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Sample records for plasma chemical vaporization

  1. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of multiwalled carbon nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Kristopher; Cruden, Brett A.; Chen, Bin; Meyyappan, M.; Delzeit, Lance

    2002-01-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is used to grow vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanofibers (MWNFs). The graphite basal planes in these nanofibers are not parallel as in nanotubes; instead they exhibit a small angle resembling a stacked cone arrangement. A parametric study with varying process parameters such as growth temperature, feedstock composition, and substrate power has been conducted, and these parameters are found to influence the growth rate, diameter, and morphology. The well-aligned MWNFs are suitable for fabricating electrode systems in sensor and device development.

  2. Radio-frequency plasma chemical vapor deposition growth of diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Duane E.; Dillon, Rodney O.; Woollam, John A.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at 13.56 MHz has been used to produce diamond particles in two different inductively coupled systems with a mixture of methane and hydrogen. The effect of a diamondlike carbon (DLC) overcoating on silicon, niobium, and stainless-steel substrates has been investigated and in the case of silicon has been found to enhance particle formation as compared to uncoated polished silicon. In addition the use of carbon monoxide in hydrogen has been found to produce well-defined individual faceted particles as well as polycrystalline films on quartz and DLC coated silicon substrates. Plasma CVD is a competitive approach to production of diamond films. It has the advantage over microwave systems of being easily scaled to large volume and high power.

  3. A high temperature, plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition system

    SciTech Connect

    Brusasco, R.M.; Britten, J.A.; Thorsness, C.B.; Scrivener, M.S.; Unites, W.G.; Campbell, J.H. ); Johnson, W.L. )

    1990-02-01

    We have designed and built a high-temperature, plasma-assisted, chemical vapor deposition system to deposit multilayer optical coatings of SiO{sub 2} and doped-SiO{sub 2} flat substrates. The coater concept and design is an outgrowth of our recent work with Schott Glasswerke demonstrating the use of plasma assisted CVD to prepare very high damage threshold optical coatings. The coater is designed to deposit up to several thousand alternating quarterwave layers of SiO{sub 2} and doped SiO{sub 2} substrate at deposition rates up to several microns per minute. The substrate is resistively heated to about 1000{degree}C during the deposition phase of the process. The plasma is driven by a 13.56 MHz RF unit capable of producing power densities of up to 140 W cm{sup {minus}3} in the reaction zone. The coater is designed to be adaptable to microwave generated plasmas, as well as RF. Reactant gas flow rates of up to 10 slm can be achieved at a 10 tar operating pressure. Reactants consist of O{sub 2}, SiCl{sub 4} and a volatile halogenated dopant. These gases react in the plasma volume producing SiO{sub 2} with dopant concentrations of up to a few percent. A variable dopant concentration is used to produce index differences between adjacent optical layers.

  4. Diagnostic for Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition and Etch Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cappelli, Mark A.

    1999-01-01

    In order to meet NASA's requirements for the rapid development and validation of future generation electronic devices as well as associated materials and processes, enabling technologies ion the processing of semiconductor materials arising from understanding etch chemistries are being developed through a research collaboration between Stanford University and NASA-Ames Research Center, Although a great deal of laboratory-scale research has been performed on many of materials processing plasmas, little is known about the gas-phase and surface chemical reactions that are critical in many etch and deposition processes, and how these reactions are influenced by the variation in operating conditions. In addition, many plasma-based processes suffer from stability and reliability problems leading to a compromise in performance and a potentially increased cost for the semiconductor manufacturing industry. Such a lack of understanding has hindered the development of process models that can aid in the scaling and improvement of plasma etch and deposition systems. The research described involves the study of plasmas used in semiconductor processes. An inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source in place of the standard upper electrode assembly of the Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) radio-frequency (RF) Reference Cell is used to investigate the discharge characteristics and chemistries. This ICP source generates plasmas with higher electron densities (approximately 10(exp 12)/cu cm) and lower operating pressures (approximately 7 mTorr) than obtainable with the original parallel-plate version of the GEC Cell. This expanded operating regime is more relevant to new generations of industrial plasma systems being used by the microelectronics industry. The motivation for this study is to develop an understanding of the physical phenomena involved in plasma processing and to measure much needed fundamental parameters, such as gas-phase and surface reaction rates. species

  5. Removal characteristics of plasma chemical vaporization machining with a pipe electrode for optical fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Takino, Hideo; Yamamura, Kazuya; Sano, Yasuhisa; Mori, Yuzo

    2010-08-10

    Plasma chemical vaporization machining (CVM) is a high-precision chemical shaping method using rf plasma generated in the proximity of an electrode in an atmospheric environment. The purpose of the present study is to clarify the removal characteristics of plasma CVM using a pipe electrode. Polished fused silica plates were processed by plasma CVM, polishing, and precision grinding under various conditions. The removal rate of plasma CVM was about 4 to 1100 times faster than that of polishing, and the maximum removal rate was almost equal to that of precision grinding. The roughness of the resultant surfaces was almost the same as that of the polished surfaces.

  6. Oxidation Protection Systems for Carbon-Carbon Composites Formed by Chemical Vapor Deposition and Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-22

    3 limitations. The most cow , ron technique used to deposit protective coatings is chemical vapor deposition (CVD). CVD is generally defined as "a... istalled in the gas feeding system. As illustrated in Figure 3-2, the vaporization device contains a Varian type tee adapter, in which ZrCl 4 powder was

  7. Analysis of hydrogen plasma in a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivkumar, G.; Tholeti, S. S.; Alrefae, M. A.; Fisher, T. S.; Alexeenko, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work is to build a numerical model of hydrogen plasma inside a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition system. This model will help in understanding and optimizing the conditions for the growth of carbon nanostructures. A 2D axisymmetric model of the system is implemented using the finite element high frequency Maxwell solver and the heat transfer solver in COMSOL Multiphysics. The system is modeled to study variation in parameters with reactor geometry, microwave power, and gas pressure. The results are compared with experimental measurements from the Q-branch of the H2 Fulcher band of hydrogen using an optical emission spectroscopy technique. The parameter γ in Füner's model is calibrated to match experimental observations at a power of 500 W and 30 Torr. Good agreement is found between the modeling and experimental results for a wide range of powers and pressures. The gas temperature exhibits a weak dependence on power and a strong dependence on gas pressure. The inclusion of a vertical dielectric pillar that concentrates the plasma increases the maximum electron temperature by 70%, the maximum gas temperature by 50%, and the maximum electron number density by 70% when compared to conditions without the pillar at 500 W and 30 Torr. Experimental observations also indicate intensified plasma with the inclusion of a pillar.

  8. Analysis of hydrogen plasma in a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Shivkumar, G.; Tholeti, S. S.; Alexeenko, A. A.; Alrefae, M. A.; Fisher, T. S.

    2016-03-21

    The aim of this work is to build a numerical model of hydrogen plasma inside a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition system. This model will help in understanding and optimizing the conditions for the growth of carbon nanostructures. A 2D axisymmetric model of the system is implemented using the finite element high frequency Maxwell solver and the heat transfer solver in COMSOL Multiphysics. The system is modeled to study variation in parameters with reactor geometry, microwave power, and gas pressure. The results are compared with experimental measurements from the Q-branch of the H{sub 2} Fulcher band of hydrogen using an optical emission spectroscopy technique. The parameter γ in Füner's model is calibrated to match experimental observations at a power of 500 W and 30 Torr. Good agreement is found between the modeling and experimental results for a wide range of powers and pressures. The gas temperature exhibits a weak dependence on power and a strong dependence on gas pressure. The inclusion of a vertical dielectric pillar that concentrates the plasma increases the maximum electron temperature by 70%, the maximum gas temperature by 50%, and the maximum electron number density by 70% when compared to conditions without the pillar at 500 W and 30 Torr. Experimental observations also indicate intensified plasma with the inclusion of a pillar.

  9. Utility of dual frequency hybrid source for plasma and radical generation in plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Kyung Sik; Bhusan Sahu, Bibhuti; Geon Han, Jeon; Hori, Masaru

    2015-07-01

    Looking into the aspect of material processing, this work evaluates alternative plasma concepts in SiH4/H2 plasmas to investigate the radical and plasma generation in the plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) synthesis of nanocrystalline Si (nc-Si:H). Simultaneous measurements by vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy (VUVAS), optical emission spectroscopy (OES), and radio frequency (RF) compensated Langmuir probe (LP) reveal that RF/ultrahigh frequency (UHF) hybrid source can efficiently produce H radicals and plasmas that are accountable for nc-Si:H film synthesis. The efficacy of hybrid plasmas is also discussed.

  10. Properties of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Barrier Coatings and Encapsulated Polymer Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Lei; Zhang, Chunmei; Chen, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we report silicon oxide coatings deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technology (PECVD) on 125 μm polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) surfaces for the purpose of the shelf lifetime extension of sealed polymer solar cells. After optimization of the processing parameters, we achieved a water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of ca. 10-3 g/m2/day with the oxygen transmission rate (OTR) less than 0.05 cc/m2/day, and succeeded in extending the shelf lifetime to about 400 h in encapsulated solar cells. And then the chemical structure of coatings related to the properties of encapsulated cell was investigated in detail.

  11. Carbon nanofiber growth in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denysenko, I.; Ostrikov, K.; Cvelbar, U.; Mozetic, M.; Azarenkov, N. A.

    2008-10-01

    A theoretical model to describe the plasma-assisted growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) is proposed. Using the model, the plasma-related effects on the nanofiber growth parameters, such as the growth rate due to surface and bulk diffusion, the effective carbon flux to the catalyst surface, the characteristic residence time and diffusion length of carbon atoms on the catalyst surface, and the surface coverages, have been studied. The dependence of these parameters on the catalyst surface temperature and ion and etching gas fluxes to the catalyst surface is quantified. The optimum conditions under which a low-temperature plasma environment can benefit the CNF growth are formulated. These results are in good agreement with the available experimental data on CNF growth and can be used for optimizing synthesis of related nanoassemblies in low-temperature plasma-assisted nanofabrication.

  12. Reduced chemical warfare agent sorption in polyurethane-painted surfaces via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of perfluoroalkanes.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Wesley O; Peterson, Gregory W; Durke, Erin M

    2015-04-01

    Perfluoralkalation via plasma chemical vapor deposition has been used to improve hydrophobicity of surfaces. We have investigated this technique to improve the resistance of commercial polyurethane coatings to chemicals, such as chemical warfare agents. The reported results indicate the surface treatment minimizes the spread of agent droplets and the sorption of agent into the coating. The improvement in resistance is likely due to reduction of the coating's surface free energy via fluorine incorporation, but may also have contributing effects from surface morphology changes. The data indicates that plasma-based surface modifications may have utility in improving chemical resistance of commercial coatings.

  13. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of tungsten films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, J. K.; Tang, C. C.; Hess, D. W.

    1982-07-01

    High-purity films of tungsten are deposited from tungsten hexafluoride and hydrogen using plasma-enhanced deposition (PED). At 400 °C deposition temperature, resistivities of ˜40 μΩ cm are attained. After annealing at 1100 °C, the resistivity falls to ˜7 μΩ cm. Below 400 °C, the as-deposited film stress is <6×109 dynes/cm2. Tensile, unlike tungsten, molybdenum films deposited by PED displayed high resistivities.

  14. Formation of Iron Carbide Nanorod by Pulsed Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yooyen, S.; Kawamura, T.; Kotake, S.; Suzuki, Y.

    2010-11-01

    Iron carbide nanorods were produced on the surface of pure iron sheet by means of pulsed plasma chemical vapor deposition. Hydrogen plasma was used in the initial state, varied from 10 to 60 minute, for the purpose of cleaning and preparing nanoparticles. The formation was done under methane atmosphere, varied from 2 to 30 minute. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns analysis showed that iron carbide was found on all of these experiment conditions. By field emission scanning electron micro spectroscopy (FESEM) observation, iron carbide nanorods, however, were found neatly only on the methane plasma treating at 10 minute.

  15. The Relationship Between Chemical Structure and Dielectric Properties of Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposited Polymer Thin Films (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Materials Sci & Tech Applications, LLC) N. Venkatasubramanian and John T. Grant (University of Dayton) Kurt Eyink, Jesse Enlow, and Timothy J. Bunning...structure and dielectric properties of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited polymer thin films Hao Jiang b,⁎, Lianggou Hong b, N. Venkatasubramanian c

  16. Plasma enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of amorphous aluminum nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, H.; Biswas, N.; Temkin, H.; Gangopadhyay, S.; Strathman, M.

    2001-12-01

    Plasma enhanced deposition of amorphous aluminum nitride (AlN) using trimethylaluminum, hydrogen, and nitrogen was performed in a capacitively coupled plasma system. Temperature was varied from 350 to 550 °C, and pressure dependence of the film structure was investigated. Films were characterized by Fourier transform infrared, Rutherford backscattering (RBS), ellipsometry, and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The films are amorphous in nature, as indicated by XRD. Variations in the refractive index were observed in ellipsometric measurements, which is explained by the incorporation of carbon in the films, and confirmed by RBS. Capacitance-voltage, conductance-voltage (G-V), and current-voltage measurements were performed to reveal bulk and interface electrical properties. The electrical properties showed marked dependence on processing conditions of the AlN films. Clear peaks as observed in the G-V characteristics indicated that the losses are predominantly due to interface states. The interface state density ranged between 1010 and 1011eV-1 cm-2. Annealing in hydrogen resulted in lowering of interface state density values.

  17. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of low-resistive tungsten thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.T.; Min, S.; Hong, J.S. ); Kim, C.K. )

    1991-02-25

    Controlling the wafer temperatures from 200 to 500 {degree}C at H{sub 2}/WF{sub 6} flow ratio equal to 24, low-resistive (about 11 {mu}{Omega} cm) tungsten thin films are deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The as-deposited tungsten films have (110), (200), and (211) oriented bcc structures and Auger depth profile shows that fluorine and oxygen impurities are below the detection limit of Auger electron spectroscopy.

  18. Patterned growth of carbon nanotubes obtained by high density plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousinho, A. P.; Mansano, R. D.

    2015-03-01

    Patterned growth of carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition represents an assembly approach to place and orient nanotubes at a stage as early as when they are synthesized. In this work, the carbon nanotubes were obtained at room temperature by High Density Plasmas Chemical Vapor Deposition (HDPCVD) system. This CVD system uses a new concept of plasma generation, where a planar coil coupled to an RF system for plasma generation was used with an electrostatic shield for plasma densification. In this mode, high density plasmas are obtained. We also report the patterned growth of carbon nanotubes on full 4-in Si wafers, using pure methane plasmas and iron as precursor material (seed). Photolithography processes were used to pattern the regions on the silicon wafers. The carbon nanotubes were characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy, the spectra showed very single-walled carbon nanotubes axial vibration modes around 1590 cm-1 and radial breathing modes (RBM) around 120-400 cm-1, confirming that high quality of the carbon nanotubes obtained in this work. The carbon nanotubes were analyzed by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy too. The results showed that is possible obtain high-aligned carbon nanotubes with patterned growth on a silicon wafer with high reproducibility and control.

  19. Optical emission diagnostics of plasmas in chemical vapor deposition of single-crystal diamond

    DOE PAGES

    Hemawan, Kadek W.; Hemley, Russell J.

    2015-08-03

    Here, a key aspect of single crystal diamond growth via microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition is in-process control of the local plasma-substrate environment, that is, plasma gas phase concentrations of activated species at the plasma boundary layer near the substrate surface. Emission spectra of the plasma relative to the diamond substrate inside the microwave plasma reactor chamber have been analyzed via optical emission spectroscopy. The spectra of radical species such as CH, C2, and H (Balmer series) important for diamond growth were found to be more depndent on operating pressure than on microwave power. Plasma gas temperatures were calculated frommore » measurements of the C2 Swan band (d3Π → a3Π transition) system. The plasma gas temperature ranges from 2800 to 3400 K depending on the spatial location of the plasma ball, microwave power and operating pressure. Addition of Ar into CH4 + H2 plasma input gas mixture has little influence on the Hα, Hβ, and Hγ intensities and single-crystal diamond growth rates.« less

  20. Optical emission diagnostics of plasmas in chemical vapor deposition of single-crystal diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Hemawan, Kadek W.; Hemley, Russell J.

    2015-08-03

    Here, a key aspect of single crystal diamond growth via microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition is in-process control of the local plasma-substrate environment, that is, plasma gas phase concentrations of activated species at the plasma boundary layer near the substrate surface. Emission spectra of the plasma relative to the diamond substrate inside the microwave plasma reactor chamber have been analyzed via optical emission spectroscopy. The spectra of radical species such as CH, C2, and H (Balmer series) important for diamond growth were found to be more depndent on operating pressure than on microwave power. Plasma gas temperatures were calculated from measurements of the C2 Swan band (d3Π → a3Π transition) system. The plasma gas temperature ranges from 2800 to 3400 K depending on the spatial location of the plasma ball, microwave power and operating pressure. Addition of Ar into CH4 + H2 plasma input gas mixture has little influence on the Hα, Hβ, and Hγ intensities and single-crystal diamond growth rates.

  1. Optical emission diagnostics of plasmas in chemical vapor deposition of single-crystal diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Hemawan, Kadek W. Hemley, Russell J.

    2015-11-15

    A key aspect of single crystal diamond growth via microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition is in-process control of the local plasma–substrate environment, that is, plasma gas phase concentrations of activated species at the plasma boundary layer near the substrate surface. Emission spectra of the plasma relative to the diamond substrate inside the microwave plasma reactor chamber have been analyzed via optical emission spectroscopy. The spectra of radical species such as CH, C{sub 2}, and H (Balmer series) important for diamond growth were identified and analyzed. The emission intensities of these electronically excited species were found to be more dependent on operating pressure than on microwave power. Plasma gas temperatures were calculated from measurements of the C{sub 2} Swan band (d{sup 3}Π → a{sup 3}Π transition) system. The plasma gas temperature ranges from 2800 to 3400 K depending on the spatial location of the plasma ball, microwave power and operating pressure. Addition of Ar into CH{sub 4}+H{sub 2} plasma input gas mixture has little influence on the Hα, Hβ, and Hγ intensities and single-crystal diamond growth rates.

  2. Ti-doped hydrogenated diamond like carbon coating deposited by hybrid physical vapor deposition and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Na Rae; Sle Jun, Yee; Moon, Kyoung Il; Sunyong Lee, Caroline

    2017-03-01

    Diamond-like carbon films containing titanium and hydrogen (Ti-doped DLC:H) were synthesized using a hybrid technique based on physical vapor deposition (PVD) and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The film was deposited under a mixture of argon (Ar) and acetylene gas (C2H2). The amount of Ti in the Ti-doped DLC:H film was controlled by varying the DC power of the Ti sputtering target ranging from 0 to 240 W. The composition, microstructure, mechanical and chemical properties of Ti-doped DLC:H films with varying Ti concentrations, were investigated using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nano indentation, a ball-on-disk tribometer, a four-point probe system and dynamic anodic testing. As a result, the optimum composition of Ti in Ti-doped DLC:H film using our hybrid method was found to be a Ti content of 18 at. %, having superior electrical conductivity and high corrosion resistance, suitable for bipolar plates. Its hardness value was measured to be 25.6 GPa with a low friction factor.

  3. Control of interface nanoscale structure created by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Peri, Someswara R; Akgun, Bulent; Satija, Sushil K; Jiang, Hao; Enlow, Jesse; Bunning, Timothy J; Foster, Mark D

    2011-09-01

    Tailoring the structure of films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) to specific applications requires a depth-resolved understanding of how the interface structures in such films are impacted by variations in deposition parameters such as feed position and plasma power. Analysis of complementary X-ray and neutron reflectivity (XR, NR) data provide a rich picture of changes in structure with feed position and plasma power, with those changes resolved on the nanoscale. For plasma-polymerized octafluorocyclobutane (PP-OFCB) films, a region of distinct chemical composition and lower cross-link density is found at the substrate interface for the range of processing conditions studied and a surface layer of lower cross-link density also appears when plasma power exceeds 40 W. Varying the distance of the feed from the plasma impacts the degree of cross-linking in the film center, thickness of the surface layer, and thickness of the transition region at the substrate. Deposition at the highest power, 65 W, both enhances cross-linking and creates loose fragments with fluorine content higher than the average. The thickness of the low cross-link density region at the air interface plays an important role in determining the width of the interface built with a layer subsequently deposited atop the first.

  4. Fabrication of ultrathin and highly uniform silicon on insulator by numerically controlled plasma chemical vaporization machining.

    PubMed

    Sano, Yasuhisa; Yamamura, Kazuya; Mimura, Hidekazu; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Mori, Yuzo

    2007-08-01

    Metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer operate faster and at a lower power than those fabricated on a bulk silicon wafer. Scaling down, which improves their performances, demands thinner SOI wafers. In this article, improvement on the thinning of SOI wafers by numerically controlled plasma chemical vaporization machining (PCVM) is described. PCVM is a gas-phase chemical etching method in which reactive species generated in atmospheric-pressure plasma are used. Some factors affecting uniformity are investigated and methods for improvements are presented. As a result of thinning a commercial 8 in. SOI wafer, the initial SOI layer thickness of 97.5+/-4.7 nm was successfully thinned and made uniform at 7.5+/-1.5 nm.

  5. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of amorphous Si on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupina, G.; Strobel, C.; Dabrowski, J.; Lippert, G.; Kitzmann, J.; Krause, H. M.; Wenger, Ch.; Lukosius, M.; Wolff, A.; Albert, M.; Bartha, J. W.

    2016-05-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of thin a-Si:H layers on transferred large area graphene is investigated. Radio frequency (RF, 13.56 MHz) and very high frequency (VHF, 140 MHz) plasma processes are compared. Both methods provide conformal coating of graphene with Si layers as thin as 20 nm without any additional seed layer. The RF plasma process results in amorphization of the graphene layer. In contrast, the VHF process keeps the high crystalline quality of the graphene layer almost intact. Correlation analysis of Raman 2D and G band positions indicates that Si deposition induces reduction of the initial doping in graphene and an increase of compressive strain. Upon rapid thermal annealing, the amorphous Si layer undergoes dehydrogenation and transformation into a polycrystalline film, whereby a high crystalline quality of graphene is preserved.

  6. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method to coat micropipettes with diamond-like carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Kakuta, Naoto; Watanabe, Mayu; Yamada, Yukio; Okuyama, Naoki; Mabuchi, Kunihiko

    2005-07-15

    This article provides a simple method for coating glass micropipettes with diamond-like carbon (DLC) through plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The apparatus uses a cathode that is a thin-metal-coated micropipette itself and an anode that is a meshed cylinder with its cylinder axis along the micropipette length. To produce a uniform plasma and prevent a temperature increase at the tip due to ion collision concentration, we investigated the effect of the height and diameter of the meshed cylindrical anode on the plasma. Intermittent deposition is also effective for inhibiting the temperature rise and producing high quality DLC films. Measured Raman spectra and electric resistivity indicate that a DLC film suitable for use as an insulating film can be produced on the micropipette. This coating method should also be useful for other extremely small probes.

  7. Textured (100) yttria-stabilized zirconia thin films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzschuh, H.; Suhr, H.

    1991-07-01

    Thin films of yttria-stabilized zirconia were deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on quartz Si(100), Si(111), Ni, and the steels V2A and Hastelloy at substrate temperatures (Ts): 673-873 K. The metal beta-diketonates Y (thd)3 and Zr(thd)4 were used as precursors. The fully stabilized fluorite-type cubic structure was obtained over a wide range of yttria contents from 3.5 to 80 mol pct (Ts = 773 K). The quality of the films depended on the match of the thermal expansion coefficients of substrate and deposit.

  8. Electrical transport properties of microcrystalline silicon grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Nicola; Ficcadenti, Marco; Morresi, Lorenzo; Murri, Roberto; Ambrosone, Giuseppina; Coscia, Ubaldo

    2004-12-01

    The dark conductivity and Hall mobility of hydrogenated silicon films deposited varying the silane concentration f =SiH4/(SiH4+H2) in a conventional plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system have been investigated as a function of temperature, taking into account their structural properties. The electrical properties have been studied in terms of a structural two-phase model. A clear transition from the electrical transport governed by a crystalline phase, in the range 1%⩽f⩽3%, to that controlled by an amorphous phase, for f >3%, has been evidenced. Some metastable effects of the dark conductivity have been noticed.

  9. Optical properties of silicon nitride films formed by plasma-chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasukova, L. A.; Komarov, F. F.; Parkhomenko, I. N.; Milchanin, O. V.; Leont'ev, A. V.; Mudryi, A. V.; Togambaeva, A. K.

    2013-03-01

    The optical properties and structure of layers of silicon nitride deposited on silicon substrates by plasma-aided chemical vapor deposition at 300°C are studied by ellipsometry, Raman scattering, IR spectroscopy, and photoluminescence techniques. It is found that immediately after deposition the silicon nitride contains hydrogen in the form of Si-H bonds. Annealing (1100°C, 30 min) leads to dehydrogenation and densification of the nitride layer. An intense Si3N4 photoluminescence signal is detected in the green. Immediately after deposition the photoluminescence peak appears at 542 nm and annealing shifts it to shorter wavelengths.

  10. Microstructural modification of nc-Si/SiOx films during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. W.

    2005-07-01

    Nanocrystalline-silicon embedded silicon oxide films are prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at 300 °C without post-heat treatment. Measurements of XPS, IR, XRD, and HREM are performed. Microstructural modifications are found occurring throughout the film deposition. The silica network with a high oxide state is suggested to be formed directly under the abduction of the former deposited layer, rather than processing repeatedly from the original low-oxide state of silica. Nanocrystalline silicon particles with a size of 6-10 nm are embedded in the SiOx film matrix, indicating the potential application in Si-based optoelectronic integrity.

  11. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of β-tungsten, a metastable phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, C. C.; Hess, D. W.

    1984-09-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of a metastable phase of tungsten ( β-W) is performed using tungsten hexafluoride and hydrogen as source gases. At 350 °C, the as-deposited resistivity of these films is ˜50 μΩ cm. After heat treatments between 650 and 750 °C in forming gas, the resistivity drops below 11 μΩ cm. Concomitant with this resistivity change is a phase change to α-W, the equilibrium, body-centered-cubic form.

  12. Growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes grown by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muneyoshi, T.; Okai, M.; Yaguchi, T.; Sasaki, S.

    2001-10-01

    To investigate the most suitable deposition conditions and growth mechanism, we grew carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition under various conditions. The experimental parameters we varied were (a) the mixture ratio of methane in hydrogen, (b) the total gas pressure, and (c) the bias electric current. We found that the bias electric current was the most influential parameter in determining the shape of CNTs. We believe that the growth process of CNTs can be explained by using the solid solubility curves of metal-carbon phase diagrams. Selective growth and low-temperature growth of CNTs can also be understood from these phase diagrams.

  13. Structure of carbon nanotubes grown by microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okai, M.; Muneyoshi, T.; Yaguchi, T.; Sasaki, S.

    2000-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes grown on a Ni substrate and an Fe-Ni-Cr alloy substrate by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition were investigated by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis. TEM showed that the nanotubes on both substrates have a piled-cone structure with metal particles on top which determine the diameter of the nanotubes. Their diameter ranges from 60 to 80 nm. Moreover, EDX showed that the metal particles are composed of Ni when the nanotubes are grown on Ni substrate and of Fe and Ni in the case of the Fe-Ni-Cr alloy substrate.

  14. A mathematical model and simulation results of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konakov, S. A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) of silicon nitride thin films from SiH4-NH3-N2-Ar mixture, an important application in modern materials science. Our multiphysics model describes gas dynamics, chemical physics, plasma physics and electrodynamics. The PECVD technology is inherently multiscale, from macroscale processes in the chemical reactor to atomic-scale surface chemistry. Our macroscale model is based on Navier-Stokes equations for a transient laminar flow of a compressible chemically reacting gas mixture, together with the mass transfer and energy balance equations, Poisson equation for electric potential, electrons and ions balance equations. The chemical kinetics model includes 24 species and 58 reactions: 37 in the gas phase and 21 on the surface. A deposition model consists of three stages: adsorption to the surface, diffusion along the surface and embedding of products into the substrate. A new model has been validated on experimental results obtained with the "Plasmalab System 100" reactor. We present the mathematical model and simulation results investigating the influence of flow rate and source gas proportion on silicon nitride film growth rate and chemical composition.

  15. Diamond synthesis at atmospheric pressure by microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemawan, Kadek W.; Gou, Huiyang; Hemley, Russell J.

    2015-11-01

    Polycrystalline diamond has been synthesized on silicon substrates at atmospheric pressure, using a microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. The CH4/Ar plasma was generated inside of quartz capillary tubes using 2.45 GHz microwave excitation without adding H2 into the deposition gas chemistry. Electronically excited species of CN, C2, Ar, N2, CH, Hβ, and Hα were observed in the emission spectra. Raman measurements of deposited material indicate the formation of well-crystallized diamond, as evidenced by the sharp T2g phonon at 1333 cm-1 peak relative to the Raman features of graphitic carbon. Field emission scanning electron microscopy images reveal that, depending on the growth conditions, the carbon microstructures of grown films exhibit "coral" and "cauliflower-like" morphologies or well-facetted diamond crystals with grain sizes ranging from 100 nm to 10 μm.

  16. Deposition of electrochromic tungsten oxide thin films by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, W.B.; Sacks, G.J.

    1997-03-01

    Use of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) for electrochromic WO{sub 3} film deposition is investigated. Oxygen, hydrogen, and tungsten hexafluoride were used as source gases. Reactant gas flow was investigated to determine the effect on film characteristics. High quality optical films were obtained at deposition rates on the order of 100 {angstrom}/s. Higher deposition rates were attainable but film quality and optical coherence degraded. Atomic emission spectroscopy (AES), was used to provide an in situ assessment of the plasma deposition chemistry. Through AES, it is shown that the hydrogen gas flow is essential to the deposition of the WO{sub 3} film. Oxygen gas flow and tungsten hexafluoride gas flow must be approximately equal for high quality films.

  17. Diamond synthesis at atmospheric pressure by microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Gou, Huiyang; Hemley, Russell J.; Hemawan, Kadek W.

    2015-11-02

    Polycrystalline diamond has been successfully synthesized on silicon substrates at atmospheric pressure using a microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. The CH4/Ar plasma was generated inside of quartz capillary tubes using 2.45 GHz microwave excitation without adding H2 into the deposition gas chemistry. Electronically excited species of CN, C2, Ar, N2, CH, Hβ and Hα were observed in emission spectra. Raman measurements of deposited material indicate the formation of well-crystallized diamond, as evidenced by the sharp T2g phonon at 1333 cm-1 peak relative to the Raman features of graphitic carbon. Furthermore, field emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images revealmore » that, depending on the on growth conditions, the carbon microstructures of grown films exhibit “coral” and “cauliflower-like” morphologies or well-facetted diamond crystals with grain sizes ranging from 100 nm to 10 μm.« less

  18. Plasma restructuring of catalysts for chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Cantoro, M.; Hofmann, S.; Pisana, S.; Parvez, A.; Fasoli, A.; Scardaci, V.; Ferrari, A. C.; Robertson, J.; Mattevi, C.; Ducati, C.

    2009-03-15

    The growth of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers by catalytic chemical vapor deposition at lower temperatures is found to be aided by a separate catalyst pretreatment step in which the catalyst thin film is restructured into a series of nanoparticles with a more active surface. The restructuring is particularly effective when carried out by an ammonia plasma. The nature of the restructuring is studied by atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman. We find that as the growth temperature decreases, there is a limiting maximum catalyst thickness, which gives any nanotube growth. Plasmas are found to restructure the catalyst by a combination of physical etching and chemical modification. Large plasma powers can lead to complete etching of thin catalyst films, and hence loss of activity. Ni is found to be the better catalyst at low temperatures because it easily reduced from any oxide form to the catalytically active metallic state. On the other hand, Fe gives the largest nanotube length and density yield at moderate temperatures because it is less easy to reduce at low temperatures and it is more easily poisoned at high temperatures.

  19. Modeling of Sheath Ion-Molecule Reactions in Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hash, David B.; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    In many plasma simulations, ion-molecule reactions are modeled using ion energy independent reaction rate coefficients that are taken from low temperature selected-ion flow tube experiments. Only exothermic or nearly thermoneutral reactions are considered. This is appropriate for plasma applications such as high-density plasma sources in which sheaths are collisionless and ion temperatures 111 the bulk p!asma do not deviate significantly from the gas temperature. However, for applications at high pressure and large sheath voltages, this assumption does not hold as the sheaths are collisional and ions gain significant energy in the sheaths from Joule heating. Ion temperatures and thus reaction rates vary significantly across the discharge, and endothermic reactions become important in the sheaths. One such application is plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes in which dc discharges are struck at pressures between 1-20 Torr with applied voltages in the range of 500-700 V. The present work investigates The importance of the inclusion of ion energy dependent ion-molecule reaction rates and the role of collision induced dissociation in generating radicals from the feedstock used in carbon nanotube growth.

  20. Tailoring carbon nanotips in the plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition: Effect of the process parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B. B.; Ostrikov, K.

    2009-04-15

    Carbon nanotips have been synthesized from a thin carbon film deposited on silicon by bias-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition under different process parameters. The results of scanning electron microscopy indicate that high-quality carbon nanotips can only be obtained under conditions when the ion flux is effectively drawn from the plasma sustained in a CH{sub 4}+NH{sub 3}+H{sub 2} gas mixture. It is shown that the morphology of the carbon nanotips can be controlled by varying the process parameters such as the applied bias, gas pressure, and the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2} mass flow ratios. The nanotip formation process is examined through a model that accounts for surface diffusion, in addition to sputtering and deposition processes included in the existing models. This model makes it possible to explain the major difference in the morphologies of the carbon nanotips formed without and with the aid of the plasma as well as to interpret the changes of their aspect ratio caused by the variation in the ion/gas fluxes. Viable ways to optimize the plasma-based process parameters to synthesize high-quality carbon nanotips are suggested. The results are relevant to the development of advanced plasma-/ion-assisted methods of nanoscale synthesis and processing.

  1. Characterizations of GaN film growth by ECR plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Silie; Chen, Junfang; Zhang, Hongbin; Guo, Chaofen; Li, Wei; Zhao, Wenfen

    2009-06-01

    The electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition technology (ECR-MOPECVD) is adopted to grow GaN films on (0 0 0 1) α-Al2O3 substrate. The gas sources are pure N2 and trimethylgallium (TMG). Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and thermodynamic analysis of GaN growth are applied to understand the GaN growth process. The OES of ECR plasma shows that TMG is significantly dissociated in ECR plasma. Reactants N and Ga in the plasma, obtained easily under the self-heating condition, are essential for the GaN growth. They contribute to the realization of GaN film growth at a relatively low temperature. The thermodynamic study shows that the driving force for the GaN growth is high when N2:TMG>1. Furthermore, higher N2:TMG flow ratio makes the GaN growth easier. Finally, X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and atomic force microscope are applied to investigate crystal quality, morphology, and roughness of the GaN films. The results demonstrate that the ECR-MOPECVD technology is favorable for depositing GaN films at low temperatures.

  2. Low Temperature Metal Free Growth of Graphene on Insulating Substrates by Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, R; Munuera, C; Martínez, J I; Azpeitia, J; Gómez-Aleixandre, C; García-Hernández, M

    2017-03-01

    Direct growth of graphene films on dielectric substrates (quartz and silica) is reported, by means of remote electron cyclotron resonance plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition r-(ECR-CVD) at low temperature (650°C). Using a two step deposition process- nucleation and growth- by changing the partial pressure of the gas precursors at constant temperature, mostly monolayer continuous films, with grain sizes up to 500 nm are grown, exhibiting transmittance larger than 92% and sheet resistance as low as 900 Ω·sq(-1). The grain size and nucleation density of the resulting graphene sheets can be controlled varying the deposition time and pressure. In additon, first-principles DFT-based calculations have been carried out in order to rationalize the oxygen reduction in the quartz surface experimentally observed. This method is easily scalable and avoids damaging and expensive transfer steps of graphene films, improving compatibility with current fabrication technologies.

