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Sample records for plasma cells age-associated

  1. Circulating human B and plasma cells. Age-associated changes in counts and detailed characterization of circulating normal CD138− and CD138+ plasma cells

    PubMed Central

    Caraux, Anouk; Klein, Bernard; Paiva, Bruno; Bret, Caroline; Schmitz, Alexander; Fuhler, Gwenny M.; Bos, Nico A.; Johnsen, Hans E; Orfao, Alberto; Perez-Andres, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Generation of B and plasma cells involves several organs with a necessary cell trafficking between them. A detailed phenotypic characterization of four circulating B-cell subsets (immature-, naïve-, memory- B-lymphocytes and plasma cells) of 106 healthy adults was realized by multiparametric flow cytometry. We show that CD10, CD27 and CD38 is the minimal combination of subsetting markers allowing unequivocal identification of immature (CD10+CD27−CD38+, 6±6 cells/μL), naïve (CD10−CD27−CD38−, 125±90 cells/μL), memory B lymphocytes (CD10−CD27+CD38−, 58±42 cells/μL), and plasma cells (CD10−CD27++CD38++, 2.1±2.1 cells/μL) within circulating CD19+ cells. From these four subsets, only memory B lymphocytes and plasma cells decreased with age, both in relative and absolute counts. Circulating plasma cells split into CD138− (57±12%) and CD138+ (43±12%) cells, the latter displaying a more mature phenotypic profile: absence of surface immunoglobulin, lower CD45 positivity and higher amounts of cytoplasmic immunoglobulin, CD38 and CD27. Unlike B lymphocytes, both populations of plasma cells are KI-67+ and show weak CXCR4 expression. PMID:20081059

  2. Osteopontin attenuates aging-associated phenotypes of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guidi, Novella; Sacma, Mehmet; Ständker, Ludger; Soller, Karin; Marka, Gina; Eiwen, Karina; Weiss, Johannes M; Kirchhoff, Frank; Weil, Tanja; Cancelas, Jose A; Florian, Maria Carolina; Geiger, Hartmut

    2017-04-03

    Upon aging, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) undergo changes in function and structure, including skewing to myeloid lineages, lower reconstitution potential and loss of protein polarity. While stem cell intrinsic mechanisms are known to contribute to HSC aging, little is known on whether age-related changes in the bone marrow niche regulate HSC aging. Upon aging, the expression of osteopontin (OPN) in the murine bone marrow stroma is reduced. Exposure of young HSCs to an OPN knockout niche results in a decrease in engraftment, an increase in long-term HSC frequency and loss of stem cell polarity. Exposure of aged HSCs to thrombin-cleaved OPN attenuates aging of old HSCs, resulting in increased engraftment, decreased HSC frequency, increased stem cell polarity and a restored balance of lymphoid and myeloid cells in peripheral blood. Thus, our data suggest a critical role for reduced stroma-derived OPN for HSC aging and identify thrombin-cleaved OPN as a novel niche informed therapeutic approach for ameliorating HSC phenotypes associated with aging. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  3. Aging-associated inflammation promotes selection for adaptive oncogenic events in B cell progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Curtis J.; Casás-Selves, Matias; Kim, Jihye; Zaberezhnyy, Vadym; Aghili, Leila; Daniel, Ashley E.; Jimenez, Linda; Azam, Tania; McNamee, Eoin N.; Clambey, Eric T.; Klawitter, Jelena; Serkova, Natalie J.; Tan, Aik Choon; Dinarello, Charles A.; DeGregori, James

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of cancer is higher in the elderly; however, many of the underlying mechanisms for this association remain unexplored. Here, we have shown that B cell progenitors in old mice exhibit marked signaling, gene expression, and metabolic defects. Moreover, B cell progenitors that developed from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) transferred from young mice into aged animals exhibited similar fitness defects. We further demonstrated that ectopic expression of the oncogenes BCR-ABL, NRASV12, or Myc restored B cell progenitor fitness, leading to selection for oncogenically initiated cells and leukemogenesis specifically in the context of an aged hematopoietic system. Aging was associated with increased inflammation in the BM microenvironment, and induction of inflammation in young mice phenocopied aging-associated B lymphopoiesis. Conversely, a reduction of inflammation in aged mice via transgenic expression of α-1-antitrypsin or IL-37 preserved the function of B cell progenitors and prevented NRASV12-mediated oncogenesis. We conclude that chronic inflammatory microenvironments in old age lead to reductions in the fitness of B cell progenitor populations. This reduced progenitor pool fitness engenders selection for cells harboring oncogenic mutations, in part due to their ability to correct aging-associated functional defects. Thus, modulation of inflammation — a common feature of aging — has the potential to limit aging-associated oncogenesis. PMID:26551682

  4. Age-associated changes in the ecological niche: implications for mesenchymal stem cell aging.

    PubMed

    Asumda, Faizal Z

    2013-05-14

    Adult stem cells are critical for organ-specific regeneration and self-renewal with advancing age. The prospect of being able to reverse tissue-specific post-injury sequelae by harvesting, culturing and transplanting a patient's own stem and progenitor cells is exciting. Mesenchymal stem cells have emerged as a reliable stem cell source for this treatment modality and are currently being tested in numerous ongoing clinical trials. Unfortunately, the fervor over mesenchymal stem cells is mitigated by several lines of evidence suggesting that their efficacy is limited by natural aging. This article discusses the mechanisms and manifestations of age-associated deficiencies in mesenchymal stem cell efficacy. A consideration of recent experimental findings suggests that the ecological niche might be responsible for mesenchymal stem cell aging.

  5. Age-associated changes in the ecological niche: implications for mesenchymal stem cell aging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Adult stem cells are critical for organ-specific regeneration and self-renewal with advancing age. The prospect of being able to reverse tissue-specific post-injury sequelae by harvesting, culturing and transplanting a patient’s own stem and progenitor cells is exciting. Mesenchymal stem cells have emerged as a reliable stem cell source for this treatment modality and are currently being tested in numerous ongoing clinical trials. Unfortunately, the fervor over mesenchymal stem cells is mitigated by several lines of evidence suggesting that their efficacy is limited by natural aging. This article discusses the mechanisms and manifestations of age-associated deficiencies in mesenchymal stem cell efficacy. A consideration of recent experimental findings suggests that the ecological niche might be responsible for mesenchymal stem cell aging. PMID:23673056

  6. The promise of human embryonic stem cells in aging-associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Yabut, Odessa; Bernstein, Harold S

    2011-05-01

    Aging-associated diseases are often caused by progressive loss or dysfunction of cells that ultimately affect the overall function of tissues and organs. Successful treatment of these diseases could benefit from cell-based therapy that would regenerate lost cells or otherwise restore tissue function. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) promise to be an important therapeutic candidate in treating aging-associated diseases due to their unique capacity for self-renewal and pluripotency. To date, there are numerous hESC lines that have been developed and characterized. We will discuss how hESC lines are derived, their molecular and cellular properties, and how their ability to differentiate into all three embryonic germ layers is determined. We will also outline the methods currently employed to direct their differentiation into populations of tissue-specific, functional cells. Finally, we will highlight the general challenges that must be overcome and the strategies being developed to generate highly-purified hESC-derived cell populations that can safely be used for clinical applications.

  7. Involvement of blood mononuclear cells in the infertility, age-associated diseases and cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bukovsky, Antonin

    2016-01-01

    Blood mononuclear cells consist of T cells and monocyte derived cells. Beside immunity, the blood mononuclear cells belong to the complex tissue control system (TCS), where they exhibit morphostatic function by stimulating proliferation of tissue stem cells followed by cellular differentiation, that is stopped after attaining the proper functional stage, which differs among various tissue types. Therefore, the term immune and morphostatic system (IMS) should be implied. The TCS-mediated morphostasis also consists of vascular pericytes controlled by autonomic innervation, which is regulating the quantity of distinct tissues in vivo. Lack of proper differentiation of tissue cells by TCS causes either tissue underdevelopment, e.g., muscular dystrophy, or degenerative functional failures, e.g., type 1 diabetes and age-associated diseases. With the gradual IMS regression after 35 years of age the gonadal infertility develops, followed by a growing incidence of age-associated diseases and cancers. Without restoring an altered TCS function in a degenerative disease, the implantation of tissue-specific stem cells alone by regenerative medicine can not be successful. Transfused young blood could temporarily restore fertility to enable parenthood. The young blood could also temporarily alleviate aging diseases, and this can be extended by substances inducing IMS regeneration, like the honey bee propolis. The local and/or systemic use of honey bee propolis stopped hair and teeth loss, regressed varicose veins, improved altered hearing, and lowered high blood pressure and sugar levels. Complete regression of stage IV ovarian cancer with liver metastases after a simple elaborated immunotherapy is also reported. PMID:28074124

  8. Age-associated changes in regenerative capabilities of mesenchymal stem cell: impact on chronic wounds repair.

    PubMed

    Yao, Bin; Huang, Sha; Gao, Dongyun; Xie, Jiangfan; Liu, Nanbo; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represent an ideal source of autologous cell-based therapy for chronic wounds. Functional characteristics of MSCs may benefit wound healing by exerting their multi-regenerative potential. However, cell ageing resulting from chronic degenerative diseases or donor age could cause inevitable effects on the regenerative abilities of MSCs. A variety of studies have shown the relationship between MSC ageing and age-related dysfunction, but few associate these age-related impacts on MSCs with their ability of repairing chronic wounds, which are common in the elderly population. Here, we discuss the age-associated changes of MSCs and describe the potential impacts on MSC-based therapy for chronic wounds. Furthermore, critical evaluation of the current literatures is necessary for understanding the underlying mechanisms of MSC ageing and raising the corresponding concerns on considering their possible use for chronic wound repair. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Clonal reversal of ageing-associated stem cell lineage bias via a pluripotent intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Wahlestedt, Martin; Erlandsson, Eva; Kristiansen, Trine; Lu, Rong; Brakebusch, Cord; Weissman, Irving L.; Yuan, Joan; Martin-Gonzalez, Javier; Bryder, David

    2017-01-01

    Ageing associates with significant alterations in somatic/adult stem cells and therapies to counteract these might have profound benefits for health. In the blood, haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) ageing is linked to several functional shortcomings. However, besides the recent realization that individual HSCs might be preset differentially already from young age, HSCs might also age asynchronously. Evaluating the prospects for HSC rejuvenation therefore ultimately requires approaching those HSCs that are functionally affected by age. Here we combine genetic barcoding of aged murine HSCs with the generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. This allows us to specifically focus on aged HSCs presenting with a pronounced lineage skewing, a hallmark of HSC ageing. Functional and molecular evaluations reveal haematopoiesis from these iPS clones to be indistinguishable from that associating with young mice. Our data thereby provide direct support to the notion that several key functional attributes of HSC ageing can be reversed. PMID:28224997

  10. Diminished Schwann cell repair responses underlie age-associated impaired axonal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Michio W.; Brosius Lutz, Amanda; Cheng, Yung-Chih; Latremoliere, Alban; Duong, Kelly; Miller, Christine M.; Posada, Sean; Cobos, Enrique J.; Zhang, Alice X.; Wagers, Amy J.; Havton, Leif A.; Barres, Ben; Omura, Takao

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The regenerative capacity of the peripheral nervous system declines with age. Why this occurs, however, is unknown. We demonstrate that 24-month old mice exhibit an impairment of functional recovery after nerve injury compared to 2-month old animals. We find no difference in the intrinsic growth capacity between aged and young sensory neurons in vitro nor in their ability to activate growth-associated transcriptional programs after injury. Instead, using age-mismatched nerve transplants in vivo, we show that the extent of functional recovery depends on the age of the nerve graft, and not the age of the host. Molecular interrogation of the sciatic nerve reveals that aged Schwann cells (SCs) fail to rapidly activate a transcriptional repair program after injury. Functionally, aged SCs exhibit impaired de-differentiation, myelin clearance and macrophage recruitment. These results suggest that the age-associated decline in axonal regeneration results from diminished Schwann cell plasticity, leading to slower myelin clearance. PMID:25033179

  11. Age-associated B cells (ABC) inhibit B lymphopoiesis and alter antibody repertoires in old age.

    PubMed

    Riley, Richard L; Khomtchouk, Kelly; Blomberg, Bonnie B

    2017-04-26

    With old age (∼2y old), mice show substantial differences in B cell composition within the lymphoid tissues. In particular, a novel subset of IgM(+) CD21/35(lo/-) CD23(-) mature B cells, the age-associated B cells or ABC, increases numerically and proportionately. This occurs at the expense of other B cell subsets, including B2 follicular B cells in spleen and recirculating primary B cells in bone marrow. Our studies suggest that ABC have a distinctive antibody repertoire, as evidenced by relatively high reactivity to the self-antigens phosphorylcholine (PC) and malondialdehyde (MDA). While PC and MDA are found on apoptotic cells and oxidized lipoproteins, antibodies to these antigens are also cross-reactive with epitopes on bacterial species. In old mice, ABC express TNFα and are pro-inflammatory. ABC can inhibit growth and/or survival in pro-B cells as well as common lymphoid progenitors (CLP). In particular, ABC cause apoptosis in pro-B cells with relatively high levels of the surrogate light chain (SLC) and, consequently, promote an "SLC low" pathway of B cell differentiation in old mice. SLC together with μ heavy chain comprises the pre-B cell receptor (preBCR) critical for pre-B cell expansion and selection of the μ heavy chain Vh repertoire. The low level of SLC likely impairs normal preBCR driven proliferation and alters μ heavy chain Vh selection thereby affecting the antibody specificities of new B cells. In this manner, ABC may contribute to both qualitative and quantitative disruptions of normal B lymphopoiesis in old age. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Deficiency and supplementation of PUFA in the diet have similar effects on the age-associated changes in rat-plasma cholesterol levels.

    PubMed

    Straniero, Sara; Cavallini, Gabriella; Donati, Alessio; Metelli, Maria Rita; Tamburini, Ilaria; Pietrini, Pietro; Bergamini, Ettore

    2008-12-01

    Levels of plasma cholesterol, particularly LDL cholesterol, increase with increasing age in humans and rodents. Feeding a fish oil-rich diet may exert hypocholesterolemic effects. The aim of this work was to examine the effects of a life-long administration of a PUFA-enriched diet and of a PUFA-deficient diet in male Sprague-Dawley rats on the age-associated increases in plasma cholesterol and triglycerides. Diet had small effects on body-weight, and had dramatic effects on liver phospholipids-fatty acids. Surprisingly, both diets counteracted the age-associated changes in plasma cholesterol and triglycerides similarly and benefits were already visible in adult rats.

  13. In Senescence, Age-associated B Cells (ABC) Secrete TNFα and Inhibit Survival of B Cell Precursors1

    PubMed Central

    Ratliff, Michelle; Alter, Sarah; Frasca, Daniela; Blomberg, Bonnie B.; Riley, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Aged mice exhibit ~ 5-10 fold increases in an ordinarily minor CD21/35− CD23− mature B cell subset termed age-associated B cells (ABC). ABC from old, but not young, mice induce apoptosis in pro-B cells directly through secretion of TNFα. In addition, aged ABC, via TNFα, stimulate bone marrow cells to suppress pro-B cell growth. ABC effects can be prevented by the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Notably, CD21/35+ CD23+ follicular (FO) splenic and FO-like recirculating bone marrow B cells in both young and aged mice contain a subpopulation which produces IL-10. Unlike young adult FO B cells, old FO B cells also produce TNFα; however, secretion of IL-10 within this B cell population ameliorates the TNFα-mediated effects on B cell precursors. Loss of B cell precursors in the bone marrow of old mice in vivo was significantly associated with increased ABC relative to recirculating FO-like B cells. Adoptive transfer of aged ABC into RAG-2 KO recipients resulted in significant losses of pro-B cells within the bone marrow. These results suggest that alterations in B cell composition during old age, in particular the increase in ABC within the B cell compartments contribute to a pro-inflammatory environment within the bone marrow. This provides a mechanism of inappropriate B cell “feedback” which promotes down-regulation of B lymphopoiesis in old age. PMID:23410004

  14. Aging-associated B7-DC+ B cells enhance anti-tumor immunity via Th1 and Th17 induction.

    PubMed

    Tomihara, Kei; Shin, Takako; Hurez, Vincent J; Yagita, Hideo; Pardoll, Drew M; Zhang, Bin; Curiel, Tyler J; Shin, Tahiro

    2012-02-01

    Because most patients with cancer are aged and because immunological functions are altered during aging, it is important to account for aging-associated immunological alterations in the design of new cancer immunotherapies. We thus compared immune populations in young and aged mice and found that B7-DC(+) (PD-L2/CD273) B cells, a minor population in young mice, were significantly increased in aged mice. Induction of both Th1 and Th17 cells was significantly augmented by B7-DC(+) B cells from aged mice, and this effect was blocked with anti-B7-DC antibodies in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, retardation of tumor growth in aged mice was largely B7-DC dependent. Tumor growth in young mice was significantly inhibited by immunization with B7-DC(+) B cells from aged mice owing to increased induction of tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. These data indicate that B7-DC(+) B cells could play an important role in aging-associated cancer immunopathology as well as in other aging-associated diseases and further suggest that B7-DC(+) B cells have potential for future cancer immunotherapy.

  15. Endothelial Cell Senescence Increases Traction Forces due to Age-Associated Changes in the Glycocalyx and SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Tracy M; Yan, Jessica B; Fu, Justin J; Huang, Jianyong; Yuan, Fan; Truskey, George A

    2015-03-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) aging and senescence are key events in atherogenesis and cardiovascular disease development. Age-associated changes in the local mechanical environment of blood vessels have also been linked to atherosclerosis. However, the extent to which cell senescence affects mechanical forces generated by the cell is unclear. In this study, we sought to determine whether EC senescence increases traction forces through age-associated changes in the glycocalyx and antioxidant regulator deacetylase Sirtuin1 (SIRT1), which is downregulated during aging. Traction forces were higher in cells that had undergone more population doublings and changes in traction force were associated with altered actin localization. Older cells also had increased actin filament thickness. Depletion of heparan sulfate in young ECs elevated traction forces and actin filament thickness, while addition of heparan sulfate to the surface of aged ECs by treatment with angiopoietin-1 had the opposite effect. While inhibition of SIRT1 had no significant effect on traction forces or actin organization for young cells, activation of SIRT1 did reduce traction forces and increase peripheral actin in aged ECs. These results show that EC senescence increases traction forces and alters actin localization through changes to SIRT1 and the glycocalyx.

  16. Chronic stress induces ageing-associated degeneration in rat Leydig cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei-Fei; Wang, Qian; Chen, Yong; Lin, Qiang; Gao, Hui-Bao; Zhang, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that stress and ageing exert inhibitory effects on rat Leydig cells. In a pattern similar to the normal process of Leydig cell ageing, stress-mediated increases in glucocorticoid levels inhibit steroidogenic enzyme expression that then results in decreased testosterone secretion. We hypothesized that chronic stress accelerates the degenerative changes associated with ageing in Leydig cells. To test this hypothesis, we established a model of chronic stress to evaluate stress-induced morphological and functional alterations in Brown Norway rat Leydig cells; additionally, intracellular lipofuscin levels, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and DNA damage were assessed. The results showed that chronic stress accelerated ageing-related changes: ultrastructural alterations associated with ageing, cellular lipofuscin accumulation, increased ROS levels and more extensive DNA damage were observed. Additionally, testosterone levels were decreased. This study sheds new light on the idea that chronic stress contributes to the degenerative changes associated with ageing in rat Leydig cells in vivo. PMID:22609820

  17. Effects of Abies sibirica terpenes on cancer- and aging-associated pathways in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Lipatova, Anastasiya; Alekseev, Boris; Maganova, Faniya; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Fedorova, Maria; Snezhkina, Anastasiya; Moskalev, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    A large number of terpenoids exhibit potential geroprotector and anti-cancer properties. Here, we studied whole transcriptomic effects of Abisil, the extract of fir (Abies sibirica) terpenes, on normal and cancer cell lines. We used early passaged and senescent none-immortalized fibroblasts as cellular aging models. It was revealed that in normal fibroblasts, terpenes induced genes of stress response, apoptosis regulation and tissue regeneration. The restoration of the expression level of some prolongevity genes after fir extract treatment was shown in old cells. In Caco-2 and AsPC-1 cancer cell lines, Abisil induced expression of both onco-suppressors (members of GADD45, DUSP, and DDIT gene families), and proto-oncogenes (c-Myc, c-Jun, EGR and others). Thus, the study demonstrates the potential anti-aging and anti-cancer effects of Abisil on senescent and cancer cell lines. PMID:27888805

  18. Age-associated Epstein–Barr virus-specific T cell responses in seropositive healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas Sierra, D; Vélez Colmenares, G; Orfao de Matos, A; Fiorentino Gómez, S; Quijano Gómez, S M

    2014-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is present in 95% of the world's adult population. The immune response participates in immune vigilance and persistent infection control, and this condition is maintained by both a good quality (functionality) and quantity of specific T cells throughout life. In the present study, we evaluated EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte responses in seropositive healthy individuals younger and older than 50 years of age. The assessment comprised the frequency, phenotype, functionality and clonotypic distribution of T lymphocytes. We found that in both age groups a similar EBV-specific T cell response was found, with overlapping numbers of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α+ T lymphocytes (CD4+ and CD8+) within the memory and effector cell compartments, in addition to monofunctional and multi-functional T cells producing interleukin (IL)-2 and/or interferon (IFN)-γ. However, individuals aged more than 50 years showed significantly higher frequencies of IL-2-producing CD4+ T lymphocytes in association with greater production of soluble IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-6 than subjects younger than 50 years. A polyclonal T cell receptor (TCR)-variable beta region (Vβ) repertoire exists in both age groups under basal conditions and in response to EBV; the major TCR families found in TNF-α+/CD4+ T lymphocytes were Vβ1, Vβ2, Vβ17 and Vβ22 in both age groups, and the major TCR family in TNF-α+/CD8+ T cells was Vβ13·1 for individuals younger than 50 years and Vβ9 for individuals aged more than 50 years. Our findings suggest that the EBV-specific T cell response (using a polyclonal stimulation model) is distributed throughout several T cell differentiation compartments in an age-independent manner and includes both monofunctional and multi-functional T lymphocytes. PMID:24666437

  19. The Citrus Flavanone Naringenin Protects Myocardial Cells against Age-Associated Damage

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Barbara; Cavallini, Chiara; Testai, Lara; Martelli, Alma; Calderone, Vincenzo; Martini, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the health-promoting effects of the citrus flavanone naringenin have been examined. The results have provided evidence for the modulation of some key mechanisms involved in cellular damage by this compound. In particular, naringenin has been revealed to have protective properties such as an antioxidant effect in cardiometabolic disorders. Very recently, beneficial effects of naringenin have been demonstrated in old rats. Because aging has been demonstrated to be directly related to the occurrence of cardiac disorders, in the present study, the ability of naringenin to prevent cardiac cell senescence was investigated. For this purpose, a cellular model of senescent myocardial cells was set up and evaluated using colorimetric, fluorimetric, and immunometric techniques. Relevant cellular senescence markers, such as X-gal staining, cell cycle regulator levels, and the percentage of cell cycle-arrested cells, were found to be reduced in the presence of naringenin. In addition, cardiac markers of aging-induced damage, including radical oxidative species levels, mitochondrial metabolic activity, mitochondrial calcium buffer capacity, and estrogenic signaling functions, were also modulated by the compound. These results suggested that naringenin has antiaging effects on myocardial cells. PMID:28386313

  20. "Angular" plasma cell cheilitis.

    PubMed

    da Cunha Filho, Roberto Rheingantz; Tochetto, Lucas Baldissera; Tochetto, Bruno Baldissera; de Almeida, Hiram Larangeira; Lorencette, Nádia Aparecida; Netto, José Fillus

    2014-03-17

    Plasma cell cheilitis is an extremely rare disease, characterized by erythematous-violaceous, ulcerated and asymptomatic plaques, which evolve slowly. The histological characteristics include dermal infiltrate composed of mature plasmocytes. We report a case of Plasma cell angular cheilitis in a 58-year-old male, localized in the lateral oral commissure.

  1. [Acute plasma cell leukemia].

    PubMed

    Monsalbe, V; Domíngues, C; Roa, I; Busel, D; González, S

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Cell Leukemia is a very rare form of plasmocytic dyscrasia, whose clinical and pathological characteristics warrant its recognition as a distinct subentity. We report the case of a 60 years old man who presented a rapidly fatal acute plasma cell leukemia, with multiple osteolytic lesions, hipercalcemia, renal and cardiac failure.

  2. In vivo and in vitro analysis of age-associated changes and somatic cellular senescence in renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Berkenkamp, Birgit; Susnik, Nathan; Baisantry, Arpita; Kuznetsova, Inna; Jacobi, Christoph; Sörensen-Zender, Inga; Broecker, Verena; Haller, Hermann; Melk, Anette; Schmitt, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a major clinical problem and advanced age is associated with ineffective renal regeneration and poor functional outcome. Data from kidney injury models suggest that a loss of tubular epithelial proliferation contributes to a decrease in renal repair capacity with aging, but aging can also lead to a higher severity of inflammation and damage which may influence repair. In this study we tested intrinsic age-dependent changes in tubular epithelial proliferation in young and old mice, by injecting low-dose lead acetate as a non-injurious mitogen. In parallel, we explored in vitro techniques of studying cellular senescence in primary tubular epithelial cells (PTEC). Lead acetate induced tubular epithelial proliferation at a significantly higher rate in young as compared to old mice. Old kidneys showed significantly more senescence as demonstrated by increased p16 (INK4a), senescence associated β-galactosidase, and γH2AX(+)/Ki-67(-) cells. This was paralleled in old kidneys by a higher number of Cyclin D1 positive tubular cells. This finding was corroborated by a positive correlation between Cyclin D1 positivity and age in human renal biopsies. When tubular cells were isolated from mouse kidneys they rapidly lost their age-associated differences under culture conditions. However, senescence was readily induced in PTEC by γ-irradiation representing a future model for study of cellular senescence in the renal epithelium. Together, our data indicate that the tubular epithelium of aged kidney has an intrinsically reduced proliferative capacity probably due to a higher load of senescent cells. Moreover, stress induced models of cellular senescence are preferable for study of the renal epithelium in vitro. Finally, the positive correlation of Cyclin D1 with age and cellular senescence in PTEC needs further evaluation as to a functional role of renal epithelial aging.

  3. Rectification of age-associated deficiency in cytotoxic T cell response to influenza A virus by immunization with immune complexes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Biao; Zhang, Yongxin; He, Hongxia; Marinova, Ekaterina; Switzer, Kirsten; Wansley, Daniel; Mbawuike, Innocent; Han, Shuhua

    2007-11-01

    Decline in cellular immunity in aging compromises protection against infectious diseases and leads to the increased susceptibility of the elderly to infection. In particular, Ag-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response against virus is markedly reduced in an aged immune system. It is of great importance to explore novel strategy in eliciting effective antiviral CTL activity in the elderly. In this study, the efficacy and mechanisms of immunization with immune complexes in overcoming age-associated deficiency in cellular immunity were investigated. In this study, we show that the severely depressed CTL response to influenza A in aged mice can be significantly restored by immunization with immune complexes consisting of influenza A virus and mAb to influenza A nucleoprotein. The main mechanisms underlying this recovery of CTL response induced by immune complex immunization in aged mice are enhanced dendritic cell function and elevated production of IFN-gamma in both CD4(+) Th1 and CD8(+) CTLs. Thus, these results demonstrate that immune complex immunization may represent a novel strategy to elicit effective virus-specific cytotoxic response in an aged immune system, and possibly, to overcome age-related immune deficiency in general.

  4. Age-Associated Induction of Cell Membrane CD47 Limits Basal and Temperature-Induced Changes in Cutaneous Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Natasha M.; Roberts, David D.; Isenberg, Jeffrey S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective We tested the hypothesis that the matricellular protein thrombospondin-1 (TSP1), through binding to and activation of the cell receptor CD47, inhibits basal and thermal-mediated cutaneous blood flow. Background Data Abnormal and decreased cutaneous blood flow in response to temperature changes or vasoactive agents is a feature of cardiovascular disease and aging. The reasons for decreased cutaneous blood flow remain incompletely understood. Further, a role for matricellular proteins in the regulation skin blood flow has never been proposed. Methods C57BL/6 wild type, TSP1- and CD47-null 12 and 72 week old male mice underwent analysis of skin blood flow (SkBF) via laser Doppler in response to thermal stress and vasoactive challenge. Results Young and aged TSP1- and CD47-null mice displayed enhanced basal and thermal sensitive SkFB changes compared to age matched wild type controls. Nitric oxide-mediated increases in SkBF were also greater in null mice. TSP1 and CD47 were expressed in skin from young wild type mice, and both were significantly upregulated in aged animals. Tissue 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), a potent vasodilator, was greater in skin samples from null mice compared to wild type regardless of age. Finally, treating wild type animals with a CD47 monoclonal antibody, that inhibits TSP1 activation of CD47, enhanced SkBF in both young and aged animals. Conclusions The above results suggest that secreted TSP1, via its cognate receptor CD47, acutely modulates SkBF. These data further support therapeutically targeting CD47 to mitigate age-associated loss of SkBF and maximize wound healing. PMID:23275312

  5. Plasma Cell Disorders.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Jorge J

    2016-12-01

    Plasma cell disorders are benign, premalignant, and malignant conditions characterized by the presence of a monoclonal paraprotein detected in serum or urine. These conditions are biologically, pathologically, and clinically heterogeneous. There have been major advances in the understanding of the biology of these diseases, which are promoting the development of therapies with novel mechanisms of action. Novel agents such as proteasome inhibitors, immunomodulatory drugs, and monoclonal antibodies have gained approval in the United States and Europe for the treatment of plasma cell disorders. Such therapies are translating into higher rates of response and survival and better toxicity profiles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Bim dictates naïve CD4 T cell lifespan and the development of age-associated functional defects1

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, Hirotake; Huston, Gail E.; Dibble, John; Duso, Debra K.; Swain, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    With age peripheral naïve CD4 T cells become both longer-lived and functionally impaired and they express reduced levels of Bim, a pro-apoptotic Bcl-family member. In this study, we show that reduced Bim expression by naïve CD4 T cells intrinsically mediates their longer lifespan in the periphery. Moreover, using mixed bone marrow chimeras reconstituted with Bim+/+ and Bim+/− bone marrow cells, Bim+/− naïve CD4 T cells exhibit accelerated development of age-associated dysfunctions including reduced proliferation and IL-2 production and defective helper function for B cells, without any increase in their turnover. However, newly generated Bim+/− naïve CD4 T cells in middle aged mice are not defective, indicating an additional requirement for their persistence in the periphery. These age-associated immune defects develop independently of the “aged” host environment and without extensive division, distinguishing them from classic “senescence”. We suggest that the reduction of Bim levels with age in naïve CD4 T cell is the initiating step that leads to increased cellular lifespan and development of age-associated functional defects. PMID:20844198

  7. Mitochondrial peptidase IMMP2L mutation causes early onset of age-associated disorders and impairs adult stem cell self-renewal

    PubMed Central

    George, Sunil K.; Jiao, Yan; Bishop, Colin E.; Lu, Baisong

    2011-01-01

    Summary Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) are proposed to play a central role in aging and age-associated disorders, although direct in vivo evidence is lacking. We recently generated a mouse mutant with mutated Inner Mitochondrial Membrane Peptidase 2-like (Immp2l) gene, which impairs the signal peptide sequence processing of mitochondrial proteins cytochrome c1 and glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase 2. The mitochondria from mutant mice generate elevated levels of superoxide ion and cause impaired fertility in both sexes. Here we design experiments to examine the effects of excessive mitochondrial ROS generation on health span. We show that Immp2l mutation increases oxidative stress in multiple organs such as the brain and the kidney, although expression of superoxide dismutases in these tissues of the mutants is also increased. The mutants show multiple aging-associated phenotypes, including wasting, sarcopenia, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis and ataxia, with female mutants showing earlier onset and more severe age-associated disorders than male mutants. The loss of body weight and fat was unrelated to food intake. Adipose derived stromal cells (ADSC) from mutant mice showed impaired proliferation capability, formed significantly less and smaller colonies in colony formation assays, although they retained adipogenic differentiation capability in vitro. This functional impairment was accompanied by increased levels of oxidative stress. Our data showed that mitochondrial ROS is the driving force of accelerated aging and suggested that ROS damage to adult stem cells could be one of the mechanisms for age-associated disorders. PMID:21332923

  8. PLASMA CELL LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    de Larrea, Carlos Fernandez; Kyle, Robert A.; Durie, Brian GM; Ludwig, Heinz; Usmani, Saad; Vesole, David H.; Hajek, Roman; Miguel, Jésus San; Sezer, Orhan; Sonneveld, Pieter; Kumar, Shaji K.; Mahindra, Anuj; Comenzo, Ray; Palumbo, Antonio; Mazumber, Amitabha; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Richardson, Paul G.; Badros, Ashraf Z.; Caers, Jo; Cavo, Michele; LeLeu, Xavier; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Chim, CS; Schots, Rik; Noeul, Amara; Fantl, Dorotea; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Landgren, Ola; Chanan-Khan, Asher; Moreau, Philippe; Fonseca, Rafael; Merlini, Giampaolo; Lahuerta, JJ; Bladé, Joan; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Shah, Jatin J.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic-pathologic entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (≥ 20%) and absolute number (≥ 2 × 10 9/L) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds for diagnosis be reexamined and consensus recommendations are made for diagnosis, as well as, response and progression criteria. Induction therapy needs to begin promptly and have high clinical activity leading to rapid disease control in an effort to minimize the risk of early death. Intensive chemotherapy regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem-cell transplantation (HDT/ASCT) if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding of the pathogenesis of PCL. PMID:23288300

  9. Mitochondrial peptidase IMMP2L mutation causes early onset of age-associated disorders and impairs adult stem cell self-renewal.

    PubMed

    George, Sunil K; Jiao, Yan; Bishop, Colin E; Lu, Baisong

    2011-08-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) are proposed to play a central role in aging and age-associated disorders, although direct in vivo evidence is lacking. We recently generated a mouse mutant with mutated inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (Immp2l) gene, which impairs the signal peptide sequence processing of mitochondrial proteins cytochrome c1 and glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase 2. The mitochondria from mutant mice generate elevated levels of superoxide ion and cause impaired fertility in both sexes. Here, we design experiments to examine the effects of excessive mitochondrial ROS generation on health span. We show that Immp2l mutation increases oxidative stress in multiple organs such as the brain and the kidney, although expression of superoxide dismutases in these tissues of the mutants is also increased. The mutants show multiple aging-associated phenotypes, including wasting, sarcopenia, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, and ataxia, with female mutants showing earlier onset and more severe age-associated disorders than male mutants. The loss of body weight and fat was unrelated to food intake. Adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSC) from mutant mice showed impaired proliferation capability, formed significantly less and smaller colonies in colony formation assays, although they retained adipogenic differentiation capability in vitro. This functional impairment was accompanied by increased levels of oxidative stress. Our data showed that mitochondrial ROS is the driving force of accelerated aging and suggested that ROS damage to adult stem cells could be one of the mechanisms for age-associated disorders. © 2011 The Authors. Aging Cell © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  10. Characterization of age-associated exhausted CD8⁺ T cells defined by increased expression of Tim-3 and PD-1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoo-A; Shin, Kwang-Soo; Kim, Ga-Young; Song, You Chan; Bae, Eun-Ah; Kim, Il-Kyu; Koh, Choong-Hyun; Kang, Chang-Yuil

    2016-04-01

    Aging is accompanied by altered T-cell responses that result in susceptibility to various diseases. Previous findings on the increased expression of inhibitory receptors, such as programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), in the T cells of aged mice emphasize the importance of investigations into the relationship between T-cell exhaustion and aging-associated immune dysfunction. In this study, we demonstrate that T-cell immunoglobulin mucin domain-3 (Tim-3), another exhaustion marker, is up-regulated on aged T cells, especially CD8(+) T cells. Tim-3-expressing cells also produced PD-1, but Tim-3(+) PD-1(+) CD8(+) T cells had a distinct phenotype that included the expression of CD44 and CD62L, from Tim-3(-) PD-1(+) cells. Tim-3(+) PD-1(+) CD8(+) T cells showed more evident properties associated with exhaustion than Tim-3(-) PD-1(+) CD8(+) T cells: an exhaustion-related marker expression profile, proliferative defects following homeostatic or TCR stimulation, and altered production of cytokines. Interestingly, these cells produced a high level of IL-10 and induced normal CD8(+) T cells to produce IL-10, which might contribute to immune dysregulation in aged mice. The generation of Tim-3-expressing CD8(+) T cells in aged mice seems to be mediated by encounters with antigens but not by specific infection, based on their high expression of CD49d and their unbiased TCR Vβ usage. In conclusion, we found that a CD8(+) T-cell population with age-associated exhaustion was distinguishable by its expression of Tim-3. These results provide clues for understanding the alterations that occur in T-cell populations with age and for improving dysfunctions related to the aging of the immune system.

  11. Age-Associated Methylation Suppresses SPRY1, Leading to a Failure of Re-quiescence and Loss of the Reserve Stem Cell Pool in Elderly Muscle.

    PubMed

    Bigot, Anne; Duddy, William J; Ouandaogo, Zamalou G; Negroni, Elisa; Mariot, Virginie; Ghimbovschi, Svetlana; Harmon, Brennan; Wielgosik, Aurore; Loiseau, Camille; Devaney, Joe; Dumonceaux, Julie; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Mouly, Vincent; Duguez, Stéphanie

    2015-11-10

    The molecular mechanisms by which aging affects stem cell number and function are poorly understood. Murine data have implicated cellular senescence in the loss of muscle stem cells with aging. Here, using human cells and by carrying out experiments within a strictly pre-senescent division count, we demonstrate an impaired capacity for stem cell self-renewal in elderly muscle. We link aging to an increased methylation of the SPRY1 gene, a known regulator of muscle stem cell quiescence. Replenishment of the reserve cell pool was modulated experimentally by demethylation or siRNA knockdown of SPRY1. We propose that suppression of SPRY1 by age-associated methylation in humans inhibits the replenishment of the muscle stem cell pool, contributing to a decreased regenerative response in old age. We further show that aging does not affect muscle stem cell senescence in humans.

  12. Plasma cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Albarracin, Flavio; Fonseca, Rafael

    2011-05-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare, yet aggressive plasma cell (PC) neoplasm, variant of multiple myeloma (MM), characterized by high levels of PCs circulating in the peripheral blood. PCL can either originate de novo (primary PCL) or as a secondary leukemic transformation of MM (secondary PCL). Presenting signs and symptoms are similar to those seen in MM such as renal insufficiency, hypercalcemia, lytic bone lesions, anemia, and thrombocytopenia, but can also include hepatomegaly and splenomegaly. The diagnostic evaluation of a patient with suspected PCL should include a review of the peripheral blood smear, bone marrow aspiration and biopsy, serum protein electrophoresis (SPEP) with immunofixation, and protein electrophoresis of an aliquot from a 24h urine collection (UPEP). The diagnosis is made when a monoclonal population of PCs is present in the peripheral blood with an absolute PC count exceeding 2000/μL and PC comprising 20% or more of the peripheral blood white cells. The prognosis of PCL is poor with a median survival of 7 to 11 months. Survival is even shorter (2 to 7 months) when PCL occurs in the context of refractory or relapsing MM. There have been no prospective randomized trials investigating the treatment of PCL. Recommendations are primarily based upon data from small retrospective series, case reports, and extrapolation of data from patients with MM. In general, patients are treated with induction therapy followed by hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in those who are appropriate candidates for this approach. The best induction regimen for PCL is not known and there is great variability in clinical practice. Newer agents that are being incorporated into frontline and salvage therapy for MM have also demonstrated activity in PCL such as Immunomodulatory agents and the use of bortezomib with different combinations.

  13. Plasma cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Albarracin, Flavio; Fonseca, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare, yet aggressive plasma cell (PC) neoplasm, variant of multiple myeloma (MM), characterized by high levels of PCs circulating in the peripheral blood. PCL can either originate de novo (primary PCL) or as a secondary leukemic transformation of MM (secondary PCL). Presenting signs and symptoms are similar to those seen in MM such as renal insufficiency, hypercalcemia, lytic bone lesions, anemia, and thrombocytopenia, but can also include hepatomegaly and splenomegaly. The diagnostic evaluation of a patient with suspected PCL should include a review of the peripheral blood smear, bone marrow aspiration and biopsy, serum protein electrophoresis (SPEP) with immunofixation, and protein electrophoresis of an aliquot from a 24h urine collection (UPEP). The diagnosis is made when a monoclonal population of PCs is present in the peripheral blood with an absolute PC count exceeding 2000/μL and PC comprising 20% or more of the peripheral blood white cells. The prognosis of PCL is poor with a median survival of 7 to 11 months. Survival is even shorter (2 to 7 months) when PCL occurs in the context of refractory or relapsing MM. There have been no prospective randomized trials investigating the treatment of PCL. Recommendations are primarily based upon data from small retrospective series, case reports, and extrapolation of data from patients with MM. In general, patients are treated with induction therapy followed by hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in those who are appropriate candidates for this approach. The best induction regimen for PCL is not known and there is great variability in clinical practice. Newer agents that are being incorporated into frontline and salvage therapy for MM have also demonstrated activity in PCL such as Immunomodulatory agents and the use of bortezomib with different combinations. PMID:21295388

  14. Notch signaling mediates the age-associated decrease in adhesion of germline stem cells to the niche.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chen-Yuan; Kao, Shih-Han; Wan, Chih-Ling; Cho, Yueh; Tung, Shu-Yun; Hsu, Hwei-Jan

    2014-12-01

    Stem cells have an innate ability to occupy their stem cell niche, which in turn, is optimized to house stem cells. Organ aging is associated with reduced stem cell occupancy in the niche, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Here, we report that Notch signaling is increased with age in Drosophila female germline stem cells (GSCs), and this results in their removal from the niche. Clonal analysis revealed that GSCs with low levels of Notch signaling exhibit increased adhesiveness to the niche, thereby out-competing their neighbors with higher levels of Notch; adhesiveness is altered through regulation of E-cadherin expression. Experimental enhancement of Notch signaling in GSCs hastens their age-dependent loss from the niche, and such loss is at least partially mediated by Sex lethal. However, disruption of Notch signaling in GSCs does not delay GSC loss during aging, and nor does it affect BMP signaling, which promotes self-renewal of GSCs. Finally, we show that in contrast to GSCs, Notch activation in the niche (which maintains niche integrity, and thus mediates GSC retention) is reduced with age, indicating that Notch signaling regulates GSC niche occupancy both intrinsically and extrinsically. Our findings expose a novel role of Notch signaling in controlling GSC-niche adhesion in response to aging, and are also of relevance to metastatic cancer cells, in which Notch signaling suppresses cell adhesion.

  15. Metformin against TGFβ-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT): from cancer stem cells to aging-associated fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Cufí, Silvia; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Joven, Jorge; Menendez, Javier A

    2010-11-15

    Transforming Growth Factor-b (TGFb) is a major driving force of the Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal (EMT) genetic program, which becomes overactive in the pathophysiology of many age-related human diseases.  TGFb-driven EMT is sufficient to generate migrating cancer stem cells by directly linking the acquisition of cellular motility with the maintenance of tumor-initiating (stemness) capacity.  Chronic diseases exhibiting excessive fibrosis can be caused by repeated and sustained infliction of TGFb-driven EMT, which increases collagen and extracellular matrix synthesis.  Pharmacological prevention and/or reversal of TGFb-induced EMT may therefore have important clinical applications in the management of cancer metastasis as well as in the prevention and/or treatment of end-state organ failures.  Earlier studies from our group have revealed that clinically-relevant concentrations of the biguanide derivative metformin, the most widely used oral agent to lower blood glucose concentration in patients with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome, notably decreased both the self-renewal and the proliferation of trastuzumab-refractory breast cancer stem cell populations.  Given that: a.) tumor-initiating cancer stem cells display a significant enrichment in the expression of basal/mesenchymal or myoepithelial markers, including an increased secretion of TGFb; b.) metformin treatment impedes the ontogeny of generating the stem cell phenotype by transcriptionally repressing key drivers of the EMT genetic program (e.g. ZEB1, TWIST1, SNAIL2 [Slug], TGFbs), we recently hypothesized that prevention of TGFb-induced EMT might represent a common molecular mechanism underlying the anti-cancer stem cells and anti-fibrotic actions of metformin.  Remarkably, metformin exposure not only impedes TGFb-promoted loss of the epithelial marker E-cadherin in MCF-7 breast cancer cells but it prevents further TGF-induced cell scattering and accumulation of the mesenchymal marker vimentin in

  16. Closed inductively coupled plasma cell

    DOEpatents

    Manning, T.J.; Palmer, B.A.; Hof, D.E.

    1990-11-06

    A closed inductively coupled plasma cell generates a relatively high power, low noise plasma for use in spectroscopic studies is disclosed. A variety of gases can be selected to form the plasma to minimize spectroscopic interference and to provide a electron density and temperature range for the sample to be analyzed. Grounded conductors are placed at the tube ends and axially displaced from the inductive coil, whereby the resulting electromagnetic field acts to elongate the plasma in the tube. Sample materials can be injected in the plasma to be excited for spectroscopy. 1 fig.

  17. Closed inductively coupled plasma cell

    DOEpatents

    Manning, Thomas J.; Palmer, Byron A.; Hof, Douglas E.

    1990-01-01

    A closed inductively coupled plasma cell generates a relatively high power, low noise plasma for use in spectroscopic studies. A variety of gases can be selected to form the plasma to minimize spectroscopic interference and to provide a electron density and temperature range for the sample to be analyzed. Grounded conductors are placed at the tube ends and axially displaced from the inductive coil, whereby the resulting electromagnetic field acts to elongate the plasma in the tube. Sample materials can be injected in the plasma to be excited for spectroscopy.

  18. HSF1-controlled and age-associated chaperone capacity in neurons and muscle cells of C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Kern, Andreas; Ackermann, Bianca; Clement, Albrecht M; Duerk, Heike; Behl, Christian

    2010-01-05

    Protein stability under changing conditions is of vital importance for the cell and under the control of a fine-tuned network of molecular chaperones. Aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases are directly associated with enhanced protein instability. Employing C. elegans expressing GFP-tagged luciferase as a reporter for evaluation of protein stability we show that the chaperoning strategy of body wall muscle cells and neurons is significantly different and that both are differently affected by aging. Muscle cells of young worms are largely resistant to heat stress, which is directly mediated by the stress response controlled through Heat Shock Transcription Factor 1. During recovery following heat stress the ability to refold misfolded proteins is missing. Young neurons are highly susceptible to chronic heat stress, but show a high potency to refold or disaggregate proteins during subsequent recovery. The particular proteome instability in neurons results from a delayed induction of the heat shock response. In aged neurons protein stability is increased during heat stress, whereas muscle cells show enhanced protein instability due to a deteriorated heat shock response. An efficient refolding activity is absent in both aged tissues. These results provide molecular insights into the differential protein stabilization capacity in different tissues and during aging.

  19. Extracellular signals in young and aging breast epithelial cells and possible connections to age-associated breast cancer development.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Sukhada; Hass, Ralf

    2011-05-01

    Aging of human breast tissue is accompanied by certain structural and functional variations and several studies suggest a possible contribution of these changes to an aging-related breast cancer development. At the cellular level, aging of human mammary epithelial cells is associated with significant morphological and functional alterations such as an increased cell size and a reduced proliferation. Cellular senescence of HMEC cannot be explained by a single mechanism but represents an interaction of numerous extra- and intracellular events and the complexity of such orchestrating pathways is still hardly understood. Besides the contribution of reactive oxygen species and telomere dysfunction to aging, it is the aim of this mini-review, to compare distinct changes to extracellular signals by certain matrix metalloproteinases including MMP-7 and associated growth factor pathways mediated by HB-EGF activation in young and aging HMEC. Such changes can alter hormone receptor levels within aged HMEC, induce tissue fibrosis and promote epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition as a potential prerequisite for breast cancer development. Moreover, an accumulation of aging cells during the normal life span of the breast tissue may also substantially effect and interact with adjacent neighboring populations in the local microenvironment to provide optimized growth conditions which would also support neoplastic cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Age-associated and cell-type-specific neurofibrillary pathology in transgenic mice expressing the human midsized neurofilament subunit.

    PubMed

    Vickers, J C; Morrison, J H; Friedrich, V L; Elder, G A; Perl, D P; Katz, R N; Lazzarini, R A

    1994-09-01

    Alterations in neurofilaments are a common occurrence in neurons of the human nervous system during aging and diseases associated with aging. Such pathologic changes may be attributed to species-specific properties of human neurofilaments as well as cell-type-specific regulation of this element of the cytoskeleton. The development of transgenic animals containing human neurofilament subunits offers an opportunity to study the effects of aging and other experimental conditions on the human-specific form of these proteins in a rodent model. The present study shows that mice from the transgenic line NF(M)27, which express the human midsized neurofilament subunit at low levels (2-25% of the endogenous NF-M), develop neurofilamentous accumulations in specific subgroups of neurons that are age dependent, affecting 78% of transgenic mice over 12 months of age. Similar accumulations do not occur in age-matched, wild-type littermates or in 3-month-old transgenic mice. In 12-month-old transgenic mice, somatic neurofilament accumulations resembling neurofibrillary tangles were present predominantly in layers III and V of the neocortex, as well as in select subpopulations of subcortical neurons. Intraperikaryal, spherical neurofilamentous accumulations were particularly abundant in cell bodies in layer II of the neocortex, and neurofilament-containing distentions of Purkinje cell proximal axons occurred in the cerebellum. These pathological accumulations contained mouse as well as human NF subunits, but could be distinguished by their content of phosphorylation-dependent NF epitopes. These cytoskeletal alterations closely resemble the cell-type-specific alterations in neurofilaments that occur during normal human aging and in diseases associated with aging, indicating that these transgenic animals may serve as models of some aspects of the pathologic features of human neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Age-associated decline in T cell repertoire diversity leads to holes in the repertoire and impaired immunity to influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Yager, Eric J.; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Lanzer, Kathleen; Randall, Troy D.; Woodland, David L.; Blackman, Marcia A.

    2008-01-01

    A diverse T cell repertoire is essential for a vigorous immune response to new infections, and decreasing repertoire diversity has been implicated in the age-associated decline in CD8 T cell immunity. In this study, using the well-characterized mouse influenza virus model, we show that although comparable numbers of CD8 T cells are elicited in the lung and lung airways of young and aged mice after de novo infection, a majority of aged mice exhibit profound shifts in epitope immunodominance and restricted diversity in the TCR repertoire of responding cells. A preferential decline in reactivity to viral epitopes with a low naive precursor frequency was observed, in some cases leading to “holes” in the T cell repertoire. These effects were also seen in young thymectomized mice, consistent with the role of the thymus in maintaining naive repertoire diversity. Furthermore, a decline in repertoire diversity generally correlated with impaired responses to heterosubtypic challenge. This study formally demonstrates in a mouse infection model that naturally occurring contraction of the naive T cell repertoire can result in impaired CD8 T cell responses to known immunodominant epitopes and decline in heterosubtypic immunity. These observations have important implications for the design of vaccine strategies for the elderly. PMID:18332179

  2. Age-associated decline in T cell repertoire diversity leads to holes in the repertoire and impaired immunity to influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Yager, Eric J; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Lanzer, Kathleen; Randall, Troy D; Woodland, David L; Blackman, Marcia A

    2008-03-17

    A diverse T cell repertoire is essential for a vigorous immune response to new infections, and decreasing repertoire diversity has been implicated in the age-associated decline in CD8 T cell immunity. In this study, using the well-characterized mouse influenza virus model, we show that although comparable numbers of CD8 T cells are elicited in the lung and lung airways of young and aged mice after de novo infection, a majority of aged mice exhibit profound shifts in epitope immunodominance and restricted diversity in the TCR repertoire of responding cells. A preferential decline in reactivity to viral epitopes with a low naive precursor frequency was observed, in some cases leading to "holes" in the T cell repertoire. These effects were also seen in young thymectomized mice, consistent with the role of the thymus in maintaining naive repertoire diversity. Furthermore, a decline in repertoire diversity generally correlated with impaired responses to heterosubtypic challenge. This study formally demonstrates in a mouse infection model that naturally occurring contraction of the naive T cell repertoire can result in impaired CD8 T cell responses to known immunodominant epitopes and decline in heterosubtypic immunity. These observations have important implications for the design of vaccine strategies for the elderly.

  3. Opposite patterns of age-associated changes in neurons and glial cells of the thalamus of human brain.

    PubMed

    Guidolin, D; Zunarelli, E; Genedani, S; Trentini, G P; De Gaetani, C; Fuxe, K; Benegiamo, C; Agnati, L F

    2008-06-01

    In an autopsy series of 19 individuals, age-ranged 24-94, a relatively age-spared region, the anterior-ventral thalamus, was analyzed by immunohistochemical techniques to visualize neurons (neurofilament protein), astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein), microglial cells (CD68) and amyloid precursor protein. The pattern of immunoreactivity was determined by surface fractal dimension and lacunarity, the size by the field area (FA) and the spatial uniformity by the uniformity index. From the normalized FA values of immunoreactivity for the four markers studied, a global parameter was defined to give an overall characterization of the age-dependent changes in the glio-neuronal networks. A significant exponential decline of the GP was observed with increasing age. This finding suggests that early in life (age<50 years) an adaptive response might be triggered, involving the glio-neuronal networks in plastic adaptive adjustments to cope with the environmental challenges and the continuous wearing off of the neuronal structures. The slow decay of the GP observed in a later phase (age>70 years) could be due to the non-trophic reserve still available.

  4. Plasma Etching Improves Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunyan, S. M.

    1982-01-01

    Etching front surfaces of screen-printed silicon photovoltaic cells with sulfur hexafluoride plasma found to increase cell performance while maintaining integrity of screen-printed silver contacts. Replacement of evaporated-metal contacts with screen-printed metal contacts proposed as one way to reduce cost of solar cells for terrestrial applications.

  5. Systemic Age-Associated DNA Hypermethylation of ELOVL2 Gene: In Vivo and In Vitro Evidences of a Cell Replication Process.

    PubMed

    Bacalini, Maria Giulia; Deelen, Joris; Pirazzini, Chiara; De Cecco, Marco; Giuliani, Cristina; Lanzarini, Catia; Ravaioli, Francesco; Marasco, Elena; van Heemst, Diana; Suchiman, H Eka D; Slieker, Roderick; Giampieri, Enrico; Recchioni, Rina; Mercheselli, Fiorella; Salvioli, Stefano; Vitale, Giovanni; Olivieri, Fabiola; Spijkerman, Annemieke M W; Dollé, Martijn E T; Sedivy, John M; Castellani, Gastone; Franceschi, Claudio; Slagboom, Pieternella E; Garagnani, Paolo

    2016-09-26

    Epigenetic remodeling is one of the major features of the aging process. We recently demonstrated that DNA methylation of ELOVL2 and FHL2 CpG islands is highly correlated with age in whole blood. Here we investigated several aspects of age-associated hypermethylation of ELOVL2 and FHL2 We showed that ELOVL2 methylation is significantly different in primary dermal fibroblast cultures from donors of different ages. Using epigenomic data from public resources, we demonstrated that most of the tissues show ELOVL2 and FHL2 hypermethylation with age. Interestingly, ELOVL2 hypermethylation was not found in tissues with very low replication rate. We demonstrated that ELOVL2 hypermethylation is associated with in vitro cell replication rather than with senescence. We confirmed intra-individual hypermethylation of ELOVL2 and FHL2 in longitudinally assessed participants from the Doetinchem Cohort Study. Finally we showed that, although the methylation of the two loci is not associated with longevity/mortality in the Leiden Longevity Study, ELOVL2 methylation is associated with cytomegalovirus status in nonagenarians, which could be informative of a higher number of replication events in a fraction of whole-blood cells. Collectively, these results indicate that ELOVL2 methylation is a marker of cell divisions occurring during human aging.

  6. Deterioration of autonomic neuronal receptor signaling and mechanisms intrinsic to heart pacemaker cells contribute to age-associated alterations in heart rate variability in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yaniv, Yael; Ahmet, Ismayil; Tsutsui, Kenta; Behar, Joachim; Moen, Jack M; Okamoto, Yosuke; Guiriba, Toni-Rose; Liu, Jie; Bychkov, Rostislav; Lakatta, Edward G

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to determine how age-associated changes in mechanisms extrinsic and intrinsic to pacemaker cells relate to basal beating interval variability (BIV) reduction in vivo. Beating intervals (BIs) were measured in aged (23-25 months) and adult (3-4 months) C57BL/6 male mice (i) via ECG in vivo during light anesthesia in the basal state, or in the presence of 0.5 mg mL(-1) atropine + 1 mg mL(-1) propranolol (in vivo intrinsic conditions), and (ii) via a surface electrogram, in intact isolated pacemaker tissue. BIV was quantified in both time and frequency domains using linear and nonlinear indices. Although the average basal BI did not significantly change with age under intrinsic conditions in vivo and in the intact isolated pacemaker tissue, the average BI was prolonged in advanced age. In vivo basal BIV indices were found to be reduced with age, but this reduction diminished in the intrinsic state. However, in pacemaker tissue BIV indices increased in advanced age vs. adults. In the isolated pacemaker tissue, the sensitivity of the average BI and BIV in response to autonomic receptor stimulation or activation of mechanisms intrinsic to pacemaker cells by broad-spectrum phosphodiesterase inhibition declined in advanced age. Thus, changes in mechanisms intrinsic to pacemaker cells increase the average BIs and BIV in the mice of advanced age. Autonomic neural input to pacemaker tissue compensates for failure of molecular intrinsic mechanisms to preserve average BI. But this compensation reduces the BIV due to both the imbalance of autonomic neural input to the pacemaker cells and altered pacemaker cell responses to neural input. © 2016 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Plasma Cell Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Examination (Video) Blood Clots: Plugging the Breaks (News) Drone Sets New Record for Transporting Blood Samples (News) ... cells Am I Correct? More Videos News HealthDay Drone Sets New Record for Transporting Blood Samples TUESDAY, ...

  8. SURFACE ALLOANTIGENS OF PLASMA CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Toshitada; Old, Lloyd J.; Boyse, Edward A.

    1970-01-01

    A serological study of immunoglobulin-forming cells of the mouse, normal and malignant, shows that they lack all known surface differentiation antigens of the thymocyte-lymphocyte axis: TL, θ, Ly-A, Ly-B, and MSLA. Two systems of normal alloantigens are expressed on these cells, H-2 and a new system named PC. The gene Pca (Plasma cell antigen) which specifies PC.1 alloantigen segregates as a mendelian dominant not closely linked with H-2. This cell surface antigen is absent from thymocytes, leukemias, and very probably from thymus-derived lymphocytes also; it is present on cells of the liver, kidney, brain, and lymph nodes as well as on hemolytic plaque-forming cells of the spleen, and on myelomas. So PC.1 is properly classified as a differentiation alloantigen. The strain distribution of PC.1 does not conform to that of any known immunoglobulin allotype or cell surface alloantigen previously described. Thus the cell surface antigens of immunoglobulin-producing cells are clearly different from those of cells belonging to the thymocyte-lymphocyte axis. Each family of cells has distinctive alloantigens, and the two families share alloantigens of only one known system, H-2. This implies that either immunoglobulin-producing cells are not derived from thymic lymphocytes, or if they are, the program responsible for the transition must include extensive revision of cell surface structure. PMID:5419273

  9. A mixture of peptides and sugars derived from plant cell walls increases plant defense responses to stress and attenuates ageing-associated molecular changes in cultured skin cells.

    PubMed

    Apone, Fabio; Tito, Annalisa; Carola, Antonietta; Arciello, Stefania; Tortora, Assunta; Filippini, Lucio; Monoli, Irene; Cucchiara, Mirna; Gibertoni, Simone; Chrispeels, Maarten J; Colucci, Gabriella

    2010-02-15

    Small peptides and aminoacid derivatives have been extensively studied for their effect of inducing plant defense responses, and thus increasing plant tolerance to a wide range of abiotic stresses. Similarly to plants, these compounds can activate different signaling pathways in mammalian skin cells as well, leading to the up-regulation of anti-aging specific genes. This suggests the existence of analogous defense response mechanisms, well conserved both in plants and animal cells. In this article, we describe the preparation of a new mixture of peptides and sugars derived from the chemical and enzymatic digestion of plant cell wall glycoproteins. We investigate the multiple roles of this product as potential "biostimulator" to protect plants from abiotic stresses, and also as potential cosmeceutical. In particular, the molecular effects of the peptide/sugar mixture of inducing plant defense responsive genes and protecting cultured skin cells from oxidative burst damages were deeply evaluated.

  10. Ex vivo characterization of age-associated impedance changes of single vascular endothelial cells using micro electrical impedance spectroscopy with a cell trap.

    PubMed

    Park, Yangkyu; Cha, Jung-Joon; Seo, Seungwan; Yun, Joho; Woo Kim, Hyeon; Park, Changju; Gang, Giseok; Lim, Juhun; Lee, Jong-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to characterize aging of single vascular endothelial cells, which are indicators of senescence, using micro electrical impedance spectroscopy (μEIS) for the first time. The proposed μEIS was equipped with two barriers under the membrane actuator near the sensing electrodes, increasing its cell-trapping capability and minimizing the interference between the target cell and subsequent cells. The cell-trapping capability in μEIS with barriers was considerably improved (90%) with a capture time of 5 s or less, compared to μEIS without barriers (30%). Cells were extracted from transgenic zebrafish to minimize an initial discrepancy originating from genetic differences. In order to estimate useful parameters, cytoplasm resistance and membrane capacitance were estimated by fitting an electrical equivalent circuit to the data of ex vivo sensor output. The estimated cytoplasm resistance and membrane capacitance in the younger vascular endothelial cells were 20.16 ± 0.79 kΩ and 17.46 ± 0.76 pF, respectively, whereas those in the older cells were 17.81 ± 0.98 kΩ and 20.08 ± 1.38 pF, respectively. Discrimination of each group with different aging showed statistical significance in terms of cytoplasm resistance (p < 0.001) and membrane capacitance (p < 0.001). Considering both of the sensor and cellular level, the optimal frequency was determined as 1 MHz at which the electrical impedance of each group was clearly discriminated (p < 0.001).

  11. Age-associated NF-κB signaling in myofibers alters the satellite cell niche and re-strains muscle stem cell function

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Kah Yong; Rosner, Bernard; Dreyfuss, Jonathan M.; Gjata, Ornela; Tran, Peter; Shoelson, Steven E.; Wagers, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a highly regenerative tissue, but muscle repair potential is increasingly compromised with advancing age. In this study, we demonstrate that increased NF-κB activity in aged muscle fibers contributes to diminished myogenic potential of their associated satellite cells. We further examine the impact of genetic modulation of NF-κB signaling in muscle satellite cells or myofibers on recovery after damage. These studies reveal that NF-κB activity in differentiated myofibers is sufficient to drive dysfunction of muscle regenerative cells via cell-non-autonomous mechanisms. Inhibition of NF-κB, or its downstream target Phospholipase A2, in myofibers rescued muscle regenerative potential in aged muscle. Moreover, systemic administration of sodium salicylate, an FDA-approved NF-κB inhibitor, decreased inflammatory gene expression and improved repair in aged muscle. Together, these studies identify a unique NF-κB regulated, non-cell autonomous mechanism by which stem cell function is linked to lipid signaling and homeostasis, and provide important new targets to stimulate muscle repair in aged individuals. PMID:27852976

  12. Correction of age-associated deficiency in germinal center response by immunization with immune complexes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Biao; Switzer, Kirsten; Marinova, Ekaterina; Wansley, Daniel; Han, Shuhua

    2007-08-01

    In aging, both primary and secondary antibody responses are impaired. One of the most notable changes in age-associated immune deficiency is the diminished germinal center (GC) reaction. This impaired GC response reduces antibody affinity maturation, decreases memory B cell development, and prevents the establishment of long-term antibody-forming cells in the bone marrow. It is of great importance to explore novel strategy in improving GC response in the elderly. In this study, the efficacy of immunization with immune complexes in overcoming age-associated deficiency in GC response was investigated. We show that the depressed GC response in aged mice can be significantly elevated by immunization with immune complexes. Importantly, there is a significant improvement of B cell memory response and long-lived plasma cells. Our results demonstrate that immune complex immunization may represent a novel strategy to elicit functional GC response in aging, and possibly, to overcome age-related immune deficiency in general.

  13. Clinically granulomatous cheilitis with plasma cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Somenath; Ghosh, Sarmistha; Sengupta, Dipayan

    2016-01-01

    Plasma cell cheilitis, also known as plasma cell orificial mucositis is a benign inflammatory condition clinically characterized by erythematous plaque on lips that may be ulcerated. Histopathologically it is characterized by dense plasma cell infiltrates in a band-like pattern in dermis, which corresponds to Zoon's plasma cell balanitis. On the other hand, granulomatous cheilitis, as a part of orofacial granulomatosis, manifests as sudden diffuse or nodular swelling involving lip and cheek. Initial swelling is soft to firm, but with recurrent episodes swelling gradually become firm rubbery in consistency. We hereby report a case of cheilitis in a 52-year-old man with diffuse swelling involving lower lip, which clinically resembles granulomatous cheilitis, but histopathological examination showed diffuse infiltrate of plasma cells predominantly in upper and mid-dermis. PMID:27057489

  14. Plasma Cell Pododermatitis in a Cat

    PubMed Central

    Drolet, R.; Bernard, J.

    1984-01-01

    Plasma cell pododermatitis, an uncommon disease of unknown etiology, is described in a six year old male domestic short-haired cat. The cat was referred with a history of lameness associated with swelling, softness and ulceration of the foot pads. The history suggested a seasonal occurrence of the condition. The dermis and subcutis of the foot pads were infiltrated by inflammatory cells which were mainly plasma cells. The large number of plasma cells present in the lesions suggests an immunological basis for the condition. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:17422486

  15. Plasma cell gingivitis: treatment with chlorpheniramine maleate.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Aravindhan Thiruputkuzhi; Chandran, Chitraa R; Prabhakar, Priya; Lakshmiganthan, Mahalingam; Parthasaradhi, Thakkalapati

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cell gingivitis is a benign lesion of unknown etiology characterized by massive and diffuse infiltration of plasma cells into the gingival connective tissue. Clinically, it can be seen as a diffuse, erythematous, and edematous swelling involving the marginal gingiva and extending into the attached gingiva. Although usually painless, the lesion can be esthetically unappealing, especially when anterior gingiva is involved. Although the usual line of management is removal of the offending agent, this report describes the treatment of plasma cell gingivitis with the topical application of chlorpheniramine maleate (25 mg) for a period of 10 days.

