these cells to specific early differentiation stages has been aided by an ES cell line carrying the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) targeted to the Brachyury (Bry) locus which marks mesoderm commitment. Furthermore, expression of the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor receptor 2 (Flk1) along with Bry defines hemangioblast commitment. Isobaric-tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQTM) and phosphopeptide enrichment coupled to liquid chromatography separation and mass spectrometry allow the study of phosphorylation changes occurring at different stages of ES cell development using Bry and Flk1 expression respectively. We identified and relatively quantified 37 phosphoentities which are modulated during mesoderm-induced ES cells differentiation, comparing epiblast-like, early mesoderm and hemangioblast-enriched cells. Among the proteins differentially phosphorylated toward mesoderm differentiation were: the epigenetic regulator Dnmt3b, the protein kinase GSK3b, the chromatin remodeling factor Smarcc1, the transcription factor Utf1; as well as protein specifically related to stem cell differentiation, as Eomes, Hmga2, Ints1 and Rif1. As most key factors regulating early hematopoietic development have also been implicated in various types of leukemia, understanding the post-translational modifications driving their regulation during normal development could result in a better comprehension of their roles during abnormal hematopoiesis in leukemia. PMID:25890499

  6. Cisplatin impaired adipogenic differentiation of adipose mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Hsun; Liu, Hwan-Wun; Chu, Tang-Yuan; Wen, Yao-Tseng; Ding, Dah-Ching

    2017-02-03

    Adipose mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) were isolated from the adipose tissue and can be induced in vitro to differentiate into osteoblasts, chondroblasts, myocytes, neurons and other cell types. Cisplatin is a commonly used chemotherapy drug for cancer patients. However, the effects of cisplatin on ASC remain elusive. This study found that high-concentration cisplatin affects the viability of ASCs. First, IC50 concentration of cisplatin was evaluated. Proliferation of ASCs assessed by XTT method decreased immediately after cisplatin treatment with various concentrations. ASCs maintained mesenchymal stem cells surface markers evaluating by flow cytometry after cisplatin treatment. Upon differentiation by adding specific chemicals, a significant decrease in adipogenic differentiation (by Oil red staining) and osteogenic differentiation (by Alizarin red staining), and significant chondrogenic differentiation (by Alcian blue staining) were found after cisplatin treatment. Simultaneously, qRT-PCR was also used for evaluating the specific gene expressions after various differentiations. Finally, ASCs from one donor who had received cisplatin showed significantly decreased adipogenic differentiation but increased osteogenic differentiation compared with ASCs derived from one healthy donor. In conclusion, cisplatin affects the viability, proliferation, and differentiation of ASCs both in vitro and in vivo via certain signaling pathway such as p53 and Fas/FasL. The differentiation abilities of ASCs should be evaluated before their transplantation for repairing cisplatin-induced tissue damage.

  7. Role of Hox genes in stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Anne; Werheid, David F; Knapp, Silvana M; Tobiasch, Edda

    2015-04-26

    Hox genes are an evolutionary highly conserved gene family. They determine the anterior-posterior body axis in bilateral organisms and influence the developmental fate of cells. Embryonic stem cells are usually devoid of any Hox gene expression, but these transcription factors are activated in varying spatial and temporal patterns defining the development of various body regions. In the adult body, Hox genes are among others responsible for driving the differentiation of tissue stem cells towards their respective lineages in order to repair and maintain the correct function of tissues and organs. Due to their involvement in the embryonic and adult body, they have been suggested to be useable for improving stem cell differentiations in vitro and in vivo. In many studies Hox genes have been found as driving factors in stem cell differentiation towards adipogenesis, in lineages involved in bone and joint formation, mainly chondrogenesis and osteogenesis, in cardiovascular lineages including endothelial and smooth muscle cell differentiations, and in neurogenesis. As life expectancy is rising, the demand for tissue reconstruction continues to increase. Stem cells have become an increasingly popular choice for creating therapies in regenerative medicine due to their self-renewal and differentiation potential. Especially mesenchymal stem cells are used more and more frequently due to their easy handling and accessibility, combined with a low tumorgenicity and little ethical concerns. This review therefore intends to summarize to date known correlations between natural Hox gene expression patterns in body tissues and during the differentiation of various stem cells towards their respective lineages with a major focus on mesenchymal stem cell differentiations. This overview shall help to understand the complex interactions of Hox genes and differentiation processes all over the body as well as in vitro for further improvement of stem cell treatments in future regenerative