  3. Stress hysteresis and mechanical properties of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited dielectric films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurn, Jeremy; Cook, Robert F.; Kamarajugadda, Mallika; Bozeman, Steven P.; Stearns, Laura C.

    2004-02-01

    A comprehensive survey is described of the responses of three plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited dielectric film systems to thermal cycling and indentation contact. All three films—silicon oxide, silicon nitride, and silicon oxy-nitride—exhibited significant nonequilibrium permanent changes in film stress on thermal cycling or annealing. The linear relationship between stress and temperature changed after the films were annealed at 300 °C, representing a structural alteration in the film reflecting a change in coefficient of thermal expansion or biaxial modulus. A double-substrate method was used to deduce both thermoelastic properties before and after the anneal of selected films and the results were compared with the modulus deconvoluted from small-scale depth-sensing indentation experiments (nanoindentation). Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and hydrogen forward scattering were used to deduce the composition of the films and it was found that all the films contained significant amounts of hydrogen.

  4. Low temperature metal free growth of graphene on insulating substrates by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, R.; Munuera, C.; Martínez, J. I.; Azpeitia, J.; Gómez-Aleixandre, C.; García-Hernández, M.

    2017-03-01

    Direct growth of graphene films on dielectric substrates (quartz and silica) is reported, by means of remote electron cyclotron resonance plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition r-(ECR-CVD) at low temperature (650 °C). Using a two step deposition process- nucleation and growth- by changing the partial pressure of the gas precursors at constant temperature, mostly monolayer continuous films, with grain sizes up to 500 nm are grown, exhibiting transmittance larger than 92% and sheet resistance as low as 900 Ω sq-1. The grain size and nucleation density of the resulting graphene sheets can be controlled varying the deposition time and pressure. In additon, first-principles DFT-based calculations have been carried out in order to rationalize the oxygen reduction in the quartz surface experimentally observed. This method is easily scalable and avoids damaging and expensive transfer steps of graphene films, improving compatibility with current fabrication technologies.

  5. High Current Emission from Patterned Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Fabricated by Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Linfan; Chen, Jiangtao; Yang, Bingjun; Jiao, Tifeng

    2015-12-01

    Vertically, carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays were successfully fabricated on hexagon patterned Si substrates through radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using gas mixtures of acetylene (C2H2) and hydrogen (H2) with Fe/Al2O3 catalysts. The CNTs were found to be graphitized with multi-walled structures. Different H2/C2H2 gas flow rate ratio was used to investigate the effect on CNT growth, and the field emission properties were optimized. The CNT emitters exhibited excellent field emission performance (the turn-on and threshold fields were 2.1 and 2.4 V/μm, respectively). The largest emission current could reach 70 mA/cm2. The emission current was stable, and no obvious deterioration was observed during the long-term stability test of 50 h. The results were relevant for practical applications based on CNTs.

  6. High Current Emission from Patterned Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Fabricated by Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Cui, Linfan; Chen, Jiangtao; Yang, Bingjun; Jiao, Tifeng

    2015-12-01

    Vertically, carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays were successfully fabricated on hexagon patterned Si substrates through radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using gas mixtures of acetylene (C2H2) and hydrogen (H2) with Fe/Al2O3 catalysts. The CNTs were found to be graphitized with multi-walled structures. Different H2/C2H2 gas flow rate ratio was used to investigate the effect on CNT growth, and the field emission properties were optimized. The CNT emitters exhibited excellent field emission performance (the turn-on and threshold fields were 2.1 and 2.4 V/μm, respectively). The largest emission current could reach 70 mA/cm(2). The emission current was stable, and no obvious deterioration was observed during the long-term stability test of 50 h. The results were relevant for practical applications based on CNTs.

  7. Low-temperature synthesis of graphene on nickel foil by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.; Song, W.; Lee, S. Y.; Jeon, C.; Jung, W.; Kim, M.; Park, C.-Y.

    2011-06-27

    Microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) was employed to synthesize high quality centimeter scale graphene film at low temperatures. Monolayer graphene was obtained by varying the gas mixing ratio of hydrogen and methane to 80:1. Using advantages of MPCVD, the synthesis temperature was decreased from 750 deg. C down to 450 deg. C. Optical microscopy and Raman mapping images exhibited that a large area monolayer graphene was synthesized regardless of the temperatures. Since the overall transparency of 89% and low sheet resistances ranging from 590 to 1855 {Omega}/sq of graphene films were achieved at considerably low synthesis temperatures, MPCVD can be adopted in manufacturing future large-area electronic devices based on graphene film.

  8. Robust Ultralow-k Dielectric (Fluorocarbon) Deposition by Microwave Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Yoshiyuki; Miyatani, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Yasuo; Kawamura, Kohei; Nemoto, Takenao; Nakamura, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Hirokazu; Ito, Azumi; Shirotori, Akihide; Nozawa, Toshihisa; Matsuoka, Takaaki

    2012-05-01

    A robust fluorocarbon film was successfully deposited on a substrate at a temperature above 400 °C by the new microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MWPE-CVD) method using the linear C5F8 precursor instead of a conventional cyclic C5F8 one. The fluorocarbon performed keeping the dielectric constant low as a value of 2.25 by controlling the molecular structure forming cross-linked poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) chains with configurational carbon atoms. The novel fluorocarbon demonstrates less fluorine degassing at an elevated temperature, with high mechanical strength and without degradation of adhesion of the fluorocarbon film to SiCN and SiOx stacked films after thermal stress at 400 °C and 1 atm N2 for 1 h. Consequently, this robust fluorocarbon film is considered a promising candidate for general porous silicon materials with applications to practical integration processes as an interlayer dielectric.

  9. Carbon nanowalls grown by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition during the carbonization of polyacrylonitrile fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jiangling; Su Shi; Kundrat, Vojtech; Abbot, Andrew M.; Ye, Haitao; Zhou Lei; Mushtaq, Fajer; Ouyang Defang; James, David; Roberts, Darren

    2013-01-14

    We used microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) to carbonize an electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) precursor to form carbon fibers. Scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the fibers at different evolution stages. It was found that MPECVD-carbonized PAN fibers do not exhibit any significant change in the fiber diameter, whilst conventionally carbonized PAN fibers show a 33% reduction in the fiber diameter. An additional coating of carbon nanowalls (CNWs) was formed on the surface of the carbonized PAN fibers during the MPECVD process without the assistance of any metallic catalysts. The result presented here may have a potential to develop a novel, economical, and straightforward approach towards the mass production of carbon fibrous materials containing CNWs.

  10. Low Temperature Metal Free Growth of Graphene on Insulating Substrates by Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, R.; Munuera, C.; Martínez, J. I.; Azpeitia, J.; Gómez-Aleixandre, C.; García-Hernández, M.

    2016-01-01

    Direct growth of graphene films on dielectric substrates (quartz and silica) is reported, by means of remote electron cyclotron resonance plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition r-(ECR-CVD) at low temperature (650°C). Using a two step deposition process- nucleation and growth- by changing the partial pressure of the gas precursors at constant temperature, mostly monolayer continuous films, with grain sizes up to 500 nm are grown, exhibiting transmittance larger than 92% and sheet resistance as low as 900 Ω·sq-1. The grain size and nucleation density of the resulting graphene sheets can be controlled varying the deposition time and pressure. In additon, first-principles DFT-based calculations have been carried out in order to rationalize the oxygen reduction in the quartz surface experimentally observed. This method is easily scalable and avoids damaging and expensive transfer steps of graphene films, improving compatibility with current fabrication technologies. PMID:28070341

  11. In situ nitrogen-doped graphene grown from polydimethylsiloxane by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chundong; Zhou, Yungang; He, Lifang; Ng, Tsz-Wai; Hong, Guo; Wu, Qi-Hui; Gao, Fei; Lee, Chun-Sing; Zhang, Wenjun

    2013-01-21

    Due to its unique electronic properties and wide spectrum of promising applications, graphene has attracted much attention from scientists in various fields. Control and engineering of graphene’s semiconducting properties is considered to be the key of its applications in electronic devices. Here, we report a novel method to prepare in situ nitrogen-doped graphene by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using PDMS (Polydimethylsiloxane) as a solid carbon source. Based on this approach, the concentration of nitrogen-doping can be easily controlled via the flow rate of nitrogen during the CVD process. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicated that the nitrogen atoms doped into graphene lattice were mainly in the forms of pyridinic and pyrrolic structures. Moreover, first-principles calculations show that the incorporated nitrogen atoms can lead to p-type doping of graphene. This in situ approach provides a promising strategy to prepare graphene with controlled electronic properties.

  12. Chemical vapor generation for sample introduction into inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy: vaporization of antimony(III) with bromide.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Molinero, A; Mendoza, O; Callizo, A; Chamorro, P; Castillo, J R

    2002-10-01

    A new method for antimony determination in soils is proposed. It is based on the chemical vapor generation of Sb(III) with bromide, after a reaction in sulfuric acid media and transport of the gaseous phase into an inductively coupled plasma for atomic emission spectrometry. The experimental variables influencing the method were delimited by experimental design and the most important were finally optimized by the modified Simplex method. In optimized conditions the method involves the reaction of 579 microl concentrated sulfuric acid with 120 microl 5% w/v KBr and 250 microl antimony solution. Measurement of antimony emission intensity at 217.581 nm provides a method with an absolute detection limit of 3.5 ng and a precision (RSD) of 5.8% for the injection of five replicates of 175 ng Sb(III) (250 microl of 0.7 microg ml(-1) solution). The interference of common anions and cations on the antimony signal was evaluated. A 21% Sb(III) volatilization efficiency was calculated from the mean of six experiments at optimum conditions. The accuracy of the methodology was checked by the analysis of one standard reference soil after acid decomposition heating in a microwave oven.

  13. Surface modification of silicon-containing fluorocarbon films prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yoonyoung; Desta, Yohannes; Goettert, Jost; Lee, G. S.; Ajmera, P. K.

    2005-07-01

    Surface modification of silicon-containing fluorocarbon (SiCF) films achieved by wet chemical treatments and through x-ray irradiation is examined. The SiCF films were prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, using gas precursors of tetrafluoromethane and disilane. As-deposited SiCF film composition was analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Surface modification of SiCF films utilizing n-lithiodiaminoethane wet chemical treatment is discussed. Sessile water-drop contact angle changed from 95°+/-2° before treatment to 32°+/-2° after treatment, indicating a change in the film surface characteristics from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. For x-ray irradiation on the SiCF film with a dose of 27.4 kJ/cm3, the contact angle of the sessile water drop changed from 95°+/-2° before radiation to 39°+/-3° after x-ray exposure. The effect of x-ray exposure on chemical bond structure of SiCF films is studied using Fourier transform infrared measurements. Electroless Cu deposition was performed to test the applicability of the surface modified films. The x-ray irradiation method offers a unique advantage in making possible surface modification in a localized area of high-aspect-ratio microstructures. Fabrication of a Ti-membrane x-ray mask is introduced here for selective surface modification using x-ray irradiation.

  14. Growth of Er-doped silicon using metalorganics by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andry, P. S.; Varhue, W. J.; Ladipo, F.; Ahmed, K.; Adams, E.; Lavoie, M.; Klein, P. B.; Hengehold, R.; Hunter, J.

    1996-07-01

    Epitaxial growth of Er-doped silicon films has been performed by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition at low temperature (430 °C) using an electron cyclotron resonance source. The goal was to incorporate an optically active center, erbium surrounded by nitrogen, through the use of the metalorganic compound tris (bis trimethyl silyl amido) erbium. Films were analyzed by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and high resolution x-ray diffraction. The characteristic 1.54 μm emission was observed by photoluminescence spectroscopy. Previous attempts to incorporate the complex (ErO6) using tris (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl- 3,5-heptanedionato) erbium (III) indicated that excessive carbon contamination lowered epitaxial quality and reduced photoluminescent intensity. In this study, chemical analysis of the films also revealed a large carbon concentration, however, the effect on epitaxial quality was much less destructive. A factorial design experiment was performed whose analysis identified the key processing parameters leading to high quality luminescent films. Hydrogen was found to be a major cause of crystal quality degradation in our metalorganic plasma-enhanced process.

  15. Preparation Of Electrochromic Metal Oxide Films By Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, D. K.; Tracy, C. E.; Svensson, J. S. E. M.; Liebert, B. E.

    1987-11-01

    Laboratory procedures have been developed for depositing thin films of electrochromic metal oxides by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD). In this process, vapor phase reactants, such as tungsten hexafluotIde, are mixed with oxygen and excited by RF energy at a frequency of 13.56 MHz and power levels up to≍1W/cm2 substrate area. Large rates of oxide deposition have been achieved (> 8 nm/s) making this process a candidate for high-speed coating of large area substrates, such as window glass. Amorphous WO1 films prepared by PE-CVD have been shown to have electrochromic responses virtually identical to films prepared by vacuum evaporation. The lithium ion diffusion rate, for example, is approximately 1.3 x 10-11 cm2 /s at x = 0.03 in LixWO3 prepared by PE-CVD. On the other hand, molybdenum oxide films and mixed molybdenum/tungsten oxide films prepared by PE-CVD from the hexafluorides differ markedly from vacuum evaporated films. Their electrochromic responses are spectrally different and are much slower. Lithium ion diffusion rates in such Mo03 films are lower by about three orders of magnitude. These differences are tentatively attributed to a large fraction of fluorine (Mo:F ratios of the order of 2:1) which are incorporated into the molybdenum and mixed oxides, but are not incorporated into the tungsten oxides.

  16. High growth rate homoepitaxial diamond film deposition at high temperatures by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vohra, Yogesh K. (Inventor); McCauley, Thomas S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The deposition of high quality diamond films at high linear growth rates and substrate temperatures for microwave-plasma chemical vapor deposition is disclosed. The linear growth rate achieved for this process is generally greater than 50 .mu.m/hr for high quality films, as compared to rates of less than 5 .mu.m/hr generally reported for MPCVD processes.

  17. Development of a Ge/GaAs HMT (High Mobility Transistor) Technology Based on Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    R SEARCH TRIANGLE INSTITUTE RTI/3628/89-3QTR November 1089 0 00 DEVELOPMENT OF A Ge/GaAs [MT TECHNOLCGY JBASED ON PLASMA-ENHANCED CHEMICAL VAPOR DE...N00014- 86-C-0838 during:the period -from I July 1080 to 30 September 1089 . Funding is being provided by the Strateg’c Defense Initiative under the

  18. Practical silicon deposition rules derived from silane monitoring during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlome, Richard De Wolf, Stefaan; Demaurex, Bénédicte; Ballif, Christophe; Amanatides, Eleftherios; Mataras, Dimitrios

    2015-05-28

    We clarify the difference between the SiH{sub 4} consumption efficiency η and the SiH{sub 4} depletion fraction D, as measured in the pumping line and the actual reactor of an industrial plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. In the absence of significant polysilane and powder formation, η is proportional to the film growth rate. Above a certain powder formation threshold, any additional amount of SiH{sub 4} consumed translates into increased powder formation rather than into a faster growing Si film. In order to discuss a zero-dimensional analytical model and a two-dimensional numerical model, we measure η as a function of the radio frequency (RF) power density coupled into the plasma, the total gas flow rate, the input SiH{sub 4} concentration, and the reactor pressure. The adjunction of a small trimethylboron flow rate increases η and reduces the formation of powder, while the adjunction of a small disilane flow rate decreases η and favors the formation of powder. Unlike η, D is a location-dependent quantity. It is related to the SiH{sub 4} concentration in the plasma c{sub p}, and to the phase of the growing Si film, whether the substrate is glass or a c-Si wafer. In order to investigate transient effects due to the RF matching, the precoating of reactor walls, or the introduction of a purifier in the gas line, we measure the gas residence time and acquire time-resolved SiH{sub 4} density measurements throughout the ignition and the termination of a plasma.

  19. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition synthesis of vertically oriented graphene nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Bo, Zheng; Yang, Yong; Chen, Junhong; Yu, Kehan; Yan, Jianhua; Cen, Kefa

    2013-06-21

    Vertically oriented graphene (VG) nanosheets have attracted growing interest for a wide range of applications, from energy storage, catalysis and field emission to gas sensing, due to their unique orientation, exposed sharp edges, non-stacking morphology, and huge surface-to-volume ratio. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) has emerged as a key method for VG synthesis; however, controllable growth of VG with desirable characteristics for specific applications remains a challenge. This paper attempts to summarize the state-of-the-art research on PECVD growth of VG nanosheets to provide guidelines on the design of plasma sources and operation parameters, and to offer a perspective on outstanding challenges that need to be overcome to enable commercial applications of VG. The review starts with an overview of various types of existing PECVD processes for VG growth, and then moves on to research on the influences of feedstock gas, temperature, and pressure on VG growth, substrate pretreatment, the growth of VG patterns on planar substrates, and VG growth on cylindrical and carbon nanotube (CNT) substrates. The review ends with a discussion on challenges and future directions for PECVD growth of VG.

  20. Growth of ultrananocrystalline diamond film by DC Arcjet plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G. C.; Li, B.; Yan, Z. Q.; Liu, J.; Lu, F. X.; Ye, H.

    2012-06-01

    Self-standing diamond films were grown by DC Arcjet plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The feed gasses were Ar/H2/CH4, in which the flow ratio of CH4 to H2 (F/F) was varied from 5% to 20%. Two distinct morphologies were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM), i.e. the "pineapple-like" morphology and the "cauliflower-like" morphology. It was found that the morphologies of the as-grown films are strongly dependent on the flow ratio of CH4 to H2 in the feed gasses. High resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) survey results revealed that there were nanocrystalline grains within the "pineapple-like" films whilst there were ultrananocrystalline grains within "cauliflower-like" films. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results suggested that (110) crystalline plane was the dominant surface in the "cauliflower-like" films whilst (100) crystalline plane was the dominant surface in the "pineapple-like" films. Raman spectroscopy revealed that nanostructured carbon features could be observed in both types of films. Plasma diagnosis was carried out in order to understand the morphology dependent growth mechanism. It could be concluded that the film morphology was strongly influenced by the density of gas phases. The gradient of C2 radical was found to be different along the growth direction under the different growth conditions.

  1. Passivation of aluminum nanoparticles by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition for energetic nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Shahravan, Anaram; Desai, Tapan; Matsoukas, Themis

    2014-05-28

    We have produced passivating coatings on 80-nm aluminum particles by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Three organic precursors--isopropyl alcohol, toluene, and perfluorodecalin--were used to fabricate thin films with thicknesses ranging from 5 nm to 30 nm. The coated samples and one untreated sample were exposed to 85% humidity at 25 °C for two months, and the active Al content was determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) in the presence of oxygen. The results were compared with an uncoated sample stored in a glovebox under argon for the same period. We find that all three coatings provide protection against humidity, compared to the control, and their efficacy ranks in the following order: isopropyl alcohol < toluene < perfluorodecalin. This order also correlates with increasing water contact angle of the three solid coatings. The amount of heat released in the oxidation, measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), was found to increase in the same order. Perfluorodecalin resulted in providing the best protection, and it produced the maximum enthalpy of combustion, ΔH = 4.65 kJ/g. This value is higher than that of uncoated aluminum stored in the glovebox, indicating that the coatings promote more complete oxidation of the core. Overall, we conclude that the plasma polymer coatings of this study are suitable passivating thin film for aluminum nanoparticles by providing protection against oxidation while facilitating the complete oxidation of the metallic core at elevated temperature.

  2. Diamond synthesis at atmospheric pressure by microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hemawan, Kadek W.; Gou, Huiyang; Hemley, Russell J.

    2015-11-02

    Polycrystalline diamond has been synthesized on silicon substrates at atmospheric pressure, using a microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. The CH{sub 4}/Ar plasma was generated inside of quartz capillary tubes using 2.45 GHz microwave excitation without adding H{sub 2} into the deposition gas chemistry. Electronically excited species of CN, C{sub 2}, Ar, N{sub 2}, CH, H{sub β}, and H{sub α} were observed in the emission spectra. Raman measurements of deposited material indicate the formation of well-crystallized diamond, as evidenced by the sharp T{sub 2g} phonon at 1333 cm{sup −1} peak relative to the Raman features of graphitic carbon. Field emission scanning electron microscopy images reveal that, depending on the growth conditions, the carbon microstructures of grown films exhibit “coral” and “cauliflower-like” morphologies or well-facetted diamond crystals with grain sizes ranging from 100 nm to 10 μm.

  3. Diamond synthesis at atmospheric pressure by microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, Huiyang; Hemley, Russell J.; Hemawan, Kadek W.

    2015-11-02

    Polycrystalline diamond has been successfully synthesized on silicon substrates at atmospheric pressure using a microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. The CH4/Ar plasma was generated inside of quartz capillary tubes using 2.45 GHz microwave excitation without adding H2 into the deposition gas chemistry. Electronically excited species of CN, C2, Ar, N2, CH, Hβ and Hα were observed in emission spectra. Raman measurements of deposited material indicate the formation of well-crystallized diamond, as evidenced by the sharp T2g phonon at 1333 cm-1 peak relative to the Raman features of graphitic carbon. Furthermore, field emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images reveal that, depending on the on growth conditions, the carbon microstructures of grown films exhibit “coral” and “cauliflower-like” morphologies or well-facetted diamond crystals with grain sizes ranging from 100 nm to 10 μm.

  4. Conformal encapsulation of three-dimensional, bioresorbable polymeric scaffolds using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Hawker, Morgan J; Pegalajar-Jurado, Adoracion; Fisher, Ellen R

    2014-10-21

    Bioresorbable polymers such as poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) have a multitude of potential biomaterial applications such as controlled-release drug delivery and regenerative tissue engineering. For such biological applications, the fabrication of porous three-dimensional bioresorbable materials with tunable surface chemistry is critical to maximize their surface-to-volume ratio, mimic the extracellular matrix, and increase drug-loading capacity. Here, two different fluorocarbon (FC) precursors (octofluoropropane (C3F8) and hexafluoropropylene oxide (HFPO)) were used to deposit FC films on PCL scaffolds using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). These two coating systems were chosen with the intent of modifying the scaffold surfaces to be bio-nonreactive while maintaining desirable bulk properties of the scaffold. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed high-CF2 content films were deposited on both the exterior and interior of PCL scaffolds and that deposition behavior is PECVD system specific. Scanning electron microscopy data confirmed that FC film deposition yielded conformal rather than blanket coatings as the porous scaffold structure was maintained after plasma treatment. Treated scaffolds seeded with human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) demonstrate that the cells do not attach after 72 h and that the scaffolds are noncytotoxic to HDF. This work demonstrates conformal FC coatings can be deposited on 3D polymeric scaffolds using PECVD to fabricate 3D bio-nonreactive materials.

  5. Preparation of amorphous electrochromic tungsten oxide and molybdenum oxide by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.K.

    1986-09-01

    Preliminary experiments have been performed to probe the feasibility of using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE--CVD) to prepare electrochromic thin films of tungsten oxide and molybdenum oxide by plasma reaction of WF/sub 6/, W(CO)/sub 6/, and Mo(CO)/sub 6/ with oxygen. Thin films produced in a 300 W, electrodeless, radio-frequency (rf), capacitive discharge were found to be electrochromic when tested with either liquid or solid electrolytes. Optical spectroscopy was performed on two electrochromic coatings after Li/sup +/ ion insertion from a propylene carbonate liquid electrolyte. Broad absorption peaks at --900 nm for WO/sub 3/ and 600 nm for MoO/sub 3/ were observed. Optical results for PE--CVD MoO/sub 3/ films differ from those reported for evaporated MoO/sub 3/ films which have an absorption peak at --800 nm. The shorter wavelength absorption in the PE--CVD MoO/sub 3/ films offers the potential for fabricating electrochromic devices with higher contrast ratios and less color change. Optical emission spectroscopy, Auger, and x-ray diffraction analyses indicate these thin film deposits to be predominantly amorphous tungsten and molybdenum oxides.

  6. Open-air type plasma chemical vaporization machining by applying pulse-width modulation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Yoshiki; Hata, Yuki; Endo, Katsuyoshi; Yamamura, Kazuya

    2014-03-01

    Photolithography techniques have been used to enable the low-cost and high-speed transfer of a pattern onto a silicon wafer. However, owing to the high integration of semiconductors, extreme ultraviolet will be increasingly used as the exposure light source and all optics must be reflective to focus light because the wavelength of the light will be so short that it cannot pass through a lens. The form accuracy of reflective optics affects the accuracy of transfer, and a flatness of less than 32 nm on a 6 inch photomask substrate is required according to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors roadmap. Plasma chemical vaporization machining is an ultraprecise figuring technique that enables a form accuracy of nanometre order to be obtained. In our previous study, the removal volume was controlled by changing the scanning speed of the worktable. However, a discrepancy between the theoretical scanning speed and the actual scanning speed occurred owing to the inertia of the worktable when the change in speed was rapid. As an attempt to resolve this issue, we controlled the removal volume by controlling the electric power applied during plasma generation while maintaining a constant scanning speed. The methods that we adapted to control the applied electric power were amplitude-modulation (AM) control and pulse-width modulation (PWM) control. In this work, we evaluate the controllability of the material removal rate in the AM and PWM control modes.

  7. Functional metal oxide coatings by molecule-based thermal and plasma chemical vapor deposition techniques.

    PubMed

    Mathur, S; Ruegamer, T; Donia, N; Shen, H

    2008-05-01

    Deposition of thin films through vaccum processes plays an important role in industrial processing of decorative and functional coatings. Many metal oxides have been prepared as thin films using different techniques, however obtaining compositionally uniform phases with a control over grain size and distribution remains an enduring challenge. The difficulties are largely related to complex compositions of functional oxide materials, which makes a control over kinetics of nucleation and growth processes rather difficult to control thus resulting in non-uniform material and inhomogeneous grain size distribution. Application of tailor-made molecular precursors in low pressure or plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques offers a viable solution for overcoming thermodynamic impediments involved in thin film growth. In this paper molecule-based CVD of functional coatings is demonstrated for iron oxide (Fe2O3, Fe3O4), vanadium oxide (V2O5, VO2) and hafnium oxide (HfO2) phases followed by the characterization of their microstructural, compositional and functional properties which support the advantages of chemical design in simplifying deposition processes and optimizing functional behavior.

  8. Cytotoxicity of Boron-Doped Nanocrystalline Diamond Films Prepared by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dan; Gou, Li; Ran, Junguo; Zhu, Hong; Zhang, Xiang

    2015-07-01

    Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) exhibits extraordinary mechanical properties and chemical stability, making it highly suitable for biomedical applications. For implant materials, the impact of boron-doped NCD films on the character of cell growth (i.e., adhesion, proliferation) is very important. Boron-doped NCD films with resistivity of 10-2 Ω·cm were grown on Si substrates by the microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) process with H2 bubbled B2O3. The crystal structure, diamond character, surface morphology, and surface roughness of the boron-doped NCD films were analyzed using different characterization methods, such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The contact potential difference and possible boron distribution within the film were studied with a scanning kelvin force microscope (SKFM). The cytotoxicity of films was studied by in vitro tests, including fluorescence microscopy, SEM and MTT assay. Results indicated that the surface roughness value of NCD films was 56.6 nm and boron was probably accumulated at the boundaries between diamond agglomerates. MG-63 cells adhered well and exhibited a significant growth on the surface of films, suggesting that the boron-doped NCD films were non-toxic to cells. supported by the Open Foundation of State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices (University of Electronic Science and Technology of China) (No. KFJJ201313)

  9. Characterization of low-temperature silicon nitride films produced by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Q.; Ra, Y.; Bachman, M.; Li, G. P.

    2009-01-15

    Silicon nitride films were synthesized at 170 deg. C by using inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition under three microwave power conditions of 500, 800, and 1000 W. The chemical, physical and electrical properties of the deposited silicon nitride films were characterized by Fourier transform infrared, wet etching, atomic force microscopy, ellipsometry, J-V, and C-V measurements of metal-insulator-semiconductor. The microwave power for film deposition is found to play an important role at the films' properties. A high microwave power reduces the retention of hydrogen in a form of Si-H and N-H atomic bonds. The microwave power significantly affects the density of pin holes; the 800 W film has the lowest density of pin holes. In general, the low-temperature silicon nitride films possess better surface roughness than the conventional silicon nitride films produced at higher temperatures. The low-temperature silicon nitride films exhibit an abrupt breakdown, a characteristic of avalanche breakdown. The variation in breakdown strength is correlated with the change in pin-hole density, and the 800 W silicon nitride film possesses the highest breakdown strength. The microwave power has limited influences on leakage current and resistivity of the films. All the low-temperature silicon nitride films are characterized by high-density fixed charges and interface charge traps, of which both densities vary slightly with the microwave power for film deposition.

  10. Method of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of diamond using methanol-based solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzeng, Yonhua (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Briefly described, methods of forming diamond are described. A representative method, among others, includes: providing a substrate in a reaction chamber in a non-magnetic-field microwave plasma system; introducing, in the absence of a gas stream, a liquid precursor substantially free of water and containing methanol and at least one carbon and oxygen containing compound having a carbon to oxygen ratio greater than one, into an inlet of the reaction chamber; vaporizing the liquid precursor; and subjecting the vaporized precursor, in the absence of a carrier gas and in the absence in a reactive gas, to a plasma under conditions effective to disassociate the vaporized precursor and promote diamond growth on the substrate in a pressure range from about 70 to 130 Torr.

  11. Chain Assemblies from Nanoparticles Synthesized by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition: The Computational View.

    PubMed

    Mishin, Maxim V; Zamotin, Kirill Y; Protopopova, Vera S; Alexandrov, Sergey E

    2015-12-01

    This article refers to the computational study of nanoparticle self-organization on the solid-state substrate surface with consideration of the experimental results, when nanoparticles were synthesised during atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (AP-PECVD). The experimental study of silicon dioxide nanoparticle synthesis by AP-PECVD demonstrated that all deposit volume consists of tangled chains of nanoparticles. In certain cases, micron-sized fractals are formed from tangled chains due to deposit rearrangement. This work is focused on the study of tangled chain formation only. In order to reveal their formation mechanism, a physico-mathematical model was developed. The suggested model was based on the motion equation solution for charged and neutral nanoparticles in the potential fields with the use of the empirical interaction potentials. In addition, the computational simulation was carried out based on the suggested model. As a result, the influence of such experimental parameters as deposition duration, particle charge, gas flow velocity, and angle of gas flow was found. It was demonstrated that electrical charges carried by nanoparticles from the discharge area are not responsible for the formation of tangled chains from nanoparticles, whereas nanoparticle kinetic energy plays a crucial role in deposit morphology and density. The computational results were consistent with experimental results.

  12. Microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition of porous carbon film as supercapacitive electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ai-Min; Feng, Chen-Chen; Huang, Hao; Paredes Camacho, Ramon Alberto; Gao, Song; Lei, Ming-Kai; Cao, Guo-Zhong

    2017-07-01

    Highly porous carbon film (PCF) coated on nickel foam was prepared successfully by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) with C2H2 as carbon source and Ar as discharge gas. The PCF is uniform and dense with 3D-crosslinked nanoscale network structure possessing high degree of graphitization. When used as the electrode material in an electrochemical supercapacitor, the PCF samples verify their advantageous electrical conductivity, ion contact and electrochemical stability. The test results show that the sample prepared under 1000 W microwave power has good electrochemical performance. It displays the specific capacitance of 62.75 F/g at the current density of 2.0 A/g and retains 95% of its capacitance after 10,000 cycles at the current density of 2.0 A/g. Besides, its near-rectangular shape of the cyclic voltammograms (CV) curves exhibits typical character of an electric double-layer capacitor, which owns an enhanced ionic diffusion that can fit the requirements for energy storage applications.

  13. Boron nitride nanowalls: low-temperature plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition synthesis and optical properties.

    PubMed

    Merenkov, Ivan S; Kosinova, Marina L; Maximovskii, Eugene A

    2017-05-05

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanowalls (BNNWs) were synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) from a borazine (B3N3H6) and ammonia (NH3) gas mixture at a low temperature range of 400 °C-600 °C on GaAs(100) substrates. The effect of the synthesis temperature on the structure and surface morphology of h-BN films was investigated. The length and thickness of the h-BN nanowalls were in the ranges of 50-200 nm and 15-30 nm, respectively. Transmission electron microscope images showed the obtained BNNWs were composed of layered non-equiaxed h-BN nanocrystallites 5-10 nm in size. The parallel-aligned h-BN layers as an interfacial layer were observed between the film and GaAs(100) substrate. BNNWs demonstrate strong blue light emission, high transparency (>90%) both in visible and infrared spectral regions and are promising for optical applications. The present results enable a convenient growth of BNNWs at low temperatures.

  14. Growth of diamond by RF plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Duane E.; Ianno, Natale J.; Woollam, John A.; Swartzlander, A. B.; Nelson, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    A system has been designed and constructed to produce diamond particles by inductively coupled radio-frequency, plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. This is a low-pressure, low-temperature process used in an attempt to deposit diamond on substrates of glass, quartz, silicon, nickel, and boron nitride. Several deposition parameters have been varied including substrate temperature, gas concentration, gas pressure, total gas flow rate, RF input power, and deposition time. Analytical methods employed to determine composition and structure of the deposits include scanning electron microscopy, absorption spectroscopy, scanning Auger microprobe spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Analysis indicates that particles having a thin graphite surface, as well as diamond particles with no surface coatings, have been deposited. Deposits on quartz have exhibited optical bandgaps as high as 4.5 eV. Scanning electron microscopy analysis shows that particles are deposited on a pedestal which Auger spectroscopy indicates to be graphite. This is a phenomenon that has not been previously reported in the literature.

  15. Structural and optical properties of silicon nanocrystals grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Prakash, G V; Daldosso, N; Degoli, E; Iacona, F; Cazzanelli, M; Gaburro, Z; Pucker, G; Dalba, P; Rocca, F; Ceretta Moreira, E; Franzò, G; Pacifici, D; Priolo, F; Arcangeli, C; Filonov, A B; Ossicini, S; Pavesi, L

    2001-06-01

    Silicon nanocrystals (Si-nc) embedded in SiO2 matrix have been prepared by high temperature thermal annealing (1000-1250 degrees C) of substoichiometric SiOx films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Different techniques have been used to examine the optical and structural properties of Si-nc. Transmission electron microscopy analysis shows the formation of nanocrystals whose sizes are dependent on annealing conditions and deposition parameters. The spectral positions of room temperature photoluminescence are systematically blue shifted with reduction in the size of Si-nc obtained by decreasing the annealing temperature or the Si content during the PECVD deposition. A similar trend has been found in optical absorption measurements. X-ray absorption fine structure measurements indicate the presence of an intermediate region between the Si-nc and the SiO2 matrix that participates in the light emission process. Theoretical observations reported here support these findings. All these efforts allow us to study the link between dimensionality, optical properties, and the local environment of Si-nc and the surrounding SiO2 matrix.

  16. Fabrication of layered self-standing diamond film by dc arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G. C.; Dai, F. W.; Li, B.; Lan, H.; Askari, J.; Tang, W. Z.; Lu, F. X.

    2007-01-15

    Layered self-standing diamond films, consisting of an upper layer, buffer layer, and a lower layer, were fabricated by fluctuating the ratio of methane to hydrogen in high power dc arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition. There were micrometer-sized columnar diamond crystalline grains in both upper layer and lower layer. The size of the columnar diamond crystalline grains was bigger in the upper layer than that in the lower layer. The orientation of the upper layer was (110), while it was (111) for the lower layer. Raman results showed that no sp{sup 3} peak shift was found in the upper layer, but it was found and blueshifted in the lower layer. This indicated that the internal stress within the film body could be tailored by this layered structure. The buffer layer with nanometer-sized diamond grains formed by secondary nucleation was necessary in order to form the layered film. Growth rate was over 10 {mu}m/h in layered self-standing diamond film fabrication.