  16. Nonthermal-plasma-mediated animal cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wanil; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Gyoo-Cheon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2011-01-01

    Animal cell death comprising necrosis and apoptosis occurred in a well-regulated manner upon specific stimuli. The physiological meanings and detailed molecular mechanisms of cell death have been continuously investigated over several decades. Necrotic cell death has typical morphological changes, such as cell swelling and cell lysis followed by DNA degradation, whereas apoptosis shows blebbing formation and regular DNA fragmentation. Cell death is usually adopted to terminate cancer cells in vivo. The current strategies against tumour are based on the induction of cell death by adopting various methods, including radiotherapy and chemotherapeutics. Among these, radiotherapy is the most frequently used treatment method, but it still has obvious limitations. Recent studies have suggested that the use of nonthermal air plasma can be a prominent method for inducing cancer cell death. Plasma-irradiated cells showed the loss of genomic integrity, mitochondrial dysfunction, plasma membrane damage, etc. Tumour elimination with plasma irradiation is an emerging concept in cancer therapy and can be accelerated by targeting certain tumour-specific proteins with gold nanoparticles. Here, some recent developments are described so that the mechanisms related to plasma-mediated cell death and its perspectives in cancer treatment can be understood.

  17. Aging-associated changes in human brain.

    PubMed

    Mrak, R E; Griffin, S T; Graham, D I

    1997-12-01

    A wide variety of anatomic and histological alterations are common in brains of aged individuals. However, identification of intrinsic aging changes--as distinct from changes resulting from cumulative environmental insult--is problematic. Some degree of neuronal and volume loss would appear to be inevitable, but recent studies have suggested that the magnitudes of such changes are much less than previously thought, and studies of dendritic complexity in cognitively intact individuals suggest continuing neuronal plasticity into the eighth decade. A number of vascular changes become more frequent with age, many attributable to systemic conditions such as hypertension and atherosclerosis. Age-associated vascular changes not clearly linked to such conditions include hyaline arteriosclerotic changes with formation of arterial tortuosities in small intracranial vessels and the radiographic changes in deep cerebral white matter known as "leukoaraiosis." Aging is accompanied by increases in glial cell activation, in oxidative damage to proteins and lipids, in irreversible protein glycation, and in damage to DNA, and such changes may underlie in part the age-associated increasing incidence of "degenerative" conditions such as Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. A small number of histological changes appear to be universal in aged human brains. These include increasing numbers of corpora amylacea within astrocytic processes near blood-brain or cerebrospinal fluid-brain interfaces, accumulation of the "aging" pigment lipofuscin in all brain regions, and appearance of Alzheimer-type neurofibrillary tangles (but not necessarily amyloid plaques) in mesial temporal structures.

  18. Cold-pressed flaxseed oil reverses age-associated depression in a primary cell-mediated adaptive immune response in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Hillyer, L M; Sandiford, A M; Gray, C E; Woodward, Bill

    2006-02-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the influence of flaxseed oil on responses representative of primary humoral and cell-mediated adaptive immune competence in immunosenescent mice. Male and female C57BL/6J mice, 85 weeks old, were randomized between two complete purified diets differing only in oil source (cold-pressed safflower or flaxseed). After 8 weeks, humoral competence was assessed in six mice per group as the serum haemagglutinin titre to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and cell-mediated competence was assessed, in an additional six mice per group, as the delayed hypersensitivity response to SRBC. A zero-time control group (88 weeks old) and a young adult positive control group (12 weeks old) were each tested similarly (six per immune response), revealing age-related depression in both antibody and cell-mediated competence at 88 weeks of age. After the 8-week experimental period, the antibody response of the two test groups of geriatric mice remained below the young adult level (P=0.04) and the cell-mediated response of the safflower oil group also continued to exhibit age-related depression (20 % of young adult level, P=0.0002). By contrast, the anti-SRBC delayed hypersensitivity response of the flaxseed group no longer differed from the response of the young adults but exceeded that of the safflower and zero-time control senescent groups (P=0.0002). Depression in primary cell-mediated competence, the most outstanding aspect of immunosenescence, can be addressed by means of a dietary source of 18 : 3n-3 without longer-chain PUFA.

  19. Age-related alterations in mesenchymal stem cells related to shift in differentiation from osteogenic to adipogenic potential: implication to age-associated bone diseases and defects.

    PubMed

    Kim, MiJung; Kim, ChanWha; Choi, Yu Suk; Kim, MinHwan; Park, ChanJeoung; Suh, Yousin

    2012-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have attracted considerable attention in the fields of cell and gene therapy due to their intrinsic ability to differentiate into multiple lineages. The various therapeutic applications involving MSC require initial expansion and/or differentiation in vitro prior to clinical use. However, serial passages of MSC in culture lead to decreased differentiation potential and stem cell characteristics, eventually inducing cellular aging which will limit the success of cell-based therapeutic interventions. Here we review the age-related changes that occur in MSC with a special focus on the shift of differentiation potential from osteogenic to adipogenic lineage during the MSC aging processes and how aging causes this preferential shift by oxidative stress and/or energy metabolism defect. Oxidative stress-related signals and some microRNAs affect the differentiation potential shift of MSC by directly targeting key regulatory factors such as Runx-2 or PPAR-γ, and energy metabolism pathway is involved as well. All information described here including transcription factors, microRNAs and FoxOs could be used towards development of treatment regimens for age-related bone diseases and related defects based on mutually exclusive lineage fate determination of MSC.

  20. Nonthermal Plasma-Mediated Cancer Cell Death; Targeted Cancer Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byul-Bora; Choi, Yeon-Sik; Lee, Hae-Jun; Lee, Jae-Koo; Kim, Uk-Kyu; Kim, Gyoo-Cheon

    Non-thermal air plasma can kill cancer cells. However, there is no selectivity between normal and cancer cells. Therefore, cancer specific antibody conjugated gold nanoparticle (GNP) was pretreated before plasma irradiation. Stimulation of antibody conjugated GNP by plasma treatment resulted in a significant decrease in viability of cancer cells. This technology shows the feasibility of using plasma therapy for killing cancer cells selectively.

  1. Age-Associated ALU Element Instability in White Blood Cells Is Linked to Lower Survival in Elderly Adults: A Preliminary Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Morgan, R Garrett; Venturelli, Massimo; Gross, Cole; Tarperi, Cantor; Schena, Federico; Reggiani, Carlo; Naro, Fabio; Pedrinolla, Anna; Monaco, Lucia; Richardson, Russell S; Donato, Anthony J

    2017-01-01

    ALU element instability could contribute to gene function variance in aging, and may partly explain variation in human lifespan. To assess the role of ALU element instability in human aging and the potential efficacy of ALU element content as a marker of biological aging and survival. Preliminary cohort study. We measured two high frequency ALU element subfamilies, ALU-J and ALU-Sx, by a single qPCR assay and compared ALU-J/Sx content in white blood cell (WBCs) and skeletal muscle cell (SMCs) biopsies from twenty-three elderly adults with sixteen healthy sex-balanced young adults; all-cause survival rates of elderly adults predicted by ALU-J/Sx content in both tissues; and cardiovascular disease (CVD)- and cancer-specific survival rates of elderly adults predicted by ALU-J/Sx content in both tissues, as planned subgroup analyses. We found greater ALU-J/Sx content variance in WBCs from elderly adults than young adults (P < 0.001) with no difference in SMCs (P = 0.94). Elderly adults with low WBC ALU-J/Sx content had worse four-year all-cause and CVD-associated survival than those with high ALU-J/Sx content (both P = 0.03 and hazard ratios (HR) ≥ 3.40), while WBC ALU-J/Sx content had no influence on cancer-associated survival (P = 0.42 and HR = 0.74). SMC ALU-J/Sx content had no influence on all-cause, CVD- or cancer -associated survival (all P ≥ 0.26; HR ≤ 2.07). These initial findings demonstrate that ALU element instability occurs with advanced age in WBCs, but not SMCs, and imparts greater risk of all-cause mortality that is likely driven by an increased risk for CVD and not cancer.

  2. Age-Associated ALU Element Instability in White Blood Cells Is Linked to Lower Survival in Elderly Adults: A Preliminary Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Venturelli, Massimo; Gross, Cole; Tarperi, Cantor; Schena, Federico; Reggiani, Carlo; Naro, Fabio; Pedrinolla, Anna; Monaco, Lucia; Richardson, Russell S.; Donato, Anthony J.

    2017-01-01

    Background ALU element instability could contribute to gene function variance in aging, and may partly explain variation in human lifespan. Objective To assess the role of ALU element instability in human aging and the potential efficacy of ALU element content as a marker of biological aging and survival. Design Preliminary cohort study. Methods We measured two high frequency ALU element subfamilies, ALU-J and ALU-Sx, by a single qPCR assay and compared ALU-J/Sx content in white blood cell (WBCs) and skeletal muscle cell (SMCs) biopsies from twenty-three elderly adults with sixteen healthy sex-balanced young adults; all-cause survival rates of elderly adults predicted by ALU-J/Sx content in both tissues; and cardiovascular disease (CVD)- and cancer-specific survival rates of elderly adults predicted by ALU-J/Sx content in both tissues, as planned subgroup analyses. Results We found greater ALU-J/Sx content variance in WBCs from elderly adults than young adults (P < 0.001) with no difference in SMCs (P = 0.94). Elderly adults with low WBC ALU-J/Sx content had worse four-year all-cause and CVD-associated survival than those with high ALU-J/Sx content (both P = 0.03 and hazard ratios (HR) ≥ 3.40), while WBC ALU-J/Sx content had no influence on cancer-associated survival (P = 0.42 and HR = 0.74). SMC ALU-J/Sx content had no influence on all-cause, CVD- or cancer -associated survival (all P ≥ 0.26; HR ≤ 2.07). Conclusions These initial findings demonstrate that ALU element instability occurs with advanced age in WBCs, but not SMCs, and imparts greater risk of all-cause mortality that is likely driven by an increased risk for CVD and not cancer. PMID:28060910

  3. Soda and Cell Aging: Associations Between Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption and Leukocyte Telomere Length in Healthy Adults From the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Laraia, Barbara A.; Needham, Belinda L.; Rehkopf, David H.; Adler, Nancy E.; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We tested whether leukocyte telomere length maintenance, which underlies healthy cellular aging, provides a link between sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption and the risk of cardiometabolic disease. Methods. We examined cross-sectional associations between the consumption of SSBs, diet soda, and fruit juice and telomere length in a nationally representative sample of healthy adults. The study population included 5309 US adults, aged 20 to 65 years, with no history of diabetes or cardiovascular disease, from the 1999 to 2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. Leukocyte telomere length was assayed from DNA specimens. Diet was assessed using 24-hour dietary recalls. Associations were examined using multivariate linear regression for the outcome of log-transformed telomere length. Results. After adjustment for sociodemographic and health-related characteristics, sugar-sweetened soda consumption was associated with shorter telomeres (b = –0.010; 95% confidence interval [CI] = −0.020, −0.001; P = .04). Consumption of 100% fruit juice was marginally associated with longer telomeres (b = 0.016; 95% CI = −0.000, 0.033; P = .05). No significant associations were observed between consumption of diet sodas or noncarbonated SSBs and telomere length. Conclusions. Regular consumption of sugar-sweetened sodas might influence metabolic disease development through accelerated cell aging. PMID:25322305

  4. Soda and cell aging: associations between sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and leukocyte telomere length in healthy adults from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys.

    PubMed

    Leung, Cindy W; Laraia, Barbara A; Needham, Belinda L; Rehkopf, David H; Adler, Nancy E; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth H; Epel, Elissa S

    2014-12-01

    We tested whether leukocyte telomere length maintenance, which underlies healthy cellular aging, provides a link between sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption and the risk of cardiometabolic disease. We examined cross-sectional associations between the consumption of SSBs, diet soda, and fruit juice and telomere length in a nationally representative sample of healthy adults. The study population included 5309 US adults, aged 20 to 65 years, with no history of diabetes or cardiovascular disease, from the 1999 to 2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. Leukocyte telomere length was assayed from DNA specimens. Diet was assessed using 24-hour dietary recalls. Associations were examined using multivariate linear regression for the outcome of log-transformed telomere length. After adjustment for sociodemographic and health-related characteristics, sugar-sweetened soda consumption was associated with shorter telomeres (b = -0.010; 95% confidence interval [CI] = -0.020, -0.001; P = .04). Consumption of 100% fruit juice was marginally associated with longer telomeres (b = 0.016; 95% CI = -0.000, 0.033; P = .05). No significant associations were observed between consumption of diet sodas or noncarbonated SSBs and telomere length. Regular consumption of sugar-sweetened sodas might influence metabolic disease development through accelerated cell aging.

  5. Effects of Nonequilibrium Plasmas on Eukaryotic Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    on Eukaryotic Cells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-06-1-0004 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr. Mounir Laroussi, P.I., and...plume in room air. is a dielectric barrier discharge riptions we first present the effects types of eukaryotic microalgae. e cells are presented...preliminary results on the effects 15. SUBJECT TERMS Glow discharge, Atmospheric pressure, air plasma, eukaryote , cell , non-equilibrium 19a. NAME

  6. Cellular and Chromatin Dynamics of Antibody-Secreting Plasma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bortnick, Alexandra; Murre, Cornelis

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cells are terminally differentiated B cells responsible for maintaining protective serum antibody titers. Despite their clinical importance, our understanding of the linear genomic features and chromatin structure of plasma cells is incomplete. The plasma cell differentiation program can be triggered by different signals and in multiple, diverse peripheral B cell subsets. This heterogeneity raises questions about the gene regulatory circuits required for plasma cell specification. Recently, new regulators of plasma cell differentiation have been identified and the enhancer landscapes of naïve B cells have been described. Other studies have revealed that the bone marrow niche harbors heterogeneous plasma cell subsets. Still undefined are the minimal requirements to become a plasma cell and what molecular features make peripheral B cell subsets competent to become antibody-secreting plasma cells. New technologies promise to reveal underlying chromatin configurations that promote efficient antibody secretion. PMID:26488117

  7. Solar cell modules for plasma interaction evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A plasma interaction analysis in support of the solar electric propulsion subsystem examined the effects of a large high voltage solar array interacting with an ion thruster produced plasma. Two solar array test modules consisting of 36 large area wraparound contact solar cells welded to a flexible Kapton integrated circuit substrate were abricated. The modules contained certain features of the effects of insulation, din-holes, and bonding of the cell to the substrate and a ground plane. The possibility of a significant power loss occurring due to the collection of charged particles on the solar array interconnects was the focus of the research.

  8. Cell array fabrication by plasma nanotexturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontziampasis, Dimitrios; Bourkoula, Athanasia; Petrou, Panagiota; Tserepi, Angeliki; Kakabakos, Sotirios; Gogolides, Evangelos

    2013-05-01

    Cell behavior (i.e. attachment, proliferation, etc.) on nanostructured surfaces is currently a hot topic throughout the scientific community. However, studies often show diverging results due to differences in cells, local surface chemistry, and nanotopography fabrication methods. In this study, we use Oxygen plasma etching to both randomly nanotexture a PMMA surface and change its surface chemistry. We find that 3T3 cells behave quite differently on flat PMMA surfaces as compared to nanotextured ones, showing an on-off attachment behavior. Work is under progress to exploit this effect allowing selective cell capturing, and creation of cell arrays in adjacent plasma-nanotextured/smooth areas using a stencil mask during etching.

  9. Plasma cell treatment device Plasma-on-Chip: Monitoring plasma-generated reactive species in microwells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jun-Seok; Kojima, Shinya; Sasaki, Minoru; Hatta, Akimitsu; Kumagai, Shinya

    2017-02-08

    We have developed a plasma cell treatment device called Plasma-on-Chip that enables the real-time monitoring of a single cell culture during plasma treatment. The device consists of three parts: 1) microwells for cell culture, 2) a microplasma device for generating reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) for use in cell treatment, and 3) through-holes (microchannels) that connect each microwell with the microplasma region for RONS delivery. Here, we analysed the delivery of the RONS to the liquid culture medium stored in the microwells. We developed a simple experimental set-up using a microdevice and applied in situ ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy with high sensitivity for detecting RONS in liquid. The plasma-generated RONS were delivered into the liquid culture medium via the through-holes fabricated into the microdevice. The RONS concentrations were on the order of 10-100 μM depending on the size of the through-holes. In contrast, we found that the amount of dissolved oxygen was almost constant. To investigate the process of RONS generation, we numerically analysed the gas flow in the through-holes. We suggest that the circulating gas flow in the through-holes promotes the interaction between the plasma (ionised gas) and the liquid, resulting in enhanced RONS concentrations.

  10. Plasma cell treatment device Plasma-on-Chip: Monitoring plasma-generated reactive species in microwells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jun-Seok; Kojima, Shinya; Sasaki, Minoru; Hatta, Akimitsu; Kumagai, Shinya

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a plasma cell treatment device called Plasma-on-Chip that enables the real-time monitoring of a single cell culture during plasma treatment. The device consists of three parts: 1) microwells for cell culture, 2) a microplasma device for generating reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) for use in cell treatment, and 3) through-holes (microchannels) that connect each microwell with the microplasma region for RONS delivery. Here, we analysed the delivery of the RONS to the liquid culture medium stored in the microwells. We developed a simple experimental set-up using a microdevice and applied in situ ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy with high sensitivity for detecting RONS in liquid. The plasma-generated RONS were delivered into the liquid culture medium via the through-holes fabricated into the microdevice. The RONS concentrations were on the order of 10-100 μM depending on the size of the through-holes. In contrast, we found that the amount of dissolved oxygen was almost constant. To investigate the process of RONS generation, we numerically analysed the gas flow in the through-holes. We suggest that the circulating gas flow in the through-holes promotes the interaction between the plasma (ionised gas) and the liquid, resulting in enhanced RONS concentrations.

  11. Plasma cell treatment device Plasma-on-Chip: Monitoring plasma-generated reactive species in microwells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jun-Seok; Kojima, Shinya; Sasaki, Minoru; Hatta, Akimitsu; Kumagai, Shinya

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a plasma cell treatment device called Plasma-on-Chip that enables the real-time monitoring of a single cell culture during plasma treatment. The device consists of three parts: 1) microwells for cell culture, 2) a microplasma device for generating reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) for use in cell treatment, and 3) through-holes (microchannels) that connect each microwell with the microplasma region for RONS delivery. Here, we analysed the delivery of the RONS to the liquid culture medium stored in the microwells. We developed a simple experimental set-up using a microdevice and applied in situ ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy with high sensitivity for detecting RONS in liquid. The plasma-generated RONS were delivered into the liquid culture medium via the through-holes fabricated into the microdevice. The RONS concentrations were on the order of 10–100 μM depending on the size of the through-holes. In contrast, we found that the amount of dissolved oxygen was almost constant. To investigate the process of RONS generation, we numerically analysed the gas flow in the through-holes. We suggest that the circulating gas flow in the through-holes promotes the interaction between the plasma (ionised gas) and the liquid, resulting in enhanced RONS concentrations. PMID:28176800

  12. Mechanisms Regulating Plasma Cell Persistence in Health and Autoimmunity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    of lupus . Task 1: Determine whether RANKL expression accompanies the emergence of autoantibody-producing plasma cells. Approach: Infuse mice...Cell Memory." American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy Annual Meeting; Washington, DC May, 2010 "Commensal Cross-talk between Plasma Cells and...plasma cell survival. To explore this suggestion, we used a Transwell system that physically separates the two cell types, but presents no barrier

  13. Plasma Cell Gingivitis: An Occasional Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mishra, M B; Sharma, Swati; Sharma, Alok

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cell gingivitis, an infrequently observed oral condition, has been clinically characterized by diffuse gingival enlargement, erythema and sometimes desquamation. These lesions are usually asymptomatic, but invariably the patient will complain of a burning sensation in the gingiva and bleeding from the mouth. The diagnosis requires hematological screening in addition to clinical and histopathological examinations. This case report outlines one such case of plasma cell gingivitis in a 15-year-old female caused by use of an herbal, homemade toothpowder. The case presented here highlights the adverse effects and irrational use of herbal agents in dentifrices. At the same time, it emphasizes the need for comprehensive history taking, careful clinical examination and appropriate diagnostic tests in order to arrive at a definitive diagnosis and treatment plan for gingival conditions that are refractory to conventional therapy and to exclude certain malignancies and oral manifestations of systemic diseases.

  14. Plasma cells in immunopathology: concepts and therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Tiburzy, Benjamin; Kulkarni, Upasana; Hauser, Anja Erika; Abram, Melanie; Manz, Rudolf Armin

    2014-05-01

    Plasma cells are terminally differentiated B cells that secrete antibodies, important for immune protection, but also contribute to any allergic and autoimmune disease. There is increasing evidence that plasma cell populations exhibit a considerable degree of heterogeneity with respect to their immunophenotype, migration behavior, lifetime, and susceptibility to immunosuppressive drugs. Pathogenic long-lived plasma cells are refractory to existing therapies. In contrast, short-lived plasma cells can be depleted by steroids and cytostatic drugs. Therefore, long-lived plasma cells are responsible for therapy-resistant autoantibodies and resemble a challenge for the therapy of antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases. Both lifetime and therapy resistance of plasma cells are supported by factors produced within their microenviromental niches. Current results suggest that plasma cell differentiation and survival factors such as IL-6 also signal via mammalian miRNAs within the plasma cell to modulate downstream transcription factors. Recent evidence also suggests that plasma cells and/or their immediate precursors (plasmablasts) can produce important cytokines and act as antigen-presenting cells, exhibiting so far underestimated roles in immune regulation and bone homeostasis. Here, we provide an overview on plasma cell biology and discuss exciting, experimental, and potential therapeutic approaches to eliminate pathogenic plasma cells.

  15. Interaction between clonal plasma cells and the immune system in plasma cell dyscrasias.

    PubMed

    Perez-Andres, M; Almeida, J; Martin-Ayuso, M; Moro, M J; Garcia-Marcos, M A; Moreno, I; Dominguez, M; Galende, J; Heras, N; Gonzalez, M I; San Miguel, J F; Orfao, A

    2004-01-01

    The term "monoclonal gammopathy" (MG) includes a group of clonal plasma cell disorders, which show heterogeneous clinical behavior. While multiple myeloma (MM) and plasma cell leukemia (PCL) are incurable malignant diseases, most patients with MG of undetermined significance (MGUS) show an indolent/benign clinical course. Evidence has accumulated which supports the role of the bone marrow microenvironment in MG. Accordingly, the survival, drug-resistance and proliferation of MM cells have been shown to be largely dependent on a supportive microenvironment. Among the different environment-associated parameters, those related to the status/activity of the immune system are particularly relevant. This review focuses on the different ways clonal plasma cells (PC) interact with the immune system in different models of MG, to characterize crucial events in the development and progression of MG. These advances may support the design of novel therapeutic approaches in patients with MG.

  16. FLOCK cluster analysis of plasma cell flow cytometry data predicts bone marrow involvement by plasma cell neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Dorfman, David M; LaPlante, Charlotte D; Li, Betty

    2016-09-01

    We analyzed plasma cell populations in bone marrow samples from 353 patients with possible bone marrow involvement by a plasma cell neoplasm, using FLOCK (FLOw Clustering without K), an unbiased, automated, computational approach to identify cell subsets in multidimensional flow cytometry data. FLOCK identified discrete plasma cell populations in the majority of bone marrow specimens found by standard histologic and immunophenotypic criteria to be involved by a plasma cell neoplasm (202/208 cases; 97%), including 34 cases that were negative by standard flow cytometric analysis that included clonality assessment. FLOCK identified discrete plasma cell populations in only a minority of cases negative for involvement by a plasma cell neoplasm by standard histologic and immunophenotypic criteria (38/145 cases; 26%). Interestingly, 55% of the cases negative by standard analysis, but containing a FLOCK-identified discrete plasma cell population, were positive for monoclonal gammopathy by serum protein electrophoresis and immunofixation. FLOCK-identified and quantitated plasma cell populations accounted for 3.05% of total cells on average in cases positive for involvement by a plasma cell neoplasm by standard histologic and immunophenotypic criteria, and 0.27% of total cells on average in cases negative for involvement by a plasma cell neoplasm by standard histologic and immunophenotypic criteria (p<0.0001; area under the curve by ROC analysis=0.96). The presence of a FLOCK-identified discrete plasma cell population was predictive of the presence of plasma cell neoplasia with a sensitivity of 97%, compared with only 81% for standard flow cytometric analysis, and had specificity of 74%, PPV of 84% and NPV of 95%. FLOCK analysis, which has been shown to provide useful diagnostic information for evaluating patients with suspected systemic mastocytosis, is able to identify neoplastic plasma cell populations analyzed by flow cytometry, and may be helpful in the diagnostic

  17. Prognostic impact of circulating plasma cells in patients with multiple myeloma: implications for plasma cell leukaemia definition.

    PubMed

    Granell, Miquel; Calvo, Xavier; Garcia-Guiñón, Antoni; Escoda, Lourdes; Abella, Eugènia; Martínez, Clara M; Teixidó, Montserrat; Gimenez, Maria Teresa; Senín, Alicia; Sanz, Patricia; Campoy, Desirée; Vicent, Ana; Arenillas, Leonor; Rosiñol, Laura; Sierra, Jorge; Blade, Joan; Fernández de Larrea, Carlos

    2017-03-02

    The presence of circulating plasma cells in patients with multiple myeloma is considered a marker for highly proliferative disease. In the present study, the impact of circulating plasma cells assessed by cytology on survival of patients with multiple myeloma was analysed. Wright-Giemsa stained peripheral blood smears of 482 patients with newly diagnosed myeloma or plasma cell leukaemia were reviewed and patients were classified in four categories according to the percentage of circulating plasma cells: 0%, 1-4%, 5-20% and plasma cell leukemia with the following frequencies: 382 (79.2%), 83 (17.2%), 12 (2.5%) and 5 (1.0%) respectively. Median overall survival according to the circulating plasma cells group was 47, 50, 6 and 14 months, respectively. At multivariate analysis, presence of 5 to 20% circulating plasma cells was associated with a worse overall survival (relative risk 4.9, 95%CI 2.6-9.3) independently of age, creatinine, Durie-Salmon and international stage. Patients with ≥5% circulating plasma cells had lower platelet counts (median 86x109/L vs. 214x109/L, p<0.0001) and higher bone marrow plasma cells (median 53% vs. 36%, p=0.004). The presence of ≥5% circulating plasma cells in patients with multiple myeloma has similar adverse prognostic impact as plasma cell leukemia.

  18. Cell adhesion to plasma-coated PVC.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Elidiane C; de Souza, Eduardo S; de Moraes, Francine S; Duek, Eliana A R; Lucchesi, Carolina; Schreiner, Wido H; Durrant, Steven F; Cruz, Nilson C

    2014-01-01

    To produce environments suitable for cell culture, thin polymer films were deposited onto commercial PVC plates from radiofrequency acetylene-argon plasmas. The proportion of argon in the plasmas, P(Ar), was varied from 5.3 to 65.8%. The adhesion and growth of Vero cells on the coated surfaces were examined for different incubation times. Cytotoxicity tests were performed using spectroscopic methods. Carbon, O, and N were detected in all the samples using XPS. Roughness remained almost unchanged in the samples prepared with 5.3 and 28.9% but tended to increase for the films deposited with P(Ar) between 28.9 and 55.3%. Surface free energy increased with increasing P(Ar), except for the sample prepared at 28.9% of Ar, which presented the least reactive surface. Cells proliferated on all the samples, including the bare PVC. Independently of the deposition condition there was no evidence of cytotoxicity, indicating the viability of such coatings for designing biocompatible devices.

  19. Cell Adhesion to Plasma-Coated PVC

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Elidiane C.; de Souza, Eduardo S.; de Moraes, Francine S.; Duek, Eliana A. R.; Lucchesi, Carolina; Schreiner, Wido H.; Durrant, Steven F.; Cruz, Nilson C.

    2014-01-01

    To produce environments suitable for cell culture, thin polymer films were deposited onto commercial PVC plates from radiofrequency acetylene-argon plasmas. The proportion of argon in the plasmas, PAr, was varied from 5.3 to 65.8%. The adhesion and growth of Vero cells on the coated surfaces were examined for different incubation times. Cytotoxicity tests were performed using spectroscopic methods. Carbon, O, and N were detected in all the samples using XPS. Roughness remained almost unchanged in the samples prepared with 5.3 and 28.9% but tended to increase for the films deposited with PAr between 28.9 and 55.3%. Surface free energy increased with increasing PAr, except for the sample prepared at 28.9% of Ar, which presented the least reactive surface. Cells proliferated on all the samples, including the bare PVC. Independently of the deposition condition there was no evidence of cytotoxicity, indicating the viability of such coatings for designing biocompatible devices. PMID:25247202

  20. Staying alive: regulation of plasma cell survival.

    PubMed

    Tangye, Stuart G

    2011-12-01

    On describing the catastrophic effect of the plague during the Peloponnesian War, Greek historian Thucydides (c ∼450 BC) made the prescient observation that the "same man was never attacked twice - never at least fatally". This is probably the first description of the mammalian immune systems' remarkable ability to elicit a pathogen-specific response that potentially protects the host for its lifetime. This protection is largely mediated by plasma cells (PCs) that produce copious quantities of antibodies for extended periods of time, even after pathogen clearance. Here, I review the requirements for PC longevity in mice and humans, in particular the roles of survival niches in bone marrow and other tissues, and the "dialogue" between PCs and other cells that are crucial for long-lived humoral immunity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Leukemia Cutis Associated with Secondary Plasma Cell Leukemia.

    PubMed

    DeMartinis, Nicole C; Brown, Megan M; Hinds, Brian R; Cohen, Philip R

    2017-05-09

    Plasma cell leukemia is an uncommon, aggressive variant of leukemia that may occur de novo or in association with multiple myeloma. Leukemia cutis is the cutaneous manifestation of leukemia, and indicates an infiltration of the skin by malignant leukocytes or their precursors. Plasma cell leukemia cutis is a rare clinical presentation of leukemia. We present a man who developed plasma cell leukemia cutis in association with multiple myeloma. Cutaneous nodules developed on his arms and legs 50 days following an autologous stem cell transplant. Histopathologic examination showed CD138-positive nodular aggregates of atypical plasma cells with kappa light chain restriction, similar to the phenotype of his myeloma. In spite of systemic treatment of his underlying disease, he died 25 days after the presentation of leukemia cutis. Pub-Med was searched for the following terms: cutaneous plasmacytomas, leukemia cutis, plasma cell leukemia nodules, plasma cell leukemia cutis, and secondary cutaneous plasmacytoma. Papers were reviewed and appropriate references evaluated. Leukemia cutis in plasma cell leukemia patients is an infrequent occurrence. New skin lesions in patients with plasma cell leukemia should be biopsied for pathology and for tissue cultures to evaluate for cancer or infection, respectively. The diagnosis plasma cell leukemia cutis is associated with a very poor prognosis.

  2. Superficial treatment of mammalian cells using plasma needle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffels, E.; Kieft, I. E.; Sladek, R. E. J.

    2003-12-01

    Interactions of a small-size, non-thermal plasma (plasma needle) with living cells in culture are studied. We have demonstrated the non-destructive character of the plasma needle: under moderate conditions (low-power and low concentration of molecular species) the plasma needle does not heat biological samples and does not induce cell death. Treatment of living cells is restricted to the cell exterior (membrane). As a result of the interactions of plasma radicals with cell adhesion molecules, cell attachment is temporarily interrupted; the loose cells can be removed, reattached or transferred. This effect may prove very useful in fine surgery, where a part of the tissue must be removed with high-precision, without damage to the adjacent cells and without inflammatory reaction.

  3. Effect of BCD Plasma on a Bacteria Cell Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasrin, Navabsafa; Hamid, Ghomi; Maryam, Nikkhah; Soheila, Mohades; Hossein, Dabiri; Saeed, Ghasemi

    2013-07-01

    Abstract Cell membrane rupture is considered to be one of the probable mechanisms for bacterial inactivation using barrier corona discharge (BCD) plasma. In this paper, the effect of the BCD plasma on the Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria cell wall was investigated through two analytical methods; Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) assay and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The ATP assay results indicate an increase in the ATP content of samples which were exposed to the BCD plasma. This implies the bacteria cell rupture. Moreover, AFM images confirm a serious damage of the bacteria cell wall under the influence of the bactericidal agents of the plasma.

  4. Development of plasma-on-chip: Plasma treatment for individual cells cultured in media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Shinya; Chang, Chun-Yao; Jeong, Jonghyeon; Kobayashi, Mime; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Sasaki, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    A device consisting of Si microwells and microplasma sources has been fabricated for plasma treatment of individual cells cultured in media. We named the device plasma-on-chip. The microwells have through-holes at the bottom where gas-liquid interfaces form when they are filled with media containing biological samples. The microplasma sources, which supply reactive species, are located on the back of each microwell. Through the gas-liquid interface, the reactive species are supplied to the cells. Chlorella cells were used to demonstrate the feasibility of the device and after three minutes of plasma treatment, the fluorescence intensity of Chlorella cells appeared to be decreased. Optical emission spectroscopy identified O and OH radicals in the plasma, which can affect the cells. In the analysis of biological samples such as human cells or tissues, this device raises the possibility of revealing the mechanisms of plasma medicine in more detail.

  5. Towards Stratified Medicine in Plasma Cell Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Philip; Drain, Stephen; Conway, Caroline; Bjourson, Anthony J.; Alexander, H. Denis

    2016-01-01

    Plasma cell myeloma is a clinically heterogeneous malignancy accounting for approximately one to 2% of newly diagnosed cases of cancer worldwide. Treatment options, in addition to long-established cytotoxic drugs, include autologous stem cell transplant, immune modulators, proteasome inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, plus further targeted therapies currently in clinical trials. Whilst treatment decisions are mostly based on a patient’s age, fitness, including the presence of co-morbidities, and tumour burden, significant scope exists for better risk stratification, sub-classification of disease, and predictors of response to specific therapies. Clinical staging, recurring acquired cytogenetic aberrations, and serum biomarkers such as β-2 microglobulin, and free light chains are in widespread use but often fail to predict the disease progression or inform treatment decision making. Recent scientific advances have provided considerable insight into the biology of myeloma. For example, gene expression profiling is already making a contribution to enhanced understanding of the biology of the disease whilst Next Generation Sequencing has revealed great genomic complexity and heterogeneity. Pathways involved in the oncogenesis, proliferation of the tumour and its resistance to apoptosis are being unravelled. Furthermore, knowledge of the tumour cell surface and its interactions with bystander cells and the bone marrow stroma enhance this understanding and provide novel targets for cell and antibody-based therapies. This review will discuss the development in understanding of the biology of the tumour cell and its environment in the bone marrow, the implementation of new therapeutic options contributing to significantly improved outcomes, and the progression towards more personalised medicine in this disorder. PMID:27775669

  6. Towards Stratified Medicine in Plasma Cell Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Egan, Philip; Drain, Stephen; Conway, Caroline; Bjourson, Anthony J; Alexander, H Denis

    2016-10-21

    Plasma cell myeloma is a clinically heterogeneous malignancy accounting for approximately one to 2% of newly diagnosed cases of cancer worldwide. Treatment options, in addition to long-established cytotoxic drugs, include autologous stem cell transplant, immune modulators, proteasome inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, plus further targeted therapies currently in clinical trials. Whilst treatment decisions are mostly based on a patient's age, fitness, including the presence of co-morbidities, and tumour burden, significant scope exists for better risk stratification, sub-classification of disease, and predictors of response to specific therapies. Clinical staging, recurring acquired cytogenetic aberrations, and serum biomarkers such as β-2 microglobulin, and free light chains are in widespread use but often fail to predict the disease progression or inform treatment decision making. Recent scientific advances have provided considerable insight into the biology of myeloma. For example, gene expression profiling is already making a contribution to enhanced understanding of the biology of the disease whilst Next Generation Sequencing has revealed great genomic complexity and heterogeneity. Pathways involved in the oncogenesis, proliferation of the tumour and its resistance to apoptosis are being unravelled. Furthermore, knowledge of the tumour cell surface and its interactions with bystander cells and the bone marrow stroma enhance this understanding and provide novel targets for cell and antibody-based therapies. This review will discuss the development in understanding of the biology of the tumour cell and its environment in the bone marrow, the implementation of new therapeutic options contributing to significantly improved outcomes, and the progression towards more personalised medicine in this disorder.

  7. Development of motorized plasma lithography for cell patterning.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Shinji; Nagasawa, Yohei; Saito, Akira C; Matsui, Tsubasa S; Yokoyama, Sho; Sato, Masaaki

    2014-03-01

    The micropatterning of cells, which restricts the adhesive regions on the substrate and thus controls cell geometry, is used to study mechanobiology-related cell functions. Plasma lithography is a means of providing such patterns and uses a spatially-selective plasma treatment. Conventional plasma lithography employs a positionally-fixed mask with which the geometry of the patterns is determined and thus is not suited for producing on-demand geometries of patterns. To overcome this, we have manufactured a new device with a motorized mask mounted in a vacuum chamber of a plasma generator, which we designate motorized plasma lithography. Our pilot tests indicate that various pattern geometries can be obtained with the control of a shielding mask during plasma treatment. Our approach can thus omit the laborious process of preparing photolithographically microfabricated masks required for the conventional plasma lithography.

  8. Responses of cells in plasma-activated medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Takeda, Keigo; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kano, Hiroyuki; Okazaki, Yasumasa; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-09-01

    Plasma consists of electrons, ions, radicals, and lights, and produces various reactive species in gas and liquid phase. Cells receive various inputs from their circumstances, and induce several physiological outputs. Our goal is to clarify the relationships between plasma inputs and physiological outputs. Plasma-activated medium (PAM) is a circumstance that plasma provides cells and our previous studies suggest that PAM is a promising tool for cancer therapy. However, the mode of actions remains to be elucidated. We propose survival and proliferation signaling networks as well as redox signaling networks are key factors to understand cellular responses of PAM-treated glioblastoma cells.

  9. Magnetron cathodes in plasma electrode Pockels cells

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, M.A.

    1995-04-25

    Magnetron cathodes, which produce high current discharges, form greatly improved plasma electrodes on each side of an electro-optic crystal. The plasma electrode has a low pressure gas region on both sides of the crystal. When the gas is ionized, e.g., by a glow discharge in the low pressure gas, the plasma formed is a good conductor. The gas electrode acts as a highly uniform conducting electrode. Since the plasma is transparent to a high energy laser beam passing through the crystal, the plasma is transparent. A crystal exposed from two sides to such a plasma can be charged up uniformly to any desired voltage. A typical configuration utilizes helium at 50 millitorr operating pressure and 2 kA discharge current. The magnetron cathode produces a more uniform plasma and allows a reduced operating pressure which leads to lower plasma resistivity and a more uniform charge on the crystal. 5 figs.

  10. Magnetron cathodes in plasma electrode pockels cells

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetron cathodes, which produce high current discharges, form greatly improved plasma electrodes on each side of an electro-optic crystal. The plasma electrode has a low pressure gas region on both sides of the crystal. When the gas is ionized, e.g., by a glow discharge in the low pressure gas, the plasma formed is a good conductor. The gas electrode acts as a highly uniform conducting electrode. Since the plasma is transparent to a high energy laser beam passing through the crystal, the plasma is transparent. A crystal exposed from two sides to such a plasma can be charged up uniformly to any desired voltage. A typical configuration utilizes helium at 50 millitorr operating. pressure and 2 kA discharge current. The magnetron cathode produces a more uniform plasma and allows a reduced operating pressure which leads to lower plasma resistivity and a more uniform charge on the crystal.

  11. Plasma polymerization for cell adhesive/anti-adhesive implant coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meichsner, Juergen; Testrich, Holger; Rebl, Henrike; Nebe, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Plasma polymerization of ethylenediamine (C2H8N2, EDA) and perfluoropropane (C3F8, PFP) with admixture of argon and hydrogen, respectively, was studied using an asymmetric 13.56 MHz CCP. The analysis of the plasma chemical gas phase processes for stable molecules revealed consecutive reactions: C2H8N2 consumption, intermediate product NH3, and main final product HCN. In C3F8- H2 plasma the precursor molecule C3F8 and molecular hydrogen are consumed and HF as well as CF4 and C2F6 are found as main gaseous reaction products. The deposited plasma polymer films on the powered electrode are strongly cross-linked due to ion bombardment. The stable plasma polymerized films from EDA are characterized by high content of nitrogen with N/C ratio of about 0.35. The plasma polymerized fluorocarbon film exhibit a reduced F/C ratio of about 1.2. Adhesion tests with human osteoblast cell line MG-63 on coated Ti6Al4V samples (polished) compared with uncoated reference sample yielded both, the enhanced cell adhesion for plasma polymerized EDA and significantly reduced cell adhesion for fluorocarbon coating, respectively. Aging of the plasma polymerized EDA film, in particular due to the reactions with oxygen from air, showed no significant change in the cell adhesion. The fluorocarbon coating with low cell adhesion is of interest for temporary implants. Funded by the Campus PlasmaMed.

  12. Differential effects of lenalidomide during plasma cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jourdan, Michel; Cren, Maïlys; Schafer, Peter; Robert, Nicolas; Duperray, Christophe; Vincent, Laure; Ceballos, Patrice; Cartron, Guillaume; Rossi, Jean-François; Moreaux, Jérôme; Chopra, Rajesh; Klein, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Thalidomide, lenalidomide and pomalidomide have greatly improved the outcome of patients with multiple myeloma. However, their effects on plasma cells, the healthy counterpart of myeloma cells, are unknown. Here, we investigated lenalidomide effects on normal human plasma cell generation using an in vitro model. Lenalidomide inhibited the generation of pre-plasmablasts and early plasma cells, while it moderately affected plasmablast production. It also reduced the expression level of Ikaros, Aiolos, and IRF4 transcription factors, in plasmablasts and early plasma cells. This suggests that their differential sensitivity to lenalidomide is not due to a difference in Ikaros or Aiolos degradation. Lenalidomide also inhibited long-lived plasma cell generation, but did not impair their long-term survival once generated. This last observation is in agreement with the finding that lenalidomide treatment for 3-18 months did not affect the bone marrow healthy plasma cell count in allografted patients with multiple myeloma. Our findings should prompt to investigate whether lenalidomide resistance in patients with multiple myeloma could be associated with the emergence of malignant plasmablasts or long-lived plasma cells that are less sensitive to lenalidomide. PMID:27057635

  13. Differential effects of lenalidomide during plasma cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Jourdan, Michel; Cren, Maïlys; Schafer, Peter; Robert, Nicolas; Duperray, Christophe; Vincent, Laure; Ceballos, Patrice; Cartron, Guillaume; Rossi, Jean-François; Moreaux, Jérôme; Chopra, Rajesh; Klein, Bernard

    2016-05-10

    Thalidomide, lenalidomide and pomalidomide have greatly improved the outcome of patients with multiple myeloma. However, their effects on plasma cells, the healthy counterpart of myeloma cells, are unknown. Here, we investigated lenalidomide effects on normal human plasma cell generation using an in vitro model. Lenalidomide inhibited the generation of pre-plasmablasts and early plasma cells, while it moderately affected plasmablast production. It also reduced the expression level of Ikaros, Aiolos, and IRF4 transcription factors, in plasmablasts and early plasma cells. This suggests that their differential sensitivity to lenalidomide is not due to a difference in Ikaros or Aiolos degradation. Lenalidomide also inhibited long-lived plasma cell generation, but did not impair their long-term survival once generated. This last observation is in agreement with the finding that lenalidomide treatment for 3-18 months did not affect the bone marrow healthy plasma cell count in allografted patients with multiple myeloma. Our findings should prompt to investigate whether lenalidomide resistance in patients with multiple myeloma could be associated with the emergence of malignant plasmablasts or long-lived plasma cells that are less sensitive to lenalidomide.

  14. Development of plasma apparatus for plasma irradiation to living cell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Ryo; Tanoue, Hideto; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Tero, Ryugo

    2012-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma has been studied for the industrial applications of biotechnology and medical care. For the development of these fields, understanding the influence of atmospheric pressure plasma on living cell and the mechanism of cell death is necessary. We focus on a basic structure of cell membrane, called lipid bilayer. Lipid bilayer is composed of lipid molecules with an amphipathic property and can be formed on hydrophilic substrates. In this paper, we report the development of the plasma apparatus for the treatment of lipid bilayer. The plasma apparatus uses a typical dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) system and employs parallel plate electrodes with a gap distance of 1 mm [1]. Each electrode is covered with a quartz plate and the substrate temperature is kept constant by cooling medium. The lower quartz electrode has a dimple, in which the substrate coated with a lipid bilayer and buffer fluid are mounted. [4pt] [1] Y. Sugioka, et al, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., in press

  15. Examination of the role of galectins in plasma cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chih-Ming; Lin, Kuo-I

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cells are terminally differentiated B cells that develop via the stimulation of mature B cells with various agents such as antigens and mitogens. Recently, we found that plasma cell differentiation can be modulated by galectin-1 and galectin-8; these galectins appear to play additive and redundant roles in promoting the production of antibody. Here, we describe the protocols for how to investigate the roles of galectins in plasma cell differentiation. These methods include the preparation of recombinant galectins from Escherichia coli for exogenously treating primary B cells, generation of galectin_Fc(m) fusion proteins for determining their binding to B cells, introduction of ectopic galectins in primary B cells using retroviral vectors, and inhibition of the binding of galectins to B cells by synthetic disaccharides.

  16. Patterns of Age-Associated Degeneration Differ in Shoulder Muscles.

    PubMed

    Raz, Yotam; Henseler, Jan F; Kolk, Arjen; Riaz, Muhammad; van der Zwaal, Peer; Nagels, Jochem; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Raz, Vered

    2015-01-01

    Shoulder complaints are common in the elderly and hamper daily functioning. These complaints are often caused by tears in the muscle-tendon units of the rotator cuff (RC). The four RC muscles stabilize the shoulder joint. While some RC muscles are frequently torn in shoulder complaints others remain intact. The pathological changes in RC muscles are poorly understood. We investigated changes in RC muscle pathology combining radiological and histological procedures. We measured cross sectional area (CSA) and fatty infiltration from Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Arthrography (MRA) in subjects without (N = 294) and with (N = 109) RC-tears. Normalized muscle CSA of the four RC muscles and the deltoid shoulder muscle were compared and age-associated patterns of muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration were constructed. We identified two distinct age-associated patterns: in the supraspinatus and subscapularis RC muscles CSAs continuously declined throughout adulthood, whereas in the infraspinatus and deltoid reduced CSA was prominent from midlife onwards. In the teres minor, CSA was unchanged with age. Most importantly, age-associated patterns were highly similar between subjects without RC tear and those with RC-tears. This suggests that extensive RC muscle atrophy during aging could contribute to RC pathology. We compared muscle pathology between torn infraspinatus and non-torn teres minor and the deltoid in two patients with a massive RC-tear. In the torn infraspinatus we found pronounced fatty droplets, an increase in extracellular collagen-1, a loss of myosin heavy chain-1 expression in myofibers and an increase in Pax7-positive cells. However, the adjacent intact teres minor and deltoid exhibited healthy muscle features. This suggests that satellite cells and the extracellular matrix may contribute to extensive muscle fibrosis in torn RC. We suggest that torn RC muscles display hallmarks of muscle aging whereas the teres minor could represent an aging

  17. Patterns of Age-Associated Degeneration Differ in Shoulder Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Raz, Yotam; Henseler, Jan F.; Kolk, Arjen; Riaz, Muhammad; van der Zwaal, Peer; Nagels, Jochem; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; Raz, Vered

    2015-01-01

    Shoulder complaints are common in the elderly and hamper daily functioning. These complaints are often caused by tears in the muscle-tendon units of the rotator cuff (RC). The four RC muscles stabilize the shoulder joint. While some RC muscles are frequently torn in shoulder complaints others remain intact. The pathological changes in RC muscles are poorly understood. We investigated changes in RC muscle pathology combining radiological and histological procedures. We measured cross sectional area (CSA) and fatty infiltration from Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Arthrography (MRA) in subjects without (N = 294) and with (N = 109) RC-tears. Normalized muscle CSA of the four RC muscles and the deltoid shoulder muscle were compared and age-associated patterns of muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration were constructed. We identified two distinct age-associated patterns: in the supraspinatus and subscapularis RC muscles CSAs continuously declined throughout adulthood, whereas in the infraspinatus and deltoid reduced CSA was prominent from midlife onwards. In the teres minor, CSA was unchanged with age. Most importantly, age-associated patterns were highly similar between subjects without RC tear and those with RC-tears. This suggests that extensive RC muscle atrophy during aging could contribute to RC pathology. We compared muscle pathology between torn infraspinatus and non-torn teres minor and the deltoid in two patients with a massive RC-tear. In the torn infraspinatus we found pronounced fatty droplets, an increase in extracellular collagen-1, a loss of myosin heavy chain-1 expression in myofibers and an increase in Pax7-positive cells. However, the adjacent intact teres minor and deltoid exhibited healthy muscle features. This suggests that satellite cells and the extracellular matrix may contribute to extensive muscle fibrosis in torn RC. We suggest that torn RC muscles display hallmarks of muscle aging whereas the teres minor could represent an aging

  18. Progressively impaired proteasomal capacity during terminal plasma cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cenci, Simone; Mezghrani, Alexandre; Cascio, Paolo; Bianchi, Giada; Cerruti, Fulvia; Fra, Anna; Lelouard, Hugues; Masciarelli, Silvia; Mattioli, Laura; Oliva, Laura; Orsi, Andrea; Pasqualetto, Elena; Pierre, Philippe; Ruffato, Elena; Tagliavacca, Luigina; Sitia, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    After few days of intense immunoglobulin (Ig) secretion, most plasma cells undergo apoptosis, thus ending the humoral immune response. We asked whether intrinsic factors link plasma cell lifespan to Ig secretion. Here we show that in the late phases of plasmacytic differentiation, when antibody production becomes maximal, proteasomal activity decreases. The excessive load for the reduced proteolytic capacity correlates with accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins, stabilization of endogenous proteasomal substrates (including Xbp1s, IκBα, and Bax), onset of apoptosis, and sensitization to proteasome inhibitors (PI). These events can be reproduced by expressing Ig-μ chain in nonlymphoid cells. Our results suggest that a developmental program links plasma cell death to protein production, and help explaining the peculiar sensitivity of normal and malignant plasma cells to PI. PMID:16498407

  19. The discovery of plasma cells: An historical note.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2017-08-01

    The name plasma cell was introduced by the anatomist Heinrich H. von Hartz-Waldeyer in 1875. Plasma cells derive from small B lymphocytes after their activation. A fully mature plasma cell lacks surface immunoglobulin expression. Its form is round or oval, with characteristic basophilic cytoplasm and an eccentric nucleus that contains coarse heterochromatin. Antigen activation of mature B cells leads initially to germinal center development, the transient generation of plasmablasts that secrete antibody while still dividing, and short-lived extrafollicular plasma cells that secrete antigen-specific germ line-encoded antibodies. Plasma cells are characterized by the co-expression of CD138 and CD38, which allows their identification in flow cytometry in bone marrow, peripheral blood, or cell suspensions from tissues. The identification of plasma cells as antibody producers was a key discovery that paved the way for the development of monoclonal antibodies. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. At the border: the plasma membrane-cell wall continuum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zengyu; Persson, Staffan; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Clara

    2015-03-01

    Plant cells rely on their cell walls for directed growth and environmental adaptation. Synthesis and remodelling of the cell walls are membrane-related processes. During cell growth and exposure to external stimuli, there is a constant exchange of lipids, proteins, and other cell wall components between the cytosol and the plasma membrane/apoplast. This exchange of material and the localization of cell wall proteins at certain spots in the plasma membrane seem to rely on a particular membrane composition. In addition, sensors at the plasma membrane detect changes in the cell wall architecture, and activate cytoplasmic signalling schemes and ultimately cell wall remodelling. The apoplastic polysaccharide matrix is, on the other hand, crucial for preventing proteins diffusing uncontrollably in the membrane. Therefore, the cell wall-plasma membrane link is essential for plant development and responses to external stimuli. This review focuses on the relationship between the cell wall and plasma membrane, and its importance for plant tissue organization. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Plasma needle: treatment of living cells and tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffels, Eva

    2003-10-01

    Non-thermal plasmas are capable of refined treatment of heat sensitive surfaces. Recently, many non-thermal sources working under atmospheric pressure have been constructed. Their main applications are various surface treatments: cleaning, etching, changing the wettability/adhesion, and bacterial decontamination. A new research at the Eindhoven University of Technology focuses on in vivo treatment by means of a novel non-thermal plasma source (the plasma needle). At present, a fundamental study has been undertaken to identify all possible responses of living objects exposed to the plasma. Plasma treatment does not lead to cell death (necrosis), which is a cause of inflammation. On the contrary, we observe various sophisticated reactions of mammalian cells, e.g. cell detachment (loss of cell contact) and programmed cell death (apoptosis). Moreover, under certain conditions the plasma is capable of killing bacteria, while eukaryotic cells remain unharmed. These findings may result in development of new techniques, like bacterial sterilization of infected (living) tissues or removal of cells without inflammatory response, and on a longer time scale to new methods in the health care. Possible applications include treatment of skin ailments, aiding wound healing and sterilization of dental cavities.

  2. Lipaemic plasma induces haemolysis in resuspended red cell concentrate.

    PubMed

    Bashir, S; Wiltshire, M; Cardigan, R; Thomas, S

    2013-04-01

    We investigated whether haemolysis in red cells suspended in plasma was affected by the lipid content and/or methylene blue (MB) treatment of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP). We also investigated whether haemolysis was affected by the conditions under which lipaemic plasma was stored. Study 1: Visibly lipaemic (n = 22) or nonlipaemic FFP (n = 24) units were thawed, pooled and split into identical pairs, one of which was MB treated. These units were used to resuspend red cell concentrates (RCC) and tested for haemolysis immediately and after 24 and 48 h of storage at 2-6°C. Study 2: Fresh plasma was aliquoted into 15-ml tubes and stored in one of four ways as follows: room temperature; 2-6°C; frozen and thawed; or twice frozen and thawed. A sample of RCC was resuspended in each of these plasmas and haemolysis measured after 2 h. Study 3: Plasma was divided into 15-ml tubes and stored as in study 2 followed by storage left standing upright in a refrigerator (2-6°C) for 24 h (with the exception of the room temperature sample). Plasma was separated into top, middle and bottom fractions and used to resuspend RCC that were assessed for haemolysis after 2 h. The levels of haemolysis in RCC were immediately greater when suspended in lipaemic plasma (0·70 ± 0·53% v 0·05 ± 0·06% for nonlipaemic plasma), which increased further on subsequent storage for 48 h (1·22 ± 0·40% v 0·15 ± 0·14% for nonlipaemic plasma). This was irrespective of whether plasma was MB treated. Lipaemic plasma stored frozen and then thawed resulted in the greatest haemolysis. In lipaemic plasma stored at 2-6°C, the chylomicron-rich top fraction caused the highest level of haemolysis. Haemolysis in red cells is increased in those suspended in lipaemic plasma and is dependent upon the storage conditions of that plasma prior to suspension. These data are relevant to the choice of plasma used to suspend red cells for neonatal exchange transfusion. © 2012 The Author(s). Vox Sanguinis © 2012

  3. ULTRASTRUCTURAL LOCALIZATION OF ANTIBODY IN DIFFERENTIATING PLASMA CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Elizabeth H.; Avrameas, Stratis; Bouteille, Michel

    1968-01-01

    Antibody was localized by electron microscopy within differentiating and mature plasma cells of the spleens of hyperimmunized rabbits. Horseradish peroxidase was used as antigen. Intracellular antibody to peroxidase was revealed in glutaraldehyde-fixed tissue by coupling it with its antigen and then revealing the sites of peroxidase activity cytochemically. Antibody first appears in the perinuclear space of hemocytoblasts where it persists through differentiation into immature plasma cells, but it disappears from this site in mature plasma cells. Concomitant with the development of the ergastoplasm, antibody accumulates in many but not all of its cisternae. Antibody is present in the lamellar portion of the Golgi apparatus in all phases of plasmacytic differentiation. Mature plasma cells exhibit two types of antibody distribution, a concentration into large spherical intracisternal granules or an overflowing into all parts of the cytoplasm. PMID:5635036

  4. Plasma cell mucositis with gingival enlargement and severe periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shalini R.; Gupta, Rajiva; Saran, Ravindra K.; Krishnan, Sriram

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cell mucositis (PCM) is a very rare, chronic, multifocal, idiopathic, non-neoplastic plasma cell proliferative disorder of the upper aerodigestive tract. The classic clinical presentation is an intensely erythematous mucosa with surface changes described variously as papillomatous, cobblestone, nodular or velvety. It is a very rare condition <50 cases reported in literature. A 72-year-old male patient complained of sore throat, stomatodynia, dysphagia, multiple oral ulcers, enlarged swollen bleeding gums and mobile teeth. There was chronic inflammatory enlargement of the gingiva and palate with severe periodontitis. Histopathological examination revealed a hyperplastic epithelium with a dense infiltrate of mature polyclonal plasma cells in the superficial layer of the lamina propria. PCM is a diagnosis of exclusion, to be differentiated from other infective, reactive, autoimmune, allergic and neoplastic disorders with plasma cell infiltrates. Management with surgical and immunosuppressive therapy is mostly ineffective with short remissions and frequent relapses. PMID:25024555

  5. Stem cell responses to plasma surface modified electrospun polyurethane scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zandén, Carl; Hellström Erkenstam, Nina; Padel, Thomas; Wittgenstein, Julia; Liu, Johan; Kuhn, H Georg

    2014-07-01

    The topographical effects from functional materials on stem cell behavior are currently of interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here we investigate the influence of argon, oxygen, and hydrogen plasma surface modification of electrospun polyurethane fibers on human embryonic stem cell (hESC) and rat postnatal neural stem cell (NSC) responses. The plasma gases were found to induce three combinations of fiber surface functionalities and roughness textures. On randomly oriented fibers, plasma treatments lead to substantially increased hESC attachment and proliferation as compared to native fibers. Argon plasma was found to induce the most optimal combination of surface functionality and roughness for cell expansion. Contact guided migration of cells and alignment of cell processes were observed on aligned fibers. Neuronal differentiation around 5% was found for all samples and was not significantly affected by the induced variations of surface functional group distribution or individual fiber topography. In this study the influence of argon, oxygen, and hydrogen plasma surface modification of electrospun polyurethane fibers on human embryonic stem cell and rat postnatal neural stem cell (NSC) responses is studied with the goal of clarifying the potential effects of functional materials on stem cell behavior, a topic of substantial interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Rapamycin treatment attenuates age-associated periodontitis in mice.

    PubMed

    An, Jonathan Y; Quarles, Ellen K; Mekvanich, Surapat; Kang, Alex; Liu, Anthony; Santos, Danielle; Miller, Richard A; Rabinovitch, Peter S; Cox, Timothy C; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2017-09-09

    Interventions that target biological mechanisms of aging have great potential to enhance quality of life by delaying morbidity and mortality. The FDA-approved drug rapamycin is a compelling candidate for such an intervention. In a previous study, it was reported that 3 months of rapamycin treatment is sufficient to increase life expectancy and remodel the gut microbiome in aged mice. Transient treatment with rapamycin or a rapamycin derivative has also been shown to delay immune stem cell senescence and rejuvenate immune function in aged mice and elderly people. Periodontal disease is an important age-related disease involving altered immune function, pathological changes to the oral microbiome, and systemic inflammation. Periodontal disease is defined clinically by loss of alveolar bone and by connective tissue degeneration. Here, we describe significant alveolar bone loss during aging in two different mouse strain backgrounds and report that rapamycin treatment is sufficient to reverse age-associated periodontal disease in mice. Partial restoration of youthful levels of alveolar bone is observed in 22-month-old rapamycin-treated mice as rapidly as 8 weeks after initiation of treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first intervention shown to substantially prevent or reverse age-associated alveolar bone loss. These findings suggest the possibility that inhibition of mTOR with rapamycin or other pharmacological agents may be useful to treat a clinically relevant condition for which there is currently no effective treatment.

  7. Effects of Non-Thermal Plasma on Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalghatgi, Sameer; Kelly, Crystal M.; Cerchar, Ekaterina; Torabi, Behzad; Alekseev, Oleg; Fridman, Alexander; Friedman, Gary; Azizkhan-Clifford, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Thermal plasmas and lasers have been widely used in medicine to cut, ablate and cauterize tissues through heating; in contrast, non-thermal plasma produces no heat, so its effects can be selective. In order to exploit the potential for clinical applications, including wound healing, sterilization, blood coagulation, and cancer treatment, a mechanistic understanding of the interaction of non-thermal plasma with living tissues is required. Using mammalian cells in culture, it is shown here that non-thermal plasma created by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) has dose-dependent effects that range from increasing cell proliferation to inducing apoptosis. It is also shown that these effects are primarily due to formation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). We have utilized γ-H2AX to detect DNA damage induced by non-thermal plasma and found that it is initiated by production of active neutral species that most likely induce formation of organic peroxides in cell medium. Phosphorylation of H2AX following non-thermal plasma treatment is ATR dependent and ATM independent, suggesting that plasma treatment may lead to replication arrest or formation of single-stranded DNA breaks; however, plasma does not lead to formation of bulky adducts/thymine dimers. PMID:21283714

  8. Electrical Diagnostics of a Macroscopic rf Plasma Display Panel Cell

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-20

    display panel cell B. Caillier, Ph. Guillot, J. Galy, L.C. Pitchford , J.P. Boeuf. Centre de Physique des Plasmas et Applications de Toulouse...Universitd Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex, France 1. Introduction Although Plasma Display Panels (PDPs) are now produced...these experiments. [4] L.C. Pitchford , J. Kang, C. Punset, and J.P. Boeuf, J. Appl. Phys. 92, 6990 (2002) [5] B. Caillier, et al, "Plasma Display Cell Operating in a RF Regime" ,ESCAMPIG 2002, 1-355. 130

  9. Transient disruptions of aortic endothelial cell plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Q C; McNeil, P L

    1992-12-01

    Cells of gut, skin, and muscle frequently suffer transient survivable plasma membrane disruptions ("wounds") under physiological conditions, but it is not known whether endothelial cells of the aorta, which are constantly exposed to hemodynamically generated mechanical forces, similarly are injured in vivo. We have used serum albumin as a molecular probe for identifying endothelial cells of the rat aorta that incurred and survived transient plasma membrane wounds in vivo. Such wounded endothelial cells were in fact observed in the aortas of all rats examined. However, the percentage of wounded cells in the total aortic endothelial population varied remarkably between individuals ranging from 1.4% to 17.9% with a mean of 6.5% (+/- 4.6% SD). Wounded endothelial cells were heterogeneously distributed, being found in distinct clusters often in the shape of streaks aligned with the long axis of the vessel, or in the shape of partial or complete rims surrounding bifurcation openings, such as the ostia of the intercostal arteries. Physical exercise (running) did not increase the frequency of aortic endothelial cell membrane wounding, nor did spontaneous hypertension. Surprisingly, 80% of mitotic endothelial cell figures were identified as wounded. This article identified a previously unrecognized form of endothelial cell injury, survivable disruptions of the plasma membrane, and shows that injury to the endothelial cells of the normal aorta is far more commonplace than previously suspected. Plasma membrane wounding of endothelial cells could be linked to the initiation of atherosclerosis.

  10. Variety of RNAs in Peripheral Blood Cells, Plasma, and Plasma Fractions

    PubMed Central

    Kuligina, Elena V.; Bariakin, Dmitry N.; Kozlov, Vadim V.; Richter, Vladimir A.; Semenov, Dmitry V.

    2017-01-01

    Human peripheral blood contains RNA in cells and in extracellular membrane vesicles, microvesicles and exosomes, as well as in cell-free ribonucleoproteins. Circulating mRNAs and noncoding RNAs, being internalized, possess the ability to modulate vital processes in recipient cells. In this study, with SOLiD sequencing technology, we performed identification, classification, and quantification of RNAs from blood fractions: cells, plasma, plasma vesicles pelleted at 16,000g and 160,000g, and vesicle-depleted plasma supernatant of healthy donors and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. It was determined that 16,000g blood plasma vesicles were enriched with cell-free mitochondria and with a set of mitochondrial RNAs. The variable RNA set of blood plasma 160,000g pellets reflected the prominent contribution of U1, U5, and U6 small nuclear RNAs' fragments and at the same time was characterized by a remarkable depletion of small nucleolar RNAs. Besides microRNAs, the variety of fragments of mRNAs and snoRNAs dominated in the set of circulating RNAs differentially expressed in blood fractions of NSCLC patients. Taken together, our data emphasize that not only extracellular microRNAs but also circulating fragments of messenger and small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs represent prominent classes of circulating regulatory ncRNAs as well as promising circulating biomarkers for the development of disease diagnostic approaches. PMID:28127559

  11. Variety of RNAs in Peripheral Blood Cells, Plasma, and Plasma Fractions.

    PubMed

    Savelyeva, Anna V; Kuligina, Elena V; Bariakin, Dmitry N; Kozlov, Vadim V; Ryabchikova, Elena I; Richter, Vladimir A; Semenov, Dmitry V

    2017-01-01

    Human peripheral blood contains RNA in cells and in extracellular membrane vesicles, microvesicles and exosomes, as well as in cell-free ribonucleoproteins. Circulating mRNAs and noncoding RNAs, being internalized, possess the ability to modulate vital processes in recipient cells. In this study, with SOLiD sequencing technology, we performed identification, classification, and quantification of RNAs from blood fractions: cells, plasma, plasma vesicles pelleted at 16,000g and 160,000g, and vesicle-depleted plasma supernatant of healthy donors and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. It was determined that 16,000g blood plasma vesicles were enriched with cell-free mitochondria and with a set of mitochondrial RNAs. The variable RNA set of blood plasma 160,000g pellets reflected the prominent contribution of U1, U5, and U6 small nuclear RNAs' fragments and at the same time was characterized by a remarkable depletion of small nucleolar RNAs. Besides microRNAs, the variety of fragments of mRNAs and snoRNAs dominated in the set of circulating RNAs differentially expressed in blood fractions of NSCLC patients. Taken together, our data emphasize that not only extracellular microRNAs but also circulating fragments of messenger and small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs represent prominent classes of circulating regulatory ncRNAs as well as promising circulating biomarkers for the development of disease diagnostic approaches.

  12. Miniature Dielectric Barrier Discharge Nonthermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells and Inhibits Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Eisenmann, Kathryn M.