  8. Role of Hox genes in stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Anne; Werheid, David F; Knapp, Silvana M; Tobiasch, Edda

    2015-01-01

    Hox genes are an evolutionary highly conserved gene family. They determine the anterior-posterior body axis in bilateral organisms and influence the developmental fate of cells. Embryonic stem cells are usually devoid of any Hox gene expression, but these transcription factors are activated in varying spatial and temporal patterns defining the development of various body regions. In the adult body, Hox genes are among others responsible for driving the differentiation of tissue stem cells towards their respective lineages in order to repair and maintain the correct function of tissues and organs. Due to their involvement in the embryonic and adult body, they have been suggested to be useable for improving stem cell differentiations in vitro and in vivo. In many studies Hox genes have been found as driving factors in stem cell differentiation towards adipogenesis, in lineages involved in bone and joint formation, mainly chondrogenesis and osteogenesis, in cardiovascular lineages including endothelial and smooth muscle cell differentiations, and in neurogenesis. As life expectancy is rising, the demand for tissue reconstruction continues to increase. Stem cells have become an increasingly popular choice for creating therapies in regenerative medicine due to their self-renewal and differentiation potential. Especially mesenchymal stem cells are used more and more frequently due to their easy handling and accessibility, combined with a low tumorgenicity and little ethical concerns. This review therefore intends to summarize to date known correlations between natural Hox gene expression patterns in body tissues and during the differentiation of various stem cells towards their respective lineages with a major focus on mesenchymal stem cell differentiations. This overview shall help to understand the complex interactions of Hox genes and differentiation processes all over the body as well as in vitro for further improvement of stem cell treatments in future regenerative

  9. Effects of Non-Thermal Plasma on Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalghatgi, Sameer; Kelly, Crystal M.; Cerchar, Ekaterina; Torabi, Behzad; Alekseev, Oleg; Fridman, Alexander; Friedman, Gary; Azizkhan-Clifford, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Thermal plasmas and lasers have been widely used in medicine to cut, ablate and cauterize tissues through heating; in contrast, non-thermal plasma produces no heat, so its effects can be selective. In order to exploit the potential for clinical applications, including wound healing, sterilization, blood coagulation, and cancer treatment, a mechanistic understanding of the interaction of non-thermal plasma with living tissues is required. Using mammalian cells in culture, it is shown here that non-thermal plasma created by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) has dose-dependent effects that range from increasing cell proliferation to inducing apoptosis. It is also shown that these effects are primarily due to formation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). We have utilized γ-H2AX to detect DNA damage induced by non-thermal plasma and found that it is initiated by production of active neutral species that most likely induce formation of organic peroxides in cell medium. Phosphorylation of H2AX following non-thermal plasma treatment is ATR dependent and ATM independent, suggesting that plasma treatment may lead to replication arrest or formation of single-stranded DNA breaks; however, plasma does not lead to formation of bulky adducts/thymine dimers. PMID:21283714

  10. Evaluation of osteoinductive and endothelial differentiation potential of Platelet-Rich Plasma incorporated Gelatin-Nanohydroxyapatite Fibrous Matrix.

    PubMed

    J, Anjana; Kuttappan, Shruthy; Keyan, Kripa S; Nair, Manitha B

    2016-05-01

    In this study, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) was incorporated into gelatin-nanohydroxyapatite fibrous scaffold in two forms (PRP gel as coating on the scaffold [PCSC] and PRP powder within the scaffold [PCSL] and investigated for (a) growth factor release; (b) stability of scaffold at different temperature; (c) stability of scaffold before and after ETO sterilization; and (d) osteogenic and endothelial differentiation potential using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). PCSC demonstrated a high and burst growth factor release initially followed by a gradual reduction in its concentration, while