  17. Heteroepitaxial growth of wafer scale highly oriented graphene using inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Libo; Xu, Hai; Li, Linjun; Yang, Yang; Fu, Qiang; Bao, Xinhe; Loh, Kian Ping

    2016-06-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene on Cu has attracted much attention because of its industrial scalability. Herein, we report inductively coupled plasma-assisted CVD of epitaxially grown graphene on (111)-textured Cu film alloyed with a small amount of Ni, where large area high quality graphene film can be grown in less than 5 min at 800 °C, thus affording industrial scalability. The epitaxially grown graphene films on (111)-textured Cu contain grains which are predominantly aligned with the Cu lattice and about 10% of 30°-rotated grains (anti-grains). Such graphene films are exclusively monolayer and possess good electrical conductivity, high carrier mobility, and room temperature quantum Hall effect. Magnetoresistance measurements reveal that the reduction of the grain sizes from 150 nm to 50 nm produce increasing Anderson localization and the appearance of a transport gap. Owing to the presence of grain boundaries in these anti-grains, epitaxially grown graphene films possess n-type characteristics and exhibit ultra-high sensitivity to adsorbates.

  18. Optimization of silicon oxynitrides by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition for an interferometric biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo, Sung Joong; Lee, Byung-Chul; Lee, Sang-Myung; Park, Jung Ho; Shin, Hyun-Joon

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, silicon oxynitride layers deposited with different plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) conditions were fabricated and optimized, in order to make an interferometric sensor for detecting biochemical reactions. For the optimization of PECVD silicon oxynitride layers, the influence of the N2O/SiH4 gas flow ratio was investigated. RF power in the PEVCD process was also adjusted under the optimized N2O/SiH4 gas flow ratio. The optimized silicon oxynitride layer was deposited with 15 W in chamber under 25/150 sccm of N2O/SiH4 gas flow rates. The clad layer was deposited with 20 W in chamber under 400/150 sccm of N2O/SiH4 gas flow condition. An integrated Mach-Zehnder interferometric biosensor based on optical waveguide technology was fabricated under the optimized PECVD conditions. The adsorption reaction between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and the silicon oxynitride surface was performed and verified with this device.

  19. Thermal Conductivity of Nanocrystalline Silicon Prepared by Plasma-Enhanced Chemical-Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jugdersuren, Battogtokh; Liu, Xiao; Kearney, Brian; Queen, Daniel; Metcalf, Thomas; Culbertson, James; Chervin, Christopher; Katz, Michael; Stroud, Rhonda

    Nanocrystallization by ball milling has been used successfully to reduce the thermal conductivity of silicon-germanium alloys (SiGe) and turn them into useful thermoelectric materials at a temperature of a few hundred degrees C. Currently the smallest grain sizes in nanocrystalline SiGe are in the 10 nm range. Germanium is added to scatter short wavelength phonons by impurity scattering. In this work, we report a record low thermal conductivity in nanocrystalline silicon prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition. By varying hydrogen to silane ratio, we can vary the average grain sizes from greater than 10 nm down to 3 nm, as determined by both the high resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The values of thermal conductivity, as measured by the 3 ω technique, can be correspondingly modulated from that of ball-milled nanocrystalline SiGe to a record low level of 0.3 W/mK at room temperature. This low thermal conductivity is only about 1/3 of the minimum thermal conductivity limit of silicon. Possible causes of such a large reduction are discussed. Work supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  20. Preparation and structure of porous dielectrics by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, S. M.; Neumayer, D. A.; Sherwood, M. H.; Grill, A.; Wang, X.; Sankarapandian, M.

    2007-05-01

    The preparation of ultralow dielectric constant porous silicon, carbon, oxygen, hydrogen alloy dielectrics, called 'pSiCOH', using a production 200 mm plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition tool and a thermal treatment is reported here. The effect of deposition temperature on the pSiCOH film is examined using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, dielectric constant (k), and film shrinkage measurements. For all deposition temperatures, carbon in the final porous film is shown to be predominantly Si-CH{sub 3} species, and lower k is shown to correlate with increased concentration of Si-CH{sub 3}. NMR and FTIR spectroscopies clearly detect the loss of a removable, unstable, hydrocarbon (CH{sub x}) phase during the thermal treatment. Also detected are increased cross-linking of the Si-O skeleton, and concentration changes for three distinct structures of carbon. In the as deposited films, deposition temperature also affects the hydrocarbon (CH{sub x}) content and the presence of C=O and C=C functional groups.

  1. Boron nitride nanowalls: low-temperature plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition synthesis and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merenkov, Ivan S.; Kosinova, Marina L.; Maximovskii, Eugene A.

    2017-05-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanowalls (BNNWs) were synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) from a borazine (B3N3H6) and ammonia (NH3) gas mixture at a low temperature range of 400 °C-600 °C on GaAs(100) substrates. The effect of the synthesis temperature on the structure and surface morphology of h-BN films was investigated. The length and thickness of the h-BN nanowalls were in the ranges of 50-200 nm and 15-30 nm, respectively. Transmission electron microscope images showed the obtained BNNWs were composed of layered non-equiaxed h-BN nanocrystallites 5-10 nm in size. The parallel-aligned h-BN layers as an interfacial layer were observed between the film and GaAs(100) substrate. BNNWs demonstrate strong blue light emission, high transparency (>90%) both in visible and infrared spectral regions and are promising for optical applications. The present results enable a convenient growth of BNNWs at low temperatures.

  2. Characterization of diamond-like nanocomposite thin films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santra, T. S.; Liu, C. H.; Bhattacharyya, T. K.; Patel, P.; Barik, T. K.

    2010-06-01

    Diamond-like nanocomposite (DLN) thin films, comprising the networks of a-C:H and a-Si:O were deposited on pyrex glass or silicon substrate using gas precursors (e.g., hexamethyldisilane, hexamethyldisiloxane, hexamethyldisilazane, or their different combinations) mixed with argon gas, by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. Surface morphology of DLN films was analyzed by atomic force microscopy. High-resolution transmission electron microscopic result shows that the films contain nanoparticles within the amorphous structure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to determine the structural change within the DLN films. The hardness and friction coefficient of the films were measured by nanoindentation and scratch test techniques, respectively. FTIR and XPS studies show the presence of CC, CH, SiC, and SiH bonds in the a-C:H and a-Si:O networks. Using Raman spectroscopy, we also found that the hardness of the DLN films varies with the intensity ratio ID/IG. Finally, we observed that the DLN films has a better performance compared to DLC, when it comes to properties like high hardness, high modulus of elasticity, low surface roughness and low friction coefficient. These characteristics are the critical components in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and emerging nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS).

  3. Growth and characterization of silicon-nitride films by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, I. K.; Lee, Y. J.; Jo, J. W.; Lee, J. I.; Kang, K. N.

    1991-06-01

    Thin films of silicon nitride were deposited on Si wafers by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). For deposition we designed and made hot wall capacitively coupled PECVD equipment which has a radial flow reactor. Using an RF generator of frequency 13.56 MHz and SiH 4 (5% SiH 4 in N 2) + NH 3 and N 2 as reactive gases and the carrier gas, respectively, we systematically varied the substrate temperature (240-360°C), the partial pressure of reactive gases (0.35

  4. Differing morphologies of textured diamond films with electrical properties made with microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Wen Chi; Wu, Yu-Shiang; Chang, Hou-Cheng; Lee, Yuan-Haun

    2010-12-01

    This study investigates the orientation of textured diamond films produced through microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) at 1200 W, 110 Torr, CH 4/H 2 = 1/20, with depositions times of 0.5-4.0 h. After a growth period of 2.0-4.0 h, this particular morphology revealed a rectangular structure stacked regularly on the diamond film. The orientation on {1 1 1}-textured diamond films grew a preferred orientation of {1 1 0} on the surface, as measured by XRD. The formation of the diamond epitaxial film formed textured octahedrons in ball shaped (or cauliflower-like) diamonds in the early stages (0.5 h), and the surface of the diamond film extended to pile the rectangular structure at 4.0 h. The width of the tier was approximately 200 nm at the 3.0 h point of deposition, according to TEM images. The results revealed that the textured diamond films showed two different morphological structures (typical ball shaped and rectangular diamonds), at different stages of the deposition period. The I- V characteristics of the oriented diamond films after 4.0 h of deposition time showed good conformity with the ohmic contact.

  5. Electrical transport properties of graphene nanowalls grown at low temperature using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Rong; Ahktar, Meysam; Alruqi, Adel; Dharmasena, Ruchira; Jasinski, Jacek B.; Thantirige, Rukshan M.; Sumanasekera, Gamini U.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we report the electrical transport properties of uniform and vertically oriented graphene (graphene nanowalls) directly synthesized on multiple substrates including glass, Si/SiO2 wafers, and copper foils using radio-frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) with methane (CH4) as the precursor at relatively low temperatures. The temperature for optimum growth was established with the aid of transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. This approach offers means for low-cost graphene nanowalls growth on an arbitrary substrate with the added advantage of transfer-free device fabrication. The temperature dependence of the electrical transport properties (resistivity and thermopower) were studied in the temperature range, 30-300 K and analyzed with a combination of 2D-variable range hopping (VRH) and thermally activated (TA) conduction mechanisms. An anomalous temperature dependence of the thermopower was observed for all the samples and explained with a combination of a diffusion term having a linear temperature dependence plus a term with an inverse temperature dependence.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide sensor based on carbon nanowalls grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomatsu, Masakazu; Hiramatsu, Mineo; Foord, John S.; Kondo, Hiroki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Sekine, Makoto; Takeda, Keigo; Hori, Masaru

    2017-06-01

    Fabrication of an electrochemical sensor for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection was demonstrated. H2O2 is a major messenger molecule in various redox-dependent cellular signaling transductions. Therefore, sensitive detection of H2O2 is greatly important in health inspection and environmental protection. Carbon nanowalls (CNWs) are composed of few-layer graphenes standing almost vertically on a substrate forming a three-dimensional structure. In this work, CNWs were used as a platform for H2O2 sensing, which is based on the large surface area of conducting carbon and surface decoration with platinum (Pt) nanoparticles (NPs). CNWs were grown on carbon fiber paper (CFP) by inductively coupled plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition to increase the surface area. Then, the CNW surface was decorated with Pt-NPs by the reduction of H2PtCl6. Cyclic voltammetry results indicate that the Pt-decorated CNW/CFP electrode possesses excellent electrocatalytic activity for the reduction of H2O2. Amperometric responses indicate the high-sensitivity detection capability of the Pt-decorated CNW/CFP electrode for H2O2.

  7. Application of a single crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond detector for deuteron plasma neutron measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xufei; Yuan, Xi; Zhang, Xing; Chen, Zhongjing; Peng, Xingyu; Du, Tengfei; Li, Tao; Hu, Zhimeng; Cui, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jinxiang; Li, Xiangqing; Zhang, Guohui; Fan, Tieshuan; Yuan, Guoliang; Yang, Jinwei; Yang, Qingwei

    2014-10-01

    A single crystal chemical vapor deposition (scCVD) diamond detector has been characterized and employed for the neutron measurement at the HL-2A tokamak device. The scCVD diamond detector has been deposited with 5 μm of lithium fluoride (LiF) layer to enhance the sensitivity to thermal neutrons. Time stability of the detector has been studied with α-source and good performance has been found for more than 12 h. Neutron irradiations have been performed in four quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields in the energy range from 2.50 MeV to 16.03 MeV. The measured response function of the scCVD diamond detector to 14.13 MeV neutrons shows a narrow 12C (n, α)9Be reaction peak which is well isolated from other structures by about 1 MeV in energy, indicating the great potential as a fast neutron spectrometer. Neutron measurement of deuterium plasma discharge was established at the HL-2A tokamak device, and good consistence has been revealed among this detector signal and other related signals.

  8. Stress control of silicon nitride films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong-ling; Feng, Xiao-fei; Wen, Zhi-yu; Shang, Zheng-guo; She, Yin

    2016-07-01

    Stress controllable silicon nitride (SiNx) films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) are reported. Low stress SiNx films were deposited in both high frequency (HF) mode and dual frequency (HF/LF) mode. By optimizing process parameters, stress free (-0.27 MPa) SiNx films were obtained with the deposition rate of 45.5 nm/min and the refractive index of 2.06. Furthermore, at HF/LF mode, the stress is significantly influenced by LF ratio and LF power, and can be controlled to be 10 MPa with the LF ratio of 17% and LF power of 150 W. However, LF power has a little effect on the deposition rate due to the interaction between HF power and LF power. The deposited SiNx films have good mechanical and optical properties, low deposition temperature and controllable stress, and can be widely used in integrated circuit (IC), micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) and bio-MEMS.

  9. Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of SiOx Films Using Electron Beam Generated Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-28

    the films was large (> 130 nm/min), which implied a high porosity for all cases except for low TEOS flow (≤ 2 sccm) at the higher (300 °C) temperature...special relation to the substrate or e-beam. A total flow of 100 sccm was used in all cases . For the gas flows mentioned above, the individual flows...beam generated plasmas. In this case , molecular hydrogen, formed primarily by recombination of atomic hydrogen on system walls, will not be

  10. Chemical vapor deposition of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} in a cold plasma reactor using an aerosol vaporization technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Y.S.; Hill, D.N.; Carter, W.B.; Lackey, W.J.

    1996-03-01

    A plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique, utilizing an aerosol decomposition/vaporization process in a cold plasma reactor, was used to form YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (YBCO) thin films on single-crystal MgO substrates. Aerosol droplets of the precursors were generated by an ultrasonic nebulizer operating at 1.63 MHz, while a 50 kW rf generator, operating at 2.87 MHz, was used to create the plasma and heat a stainless steel susceptor. Nitrate, acetylacetonate, and tetramethylheptanedionate compounds were used as precursors, and distilled water, ethyl alcohol, and an aqueous benzoic acid solution were investigated as solvents for the aerosol solution. The effects of the solubility and decomposition temperature of the chemical precursors, and the vapor pressure of the solvents, on the microstructure and phase assemblage of the deposits were determined. Specific combinations of substrate temperature, in the range of 800--940 C, and oxygen partial pressure, in the range of 0.3--2.7 kPa, were found to produce in situ, crystalline, stoichiometric YBCO films.

  11. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method of forming vanadium oxide films and vanadium oxide thin-films prepared thereby

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Ji-Guang; Tracy, C. Edwin; Benson, David K.; Turner, John A.; Liu, Ping

    2000-01-01

    A method is disclosed of forming a vanadium oxide film on a substrate utilizing plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The method includes positioning a substrate within a plasma reaction chamber and then forming a precursor gas comprised of a vanadium-containing chloride gas in an inert carrier gas. This precursor gas is then mixed with selected amounts of hydrogen and oxygen and directed into the reaction chamber. The amounts of precursor gas, oxygen and hydrogen are selected to optimize the final properties of the vanadium oxide film An rf plasma is generated within the reaction chamber to chemically react the precursor gas with the hydrogen and the oxygen to cause deposition of a vanadium oxide film on the substrate while the chamber deposition pressure is maintained at about one torr or less. Finally, the byproduct gases are removed from the plasma reaction chamber.

  12. SiC nanofibers grown by high power microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Shin-ichi; Baek, Yang-Gyu; Ikuno, Takashi; Kohara, Hidekazu; Katayama, Mitsuhiro; Oura, Kenjiro; Hirao, Takashi

    2003-05-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) nanofibers have been synthesized on Si substrates covered by Ni thin films using high power microwave chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Characterization using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with electron energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) revealed that the resultant fibrous nanostructures were assigned to β-SiC with high crystallinity. The formation of SiC nanofibers can be explained by the vapor liquid solid (VLS) mechanism in which precipitation of SiC occurs from the supersaturated Ni nanoparticle containing Si and C.

  13. Hollow electrode enhanced radio frequency glow plasma and its application to the chemical vapor deposition of microcrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Tabuchi, Toshihiro; Mizukami, Hiroyuki; Takashiri, Masayuki

    2004-09-01

    A hollow electrode enhanced radio frequency (rf) glow plasma excitation technique and its application to the chemical vapor deposition of microcrystalline silicon films have been studied. In this technique, the reactor has two types of hollow structure. One is a hollow counterelectrode, and the other serves as both a hollow counterelectrode and a hollow rf electrode. The application of these discharge types to semiconductor processing is studied in the case of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon thin films. High crystallinity, photosensitivity and a maximum deposition rate of 6.0 nm/s can all be achieved at plasma excitation frequency of 13.56 MHz and substrate temperature of 300 deg. C. Properties of these plasmas are investigated by observing the plasma emission pattern, optical emission spectrum analysis and electrical parameters of the rf electrode. It is found that the plasma technique using both types of hollow discharge not only results in higher intensity of SiH{sup *} and H{alpha} but also in much smaller self-bias voltage of the rf electrode. Faster processing of device grade hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon films can also be achieved under lower rf power compared to use of the hollow counterelectrode technique alone.

  14. Hollow electrode enhanced radio frequency glow plasma and its application to the chemical vapor deposition of microcrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabuchi, Toshihiro; Mizukami, Hiroyuki; Takashiri, Masayuki

    2004-09-01

    A hollow electrode enhanced radio frequency (rf) glow plasma excitation technique and its application to the chemical vapor deposition of microcrystalline silicon films have been studied. In this technique, the reactor has two types of hollow structure. One is a hollow counterelectrode, and the other serves as both a hollow counterelectrode and a hollow rf electrode. The application of these discharge types to semiconductor processing is studied in the case of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon thin films. High crystallinity, photosensitivity and a maximum deposition rate of 6.0 nm/s can all be achieved at plasma excitation frequency of 13.56 MHz and substrate temperature of 300°C. Properties of these plasmas are investigated by observing the plasma emission pattern, optical emission spectrum analysis and electrical parameters of the rf electrode. It is found that the plasma technique using both types of hollow discharge not only results in higher intensity of SiH* and Hα but also in much smaller self-bias voltage of the rf electrode. Faster processing of device grade hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon films can also be achieved under lower rf power compared to use of the hollow counterelectrode technique alone.

  15. Annealing and oxidation of silicon oxide films prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. Y.; Lu, Y. F.; Tang, L. J.; Wu, Y. H.; Cho, B. J.; Xu, X. J.; Dong, J. R.; Song, W. D.

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated phase separation, silicon nanocrystal (Si NC) formation and optical properties of Si oxide (SiOx, 0plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition at different nitrous-oxide/silane flow ratios. The physical and optical properties of the SiOx films were studied as a result of high-vacuum annealing and thermal oxidation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals that the as-deposited films have a random-bonding or continuous-random-network structure with different oxidation states. After annealing at temperatures above 1000 °C, the intermediate Si continuum in XPS spectra (referring to the suboxide) split to Si peaks corresponding to SiO2 and elemental Si. This change indicates the phase separation of the SiOx into more stable SiO2 and Si clusters. Raman, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and optical absorption confirmed the phase separation and the formation of Si NCs in the films. The size of Si NCs increases with increasing Si concentration in the films and increasing annealing temperature. Two photoluminescence (PL) bands were observed in the films after annealing. The ultraviolet (UV)-range PL with a peak fixed at 370-380 nm is independent of Si concentration and annealing temperature, which is a characteristic of defect states. Strong PL in red range shows redshifts from ˜600 to 900 nm with increasing Si concentration and annealing temperature, which supports the quantum confinement model. After oxidation of the high-temperature annealed films, the UV PL was almost quenched while the red PL shows continuous blueshifts with increasing oxidation time. The different oxidation behaviors further relate the UV PL to the defect states and the red PL to the recombination of quantum-confined excitions.

  16. Automation of a remote plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system using LabVIEW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rajan; Fretwell, John L.; Vaihinger, Jochen; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    1997-08-01

    The remote plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RPCVD) system is an experimental low temperature Si/Si-Ge epitaxy system. This paper describes an integrated hardware/software automation package developed for the RPCVD system. Aspects of the system controlled by the package include pneumatic gas valves, mass flow controllers (MFCs), and a temperature controller. The package was developed on an Apple Quadra 950 platform using LabVIEWTM 3.1 and associated data acquisition and control hardware supplied by National Instruments and other vendors. The software interface allows the user to operate the system through a virtual control panel which displays critical system parameters such as chamber pressure, chamber temperature and gas flow rates, along with the states of the gas valves and the MFCs. The system can also be run in the recipe mode, in which a sequence of steps are read in from an ExcelTM file. A simulation routine scans each recipe for possible errors such as violation of valve interlocks while the recipe is being loaded. All actions, whether in the manual mode or the recipe mode, are recorded in a log file. Finally, since many of the gases used in the RPCVD process are toxic and/or flammable, there is an emphasis on safety in the entire control scheme. A safety monitor routine constantly checks for valve interlocks and pressure-valve interlocks. Upon detecting an illegal state, it automatically takes necessary action to bring the system into a safe state. In addition to these software safety features, there are also hardware interlocks to deal with such situations as power outages.

  17. Low-Temperature Silicon Epitaxy by Remote, Plasma - Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habermehl, Scott Dwight

    The dynamics of low temperature Si homoepitaxial and heteroepitaxial growth, by remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, RPECVD, have been investigated. For the critical step of pre-deposition surface preparation of Si(100) surfaces, the attributes of remote plasma generated atomic H are compared to results obtained with a rapid thermal desorption, RTD, technique and a hybrid H-plasma/RTD technique. Auger electron spectroscopy, AES, and electron diffraction analysis indicate the hybrid technique to be very effective at surface passivation, while the RTD process promotes the formation of SiC precipitates, which induce defective epitaxial growth. For GaP and GaAs substrates, the use of atomic H exposure is investigated as a surface passivation technique. AES shows this technique to be effective at producing atomically clean surfaces. For processing at 400^circrm C, the GaAs(100) surface is observed to reconstruct to a c(8 x 2)Ga symmetry while, at 530^ circrm C the vicinal GaP(100) surface, miscut 10^circ , is observed to reconstruct to a (1 x n) type symmetry; an unreconstructed (1 x 1) symmetry is observed for GaP(111). Differences in the efficiency with which native oxides are removed from the surface are attributed to variations in the local atomic bonding order of group V oxides. The microstructure of homoepitaxial Si films, deposited at temperatures of 25-450^circ rm C and pressures of 50-500 mTorr, is catalogued. Optimized conditions for the deposition of low defect, single crystal films are identified. The existence of two pressure dependent regimes for process activation are observed. In-situ mass spectral analysis indicates that the plasma afterglow is dominated by monosilane ions below 200 mTorr, while above 200 mTorr, low mass rm H_{x} ^+ (x = 1,2,3) and rm HHe^+ ions dominate. Consideration of the growth rate data indicates that downstream dissociative silane ionization, in the lower pressure regime, is responsible for an enhanced surface H

  18. Proposal of New Precursors for Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of SiOCH Low-k Films with Plasma Damage Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshi Ohashi,; Nobuo Tajima,; Yonghua Xu,; Takeshi Kada,; Shuji Nagano,; Hideharu Shimizu,; Satoshi Hasaka,

    2010-05-01

    We propose new precursors for bulk low-k films with plasma damage resistance. Our newly designed precursors contain long-chain hydrocarbon groups such as i-butyl and n-propyl groups. Using these precursors, we successfully produced films containing Si-CH2-Si groups by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The plasma damage resistance of these films under NH3 plasma treatment was studied. It was found that the increase in the k-value (Δ k) is smaller in films with more Si-CH2-Si groups.

  19. Proposal of New Precursors for Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of SiOCH Low-k Films with Plasma Damage Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Yoshi; Tajima, Nobuo; Xu, Yonghua; Kada, Takeshi; Nagano, Shuji; Shimizu, Hideharu; Hasaka, Satoshi

    2010-05-01

    We propose new precursors for bulk low-k films with plasma damage resistance. Our newly designed precursors contain long-chain hydrocarbon groups such as i-butyl and n-propyl groups. Using these precursors, we successfully produced films containing Si-CH2-Si groups by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The plasma damage resistance of these films under NH3 plasma treatment was studied. It was found that the increase in the k-value (Δk) is smaller in films with more Si-CH2-Si groups.

  20. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of n-heptane and methyl methacrylate for potential cell alignment applications.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Annina; Tautzenberger, Andrea; Schaller, Andreas; Kalytta-Mewes, Andreas; Tränkle, Sebastian; Ignatius, Anita; Volkmer, Dirk

    2012-10-24

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited polymers (plasma polymers) are promising candidates for biomaterials applications. In the present study, plasma deposition as a fast and easily scalable method was adapted to deposit coatings from n-heptane and methyl methacrylate monomers onto glass substrates. Linear patterns with line and groove widths between 1.25 and 160 μm were introduced by degrative UV-lithography for cell alignment. Differential interference contrast optical microscopy, profilometry and atomic force microscopy revealed that the patterned surfaces had a smooth, homogeneous appearance and a pattern height of 8 and 45 nm for plasma deposited n-heptane and methyl methacrylate, respectively. UV-lithography increased the oxygen content on the surface drastically as shown by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. After immersion in simulated body fluid for 21 days, the pattern was still intact, and the ester groups were also maintained for the most part as shown by infrared spectroscopy. To test the coatings' potential applicability for biomaterial surfaces in a preliminary experiment, we cultured murine preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells on these coatings. Light and electron microscopically, a normal spindle-shaped and aligned cell morphology was observed. At the mRNA level, cells showed no signs of diminished proliferation or elevated expression of apoptosis markers. In conclusion, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited polymers can be patterned with a fast and feasible method and might be suitable materials to guide cell alignment.

  1. Diamond thin films grown by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Leksono, M.

    1991-09-05

    Undoped and boron doped diamond thin films have been successfully grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition from CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, and B{sub 2}H{sub 6}. The films were characterized using x- ray diffraction techniques, Raman and infrared spectroscopies, scanning electron microscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and various electrical measurements. The deposition rates of the diamond films were found to increase with the CH{sub 4} concentration, substrate temperature, and/or pressure, and at 1.0% methane, 900{degrees}C, and 35 Torr, the value was measured to be 0.87 {mu}m/hour. The deposition rate for boron doped diamond films, decreases as the diborane concentration increases. The morphologies of the undoped diamond films are strongly related to the deposition parameters. As the temperature increases from 840 to 925 C, the film morphology changes from cubo-octahedron to cubic structures, while as the CH{sub 4} concentration increases from 0.5 to 1.0%, the morphology changes from triangular (111) faces with a weak preferred orientation to square (100) faces. At 2.0% Ch{sub 4} or higher the films become microcrystalline with cauliflower structures. Scanning electron microscopy analyses also demonstrate that selective deposition of undoped diamond films has been successfully achieved using a lift-off process with a resolution of at least 2 {mu}m. The x-ray diffraction and Raman spectra demonstrate that high quality diamond films have been achieved. The concentration of the nondiamond phases in the films grown at 1.0% CH{sub 4} can be estimated from the Raman spectra to be at less than 0.2% and increases with the CH{sub 4} concentration. The Raman spectra of the boron doped diamond films also indicate that the presence of boron tends to suppress the nondiamond phases in the films. Infrared spectra of the undoped diamond films show very weak CH stretch peaks which suggest that the hydrogen concentration is very low.

  2. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of graphene on copper substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Woehrl, Nicolas Schulz, Stephan; Ochedowski, Oliver; Gottlieb, Steven; Shibasaki, Kosuke

    2014-04-15

    A plasma enhanced vapor deposition process is used to synthesize graphene from a hydrogen/methane gas mixture on copper samples. The graphene samples were transferred onto SiO{sub 2} substrates and characterized by Raman spectroscopic mapping and atomic force microscope topographical mapping. Analysis of the Raman bands shows that the deposited graphene is clearly SLG and that the sheets are deposited on large areas of several mm{sup 2}. The defect density in the graphene sheets is calculated using Raman measurements and the influence of the process pressure on the defect density is measured. Furthermore the origin of these defects is discussed with respect to the process parameters and hence the plasma environment.

  3. Microwave Plasma-Activated Chemical Vapor Deposition of Nitrogen-Doped Diamond. II: CH4/N2/H2 Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Truscott, Benjamin S; Kelly, Mark W; Potter, Katie J; Ashfold, Michael N R; Mankelevich, Yuri A

    2016-11-03

    We report a combined experimental and modeling study of microwave-activated dilute CH4/N2/H2 plasmas, as used for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamond, under very similar conditions to previous studies of CH4/H2, CH4/H2/Ar, and N2/H2 gas mixtures. Using cavity ring-down spectroscopy, absolute column densities of CH(X, v = 0), CN(X, v = 0), and NH(X, v = 0) radicals in the hot plasma have been determined as functions of height, z, source gas mixing ratio, total gas pressure, p, and input power, P. Optical emission spectroscopy has been used to investigate, with respect to the same variables, the relative number densities of electronically excited species, namely, H atoms, CH, C2, CN, and NH radicals and triplet N2 molecules. The measurements have been reproduced and rationalized from first-principles by 2-D (r, z) coupled kinetic and transport modeling, and comparison between experiment and simulation has afforded a detailed understanding of C/N/H plasma-chemical reactivity and variations with process conditions and with location within the reactor. The experimentally validated simulations have been extended to much lower N2 input fractions and higher microwave powers than were probed experimentally, providing predictions for the gas-phase chemistry adjacent to the diamond surface and its variation across a wide range of conditions employed in practical diamond-growing CVD processes. The strongly bound N2 molecule is very resistant to dissociation at the input MW powers and pressures prevailing in typical diamond CVD reactors, but its chemical reactivity is boosted through energy pooling in its lowest-lying (metastable) triplet state and subsequent reactions with H atoms. For a CH4 input mole fraction of 4%, with N2 present at 1-6000 ppm, at pressure p = 150 Torr, and with applied microwave power P = 1.5 kW, the near-substrate gas-phase N atom concentration, [N]ns, scales linearly with the N2 input mole fraction and exceeds the concentrations [NH]ns, [NH2]ns

  4. Microwave Plasma-Activated Chemical Vapor Deposition of Nitrogen-Doped Diamond. II: CH4/N2/H2 Plasmas

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report a combined experimental and modeling study of microwave-activated dilute CH4/N2/H2 plasmas, as used for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamond, under very similar conditions to previous studies of CH4/H2, CH4/H2/Ar, and N2/H2 gas mixtures. Using cavity ring-down spectroscopy, absolute column densities of CH(X, v = 0), CN(X, v = 0), and NH(X, v = 0) radicals in the hot plasma have been determined as functions of height, z, source gas mixing ratio, total gas pressure, p, and input power, P. Optical emission spectroscopy has been used to investigate, with respect to the same variables, the relative number densities of electronically excited species, namely, H atoms, CH, C2, CN, and NH radicals and triplet N2 molecules. The measurements have been reproduced and rationalized from first-principles by 2-D (r, z) coupled kinetic and transport modeling, and comparison between experiment and simulation has afforded a detailed understanding of C/N/H plasma-chemical reactivity and variations with process conditions and with location within the reactor. The experimentally validated simulations have been extended to much lower N2 input fractions and higher microwave powers than were probed experimentally, providing predictions for the gas-phase chemistry adjacent to the diamond surface and its variation across a wide range of conditions employed in practical diamond-growing CVD processes. The strongly bound N2 molecule is very resistant to dissociation at the input MW powers and pressures prevailing in typical diamond CVD reactors, but its chemical reactivity is boosted through energy pooling in its lowest-lying (metastable) triplet state and subsequent reactions with H atoms. For a CH4 input mole fraction of 4%, with N2 present at 1–6000 ppm, at pressure p = 150 Torr, and with applied microwave power P = 1.5 kW, the near-substrate gas-phase N atom concentration, [N]ns, scales linearly with the N2 input mole fraction and exceeds the concentrations [NH]ns, [NH2]ns

  5. Raman spectra investigation of the defects of chemical vapor deposited multilayer graphene and modified by oxygen plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zongyao; Xu, Yu; Cao, Bing; Qi, Lin; He, Shunyu; Wang, Chinhua; Zhang, Jicai; Wang, Jianfeng; Xu, Ke

    2016-11-01

    Graphene, a two dimensional material, can be modified its properties by defects engineering. Here, we present Raman spectra studies of the multilayer graphene (MLG) fabricated by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition over copper foil, and report that the defects of MLG can be controlled by adjusting methane concentration. Moreover, MLG can be changed from metallic to semiconductoring properties by using oxygen plasma treatment, and we investigate the defects evolution of the graphene after exposing to oxygen plasma by Raman spectra. Our results indicate that the amount of defects in graphene can be changed by regulating the methane concentration and oxygen plasma exposure times, but the primary type of defect in MLG is still boundary-like defect. It is valuable for understanding the physics of defects evolution through artificially generated defects, and such defect engineering will greatly open up the future application of the novel material.

  6. Cluster model of aluminum dense vapor plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomkin, A. L.; Shumikhin, A. S.

    2009-08-01

    The chemical model of aluminum vapor plasma, that take into account the formation of neutral and charged clusters, is suggested. Caloric and thermal equations of state and composition of plasma were received using the available information about properties of metal clusters. It is shown, that aluminum vapors are clusterized with decrease of temperature and with increase of density. Pressure dependence on internal energy is calculated and comparison with experimental data is made. The important role of aluminum clusters, especially in an initial phase of the metals vapor heating, is demonstrated. It is shown, that the region of plasma clusterization in gaseous phase agree with known literature data for binodal of vapor-liquid transition from gaseous region. Suggested cluster model may be used to forecast the location of metal vapors binodal. The conductivity of aluminum vapor plasma was calculated. The satisfactory agreement with available experimental data is received.

  7. Green light emission from terbium doped silicon rich silicon oxide films obtained by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Podhorodecki, A; Zatryb, G; Misiewicz, J; Wojcik, J; Wilson, P R J; Mascher, P

    2012-11-30

    The effect of silicon concentration and annealing temperature on terbium luminescence was investigated for thin silicon rich silicon oxide films. The structures were deposited by means of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The structural properties of these films were investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering. The optical properties were investigated by means of photoluminescence and photoluminescence decay spectroscopy. It was found that both the silicon concentration in the film and the annealing temperature have a strong impact on the terbium emission intensity. In this paper, we present a detailed discussion of these issues and determine the optimal silicon concentration and annealing temperature.

  8. Green light emission from terbium doped silicon rich silicon oxide films obtained by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podhorodecki, A.; Zatryb, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Wojcik, J.; Wilson, P. R. J.; Mascher, P.

    2012-11-01

    The effect of silicon concentration and annealing temperature on terbium luminescence was investigated for thin silicon rich silicon oxide films. The structures were deposited by means of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The structural properties of these films were investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering. The optical properties were investigated by means of photoluminescence and photoluminescence decay spectroscopy. It was found that both the silicon concentration in the film and the annealing temperature have a strong impact on the terbium emission intensity. In this paper, we present a detailed discussion of these issues and determine the optimal silicon concentration and annealing temperature.

  9. Organometallic chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films enhanced by atomic nitrogen generated from surface-wave plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, H.; Kato, M.; Ishimaru, T.; Sekiguchi, H.; Wakahara, A.; Furukawa, M.

    2014-02-20

    Organometallic chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films enhanced by atomic nitrogen generated from surface-wave plasma is investigated. Feasibility of precursors of triethylsilane (TES) and bis(dimethylamino)dimethylsilane (BDMADMS) is discussed based on a calculation of bond energies by computer simulation. Refractive indices of 1.81 and 1.71 are obtained for deposited films with TES and BDMADMS, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of the deposited film revealed that TES-based film coincides with the stoichiometric thermal silicon nitride.