    2017-01-01

    Traditional cancer treatments like radiotherapy and chemotherapy have drawbacks and are not selective for killing only cancer cells. Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasmas with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) can be applied to living cells and tissues and have emerged as novel tools for localized cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the different effects caused by miniature DBD (mDBD) plasma to A549 lung cancer cells. In this study, A549 lung cancer cells cultured in 12 well plates were treated with mDBD plasma for specified treatment times to assess the changes in the size of the area of cell detachment, the viability of attached or detached cells, and cell migration. Furthermore, we investigated an innovative mDBD plasma-based therapy for localized treatment of lung cancer cells through apoptotic induction. Our results indicate that plasma treatment for 120 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 35.8% of cells, while mDBD plasma treatment for 60 sec, 30 sec, or 15 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 20.5%, 14.1%, and 6.3% of the cell population, respectively. Additionally, we observed reduced A549 cell migration in response to mDBD plasma treatment. Thus, mDBD plasma system can be a viable platform for localized lung cancer therapy. PMID:28243603

  13. Miniature Dielectric Barrier Discharge Nonthermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells and Inhibits Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Karki, Surya B; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda; Eisenmann, Kathryn M; Ayan, Halim

    2017-01-01

    Traditional cancer treatments like radiotherapy and chemotherapy have drawbacks and are not selective for killing only cancer cells. Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasmas with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) can be applied to living cells and tissues and have emerged as novel tools for localized cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the different effects caused by miniature DBD (mDBD) plasma to A549 lung cancer cells. In this study, A549 lung cancer cells cultured in 12 well plates were treated with mDBD plasma for specified treatment times to assess the changes in the size of the area of cell detachment, the viability of attached or detached cells, and cell migration. Furthermore, we investigated an innovative mDBD plasma-based therapy for localized treatment of lung cancer cells through apoptotic induction. Our results indicate that plasma treatment for 120 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 35.8% of cells, while mDBD plasma treatment for 60 sec, 30 sec, or 15 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 20.5%, 14.1%, and 6.3% of the cell population, respectively. Additionally, we observed reduced A549 cell migration in response to mDBD plasma treatment. Thus, mDBD plasma system can be a viable platform for localized lung cancer therapy.

  14. Tubulointerstitial Nephritis with IgM-Positive Plasma Cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Naoki; Saeki, Takako; Komatsuda, Atsushi; Munemura, Chishio; Fukui, Takeaki; Imai, Naofumi; Homma, Noriyuki; Hatta, Tsuguru; Samejima, Ken-Ichi; Fujimoto, Takashi; Omori, Hiroki; Ito, Yumi; Nishikawa, Yudai; Kobayashi, Mamiko; Morikawa, Yukie; Fukushima, Sachiko; Yokoi, Seiji; Mikami, Daisuke; Kasuno, Kenji; Kimura, Hideki; Nemoto, Tomoyuki; Nakamoto, Yasunari; Sada, Kiyonao; Sugai, Manabu; Naiki, Hironobu; Yoshida, Haruyoshi; Narita, Ichiei; Saito, Yoshihiko; Iwano, Masayuki

    2017-08-09

    Infiltration by IgG-positive plasma cells is a common finding in tubulointerstitial nephritis. Indeed, it has been thought that CD138-positive mature plasma cells secrete mainly IgG, and the occurrence of tubulointerstitial nephritis with CD138-positive plasma cells secreting IgM has rarely been reported. Routine immunofluorescence of fresh frozen sections is considered the gold standard for detection of immune deposits. However, the immunoenzyme method with formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections is superior for detecting IgM- or IgG-positive cells within the renal interstitium, thus histologic variants may often go undetected. We recently discovered a case of tubulointerstitial nephritis showing IgM-positive plasma cell accumulation within the interstitium. To further explore the morphologic and clinical features of such cases, we performed a nationwide search for patients with biopsy-proven tubulointerstitial nephritis and high serum IgM levels. We identified 13 patients with tubulointerstitial nephritis and IgM-positive plasma cell infiltration confirmed with the immunoenzyme method. The clinical findings for these patients included a high prevalence of distal renal tubular acidosis (100%), Fanconi syndrome (92%), and anti-mitochondrial antibodies (82%). The pathologic findings were interstitial nephritis with diffusely distributed CD3-positive T lymphocytes and colocalized IgM-positive plasma cells, as well as tubulitis with CD3-positive T lymphocytes in the proximal tubules and collecting ducts. Additionally, levels of H(+)-ATPase, H(+), K(+)-ATPase, and the HCO3(-)-Cl(-) anion exchanger were markedly decreased in the collecting ducts. We propose to designate this group of cases, which have a common histologic and clinical form, as IgM-positive plasma cell-tubulointerstitial nephritis. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  15. Biomedical Applications of the Cold Atmospheric Plasma: Cell Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volotskova, Olga

    Current breakthrough research on cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) demonstrates that CAP has great potential in various areas, including medicine and biology, thus providing a new tool for living tissue treatment. Depending on the configuration the cold plasma sources can be used in the following areas: wound healing, skin diseases, hospital hygiene, sterilization, antifungal treatments, dental care, cosmetics targeted cell/tissue removal, and cancer treatments. This dissertation is focused on the studies of biomedical applications of cold atmospheric plasma jet based on helium flow and resultant cell responses to the cold plasma treatment. The studies were carried out on extra-cellular and intra-cellular levels in vitro. The main practical applications are wound healing and alternative to existing cancer therapy methods, areas of great interest and significant challenges. The CAP jet was built in the Micropropulsion and Nanotechnology Laboratory of Dr. Michael Keidar, as a part of multidisciplinary collaboration with the GW Medical School (Dr. M.A. Stepp) concerned with plasma medicine and bioengineering studies. Normal and cancer cells have two fundamental behavioral properties, proliferation and motility, which can be evaluated through cell migration rates and cell cycle progression. Various microscopic, spectroscopic and flow cytometry techniques were used to characterize cell responses to the cold plasma treatment. It was found that CAP effect on the cells is localized within the area of the treatment (of around ˜ 5mm in diameter). The migration rates of the normal skin cells can be reduced up to ˜ 40%. However, depending on the cell type the required treatment time is different, thus differential treatment of various cells presented in tissue is possible. The CAP effect on the migration was explained through the changes of the cell surface proteins/integrins. It was also found that normal and cancer cells respond differently to the CAP treatment under the same

  16. Low Temperature Plasma Kills SCaBER Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barekzi, Nazir; van Way, Lucas; Laroussi, Mounir

    2013-09-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder is a rare type of bladder cancer that forms as a result of chronic irritation of the epithelial lining of the bladder. The cell line used in this study is SCaBER (ATCC® HTB-3™) derived from squamous cell carcinoma of the human urinary bladder. Current treatments of bladder cancer include surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. However, the cost of these treatments, the potential toxicity of the chemotherapeutic agents and the systemic side-effects warrant an alternative to current cancer treatment. This paper represents preliminary studies to determine the effects of biologically tolerant plasma (BTP) on a cell line of human bladder cancer cells. Previous work by our group using the plasma pencil revealed the efficacy of BTP on leukemia cells suspended in solution. Based on these earlier findings we hypothesized that the plasma exposure would elicit a similar programmed cell death in the SCaBER cells. Trypan blue exclusion and MTT assays revealed the cell killing after exposure to BTP. Our study indicates that low temperature plasma generated by ionizing helium gas and the reactive species may be a suitable and safe alternative for cancer therapy.

  17. Induction of cell growth arrest by atmospheric non-thermal plasma in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chul-Ho; Bahn, Jae Hoon; Lee, Seong-Ho; Kim, Gye-Yeop; Jun, Seung-Ik; Lee, Keunho; Baek, Seung Joon

    2010-12-01

    Plasma is generated by ionizing neutral gas molecules, resulting in a mixture of energy particles, including electrons and ions. Recent progress in the understanding of non-thermal atmospheric plasma has led to applications in biomedicine. However, the exact molecular mechanisms involved in plasma-induced cell growth arrest are unclear. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of non-thermal atmospheric plasma treatment for cancer therapy and examined the mechanism by which plasma induces anti-proliferative properties and cell death in human colorectal cancer cells. Non-thermal atmospheric plasma induced cell growth arrest and induced apoptosis. In addition, plasma reduced cell migration and invasion activities. As a result, we found that plasma treatment to the cells increases β-catenin phosphorylation, suggesting that β-catenin degradation plays a role at least in part in plasma-induced anti-proliferative activity. Therefore, non-thermal atmospheric plasma constitutes a new biologic tool with the potential for therapeutic applications that modulate cell signaling and function. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. ISOLATION OF PLASMA MEMBRANE FRAGMENTS FROM HELA CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Charles W.; Ford, Lincoln E.; Bond, Howard E.; Stuart, Donald C.; Lorenz, Dianne

    1969-01-01

    A method for isolating plasma membrane fragments from HeLa cells is described. The procedure starts with the preparation of cell membrane "ghosts," obtained by gentle rupture of hypotonically swollen cells, evacuation of most of the cell contents by repeated washing, and isolation of the ghosts on a discontinuous sucrose density gradient. The ghosts are then treated by minimal sonication (5 sec) at pH 8.6, which causes the ghost membranes to pinch off into small vesicles but leaves any remaining larger intracellular particulates intact and separable by differential centrifugation. The ghost membrane vesicles are then subjected to isopycnic centrifugation on a 20–50% w/w continuous sucrose gradient in tris-magnesium buffer, pH 8.6. A band of morphologically homogeneous smooth vesicles, derived principally from plasma membrane, is recovered at 30–33% (peak density = 1.137). The plasma membrane fraction contained a Na-K-activated ATPase activity of 1.5 µmole Pi/hr per mg, 3% RNA, and 13.8% of the NADH-cytochrome c reductase activity of a heavier fraction from the same gradient which contained mitochondria and rough endoplasmic vesicles. The plasma membranes of viable HeLa cells were marked with 125I-labeled horse antibody and followed through the isolation procedure. The specific antibody binding of the plasma membrane vesicle fraction was increased 49-fold over that of the original whole cells. PMID:4239370

  19. Osteoblastlike cell adhesion on titanium surfaces modified by plasma nitriding.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Jose Sandro Pereira; Amico, Sandro Campos; Rodrigues, Almir Olegario Neves; Barboza, Carlos Augusto Galvao; Alves, Clodomiro; Croci, Alberto Tesconi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of various titanium surfaces modified by cold plasma nitriding in terms of adhesion and proliferation of rat osteoblastlike cells. Samples of grade 2 titanium were subjected to three different surface modification processes: polishing, nitriding by plasma direct current, and nitriding by cathodic cage discharge. To evaluate the effect of the surface treatment on the cellular response, the adhesion and proliferation of osteoblastlike cells (MC3T3) were quantified and the results were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Friedman statistical tests. Cellular morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy. There was more MC3T3 cell attachment on the rougher surfaces produced by cathodic cage discharge compared with polished samples (P < .05). Plasma nitriding improves titanium surface roughness and wettability, leading to osteoblastlike cell adhesion.

  20. CD138-negative clonogenic cells are plasma cells but not B cells in some multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Hosen, N; Matsuoka, Y; Kishida, S; Nakata, J; Mizutani, Y; Hasegawa, K; Mugitani, A; Ichihara, H; Aoyama, Y; Nishida, S; Tsuboi, A; Fujiki, F; Tatsumi, N; Nakajima, H; Hino, M; Kimura, T; Yata, K; Abe, M; Oka, Y; Oji, Y; Kumanogoh, A; Sugiyama, H

    2012-09-01

    Clonogenic multiple myeloma (MM) cells reportedly lacked expression of plasma cell marker CD138. It was also shown that CD19(+) clonotypic B cells can serve as MM progenitor cells in some patients. However, it is unclear whether CD138-negative clonogenic MM plasma cells are identical to clonotypic CD19(+) B cells. We found that in vitro MM colony-forming cells were enriched in CD138(-)CD19(-)CD38(++) plasma cells, while CD19(+) B cells never formed MM colonies in 16 samples examined in this study. We next used the SCID-rab model, which enables engraftment of human MM in vivo. CD138(-)CD19(-)CD38(++) plasma cells engrafted in this model rapidly propagated MM in 3 out of 9 cases, while no engraftment of CD19(+) B cells was detected. In 4 out of 9 cases, CD138(+) plasma cells propagated MM, although more slowly than CD138(-) cells. Finally, we transplanted CD19(+) B cells from 13 MM patients into NOD/SCID IL2Rγc(-/-) mice, but MM did not develop. These results suggest that at least in some MM patients CD138-negative clonogenic cells are plasma cells rather than B cells, and that MM plasma cells including CD138(-) and CD138(+) cells have the potential to propagate MM clones in vivo in the absence of CD19(+) B cells.

  1. Age-Associated Lipidome Changes in Metaphase II Mouse Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Mok, Hyuck Jun; Shin, Hyejin; Lee, Jae Won; Lee, Geun-Kyung; Suh, Chang Suk; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Lim, Hyunjung Jade

    2016-01-01

    The quality of mammalian oocytes declines with age, which negatively affects fertilization and developmental potential. The aging process often accompanies damages to macromolecules such as proteins, DNA, and lipids. To investigate if aged oocytes display an altered lipidome compared to young oocytes, we performed a global lipidomic analysis between oocytes from 4-week-old and 42 to 50-week-old mice. Increased oxidative stress is often considered as one of the main causes of cellular aging. Thus, we set up a group of 4-week-old oocytes treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a commonly used oxidative stressor, to compare if similar lipid species are altered between aged and oxidative-stressed oocytes. Between young and aged oocytes, we identified 26 decreased and 6 increased lipids in aged oocytes; and between young and H2O2-treated oocytes, we identified 35 decreased and 26 increased lipids in H2O2-treated oocytes. The decreased lipid species in these two comparisons were overlapped, whereas the increased lipid species were distinct. Multiple phospholipid classes, phosphatidic acid (PA), phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylserine (PS), and lysophosphatidylserine (LPS) significantly decreased both in H2O2-treated and aged oocytes, suggesting that the integrity of plasma membrane is similarly affected under these conditions. In contrast, a dramatic increase in diacylglycerol (DG) was only noted in H2O2-treated oocytes, indicating that the acute effect of H2O2-caused oxidative stress is distinct from aging-associated lipidome alteration. In H2O2-treated oocytes, the expression of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1 increased along with increases in phosphatidylcholine. Overall, our data reveal that several classes of phospholipids are affected in aged oocytes, suggesting that the integrity of plasma membrane is associated with maintaining fertilization and developmental potential of mouse oocytes.

  2. Age-Associated Lipidome Changes in Metaphase II Mouse Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Won; Lee, Geun-Kyung; Suh, Chang Suk; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Lim, Hyunjung Jade

    2016-01-01

    The quality of mammalian oocytes declines with age, which negatively affects fertilization and developmental potential. The aging process often accompanies damages to macromolecules such as proteins, DNA, and lipids. To investigate if aged oocytes display an altered lipidome compared to young oocytes, we performed a global lipidomic analysis between oocytes from 4-week-old and 42 to 50-week-old mice. Increased oxidative stress is often considered as one of the main causes of cellular aging. Thus, we set up a group of 4-week-old oocytes treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a commonly used oxidative stressor, to compare if similar lipid species are altered between aged and oxidative-stressed oocytes. Between young and aged oocytes, we identified 26 decreased and 6 increased lipids in aged oocytes; and between young and H2O2-treated oocytes, we identified 35 decreased and 26 increased lipids in H2O2-treated oocytes. The decreased lipid species in these two comparisons were overlapped, whereas the increased lipid species were distinct. Multiple phospholipid classes, phosphatidic acid (PA), phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylserine (PS), and lysophosphatidylserine (LPS) significantly decreased both in H2O2-treated and aged oocytes, suggesting that the integrity of plasma membrane is similarly affected under these conditions. In contrast, a dramatic increase in diacylglycerol (DG) was only noted in H2O2-treated oocytes, indicating that the acute effect of H2O2-caused oxidative stress is distinct from aging-associated lipidome alteration. In H2O2-treated oocytes, the expression of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1 increased along with increases in phosphatidylcholine. Overall, our data reveal that several classes of phospholipids are affected in aged oocytes, suggesting that the integrity of plasma membrane is associated with maintaining fertilization and developmental potential of mouse oocytes. PMID:26881843

  3. Age-Associated Differences in MiRNA Signatures Are Restricted to CD45RO Negative T Cells and Are Associated with Changes in the Cellular Composition, Activation and Cellular Ageing.

    PubMed

    Teteloshvili, Nato; Kluiver, Joost; van der Geest, Kornelis S M; van der Lei, Roelof Jan; Jellema, Pytrick; Pawelec, Graham; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; Boots, Annemieke M H; van den Berg, Anke

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important players in the regulation of T-cell functionality. However, comprehensive insight into the extent of age-related miRNA changes in T cells is lacking. We established miRNA expression patterns of CD45RO- naïve and CD45RO+ memory T-cell subsets isolated from peripheral blood cells from young and elderly individuals. Unsupervised clustering of the miRNA expression data revealed an age-related clustering in the CD45RO- T cells, while CD45RO+ T cells clustered based on expression of CD4 and CD8. Seventeen miRNAs showed an at least 2-fold up- or downregulation in CD45RO- T cells obtained from young as compared to old donors. Validation on the same and independent samples revealed a statistically significant age-related upregulation of miR-21, miR-223 and miR-15a. In a T-cell subset analysis focusing on known age-related phenotypic changes, we showed significantly higher miR-21 and miR-223 levels in CD8+CD45RO-CCR7- TEMRA compared to CD45RO-CCR7+ TNAIVE-cells. Moreover, miR-21 but not miR-223 levels were significantly increased in CD45RO-CD31- post-thymic TNAIVE cells as compared to thymic CD45RO-CD31+ TNAIVE cells. Upon activation of CD45RO- TNAIVE cells we observed a significant induction of miR-21 especially in CD4+ T cells, while miR-223 levels significantly decreased only in CD4+ T cells. Besides composition and activation-induced changes, we showed a borderline significant increase in miR-21 levels upon an increasing number of population doublings in CD4+ T-cell clones. Together, our results show that ageing related changes in miRNA expression are dominant in the CD45RO- T-cell compartment. The differential expression patterns can be explained by age related changes in T-cell composition, i.e. accumulation of CD8+ TEMRA and CD4+ post-thymic expanded CD31- T cells and by cellular ageing, as demonstrated in a longitudinal clonal culture model.

  4. Arsenic trioxide and melarsoprol induce apoptosis in plasma cell lines and in plasma cells from myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Rousselot, P; Labaume, S; Marolleau, J P; Larghero, J; Noguera, M H; Brouet, J C; Fermand, J P

    1999-03-01

    Recent data have renewed the interest for arsenic-containing compounds as anticancer agents. In particular, arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has been demonstrated to be an effective drug in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia by inducing programmed cell death in leukemic cells both in vitro and in vivo. This prompted us to study the in vitro effects of As2O3 and of another arsenical derivative, the organic compound melarsoprol, on human myeloma cells and on the plasma cell differentiation of normal B cells. At pharmacological concentrations (10(-8) to 10(-6) mol/L), As2O3 and melarsoprol caused a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of survival and growth in myeloma cell lines that was, in some, similar to that of acute promyelocytic leukemia cells. Both arsenical compounds induced plasma cell apoptosis, as assessed by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining, detection of phosphatidylserine at the cell surface using annexin V, and by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling assay. As2O3 and melarsoprol also inhibited viability and growth and induced apoptosis in plasma-cell enriched preparations from the bone marrow or blood of myeloma patients. In nonseparated bone marrow samples, both arsenical compounds triggered death in myeloma cells while sparing most myeloid cells, as demonstrated by double staining with annexin V and CD38 or CD15 antibodies. In primary myeloma cells as in cell lines, interleukin 6 did not prevent arsenic-induced cell death or growth inhibition, and no synergistic effect was observed with IFN-alpha. In contrast to As2O3, melarsoprol only slightly reduced the plasma cell differentiation of normal B cells induced by pokeweed mitogen. Both pokeweed mitogen-induced normal plasma cells and malignant plasma cells showed a normal nuclear distribution of PML protein, which was disrupted by As2O3 but not by melarsoprol, suggesting that the two arsenical derivatives acted by different mechanisms. These results point to the

  5. Conservative fluid management prevents age-associated ventilator induced mortality.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Joseph A; Valentine, Michael S; Saravanan, Nivi; Schneck, Matthew B; Pidaparti, Ramana; Fowler, Alpha A; Reynolds, Angela M; Heise, Rebecca L

    2016-08-01

    Approximately 800 thousand patients require mechanical ventilation in the United States annually with an in-hospital mortality rate of over 30%. The majority of patients requiring mechanical ventilation are over the age of 65 and advanced age is known to increase the severity of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) and in-hospital mortality rates. However, the mechanisms which predispose aging ventilator patients to increased mortality rates are not fully understood. Ventilation with conservative fluid management decreases mortality rates in acute respiratory distress patients, but to date there has been no investigation of the effect of conservative fluid management on VILI and ventilator associated mortality rates. We hypothesized that age-associated increases in susceptibility and incidence of pulmonary edema strongly promote age-related increases in ventilator associated mortality. 2month old and 20month old male C57BL6 mice were mechanically ventilated with either high tidal volume (HVT) or low tidal volume (LVT) for up to 4h with either liberal or conservative fluid support. During ventilation, lung compliance, total lung capacity, and hysteresis curves were quantified. Following ventilation, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was analyzed for total protein content and inflammatory cell infiltration. Wet to dry ratios were used to directly measure edema in excised lungs. Lung histology was performed to quantify alveolar barrier damage/destruction. Age matched non-ventilated mice were used as controls. At 4h, both advanced age and HVT ventilation significantly increased markers of inflammation and injury, degraded pulmonary mechanics, and decreased survival rates. Conservative fluid support significantly diminished pulmonary edema and improved pulmonary mechanics by 1h in advanced age HVT subjects. In 4h ventilations, conservative fluid support significantly diminished pulmonary edema, improved lung mechanics, and resulted in significantly lower mortality rates in

  6. Conservative Fluid Management Prevents Age-Associated Ventilator Induced Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Joseph A.; Valentine, Michael S.; Saravanan, Nivi; Schneck, Matthew B.; Pidaparti, Ramana; Fowler, Alpha A.; Reynolds, Angela M.; Heise, Rebecca L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Approximately 800 thousand patients require mechanical ventilation in the United States annually with an in-hospital mortality rate of over 30%. The majority of patients requiring mechanical ventilation are over the age of 65 and advanced age is known to increase the severity of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) and in-hosptial mortality rates. However, the mechanisms which predispose aging ventilator patients to increased mortality rates are not fully understood. Ventilation with conservative fluid management decreases mortality rates in acute respiratory distress patients, but to date there has been no investigation of the effect of conservative fluid management on VILI and ventilator associated mortality rates. We hypothesized that age-associated increases in susceptibility and incidence of pulmonary edema strongly promote age-related increases in ventilator associated mortality. Methods 2 month old and 20 month old male C57BL6 mice were mechanically ventilated with either high tidal volume (HVT) or low tidal volume (LVT) for up to 4 hours with either liberal or conservative fluid support. During ventilation, lung compliance, total lung capacity, and hysteresis curves were quantified. Following ventilation, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was analyzed for total protein content and inflammatory cell infiltration. Wet to dry ratios were used to directly measure edema in excised lungs. Lung histology was performed to quantify alveolar barrier damage/destruction. Age matched non-ventilated mice were used as controls. Results At 4hrs, both advanced age and HVT ventilation significantly increased markers of inflammation and injury, degraded pulmonary mechanics, and decreased survival rates. Conservative fluid support significantly diminished pulmonary edema and improved pulmonary mechanics by 1hr in advanced age HVT subjects. In 4hr ventilations, conservative fluid support significantly diminished pulmonary edema, improved lung mechanics, and resulted in

  7. Anti-cancer efficacy of nonthermal plasma dissolved in a liquid, liquid plasma in heterogeneous cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Ngoc Hoan; Park, Hyung Jun; Yang, Sang Sik; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2016-07-01

    The therapeutic potential of nonthermal plasma for cancer treatment has been reported recently. The heterogeneity of cancer cells need to be addressed to design effective anticancer treatments. Here, we show that treatment with nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasma dissolved in a liquid (liquid plasma) induces oxidative stress in heterogeneous populations of cancer cells and ultimately kills these cells via apoptosis, regardless of genetic status, e.g., mutations in p53 and other DNA-damage-response genes. We found that liquid plasma markedly increased the concentration of intracellular and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), reflecting an influx from the extracellular milieu. Liquid plasma contributed to mitochondrial accumulation of ROS and depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential with consequent cell death. Healthy normal cells, however, were hardly affected by the liquid-plasma treatment. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine blocked liquid-plasma-induced cell death. A knockdown of CuZn-superoxide dismutase or Mn-SOD enhanced the plasma-induced cell death, whereas expression of exogenous CuZn-SOD, Mn-SOD, or catalase blocked the cell death. These results suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction mediated by ROS production is a key contributor to liquid-plasma-induced apoptotic cell death, regardless of genetic variation. Thus, liquid plasma may have clinical applications, e.g., the development of therapeutic strategies and prevention of disease progression despite tumor heterogeneity.

  8. Anti-cancer efficacy of nonthermal plasma dissolved in a liquid, liquid plasma in heterogeneous cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ngoc Hoan; Park, Hyung Jun; Yang, Sang Sik; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of nonthermal plasma for cancer treatment has been reported recently. The heterogeneity of cancer cells need to be addressed to design effective anticancer treatments. Here, we show that treatment with nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasma dissolved in a liquid (liquid plasma) induces oxidative stress in heterogeneous populations of cancer cells and ultimately kills these cells via apoptosis, regardless of genetic status, e.g., mutations in p53 and other DNA-damage-response genes. We found that liquid plasma markedly increased the concentration of intracellular and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), reflecting an influx from the extracellular milieu. Liquid plasma contributed to mitochondrial accumulation of ROS and depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential with consequent cell death. Healthy normal cells, however, were hardly affected by the liquid-plasma treatment. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine blocked liquid-plasma-induced cell death. A knockdown of CuZn-superoxide dismutase or Mn-SOD enhanced the plasma-induced cell death, whereas expression of exogenous CuZn-SOD, Mn-SOD, or catalase blocked the cell death. These results suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction mediated by ROS production is a key contributor to liquid-plasma-induced apoptotic cell death, regardless of genetic variation. Thus, liquid plasma may have clinical applications, e.g., the development of therapeutic strategies and prevention of disease progression despite tumor heterogeneity. PMID:27364630

  9. Analysis of non-thermal plasma-induced cell injury in human lung cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Hirofumi; Sano, Kaori; Wada, Motoi; Mizuno, Kazue; Ono, Ryo; Yasuda, Hachiro; Takashima, Kazunori; Mizuno, Akira

    2015-09-01

    Recent progress of biomedical application of atmospheric pressure plasma shows that the biological effects are mainly due to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in liquid produced by the plasma exposure. To elucidate the cellular responses induced by exposure to the plasma, we focused on identification and quantification of reactive chemical species in plasma-exposed cell culture medium, and cell injury in mammalian cells after treatment of the plasma-exposed medium. In this study, we examined human lung cancer cell lines. The contribution of H2O2 to the cellular responses was considered. Here, an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) sustained by a pulsed power supply in argon was used. After APPJ exposure to cell culture medium, RONS detection in liquid was conducted. It showed that OH radical, ONOO-, NO2-, NO3-, and H2O2 were produced in the plasma-exposed medium. Cellular responses of human lung cancer cell lines to the plasma-exposed medium in a concentration-dependence manner were also studied. It showed that the plasma-exposed medium and the H2O2 treatment gave similar reduction in viability and induction of apoptosis. This work was partly supported by MEXT KAKENHI Grant Number 24108005 and JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26390096.

  10. Probing cell migration in confined environments by plasma lithography.

    PubMed

    Junkin, Michael; Wong, Pak Kin

    2011-03-01

    Cellular processes are regulated by various mechanical and physical factors in their local microenvironment such as geometric confinements, cell-substrate interactions, and cell-cell contact. Systematic elucidation of these regulatory mechanisms is crucial for fundamental understanding of cell biology and for rational design of biomedical devices and regenerative medicine. Here, we report a generally applicable plasma lithography technique, which performs selective surface functionalization on large substrate areas, for achieving long-term, stable confinements with length scales from 100 nm to 1 cm toward the investigation of cell-microenvironment interactions. In particular, we applied plasma lithography for cellular confinement of neuroblastomas, myoblasts, endothelial cells, and mammary gland epithelial cells, and examined the motion of mouse embryonic fibroblasts in directionality-confined environments for studying the effect of confinements on migratory behavior. In conjunction with live cell imaging, the distance traveled, velocity, and angular motion of individual cells and collective cell migration behaviors were measured in confined environments with dimensions comparable to a cell. A critical length scale that a cell could conceivably occupy and migrate to was also identified by investigating the behaviors of cells using confined environments with subcellular length scales. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Probing cell migration in confined environments by plasma lithography

    PubMed Central

    Junkin, Michael; Wong, Pak Kin

    2010-01-01

    Cellular processes are regulated by various mechanical and physical factors in their local microenvironment such as geometric confinements, cell-substrate interactions, and cell-cell contact. Systematic elucidation of these regulatory mechanisms is crucial for fundamental understanding of cell biology and for rational design of biomedical devices and regenerative medicine. Here, we report a generally applicable plasma lithography technique, which performs selective surface functionalization on large substrate areas, for achieving long-term, stable confinements with length scales from 100 nm to 1 cm toward the investigation of cell-microenvironment interactions. In particular, we applied plasma lithography for cellular confinement of neuroblastomas, myoblasts, endothelial cells, and mammary gland epithelial cells, and examined the motion of mouse embryonic fibroblasts in directionality-confined environments for studying the effect of confinements on migratory behavior. In conjunction with live cell imaging, the distance traveled, velocity, and angular motion of individual cells and collective cell migration behaviors were measured in confined environments with dimensions comparable to a cell. A critical length scale that a cell could conceivably occupy and migrate to was also identified by investigating the behaviors of cells using confined environments with subcellular length scales. PMID:21134692

  12. Plasma Treatment of Single-Cell Niobium SRF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    J. Upadhyay, M. Nikolić, S. Popović, L. Vušković, H.L. Phillips, A-M. Valente-Feliciano

    2011-03-01

    Superconducting radio frequency cavities of bulk Niobium are integral components of particle accelerators based on superconducting technology. Wet chemical processing is the commonly used procedure for impurities and surface defects removal and surface roughness improvement , both required to improve the RF performance of the cavity. We are studying plasma etching as an alternate technique to process these cavities. The uniformity of the plasma sheath at the inner wall of the cavity is one prerequisite for its uniform etching. We are developing electro-optic diagnostic techniques to assess the plasma uniformity. Multiple electro-optical probes are placed at different locations of the single cell cavity to diagnose the electrical and optical properties of the plasma. The electrical parameters are required to understand the kinetic nature of the plasma and the optical emission spectroscopy provides the spatial distribution of radicals in the plasma. The spatial variation of the plasma parameters inside the cavity and their effect on the etching of niobium samples placed at different locations in the cavity will be presented.

  13. Distinct T helper cell dependence of memory B-cell proliferation versus plasma cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zabel, Franziska; Fettelschoss, Antonia; Vogel, Monique; Johansen, Pål; Kündig, Thomas M; Bachmann, Martin F

    2017-03-01

    Several memory B-cell subclasses with distinct functions have been described, of which the most effective is the class-switched (CS) memory B-cell population. We have previously shown, using virus-like particles (VLPs), that the proliferative potential of these CS memory B cells is limited and they fail to re-enter germinal centres (GCs). However, VLP-specific memory B cells quickly differentiated into secondary plasma cells (PCs) with the virtue of elevated antibody production compared with primary PCs. Whereas the induction of VLP(+) memory B cells was strongly dependent on T helper cells, we were wondering whether re-stimulation of VLP(+) memory B cells and their differentiation into secondary PCs would also require T helper cells. Global absence of T helper cells led to strongly impaired memory B cell proliferation and PC differentiation. In contrast, lack of interleukin-21 receptor-dependent follicular T helper cells or CD40 ligand signalling strongly affected proliferation of memory B cells, but differentiation into mature secondary PCs exhibiting increased antibody production was essentially normal. This contrasts with primary B-cell responses, where a strong dependence on CD40 ligand but limited importance of interleukin-21 receptor was seen. Hence, T helper cell dependence differs between primary and secondary B-cell responses as well as between memory B-cell proliferation and PC differentiation.

  14. Lichen Planus With Predominate Plasma Cell Infiltrate: Two Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Huyenlan; Seyffert, Jennifer; Lountzis, Nektarios I; Altman, Howard B; Oram, Christian; Purcell, Stephen M

    2017-02-01

    Lichen planus (LP) is a mucocutaneous inflammatory dermatitis of idiopathic origin that can involve the skin, mucous membranes, hair, and nails. LP has an associated set of characteristic histopathologic findings which include hyperkeratosis, vacuolization of the basal layer, Civatte bodies, wedge-shaped hypergranulosis, band-like lymphocytic infiltrate at the dermal epidermal junction, eosinophilic colloid bodies in the papillary dermis, and pigment incontinence. The infiltrate is usually composed of lymphocytes with few histiocytes, mast cells, and macrophages. The presence of plasma cell predominant infiltrate in LP has only been reported in four previous cases and 2 other cases of lichen nitidus. The authors report another 2 cases of LP with predominate plasma cell infiltrate in 2 female patients on the legs. The differential includes a drug-induced lichenoid reaction with predominate plasma cell infiltrate. However, there have been no case reports of that type of reaction. Because plasma cells are seen commonly in certain infectious diseases, malignancy, and macroglobulinemia, it is prudent to rule out those entities. Our patients responded well with a class 1 topical steroid, with improvement of their lower leg lesions within 1 month of treatment.

  15. rs78378222 polymorphism in the 3'-untranslated region of TP53 contributes to development of age-associated cataracts by modifying microRNA-125b-induced apoptosis of lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; Li, Xiao; Zhu, Siquan

    2016-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) negatively regulate the expression of the target genes by binding to 'seed sequences' in the 3'‑untranslated region (3'‑UTR) mRNA transcripts, and the variants within or nearby 'seed sequences' may compromise or enhance miRNA/mRNA interaction leading to either 'loss‑of‑function' or 'gain‑of‑function' effects. Cataracts are the leading cause of blindness worldwide and are characterized by progressive aggregation and precipitation of lens proteins, and the development of age‑related cataracts is associated with dysregulated cellular activities of lens epithelial cells. Luciferase assays and online miRNA databases were used to validate that tumor protein p53 (TP53) is the target gene of miR‑125b. Furthermore, reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were conducted to detect expression levels of miR‑125b and TP53 in different groups of cells transfected with miR‑125b mimics or inhibitors. In addition, flow cytometry analysis and the MTT assay were conducted to detect the effects of miR‑125b on apoptosis and cell viability. The current study demonstrated that the rs78378222 polymorphism minor allele introduces a novel potential miR‑125b binding site in the TP53 3'‑UTR with a consecutive 8‑bp perfect match, creating a 'gain‑of‑function' variant and affecting the regulation of TP53 expression. A luciferase assay demonstrated that transfection of lens epithelial cells with wild type TP53 3'‑UTR significantly reduced the luciferase activity of the miR‑125b overexpressing cells compared with scramble controls. In addition, the luciferase activity of miR‑125b overexpressing cells transfected with the construct containing the rs78378222 polymorphism minor allele was also reduced compared with cells transfected with the wild type 3'‑UTR. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the expression level of miR‑125 was comparable in epithelial cells from patients with age

  16. IMMUNE AND NATURAL ANTIBODIES TO SYNGENEIC MURINE PLASMA CELL TUMORS

    PubMed Central

    Herberman, Ronald B.; Aoki, Tadao

    1972-01-01

    Cytotoxic antibody to a plasma cell tumor antigen was produced in syngeneic BALB mice by immunization with viable or inactivated plasma cell tumors. Antibody with the same specificity was found in the sera of normal BALB and other strains of mice. This natural antibody reacted with an antigen with characteristics indistinguishable from the previously described alloantigen, PC.1, and with viral envelope antigen, χVEA. The incidence of cytotoxic reactivity and the antibody titers reached a peak in normal BALB mice at 3–4 months of age, and were lower in 9–12-month old mice. The sera of germfree mice had lower reactivity; but when the mice were transferred to conventional conditions, their sera soon became as active as those of conventional mice. A virus common to all plasma cell tumors, which is present in latent form in some normal tissues of BALB and other PC.1 positive strains, is suggested as the cause for the PC.1 antigen and for the appearance of natural antibody to it. The considerable evidence for the close association of a virus with plasma cell tumors is presented. PMID:5033423

  17. LOX-1 unlocks human plasma cell potential.

    PubMed

    Brink, Robert

    2014-10-16

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is best known for promoting atherosclerosis. In this issue of Immunity, Joo et al. (2014) find that dendritic cells triggered through LOX-1 can directly support plasmablast production via the production of the cytokines APRIL and BAFF.

  18. Systematization of the Mechanism by Which Plasma Irradiation Causes Cell Growth and Tumor Cell Death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    New methods and technologies have improved minimally invasive surgical treatment and saved numerous patients. Recently, plasma irradiation has been demonstrated that might be useful in medical field and the plasma irradiation device is expected to become practically applicable. Mild plasma coagulator showed some advantages such as hemostasis and adhesion reduction in experimental animal model, but the mechanism of plasma irradiation remains unclear. Our study group aim to clarify the mechanism of plasma irradiation effects, mainly focusing on oxidative stress using cultured cell lines and small animal model. First, a study using cultured cell lines showed that the culture medium that was activated by plasma irradiation (we called this kind of medium as ``PAM'' -plasma activated medium-) induced tumor cell death. Although this effect was mainly found to be due to hydrogen peroxide, the remaining portion was considered as the specific effect of the plasma irradiation and we are now studying focusing on this effect. Second, we established a mouse intra-peritoneal adhesion model and checked biological reaction that occurred in the adhesion part. Histopathological study showed inflammatory cells infiltration into adhesion part and the expression of PTX3 that might involve tissue repair around adhesion part. We also confirmed that cytokines IL-6 and IL-10 might be useful as a marker of adhesion formation in this model. Applying ``PAM'' or mild plasma irradiation in this model, we examine the effects of plasma on inflamed cells. The samples in these experiments would be applied to targeted proteomics analysis, and we aim to demonstrate the systematization of the cell's reaction by plasma irradiation.

  19. Measurement of plasma-generated RONS in the cancer cells exposed by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joh, Hea Min; Baek, Eun Jeong; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, Tae Hun

    2015-09-01

    The plasma-induced reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) could result in cellular responses including DNA damages and apoptotic cell death. These chemical species, O, O2-,OH, NO, and NO2-,exhibit strong oxidative stress and/or trigger signaling pathways in biological cells. Each plasma-generated chemical species having biological implication should be identified and quantitatively measured. For quantitative measurement of RONS, this study is divided into three stages; plasma diagnostics, plasma-liquid interactions, plasma-liquid-cell interactions. First, the optical characteristics of the discharges were obtained by optical emission spectroscopy to identify various excited plasma species. And the characteristics of voltage-current waveforms, gas temperature, and plume length with varying control parameters were measured. Next, atmospheric pressure plasma jet was applied on the liquid. The estimated OH radical densities were obtained by ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy at the liquid surface. And NO2-is detected by Griess test and compared between the pure liquid and the cell-containing liquid. Finally, bio-assays were performed on plasma treated human lung cancer cells (A549). Intracellular ROS production was measured using DCF-DA. Among these RONS, productions of NO and OH within cells were measured by DAF-2DA and APF, respectively. The data are very suggestive that there is a strong correlation among the production of RONS in the plasmas, liquids, and cells.

  20. Protein diffusion in plant cell plasma membranes: the cell-wall corral

    PubMed Central

    Martinière, Alexandre; Runions, John

    2013-01-01

    Studying protein diffusion informs us about how proteins interact with their environment. Work on protein diffusion over the last several decades has illustrated the complex nature of biological lipid bilayers. The plasma membrane contains an array of membrane-spanning proteins or proteins with peripheral membrane associations. Maintenance of plasma membrane microstructure can be via physical features that provide intrinsic ordering such as lipid microdomains, or from membrane-associated structures such as the cytoskeleton. Recent evidence indicates, that in the case of plant cells, the cell wall seems to be a major player in maintaining plasma membrane microstructure. This interconnection / interaction between cell-wall and plasma membrane proteins most likely plays an important role in signal transduction, cell growth, and cell physiological responses to the environment. PMID:24381579

  1. Effects of plasma etching solar cell front surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, W.E.; Bunyan, S.M.; Olson, C.E.

    1980-01-01

    A front surface plasma etch with Freon 14+8% O/sub 2/ or sulfur hexafluoride (SF/sub 6/) was found to improve terrestrial solar cell output. SEM studies of these samples revealed surface pitting on Freon 14 etched samples. About 50% of the improvement from Freon etched samples can be attributed to the light capturing effects of surface pits. Output increases from SF/sub 6/ plasma etched cells were found to be comparable with Freon etched cells after subtraction of the light trapping effects. The excess output improvement might be attributed to reduced junction depth or removal of near surface lattice damage. Investigations attempting to identify the cause are described. 1 ref.

  2. Successful treatment of plasma cell cheilitis with topical tacrolimus: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Hanami, Yuka; Motoki, Yoshikazu; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2011-02-15

    Plasma cell cheilitis is an uncommon chronic inflammatory dermatitis that presents with flat to slightly elevated erosive erythematous plaques. It is histologically characterized by plasma cell infiltrates into the mucosa. Other than the lip, genital areas are often involved, which is called plasma cell balanitis or vulvitis. Plasma cell cheilitis is sometimes resistant to conventional topical corticosteroid therapy. Other choices include oral griseofulvin, topical cyclosporine, and intralesional corticosteroid injection, all of which occasionally fail to produce satisfactory results. Recent reports show that topical calcineurin inhibitors are effective for plasma cell cheilitis, balanitis, and vulvitis. However, there are so far only 2 reports of plasma cell cheilitis successfully treated with topical pimecrolimus and tacrolimus. We present herein two cases of plasma cell cheilitis, in which topical tacrolimus showed beneficial effects, suggesting that this immunomodulatory agent is a promising option for plasma cell cheilitis.

  3. Cold Atmospheric Plasma for Selectively Ablating Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mian; Holmes, Benjamin; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Wei; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-01-01

    Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atomospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa) cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy. PMID:24040051

  4. Pathogenic long-lived plasma cells and their survival niches in autoimmunity, malignancy, and allergy.

    PubMed

    Winter, Oliver; Dame, Christof; Jundt, Franziska; Hiepe, Falk

    2012-12-01

    Long-lived plasma cells survive in a protected microenvironment for years or even a lifetime and provide humoral memory by establishing persistent Ab titers. Long-lived autoreactive, malignant, and allergen-specific plasma cells are likewise protected in their survival niche and are refractory to immunosuppression, B cell depletion, and irradiation. Their elimination remains an essential therapeutic challenge. Recent data indicate that long-lived plasma cells reside in a multicomponent plasma cell niche with a stable mesenchymal and a dynamic hematopoietic component, both providing essential soluble and membrane-bound survival factors. Alternative niches with different hematopoietic cell components compensate fluctuations of single cell types but may also harbor distinct plasma cell subsets. In this Brief Review, we discuss conventional therapies in autoimmunity and multiple myeloma in comparison with novel drugs that target plasma cells and their niches. In the future, such strategies may enable the specific depletion of pathogenic plasma cells while leaving the protective humoral memory intact.

  5. Influence of electron injection into 27 cm audio plasma cell on the plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Haleem, N. A.; Ragheb, M. S.; Zakhary, S. G.; El Fiki, S. A.; Nouh, S. A.; El Disoki, T. M.

    2013-08-15

    In this article, the plasma is created in a Pyrex tube (L = 27 cm, φ= 4 cm) as a single cell, by a capacitive audio frequency (AF) discharge (f = 10–100 kHz), at a definite pressure of ∼0.2 Torr. A couple of tube linear and deviating arrangements show plasma characteristic conformity. The applied AF plasma and the injection of electrons into two gas mediums Ar and N{sub 2} revealed the increase of electron density at distinct tube regions by one order to attain 10{sup 13}/cm{sup 3}. The electrons temperature and density strengths are in contrast to each other. While their distributions differ along the plasma tube length, they show a decaying sinusoidal shape where their peaks position varies by the gas type. The electrons injection moderates electron temperature and expands their density. The later highest peak holds for the N{sub 2} gas, at electrons injection it changes to hold for the Ar. The sinusoidal decaying density behavior generates electric fields depending on the gas used and independent of tube geometry. The effect of the injected electrons performs a responsive impact on electrons density not attributed to the gas discharge. Analytical tools investigate the interaction of the plasma, the discharge current, and the gas used on the electrodes. It points to the emigration of atoms from each one but for greater majority they behave to a preferred direction. Meanwhile, only in the linear regime, small percentage of atoms still moves in reverse direction. Traces of gas atoms revealed on both electrodes due to sheath regions denote lack of their participation in the discharge current. In addition, atoms travel from one electrode to the other by overcoming the sheaths regions occurring transportation of particles agglomeration from one electrode to the other. The electrons injection has contributed to increase the plasma electron density peaks. These electrons populations have raised the generated electrostatic fields assisting the elemental ions

  6. Mitochondria and PGC-1α in Aging and Age-Associated Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wenz, Tina

    2011-01-01

    Aging is the most significant risk factor for a range of degenerative disease such as cardiovascular, neurodegenerative and metabolic disorders. While the cause of aging and its associated diseases is multifactorial, mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the aging process and the onset and progression of age-associated disorders. Recent studies indicate that maintenance of mitochondrial function is beneficial in the prevention or delay of age-associated diseases. A central molecule seems to be the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator α (PGC-1α), which is the key regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. Besides regulating mitochondrial function, PGC-1α targets several other cellular processes and thereby influences cell fate on multiple levels. This paper discusses how mitochondrial function and PGC-1α are affected in age-associated diseases and how modulation of PGC-1α might offer a therapeutic potential for age-related pathology. PMID:21629705

  7. Mitochondria and PGC-1α in Aging and Age-Associated Diseases.

    PubMed

    Wenz, Tina

    2011-01-01

    Aging is the most significant risk factor for a range of degenerative disease such as cardiovascular, neurodegenerative and metabolic disorders. While the cause of aging and its associated diseases is multifactorial, mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the aging process and the onset and progression of age-associated disorders. Recent studies indicate that maintenance of mitochondrial function is beneficial in the prevention or delay of age-associated diseases. A central molecule seems to be the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator α (PGC-1α), which is the key regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. Besides regulating mitochondrial function, PGC-1α targets several other cellular processes and thereby influences cell fate on multiple levels. This paper discusses how mitochondrial function and PGC-1α are affected in age-associated diseases and how modulation of PGC-1α might offer a therapeutic potential for age-related pathology.

  8. From cellular senescence to age-associated diseases: the miRNA connection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cellular senescence has evolved from an in-vitro model system to study aging in vitro to a multifaceted phenomenon of in-vivo importance as senescent cells in vivo have been identified and their removal delays the onset of age-associated diseases in a mouse model system. From the large emerging class of non-coding RNAs, miRNAs have only recently been functionally implied in the regulatory networks that are modified during the aging process. Here we summarize examples of similarities between the differential expression of miRNAs during senescence and age-associated diseases and suggest that these similarities might emphasize the importance of senescence for the pathogenesis of age-associated diseases. Understanding such a connection on the level of miRNAs might offer valuable opportunities for designing novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:24472232

  9. Plasma Electrode Pockels Cells for the Beamlet and NIF lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M.A.; Woods, B.; DeYoreo, J.; Atherton, J.

    1994-05-01

    We describe Plasma Electrode Pockels Cells (PEPC) for the Beamlet laser and the proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser. These PEPCs, together with passive polarizers, function as large aperture (> 35 {times} 35 cm{sup 2}) optical switches enabling the design of high-energy (> 5 kJ), multipass laser amplifiers. In a PEPC, plasma discharges form on both sides of a thin (1 cm) electro-optic crystal (KDP). These plasma discharges produce highly conductive and transparent electrodes that facilitate rapid (< 100 ns) and uniform charging of the KDP up to the half-wave voltage (17 kV) and back to zero volts. We discuss the operating principles, design, and optical performance of the Beamlet PEPC and briefly discuss our plans to extend PEPC technology for the NIF.

  10. Treatment of prostate cancer cell lines and primary cells using low temperature plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Deborah; Hirst, Adam; Frame, Fiona F.; Maitland, Norman J.

    2014-10-01

    The mechanisms of cell death after plasma treatment of both benign and cancerous prostate epithelial cells are investigated. Prostate cancer tissue was obtained with patient consent from targeted needle core biopsies following radical prostatectomy. Primary cells were cultured from cancer tissue and plated onto a chamber slide at a density of 10,000 cells per well in 200 microliter of stem cell media (SCM). The treated sample was previously identified as Gleason grade 7 cancer through tissue histo-pathology. A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) jet configuration, with helium as a carrier gas, and 0.3% O2 admixture was used for treating the cells. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) produced by the plasma are believed to be the main mediators of the plasma-cell interaction and response. We found the concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced inside the cells increased with plasma exposure. Exposure to the plasma for >3 minutes showed high levels of DNA damage compared to untreated and hydrogen peroxide controls. Cell viability and cellular recovery are also investigated and will be presented. All findings were common to both cell lines, suggesting the potential of LTP therapy for both benign and malignant disease.

  11. Particle-in-cell simulations of Hall plasma thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Rodrigo; Ferreira, Jose Leonardo; Martins, Alexandre

    2016-07-01

    Hall plasma thrusters can be modelled using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. In these simulations, the plasma is described by a set of equations which represent a coupled system of charged particles and electromagnetic fields. The fields are computed using a spatial grid (i.e., a discretization in space), whereas the particles can move continuously in space. Briefly, the particle and fields dynamics are computed as follows. First, forces due to electric and magnetic fields are employed to calculate the velocities and positions of particles. Next, the velocities and positions of particles are used to compute the charge and current densities at discrete positions in space. Finally, these densities are used to solve the electromagnetic field equations in the grid, which are interpolated at the position of the particles to obtain the acting forces, and restart this cycle. We will present numerical simulations using software for PIC simulations to study turbulence, wave and instabilities that arise in Hall plasma thrusters. We have sucessfully reproduced a numerical simulation of a SPT-100 Hall thruster using a two-dimensional (2D) model. In addition, we are developing a 2D model of a cylindrical Hall thruster. The results of these simulations will contribute to improve the performance of plasma thrusters to be used in Cubesats satellites currenty in development at the Plasma Laboratory at University of Brasília.

  12. Cold atmospheric plasma treatment selectively targets head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Preston, Rafael; Ogawa, Takenori; Uemura, Mamoru; Shumulinsky, Gary; Valle, Blanca L; Pirini, Francesca; Ravi, Rajani; Sidransky, David; Keidar, Michael; Trink, Barry

    2014-10-01

    The treatment of locoregional recurrence (LRR) of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) often requires a combination of surgery, radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. Survival outcomes are poor and the treatment outcomes are morbid. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas produced at room temperature under laboratory conditions. We have previously demonstrated that treatment with a CAP jet device selectively targets cancer cells using in vitro melanoma and in vivo bladder cancer models. In the present study, we wished to examine CAP selectivity in HNSCC in vitro models, and to explore its potential for use as a minimally invasive surgical approach that allows for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue ablation without affecting the surrounding healthy cells and tissues. Four HNSCC cell lines (JHU-022, JHU-028, JHU-029, SCC25) and 2 normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines (OKF6 and NOKsi) were subjected to cold plasma treatment for durations of 10, 30 and 45 sec, and a helium flow of 20 l/min-1 for 10 sec was used as a positive treatment control. We showed that cold plasma selectively diminished HNSCC cell viability in a dose-response manner, as evidenced by MTT assays; the viability of the OKF6 cells was not affected by the cold plasma. The results of colony formation assays also revealed a cell-specific response to cold plasma application. Western blot analysis did not provide evidence that the cleavage of PARP occurred following cold plasma treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that cold plasma application selectively impairs HNSCC cell lines through non-apoptotic mechanisms, while having a minimal effect on normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines.

  13. Cold atmospheric plasma treatment selectively targets head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    GUERRERO-PRESTON, RAFAEL; OGAWA, TAKENORI; UEMURA, MAMORU; SHUMULINSKY, GARY; VALLE, BLANCA L.; PIRINI, FRANCESCA; RAVI, RAJANI; SIDRANSKY, DAVID; KEIDAR, MICHAEL; TRINK, BARRY

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of locoregional recurrence (LRR) of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) often requires a combination of surgery, radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. Survival outcomes are poor and the treatment outcomes are morbid. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas produced at room temperature under laboratory conditions. We have previously demonstrated that treatment with a CAP jet device selectively targets cancer cells using in vitro melanoma and in vivo bladder cancer models. In the present study, we wished to examine CAP selectivity in HNSCC in vitro models, and to explore its potential for use as a minimally invasive surgical approach that allows for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue ablation without affecting the surrounding healthy cells and tissues. Four HNSCC cell lines (JHU-022, JHU-028, JHU-029, SCC25) and 2 normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines (OKF6 and NOKsi) were subjected to cold plasma treatment for durations of 10, 30 and 45 sec, and a helium flow of 20 l/min−1 for 10 sec was used as a positive treatment control. We showed that cold plasma selectively diminished HNSCC cell viability in a dose-response manner, as evidenced by MTT assays; the viability of the OKF6 cells was not affected by the cold plasma. The results of colony formation assays also revealed a cell-specific response to cold plasma application. Western blot analysis did not provide evidence that the cleavage of PARP occurred following cold plasma treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that cold plasma application selectively impairs HNSCC cell lines through non-apoptotic mechanisms, while having a minimal effect on normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines. PMID:25050490

  14. Lipid signalling dynamics at the β-cell plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, Anne

    2015-04-01

    Pancreatic β-cells are clustered in islets of Langerhans and secrete insulin in response to increased concentrations of circulating glucose. Insulin in turn acts on liver, muscle and fat tissue to store energy and normalize the blood glucose level. Inappropriate insulin release may lead to impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes. In addition to glucose, other nutrients, neural stimuli and hormonal stimuli control insulin secretion. Many of these signals are perceived at the plasma membrane, which is also the site where insulin granules undergo exocytosis. Therefore, it is not surprising that membrane lipids play an important role in the regulation of insulin secretion. β-cells release insulin in a pulsatile fashion. Signalling lipids integrate the nutrient and neurohormonal inputs to fine-tune, shape and co-ordinate the pulsatility. An important group of signalling lipids are phosphoinositides and their downstream messengers. This MiniReview will discuss new insights into lipid signalling dynamics in β-cells obtained from live-cell imaging experiments with fluorescent translocation biosensors. The plasma membrane concentration of several phosphoinositides and of their downstream messengers changes rapidly upon nutrient or neurohormonal stimulation. Glucose induces the most complex spatio-temporal patterns, typically involving oscillations of messenger concentrations, which sometimes are locally restricted. The tightly controlled levels of lipid messengers can mediate specific binding of downstream effectors to the plasma membrane, contributing to the appropriate regulation of insulin secretion. © 2014 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  15. [Multiple myeloma and other plasma cell dyscrasias].

    PubMed

    Nagy, Zsolt

    2016-06-06

    Multiple myeloma is the most common primary malignant disease of bone marrow. It mainly occurs among elderly people and, according to international databases, it is twice as frequent in men, however in our country this fact cannot be observed because of the high male mortality rate. The presence of this disease increased by more than one and the half times during the last 60 years. The five year survival for multiple myeloma has increased from 25% to 40% since the seventies due to high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation and the new anti-myeloma drugs which were introduced in the last decade, such as immunomodulators (IMiD) like thalidomide, lenalidomide, pomalidomide and proteasome inhibitors (PI) like bortezomib, carfilzomib, ixazomib. The number of treatment options are growing fast, and not only because of using new combinations of medications, but also due to the development of investigational products which are available for the patients by participating in a clinical trial.

  16. Selective killing of ovarian cancer cells through induction of apoptosis by nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Iseki, Sachiko; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Kondo, Hiroki; Hori, Masaru; Nakamura, Kae; Hayashi, Moemi; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Kano, Hiroyuki

    2012-03-12

    Two independent ovarian cancer cell lines and fibroblast controls were treated with nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP). Most ovarian cancer cells were detached from the culture dish by continuous plasma treatment to a single spot on the dish. Next, the plasma source was applied over the whole dish using a robot arm. In vitro cell proliferation assays showed that plasma treatments significantly decreased proliferation rates of ovarian cancer cells compared to fibroblast cells. Flow cytometry and western blot analysis showed that plasma treatment of ovarian cancer cells induced apoptosis. NEAPP could be a promising tool for therapy for ovarian cancers.

  17. Selective killing of ovarian cancer cells through induction of apoptosis by nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iseki, Sachiko; Nakamura, Kae; Hayashi, Moemi; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Kondo, Hiroki; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kano, Hiroyuki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2012-03-01

    Two independent ovarian cancer cell lines and fibroblast controls were treated with nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP). Most ovarian cancer cells were detached from the culture dish by continuous plasma treatment to a single spot on the dish. Next, the plasma source was applied over the whole dish using a robot arm. In vitro cell proliferation assays showed that plasma treatments significantly decreased proliferation rates of ovarian cancer cells compared to fibroblast cells. Flow cytometry and western blot analysis showed that plasma treatment of ovarian cancer cells induced apoptosis. NEAPP could be a promising tool for therapy for ovarian cancers.

  18. Apoptosis in vascular cells induced by cold atmospheric plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sladek, Raymond; Stoffels, Eva

    2006-10-01

    Apoptosis is a natural mechanism of cellular self-destruction. It can be triggered by moderate, yet irreversible damage. Apoptosis plays a major role in tissue renewal. Artificial apoptosis induction will become a novel therapy that meets all requirements for tissue-saving surgery. Diseased tissues can disappear without inflammation and scarring. This is particularly important in treatment of blockages in body tracts (e.g. cardiovascular diseases). Artificial induction of apoptosis can be achieved by means of cold plasma treatment. In this work an atmospheric micro-plasma operated in helium/air has been used to induce apoptosis in vascular cells. Parametric studies of apoptosis induction have been conducted; the efficiency is almost 100%. The apoptotic factors are ROS/RNS (reactive oxygen and nitrogen species). Their densities in the plasma have been measured by mass spectrometry. For apoptosis induction, RNS seem to be more important than ROS, because of their relative abundance. Moreover, addition of a ROS scavenger (ascorbic acid) to the cell culture medium does not reduce the occurrence of apoptosis. Cold plasma is a very efficient tool for fundamental studies of apoptosis, and later, for controlled tissue removal in vivo.

  19. Appearance of Human Plasma Cells Following Differentiation of Human B Cells in NOD/SCID Mouse Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Kentaro; Lian, Zhe-Xiong; He, Xiao-Song; Ansari, Aftab A.; Ishibashi, Miyuki; Miyakawa, Hiroshi; Shultz, Leonard D.; Ikehara, Susumu; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2003-01-01

    Relatively little is known for the differentiation and maturation process of human B cells to plasma cells. This is particularly important in reconstitution work involving transfer of autoantibodies. To address this issue, we transplanted human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) directly into the spleen of irradiated NOD/SCID mice depleted of natural killer cell activity. Within 6 weeks, naïve B cells differentiated into memory B cells and, importantly, the numbers of human CD138+ plasma cells in spleen increased by 100 fold after transplantation. Plasma cell numbers correlated with the detection of human IgM and IgG in serum, indicating that human B cells had differentiated into mature plasma cells in the murine spleen. In addition to CD19+ plasma cells, a distinct CD19- plasma cell population was detected, suggesting that downregulation of CD19 associated with maturation of plasma cells occurred. When purified human B cells were transplanted, those findings were not observed. Our results indicate that differentiation and maturation of human B cells and plasma cells can be investigated by transplantation of human PBMC into the spleen of NOD/SCID mice. The model will be useful for studying the differentiation of human B cells and generation of plasma cells. PMID:14768952

  20. Plasma Cell Gingivits-A Conflict of Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Mutyap, Divya Aishwarya; Pantula, Veerandranath Reddy; Akula, Shilpa; Chinthapalli, Bhargavi

    2016-01-01

    Plasma Cell Gingivitis (PCG) is a rare condition of the gingiva which is benign in nature. In this condition there is enlargement of the marginal and attached gingiva. It is not only unaesthetic in appearance but also causes difficulty in speech and mastication. Hence, it creates an area for plaque accumulation because of which there is difficulty in carrying out the routine oral hygiene procedures. The aetiology is unknown and is thought to be a hypersensitive reaction to an allergen. This condition is characterized by massive infiltration of the plasma cells into the sub-epithelial connective tissue layers. Here we are presenting two cases of PCG associated with swollen lips, which is an uncommon condition. These cases were treated by gingivectomy and followed up to six months. PMID:28050510

  1. CATION EXCHANGE BETWEEN CELLS AND PLASMA OF MAMMALIAN BLOOD

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, C. W.; Martin, W. R.

    1950-01-01

    The exchange of potassium between cells and plasma of heparinized human blood has been studied in vitro using the radioactive isotope K42. The changes in cell and plasma specific activity are characteristic of a simple two-compartment system. The mean of seven determinations of the exchange rate at 38°C. is 1.8 per cent of the cellular potassium per hour. The results indicate that at 38°C. the rate is relatively insensitive to oxygenation or reduction of the hemoglobin, and to 1200 r of gamma radiation. With varying temperature the rate follows pseudo first order kinetics with a Q10 of 2.35. Below 15°C. the rate of loss of potassium exceeds the rate of uptake. PMID:15428612

  2. Induction of Malignant Plasma Cell Proliferation by Eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Tina W.; Kita, Hirohito; Hanson, Curtis A.; Walters, Denise K.; Arendt, Bonnie K.; Jelinek, Diane F.

    2013-01-01

    The biology of the malignant plasma cells (PCs) in multiple myeloma (MM) is highly influenced by the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment in which they reside. More specifically, BM stromal cells (SCs) are known to interact with MM cells to promote MM cell survival and proliferation. By contrast, it is unclear if innate immune cells within this same space also actively participate in the pathology of MM. Our study shows for the first time that eosinophils (Eos) can contribute to the biology of MM by enhancing the proliferation of some malignant PCs. We first demonstrate that PCs and Eos can be found in close proximity in the BM. In culture, Eos were found to augment MM cell proliferation that is predominantly mediated through a soluble factor(s). Fractionation of cell-free supernatants and neutralization studies demonstrated that this activity is independent of Eos-derived microparticles and a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL), respectively. Using a multicellular in vitro system designed to resemble the native MM niche, SCs and Eos were shown to have non-redundant roles in their support of MM cell growth. Whereas SCs induce MM cell proliferation predominantly through the secretion of IL-6, Eos stimulate growth of these malignant cells via an IL-6-independent mechanism. Taken together, our study demonstrates for the first time a role for Eos in the pathology of MM and suggests that therapeutic strategies targeting these cells may be beneficial. PMID:23894671

  3. Plasma-Sprayed Titanium Patterns for Enhancing Early Cell Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yunqi; Xie, Youtao; Pan, Houhua; Zheng, Xuebin; Huang, Liping; Ji, Fang; Li, Kai

    2016-06-01

    Titanium coating has been widely used as a biocompatible metal in biomedical applications. However, the early cell responses and long-term fixation of titanium implants are not satisfied. To obviate these defects, in this paper, micro-post arrays with various widths (150-1000 μm) and intervals (100-300 μm) were fabricated on the titanium substrate by template-assisted plasma spraying technology. In vitro cell culture experiments showed that MC3T3-E1 cells exhibited significantly higher osteogenic differentiation as well as slightly improved adhesion and proliferation on the micro-patterned coatings compared with the traditional one. The cell number on the pattern with 1000 µm width reached 130% after 6 days of incubation, and the expressions of osteopontin (OPN) as well as osteocalcin (OC) were doubled. No obvious difference was found in cell adhesion on various size patterns. The present micro-patterned coatings proposed a new modification method for the traditional plasma spraying technology to enhance the early cell responses and convenience for the bone in-growth.

  4. Bach2 represses plasma cell gene regulatory network in B cells to promote antibody class switch.

    PubMed

    Muto, Akihiko; Ochiai, Kyoko; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Itoh-Nakadai, Ari; Calame, Kathryn L; Ikebe, Dai; Tashiro, Satoshi; Igarashi, Kazuhiko

    2010-12-01

    Two transcription factors, Pax5 and Blimp-1, form a gene regulatory network (GRN) with a double-negative loop, which defines either B-cell (Pax5 high) or plasma cell (Blimp-1 high) status as a binary switch. However, it is unclear how this B-cell GRN registers class switch DNA recombination (CSR), an event that takes place before the terminal differentiation to plasma cells. In the absence of Bach2 encoding a transcription factor required for CSR, mouse splenic B cells more frequently and rapidly expressed Blimp-1 and differentiated to IgM plasma cells as compared with wild-type cells. Genetic loss of Blimp-1 in Bach2(-/-) B cells was sufficient to restore CSR. These data with mathematical modelling of the GRN indicate that Bach2 achieves a time delay in Blimp-1 induction, which inhibits plasma cell differentiation and promotes CSR (Delay-Driven Diversity model for CSR). Reduction in mature B-cell numbers in Bach2(-/-) mice was not rescued by Blimp-1 ablation, indicating that Bach2 regulates B-cell differentiation and function through Blimp-1-dependent and -independent GRNs.

  5. Plasma Discharge Cleaning of NLCTA Cells(LCC-0075)

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, R

    2003-11-06

    Diamond-machined NLCTA cells were hydrogen-plasma cleaned, following thermal oxidation and surface particle-seeding with alumina powder. The processing removes the oxide, as expected, but does not smooth the oxide damage. Particles are removed from the surfaces, as well as from other places in the processing chamber, but are simply re-distributed. Further development, particularly with respect to permanently removing the dislodged particles from the process chamber, is needed.

  6. Dihydrocapsiate improved age-associated impairments in mice by increasing energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Kana; Suzuki, Katsuya

    2017-08-15

    Metabolic dysfunction is associated with aging and results in age-associated chronic diseases, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and stroke. Hence, there has been a focus on increasing energy expenditure in aged populations to protect them from age-associated diseases. Dihydrocapsiate (DCT) is a compound that belongs to the capsinoid family. Capsinoids are capsaicin analogs that are found in non-pungent peppers and increase whole-body energy expenditure. However, their effect on energy expenditure has been reported only in young populations, and to date the effectiveness of DCT in increasing energy expenditure in aged populations has not been investigated. In this study, we investigated whether DCT supplementation in aged mice improves age-associated impairments. We obtained five-week-old and one-year-old male C57BL/6J mice and randomly assigned the aged mice to two groups, resulting in a total of three groups: 1) young mice, 2) old mice, and 3) old mice supplemented with 0.3% DCT. After 12 weeks of supplementation, blood and tissue samples were collected and analyzed. DCT significantly suppressed age-associated fat accumulation, adipocyte hypertrophy, and liver steatosis. In addition, the DCT treatment dramatically suppressed age-associated increases in hepatic inflammation, immune cell infiltration, and oxidative stress. DCT exerted these suppression effects by increasing energy expenditure linked to upregulation of both the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) gene program and fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle. These results indicate that DCT efficiently improves age-associated impairments, including liver steatosis and inflammation, in part by increasing energy expenditure via activation of the fat oxidation pathway in skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2017, American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism.

  7. Evaluation of non-thermal plasma-induced anticancer effects on human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae-Sun; Kim, Jeongho; Hong, Young-Jun; Bae, Woom-Yee; Choi, Eun Ha; Jeong, Joo-Won; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2017-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma has been introduced in various applications such as sterilization, wound healing, blood coagulation, and other biomedical applications. The most attractive application of non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma is in cancer treatment, where the plasma is used to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) to facilitate cell apoptosis. We investigate the effects of different durations of exposure to dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) plasma on colon cancer cells using measurement of cell viability and ROS levels, western blot, immunocytochemistry, and Raman spectroscopy. Our results suggest that different kinds of plasma-treated cells can be differentiated from control cells using the Raman data. PMID:28663896

  8. DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction in cell apoptosis induced by nonthermal air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, G. J.; Kim, W.; Kim, K. T.; Lee, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    Nonthermal plasma is known to induce animal cell death but the mechanism is not yet clear. Here, cellular and biochemical regulation of cell apoptosis is demonstrated for plasma treated cells. Surface type nonthermal air plasma triggered apoptosis of B16F10 mouse melanoma cancer cells causing DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction. Plasma treatment activated caspase-3, apoptosis executioner. The plasma treated cells also accumulated gamma-H2A.X, marker for DNA double strand breaks, and p53 tumor suppressor gene as a response to DNA damage. Interestingly, cytochrome C was released from mitochondria and its membrane potential was changed significantly.

  9. Dose-dependent killing of leukemia cells by low-temperature plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barekzi, N.; Laroussi, M.

    2012-10-01

    The effect of low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma towards the progression of cancerous human T-cell leukemia cells was investigated. The plasma pencil, which utilizes short duration high voltage pulses, was used to generate a low-temperature plasma (LTP) plume in ambient air. Our data showed that cell morphology and cell viability were affected in a dose-dependent manner after treatment with LTP. The outcome of this study revealed that the effect of plasma exposure was not immediate, but had a delayed effect and increasing the time of plasma exposure resulted in increased leukemia cell death.

  10. DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction in cell apoptosis induced by nonthermal air plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, G. J.; Lee, J. K.; Kim, W.; Kim, K. T.

    2010-01-11

    Nonthermal plasma is known to induce animal cell death but the mechanism is not yet clear. Here, cellular and biochemical regulation of cell apoptosis is demonstrated for plasma treated cells. Surface type nonthermal air plasma triggered apoptosis of B16F10 mouse melanoma cancer cells causing DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction. Plasma treatment activated caspase-3, apoptosis executioner. The plasma treated cells also accumulated gamma-H2A.X, marker for DNA double strand breaks, and p53 tumor suppressor gene as a response to DNA damage. Interestingly, cytochrome C was released from mitochondria and its membrane potential was changed significantly.

  11. Biomedical Applications of Low Temperature Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas to Cancerous Cell Treatment and Tooth Bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Koo; Kim, Myoung Soo; Byun, June Ho; Kim, Kyong Tai; Kim, Gyoo Cheon; Park, Gan Young

    2011-08-01

    Low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas have attracted great interests and they have been widely applied to biomedical applications to interact with living tissues, cells, and bacteria due to their non-thermal property. This paper reviews the biomedical applications of low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas to cancerous cell treatment and tooth bleaching. Gold nanoparticles conjugated with cancer-specific antibodies have been introduced to cancerous cells to enhance selective killing of cells, and the mechanism of cell apoptosis induced by plasma has been investigated. Tooth exposed to helium plasma jet with hydrogen peroxide has become brighter and the productions of hydroxyl radicals from hydrogen peroxide have been enhanced by plasma exposure.

  12. Fat, Stem Cells, and Platelet-Rich Plasma.

    PubMed

    James, Isaac B; Coleman, Sydney R; Rubin, J Peter

    2016-07-01

    The ideal filler for aesthetic surgery is inexpensive and easy to obtain, natural in appearance and texture, immunologically compatible, and long lasting without risk of infection. By most metrics, autologous fat grafts meet these criteria perfectly. Although facial fat grafting is now a commonly accepted surgical procedure, there has been a wave of activity applying stem cells and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapies to aesthetic practice. This article addresses technical considerations in the use of autologous fat transfer for facial rejuvenation, and also explores the current evidence for these stem cell and PRP therapies in aesthetic practice.

  13. Multigrid Particle-in-cell Simulations of Plasma Microturbulence

    SciTech Connect

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2003-06-17

    A new scheme to accurately retain kinetic electron effects in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations for the case of electrostatic drift waves is presented. The splitting scheme, which is based on exact separation between adiabatic and on adiabatic electron responses, is shown to yield more accurate linear growth rates than the standard df scheme. The linear and nonlinear elliptic problems that arise in the splitting scheme are solved using a multi-grid solver. The multi-grid particle-in-cell approach offers an attractive path, both from the physics and numerical points of view, to simulate kinetic electron dynamics in global toroidal plasmas.

  14. Resveratrol: a multitargeted agent for age-associated chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Harikumar, Kuzhuvelil B; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2008-04-15

    Extensive research within the last decade has revealed that most chronic illnesses such as cancer, cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, neurological diseases, diabetes, and autoimmune diseases exhibit dysregulation of multiple cell signaling pathways that have been linked to inflammation. Thus mono-targeted therapies developed for the last two decades for these diseases have proven to be unsafe, ineffective and expensive. Although fruits and vegetables are regarded to have therapeutic potential against chronic illnesses, neither their active component nor the mechanism of action is well understood. Resveratrol (trans-3, 5, 4'-trihydroxystilbene), a component of grapes, berries, peanuts and other traditional medicines, is one such polyphenol that has been shown to mediate its effects through modulation of many different pathways. This stilbene has been shown to bind to numerous cell-signaling molecules such as multi drug resistance protein, topoisomerase II, aromatase, DNA polymerase, estrogen receptors, tubulin and F1-ATPase. Resveratrol has also been shown to activate various transcription factor (e.g; NFkappaB, STAT3, HIF-1alpha, beta-catenin and PPAR-gamma), suppress the expression of antiapoptotic gene products (e.g; Bcl-2, Bcl-X(L), XIAP and survivin), inhibit protein kinases (e.g; src, PI3K, JNK, and AKT), induce antioxidant enzymes (e,g; catalase, superoxide dismutase and hemoxygenase-1), suppress the expression of inflammatory biomarkers (e.g., TNF, COX-2, iNOS, and CRP), inhibit the expression of angiogenic and metastatic gene products (e.g., MMPs, VEGF, cathepsin D, and ICAM-1), and modulate cell cycle regulatory genes (e.g., p53, Rb, PTEN, cyclins and CDKs). Numerous animal studies have demonstrated that this polyphenol holds promise against numerous age-associated diseases including cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer, cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases. In view of these studies, resveratrol's prospects for use in the clinics are rapidly accelerating

  15. Plasma Cell-Free DNA in Paediatric Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Mussolin, Lara; Burnelli, Roberta; Pillon, Marta; Carraro, Elisa; Farruggia, Piero; Todesco, Alessandra; Mascarin, Maurizio; Rosolen, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Background: Extracellular circulating DNA (cfDNA) can be found in small amounts in plasma of healthy individuals. Increased levels of cfDNA have been reported in patients with cancer of breast, cervix, colon, liver and it was shown that cfDNA can originate from both tumour and non-tumour cells. Objectives: Levels of cfDNA of a large series of children with lymphoma were evaluated and analyzed in relation with clinical characteristics. Methods: plasma cfDNA levels obtained at diagnosis in 201 paediatric lymphoma patients [43 Hodgkin lymphomas (HL), 45 anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL), 88 Burkitt lymphomas (BL), 17 lymphoblastic (LBL), 8 diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL)] and 15 healthy individuals were determined using a quantitative PCR assay for POLR2 gene and, in addition, for NPM-ALK fusion gene in ALCL patients. Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare plasma levels among different patient subgroups and controls and to analyze relationship between levels of cfDNA and clinical characteristics. Results: Levels of cfDNA in lymphoma patients were significantly higher compared with controls (p<0.0001). CfDNA was associated with median age (p=0.01) in HL, and with stage in ALCL (p=0.01). In HL patients high cfDNA levels were correlated with poor prognosis (p=0.03). In ALCL we found that most of the cfDNA (77%) was non-tumor DNA. Conclusion: level of plasma cfDNA might constitute an important non-invasive tool at diagnosis in lymphoma patients' management; in particular in patients with HL, cfDNA seems to be a promising prognostic biomarker. PMID:23678368

  16. The effect of jet and DBD plasma on NCI-78 blood cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Nagendra K.; Kaushik, Neha; Choi, Eun Ha

    2013-06-01

    In this study we describe the effects of a nonthermal jet and dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma on the T98G brain cancer cell line. The results of this study reveal that the jet and DBD plasma inhibits NCI-78 blood cancer cells growth efficiently with the loss of metabolic viability of cells. The main goal of this study is to induce cell death in NCI-78 blood cancer cells by the toxic effect of jet and DBD plasma.

  17. Effect of plasma expander viscosity on the cell free layer.

    PubMed

    Hightower, C Makena; Yalcin, Ozlem; Vázquez, Beatriz Y Salazar; Johnson, Paul C; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2011-01-01

    The effect of low and high viscosity hemodilution with plasma expanders on the extent of the cell free layer (CFL) width was analyzed in the microcirculation of the exteriorized cremaster muscle preparation of Sprague-Dawley male rats. Anesthetized animals were subjected to 40% hemodilution by blood volume, using 5% human serum albumin (HSA) or 6% Hetastarch (hydroxyethyl starch 670 kDa). Arterioles (n=5 for each treatment) were investigated. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, vessel flow velocity and CFL width were measured at baseline and 5, 20 and 40 min post-exchange transfusion. Blood and plasma viscosity was determined from terminal blood collections. CFL width and pseudoshear rate, diameter and flow, normalized to baseline, were significantly elevated at all post-exchange assessments. Peripheral vascular resistance decreased. The increase of the CFL width was greater with HSA by comparison with Hetastarch hemodilution (p<0.05). Hetastarch blood and plasma viscosities increased significantly compared to those of HSA (p<0.05). This study shows that CFL widths are influenced by plasma expander viscosity, a phenomenon proportional to the increase in molecular weight of the colloids in solution.

  18. Cell cycle dependent changes in the plasma membrane organization of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Denz, Manuela; Chiantia, Salvatore; Herrmann, Andreas; Mueller, Peter; Korte, Thomas; Schwarzer, Roland

    2017-03-01

    Lipid membranes are major structural elements of all eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. Although many aspects of their biology have been studied extensively, their dynamics and lateral heterogeneity are still not fully understood. Recently, we observed a cell-to-cell variability in the plasma membrane organization of CHO-K1 cells (Schwarzer et al., 2014). We surmised that cell cycle dependent changes of the individual cells from our unsynchronized cell population account for this phenomenon. In the present study, this hypothesis was tested. To this aim, CHO-K1 cells were arrested in different cell cycle phases by chemical treatments, and the order of their plasma membranes was determined by various fluorescent lipid analogues using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. Our experiments exhibit significant differences in the membrane order of cells arrested in the G2/M or S phase compared to control cells. Our single-cell analysis also enabled the specific selection of mitotic cells, which displayed a significant increase of the membrane order compared to the control. In addition, the lipid raft marker GPImYFP was used to study the lateral organization of cell cycle arrested cells as well as mitotic cells and freely cycling samples. Again, significant differences were found between control and arrested cells and even more pronounced between control and mitotic cells. Our data demonstrate a direct correlation between cell cycle progression and plasma membrane organization, underlining that cell-to-cell heterogeneities of membrane properties have to be taken into account in cellular studies especially at the single-cell level.

  19. Selective cytotoxicity of indirect nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma against ovarian clear-cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Fumi; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Kae; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Hori, Masaru; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian clear cell carcinoma (CCC) is a histological type of epithelial ovarian cancer that is less responsive to chemotherapy and associated with a poorer prognosis than serous and endometrioid carcinoma. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma which produces reactive species has recently led to an explosion of research in plasma medicine. Plasma treatment can be applied to cancer treatment to induce apoptosis and tumor growth arrest. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that a medium exposed to plasma also has an anti-proliferative effect against cancer in the absence of direct exposure to plasma. In this study, we confirmed whether this indirect plasma has an anti-tumor effect against CCC, and investigated whether this efficacy is selective for cancer cells. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma induced apoptosis in CCC cells, while human peritoneal mesothelial cells remained viable. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma exhibits selective cytotoxicity against CCC cells which are resistant to chemotherapy.

  20. Effect of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet on human breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirpour, Shahriar; Nikkhah, Maryam; Pirouzmand, Somaye; Ghomi, Hamid Reza

    2012-10-01

    Nowadays, Non-thermal plasma enjoy a wide range of applications in biomedical fields such as Sterilization, Wound healing, Cancer treatment and etc. The aim of this paper is to study the effect of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet on breast cancer (MCF-7) cells. In this regard the effect of plasma on death of the cancer cells are explored experimentally. The plasma in this discharge is created by pulsed dc high voltage power supply with repetition rate of several tens of kilohertz which led to the inductively coupled plasma. The pure helium gas were used for formation of the plasma jet. MTT assay were used for quantification of death cells. The results showed that the cells death rate increase with plasma exposure time. This study confirm that plasma jet have significant effect on treatment of human breast cancer cells.

  1. A membrane reservoir at the cell surface: unfolding the plasma membrane to fuel cell shape change.

    PubMed

    Figard, Lauren; Sokac, Anna Marie

    2014-01-01

    Cell surface expansion is a necessary part of cell shape change. One long-standing hypothesis proposes that membrane for this expansion comes from the flattening out of cell surface projections such as microvilli and membrane folds. Correlative EM data of cells undergoing phagocytosis, cytokinesis, and morphogenesis has hinted at the existence of such an unfolding mechanism for decades; but unfolding has only recently been confirmed using live-cell imaging and biophysical approaches. Considering the wide range of cells in which plasma membrane unfolding has now been reported, it likely represents a fundamental mechanism of cell shape change.

  2. Development of a microfluidic device for cell concentration and blood cell-plasma separation.

    PubMed

    Maria, M Sneha; Kumar, B S; Chandra, T S; Sen, A K

    2015-12-01

    This work presents design, fabrication and test of a microfluidic device which employs Fahraeus-Lindqvist and Zweifach-Fung effects for cell concentration and blood cell-plasma separation. The device design comprises a straight main channel with a series of branched channels placed symmetrically on both sides of the main channel. The design implements constrictions before each junction (branching point) in order to direct cells that would have migrated closer to the wall (naturally or after liquid extraction at a junction) towards the centre of the main channel. Theoretical and numerical analysis are performed for design of the microchannel network to ensure that a minimum flow rate ratio (of 2.5:1, main channel-to-side channels) is maintained at each junction and predict flow rate at the plasma outlet. The dimensions and location of the constrictions were determined using numerical simulations. The effect of presence of constrictions before the junctions was demonstrated by comparing the performances of the device with and without constrictions. To demonstrate the performance of the device, initial experiments were performed with polystyrene microbeads (10 and 15 μm size) and droplets. Finally, the device was used for concentration of HL60 cells and separation of plasma and cells in diluted blood samples. The cell concentration and blood-plasma purification efficiency was quantified using Haemocytometer and Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorter (FACS). A seven-fold cell concentration was obtained with HL60 cells and a purification efficiency of 70 % and plasma recovery of 80 % was observed for diluted (1:20) blood sample. FACS was used to identify cell lysis and the cell viability was checked using Trypan Blue test which showed that more than 99 % cells are alive indicating the suitability of the device for practical use. The proposed device has potential to be used as a sample preparation module in lab on chip based diagnostic platforms.

  3. Investigating the cell death mechanisms in primary prostate cancer cells using low-temperature plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Deborah; Hirst, A. M.; Packer, J. R.; Simms, M. S.; Mann, V. M.; Frame, F. M.; Maitland, N. J.

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas have shown considerable promise as a potential cancer therapy. An atmospheric pressure plasma driven with kHz kV excitation, operated with helium and oxygen admixtures is used to investigate the interaction with prostate cancer cells. The cytopathic effect was verified first in two commonly used prostate cancer cell lines (BPH-1 and PC-3 cells) and further extended to examine the effects in paired normal and tumour prostate epithelial cells cultured directly from patient tissues. Through the formation of reactive species in cell culture media, and potentially other plasma components, we observed high levels of DNA damage, together with reduced cell viability and colony-forming ability. We observed differences in response between the prostate cell lines and primary cells, particularly in terms of the mechanism of cell death. The primary cells ultimately undergo necrotic cell death in both the normal and tumour samples, in the complete absence of apoptosis. In addition, we provide the first evidence of an autophagic response in primary cells. This work highlights the importance of studying primary cultures in order to gain a more realistic insight into patient efficacy. EPSRC EP/H003797/1 & EP/K018388/1, Yorkshire Cancer Research: YCR Y257PA.

  4. The Effect of Tuning Cold Plasma Composition on Glioblastoma Cell Viability

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaoqian; Sherman, Jonathan; Murphy, William; Ratovitski, Edward; Canady, Jerome; Keidar, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Previous research in cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) and cancer cell interaction has repeatedly proven that the cold plasma induced cell death. It is postulated that the reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) play a major role in the CAP cancer therapy. In this paper, we seek to determine a mechanism of CAP therapy on glioblastoma cells (U87) through an understanding of the composition of the plasma, including treatment time, voltage, flow-rate and plasma-gas composition. In order to determine the threshold of plasma treatment on U87, normal human astrocytes (E6/E7) were used as the comparison cell line. Our data showed that the 30 sec plasma treatment caused 3-fold cell death in the U87 cells compared to the E6/E7 cells. All the other compositions of cold plasma were performed based on this result: plasma treatment time was maintained at 30 s per well while other plasma characteristics such as voltage, flow rate of source gas, and composition of source gas were changed one at a time to vary the intensity of the reactive species composition in the plasma jet, which may finally have various effect on cells reflected by cell viability. We defined a term “plasma dosage” to summarize the relationship of all the characteristics and cell viability. PMID:24878760

  5. Fractionated stem cell infusions for patients with plasma cell myeloma undergoing autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Landau, Heather; Wood, Kevin; Chung, David J; Koehne, Guenther; Lendvai, Nikoletta; Hassoun, Hani; Lesokhin, Alexander; Hoover, Elizabeth; Zheng, Junting; Devlin, Sean M; Giralt, Sergio

    2016-08-01

    We conducted a phase II trial investigating the impact of fractionated hematopoietic cell infusions on engraftment kinetics and symptom burden in patients with plasma cell myeloma (PCM) undergoing autologous hematopoietic cell transplant (AHCT). We hypothesized that multiple hematopoietic cell infusions would reduce duration of neutropenia and enhance immune recovery resulting in a better tolerated procedure. Twenty-six patients received high-dose melphalan followed by multiple cell infusions (Days 0, +2, +4, +6) and were compared to PCM patients (N = 77) who received high-dose melphalan and a single infusion (Day 0) (concurrent control group). The primary endpoint was number of days with ANC <500K/mcL. Symptom burden was assessed using the MSK-modified MD Anderson Symptom Inventory. Median duration of neutropenia was similar in study (4 days, range 3-5) and control patients (4 days, range 3-9) (p = 0.654). There was no significant difference in the number of red cell or platelet transfusions, days of fever, diarrhea, antibiotics, number of documented infections, or length of admission. Symptom burden surveys showed that AHCT was well-tolerated in both study and control patients. We conclude that fractionated stem cell infusions following high-dose melphalan do not enhance engraftment kinetics or significantly alter patients' clinical course following AHCT in PCM.

  6. High-contrast plasma-electrode Pockels cell.

    PubMed

    Kruschwitz, B E; Kelly, J H; Shoup Iii, M J; Waxer, L J; Cost, E C; Green, E T; Hoyt, Z M; Taniguchi, J; Walker, T W

    2007-03-10

    A plasma-electrode Pockels cell (PEPC) has been developed for use on the OMEGA extended performance (EP) laser system that can be used in a high-contrast optical switch, as required for isolation of the system from retroreflected pulses. Contrast ratios reliably exceeded 500:1 locally everywhere in the clear aperture. The key to achieving this improvement was the use of circular windows simply supported on compliant O rings, which is shown to produce very low stress-induced birefringence despite vacuum loading. Reliable operation was achieved operating at a relatively high operating pressure, low operating pressures being found to be strongly correlated to occurrences of local loss of plasma density.

  7. Separation of blood cells and plasma in microchannel bend structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blattert, Christoph; Jurischka, Reinhold; Schoth, Andreas; Kerth, Paul; Menz, Wolfgang

    2004-12-01

    Biological applications of micro assay devices require easy implementable on-chip microfluidics for separation of plasma or serum from blood. This is achieved by a new blood separation technique based on a microchannel bend structure developed within the collaborative Micro-Tele-BioChip (μTBC) project. Different prototype polymer chips have been manufactured with an UV-LIGA process and hot embossing technology. The separation mechanisms have been identified and the separation efficiency of these chips has been determined by experimental measurements using human blood samples. Results show different separation efficiencies for cells and plasma up to 100 % depending on microchannel geometry, hematocrit, and feed velocity. This novel technique leads to an alternative blood separation method as compared to existing micro separation technologies.

  8. Direct plasma irradiation affects expression of RNAs in cultured mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Mime; Tokaji, Hideto; Kumagai, Shinya

    2016-12-01

    The expression of RNAs in mouse NIH3T3 cells was altered by low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma irradiation. Cell culture liquid media were removed before plasma irradiation so that direct plasma effects can be assessed. After 5 s irradiation, the cells were cultured in media for 1 or 3 h and RNA expression was analyzed using a microarray. When analyzed 1 and 3 h after plasma irradiation, the upregulation of hypothetical transmembrane proteins and U3 small nucleolar RNAs was detected at both time points. Our results provide a basic principle for understanding the molecular mechanisms of plasma effects on mammalian cells.

  9. Atomic Force Microscope Investigations of Biofilm-Forming Bacterial Cells Treated with Gas Discharge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandervoort, Kurt; Renshaw, Andrew; Abramzon, Nina; Brelles-Marino, Graciela

    2009-03-01

    We present investigations of biofilm-forming bacteria before and after treatment from gas discharge plasmas. Gas discharge plasmas represent a way to inactivate bacteria under conditions where conventional disinfection methods are often ineffective. These conditions involve bacteria in biofilm communities, where cooperative interactions between cells make organisms less susceptible to standard killing methods. Chromobacterium violaceum were imaged before and after plasma treatment using an atomic force microscope (AFM). After 5 min. plasma treatment, 90% of cells were inactivated, that is, transformed to non-culturable cells. Results for cell surface morphology and micromechanical properties for plasma treatments lasting from 5 to 60 minutes were obtained and will be presented.

  10. Aging-associated renal disease in mice is fructokinase dependent.

    PubMed

    Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos A; Ishimoto, Takuji; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Milagres, Tamara; Hernando, Ana Andres; Jensen, Thomas; Miyazaki, Makoto; Doke, Tomohito; Hayasaki, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Marumaya, Shoichi; Long, David A; Garcia, Gabriela E; Kuwabara, Masanari; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G; Kang, Duk-Hee; Johnson, Richard J

    2016-10-01

    Aging-associated kidney disease is usually considered a degenerative process associated with aging. Recently, it has been shown that animals can produce fructose endogenously, and that this can be a mechanism for causing kidney damage in diabetic nephropathy and in association with recurrent dehydration. We therefore hypothesized that low-level metabolism of endogenous fructose might play a role in aging-associated kidney disease. Wild-type and fructokinase knockout mice were fed a normal diet for 2 yr that had minimal (<5%) fructose content. At the end of 2 yr, wild-type mice showed elevations in systolic blood pressure, mild albuminuria, and glomerular changes with mesangial matrix expansion, variable mesangiolysis, and segmental thrombi. The renal injury was amplified by provision of high-salt diet for 3 wk, as noted by the presence of glomerular hypertrophy, mesangial matrix expansion, and alpha smooth muscle actin expression, and with segmental thrombi. Fructokinase knockout mice were protected from renal injury both at baseline and after high salt intake (3 wk) compared with wild-type mice. This was associated with higher levels of active (phosphorylated serine 1177) endothelial nitric oxide synthase in their kidneys. These studies suggest that aging-associated renal disease might be due to activation of specific metabolic pathways that could theoretically be targeted therapeutically, and raise the hypothesis that aging-associated renal injury may represent a disease process as opposed to normal age-related degeneration.

  11. Age-associated changes of appetite-regulating peptides.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Saeko; Miyasaka, Kyoko

    2010-07-01

    Aging is associated with a progressive decrease in appetite and food intake. The reasons for the decline in food intake are multifactorial, and relate to both peripheral and central mechanisms. Current studies about the regulation of food intake suggest that there are many central mediators that control the appetite. To determine the mechanism of age-associated decrease in appetite and food intake, we focused on the age-associated changes of the suppressing and stimulatory effect of some appetite-regulating peptides. At first, we examined cholecystokinin (CCK), one of the typical appetite-suppressing factors. Although sensitivity to CCK is enhanced in old animals, the mechanism underlying this effect has not been elucidated. Next, we focused on the appetite-stimulating peptides, orexin-A, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and ghrelin, which are known to play a critical role in food intake. To determine the age-associated decrease in appetite and food intake, we compared the stimulatory effect of intracerebroventricular administration of orexin-A, NPY and ghrelin. We report the studies of the age-associated changes of appetite-regulating peptides in this review.

  12. The hormesis effect of plasma-elevated intracellular ROS on HaCaT cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szili, Endre J.; Harding, Frances J.; Hong, Sung-Ha; Herrmann, Franziska; Voelcker, Nicolas H.; Short, Robert D.

    2015-12-01

    We have examined the link between ionized-gas plasma delivery of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to immortalized keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells and cell fate, defined in terms of cell viability versus death. Phospholipid vesicles were used as cell mimics to measure the possible intracellular ROS concentration, [ROSi], delivered by various plasma treatments. Cells were exposed to a helium cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) jet for different plasma exposure times (5-60 s) and gas flow rates (50-1000 ml min-1). Based upon the [ROSi] data we argue that plasma-generated ROS in the cell culture medium can readily diffuse into real cells. Plasma exposure that equated to an [ROSi] in the range of 3.81  ×  10-10-9.47  ×  10-8 M, measured at 1 h after the plasma exposure, resulted in increased cell viability at 72 h; whereas a higher [ROSi] at 1 h decreased cell viability after 72 h of culture. This may be because of the manner in which the ROS are delivered by the plasma: HaCaT cells better tolerate a low ROS flux over an extended plasma exposure period of 1 min, compared to a high flux delivered in a few seconds, although the final [ROSi] may be the same. Our results suggest that plasma stimulation of HaCaT cells follows the principle of hormesis.

  13. CD28–B7 Interaction Modulates Short- and Long-Lived Plasma Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Njau, Modesta N.; Kim, Jin Hyang; Chappell, Craig P.; Ravindran, Rajesh; Thomas, Leela; Pulendran, Bali; Jacob, Joshy

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of CD28, which is constitutively expressed on T cells, with B7.1/B7.2 expressed on APCs is critical for T cell activation. CD28 is also expressed on murine and human plasma cells but its function on these cells remains unclear. There are two types of plasma cells: short-lived ones that appear in the secondary lymphoid tissue shortly after Ag exposure, and long-lived plasma cells that mainly reside in the bone marrow. We demonstrate that CD28-deficient murine short- and long-lived plasma cells produce significantly higher levels of Abs than do their wild-type counterparts. This was owing to both increased frequencies of plasma cells as well as increased Ab production per plasma cell. Plasma cells also express the ligand for CD28, B7.1, and B7.2. Surprisingly, deficiency of B7.1 and B7.2 in B cells also led to higher Ab levels, analogous to Cd28−/− plasma cells. Collectively, our results suggest that the CD28–B7 interaction operates as a key modulator of plasma cell function. PMID:22908331

  14. 3D Mapping of plasma effective areas via detection of cancer cell damage induced by atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Liu, Yueing; Stack, M. Sharon; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, a nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used for irradiation of oral cancer cells. Since cancer cells are very susceptible to plasma treatment, they can be used as a tool for detection of APPJ-effective areas, which extended much further than the visible part of the APPJ. An immunofluorescence assay was used for DNA damage identification, visualization and quantification. Thus, the effective damage area and damage level were determined and plotted as 3D images.

  15. Identification of Aging-Associated Gene Expression Signatures That Precede Intestinal Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Okuchi, Yoshihisa; Imajo, Masamichi; Mizuno, Rei; Kamioka, Yuji; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Taketo, Makoto Mark; Nagayama, Satoshi; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Aging-associated alterations of cellular functions have been implicated in various disorders including cancers. Due to difficulties in identifying aging cells in living tissues, most studies have focused on aging-associated changes in whole tissues or certain cell pools. Thus, it remains unclear what kinds of alterations accumulate in each cell during aging. While analyzing several mouse lines expressing fluorescent proteins (FPs), we found that expression of FPs is gradually silenced in the intestinal epithelium during aging in units of single crypt composed of clonal stem cell progeny. The cells with low FP expression retained the wild-type Apc allele and the tissues composed of them did not exhibit any histological abnormality. Notably, the silencing of FPs was also observed in intestinal adenomas and the surrounding normal mucosae of Apc-mutant mice, and mediated by DNA methylation of the upstream promoter. Our genome-wide analysis then showed that the silencing of FPs reflects specific gene expression alterations during aging, and that these alterations occur in not only mouse adenomas but also human sporadic and hereditary (familial adenomatous polyposis) adenomas. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of DNA methylation, which suppresses adenoma development in Apc-mutant mice, reverted the aging-associated silencing of FPs and gene expression alterations. These results identify aging-associated gene expression signatures that are heterogeneously induced by DNA methylation and precede intestinal tumorigenesis triggered by Apc inactivation, and suggest that pharmacological inhibition of the signature genes could be a novel strategy for the prevention and treatment of intestinal tumors. PMID:27589228

  16. Plasma electrode pockels cell for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Alger, T.; Biltoft, P.; Boley, C. D.; Fochs, S.; Funkhouser, B.; Rhodes, M. A.

    1998-07-28

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), now under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, will be the largest laser fusion facility ever built. The NIF laser architecture is based on a multi-pass power amplifier to reduce cost and maximize performance. A key component in this laser design is an optical switch that closes to trap the optical pulse in the cavity for four gain passes and then opens to divert the optical pulse out of the amplifier cavity. The switch is comprised of a Pockels cell and a polarizer and is unique because it handles a beam that is 40 cm x 40 cm square and allows close horizontal and vertical beam spacing. Conventional Pockels cells do not scale to such large apertures or the square shape required for close packing. Our switch is based on a Plasma-Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC). In a PEPC, low-pressure helium discharges (1-2 kA) are formed on both sides of a thin slab of electro-optic material. Typically, we use KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4 } crystals (KDP). The discharges form highly conductive, transparent sheets that allow uniform application of a high-voltage pulse (17 kV) across the crystal. A 37 cm x 37 cm PEPC has been in routine operation for two years on the 6 k.J Beamlet laser at LLNL. For the NIF, a module four apertures high by one wide (4x1) is required. However, this 4x1 mechanical module will be comprised electrically of a pair of 2x1 sub-modules. Last year (FY 97), we demonstrated full operation of a prototype 2x1 PEPC. In this PEPC, the plasma spans two KDP crystals. A major advance in the 2x1 PEPC over the Beamlet PEPC is the use of anodized aluminum construction that still provides sufficient insulation to allow formation of the planar plasmas.

  17. Diagnosis and management of neuropathies associated with plasma cell dyscrasias.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Evan; Marks, Douglas; Raza, Shahzad

    2017-04-10

    Neuropathies associated with plasma cell dyscrasias are a major cause of morbidity for patients managed by medical oncologists. Because of similarities in clinical presentation and on nerve conduction studies, identifying the underlying disease leading to a paraproteinemic neuropathy can often be difficult. In addition, the degree of neurologic deficit does not strictly correlate with the extent of abnormalities on common clinical laboratory testing. Fortunately, with increasing understanding into the biologic mechanisms of underlying hematologic diseases, additional biomarkers have recently been developed, thus improving our diagnostic capacity. Neuropathies associated with plasma cells dyscrasias are seen with Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) particularly IgM subtype, followed by IgG and IgA MGUS, multiple myeloma, Waldenström's macroglobulinemia, amyloid, Castleman's disease, and POEMS syndrome. The mechanisms of neuronal injury associated with plasma cell dyscrasia vary based on underlying diagnosis and include malignant infiltration, immune-mediated antibody deposition, or local compression of nerve roots. The polyneuropathies are frequently demyelinating, although axonal and mixed neuropathies can also be seen. As demonstrated by the cases included in this review, patients frequently present with symmetric sensory disturbance, followed by progressive motor weakness. Unfortunately, because of the complexity of diagnostic testing, patients are frequently examined late, often after receiving several ineffective therapies. The aim of this case-based review is to provide clinicians with insight on how to properly recognize these atypical neuropathies and send the appropriate diagnostic work, increasing the likelihood of accurately classify the patient's underlying hematologic disorder. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Age-associated loss of lamin-B leads to systemic inflammation and gut hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haiyang; Zheng, Xiaobin; Zheng, Yixian

    2014-01-01

    Aging of immune organs, termed as immunosenescence, is suspected to promote systemic inflammation and age-associated disease. The cause of immunosenescence and how it promotes disease, however, has remained unexplored. We report that the Drosophila fat body, a major immune organ, undergoes immunosenescence and mounts strong systemic inflammation that leads to de-regulation of immune deficiency (IMD) signaling in the midgut of old animals. Inflamed old fat bodies secrete circulating peptidoglycan recognition proteins that repress IMD activity in the midgut, thereby promoting gut hyperplasia. Further, fat body immunosenecence is caused by age-associated lamin-B reduction specifically in fat body cells, which then contributes to heterochromatin loss and de-repression of genes involved in immune responses. As lamin-associated heterochromatin domains are enriched for genes involved in immune response in both Drosophila and mammalian cells, our findings may provide insights into the cause and consequence of immunosenescence during aging. PMID:25417159

  19. The effect of plasma on solar cell array arc characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, D. B.; Tyree, E.

    1984-01-01

    The influence from the ambient plasma on the arc characteristics of a negatively biased solar cell array was investigated. The arc characteristics examined were the peak current during an arc, the decay time as the arc terminates, and the charge lost during the arc. These arc characteristics were examined in a nitrogen plasma with charge densities ranging from 15,000 to 45,000 cu cm. Background gas pressures ranged from 8x1,000,000 to 6x100,000 torr. Over these ranges of parameters no significant effect on the arc characteristics were seen. Arc characteristics were also examined for three gas species: helium, nitrogen and argon. The helium arcs have higher peak currents and shorter decay times than nitrogen and argon arcs. There are slight differences in the arc characteristics between nitrogen and argon. These differences may be caused by the differences in mass of the respective species. Also, evidence is presented for an electron emission mechanism appearing as a precursor to solar array arcs. Occassionally the plasma generator could be turned off, and currents could still be detected in the vacuum system. When these currents are presented, arcs may occur.

  20. The effect of plasma on solar cell array arc characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, D. B.; Tyree, E.

    1985-01-01

    The influence from the ambient plasma on the arc characteristics of a negatively biased solar cell array was investigated. The arc characteristics examined were the peak current during an arc, the decay time as the arc terminates, and the charge lost during the arc. These arc characteristics were examined in a nitrogen plasma with charge densities ranging from 15,000 to 45,000 cu cm. Background gas pressures ranged from 8x1,000,000 to 6x100,000 torr. Over these ranges of parameters no significant effect on the arc characteristics were seen. Arc characteristics were also examined for three gas species: helium, nitrogen and argon. The helium arcs have higher peak currents and shorter decay times than nitrogen and argon arcs. There are slight differences in the arc characteristics between nitrogen and argon. These differences may be caused by the differences in mass of the respective species. Also, evidence is presented for an electron emission mechanism appearing as a precursor to solar array arcs. Occasionally the plasma generator could be turned off, and currents could still be detected in the vacuum system. When these currents are presented, arcs may occur.

  1. Analysis of plasma membrane phosphoinositides from fusogenic carrot cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, J.J.; Boss, W.F.

    1987-04-01

    Phosphatidylinositol monophosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP/sub 2/) were found to be associated with the plasma membrane-rich fractions isolated by aqueous polymer two-phase partitioning from fusogenic cells. They represented at least 5% and 0.7% of the total inositol-labeled lipids in the plasma membrane-rich fractions, respectively, and were present in a ratio of about 7:1 (PIP:PIP/sub 2/). In addition, two unidentified inositol-labeled compounds, which together were approximately 3% of the inositol-labeled lipids, were found predominantly in the plasma membrane-rich fractions and migrated between PIP/sub 2/ and PIP. The R/sub f/s of these compounds were approximately 0.31 and 0.34 in the solvent system CHCl/sub 3/:MeOH:15N NH/sub 4/OH:H/sub 2/O (90:90:7:22) using LK5 plates presoaked in 1% potassium oxalate. These compounds incorporated /sup 32/P/sub i/, (/sup 3/H)inositol and were hydrolyzed in mild base. These data suggested that they were glycero-phospholipids. Although the compounds did not comigrate with lysoPIP obtained from bovine brain (R/sub f/ approx. 0.35), when endogenous PIP was hydrolyzed to lysoPIP, the breakdown product migrated in the region of the unidentified inositol lipids.

  2. Non-thermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Melanoma Cells via Production of Intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Sensenig, Rachel; Kalghatgi, Sameer; Cerchar, Ekaterina; Fridman, Gregory; Shereshevsky, Alexey; Torabi, Behzad; Arjunan, Krishna Priya; Podolsky, Erica; Fridman, Alexander; Friedman, Gary; Azizkhan-Clifford, Jane; Brooks, Ari D.

    2012-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma may provide a novel approach to treat malignancies via induction of apoptosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of DBD plasma to induce apoptosis in melanoma cells. Melanoma cells were exposed to plasma at doses that did not induce necrosis, and cell viability and apoptotic activity were evaluated by Trypan blue exclusion test, Annexin-V/PI staining, caspase-3 cleavage, and TUNEL® analysis. Trypan blue staining revealed that non-thermal plasma treatment significantly decreased the viability of cells in a dose-dependent manner 3 and 24 h after plasma treatment. Annexin-V/PI staining revealed a significant increase in apoptosis in plasma-treated cells at 24, 48, and 72 h post-treatment (p<0.001). Caspase-3 cleavage was observed 48 h post-plasma treatment at a dose of 15 J/cm2. TUNEL® analysis of plasma-treated cells demonstrated an increase in apoptosis at 48 and 72 h post-treatment (p<0.001) at a dose of 15 J/cm2. Pre-treatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), an intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, significantly decreased apoptosis in plasma-treated cells at 5 and 15 J/cm2. Plasma treatment induces apoptosis in melanoma cells through a pathway that appears to be dependent on production of intracellular ROS. DBD plasma production of intracellular ROS leads to dose-dependent DNA damage in melanoma cells, detected by γ-H2AX, which was completely abrogated by pre-treating cells with ROS scavenger, NAC. Plasma-induced DNA damage in turn may lead to the observed plasma-induced apoptosis. Since plasma is non-thermal, it may be used to selectively treat malignancies. PMID:21046465

  3. A micromechanic study of cell polarity and plasma membrane cell body coupling in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed Central

    Merkel, R; Simson, R; Simson, D A; Hohenadl, M; Boulbitch, A; Wallraff, E; Sackmann, E

    2000-01-01

    We used micropipettes to aspirate leading and trailing edges of wild-type and mutant cells of Dictyostelium discoideum. Mutants were lacking either myosin II or talin, or both proteins simultaneously. Talin is a plasma membrane-associated protein important for the coupling between membrane and actin cortex, whereas myosin II is a cytoplasmic motor protein essential for the locomotion of Dictyostelium cells. Aspiration into the pipette occurred above a threshold pressure only. For all cells containing talin this threshold was significantly lower at the leading edge of an advancing cell as compared to its rear end, whereas we found no such difference in cells lacking talin. Wild-type and talin-deficient cells were able to retract from the pipette against an applied suction pressure. In these cells, retraction was preceded by an accumulation of myosin II in the tip of the aspirated cell lobe. Mutants lacking myosin II could not retract, even if the suction pressures were removed after aspiration. We interpreted the initial instability and the subsequent plastic deformation of the cell surface during aspiration in terms of a fracture between the cell plasma membrane and the cell body, which may involve destruction of part of the cortex. Models are presented that characterize the coupling strength between membrane and cell body by a surface energy sigma. We find sigma approximately 0.6(1.6) mJ/m(2) at the leading (trailing) edge of wild-type cells. PMID:10920005

  4. PAX-5 is invariably expressed in B-cell lymphomas without plasma cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dong, H Y; Browne, P; Liu, Z; Gangi, M

    2008-09-01

    The B-cell-specific transcription factor PAX-5 is physiologically expressed in normal B cells and silenced in plasma cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether PAX-5 expression is universal among B-cell malignancies. A wide spectrum of B-cell malignancies were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis for PAX-5 expression. The study was especially focused on cases lacking CD20, such as precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (preB-ALL), CD20- B-cell lymphomas, classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (CHL) and B-cell lymphomas with significant plasmacytic differentiation. Strong PAX-5 expression was identified, without exception, in all cases of CD20+ B-lymphoproliferative disorders. It was also invariably detected in 31/31 cases of preB-ALL, 14/14 cases of CD20- diffuse large B-cell lymphoma without plasmacytic differentiation and 26/26 CD20- B-cell lymphoma status post rituximab treatment. The vast majority of CHLs had unequivocal PAX-5 expression of varying intensity (80/86). However, variants of B-cell malignancies with characteristic plasmacytic differentiation exhibited no detectable PAX-5 expression (0/17). PAX-5 is the most sensitive and reliable immunohistochemical marker for B-cell malignancies. Lack of PAX-5 expression correlates with the presence of marked plasma cell differentiation.

  5. Study of plasma-induced peripheral blood mononuclear cells survival using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ranjit K; Salman, Ahmad; Mordechai, Shaul; Manor, Esther

    2013-11-01

    Components present in the acellular fraction of blood influence the blood cell survival and function and the response to biotic and abiotic factors. Human plasma and sera have been used as therapeutic agents and are known to increase cell survival. White blood cells in normal blood are exposed to plasma components in vivo, but the effect of such plasma components in vitro on adherent peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) that includes monocytes has not been fully investigated. We cultured human PBMCs with autologous plasma and observed structural variation due to plasma addition in PBMCs along with increased cell survival. Light microscopy of the cells showed increased granularity in plasma-treated cells. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to elucidate the possible mechanism by studying the changes in the biochemical composition of the cells that explained the observations. FTIR spectroscopy of plasma-treated cells show altered spectral pattern in the mid-IR region, indicating increased phospholipid levels. Heat-stable components in the plasma possibly increase the differentiation of PBMCs, as evident by increased phospholipid metabolism. The data suggest that plasma-stimulated membrane biogenesis may contribute to PBMC survival by inducing them to differentiate into antigen presenting cells (APCs) like macrophages and dendritic cells.

  6. Cold atmospheric plasma jet-generated RONS and their selective effects on normal and carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T H

    2016-02-03

    Cold atmospheric helium plasma jets were fabricated and utilized for plasma-cell interactions. The effect of operating parameters and jet design on the generation of specific reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) within cells and cellular response were investigated. It was found that plasma treatment induced the overproduction of RONS in various cancer cell lines selectively. The plasma under a relatively low applied voltage induced the detachment of cells, a reduction in cell viability, and apoptosis, while the plasma under higher applied voltage led to cellular necrosis in our case. To determine whether plasma-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation occurs through interfering with mitochondria-related cellular response, we examined the plasma effects on ROS generation in both parental A549 cells and A549 ρ(0) cells. It was observed that cancer cells were more susceptible to plasma-induced RONS (especially nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2(-)) radicals) than normal cells, and consequently, plasma induced apoptotic cell responses mainly in cancer cells.

  7. Therapeutic approaches to age-associated neurocognitive disorders

    PubMed Central

    O'Hara, Ruth; Derouesné, Christian; Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N.; Yesavage, Jerome A.

    2001-01-01

    The United Nations projects that the number of individuals with dementia in developed countries alone will be approximately 36,7 million by the year 2050. International recognition of the significant emotional and economic burden of Alzheimer's disease has been matched by a dramatic increase in the development of pharmacological and nonpharmacological approaches to this illness in the past decade. Changing demographics have underscored the necessity to develop similar approaches for the remediation of the cognitive impairment associated with more benign syndromes, such as mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and age-associated cognitive decline (AACD). The present article aims to provide an overview of the most current therapeutic approaches to age-associated neurocognitive disorders. Additionally, it discusses the conceptual and methodological issues that surround the design, implementation, and interpretation of such approaches. PMID:22033831

  8. The spectrum of plasma cell neoplasia in oral pathology.

    PubMed

    Seoane, Juan; Aguirre-Urizar, José Manuel; Esparza-Gómez, Germán; Suárez-Cunqueiro, Mercedes; Campos-Trapero, Julián; Pomareda, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    Plasma cell tumors are lymphoid neoplastic proliferations of B cells that may be classified as multiple myeloma (MM), solitary bone plasmacytoma (SBP) and extramedullary plasmacytoma (PEM). These types of neoplasia are typically found in adults and may occur as disseminated tumors of the bone marrow or in some cases as solitary bone or extramedullary tumors. Most SBP eventually develop into MM, whereas only 30% of the PEM do so. Oral manifestations in the form of oral and maxillofacial lesions are often the first sign of the disease. Treatment of these neoplastic tumors varies depending on the type of proliferation and may involve surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, alone or combined. This paper reviews the main clinical and pathological aspects of these tumors and their relationship to the oral and maxillofacial area.

  9. [Experimental estimation of proteome size for cells and human plasma].

    PubMed

    Naryzhny, S N; Zgoda, V G; Maynskova, M A; Ronzhina, N L; Belyakova, N V; Legina, O K; Archakov, A I

    2015-01-01

    Huge range of concentrations of different protein and insufficient sensitivity of methods for detection of proteins at a single molecule level does not yet allow obtaining the whole image of human proteome. In our investigations, we tried to evaluate the size of different proteomes (cells and plasma). The approach used is based on detection of protein spots in 2-DE after staining by protein dyes with different sensitivities. The function representing the dependence of the number of protein spots on sensitivity of protein dyes was generated. Next, by extrapolation of this function curve to theoretical point of the maximum sensitivity (detection of a single smallest polypeptide) it was calculated that a single human cell (HepG2) may contain minimum 70,000 proteoforms, and plasma--1.5 mln. Utilization of this approach to other, smaller proteomes showed the competency of this extrapolation. For instance, the size of mycoplas ma (Acholeplasma laidlawii) was estimated in 1100 proteoforms, yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae)--40,000, E. coli--6200, P. furiosus--3400. In hepatocytes, the amount of proteoforms was the same as in HepG2--70,000. Significance of obtained data is in possibilities to estimating the proteome organization and planning next steps in its study.

  10. Simplex-in-cell technique for collisionless plasma simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kates-Harbeck, Julian; Totorica, Samuel; Zrake, Jonathan; Abel, Tom

    2016-01-01

    We extend the simplex-in-cell (SIC) technique recently introduced in the context of collisionless dark matter fluids [1,2] to the case of collisionless plasmas. The six-dimensional phase space distribution function f (x , v) is represented by an ensemble of three-dimensional manifolds, which we refer to as sheets. The electric potential field is obtained by solving the Poisson equation on a uniform mesh, where the charge density is evaluated by a spatial projection of the phase space sheets. The SIC representation of phase space density facilitates robust, high accuracy numerical evolution of the Vlasov-Poisson system using significantly fewer tracer particles than comparable particle-in-cell (PIC) approaches by reducing the numerical shot-noise associated with the latter. We introduce the SIC formulation and describe its implementation in a new code, which we validate using standard test problems including plasma oscillations, Landau damping, and two stream instabilities in one dimension. Merits of the new scheme are shown to include higher accuracy and faster convergence rates in the number of particles. We finally motivate and outline the efficient application of SIC to higher dimensional problems.

  11. Nutrition in early life and age-associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Tarry-Adkins, Jane L; Ozanne, Susan E

    2017-10-01

    The prevalence of age-associated disease is increasing at a striking rate globally. It is known that a strong association exists between a suboptimal maternal and/or early-life environment and increased propensity of developing age-associated disease, including cardiovascular disease (CVD), type-2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity. The dissection of underlying molecular mechanisms to explain this phenomenon, which is known as 'developmental programming' is still emerging; however three common mechanisms have emerged in many models of developmental programming. These mechanisms are (a) changes in tissue structure, (b) epigenetic regulation and (c) accelerated cellular ageing. This review will examine the epidemiological evidence and the animal models of suboptimal maternal environments, focusing upon these molecular mechanisms and will discuss the progress being made in the development of safe and effective intervention strategies which ultimately could target those 'programmed' individuals who are known to be at-risk of age-associated disease. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Suicide rates: age-associated trends and their correlates.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ajit

    2012-07-01

    Suicide rates traditionally increased with ageing. There is a paucity of studies examining factors associated with age-associated trends in suicide rates. The relationship between suicide rates and ageing was examined by ascertaining suicide rates in the seven age-bands 16-24 years to 75+ years from the World Health Organisation for 97 countries. The relationship between socio-economic status, income inequality, health-care expenditure, child mortality rates and life expectancy and countries with an increase, a decline and no change in suicide rates with ageing was examined using data from the United Nations. In males and females there was a decline in 5 and 10 countries, an increase in 33 and 37 countries and no change in 59 and 50 countries respectively in suicide rates with ageing. Age-associated trends in suicide rates were significantly associated with socio-economic status (males) or income inequality (females), per capita expenditure in healthcare, the proportion of gross-national domestic product spent on healthcare, child mortality rates and life expectancy. The current study, of factors associated with age-associated trends in suicide rates, confirmed a previously developed five sequential stage model to explain the relationship between elderly suicide rates and socio-economic status and income inequality, quality and quantity of healthcare services, child mortality rates and life expectancy.

  13. Suicide rates: age-associated trends and their correlates

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ajit

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Suicide rates traditionally increased with ageing. There is a paucity of studies examining factors associated with age-associated trends in suicide rates. Methods: The relationship between suicide rates and ageing was examined by ascertaining suicide rates in the seven age-bands 16-24 years to 75+ years from the World Health Organisation for 97 countries. The relationship between socio-economic status, income inequality, healthcare expenditure, child mortality rates and life expectancy and countries with an increase, a decline and no change in suicide rates with ageing was examined using data from the United Nations. Results: In males and females there was a decline in 5 and 10 countries, an increase in 33 and 37 countries and no change in 59 and 50 countries respectively in suicide rates with ageing. Age-associated trends in suicide rates were significantly associated with socio-economic status (males) or income inequality (females), per capita expenditure in healthcare, the proportion of gross-national domestic product spent on healthcare, child mortality rates and life expectancy. Conclusion: The current study, of factors associated with age-associated trends in suicide rates, confirmed a previously developed five sequential stage model to explain the relationship between elderly suicide rates and socio-economic status and income inequality, quality and quantity of healthcare services, child mortality rates and life expectancy. PMID:21502781

  14. T Regulatory Cells Support Plasma Cell Populations in the Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Glatman Zaretsky, Arielle; Konradt, Christoph; Dépis, Fabien; Wing, James B; Goenka, Radhika; Atria, Daniela Gomez; Silver, Jonathan S; Cho, Sunglim; Wolf, Amaya I; Quinn, William J; Engiles, Julie B; Brown, Dorothy C; Beiting, Daniel; Erikson, Jan; Allman, David; Cancro, Michael P; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Lu, Li-Fan; Benoist, Christophe O; Hunter, Christopher A

    2017-02-21

    Long-lived plasma cells (PCs) in the bone marrow (BM) are a critical source of antibodies after infection or vaccination, but questions remain about the factors that control PCs. We found that systemic infection alters the BM, greatly reducing PCs and regulatory T (Treg) cells, a population that contributes to immune privilege in the BM. The use of intravital imaging revealed that BM Treg cells display a distinct behavior characterized by sustained co-localization with PCs and CD11c-YFP(+) cells. Gene expression profiling indicated that BM Treg cells express high levels of Treg effector molecules, and CTLA-4 deletion in these cells resulted in elevated PCs. Furthermore, preservation of Treg cells during systemic infection prevents PC loss, while Treg cell depletion in uninfected mice reduced PC populations. These studies suggest a role for Treg cells in PC biology and provide a potential target for the modulation of PCs during vaccine-induced humoral responses or autoimmunity.

  15. Increased CXCR3 Expression of Infiltrating Plasma Cells in Hunner Type Interstitial Cystitis.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yoshiyuki; Morikawa, Teppei; Maeda, Daichi; Shintani, Yukako; Niimi, Aya; Nomiya, Akira; Nakayama, Atsuhito; Igawa, Yasuhiko; Fukayama, Masashi; Homma, Yukio

    2016-06-24

    An up-regulated CXCR3 pathway and affluent plasma cell infiltration are characteristic features of Hunner type interstitial cystitis (HIC). We further examined these two features using bladder biopsy samples taken from 27 patients with HIC and 15 patients with non-IC cystitis as a control. The number of CD3-positive T lymphocytes, CD20-positive B lymphocytes, CD138-positive plasma cells, and CXCR3-positive cells was quantified by digital image analysis. Double-immunofluorescence for CXCR3 and CD138 was used to detect CXCR3 expression in plasma cells. Correlations between CXCR3 positivity and lymphocytic and plasma cell numbers and clinical parameters were explored. The density of CXCR3-positive cells showed no significant differences between HIC and non-IC cystitis specimens. However, distribution of CXCR3-positivity in plasma cells indicated co-localization of CXCR3 with CD138 in HIC specimens, but not in non-IC cystitis specimens. The number of CXCR3-positive cells correlated with plasma cells in HIC specimens alone. Infiltration of CXCR3-positive cells was unrelated to clinical parameters of patients with HIC. These results suggest that infiltration of CXCR3-positive plasma cells is a characteristic feature of HIC. The CXCR3 pathway and specific immune responses may be involved in accumulation/retention of plasma cells and pathophysiology of the HIC bladder.

  16. Characterization of plasma-induced cell membrane permeabilization: focus on OH radical distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Shota; Honda, Ryosuke; Hokari, Yutaro; Takashima, Keisuke; Kanzaki, Makoto; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-08-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma (APP) is used medically for plasma-induced cell permeabilization. However, how plasma irradiation specifically triggers permeabilization remains unclear. In an attempt to identify the dominant factor(s), the distribution of plasma-produced reactive species was investigated, primarily focusing on OH radicals. A stronger plasma discharge, which produced more OH radicals in the gas phase, also produced more OH radicals in the liquid phase (OHaq), enhancing the cell membrane permeability. In addition, plasma irradiation-induced enhancement of cell membrane permeability decreased markedly with increased solution thickness (<1 mm), and the plasma-produced OHaq decayed in solution (diffusion length on the order of several hundred micrometers). Furthermore, the horizontally center-localized distribution of OHaq corresponded with the distribution of the permeabilized cells by plasma irradiation, while the overall plasma-produced oxidizing species in solution (detected by iodine-starch reaction) exhibited a doughnut-shaped horizontal distribution. These results suggest that OHaq, among the plasma-produced oxidizing species, represents the dominant factor in plasma-induced cell permeabilization. These results enhance the current understanding of the mechanism of APP as a cell-permeabilization tool.

  17. Immunohistological analysis in diagnosis of plasma cell myeloma based on cytoplasmic kappa/lambda ratio of CD38-positive plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shoko; Yokote, Taiji; Hirata, Yuji; Iwaki, Kazuki; Akioka, Toshikazu; Miyoshi, Takuji; Nishiwaki, Uta; Masuda, Yuki; Hiraoka, Nobuya; Takayama, Ayami; Nishimura, Yasuichiro; Tsuji, Motomu; Hanafusa, Toshiaki

    2012-11-01

    The accurate determination of cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (cIg) light chain (LC) expression is important to differentiate reactive plasmacytosis from a clonal plasma cell neoplasm such as plasma cell myeloma (PCM). Through retrospective analysis, we studied the cytoplasmic kappa/lambda ratio of CD38-positive plasma cells in the bone marrow from 19 PCM patients and 19 controls. To demonstrate cIg LC expression, the bone marrow was immunostained for IgA, IgG, IgM, kappa, and lambda. The kappa/lambda ratio was defined as the ratio of the kappa-positive cell to the lambda-positive cell in plasma cells. PCM cells were distinguished from normal plasma cells by cut-off levels between 0.59 and 4.0, a sensitivity of 94.7%, and a specificity of 94.7%. The detection of the cytoplasmic kappa/lambda ratio of CD38-positive plasma cells may be a useful tool in the diagnosis of PCM and the correct diagnosis of PCM may be achieved more simply.

  18. Plasma cell cheilitis, successfully treated with topical 0.03% tacrolimus ointment.

    PubMed

    Jin, Seon Pil; Cho, Kwang Hyun; Huh, Chang Hun

    2010-05-01

    Plasma cell cheilitis is a rare, idiopathic mucosal condition. The treatment of plasma cell cheilitis is often disappointing. It is often resistant to various topical treatments. We present a 65-year-old woman who had a painful, eroded area on her lower lip, which responded poorly to various topical treatments. A biopsy revealed a band-like infiltration composed mainly of plasma cells in the dermis. She was diagnosed as having plasma cell cheilitis, and was successfully treated with 0.03% topical tacrolimus ointment.

  19. Micronucleus formation induced by dielectric barrier discharge plasma exposure in brain cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Nagendra K.; Uhm, Hansup; Ha Choi, Eun

    2012-02-01

    Induction of micronucleus formation (cytogenetic damage) in brain cancer cells upon exposure of dielectric barrier discharge plasma has been investigated. We have investigated the influence of exposure and incubation times on T98G brain cancer cells by using growth kinetic, clonogenic, and micronucleus formation assay. We found that micronucleus formation rate directly depends on the plasma exposure time. It is also shown that colony formation capacity of cells has been inhibited by the treatment of plasma at all doses. Cell death and micronucleus formation are shown to be significantly elevated by 120 and 240 s exposure of dielectric barrier discharge plasma.

  20. Induction of apoptosis in human breast cancer cells by a pulsed atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Bae, S. H.; Leem, S. H.

    2010-07-01

    By using an atmospheric pressure plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage with repetition rate of several tens of kilohertz, we were able to induce apoptosis in cultured human breast cancer cells (MCF-7). The apoptotic changes in cells with plasma treatment were detected by flow cytometry and fluorescence staining assay. A significant portion of these cells was observed to exhibit the apoptotic fragmentation. Helium plasma with additive O2 gas was found to be effective in the induction of apoptosis. This plasma jet provides an effective mode of human breast cancer cell therapy.

  1. Plasma-dependent chemotaxis of macrophages toward BCG cell walls and the mycobacterial glycolipid P3.

    PubMed

    Kelly, M T

    1977-01-01

    BCG cell walls, associated with oil droplets in the form of emulsions in saline, generate macrophage chemotactic activity from fresh guinea pig plasma. Serum and heat-inactivated plasma were inactive, suggesting involvement of complement or fibrinogen-derived chemotactic factors. Suspensions of cell walls and oil droplets each generated chemotactic activity from plasma, and the activity of the cell wall vaccine was due to the additive effects of these two components. A mycobacterial glycolipid (P3), which is a constituent of BCG cell walls, also had plasma-dependent chemotactic activity. The results suggest that macrophage chemotaxis may be an important part of the immunopotentiating activity of these mycobacterial products.

  2. Cold atmospheric-pressure air plasma treatment of C6 glioma cells: effects of reactive oxygen species in the medium produced by the plasma on cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuyang, Wang; Cheng, Cheng; Peng, Gao; Shaopeng, Li; Jie, Shen; Yan, Lan; Yongqiang, Yu; Paul, K. Chu

    2017-02-01

    An atmospheric-pressure air plasma is employed to treat C6 glioma cells in vitro. To elucidate on the mechanism causing cell death and role of reactive species (RS) in the medium produced by the plasma, the concentration of the long-lived RS such as hydrogen peroxide, nitrate, and ozone in the plasma-treated liquid (phosphate-buffered saline solution) is measured. When vitamin C is added to the medium as a ROS quencher, the viability of C6 glioma cells after the plasma treatment is different from that without vitamin C. The results demonstrate that reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as H2O2, and O3 constitute the main factors for inactivation of C6 glioma cells and the reactive nitrogen species (RNS) may only play an auxiliary role in cell death.

  3. Cold atmospheric-pressure air plasma treatment of C6 glioma cells: effects of reactive oxygen species in the medium produced by the plasma on cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuyang; Cheng, Cheng; Gao, Peng; Li, Shaopeng; Shen, Jie; Lan, Yan; Yu, Yongqiang; Chu, Paul K.

    2017-02-01

    An atmospheric-pressure air plasma is employed to treat C6 glioma cells in vitro. To elucidate on the mechanism causing cell death and role of reactive species (RS) in the medium produced by the plasma, the concentration of the long-lived RS such as hydrogen peroxide, nitrate, and ozone in the plasma-treated liquid (phosphate-buffered saline solution) is measured. When vitamin C is added to the medium as a ROS quencher, the viability of C6 glioma cells after the plasma treatment is different from that without vitamin C. The results demonstrate that reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as H2O2, and O3 constitute the main factors for inactivation of C6 glioma cells and the reactive nitrogen species (RNS) may only play an auxiliary role in cell death.

  4. Cold atmospheric plasma jet-generated RONS and their selective effects on normal and carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.

    2016-01-01

    Cold atmospheric helium plasma jets were fabricated and utilized for plasma–cell interactions. The effect of operating parameters and jet design on the generation of specific reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) within cells and cellular response were investigated. It was found that plasma treatment induced the overproduction of RONS in various cancer cell lines selectively. The plasma under a relatively low applied voltage induced the detachment of cells, a reduction in cell viability, and apoptosis, while the plasma under higher applied voltage led to cellular necrosis in our case. To determine whether plasma-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation occurs through interfering with mitochondria-related cellular response, we examined the plasma effects on ROS generation in both parental A549 cells and A549 ρ0 cells. It was observed that cancer cells were more susceptible to plasma-induced RONS (especially nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2−) radicals) than normal cells, and consequently, plasma induced apoptotic cell responses mainly in cancer cells. PMID:26838306

  5. Focal Adhesion of Osteoblastic Cells on Titanium Surface with Amine Functionalities Formed by Plasma Polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Heesang; Jung, Sang Chul; Kim, Byung Hoon

    2012-08-01

    To enhance the focal adhesion of osteoblastic cells on a titanium surface, plasma polymerized allyl amine (AAm) thin films were deposited by plasma polymerization. This plasma polymer functionalization of titanium is advantageous for osteoblastic focal adhesion formation. Such Ti surfaces are useful for the fabrication of titanium-based dental implants for enhancement of osseointegration.

  6. Fluconazole treatment hyperpolarizes the plasma membrane of Candida cells.

    PubMed

    Elicharova, Hana; Sychrova, Hana

    2013-11-01

    Five pathogenic Candida species were compared in terms of their osmotolerance, tolerance to toxic sodium and lithium cations, and resistance to fluconazole. The species not only differed, in general, in their tolerance to high osmotic pressure (C. albicans and C. parapsilosis being the most osmotolerant) but exhibited distinct sensitivities to toxic sodium and lithium cations, with C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis being very tolerant but C. krusei and C. dubliniensis sensitive to LiCl. The treatment of both fluconazole-susceptible (C. albicans and C. parapsilosis) and fluconazole-resistant (C. dubliniensis, C. krusei and C. tropicalis) growing cells with subinhibitory concentrations of fluconazole resulted in substantially elevated intracellular Na(+) levels. Using a diS-C3(3) assay, for the first time, to monitor the relative membrane potential (ΔΨ) of Candida cells, we show that the fluconazole treatment of growing cells of all five species results in a substantial hyperpolarization of their plasma membranes, which is responsible for an increased non-specific transport of toxic alkali metal cations and other cationic drugs (e.g., hygromycin B). Thus, the combination of relatively low doses of fluconazole and drugs, whose import into the tested Candida strains is driven by the cell membrane potential, might be especially potent in terms of its ability to inhibit the growth of or even kill various Candida species.

  7. Pulsed Power Aspects of the NIF Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, P A; Ollis, C W; Hinz, A F; Barbosa, F; Fulkerson, E S

    2005-06-09

    The Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC) embodies technology essential to the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Together with a thin-film polarizer, PEPC functions as an optical switch for the main amplifier cavity, allowing optical pulses to be trapped, and then released, and enabling NIF to take advantage of the attendant gain and cost-savings. Details of the genesis, development, and prototyping of the PEPC are well documented. After moving from its laboratory setting to the NIF facility, PEPC--via its performance during the two-year NIF Early Light (NEL) campaign and its ongoing operation during facility build-out--has proven to be a fully functional system. When complete, NIF will accommodate 192 beams, capable of delivering 1.8 MJ to a fusion target. Forty-eight Plasma Electrode Pockels--driven by nearly 300 high-power, high-voltage pulse generators--will support this complement of beams. As deployed, PEPC is a complex association of state-of-the-art optics; low-voltage and high-voltage electronics; and mechanical, gas, and vacuum subsystems--all under computer control. In this paper, we briefly describe each of these elements, but focus on the pulse power aspects of the PEPC system.

  8. Deletion(20q) as the sole abnormality in plasma cell myeloma is not associated with plasma cells as identified by cIg FISH.

    PubMed

    White, Joanne S; Zordan, Adrian; Batzios, Crisoula; Campbell, Lynda J

    2012-12-01

    Deletion of 20q is a common finding in myeloid disorders but it is also observed in plasma cell myeloma (PCM). As a del(20q) in a patient receiving treatment for myeloma may indicate therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS), it is important to differentiate chromosome abnormalities associated with myeloma from those reflecting t-MDS. We performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a 20q12 probe (D20S108) in conjunction with cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (cIg) staining in 20 PCM cases with a del(20q) in order to confirm the cell type involved. Of the nine cases studied with a clone showing a del(20q) as the sole abnormality, 8 of 9 demonstrated loss of the D20S108 signals in non-plasma cells only and 5 of 9 had either a confirmed myeloid malignancy in addition to PCM or showed evidence of dysplastic changes in the marrow; however, of the 11 patients with a del(20q) within a complex PCM karyotype, 4 of 11 showed loss of the D20S108 signals in plasma cells only and 7 of 11 showed no significant loss in either plasma cells or non-plasma cells. Therefore, our results indicate that a del(20q) as the sole abnormality in PCM is present in non-plasma cells and, therefore, suggests the presence of an associated myeloid malignancy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Apoptotic effects on cultured cells of atmospheric-pressure plasma produced using various gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominami, Kanako; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Kudo, Tada-aki; Sasaki, Shota; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma on various cells such as rat fibroblastic Rat-1 cell line, rat neuroblastoma-like PC12 cell line, and rat macrophage-like NR8383 cell line. The plasma was irradiated directly to a culture medium containing plated cells for 0-20 s. The applied voltage, excitation frequency, and argon or helium gas flow were, respectively, 3-6 kV, 10 kHz, and 3 L/min. Cell viability and apoptotic activity were evaluated using annexin-V/propidium iodide staining. Results showed that the low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma irradiation promoted cell death in a discharge-voltage-dependent and irradiation-time-dependent manner. Furthermore, different effects are produced depending on the cell type. Moreover, entirely different mechanisms might be responsible for the induction of apoptosis in cells by helium and argon plasma.