  10. Electrochromic Devices Deposited on Low-Temperature Plastics by Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, Joshua; Seman, Michael

    2005-09-20

    Electrochromic windows have been identified by the Basic energy Sciences Advisory committee as an important technology for the reduction of energy spent on heating and cooling in residential and commercial buildings. Electrochromic devices have the ability to reversibly alter their optical properties in response to a small electric field. By blocking ultraviolet and infrared radiation, while modulating the incoming visible radiation, electrochromics could reduce energy consumption by several Quads per year. This amounts to several percent of the total annual national energy expenditures. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate proof of concept for using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) for depositing all five layers necessary for full electrochromic devices, as an alternative to sputtering techniques. The overall goal is to produce electrochromic devices on flexible polymer substrates using PECVD to significantly reduce the cost of the final product. We have successfully deposited all of the films necessary for a complete electrochromic devices using PECVD. The electrochromic layer, WO3, displayed excellent change in visible transmission with good switching times. The storage layer, V2O5, exhibited a high storage capacity and good clear state transmission. The electrolyte, Ta2O5, was shown to functional with good electrical resistivity to go along with the ability to transfer Li ions. There were issues with leakage over larger areas, which can be address with further process development. We developed a process to deposit ZnO:Ga with a sheet resistance of < 50 W/sq. with > 90% transmission. Although we were not able to deposit on polymers due to the temperatures required in combination with the inverted position of our substrates. Two types of full devices were produced. Devices with Ta2O5 were shown to be functional using small aluminum dots as the top contact. The polymer electrolyte devices were shown to have a clear state transmission of

  11. Exploring the plasma chemistry in microwave chemical vapor deposition of diamond from C/H/O gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Mark W; Richley, James C; Western, Colin M; Ashfold, Michael N R; Mankelevich, Yuri A

    2012-09-27

    Microwave (MW)-activated CH(4)/CO(2)/H(2) gas mixtures operating under conditions relevant to diamond chemical vapor deposition (i.e., X(C/Σ) = X(elem)(C)/(X(elem)(C) + X(elem)(O)) ≈ 0.5, H(2) mole fraction = 0.3, pressure, p = 150 Torr, and input power, P = 1 kW) have been explored in detail by a combination of spatially resolved absorption measurements (of CH, C(2)(a), and OH radicals and H(n = 2) atoms) within the hot plasma region and companion 2-dimensional modeling of the plasma. CO and H(2) are identified as the dominant species in the plasma core. The lower thermal conductivity of such a mixture (cf. the H(2)-rich plasmas used in most diamond chemical vapor deposition) accounts for the finding that CH(4)/CO(2)/H(2) plasmas can yield similar maximal gas temperatures and diamond growth rates at lower input powers than traditional CH(4)/H(2) plasmas. The plasma chemistry and composition is seen to switch upon changing from oxygen-rich (X(C/Σ) < 0.5) to carbon-rich (X(C/Σ) > 0.5) source gas mixtures and, by comparing CH(4)/CO(2)/H(2) (X(C/Σ) = 0.5) and CO/H(2) plasmas, to be sensitive to the choice of source gas (by virtue of the different prevailing gas activation mechanisms), in contrast to C/H process gas mixtures. CH(3) radicals are identified as the most abundant C(1)H(x) [x = 0-3] species near the growing diamond surface within the process window for successful diamond growth (X(C/Σ) ≈ 0.5-0.54) identified by Bachmann et al. (Diamond Relat. Mater.1991, 1, 1). This, and the findings of similar maximal gas temperatures (T(gas) ~2800-3000 K) and H atom mole fractions (X(H)~5-10%) to those found in MW-activated C/H plasmas, points to the prevalence of similar CH(3) radical based diamond growth mechanisms in both C/H and C/H/O plasmas.

  12. Metal-boride phase formation on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) during microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Jamin M.; Catledge, Shane A.

    2016-02-01

    Strengthening of cemented tungsten carbide by boriding is used to improve the wear resistance and lifetime of carbide tools; however, many conventional boriding techniques render the bulk carbide too brittle for extreme conditions, such as hard rock drilling. This research explored the variation in metal-boride phase formation during the microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at surface temperatures from 700 to 1100 °C. We showed several well-adhered metal-boride surface layers consisting of WCoB, CoB and/or W2CoB2 with average hardness from 23 to 27 GPa and average elastic modulus of 600-730 GPa. The metal-boride interlayer was shown to be an effective diffusion barrier against elemental cobalt; migration of elemental cobalt to the surface of the interlayer was significantly reduced. A combination of glancing angle X-ray diffraction, electron dispersive spectroscopy, nanoindentation and scratch testing was used to evaluate the surface composition and material properties. An evaluation of the material properties shows that plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited borides formed at substrate temperatures of 800 °C, 850 °C, 900 °C and 1000 °C strengthen the material by increasing the hardness and elastic modulus of cemented tungsten carbide. Additionally, these boride surface layers may offer potential for adhesion of ultra-hard carbon coatings.

  13. Effects of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) on the carrier lifetime of Al2O3 passivation stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Kuk-Hyun; Cho, Young Joon; Chang, Hyo Sik; Kim, Kyung-Joong; Song, Hee Eun

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the effect on the minority carrier lifetime of atomic layer deposition (ALD) Al2O3 passivation by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) SiON layer in Si/Al2O3/SiON-passivated structure. The lifetime variation of the Al2O3/SiON stack layer was found to depend on both the plasma power and the deposition temperature during the PECVD SiON process and to show better thermal stability than the Al2O3/SiNx:H stack under the same deposition conditions. The lifetime after a high-temperature firing process was improved dramatically at the PECVD deposition temperature of 200 °C. Our results provide a significant clue to reason for the improvement of the passivation performance for passivated emitter and rear contact (PERC) silicon solar cells.

  14. Characteristics of silicon nitride deposited by VHF (162 MHz)-plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using a multi-tile push-pull plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki Seok; Sirse, Nishant; Kim, Ki Hyun; Rogers Ellingboe, Albert; Kim, Kyong Nam; Yeom, Geun Young

    2016-10-01

    To prevent moisture and oxygen permeation into flexible organic electronic devices formed on substrates, the deposition of an inorganic diffusion barrier material such as SiN x is important for thin film encapsulation. In this study, by a very high frequency (162 MHz) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF-PECVD) using a multi-tile push-pull plasma source, SiN x layers were deposited with a gas mixture of NH3/SiH4 with/without N2 and the characteristics of the plasma and the deposited SiN x film as the thin film barrier were investigated. Compared to a lower frequency (60 MHz) plasma, the VHF (162 MHz) multi-tile push-pull plasma showed a lower electron temperature, a higher vibrational temperature, and higher N2 dissociation for an N2 plasma. When a SiN x layer was deposited with a mixture of NH3/SiH4 with N2 at a low temperature of 100 °C, a stoichiometric amorphous Si3N4 layer with very low Si-H bonding could be deposited. The 300 nm thick SiN x film exhibited a low water vapor transmission rate of 1.18  ×  10-4 g (m2 · d)-1, in addition to an optical transmittance of higher than 90%.

  15. Characterization of TiO x film prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using a multi-jet hollow cathode plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Masatoshi; Korzec, Dariusz; Aoki, Toru; Engemann, Jurgen; Hatanaka, Yoshinori

    2001-05-01

    The high rate deposition of TiO x film at low temperature was achieved by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) as a source material. The multi-jet hollow cathode plasma source was used to generate the high-density plasma, which was showered toward the substrate. The emission spectra suggest that oxygen radicals play an important role for dissociation of the source material and for yielding the precursors. The high deposition rate up to 50 nm/min was achieved by this process. The as-deposited films are completely amorphous. They consist of structures with complex bondings including both tetrahedral and octahedral components. Though they have such complex bondings, the hydrophilicity of the PECVD film is excellent comparing to that of the annealed crystalline anatase structure. It seems that the PECVD using the multi-jet plasma source is promising for fabrication of hydrophilic TiO x films in low-temperature process.

  16. Chemical and physical sputtering effects on the surface morphology of carbon films grown by plasma chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, Luis

    2009-08-01

    We have studied the influence of chemical and physical sputtering on the surface morphology of hydrogenated carbon films deposited on silicon substrates by bias-enhanced electron cyclotron resonance chemical vapor deposition. Atomic force microscopy based power spectrum density (PSD) and roughness analysis have been used to investigate the film morphology. This study has been possible due to the appropriate choice of the experimental variables, in particular, gas mixture, resulting in either nitrogen-free (a-C:H) or nitrogenated carbon (a-CN:H) films, and substrate bias (V{sub b}). Under these conditions, chemical sputtering is present for a-CN:H deposition but it is negligible for a-C:H film growth, while physical sputtering processes appear for both systems for V{sub b}<=-85 V. When physical sputtering does not operate, the film growth with simultaneous chemical sputtering leads to a characteristic a-CN:H granular surface morphology. Furthermore, PSD analysis reveals that a spatial correlation of the a-CN:H film surface roughness, up to distances approx300 nm, becomes a fingerprint of the coexistence of growth and chemical erosion processes on the film morphology. However, once physical sputtering takes place, the influence of chemical sputtering by reactive nitrogen species on the final surface morphology becomes negligible and both a-CN:H and a-C:H film morphologies are ultrasmooth.

  17. A solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance study of post-plasma reactions in organosilicone microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) coatings.

    PubMed

    Hall, Colin J; Ponnusamy, Thirunavukkarasu; Murphy, Peter J; Lindberg, Mats; Antzutkin, Oleg N; Griesser, Hans J

    2014-06-11

    Plasma-polymerized organosilicone coatings can be used to impart abrasion resistance and barrier properties to plastic substrates such as polycarbonate. Coating rates suitable for industrial-scale deposition, up to 100 nm/s, can be achieved through the use of microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), with optimal process vapors such as tetramethyldisiloxane (TMDSO) and oxygen. However, it has been found that under certain deposition conditions, such coatings are subject to post-plasma changes; crazing or cracking can occur anytime from days to months after deposition. To understand the cause of the crazing and its dependence on processing plasma parameters, the effects of post-plasma reactions on the chemical bonding structure of coatings deposited with varying TMDSO-to-O2 ratios was studied with (29)Si and (13)C solid-state magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) using both single-pulse and cross-polarization techniques. The coatings showed complex chemical compositions significantly altered from the parent monomer. (29)Si MAS NMR spectra revealed four main groups of resonance lines, which correspond to four siloxane moieties (i.e., mono (M), di (D), tri (T), and quaternary (Q)) and how they are bound to oxygen. Quantitative measurements showed that the ratio of TMDSO to oxygen could shift the chemical structure of the coating from 39% to 55% in Q-type bonds and from 28% to 16% for D-type bonds. Post-plasma reactions were found to produce changes in relative intensities of (29)Si resonance lines. The NMR data were complemented by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Together, these techniques have shown that the bonding environment of Si is drastically altered by varying the TMDSO-to-O2 ratio during PECVD, and that post-plasma reactions increase the cross-link density of the silicon-oxygen network. It appears that Si-H and Si-OH chemical groups are the most susceptible to post-plasma reactions. Coatings produced at a

  18. Deposition kinetics and characterization of stable ionomers from hexamethyldisiloxane and methacrylic acid by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Urstöger, Georg; Resel, Roland; Coclite, Anna Maria; Koller, Georg

    2016-04-07

    A novel ionomer of hexamethyldisiloxane and methacrylic acid was synthesized by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The PECVD process, being solventless, allows mixing of monomers with very different solubilities, and for polymers formed at high deposition rates and with high structural stability (due to the high number of cross-links and covalent bonding to the substrate) to be obtained. A kinetic study over a large set of parameters was run with the aim of determining the optimal conditions for high stability and proton conductivity of the polymer layer. Copolymers with good stability over 6 months' time in air and water were obtained, as demonstrated by ellipsometry, X-Ray reflectivity, and FT-IR spectroscopy. Stable coatings showed also proton conductivity as high as 1.1 ± 0.1 mS cm{sup −1}. Chemical analysis showed that due to the high molecular weight of the chosen precursors, it was possible to keep the plasma energy-input-per-mass low. This allowed limited precursor fragmentation and the functional groups of both monomers to be retained during the plasma polymerization.

  19. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor system with a vertical deposition chamber was used for the growth of Si films on glass, glass-ceramic, and polycrystalline ceramic substrates. Silicon vapor was produced by pyrolysis of SiH4 in a H2 or He carrier gas. Preliminary deposition experiments with two of the available glasses were not encouraging. Moderately encouraging results, however, were obtained with fired polycrystalline alumina substrates, which were used for Si deposition at temperatures above 1,000 C. The surfaces of both the substrates and the films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, reflection electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy optical microscopy, and surface profilometric techniques. Several experiments were conducted to establish baseline performance data for the reactor system, including temperature distributions on the sample pedestal, effects of carrier gas flow rate on temperature and film thickness, and Si film growth rate as a function of temperature.

  20. Mass densification and defect restoration in chemical vapor deposition silicon dioxide film using Ar plasma excited by microwave

    SciTech Connect

    Kawase, Kazumasa Motoya, Tsukasa; Uehara, Yasushi; Teramoto, Akinobu; Suwa, Tomoyuki; Ohmi, Tadahiro

    2014-09-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) films formed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) have been treated with Ar plasma excited by microwave. The changes of the mass densities, carrier trap densities, and thicknesses of the CVD-SiO{sub 2} films with the Ar plasma treatments were investigated. The mass density depth profiles were estimated with X-Ray Reflectivity (XRR) analysis using synchrotron radiation. The densities of carrier trap centers due to defects of Si-O bond network were estimated with X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) time-dependent measurement. The changes of the thicknesses due to the oxidation of Si substrates were estimated with the XRR and XPS. The mass densities of the CVD-SiO{sub 2} films are increased by the Ar plasma treatments. The carrier trap densities of the films are decreased by the treatments. The thicknesses of the films are not changed by the treatments. It has been clarified that the mass densification and defect restoration in the CVD-SiO{sub 2} films are caused by the Ar plasma treatments without the oxidation of the Si substrates.

  1. Characterization of low temperature graphene synthesis in inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition process with optical emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yifei; Kim, Daekyoung; Jang, Haegyu; Cho, Sung Min; Chae, Heeyeop

    2014-12-01

    Low-temperature graphene was synthesized at 400 degrees C with inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process. The effects of plasma power and flow rate of various carbon containing precursors and hydrogen on graphene properties were investigated with optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Various radicals monitored by OES were correlated with graphene film properties such as sheet resistance, I(D)/I(G) ratio of Raman spectra and transparency. C2H2 was used as a main precursor and the increase of plasma power enhanced intensity of carbon (C2) radical OES intensity in plasma, reduced sheet resistance and increased transparency of graphene films. The reduced flow rate of C2H2 decreased sheet resistance and increased transparency of graphene films in the range of this study. H2 addition was found to increase sheet resistance, transparency and attributed to reduction of graphene grain and etching graphene layers. OES analysis showed that C2 radicals contribute to graphite networking and sheet resistance reduction. TEM and AFM were applied to provide credible information that graphene had been successfully grown at low temperature.

  2. Argon–germane in situ plasma clean for reduced temperature Ge on Si epitaxy by high density plasma chemical vapor deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Douglas, Erica A.; Sheng, Josephine J.; Verley, Jason C.; ...

    2015-06-04

    We found that the demand for integration of near infrared optoelectronic functionality with silicon complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology has for many years motivated the investigation of low temperature germanium on silicon deposition processes. Our work describes the development of a high density plasma chemical vapor deposition process that uses a low temperature (<460 °C) in situ germane/argon plasma surface preparation step for epitaxial growth of germanium on silicon. It is shown that the germane/argon plasma treatment sufficiently removes SiOx and carbon at the surface to enable germanium epitaxy. Finally, the use of this surface preparation step demonstrates anmore » alternative way to produce germanium epitaxy at reduced temperatures, a key enabler for increased flexibility of integration with CMOS back-end-of-line fabrication.« less

  3. Argon–germane in situ plasma clean for reduced temperature Ge on Si epitaxy by high density plasma chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, Erica A.; Sheng, Josephine J.; Verley, Jason C.; Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2015-06-04

    We found that the demand for integration of near infrared optoelectronic functionality with silicon complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology has for many years motivated the investigation of low temperature germanium on silicon deposition processes. Our work describes the development of a high density plasma chemical vapor deposition process that uses a low temperature (<460 °C) in situ germane/argon plasma surface preparation step for epitaxial growth of germanium on silicon. It is shown that the germane/argon plasma treatment sufficiently removes SiOx and carbon at the surface to enable germanium epitaxy. Finally, the use of this surface preparation step demonstrates an alternative way to produce germanium epitaxy at reduced temperatures, a key enabler for increased flexibility of integration with CMOS back-end-of-line fabrication.

  4. Non-catalytic direct synthesis of graphene on Si (111) wafers by using inductively-coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sung Won; Shin, Hyunho; Lee, Bongsoo; Choi, Suk-Ho

    2016-08-01

    We employ inductively-coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition for non-catalytic growth of graphene on a Si (111) wafer or glass substrate, which is useful for practical device applications of graphene without transfer processes. At a RF power (P) of 500 W under C2H2 flow, defect-free 3 ˜ 5-layer graphene is grown on Si (111) wafers, but on glass substrate, the layer is thicker and defective, as characterized by Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy. The graphene is produced on Si (111) for P down to 190 W whereas it is almost not formed on glass for P < 250 W, possibly resulting from the weak catalytic-reaction-like effect on glass. These results are discussed based on possible growth mechanisms.

  5. Selective growth of boron nitride nanotubes by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition at low substrate temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L.; Singh, R. N.

    2008-02-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) were synthesized at a low substrate temperature of 800 °C on nickel (Ni) coated oxidized Si(111) wafers in a microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system (MPCVD) by decomposition and reaction of gas mixtures consisting of B2H6-NH3-H2. The 1D BN nanostructures grew preferentially on Ni catalyst islands with a small thickness only. In situ mass spectroscopic analysis and optical emission spectroscopy were used to identify the gas reactions responsible for the BNNT formation. The morphology and structural properties of the deposits were analyzed by SEM, TEM, EDX, SAD and Raman spectroscopy. The growth mechanism of the BNNTs was identified.

  6. Growth of 4″ diameter polycrystalline diamond wafers with high thermal conductivity by 915 MHz microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A, F. POPOVICH; V, G. RALCHENKO; V, K. BALLA; A, K. MALLIK; A, A. KHOMICH; A, P. BOLSHAKOV; D, N. SOVYK; E, E. ASHKINAZI; V, Yu YUROV

    2017-03-01

    Polycrystalline diamond (PCD) films 100 mm in diameter are grown by 915 MHz microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) at different process parameters, and their thermal conductivity (TC) is evaluated by a laser flash technique (LFT) in the temperature range of 230-380 K. The phase purity and quality of the films are assessed by micro-Raman spectroscopy based on the diamond Raman peak width and the amorphous carbon (a-C) presence in the spectra. Decreasing and increasing dependencies for TC with temperature are found for high and low quality samples, respectively. TC, as high as 1950 ± 230 W m-1 K-1 at room temperature, is measured for the most perfect material. A linear correlation between the TC at room temperature and the fraction of the diamond component in the Raman spectrum for the films is established.

  7. The SiNx films process research by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition in crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bitao; Zhang, Yingke; Ouyang, Qiuping; Chen, Fei; Zhan, Xinghua; Gao, Wei

    2017-07-01

    SiNx thin film has been widely used in crystalline silicon solar cell production because of the good anti-reflection and passivation effect. We can effectively optimize the cells performance by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method to change deposition conditions such as temperature, gas flow ratio, etc. In this paper, we deposit a new layer of SiNx thin film on the basis of double-layers process. By changing the process parameters, the compactness of thin films is improved effectively. The NH3 passivation technology is augmented in a creative way, which improves the minority carrier lifetime. In sight of this, a significant increase is generated in the photoelectric performance of crystalline silicon solar cell.

  8. Effects of the growth conditions on the roughness of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Capote, G.; Prioli, R.; Freire, F. L. Jr.

    2006-11-15

    The surface roughness and scaling behavior of a-C:H films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition from CH{sub 4}-Ar mixtures were studied using atomic force microscopy. Raman spectroscopy gives some insights about the film microstructure. The film surface roughness is shown to decrease with the increase of deposition negative self-bias, while the presence of Ar ions enhances this effect. An analysis of the film surface and scaling behavior suggests that there is a transition of the mechanism of the film growth from a random deposition with surface diffusion process to a thermal spike based process that occurs upon the increase of the negative self-bias voltage and the argon bombardment.

  9. Remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of GaP with in situ generation of phosphine precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. W.; Lucovsky, G.; Bachmann, K. J.

    1992-01-01

    Thin homoepitaxial films of gallium phosphide (GaP) have been grown by remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition utilizing in situ-generated phosphine precursors. The GaP forming reaction is kinetically controlled with an activation energy of 0.65 eV. The increase of the growth rate with increasing radio frequency (RF) power between 20 and 100 W is due to the combined effects of increasingly complete excitation and the spatial extension of the glow discharge toward the substrate; however, the saturation of the growth rate at even higher RF power indicates the saturation of the generation rate of phosphine precursors at this condition. Slight interdiffusion of P into Si and Si into GaP is indicated from GaP/Si heterostructures grown under similar conditions as the GaP homojunctions.

  10. Remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of GaP with in situ generation of phosphine precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. W.; Lucovsky, G.; Bachmann, Klaus J.

    1993-01-01

    Thin homoepitaxial films of gallium phosphide (GaP) were grown by remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition utilizing in situ generated phosphine precursors. The GaP forming reaction is kinetically controlled with an activation energy of 0.65 eV. The increase of the growth rate with increasing radio frequency (rf) power between 20 and 100 W is due to the combined effects of increasingly complete excitation and the spatial extension of the glow discharge toward the substrate, however, the saturation of the growth rate at even higher rf power indicates the saturation of the generation rate of phosphine precursors at this condition. Slight interdiffusion of P into Si and Si into GaP is indicated from GaP/Si heterostructures grown under similar conditions as the GaP homojunctions.

  11. Influence of the normalized ion flux on the constitution of alumina films deposited by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kurapov, Denis; Reiss, Jennifer; Trinh, David H.; Hultman, Lars; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2007-07-15

    Alumina thin films were deposited onto tempered hot working steel substrates from an AlCl{sub 3}-O{sub 2}-Ar-H{sub 2} gas mixture by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. The normalized ion flux was varied during deposition through changes in precursor content while keeping the cathode voltage and the total pressure constant. As the precursor content in the total gas mixture was increased from 0.8% to 5.8%, the deposition rate increased 12-fold, while the normalized ion flux decreased by approximately 90%. The constitution, morphology, impurity incorporation, and the elastic properties of the alumina thin films were found to depend on the normalized ion flux. These changes in structure, composition, and properties induced by normalized ion flux may be understood by considering mechanisms related to surface and bulk diffusion.

  12. Highly efficient shrinkage of inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifan; Deng, Tao; Chen, Qi; Liang, Feng; Liu, Zewen

    2016-06-24

    Solid-state nanopore-based analysis systems are currently one of the most attractive and promising platforms in sensing fields. This work presents a highly efficient method to shrink inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technology by the deposition of SiN x onto the surface of the nanopore. The contraction of the inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores when subjected to the PECVD process has been modeled and carefully analyzed, and the modeling data are in good agreement with the experimental results within a specific PECVD shrinkage period (∼0-600 s). Silicon nanopores within a 50-400 nm size range contract to sub-10 nm dimensions. Additionally, the inner structure of the nanopores after the PECVD process has been analyzed by focused ion beam cutting process. The results show an inner structure morphology change from inverted-pyramid to hourglass, which may enhance the spatial resolution of sensing devices.

  13. Experimental study of fractal clusters formation from nanoparticles synthesized by atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, Maxim V.; Protopopova, Vera S.; Alexandrov, Sergey E.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the experimental results from the fractal structures formation from nanoparticles of silicone dioxide deposited on the silicon substrate surface. Nanoparticles are synthesized by atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition with the use of capacitively coupled radio frequency (13.56 MHz) discharge sustained in helium atmosphere. Tetraethoxysilane is chosen as the test precursor. Correlation between the morphology of obtained deposits and the process parameters is found. The capability of nanoparticles movement along the deposit surface in local near-surface electric field is demonstrated. The empirical model that satisfactorily explained the mechanism of fractal clusters formation from nanoparticles on the substrate surface is developed. The model indicates that the dynamics of deposit morphology variations is determined by two competing processes: electrical charge transfer by nanoparticles to the deposit surface and electrical charge running off over the surface under conditions of changeable conductivity of the deposit surface.

  14. The growth characteristics of microcrystalline Si thin film deposited by atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jung-Dae

    2013-11-01

    Microcrystalline silicon thin film was grown by atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (AP-PECVD) technique with a cylindrical rotary electrode supplied with 150 MHz very-high-frequency power. The crystalline volume fraction could be controlled by changing the flow rate ratio of silane and hydrogen gas during AP-PECVD. We could also control it by regulating the substrate scanning speed. At low substrate scanning speed, the silicon film had a low crystalline volume faction and layer-by-layer structure with alternating layers of amorphous and microcrystalline Si. On the other hand, at high substrate scanning speed, silicon crystals of sizes 25 nm grew homogeneously throughout the whole film.

  15. Optical emission study of a doped diamond deposition process by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Rayar, M.; Supiot, P.; Veis, P.; Gicquel, A.

    2008-08-01

    Standard H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}/B{sub 2}H{sub 6} plasmas (99% of H{sub 2} and 1% of CH{sub 4}, with 0-100 ppm of B{sub 2}H{sub 6} added) used for doped diamond film growth are studied by optical emission spectroscopy in order to gain a better understanding of the influence of boron species on the gas phase chemistry. Only two boron species are detected under our experimental conditions (9/15/23 W cm{sup -3} average microwave power density values), and the emission spectra used for studies reported here are B({sup 2}S{sub 1/2}-{sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2}{sup 0}) and BH[A {sup 1}{pi}-X {sup 1}{sigma}{sup +}(0,0)]. Variations of their respective emission intensities as a function of the ratio B/C, the boron to carbon ratio in the gas mixture, are reported. We confirmed that the plasma parameters (T{sub g}, T{sub e}, and n{sub e}) are not affected by the introduction of diborane, and the number densities of B atoms and BH radical species were estimated from experimental measurements. The results are compared to those obtained from a zero-dimensional chemical kinetic model where two groups of reactions are considered: (1) BH{sub x}+H{r_reversible}BH{sub x-1}+H{sub 2} (x=1-3) by analogy with the well-known equilibrium CH{sub x}+H set of reactions, which occurs, in particular, in diamond deposition reactors; and (2) from conventional organic chemistry, the set of reactions involving boron species: BH{sub x}+C{sub 2}H{sub 2} (x=0-1). The results clearly show that the model based on hydrogen and boron hydrides reactions alone is not consistent with the experimental results, while it is so when taking into account both sets of reactions. Once an upper limit for the boron species number densities has been estimated, axial profiles are calculated on the basis of the plasma model results obtained previously in Laboratoire d'Ingenierie des Materiaux et des Hautes Pressions, and significant differences in trends for different boron species are found. At the plasma-to-substrate boundary

  16. Optical emission study of a doped diamond deposition process by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayar, M.; Supiot, P.; Veis, P.; Gicquel, A.

    2008-08-01

    Standard H2/CH4/B2H6 plasmas (99% of H2 and 1% of CH4, with 0-100ppm of B2H6 added) used for doped diamond film growth are studied by optical emission spectroscopy in order to gain a better understanding of the influence of boron species on the gas phase chemistry. Only two boron species are detected under our experimental conditions (9/15/23Wcm-3 average microwave power density values), and the emission spectra used for studies reported here are B(S1/22-P1/2,3/202) and BH [AΠ1-XΣ+1(0,0)]. Variations of their respective emission intensities as a function of the ratio B /C, the boron to carbon ratio in the gas mixture, are reported. We confirmed that the plasma parameters (Tg, Te, and ne) are not affected by the introduction of diborane, and the number densities of B atoms and BH radical species were estimated from experimental measurements. The results are compared to those obtained from a zero-dimensional chemical kinetic model where two groups of reactions are considered: (1) BHx+H ↔BHx -1+H2 (x=1-3) by analogy with the well-known equilibrium CHx+H set of reactions, which occurs, in particular, in diamond deposition reactors; and (2) from conventional organic chemistry, the set of reactions involving boron species: BHx+C2H2 (x =0-1). The results clearly show that the model based on hydrogen and boron hydrides reactions alone is not consistent with the experimental results, while it is so when taking into account both sets of reactions. Once an upper limit for the boron species number densities has been estimated, axial profiles are calculated on the basis of the plasma model results obtained previously in Laboratoire d'Ingénierie des Matériaux et des Hautes Pressions, and significant differences in trends for different boron species are found. At the plasma-to-substrate boundary, [BH] and [B] drop off in contrast to [BH2], which shows little decrease, and [BH3], which shows little increase, in this region.

  17. Effect of plasma parameters on characteristics of silicon nitride film deposited by single and dual frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, B. B.; Yin, Yongyi; Han, Jeon G.

    2016-03-01

    This work investigates the deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride films using various low-temperature plasmas. Utilizing radio-frequency (RF, 13.56 MHz) and ultra-high frequency (UHF, 320 MHz) powers, different plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition processes are conducted in the mixture of reactive N2/NH3/SiH4 gases. The processes are extensively characterized using different plasma diagnostic tools to study their plasma and radical generation capabilities. A typical transition of the electron energy distribution function from single- to bi-Maxwellian type is achieved by combining RF and ultra-high powers. Data analysis revealed that the RF/UHF dual frequency power enhances the plasma surface heating and produces hot electron population with relatively low electron temperature and high plasma density. Using various film analysis methods, we have investigated the role of plasma parameters on the compositional, structural, and optical properties of the deposited films to optimize the process conditions. The presented results show that the dual frequency power is effective for enhancing dissociation and ionization of neutrals, which in turn helps in enabling high deposition rate and improving film properties.

  18. Effect of plasma parameters on characteristics of silicon nitride film deposited by single and dual frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, B. B. E-mail: hanjg@skku.edu; Yin, Yongyi; Han, Jeon G. E-mail: hanjg@skku.edu

    2016-03-15

    This work investigates the deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride films using various low-temperature plasmas. Utilizing radio-frequency (RF, 13.56 MHz) and ultra-high frequency (UHF, 320 MHz) powers, different plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition processes are conducted in the mixture of reactive N{sub 2}/NH{sub 3}/SiH{sub 4} gases. The processes are extensively characterized using different plasma diagnostic tools to study their plasma and radical generation capabilities. A typical transition of the electron energy distribution function from single- to bi-Maxwellian type is achieved by combining RF and ultra-high powers. Data analysis revealed that the RF/UHF dual frequency power enhances the plasma surface heating and produces hot electron population with relatively low electron temperature and high plasma density. Using various film analysis methods, we have investigated the role of plasma parameters on the compositional, structural, and optical properties of the deposited films to optimize the process conditions. The presented results show that the dual frequency power is effective for enhancing dissociation and ionization of neutrals, which in turn helps in enabling high deposition rate and improving film properties.

  19. Analysis of Oxidation State of Multilayered Catalyst Thin Films for Carbon Nanotube Growth Using Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, Atsushi; Ozeki, Atsushi; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Junji; Oda, Akinori; Bhattacharyya, Krishnendu; Sugawara, Hirotake; Sakai, Yosuke

    2006-10-01

    We synthesized vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using multilayered catalyst thin films (Fe/Al2O3 and Al2O3/Fe/Al2O3) by RF (13.56 MHz) CH4/H2/Ar plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Pretreatment of the catalyst is crucial for CNT growth. In this paper, we analyzed the effect of catalyst reduction on CNT growth. Catalyst thin films on substrates were reduced by H2 plasma pretreatment at 550 °C to form nanometer-sized catalyst particles. The multilayered thin films were analyzed; the chemical composition and oxidation state by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the surface morphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The Fe 2p peak of the XPS spectra showed that FexOy in the as-deposited catalyst was effectively reduced to Fe by a pretreatment of duration 4 min. Using this catalyst, we obtained CNTs with an average diameter of 10.7 nm and an average length of 5.3 μm. However, pretreatment longer than 4 min resulted in shorter CNTs and the Fe peak was shifted from Fe to Fe3O4. These transitions (Fe2O3→Fe3O4→Fe→Fe3O4) can be explained by the enthalpy of the oxides. This result indicates the presence of an optimum ratio between Fe and FexOy to maximize the CNT lengths.

  20. Highly uniform wafer-scale synthesis of α-MoO3 by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyeong-U.; Son, Juhyun; Kulkarni, Atul; Ahn, Chisung; Kim, Ki Seok; Shin, Dongjoo; Yeom, Geun Yong; Kim, Taesung

    2017-04-01

    Molybdenum oxide (MoO3) has gained immense attention because of its high electron mobility, wide band gap, and excellent optical and catalytic properties. However, the synthesis of uniform and large-area MoO3 is challenging. Here, we report the synthesis of wafer-scale α-MoO3 by plasma oxidation of Mo deposited on Si/SiO2. Mo was oxidized by O2 plasma in a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system at 150 °C. It was found that the synthesized α-MoO3 had a highly uniform crystalline structure. For the as-synthesized α-MoO3 sensor, we observed a current change when the relative humidity was increased from 11% to 95%. The sensor was exposed to different humidity levels with fast recovery time of about 8 s. Hence this feasibility study shows that MoO3 synthesized at low temperature can be utilized for gas sensing applications by adopting flexible device technology.

  1. Highly uniform wafer-scale synthesis of α-MoO3 by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeong-U; Son, Juhyun; Kulkarni, Atul; Ahn, Chisung; Kim, Ki Seok; Shin, Dongjoo; Yeom, Geun Yong; Kim, Taesung

    2017-04-28

    Molybdenum oxide (MoO3) has gained immense attention because of its high electron mobility, wide band gap, and excellent optical and catalytic properties. However, the synthesis of uniform and large-area MoO3 is challenging. Here, we report the synthesis of wafer-scale α-MoO3 by plasma oxidation of Mo deposited on Si/SiO2. Mo was oxidized by O2 plasma in a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system at 150 °C. It was found that the synthesized α-MoO3 had a highly uniform crystalline structure. For the as-synthesized α-MoO3 sensor, we observed a current change when the relative humidity was increased from 11% to 95%. The sensor was exposed to different humidity levels with fast recovery time of about 8 s. Hence this feasibility study shows that MoO3 synthesized at low temperature can be utilized for gas sensing applications by adopting flexible device technology.

  2. Low temperature plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of thin films combining mechanical stiffness, electrical insulation, and homogeneity in microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, S.; Guenther, M.; Hauschild, D.; Richter, F.

    2010-08-15

    The deposition of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) as well as hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbonitride (SiCN:H) films was investigated in view of a simultaneous realization of a minimum Young's modulus (>70 GPa), a high electrical insulation ({>=}1 MV/cm), a low permittivity and the uniform coverage of microcavities with submillimeter dimensions. For the a-C:H deposition the precursors methane (CH{sub 4}) and acetylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) were used, while SiCN:H films were deposited from mixtures of trimethylsilane [SiH(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}] with nitrogen and argon. To realize the deposition of micrometer thick films with the aforementioned complex requirements at substrate temperatures {<=}200 deg. C, several plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition methods were investigated: the capacitively coupled rf discharge and the microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma, combined with two types of pulsed substrate bias. SiCN:H films deposited at about 1 Pa from ECR plasmas with pulsed high-voltage bias best met the requirements. Pulsed biasing with pulse periods of about 1 {mu}s and amplitudes of about -2 kV was found to be most advantageous for the conformal low temperature coating of the microtrenches, thereby ensuring the required mechanical and insulating film properties.

  3. Growth of graphene on Cu foils by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition: The effect of in-situ hydrogen plasma post-treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Liping; Yuan, Wen; Wang, Bing; Xiong, Ying

    2016-10-01

    Microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) is a promising method for the large-scale production of high-quality graphene. The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of in-situ hydrogen plasma post-treatment on the MPCVD-grown graphene films. By simply varying the duration time of in-situ hydrogen plasma, surface morphology, number of layers and defect density of as-grown graphene films can be manipulated. The role of hydrogen plasma can be proposed from our observations, promoting to further grow graphene films in the early stage and consequently acting as an etching agent to thin graphene films in the later stage. On the basis of above mechanism, monolayer graphene films with low defect density and smooth surface can be grown by adjusting the times of the growing step and the plasma post-treatment step. This additional in-situ hydrogen plasma post-treatment may be significant for growing well-defined graphene films with controllable defects and number of layers.

  4. Boron nitride phosphide thin films grown on quartz substrate by hot-filament and plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. W.; Xu, S. Y.; Han, G. R.