  10. The interaction of atmospheric pressure plasma jets with cancer and normal cells: generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and changes of the cell proliferation and cell cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Tae Hun; Joh, Hea Min; Kim, Sun Ja; Leem, Sun Hee

    2013-09-01

    The possibility of atmospheric pressure plasmas is emerging as a candidate in cancer therapy. The primary role is played by reactive oxygen species (ROS), UV photons, charged particles and electric fields. Among them, intracellular ROS induced by plasma are considered to be the key constituents that induce cellular changes and apoptosis. In this study, the effects of atmospheric pressure plasma jet on cancer cells (human lung carcinoma cells) and normal cells (embryonic kidney cells and bronchial epithelial cells) were investigated. The plasma treatment was performed under different working gases, applied voltages, gas flow rates, and with and without additive oxygen flow. Using a detection dye, we observed that plasma exposure leads to the increase of the intracellular ROS and that the intracellular ROS production can be controlled by plasma parameters. A significant ROS generation was induced by plasma exposure on cancer cells and the overproduction of ROS contributes to the reduced cell proliferation. Normal cells were observed to be less affected by the plasma-mediated ROS and cell proliferation was less changed. The plasma treatment also resulted in the alteration of the cell cycle that contributes to the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. The selective effect on cancer and normal cells provides a promising prospect of cold plasma as cancer therapy. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea under Contract No. 2012R1A1A2002591 and 2012R1A1A3010213.

  11. Effects of atmospheric pressure cold plasma on human hepatocarcinoma cell and its 5-fluorouracil resistant cell line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Lu, R.; Xian, Y.; Gan, L.; Lu, X.; Yang, X.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure cold plasma showed selective killing efficiency on cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, which makes plasma a potential option for cancer therapy. However, the plasma effects on chemotherapeutic drugs-resistant cells are rarely to be found. In this paper, the effects of plasma on human hepatocellular carcinoma Bel7402 cells and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) resistant Bel7402/5FU cells were intensively investigated. The results showed that plasma induced superior toxicity to Bel7402 cells compared with Bel7402/5FU cells. Incubation with plasma-treated medium for 20 s induced more than 85% death rate in Bel7402 cells, while the same death ratio was achieved when Bel7402/5FU cells were treated for as long as 300 s. The hydrogen peroxide in the medium played a leading role in the cytotoxicity effects. Further studies implicated that when the treatment time was shorter than 60 s, the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis occurred through the intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation in Bel7402 cells. Molecular analysis showed an increase in the transcription factor activity for AP-1, NF-кB, and p53 in Bel7402 cells. No obvious damage could be detected in plasma-treated Bel7402/5FU cells due to the strong intracellular reactive oxygen stress scavenger system.

  12. Effects of atmospheric pressure cold plasma on human hepatocarcinoma cell and its 5-fluorouracil resistant cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H.; Gan, L.; Yang, X. E-mail: yangxl@mail.hust.edu.cn; Lu, R.; Xian, Y.; Lu, X. E-mail: yangxl@mail.hust.edu.cn

    2015-12-15

    Atmospheric pressure cold plasma showed selective killing efficiency on cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, which makes plasma a potential option for cancer therapy. However, the plasma effects on chemotherapeutic drugs-resistant cells are rarely to be found. In this paper, the effects of plasma on human hepatocellular carcinoma Bel7402 cells and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) resistant Bel7402/5FU cells were intensively investigated. The results showed that plasma induced superior toxicity to Bel7402 cells compared with Bel7402/5FU cells. Incubation with plasma-treated medium for 20 s induced more than 85% death rate in Bel7402 cells, while the same death ratio was achieved when Bel7402/5FU cells were treated for as long as 300 s. The hydrogen peroxide in the medium played a leading role in the cytotoxicity effects. Further studies implicated that when the treatment time was shorter than 60 s, the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis occurred through the intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation in Bel7402 cells. Molecular analysis showed an increase in the transcription factor activity for AP-1, NF-kB, and p53 in Bel7402 cells. No obvious damage could be detected in plasma-treated Bel7402/5FU cells due to the strong intracellular reactive oxygen stress scavenger system.

  13. Intracellular effects of atmospheric-pressure plasmas on melanoma cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ishaq, M.; Bazaka, K.; Ostrikov, K.

    2015-12-15

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown as a promising tool for cancer treatment. The mechanism of the plasma action is attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, electric fields, charges, and photons. The relative importance of different modes of action of atmospheric-pressure plasmas depends on the process parameters and specific treatment objects. Hence, an in-depth understanding of biological mechanisms that underpin plasma-induced death in cancer cells is required to optimise plasma processing conditions. Here, the intracellular factors involved in the observed anti-cancer activity in melanoma Mel007 cells are studied, focusing on the effect of the plasma treatment dose on the expression of tumour suppressor protein TP73. Over-expression of TP73 causes cell growth arrest and/or apoptosis, and hence can potentially be targeted to enhance killing efficacy and selectivity of the plasma treatment. It is shown that the plasma treatment induces dose-dependent up-regulation of TP73 gene expression, resulting in significantly elevated levels of TP73 RNA and protein in plasma-treated melanoma cells. Silencing of TP73 expression by means of RNA interference inhibited the anticancer effects of the plasma, similar to the effect of caspase inhibitor z-VAD or ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine. These results confirm the role of TP73 protein in dose-dependent regulation of anticancer activity of atmospheric-pressure plasmas.

  14. Intracellular effects of atmospheric-pressure plasmas on melanoma cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishaq, M.; Bazaka, K.; Ostrikov, K.

    2015-12-01

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown as a promising tool for cancer treatment. The mechanism of the plasma action is attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, electric fields, charges, and photons. The relative importance of different modes of action of atmospheric-pressure plasmas depends on the process parameters and specific treatment objects. Hence, an in-depth understanding of biological mechanisms that underpin plasma-induced death in cancer cells is required to optimise plasma processing conditions. Here, the intracellular factors involved in the observed anti-cancer activity in melanoma Mel007 cells are studied, focusing on the effect of the plasma treatment dose on the expression of tumour suppressor protein TP73. Over-expression of TP73 causes cell growth arrest and/or apoptosis, and hence can potentially be targeted to enhance killing efficacy and selectivity of the plasma treatment. It is shown that the plasma treatment induces dose-dependent up-regulation of TP73 gene expression, resulting in significantly elevated levels of TP73 RNA and protein in plasma-treated melanoma cells. Silencing of TP73 expression by means of RNA interference inhibited the anticancer effects of the plasma, similar to the effect of caspase inhibitor z-VAD or ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine. These results confirm the role of TP73 protein in dose-dependent regulation of anticancer activity of atmospheric-pressure plasmas.

  15. Evaluation of the effects of a plasma activated medium on cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mohades, S.; Laroussi, M. Sears, J.; Barekzi, N.; Razavi, H.

    2015-12-15

    The interaction of low temperature plasma with liquids is a relevant topic of study to the field of plasma medicine. This is because cells and tissues are normally surrounded or covered by biological fluids. Therefore, the chemistry induced by the plasma in the aqueous state becomes crucial and usually dictates the biological outcomes. This process became even more important after the discovery that plasma activated media can be useful in killing various cancer cell lines. Here, we report on the measurements of concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, a species known to have strong biological effects, produced by application of plasma to a minimum essential culture medium. The activated medium is then used to treat SCaBER cancer cells. Results indicate that the plasma activated medium can kill the cancer cells in a dose dependent manner, retain its killing effect for several hours, and is as effective as apoptosis inducing drugs.

  16. Evaluation of the effects of a plasma activated medium on cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohades, S.; Laroussi, M.; Sears, J.; Barekzi, N.; Razavi, H.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of low temperature plasma with liquids is a relevant topic of study to the field of plasma medicine. This is because cells and tissues are normally surrounded or covered by biological fluids. Therefore, the chemistry induced by the plasma in the aqueous state becomes crucial and usually dictates the biological outcomes. This process became even more important after the discovery that plasma activated media can be useful in killing various cancer cell lines. Here, we report on the measurements of concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, a species known to have strong biological effects, produced by application of plasma to a minimum essential culture medium. The activated medium is then used to treat SCaBER cancer cells. Results indicate that the plasma activated medium can kill the cancer cells in a dose dependent manner, retain its killing effect for several hours, and is as effective as apoptosis inducing drugs.

  17. Deactivation of A549 cancer cells in vitro by a dielectric barrier discharge plasma needle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jun; Chen, Wei; Li, Hui; Wang, Xing-Quan; Lv, Guo-Hua; Khohsa, M. Latif; Guo, Ming; Feng, Ke-Cheng; Wang, Peng-Ye; Yang, Si-Ze

    2011-03-01

    An inactivation mechanism study on A549 cancer cells by means of a dielectric barrier discharge plasma needle is presented. The neutral red uptake assay provides a quantitative estimation of cell viability after plasma treatment. Experimental results show that the efficiency of argon plasma for the inactivation process is very dependent on power and treatment time. A 27 W power and 120 s treatment time along with 900 standard cubic centimeter per minute Ar flow and a nozzle-to-sample separation of 3 mm are the best parameters of the process. According to the argon emission spectra of the plasma jet and the optical microscope images of the A549 cells after plasma treatment, it is concluded that the reactive species (for example, OH and O) in the argon plasma play a major role in the cell deactivation.

  18. Plasma Membranes Modified by Plasma Treatment or Deposition as Solid Electrolytes for Potential Application in Solid Alkaline Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reinholdt, Marc; Ilie, Alina; Roualdès, Stéphanie; Frugier, Jérémy; Schieda, Mauricio; Coutanceau, Christophe; Martemianov, Serguei; Flaud, Valérie; Beche, Eric; Durand, Jean

    2012-01-01

    In the highly competitive market of fuel cells, solid alkaline fuel cells using liquid fuel (such as cheap, non-toxic and non-valorized glycerol) and not requiring noble metal as catalyst seem quite promising. One of the main hurdles for emergence of such a technology is the development of a hydroxide-conducting membrane characterized by both high conductivity and low fuel permeability. Plasma treatments can enable to positively tune the main fuel cell membrane requirements. In this work, commercial ADP-Morgane® fluorinated polymer membranes and a new brand of cross-linked poly(aryl-ether) polymer membranes, named AMELI-32®, both containing quaternary ammonium functionalities, have been modified by argon plasma treatment or triallylamine-based plasma deposit. Under the concomitant etching/cross-linking/oxidation effects inherent to the plasma modification, transport properties (ionic exchange capacity, water uptake, ionic conductivity and fuel retention) of membranes have been improved. Consequently, using plasma modified ADP-Morgane® membrane as electrolyte in a solid alkaline fuel cell operating with glycerol as fuel has allowed increasing the maximum power density by a factor 3 when compared to the untreated membrane. PMID:24958295

  19. Plasma membranes modified by plasma treatment or deposition as solid electrolytes for potential application in solid alkaline fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Reinholdt, Marc; Ilie, Alina; Roualdès, Stéphanie; Frugier, Jérémy; Schieda, Mauricio; Coutanceau, Christophe; Martemianov, Serguei; Flaud, Valérie; Beche, Eric; Durand, Jean

    2012-07-30

    In the highly competitive market of fuel cells, solid alkaline fuel cells using liquid fuel (such as cheap, non-toxic and non-valorized glycerol) and not requiring noble metal as catalyst seem quite promising. One of the main hurdles for emergence of such a technology is the development of a hydroxide-conducting membrane characterized by both high conductivity and low fuel permeability. Plasma treatments can enable to positively tune the main fuel cell membrane requirements. In this work, commercial ADP-Morgane® fluorinated polymer membranes and a new brand of cross-linked poly(aryl-ether) polymer membranes, named AMELI-32®, both containing quaternary ammonium functionalities, have been modified by argon plasma treatment or triallylamine-based plasma deposit. Under the concomitant etching/cross-linking/oxidation effects inherent to the plasma modification, transport properties (ionic exchange capacity, water uptake, ionic conductivity and fuel retention) of membranes have been improved. Consequently, using plasma modified ADP-Morgane® membrane as electrolyte in a solid alkaline fuel cell operating with glycerol as fuel has allowed increasing the maximum power density by a factor 3 when compared to the untreated membrane.

  20. Stimulation of autophagy by antilipolytic drugs may rescue rodents from age-associated hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Straniero, Sara; Cavallini, Gabriella; Donati, Alessio; Pallottini, Valentina; Martini, Chiara; Trentalance, Anna; Bergamini, Ettore

    2009-04-01

    Aging is characterized by several metabolic changes responsible for the decline of certain functions and the appearance of age-related diseases, including hypercholesterolemia, which is the main risk factor for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Similar changes in a number of morphological and biochemical parameters were observed in rats. Caloric restriction (CR) was shown to increase longevity and prevent age-related diseases in various organisms, and to counteract the age-associated increase in plasma cholesterol. CR was thought to operate through the stimulation of the process of macroautophagy. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of the stimulation of macroautophagy on age-associated cholesterolemia. Mature Sprague-Dawley rats were fasted overnight and given the antilipolytic agent 3,5-dimethylpyrazole (DMP; 12 mg/kg b.w. in 0.2 mL of saline, intraperitoneally). The age-related changes in cholesterol plasma level, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA-R) activity, and lipoperoxidation were determined. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor expression was determined by immunoblot of sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE)-separated liver membranes. Results show that the stimulation of macroautophagy reduces the total LDL and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol plasma level to juvenile values, and triglycerides levels even lower. The hypocholesterolemic action of DMP requires neither the counteraction of the age-related changes in the HMG-CoA-R activation state and regulation, nor the counteraction of the age-related increase in lipoperoxidation, and only involves a restoration of the numbers of LDL receptors on liver membranes to juvenile levels.

  1. Altered Antioxidant System Stimulates Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma-Induced Cell Death for Solid Tumor Cell Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Park, Daehoon; Choi, Eun H.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the experimental findings and plasma delivery approach developed at the Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Korea for the assessment of antitumor activity of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) for cancer treatment. Detailed investigation of biological effects occurring after atmospheric pressure non-thermal (APNT) plasma application during in vitro experiments revealed the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in modulation of the antioxidant defense system, cellular metabolic activity, and apoptosis induction in cancer cells. To understand basic cellular mechanisms, we investigated the effects of APNT DBD plasma on antioxidant defense against oxidative stress in various malignant cells as well as normal cells. T98G glioblastoma, SNU80 thyroid carcinoma, KB oral carcinoma and a non-malignant HEK293 embryonic human cell lines were treated with APNT DBD plasma and cellular effects due to reactive oxygen species were observed. Plasma significantly decreased the metabolic viability and clonogenicity of T98G, SNU80, KB and HEK293 cell lines. Enhanced ROS in the cells led to death via alteration of total antioxidant activity, and NADP+/NADPH and GSH/GSSG ratios 24 hours (h) post plasma treatment. This effect was confirmed by annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide staining. These consequences suggested that the failure of antioxidant defense machinery, with compromised redox status, might have led to sensitization of the malignant cells. These findings suggest a promising approach for solid tumor therapy by delivering a lethal dose of APNT plasma to tumor cells while sparing normal healthy tissues. PMID:25068311

  2. Altered antioxidant system stimulates dielectric barrier discharge plasma-induced cell death for solid tumor cell treatment.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Nagendra K; Kaushik, Neha; Park, Daehoon; Choi, Eun H

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the experimental findings and plasma delivery approach developed at the Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Korea for the assessment of antitumor activity of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) for cancer treatment. Detailed investigation of biological effects occurring after atmospheric pressure non-thermal (APNT) plasma application during in vitro experiments revealed the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in modulation of the antioxidant defense system, cellular metabolic activity, and apoptosis induction in cancer cells. To understand basic cellular mechanisms, we investigated the effects of APNT DBD plasma on antioxidant defense against oxidative stress in various malignant cells as well as normal cells. T98G glioblastoma, SNU80 thyroid carcinoma, KB oral carcinoma and a non-malignant HEK293 embryonic human cell lines were treated with APNT DBD plasma and cellular effects due to reactive oxygen species were observed. Plasma significantly decreased the metabolic viability and clonogenicity of T98G, SNU80, KB and HEK293 cell lines. Enhanced ROS in the cells led to death via alteration of total antioxidant activity, and NADP+/NADPH and GSH/GSSG ratios 24 hours (h) post plasma treatment. This effect was confirmed by annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide staining. These consequences suggested that the failure of antioxidant defense machinery, with compromised redox status, might have led to sensitization of the malignant cells. These findings suggest a promising approach for solid tumor therapy by delivering a lethal dose of APNT plasma to tumor cells while sparing normal healthy tissues.

  3. Age-associated physiological and pathological changes at the blood-brain barrier: A review.

    PubMed

    Erdő, Franciska; Denes, László; de Lange, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    The age-associated decline of the neurological and cognitive functions becomes more and more serious challenge for the developed countries with the increasing number of aged populations. The morphological and biochemical changes in the aging brain are the subjects of many extended research projects worldwide for a long time. However, the crucial role of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) impairment and disruption in the pathological processes in age-associated neurodegenerative disorders received special attention just for a few years. This article gives an overview on the major elements of the blood-brain barrier and its supporting mechanisms and also on their alterations during development, physiological aging process and age-associated neurodegenerative disorders (Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, pharmacoresistant epilepsy). Besides the morphological alterations of the cellular elements (endothelial cells, astrocytes, pericytes, microglia, neuronal elements) of the BBB and neurovascular unit, the changes of the barrier at molecular level (tight junction proteins, adheres junction proteins, membrane transporters, basal lamina, extracellular matrix) are also summarized. The recognition of new players and initiators of the process of neurodegeneration at the level of the BBB may offer new avenues for novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of numerous chronic neurodegenerative disorders currently without effective medication.

  4. Oxidative Stress and Salvia miltiorrhiza in Aging-Associated Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Chieh; Chang, Yu-Chun; Hu, Wen-Long; Hung, Yu-Chiang

    2016-01-01

    Aging-associated cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) have some risk factors that are closely related to oxidative stress. Salvia miltiorrhiza (SM) has been used commonly to treat CVDs for hundreds of years in the Chinese community. We aimed to explore the effects of SM on oxidative stress in aging-associated CVDs. Through literature searches using Medicine, PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane library, CINAHL, and Scopus databases, we found that SM not only possesses antioxidant, antiapoptotic, and anti-inflammatory effects but also exerts angiogenic and cardioprotective activities. SM may reduce the production of reactive oxygen species by inhibiting oxidases, reducing the production of superoxide, inhibiting the oxidative modification of low-density lipoproteins, and ameliorating mitochondrial oxidative stress. SM also increases the activities of catalase, manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and coupled endothelial nitric oxide synthase. In addition, SM reduces the impact of ischemia/reperfusion injury, prevents cardiac fibrosis after myocardial infarction, preserves cardiac function in coronary disease, maintains the integrity of the blood-brain barrier, and promotes self-renewal and proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells in stroke. However, future clinical well-designed and randomized control trials will be necessary to confirm the efficacy of SM in aging-associated CVDs.

  5. Oxidative Stress and Salvia miltiorrhiza in Aging-Associated Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Aging-associated cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) have some risk factors that are closely related to oxidative stress. Salvia miltiorrhiza (SM) has been used commonly to treat CVDs for hundreds of years in the Chinese community. We aimed to explore the effects of SM on oxidative stress in aging-associated CVDs. Through literature searches using Medicine, PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane library, CINAHL, and Scopus databases, we found that SM not only possesses antioxidant, antiapoptotic, and anti-inflammatory effects but also exerts angiogenic and cardioprotective activities. SM may reduce the production of reactive oxygen species by inhibiting oxidases, reducing the production of superoxide, inhibiting the oxidative modification of low-density lipoproteins, and ameliorating mitochondrial oxidative stress. SM also increases the activities of catalase, manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and coupled endothelial nitric oxide synthase. In addition, SM reduces the impact of ischemia/reperfusion injury, prevents cardiac fibrosis after myocardial infarction, preserves cardiac function in coronary disease, maintains the integrity of the blood-brain barrier, and promotes self-renewal and proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells in stroke. However, future clinical well-designed and randomized control trials will be necessary to confirm the efficacy of SM in aging-associated CVDs. PMID:27807472

  6. An Age-Associated Decline in Thymic Output Differs in Dog Breeds According to Their Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Holder, Angela; Mella, Stephanie; Palmer, Donald B.; Aspinall, Richard; Catchpole, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The age associated decline in immune function is preceded in mammals by a reduction in thymic output. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence of a link between immune competence and lifespan. One approach to determining thymic output is to quantify signal joint T cell receptor excision circles (sj-TRECs), a method which has been developed and used in several mammalian species. Life expectancy and the rate of aging vary in dogs depending upon their breed. In this study, we quantified sj-TRECs in blood samples from dogs of selected breeds to determine whether there was a relationship between longevity and thymic output. In Labrador retrievers, a breed with a median expected lifespan of 11 years, there was an age-associated decline in sj-TREC values, with the greatest decline occurring before 5 years of age, but with sj-TREC still detectable in some geriatric animals, over 13 years of age. In large short-lived breeds (Burnese mountain dogs, Great Danes and Dogue de Bordeaux), the decline in sj-TREC values began earlier in life, compared with small long-lived breeds (Jack Russell terriers and Yorkshire terriers), and the presence of animals with undetectable sj-TRECs occurred at a younger age in the short-lived breeds. The study findings suggest that age-associated changes in canine sj-TRECs are related to breed differences in longevity, and this research highlights the use of dogs as a potential model of immunosenescence. PMID:27824893

  7. THE FORMATION OF MYELOMA PROTEIN BY A MOUSE PLASMA CELL TUMOR

    PubMed Central

    Nathans, Daniel; Fahey, John L.; Potter, Michael

    1958-01-01

    The origin of the myeloma protein found in mice bearing the plasma cell tumor X5563 has been investigated. Specific activity-time curves of the myeloma proteins isolated from the tumor and from the plasma of these animals were compared following intravenous injection of L-lysine-C14. The results indicate that myeloma protein is synthesized in the plasma cell tumor. PMID:13549645

  8. The transcription factors IRF8 and PU.1 negatively regulate plasma cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Carotta, Sebastian; Willis, Simon N.; Hasbold, Jhagvaral; Inouye, Michael; Pang, Swee Heng Milon; Emslie, Dianne; Light, Amanda; Chopin, Michael; Shi, Wei; Wang, Hongsheng; Morse, Herbert C.; Tarlinton, David M.; Corcoran, Lynn M.; Hodgkin, Philip D.

    2014-01-01

    Activated B cells undergo immunoglobulin class-switch recombination (CSR) and differentiate into antibody-secreting plasma cells. The distinct transcriptomes of B cells and plasma cells are maintained by the antagonistic influences of two groups of transcription factors: those that maintain the B cell program, including BCL6 and PAX5, and plasma cell–promoting factors, such as IRF4 and BLIMP-1. We show that the complex of IRF8 and PU.1 controls the propensity of B cells to undergo CSR and plasma cell differentiation by concurrently promoting the expression of BCL6 and PAX5 and repressing AID and BLIMP-1. As the PU.1–IRF8 complex functions in a reciprocal manner to IRF4, we propose that concentration-dependent competition between these factors controls B cell terminal differentiation. PMID:25288399

  9. Plasma cell differentiation is coupled to division-dependent DNA hypomethylation and gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bally, Alexander P.R.; Boss, Jeremy M.

    2016-01-01

    The epigenetic processes that regulate antibody secreting plasma cells are not well understood. Here, analysis of plasma cell differentiation revealed DNA hypomethylation of 10% of CpG loci that were overrepresented at enhancers. Inhibition of DNA methylation enhanced plasma cell commitment in a cell division-dependent manner. Examination of in vivo differentiating B cells stratified by cell division revealed a 5-fold increase in mRNA transcription coupled to DNA hypomethylation. Demethylation occurred first at binding motifs of NF-κB and AP-1 and later at those for IRF and Oct-2, and were coincident with activation and differentiation gene expression programs. These data provide mechanistic insight into the cell-division coupled transcriptional and epigenetic reprogramming and suggest DNA hypomethylation reflects the cis-regulatory history of plasma cell differentiation. PMID:27500631

  10. Age-associated pro-inflammatory adaptations of the mouse thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Hemmeryckx, Bianca; Hoylaerts, Marc F; Deloose, Eveline; Van Hove, Cor E; Fransen, Paul; Bult, Hidde; Lijnen, H Roger

    2013-10-01

    Arterial ageing may be associated with a reduction in vasodilation due to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, whereas endothelial cell activation induces procoagulant changes. However, little is known on the effect of ageing on expression of anticoagulant endothelial markers such as endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR). To study age-associated alterations in smooth muscle cell (SMC) and endothelial cell (EC) structure and function, the aorta was isolated from 10-week- and 12- and 24-month-old C57BL/6J mice and analysed for its expression of genes involved in senescence, oxidative stress production, coagulation and matrix remodelling. In addition, vasorelaxation experiments were performed using 10-week- and 24-month-old thoracic aortic ring segments in organ chamber baths. The media thickness of the thoracic aorta progressively increased with age, associated with hypertrophy of vascular SMCs. Basal nitric oxide production and sensitivity to acetylcholine-mediated vasodilation in thoracic aorta rings was reduced with age, whereas no significant differences in ROS production could be demonstrated. Gene expression of tissue factor, EPCR and von Willebrand factor was not affected by ageing of the aorta, whereas that of thrombomodulin was mildly reduced and that of xanthine dehydrogenase, NADPH oxidase 4, tumour necrosis factor-α and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 significantly enhanced. In conclusion, a reduction in endothelial cell-mediated vasodilation in aged thoracic aortas of C57BL/6J mice was accompanied by a shift towards a pro-inflammatory state of the endothelium.

  11. Frequency of cell treatment with cold microwave argon plasma is important for the final outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sysolyatina, E.; Vasiliev, M.; Kurnaeva, M.; Kornienko, I.; Petrov, O.; Fortov, V.; Gintsburg, A.; Petersen, E.; Ermolaeva, S.

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to establish the influence of a regime of cold microwave argon plasma treatments on the physiological characteristics of human fibroblasts and keratinocytes. We used three regimes of plasma application: a single treatment, double treatment with a 48 h interval, and daily treatments for 3 d. Cell proliferation after plasma application was quantified in real time, and immunohistochemistry was used to establish the viability of the cells and determine changes in their physiology. It was established that the frequency of cell treatments is important for the outcome. In the samples treated with single plasma application and double plasma applications with a 48 h interval, a 42.6% and 32.0% increase was observed in the number of cells, respectively. In addition, there were no signs of deoxyribonucleic acid breaks immediately after plasma application. In contrast, plasma application increased the accumulation of cells in the active phases of the cell cycle. The activation of proliferation correlated with a decrease in the level of β-galactosidase, a senescence marker. This could be due to cell renovation after plasma application. Daily treatment decreased cell proliferation up to 29.1% in comparison with the control after 3 d.

  12. HeLa cell plasma membranes. I. 5'-Nucleotidase and ouabain-sensitive ATPase as markers for plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, S; Stokke, T; Prydz, H

    1974-11-01

    A method for the preparation of HeLa cell plasma membrane ghosts is described. The purity of the plasma membrane fraction was examined by phase contrast and electron microscopy, by chemical analysis, and by assay of marker enzymes. Data on the composition of the plasma membrane fraction are given. It was observed that the distribution pattern of 5'-nucleotidase activity among the subcellular fractions differed from that of ouabain-sensitive ATPase. In addition, the specific activity of 5'-nucleotidase did not follow the distribution of the membrane ghosts. Thus, this enzyme would seem unsuitable as a plasma membrane marker. A complete balance sheet for marker enzyme activities during the fractionation is necessary for the calculation of increase in specific activity because the activities of both 5'-nucleotidase and ouabain-sensitive ATPase might change during the fractionation procedures.

  13. Cell death induced by ozone and various non-thermal plasmas: therapeutic perspectives and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskii, Vitalii; Churpita, Olexander; Chánová, Eliška; Syková, Eva; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka

    2014-11-01

    Non-thermal plasma has been recognized as a promising tool across a vast variety of biomedical applications, with the potential to create novel therapeutic methods. However, the understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind non-thermal plasma cellular effects remains a significant challenge. In this study, we show how two types of different non-thermal plasmas induce cell death in mammalian cell cultures via the formation of multiple intracellular reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. Our results showed a discrepancy in the superoxide accumulation and lysosomal activity in response to air and helium plasma, suggesting that triggered signalling cascades might be grossly different between different plasmas. In addition, the effects of ozone, a considerable component of non-thermal plasma, have been simultaneously evaluated and have revealed much faster and higher cytotoxic effects. Our findings offer novel insight into plasma-induced cellular responses, and provide a basis for better controlled biomedical applications.

  14. Cell death induced by ozone and various non-thermal plasmas: therapeutic perspectives and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskii, Vitalii; Churpita, Olexander; Chánová, Eliška; Syková, Eva; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka

    2014-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma has been recognized as a promising tool across a vast variety of biomedical applications, with the potential to create novel therapeutic methods. However, the understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind non-thermal plasma cellular effects remains a significant challenge. In this study, we show how two types of different non-thermal plasmas induce cell death in mammalian cell cultures via the formation of multiple intracellular reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. Our results showed a discrepancy in the superoxide accumulation and lysosomal activity in response to air and helium plasma, suggesting that triggered signalling cascades might be grossly different between different plasmas. In addition, the effects of ozone, a considerable component of non-thermal plasma, have been simultaneously evaluated and have revealed much faster and higher cytotoxic effects. Our findings offer novel insight into plasma-induced cellular responses, and provide a basis for better controlled biomedical applications. PMID:25410636

  15. Induction of growth arrest in colorectal cancer cells by cold plasma and gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Irani, Shiva; Shahmirani, Zhohreh; Mirpoor, Shahriar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Guided treatments with nanoparticles and cold atmospheric plasma are a new approach in cancer therapy. Plasma is an ionized gas that has reactive and energetic particles and can be produced in the laboratory by different methods. Material and methods Plasma jet therapy was employed to irradiate HCT-116 cells (human colorectal cancer cells) which were cultured in the presence of gold nanoparticles (GNPs). Cell cytotoxicity was tested with 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), and cancerous cell apoptosis was shown by 4’,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. Results The results showed that cell death was increased significantly with p < 0.001 by cold atmospheric plasma in the presence of gold nanoparticles. Conclusions It appears that non-thermal plasma and gold nanoparticles synergism is a promising approach in colon cancer therapy. PMID:26788092

  16. Meningeal infiltration by non-myelomatous IgD-secreting plasma cell dyscrasias.

    PubMed Central

    Yebra, M.; Manzano, L.; de la Torre, A.; Hornedo, J.; Albarran, F.; Menéndez, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    Two cases of meningeal invasion by non-myelomatous plasma cell dyscrasias--a plasma cell leukaemia and an extramedullary plasmacytoma--are described. Both were secretors of IgD paraprotein and both were diagnosed in life, characteristics which we have not found in any other published case of plasma cell leptomeningitis. Analysis of our patients and of another 25 cases suggests as predisposing factors of meningeal invasion the male sex, presentation in the form of plasma cell leukaemia, presence of the IgD paraprotein and tumoral involvement of pleura, lung, pericardium and testicles. Aggressive treatment of this neurological complication controlled the meningeal disorder in some cases. However, the majority died of disseminated disease in spite of systemic chemotherapy. Until an effective treatment can be found, able to maintain remission or cure the systemic disease, prophylaxis of the central nervous system in plasma cell dyscrasias does not appear to be advisable. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2602256

  17. Identification of human plasma cells with a lamprey monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cuiling; Liu, Yanling; Chan, Justin Tze Ho; Tong, Jiefei; Li, Zhihua; Shi, Mengyao; Davani, Dariush; Parsons, Marion; Khan, Srijit; Zhan, Wei; Kyu, Shuya; Grunebaum, Eyal; Campisi, Paolo; Propst, Evan J.; Jaye, David L.; Trudel, Suzanne; Moran, Michael F.; Ostrowski, Mario; Herrin, Brantley R.; Lee, F. Eun-Hyung; Sanz, Ignacio; Cooper, Max D.; Ehrhardt, Götz R.A.

    2016-01-01

    Ab-producing plasma cells (PCs) serve as key participants in countering pathogenic challenges as well as being contributors to autoimmune and malignant disorders. Thus far, only a limited number of PC–specific markers have been identified. The characterization of the unique variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) Abs that are made by evolutionarily distant jawless vertebrates prompted us to investigate whether VLR Abs could detect novel PC antigens that have not been recognized by conventional Abs. Here, we describe a monoclonal lamprey Ab, VLRB MM3, that was raised against primary multiple myeloma cells. VLRB MM3 recognizes a unique epitope of the CD38 ectoenzyme that is present on plasmablasts and PCs from healthy individuals and on most, but not all, multiple myelomas. Binding by the VLRB MM3 Ab coincides with CD38 dimerization and NAD glycohydrolase activity. Our data demonstrate that the lamprey VLRB MM3 Ab is a unique reagent for the identification of plasmablasts and PCs, with potential applications in the diagnosis and therapeutic intervention of PC or autoimmune disorders. PMID:27152361

  18. Electrostatic plasma simulation by Particle-In-Cell method using ANACONDA package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blandón, J. S.; Grisales, J. P.; Riascos, H.

    2017-06-01

    Electrostatic plasma is the most representative and basic case in plasma physics field. One of its main characteristics is its ideal behavior, since it is assumed be in thermal equilibrium state. Through this assumption, it is possible to study various complex phenomena such as plasma oscillations, waves, instabilities or damping. Likewise, computational simulation of this specific plasma is the first step to analyze physics mechanisms on plasmas, which are not at equilibrium state, and hence plasma is not ideal. Particle-In-Cell (PIC) method is widely used because of its precision for this kind of cases. This work, presents PIC method implementation to simulate electrostatic plasma by Python, using ANACONDA packages. The code has been corroborated comparing previous theoretical results for three specific phenomena in cold plasmas: oscillations, Two-Stream instability (TSI) and Landau Damping(LD). Finally, parameters and results are discussed.

  19. Classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma shows epigenetic features of abortive plasma cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Volkhard; Thomas, Philippe E.; Zimmermann, Karin; Paul, Ulrike; Ehlers, Anke; Joosten, Maria; Dimitrova, Lora; Lenze, Dido; Sommerfeld, Anke; Oker, Elisabeth; Leser, Ulf; Stein, Harald; Hummel, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background Epigenetic changes are involved in the extinction of the B-cell gene expression program of classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma. However, little is known regarding epigenetic similarities between cells of classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma and plasma cell myeloma, both of which share extinction of the gene expression program of mature B cells. Design and Methods Global histone H3 acetylation patterns were determined in cell lines derived from classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma, plasma cell myeloma and B-cell lymphoma by chromatin immunoprecipitation and subsequent hybridization onto promoter tiling arrays. H3K27 trimethylation was analyzed by chromatin immunoprecipitation and real-time DNA polymerase chain reaction for selected genes. Epigenetic modifications were compared to gene expression data. Results Characteristic B-cell genes were hypoacetylated in classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma and plasma cell myeloma cell lines as demonstrated by comparison of their histone H3 acetylation patterns to those of B-cell lines. However, the number of genes jointly hyperacetylated and expressed in classical Hodgkin’ lymphoma and plasma cell myeloma cell lines, such as IRF4/MUM1 and RYBP, is limited. Moreover, H3K27 trimethylation for selected characteristic B-cell genes revealed that this additional epigenetic silencing is much more prevalent in classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma than in plasma cell myeloma. Conclusions Our epigenetic data support the view that classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma is characterized by abortive plasma cell differentiation with a down-regulation of characteristic B-cell genes but without activation of most genes typical of plasma cells. PMID:21393330

  20. An approach for plasma cell myeloma diagnosis by two-color flow cytometry based on kappa/lambda ratios of CD38-gated plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, S; Yokote, T; Hirata, Y; Iwaki, K; Akioka, T; Miyoshi, T; Takayama, A; Nishiwaki, U; Masuda, Y; Ikemoto, T; Tanaka, H; Nishimura, Y; Tsuji, M; Hanafusa, T

    2013-01-01

    Criteria from the World Health Organization (WHO) are commonly used to diagnose plasma cell myeloma (PCM), but they are complex and require several laboratory parameters. To differentiate reactive plasmacytosis from clonal plasma cell neoplasms, such as PCM, it is important to accurately determine the expression of the cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (cIg) light chain (LC). Through retrospective analyses, we selected the patients with PCM, and analyzed records of 52 PCM patients, who underwent bone biopsies, and final diagnosis of PCM was established according to WHO criteria, and 22 controls. In the present study, all samples were analyzed by flow cytometry (FC) in the side scatter vs CD38 histogram mode, and the CD38-gated plasma cell population was identified. The positive cell ratios of kappa and lambda to plasma cell populations were analyzed. PCM cells were distinguished from normal plasma cells by a cut-off level between 0.80 and 3.3, a sensitivity of 90.3 percent, and a specificity of 81.1 percent. Two-color FC analysis is simple to perform, inexpensive, and clinically relevant data are obtained soon after completion of the FC measurements. It could be one of the helpful tools in the diagnosis of PCM. The correct diagnosis of PCM can be achieved more simply, efficiently, and rapidly by combining this method.

  1. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Induces a Predominantly Necrotic Cell Death via the Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Cousty, Sarah; Cambus, Jean-Pierre; Valentin, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cold plasma is a partially ionized gas generated by an electric field at atmospheric pressure that was initially used in medicine for decontamination and sterilization of inert surfaces. There is currently growing interest in using cold plasma for more direct medical applications, mainly due to the possibility of tuning it to obtain selective biological effects in absence of toxicity for surrounding normal tissues,. While the therapeutic potential of cold plasma in chronic wound, blood coagulation, and cancer treatment is beginning to be documented, information on plasma/cell interaction is so far limited and controversial. Methods and Results Using normal primary human fibroblast cultures isolated from oral tissue, we sought to decipher the effects on cell behavior of a proprietary cold plasma device generating guided ionization waves carried by helium. In this model, cold plasma treatment induces a predominantly necrotic cell death. Interestingly, death is not triggered by a direct interaction of the cold plasma with cells, but rather via a transient modification in the microenvironment. We show that modification of the microenvironment redox status suppresses treatment toxicity and protects cells from death. Moreover, necrosis is not accidental and seems to be an active response to an environmental cue, as its execution can be inhibited to rescue cells. Conclusion These observations will need to be taken into account when studying in vitro plasma/cell interaction and may have implications for the design and future evaluation of the efficacy and safety of this new treatment strategy. PMID:26275141

  2. Long and short term effects of plasma treatment on meristematic plant cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puač, N.; Živković, S.; Selaković, N.; Milutinović, M.; Boljević, J.; Malović, G.; Petrović, Z. Lj.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we will present results of plasma treatments of meristematic cells of Daucus carota. Plasma needle was used as an atmospheric pressure/gas composition source of non-equilibrium plasma in all treatments. Activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase was measured immediately after plasma treatment and after two weeks following the treatment. Superoxide dismutase activity was increased in samples immediately after the plasma treatment. On the other hand, catalase activity was much higher in treated samples when measured two weeks after plasma treatment. These results show that there is a direct proof of the triggering of signal transduction in the cells by two reactive oxygen species H2O2 and O2-, causing enzyme activity and short and long term effects even during the growth of calli, where the information is passed to newborn cells over the period of two weeks.

  3. Plasma membrane proteomics of human embryonic stem cells and human embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Dormeyer, Wilma; van Hoof, Dennis; Braam, Stefan R; Heck, Albert J R; Mummery, Christine L; Krijgsveld, Jeroen

    2008-07-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are of immense interest in regenerative medicine as they can self-renew indefinitely and can give rise to any adult cell type. Human embryonal carcinoma cells (hECCs) are the malignant counterparts of hESCs found in testis tumors. hESCs that have acquired chromosomal abnormalities in culture are essentially indistinguishable from hECC. Direct comparison of karyotypically normal hESCs with hECCs could lead to understanding differences between their mechanisms of growth control and contribute to implementing safe therapeutic use of stem cells without the development of germ cell cancer. While several comparisons of hECCs and hESCs have been reported, their cell surface proteomes are largely unknown, partly because plasma membrane proteomics is still a major challenge. Here, we present a strategy for the identification of plasma membrane proteins that has been optimized for application to the relatively small numbers of stem cells normally available, and that does not require tedious cell fractionation. The method led to the identification of 237 and 219 specific plasma membrane proteins in the hESC line HUES-7 and the hECC line NT2/D1, respectively. In addition to known stemness-associated cell surface markers like ALP, CD9, and CTNNB, a large number of receptors, transporters, signal transducers, and cell-cell adhesion proteins were identified. Our study revealed that several Hedgehog and Wnt pathway members are differentially expressed in hESCs and hECCs including NPC1, FZD2, FZD6, FZD7, LRP6, and SEMA4D, which play a pivotal role in stem cell self-renewal and cancer growth. Various proteins encoded on chromosome 12p, duplicated in testicular cancer, were uniquely identified in hECCs. These included GAPDH, LDHB, YARS2, CLSTN3, CSDA, LRP6, NDUFA9, and NOL1, which are known to be upregulated in testicular cancer. Distinct HLA molecules were revealed on the surface of hESCs and hECCs, despite their low abundance. Results were

  4. Comparing plasma and X-ray exposure and identifying vulnerable cell parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Bill

    2012-10-01

    Here two issues in plasma medicine that are being addressed in a collaboration between the Centre of Plasma Physics and the School of Pharmacy at Queen's University Belfast and the Plasma Institute at York University UK will be discussed. Recent measurements of the interaction of plasmas created directly in DMEM cell medium and MDAMB-231, a human breast cancer cell line, showed evidence of reduced cell viability and of DNA damage. The same set of experiments were undertaken but with X-ray exposure. A correlation of the dependence on plasma exposure time and X-ray dose was observed which might point the way to dose definition in plasma medicine. We have also been working to identify the cell parts most vulnerable to plasma exposure. In this study a 10 kHz atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma jet, operating in He/0.5%O2 and characterized to determine the behavior of many of the plasma species, was incident onto the surface of media containing either bacterial strains, in their planktonic and biofilm forms, or isolated bacterial plasmid DNA. The results of measurements to look for changes in plasmid structural conformation, rates of single and double strand breaks, the catalytic activity of certain bacterial enzymes, the peroxidation of lipid content of the bacterial cells, the leakage of ATP and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images will be discussed.

  5. Effect of cold plasma on glial cell morphology studied by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Recek, Nina; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Keidar, Michael; Cvelbar, Uros; Vesel, Alenka; Mozetic, Miran; Sherman, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is broadly used to study the morphology of cells. The morphological characteristics and differences of the cell membrane between normal human astrocytes and glial tumor cells are not well explored. Following treatment with cold atmospheric plasma, evaluation of the selective effect of plasma on cell viability of tumor cells is poorly understood and requires further evaluation. Using AFM we imaged morphology of glial cells before and after cold atmospheric plasma treatment. To look more closely at the effect of plasma on cell membrane, high resolution imaging was used. We report the differences between normal human astrocytes and human glioblastoma cells by considering the membrane surface details. Our data, obtained for the first time on these cells using atomic force microscopy, argue for an architectural feature on the cell membrane, i.e. brush layers, different in normal human astrocytes as compared to glioblastoma cells. The brush layer disappears from the cell membrane surface of normal E6/E7 cells and is maintained in the glioblastoma U87 cells after plasma treatment.

  6. Plasma membrane microdomains from hybrid aspen cells are involved in cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bessueille, Laurence; Sindt, Nicolas; Guichardant, Michel; Djerbi, Soraya; Teeri, Tuula T; Bulone, Vincent

    2009-04-28

    Detergent-resistant plasma membrane microdomains [DRMs (detergent-resistant membranes)] were isolated recently from several plant species. As for animal cells, a large range of cellular functions, such as signal transduction, endocytosis and protein trafficking, have been attributed to plant lipid rafts and DRMs. The data available are essentially based on proteomics and more approaches need to be undertaken to elucidate the precise function of individual populations of DRMs in plants. We report here the first isolation of DRMs from purified plasma membranes of a tree species, the hybrid aspen Populus tremula x tremuloides, and their biochemical characterization. Plasma membranes were solubilized with Triton X-100 and the resulting DRMs were isolated by flotation in sucrose density gradients. The DRMs were enriched in sterols, sphingolipids and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins and thus exhibited similar properties to DRMs from other species. However, they contained key carbohydrate synthases involved in cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis, namely callose [(1-->3)-beta-D-glucan] and cellulose synthases. The association of these enzymes with DRMs was demonstrated using specific glucan synthase assays and antibodies, as well as biochemical and chemical approaches for the characterization of the polysaccharides synthesized in vitro by the isolated DRMs. More than 70% of the total glucan synthase activities present in the original plasma membranes was associated with the DRM fraction. In addition to shedding light on the lipid environment of callose and cellulose synthases, our results demonstrate the involvement of DRMs in the biosynthesis of important cell wall polysaccharides. This novel concept suggests a function of plant membrane microdomains in cell growth and morphogenesis.

  7. Evaluation of the Efficacy of the Plasma Pencil Against Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohades, Soheila; Barekzi, Nazir; Razavi, Hamid; Laroussi, Mounir

    2014-10-01

    The plasma pencil generates low temperature and atmospheric pressure plasma. To generate the plasma, high voltage pulses with short width (from nanosecond to microsecond) are applied to a noble gas. The working gas can be helium, argon or a mixture of these with air or oxygen. Generating plasma with helium provides a tolerable temperature for biological cells and tissues. Diagnostic measurements on the plasma plume has revealed the presence of active agents such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen reactive species (RNS), which are known to have biological implications. Recently, low temperature plasma has drawn attention to its potential in cancer therapy. In our lab, the plasma pencil has been used to treat leukemia, prostate and epithelial cancer cells. The cancer cell line used here is the SCaBER (ATCC®HTB3™) cell line originating from a human bladder cancer. The results indicate that specific species induce the molecular mechanisms associated with cell death. The death of cells after plasma treatment will be studied using assays, such as DNA laddering and Caspase-3 activation, to elucidate the mechanism of the apoptotic or necrotic pathways.

  8. PLASMA CELL NEOPLASIA IN A SINGLE HOST: A MOSAIC OF DIFFERENT PROTEIN-PRODUCING CELL TYPES

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Michael

    1962-01-01

    The peritoneal plasma cell neoplasias that develop in strain BALB/c mice after the injection of adjuvant-staphylococcus mixtures or mineral oil alone appear in the form of multiple nodules in the mesentery and on peritoneal surfaces. Experiments were done to determine if these nodules were metastases or multiple primary neoplasms. Nodules or pieces of masses were transplanted subcutaneously by the trochar method or by insertion of tissue under the kidney capsule from 6 primary cases and parallel transplant lines were established. The serum and urinary protein abnormality (a stable heritable characteristic) of each of the various transplant lines was characterized by agar gel electrophoresis and immunoelectrophoresis. Different protein-producing lines were found in 3 cases; in one case 5 different protein-producing lines were isolated. Two different lines were found for each of the other 2 cases. When transplantation studies were begun early, it was demonstrated that the nodules were multiple primary plasma cell neoplasms; when delayed, only one protein-producing plasma cell neoplasm was found. PMID:14488298

  9. The suppression of ghrelin signaling mitigates age-associated thermogenic impairment

    PubMed Central

    Bongmba, Odelia Y. N.; Ma, Xiaojun; Zhu, Xiongwei; Sheikh-Hamad, David; Sun, Yuxiang

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated with severe thermogenic impairment, which contributes to obesity and diabetes in aging. We previously reported that ablation of the ghrelin receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), attenuates age-associated obesity and insulin resistance. Ghrelin and obestatin are derived from the same preproghrelin gene. Here we showed that in brown adipocytes, ghrelin decreases the expression of thermogenic regulator but obestatin increases it, thus showing the opposite effects. We also found that during aging, plasma ghrelin and GHS-R expression in brown adipose tissue (BAT) are increased, but plasma obestatin is unchanged. Increased plasma ghrelin and unchanged obestatin during aging may lead to an imbalance of thermogenic regulation, which may in turn exacerbate thermogenic impairment in aging. Moreover, we found that GHS-R ablation activates thermogenic signaling, enhances insulin activation, increases mitochondrial biogenesis, and improves mitochondrial dynamics of BAT. In addition, we detected increased norepinephrine in the circulation, and observed that GHS-R knockdown in brown adipocytes directly stimulates thermogenic activity, suggesting that GHS-R regulates thermogenesis via both central and peripheral mechanisms. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that ghrelin signaling is an important thermogenic regulator in aging. Antagonists of GHS-R may serve as unique anti-obesity agents, combating obesity by activating thermogenesis. PMID:25543537

  10. Plasmolysis, red blood cell partitioning, and plasma protein binding of etofibrate, clofibrate, and their degradation products.

    PubMed

    Altmayer, P; Garrett, E R

    1983-11-01

    Etofibrate (I), the ethylene glycol diester of clofibric and nicotinic acids, degrades almost equally through both half-esters with half-lives of approximately 10 and 1 min in fresh dog and human plasma, respectively. The nicotinate V degrades with half-lives of approximately 12 hr and 50 min in fresh dog and human plasma, respectively. Ester III and clofibrate VI degrade by saturable Michaelis-Menten kinetics in fresh human plasma, with similar maximum initial rates and respective terminal first-order half-lives of 12 and 26 min. Tetraethyl pyrophosphate at 100 micrograms/ml inhibited human plasma and red blood cell esterases permitting plasma protein binding and red blood cell partitioning studies. The red blood cell-plasma water partition coefficient was 5.4 for 0.2-80 micrograms/ml of I. Clofibrate (VI) showed a saturable erythrocyte partitioning that decreased from 7.8 (10 micrograms/ml) to 1 (50 micrograms/ml). The strong binding of I and VI to ultrafiltration membranes necessitated the determination of their plasma protein binding by the method of variable plasma concentrations of erythrocyte suspensions to give 96.6% (0.2-80 micrograms/ml) and 98.2% (13.6-108.4 micrograms/ml) binding, respectively. Methods for the determination of the parameters of saturable and nonsaturable plasma protein binding for unstable and membrane-binding drugs by the method of variable plasma concentrations in partitioning erythrocyte suspensions are presented.

  11. The effects of non-thermal plasmas on selected mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leduc, Mathieu

    Non-thermal plasma surface modifications have become indispensable processing steps in various industry and research sectors. Applications range from semiconductor processing to biotechnology and recently, plasma medicine. Non-thermal plasma sources have the advantage that a number of electron-driven chemical reactions can be produced while maintaining the gas (heavy species) temperature low, thus enabling the treatment of temperature-sensitive surfaces such as polymers, tissues and live cells. In the fields of biology and medicine, non-thermal plasmas have been primarily used for the deposition or modification of biocompatible polymers and for sterilization. Recently, non-thermal plasmas have been used to treat tissues and cells. A new field of research has emerged, Plasma Medicine, which studies the effects of non-thermal plasmas on cells and tissues for clinical applications. The Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge torch (APGD-t), a non-thermal plasma source, built in our laboratory was used to study the effects of non-thermal plasmas on mammalian cells. In its first application, we indirectly used the APGD-t to deposit a plasma-polymer on a glass surface and studied its effects on cultured cells. It was shown that the cells grew preferentially on the plasma-polymer, and their proliferation rate increased. The second application of the APGD-t was to further investigate previous observations of cell permeabilization obtained by plasma treatments and to apply non-thermal plasmas to cell transfection. It was demonstrated that the APGD-t is able to locally transfect adherent cells. We estimated the diameter of the pores created to be below 10 nm and that the pores remain open for less than 5 seconds. However, while investigating the mechanisms involved in cell transfection we observed that the use of higher gas flows in the negative controls (using the APGD-t but with the plasma turned off) also resulted in cell transfection. To further study this phenomena, we

  12. Ionized gas (plasma) delivery of reactive oxygen species (ROS) into artificial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung-Ha; Szili, Endre J.; Jenkins, A. Toby A.; Short, Robert D.

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to enhance our understanding of how reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated ex situ by ionized gas (plasma), can affect the regulation of signalling processes within cells. A model system, comprising of a suspension of phospholipid vesicles (cell mimics) encapsulating a ROS reporter, was developed to study the plasma delivery of ROS into cells. For the first time it was shown that plasma unequivocally delivers ROS into cells over a sustained period and without compromising cell membrane integrity. An important consideration in cell and biological assays is the presence of serum, which significantly reduced the transfer efficiency of ROS into the vesicles. These results are key to understanding how plasma treatments can be tailored for specific medical or biotechnology applications. Further, the phospholipid vesicle ROS reporter system may find use in other studies involving the application of free radicals in biology and medicine.

  13. Stem cell marker nestin is expressed in plasma cells of multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Svachova, H; Pour, L; Sana, J; Kovarova, L; Raja, K R Muthu; Hajek, R

    2011-08-01

    Nestin is considered to be a characteristic marker of multipotent proliferative precursors found in some embryonic and fetal tissues. Its expression might be a suitable diagnostic and prognostic indicator of malignancy and a potential marker of cancer stem cells in solid tumors. Unexpectedly, nestin protein was detected in mature CD138(+)CD38(+) plasma cells of multiple myeloma patients and statistical analysis confirmed significant differences between myeloma patients and control group without hematological malignancy. Our results represent the first evidence of nestin expression in multiple myeloma. Further studies are required to elucidate the role of this protein in multiple myeloma. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Induction of Immunogenic Cell Death with Non-Thermal Plasma for Cancer Immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Abraham G.

    Even with the recent advancements in cancer immunotherapy, treatments are still associated with debilitating side effects and unacceptable fail rates. Induction of immunogenic cell death (ICD) in tumors is a promising approach to cancer treatment that may overcome these deficiencies. Cells undergoing ICD pathways enhance the interactions between cancerous cells and immune cells of the patient, resulting in the generation of anti-cancer immunity. The goal of this therapy relies on the engagement and reestablishment of the patient's natural immune processes to target and eliminate cancerous cells systemically. The main objective of this research was to determine if non-thermal plasma could be used to elicit immunogenic cancer cell death for cancer immunotherapy. My hypothesis was that plasma induces immunogenic cancer cell death through oxidative stress pathways, followed by development of a specific anti-tumor immune response. This was tested by investigating the interactions between plasma and multiple cancerous cells in vitro and validating anti-tumor immune responses in vivo. Following plasma treatment, two surrogate ICD markers, secreted adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and surface exposed calreticulin (ecto-CRT), were emitted from all three cancerous cell lines tested: A549 lung carcinoma cell line, CNE-1 radiation-resistant nasopharyngeal cell line and CT26 colorectal cancer cell line. When these cells were co-cultured with macrophages, cells of the innate immune system, the tumoricidal activity of macrophages was enhanced, thus demonstrating the immunostimulatory activity of cells undergoing ICD. The underlying mechanisms of plasma-induced ICD were also evaluated. When plasma is generated, four major components are produced: electromagnetic fields, ultraviolet radiation, and charged and neutral reactive species. Of these, we determined that plasma-generated charged and short-lived reactive oxygen species (ROS) were the major effectors of ICD. Following plasma

  15. Nonthermal Atmospheric Plasma Rapidly Disinfects Multidrug-Resistant Microbes by Inducing Cell Surface Damage

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Brian; Mondello, Frank; Garner, Allen L.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma, a unique state of matter with properties similar to those of ionized gas, is an effective biological disinfectant. However, the mechanism through which nonthermal or “cold” plasma inactivates microbes on surfaces is poorly understood, due in part to challenges associated with processing and analyzing live cells on surfaces rather than in aqueous solution. Here, we employ membrane adsorption techniques to visualize the cellular effects of plasma on representative clinical isolates of drug-resistant microbes. Through direct fluorescent imaging, we demonstrate that plasma rapidly inactivates planktonic cultures, with >5 log10 kill in 30 s by damaging the cell surface in a time-dependent manner, resulting in a loss of membrane integrity, leakage of intracellular components (nucleic acid, protein, ATP), and ultimately focal dissolution of the cell surface with longer exposure time. This occurred with similar kinetic rates among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. We observed no correlative evidence that plasma induced widespread genomic damage or oxidative protein modification prior to the onset of membrane damage. Consistent with the notion that plasma is superficial, plasma-mediated sterilization was dramatically reduced when microbial cells were enveloped in aqueous buffer prior to treatment. These results support the use of nonthermal plasmas for disinfecting multidrug-resistant microbes in environmental settings and substantiate ongoing clinical applications for plasma devices. PMID:22232292

  16. Regulation of plasma histamine levels by the mast cell clock and its modulation by stress

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yuki; Ishimaru, Kayoko; Shibata, Shigenobu; Nakao, Atsuhito

    2017-01-01

    At steady state, plasma histamine levels exhibit circadian variations with nocturnal peaks, which is implicated in the nighttime exacerbation of allergic symptoms. However, the regulatory mechanisms are largely unexplored. This study determined how steady-state plasma histamine levels are regulated and affected by environmental factors. We found that plasma histamine levels decreased in mast cell–deficient mice and their circadian variations were lost in mast cell–deficient mice reconstituted with bone marrow–derived mast cells (BMMCs) harboring a mutation in the circadian gene Clock. Clock temporally regulates expression of organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3), which is involved in histamine transport, in mast cells; OCT inhibition abolished circadian variations in plasma histamine levels. Mice housed under aberrant light/dark conditions or suffering from restraint stress exhibited de-synchronization of the mast cell clockwork, concomitant with the loss of circadian variations in OCT3 expression and plasma histamine levels. The degree of compound 48/80–induced plasma extravasation in mice was correlated with plasma histamine levels. Collectively, the mast cell clock mediates circadian regulation of plasma histamine levels at steady state, in part by controlling OCT3 expression, which can be modulated by stress. Additionally, we propose that plasma histamine levels potentiate mast cell–mediated allergic reactions. PMID:28074918

  17. Nonthermal atmospheric plasma rapidly disinfects multidrug-resistant microbes by inducing cell surface damage.

    PubMed

    Kvam, Erik; Davis, Brian; Mondello, Frank; Garner, Allen L

    2012-04-01

    Plasma, a unique state of matter with properties similar to those of ionized gas, is an effective biological disinfectant. However, the mechanism through which nonthermal or "cold" plasma inactivates microbes on surfaces is poorly understood, due in part to challenges associated with processing and analyzing live cells on surfaces rather than in aqueous solution. Here, we employ membrane adsorption techniques to visualize the cellular effects of plasma on representative clinical isolates of drug-resistant microbes. Through direct fluorescent imaging, we demonstrate that plasma rapidly inactivates planktonic cultures, with >5 log(10) kill in 30 s by damaging the cell surface in a time-dependent manner, resulting in a loss of membrane integrity, leakage of intracellular components (nucleic acid, protein, ATP), and ultimately focal dissolution of the cell surface with longer exposure time. This occurred with similar kinetic rates among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. We observed no correlative evidence that plasma induced widespread genomic damage or oxidative protein modification prior to the onset of membrane damage. Consistent with the notion that plasma is superficial, plasma-mediated sterilization was dramatically reduced when microbial cells were enveloped in aqueous buffer prior to treatment. These results support the use of nonthermal plasmas for disinfecting multidrug-resistant microbes in environmental settings and substantiate ongoing clinical applications for plasma devices.

  18. Epigenetic regulation of the nuclear-coded GCAT and SHMT2 genes confers human age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Osamu; Ohnishi, Sakiko; Mito, Takayuki; Shimizu, Akinori; Ishikawa, Kaori; Iashikawa, Kaori; Nakada, Kazuto; Soda, Manabu; Mano, Hiroyuki; Togayachi, Sumie; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Okita, Keisuke; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2015-05-22

    Age-associated accumulation of somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been proposed to be responsible for the age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects found in elderly human subjects. We carried out reprogramming of human fibroblast lines derived from elderly subjects by generating their induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and examined another possibility, namely that these aging phenotypes are controlled not by mutations but by epigenetic regulation. Here, we show that reprogramming of elderly fibroblasts restores age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects, indicating that these aging phenotypes are reversible and are similar to differentiation phenotypes in that both are controlled by epigenetic regulation, not by mutations in either the nuclear or the mitochondrial genome. Microarray screening revealed that epigenetic downregulation of the nuclear-coded GCAT gene, which is involved in glycine production in mitochondria, is partly responsible for these aging phenotypes. Treatment of elderly fibroblasts with glycine effectively prevented the expression of these aging phenotypes.

  19. Epigenetic regulation of the nuclear-coded GCAT and SHMT2 genes confers human age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects

    PubMed Central

    Hashizume, Osamu; Ohnishi, Sakiko; Mito, Takayuki; Shimizu, Akinori; Ishikawa, Kaori; Nakada, Kazuto; Soda, Manabu; Mano, Hiroyuki; Togayachi, Sumie; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Okita, Keisuke; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    Age-associated accumulation of somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been proposed to be responsible for the age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects found in elderly human subjects. We carried out reprogramming of human fibroblast lines derived from elderly subjects by generating their induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and examined another possibility, namely that these aging phenotypes are controlled not by mutations but by epigenetic regulation. Here, we show that reprogramming of elderly fibroblasts restores age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects, indicating that these aging phenotypes are reversible and are similar to differentiation phenotypes in that both are controlled by epigenetic regulation, not by mutations in either the nuclear or the mitochondrial genome. Microarray screening revealed that epigenetic downregulation of the nuclear-coded GCAT gene, which is involved in glycine production in mitochondria, is partly responsible for these aging phenotypes. Treatment of elderly fibroblasts with glycine effectively prevented the expression of these aging phenotypes. PMID:26000717

  20. Circulating plasma cells in multiple myeloma: characterization and correlation with disease stage.

    PubMed

    Rawstron, A C; Owen, R G; Davies, F E; Johnson, R J; Jones, R A; Richards, S J; Evans, P A; Child, J A; Smith, G M; Jack, A S; Morgan, G J

    1997-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a flow cytometric test to quantitate low levels of circulating myeloma plasma cells, and to determine the relationship of these cells with disease stage. Cells were characterized using five-parameter flow cytometric analysis with a panel of antibodies, and results were evaluated by comparison with fluorescent consensus-primer IgH-PCR. Bone marrow myeloma plasma cells, defined by high CD38 and Syndecan-1 expression, did not express CD10, 23, 30, 34 or 45RO, and demonstrated weak expression of CD37 and CD45. 65% of patients had CD19- 56+ plasma cells, 30% CD19- 56(low), and 5% CD19+ 56+, and these two antigens discriminated myeloma from normal plasma cells, which were all CD19+ 56(low). Peripheral blood myeloma plasma cells had the same composite phenotype, but expressed significantly lower levels of CD56 and Syndecan-1, and were detected in 75% (38/51) of patients at presentation, 92% (11/12) of patients in relapse, and 40% (4/10) of stem cell harvests. Circulating plasma cells were not detectable in patients in CR (n = 9) or normals (n = 10), at a sensitivity of up to 1 in 10,000 cells. There was good correlation between the flow cytometric test and IgH-PCR results: myeloma plasma cells were detectable by flow cytometry in all PCR positive samples, and samples with no detectable myeloma plasma cells were PCR negative. Absolute numbers decreased in patients responding to treatment, remained elevated in patients with refractory disease, and increased in patients undergoing relapse. We conclude that flow cytometry can provide an effective aternative to IgH-PCR that will allow quantitative assessment of low levels of residual disease.

  1. Organization of lipids in fiber-cell plasma membranes of the eye lens.

    PubMed

    Subczynski, Witold K; Mainali, Laxman; Raguz, Marija; O'Brien, William J

    2017-03-01

    The plasma membrane together with the cytoskeleton forms the only supramolecular structure of the matured fiber cell which accounts for mostly all fiber cell lipids. The purpose of this review is to inform researchers about the importance of the lipid bilayer portion of the lens fiber cell plasma membranes in the maintaining lens homeostasis, and thus protecting against cataract development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular Characteristics of Mantle Cell Lymphoma Presenting with Clonal Plasma Cell Component

    PubMed Central

    Visco, Carlo; Hoeller, Sylvia; Malik, Jeffrey T.; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y.; Wiggins, Michele L.; Liu, Jessica; Sanger, Warren G.; Liu, Zhongfeng; Chang, Julie; Ranheim, Erik A.; Gradowski, Joel F.; Serrrano, Sergio; Wang, Huan-You; Liu, Qingquan; Dave, Sandeep; Olsen, Brian; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Campo, Elias; Swerdlow, Steven H.; Chan, Wing C.; Tzankov, Alexander; Young, Ken H.

    2011-01-01

    The normal counterparts of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) are naïve quiescent B-cells that have not been processed through the germinal center (GC). For this reason, while lymphomas arising from GC or post-GC B-cells often exhibit plasmacytic differentiation, MCL rarely presents with plasmacytic features. Seven cases of MCL with a monotypic plasma cell (PC) population were collected from six centers and studied by immunohistochemistry, FICTION (Fluorescence immunophenotyping and Interphase Cytogenetics as a Tool for the Investigation of Neoplasms), capillary gel electrophoresis, and restriction fragment length polymorphism of immunoglobulin heavy chain analysis (RFLP/IgH) of microdissections of each of the MCL and PC populations to assess their clonal relationship. Clinical presentation was rather unusual compared to typical MCL, with two cases arising from extranodal soft-tissues of the head. All MCL cases were morphologically and immunohistochemically typical, bearing the t(11;14)(q13;q32). In all cases PC populations were clonal. In 5 of the 7 cases, the MCL and PC clones showed identical restriction fragments, indicating a common clonal origin of the neoplastic populations. The two cases with clonal diversity denoted the coexistence of two different tumors in a composite lymphoma/plasma cell neoplasm. Our findings suggest that MCL can present with a PC component that is often clonally related to the lymphoma, representing a rare but unique biological variant of this tumor. PMID:21263238

  3. Helium generated cold plasma finely regulates activation of human fibroblast-like primary cells.

    PubMed

    Brun, Paola; Pathak, Surajit; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Palù, Giorgio; Brun, Paola; Zuin, Matteo; Cavazzana, Roberto; Martines, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas are being developed for a wide range of health care applications, including wound healing. However in order to exploit the potential of plasma for clinical applications, the understanding of the mechanisms involved in plasma-induced activation of fibroblasts, the cells active in the healing process, is mandatory. In this study, the role of helium generated plasma in the tissue repairing process was investigated in cultured human fibroblast-like primary cells, and specifically in hepatic stellate cells and intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts. Five minutes after treatment, plasma induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cultured cells, as assessed by flow cytometric analysis of fluorescence-activated 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate probe. Plasma-induced intracellular ROS were characterized by lower concentrations and shorter half-lives with respect to hydrogen peroxide-induced ROS. Moreover ROS generated by plasma treatment increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-γ, nuclear receptor that modulates the inflammatory responses. Plasma exposure promoted wound healing in an in vitro model and induced fibroblast migration and proliferation, as demonstrated, respectively, by trans-well assay and partitioning between daughter cells of carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester fluorescent dye. Plasma-induced fibroblast migration and proliferation were found to be ROS-dependent as cellular incubation with antioxidant agents (e.g. N-acetyl L-cysteine) cancelled the biological effects. This study provides evidence that helium generated plasma promotes proliferation and migration in liver and intestinal fibroblast-like primary cells mainly by increasing intracellular ROS levels. Since plasma-evoked ROS are time-restricted and elicit the PPAR-γ anti-inflammatory molecular pathway, this strategy ensures precise regulation of human fibroblast activation and can be considered a

  4. Helium Generated Cold Plasma Finely Regulates Activation of Human Fibroblast-Like Primary Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brun, Paola; Pathak, Surajit; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Palù, Giorgio; Brun, Paola; Zuin, Matteo; Cavazzana, Roberto; Martines, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas are being developed for a wide range of health care applications, including wound healing. However in order to exploit the potential of plasma for clinical applications, the understanding of the mechanisms involved in plasma-induced activation of fibroblasts, the cells active in the healing process, is mandatory. In this study, the role of helium generated plasma in the tissue repairing process was investigated in cultured human fibroblast-like primary cells, and specifically in hepatic stellate cells and intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts. Five minutes after treatment, plasma induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cultured cells, as assessed by flow cytometric analysis of fluorescence-activated 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate probe. Plasma-induced intracellular ROS were characterized by lower concentrations and shorter half-lives with respect to hydrogen peroxide-induced ROS. Moreover ROS generated by plasma treatment increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-γ, nuclear receptor that modulates the inflammatory responses. Plasma exposure promoted wound healing in an in vitro model and induced fibroblast migration and proliferation, as demonstrated, respectively, by trans-well assay and partitioning between daughter cells of carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester fluorescent dye. Plasma-induced fibroblast migration and proliferation were found to be ROS-dependent as cellular incubation with antioxidant agents (e.g. N-acetyl L-cysteine) cancelled the biological effects. This study provides evidence that helium generated plasma promotes proliferation and migration in liver and intestinal fibroblast-like primary cells mainly by increasing intracellular ROS levels. Since plasma-evoked ROS are time-restricted and elicit the PPAR-γ anti-inflammatory molecular pathway, this strategy ensures precise regulation of human fibroblast activation and can be

  5. Proliferation-Related Activity in Endothelial Cells Is Enhanced by Micropower Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kotaro

    2016-01-01

    Nonthermal plasma has received a lot of attention as a medical treatment technique in recent years. It can easily create various reactive chemical species (ROS) and is harmless to living body. Although plasma at gas-liquid interface has a potential for a biomedical application, the interactions between the gas-liquid plasma and living cells remain unclear. Here, we show characteristics of a micropower plasma with 0.018 W of the power input, generated at gas-liquid interface. We also provide the evidence of plasma-induced enhancement in proliferation activity of endothelial cells. The plasma produced H2O2, HNO2, and HNO3 in phosphate buffered saline containing Mg++ and Ca++ (PBS(+)), and their concentration increased linearly during 600-second discharge. The value of pH in PBS(+) against the plasma discharge time was stable at about 7.0. Temperature in PBS(+) rose monotonically, and its rise was up to 0.8°C at the bottom of a cell-cultured dish by the plasma discharge for 600 s. Short-time treatment of the plasma enhanced proliferation activity of endothelial cells. In contrast, the treatment of H2O2 does not enhance the cell proliferation. Thus, the ROS production and the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation due to the plasma treatment might be related to enhancement of the cell proliferation. Our results may potentially provide the basis for developing the biomedical applications using the gas-liquid plasma. PMID:28058258

  6. Active screen plasma nitriding enhances cell attachment to polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaklamani, Georgia; Bowen, James; Mehrban, Nazia; Dong, Hanshan; Grover, Liam M.; Stamboulis, Artemis

    2013-05-01

    Active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) is a well-established technique used for the surface modification of materials, the result of which is often a product with enhanced functional performance. Here we report the modification of the chemical and mechanical properties of ultra-high molecular weight poly(ethylene) (UHMWPE) using 80:20 (v/v) N2/H2 ASPN, followed by growth of 3T3 fibroblasts on the treated and untreated polymer surfaces. ASPN-treated UHMWPE showed extensive fibroblast attachment within 3 h of seeding, whereas fibroblasts did not successfully attach to untreated UHMWPE. Fibroblast-coated surfaces were maintained for up to 28 days, monitoring their metabolic activity and morphology throughout. The chemical properties of the ASPN-treated UHMWPE surface were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, revealing the presence of Csbnd N, Cdbnd N, and Ctbnd N chemical bonds. The elastic modulus, surface topography, and adhesion properties of the ASPN-treated UHMWPE surface were studied over 28 days during sample storage under ambient conditions and during immersion in two commonly used cell culture media.

  7. Differentiation stage of myeloma plasma cells: biological and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Paiva, B; Puig, N; Cedena, M T; de Jong, B G; Ruiz, Y; Rapado, I; Martinez-Lopez, J; Cordon, L; Alignani, D; Delgado, J A; van Zelm, M C; Van Dongen, J J M; Pascual, M; Agirre, X; Prosper, F; Martín-Subero, J I; Vidriales, M-B; Gutierrez, N C; Hernandez, M T; Oriol, A; Echeveste, M A; Gonzalez, Y; Johnson, S K; Epstein, J; Barlogie, B; Morgan, G J; Orfao, A; Blade, J; Mateos, M V; Lahuerta, J J; San-Miguel, J F

    2017-02-01

    The notion that plasma cells (PCs) are terminally differentiated has prevented intensive research in multiple myeloma (MM) about their phenotypic plasticity and differentiation. Here, we demonstrated in healthy individuals (n=20) that the CD19-CD81 expression axis identifies three bone marrow (BM)PC subsets with distinct age-prevalence, proliferation, replication-history, immunoglobulin-production, and phenotype, consistent with progressively increased differentiation from CD19+CD81+ into CD19-CD81+ and CD19-CD81- BMPCs. Afterwards, we demonstrated in 225 newly diagnosed MM patients that, comparing to normal BMPC counterparts, 59% had fully differentiated (CD19-CD81-) clones, 38% intermediate-differentiated (CD19-CD81+) and 3% less-differentiated (CD19+CD81+) clones. The latter patients had dismal outcome, and PC differentiation emerged as an independent prognostic marker for progression-free (HR: 1.7; P=0.005) and overall survival (HR: 2.1; P=0.006). Longitudinal comparison of diagnostic vs minimal-residual-disease samples (n=40) unraveled that in 20% of patients, less-differentiated PCs subclones become enriched after therapy-induced pressure. We also revealed that CD81 expression is epigenetically regulated, that less-differentiated clonal PCs retain high expression of genes related to preceding B-cell stages (for example: PAX5), and show distinct mutation profile vs fully differentiated PC clones within individual patients. Together, we shed new light into PC plasticity and demonstrated that MM patients harbouring less-differentiated PCs have dismal survival, which might be related to higher chemoresistant potential plus different molecular and genomic profiles.

  8. Differentiation stage of myeloma plasma cells: biological and clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, B; Puig, N; Cedena, MT; de Jong, BG; Ruiz, Y; Rapado, I; Martinez-Lopez, J; Cordon, L; Alignani, D; Delgado, JA; van Zelm, MC; Van Dongen, JJM; Pascual, M; Agirre, X; Prosper, F; Martín-Subero, JI; Vidriales, M-B; Gutierrez, NC; Hernandez, MT; Oriol, A; Echeveste, MA; Gonzalez, Y; Johnson, SK; Epstein, J; Barlogie, B; Morgan, GJ; Orfao, A; Blade, J; Mateos, MV; Lahuerta, JJ; San-Miguel, JF

    2017-01-01

    The notion that plasma cells (PCs) are terminally differentiated has prevented intensive research in multiple myeloma (MM) about their phenotypic plasticity and differentiation. Here, we demonstrated in healthy individuals (n = 20) that the CD19 − CD81 expression axis identifies three bone marrow (BM)PC subsets with distinct age-prevalence, proliferation, replication-history, immunoglobulin-production, and phenotype, consistent with progressively increased differentiation from CD19+CD81+ into CD19 − CD81+ and CD19 − CD81 − BMPCs. Afterwards, we demonstrated in 225 newly diagnosed MM patients that, comparing to normal BMPC counterparts, 59% had fully differentiated (CD19 − CD81 −) clones, 38% intermediate-differentiated (CD19 − CD81+) and 3% less-differentiated (CD19+CD81+) clones. The latter patients had dismal outcome, and PC differentiation emerged as an independent prognostic marker for progression-free (HR: 1.7; P = 0.005) and overall survival (HR: 2.1; P = 0.006). Longitudinal comparison of diagnostic vs minimal-residual-disease samples (n = 40) unraveled that in 20% of patients, less-differentiated PCs subclones become enriched after therapy-induced pressure. We also revealed that CD81 expression is epigenetically regulated, that less-differentiated clonal PCs retain high expression of genes related to preceding B-cell stages (for example: PAX5), and show distinct mutation profile vs fully differentiated PC clones within individual patients. Together, we shed new light into PC plasticity and demonstrated that MM patients harbouring less-differentiated PCs have dismal survival, which might be related to higher chemoresistant potential plus different molecular and genomic profiles. PMID:27479184

  9. Viral particles drive rapid differentiation of memory B cells into secondary plasma cells producing increased levels of antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zabel, Franziska; Mohanan, Deepa; Bessa, Juliana; Link, Alexander; Fettelschoss, Antonia; Saudan, Philippe; Kündig, Thomas M; Bachmann, Martin F

    2014-06-15

    Extensive studies have been undertaken to describe naive B cells differentiating into memory B cells at a cellular and molecular level. However, relatively little is known about the fate of memory B cells upon Ag re-encounter. We have previously established a system based on virus-like particles (VLPs), which allows tracking of VLP-specific B cells by flow cytometry as well as histology. Using allotype markers, it is possible to adoptively transfer memory B cells into a naive mouse and track responses of naive and memory B cells in the same mouse under physiological conditions. We have observed that VLP-specific memory B cells quickly differentiated into plasma cells that drove the early onset of a strong humoral IgG response. However, neither IgM(+) nor IgG(+) memory B cells proliferated extensively or entered germinal centers. Remarkably, plasma cells derived from memory B cells preferentially homed to the bone marrow earlier and secreted increased levels of Abs when compared with primary plasma cells derived from naive B cells. Hence, memory B cells have the unique phenotype to differentiate into highly effective secondary plasma cells.

  10. Normal and neoplastic plasma cell membrane phenotype: studies with new monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Tazzari, P L; Gobbi, M; Dinota, A; Bontadini, A; Grassi, G; Cerato, C; Cavo, M; Pileri, S; Caligaris-Cappio, F; Tura, S

    1987-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies (MoAb), named 8A, 8F6 and 62B1, reacting with plasma cell-associated antigens, were characterized. 8A was found to be positive throughout the B cell lineage maturation steps from the immature B-committed CD10+ cell to the plasma cells. 8F6 and 62B1 reactivity is restricted to more mature cells and related lymphoid malignancies. In particular 62B1 appears to be limited to hairy cells and plasma cells. The results show that it is possible to obtain reagents reacting with plasma cells by immunizing mice with cells derived from human multiple myelomas. Furthermore, the obtained results suggest that it is possible to elicit antibodies against antigens which are present throughout all the differentiation steps of the B cell lineage. These new MoAb could help in elucidating the phenotype of the plasma cells and the relationships of multiple myelomas with other B cell proliferative disorders. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3319299

  11. Improvement of cell adhesion on poly(L-lactide) by atmospheric plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Masafumi; Teraoka, Fumio; Fujimoto, Shinji; Hamada, Yoshinosuke; Kibayashi, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Junzo

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate the interaction between the cell and the surface of poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) samples, which were modified using a low-temperature plasma treatment apparatus at atmospheric pressure. The plasma treatments were carried out in the atmospheres of air, carbon dioxide (CO2), and perfluoro propane (C3F8) gas. The PLLA samples before and after the plasma treatment were analyzed by XPS and their contact angles with water. Furthermore, the cell adhesion capability and cell mass culturing tests on the PLLA samples were carried out using MC3T3-E1 cells. The results showed that the contact angle of the samples, which was plasma treated in air or in CO2 gas, decreased compared with that of the untreated samples. On the other hand, the contact angle of the samples, which was plasma treated in the C3F8 gas, increased compared with the untreated plasma samples. The cell response on the PLLA samples plasma treated in air or in the CO2 gas were significantly superior to that of the PLLA samples, which was plasma treated in the C3F8 gas.

  12. DNA damage in oral cancer cells induced by nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Klas, Matej; Liu, Yueying; Stack, M. Sharon; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2013-09-01

    The nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) has been shown to effectively induce DNA double strand breaks in SCC-25 oral cancer cells. The APPJ source constructed in our laboratory consists of two external electrodes wrapping around a quartz tube and nitrogen as a feed gas and operates based on dielectric barrier gas discharge. Generally, it is more challenging to ignite plasma in N2 atmosphere than in noble gases. However, this design provides additional advantages such as lower costs compared to the noble gases for future clinical operation. Different parameters of the APPJ configuration were tested in order to determine radiation dosage. To explore the effects of delayed damage and cell self-repairing, various incubation times of cells after plasma treatment were also performed. Reactive species generated in plasma jet and in liquid environment are essential to be identified and quantified, with the aim of unfolding the mystery of detailed mechanisms for plasma-induced cell apoptosis. Moreover, from the comparison of plasma treatment effect on normal oral cells OKF6T, an insight to the selectivity for cancer treatment by APPJ can be explored. All of these studies are critical to better understand the damage responses of normal and abnormal cellular systems to plasma radiation, which are useful for the development of advanced plasma therapy for cancer treatment at a later stage.

  13. Plasma treatment of biomaterials to direct the differentiation of embryonic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, Erik

    In this work, we explore how embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation patterns are affected by surface interactions with plasma-processed materials. We hypothesize that mouse embryonic stem-cell exposure to certain plasma-polymerized tetraglyme surfaces will direct their differentiation into endothelial cells. R1 mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells were plated on surfaces onto which tetraglyme was deposited by plasma polymerization. In addition, tissue-treated polystyrene and control glass cover slips were also examined. Some samples were fixed three days after plating and immunofluorescence stained with platelet endothelial-cell adhesion molecule, while the others were fixed seven days after plating and immunofluorescence stained with von Willebrand Factor. Positive results seen by ES cell derivatives precociously expressing the vWF and PECAM genetic markers on the plasma-polymerized tetraglyme treated surfaces suggest that the plasma-polymerized surfaces direct differentiation of ES cells into endothelial cells. Research goals of this dissertation include: characterization of the material properties of the plasma-polymerized tetraglyme surfaces that induce directed differentiation of ES cells into endothelial cells, optimization of the plasma-polymerization process to maximize the number of endothelial cells derived from R1 ES cells, and biological experimentation to characterize properties of the mechanism of directed differentiation. A potential application of this work is in the design and construction of an artificial blood vessel. Current small-scale arterial substitutes have proved inadequate because of thrombogenicity and infection. Moreover, the lower blood flow velocities of smaller vessels pose a different set of design criteria and introduce new problems not encountered in large arterial substitutes. By utilizing a tissue engineering approach that incorporates embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells, the longevity of the prosthesis can be ensured.

  14. Improvement of early cell adhesion on Thai silk fibroin surface by low energy plasma.

    PubMed

    Amornsudthiwat, Phakdee; Mongkolnavin, Rattachat; Kanokpanont, Sorada; Panpranot, Joongjai; Wong, Chiow San; Damrongsakkul, Siriporn

    2013-11-01

    Low energy plasma has been introduced to treat the surface of Thai silk fibroin which should be enhanced for cell adhesion due to its native hydrophobic surface. Plasma surface treatment could introduce desirable hydrophilic functionalities on the surface without using any chemicals. In this work, nitrogen glow discharge plasma was generated by a low energy AC50Hz power supply system. The plasma operating conditions were optimized to reach the highest nitrogen active species by using optical emission spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that amine, hydroxyl, ether, and carboxyl groups were induced on Thai silk fibroin surface after plasma treatment. The results on Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy confirmed that the plasma treated effects were only on the outermost layer since there was no change in the bulk chemistry. The surface topography was insignificantly changed from the detection with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The plasma-treated effects were the improved surface wettability and cell adhesion. After a 90-s treatment, the water contact angle was at 20°, while the untreated surface was at 70°. The early cell adhesion of L929 mouse fibroblast was accelerated. L929 cells only took 3h to reach 100% cell adhesion on 90 s N2 plasma-treated surface, while there was less than 50% cell adhesion on the untreated Thai silk fibroin surface after 6h of culture. The cell adhesion results were in agreement with the cytoskeleton development. L929 F-actin was more evident on 90 s N2 plasma-treated surface than others. It could be concluded that a lower energy AC50Hz plasma system enhanced early L929 mouse fibroblast adhesion on Thai silk fibroin surface without any significant change in surface topography and bulk chemistry. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Inhibition of DEPDC1A, a bad prognostic marker in multiple myeloma, delays growth and induces mature plasma cell markers in malignant plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Kassambara, Alboukadel; Schoenhals, Matthieu; Moreaux, Jérôme; Veyrune, Jean-Luc; Rème, Thierry; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Hose, Dirk; Klein, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    High throughput DNA microarray has made it possible to outline genes whose expression in malignant plasma cells is associated with short overall survival of patients with Multiple Myeloma (MM). A further step is to elucidate the mechanisms encoded by these genes yielding to drug resistance and/or patients' short survival. We focus here on the biological role of the DEP (for Disheveled, EGL-10, Pleckstrin) domain contained protein 1A (DEPDC1A), a poorly known protein encoded by DEPDC1A gene, whose high expression in malignant plasma cells is associated with short survival of patients. Using conditional lentiviral vector delivery of DEPDC1A shRNA, we report that DEPDC1A knockdown delayed the growth of human myeloma cell lines (HMCLs), with a block in G2 phase of the cell cycle, p53 phosphorylation and stabilization, and p21(Cip1) accumulation. DEPDC1A knockdown also resulted in increased expression of mature plasma cell markers, including CXCR4, IL6-R and CD38. Thus DEPDC1A could contribute to the plasmablast features of MMCs found in some patients with adverse prognosis, blocking the differentiation of malignant plasma cells and promoting cell cycle.

  16. DNA damage in oral cancer cells induced by nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Xu; Ptasinska, Sylwia; Klas, Matej; Liu, Yueying; Sharon Stack, M.

    2013-06-10

    The nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was applied to induce DNA damage of SCC-25 oral cancer cells. Optical emission spectra were taken to characterize the reactive species produced in APPJ. In order to explore the spatial distribution of plasma effects, cells were placed onto photo-etched grid slides and the antibody H2A.X was used to locate double strand breaks of DNA inside nuclei using an immunofluorescence assay. The number of cells with double strand breaks in DNA was observed to be varied due to the distance from the irradiation center and duration of plasma treatment.

  17. DNA damage in oral cancer cells induced by nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Klas, Matej; Liu, Yueying; Sharon Stack, M.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2013-06-01

    The nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was applied to induce DNA damage of SCC-25 oral cancer cells. Optical emission spectra were taken to characterize the reactive species produced in APPJ. In order to explore the spatial distribution of plasma effects, cells were placed onto photo-etched grid slides and the antibody H2A.X was used to locate double strand breaks of DNA inside nuclei using an immunofluorescence assay. The number of cells with double strand breaks in DNA was observed to be varied due to the distance from the irradiation center and duration of plasma treatment.

  18. A balance between B cell receptor and inhibitory receptor signaling controls plasma cell differentiation by maintaining optimal Ets1 levels.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Mayeux, Jessica; Gutierrez, Toni; Russell, Lisa; Getahun, Andrew; Müller, Jennifer; Tedder, Thomas; Parnes, Jane; Rickert, Robert; Nitschke, Lars; Cambier, John; Satterthwaite, Anne B; Garrett-Sinha, Lee Ann

    2014-07-15

    Signaling through the BCR can drive B cell activation and contribute to B cell differentiation into Ab-secreting plasma cells. The positive BCR signal is counterbalanced by a number of membrane-localized inhibitory receptors that limit B cell activation and plasma cell differentiation. Deficiencies in these negative signaling pathways may cause autoantibody generation and autoimmune disease in both animal models and human patients. We have previously shown that the transcription factor Ets1 can restrain B cell differentiation into plasma cells. In this study, we tested the roles of the BCR and inhibitory receptors in controlling the expression of Ets1 in mouse B cells. We found that Ets1 is downregulated in B cells by BCR or TLR signaling through a pathway dependent on PI3K, Btk, IKK2, and JNK. Deficiencies in inhibitory pathways, such as a loss of the tyrosine kinase Lyn, the phosphatase Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP1) or membrane receptors CD22 and/or Siglec-G, result in enhanced BCR signaling and decreased Ets1 expression. Restoring Ets1 expression in Lyn- or SHP1-deficient B cells inhibits their enhanced plasma cell differentiation. Our findings indicate that downregulation of Ets1 occurs in response to B cell activation via either BCR or TLR signaling, thereby allowing B cell differentiation and that the maintenance of Ets1 expression is an important function of the inhibitory Lyn → CD22/SiglecG → SHP1 pathway in B cells.

  19. The effect of plasma jet on morphology of the apoptosis cancer cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirpour, Shahriar; Nikkhah, Maryam; Pirouzmand, Somaye; Ghomi, Hamid Reza

    2012-10-01

    In recent years, many studies have been carried out to understand the effect of non-thermal plasma on cancer cells. The previous studies showed that non-thermal plasma has apoptosis effect on cancer cells. Also they discovered that after plasma treatment three distinct regions (Death cells, Void zone and live cells) were observed in wells treated [1]. The aim of this paper is to study the effect of plasma jet on these three regions. For this purpose a variable voltage power supply with 20 kHz frequency are used experimentally. The results showed the detached cells rate were increased by increasing the voltage. [4pt] [1] A. Shashurin, M. Keidar, S. Bronnikov, R. A. Jurjus, and M. A. Stepp, Appl. Phys. Lett. 93, 181501 (2008), DOI:10.1063/1.3020223

  20. Skeletal cell differentiation is enhanced by atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Steinbeck, Marla J; Chernets, Natalie; Zhang, Jun; Kurpad, Deepa S; Fridman, Gregory; Fridman, Alexander; Freeman, Theresa A

    2013-01-01

    Enhancing chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation is of paramount importance in providing effective regenerative therapies and improving the rate of fracture healing. This study investigated the potential of non-thermal atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge plasma (NT-plasma) to enhance chondrocyte and osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. Although the exact mechanism by which NT-plasma interacts with cells is undefined, it is known that during treatment the atmosphere is ionized generating extracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) and an electric field. Appropriate NT-plasma conditions were determined using lactate-dehydrogenase release, flow cytometric live/dead assay, flow cytometric cell cycle analysis, and Western blots to evaluate DNA damage and mitochondrial integrity. We observed that specific NT-plasma conditions were required to prevent cell death, and that loss of pre-osteoblastic cell viability was dependent on intracellular ROS and RNS production. To further investigate the involvement of intracellular ROS, fluorescent intracellular dyes Mitosox (superoxide) and dihydrorhodamine (peroxide) were used to assess onset and duration after NT-plasma treatment. Both intracellular superoxide and peroxide were found to increase immediately post NT-plasma treatment. These increases were sustained for one hour but returned to control levels by 24 hr. Using the same treatment conditions, osteogenic differentiation by NT-plasma was assessed and compared to peroxide or osteogenic media containing β-glycerolphosphate. Although both NT-plasma and peroxide induced differentiation-specific gene expression, neither was as effective as the osteogenic media. However, treatment of cells with NT-plasma after 24 hr in osteogenic or chondrogenic media significantly enhanced differentiation as compared to differentiation media alone. The results of this study show that NT-plasma can selectively initiate and amplify ROS signaling to enhance

  1. Skeletal Cell Differentiation Is Enhanced by Atmospheric Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Kurpad, Deepa S.; Fridman, Gregory; Fridman, Alexander; Freeman, Theresa A.

    2013-01-01

    Enhancing chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation is of paramount importance in providing effective regenerative therapies and improving the rate of fracture healing. This study investigated the potential of non-thermal atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge plasma (NT-plasma) to enhance chondrocyte and osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. Although the exact mechanism by which NT-plasma interacts with cells is undefined, it is known that during treatment the atmosphere is ionized generating extracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) and an electric field. Appropriate NT-plasma conditions were determined using lactate-dehydrogenase release, flow cytometric live/dead assay, flow cytometric cell cycle analysis, and Western blots to evaluate DNA damage and mitochondrial integrity. We observed that specific NT-plasma conditions were required to prevent cell death, and that loss of pre-osteoblastic cell viability was dependent on intracellular ROS and RNS production. To further investigate the involvement of intracellular ROS, fluorescent intracellular dyes Mitosox (superoxide) and dihydrorhodamine (peroxide) were used to assess onset and duration after NT-plasma treatment. Both intracellular superoxide and peroxide were found to increase immediately post NT-plasma treatment. These increases were sustained for one hour but returned to control levels by 24 hr. Using the same treatment conditions, osteogenic differentiation by NT-plasma was assessed and compared to peroxide or osteogenic media containing β-glycerolphosphate. Although both NT-plasma and peroxide induced differentiation-specific gene expression, neither was as effective as the osteogenic media. However, treatment of cells with NT-plasma after 24 hr in osteogenic or chondrogenic media significantly enhanced differentiation as compared to differentiation media alone. The results of this study show that NT-plasma can selectively initiate and amplify ROS signaling to enhance

  2. Phosphatidic acid phosphatase and phospholipdase A activities in plasma membranes from fusing muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kent, C; Vagelos, P R

    1976-06-17

    Plasma membrane from fusing embryonic muscle cells were assayed for phospholipase A activity to determine if this enzyme plays a role in cell fusion. The membranes were assayed under a variety of conditions with phosphatidylcholine as the substrate and no phospholipase A activity was found. The plasma membranes did contain a phosphatidic acid phosphatase which was optimally active in the presence of Triton X-100 and glycerol. The enzyme activity was constant from pH 5.2 to 7.0, and did not require divalent cations. Over 97% of the phosphatidic acid phosphatase activity was in the particulate fraction. The subcellular distribution of the phosphatidic acid phosphatase was the same as the distributions of the plasma membrane markers, (Na+ + k+)-ATPase and the acetylcholine receptor, which indicates that this phosphatase is located exclusively in the plasma membranes. There was no detectable difference in the phosphatidic acid phosphatase activities of plasma membranes from fusing and non-fusing cells.

  3. Enhanced detection of metastatic prostate cancer cells in human plasma with lipid bodies staining.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Ranjana; Goodman, Oscar B; Le, Thuc T

    2014-02-15

    Reprogramming of energy metabolism of malignant cancer cells confers competitive advantage in growth environments with limited resources. However, not every process of cancer development is associated with competition for resources. During hematogenous transport, cancer cells are exposed to high levels of oxygen and nutrients. Does energy metabolism of cancer cells change as a function of exposure to the bloodstream? Could such changes be exploited to improve the detection of circulating tumor cells (CTC)? These questions have clinical significance, but have not yet been sufficiently examined. The energy metabolism was examined as a function of incubation in nutrient-rich plasma in prostate metastatic cancer cells LNCaP and non-transformed prostate epithelial cells RWPE1. Uptake kinetics of a fluorescent glucose analog (2-NBD) and lipophilic dyes (DiD & Bodipy) were measured in both cell lines, as well as in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). LNCaP cells exhibited hyper-acetylation of low molecular weight proteins compared to RWPE1 cells. Following plasma incubation, protein lysine acetylation profile was unchanged for LNCaP cells while significantly altered for RWPE1 cells. O-linked glycosylated protein profiles were different between LNCaP and RWPE1 cells and varied in both cell lines with plasma incubation. Maximal respiration or glycolytic capacities was unchanged in LNCaP cells and impaired in RWPE1 cells following plasma incubation. However, the uptake rates of 2-NBD and DiD were insufficient for discrimination of LNCaP, or RWPE1 cells from PBMC. On the other hand, both RWPE1 and LNCaP cells exhibited intracellular lipid bodies following plasma incubation; whereas, PBMC did not. The presence of lipid bodies in LNCaP cells permitted retention of Bodipy dye and allowed discrimination of LNCaP cells from PBMC with flow cytometry. Despite clear differences in energy metabolism, metastatic prostate cancer cells could not be efficiently distinguished from

  4. Aging-associated excess formaldehyde leads to spatial memory deficits.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhiqian; Han, Chanshuai; Luo, Wenhong; Li, Hui; Luo, Hongjun; Qiang, Min; Su, Tao; Wu, Beibei; Liu, Ying; Yang, Xu; Wan, You; Cui, Dehua; He, Rongqiao

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies show that formaldehyde participates in DNA demethylation/methylation cycle. Emerging evidence identifies that neuronal activity induces global DNA demethylation and re-methylation; and DNA methylation is a critical step for memory formation. These data suggest that endogenous formaldehyde may intrinsically link learning-responsive DNA methylation status and memory formation. Here, we report that during spatial memory formation process, spatial training induces an initial global DNA demethylation and subsequent re-methylation associated with hippocampal formaldehyde elevation then decline to baseline level in Sprague Dawley rats. Scavenging this elevated formaldehyde by formaldehyde-degrading enzyme (FDH), or enhancing DNA demethylation by a DNA demethylating agent, both led to spatial memory deficits by blocking DNA re-methylation in rats. Furthermore, we found that the normal adult rats intrahippocampally injected with excess formaldehyde can imitate the aged-related spatial memory deficits and global DNA methylation decline. These findings indicate that aging-associated excess formaldheyde contributes to cognitive decline during aging.

  5. Aging-associated excess formaldehyde leads to spatial memory deficits

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zhiqian; Han, Chanshuai; Luo, Wenhong; Li, Hui; Luo, Hongjun; Qiang, Min; Su, Tao; Wu, Beibei; Liu, Ying; Yang, Xu; Wan, You; Cui, Dehua; He, Rongqiao

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies show that formaldehyde participates in DNA demethylation/methylation cycle. Emerging evidence identifies that neuronal activity induces global DNA demethylation and re-methylation; and DNA methylation is a critical step for memory formation. These data suggest that endogenous formaldehyde may intrinsically link learning-responsive DNA methylation status and memory formation. Here, we report that during spatial memory formation process, spatial training induces an initial global DNA demethylation and subsequent re-methylation associated with hippocampal formaldehyde elevation then decline to baseline level in Sprague Dawley rats. Scavenging this elevated formaldehyde by formaldehyde-degrading enzyme (FDH), or enhancing DNA demethylation by a DNA demethylating agent, both led to spatial memory deficits by blocking DNA re-methylation in rats. Furthermore, we found that the normal adult rats intrahippocampally injected with excess formaldehyde can imitate the aged-related spatial memory deficits and global DNA methylation decline. These findings indicate that aging-associated excess formaldheyde contributes to cognitive decline during aging. PMID:23657727

  6. Age-associated changes in microvasculature of human adult testis.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, T; Hatakeyama, S

    1978-07-01

    Age-associated architectural changes of the human testicular microvasculature from 70 autopsy cases were stereoscopically examined with a silicone-rubber injection technique. In the testis of a young subject, the interlobular main arteries run straight. The coiling phenomena of the interlobular centripetal or centrifugal arteries, which are commonly seen in adult testis, have been so far considered as physiological transformation of the vasculature. It was confirmed that the coiling changes in the interlobular main arteries of the human testis appear as an age-dependent alteration of the vasculature closely related to the volume of the gland. The practical importance of the spirallin or coiling of arteries is that it results in a considerable reduction of blood flow. The age-related coiling of the interlobular arteries is virtually accompanied by varying degrees of collapse of the peritubular capillary networks. The reduction of blood supply to the seminiferous tubules plays an active role in promoting aging of the testis. These stereoscopical observations of age-related transfiguration of testicular microvasculature were ascertained also by histometrical examinations.

  7. Antioxidant Supplementation in the Treatment of Aging-Associated Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Valeria; Izzo, Viviana; Corbi, Graziamaria; Russomanno, Giusy; Manzo, Valentina; De Lise, Federica; Di Donato, Alberto; Filippelli, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is generally considered as the consequence of an imbalance between pro- and antioxidants species, which often results into indiscriminate and global damage at the organismal level. Elderly people are more susceptible to oxidative stress and this depends, almost in part, from a decreased performance of their endogenous antioxidant system. As many studies reported an inverse correlation between systemic levels of antioxidants and several diseases, primarily cardiovascular diseases, but also diabetes and neurological disorders, antioxidant supplementation has been foreseen as an effective preventive and therapeutic intervention for aging-associated pathologies. However, the expectations of this therapeutic approach have often been partially disappointed by clinical trials. The interplay of both endogenous and exogenous antioxidants with the systemic redox system is very complex and represents an issue that is still under debate. In this review a selection of recent clinical studies concerning antioxidants supplementation and the evaluation of their influence in aging-related diseases is analyzed. The controversial outcomes of antioxidants supplementation therapies, which might partially depend from an underestimation of the patient specific metabolic demand and genetic background, are presented. PMID:26903869

  8. SIRT1 in the brain—connections with aging-associated disorders and lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Fanny; Wijaya, Laura; Tang, Bor Luen

    2015-01-01

    The silent mating type information regulation 2 proteins (sirtuins) 1 of class III histone deacetylases (HDACs) have been associated with health span and longevity. SIRT1, the best studied member of the mammalian sirtuins, has a myriad of roles in multiple tissues and organs. However, a significant part of SIRT1’s role that impinges on aging and lifespan may lie in its activities in the central nervous system (CNS) neurons. Systemically, SIRT1 influences energy metabolism and circadian rhythm through its activity in the hypothalamic nuclei. From a cell biological perspective, SIRT1 is a crucial component of multiple interconnected regulatory networks that modulate dendritic and axonal growth, as well as survival against stress. This neuronal cell autonomous activity of SIRT1 is also important for neuronal plasticity, cognitive functions, as well as protection against aging-associated neuronal degeneration and cognitive decline. We discuss recent findings that have shed light on the various activities of SIRT1 in the brain, which collectively impinge on aging-associated disorders and lifespan. PMID:25805970

  9. Molecular signatures of age-associated chronic degeneration of shoulder muscles.

    PubMed

    Raz, Yotam; Henseler, Jan Ferdinand; Kolk, Arjen; Tatum, Zuotian; Groosjohan, Niels Kuipers; Verwey, Nisha E; Arindrarto, Wibowo; Kielbasa, Szymon M; Nagels, Jochem; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Raz, Vered

    2016-02-23

    Chronic muscle diseases are highly prevalent in the elderly causing severe mobility limitations, pain and frailty. The intrinsic molecular mechanisms are poorly understood due to multifactorial causes, slow progression with age and variations between individuals. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms could lead to new treatment options which are currently limited. Shoulder complaints are highly common in the elderly, and therefore, muscles of the shoulder's rotator cuff could be considered as a model for chronic age-associated muscle degeneration. Diseased shoulder muscles were characterized by muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration compared with unaffected shoulder muscles. We confirmed fatty infiltration using histochemical analysis. Additionally, fibrosis and loss of contractile myosin expression were found in diseased muscles. Most cellular features, including proliferation rate, apoptosis and cell senescence, remained unchanged and genome-wide molecular signatures were predominantly similar between diseased and intact muscles. However, we found down-regulation of a small subset of muscle function genes, and up-regulation of extracellular region genes. Myogenesis was defected in muscle cell culture from diseased muscles but was restored by elevating MyoD levels. We suggest that impaired muscle functionality in a specific environment of thickened extra-cellular matrix is crucial for the development of chronic age-associated muscle degeneration.

  10. Role of oxidative stress in age-associated chronic kidney pathologies.

    PubMed

    Percy, Christine; Pat, Betty; Poronnik, Philip; Gobe, Glenda

    2005-01-01

    The kidneys exhibit age-associated deterioration in function via a loss of 20% to 25% kidney mass, particularly from the renal cortex and increased fibrosis. Oxidative stress has been found to mediate age-associated renal cell injury and cell death, particularly apoptosis. Oxidative stress results from an imbalance between the levels of free radicals generated during aerobic metabolism, inflammation, and infection and the safe breakdown of these species by endogenous and exogenous scavengers. Other factors may influence these pathologies. For example, growth hormone and caloric restriction have been shown to influence life span, although neither method of prolonging life is likely to find general acceptance in humans. Some genetic knockout models offer promise; for example, knockout of the p66 isoform of the Shc gene in mice increases life span by 30%, but appetite, size, and fertility are retained. Whether the increase in life span is via increased kidney health is not yet clear, but decreasing the age-related renal pathologies will no doubt aid in increasing life span and health in general. This review looks at the role and modulation of factors that influence life span, in particular modulation of oxidative stress, with particular relevance to age-related renal pathologies.

  11. Molecular signatures of age-associated chronic degeneration of shoulder muscles

    PubMed Central

    Raz, Yotam; Henseler, Jan Ferdinand; Kolk, Arjen; Tatum, Zuotian; Groosjohan, Niels Kuipers; Verwey, Nisha E.; Arindrarto, Wibowo; Kielbasa, Szymon M.; Nagels, Jochem; Hoen, Peter A. C. 't; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; Raz, Vered

    2016-01-01

    Chronic muscle diseases are highly prevalent in the elderly causing severe mobility limitations, pain and frailty. The intrinsic molecular mechanisms are poorly understood due to multifactorial causes, slow progression with age and variations between individuals. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms could lead to new treatment options which are currently limited. Shoulder complaints are highly common in the elderly, and therefore, muscles of the shoulder's rotator cuff could be considered as a model for chronic age-associated muscle degeneration. Diseased shoulder muscles were characterized by muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration compared with unaffected shoulder muscles. We confirmed fatty infiltration using histochemical analysis. Additionally, fibrosis and loss of contractile myosin expression were found in diseased muscles. Most cellular features, including proliferation rate, apoptosis and cell senescence, remained unchanged and genome-wide molecular signatures were predominantly similar between diseased and intact muscles. However, we found down-regulation of a small subset of muscle function genes, and up-regulation of extracellular region genes. Myogenesis was defected in muscle cell culture from diseased muscles but was restored by elevating MyoD levels. We suggest that impaired muscle functionality in a specific environment of thickened extra-cellular matrix is crucial for the development of chronic age-associated muscle degeneration. PMID:26885755

  12. Blimp-1 controls plasma cell function through the regulation of immunoglobulin secretion and the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Tellier, Julie; Shi, Wei; Minnich, Martina; Liao, Yang; Crawford, Simon; Smyth, Gordon K; Kallies, Axel; Busslinger, Meinrad; Nutt, Stephen L

    2016-03-01

    Plasma cell differentiation requires silencing of B cell transcription, while it establishes antibody-secretory function and long-term survival. The transcription factors Blimp-1 and IRF4 are essential for the generation of plasma cells; however, their function in mature plasma cells has remained elusive. We found that while IRF4 was essential for the survival of plasma cells, Blimp-1 was dispensable for this. Blimp-1-deficient plasma cells retained their transcriptional identity but lost the ability to secrete antibody. Blimp-1 regulated many components of the unfolded protein response (UPR), including XBP-1 and ATF6. The overlap in the functions of Blimp-1 and XBP-1 was restricted to that response, with Blimp-1 uniquely regulating activity of the kinase mTOR and the size of plasma cells. Thus, Blimp-1 was required for the unique physiological ability of plasma cells that enables the secretion of protective antibody.

  13. Targeting Cancer Cells with Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species Generated by Atmospheric-Pressure Air Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Hoan, Nguyen Ngoc; Kim, Churl Ho; Moon, Eunpyo; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Yang, Sang Sik; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    The plasma jet has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for cancer. Anticancer activity of plasma has been reported to involve mitochondrial dysfunction. However, what constituents generated by plasma is linked to this anticancer process and its mechanism of action remain unclear. Here, we report that the therapeutic effects of air plasma result from generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) including H2O2, Ox, OH−, •O2, NOx, leading to depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial ROS accumulation. Simultaneously, ROS/RNS activate c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase. As a consequence, treatment with air plasma jets induces apoptotic death in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Pretreatment of the cells with antioxidants, JNK and p38 inhibitors, or JNK and p38 siRNA abrogates the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and impairs the air plasma-induced apoptotic cell death, suggesting that the ROS/RNS generated by plasma trigger signaling pathways involving JNK and p38 and promote mitochondrial perturbation, leading to apoptosis. Therefore, administration of air plasma may be a feasible strategy to eliminate cancer cells. PMID:24465942

  14. Targeting cancer cells with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated by atmospheric-pressure air plasma.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hak Jun; Kim, Kang Il; Hoan, Nguyen Ngoc; Kim, Churl Ho; Moon, Eunpyo; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Yang, Sang Sik; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    The plasma jet has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for cancer. Anticancer activity of plasma has been reported to involve mitochondrial dysfunction. However, what constituents generated by plasma is linked to this anticancer process and its mechanism of action remain unclear. Here, we report that the therapeutic effects of air plasma result from generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) including H2O2, Ox, OH-, •O2, NOx, leading to depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial ROS accumulation. Simultaneously, ROS/RNS activate c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase. As a consequence, treatment with air plasma jets induces apoptotic death in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Pretreatment of the cells with antioxidants, JNK and p38 inhibitors, or JNK and p38 siRNA abrogates the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and impairs the air plasma-induced apoptotic cell death, suggesting that the ROS/RNS generated by plasma trigger signaling pathways involving JNK and p38 and promote mitochondrial perturbation, leading to apoptosis. Therefore, administration of air plasma may be a feasible strategy to eliminate cancer cells.

  15. Investigation of non-thermal plasma effects on lung cancer cells within 3D collagen matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karki, Surya B.; Thapa Gupta, Tripti; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda; Eisenmann, Kathryn M.; Ayan, Halim

    2017-08-01

    Recent breakthroughs in plasma medicine have identified a potential application for the non-thermal plasma in cancer therapy. Most studies on the effects of non-thermal plasma on cancer cells have used traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cell culture. However, very few studies are conducted employing non-thermal plasma in animal models. Two dimensional models do not fully mimic the three-dimensional (3D) tumor microenvironment and animal models are expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, we used 3D collagen matrices that closely resemble the native geometry of cancer tissues and provide more physiologically relevant results than 2D models, while providing a more cost effective and efficient precursor to animal studies. We previously demonstrated a role for non-thermal plasma application in promoting apoptotic cell death and reducing the viability of A549 lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells cultured upon 2D matrices. In this study, we wished to determine the efficacy of non-thermal plasma application in driving apoptotic cell death of A549 lung cancer cells encapsulated within a 3D collagen matrix. The percentage of apoptosis increased as treatment time increased and was time dependent. In addition, the anti-viability effect of plasma was demonstrated. Twenty-four hours post-plasma treatment, 38% and 99% of cell death occurred with shortest (15 s) and longest treatment time (120 s) respectively at the plasma-treated region. We found that plasma has a greater effect on the viability of A549 lung cancer cells on the superficial surface of 3D matrices and has diminishing effects as it penetrates the 3D matrix. We also identified the nitrogen and oxygen species generated by plasma and characterized their penetration in vertical and lateral directions within the 3D matrix from the center of the plasma-treated region. Therefore, the utility of non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma in driving apoptosis and reducing the viability of lung cancer cells

  16. Elisidepsin Interacts Directly with Glycosylceramides in the Plasma Membrane of Tumor Cells to Induce Necrotic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Guijarro, José Manuel; García, Carolina; Macías, Álvaro; García-Fernández, Luis Francisco; Moreno, Cristina; Reyes, Fernando; Martínez-Leal, Juan Fernando; Fernández, Rogelio; Martínez, Valentín; Valenzuela, Carmen; Lillo, M. Pilar; Galmarini, Carlos M.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane integrity is essential for cell life. Any major break on it immediately induces the death of the affected cell. Different molecules were described as disrupting this cell structure and thus showing antitumor activity. We have previously defined that elisidepsin (Irvalec®, PM02734) inserts and self-organizes in the plasma membrane of tumor cells, inducing a rapid loss of membrane integrity, cell permeabilization and necrotic death. Here we show that, in sensitive HCT-116 colorectal cells, all these effects are consequence of the interaction of elisidepsin with glycosylceramides in the cell membrane. Of note, an elisidepsin-resistant subline (HCT-116-Irv) presented reduced levels of glycosylceramides and no accumulation of elisidepsin in the plasma membrane. Consequently, drug treatment did not induce the characteristic necrotic cell death. Furthermore, GM95, a mutant derivative from B16 mouse melanoma cells lacking ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG) activity and thus the synthesis of glycosylceramides, was also resistant to elisidepsin. Over-expression of UGCG gene in these deficient cells restored glycosylceramides synthesis, rendering them sensitive to elisidepsin, at a similar level than parental B16 cells. These results indicate that glycosylceramides act as membrane targets of elisidepsin, facilitating its insertion in the plasma membrane and the subsequent membrane permeabilization that leads to drug-induced cell death. They also indicate that cell membrane lipids are a plausible target for antineoplastic therapy. PMID:26474061

  17. Gammaherpesvirus-driven plasma cell differentiation regulates virus reactivation from latently infected B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaozhen; Collins, Christopher M; Mendel, Justin B; Iwakoshi, Neal N; Speck, Samuel H

    2009-11-01

    Gammaherpesviruses chronically infect their host and are tightly associated with the development of lymphoproliferative diseases and lymphomas, as well as several other types of cancer. Mechanisms involved in maintaining chronic gammaherpesvirus infections are poorly understood and, in particular, little is known about the mechanisms involved in controlling gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells in vivo. Recent evidence has linked plasma cell differentiation with reactivation of the human gammaherpesviruses EBV and KSHV through induction of the immediate-early viral transcriptional activators by the plasma cell-specific transcription factor XBP-1s. We now extend those findings to document a role for a gammaherpesvirus gene product in regulating plasma cell differentiation and thus virus reactivation. We have previously shown that the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) gene product M2 is dispensable for virus replication in permissive cells, but plays a critical role in virus reactivation from latently infected B cells. Here we show that in mice infected with wild type MHV68, virus infected plasma cells (ca. 8% of virus infected splenocytes at the peak of viral latency) account for the majority of reactivation observed upon explant of splenocytes. In contrast, there is an absence of virus infected plasma cells at the peak of latency in mice infected with a M2 null MHV68. Furthermore, we show that the M2 protein can drive plasma cell differentiation in a B lymphoma cell line in the absence of any other MHV68 gene products. Thus, the role of M2 in MHV68 reactivation can be attributed to its ability to manipulate plasma cell differentiation, providing a novel viral strategy to regulate gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells. We postulate that M2 represents a new class of herpesvirus gene products (reactivation conditioners) that do not directly participate in virus replication, but rather facilitate virus reactivation by

  18. Comparison of the characteristics of atmospheric pressure plasma jets using different working gases and applications to plasma-cancer cell interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joh, Hea Min; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Leem, S. H.

    2013-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets employing nitrogen, helium, or argon gases driven by low-frequency (several tens of kilohertz) ac voltage and pulsed dc voltage were fabricated and characterized. The changes in discharge current, optical emission intensities from reactive radicals, gas temperature, and plume length of plasma jets with the control parameters were measured and compared. The control parameters include applied voltage, working gas, and gas flow rate. As an application to plasma-cancer cell interactions, the effects of atmospheric pressure plasma jet on the morphology and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level of human lung adenocarcinoma cell (A549) and human bladder cancer cell (EJ) were explored. The experimental results show that the plasma can effectively control the intracellular concentrations of ROS. Although there exist slight differences in the production of ROS, helium, argon, or nitrogen plasma jets are found to be useful in enhancing the intracellular ROS concentrations in cancer cells.

  19. The connection of cytoskeletal network with plasma membrane and the cell wall

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zengyu; Persson, Staffan; Zhang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The cell wall provides external support of the plant cells, while the cytoskeletons including the microtubules and the actin filaments constitute an internal framework. The cytoskeletons contribute to the cell wall biosynthesis by spatially and temporarily regulating the transportation and deposition of cell wall components. This tight control is achieved by the dynamic behavior of the cytoskeletons, but also through the tethering of these structures to the plasma membrane. This tethering may also extend beyond the plasma membrane and impact on the cell wall, possibly in the form of a feedback loop. In this review, we discuss the linking components between the cytoskeletons and the plasma membrane, and/or the cell wall. We also discuss the prospective roles of these components in cell wall biosynthesis and modifications, and aim to provide a platform for further studies in this field. PMID:25693826

  20. Treatment of oral cancer cells with nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurkovich, James; Han, Xu; Coffey, Benjamin; Klas, Matej; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2012-10-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas are specialized types of plasma that are proposed as a new agent to induce death in cancer cells. The experimental phase of this study will test the application of such plasma to SCC-25 oral cancer cells to determine if it is possible to induce apoptosis or necrosis. Different sources are used on the cells to find a configuration which kills cancer cells but has no effect on normal cells. The sources have been developed based on the dielectric barrier discharge between two external electrodes surrounding a dielectric tube; such a configuration has been shown to induce breaks in DNA strands. Each configuration is characterized using an optical emission spectrophotometer and iCCD camera to determine the optimal conditions for inducing cell death. The cells are incubated after irradiation with plasma, and cell death is determined using microscopy imaging to identify antibody interaction within the cells. These studies are important for better understanding of plasma species interactions with cancer cells and mechanisms of DNA damage and at latter stage they will be useful for the development of advanced cancer therapy.

  1. The generation and regulation of functional diversity of malignant plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Nadav, Liat; Katz, Ben-Zion; Baron, Shoshana; Cohen, Nir; Naparstek, Elizabeth; Geiger, Benjamin

    2006-09-01

    Cellular diversity, which is a hallmark of malignancy, can be generated by both genetic and nongenetic mechanisms. We describe here variability in the adhesive and migratory behavior of malignant plasma cell populations, including multiple myeloma-derived lines and primary patient samples. Examination of the plasma cell lines ARH-77, CAG, and AKR revealed two distinct subpopulations of cells, one displaying highly adhesive properties (type A) and the other consisting of poorly adhesive, floating cells (type F). In the ARH-77 cell line, type A cells attach better to fibronectin and to human bone fragments and form paxillin-rich focal adhesions, whereas type F cells are highly motile and exert integrin-dependent bone marrow homing capacity in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice. Flow cytometry indicated that type A cells express significantly higher levels of CD45 and CD56 and lower levels of CD138 compared with type F cells. Interestingly, culturing of either type A or type F cells under nonselective conditions resulted in the development of mixed cell population similar to the parental ARH-77 cells. Analysis of bone marrow aspirates of multiple myeloma patients revealed that spicules within the aspirates are enriched with type A-like cells. Nonadherent cells within the aspirate fluids express a marker profile similar to type F cells. This study indicates that multiple myeloma patients contain heterogeneous populations of malignant plasma cells that display distinct properties. Diverse subpopulations of malignant plasma cells may play distinct roles in the different biological and clinical manifestations of plasma cell dyscrasias, including bone dissemination and selective adhesion to bone marrow compartments.

  2. Targeting NEU Protein in Melanoma Cells with Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma and Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byul Bora; Kim, Myung Soo; Kim, Uk Kyu; Hong, Jin Woo; Lee, Hae June; Kim, Gyoo Cheon

    2015-05-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma effectively kills cancer cells, but it cannot selectively kill cancer cells. The authors targeted NEU (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) protein, which is frequently over-expressed in the cell membrane of melanoma cells, using anti-NEU antibody-labeled gold nanoparticles. The labeled nanoparticles preferentially targeted melanoma cells rather than normal keratinocytes. After the addition of labeled gold nanoparticles to melanoma and normal keratinocyte cells, both cells were exposed to non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma. The death rate of melanoma cells was significantly higher than that of normal keratinocyte cells; many vacuoles, indicative of cell death, were observed in melanoma cells treated with anti-NEU antibody labeled gold nanoparticles and plasma. This selective cancer cell death was attributed to the selective destruction of NEU protein and a downstream effector of NEU. Our study findings show that treatment with a combination of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma and anti-NEU antibody-labeled gold nanoparticles effectively and selectively kills melanoma cells.

  3. Host Cell Plasma Membrane Phosphatidylserine Regulates the Assembly and Budding of Ebola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Adu-Gyamfi, Emmanuel; Johnson, Kristen A.; Fraser, Mark E.; Scott, Jordan L.; Soni, Smita P.; Jones, Keaton R.; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Tessier, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lipid-enveloped viruses replicate and bud from the host cell where they acquire their lipid coat. Ebola virus, which buds from the plasma membrane of the host cell, causes viral hemorrhagic fever and has a high fatality rate. To date, little has been known about how budding and egress of Ebola virus are mediated at the plasma membrane. We have found that the lipid phosphatidylserine (PS) regulates the assembly of Ebola virus matrix protein VP40. VP40 binds PS-containing membranes with nanomolar affinity, and binding of PS regulates VP40 localization and oligomerization on the plasma membrane inner leaflet. Further, alteration of PS levels in mammalian cells inhibits assembly and egress of VP40. Notably, interactions of VP40 with the plasma membrane induced exposure of PS on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane at sites of egress, whereas PS is typically found only on the inner leaflet. Taking the data together, we present a model accounting for the role of plasma membrane PS in assembly of Ebola virus-like particles. IMPORTANCE The lipid-enveloped Ebola virus causes severe infection with a high mortality rate and currently lacks FDA-approved therapeutics or vaccines. Ebola virus harbors just seven genes in its genome, and there is a critical requirement for acquisition of its lipid envelope from the plasma membrane of the human cell that it infects during the replication process. There is, however, a dearth of information available on the required contents of this envelope for egress and subsequent attachment and entry. Here we demonstrate that plasma membrane phosphatidylserine is critical for Ebola virus budding from the host cell plasma membrane. This report, to our knowledge, is the first to highlight the role of lipids in human cell membranes in the Ebola virus replication cycle and draws a clear link between selective binding and transport of a lipid across the membrane of the human cell and use of that lipid for subsequent viral entry. PMID

  4. Evaluation of the sensitivity of bacterial and yeast cells to cold atmospheric plasma jet treatments.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Michael A; Chebbi, Ahmed; McDonnell, Kevin A; Staunton, Claire; Dowling, Denis P

    2015-06-07

    The focus of this research was first to determine the influence of the atmospheric plasma drive frequency on the generation of atomic oxygen species and its correlation with the reduction of bacterial load after treatment in vitro. The treatments were carried out using a helium-plasma jet source called PlasmaStream™. The susceptibility of multiple microbial cell lines was investigated in order to compare the response of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, as well as a yeast cell line to the atmospheric plasma treatment. It was observed for the source evaluated that at a frequency of 160 kHz, increased levels of oxygen-laden active species (i.e., OH, NO) were generated. At this frequency, the maximum level of bacterial inactivation in vitro was also achieved. Ex vivo studies (using freshly excised porcine skin as a human analog) were also carried out to verify the antibacterial effect of the plasma jet treatment at this optimal operational frequency and to investigate the effect of treatment duration on the reduction of bacterial load. The plasma jet treatment was found to yield a 4 log reduction in bacterial load after 6 min of treatment, with no observable adverse effects on the treatment surface. The gram-negative bacterial cell lines were found to be far more susceptible to the atmospheric plasma treatments than the gram-positive bacteria. Flow cytometric analysis of plasma treated bacterial cells (Escherichia coli) was conducted in order to attain a fundamental understanding of the mode of action of the treatment on bacteria at a cellular level. This study showed that after treatment with the plasma jet, E. coli cells progressed through the following steps of cell death; the inactivation of transport systems, followed by depolarization of the cytoplasmic membrane, and finally permeabilization of the cell wall.

  5. Age-associated hyper-methylated regions in the human brain overlap with bivalent chromatin domains.

    PubMed

    Watson, Corey T; Disanto, Giulio; Sandve, Geir Kjetil; Breden, Felix; Giovannoni, Gavin; Ramagopalan, Sreeram V

    2012-01-01

    Recent associations between age-related differentially methylated sites and bivalently marked chromatin domains have implicated a role for these genomic regions in aging and age-related diseases. However, the overlap between such epigenetic modifications has so far only been identified with respect to age-associated hyper-methylated sites in blood. In this study, we observed that age-associated differentially methylated sites characterized in the human brain were also highly enriched in bivalent domains. Analysis of hyper- vs. hypo-methylated sites partitioned by age (fetal, child, and adult) revealed that enrichment was significant for hyper-methylated sites identified in children and adults (child, fold difference = 2.28, P = 0.0016; adult, fold difference = 4.73, P = 4.00 × 10(-5)); this trend was markedly more pronounced in adults when only the top 100 most significantly hypo- and hyper-methylated sites were considered (adult, fold difference = 10.7, P = 2.00 × 10(-5)). Interestingly, we found that bivalently marked genes overlapped by age-associated hyper-methylation in the adult brain had strong involvement in biological functions related to developmental processes, including neuronal differentiation. Our findings provide evidence that the accumulation of methylation in bivalent gene regions with age is likely to be a common process that occurs across tissue types. Furthermore, particularly with respect to the aging brain, this accumulation might be targeted to loci with important roles in cell differentiation and development, and the closing off of these developmental pathways. Further study of these genes is warranted to assess their potential impact upon the development of age-related neurological disorders.

  6. Cognitive training and Bacopa monnieri: Evidence for a combined intervention to alleviate age associated cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    McPhee, Grace M; Downey, Luke A; Noble, Anthony; Stough, Con

    2016-10-01

    As the elderly population grows the impact of age associated cognitive decline as well as neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and dementia will increase. Ageing is associated with consistent impairments in cognitive processes (e.g., processing speed, memory, executive function and learning) important for work, well-being, life satisfaction and overall participation in society. Recently, there has been increased effort to conduct research examining methods to improve cognitive function in older citizens. Cognitive training has been shown to improve performance in some cognitive domains; including memory, processing speed, executive function and attention in older adults. These cognitive changes are thought to be related to improvements in brain connectivity and neural circuitry. Bacopa monnieri has also been shown to improve specific domains of cognition, sensitive to age associated cognitive decline (particularly processing speed and memory). These Bacopa monnieri dependent improvements may be due to the increase in specific neuro-molecular mechanisms implicated in the enhancement of neural connections in the brain (i.e. synaptogenesis). In particular, a number of animal studies have shown Bacopa monnieri consumption upregulates calcium dependent kinases in the synapse and post-synaptic cell, crucial for strengthening and growing connections between neurons. These effects have been shown to occur in areas important for cognitive processes, such as the hippocampus. As Bacopa monnieri has shown neuro-molecular mechanisms that encourage synaptogenesis, while cognitive training enhances brain connectivity, Bacopa monnieri supplementation could theoretically enhance and strengthen synaptic changes acquired through cognitive training. Therefore, the current paper hypothesises that the combination of these two interventions could improve cognitive outcomes, over and above the effects of administrating these interventions independently, as an effective

  7. Polycomb repressive complex 2 epigenomic signature defines age-associated hypermethylation and gene expression changes

    PubMed Central

    Dozmorov, Mikhail G

    2015-01-01

    Although age-associated gene expression and methylation changes have been reported throughout the literature, the unifying epigenomic principles of aging remain poorly understood. Recent explosion in availability and resolution of functional/regulatory genome annotation data (epigenomic data), such as that provided by the ENCODE and Roadmap Epigenomics projects, provides an opportunity for the identification of epigenomic mechanisms potentially altered by age-associated differentially methylated regions (aDMRs) and regulatory signatures in the promoters of age-associated genes (aGENs). In this study we found that aDMRs and aGENs identified in multiple independent studies share a common Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 signature marked by EZH2, SUZ12, CTCF binding sites, repressive H3K27me3, and activating H3K4me1 histone modification marks, and a “poised promoter” chromatin state. This signature is depleted in RNA Polymerase II-associated transcription factor binding sites, activating H3K79me2, H3K36me3, H3K27ac marks, and an “active promoter” chromatin state. The PRC2 signature was shown to be generally stable across cell types. When considering the directionality of methylation changes, we found the PRC2 signature to be associated with aDMRs hypermethylated with age, while hypomethylated aDMRs were associated with enhancers. In contrast, aGENs were associated with the PRC2 signature independently of the directionality of gene expression changes. In this study we demonstrate that the PRC2 signature is the common epigenomic context of genomic regions associated with hypermethylation and gene expression changes in aging. PMID:25880792

  8. Direct protein introduction into plant cells using a multi-gas plasma jet

    PubMed Central

    Yanagawa, Yuki; Kawano, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Tomohiro; Miyahara, Hidekazu; Okino, Akitoshi; Mitsuhara, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    Protein introduction into cells is more difficult in plants than in mammalian cells, although it was reported that protein introduction was successful in shoot apical meristem and leaves only together with a cell-penetrating peptide. In this study, we tried to introduce superfolder green fluorescent protein (sGFP)-fused to adenylate cyclase as a reporter protein without a cell-penetrating peptide into the cells of tobacco leaves by treatment with atmospheric non-thermal plasmas. For this purpose, CO2 or N2 plasma was generated using a multi-gas plasma jet. Confocal microscopy indicated that sGFP signals were observed inside of leaf cells after treatment with CO2 or N2 plasma without substantial damage. In addition, the amount of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) formed by the catalytic enzyme adenylate cyclase, which requires cellular calmodulin for its activity, was significantly increased in leaves treated with CO2 or N2 plasma, also indicating the introduction of sGFP-fused adenylate cyclase into the cells. These results suggested that treatment with CO2 or N2 plasma could be a useful technique for protein introduction into plant tissues. PMID:28182666

  9. Direct protein introduction into plant cells using a multi-gas plasma jet.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Yuki; Kawano, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Tomohiro; Miyahara, Hidekazu; Okino, Akitoshi; Mitsuhara, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    Protein introduction into cells is more difficult in plants than in mammalian cells, although it was reported that protein introduction was successful in shoot apical meristem and leaves only together with a cell-penetrating peptide. In this study, we tried to introduce superfolder green fluorescent protein (sGFP)-fused to adenylate cyclase as a reporter protein without a cell-penetrating peptide into the cells of tobacco leaves by treatment with atmospheric non-thermal plasmas. For this purpose, CO2 or N2 plasma was generated using a multi-gas plasma jet. Confocal microscopy indicated that sGFP signals were observed inside of leaf cells after treatment with CO2 or N2 plasma without substantial damage. In addition, the amount of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) formed by the catalytic enzyme adenylate cyclase, which requires cellular calmodulin for its activity, was significantly increased in leaves treated with CO2 or N2 plasma, also indicating the introduction of sGFP-fused adenylate cyclase into the cells. These results suggested that treatment with CO2 or N2 plasma could be a useful technique for protein introduction into plant tissues.

  10. Gas-liquid interfacial plasmas producing reactive species for cell membrane permeabilization

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Toshiro; Sasaki, Shota; Takashima, Keisuke; Kanzaki, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Gas-liquid interfacial atmospheric-pressure plasma jets (GLI-APPJ) are used medically for plasma-induced cell-membrane permeabilization. In an attempt to identify the dominant factors induced by GLI-APPJ responsible for enhancing cell-membrane permeability, the concentration and distribution of plasma-produced reactive species in the gas and liquid phase regions are measured. These reactive species are classified in terms of their life-span: long-lived (e.g., H2O2), short-lived (e.g., O2•−), and extremely-short-lived (e.g., •OH). The concentration of plasma-produced •OHaq in the liquid phase region decreases with an increase in solution thickness (<1 mm), and plasma-induced cell-membrane permeabilization is found to decay markedly as the thickness of the solution increases. Furthermore, the horizontally center-localized distribution of •OHaq, resulting from the center-peaked distribution of •OH in the gas phase region, corresponds with the distribution of the permeabilized cells upon APPJ irradiation, whereas the overall plasma-produced oxidizing species such as H2O2aq in solution exhibit a doughnut-shaped horizontal distribution. These results suggest that •OHaq is likely one of the dominant factors responsible for plasma-induced cell-membrane permeabilization. PMID:28163376

  11. Gas-liquid interfacial plasmas producing reactive species for cell membrane permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Toshiro; Sasaki, Shota; Takashima, Keisuke; Kanzaki, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Gas-liquid interfacial atmospheric-pressure plasma jets (GLI-APPJ) are used medically for plasma-induced cell-membrane permeabilization. In an attempt to identify the dominant factors induced by GLI-APPJ responsible for enhancing cell-membrane permeability, the concentration and distribution of plasma-produced reactive species in the gas and liquid phase regions are measured. These reactive species are classified in terms of their life-span: long-lived (e.g., H2O2), short-lived (e.g., O2(•-)), and extremely-short-lived (e.g., (•)OH). The concentration of plasma-produced (•)OHaq in the liquid phase region decreases with an increase in solution thickness (<1 mm), and plasma-induced cell-membrane permeabilization is found to decay markedly as the thickness of the solution increases. Furthermore, the horizontally center-localized distribution of (•)OHaq, resulting from the center-peaked distribution of (•)OH in the gas phase region, corresponds with the distribution of the permeabilized cells upon APPJ irradiation, whereas the overall plasma-produced oxidizing species such as H2O2aq in solution exhibit a doughnut-shaped horizontal distribution. These results suggest that (•)OHaq is likely one of the dominant factors responsible for plasma-induced cell-membrane permeabilization.

  12. Temporal stability and molecular persistence of the bone marrow plasma cell antibody repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Gabriel C.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.; Georgiou, George; Marcotte, Edward M.; Ippolito, Gregory C.

    2016-01-01

    Plasma cells in human bone marrow (BM) are thought to be responsible for sustaining lifelong immunity, but its underlying basis is controversial. Here we use high-throughput sequence analysis of the same individual across 6.5 years to show that the BM plasma cell immunoglobulin heavy chain repertoire is remarkably stable over time. We find a nearly static bias in individual and combinatorial gene usage across time. Analysis of a second donor corroborates these observations. We also report the persistence of numerous BM plasma cell clonotypes (∼2%) identifiable at all points assayed across 6.5 years, supporting a model of serological memory based upon intrinsic longevity of human plasma cells. Donors were adolescents who completely recovered from neuroblastoma prior to the start of this study. Our work will facilitate differentiation between healthy and diseased antibody repertoires, by serving as a point of comparison with future deep-sequencing studies involving immune intervention. PMID:28000661

  13. Effect of damage removal etch (DRE) on plasma textured, multi-crystalline solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, S.; Pathak, M.; Chahar, N.; Sharan, A.; Saxena, A. K.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2014-10-01

    In the present work, a self-masked, dry, plasma texturing process for multi crystalline silicon (mc-Si) wafers has been developed that results in a higher cell performance than that with un-textured wafers. Plasma textured samples prepared have low levels (∼4%) of reflectance. Plasma damage of textured wafers has been eliminated by a damage removal etch (DRE). The improvement in efficiency of mc-Si solar cells up to 15.1% has been attributed to complete suppression of reflectivity (4-5%) in a broad spectral range (350-800 nm) leading to black silicon surface. Also, DRE on plasma textured wafers has been found to result in reduced surface damage compared to cells without DRE leading to higher cell efficiencies.

  14. Multiple myeloma: Development of plasma cell sarcoma during apparently successful chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Holt, J. M.; Robb-Smith, A. H. T.