    2004-10-01

    Boron nitride phosphide films are, for the first time, grown on transparent quartz substrate by hot filament and radio-frequency plasma co-assisted chemical vapor deposition technique. XPS, XRD, SEM, and UV measurements are performed to study the chemical composition, crystallization, microstructure, and optical absorption, respectively. A centipede-like microstructure and undulating ground morphology on the film surface are observed, and their growth mechanism is speculated upon. The chemical composition is determined as BN1-xPx, whose characteristic XRD peak is preliminarily identified. The optical band gap can be modulated between 5.52 eV and 3.74 eV, simply by adjusting the phosphorus content in BN1-xPx through modifying the PH3 flux during the film-deposition process. The merits of the BN1-xPx film, such as high ultraviolet photoelectric sensitivity with negligible sensitivity in the visible region, modifiable wide optical band gap, and good adhesion on transparent substrate, suggest potential applications for ultraviolet photo-electronics.

  5. Characteristics of ultra low-k nanoporous and fluorinated silica based films prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi-Firouzjah, M.; Shokri, B.

    2013-12-07

    Low dielectric constant (low-k) silica based films were deposited on p-type silicon and polycarbonate substrates by radio frequency (RF) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method at low temperature. A mixture of tetraethoxysilane vapor, oxygen, and tetrafluoromethane (CF{sub 4}) was used for the deposition of the films in forms of two structures called as SiO{sub x}C{sub y} and SiO{sub x}C{sub y}F{sub z}. Properties of the films were controlled by amount of porosity and fluorine content in the film matrix. The influence of RF power and CF{sub 4} flow on the elemental composition, deposition rate, surface roughness, leakage current, refractive index, and dielectric constant of the films were characterized. Moreover, optical emission spectroscopy was applied to monitor the plasma process at the different parameters. Electrical characteristics of SiO{sub x}C{sub y} and SiO{sub x}C{sub y}F{sub z} films with metal-oxide-semiconductor structure were investigated using current-voltage analysis to measure the leakage current and breakdown field, as well as capacitance-voltage analysis to obtain the film's dielectric constant. The results revealed that SiO{sub x}C{sub y} films, which are deposited at lower RF power produce more leakage current, meanwhile the dielectric constant and refractive index of these films decreased mainly due to the more porosity in the film structure. By adding CF{sub 4} in the deposition process, fluorine, the most electronegative and the least polarized atom, doped into the silica film and led to decrease in the refractive index and the dielectric constant. In addition, no breakdown field was observed in the electrical characteristics of SiO{sub x}C{sub y}F{sub z} films and the leakage current of these films reduced by increment of the CF{sub 4} flow.

  6. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the growth of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials is investigated. The objective is to develop CVD techniques for producing large areas of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials, with sheet properties suitable for fabricating solar cells meeting the technical goals of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Specific areas covered include: (1) modification and test of existing CVD reactor system; (2) identification and/or development of suitable inexpensive substrate materials; (3) experimental investigation of CVD process parameters using various candidate substrate materials; (4) preparation of Si sheet samples for various special studies, including solar cell fabrication; (5) evaluation of the properties of the Si sheet material produced by the CVD process; and (6) fabrication and evaluation of experimental solar cell structures, using standard and near-standard processing techniques.

  7. Characterization of intrinsic a-Si:H films prepared by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition for solar cell applications.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Chaehwan; Boo, Seongjae; Jeon, Minsung; Kamisako, Koichi

    2007-11-01

    The hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films, which can be used as the passivation or absorption layer of solar cells, were prepared by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition (ICP-CVD) and their characteristics were studied. Deposition process of a-Si:H films was performed by varying the parameters, gas ratio (H2/SiH4), radio frequency (RF) power and substrate temperature, while a working pressure was fixed at 70 m Torr. Their characteristics were studied by measuring thickness, optical bandgap (eV), photosensitivity, bond structure and surface roughness. When the RF power and substrate temperature were 300 watt and 200 degrees C, respectively, optical bandgap and photosensitivity, similar to the intrinsic a-Si:H film, were obtained. The Si-H stretching mode at 2000 cm(-1), which means a good quality of films, was found at all conditions. Although the RF power increased up to 400 watt, average of surface roughness got better, compared to a-Si:H films deposited by the conventional PECVD method. These results show the potential for developing the solar cells using ICP-CVD, which have the relatively less damage of plasma.

  8. Visible Light Photocatalysis with Nitrogen-Doped Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Prepared by Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Buzby,S.; Barakat, M.; Lin, H.; Ni, C.; Rykov, S.; Chen, J.; Shah, S.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized via plasma assisted metal organic chemical vapor deposition. Nitrogen dopant concentration was varied from 0 to 1.61 at. %. The effect of nitrogen ion doping on visible light photocatalysis has been investigated. Samples were analyzed by various analytical techniques such as x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure. Titanium tetraisopropoxide was used as the titanium precursor, while rf-plasma-decomposed ammonia was used as the source for nitrogen doping. The N-doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were deposited on stainless steel mesh under a flow of Ar and O2 gases at 600 {sup o}C in a tube reactor. The photocatalytic activity of the prepared N-doped TiO{sub 2} samples was tested by the degradation of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) in an aqueous solution using a visible lamp equipped with an UV filter. The efficiency of photocatalytic oxidation of 2-CP was measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Results obtained revealed the formation of N-doped TiO{sub 2} samples as TiO{sub 2-x}N{sub x}, and a corresponding increase in the visible light photocatalytic activity.

  9. Preparation of hydrophobic metal-organic frameworks via plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of perfluoroalkanes for the removal of ammonia.

    PubMed

    DeCoste, Jared B; Peterson, Gregory W

    2013-10-10

    Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of perfluoroalkanes has long been studied for tuning the wetting properties of surfaces. For high surface area microporous materials, such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), unique challenges present themselves for PECVD treatments. Herein the protocol for development of a MOF that was previously unstable to humid conditions is presented. The protocol describes the synthesis of Cu-BTC (also known as HKUST-1), the treatment of Cu-BTC with PECVD of perfluoroalkanes, the aging of materials under humid conditions, and the subsequent ammonia microbreakthrough experiments on milligram quantities of microporous materials. Cu-BTC has an extremely high surface area (~1,800 m(2)/g) when compared to most materials or surfaces that have been previously treated by PECVD methods. Parameters such as chamber pressure and treatment time are extremely important to ensure the perfluoroalkane plasma penetrates to and reacts with the inner MOF surfaces. Furthermore, the protocol for ammonia microbreakthrough experiments set forth here can be utilized for a variety of test gases and microporous materials.

  10. Preparation of Hydrophobic Metal-Organic Frameworks via Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Perfluoroalkanes for the Removal of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    DeCoste, Jared B.; Peterson, Gregory W.

    2013-01-01

    Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of perfluoroalkanes has long been studied for tuning the wetting properties of surfaces. For high surface area microporous materials, such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), unique challenges present themselves for PECVD treatments. Herein the protocol for development of a MOF that was previously unstable to humid conditions is presented. The protocol describes the synthesis of Cu-BTC (also known as HKUST-1), the treatment of Cu-BTC with PECVD of perfluoroalkanes, the aging of materials under humid conditions, and the subsequent ammonia microbreakthrough experiments on milligram quantities of microporous materials. Cu-BTC has an extremely high surface area (~1,800 m2/g) when compared to most materials or surfaces that have been previously treated by PECVD methods. Parameters such as chamber pressure and treatment time are extremely important to ensure the perfluoroalkane plasma penetrates to and reacts with the inner MOF surfaces. Furthermore, the protocol for ammonia microbreakthrough experiments set forth here can be utilized for a variety of test gases and microporous materials. PMID:24145623

  11. Synthesis of large scale graphene oxide using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method and its application in humidity sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang; Chen, Yuming

    2016-03-14

    Large scale graphene oxide (GO) is directly synthesized on copper (Cu) foil by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method under 500 °C and even lower temperature. Compared to the modified Hummer's method, the obtained GO sheet in this article is large, and it is scalable according to the Cu foil size. The oxygen-contained groups in the GO are introduced through the residual gas of methane (99.9% purity). To prevent the Cu surface from the bombardment of the ions in the plasma, we use low intensity discharge. Our experiment reveals that growth temperature has important influence on the carbon to oxygen ratio (C/O ratio) in the GO; and it also affects the amount of π-π* bonds between carbon atoms. Preliminary experiments on a 6 mm × 12 mm GO based humidity sensor prove that the synthesized GO reacts well to the humidity change. Our GO synthesis method may provide another channel for obtaining large scale GO in gas sensing or other applications.

  12. Experiments and models of the plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition of copper from copper hexafluoroacetylacetonate and hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmanan, Satish Kumar

    Low resistivity, high electromigration and stress migration resistance of copper interconnects will improve device reliability and lower RC delays, as device dimensions decrease into the deep sub-micron region. Plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) using a Hsb2 plasma and copper(II) hexafluoro acetylacetonate (Cu(Hfa)sb2), is an attractive process because of its ability to form pure copper films conformally, in narrow vias and trenches, at low substrate temperatures (150-220sp°C). Copper films have been deposited by hydrogen plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition at pressures of 0.5-3.0 torr, substrate temperatures of 150-250sp°C, plasma powers of 3.0-85.0 W and precursor mole fractions of 0.1-0.8%, in a cold wall PACVD research reactor and a commercial Watkins Johnson Select 7000 reactor. Film purity and morphology have been analyzed by X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray diffraction (XRD). Under the conditions investigated, the film growth rates were measured to be in the range of 40-200 A/min. An activation energy of 5 kcal/mol is suggested for the deposition, by the experiments. Further, the deposition rate, precursor conversion, film purity and morphology can be tailored by adjusting the operating conditions appropriately. A new distributed parameter model of a capacitively coupled rf Hsb2 discharge including a copper precursor has been developed, from the first three moments of the Boltzmann equation. The model predicts the concentrations and fluxes of (1) the positive ions Hsp+, Hsbsp{2}{+} and Hsbsp{3}{+} (2) the electrons and (3) atomic hydrogen, under the conditions that produce low resistivity copper films. A lumped parameter model has also been developed, which shows that Cu(Hfa)sb2 decomposes only when electron concentrations are high, resulting in the incorporation of carbon and fluorine in the growing film. However, at low pressures and powers, Cu(Hfa)sb2 reacts predominantly with H on

  13. Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition as a Method for the Deposition of Peptide Nanotubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-17

    45432, United States Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 2    Introduction: The unique ability of dipeptides ...Using physical vapor deposition (PVD) well-ordered assemblies of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) composed of dipeptide subunits are obtained on various...the PECVD deposition chamber with sublimation capability in the laboratory of Dr. Rajesh Naik (AFRL/RXAS) and conditions were modified for dipeptide

  14. Determination of photocatalytic activity in amorphous and crystalline titanium oxide films prepared using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Cheng-Yang; Chiang, Bo-Sheng; Chang, Springfield; Liu, Day-Shan

    2011-01-01

    Hydro-oxygenated amorphous titanium oxide (a-TiO x:OH) films were prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using precursors of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) and oxygen. The influences of chemical states and crystal quality on the photocatalytic activity were systematically investigated in the as-deposited and post-annealed films. The degree of the photocatalytic activity was deeply correlated with the porosity related to the hydroxyl (OH) groups in the as-deposited amorphous film. The crystallized anatase structures was observed from the 200 °C-deposited a-TiO x:OH film after a post-annealing treatment at 400 °C. The photocatalytic activity related to the film with anatase structure was markedly superior to that of an amorphous film with porous structures. The larger the crystal size of the anatase structure, the higher the photocatalytic activity obtained. At elevated annealed temperatures, the inferior anatase structure due to the crystalline transformation led to a low photocatalytic activity. It was concluded that the photocatalytic activity of an amorphous TiO x film prepared using PECVD was determined by the porosity originating from the functional OH groups in the film, whereas the crystalline quality of anatase phase in the annealed poly-TiO x film was crucial to the photocatalytic activity.

  15. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of low- loss as-grown germanosilicate layers for optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ay, Feridun; Agan, Sedat; Aydinli, Atilla

    2004-08-01

    We report on systematic growth and characterization of low-loss germanosilicate layers for use in optical waveguides. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique was used to grow the films using silane, germane and nitrous oxide as precursor gases. Chemical composition was monitored by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. N-H bond concentration of the films decreased from 0.43x1022 cm-3 down to below 0.06x1022 cm-3, by a factor of seven as the GeH4 flow rate increased from 0 to 70 sccm. A simultaneous decrease of O-H related bonds was also observed by a factor of 10 in the same germane flow range. The measured TE rate increased from 5 to 50 sccm, respectively. In contrast, the propagation loss values for TE polarization at λ=632.8 nm were found to increase from are 0.20 +/- 0.02 to 6.46 +/- 0.04 dB/cm as the germane flow rate increased from 5 to 50 sccm, respectively. In contrast, the propagation loss values for TE polarization at λ=1550 nm were found to decrease from 0.32 +/- 0.03 down to 0.14 +/- 0.06 dB/cm for the same samples leading to the lowest values reported so far in the literature, eliminating the need for high temperature annealing as is usually done for these materials to be used in waveguide devices.

  16. Microwave Plasma-Activated Chemical Vapor Deposition of Nitrogen-Doped Diamond. I. N2/H2 and NH3/H2 Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Truscott, Benjamin S; Kelly, Mark W; Potter, Katie J; Johnson, Mack; Ashfold, Michael N R; Mankelevich, Yuri A

    2015-12-31

    We report a combined experimental/modeling study of microwave activated dilute N2/H2 and NH3/H2 plasmas as a precursor to diagnosis of the CH4/N2/H2 plasmas used for the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of N-doped diamond. Absolute column densities of H(n = 2) atoms and NH(X(3)Σ(-), v = 0) radicals have been determined by cavity ring down spectroscopy, as a function of height (z) above a molybdenum substrate and of the plasma process conditions, i.e., total gas pressure p, input power P, and the nitrogen/hydrogen atom ratio in the source gas. Optical emission spectroscopy has been used to investigate variations in the relative number densities of H(n = 3) atoms, NH(A(3)Π) radicals, and N2(C(3)Πu) molecules as functions of the same process conditions. These experimental data are complemented by 2-D (r, z) coupled kinetic and transport modeling for the same process conditions, which consider variations in both the overall chemistry and plasma parameters, including the electron (Te) and gas (T) temperatures, the electron density (ne), and the plasma power density (Q). Comparisons between experiment and theory allow refinement of prior understanding of N/H plasma-chemical reactivity, and its variation with process conditions and with location within the CVD reactor, and serve to highlight the essential role of metastable N2(A(3)Σ(+)u) molecules (formed by electron impact excitation) and their hitherto underappreciated reactivity with H atoms, in converting N2 process gas into reactive NHx (x = 0-3) radical species.

  17. Compositional study of silicon oxynitride thin films deposited using electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, H.; Sah, R.E.

    2005-05-01

    We have used backscattering spectrometry and {sup 15}N({sup 1}H,{alpha},{gamma}){sup 12}C nuclear reaction analysis techniques to study in detail the variation in the composition of silicon oxynitride films with deposition parameters. The films were deposited using 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique from mixtures of precursors argon, nitrous oxide, and silane at deposition temperature 90 deg. C. The deposition pressure and nitrous oxide-to-silane gas flow rates ratio have been found to have a pronounced influence on the composition of the films. When the deposition pressure was varied for a given nitrous oxide-to-silane gas flow ratio, the amount of silicon and nitrogen increased with the deposition pressure, while the amount of oxygen decreased. For a given deposition pressure, the amount of incorporated nitrogen and hydrogen decreased while that of oxygen increased with increasing nitrous oxide-to-silane gas flow rates ratio. For nitrous oxide-to-silane gas flow ratio of 5, we obtained films which contained neither chemically bonded nor nonbonded nitrogen atoms as revealed by the results of infrared spectroscopy, backscattering spectrometry, and nuclear reaction analysis. Our results demonstrate the nitrogen-free nearly stoichiometric silicon dioxide films can be prepared from a mixture of precursors argon, nitrous oxide, and silane at low substrate temperature using high-density PECVD technique. This avoids the use of a hazardous and an often forbidden pair of silane and oxygen gases in a plasma reactor.

  18. Growth of carbon nanofibers in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denysenko, Igor; Ostrikov, Kostya; Tam, Eugene

    2008-10-01

    A theoretical model describing the plasma-assisted growth of carbon nanofibers with metal catalyst particles on top is proposed. Using the model, the plasma-related effects on the nanofiber growth parameters such us the surface diffusion growth rate, the effective carbon flux to the catalyst surface, the characteristic residence time and diffusion length of carbon on the catalyst surface, and the surface coverages, have been studied. It has been found how these parameters depend on the catalyst surface temperature and ion and etching gas fluxes to the catalyst surface. The optimum conditions under which a low-temperature plasma environment can benefit the carbon nanofiber growth are formulated. It has been also found how the plasma environment affects the temperature distribution over the length of the carbon nanofibers. Conditions when the temperature of the catalyst nanoparticles is higher than the temperature of the substrate holder are determined. The results here are in a good agreement with the available experimental data on the carbon nanofiber growth and can be used for optimizing synthesis of nanoassemblies in low-temperature plasma-assisted nanofabrication.

  19. Growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes grown by microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okai, M.; Muneyoshi, T.; Yaguchi, T.; Sasaki, S.; Shinohara, H.

    2001-11-01

    To understand the growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes, we have investigated the initial stage of carbon nanotube growth by microwave-plasma-enhanced CVD on a metal substrate. Metal droplets with diameters of 20-180 nm appeared on the substrate surface after plasma cleaning. These metal droplets operate as a catalyst for the growth of carbon nanotubes. The grown nanotubes had a piled-cone structure with metal particles at the top. The diameters of the carbon nanotubes ranged from 60 to 80 nm and the metal particles at the top were the same sizes.

  20. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Campbell, A. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Shaw, G. L.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The objective was to investigate and develop chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques for the growth of large areas of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials, with resulting sheet properties suitable for fabricating solar cells that would meet the technical goals of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. The program involved six main technical tasks: (1) modification and test of an existing vertical-chamber CVD reactor system; (2) identification and/or development of suitable inexpensive substrate materials; (3) experimental investigation of CVD process parameters using various candidate substrate materials; (4) preparation of Si sheet samples for various special studies, including solar cell fabrication; (5) evaluation of the properties of the Si sheet material produced by the CVD process; and (6) fabrication and evaluation of experimental solar cell structures, using impurity diffusion and other standard and near-standard processing techniques supplemented late in the program by the in situ CVD growth of n(+)/p/p(+) sheet structures subsequently processed into experimental cells.

  1. Nitrogen plasma instabilities and the growth of silicon nitride by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pool, F. S.

    1997-03-01

    Nitrogen plasma instabilities have been identified through fluctuations in the ion current density and substrate floating potential. The behavior of the plasma instabilities was found to be confined to the pressure regime 0.9 mTorrplasmas occurred following the transition from an underdense to overdense plasma, where an overdense plasma is defined for densities greater than the critical density nc=7.4×1010 cm-3. The instabilities are a consequence of the nonlinear dynamics present in electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas and indicative of a transition between plasma modes as the pressure increases from 0.9 to 1.6 mTorr. The plasma instabilities are suppressed with the introduction of silane for the deposition of silicon nitride, although the plasma still undergoes a transition from an underdense to overdense plasma at 1.0 mTorr. The transition pressure delineated regions of poor and optimum electrical properties of silicon nitride films deposited from a dilute nitrogen-silane (N2/SiH4=5) plasma. To evaluate growth conditions, the flux of energetic ions to deposited atoms was approximated by examination of the ratio of ion current density to deposition rate. This ratio was found to be well correlated to the electrical properties of ECR microwave plasma deposited silicon nitride films for pressures above the underdense to overdense transition at 1.0 mTorr.

  2. Numerical analysis of a mixture of Ar/NH3 microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi; Zhao, Zhen; Li, Xuehui

    2012-06-01

    A two-dimensional fluid model has been used to investigate the properties of plasma in Ar/NH3 microwave electron cyclotron resonance discharge at low pressure. The electromagnetic field model solved by the three-dimensional Simpson method is coupled to a fluid plasma model. The finite difference method was employed to discrete the governing equations. 40 species (neutrals, radicals, ions, and electrons) are consisted in the model. In total, 75 electron-neutral, 43 electron-ion, 167 neutral-neutral, 129 ion-neutral, 28 ion-ion, and 90 3-body reactions are used in the model. According to the simulation, the distribution of the densities of the considered plasma species has been showed and the mechanisms of their variations have been discussed. It is found that the main neutrals (Ar*, Ar**, NH3*, NH, H2, NH2, H, and N2) are present at high densities in Ar/NH3 microwave electron cyclotron resonance discharge when the mixing ratio of Ar/NH3 is 1:1 at 20 Pa. The density of NH is more than that of NH2 atom. And NH3+ are the most important ammonia ions. But the uniformity of the space distribution of NH3+ is lower than the other ammonia ions.

  3. Influence of krypton atoms on the structure of hydrogenated amorphous carbon deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, M. H. Jr.; Viana, G. A.; Marques, F. C.; Lima, M. M. Jr. de; Cros, A.; Cantarero, A.

    2010-12-15

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films were prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using methane (CH{sub 4}) plus krypton (Kr) mixed atmosphere. The depositions were performed as function of the bias voltage and krypton partial pressure. The goal of this work was to study the influence of krypton gas on the physical properties of a-C:H films deposited on the cathode electrode. Krypton concentration up to 1.6 at. %, determined by Rutherford Back-Scattering, was obtained at high Kr partial pressure and bias of -120 V. The structure of the films was analyzed by means of optical transmission spectroscopy, multi-wavelength Raman scattering and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. It was verified that the structure of the films remains unchanged up to a concentration of Kr of about 1.0 at. %. A slight graphitization of the films occurs for higher concentration. The observed variation in the film structure, optical band gap, stress, and hydrogen concentration were associated mainly with the subplantation process of hydrocarbons radicals, rather than the krypton ion energy.

  4. Large-area SiC membrane produced by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition at relatively high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yu; Xie, Changqing

    2015-09-15

    Advances in the growth of silicon carbide (SiC) thin films with outstanding thermal and mechanical properties have received considerable attention. However, the fabrication of large-area free-standing SiC membrane still remains a challenge. Here, the authors report a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at a relatively high temperature to improve the free-standing SiC membrane area. A systematic study on the microstructural, mechanical, and optical properties of hydrogenated polycrystalline silicon carbide (poly-SiC{sub x}:H) thin films deposited at 600 °C with different annealing temperatures has been performed. In the as-deposited state, SiC{sub x}:H thin films show a polycrystalline structure. The crystallinity degree can be further improved with the increase of the postdeposition annealing temperature. The resulting process produced free-standing 2-μm-thick SiC membranes up to 70 mm in diameter with root mean square roughness of 3.384 nm and optical transparency of about 70% at 632.8 nm wavelength. The large-area SiC membranes made out of poly-SiC{sub x}:H thin films deposited at a relatively high temperature can be beneficial for a wide variety of applications, such as x-ray diffractive optical elements, optical and mechanical filtering, lithography mask, lightweight space telescopes, etc.

  5. A new perspective on structural and morphological properties of carbon nanotubes synthesized by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salar Elahi, A.; Agah, K. Mikaili; Ghoranneviss, M.

    CNTs were produced on a silicon wafer by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) using acetylene as a carbon source, cobalt as a catalyst and ammonia as a reactive gas. The DC-sputtering system was used to prepare cobalt thin films on Si substrates. A series of experiments was carried out to investigate the effects of reaction temperature and deposition time on the synthesis of the nanotubes. The deposition time was selected as 15 and 25 min for all growth temperatures. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) measurements were used to investigate the elemental composition of the Co nanocatalyst deposited on Si substrates. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the surface topography of the Co nanocatalyst deposited on Si substrates. The as-grown CNTs were characterized under Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) to study the morphological properties of CNTs. Also, the grown CNTs have been investigated by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that increasing the temperature leads to increasing the diameter of CNTs.

  6. Microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of nanocrystalline diamond films by bias-enhanced nucleation and bias-enhanced growth

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Yueh-Chieh; Tzeng, Yonhua; Auciello, Orlando

    2014-01-14

    Effects of biasing voltage-current relationship on microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films on (100) silicon in hydrogen diluted methane by bias-enhanced nucleation and bias-enhanced growth processes are reported. Three biasing methods are applied to study their effects on nucleation, growth, and microstructures of deposited UNCD films. Method A employs 320 mA constant biasing current and a negative biasing voltage decreasing from −490 V to −375 V for silicon substrates pre-heated to 800 °C. Method B employs 400 mA constant biasing current and a decreasing negative biasing voltage from −375 V to −390 V for silicon pre-heated to 900 °C. Method C employs −350 V constant biasing voltage and an increasing biasing current up to 400 mA for silicon pre-heated to 800 °C. UNCD nanopillars, merged clusters, and dense films with smooth surface morphology are deposited by the biasing methods A, B, and C, respectively. Effects of ion energy and flux controlled by the biasing voltage and current, respectively, on nucleation, growth, microstructures, surface morphologies, and UNCD contents are confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission-electron-microscopy, and UV Raman scattering.

  7. Coating of diamond-like carbon nanofilm on alumina by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process.

    PubMed

    Rattanasatien, Chotiwan; Tonanon, Nattaporn; Bhanthumnavin, Worawan; Paosawatyanyong, Boonchoat

    2012-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) nanofilms with thickness varied from under one hundred to a few hundred nanometers have been successfully deposited on alumina substrates by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MW-PECVD) process. To obtain dense continuous DLC nanofilm coating over the entire sample surface, alumina substrates were pre-treated to enhance the nucleation density. Raman spectra of DLC films on samples showed distinct diamond peak at around 1332 cm(-1), and the broad band of amorphous carbon phase at around 1550 cm(-1). Full width at half maximum height (FWHM) values indicated good formation of diamond phase in all films. The result of nano-indentation test show that the hardness of alumina samples increase from 7.3 +/- 2.0 GPa in uncoated samples to 15.8 +/- 4.5-52.2 +/- 2.1 GPa in samples coated with DLC depending on the process conditions. It is observed that the hardness values are still in good range although the thickness of the films is less than a hundred nanometer.

  8. Reaction Gas Ratio Effect on the Growth of a Diamond Film Using Microwave Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Joung, Y H; Kang, F S; Lee, S; Kang, H; Choi, W S; Choi, Y K; Song, B S; Lee, J; Hong, B

    2016-05-01

    In this study, diamond films were prepared using the microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system, which included a DC bias system to enhance the nucleation of the films. The films were synthesized on Si wafers with different ratios of methane (CH4) and hydrogen (H2) gases. We have studied the effects of the CH4-to-H2 ratio on the structural and optical properties of diamond films. The thickness and surface profile of the films were characterized via field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Raman was used to investigate the structural properties of the diamond films. The refractive indexes as functions of the CH4-to-H2 ratio were measured using an ellipsometer. The FE-SEM analysis showed that the 3 and 5 sccm CH4 created diamond films. The Raman analysis indicated that a nanocrystalline diamond film was formed at 3 sccm; a general diamond film, at 5 sccm; and films similar to the a-C:H film, at 7 sccm. The ellipsometer measurement showed that the refractive index of the synthesized diamond film was around 2.42 at 3 sccm. This value decreased as the CH4 volume increased.

  9. Effects of Pretreatment on the Electronic Properties of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Hetero-Epitaxial Graphene Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lian-Chang; Shi, Zhi-Wen; Yang, Rong; Huang, Jian

    2014-09-01

    Quasi-monolayer graphene is successfully grown by the plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition heteroepitaxial method we reported previously. To measure its electrical properties, the prepared graphene is fabricated into Hall ball shaped devices by the routine micro-fabrication method. However, impurity molecules adsorbed onto the graphene surface will impose considerable doping effects on the one-atom-thick film material. Our experiment demonstrates that pretreatment of the device by heat radiation baking and electrical annealing can dramatically influence the doping state of the graphene and consequently modify the electrical properties. While graphene in the as-fabricated device is highly p-doped, as confirmed by the position of the Dirac point at far more than +60 V, baking treatment at temperatures around 180°C can significantly lower the doping level and reduce the conductivity. The following electrical annealing is much more efficient to desorb the extrinsic molecules, as confirmed by the in situ measurement, and as a result, further modify the doping state and electrical properties of the graphene, causing a considerable drop of the conductivity and a shifting of Dirac point from beyond +60 V to 0 V.

  10. Deposition of zinc oxide photoelectrode using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su Young; Kim, Sang Ho

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the characteristics of zinc oxide (ZnO) photoelectrodes grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. ZnO has many advantages, such as high binding energy, breakdown strength, cohesion, hardness, and electron mobility. On the F-doped SnO2 (FTO) electrode, we deposited ZnO as a function of thickness, and we examined the thickness effect on the I-V, fill factor, open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current density, and especially the power conversion efficiency of the built in dye-sensitized solar cell. To study the thickness effect on the conduction and recombination of electrons in the ZnO electrode, we analyzed the alignment of grains, crystallinity, impedance, and cyclic I-V properties. The thickness of ZnO changed the electron diffusion length and recombination time. As a result, the maximum power conversion efficiency of 2.63% was obtained with a moderately thick (8.06 μm) ZnO.

  11. Photocatalytic Functional Coating of TiO2 Thin Film Deposited by Cyclic Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jung-Dae; Rha, Jong-Joo; Nam, Kee-Seok; Park, Jin-Seong

    2011-08-01

    Photocatalytic TiO2 thin films were prepared with titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) using cyclic plasma chemical vapor deposition (CPCVD) at atmospheric pressure. The CPCVD TiO2 films contain carbon-free impurities up to 100 °C and polycrystalline anatase phases up to 200 °C, due to the radicals and ion-bombardments. The CPCVD TiO2 films have high transparency in the visible wavelength region and absorb wavelengths below 400 nm (>3.2 eV). The photocatalytic effects of the CPCVD TiO2 and commercial sprayed TiO2 films were measured by decomposing methylene blue (MB) solution under UV irradiation. The smooth CPCVD TiO2 films showed a relatively lower photocatalytic efficiency, but superior catalyst-recycling efficiency, due to their high adhesion strength on the substrates. This CPCVD technique may provide the means to produce photocatalytic thin films with low cost and high efficiency, which would be a reasonable candidate for practical photocatalytic applications, because of the reliability and stability of their photocatalytic efficiency in a practical environment.

  12. Optimal design of antireflection coating and experimental verification by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition in small displays

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S. M.; Hsieh, Y. C.; Jeng, C. A.

    2009-03-15

    Conventional antireflection coating by thin films of quarter-wavelength thickness is limited by material selections and these films' refractive indices. The optimal design by non-quarter-wavelength thickness is presented in this study. A multilayer thin-film model is developed by the admittance loci to show that the two-layer thin film of SiN{sub x}/SiO{sub y} at 124/87 nm and three layer of SiN{sub x}/SiN{sub y}/SiO{sub z} at 58/84/83 nm can achieve average transmittances of 94.4% and 94.9%, respectively, on polymer, glass, and silicon substrates. The optimal design is validated by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of N{sub 2}O/SiH{sub 4} and NH{sub 3}/SiH{sub 4} to achieve the desired optical constants. Application of the antireflection coating to a 4 in. liquid crystal display demonstrates that the transmittance is over 94%, the mean luminance can be increased by 25%, and the total reflection angle increased from 41 deg. to 58 deg.

  13. Tribological and thermal stability study of nanoporous amorphous boron carbide films prepared by pulsed plasma chemical vapor deposition

    PubMed Central

    Liza, Shahira; Ohtake, Naoto; Akasaka, Hiroki; Munoz-Guijosa, Juan M

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the thermal stability and the oxidation and tribological behavior of nanoporous a-BC:H films are studied and compared with those in conventional diamond-like carbon (DLC) films. a-BC:H films were deposited by pulsed plasma chemical vapor deposition using B(CH3)3 gas as the boron source. A DLC interlayer was used to prevent the a-BC:H film delamination produced by oxidation. Thermal stability of a-BC:H films, with no delamination signs after annealing at 500 °C for 1 h, is better than that of the DLC films, which completely disappeared under the same conditions. Tribological test results indicate that the a-BC:H films, even with lower nanoindentation hardness than the DLC films, show an excellent boundary oil lubricated behavior, with lower friction coefficient and reduce the wear rate of counter materials than those on the DLC film. The good materials properties such as low modulus of elasticity and the formation of micropores from the original nanopores during boundary regimes explain this better performance. Results show that porous a-BC:H films may be an alternative for segmented DLC films in applications where severe tribological conditions and complex shapes exist, so surface patterning is unfeasible. PMID:27877808

  14. Enhanced field emission characteristics of boron doped diamond films grown by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koinkar, Pankaj M.; Patil, Sandip S.; Kim, Tae-Gyu; Yonekura, Daisuke; More, Mahendra A.; Joag, Dilip S.; Murakami, Ri-ichi

    2011-01-01

    Boron doped diamond films were synthesized on silicon substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) technique. The effect of B 2O 3 concentration varied from 1000 to 5000 ppm on the field emission characteristics was examined. The surface morphology and quality of films were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The surface morphology obtained by SEM showed variation from facetted microcrystal covered with nanometric grains to cauliflower of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) particles with increasing B 2O 3 concentration. The Raman spectra confirm the formation of NCD films. The field emission properties of NCD films were observed to improve upon increasing boron concentration. The values of the onset field and threshold field are observed to be as low as 0.36 and 0.08 V/μm, respectively. The field emission current stability investigated at the preset value of ˜1 μA is observed to be good, in each case. The enhanced field emission properties are attributed to the better electrical conductivity coupled with the nanometric features of the diamond films.

  15. Film Characteristics of Low-Temperature Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Silicon Dioxide Using Tetraisocyanatesilane and Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, Irman; Sugiura, Osamu

    1998-12-01

    Silicon dioxide films were deposited in a parallel-plate electrode RF plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system using hydrogen-free tetraisocyanatesilane (TICS) and oxygen. The deposition parameters were varied systematically, and the films were characterized by measuring infrared spectra, density, etch rate, refractive index, and current-voltage (I V) and capacitance-voltage (C V) characteristics, as well as by examining their annealing behavior. At 300°C and a TICS partial pressure ratio of 20%, a water-free and hydroxyl-group-free SiO2 film was obtained. The film density, BHF etch rate, refractive index, resistivity, and dielectric constant were 2.3 g/cm3, 330 nm/min, 1.46, 7×1015 Ω·cm, and 3.6, respectively. The film quality degraded and, simultaneously, the film absorbed moisture from the atmosphere with decreasing deposition temperature; however, the quality can be improved by reducing TICS partial pressure. SiO2 films could be deposited even at 15°C, and had a resistivity of about 1013Ω·cm. Infrared measurements showed that SiO2 films deposited from TICS/O2 contained less absorbed water than those deposited from hydrogen-containing source materials at the same deposition temperature.

  16. Anatomy of μc-Si thin films by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition: An investigation by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losurdo, M.; Rizzoli, R.; Summonte, C.; Cicala, G.; Capezzuto, P.; Bruno, G.

    2000-09-01

    A detailed analysis of the anatomy of microcrystalline (μc-Si) films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition from both SiF4-H2 and SiH4-H2 mixtures is performed by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). Specifically, the μc-Si film anatomy consists of an interface layer at the substrate/μc-Si bulk layer, a bulk μc-Si layer, and a surface porous layer. All these layers have their own microstructures, which need to be highlighted, since it is this overall anatomy which determines the optical properties of μc-Si films. The ability of SE to discriminate the complex microstructure of μc-Si thin films is emphasized also by the comparison with the x-ray diffraction data which cannot provide unambiguous information regarding the distribution of the crystalline and the amorphous phases along the μc-Si film thickness. Through the description of the μc-Si film anatomy, information on the effect of the growth precursors (SiF4 or SiH4) and of the substrate (c-Si or Corning glass) on the growth dynamics can be obtained. The key role of the F-atoms density and, therefore, of the etching-to-deposition competition on the growth mechanism and film microstructure is highlighted.