    1973-01-01

    Three patients with multiple myeloma who developed a plasma cell sarcoma during apparently successful chemothapy are described. It is postulated that the chemotherapy induced the sarcomatous change. Images PMID:4584727

  15. Recruitment of Lyn from endomembranes to the plasma membrane through calcium-dependent cell-cell interactions upon polarization of inducible Lyn-expressing MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Morinaga, Takao; Yanase, Sayuri; Okamoto, Aya; Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2017-03-28

    Src-family kinases, expressed in a wide variety of cell types, are anchored to cellular membranes through posttranslational lipid modifications and involved in diverse cellular signalling. In epithelial cells, Src-family kinases are localized at the plasma membrane and participate in epithelial functions. Epithelial cell polarity is achieved through dynamic reorganization of protein trafficking. To examine the trafficking of Src-family kinases between polarized and non-polarized epithelial cells, we generated an MDCK cell line that can inducibly express a protein of interest in a polarized state at any time. We show here that Lyn, a member of Src-family kinases, mainly localizes to the plasma membrane in polarized MDCK cells and to endomembranes in non-polarized MDCK cells. Cell-cell interactions between adjacent MDCK cells recruit Lyn from endomembranes to the plasma membrane even without cell attachment to extracellular matrix scaffolds, and loss of cell-cell interactions by calcium deprivation relocates Lyn from the plasma membrane to endomembranes through Rab11-mediated recycling. Therefore, using our MDCK cells expressing inducible Lyn, we reveal that calcium-dependent cell-cell interactions play a critical role in plasma membrane localization of Lyn in polarized MDCK cells.

  16. Plasma-on-chip device for stable irradiation of cells cultured in media with a low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma.

    PubMed

    Okada, Tomohiro; Chang, Chun-Yao; Kobayashi, Mime; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Sasaki, Minoru; Kumagai, Shinya

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) device which enables plasma treatment for cells cultured in media. The device, referred to as the plasma-on-chip, comprises microwells and microplasma sources fabricated together in a single chip. The microwells have through-holes between the microwells and microplasma sources. Each microplasma source is located on the backside of each microwells. The reactive components generated by the microplasma sources pass through the through-holes and reach cells cultured in the microwells. In this study, a plasma-on-chip device was modified for a stable plasma treatment. The use of a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) technique allowed a stable plasma treatment up to 3 min. The plasma-on-chip with the original electrode configuration typically had the maximum stable operation time of around 1 min. Spectral analysis of the plasma identified reactive species such as O and OH radicals that can affect the activity of cells. Plasma treatment was successfully performed on yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and green algae (Chlorella) cells. While no apparent change was observed with yeast, the treatment degraded the activity of the Chlorella cells and decreased their fluorescence. The device has the potential to help understand interactions between plasma and cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The relation between doses or post-plasma time points and apoptosis of leukemia cells induced by dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Haixia; Xue, Zhixiao; Yin, Huijuan; Niu, Qing; Chen, Hongli

    2015-12-01

    The dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma was applied to induce apoptosis of LT-12 leukemia cells. Plasma effects on cell death was evaluated by MTT assay and FCM apoptosis assay with Annexin V/PI double staining, suggesting that plasma killing cells rate and inducing cell apoptosis rate both positively were related to the plasma doses or the post-plasma time points. The cell death rates increased from 15.2% to 33.1% and the apoptosis rate raise from 23.8% to 28% when the dose raise from 60s to 120 s at 8 h post-plasma, while they increased from 15.4% to 34.9% and from 48% to 55.3% respectively at the same doses at 12 h post-plasma. Furthermore, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), gene and protein expression for Caspases and Bcl-2 family members were measured for exploring the related apoptotic mechanisms phenomenon. We found ROS immediately increased to 1.24 times of the original amount, then increasing to 5.39-fold at 20 h after treatment. The gene and protein expression for Caspases and Bcl-2 family members are very active at 8-12 h post-plasma. Our results demonstrate that DBD plasma can effectively induce tumor cell death through primarily related apoptotic mechanisms.

  18. Tyrosine kinase c-Abl regulates the survival of plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Feng; Xu, Shengli; Huang, Yuhan; Ou, Xijun; Lam, Kong-Peng

    2017-01-06

    Tyrosine kinase c-Abl plays an important role in early B cell development. Its deletion leads to reduced pro- and pre-B cell generation in mice. However, its function in B cell terminal differentiation remains unexplored. Here, we used c-Abl(f/f) Aicda(cre/+) mice, in which c-Abl is ablated only in antigen-activated B cells, to study the role of c-Abl in germinal center (GC) B and antibody-secreting plasma cell formation. Upon challenge with a model antigen, we found normal GC and memory B but reduced plasma cells and antigen-specific antibody response in the mutant mice. In-vitro studies revealed that plasma cells lacking c-Abl could be generated but did not accumulate in culture, indicative of survival defect. They also exhibited impaired STAT3 phosphorylation. The plasma cell defects could be rectified by introduction of Bim-deficiency or delivery of colivelin, a STAT3 activator, into c-Abl(f/f) Aicda(cre/+) mice. Hence, c-Abl signalling regulates the survival of plasma cells.

  19. IgE-positive plasma cells are present in adenoids of atopic children.

    PubMed

    Papatziamos, Georgios; Van Hage-Hamsten, Marianne; Lundahl, Joachim; Hemlin, Claes

    2006-02-01

    We demonstrated the presence of IgE(+) plasma cells in the adenoids of atopic children. Our data suggest that adenoids are capable of local production of IgE and support the role of adenoids as an inductive site for allergic reactions. We have previously demonstrated increased numbers of IgE(+) cells in the adenoids of atopic children and also found support for an IL-4-induced class switch to IgE production in adenoids. In search of further evidence of adenoids being involved in IgE-mediated sensitization, we investigated the distribution of plasma cells and macrophages positive for IgE in adenoids. Adenoid tissue from atopic and non-atopic children was examined using immunohistochemical markers for IgE, plasma cells (CD138) and macrophages (CD68). The distribution of positive cells was determined in the extrafollicular area and in the follicles of adenoids. Co-localization of IgE and CD138(+) plasma cells and CD68(+) macrophages was examined using immunohistochemical double-staining methods. Non-atopic adenoids contained no or very few IgE(+) cells. In contrast, IgE(+) cells were found in high numbers in atopic adenoids, mainly in the extrafollicular area. Higher numbers of IgE(+) plasma cells and IgE(+) macrophages were also found in the adenoids of atopic children.

  20. Tyrosine kinase c-Abl regulates the survival of plasma cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-Feng; Xu, Shengli; Huang, Yuhan; Ou, Xijun; Lam, Kong-Peng

    2017-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase c-Abl plays an important role in early B cell development. Its deletion leads to reduced pro- and pre-B cell generation in mice. However, its function in B cell terminal differentiation remains unexplored. Here, we used c-Ablf/f Aicdacre/+ mice, in which c-Abl is ablated only in antigen-activated B cells, to study the role of c-Abl in germinal center (GC) B and antibody-secreting plasma cell formation. Upon challenge with a model antigen, we found normal GC and memory B but reduced plasma cells and antigen-specific antibody response in the mutant mice. In-vitro studies revealed that plasma cells lacking c-Abl could be generated but did not accumulate in culture, indicative of survival defect. They also exhibited impaired STAT3 phosphorylation. The plasma cell defects could be rectified by introduction of Bim-deficiency or delivery of colivelin, a STAT3 activator, into c-Ablf/f Aicdacre/+ mice. Hence, c-Abl signalling regulates the survival of plasma cells. PMID:28057924

  1. Alternative mechanism of Eimeria bovis sporozoites to invade cells in vitro by breaching the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, J H; Clauss, W; Zahner, H; Hermosilla, C

    2004-10-01

    In vitro Eimeria bovis sporozoites invade a wide range of cell types, and in the case of bovine cells, they may develop to first-generation schizonts. Often, however, they subsequently leave their host cell to invade a new one, which seems contrary to the classical way of infecting a cell by forming a parasitophorous vacuole. Using a standard, "cell wound assay," we show that E. bovis can invade bovine endothelial cells by breaching the plasma membrane and may again leave the surviving cell. Eimeria bovis sporozoites also infected VERO and HT29 cells but obviously without damaging the plasma membrane. The same held true when bovine endothelial cells were exposed to tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum. According to a literature report dealing with Plasmodium yoelii sporozoites, breaching the membrane of certain host cells may be a common phenomenon for coccidian sporozoites but may not be for merozoites.

  2. Age-associated reduction of stimulatory effect of ghrelin on food intake in mice.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Yosuke; Kanai, Setsuko; Ohta, Minoru; Akimoto, Saeko; Uematsu, Hiroshi; Miyasaka, Kyoko

    2012-01-01

    Aging is associated with a progressive decrease in appetite and food intake. We focused on the age-associated changes of the stimulatory effect of the appetite-regulating peptide, ghrelin. Food intake and the concentrations of acyl ghrelin and desacyl ghrelin in the plasma and in the stomach were measured with and without overnight fasting in young and old mice. Moreover, the food intake in response to the intraperitoneal administration of graded doses of acyl ghrelin was compared between young and old mice. Fasting drives food intake in young mice, but not in old mice. The concentrations of acyl ghrelin and desacyl ghrelin in the plasma and in the stomach were higher in the old mice than in the young mice. Food intake did not increase in old mice when stimulated by the administration of 1-3 nmol of acyl ghrelin, which could produce a significant increase in food intake in young mice. In conclusion, food intake did not increase in old mice after either overnight fasting or the administration of acyl ghrelin. The release and synthesis of ghrelin seem to be rather higher in old mice compared to young mice. These increases might be the results of compensation for the decline of receptor (and/or post-receptor) functions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cell adhesion and proliferation on poly(tetrafluoroethylene) with plasma-metal and plasma-metal-carbon interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznickova, Alena; Kvitek, Ondrej; Kolarova, Katerina; Smejkalova, Zuzana; Svorcik, Vaclav

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate the effect of the interface between plasma activated, gold and carbon coated poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) on in vitro adhesion and spreading of mouse fibroblasts (L929). Surface properties of pristine and modified PTFE were studied by several experimental techniques. The thickness of a deposited gold film is an increasing function of the sputtering time, conversely thickness of carbon layer decreases with increasing distance between carbon source and the substrate. Because all the used surface modification techniques take place in inert Ar plasma, oxidized degradation products are formed on the PTFE surface, which affects wettability of the polymer surface. Cytocompatibility tests indicate that on samples with Au/C interface, the cells accumulate on the part of sample with evaporated carbon. Number of L929 cells proliferated on the studied samples is comparable to tissue culture polystyrene standard.

  4. Interaction of cold plasmas with biological cells: What we have learned so far

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroussi, Mounir

    2006-10-01

    In the last two decades, non-equilibrium, low temperature, atmospheric pressure plasmas have gained acceptance as an attractive technological solution in industrial applications such as the surface modification of polymers and the cleaning of flue gases. As more reliable ``cold'' plasma sources are developed, new and interesting applications continue to emerge. Amongst the more recent applications, the use of atmospheric pressure cold plasmas in the biomedical field is presently experiencing a heightened interest from the plasma science research community. This is due to promising possibilities to use these plasmas in medical research such as wound healing, tissue engineering, surface modification of biocompatible materials, and the sterilization of reusable heat-sensitive medical instruments. However, before any of these exciting possibilities become reality, an in-depth understanding of the effects of plasma on the cellular and sub-cellular levels has to be achieved. In this paper, a review of the knowledge that has been gained during the last few years will be presented. First an overview of research efforts on the inactivation of bacterial cells will be presented. This includes the evaluation of the inactivation kinetics and the roles played by the various plasma agents (such as UV photons and free radicals) in the inactivation process. In the second part of this talk, plasma sub-lethal effects on both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells will be discussed. Finally, the prospects of the use of ``cold'' plasmas in the biomedical field are outlined.

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Plasma Cell Neoplasms Including Multiple Myeloma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neoplasms for more information. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant This treatment is a way of giving ... blood -forming cells destroyed by the cancer treatment. Stem cells (immature blood cells) are removed from the blood ...

  6. General Information about Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neoplasms for more information. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant This treatment is a way of giving ... blood -forming cells destroyed by the cancer treatment. Stem cells (immature blood cells) are removed from the blood ...

  7. Treatment Options for Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neoplasms for more information. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant This treatment is a way of giving ... blood -forming cells destroyed by the cancer treatment. Stem cells (immature blood cells) are removed from the blood ...

  8. Stages of Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neoplasms for more information. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant This treatment is a way of giving ... blood -forming cells destroyed by the cancer treatment. Stem cells (immature blood cells) are removed from the blood ...

  9. Exogenous nitric oxide (NO) generated by NO-plasma treatment modulates osteoprogenitor cells early differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsaadany, Mostafa; Subramanian, Gayathri; Ayan, Halim; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we investigated whether nitric oxide (NO) generated using a non-thermal plasma system can mediate osteoblastic differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells without creating toxicity. Our objective was to create an NO delivery mechanism using NO-dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma that can generate and transport NO with controlled concentration to the area of interest to regulate osteoprogenitor cell activity. We built a non-thermal atmospheric pressure DBD plasma nozzle system based on our previously published design and similar designs in the literature. The electrical and spectral analyses demonstrated that N2 dissociated into NO under typical DBD voltage-current characteristics. We treated osteoprogenitor cells (MC3T3-E1) using NO-plasma treatment system. Our results demonstrated that we could control NO concentration within cell culture media and could introduce NO into the intracellular space using NO-plasma treatment with various treatment times. We confirmed that NO-plasma treatment maintained cell viability and did not create any toxicity even with prolonged treatment durations. Finally, we demonstrated that NO-plasma treatment induced early osteogenic differentiation in the absence of pro-osteogenic growth factors/proteins. These findings suggest that through the NO-plasma treatment system we are able to generate and transport tissue-specific amounts of NO to an area of interest to mediate osteoprogenitor cell activity without subsequent toxicity. This opens up the possibility to develop DBD plasma-assisted tissue-specific NO delivery strategies for therapeutic intervention in the prevention and treatment of bone diseases.

  10. Particle-in-cell simulations of laser beat-wave magnetization of dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D. R.; Genoni, T. C.; Thoma, C.; Rose, D. V.; Hsu, S. C.

    2014-03-15

    The interaction of two lasers with a difference frequency near that of the ambient plasma frequency produces beat waves that can resonantly accelerate thermal electrons. These beat waves can be used to drive electron current and thereby embed magnetic fields into the plasma [Welch et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 225002 (2012)]. In this paper, we present two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the beat-wave current-drive process over a wide range of angles between the injected lasers, laser intensities, and plasma densities. We discuss the application of this technique to the magnetization of dense plasmas, motivated in particular by the problem of forming high-β plasma targets in a standoff manner for magneto-inertial fusion. The feasibility of a near-term experiment embedding magnetic fields using lasers with micron-scale wavelengths into a ∼10{sup 18} cm{sup −3}-density plasma is assessed.

  11. AT14A mediates the cell wall-plasma membrane-cytoskeleton continuum in Arabidopsis thaliana cells.

    PubMed

    Lü, Bing; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Hongcheng; Liang, Jiansheng; Zhang, Jianhua

    2012-06-01

    AT14A has a small domain that has sequence similarities to integrins from animals. Integrins serve as a transmembrane linker between the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton, which play critical roles in a variety of biological processes. Because the function of AT14A is unknown, Arabidopsis thaliana AT14A, which is a transmembrane receptor for cell adhesion molecules and a middle member of the cell wall-plasma membrane-cytoskeleton continuum in plants, has been described. AT14A, co-expressed with green fluorescent protein (GFP), was found to localize mainly to the plasma membrane. The mutant Arabidopsis at14a-1 cells exhibit various phenotypes with cell shape, cell cluster size, thickness, and cellulose content of cell wall, the adhesion between cells, and the adhesion of plasma membrane to cell wall varied by plasmolysis. Using direct staining of filamentous actin and indirect immunofluorescence staining of microtubules, cortical actin filaments and microtubules arrays were significantly altered in cells, either where AT14A was absent or over-expressed. It is concluded that AT14A may be a substantial middle member of the cell wall-plasma membrane-cytoskeleton continuum and play an important role in the continuum by regulating cell wall and cortical cytoskeleton organization.

  12. AT14A mediates the cell wall–plasma membrane–cytoskeleton continuum in Arabidopsis thaliana cells

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Bing; Wang, Juan; Wang, Hongcheng; Liang, Jiansheng; Zhang, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    AT14A has a small domain that has sequence similarities to integrins from animals. Integrins serve as a transmembrane linker between the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton, which play critical roles in a variety of biological processes. Because the function of AT14A is unknown, Arabidopsis thaliana AT14A, which is a transmembrane receptor for cell adhesion molecules and a middle member of the cell wall–plasma membrane–cytoskeleton continuum in plants, has been described. AT14A, co-expressed with green fluorescent protein (GFP), was found to localize mainly to the plasma membrane. The mutant Arabidopsis at14a-1 cells exhibit various phenotypes with cell shape, cell cluster size, thickness, and cellulose content of cell wall, the adhesion between cells, and the adhesion of plasma membrane to cell wall varied by plasmolysis. Using direct staining of filamentous actin and indirect immunofluorescence staining of microtubules, cortical actin filaments and microtubules arrays were significantly altered in cells, either where AT14A was absent or over-expressed. It is concluded that AT14A may be a substantial middle member of the cell wall–plasma membrane–cytoskeleton continuum and play an important role in the continuum by regulating cell wall and cortical cytoskeleton organization. PMID:22456678

  13. Inhibition of CaMKK2 Reverses Age-Associated Decline in Bone Mass

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Zachary J.; Cary, Rachel L.; Yang, Chang; Novack, Deborah V.; Voor, Michael J.; Sankar, Uma

    2016-01-01

    Decline in bone formation is a major contributing factor to the loss of bone mass associated with aging. We previously showed that the genetic ablation of the tissue-restricted and multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase kinase 2 (CaMKK2) stimulates trabecular bone mass accrual, mainly by promoting anabolic pathways and inhibiting catabolic pathways of bone remodeling. In this study, we investigated whether inhibition of this kinase using its selective cell-permeable inhibitor STO-609 will stimulate bone formation in 32 week old male WT mice and reverse age-associated of decline in bone volume and strength. Tri-weekly intraperitoneal injections of saline or STO-609 (10 μM) were performed for six weeks followed by metabolic labeling with calcein and alizarin red. New bone formation was assessed by dynamic histomorphometry whereas micro-computed tomography was employed to measure trabecular bone volume, microarchitecture and femoral mid-shaft geometry. Cortical and trabecular bone biomechanical properties were assessed using three-point bending and punch compression methods respectively. Our results reveal that as they progress from 12 to 32 weeks of age, WT mice sustain a significant decline in trabecular bone volume, microarchitecture and strength as well as cortical bone strength. However, treatment of the 32 week old WT mice with STO-609 stimulated apposition of new bone and completely reversed the age-associated decrease in bone volume, quality, as well as trabecular and cortical bone strength. We also observed that regardless of age, male Camkk2−/− mice possessed significantly elevated trabecular bone volume, microarchitecture and compressive strength as well as cortical bone strength compared to age-matched WT mice, implying that the chronic loss of this kinase attenuates age-associated decline in bone mass. Further, whereas STO-609 treatment and/or the absence of CaMKK2 significantly enhanced the femoral midshaft geometry, the

  14. The influence of platelets, plasma and red blood cells on functional haemostatic assays.

    PubMed

    Bochsen, Louise; Johansson, Pär I; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Daugaard, Gedske; Ostrowski, Sisse R

    2011-04-01

    Functional whole blood haemostatic assays are used increasingly to guide transfusion therapy and monitor medical treatment and are also applied for in-vitro evaluations of the haemostatic potential of stored platelets. We investigated how the cellular and plasmatic elements, both isolated and combined, influenced the two methodologically different assays, thrombelastography (TEG) and impedance aggregometry (Multiplate). Platelet-rich plasma (200 × 10/l) or pure plasma (0 platelets), with and without added red blood cells (RBCs), hematocrit 0, 0.15 or 0.29, were produced in vitro from platelet concentrates, fresh frozen plasma and stored RBC. Pure platelets were investigated by removing plasma components from platelet concentrates by diafiltration against the platelet storage solution Intersol. Plasma was readded by diafiltration against plasma in Intersol. Haemostatic function was evaluated by TEG and Multiplate. In the TEG, increasing amounts of RBC reduced clot strength and clot kinetics (α-angle), most markedly in plasma/RBC without platelets. In contrast, RBC in a platelet concentrate matrix enhanced Multiplate aggregation in response to weak agonists (ADP and arachidonic acid). Furthermore, removing plasma from platelet concentrates eliminated the TEG response and diminished the Multiplate aggregation response, but readding plasma to the pure platelet concentrates restored the response. Each of the elements in whole blood, plasma, platelets and RBC, affected the Multiplate and TEG results differently. The results emphasize that the concentrations of all cellular and plasmatic components in whole blood should be taken into account when interpreting results obtained by TEG and multiplate.

  15. Plasma-cell cheilitis: successful treatment with intralesional injections of corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Tseng, J T-P; Cheng, C-J; Lee, W-R; Wang, K-H

    2009-03-01

    Plasma-cell cheilitis is a rare inflammatory disorder of the lip characterized histologically by a band-like infiltrate of plasma cells in the upper dermis. It is considered an oral counterpart of plasma-cell balanitis. Clinically, it presents as a circumscribed, flat to slightly raised, eroded area of the lip. The cause of plasma-cell cheilitis is unknown, and the treatment is often disappointing. We describe a 55-year-old woman who had a long-lasting painful, swollen, and eroded area on her lips, which responded poorly to various topical treatments. Biopsy showed a band-like infiltrate composed mainly of mature plasma cells in the dermis. A diagnosis of plasma-cell cheilitis was made after excluding contact dermatitis, lichen planus, bacterial, fungal and spirochaete infections, and an extramedullary plasmacytoma. Dramatic improvements were observed after intralesional injections of corticosteroids. The lesion cleared up after two treatments, and there has been no recurrence in 1 year of follow-up.

  16. Application of atmospheric plasma sources in growth and differentiation of plant and mammalian stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puac, Nevena

    2014-10-01

    The expansion of the plasma medicine and its demand for in-vivo treatments resulted in fast development of various plasma devices that operate at atmospheric pressure. These sources have to fulfill all demands for application on biological samples. One of the sources that meet all the requirements needed for treatment of biological material is plasma needle. Previously, we have used this device for sterilization of planctonic samples of bacteria, MRSA biofilm, for improved differentiation of human periodontal stem cells into osteogenic line and for treatment of plant meristematic cells. It is well known that plasma generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that strongly affect metabolism of living cells. One of the open issues is to correlate external plasma products (electrons, ions, RNS, ROS, photons, strong fields etc.) with the immediate internal response which triggers or induces effects in the living cell. For that purpose we have studied the kinetics of enzymes which are typical indicators of the identity of reactive species from the plasma created environment that can trigger signal transduction in the cell and ensue cell activity. In collaboration with Suzana Zivkovicm, Institute for Biological Research ``Sinisa Stankovic,'' University of Belgrade; Nenad Selakovic, Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade; Milica Milutinovic, Jelena Boljevic, Institute for Biological Research ``Sinisa Stankovic,'' University of Belgrade; and Gordana Malovic, Zoran Lj. Petrovic, Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade. Grants III41011, ON171037 and ON173024, MESTD, Serbia.

  17. Silicon solar cells made by a self-aligned, selective-emitter, plasma-etchback process

    DOEpatents

    Ruby, D.S.; Schubert, W.K.; Gee, J.M.

    1999-02-16

    A potentially low-cost process for forming and passivating a selective emitter. The process uses a plasma etch of the heavily doped emitter to improve its performance. The grids of the solar cell are used to mask the plasma etch so that only the emitter in the region between the grids is etched, while the region beneath the grids remains heavily doped for low contact resistance. This process is potentially low-cost because it requires no alignment. After the emitter etch, a silicon nitride layer is deposited by plasma-enhanced, chemical vapor deposition, and the solar cell is annealed in a forming gas. 5 figs.

  18. Silicon solar cells made by a self-aligned, selective-emitter, plasma-etchback process

    DOEpatents

    Ruby, Douglas S.; Schubert, William K.; Gee, James M.

    1999-01-01

    A potentially low-cost process for forming and passivating a selective emitter. The process uses a plasma etch of the heavily doped emitter to improve its performance. The grids of the solar cell are used to mask the plasma etch so that only the emitter in the region between the grids is etched, while the region beneath the grids remains heavily doped for low contact resistance. This process is potentially low-cost because it requires no alignment. After the emitter etch, a silicon nitride layer is deposited by plasma-enhanced, chemical vapor deposition, and the solar cell is annealed in a forming gas.

  19. An evaluation of anti-oxidative protection for cells against atmospheric pressure cold plasma treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Ruonan; Zhang Qian; Feng Hongqing; Liang Yongdong; Li Fangting; Zhu Weidong; Zhang Jue; Fang Jing; Becker, Kurt H.

    2012-03-19

    With the development of plasma medicine, safety issues are emerging as a serious concern. In this study, both intracellular (genetic engineering) and extracellular (scavengers) measures were tested in an effort to determine the best protection for cells against plasma-induced oxidative stress. All results of immediate reactive species detection, short term survival and long term proliferation, suggest that intracellular pathways are superior in reducing oxidative stress and cell death. This work provides a potential mechanism to enhance safety and identifies precautionary measures that should be taken in future clinical applications of plasmas.

  20. An evaluation of anti-oxidative protection for cells against atmospheric pressure cold plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ruonan; Feng, Hongqing; Li, Fangting; Liang, Yongdong; Zhang, Qian; Zhu, Weidong; Zhang, Jue; Becker, Kurt H.; Fang, Jing

    2012-03-01

    With the development of plasma medicine, safety issues are emerging as a serious concern. In this study, both intracellular (genetic engineering) and extracellular (scavengers) measures were tested in an effort to determine the best protection for cells against plasma-induced oxidative stress. All results of immediate reactive species detection, short term survival and long term proliferation, suggest that intracellular pathways are superior in reducing oxidative stress and cell death. This work provides a potential mechanism to enhance safety and identifies precautionary measures that should be taken in future clinical applications of plasmas.

  1. Hemorheological alterations of red blood cells induced by non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeongho; Kim, Jae Hyung; Chang, Boksoon; Choi, Eun Ha; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2016-11-01

    Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma has been introduced in various applications such as wound healing, sterilization of infected tissues, blood coagulation, delicate surgeries, and so on. The non-thermal plasma generates reactive oxygen species (ROS), including ozone. Various groups have reported that the produced ROS influence proliferation and differentiation of cells, as well as apoptosis and growth arrest of tumor cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of non-thermal plasma on rheological characteristics of red blood cells (RBC). We experimentally measured the extent of hemolysis, deformability, and aggregation of red blood cells (RBC) with respect to exposure times of non-thermal plasma. RBC morphology was also examined using field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The absorbance of hemoglobin released from the RBCs increased with increasing exposure time of the non-thermal plasma. Values of the elongation index and aggregation index were shown to decrease significantly with increasing plasma exposure times. Therefore, hemorheological properties of RBCs could be utilized to assess the performance of various non-thermal plasmas.

  2. Phase imaging microscopy for the diagnostics of plasma-cell interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohene, Yolanda; Marinov, Ilya; de Laulanié, Lucie; Dupuy, Corinne; Wattelier, Benoit; Starikovskaia, Svetlana

    2015-06-01

    Phase images of biological specimens were obtained by the method of Quadriwave Lateral Shearing Interferometry (QWLSI). The QWLSI technique produces, at high resolution, phase images of the cells having been exposed to a plasma treatment and enables the quantitative analysis of the changes in the surface area of the cells over time. Morphological changes in the HTori normal thyroid cells were demonstrated using this method. There was a comparison of the cell behaviour between control cells, cells treated by plasma of a nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge, including cells pre-treated by catalase, and cells treated with an equivalent amount of H2O2. The major changes in the cell membrane morphology were observed at only 5 min after the plasma treatment. The primary role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in this degradation is suggested. Deformation and condensation of the cell nucleus were observed 2-3 h after the treatment and are supposedly related to apoptosis induction. The coupling of the phase QWLSI with immunofluorescence imaging would give a deeper insight into the mechanisms of plasma induced cell death.

  3. Syntaxin-4 is essential for IgE secretion by plasma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Arman; DeCourcey, Joseph; Larbi, Nadia Ben; Loughran, Sinéad T.; Walls, Dermot; Loscher, Christine E.

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •Knock-down of syntaxin-4 in U266 plasma cells resulted in reduction of IgE secretion. •Knock-down of syntaxin-4 also leads to the accumulation of IgE in the cell. •Immuno-fluorescence staining shows co-localisation of IgE and syntaxin-4 in U266 cells. •Findings suggest a critical requirement for syntaxin-4 in IgE secretion from plasma cells. -- Abstract: The humoral immune system provides a crucial first defense against the invasion of microbial pathogens via the secretion of antigen specific immunoglobulins (Ig). The secretion of Ig is carried out by terminally differentiated B-lymphocytes called plasma cells. Despite the key role of plasma cells in the immune response, the mechanisms by which they constitutively traffic large volumes of Ig out of the cell is poorly understood. The involvement of Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins in the regulation of protein trafficking from cells has been well documented. Syntaxin-4, a member of the Qa SNARE syntaxin family has been implicated in fusion events at the plasma membrane in a number of cells in the immune system. In this work we show that knock-down of syntaxin-4 in the multiple myeloma U266 human plasma cell line results in a loss of IgE secretion and accumulation of IgE within the cells. Furthermore, we show that IgE co-localises with syntaxin-4 in U266 plasma cells suggesting direct involvement in secretion at the plasma membrane. This study demonstrates that syntaxin-4 plays a critical role in the secretion of IgE from plasma cells and sheds some light on the mechanisms by which these cells constitutively traffic vesicles to the surface for secretion. An understanding of this machinery may be beneficial in identifying potential therapeutic targets in multiple myeloma and autoimmune disease where over-production of Ig leads to severe pathology in patients.

  4. Specific Age-Associated DNA Methylation Changes in Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qiong; Bork, Simone; Goergens, Maria; Joussen, Sylvia; Pallua, Norbert; Ho, Anthony D.; Zenke, Martin; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications of cytosine residues in the DNA play a critical role for cellular differentiation and potentially also for aging. In mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) from human bone marrow we have previously demonstrated age-associated methylation changes at specific CpG-sites of developmental genes. In continuation of this work, we have now isolated human dermal fibroblasts from young (<23 years) and elderly donors (>60 years) for comparison of their DNA methylation profiles using the Infinium HumanMethylation27 assay. In contrast to MSC, fibroblasts could not be induced towards adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic lineage and this is reflected by highly significant differences between the two cell types: 766 CpG sites were hyper-methylated and 752 CpG sites were hypo-methylated in fibroblasts in comparison to MSC. Strikingly, global DNA methylation profiles of fibroblasts from the same dermal region clustered closely together indicating that fibroblasts maintain positional memory even after in vitro culture. 75 CpG sites were more than 15% differentially methylated in fibroblasts upon aging. Very high hyper-methylation was observed in the aged group within the INK4A/ARF/INK4b locus and this was validated by pyrosequencing. Age-associated DNA methylation changes were related in fibroblasts and MSC but they were often regulated in opposite directions between the two cell types. In contrast, long-term culture associated changes were very consistent in fibroblasts and MSC. Epigenetic modifications at specific CpG sites support the notion that aging represents a coordinated developmental mechanism that seems to be regulated in a cell type specific manner. PMID:21347436

  5. New Treatment Options for Osteosarcoma - Inactivation of Osteosarcoma Cells by Cold Atmospheric Plasma.

    PubMed

    Gümbel, Denis; Gelbrich, Nadine; Weiss, Martin; Napp, Matthias; Daeschlein, Georg; Sckell, Axel; Ender, Stephan A; Kramer, Axel; Burchardt, Martin; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Stope, Matthias B

    2016-11-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma has been shown to inhibit tumor cell growth and induce tumor cell death. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of cold atmospheric plasma treatment on proliferation of human osteosarcoma cells and to characterize the underlying cellular mechanisms. Human osteosarcoma cells (U2-OS and MNNG/HOS) were treated with cold atmospheric plasma and seeded in culture plates. Cell proliferation, p53 and phospho-p53 protein expression and nuclear morphology were assessed. The treated human osteosarcoma cell lines exhibited attenuated proliferation rates by up to 66%. The cells revealed an induction of p53, as well as phospho-p53 expression, by 2.3-fold and 4.5-fold, respectively, compared to controls. 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining demonstrated apoptotic nuclear condensation following cold atmospheric plasma treatment. Cold atmospheric plasma treatment significantly attenuated cell proliferation in a preclinical in vitro osteosarcoma model. The resulting increase in p53 expression and phospho-activation in combination with characteristic nuclear changes indicate this was through induction of apoptosis. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  6. Mechanisms of interaction of non-thermal plasma with living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalghatgi, Sameer Ulhas

    Thermal plasmas and lasers have been widely used in medicine to cut, ablate and cauterize tissues through heating; in contrast, non-thermal plasma produces various highly active molecules and atoms without heat. As a result, its effects on living cells and tissues could be selective and tunable. This makes non-thermal plasma very attractive for medical applications. However, despite several interesting demonstrations of non-thermal plasma in blood coagulation and tissue sterilization, the biological and physical mechanisms of its interaction with living cells are still poorly understood impeding further development of non-thermal plasma as a clinical tool. Although several possible mechanisms of interaction have been suggested, no systematic experimental work has been performed to verify these hypotheses. Using cells in culture, it is shown in this work that non-thermal plasma created by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) has dose-dependent effects ranging from increasing cell proliferation to inducing apoptosis which are consistent with the effects of oxidative stress. DNA damage is chosen as a marker to assess the effects of oxidative stress in a quantitative manner. It is demonstrated here that plasma induced DNA damage as well as other effects ranging from cell proliferation to apoptosis are indeed due to production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). We found that DNA damage is initiated primarily by plasma generated active neutral species which cannot be attributed to ozone alone. Moreover, it is found that extracellular media and its components play a critical role in the transfer of the non-thermal plasma initiated oxidative stress into cells. Specifically, it is found that the peroxidation efficiency of amino acids is the sole predictor of the ability of the medium to transfer the oxidative stress induced by non-thermal plasma. Phosphorylation of H2AX, a DNA damage marker, following plasma treatment is found to be ATR dependent and ATM

  7. Plasma cell and terminal B-cell differentiation in mantle cell lymphoma mainly occur in the SOX11-negative subtype.

    PubMed

    Ribera-Cortada, Inmaculada; Martinez, Daniel; Amador, Virginia; Royo, Cristina; Navarro, Alba; Beà, Silvia; Gine, Eva; de Leval, Laurence; Serrano, Sergio; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Colomer, Dolors; Martinez, Antonio; Campo, Elías

    2015-11-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma is a mature lymphoid neoplasm characterized by the t(11;14)(q13;q32) and cyclin D1 overexpression. SOX11 is a transcription factor commonly overexpressed in these tumors but absent in most other mature B-cell lymphomas whose function is not well understood. Experimental studies have shown that silencing of SOX11 in mantle cell lymphoma cells promotes the shift from a mature B cell into an early plasmacytic differentiation phenotype, suggesting that SOX11 may contribute to tumor development by blocking the B-cell differentiation program. The relationship between SOX11 expression and terminal B-cell differentiation in primary mantle cell lymphoma and its relationship to the plasmacytic differentiation observed in occasional cases is not known. In this study we have investigated the terminal B-cell differentiation phenotype in 60 mantle cell lymphomas, 41 SOX11-positive and 19 SOX11-negative. Monotypic plasma cells and lymphoid cells with plasmacytic differentiation expressing cyclin D1 were observed in 7 (37%) SOX11-negative but in none of 41 SOX11-positive mantle cell lymphomas (P<0.001). Intense cytoplasmic expression of a restricted immunoglobulin light chain was significantly more frequent in SOX11-negative than -positive tumors (58 vs 13%) (P=0.001). Similarly, BLIMP1 and XBP1 expression was also significantly more frequent in SOX11-negative than in -positive cases (83 vs 34% and 75 vs 11%, respectively) (P=0.001). However, no differences in the expression of IRF4/MUM1 were observed among these subtypes of mantle cell lymphoma. In conclusion, these results indicate that SOX11-negative mantle cell lymphoma may be a particular subtype of this tumor characterized by more frequent morphological and immunophenotypic terminal B-cell differentiation features that may be facilitated by the absence of SOX11 transcription factor.

  8. Proliferation-promoting effect of platelet-rich plasma on human adipose-derived stem cells and human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kakudo, Natsuko; Minakata, Tatsuya; Mitsui, Toshihito; Kushida, Satoshi; Notodihardjo, Frederik Zefanya; Kusumoto, Kenji

    2008-11-01

    This study evaluated changes in platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AB and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 release from platelets by platelet-rich plasma activation, and the proliferation potential of activated platelet-rich plasma and platelet-poor plasma on human adipose-derived stem cells and human dermal fibroblasts. Platelet-rich plasma was prepared using a double-spin method, with the number of platelets counted in each preparation stage. Platelet-rich and platelet-poor plasma were activated with autologous thrombin and calcium chloride, and levels of platelet-released PDGF-AB and TGF-beta1 were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cells were cultured for 1, 4, or 7 days in serum-free Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium supplemented with 5% whole blood plasma, nonactivated platelet-rich plasma, nonactivated platelet-poor plasma, activated platelet-rich plasma, or activated platelet-poor plasma. In parallel, these cells were cultured for 1, 4, or 7 days in serum-free Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium supplemented with 1%, 5%, 10%, or 20% activated platelet-rich plasma. The cultured human adipose-derived stem cells and human dermal fibroblasts were assayed for proliferation. Platelet-rich plasma contained approximately 7.9 times as many platelets as whole blood, and its activation was associated with the release of large amounts of PDGF-AB and TGF-beta1. Adding activated platelet-rich or platelet-poor plasma significantly promoted the proliferation of human adipose-derived stem cells and human dermal fibroblasts. Adding 5% activated platelet-rich plasma to the medium maximally promoted cell proliferation, but activated platelet-rich plasma at 20% did not promote it. Platelet-rich plasma can enhance the proliferation of human adipose-derived stem cells and human dermal fibroblasts. These results support clinical platelet-rich plasma application for cell-based, soft-tissue engineering and wound healing.

  9. Voltage- and Tension-Dependent Lipid Mobility in the Outer Hair Cell Plasma Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oghalai, John S.; Zhao, Hong-Bo; Kutz, J. Walter; Brownell, William E.

    2000-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for electromotility of outer hair cells in the ear is unknown but is thought to reside within the plasma membrane. Lipid lateral diffusion in the outer hair cell plasma membrane is a sigmoidal function of transmembrane potential and bathing media osmolality. Cell depolarization or hyposmotic challenge shorten the cell and reduce membrane fluidity by half. Changing the membrane tension with amphipathic drugs results in similar reductions. These dynamic changes in membrane fluidity represent the modulation of membrane tension by lipid-protein interactions. The voltage dependence may be associated with the force-generating motors that contribute to the exquisite sensitivity of mammalian hearing.

  10. Salivary glands of primary Sjögren's syndrome patients express factors vital for plasma cell survival

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The presence of circulating Ro/SSA and La/SSB autoantibodies has become an important marker in the classification criteria for primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). Plasma cells producing these autoantibodies are mainly high affinity plasma cells originating from germinal centre reactions. When exposed to the right microenvironment these autoimmune plasma cells become long-lived and resistant to immunosuppressive treatment. Since autoimmune plasma cells have been detected in the salivary glands of SS patients, we wanted to investigate if the glandular microenvironment is suitable for plasma cell survival and if glandular residing plasma cells are the long-lived plasma cell subset. Methods Single, double and triple immunohistochemistry as well as immunofluorescence staining was performed on minor salivary gland tissue retrieved from pSS, chronically inflamed and normal subjects. Results We detected significant numbers of CD138+, non-proliferating, Bcl-2 expressing plasma cells in the salivary glands of pSS patients with high focus score (FS). Furthermore, we demonstrated that CXCL12 and interleukin (IL)-6 survival factors were highly expressed in pSS salivary gland epithelium and by focal mononuclear infiltrating cells. Notably, adipocytes when present in the salivary gland tissue were an important source of CXCL12. We clearly demonstrate that plasma cells are localised in close proximity to CXCL12 and IL-6 expressing cells and thus that the environment of salivary glands with high FS provide factors vital for plasma cell survival. Conclusions Plasma cells residing in the salivary glands of pSS patients with high FS showed phenotypic characteristics of the long-lived plasma cell subtype. Furthermore, the pSS salivary gland microenvironment provided niches rich in factors vital for plasma cell survival. PMID:21214903

  11. Dendritic cell-mediated HIV-1 infection of T-cells demonstrates a direct relationship to plasma viral RNA levels

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Reetakshi; Bull, Lara; Siwak, Edward B.; Thippeshappa, Rajesh; Arduino, Roberto C.; Kimata, Jason T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between infectivity of HIV-1 variants in dendritic cell-mediated in trans infection of T-cells and plasma viral RNA levels in infected subjects. Methods HIV-1 was isolated from PBMCs of chronically infected individuals, typed for coreceptor usage, and viral replication was examined in monocyte derived-dendritic cells-peripheral blood lymphocytes (DC-PBL) co-cultures. The rate of p24 antigen production during the logarithmic phase of viral replication was determined by ELISA. Additionally, nef variants were cloned and expressed in trans with a HIV-luciferase vector and CCR5-tropic HIV-1 envelope, and infectivity was measured in DC-mediated capture-transfer assays. Results Replication capacity of HIV-1 viral CCR5-tropic isolates in DC-PBL co-cultures was linearly associated with the plasma viral RNA levels in a cohort of HIV-1 infected individuals exhibiting an inverse relationship between plasma viral RNA and CD4 cell count. Furthermore, infectivity activity of Nef variants in context of DC-mediated enhanced infection of T-cells also showed a linear relationship to plasma viral RNA levels. Conclusion These results illustrate that replication capacity of HIV-1 in DC-T-cell cultures is a significant predictor of plasma viral RNA level. The data suggest that adaptation of HIV-1 to DC interactions with T-cells influences the level of viral replication in the host. PMID:20386455

  12. Red cell volume with changes in plasma osmolarity during maximal exercise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Beaumont, W.

    1973-01-01

    The volume of the red cell in vivo was measured during acute changes in plasma osmolarity evoked through short (6 to 8 min) maximal exercise in six male volunteer subjects. Simultaneous measurements of mean corpuscular red cell volume (MCV), hematocrit, blood hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), and plasma osmolarity showed that there was no change in the MCV or MCHC with a concomitant rise of nearly 6% in plasma osmolarity. Apparently, in vivo, the volume of the red cell in exercising healthy human subjects does not change measurably, in spite of significant changes in osmotic pressure of the surrounding medium. Consequently, it is not justified to correct postexercise hematocrit measurements for changes in plasma osmolarity.

  13. Enhancing cold atmospheric plasma treatment of cancer cells by static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaoqian; Rajjoub, Kenan; Shashurin, Alexey; Yan, Dayun; Sherman, Jonathan H; Bian, Ka; Murad, Ferid; Keidar, Michael

    2017-01-01

    It has been reported since late 1970 that magnetic field interacts strongly with biological systems. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) has also been widely studied over the past few decades in physics, biology, and medicine. In this study, we propose a novel idea to combine static magnetic field (SMF) with CAP as a tool for cancer therapy. Breast cancer cells and wild type fibroblasts were cultured in 96-well plates and treated by CAP with or without SMF. Breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 showed a significant decrease in viability after direct plasma treatment with SMF (compared to only plasma treatment). In addition, cancer cells treated by the CAP-SMF-activated medium (indirect treatment) also showed viability decrease but was slightly weaker than the direct plasma-SMF treatment. By integrating the use of SMF and CAP, we were able to discover their advantages that have yet to be utilized. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:53-62, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Red cell volume with changes in plasma osmolarity during maximal exercise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Beaumont, W.

    1973-01-01

    The volume of the red cell in vivo was measured during acute changes in plasma osmolarity evoked through short (6 to 8 min) maximal exercise in six male volunteer subjects. Simultaneous measurements of mean corpuscular red cell volume (MCV), hematocrit, blood hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), and plasma osmolarity showed that there was no change in the MCV or MCHC with a concomitant rise of nearly 6% in plasma osmolarity. Apparently, in vivo, the volume of the red cell in exercising healthy human subjects does not change measurably, in spite of significant changes in osmotic pressure of the surrounding medium. Consequently, it is not justified to correct postexercise hematocrit measurements for changes in plasma osmolarity.

  15. Rationale of anti-CD19 immunotherapy: an option to target autoreactive plasma cells in autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Anti-CD20 therapy using rituximab directly targeting B cells has been approved for treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, rheumatoid arthritis and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitides and has led to reappreciation of B-lineage cells for anti-rheumatic treatment strategies. Moreover, blocking B-cell activating factor with belimumab, a drug that is licensed for treatment of active, seropositive systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), represents an alternative, indirect anti-B-cell approach interfering with proper B-cell development. While these approaches apparently have no substantial impact on antibody-secreting plasma cells, challenges to improve the treatment of difficult-to-treat patients with SLE remain. In this context, anti-CD19 antibodies have the promise to directly target autoantibody-secreting plasmablasts and plasma cells as well as early B-cell differentiation stages not covered by anti-CD20 therapy. Currently known distinct expression profiles of CD19 by human plasma cell subsets, experiences with anti-CD19 therapies in malignant conditions as well as the rationale of targeting autoreactive plasma cells in patients with SLE are discussed in this review. PMID:23281743

  16. Factors Regulating Immunoglobulin Production by Normal and Disease-Associated Plasma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, David A.; Elsawa, Sherine F.

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulins are molecules produced by activated B cells and plasma cells in response to exposure to antigens. Upon antigen exposure, these molecules are secreted allowing the immune system to recognize and effectively respond to a myriad of pathogens. Immunoglobulin or antibody secreting cells are the mature form of B lymphocytes, which during their development undergo gene rearrangements and selection in the bone marrow ultimately leading to the generation of B cells, each expressing a single antigen-specific receptor/immunoglobulin molecule. Each individual immunoglobulin molecule has an affinity for a unique motif, or epitope, found on a given antigen. When presented with an antigen, activated B cells differentiate into either plasma cells (which secrete large amounts of antibody that is specific for the inducing antigen), or memory B cells (which are long-lived and elicit a stronger and faster response if the host is re-exposed to the same antigen). The secreted form of immunoglobulin, when bound to an antigen, serves as an effector molecule that directs other cells of the immune system to facilitate the neutralization of soluble antigen or the eradication of the antigen-expressing pathogen. This review will focus on the regulation of secreted immunoglobulin by long-lived normal or disease-associated plasma cells. Specifically, the focus will be on signaling and transcriptional events that regulate the development and homeostasis of long-lived immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells. PMID:25615546

  17. [Proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in hydrogels of human blood plasma].

    PubMed

    Linero, Itali M; Doncel, Adriana; Chaparro, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    The use of mesenchymal stem cells in clinical practice has increased considerably in the last decade because they play a supporting role in the processes of tissue repair and regeneration, becoming the main tool of cell therapy for the treatment of diseases functionally affecting bone and cartilage tissue . To evaluate in vitro the proliferative and osteogenic differentiation ability of mesenchymal stem cells derived from human adipose tissue in a blood plasma hydrogel. Mesenchymal stem cells were obtained from human adipose tissue explants and characterized by flow cytometry. Their multipotentiality was demonstrated by their ability to differentiate to adipogenic and osteogenic lineages. Cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation ability of the cells cultured in blood plasma hydrogels were also evaluated. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from human adipose tissue growing in human blood plasma hydrogels showed a pattern of proliferation similar to that of the cells cultured in monolayer and also maintained their ability to differentiate to osteogenic lineage. Human blood plasma hydrogels are a suitable support for proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells derived from human adipose tissue and provides a substrate that is autologous, biocompatible, reabsorbable, easy to use, potentially injectable and economic, which could be used as a successful strategy for the management and clinical application of cell therapy in regenerative medicine.

  18. Increased response of Vero cells to PHBV matrices treated by plasma.

    PubMed

    Lucchesi, Carolina; Ferreira, Betina M P; Duek, Eliana A R; Santos, Arnaldo R; Joazeiro, Paulo P

    2008-02-01

    The copolymers poly(3-hydroxybutyric acid-co-3-hydroxyvaleric acid) (PHBV) are being intensely studied as a tissue engineering substrate. It is known that poly 3-hydroxybutyric acids (PHBs) and their copolymers are quite hydrophobic polyesters. Plasma-surface modification is an effective and economical surface treatment technique for many materials and of growing interest in biomedical engineering. In this study we investigate the advantages of oxygen and nitrogen plasma treatment to modify the PHBV surface to enable the acceleration of Vero cell adhesion and proliferation. PHBV was dissolved in methylene chloride at room temperature. The PHBV membranes were modified by oxygen or nitrogen-plasma treatments using a plasma generator. The membranes were sterilized by UV irradiation for 30 min and placed in 96-well plates. Vero cells were seeded onto the membranes and their proliferation onto the matrices was also determined by cytotoxicity and cell adhesion assay. After 2, 24, 48 and 120 h of incubation, growth of fibroblasts on matrices was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The analyses of the membranes indicated that the plasma treatment decreased the contact angle and increased the surface roughness; it also changed surface morphology, and consequently, enhanced the hydrophilic behavior of PHBV polymers. SEM analysis of Vero cells adhered to PHBV treated by plasma showed that the modified surface had allowed better cell attachment, spreading and growth than the untreated membrane. This combination of surface treatment and polymer chemistry is a valuable guide to prepare an appropriate surface for tissue engineering application.

  19. Cold atmospheric plasma jet effects on V79-4 cells.

    PubMed

    Lupu, Andreea-Roxana; Georgescu, N

    2010-01-01

    The effects of cold plasmas are due to charged particles, reactive oxygen species (ROS), reactive nitrogen species (RNS), UV photons, and intense electric field. In order to obtain a more efficient action on mammalian cells (useful for cancer therapy), we used in our studies chemically activated cold plasma (He and O2 gas mixture). V79-4 cells were exposed to plasma jet for different time periods (30, 60, 90, 120 and 150s), using different combinations of helium and oxygen inputs (He:2.5l/min + 02:12.5ml/min; He:2.51/min + O2:25ml/min; He:2.51/min + O2:37.5 ml/min). Using MTT test we demonstrated that plasma jet induced cell viability decrease in all cases. The effect of chemically activated cold plasma--apoptosis or necrosis--depends on gas mixture and treatment period. Taking into account that ROS density in cell microenvironment is related to O2 percent in the gas mixture and treatment period, we can presume that cell death is due to ROS produced in plasma jet.

  20. How plasma induced oxidation, oxygenation, and de-oxygenation influences viability of skin cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jun-Seok; Strudwick, Xanthe; Short, Robert D.; Ogawa, Kotaro; Hatta, Akimitsu; Furuta, Hiroshi; Gaur, Nishtha; Hong, Sung-Ha; Cowin, Allison J.; Fukuhara, Hideo; Inoue, Keiji; Ito, Masafumi; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Roderick W.; Bradley, James W.; Graves, David B.; Szili, Endre J.

    2016-11-01

    The effect of oxidation, oxygenation, and de-oxygenation arising from He gas jet and He plasma jet treatments on the viability of skin cells cultured in vitro has been investigated. He gas jet treatment de-oxygenated cell culture medium in a process referred to as "sparging." He plasma jet treatments oxidized, as well as oxygenated or de-oxygenated cell culture medium depending on the dissolved oxygen concentration at the time of treatment. He gas and plasma jets were shown to have beneficial or deleterious effects on skin cells depending on the concentration of dissolved oxygen and other oxidative molecules at the time of treatment. Different combinations of treatments with He gas and plasma jets can be used to modulate the concentrations of dissolved oxygen and other oxidative molecules to influence cell viability. This study highlights the importance of a priori knowledge of the concentration of dissolved oxygen at the time of plasma jet treatment, given the potential for significant impact on the biological or medical outcome. Monitoring and controlling the dynamic changes in dissolved oxygen is essential in order to develop effective strategies for the use of cold atmospheric plasma jets in biology and medicine.

  1. Effect of dietary cholesterol and fat on cell cholesterol transfer to postprandial plasma in hyperlipidemic men.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Wayne H F; de Jong, Sylvia A; Walker, Robert J

    2007-10-01

    Postprandial chylomicrons are potent ultimate acceptors of cell membrane cholesterol and are believed to accelerate reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). We compared the effects of meals rich in polyunsaturated fat (PUFA) and either high (605 mg) or low (151 mg) in cholesterol and a meal rich in dairy fat (DF) in the form of cream on net in vitro transport of red blood cell (RBC) membrane cholesterol to 4 and 6 h postprandial plasma in eight normotriglyceridemic (NTG-H) and eight hypertriglyceridemic (HTG-H) men with mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia. In HTG-H men, cell cholesterol accumulation in 6-h postprandial plasma was significantly (P = 0.02) less after the PUFA-HC meal compared with the other meals. The significant (P < 0.001) increase in cell plus endogenous cholesterol accumulation in the triglyceride-rich lipoprotein (TRL) fraction of 4 h postprandial plasma incubated with RBC was significantly (P = 0.007) higher after the PUFA-HC meal compared with DF meal in HTG-H men. In NTG-H men, cholesterol accumulation in plasma and plasma lipoproteins in the presence and absence of RBC was not significantly affected by the type of meal ingested. These data suggest that addition of large amounts of cholesterol to a PUFA meal may impair diffusion-mediated transport of cell membrane cholesterol to postprandial plasma and that replacing DF with PUFA in a meal increases postprandial lipemia and may potentially increase cholesterol accumulation in atherogenic postprandial TRL in HTG-H men.

  2. Production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and change of cell viability induced by atmospheric pressure plasma in normal and cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ja Kim, Sun; Min Joh, Hea; Chung, T. H.

    2013-10-01

    The effects of atmospheric pressure plasma jet on cancer cells (human lung carcinoma cells) and normal cells (embryonic kidney cells and bronchial epithelial cells) were investigated. Using a detection dye, the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was found to be increased in plasma-treated cells compared to non-treated and gas flow-treated cells. A significant overproduction of ROS and a reduction in cell viability were induced by plasma exposure on cancer cells. Normal cells were observed to be less affected by the plasma-mediated ROS, and cell viability was less changed. The selective effect on cancer and normal cells provides a promising prospect of cold plasma as a cancer therapy.

  3. Embryonal cell surface recognition. Extraction of an active plasma membrane component.

    PubMed

    Merrell, R; Gottlieb, D I; Glaser, L

    1975-07-25

    Plasma membranes obtained from different neural regions of the chicken embryo have previously been shown to specifically bind to homotypic cells and prevent cell aggregation (Merrell, R., and Glaser, L. (1973) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 70, 2794-2798). Proteins responsible for the specific inhibition of cell aggregation have been solubilized from the plasma membrane of neural retina and optic tectum by delipidation with acetone followed by extraction with lithium diiodosalicylate. The extracts show the same regional and temporal specificity as previously shown for plasma membrane recognition by the same cells (Gottlieb, D. I., Merrell, R., and Glaser, L. (1974) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 71, 1800-1802). Two micrograms of the most purified protein fraction inhibits the aggregation of 2.5 times 10(-4) cells under standard assay conditions. This represents a 20-fold increase in specific activity compared to whole membranes.

  4. Binding and Fusion of Extracellular Vesicles to the Plasma Membrane of Their Cell Targets.

    PubMed

    Prada, Ilaria; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2016-08-09

    Exosomes and ectosomes, extracellular vesicles of two types generated by all cells at multivesicular bodies and the plasma membrane, respectively, play critical roles in physiology and pathology. A key mechanism of their function, analogous for both types of vesicles, is the fusion of their membrane to the plasma membrane of specific target cells, followed by discharge to the cytoplasm of their luminal cargo containing proteins, RNAs, and DNA. Here we summarize the present knowledge about the interactions, binding and fusions of vesicles with the cell plasma membrane. The sequence initiates with dynamic interactions, during which vesicles roll over the plasma membrane, followed by the binding of specific membrane proteins to their cell receptors. Membrane binding is then converted rapidly into fusion by mechanisms analogous to those of retroviruses. Specifically, proteins of the extracellular vesicle membranes are structurally rearranged, and their hydrophobic sequences insert into the target cell plasma membrane which undergoes lipid reorganization, protein restructuring and membrane dimpling. Single fusions are not the only process of vesicle/cell interactions. Upon intracellular reassembly of their luminal cargoes, vesicles can be regenerated, released and fused horizontally to other target cells. Fusions of extracellular vesicles are relevant also for specific therapy processes, now intensely investigated.

  5. Defects in Postabsorptive Plasma Homeostasis of Fatty Acids in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Buchowski, Maciej S.; Swift, Larry L.; Akohoue, Sylvie A.; Shankar, Sadhna M.; Flakoll, Paul J.; Abumrad, Naji

    2010-01-01

    Background The chronic hemolytic anemia experienced by sickle cell disease (SCD) patients leads to adverse effects on oxygen transport by the blood and to a decrease in oxygen availability for peripheral tissues. Limited tissue oxygen availability has the potential to modify events of intracellular metabolism and, thus, alter lipid homeostasis. Methods The impact of SCD on plasma fatty acid homeostasis was determined in 8 African American SCD patients and in 6 healthy African American control subjects under postabsorptive conditions and during a 3-hour IV infusion of a nutrient solution containing lipid, glucose, and amino acids. Results SCD patients had higher fasting levels of plasma nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), triglycerides, and phospholipids than healthy controls. Similarly, SCD patients had higher fasting levels of fatty acids in plasma triglycerides and phospholipids than healthy controls. Infusion of nutrients resulted in equivalent plasma NEFA profiles, total NEFA, and triglycerides in SCD patients and controls. However, the plasma phospholipid concentrations and fatty acid composition of plasma triglycerides and phospholipids were significantly higher in SCD patients; in particular, plasma pools of oleic acid were consistently increased in SCD. Plasma free oleic acid levels were elevated basally, leading to increased oleic acid content in triglycerides and phospholipids both postabsorptively and during nutrient infusion. Conclusions There is an underlying defect in lipid metabolism associated with SCD best manifested during the fasting state. This abnormality in lipid homeostasis has the potential to alter red blood cell (RBC) membrane fluidity and function in SCD patients. PMID:17595432

  6. Plasma Jet (V)UV-Radiation Impact on Biologically Relevant Liquids and Cell Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tresp, H.; Bussiahn, R.; Bundscherer, L.; Monden, A.; Hammer, M. U.; Masur, K.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Woedtke, Th. V.; Reuter, S.

    2014-10-01

    In this study the generation of radicals in plasma treated liquids has been investigated. To quantify the contribution of plasma vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the species investigated, three cases have been studied: UV of plasma jet only, UV and VUV of plasma jet combined, and the plasma effluent including all reactive components. The emitted VUV has been observed by optical emission spectroscopy and its effect on radical formation in liquids has been analyzed by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Radicals have been determined in ultrapure water (dH2O), as well as in more complex, biorelevant solutions like phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution, and two different cell culture media. Various compositions lead to different reactive species formation, e.g. in PBS superoxide anion and hydroxyl radicals have been detected, in cell suspension also glutathione thiyl radicals have been found. This study highlights that UV has no impact on radical generation, whereas VUV is relevant for producing radicals. VUV treatment of dH2O generates one third of the radical concentration produced by plasma-effluent treatment. It is relevant for plasma medicine because although plasma sources are operated in open air atmosphere, still VUV can lead to formation of biorelevant radicals. This work is funded by German Federal Ministry of Education a Research (BMBF) (Grant # 03Z2DN12+11).

  7. Determination of the optimum conditions for lung cancer cells treatment using cold atmospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhlaghi, Morteza; Rajaei, Hajar; Mashayekh, Amir Shahriar; Shafiae, Mojtaba; Mahdikia, Hamed; Khani, Mohammadreza; Hassan, Zuhair Mohammad; Shokri, Babak

    2016-10-01

    Cold atmospheric plasmas (CAPs) can affect live cells and organisms due to the production of different reactive species. In this paper, the effects of various parameters of the CAP such as the treatment time, gas mixture, gas flow rate, applied voltage, and distance from the nozzle on the LL/2 lung cancer cell line have been studied. The probable effect of UV radiation has also been investigated using an MgF2 filter. Besides the cancerous cells, the 3T3 fibroblast cell line as a normal cell has been treated with the CAP. The Methylthiazol Tetrazolium assay showed that all parameters except the gas flow rate could impress effectively on the cancer cell viability. The cell proliferation seemed to be stopped after plasma treatment. The flow cytometry assay revealed that apoptosis and necrosis were appreciable. It was also found that treating time up to 2 min will not exert any effect on the normal cells.

  8. O2 plasma sintering study of TiO2 photoelectrodes in dye solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraes, R. S.; Gonçalves, A. D.; Stegemann, C.; da Silva Sobrinho, A. S.; Miyakawa, W.; Massi, M.

    2017-08-01

    The development of more efficient photoelectrochemical solar cells has been, over the years, the subject of many scientific researches. In this paper a methodology was established to carry out the sintering process of nanoporous TiO2 layer by using plasma, which was compared with sintered layers made by the conventional sintering process in a furnace. The TiO2 commercial paste was spread by doctor-blading technique and subjected to different sintering processes. Porous layer samples were subjected to structural and morphological analyses. Then photoelectrodes dye-loading was measured by optical spectrophotometry. The quality of the layers under plasma sintering process in terms of weight loss and removal of organic compounds was evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry and FT-IR. The results showed that the plasma sintering process favors the adsorption of dye on the layer surface due to the creation of active states caused by O2 reactive plasma. Furthermore the O2 plasma process provides enough energy for removing organic compounds arising from the TiO2 paste and for providing nanoparticle sintering. Solar cells assembled with the plasma-sintered layers had a power conversion efficiency 20.1% higher than the obtained in solar cells sintered in a conventional furnace, proving the efficiency of the plasma sintering process.

  9. Clinical and Prognostic Effect of Plasma Fibrinogen in Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuejun; Hong, Mei; Jing, Suoshi; Liu, Xingchen; Wang, Hanzhang; Wang, Xinping; Kaushik, Dharam; Rodriguez, Ronald; Wang, Zhiping

    2017-01-01

    Background. Although numerous studies have shown that plasma fibrinogen is linked to renal cell carcinoma (RCC) risk, the consistency and magnitude of the effect of plasma fibrinogen are unclear. The aim of the study was to explore the association between plasma fibrinogen and RCC prognosis. Methods. An electronic search of Embase, PubMed/MEDLINE, and the Cochrane databases was performed to identify relevant studies published prior to June 1, 2016. Results. A total of 3744 patients with RCC from 7 published studies were included in the meta-analysis. The prognostic and clinical relevance of plasma fibrinogen are evaluated in RCC patients. Statistical significance of the combined hazard ratio (HR) was detected for overall survival, cancer-specific survival, and disease-free survival. Our pooled results showed that elevated plasma fibrinogen was significantly associated with clinical stage and Fuhrman grading. The level of plasma fibrinogen was not found to be associated with tumor type and gender. Conclusions. Elevated plasma fibrinogen is a strong indicator of poorer prognosis of patients with RCC, whereas the plasma fibrinogen is not significantly associated with tumor type. Therefore, plasma fibrinogen could be used in patients with RCC for risk stratification and decision providing a proper therapeutic strategy.

  10. Clinical and Prognostic Effect of Plasma Fibrinogen in Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Mei; Jing, Suoshi; Liu, Xingchen; Wang, Hanzhang; Wang, Xinping; Kaushik, Dharam; Rodriguez, Ronald

    2017-01-01

    Background. Although numerous studies have shown that plasma fibrinogen is linked to renal cell carcinoma (RCC) risk, the consistency and magnitude of the effect of plasma fibrinogen are unclear. The aim of the study was to explore the association between plasma fibrinogen and RCC prognosis. Methods. An electronic search of Embase, PubMed/MEDLINE, and the Cochrane databases was performed to identify relevant studies published prior to June 1, 2016. Results. A total of 3744 patients with RCC from 7 published studies were included in the meta-analysis. The prognostic and clinical relevance of plasma fibrinogen are evaluated in RCC patients. Statistical significance of the combined hazard ratio (HR) was detected for overall survival, cancer-specific survival, and disease-free survival. Our pooled results showed that elevated plasma fibrinogen was significantly associated with clinical stage and Fuhrman grading. The level of plasma fibrinogen was not found to be associated with tumor type and gender. Conclusions. Elevated plasma fibrinogen is a strong indicator of poorer prognosis of patients with RCC, whereas the plasma fibrinogen is not significantly associated with tumor type. Therefore, plasma fibrinogen could be used in patients with RCC for risk stratification and decision providing a proper therapeutic strategy. PMID:28154828

  11. MYC protein expression is detected in plasma cell myeloma but not in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ruobing; Cerny, Jan; Devitt, Katherine; Dresser, Karen; Nath, Rajneesh; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Rodig, Scott J; Chen, Benjamin J; Woda, Bruce A; Yu, Hongbo

    2014-06-01

    It has been recognized that monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) precedes a diagnosis of plasma cell myeloma in most patients. Recent gene expression array analysis has revealed that an MYC activation signature is detected in plasma cell myeloma but not in MGUS. In this study, we performed immunohistochemical studies using membrane CD138 and nuclear MYC double staining on bone marrow biopsies from patients who met the diagnostic criteria of plasma cell myeloma or MGUS. Our study demonstrated nuclear MYC expression in CD138-positive plasma cells in 22 of 26 (84%) plasma cell myeloma samples and in none of the 29 bone marrow samples from patients with MGUS. In addition, our data on the follow-up biopsies from plasma cell myeloma patients with high MYC expression demonstrated that evaluation of MYC expression in plasma cells can be useful in detecting residual disease. We also demonstrated that plasma cells gained MYC expression in 5 of 8 patients (62.5%) when progressing from MGUS to plasma cell myeloma. Analysis of additional lymphomas with plasmacytic differentiation, including lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma, marginal zone lymphoma, and plasmablastic lymphoma, reveals that MYC detection can be a useful tool in the diagnosis of plasma cell myeloma.

  12. Small unilamellar liposomes as a membrane model for cell inactivation by cold atmospheric plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheux, S.; Frache, G.; Thomann, J. S.; Clément, F.; Penny, C.; Belmonte, T.; Duday, D.

    2016-09-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma is thought to be a promising tool for numerous biomedical applications due to its ability to generate a large diversity of reactive species in a controlled way. In some cases, it can also generate pulsed electric fields at the zone of treatment, which can induce processes such as electroporation in cell membranes. However, the interaction of these reactive species and the pulse electric field with cells in a physiological medium is very complex, and we still need a better understanding in order to be useful for future applications. A way to reach this goal is to work with model cell membranes such as liposomes, with the simplest physiological liquid and in a controlled atmosphere in order to limit the number of parallel reactions and processes. In this paper, where this approach has been chosen, 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) small unilamellar vesicles (SUV) have been synthesized in a phosphate buffered aqueous solution, and this solution has been treated by a nanosecond pulsed plasma jet under a pure nitrogen atmosphere. It is only the composition of the plasma gas that has been changed in order to generate different cocktails of reactive species. After the quantification of the main plasma reactive species in the phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution, structural, surface charge state, and chemical modifications generated on the plasma treated liposomes, due to the interaction with the plasma reactive species, have been carefully characterized. These results allow us to further understand the effect of plasma reactive species on model cell membranes in physiological liquids. The permeation through the liposomal membrane and the reaction of plasma reactive species with molecules encapsulated inside the liposomes have also been evaluated. New processes of degradation are finally presented and discussed, which come from the specific conditions of plasma treatment under the pure nitrogen atmosphere.

  13. Proteome-wide analysis reveals an age-associated cellular phenotype of in situ aged human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Waldera-Lupa, Daniel M.; Kalfalah, Faiza; Florea, Ana-Maria; Sass, Steffen; Kruse, Fabian; Rieder, Vera; Tigges, Julia; Fritsche, Ellen; Krutmann, Jean; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Meyer, Helmut E.; Boege, Fritz; Theis, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed an ex vivo model of in situ aged human dermal fibroblasts, obtained from 15 adult healthy donors from three different age groups using an unbiased quantitative proteome-wide approach applying label-free mass spectrometry. Thereby, we identified 2409 proteins, including 43 proteins with an age-associated abundance change. Most of the differentially abundant proteins have not been described in the context of fibroblasts’ aging before, but the deduced biological processes confirmed known hallmarks of aging and led to a consistent picture of eight biological categories involved in fibroblast aging, namely proteostasis, cell cycle and proliferation, development and differentiation, cell death, cell organization and cytoskeleton, response to stress, cell communication and signal transduction, as well as RNA metabolism and translation. The exhaustive analysis of protein and mRNA data revealed that 77% of the age-associated proteins were not linked to expression changes of the corresponding transcripts. This is in line with an associated miRNA study and led us to the conclusion that most of the age-associated alterations detected at the proteome level are likely caused post-transcriptionally rather than by differential gene expression. In summary, our findings led to the characterization of novel proteins potentially associated with fibroblast aging and revealed that primary cultures of in situ aged fibroblasts are characterized by moderate age-related proteomic changes comprising the multifactorial process of aging. PMID:25411231

  14. Factors regulating immunoglobulin production by normal and disease-associated plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Jackson, David A; Elsawa, Sherine F

    2015-01-21

    Immunoglobulins are molecules produced by activated B cells and plasma cells in response to exposure to antigens. Upon antigen exposure, these molecules are secreted allowing the immune system to recognize and effectively respond to a myriad of pathogens. Immunoglobulin or antibody secreting cells are the mature form of B lymphocytes, which during their development undergo gene rearrangements and selection in the bone marrow ultimately leading to the generation of B cells, each expressing a single antigen-specific receptor/immunoglobulin molecule. Each individual immunoglobulin molecule has an affinity for a unique motif, or epitope, found on a given antigen. When presented with an antigen, activated B cells differentiate into either plasma cells (which secrete large amounts of antibody that is specific for the inducing antigen), or memory B cells (which are long-lived and elicit a stronger and faster response if the host is re-exposed to the same antigen). The secreted form of immunoglobulin, when bound to an antigen, serves as an effector molecule that directs other cells of the immune system to facilitate the neutralization of soluble antigen or the eradication of the antigen-expressing pathogen. This review will focus on the regulation of secreted immunoglobulin by long-lived normal or disease-associated plasma. Specifically, the focus will be on signaling and transcriptional events that regulate the development and homeostasis of long-lived immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells.

  15. Trypanosoma cruzi subverts the sphingomyelinase-mediated plasma membrane repair pathway for cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Maria Cecilia; Cortez, Mauro; Flannery, Andrew R.; Tam, Christina; Mortara, Renato A.

    2011-01-01

    Upon host cell contact, the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi triggers cytosolic Ca2+ transients that induce exocytosis of lysosomes, a process required for cell invasion. However, the exact mechanism by which lysosomal exocytosis mediates T. cruzi internalization remains unclear. We show that host cell entry by T. cruzi mimics a process of plasma membrane injury and repair that involves Ca2+-dependent exocytosis of lysosomes, delivery of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane, and a rapid form of endocytosis that internalizes membrane lesions. Host cells incubated with T. cruzi trypomastigotes are transiently wounded, show increased levels of endocytosis, and become more susceptible to infection when injured with pore-forming toxins. Inhibition or depletion of lysosomal ASM, which blocks plasma membrane repair, markedly reduces the susceptibility of host cells to T. cruzi invasion. Notably, extracellular addition of sphingomyelinase stimulates host cell endocytosis, enhances T. cruzi invasion, and restores normal invasion levels in ASM-depleted cells. Ceramide, the product of sphingomyelin hydrolysis, is detected in newly formed parasitophorous vacuoles containing trypomastigotes but not in the few parasite-containing vacuoles formed in ASM-depleted cells. Thus, T. cruzi subverts the ASM-dependent ceramide-enriched endosomes that function in plasma membrane repair to infect host cells. PMID:21536739

  16. Differential Epigenetic Effects of Atmospheric Cold Plasma on MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung-Bin; Kim, Byungtak; Bae, Hansol; Lee, Hyunkyung; Lee, Seungyeon; Choi, Eun H.; Kim, Sun Jung

    2015-01-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (plasma) has emerged as a novel tool for a cancer treatment option, having been successfully applied to a few types of cancer cells, as well as tissues. However, to date, no studies have been performed to examine the effect of plasma on epigenetic alterations, including CpG methylation. In this study, the effects of plasma on DNA methylation changes in breast cancer cells were examined by treating cultured MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, representing estrogen-positive and estrogen-negative cancer cells, respectively, with plasma. A pyrosequencing analysis of Alu indicated that a specific CpG site was induced to be hypomethylated from 23.4 to 20.3% (p < 0.05) by plasma treatment in the estrogen-negative MDA-MB-231 cells only. A genome-wide methylation analysis identified “cellular movement, connective tissue development and function, tissue development” and “cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cell death and survival, cellular development” as the top networks. Of the two cell types, the MDA-MB-231 cells underwent a higher rate of apoptosis and a decreased proliferation rate upon plasma treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that plasma induces epigenetic and cellular changes in a cell type-specific manner, suggesting that a careful screening of target cells and tissues is necessary for the potential application of plasma as a cancer treatment option. PMID:26042423

  17. The tyrosine kinase Lyn limits the cytokine responsiveness of plasma cells to restrict their accumulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Infantino, Simona; Jones, Sarah A; Walker, Jennifer A; Maxwell, Mhairi J; Light, Amanda; O'Donnell, Kristy; Tsantikos, Evelyn; Peperzak, Victor; Phesse, Toby; Ernst, Matthias; Mackay, Fabienne; Hibbs, Margaret L; Fairfax, Kirsten A; Tarlinton, David M

    2014-08-12

    Maintenance of an appropriate number of plasma cells, long-lived antibody-producing cells that are derived from B cells, is essential for maintaining immunological memory while limiting disease. Plasma cell survival relies on extrinsic factors, the limited availability of which determines the size of the plasma cell population. Mice deficient in the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Lyn are prone to an autoimmune disease that is characterized by inflammation and an excess of plasma cells (plasmacytosis). We demonstrated that the plasmacytosis was intrinsic to B cells and independent of inflammation. We also showed that Lyn attenuated signaling by signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and STAT5 in response to the cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-3, respectively, in two previously uncharacterized plasma cell signaling pathways. Thus, in the absence of Lyn, the survival of plasma cells was improved, which enabled the plasma cells to become established in excess numbers in niches in vivo. These data identify Lyn as a key regulator of survival signaling in plasma cells, limiting plasma cell accumulation and autoimmune disease susceptibility. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Plasma modified PLA electrospun membranes for actinorhodin production intensification in Streptomyces coelicolor immobilized-cell cultivations.

    PubMed

    Scaffaro, Roberto; Lopresti, Francesco; Sutera, Alberto; Botta, Luigi; Fontana, Rosa Maria; Gallo, Giuseppe

    2017-09-01

    Most of industrially relevant bioproducts are produced by submerged cultivations of actinomycetes. The immobilization of these Gram-positive filamentous bacteria on suitable porous supports may prevent mycelial cell-cell aggregation and pellet formation which usually negatively affect actinomycete submerged cultivations, thus, resulting in an improved biosynthetic capability. In this work, electrospun polylactic acid (PLA) membranes, subjected or not to O2-plasma treatment (PLA-plasma), were used as support for immobilized-cell submerged cultivations of Streptomyces coelicolor M145. This strain produces different bioactive compounds, including the blue-pigmented actinorhodin (ACT) and red-pigmented undecylprodigiosin (RED), and constitutes a model for the study of antibiotic-producing actinomycetes. Wet contact angles and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirmed the increased wettability of PLA-plasma due to the formation of polar functional groups such as carboxyl and hydroxyl moieties. Scanning electron microscope observations, carried out at different incubation times, revealed that S. coelicolor immobilized-cells created a dense "biofilm-like" mycelial network on both kinds of PLA membranes. Cultures of S. coelicolor immobilized-cells on PLA or PLA-plasma membranes produced higher biomass (between 1.5 and 2 fold) as well as higher levels of RED and ACT than planktonic cultures. In particular, cultures of immobilized-cells on PLA and PLA-plasma produced comparable levels of RED that were approximatively 4 and 5 fold higher than those produced by planktonic cultures, respectively. In contrast, levels of ACT produced by immobilized-cell cultures on PLA and PLA-plasma were different, being 5 and 10 fold higher than those of planktonic cultures, respectively. Therefore, this is study demonstrated the positive influence of PLA membrane on growth and secondary metabolite production in S. coelicolor and also revealed that O2-plasma treated PLA membranes

  19. Effects of atmospheric pressure plasma jet with floating electrode on murine melanoma and fibroblast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Liu, J.; Yao, C.; Chen, S.; Lin, F.; Li, P.; Shi, X.; Zhang, Guan-Jun

    2017-08-01

    Atmospheric pressure cold plasma jets have been recently shown as a highly promising tool in certain cancer therapies. In this paper, an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) with a one inner floating and two outer electrode configuration using helium gas for medical applications is developed. Subjected to a range of applied voltages with a frequency of 19.8 kHz at a fixed rate of gas flow (i.e., 3 l/min), electrical and optical characteristics of the APPJ are investigated. Compared with the device only with two outer electrodes, higher discharge current, longer jet, and more active species in the plasma plume at the same applied voltage together with the lower gas breakdown voltage can be achieved through embedding a floating inner electrode. Employing the APPJ with a floating electrode, the effects of identical plasma treatment time durations on murine melanoma cancer and normal fibroblast cells cultured in vitro are evaluated. The results of cell viability, cell apoptosis, and DNA damage detection show that the plasma can inactivate melanoma cells in a time-dependent manner from 10 s to 60 s compared with the control group (p < 0.05). However, for fibroblast cells compared with their control group, the plasma with treatment time from 30 s to 60 s can induce significant changes (p < 0.05), showing a less cytotoxic effect than that on melanoma cells at the same treatment time. The different basal reactive oxygen species level and antioxidant superoxide dismutase level of two kinds of cells may account for their different responses towards the identical plasma exposure.

  20. Atmospheric-pressure plasma-jet from micronozzle array and its biological effects on living cells for cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kangil; Kim, Geunyoung; Yang, Sang Sik; Choi, Jae Duk; Hong, Yong Cheol; Noh, Eun Joo; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2011-02-14

    We propose a plasma-jet device with a micrometer-sized nozzle array for use in a cancer therapy. Also, we show the biological effects of atmospheric-pressure plasma on living cells. Nitrogen-plasma activated a surrogate DNA damage signal transduction pathway, called the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-checkpoint kinase 2 pathway, suggesting that the nitrogen-plasma generates DNA double-strand breaks. Phosphorylation of H2AX and p53 was detected in the plasma-treated cells, leading to apoptotic cell death. Thus, an effect for the nitrogen plasma in the control of apoptotic cell death provides insight into the how biological effects of the nitrogen-plasma can be applied to the control of cell survival, a finding with potential therapeutic implications.

  1. Atmospheric-pressure plasma-jet from micronozzle array and its biological effects on living cells for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kangil; Choi, Jae Duk; Hong, Yong Cheol; Kim, Geunyoung; Noh, Eun Joo; Lee, Jong-Soo; Yang, Sang Sik

    2011-02-01

    We propose a plasma-jet device with a micrometer-sized nozzle array for use in a cancer therapy. Also, we show the biological effects of atmospheric-pressure plasma on living cells. Nitrogen-plasma activated a surrogate DNA damage signal transduction pathway, called the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-checkpoint kinase 2 pathway, suggesting that the nitrogen-plasma generates DNA double-strand breaks. Phosphorylation of H2AX and p53 was detected in the plasma-treated cells, leading to apoptotic cell death. Thus, an effect for the nitrogen plasma in the control of apoptotic cell death provides insight into the how biological effects of the nitrogen-plasma can be applied to the control of cell survival, a finding with potential therapeutic implications.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF SOLID-STATE DRIVERS FOR THE NIF PLASMA ELECTRODE POCKELS CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, F; Arnold, P A; McHale, G B; James, G; Brown, G; Cook, E G; Hickman, B C

    2008-05-14

    Large aperture Plasma Electrode Pockels Cells (PEPC) are an enabling technology in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Pockels cell allows the NIF laser to take advantage of multipass amplifier architecture, thus reducing costs and physical size of the facility. Each Pockels cell comprises four 40-cm x 40-cm apertures arranged in a 4 x 1 array. The combination of the Pockels cell and a thin-film polarizer, configured in a 4 x 1 array, form an optical switch that is key to achieving multi-pass operation. Solid-state Plasma Pulse Generators (PPGs) and high current high voltage solid-state Switch Pulse Generators (SPGs) have been developed for use in the PEPC. The solid-state plasma pulse generators initiate and maintain plasma within the cells; each pulser is capable of delivering 60J of energy to each plasma channel. Deployment of the solid-state PPGs has been completed in NIF. The MOSFET-switched SPG is capable of delivering a requisite fast rise time, 17kV flattop pulse to the cells nonlinear crystals. A complete software and hardware control system has been developed and is currently being tested for use on the solid-state SPGs. Also a transmission line modeling, development, and testing effort is in process, in support of NIFs Advanced Radiographic Capabilities (ARC). Work is scheduled for completion by the end of the calendar year.

  3. Enhanced adherence of mouse fibroblast and vascular cells to plasma modified polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Reznickova, Alena; Novotna, Zdenka; Kolska, Zdenka; Kasalkova, Nikola Slepickova; Rimpelova, Silvie; Svorcik, Vaclav

    2015-01-01

    Since the last decade, tissue engineering has shown a sensational promise in providing more viable alternatives to surgical procedures for harvested tissues, implants and prostheses. Biomedical polymers, such as low-density polyethylene (LDPE), high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), were activated by Ar plasma discharge. Degradation of polymer chains was examined by determination of the thickness of ablated layer. The amount of an ablated polymer layer was measured by gravimetry. Contact angle, measured by goniometry, was studied as a function of plasma exposure and post-exposure aging times. Chemical structure of modified polymers was characterized by angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Surface chemistry and polarity of the samples were investigated by electrokinetic analysis. Changes in surface morphology were followed using atomic force microscopy. Cytocompatibility of plasma activated polyethylene foils was studied using two distinct model cell lines; VSMCs (vascular smooth muscle cells) as a model for vascular graft testing and connective tissue cells L929 (mouse fibroblasts) approved for standardized material cytotoxicity testing. Specifically, the cell number, morphology, and metabolic activity of the adhered and proliferated cells on the polyethylene matrices were studied in vitro. It was found that the plasma treatment caused ablation of the polymers, resulting in dramatic changes in their surface morphology and roughness. ARXPS and electrokinetic measurements revealed oxidation of the polymer surface. It was found that plasma activation has a positive effect on the adhesion and proliferation of VSMCs and L929 cells.

  4. Targeting protective catalase of tumor cells with cold atmospheric plasma-treated medium (PAM).

    PubMed

    Bauer, Georg

    2017-08-01

    ● Background Application of cold atmospheric plasma to medium generates "plasma-activated medium" that induces apoptosis selectively in tumor cells and that has an antitumor effect in vivo. The underlying mechanisms are not well understood. ● Objective Elucidation of potential chemical interactions within plasma-activated medium and of reactions of medium components with specific target structures of tumor cells should allow to define the active principle in plasma activated medium. ● Method Established knowledge of intercellular apoptosis-inducing reactive oxygen/nitrogen species-dependent signaling and its control by membrane-associated catalase was reviewed. Model experiments using extracellular singlet oxygen were analyzed with respect to catalase inactivation and their relevance for the antitumor action of cold atmospheric plasma. Potential interactions of the tumor cell-specific control system with components of plasma-activated medium were discussed within the scope of the reviewed signaling principles. ● Result None of the long-lived species found in plasma-activated medium, such as nitrite and H2O2, nor OCl- or .NO seemed to have the potential to interfere with catalase-dependent control of apoptosis-inducing signaling of tumor cells when acting alone. However, the combination of H2O2 and nitrite might generate peroxynitrite. The protonation of peroxnitrite to peroxynitrous acid allows for the generation of hydroxyl radicals that react with H2O2, leading to the formation of hydroperoxide radicals. These allow for singlet oxygen generation and inactivation of membrane-associated catalase through an autoamplificatory mechanism, followed by intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling. ● Conclusions Nitrite and H2O2 in plasma-activated medium establish singlet oxygen-dependent interference selectively with the control system of tumor cells. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Consensus guidelines on plasma cell myeloma minimal residual disease analysis and reporting.

    PubMed

    Arroz, Maria; Came, Neil; Lin, Pei; Chen, Weina; Yuan, Constance; Lagoo, Anand; Monreal, Mariela; de Tute, Ruth; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Rawstron, Andy C; Paiva, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Major heterogeneity between laboratories in flow cytometry (FC) minimal residual disease (MRD) testing in multiple myeloma (MM) must be overcome. Cytometry societies such as the International Clinical Cytometry Society and the European Society for Clinical Cell Analysis recognize a strong need to establish minimally acceptable requirements and recommendations to perform such complex testing. A group of 11 flow cytometrists currently performing FC testing in MM using different instrumentation, panel designs (≥ 6-color) and analysis software compared the procedures between their respective laboratories and reviewed the literature to propose a consensus guideline on flow-MRD analysis and reporting in MM. Consensus guidelines support i) the use of minimum of five initial gating parameters (CD38, CD138, CD45, forward, and sideward light scatter) within the same aliquot for accurate identification of the total plasma cell compartment; ii) the analysis of potentially aberrant phenotypic markers and to report the antigen expression pattern on neoplastic plasma cells as being reduced, normal or increased, when compared to a normal reference plasma cell immunophenotype (obtained using the same instrument and parameters); and iii) the percentage of total bone marrow plasma cells plus the percentages of both normal and neoplastic plasma cells within the total bone marrow plasma cell compartment, and over total bone marrow cells. Consensus guidelines on minimal current and future MRD analyses should target a lower limit of detection of 0.001%, and ideally a limit of quantification of 0.001%, which requires at least 3 × 10(6) and 5 × 10(6) bone marrow cells to be measured, respectively. © 2015 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  6. Elevated plasma glucosylsphingosine in Gaucher disease: relation to phenotype, storage cell markers, and therapeutic response

    PubMed Central

    Dekker, Nick; van Dussen, Laura; Hollak, Carla E. M.; Overkleeft, Herman; Scheij, Saskia; Ghauharali, Karen; van Breemen, Mariëlle J.; Ferraz, Maria J.; Groener, Johanna E. M.; Maas, Mario; Wijburg, Frits A.; Speijer, Dave; Tylki-Szymanska, Anna; Mistry, Pramod K.; Boot, Rolf G.

    2011-01-01

    Gaucher disease, caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase, leads to prominent glucosylceramide accumulation in lysosomes of tissue macrophages (Gaucher cells). Here we show glucosylsphingosine, the deacylated form of glucosylceramide, to be markedly increased in plasma of symptomatic nonneuronopathic (type 1) Gaucher patients (n = 64, median = 230.7nM, range 15.6-1035.2nM; normal (n = 28): median 1.3nM, range 0.8-2.7nM). The method developed for mass spectrometric quantification of plasma glucosylsphingosine is sensitive and robust. Plasma glucosylsphingosine levels correlate with established plasma markers of Gaucher cells, chitotriosidase (ρ = 0.66) and CCL18 (ρ = 0.40). Treatment of Gaucher disease patients by supplementing macrophages with mannose-receptor targeted recombinant glucocerebrosidase results in glucosylsphingosine reduction, similar to protein markers of Gaucher cells. Since macrophages prominently accumulate the lysoglycosphingolipid on glucocerebrosidase inactivation, Gaucher cells seem a major source of the elevated plasma glucosylsphingosine. Our findings show that plasma glucosylsphingosine can qualify as a biomarker for type 1 Gaucher disease, but that further investigations are warranted regarding its relationship with clinical manifestations of Gaucher disease. PMID:21868580

  7. Plasma contact system activation drives anaphylaxis in severe mast cell-mediated allergic reactions.

    PubMed

    Sala-Cunill, Anna; Björkqvist, Jenny; Senter, Riccardo; Guilarte, Mar; Cardona, Victoria; Labrador, Moises; Nickel, Katrin F; Butler, Lynn; Luengo, Olga; Kumar, Parvin; Labberton, Linda; Long, Andy; Di Gennaro, Antonio; Kenne, Ellinor; Jämsä, Anne; Krieger, Thorsten; Schlüter, Hartmut; Fuchs, Tobias; Flohr, Stefanie; Hassiepen, Ulrich; Cumin, Frederic; McCrae, Keith; Maas, Coen; Stavrou, Evi; Renné, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Anaphylaxis is an acute, potentially lethal, multisystem syndrome resulting from the sudden release of mast cell-derived mediators into the circulation. We report here that a plasma protease cascade, the factor XII-driven contact system, critically contributes to the pathogenesis of anaphylaxis in both murine models and human subjects. Deficiency in or pharmacologic inhibition of factor XII, plasma kallikrein, high-molecular-weight kininogen, or the bradykinin B2 receptor, but not the B1 receptor, largely attenuated allergen/IgE-mediated mast cell hyperresponsiveness in mice. Reconstitutions of factor XII null mice with human factor XII restored susceptibility for allergen/IgE-mediated hypotension. Activated mast cells systemically released heparin, which provided a negatively charged surface for factor XII autoactivation. Activated factor XII generates plasma kallikrein, which proteolyzes kininogen, leading to the liberation of bradykinin. We evaluated the contact system in patients with anaphylaxis. In all 10 plasma samples immunoblotting revealed activation of factor XII, plasma kallikrein, and kininogen during the acute phase of anaphylaxis but not at basal conditions or in healthy control subjects. The severity of anaphylaxis was associated with mast cell degranulation, increased plasma heparin levels, the intensity of contact system activation, and bradykinin formation. In summary, the data collectively show a role of the contact system in patients with anaphylaxis and support the hypothesis that targeting bradykinin generation and signaling provides a novel and alternative treatment strategy for anaphylactic attacks. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Exocytosis of acid sphingomyelinase by wounded cells promotes endocytosis and plasma membrane repair

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Christina; Idone, Vincent; Devlin, Cecilia; Fernandes, Maria Cecilia; Flannery, Andrew; He, Xingxuan; Schuchman, Edward; Tabas, Ira

    2010-01-01

    Rapid plasma membrane resealing is essential for cellular survival. Earlier studies showed that plasma membrane repair requires Ca2+-dependent exocytosis of lysosomes and a rapid form of endocytosis that removes membrane lesions. However, the functional relationship between lysosomal exocytosis and the rapid endocytosis that follows membrane injury is unknown. In this study, we show that the lysosomal enzyme acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is released extracellularly when cells are wounded in the presence of Ca2+. ASM-deficient cells, including human cells from Niemann-Pick type A (NPA) patients, undergo lysosomal exocytosis after wounding but are defective in injury-dependent endocytosis and plasma membrane repair. Exogenously added recombinant human ASM restores endocytosis and resealing in ASM-depleted cells, suggesting that conversion of plasma membrane sphingomyelin to ceramide by this lysosomal enzyme promotes lesion internalization. These findings reveal a molecular mechanism for restoration of plasma membrane integrity through exocytosis of lysosomes and identify defective plasma membrane repair as a possible component of the severe pathology observed in NPA patients. PMID:20530211

  9. Low-temperature plasma needle effects on cultured metastatic breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knecht, Sean; Bilen, Sven; Micci, Michael; Brubaker, Timothy; Wilson, Michael; Cook, Ian; Czesak, Nicholas; Hipkins, Garret

    2015-11-01

    The Penn State Low-Temperature Plasma group is presently investigating the applications of low-temperature plasma for biomedical applications, including the effects on MDA-MB-231 metastatic breast cancer cells. A plasma needle system has been designed and constructed that consists of a 22-gauge stainless steel syringe needle, which acts as the high-voltage electrode, covered with PEEK tubing as the dielectric with a ring ground electrode on the outside. The system is driven by a low-frequency AC voltage amplifier, with typical operating conditions of 2-5 kV peak voltage at 5 kHz. Helium is used as the working fluid and produces a plasma jet with ~ cm's visible extent. Cultured breast cancer cells were provided by our collaborator and exposed to the plasma needle for varying doses and detachment of cells was observed. The effects are attributed to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation and transport through the cell culture medium. Plasma needle characterization and the results of the breast cancer experiments will be presented.

  10. Ammonia plasma treatment of polystyrene surfaces enhances proliferation of primary human mesenchymal stem cells and human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kleinhans, Claudia; Barz, Jakob; Wurster, Simone; Willig, Marleen; Oehr, Christian; Müller, Michael; Walles, Heike; Hirth, Thomas; Kluger, Petra J

    2013-03-01

    The control of surface properties is a substantial step in the development and improvement of biomaterials for clinical applications as well as for their use in tissue engineering. Interaction of the substrate surface with the biochemical or biological environment is crucial for the outcome of the applied biomaterial and therefore should meet specific requirements regarding the chemical composition, wettability, elasticity, and charge. In this study, we examined the effect of chemical groups introduced by low pressure plasma treatments of polystyrene surfaces on the cell behavior of primary human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and dermal microvascular endothelial cells (hDMECs). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and contact angle measurements were employed to evaluate ammonia-, carbon dioxide-, and acrylic acid-plasma modifications to substrate surfaces. HMSCs and hDMECs were analyzed simultaneously to identify the most suitable surface functionalization for each cell type. Significantly higher cell proliferation was detected on ammonia plasma-treated surfaces. Cell-material interaction could be shown on all created interfaces as well as the expression of typical cell markers. Hence, the applied plasma treatment presents a suitable tool to improve culture condition on polystyrene for two important cell types (hMSCs and hDMECs) in the field of tissue engineering. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Age-Associated Increase in BMP Signaling Inhibits Hippocampal Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Hanadie; Morgenthaler, Adam; Schlesinger, Christina; Bugaj, Lukasz; Conboy, Irina M; Schaffer, David V

    2015-05-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis, the product of resident neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation, persists into adulthood but decreases with organismal aging, which may contribute to the age-related decline in cognitive function. The mechanisms that underlie this decrease in neurogenesis are not well understood, although evidence in general indicates that extrinsic changes in an aged stem cell niche can contribute to functional decline in old stem cells. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family members are intercellular signaling proteins that regulate stem and progenitor cell quiescence, proliferation, and differentiation in various tissues and are likewise critical regulators of neurogenesis in young adults. Here, we establish that BMP signaling increases significantly in old murine hippocampi and inhibits neural progenitor cell proliferation. Furthermore, direct in vivo attenuation of BMP signaling via genetic and transgenic perturbations in aged mice led to elevated neural stem cell proliferation, and subsequent neurogenesis, in old hippocampi. Such advances in our understanding of mechanisms underlying decreased hippocampal neurogenesis with age may offer targets for the treatment of age-related cognitive decline.

  12. Biclonal IgD and IgM Plasma Cell Myeloma: A Report of Two Cases and a Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongchuan W; Kotsikogianni, Ioanna; Raval, Jay S; Roth, Christine G; Rollins-Raval, Marian A

    2013-01-01

    Biclonal plasma cell myelomas producing two different isotypes of immunoglobulins are extremely rare entities; to date, the combination of IgD and IgM secretion by a biclonal plasma cell myeloma has not been reported. Bone marrow biopsy immunohistochemical studies in two cases revealed neoplastic plasma cells coexpressing IgD and IgM, but serum protein electrophoresis identified only the IgM monoclonal paraprotein in both cases. Biclonal plasma cell myelomas, while currently not well characterized in terms of their clinical behavior, should be distinguished from B-cell lymphoma with plasmacytic differentiation, given the different therapeutic implications. Both cases reported herein demonstrated chemotherapy-resistant clinical courses.

  13. Comparison of EBV DNA viral load in whole blood, plasma, B-cells and B-cell culture supernatant.

    PubMed

    Ouedraogo, David Eric; Bollore, Karine; Viljoen, Johannes; Foulongne, Vincent; Reynes, Jacques; Cartron, Guillaume; Vendrell, Jean-Pierre; Van de Perre, Philippe; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2014-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome quantitation in whole blood is used widely for therapeutic monitoring of EBV-associated disorders in immunosuppressed individuals and in patients with EBV-associated lymphoma. However, the most appropriate biological material to be used for EBV DNA quantitation remains a subject of debate. This study compare the detection rate and levels of EBV DNA from whole blood, plasma, enriched B-cells, and B-cell short-term culture supernatant using quantitative real-time PCR. Samples were collected from 33 subjects with either HIV infection or B-cell lymphoma. Overall, EBV DNA was detected in 100% of enriched B-cell samples, in 82% of B-cell culture supernatants, in 57% of plasma, and 42% of whole blood samples. A significant correlation for EBV viral load was found between enriched B-cell and B-cell culture supernatant material (ρ = 0.92; P < 0.0001), but no significant correlation existed between EBV DNA levels in whole blood and enriched B-cells (ρ = -0.02; P = 0.89), whole blood and plasma (ρ = 0.24; P = 0.24), or enriched B-cells and plasma (ρ = 0.08; P = 0.77). Testing of enriched B-cells appeared to be the most sensitive method for detection of EBV DNA as well as for exploration of the cellular reservoir. Quantitation of EBV DNA in plasma and B-cell culture supernatant may be of interest to assess EBV reactivation dynamics and response to treatment as well as to decipher EBV host-pathogen interactions in various clinical scenarios. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Isolation of the plasma membrane and organelles from Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Cezanne, L; Navarro, L; Tocanne, J F

    1992-12-09

    Two methods are described enabling the plasma membrane from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to be obtained rapidly, relatively pure and with a good yield. In both cases, cells were disrupted by nitrogen cavitation in an isoosmotic buffer either at pH 5.4 or at pH 7.4. In the first approach, cells were lysed at pH 7.4 and the plasma membrane and cell organelles were isolated on a self-generated gradient of Percoll, at neutral pH. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum were recovered in the denser fractions, plasma membrane fragments were found in the lighter fractions, but always contaminated by lysosomes. Because lysosomes were found to sediment in acidic conditions, cells were lysed at pH 5.4 and presedimentation (1500 x g) of the cell homogenate at the same pH enabled more than 80% of the lysosomes to be removed. Then, ultracentrifugation of the supernatant over a Percoll gradient at neutral pH yielded plasma membrane fractions practically free of lysosomes with an enrichment ratio of 3 and fractions of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum with enrichment ratios of 17 and 6, respectively. A major problem was encountered in the final step of elimination of Percoll from the purified plasma membrane fractions. Whatever the technique used for eliminating Percoll, plasma membranes were observed to be contaminated by a Percoll constituent which prevented further purification and biochemical identification of the lipids extracted from these membrane fractions to be carried out. A second method of plasma membrane preparation was tested consisting first in the coating of the cell surface with positive colloidal silica which was stabilized by an anionic polymer. Then, and through differential centrifugations, plasma membrane fractions were easily obtained within less than 1 h, with a yield of 65% and an enrichment ratio of 7. The coating pellicle was quantitatively removed thus enabling any biochemical manipulation of the plasma membrane to be carried out. The lipids

  15. Operation of a multiple cell array detector in plasma experiments with a heavy ion beam diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Goncalves, B.; Malaquias, A.; Nedzelskiy, I. S.; Pereira, L.; Silva, C.; Varandas, C.A.F.; Cabral, J.A.C.; Khrebtov, S.M.; Dreval, N.B.; Krupnik, L.I.; Hidalgo, C.; Depablos, J.

    2004-10-01

    A multiple cell array detector (MCAD) has been developed to investigate the spatial structure of plasma turbulence in fusion plasmas. This system is expected to provide simultaneous measurements of edge and core density fluctuations with both temporal and spatial resolution, extending the range and number of the sample volumes simultaneously recorded by a heavy ion beam diagnostic (HIBD). Since the detector (usually located close to the vessel wall of a plasma device) operates in a strong plasma radiation environment, the effective shielding of the detector presents a special problem. This article describes and compares the MCAD operation conditions on ISTTOK tokamak and TJ-II stellarator. Experimental results of the detector performance are presented together with the first measurements of n{sub e}{sigma}{sub eff} in the TJ-II plasmas.

  16. Age-associated Pro-inflammatory Remodeling and Functional Phenotype in the Heart and Large Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingyi; Shah, Ajay M

    2015-01-01

    The aging population is increasing dramatically. Aging–associated stress simultaneously drives proinflammatory remodeling, involving angiotensin II and other factors, in both the heart and large arteries. The structural remodeling and functional changes that occur with aging include cardiac and vascular wall stiffening, systolic hypertension and suboptimal ventricular-arterial coupling, features that are often clinically silent and thus termed a silent syndrome. These age-related effects are the result of responses initiated by cardiovascular proinflammatory cells. Local proinflammatory signals are coupled between the heart and arteries due to common mechanical and humoral messengers within a closed circulating system. Thus, targeting proinflammatory signaling molecules would be a promising approach to improve age-associated suboptimal ventricular-arterial coupling, a major predisposing factor for the pathogenesis of clinical cardiovascular events such as heart failure. PMID:25665458

  17. Plasma Surface Chemical Treatment of Electrospun Poly(l-Lactide) Microfibrous Scaffolds for Enhanced Cell Adhesion, Growth, and Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qian; Lee, Benjamin Li-Ping; Yan, Zhiqiang; Li, Song

    2013-01-01

    Poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) microfibrous scaffolds produced by electrospinning were treated with mild Ar or Ar-NH3/H2 plasmas to enhance cell attachment, growth, and infiltration. Goniometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements were used to evaluate the modification of the scaffold surface chemistry by plasma treatment. AFM and XPS measurements showed that both plasma treatments increased the hydrophilicity without affecting the integrity of the fibrous structure and the fiber roughness, whereas Ar-NH3/H2 plasma treatment also resulted in surface functionalization with amine groups. Culture studies of bovine aorta endothelial cells and bovine smooth muscle cells on the plasma-treated PLLA scaffolds revealed that both Ar and Ar-NH3/H2 plasma treatments promoted cell spreading during the initial stage of cell attachment and, more importantly, increased the cell growth rate, especially for Ar plasma treatment. In vitro cell infiltration studies showed that both plasma treatments effectively enhanced cell migration into the microfibrous scaffolds. In vivo experiments involving the subcutaneous implantation of plasma-treated PLLA scaffolds under the skin of Sprague-Dawley rats also showed increased cell infiltration. The results of this study indicate that surface treatment of PLLA microfibrous scaffolds with mild Ar or Ar-NH3/H2 plasmas may have important implications in tissue engineering. Further modifications with bioactive factors should improve the functions of the scaffolds for specific applications. PMID:23281641

  18. Characterization of antibody binding to cell surface antigens using a plasma membrane-bound plate assay.

    PubMed

    Vater, C A; Reid, K; Bartle, L M; Goldmacher, V S

    1995-01-01

    A procedure has been developed for measuring antibody binding to cell surface antigens using an immobilized plasma membrane fraction. In this method, isolated plasma membranes are dried onto wells of a 96-well microtiter plate and incubated with antibodies that recognize a cell surface protein. Bound antibody is detected indirectly using an enzyme-linked or fluorescently tagged second antibody. Alternatively, the primary antibody itself can be labeled and its binding can be detected directly. The assay is simple and fast and provides several advantages over whole cell binding assays currently in widespread use.

  19. Immunoglobulin therapy for plasma cell-rich rejection in the renal allograft.

    PubMed

    Adrogue, Horacio E; Soltero, Liliana; Land, Geoffrey A; Ramanathan, Venkataraman; Truong, Luan D; Suki, Wadi N

    2006-08-27

    Plasma cell-rich acute rejection (PCAR) is associated with poor allograft outcome in renal transplantation. Previous studies report a graft half-life of six months after a single PCAR episode. However, the management of this condition is unclear. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy, by virtue of its immunomodulating properties, and its influence on B-cell maturation into plasma cells, may be a good candidate for reversing this type of rejection. We report four episodes of PCAR in two patients who responded well to IVIG with improvement in renal function.

  20. Exosomes and HIV Gag bud from endosome-like domains of the T cell plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Amy M.; Fang, Yi; Fallon, Jonathan K.; Yang, Jr-Ming; Hildreth, James E.K.; Gould, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    Exosomes are secreted, single membrane organelles of ∼100 nm diameter. Their biogenesis is typically thought to occur in a two-step process involving (1) outward vesicle budding at limiting membranes of endosomes (outward = away from the cytoplasm), which generates intralumenal vesicles, followed by (2) endosome–plasma membrane fusion, which releases these internal vesicles into the extracellular milieu as exosomes. In this study, we present evidence that certain cells, including Jurkat T cells, possess discrete domains of plasma membrane that are enriched for exosomal and endosomal proteins, retain the endosomal property of outward vesicle budding, and serve as sites of immediate exosome biogenesis. It has been hypothesized that retroviruses utilize the exosome biogenesis pathway for the formation of infectious particles. In support of this, we find that Jurkat T cells direct the key budding factor of HIV, HIV Gag, to these endosome-like domains of plasma membrane and secrete HIV Gag from the cell in exosomes. PMID:16533950

  1. Autophagy, a new determinant of plasma cell differentiation and antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Cenci, Simone

    2014-12-01

    Plasma cells, the terminal effectors of the B lymphoid lineage, are responsible for the humoral arm of adaptive immunity. Their differentiation from B cells entails a profound cellular reshaping inherently associated with stress. Autophagy is a conserved adaptive cellular strategy recently implicated in differentiation and immunity. We identified a novel autophagic function in plasma cells. Autophagy restricts the expression of the transcriptional repressor Blimp-1 and immunoglobulins through a selective negative control on the endoplasmic reticulum and its stress signaling response, thereby optimizing energy and viability. As a result, autophagy in vivo sustains antibody responses, and is an essential intrinsic determinant of the bone marrow long-lived plasma cell niche. Here, I discuss several immune and biomedical implications, and experimental issues to be addressed in the near future. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. The interleukin-6 receptor alpha-chain (CD126) is expressed by neoplastic but not normal plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Rawstron, A C; Fenton, J A; Ashcroft, J; English, A; Jones, R A; Richards, S J; Pratt, G; Owen, R; Davies, F E; Child, J A; Jack, A S; Morgan, G

    2000-12-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is reported to be central to the pathogenesis of myeloma, inducing proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis in neoplastic plasma cells. Therefore, abrogating IL-6 signaling is of therapeutic interest, particularly with the development of humanized anti-IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) antibodies. The use of such antibodies clinically requires an understanding of IL-6R expression on neoplastic cells, particularly in the cycling fraction. IL-6R expression levels were determined on plasma cells from patients with myeloma (n = 93) and with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) or plasmacytoma (n = 66) and compared with the levels found on normal plasma cells (n = 11). In addition, 4-color flow cytometry was used to assess the differential expression by stage of differentiation and cell cycle status of the neoplastic plasma cells. IL-6R alpha chain (CD126) was not detectable in normal plasma cells, but was expressed in approximately 90% of patients with myeloma. In all groups, the expression levels showed a normal distribution. In patients with MGUS or plasmacytoma, neoplastic plasma cells expressed significantly higher levels of CD126 compared with phenotypically normal plasma cells from the same marrow. VLA-5(-) "immature" plasma cells showed the highest levels of CD126 expression, but "mature" VLA-5(+) myeloma plasma cells also overexpressed CD126 when compared with normal subjects. This study demonstrates that CD126 expression is restricted to neoplastic plasma cells, with little or no detectable expression by normal cells. Stromal cells in the bone marrow microenvironment do not induce the overexpression because neoplastic cells express higher levels of CD126 than normal plasma cells from the same bone marrow in individuals with MGUS. (Blood. 2000;96:3880-3886)

  3. Gas plasmas treatment of cathodes to improve Li/So2 cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibder, Michael; Mammone, Robert J.; Thurston, Edward P.; Reddy, Thomas B.

    1993-12-01

    Overall performance after storage at 71 C of spirally wound, hermetically sealed, Li/SO2 squat 'D' sized cells discharged at 3 A at -29 C can be improved by exposing the porous carbon cathodes to a room temperature, low pressure gas plasma prior to cell assembly.

  4. Moderate plasma activated media suppresses proliferation and migration of MDCK epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohades, Soheila; Laroussi, Mounir; Maruthamuthu, Venkat

    2017-05-01

    Low-temperature plasma has been shown to have diverse biomedical uses, including its applications in cancer and wound healing. One recent approach in treating mammalian cells with plasma is through the use of plasma activated media (PAM), which is produced by exposing cell culture media to plasma. While the adverse effects of PAM treatment on cancerous epithelial cell lines have been recently studied, much less is known about the interaction of PAM with normal epithelial cells. In this paper, non-cancerous canine kidney MDCK (Madin-Darby Canine Kidney) epithelial cells were treated by PAM and time-lapse microscopy was used to directly monitor their proliferation and random migration upon treatment. While longer durations of PAM treatment led to cell death, we found that moderate levels of PAM treatment inhibited proliferation in these epithelial cells. We also found that PAM treatment reduced random cell migration within epithelial islands. Immunofluorescence staining showed that while there were no major changes in the actin/adhesion apparatus, there was a significant change in the nuclear localization of proliferation marker Ki-67, consistent with our time-lapse results.

  5. Plasma effects on the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in cancer cells in-vitro exposed by atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.

    2015-08-01

    Atmospheric pressure pulsed helium plasma jets are utilized for plasma-cell interactions. The effect of operating parameters such as applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, and duty ratio on the generation of specific reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in gas and liquid phases and within cells is investigated. The apoptotic changes detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay in cells caused by plasma exposure are observed to correlate well with the levels of extracellular and intracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

  6. Flow Cytometry Assessment of In Vitro Generated CD138+ Human Plasma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Itoua Maïga, Rayelle; Lemieux, Jennifer; Roy, Annie; Simard, Carl; Néron, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    The in vitro CD40-CD154 interaction promotes human B lymphocytes differentiation into plasma cells. Currently, CD138 is the hallmark marker enabling the detection of human plasma cells, both in vitro and in vivo; its presence can be monitored by flow cytometry using a specific antibody. We have developed a culture system allowing for the differentiation of memory B lymphocytes. In order to detect the newly formed plasma cells, we have compared their staining using five anti-CD138 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). As a reference, we also tested human cell lines, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and bone marrow samples. The five anti-CD138 mAbs stained RPMI-8226 cells (>98%) with variable stain index (SI). The highest SI was obtained with B-A38 mAb while the lowest SI was obtained with DL-101 and 1D4 mAbs. However, the anti-CD138 mAbs were not showing equivalent CD138+ cells frequencies within the generated plasma cells. B-A38, B-B4, and MI-15 were similar (15–25%) while DL-101 mAb stained a higher proportion of CD138-positive cells (38–42%). DL-101 and B-A38 mAbs stained similar populations in bone marrow samples but differed in their capacity to bind to CD138high and CD138lo cell lines. In conclusion, such cellular fluctuations suggest heterogeneity in human plasma cell populations and/or in CD138 molecules. PMID:24689045

  7. Flow cytometry assessment of in vitro generated CD138+ human plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Itoua Maïga, Rayelle; Lemieux, Jennifer; Roy, Annie; Simard, Carl; Néron, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    The in vitro CD40-CD154 interaction promotes human B lymphocytes differentiation into plasma cells. Currently, CD138 is the hallmark marker enabling the detection of human plasma cells, both in vitro and in vivo; its presence can be monitored by flow cytometry using a specific antibody. We have developed a culture system allowing for the differentiation of memory B lymphocytes. In order to detect the newly formed plasma cells, we have compared their staining using five anti-CD138 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). As a reference, we also tested human cell lines, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and bone marrow samples. The five anti-CD138 mAbs stained RPMI-8226 cells (>98%) with variable stain index (SI). The highest SI was obtained with B-A38 mAb while the lowest SI was obtained with DL-101 and 1D4 mAbs. However, the anti-CD138 mAbs were not showing equivalent CD138(+) cells frequencies within the generated plasma cells. B-A38, B-B4, and MI-15 were similar (15-25%) while DL-101 mAb stained a higher proportion of CD138-positive cells (38-42%). DL-101 and B-A38 mAbs stained similar populations in bone marrow samples but differed in their capacity to bind to CD138(high) and CD138(lo) cell lines. In conclusion, such cellular fluctuations suggest heterogeneity in human plasma cell populations and/or in CD138 molecules.

  8. Prophylactic Plasma Transfusion Is Not Associated With Decreased Red Blood Cell Requirements in Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Warner, Matthew A; Chandran, Arun; Jenkins, Gregory; Kor, Daryl J

    2017-05-01

    Critically ill patients frequently receive plasma transfusion under the assumptions that abnormal coagulation test results confer increased risk of bleeding and that plasma transfusion will decrease this risk. However, the effect of prophylactic plasma transfusion remains poorly understood. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between prophylactic plasma transfusion and bleeding complications in critically ill patients. This is a retrospective cohort study of adults admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) at a single academic institution between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2013. Inclusion criteria included age ≥18 years and an international normalized ratio measured during ICU admission. Multivariable propensity-matched analyses were used to evaluate associations between prophylactic plasma transfusion and outcomes of interest with a primary outcome of red blood cell transfusion in the ensuing 24 hours and secondary outcomes of hospital- and ICU-free days and mortality within 30 days of ICU discharge. A total of 27,561 patients were included in the investigation with 2472 (9.0%) receiving plasma therapy and 1105 (44.7%) for which plasma transfusion was prophylactic in nature. In multivariable propensity-matched analyses, patients receiving plasma had higher rates of red blood cell transfusion (odds ratio: 4.3 [95% confidence interval: 3.3-5.7], P < .001) and fewer hospital-free days (estimated % increase: -11.0% [95% confidence interval: -11.4, -10.6%], P < .001). There were no significant differences in ICU-free days or mortality. These findings appeared robust, persisting in multiple predefined sensitivity analyses. Prophylactic administration of plasma in the critically ill was not associated with improved clinical outcomes. Further investigation examining the utility of plasma transfusion in this population is warranted.

  9. Increased Polyamine Intake Inhibits Age-Associated Alteration in Global DNA Methylation and 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine-Induced Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Soda, Kuniyasu; Kano, Yoshihiko; Chiba, Fumihiro; Koizumi, Kei; Miyaki, Yuichiro

    2013-01-01

    Polyamines (spermine and spermidine) play many important roles in cellular function and are supplied from the intestinal lumen. We have shown that continuous high polyamine intake inhibits age-associated pathologies in mice. The mechanism by which polyamines elicit these effects was examined. Twenty-four week old Jc1:ICR male mice were fed one of three experimental chows containing different polyamine concentrations. Lifetime intake of high polyamine chow, which had a polyamine content approximately three times higher than regular chow, elevated polyamine concentrations in whole blood, suppressed age-associated increases in pro-inflammatory status, decreased age-associated pathological changes, inhibited age-associated global alteration in DNA methylation status and reduced the mortality in aged mice. Exogenous spermine augmented DNA methyltransferase activity in Jurkat and HT-29 cells and inhibited polyamine deficiency-induced global alteration in DNA methylation status in vitro. In addition, increased polyamine intake was associated with a decreased incidence of colon tumors in BALB/c mice after 1,2-demethylhydrazine administration; 12 mice (60%) in the low polyamine group developed tumors, compared with only 5 mice (25%) in the high polyamine group (Fisher's exact probability = 0.027, p = 0.025). However, increased polyamine intake accelerated the growth of established tumors; maximal tumor diameter in the Low and High groups was 3.85±0.90 mm and 5.50±1.93 mm, respectively (Mann-Whitney test, p = 0.039). Spermine seems to play important roles in inhibiting age-associated and polyamine-deficient induced abnormal gene methylation as well as pathological changes including tumorigenesis. PMID:23696883

  10. Glucosamine binding to proteins in plasma and synovial fluid and blood cell/plasma partitioning in mouse and man in vitro.

    PubMed

    Persiani, Stefano; Matthews, Anne; Larger, Patrice; Hall, Michael; Rotini, Roberto; Trisolino, Giovanni; Antonioli, Diego; Zaccarelli, Lorenzo; Rovati, Lucio C

    2009-01-01

    Protein binding of [14C]glucosamine (400, 1000 and 4000 ng/ml) was evaluated in human and mouse plasma and in human synovial fluid. Blood cell/plasma partitioning in human and mouse was also determined. There was no measurable protein binding of [14C]glucosamine. Its association with human and mouse blood cells ranged from 43-47% and from 27-29%, respectively. Therefore, the unbound (pharmacologically active) fraction of glucosamine in plasma and at the site of action (the joint) is the same. Protein binding displacement drug-drug interactions are unlikely during the clinical use of crystalline glucosamine sulfate. No corrections are needed, either for unbound fraction when comparing human and mouse pharmacokinetic data or for blood cell/plasma partitioning to assess glucosamine total blood clearance from plasma data in these two species.

  11. Accumulation of raft lipids in T-cell plasma membrane domains engaged in TCR signalling

    PubMed Central

    Zech, Tobias; Ejsing, Christer S; Gaus, Katharina; de Wet, Ben; Shevchenko, Andrej; Simons, Kai; Harder, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Activating stimuli for T lymphocytes are transmitted through plasma membrane domains that form at T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) signalling foci. Here, we determined the molecular lipid composition of immunoisolated TCR activation domains. We observed that they accumulate cholesterol, sphingomyelin and saturated phosphatidylcholine species as compared with control plasma membrane fragments. This provides, for the first time, direct evidence that TCR activation domains comprise a distinct molecular lipid composition reminiscent of liquid-ordered raft phases in model membranes. Interestingly, TCR activation domains were also enriched in plasmenyl phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine. Modulating the T-cell lipidome with polyunsaturated fatty acids impaired the plasma membrane condensation at TCR signalling foci and resulted in a perturbed molecular lipid composition. These results correlate the accumulation of specific molecular lipid species with the specific plasma membrane condensation at sites of TCR activation and with early TCR activation responses. PMID:19177148

  12. Effects of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal bio-compatible plasma and plasma activated nitric oxide water on cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Ho Kang, Min; Sup Uhm, Han; Joon Lee, Geon; Ha Choi, Eun; Han, Ihn

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric-pressure non-thermal bio-compatible plasma is a partially ionized gas with electrically charged particles. Previous studies demonstrated that dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma could induce apoptosis of various cancer cells, in particular demonstrating the selective cytotoxicity of cancer cells over normal cells. Therefore, DBD plasma can be considered as a potential cancer treatment method for clinical applications. We previously developed a microwave jet plasma system, producing nitric oxide called nitric oxide-plasma activated water (NO-PAW). In this study, we explored the effects of NO-PAW on a cervical cancer cell line, in comparison with DBD plasma. The cytotoxicity results showed that the treatment of HeLa cell with DBD for 4 minutes and 7 μM concentration of NO-PAW could reach almost IC60. For the apoptosis assay, 4 minutes treatment of DBD could induce 7% apoptotic effect, whereas 7 μM NO-PAW could induce 18% apoptotic effect. In addition, we assumed that both DBD plasma and NO-PAW could induce HeLa cell apoptosis by facilitating an accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS). Although further detail on the molecular signal pathway is still needed, DBD and NO-PAW could become promising applications for effective and safe clinical trials for cancer therapy. PMID:28361987

  13. Effects of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal bio-compatible plasma and plasma activated nitric oxide water on cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Ho Kang, Min; Sup Uhm, Han; Joon Lee, Geon; Ha Choi, Eun; Han, Ihn

    2017-03-31

    Atmospheric-pressure non-thermal bio-compatible plasma is a partially ionized gas with electrically charged particles. Previous studies demonstrated that dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma could induce apoptosis of various cancer cells, in particular demonstrating the selective cytotoxicity of cancer cells over normal cells. Therefore, DBD plasma can be considered as a potential cancer treatment method for clinical applications. We previously developed a microwave jet plasma system, producing nitric oxide called nitric oxide-plasma activated water (NO-PAW). In this study, we explored the effects of NO-PAW on a cervical cancer cell line, in comparison with DBD plasma. The cytotoxicity results showed that the treatment of HeLa cell with DBD for 4 minutes and 7 μM concentration of NO-PAW could reach almost IC60. For the apoptosis assay, 4 minutes treatment of DBD could induce 7% apoptotic effect, whereas 7 μM NO-PAW could induce 18% apoptotic effect. In addition, we assumed that both DBD plasma and NO-PAW could induce HeLa cell apoptosis by facilitating an accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS). Although further detail on the molecular signal pathway is still needed, DBD and NO-PAW could become promising applications for effective and safe clinical trials for cancer therapy.

  14. Effects of non-thermal atmospheric plasma on human periodontal ligament mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miletić, M.; Mojsilović, S.; Okić Đorđević, I.; Maletić, D.; Puač, N.; Lazović, S.; Malović, G.; Milenković, P.; Petrović, Z. Lj; Bugarski, D.

    2013-08-01

    Here we investigate the influences of non-thermal atmospheric plasma on human mesenchymal stem cells isolated from periodontal ligament (hPDL-MSCs). A specially redesigned plasma needle was used as the source of low-temperature plasma and its effects on different hPDL-MSC functions were investigated. Cell cultures were obtained from extracted normal impacted third molars and characterized for their phenotype and multi-potential differentiation. The hPDL-MSCs possessed all the typical MSC properties, including clonogenic ability, high proliferation rate, specific phenotype and multilineage differentiation. The data regarding the interaction of plasma with hPDL-MSCs demonstrated that plasma treatment inhibited the migration of hPDL-MSCs and induced some detachment, while not affecting their viability. Additionally, plasma significantly attenuated hPDL-MSCs' proliferation, but promoted their osteogenic differentiation. The results of this study indicated that a non-thermal plasma offers specific activity with non-destructive properties that can be advantageous for future dental applications.

  15. On the effect of baryon loading in magnetized counterstreaming plasmas. II. Particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tautz, R. C.; Sakai, J.-I.

    2008-12-01

    Assuming a non-relativistic three species electron-positron-ion plasma, the counterstreaming instability is investigated for waves propagating parallel and perpendicular to a homogeneous background magnetic field. To support previous analytical investigations (Tautz and Sakai 2007), the instability is investigated by means of self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that the presence of a third particle species is responsible for a variety of new features that cannot be seen either from an electron-ion plasma or for an electron-positron plasma.

  16. DEMOCRITUS: An adaptive particle in cell (PIC) code for object-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni

    2011-06-01

    A new method for the simulation of plasma materials interactions is presented. The method is based on the particle in cell technique for the description of the plasma and on the immersed boundary method for the description of the interactions between materials and plasma particles. A technique to adapt the local number of particles and grid adaptation are used to reduce the truncation error and the noise of the simulations, to increase the accuracy per unit cost. In the present work, the computational method is verified against known results. Finally, the simulation method is applied to a number of specific examples of practical scientific and engineering interest.

  17. Implementations of mesh refinement schemes for particle-in-cell plasma simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J.-L.; Colella, P.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; McCorquodale, P.; Serafini, D.B.

    2003-10-20

    Plasma simulations are often rendered challenging by the disparity of scales in time and in space which must be resolved. When these disparities are in distinctive zones of the simulation region, a method which has proven to be effective in other areas (e.g. fluid dynamics simulations) is the mesh refinement technique. We briefly discuss the challenges posed by coupling this technique with plasma Particle-In-Cell simulations and present two implementations in more detail, with examples.

  18. Reactive oxygen species in plasma against E. coli cells survival rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ren-Wu; Zhang, Xian-Hui; Zong, Zi-Chao; Li, Jun-Xiong; Yang, Zhou-Bin; Liu, Dong-Ping; Yang, Si-Ze

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we report on the contrastive analysis of inactivation efficiency of E. coli cells in solution with different disinfection methods. Compared with the hydrogen peroxide solution and the ozone gas, the atmospheric-pressure He plasma can completely kill the E. coli cells in the shortest time. The inactivation efficiency of E. coli cells in solution can be well described by using the chemical reaction rate model. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis shows that the C-O or C=O content of the inactivated E. coli cell surface by plasma is predominantly increased, indicating the quantity of oxygen-containing species in plasma is more than those of two other methods, and then the C-C or C-H bonds can be broken, leading to the etching of organic compounds. Analysis also indicates that plasma-generated species can play a crucial role in the inactivation process by their direct reactions or the decompositions of reactive species, such as ozone into OH radicals in water, then reacting with E. coli cells. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Fujian Province, China (Grant No. 2014J01025), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11275261), and the Funds from the Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory for Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, China.

  19. The effect of plasma-nitrided titanium surfaces on osteoblastic cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Emanuela P; Sa, Juliana C; de Oliveira, Paulo T; Alves, Clodomiro; Beloti, Marcio M; Rosa, Adalberto L

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of new plasma-nitrided Ti surfaces on the progression of osteoblast cultures, including cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. Ti surfaces were treated using two plasma-nitriding protocols, hollow cathode for 3 h (HC 3 h) and 1 h (HC 1 h) and planar for 1 h. Untreated Ti surfaces were used as control. Cells derived from human alveolar and rat calvarial bones were cultured on Ti surfaces for periods of up to 14 days and the following parameters were evaluated: cell morphology, adhesion, spreading and proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, extracellular matrix mineralization, and gene expression of key osteoblast markers. Plasma-nitriding treatments resulted in Ti surfaces with distinct physicochemical characteristics. The cell adhesion and ALP activity were higher on plasma-nitrided Ti surfaces compared with untreated one, whereas cell proliferation and extracellular matrix mineralization were not affected by the treatments. In addition, the plasma-nitrided Ti surfaces increased the ALP, reduced the osteocalcin and did not affect the Runx2 gene expression. We have shown that HC 3 h and planar Ti surfaces slightly favored the osteoblast differentiation process, and then these surfaces should be considered for further investigation using preclinical models. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Activated air produced by shielded sliding discharge plasma mediates plasmid DNA delivery to mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Heller, Loree C; Malik, Muhammad A; Heller, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Cold plasma is emerging as a potential method for medical applications. The current study assessed the efficacy of a novel cold plasma reactor based on shielded sliding discharge producing cathode-directed streamers generated in ambient air for the delivery of plasmid DNA. Experiments were performed with mouse melanoma cells (B16F10) and human keratinocyte cells (HaCaT) inoculated with plasmid DNA encoding luciferase. Quantitative results measured over a 72-h period displayed luciferase expression levels as high as 5-fold greater in cells exposed to plasma-activated air (PAA) than levels obtained from the inoculation of plasmid DNA alone (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). No effect on cell viability was observed. Delivery of plasmid encoding GFP to HaCaT cells seeded on polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds was confirmed by immunostaining. The use of cold plasma for DNA delivery is attractive as it provides a non-viral, non-invasive method where the electrode or the plasma itself never directly contacts the exposed site. The current device design provides localized DNA transfer using a novel technology. Our report suggests PAA warrants further exploration as an alternative or supplemental approach for DNA transfer.

  1. A key inactivation factor of HeLa cell viability by a plasma flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Takehiko; Yokoyama, Mayo; Johkura, Kohei

    2011-09-01

    Recently, a plasma flow has been applied to medical treatment using effects of various kinds of stimuli such as chemical species, charged particles, heat, light, shock wave and electric fields. Among them, the chemical species are known to cause an inactivation of cell viability. However, the mechanisms and key factors of this event are not yet clear. In this study, we focused on the effect of H2O2 in plasma-treated culture medium because it is generated in the culture medium and it is also chemically stable compared with free radicals generated by the plasma flow. To elucidate the significance of H2O2, we assessed the differences in the effects of plasma-treated medium and H2O2-added medium against inactivation of HeLa cell viability. These two media showed comparable effects on HeLa cells in terms of the survival ratios, morphological features of damage processes, permeations of H2O2 into the cells, response to H2O2 decomposition by catalase and comprehensive gene expression. The results supported that among chemical species generated in a plasma-treated culture medium, H2O2 is one of the main factors responsible for inactivation of HeLa cell viability.

  2. Prognostic impact of tumour-associated B cells and plasma cells in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Sebastian; Berntsson, Jonna; Nodin, Björn; Micke, Patrick; Jirström, Karin

    2016-04-06

    The critical role of the immune system in controlling cancer progression has become evident and immune modulatory therapy is now approved for clinical use. However, while the majority of studies on the inflammatory tumour microenvironment have focused on the cellular immune response, in particular the prognostic and predictive role of various T cell infiltrates, the role of the humoral immune response in this context has long been overlooked. This study aimed to investigate the clinicopathological correlates and prognostic impact of B cell and plasma cell infiltration in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Immunohistochemical expression of immunoglobulin kappa C (IGKC), CD20 and CD138 was analysed in tissue microarrays with tumours from 154 incident cases of EOC from two pooled prospective population-based cohorts. Subsets of corresponding benign-appearing fallopian tubes (n = 38) and omental metastases (n = 33) were also analysed. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression analysis were used to determine the impact of immune-cell specific IGKC, CD20 and CD138 expression on overall survival and ovarian cancer-specific survival. High IGKC expression correlated significantly with expression of CD20 (p = 0.001) and CD138 (p = 0.035). Expression of IGKC as well as CD138 was significantly higher in primary tumours than in fallopian tubes (p = 0.004 and p = 0.001, respectively). High CD20 and CD138 expression correlated significantly with high tumour grade (p = 0.032 and p = 0.030, respectively). CD20 and IGKC expression was not prognostic but univariable Cox regression analysis revealed high CD138 expression to correlate with a significantly reduced overall survival (HR = 2.20; 95 % CI 1.34-3.55; p-0.001) as well as ovarian cancer-specific survival (HR = 1.95; 95 % CI 1.28-2.98; p = 0.002). The prognostic impact was independent of established clinical parameters (age, grade, clinical stage) as shown in multivariable analysis (HR = 2.28; 95 % CI 1.39-3.75; p = 0.001). In

  3. Feed gas humidity: a vital parameter affecting a cold atmospheric-pressure plasma jet and plasma-treated human skin cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, J.; Wende, K.; Masur, K.; Iseni, S.; Dünnbier, M.; Hammer, M. U.; Tresp, H.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Reuter, S.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, the effect of feed gas humidity on the reactive component generation of an atmospheric-pressure argon plasma jet and its effect on human skin cells are investigated. Feed gas humidity is identified as one key parameter that strongly influences stability and reproducibility of plasma medical studies. The plasma jet is investigated by absorption spectroscopy in the ultraviolet and infrared spectral region for its ozone production depending on the humidity concentration in the feed gas. By optical emission spectroscopy the dependence of present excited plasma species such as hydroxyl radicals, molecular nitrogen, argon and atomic oxygen on the feed gas humidity is investigated. As an interface layer between the plasma jet effluent and the biological cell, a buffer solution is treated and the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production is studied with two independent colorimetric assays as a function of humidity admixture to the feed gas. Ultimately, the effect of varying feed gas humidity on the cell viability of indirect plasma treated adherent HaCAT cells is investigated. The highest viability is found for the driest feed gas condition. Furthermore, this work shows answers for the relevance of unwanted—or intended—feed gas humidity in plasma medical experiments and their comparatively large relevance with respect to ambient humidity. The findings will lead to more reproducible experiments in the field of plasma medicine.

  4. Low-temperature atmospheric plasma increases the expression of anti-aging genes of skin cells without causing cellular damages.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Hae; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Lee, Jae-Koo; Hong, Jin-woo; Kim, Gyoo-cheon

    2013-03-01

    Efforts to employ various types of plasma in the field of skin care have increased consistently because it can regulate many biochemical reactions that are normally unaffected by light-based therapy. One method for skin rejuvenation adopted a high-temperature plasma generator to remove skin epithelial cells. In this case, the catalyzing effects of the plasma were rarely used due to the high temperature. Hence, the benefits of the plasma were not magnified. Recently, many types of low-temperature plasma devices have been developed for medical applications but their detailed functions and working mechanisms are unclear. The present study examined the effect of low-temperature microwave plasma on skin cells. Treatment with low-temperature plasma increased the expression of anti-aging genes in skin cells, including collagen, fibronectin and vascular endothelial growth factor. Furthermore, the plasma treatment did not cause cell death, but only induced slight cell growth arrest at the G2 phase. Although the cells treated with low-temperature plasma showed moderate growth arrest, there were no signs of thermal or genetic damage of skin cells. Overall, this low-temperature microwave plasma device induces the expressions of some anti-aging-related genes in skin cells without causing damage.

  5. Argon Micro-Cell Plasma with Applications in Bio-Medical Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, Jan; Horiuchi, Yasuhiro; Makabe, Toshiaki

    2003-10-01

    In bio-medical technology, plasmas have recently been acknowledged as a viable instrument for performing micro-surgery. This in-vivo application obviously demands strict compatibility with the human tissue which is to be treated. That in turn imposes strict requirements on the pressure (1 atmosphere) and gas temperature (37 C) in which the plasma operates. In addition, the plasma source must be compact and reliable, while the plasma species should not poison the body fluids with which they are in contact. In this contribution we will discuss the plasma-physical and electrical properties of an RF-operated argon micro-cell plasma (MCP) configuration which is believed to be able to meet these design restrictions. Results of a numerical study with the help of the two-dimensional Relaxation ConTinuum (RCT) model [1-2] will be presented. We shall focus on the spatial variation of the feed gas temperature for various plasma operating conditions. Special attention will be paid to the volumetric and surface heating mechanisms. [1] T. Makabe, N. Nakano and Y. Yamaguchi, Phys. Rev. A (45), 2520 (1992) [2] T. Makabe, "Advances in Low Temperature RF Plasmas" Elsevier, (2002)

  6. Changes in the biomechanical properties of a single cell induced by nonthermal atmospheric pressure micro-dielectric barrier discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyeongwon; Choi, Eun Ha; Kim, Kyung Sook

    2017-10-01

    Mechanical properties of a single cell are closely related to the fate and functions of the cell. Changes in mechanical properties may cause diseases or cell apoptosis. Selective cytotoxic effects of nonthermal atmospheric pressure micro-dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma have been demonstrated on cancer cells. In this work, changes in the mechanical properties of a single cell induced by nonthermal atmospheric pressure micro-DBD plasma were investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Two cervical cancer cell lines (HeLa and SiHa) and normal human fibroblast cells (HFBs) were exposed to micro-DBD plasma for various exposure times. The elasticity of a single cell was determined by force-distance curve measurement using AFM. Young's modulus was decreased by plasma treatment for all cells. The Young's modulus of plasma-treated HeLa cells was decreased by 75% compared to nontreated HeLa cells. In SiHa cells and HFBs, elasticity was decreased slightly. Chemical changes induced by the plasma treatment, which were observed by Raman spectroscopy, were also significant in HeLa cells compared to SiHa cells and HFBs. The