  17. Influence of krypton atoms on the structure of hydrogenated amorphous carbon deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, M. H.; Viana, G. A.; de Lima, M. M.; Cros, A.; Cantarero, A.; Marques, F. C.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films were prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using methane (CH4) plus krypton (Kr) mixed atmosphere. The depositions were performed as function of the bias voltage and krypton partial pressure. The goal of this work was to study the influence of krypton gas on the physical properties of a-C:H films deposited on the cathode electrode. Krypton concentration up to 1.6 at. %, determined by Rutherford Back-Scattering, was obtained at high Kr partial pressure and bias of -120 V. The structure of the films was analyzed by means of optical transmission spectroscopy, multi-wavelength Raman scattering and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. It was verified that the structure of the films remains unchanged up to a concentration of Kr of about 1.0 at. %. A slight graphitization of the films occurs for higher concentration. The observed variation in the film structure, optical band gap, stress, and hydrogen concentration were associated mainly with the subplantation process of hydrocarbons radicals, rather than the krypton ion energy.

  18. Modeling and experimental study on the growth of silicon germanium film by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lai

    Hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon germanium µc-SiGe:H deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) is of great interest to photovoltaic (PV) applications due to its low process temperature and good uniformity over large area. The nature of high optical absorption and low optical bandgap makes it promising as the bottom cell absorbing layer for tandem junction solar cells. However, the addition of germane (GeH4) gas changes deposited film properties and makes it rather complicated for the established silane (SiH4) based discharge process with hydrogen (H2) dilution. Despite existing experimental studies for SiH 4/GeH4/H2 3-gas mixture discharge and comprehensive numerical simulations for SiH4/H2 or SiH4/Ar plasma, to the author's best knowledge, a numerical model for both SiH 4 and GeH4 in a high pressure regime is yet to be developed. The plasma discharge, the film growth and their effects on film properties and the solar device performance need deep understanding. In this dissertation, the growth of the µc-SiGe:H film by radio frequency (RF) PECVD is studied through modeling simulation as well as experiments. The first numerical model for the glow discharge of SiH4/GeH 4/H2 3-gas mixture in a high pressure regime is developed based on one dimensional fluid model. Transports of electrons, molecules, radicals and ions in the RF excitation are described by diffusion equations that are coupled with the Poisson's equation. The deposition is integrated as the boundary conditions for discharge equations through the sticking coefficient model. Neutral ionizations, radical dissociations and chemical reactions in the gas phase and surface kinetics such as the diffusive motion, chemical reactions and the hydrogen etching are included with interaction rate constants. Solved with an explicit central-difference discretization scheme, the model simulates mathematical features that reflect the plasma physics such as the plasma sheath and gas species

  19. Ultrathin ultrananocrystalline diamond film synthesis by direct current plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hak-Joo; Jeon, Hyeongtag; Lee, Wook-Seong

    2011-10-01

    The synthesis of ultrathin, mirror-smooth, and void-free ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD) film was investigated using DC-PACVD. The seeding process was investigated in the previously reported "two-step" seeding scheme, where the substrate was pretreated in microwave hydrocarbon plasma prior to the ultrasonic seeding to enhance seed density; in the present study, DC plasma and hot filament process were adopted for the pretreatment, instead of the conventional microwave plasma. Two types of nano-diamond seed powders of similar grain sizes but with different zeta potentials were also compared. The pretreated substrate surface and the synthesized UNCD film were characterized by near edge x-ray absorption fine structure, FTIR, AFM, high-resolution scanning electron microscope, HR-TEM, and Raman spectroscopy. The electrophoretic light scattering spectroscopy was adopted to characterize the zeta potentials of the seeding suspensions and that of the substrates, respectively. Contrary to the previous report, the pretreatments deteriorated the seed density relative to that of the non-treated substrate. By contrast, the seed density was drastically improved by using a proper type of the nano-diamond seed powder. The seed density variation according to the substrate pretreatments and the type of the seed powders was attributed to the relative values of the zeta potentials of the substrates and that of the seed powders, which indicated the electrostatic nature of the seeding process. The variation of the substrate surface zeta potentials was attributed to the variation in the surface terminations induced by the respective pretreatments. The present DC-PACVD environment ensured that the secondary nucleation was also active enough to generate the densely packed UNCD grains in the growth stage. Consequently, the ultrathin, mirror-smooth and void-free UNCD film of 30 nm in thickness was enabled.

  20. Probing the plasma chemistry in a microwave reactor used for diamond chemical vapor deposition by cavity ring down spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Jie; Richley, James C.; Ashfold, Michael N. R.; Mankelevich, Yuri A.

    2008-11-15

    Absolute column densities of C{sub 2}(a) and CH radicals and H(n=2) atoms have been measured in a diamond growing microwave reactor operating with hydrocarbon/Ar/H{sub 2} gas mixtures as functions of height (z) above the substrate surface and process conditions. The monitored species are each localized in the hot plasma region, where T{sub gas}{approx}3000 K, and their respective column densities are each reproduced, quantitatively, by two-dimensional (r,z) modeling of the plasma chemistry. The H(n=2) distribution is seen to peak nearer the substrate, reflecting its sensitivity both to thermal chemistry (which drives the formation of ground state H atoms) and the distributions of electron density (n{sub e}) and temperature (T{sub e}). All three column densities are found to be sensitively dependent on the C/H ratio in the process gas mixture but insensitive to the particular choice of hydrocarbon (CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}). The excellent agreement between measured and predicted column densities for all three probed species, under all process conditions investigated, encourages confidence in the predicted number densities of other of the more abundant radical species adjacent to the growing diamond surface which, in turn, reinforces the view that CH{sub 3} radicals are the dominant growth species in microwave activated hydrocarbon/Ar/H{sub 2} gas mixtures used in the chemical vapor deposition of microcrystalline and single crystal diamond samples.

  1. Glutamate biosensor based on carbon nanowalls grown using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomatsu, Masakazu; Hiramatsu, Mineo; Kondo, Hiroki; Hori, Masaru

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanowalls (CNWs) are composed of few-layer graphene standing almost vertically on the substrate. Due to the large surface area of vertical nanographene network, CNWs draw attention as platform for electrochemical sensing, biosensing and energy conversion applications. In this work, CNWs were grown on nickel substrate using inductively coupled plasma with methane/Ar mixture. After the CNW growth, the surface of CNWs was oxidized using Ar atmospheric pressure plasma to obtain super-hydrophilic surface. For the biosensing application, the surface of CNWs was decorated with platinum (Pt) nanoparticles by the reduction of hydrogen hexachloroplatinate (IV) solution. The resultant Pt particle size was estimated to be 3-4 nm. From the XPS analysis, pure Pt existed without being oxidized on the CNW surface. Electrochemical surface area of the Pt catalyst was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry. Pt-decorated CNWs will be used as an electrode for electrochemical glutamate biosensing. L-glutamate is one of the most important in the mammalian central nervous system, playing a vital role in many physiological processes. Nanoplatform based on vertical nanographene offers great promise for providing a new class of nanostructured electrodes for electrochemical sensing.

  2. Microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition of ultra-nanocrystalline diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Shin

    Microwave plasma assisted ultra-nanocrystalline diamond film deposition was investigated using hydrogen deficient, carbon containing argon plasma chemistries with MSU-developed microwave plasma reactors. Ultra-nanocrystalline diamond film deposition on mechanically scratched silicon wafers was experimentally explored over the following input variables: (1) pressure: 60--240Torr, (2) total gas flow rate: 101--642 sccm, (3) input microwave power 732--1518W, (4) substrate temperature: 500°C--770°C, (5) deposition time: 2--48 hours, and (6) N2 impurities 5--2500 ppm. H2 concentrations were less than 9%, while CH 4 concentration was 0.17--1.85%. It was desired to grow films uniformly over 3″ diameter substrates and to minimize the grain size. Large, uniform, intense, and greenish-white discharges were sustained in contact with three inch silicon substrates over a 60--240 Torr pressure regime. At a given operating pressure, film uniformity was controlled by adjusting substrate holder geometry, substrate position, input microwave power, gas chemistries, and total gas flow rates. Film ultra-nanocrystallinity and smoothness required high purity deposition conditions. Uniform ultra-nanocrystalline films were synthesized in low leak-rate system with crystal sizes ranging from 3--30 nm. Films with 11--50 nm RMS roughness and respective thickness values of 1--23 mum were synthesized over 3″ wafers under a wide range of different deposition conditions. Film RMS roughness 7 nm was synthesized with thickness of 430 nm. Film uniformities of almost 100% were achieved over three inch silicon wafers. UV Raman and XRD characterization results indicated the presence of diamond in the synthesized films. Optical Emission Spectroscopy measurements showed that the discharge gas temperature was in excess of 2000 K. The synthesized films are uniformly smooth and the as grown ultra-nanocrystalline diamond can be used for a high frequency SAW device substrate material. IR measurements

  3. Cell proliferation on modified DLC thin films prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Stoica, Adrian; Manakhov, Anton; Polčák, Josef; Ondračka, Pavel; Buršíková, Vilma; Zajíčková, Renata; Medalová, Jiřina; Zajíčková, Lenka

    2015-06-12

    Recently, diamondlike carbon (DLC) thin films have gained interest for biological applications, such as hip and dental prostheses or heart valves and coronary stents, thanks to their high strength and stability. However, the biocompatibility of the DLC is still questionable due to its low wettability and possible mechanical failure (delamination). In this work, DLC:N:O and DLC: SiOx thin films were comparatively investigated with respect to cell proliferation. Thin DLC films with an addition of N, O, and Si were prepared by plasma enhanced CVD from mixtures of methane, hydrogen, and hexamethyldisiloxane. The films were optically characterized by infrared spectroscopy and ellipsometry in UV-visible spectrum. The thickness and the optical properties were obtained from the ellipsometric measurements. Atomic composition of the films was determined by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy combined with elastic recoil detection analysis and by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The mechanical properties of the films were studied by depth sensing indentation technique. The number of cells that proliferate on the surface of the prepared DLC films and on control culture dishes were compared and correlated with the properties of as-deposited and aged films. The authors found that the level of cell proliferation on the coated dishes was high, comparable to the untreated (control) samples. The prepared DLC films were stable and no decrease of the biocompatibility was observed for the samples aged at ambient conditions.

  4. Growth and characterization of large, high quality single crystal diamond substrates via microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nad, Shreya

    Single crystal diamond (SCD) substrates can be utilized in a wide range of applications. Important issues in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of such substrates include: shrinking of the SCD substrate area, stress and cracking, high defect density and hence low electronic quality and low optical quality due to high nitrogen impurities. The primary objective of this thesis is to begin to address these issues and to find possible solutions for enhancing the substrate dimensions and simultaneously improving the quality of the grown substrates. The deposition of SCD substrates is carried out in a microwave cavity plasma reactor via the microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition technique. The operation of the reactor was first optimized to determine the safe and efficient operating regime. By adjusting the matching of the reactor cavity with the help of four internal tuning length variables, the system was further matched to operate at a maximum overall microwave coupling efficiency of ˜ 98%. Even with adjustments in the substrate holder position, the reactor remains well matched with a coupling efficiency of ˜ 95% indicating good experimental performance over a wide range of operating conditions. SCD substrates were synthesized at a high pressure of 240 Torr and with a high absorbed power density of 500 W/cm3. To counter the issue of shrinking substrate size during growth, the effect of different substrate holder designs was studied. An increase in the substrate dimensions (1.23 -- 2.5 times) after growth was achieved when the sides of the seeds were shielded from the intense microwave electromagnetic fields in a pocket holder design. Using such pocket holders, high growth rates of 16 -- 32 mum/hr were obtained for growth times of 8 -- 72 hours. The polycrystalline diamond rim deposition was minimized/eliminated from these growth runs, hence successfully enlarging the substrate size. Several synthesized CVD SCD substrates were laser cut and separated

  5. Methane as an effective hydrogen source for single-layer graphene synthesis on Cu foil by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Seung; Lee, Jae Hong; Kim, Young Duck; Jerng, Sahng-Kyoon; Joo, Kisu; Kim, Eunho; Jung, Jongwan; Yoon, Euijoon; Park, Yun Daniel; Seo, Sunae; Chun, Seung-Hyun

    2013-02-07

    A single-layer graphene is synthesized on Cu foil in the absence of H(2) flow by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). In lieu of an explicit H(2) flow, hydrogen species are produced during the methane decomposition process into their active species (CH(x<4)), assisted with the plasma. Notably, the early stage of growth depends strongly on the plasma power. The resulting grain size (the nucleation density) has a maximum (minimum) at 50 W and saturates when the plasma power is higher than 120 W because hydrogen partial pressures are effectively tuned by a simple control of the plasma power. Raman spectroscopy and transport measurements show that decomposed methane alone can provide a sufficient amount of hydrogen species for high-quality graphene synthesis by PECVD.

  6. Use of Optical Microscopy to Examine Crystallite Nucleation and Growth in Thermally Annealed Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition and Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition a-Si:H Films

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, A. H.; Dabney, M. S.; Reedy, Jr R. C.; Molina, D.; Ginley, D. S.

    2012-05-15

    We report a simple method to investigate crystallite nucleation and growth in stepwise, thermally annealed plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and hot wire chemical vapor deposition a-Si:H films. By confining film thicknesses to the range 500-4000 {angstrom}, optical microscopy in the reflection mode can be used to readily detect crystallites in the thermally annealed a-Si:H lattice. Measurements of the crystallite density versus annealing time for identically prepared films of different thickness show that the crystallite nucleation rate is smaller for thinner films, suggesting that crystallite nucleation is homogeneous, in agreement with previous results. A comparison of film nucleation rates with those obtained by other methods on identically prepared films shows excellent agreement, thus establishing the validity of the current technique. The potential effect of impurity (oxygen) incorporation during the stepwise annealing in air is shown not to affect crystallite nucleation and growth, in that SIMS oxygen profiles for stepwise versus continuous annealing show not only similar impurity profiles but also similar bulk impurity densities.

  7. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of Electron Cyclotron Resonance-Plasma Enchanced Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition Process for Deposition of GaN Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Silie; Chen, Junfang; Li, Yun; Li, Wei; Zhang, Maoping; Hu, Shejun

    2008-02-01

    An investigation was made into the nitrogen-trimethylgallium mixed electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The ECR plasma enhanced metalorganic chemical vapour deposition technology was adopted to grow GaN film on an α-Al2O3 substrate. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses showed that the peak of GaN (0002) was at 2θ = 34.48°, being sharper and more intense with the increase in the N2: trimethylgallium(TMG) flow ratio. The results demonstrate that the electron cyclotron resonance-plasma enchanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (ECR-MOPECVD) technology is evidently advantageous for the deposition of GaN film at a low growth temperature.

  8. Impact of the etching gas on vertically oriented single wall and few walled carbon nanotubes by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohier, A.; Minea, T. M.; Djouadi, M. A.; Granier, A.

    2007-03-01

    Vertically oriented single wall nanotubes (SWNTs) and few walled nanotubes (FWNTs) have been grown by electronic cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) on silica flat substrates. The impact of the plasma parameters on SWNT and FWNT growth has been investigated using two different etching gas mixtures, namely, C2H2/NH3 and C2H2/H2 with various ratios and applied bias voltages. Kinetic studies are also proposed in order to describe the FWNT growth mechanism by plasma techniques. A key role played by the reactive gas (NH3 and H2) is observed in the PECVD process, contrary to multiwalled nanotube growth. It is demonstrated that the balance between FWNT growth versus FWNT etching can be widely modulated by varying the gas mixture and bias voltage. It is shown that the use of hydrogen for hydrocarbon gas dilution restricts the destruction of SWNT and FWNT by the plasma species (ions and radicals).

  9. Novel chemical vapor deposition process of ZnO films using nonequilibrium N2 plasma generated near atmospheric pressure with small amount of O2 below 1%

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nose, Yukinori; Yoshimura, Takeshi; Ashida, Atsushi; Uehara, Tsuyoshi; Fujimura, Norifumi

    2016-05-01

    We propose a novel chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process of ZnO films involving a nonequilibrium N2 plasma generated near atmospheric pressure with small O2 concentration (O2%) below 1%. In the optical emission (OE) spectra of the plasma, OE lines corresponding to the NO-γ system ( A 2 Σ + → X 2 Πγ + ) were observed, despite the only introduced gases being N2 and O2; these vanish at an O2% of more than 1%. ZnO films were grown on a glass substrate placed in the plasma at a growth temperature of as low as 200 °C and at an O2% of below 1% in the presence of the NO-γ system. This plasma yielded almost the same growth rate for ZnO films as O2 plasma including atomic O radicals that are often observed in low-pressure O2 plasma, suggesting that some highly reactive oxidant was sufficiently generated in such a small O2%. ZnO films synthesized using this plasma exhibited excellent ( 0001 ) preferred orientation without other diffractions such as 10 1 ¯ 1 diffraction, and with an optical bandgap of 3.30 eV. Based on the analyses of the plasma and the exhaust gases, the coexistence state of NO-γ and O3 should be essential and useful for the decomposition and oxidation of Zn source material in the proposed CVD process.

  10. Synthesis of thin films in boron-carbon-nitrogen ternary system by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukreja, Ratandeep Singh

    The Boron Carbon Nitorgen (B-C-N) ternary system includes materials with exceptional properties such as wide band gap, excellent thermal conductivity, high bulk modulus, extreme hardness and transparency in the optical and UV range that find application in most fields ranging from micro-electronics, bio-sensors, and cutting tools to materials for space age technology. Interesting materials that belong to the B-C-N ternary system include Carbon nano-tubes, Boron Carbide, Boron Carbon Nitride (B-CN), hexagonal Boron Nitride ( h-BN), cubic Boron Nitride (c-BN), Diamond and beta Carbon Nitride (beta-C3N4). Synthesis of these materials requires precisely controlled and energetically favorable conditions. Chemical vapor deposition is widely used technique for deposition of thin films of ceramics, metals and metal-organic compounds. Microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) is especially interesting because of its ability to deposit materials that are meta-stable under the deposition conditions, for e.g. diamond. In the present study, attempt has been made to synthesize beta-carbon nitride (beta-C3N4) and cubic-Boron Nitride (c-BN) thin films by MPECVD. Also included is the investigation of dependence of residual stress and thermal conductivity of the diamond thin films, deposited by MPECVD, on substrate pre-treatment and deposition temperature. Si incorporated CNx thin films are synthesized and characterized while attempting to deposit beta-C3N4 thin films on Si substrates using Methane (CH4), Nitrogen (N2), and Hydrogen (H2). It is shown that the composition and morphology of Si incorporated CNx thin film can be tailored by controlling the sequence of introduction of the precursor gases in the plasma chamber. Greater than 100mum size hexagonal crystals of N-Si-C are deposited when Nitrogen precursor is introduced first while agglomerates of nano-meter range graphitic needles of C-Si-N are deposited when Carbon precursor is introduced first in the

  11. Simple Chemical Vapor Deposition Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process commonly used for the synthesis of thin films for several important technological applications, for example, microelectronics, hard coatings, and smart windows. Unfortunately, the complexity and prohibitive cost of CVD equipment makes it seldom available for undergraduate chemistry students. Here, a…

  12. Simple Chemical Vapor Deposition Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process commonly used for the synthesis of thin films for several important technological applications, for example, microelectronics, hard coatings, and smart windows. Unfortunately, the complexity and prohibitive cost of CVD equipment makes it seldom available for undergraduate chemistry students. Here, a…

  13. Control of carbon content in amorphous GeTe films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-MOCVD) for phase-change random access memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoukar, M.; Szkutnik, P. D.; Jourde, D.; Pelissier, B.; Michallon, P.; Noé, P.; Vallée, C.

    2015-07-01

    Amorphous and smooth GeTe thin films are deposited on 200 mm silicon substrates by plasma enhanced—metal organic chemical vapor deposition (PE-MOCVD) using the commercial organometallic precursors TDMAGe and DIPTe as Ge and Te precursors, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements show a stoichiometric composition of the deposited GeTe films but with high carbon contamination. Using information collected by Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) and XPS, the origin of carbon contamination is determined and the dissociation mechanisms of Ge and Te precursors in H2 + Ar plasma are proposed. As a result, carbon level is properly controlled by varying operating parameters such as plasma radio frequency power, pressure and H2 rate. Finally, GeTe films with carbon level as low as 5 at. % are obtained.

  14. High-durability catalytic electrode composed of Pt nanoparticle-supported carbon nanowalls synthesized by radical-injection plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Shun; Kondo, Hiroki; Cho, Hyungjun; Kano, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Sekine, Makoto; Hiramatsu, Mineo; Ito, Masafumi; Hori, Masaru

    2017-10-01

    For polymer electrolyte fuel cell applications, carbon nanowalls (CNWs) were synthesized by radical-injection plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and a high density of Pt nanoparticles (>1012 cm‑2) was supported on the CNWs using a supercritical fluid deposition system. The high potential cycle tests were applied and the electrochemical surface area of the Pt nanoparticle-supported CNWs did not change significantly, even after 20 000 high potential cycles. According to transmission electron microscopy observations, the mean diameter of Pt changed slightly after the cycle tests, while the crystallinity of the CNWs evaluated using Raman spectroscopy showed almost no change.

  15. Atmospheric pressure plasma-initiated chemical vapor deposition (AP-PiCVD) of poly(diethylallylphosphate) coating: a char-forming protective coating for cellulosic textile.

    PubMed

    Hilt, Florian; Boscher, Nicolas D; Duday, David; Desbenoit, Nicolas; Levalois-Grützmacher, Joëlle; Choquet, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    An innovative atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition method toward the deposition of polymeric layers has been developed. This latter involves the use of a nanopulsed plasma discharge to initiate the free-radical polymerization of an allyl monomer containing phosphorus (diethylallylphosphate, DEAP) at atmospheric pressure. The polymeric structure of the film is evidence by mass spectrometry. The method, highly suitable for the treatment of natural biopolymer substrate, has been carried out on cotton textile to perform the deposition of an efficient and conformal protective coating.

  16. Hydrogen-Free Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Silicon Dioxide Using Tetra-isocyanate-silane (Si(NCO) 4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, Irman; Sugiura, Osamu

    1995-06-01

    Deposition of silicon dioxide by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique using tetra-isocyanate-silane (Si(NCO)4 : TICS) and oxygen for interlayer dielectric film application is proposed. Film properties strongly depend on the gas composition. The film which was deposited under an oxygen-rich condition was water-free after deposition. The film density, refractive index, resistivity, and dielectric constant were 2.3 g/cm3, 1.46, 5×1014 Ω·cm, and 3.6, respectively. The etch rate by buffered HF was 330 nm/min.

  17. Effects of pulse bias duty cycle on fullerenelike nanostructure and mechanical properties of hydrogenated carbon films prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Li; Li, Hongxuan; Zhao, Fei; Quan, Weilong; Chen, Jianmin; Zhou, Huidi

    2009-05-01

    Fullerenelike hydrogenated carbon films were produced by pulse bias-assisted rf inductively coupled plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (ICPECVD). The effects of pulse duty cycle on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the resultant films were investigated by means of high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectroscopy, nanoindentation, and stress measurement. The low pulse duty cycle was found the key in the formation of fullerenelike structure in hydrogenated carbon films, and thus increased the hardness, elasticity, and internal stress of the films. The role of pulse duty cycle in evolution of fullerenelike structure was also discussed in terms of ion bombardment, hydrogen removal, and "annealing" effects.

  18. Sub-micro a-C:H patterning of silicon surfaces assisted by atmospheric-pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boileau, Alexis; Gries, Thomas; Noël, Cédric; Perito Cardoso, Rodrigo; Belmonte, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    Micro and nano-patterning of surfaces is an increasingly popular challenge in the field of the miniaturization of devices assembled via top-down approaches. This study demonstrates the possibility of depositing sub-micrometric localized coatings—spots, lines or even more complex shapes—made of amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) thanks to a moving XY stage. Deposition was performed on silicon substrates using chemical vapor deposition assisted by an argon atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. Acetylene was injected into the post-discharge region as a precursor by means of a glass capillary with a sub-micrometric diameter. A parametric study was carried out to study the influence of the geometric configurations (capillary diameter and capillary-plasma distance) on the deposited coating. Thus, the patterns formed were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Furthermore, the chemical composition of large coated areas was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy according to the chosen atmospheric environment. The observed chemical bonds show that reactions of the gaseous precursor in the discharge region and both chemical and morphological stability of the patterns after treatment are strongly dependent on the surrounding gas. Various sub-micrometric a-C:H shapes were successfully deposited under controlled atmospheric conditions using argon as inerting gas. Overall, this new process of micro-scale additive manufacturing by atmospheric plasma offers unusually high-resolution at low cost.

  19. Chemical vapor deposition of sialon

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, R.L.; Casey, A.W.

    A laminated composite and a method for forming the composite by chemical vapor deposition are described. The composite includes a layer of sialon and a material to which the layer is bonded. The method includes the steps of exposing a surface of the material to an ammonia containing atmosphere; heating the surface to at least about 1200/sup 0/C; and impinging a gas containing N/sub 2/, SiCl/sub 4/, and AlCl/sub 3/ on the surface.

  20. Development of speckle-free channel-cut crystal optics using plasma chemical vaporization machining for coherent x-ray applications.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Takashi; Osaka, Taito; Sano, Yasuhisa; Inubushi, Yuichi; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Tono, Kensuke; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yabashi, Makina; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a method of fabricating speckle-free channel-cut crystal optics with plasma chemical vaporization machining, an etching method using atmospheric-pressure plasma, for coherent X-ray applications. We investigated the etching characteristics to silicon crystals and achieved a small surface roughness of less than 1 nm rms at a removal depth of >10 μm, which satisfies the requirements for eliminating subsurface damage while suppressing diffuse scattering from rough surfaces. We applied this method for fabricating channel-cut Si(220) crystals for a hard X-ray split-and-delay optical system and confirmed that the crystals provided speckle-free reflection profiles under coherent X-ray illumination.

  1. Direct fabrication of 3D graphene on nanoporous anodic alumina by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Hualin; Garrett, David J.; Apollo, Nicholas V.; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Lau, Desmond; Prawer, Steven; Cervenka, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    High surface area electrode materials are of interest for a wide range of potential applications such as super-capacitors and electrochemical cells. This paper describes a fabrication method of three-dimensional (3D) graphene conformally coated on nanoporous insulating substrate with uniform nanopore size. 3D graphene films were formed by controlled graphitization of diamond-like amorphous carbon precursor films, deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). Plasma-assisted graphitization was found to produce better quality graphene than a simple thermal graphitization process. The resulting 3D graphene/amorphous carbon/alumina structure has a very high surface area, good electrical conductivity and exhibits excellent chemically stability, providing a good material platform for electrochemical applications. Consequently very large electrochemical capacitance values, as high as 2.1 mF for a sample of 10 mm3, were achieved. The electrochemical capacitance of the material exhibits a dependence on bias voltage, a phenomenon observed by other groups when studying graphene quantum capacitance. The plasma-assisted graphitization, which dominates the graphitization process, is analyzed and discussed in detail. PMID:26805546

  2. Direct fabrication of 3D graphene on nanoporous anodic alumina by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Hualin; Garrett, David J.; Apollo, Nicholas V.; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Lau, Desmond; Prawer, Steven; Cervenka, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    High surface area electrode materials are of interest for a wide range of potential applications such as super-capacitors and electrochemical cells. This paper describes a fabrication method of three-dimensional (3D) graphene conformally coated on nanoporous insulating substrate with uniform nanopore size. 3D graphene films were formed by controlled graphitization of diamond-like amorphous carbon precursor films, deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). Plasma-assisted graphitization was found to produce better quality graphene than a simple thermal graphitization process. The resulting 3D graphene/amorphous carbon/alumina structure has a very high surface area, good electrical conductivity and exhibits excellent chemically stability, providing a good material platform for electrochemical applications. Consequently very large electrochemical capacitance values, as high as 2.1 mF for a sample of 10 mm3, were achieved. The electrochemical capacitance of the material exhibits a dependence on bias voltage, a phenomenon observed by other groups when studying graphene quantum capacitance. The plasma-assisted graphitization, which dominates the graphitization process, is analyzed and discussed in detail.

  3. Resolving the nanostructure of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited nanocrystalline SiO{sub x} layers for application in solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Klingsporn, M.; Costina, I.; Kirner, S.; Stannowski, B.; Villringer, C.; Abou-Ras, D.; Lehmann, M.

    2016-06-14

    Nanocrystalline silicon suboxides (nc-SiO{sub x}) have attracted attention during the past years for the use in thin-film silicon solar cells. We investigated the relationships between the nanostructure as well as the chemical, electrical, and optical properties of phosphorous, doped, nc-SiO{sub 0.8}:H fabricated by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The nanostructure was varied through the sample series by changing the deposition pressure from 533 to 1067 Pa. The samples were then characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, Raman spectroscopy, aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected-area electron diffraction, and a specialized plasmon imaging method. We found that the material changed with increasing pressure from predominantly amorphous silicon monoxide to silicon dioxide containing nanocrystalline silicon. The nanostructure changed from amorphous silicon filaments to nanocrystalline silicon filaments, which were found to cause anisotropic electron transport.

  4. Vapor Phase Deposition Using Plasma Spray-PVD™

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Niessen, K.; Gindrat, M.; Refke, A.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma spray—physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is a low pressure plasma spray technology to deposit coatings out of the vapor phase. PS-PVD is a part of the family of new hybrid processes recently developed by Sulzer Metco AG (Switzerland) on the basis of the well-established low pressure plasma spraying (LPPS) technology. Included in this new process family are plasma spray—chemical vapor deposition (PS-CVD) and plasma spray—thin film (PS-TF) processes. In comparison to conventional vacuum plasma spraying and LPPS, these new processes use a high energy plasma gun operated at a work pressure below 2 mbar. This leads to unconventional plasma jet characteristics which can be used to obtain specific and unique coatings. An important new feature of PS-PVD is the possibility to deposit a coating not only by melting the feed stock material which builds up a layer from liquid splats, but also by vaporizing the injected material. Therefore, the PS-PVD process fills the gap between the conventional PVD technologies and standard thermal spray processes. The possibility to vaporize feedstock material and to produce layers out of the vapor phase results in new and unique coating microstructures. The properties of such coatings are superior to those of thermal spray and EB-PVD coatings. This paper reports on the progress made at Sulzer Metco to develop functional coatings build up from vapor phase of oxide ceramics and metals.

  5. The Effect of Plasma Treatment on Adsorbed Iodine as a Catalyst in Chemical Vapor Deposition of Copper and Application to Filling of Deep Trenches with High Aspect Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Do-Seon; Lee, Won-Jong

    2009-07-01

    Plasma treatment was introduced in order to control the catalytic properties of iodine in catalyst-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CECVD) of copper (Cu). The iodine adatoms are deactivated (i.e., lose their catalytic effect) by forming Cu-I bonds through reaction with Cu atoms by the bombardment of ions during the plasma treatment. The surface concentration of effective iodine adatoms that can act as catalysts decreases exponentially with an increasing of ion exposure which is the product of ion flux and plasma treatment time. The deactivated iodine can be reactivated by annealing above 200 °C. The enhancement factor, defined as the ratio of the enhanced deposition rate of Cu film by the adsorbed iodine to the deposition rate without the catalytic effect of iodine, is proportional to the surface concentration of effective iodine adatoms. The distribution of the surface concentration of effective iodine adatoms inside the trench can be controlled by the plasma treatment. CECVD coupled with plasma treatment enables void-free filling of deep trenches with an aspect ratio of 14.

  6. Atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor for 100 mm wafers, optimized for minimum contamination at low gas flow rates

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, Venu E-mail: venuanand83@gmail.com; Shivashankar, S. A.; Nair, Aswathi R.; Mohan Rao, G.

    2015-08-31

    Gas discharge plasmas used for thinfilm deposition by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) must be devoid of contaminants, like dust or active species which disturb the intended chemical reaction. In atmospheric pressure plasma systems employing an inert gas, the main source of such contamination is the residual air inside the system. To enable the construction of an atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) system with minimal contamination, we have carried out fluid dynamic simulation of the APP chamber into which an inert gas is injected at different mass flow rates. On the basis of the simulation results, we have designed and built a simple, scaled APP system, which is capable of holding a 100 mm substrate wafer, so that the presence of air (contamination) in the APP chamber is minimized with as low a flow rate of argon as possible. This is examined systematically by examining optical emission from the plasma as a function of inert gas flow rate. It is found that optical emission from the plasma shows the presence of atmospheric air, if the inlet argon flow rate is lowered below 300 sccm. That there is minimal contamination of the APP reactor built here, was verified by conducting an atmospheric pressure PECVD process under acetylene flow, combined with argon flow at 100 sccm and 500 sccm. The deposition of a polymer coating is confirmed by infrared spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the polymer coating contains only 5% of oxygen, which is comparable to the oxygen content in polymer deposits obtained in low-pressure PECVD systems.

  7. Effect of Gas Sources on the Deposition of Nano-Crystalline Diamond Films Prepared by Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Jun; Xiong, Liwei; Wang, Jianhua; Man, Weidong; Chen, Guanhu

    2010-12-01

    Nano-crystalline diamond (NCD) films were deposited on silicon substrates by a microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) reactor in C2H5OH/H2 and CH4/H2/O2 systems, respectively, with a constant ratio of carbon/hydrogen/oxygen. By means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), it was shown that the NCD films deposited in the C2H5OH/H2 system possesses more uniform surface than that deposited in the CH4/H2/O2 system. Results from micro-Raman spectroscopy revealed that the quality of the NCD films was different even though the plasmas in the two systems contain exactly the same proportion of elements. In order to explain this phenomenon, the bond energy of forming OH groups, energy distraction in plasma and the deposition process of NCD films were studied. The experimental results and discussion indicate that for a same ratio of carbon/hydrogen/oxygen, the C2H5OH/H2 plasma was beneficial to deposit high quality NCD films with smaller average grain size and lower surface roughness.

  8. Optical Emission from C2(-) Anions in Microwave-Activated CH4/H2 Plasmas for Chemical Vapor Deposition of Diamond.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, E J D; Truscott, B S; Ashfold, M N R; Mankelevich, Yu A

    2017-04-13

    Visible emission from C2(-)(B(2)Σu(+)) anions has been identified underlying the much stronger Swan band emission from neutral C2(d(3)Πg) radicals (henceforth C2(-)* and C2*, respectively) in MW-activated C/H/(Ar) plasmas operating under conditions appropriate for the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamond. Spatially resolved measurements of the C2(-)* and C2* emissions as functions of the C/H/(Ar) ratio in the input gas mixture, the total pressure, and the applied MW power, together with complementary 2-D(r, z) plasma modeling, identifies dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to C2H radicals in the hot plasma as the dominant source of the observed C2(-)* emission. Modeling not only indicates substantially higher concentrations of C2H(-) anions (from analogous DEA to C2H2) in the near-substrate region but also suggests that the anion number densities will typically be 3-4 orders of magnitude lower than those of the electrons and partner cations, i.e., mainly C2H2(+) and C2H3(+). The identification of negatively charged carbon-containing species in diamond CVD plasmas offers a possible rationale for previous reports that nucleation densities and growth rates can be enhanced by applying a positive bias to the substrate.

  9. Oxygen Gas Barrier Properties of Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Thin Films Deposited with a Pulse-Biased Inductively Coupled Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Sang-min; Shirafuji, Tatsuru; Cho, Sung-pyo; Saito, Nagahiro; Takai, Osamu

    2010-08-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films have been deposited on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) films with an pulse-biased inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition method using CH4 and C2H2 gases. We have investigated the effects of the pulse-bias frequency on the oxygen transmission rate (OTR) of the a-C:H-coated PET sample, and discussed relationship between the OTR characteristics and the structure of the films based on the results of Raman and infrared absorption spectroscopy. In case of CH4 plasmas, the OTR of the sample has been reduced down to 1.12 cm3/(m2·day·atm) by increasing the bias-frequency to 2 kHz, and the structure of the a-C:H films has been modified from polymer-like to tetrahedral one. In case of C2H2 plasmas, the OTR of the samples has been 1.18 cm3/(m2·day·atm) with the lower bias frequency of 0.5 kHz, and has not shown strong dependence on the pulse-bias frequency. This has been explained by the fact that the films prepared with C2H2 plasma can be modified to tetrahedral structures by applying the bias with the lower frequency.

  10. Effect of ion bombardment on the synthesis of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhiqiang; Lim, Sanhua; You, Yumeng; Miao, Jianmin; Gong, Hao; Zhang, Jixuan; Wang, Shanzhong; Lin, Jianyi; Shen, Zexiang

    2008-06-25

    The synthesis of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs) by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) was achieved at 500-600 °C, using ethylene as the carbon source and 1 nm Fe film as the catalyst. For growth of high-quality VA-SWNTs in a plasma sheath, it is crucial to alleviate the undesirable ion bombardment etching effects by the optimization of plasma input power and gas pressure. The resistibility of synthesized VA-SWNTs against ion bombardment etching was found to be closely related to the growth temperature. At relatively low temperature (500 °C), the VA-SWNTs were very susceptible to ion bombardments, which could induce structural defects, and even resulted in a structural transition to few-walled nanotubes. For capacitively coupled radio frequency (rf) PECVD operating at moderate gas pressure (0.3-10 Torr), the ion bombardment etching effect is mainly dependent on the ion flux, which is related to the plasma input power and gas pressure.

  11. Overview of chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Lowden, R.A.

    1993-06-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is developing into a commercially important method for the fabrication of continuous filament ceramic composites. Current efforts are focused on the development of an improved understanding of the various processes in CVI and its modeling. New approaches to CVI are being explored, including pressure pulse infiltration and microwave heating. Material development is also proceeding with emphasis on improving the oxidation resistance of the interfacial layer between the fiber and matrix. This paper briefly reviews these subjects, indicating the current state of the science and technology.

  12. Chemical vapor deposition of sialon

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, Richard L.; Casey, Alton W.

    1982-01-01

    A laminated composite and a method for forming the composite by chemical vapor deposition. The composite includes a layer of sialon and a material to which the layer is bonded. The method includes the steps of exposing a surface of the material to an ammonia containing atmosphere; heating the surface to at least about 1200.degree. C.; and impinging a gas containing in a flowing atmosphere of air N.sub.2, SiCl.sub.4, and AlCl.sub.3 on the surface.

  13. Microwave assisted chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, D.J.; Currier, R.P.; Barbero, R.S.; Espinoza, B.F.; Elliott, N.

    1991-12-31

    A microwave assisted process for production of continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites is described. A simple apparatus combining a chemical vapor infiltration reactor with a conventional 700 W multimode oven is described. Microwave induced inverted thermal gradients are exploited with the ultimate goal of reducing processing times on complex shapes. Thermal gradients in stacks of SiC (Nicalon) cloths have been measured using optical thermometry. Initial results on the ``inside out`` deposition of SiC via decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane in hydrogen are presented. Several key processing issues are identified and discussed. 5 refs.

  14. Determination of Se in biological samples by axial view inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry after digestion with aqua regia and on-line chemical vapor generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Éder José; Herrmann, Amanda Beatriz; de Caires, Suzete Kulik; Frescura, Vera Lúcia Azzolin; Curtius, Adilson José

    2009-06-01

    A simple and fast method for the determination of Se in biological samples, including food, by axial view inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry using on-line chemical vapor generation (CVG-ICP OES) is proposed. The concentrations of HCl and NaBH 4, used in the chemical vapor generation were optimized by factorial analysis. Six certified materials (non-fat milk powder, lobster hepatopancreas, human hair, whole egg powder, oyster tissue, and lyophilised pig kidney) were treated with 10 mL of aqua regia in a microwave system under reflux for 15 min followed by additional 15 min in an ultrasonic bath. The solutions were transferred to a 100 mL volumetric flask and the final volume was made up with water. The Se was determined directly in these solutions by CVG-ICP OES, using the analytical line at 196.026 nm. Calibration against aqueous standards in 10% v/v aqua regia in the concentration range of 0.5-10.0 µg L - 1 Se(IV) was used for the analysis. The quantification limit, considering a 0.5 g sample weight in a final volume of 100 mL - 1 was 0.10 µg g - 1. The obtained concentration values were in agreement with the total certified concentrations, according to the t-test for a 95% confidence level.

  15. Studies of gas phase reactions, nucleation and growth mechanisms of plasma promoted chemical vapor deposition of aluminum using dimethylethylamine alane as source percursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, Andreas H.

    The work presented herein focuses on the use of plasma promoted chemical vapor deposition (PPCVD) of aluminum (Al) using dimethylethylamine alane (DMEAA) as source precursor to provide an integrated, low temperature alternative to currently employed Al deposition methods in ultra large sale integration ULSI multilevel metal wiring schemes. In this respect, key findings are reported and discussed from critical scientific and technical aspects of an research and development effort, which was successfully executed to identify a viable Al CVD deposition process. In this respect, advanced atomic scale analytical techniques were successfully employed to characterize the PPCVD deposition process at the molecular level, and document the dependence of film's structural and compositional properties on key process parameters. This led to the development and optimization of a PPCVD Al process for ULSI applications. In addition, gas phase quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) was employed to study the gas phase evolution during TCVD and PPCVD in order to gain a thorough understanding of the potential chemical and physical reactions that could occur in the gas phase and derive corresponding optimized reaction pathways for both CVD processes. Key reaction mechanisms involved in thermal and plasma promoted CVD as a function of processing parameters were investigated, including the role of hydrogen plasma in providing an efficient pathway to aluminum nucleation and growth. The resulting reaction mechanisms were then employed to identify the most likely precursor decomposition pathways and explore relevant implications for thermal and plasma promoted CVD Al. Furthermore, the nucleation and growth of Al in both TCVD and PPCVD were thoroughly characterized. Time evolution studies were carried out employing a variety of relevant liners and seed layers under selected surface chemical states. The surface morphology of the resulting films were analyzed by means of scanning probe microscopy

  16. Silicon nanocrystals prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition: Importance of parasitic oxidation for third generation photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartel, A. M.; Gutsch, S.; Hiller, D.; Kübel, C.; Zakharov, N.; Werner, P.; Zacharias, M.

    2012-11-01

    We report on an in-situ oxidation effect during annealing of SiO2/SiO1.0N0.23 multilayers prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). This in-situ oxidation leads to an undesired growth of the tunneling oxide and also affects the silicon nanocrystal (SiNC) size control, i.e., a NC shrinkage. The origin of this oxidation is identified to be a "quasi-wet" oxidation by O-H groups incorporated in the PECVD-SiO2 barrier layers. By varying the thickness of the PECVD-SiO2 layer underneath a single SiO1.0N0.23 layer, the extent of NC oxidation is tuned. The shrinkage of SiNCs is proven by a blueshift of the photoluminescence peak position as well as by transmission electron microscopy.

  17. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of wear resistant gradual a-Si1-x:Cx:H coatings on nickel-titanium for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niermann, Benedikt; Böke, Marc; Schauer, Janine-Christina; Winter, Jörg

    2010-03-01

    Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition has been used to deposit thin films with gradual transitions from silicon to carbon on Cu, Ni, stainless steel, and NiTi. Thus show low stress, elasticity, and wear resistance with excellent adhesion on all metals under investigation. Already at low Si concentrations of 10 at. % the intrinsic stress is considerably reduced compared to pure diamondlike carbon (DLC) films. The deposition process is controlled by optical emission spectroscopy. This technique has been applied to monitor the growth precursors and to correlate them with the film composition. The compositions of the films were determined by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and XPS measurements. Due to the elastic properties of the gradual transition and the excellent biocompatibility of DLC, the described film systems present a useful coating for biomedical applications.

  18. Amorphous silicon waveguides and light modulators for integrated photonics realized by low-temperature plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Cocorullo, G; Corte, F G; Rendina, I; Minarini, C; Rubino, A; Terzini, E

    1996-12-15

    A new amorphous silicon waveguide is realized by use of amorphous silicon carbon as cladding material. The structure is characterized both experimentally and theoretically, and its application for optical interconnections in photonic integrated circuits on silicon motherboards is proposed. The fabrication process is based on low-temperature (220 degrees C) plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition and is compatible with standard microelectronic processes. Propagation losses of 1.8 dB/cm have been measured at the fiber-optic wavelength of 1.3 microm. A strong thermo-optic coefficient has been measured in this material at this wavelength and exploited for the realization of a light-intensity modulator based on a Fabry-Perot interferometer that is tunable by temperature.

  19. Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition of Nano-Structured Sn/C Composite Thin-Film Anodes for Li-ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, Cynthia; Marcinek, M.; Hardwick, L.J.; Richardson, T.J.; Song, X.; Kostecki, R.

    2008-02-01

    In this paper we report results of a novel synthesis method of thin-film composite Sn/C anodes for lithium batteries. Thin layers of graphitic carbon decorated with uniformly distributed Sn nanoparticles were synthesized from a solid organic precursor Sn(IV) tert-butoxide by a one step microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD). The thin-film Sn/C electrodes were electrochemically tested in lithium half cells and produced a reversible capacity of 440 and 297 mAhg{sup -1} at C/25 and 5C discharge rates, respectively. A long term cycling of the Sn/C nanocomposite anodes showed 40% capacity loss after 500 cycles at 1C rate.

  20. Tensile test of a silicon microstructure fully coated with submicrometer-thick diamond like carbon film using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenlei; Uesugi, Akio; Hirai, Yoshikazu; Tsuchiya, Toshiyuki; Tabata, Osamu

    2017-06-01

    This paper reports the tensile properties of single-crystal silicon (SCS) microstructures fully coated with sub-micrometer thick diamond like carbon (DLC) film using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). To minimize the deformations or damages caused by non-uniform coating of DLC, which has high compression residual stress, released SCS specimens with the dimensions of 120 µm long, 4 µm wide, and 5 µm thick were coated from the top and bottom side simultaneously. The thickness of DLC coating is around 150 nm and three different bias voltages were used for deposition. The tensile strength improved from 13.4 to 53.5% with the increasing of negative bias voltage. In addition, the deviation in strength also reduced significantly compared to bare SCS sample.

  1. Deposition and Characterization of Nanocrystalline Diamond Films on Mirror-Polished Si Substrate by Biased Enhanced Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soga, T.; Sharda, T.; Jimbo, T.; Umeno, M.

    Hard and smooth nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films were deposited on polished silicon substrates by biased enhanced growth in microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition. The films deposited with varying the methane concentration and biasing voltage were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, nano-indenter, x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. Stress in the films increases with decreasing methane concentration in the gas-phase and with increasing biasing. The adhesion between NCD film and Si substrate is very strong sustaining the compressive stress as high as high as 85 GPa. It was hypothesized that hydrogen content of the films and graphitic content of the films are responsible in generating stress. The hardness is well correlated with the Raman peak intensity ratio of NCD peak to G peak.

  2. Structural Characterization of Polycrystalline 3C-SiC Films Prepared at High Rates by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition Using Monomethylsilane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakiuchi, Hiroaki; Ohmi, Hiromasa; Nakamura, Ryota; Aketa, Masatoshi; Yasutake, Kiyoshi

    2006-10-01

    Polycrystalline cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) films were deposited at a relatively low temperature of 1070 K on Si(001) substrates by atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapor deposition. Monomethylsilane (CH3SiH3) was used as the single source. CH4 and SiH4 dual sources were also used to compare deposition characteristics. Under the present deposition conditions, very high deposition rates of more than 3 nm/s were obtained. The structure of the SiC films was evaluated by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. In addition, optical emission spectroscopy was employed to study the chemical reactions in the CH4/SiH4 and CH3SiH3 plasmas. The results showed that increasing H2 concentration is essential in forming a high quality 3C-SiC film by enhancing the hydrogen elimination reaction at the film-growing surface. From the optical emission spectra, it was found that atomic hydrogen generated by adding H2 in the plasma increase the amount of principal precursors for the film growth. The utilization of CH3SiH3 also led to a higher concentration of principal precursors in the plasma, enhancing the incorporation of Si-C bonds into the film. As a consequence of simultaneously using a high H2 concentration and the CH3SiH3 single source, the columnar growth of 3C-SiC crystallites was achieved.

  3. Impact of Hydrocarbon Control in Ultraviolet-Assisted Restoration Process for Extremely Porous Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition SiOCH Films with k = 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yosuke; Ishikawa, Dai; Nakano, Akinori; Kobayashi, Akiko; Matsushita, Kiyohiro; de Roest, David; Kobayashi, Nobuyoshi

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the effects of UV-assisted restoration on porous plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) SiOCH films with k = 2.0 and 2.3 having high porosities. By applying the UV-assisted restoration to O2-plasma-damaged films with k = 2.0 and 2.3, the recovery of the k-value was observed on the k = 2.3 film in proportion to -OH group reduction. However, the k = 2.0 film did not show recovery in spite of -OH group reduction. We found that hydrocarbon content in the k = 2.0 film was significantly increased by the UV-assisted restoration compared with the k = 2.3 film. According to these findings, we optimized the UV-assisted restoration to achieve improved controllability of the hydrocarbon uptake in the k = 2.0 film and confirmed the recovery of the k-value for O2-plasma-damaged film. Thus, adjusting the hydrocarbon uptake was crucial for restoring extremely porous SiOCH film.

  4. Sensitive determination of bromine and iodine in aqueous and biological samples by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using tetramethylammonium hydroxide as a chemical modifier.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hiroko; Tanaka, Sachiko; Konishi, Chie; Okamoto, Yasuaki; Fujiwara, Terufumi; Ito, Kazuaki

    2008-06-01

    A procedure for the simultaneous determination of bromine and iodine by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry was investigated. In order to prevent the decrease in the ionization efficiencies of bromine and iodine atoms caused by the introduction of water mist, electrothermal vaporization was used for sample introduction into the ICP mass spectrometer. To prevent loss of analytes during the drying process, a small amount of tetramethylammonium hydroxide solution was placed as a chemical modifier into the tungsten boat furnace. After evaporation of the solvent, the analytes instantly vaporized and were then introduced into the ICP ion source to detect the (79)Br(+), (81)Br(+), and (127)I(+) ions. By using this system, detection limits of 0.77 pg and 0.086 pg were achieved for bromine and iodine, respectively. These values correspond to 8.1 pg mL(-1) and 0.91 pg mL(-1) of the aqueous bromide and iodide ion concentrations, respectively, for a sampling volume of 95 microL. The relative standard deviations for eight replicate measurements were 2.2% and 2.8% for 20 pg of bromine and 2 pg of iodine, respectively. Approximately 25 batches were vaporizable per hour. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of various certified reference materials and practical situations as biological and aqueous samples. There is further potential for the simultaneous determination of fluorine and chlorine.

  5. Single liquid source plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of high-quality YBa2Cu3O(7-x) thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Jiming; Gardiner, Robin A.; Kirlin, Peter S.; Boerstler, Robert W.; Steinbeck, John

    1992-01-01

    High quality YBa2Cu3O(7-x) films were grown in-situ on LaAlO3 (100) by a novel single liquid source plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition process. The metalorganic complexes M(thd) (sub n), (thd = 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionate; M = Y, Ba, Cu) were dissolved in an organic solution and injected into a vaporizer immediately upstream of the reactor inlet. The single liquid source technique dramatically simplifies current CVD processing and can significantly improve the process reproducibility. X-ray diffraction measurements indicated that single phase, highly c-axis oriented YBa2Cu3O(7-x) was formed in-situ at substrate temperature 680 C. The as-deposited films exhibited a mirror-like surface, had transition temperature T(sub cO) approximately equal to 89 K, Delta T(sub c) less than 1 K, and Jc (77 K) = 10(exp 6) A/sq cm.

  6. Single liquid source plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of high-quality YBa2Cu3O(7-x) thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Jiming; Gardiner, Robin A.; Kirlin, Peter S.; Boerstler, Robert W.; Steinbeck, John

    1992-01-01

    High quality YBa2Cu3O(7-x) films were grown in-situ on LaAlO3 (100) by a novel single liquid source plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition process. The metalorganic complexes M(thd) (sub n), (thd = 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionate; M = Y, Ba, Cu) were dissolved in an organic solution and injected into a vaporizer immediately upstream of the reactor inlet. The single liquid source technique dramatically simplifies current CVD processing and can significantly improve the process reproducibility. X-ray diffraction measurements indicated that single phase, highly c-axis oriented YBa2Cu3O(7-x) was formed in-situ at substrate temperature 680 C. The as-deposited films exhibited a mirror-like surface, had transition temperature T(sub cO) approximately equal to 89 K, Delta T(sub c) less than 1 K, and Jc (77 K) = 10(exp 6) A/sq cm.

  7. Si nanowires grown by Al-catalyzed plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition: synthesis conditions, electrical properties and application to lithium battery anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toan, Le Duc; Moyen, Eric; Zamfir, Mihai Robert; Joe, Jemee; Kim, Young Woo; Pribat, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Silicon nanowires have been synhesized using Al as a catalyst. Silane (SiH4) diluted in H2 carrier gas was employed as Si precursor in a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system operated at various temperatures (450 °C and 550 °C). Those growth temperatures, which are lower than the eutectic temperature in the Al-Si system (577 °C) suggests a vapor-solid-solid growth mechanism. Four point resistance measurements and back-gated current-voltage measurements indicated that silicon nanowires were heavily doped (p type), with a doping concentration of a few 1019 cm-3. We have measured hole mobility values of ˜16 cm2 V-1 s-1 at 450 °C and ˜30 cm2 V-1 s-1 at 550 °C. Transmission electron microscope analyses showed that the silicon nanowires were highly twinned even when they grow epitaxially on (111) Si substrates. We have also evaluated the use of those highly doped Si nanowires for lithium-ion battery anodes. We have observed a good cycling behavior during the first 65 charge-discharge cycles, followed by a slow capacity decay. After 150 cycles at a charge-discharge rate of 0.1 C, the electrode capacity was still 1400 mAh g-1. The ageing mechanism seems to be related to the delamination of the SiNWs from the stainless steel substrate on which they were grown.

  8. Preparation of MgO Films by Atmospheric Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition as a Protective Layer in AC Plasma Display Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Takeru; Komaki, Toshihiro

    2008-03-01

    MgO thin films were fabricated by atmospheric metal-organic chemical vapor deposition as a protective layer of AC plasma display panels. The deposition conditions and the discharge properties of the films were evaluated. Among four Mg precursors tested, Mg(C11H19O2)2 [Mg(DPM)2] was the most suitable source material in film growth properties and discharge characteristics. The deposition rate increased with increasing vaporizing temperature and substrate temperature, and the maximum deposition rate reached 3.3 nm/s (5.1 min/µm). The films had (200) main orientations, and highly crystalline square-pyramid structures were observed in high deposition-rate films. Under the high-rate deposition condition, the firing voltage and the discharge delay of the film were comparable to those of conventional vacuum-evaporated MgO film. The discharge delay was shorter when the crystal size was larger, the work function was smaller, and the concentrations of impurities were lower.

  9. Slurry sampling flow injection chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of As, Cd, and Hg in cereals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng-Yi; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen

    2009-08-12

    A slurry sampling inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method has been developed for the determination of As, Cd, and Hg in cereals using flow injection chemical vapor generation (VG) as the sample introduction system. A slurry containing 6% m/v flour, 0.7% m/v thiourea, 0.4 microg mL(-1) Co(II), and 2.5% v/v HCl was injected into a VG-ICP-MS system for the determination of As, Cd, and Hg without dissolution and mineralization. Because the sensitivities of the elements studied in the slurry and that of aqueous solution were quite different, a standard addition method and an isotope dilution method were used for the determination of As, Cd, and Hg in selected cereal samples. The influences of vapor generation conditions and slurry preparation on the ion signals were reported. The effectiveness of the vapor generation sample introduction technique in alleviating various spectral interferences in ICP-MS analysis has been demonstrated. This method has been applied for the determination of As, Cd, and Hg in NIST SRM 1567a Wheat Flour reference material, NIST SRM 1568a Rice Flour reference material, and cereal samples obtained from local market. The As, Cd, and Hg analysis results of the reference materials agreed with the certified values. The method detection limits estimated from standard addition curves were about 0.10, 0.16, and 0.07 ng g(-1) for As, Cd, and Hg, respectively, in the original cereal samples.

  10. Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PE-CVD) yields better Hydrolytical Stability of Biocompatible SiOx Thin Films on Implant Alumina Ceramics compared to Rapid Thermal Evaporation Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD).

    PubMed

    Böke, Frederik; Giner, Ignacio; Keller, Adrian; Grundmeier, Guido; Fischer, Horst

    2016-07-20

    Densely sintered aluminum oxide (α-Al2O3) is chemically and biologically inert. To improve the interaction with biomolecules and cells, its surface has to be modified prior to use in biomedical applications. In this study, we compared two deposition techniques for adhesion promoting SiOx films to facilitate the coupling of stable organosilane monolayers on monolithic α-alumina; physical vapor deposition (PVD) by thermal evaporation and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD). We also investigated the influence of etching on the formation of silanol surface groups using hydrogen peroxide and sulfuric acid solutions. The film characteristics, that is, surface morphology and surface chemistry, as well as the film stability and its adhesion properties under accelerated aging conditions were characterized by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), and tensile strength tests. Differences in surface functionalization were investigated via two model organosilanes as well as the cell-cytotoxicity and viability on murine fibroblasts and human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC). We found that both SiOx interfaces did not affect the cell viability of both cell types. No significant differences between both films with regard to their interfacial tensile strength were detected, although failure mode analyses revealed a higher interfacial stability of the PE-CVD films compared to the PVD films. Twenty-eight day exposure to simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C revealed a partial delamination of the thermally deposited PVD films whereas the PE-CVD films stayed largely intact. SiOx layers deposited by both PVD and PE-CVD may thus serve as viable adhesion-promoters for subsequent organosilane coupling agent binding to α-alumina. However, PE-CVD appears to be favorable for long-term direct film exposure to aqueous

  11. Synthesis of Diamond-Like Carbon Films on Planar and Non-Planar Geometries by the Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noborisaka, Mayui; Hirako, Tomoaki; Shirakura, Akira; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Morikawa, Masashi; Seki, Masaki; Suzuki, Tetsuya

    2012-09-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were synthesized by the dielectric barrier discharge-based plasma deposition at atmospheric pressure and their hardness and gas barrier properties were measured. A decrease in size of grains and heating substrate temperature improved nano-hardness up to 3.3 GPa. The gas barrier properties of DLC-coated poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) sheets were obtained by 3-5 times of non-coated PET with approximately 0.5 µm in film thickness. The high-gas-barrier DLC films deposited on PET sheets are expected to wrap elevated bridge of the super express and prevent them from neutralization of concrete. We also deposited DLC films inside PET bottles by the microwave surface-wave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method at near-atmospheric pressure. Under atmospheric pressure, the films were coated uniformly inside the PET bottles, but did not show high gas barrier properties. In this paper, we summarize recent progress of DLC films synthesized at atmospheric pressure with the aimed of food packaging and concrete pillar.

  12. Diamond nucleation on unscratched silicon substrates coated with various non-diamond carbon films by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Z. ); Brewer, M.A. ); Komvopoulos, K. ); Brown, I.G. ); Bogy, D.B. )

    1995-01-01

    The efficacy of various non-diamond carbon films as precursors for diamond nucleation on unscratched silicon substrates was investigated with a conventional microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. Silicon substrates were partially coated with various carbonaceous substances such as clusters consisting of a mixture of C[sub 60] and C[sub 70], evaporated films of carbon and pure C[sub 70], and hard carbon produced by a vacuum arc deposition technique. For comparison, diamond nucleation on silicon substrates coated with submicrometer-sized diamond particles and uncoated smooth silicon surfaces was also examined under similar conditions. Except for evaporated carbon films, significantly higher diamond nucleation densities were obtained by subjecting the carbon-coated substrates to a low-temperature high-methane concentration hydrogen plasma treatment prior to diamond nucleation. The highest nucleation density ([similar to]3[times]10[sup 8] cm[sup [minus]2]) was obtained with hard carbon films. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy demonstrated that the diamond nucleation density increased with the film thickness and etching resistance. The higher diamond nucleation density obtained with the vacuum arc-deposited carbon films may be attributed to the inherent high etching resistance, presumably resulting from the high content of [ital sp][sup 3] atomic bonds. Microscopy observations suggested that diamond nucleation in the presence of non-diamond carbon deposits resulted from carbon layers generated under the pretreatment conditions.

  13. High performance mechanisms of near-infrared photodetectors with microcrystalline SiGe films deposited using laser-assisted plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ching-Ting; Tsai, Min-Yen

    2013-03-11

    The SiH(4) and GeH(4) reactant gases used for depositing microcrystalline SiGe films could be simultaneously decomposed when acted cooperatively on the plasma and the assistant CO(2) laser in the laser-assisted plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. The carrier mobility of the 80 W laser-assisted SiGe films was significantly increased to 66.8 cm(2)/V-s compared with 2.22 cm(2)/V-s of the non-laser-assisted SiGe films. The performances of the resulting p-Si/i-SiGe/n-Si near-infrared photodetectors were improved due to the high quality and high carrier mobility of the laser-assisted SiGe films. The maximum photoresponsivity and the maximum quantum efficiency of the photodetectors with 80 W laser-assisted SiGe films were respectively improved to 0.47 A/W and 68.5% in comparison with 0.31 A/W and 46.5% of the photodetectors with non-laser-assisted SiGe films.

  14. CHARACTERISTICS OF A FAST RISE TIME POWER SUPPLY FOR A PULSED PLASMA REACTOR FOR CHEMICAL VAPOR DESTRUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rotating spark gap devices for switching high-voltage direct current (dc) into a corona plasma reactor can achieve pulse rise times in the range of tens of nanoseconds. The fast rise times lead to vigorous plasma generation without sparking at instantaneous applied voltages highe...

  15. CHARACTERISTICS OF A FAST RISE TIME POWER SUPPLY FOR A PULSED PLASMA REACTOR FOR CHEMICAL VAPOR DESTRUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rotating spark gap devices for switching high-voltage direct current (dc) into a corona plasma reactor can achieve pulse rise times in the range of tens of nanoseconds. The fast rise times lead to vigorous plasma generation without sparking at instantaneous applied voltages highe...

  16. The Surface Interface Characteristics of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube and Graphitic Carbon Fiber Arrays Grown by Thermal and Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance; Nguyen, Cattien; Li, Jun; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.

    2002-01-01

    The development of nano-arrays for sensors and devices requires the growth of arrays with the proper characteristics. One such application is the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphitic carbon fibers (GCFs) for the chemical attachment of probe molecules. The effectiveness of such an array is dependent not only upon the effectiveness of the probe and the interface between that probe and the array, but also the array and the underlaying substrate. If that array is a growth of vertically aligned CNTs or GCFs then the attachment of that array to the surface is of the utmost importance. This attachment provides the mechanical stability and durability of the array, as well as, the electrical properties of that array. If the detection is to be acquired through an electrical measurement, then the appropriate resistance between the array and the surface need to be fabricated into the device. I will present data on CNTs and GCFs grown from both thermal and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The focus will be on the characteristics of the metal film from which the CNTs and GCFs are grown and the changes that occur due to changes within the growth process.

  17. In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry growth studies on the Al-doped ZnO films deposited by remote plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Volintiru, I.; Creatore, M.; Sanden, M. C. M. van de

    2008-02-01

    In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) was applied to study the pyramidlike and pillarlike growth of Al doped ZnO (AZO) films deposited by means of remote plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition for transparent conductive oxide applications. Real time SE studies in the visible region allowed discerning between the two growth modes by addressing the time evolution of the bulk and surface roughness layer thickness. While the pillarlike mode is characterized by a constant growth rate, a slower rate in the initial stage (up to 150-200 nm film thickness), compared to the bulk, is observed for the growth of pyramidlike AZO films. The two modes differ also in terms of surface roughness development: a saturation behavior is observed for film thickness above 150-200 nm in the case of the pyramidlike films, while a slow linear increase with film thickness characterizes the pillarlike mode. By extending the SE analysis of the AZO films to the near infrared region, valuable information about the in grain properties could be extracted: excellent in grain mobility values, i.e., larger than 100 and 50 cm{sup 2}/V s, are determined for the pyramidlike and pillarlike AZO layers, respectively. The comparison between the outcome of the in situ real time SE studies and the ex situ electrical and chemical characterization highlights the limitations in the electron transport occurring in both types of films and allows one to address routes toward further improvement in AZO conductivity.

  18. Evolution of the electrical and structural properties during the growth of Al doped ZnO films by remote plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Volintiru, I.; Creatore, M.; Kniknie, B. J.; Spee, C. I. M. A.; Sanden, M. C. M. van de

    2007-08-15

    Al-doped zinc oxide (AZO) films were deposited by means of remote plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition from oxygen/diethylzinc/trimethylaluminum mixtures. The electrical, structural (crystallinity and morphology), and chemical properties of the deposited films were investigated using Hall, four point probe, x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), electron recoil detection (ERD), Rutherford backscattering (RBS), and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), respectively. We found that the working pressure plays an important role in controlling the sheet resistance R{sub s} and roughness development during film growth. At 1.5 mbar the AZO films are highly conductive (R{sub s}<6 {omega}/{open_square} for a film thickness above 1200 nm) and very rough (>4% of the film thickness), however, they are characterized by a large sheet resistance gradient with increasing film thickness. By decreasing the pressure from 1.5 to 0.38 mbar, the gradient is significantly reduced and the films become smoother, but the sheet resistance increases (R{sub s}{approx_equal}100 {omega}/{open_square} for a film thickness of 1000 nm). The sheet resistance gradient and the surface roughness development correlate with the grain size evolution, as determined from the AFM and SEM analyses, indicating the transition from pyramid-like at 1.5 mbar to pillar-like growth mode at 0.38 mbar. The change in plasma chemistry/growth precursors caused by the variation in pressure leads to different concentration and activation efficiency of Al dopant in the zinc oxide films. On the basis of the experimental evidence, a valid route for further improving the conductivity of the AZO film is found, i.e., increasing the grain size at the initial stage of film growth.

  19. Atmospheric-pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of a-SiCN:H films: Role of precursors on the film growth and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Guruvenket, Srinivasan; Andrie, Steven; Simon, Mark; Johnson, Kyle W.; Sailer, Robert A.

    2012-09-14

    Atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (AP-PECVD) using Surfx AtomflowTM 250D APPJ was utilized to synthesize amorphous silicon carbonitride coatings using tetramethyldisilizane (TMDZ) and hexamethyldisilizane (HMDZ) as the single source precursors. The effect of precursor chemistry and the substrate temperature (Ts) on the properties of a-SiCN:H films were evaluated, while nitrogen was used as the reactive gas. Surface morphology of the films was evaluated using atomic force microscopy (AFM); chemical properties were determined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR); thickness and optical properties were determined using spectroscopic ellipsometry and mechanical properties were determined using nano-indentation. In general films deposited at substrate temperature (Ts) <200 °C contained organic moieties, while the films deposited at Ts >200 oC depicted strong Si-N and Si-CN absorption. Refractive indices (n) of the thin films showed values between 1.5 -2.0 depending on the deposition parameters. Mechanical properties of the films determined using nano-indentation revealed that these films have hardness between 0.5 GPa to 15 GPa depending on the Ts. AFM evaluation of the films showed high roughness (Ra) values of 2-3 nm for the films grown at low Ts (< 250 °C), while the films grown at Ts ≥ 300 °C exhibited atomically smooth surface with Ra of ~ 0.5 nm. Furthermore, based on the gas phase (plasma) chemistry, precursor chemistry and the other experimental observations, a possible growth model that prevails in the AP-PECVD of a-SiCN:H thin films is proposed.

  20. Atmospheric-pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of a-SiCN:H films: Role of precursors on the film growth and properties

    DOE PAGES

    Guruvenket, Srinivasan; Andrie, Steven; Simon, Mark; ...

    2012-09-14

    Atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (AP-PECVD) using Surfx AtomflowTM 250D APPJ was utilized to synthesize amorphous silicon carbonitride coatings using tetramethyldisilizane (TMDZ) and hexamethyldisilizane (HMDZ) as the single source precursors. The effect of precursor chemistry and the substrate temperature (Ts) on the properties of a-SiCN:H films were evaluated, while nitrogen was used as the reactive gas. Surface morphology of the films was evaluated using atomic force microscopy (AFM); chemical properties were determined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR); thickness and optical properties were determined using spectroscopic ellipsometry and mechanical properties were determined using nano-indentation. In general films depositedmore » at substrate temperature (Ts) <200 °C contained organic moieties, while the films deposited at Ts >200 oC depicted strong Si-N and Si-CN absorption. Refractive indices (n) of the thin films showed values between 1.5 -2.0 depending on the deposition parameters. Mechanical properties of the films determined using nano-indentation revealed that these films have hardness between 0.5 GPa to 15 GPa depending on the Ts. AFM evaluation of the films showed high roughness (Ra) values of 2-3 nm for the films grown at low Ts (< 250 °C), while the films grown at Ts ≥ 300 °C exhibited atomically smooth surface with Ra of ~ 0.5 nm. Furthermore, based on the gas phase (plasma) chemistry, precursor chemistry and the other experimental observations, a possible growth model that prevails in the AP-PECVD of a-SiCN:H thin films is proposed.« less

  1. Impact of In doping on GeTe phase-change materials thin films obtained by means of an innovative plasma enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkutnik, P. D.; Aoukar, M.; Todorova, V.; Angélidès, L.; Pelissier, B.; Jourde, D.; Michallon, P.; Vallée, C.; Noé, P.

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the deposition and the phase-change properties of In-doped GeTe thin films obtained by plasma enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition and doped with indium using a solid delivery system. The sublimated indium precursor flow rate was calculated as a function of sublimation and deposition parameters. Indium related optical emission recorded by means of optical emission spectroscopy during deposition plasma allowed proposing the dissociation mechanisms of the [In(CH3)2N(CH3)2]2 solid precursor. In particular, using an Ar + H2 + NH3 deposition plasma, sublimated indium molecules are completely dissociated and do not induce by-product contamination by addition of nitrogen or carbon in the films. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy evidences the formation of In-Te bonds in amorphous as-deposited In-doped GeTe films. The formation of an InTe phase after 400 °C annealing is also evidenced by means of X-ray diffraction analysis. The crystallization temperature Tx, deduced from monitoring of optical reflectivity of In-doped GeTe films with doping up to 11 at. % slightly varies as a function of the In dopant level with a decrease of Tx down to a minimum value for an In doping level of about 6-8 at. %. In this In doping range, the structure of crystallized In-GeTe films changes and is dominated by the presence of a crystalline In2Te3 phase. Finally, the Kissinger activation energy for crystallization Ea is showing to monotonically decrease as the indium content in the GeTe film is increased indicating a promising effect of In doping on crystallization speed in memory devices while keeping a good thermal stability for data retention.

  2. Influence of boron concentration on growth characteristic and electro-catalytic performance of boron-doped diamond electrodes prepared by direct current plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yujie; Lv, Jiangwei; Liu, Junfeng; Gao, Na; Peng, Hongyan; Chen, Yuqiang

    2011-02-01

    A series of boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes were prepared by direct current plasma chemical vapor deposition (DC-PCVD) with different compositions of CH4/H2/B(OCH3)3 gas mixture. A maximum growth rate of 0.65 mg cm-2 h-1 was obtained with CH4/H2/B(OCH3)3 radio of 4/190/10 and this growth condition was also a turning point for discharge plasma stability which arose from the addition of B(OCH3)3 that changed electron energy distribution and influenced the plasma reaction. The surface coating structure and electro-catalytic performance of the BDD electrodes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, Hall test, and electrochemical measurement and electro-catalytic oxidation in phenol solution. It is suggested that the boron doping level and the thermal stress in the films are the main factors affecting the electro-catalytic characteristics of the electrodes. Low boron doping level with CH4/H2/B(OCH3)3 ratio of 4/199/1 decreased the films electrical conductivity and its electro-catalytic activity. When the carrier concentration in the films reached around 1020 cm-3 with CH4/H2/B(OCH3)3 ratio over a range of 4/195/5-4/185/15, the thermal stress in the films was the key reason that influenced the electro-catalytic activity of the electrodes for its effect on diamond lattice expansion. Therefore, the BDD electrode with modest CH4/H2/B(OCH3)3 ratio of 4/190/10 possessed the best phenol removal efficiency.

  3. Gas diffusion ultrabarriers on polymer substrates using Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} atomic layer deposition and SiN plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Carcia, P. F.; McLean, R. S.; Groner, M. D.; Dameron, A. A.; George, S. M.

    2009-07-15

    Thin films grown by Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} atomic layer deposition (ALD) and SiN plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) have been tested as gas diffusion barriers either individually or as bilayers on polymer substrates. Single films of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD with thicknesses of >=10 nm had a water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of <=5x10{sup -5} g/m{sup 2} day at 38 deg. C/85% relative humidity (RH), as measured by the Ca test. This WVTR value was limited by H{sub 2}O permeability through the epoxy seal, as determined by the Ca test for the glass lid control. In comparison, SiN PECVD films with a thickness of 100 nm had a WVTR of approx7x10{sup -3} g/m{sup 2} day at 38 deg. C/85% RH. Significant improvements resulted when the SiN PECVD film was coated with an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD film. An Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD film with a thickness of only 5 nm on a SiN PECVD film with a thickness of 100 nm reduced the WVTR from approx7x10{sup -3} to <=5x10{sup -5} g/m{sup 2} day at 38 deg. C/85% RH. The reduction in the permeability for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD on the SiN PECVD films was attributed to either Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD sealing defects in the SiN PECVD film or improved nucleation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD on SiN.

  4. Characteristics of a fast rise time power supply for a pulsed plasma reactor for chemical vapor destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Lawless, P.A.; Yamamoto, Toshiaki; Shofran, S.P.; Boss, C.B.; Nunez, C.M.; Ramsey, G.H.; Engels, R.L.

    1996-11-01

    Rotating spark gap devices for switching high-voltage direct current (dc) into a corona plasma reactor can achieve pulse rise times in the range of tens of nanoseconds. The fast rise times lead to vigorous plasma generation without sparking at instantaneous applied voltages higher than can be obtained with dc. The resulting energetic plasma is effective for destroying a variety of molecules. The spark gap circuit configuration plays an important role in the effectiveness of the plasma generation. A single-gap circuit is effective for generating moderate peak voltages, but is limited by a multiple sparking phenomenon. A double-gap circuit can achieve equal peak voltages with every spark, but with a reduced number of pulses, compared to the single gap. Both configurations have an upper voltage imposed by the changing impedance of the reactor as voltage and frequency are varied. The pulse characteristics are reported for both types of circuits. The general performance of the reactors for destruction of some compounds with both circuits is also reported.

  5. Anisotropic growth of single-crystal graphite plates by nickel-assisted microwave-plasma chemical-vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badzian, Teresa; Badzian, Andrzej; Roy, Rustum; Cheng, Shang-Cong

    2000-02-01

    Growth of single-crystal graphite free-standing plates has been achieved by a microwavehydrogen-plasma etching of graphite powder and nickel mesh. The plates resemble a knife blade and grow in the <11¯00> direction with long crystals exceeding 100 μm. Hexagonal growth features at the edges and electron diffraction patterns confirm the single-crystal nature of these ultrathin plates. Electron microprobe and Raman spectroscopy indicate the presence of graphite. Diamond crystals nucleate on these plates and they grow simultaneously. We suggest that the paradoxical growth of graphite in a hydrogen plasma, under conditions in which graphite is usually etched away, is possible because of a protective coating by a Ni-C-H phase. This thin coating allows for transport of carbon atoms from the gas phase to the growing graphite surface.

  6. Negative resistance phenomenon in dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system for photovoltaic manufacturing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, H. C.; Aman-ur-Rehman, Won, I. H.; Park, W. T.; Lee, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    The validity of effective frequency concept is investigated for dual-frequency (DF) capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) discharges by using particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision simulations. This concept helps in analyzing DF CCP discharges in a fashion similar to single-frequency (SF) CCP discharges with effective parameters. Unlike the driving frequency of SF CCP discharges, the effective frequency in DF CCP is dependent on the ratio of the two driving currents (or voltages) and this characteristic makes it possible to control the ion flux and the ion bombardment energy independently. This separate control principally allows to increase the ion flux and plasma density for high deposition rates, while keeping the ion mean energy constant at low values to prevent the bombardment of highly energetic ions at the substrate surface to avoid unwanted damage in the solar cell manufacturing. The abrupt transition of the effective frequency leads to the phenomenon of negative resistance which is one of the several physical phenomena associated uniquely with DF CCP discharges. Using effective frequency concept, the plasma characteristics have been investigated in the negative resistance regime for solar cell manufacturing.

  7. Numerical analysis of a mixture of Ar/NH{sub 3} microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhi; Zhao Zhen; Li Xuehui

    2012-06-01

    A two-dimensional fluid model has been used to investigate the properties of plasma in Ar/NH{sub 3} microwave electron cyclotron resonance discharge at low pressure. The electromagnetic field model solved by the three-dimensional Simpson method is coupled to a fluid plasma model. The finite difference method was employed to discrete the governing equations. 40 species (neutrals, radicals, ions, and electrons) are consisted in the model. In total, 75 electron-neutral, 43 electron-ion, 167 neutral-neutral, 129 ion-neutral, 28 ion-ion, and 90 3-body reactions are used in the model. According to the simulation, the distribution of the densities of the considered plasma species has been showed and the mechanisms of their variations have been discussed. It is found that the main neutrals (Ar*, Ar**, NH{sub 3}{sup *}, NH, H{sub 2}, NH{sub 2}, H, and N{sub 2}) are present at high densities in Ar/NH{sub 3} microwave electron cyclotron resonance discharge when the mixing ratio of Ar/NH{sub 3} is 1:1 at 20 Pa. The density of NH is more than that of NH{sub 2} atom. And NH{sub 3}{sup +} are the most important ammonia ions. But the uniformity of the space distribution of NH{sub 3}{sup +} is lower than the other ammonia ions.

  8. Thermal expansion coefficient and thermomechanical properties of SiN(x) thin films prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Tien, Chuen-Lin; Lin, Tsai-Wei

    2012-10-20

    We present a new method based on fast Fourier transform (FFT) for evaluating the thermal expansion coefficient and thermomechanical properties of thin films. The silicon nitride thin films deposited on Corning glass and Si wafers were prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition in this study. The anisotropic residual stress and thermomechanical properties of silicon nitride thin films were studied. Residual stresses in thin films were measured by a modified Michelson interferometer associated with the FFT method under different heating temperatures. We found that the average residual-stress value increases when the temperature increases from room temperature to 100°C. Increased substrate temperature causes the residual stress in SiN(x) film deposited on Si wafers to be more compressive, but the residual stress in SiN(x) film on Corning glass becomes more tensile. The residual-stress versus substrate-temperature relation is a linear correlation after heating. A double substrate technique is used to determine the thermal expansion coefficients of the thin films. The experimental results show that the thermal expansion coefficient of the silicon nitride thin films is 3.27×10(-6)°C(-1). The biaxial modulus is 1125 GPa for SiN(x) film.

  9. Growth, microstructure, and field-emission properties of synthesized diamond film on adamantane-coated silicon substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Rajanish N.; Chang Li

    2010-05-15

    Diamond nucleation on unscratched Si surface is great importance for its growth, and detailed understanding of this process is therefore desired for many applications. The pretreatment of the substrate surface may influence the initial growth period. In this study, diamond films have been synthesized on adamantane-coated crystalline silicon {l_brace}100{r_brace} substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition from a gaseous mixture of methane and hydrogen gases without the application of a bias voltage to the substrates. Prior to adamantane coating, the Si substrates were not pretreated such as abraded/scratched. The substrate temperature was {approx}530 deg. C during diamond deposition. The deposited films are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectrometry, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These measurements provide definitive evidence for high-crystalline quality diamond film, which is synthesized on a SiC rather than clean Si substrate. Characterization through atomic force microscope allows establishing fine quality criteria of the film according to the grain size of nanodiamond along with SiC. The diamond films exhibit a low-threshold (55 V/{mu}m) and high current-density (1.6 mA/cm{sup 2}) field-emission (FE) display. The possible mechanism of formation of diamond films and their FE properties have been demonstrated.

  10. Structure, mechanical, and frictional properties of hydrogenated fullerene-like amorphous carbon film prepared by direct current plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yongfu; Gao, Kaixiong; Zhang, Junyan

    2016-07-28

    In this study, fullerene like carbon (FL-C) is introduced in hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) film by employing a direct current plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The film has a low friction and wear, such as 0.011 and 2.3 × 10{sup −9}mm{sup 3}/N m in the N{sub 2}, and 0.014 and 8.4 × 10{sup −8}mm{sup 3}/N m in the humid air, and high hardness and elasticity (25.8 GPa and 83.1%), to make further engineering applications in practice. It has several nanometers ordered domains consisting of less frequently cross-linked graphitic sheet stacks. We provide new evidences for understanding the reported Raman fit model involving four vibrational frequencies from five, six, and seven C-atom rings of FL-C structures, and discuss the structure evolution before or after friction according to the change in the 1200 cm{sup −1} Raman band intensity caused by five- and seven-carbon rings. Friction inevitably facilitates the transformation of carbon into FL-C nanostructures, namely, the ultra low friction comes from both such structures within the carbon film and the sliding induced at friction interface.

  11. Structural evolution and photoluminescence of annealed Si-rich nitride with Si quantum dots prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xiangbin Liao, Wugang; Wen, Guozhi; Wen, Xixing; Zheng, Wenjun

    2014-04-21

    Silicon-rich nitride films were deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Silicon quantum dots (Si QDs) were formed by post-thermal annealing processing verified using the High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope. The 1100 °C thermal annealing leads to the nucleation of silicon atoms, the growth of Si QDs, and the rearrangement of Si 2p and N 1s elements. The structural evolution of silicon-rich nitride thin film with post annealing promotes the formation of Si QDs and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} matrix. We also investigated the effect of the NH{sub 3}-to-SiH{sub 4} ratio R on the photoluminescence (PL) of SiN{sub x} with Si QDs. We found that the broad blue luminescence originates from both quantum confined effect and radiative defects. The intensity of the PL was changed by adjusting the NH{sub 3} flow rate. The increase of R could limit the transformation of Si QDs from amorphous to crystalline status, meanwhile lead to the alteration of distribution of defect states. These can help to understand the annealing-dependent characteristics, the PL mechanisms of silicon-rich nitride and to optimize the fabrication process of Si QDs embedded in nitride.

  12. Structural and electrical properties and current-voltage characteristics of nitrogen-doped diamond-like carbon films on Si substrates by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Masato; Murakami, Kazuki; Magara, Kohei; Nakamura, Kazuki; Ohashi, Haruka; Tokuda, Kengo; Takami, Takahiro; Ogasawara, Haruka; Enta, Yoshiharu; Suzuki, Yushi; Ando, Satoshi; Nakazawa, Hideki

    2016-06-01

    We have deposited nitrogen-doped diamond-like carbon (N-DLC) films by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using CH4, N2, and Ar, and investigated the effects of N doping on the structure and the electrical, mechanical, and optical properties of the N-DLC films. We fabricated undoped DLC/p-type Si and N-DLC/p-type Si heterojunctions and examined the current-voltage characteristics of the heterojunctions. When the N2 flow ratio was increased from 0 to 3.64%, the resistivity markedly decreased from the order of 105 Ω·cm to that of 10-2 Ω·cm and the internal stress also decreased. The resistivity gradually increased with increasing N2 flow ratio from 3.64 to 13.6%, and then it decreased at a N2 flow ratio of 13.6%. These behaviors can be explained in terms of the clustering of sp2 carbons and the formation of sp3C-N, sp2C=N, sp1C≡N, and C-H n bonds. The rectification ratio of the heterojunction using the N-DLC film prepared at 3.64% was 35.8 at ±0.5 V.

  13. Low-temperature growth and characterization of single crystalline ZnO nanorod arrays using a catalyst-free inductively coupled plasma-metal organic chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sang-Hun; Lee, Chang-Bae; Moon, Won-Jin; Song, Ho-Jun

    2008-10-01

    Vertically aligned ZnO nanorod arrays have been synthesized on c-plane sapphires at a low temperature of 400 degrees C using catalyst-free inductively coupled plasma (ICP) metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique by varying the ICP powers. Diameters of the ZnO nanorods changed from 200 nm to 400 nm as the ICP power increased from 200 to 400 Watt. TEM and XRD investigations indicated that the ZnO nanorod arrays grown at ICP powers above 200 Watt had a homogeneous in-plane alignment and single crystalline nature. PL study at room temperature (RT) and 6 K confirmed that the ZnO nanorod arrays in the present study are of high optical quality as well as good crystalline quality, showing only exciton-related emission peaks without any trace of defect-related deep level emissions in visible range. The blueshift of exciton emission peak in RTPL spectra was also found as rod diameter decreased and it is deduced that this shift in emission energy may be due to the surface resonance effect resulted from the increased surface-to-volume ratio, based on the observation and behavior of the surface exciton (SX) emission in the high-resolution 6 K PL spectra.

  14. Nanocrystalline-Si-dot multi-layers fabrication by chemical vapor deposition with H-plasma surface treatment and evaluation of structure and quantum confinement effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kosemura, Daisuke Mizukami, Yuki; Takei, Munehisa; Numasawa, Yohichiroh; Ogura, Atsushi; Ohshita, Yoshio

    2014-01-15

    100-nm-thick nanocrystalline silicon (nano-Si)-dot multi-layers on a Si substrate were fabricated by the sequential repetition of H-plasma surface treatment, chemical vapor deposition, and surface oxidation, for over 120 times. The diameter of the nano-Si dots was 5–6 nm, as confirmed by both the transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The annealing process was important to improve the crystallinity of the nano-Si dot. We investigated quantum confinement effects by Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. Based on the experimental results, we simulated the Raman spectrum using a phenomenological model. Consequently, the strain induced in the nano-Si dots was estimated by comparing the experimental and simulated results. Taking the estimated strain value into consideration, the band gap modulation was measured, and the diameter of the nano-Si dots was calculated to be 5.6 nm by using PL. The relaxation of the q ∼ 0 selection rule model for the nano-Si dots is believed to be important to explain both the phenomena of peak broadening on the low-wavenumber side observed in Raman spectra and the blue shift observed in PL measurements.

  15. Effects of thermal annealing on the structural, mechanical, and tribological properties of hard fluorinated carbon films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Maia da Costa, M.E.H.; Baumvol, I.J.R.; Radke, C.; Jacobsohn, L.G.; Zamora, R.R.M.; Freire, F.L. Jr.

    2004-11-01

    Hard amorphous fluorinated carbon films (a-C:F) deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition were annealed in vacuum for 30 min in the temperature range of 200-600 deg. C. The structural and compositional modifications were followed by several analytical techniques: Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. Nanoidentation measurements and lateral force microscopy experiments were carried out in order to provide the film hardness and the friction coefficient, respectively. The internal stress and contact angle were also measured. RBS, ERDA, and XPS results indicate that both fluorine and hydrogen losses occur for annealing temperatures higher than 300 deg. C. Raman spectroscopy shows a progressive graphitization upon annealing, while the surface became slightly more hydrophobic as revealed by the increase of the contact angle. Following the surface wettability reduction, a decrease of the friction coefficient was observed. These results highlight the influence of the capillary condensation on the nanoscale friction. The film hardness and the internal stress are constant up to 300 deg. C and decrease for higher annealing temperatures, showing a direct correlation with the atomic density of the films. Since the thickness variation is negligible, the mass loss upon thermal treatment results in amorphous structures with a lower degree of cross-linking, explaining the deterioration of the mechanical properties of the a-C:F films.

  16. Crystalline silicon surface passivation with amorphous SiC{sub x}:H films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, I.; Vetter, M.; Garin, M.; Orpella, A.; Voz, C.; Puigdollers, J.; Alcubilla, R.

    2005-12-01

    Surface-passivating properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films (a-SiC{sub x}:H) deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition on both p- and n-type crystalline silicon (c-Si) have been extensively studied by our research group in previous publications. We characterized surface recombination by measuring the dependence of the effective lifetime ({tau}{sub eff}) on excess carrier density ({delta}n) through quasi-steady-state photoconductance technique. Additionally, we fitted the measured {tau}{sub eff}({delta}n) curves applying an insulator/semiconductor model which allows us to determine the surface recombination parameters. In this paper, this model is analyzed in detail focusing on the accuracy in the determination of the fitting parameters and revealing uncertainties not detected up to now. Taking advantage of this analysis, the dependence of surface passivation on film deposition conditions is revised including intrinsic a-SiC{sub x}:H films on both p- and n-type c-Si and phosphorus-doped a-SiC{sub x}:H films on p-type c-Si. As a consequence, a broad view of this passivation scheme is obtained.

  17. Structure, mechanical, and frictional properties of hydrogenated fullerene-like amorphous carbon film prepared by direct current plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongfu; Gao, Kaixiong; Zhang, Junyan

    2016-07-01

    In this study, fullerene like carbon (FL-C) is introduced in hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) film by employing a direct current plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The film has a low friction and wear, such as 0.011 and 2.3 × 10-9mm3/N m in the N2, and 0.014 and 8.4 × 10-8mm3/N m in the humid air, and high hardness and elasticity (25.8 GPa and 83.1%), to make further engineering applications in practice. It has several nanometers ordered domains consisting of less frequently cross-linked graphitic sheet stacks. We provide new evidences for understanding the reported Raman fit model involving four vibrational frequencies from five, six, and seven C-atom rings of FL-C structures, and discuss the structure evolution before or after friction according to the change in the 1200 cm-1 Raman band intensity caused by five- and seven-carbon rings. Friction inevitably facilitates the transformation of carbon into FL-C nanostructures, namely, the ultra low friction comes from both such structures within the carbon film and the sliding induced at friction interface.

  18. Tribological properties and thermal stability of hydrogenated, silicon/nitrogen-coincorporated diamond-like carbon films prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Hideki; Okuno, Saori; Magara, Kohei; Nakamura, Kazuki; Miura, Soushi; Enta, Yoshiharu

    2016-12-01

    We have deposited hydrogenated, silicon/nitrogen-incorporated diamond-like carbon (Si-N-DLC) films by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using hexamethyldisilazane [((CH3)3Si)2NH; HMDS] as the Si and N source, and compared the tribological performance and thermal stability of the Si-N-DLC films with those of hydrogenated, Si-incorporated DLC (Si-DLC) films prepared using dimethylsilane [SiH2(CH3)2] as the Si source. The deposited films were annealed at 723-873 K in air atmosphere. The friction coefficients of hydrogenated DLC films after annealing significantly increased at the initial stages of friction tests. On the other hand, the friction coefficients of the Si-N-DLC films deposited at an HMDS flow ratio [HMDS/(HMDS+CH4)] of 2.27% remained low after the annealing even at 873 K. We found that the wear rate of the Si-N-DLC film deposited at 2.27% and -1000 V remained almost unchanged after the annealing at 873 K, whereas that of the Si-DLC film with a similar Si fraction deposited at -1000 V significantly increased after the annealing at 773 K.

  19. Simultaneous synthesis of nanodiamonds and graphene via plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MW PE-CVD) on copper.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Steven; Wöhrl, Nicolas; Schulz, Stephan; Buck, Volker

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous growth of both nanodiamonds and graphene on copper samples is described for the first time. A PE-CVD process is used to synthesize graphene layers and nanodiamond clusters from a hydrogen/methane gas mixture as it is typically done successfully in thermal CVD processes for graphene synthesis. However, the standard thermal CVD process is not without problems since the deposition of graphene is affected by the evaporation of a notable amount of copper caused by the slow temperature increase typical for thermal CVD resulting in a long process time. In sharp contrast, the synthesis of graphene by PE-CVD can circumvent this problem by substantially shortening the process time at holding out the prospect of a lower substrate temperature. The reduced thermal load and the possibility to industrially scale-up the PE-CVD process makes it a very attractive alternative to the thermal CVD process with respect to the graphene production in the future. Nanodiamonds are synthesized in PE-CVD reactors for a long time because these processes offer a high degree of control over the film's nanostructure and simultaneously providing a significant high deposition rate. To model the co-deposition process, the three relevant macroscopic parameters (pressure, gas mixture and microwave power) are correlated with three relevant process properties (plasma ball size, substrate temperature and C2/Hα-ratio) and the influence on the quality of the deposited carbon allotropes is investigated. For the evaluation of the graphene as well as the nanodiamond quality, Raman spectroscopy used whereas the plasma properties are measured by optical methods. It is found that the diamond nucleation can be influenced by the C2/Hα-ratio in the plasma, while the graphene quality remains mostly unchanged by this parameter. Moreover it is derived from the experimental data that the direct plasma contact with the copper surface is beneficial for the nucleation of the diamond while the growth and

  20. HANFORD CHEMICAL VAPORS WORKER CONCERNS & EXPOSURE EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    ANDERSON, T.J.

    2006-12-20

    Chemical vapor emissions from underground hazardous waste storage tanks on the Hanford site in eastern Washington State are a potential concern because workers enter the tank farms on a regular basis for waste retrievals, equipment maintenance, and surveillance. Tank farm contractors are in the process of retrieving all remaining waste from aging single-shell tanks, some of which date to World War II, and transferring it to newer double-shell tanks. During the waste retrieval process, tank farm workers are potentially exposed to fugitive chemical vapors that can escape from tank headspaces and other emission points. The tanks are known to hold more than 1,500 different species of chemicals, in addition to radionuclides. Exposure assessments have fully characterized the hazards from chemical vapors in half of the tank farms. Extensive sampling and analysis has been done to characterize the chemical properties of hazardous waste and to evaluate potential health hazards of vapors at the ground surface, where workers perform maintenance and waste transfer activities. Worker concerns. risk communication, and exposure assessment are discussed, including evaluation of the potential hazards of complex mixtures of chemical vapors. Concentrations of vapors above occupational exposure limits-(OEL) were detected only at exhaust stacks and passive breather filter outlets. Beyond five feet from the sources, vapors disperse rapidly. No vapors have been measured above 50% of their OELs more than five feet from the source. Vapor controls are focused on limited hazard zones around sources. Further evaluations of vapors include analysis of routes of exposure and thorough analysis of nuisance odors.

  1. Low-dielectric-constant fluorinated diamond-like carbon thin films by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Jeong Woo

    Fluorinated amorphous carbon (a-C:F) thin films are developed for a low dielectric constant interlayer dielectric material from hexafluorobenze (C 6F6) or 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (FCH2CF 4) as the source gas and argon as the diluent gas in an asymmetric capacitively coupled rf (radio frequency) plasma reactor and an inductively coupled plasma reactor. Effects of input rf power, fluorination, applied bias voltage and post annealing on the properties of a-C:F films are investigated. For depositing a-C:F films from highly diluted C6F6 (3%) and argon (97%) in the capacitively rf plasma reactor at 150 mTorr, the dielectric constant of the film increases from 2.0 to 2.8 as the rf power is increased from 10 W to 70 W, while the optical energy gap decreases from 2.6 eV to 1.9 eV and the transparency in a ultra-violet range is degraded. At input power of 100 W, the deposited film exhibits high residual stress of 40 MPa and easily peeled off by a Scotch tape test. This is due to high self-bias voltage (-230 V) developed at the substrate holder during deposition. When depositing amorphous carbon films from tetrafluoroethane (TFE) and methane in the capacitively coupled plasma reactor, the incorporation of fluorine in the film is increased with increasing TFE fraction in the feed gas mixture. The dielectric constant of the a-C:F film deposited from pure TFE is as low as 2.3, but the film exhibits poor thermal stability while a-C:H (diamond-like carbon) film deposited from pure methane has a dielectric constant of 3.8 and shows good thermal stability up to 400°C. As the TFE content in the feed is increased, the dielectric constant and the refractive index decrease while the transparency of the film is enhanced significantly. When depositing a-C:F films from C6F6 (4 sccm) and Ar (5 sccm) in the inductively coupled rf plasma reactor, the bias voltage (from a separate 100 KHz source) applied to the substrate holder affects the film properties significantly. As the negative bias

  2. Chemical vapor infiltration using microwave energy

    DOEpatents

    Devlin, David J.; Currier, Robert P.; Laia, Jr., Joseph R.; Barbero, Robert S.

    1993-01-01

    A method for producing reinforced ceramic composite articles by means of chemical vapor infiltration and deposition in which an inverted temperature gradient is utilized. Microwave energy is the source of heat for the process.

  3. Hydrogenation of defects in edge-defined film-fed grown aluminum-enhanced plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon nitride multicrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Ji-Weon; Rosenblum, Mark D.; Kalejs, Juris P.; Rohatgi, Ajeet

    2000-05-01

    Gettering of impurities and hydrogen passivation of defects in edge-defined film-fed grown (EFG) multicrystalline silicon were studied by low-cost manufacturable technologies such as emitter diffusion by a spin-on phosphorus dopant source, back surface field formation by screen-printed aluminum, and a post-deposition anneal of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD) silicon nitride antireflection coating. These processes were carried out in a high-throughput lamp-heated conveyor belt furnace. PECVD silicon nitride-induced hydrogenation of defects in EFG silicon was studied in conjunction with screen-printed aluminum back surface field formation to investigate the synergistic effect of aluminum gettering and silicon nitride hydrogenation of bulk defects. It was found that post-deposition anneal of PECVD silicon nitride at temperatures ranging from 450 to 850 °C, without the coformation of aluminum back surface field on the back, does not provide appreciable passivation or hydrogenation of bulk defects in EFG material. However, simultaneous anneal of PECVD silicon nitride and formation of aluminum back surface field at 850 °C significantly enhanced the hydrogenation ability of the PECVD silicon nitride film. PECVD silicon nitride deposition and a subsequent anneal, after the aluminum back surface field formation, was found to be less effective in passivating bulk defects. It is proposed that aluminum-enhanced hydrogenation from a PECVD silicon nitride film is the result of vacancy generation at the aluminum-silicon interface due to the alloying process. The affinity of hydrogen to react with vacancies provides a chemical potential gradient that increases the flux of atomic hydrogen from the silicon nitride film into the bulk silicon. In addition, vacancies can dissociate hydrogen molecules, increasing the atomic hydrogen content of the bulk silicon. This enhances defect passivation and improves the minority carrier lifetime.

  4. Formation of size controlled silicon nanocrystals in nitrogen free silicon dioxide matrix prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laube, J.; Gutsch, S.; Hiller, D.; Bruns, M.; Kübel, C.; Weiss, C.; Zacharias, M.

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports the growth of silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) from SiH4-O2 plasma chemistry. The formation of an oxynitride was avoided by using O2 instead of the widely used N2O as precursor. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to prove the absence of nitrogen in the layers and determine the film stoichiometry. It is shown that the Si rich film growth is achieved via non-equilibrium deposition that resembles a interphase clusters mixture model. Photoluminescence and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy are used to monitor the formation process of the SiNCs, to reveal that the phase separation is completed at lower temperatures as for SiNCs based on oxynitrides. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy proves that the SiNC sizes are well controllable by superlattice configuration, and as a result, the optical emission band of the Si nanocrystal can be tuned over a wide range.

  5. Device Quality SiO2 Deposited by Distributed Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition without Substrate Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; Hugon, Marie-Christine; Agius, Bernard; Kretz, Thierry; Plais, François; Pribat, Didier; Carriere, Thierry; Puech, Michel

    1992-10-01

    The deposition of high electrical quality SiO2 films on Si wafers has been achieved without substrate heating, (T<˜ 100°C), using distributed electron cyclotron resonance (DECR) microwave plasmas. We have studied the effects of the reactant gas mixture composition (O2/SiH4) on the dielectric behavior of DECR SiO2. The electrical performances of both Si-SiO2 interfaces and SiO2 films in metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures were assessed by several characterization methods including critical field (Ec) evaluation, fixed charge densities (Qox) and interface traps densities (Dit) determinations. We report typical values of Ec around 6 MV\\cdotcm-1, and Qox and Dit densities around 2× 1010 cm-2 and 3× 1010 cm-2\\cdoteV-1 respectively. Thin film SOI-MOSFETs have also been fabricated to prove the DECR oxide quality.

  6. Effect of substrate crystalline morphology on the adhesion of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited thin silicon oxide coatings on polyamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochat, G.; Leterrier, Y.; Plummer, C. J. G.; Mânson, J.-A. E.; Szoszkiewicz, R.; Kulik, A. J.; Fayet, P.

    2004-05-01

    The influence of the surface morphology of semicrystalline polyamide 12 (PA12) on the adhesion of thin silicon oxide coatings is analyzed by means of uniaxial fragmentation tests and scanning local-acceleration microscopy (SLAM). Two types of PA12 substrates are investigated, namely, as-received PA12, which contains large spherulites, and quenched PA12, which has a relatively smooth, homogeneous surface structure. The adhesion of the coating is found to be identical for the two types of PA12. This indicates that plasma deposition of the oxide leads to an equivalent functionalization of the two types of surfaces. Nonetheless, localized delamination is observed at spherulite boundaries, and is argued to result from strain concentrations in the corresponding soft zones, revealed by SLAM measurements.

  7. Vapor Pressure of Coal Chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, J.; Lin, C. T.; Chung, T. H.

    1983-10-01

    The vapor pressure data on 324 coal compounds are collected and analyzed. The adopted data sets for each substance are weighted and combined to fit into a Cox vapor pressure equation, log10P=(1-D/T)×10(A+BT+CT2) by the least-squares method. The results of the literature review and the evaluated values of coefficients for the vapor pressure equations are presented in separate tables. For ease of presentation, the coal compounds are divided into seven groups, based upon their molecular structures. They are (1) benzene and its derivatives, (2) naphthalene and its derivatives, (3) saturated ring compounds, (4) unsaturated ring compounds, (5) heterocyclic sulfur compounds, (6) heterocyclic nitrogen compounds, and (7) heterocyclic oxygen compounds.

  8. Formation of size controlled silicon nanocrystals in nitrogen free silicon dioxide matrix prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Laube, J. Gutsch, S.; Hiller, D.; Zacharias, M.; Bruns, M.; Kübel, C.; Weiss, C.

    2014-12-14

    This paper reports the growth of silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) from SiH4–O{sub 2} plasma chemistry. The formation of an oxynitride was avoided by using O{sub 2} instead of the widely used N{sub 2}O as precursor. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to prove the absence of nitrogen in the layers and determine the film stoichiometry. It is shown that the Si rich film growth is achieved via non-equilibrium deposition that resembles a interphase clusters mixture model. Photoluminescence and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy are used to monitor the formation process of the SiNCs, to reveal that the phase separation is completed at lower temperatures as for SiNCs based on oxynitrides. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy proves that the SiNC sizes are well controllable by superlattice configuration, and as a result, the optical emission band of the Si nanocrystal can be tuned over a wide range.

  9. On the growth of carbon nanofibers on glass with a Cr layer by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition: The effect of Ni film thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, H. W.; Tung, C. H.; Sung, M. S.; Leou, K. C.; Tsai, C. H.

    2007-12-01

    We have studied the effect of the thickness of catalytic Ni film for the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VA-CNFs) on glass substrates coated with a conductive underlayer of Cr. Both the pretreatment process through which the catalytic Ni nanoparticles were formed and the growth of well-aligned CNFs were carried out in an inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition (ICP-CVD) system. The VA-CNFs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, as well as field emission measurements. The results of VA-CNF growth shows that as the Ni film thicknesses decrease, not only the length but also the density of the CNFs drop, although the density of catalytic Ni nanoparticles increases. The variation of CNF density with Ni film thicknesses is believed to be a result of the detachment of the CNFs from the substrate, caused by the electrostatic force produced by the plasma sheath electric field, as well as an ion-enhanced chemical etching effect due to atomic/ionic hydrogen, during the ICP-CVD growth. A field emission measurement apparatus based on a metallic probe of spherical anode structure was also constructed in this study. An electrostatic image model was employed to determine the electric field distribution on the cathode surface. Along with the standard F -N field emission model, the dependence of field emission current density on the cathode surface electric field, as well as an effective field enhancement factor, were extracted from the current-voltage measurement results. The threshold electric field (Ethreshold, for a current density of 1 mA/cm2) increases from 9.2 V/μm to 13.1 V/μm, and then drops to 11.5 V/μm for the CNFs with Ni film thicknesses of 20 nm, 30 nm, and 40 nm, respectively. The electrostatic model results also indicate that the 20 nm case has the greatest space-charge effect on the emission current, consistent with the growth results that the 20 nm case has the lowest CNF density. On the other hand

  10. Terahertz radiation in alkali vapor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xuan; Zhang, X.-C.

    2014-05-12

    By taking advantage of low ionization potentials of alkali atoms, we demonstrate terahertz wave generation from cesium and rubidium vapor plasmas with an amplitude nearly one order of magnitude larger than that from nitrogen gas at low pressure (0.02–0.5 Torr). The observed phenomena are explained by the numerical modeling based upon electron tunneling ionization.

  11. High-temperature degradation in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface passivation layers on crystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kühnhold, Saskia; Saint-Cast, Pierre; Kafle, Bishal; Hofmann, Marc; Colonna, Francesco; Zacharias, Margit

    2014-08-07

    In this publication, the activation and degradation of the passivation quality of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) layers with different thicknesses (10 nm, 20 nm, and 110 nm) on crystalline silicon (c-Si) during long and high temperature treatments are investigated. As indicated by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, the concentration of tetrahedral and octahedral sites within the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer changes during temperature treatments and correlates with the amount of negative fixed charges at the Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface, which was detected by Corona Oxide Characterization of Semiconductors. Furthermore, during a temperature treatment at 820 °C for 30 min, the initial amorphous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer crystallize into the γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} structure and was enhanced by additional oxygen as was proven by x-ray diffraction measurements and underlined by Density Functional Theory simulations. The crystallization correlates with the increase of the optical density up to 20% while the final Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer thickness decreases at the same time up to 26%. All observations described above were detected to be Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer thickness dependent. These observations reveal novel aspects to explain the temperature induced passivation and degradation mechanisms of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers at a molecular level like the origin of the negative fixe charges at the Si/SiO{sub x}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface or the phenomena of blistering. Moreover, the crystal phase of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} does not deliver good surface passivation due to a high concentration of octahedral sites leading to a lower concentration of negative fixed charges at the interface.

  12. Synthesis and Characterization of High c-axis ZnO Thin Film by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition System and its UV Photodetector Application.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chung-Hua; Wei, Da-Hua

    2015-10-03

    In this study, zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films with high c-axis (0002) preferential orientation have been successfully and effectively synthesized onto silicon (Si) substrates via different synthesized temperatures by using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. The effects of different synthesized temperatures on the crystal structure, surface morphologies and optical properties have been investigated. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns indicated that the intensity of (0002) diffraction peak became stronger with increasing synthesized temperature until 400 (o)C. The diffraction intensity of (0002) peak gradually became weaker accompanying with appearance of (10-10) diffraction peak as the synthesized temperature up to excess of 400 (o)C. The RT photoluminescence (PL) spectra exhibited a strong near-band-edge (NBE) emission observed at around 375 nm and a negligible deep-level (DL) emission located at around 575 nm under high c-axis ZnO thin films. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) images revealed the homogeneous surface and with small grain size distribution. The ZnO thin films have also been synthesized onto glass substrates under the same parameters for measuring the transmittance. For the purpose of ultraviolet (UV) photodetector application, the interdigitated platinum (Pt) thin film (thickness ~100 nm) fabricated via conventional optical lithography process and radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering. In order to reach Ohmic contact, the device was annealed in argon circumstances at 450 (o)C by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) system for 10 min. After the systematic measurements, the current-voltage (I-V) curve of photo and dark current and time-dependent photocurrent response results exhibited a good responsivity and reliability, indicating that the high c-axis ZnO thin film is a suitable sensing layer for UV photodetector application.

  13. Friction and Wear Properties of Selected Solid Lubricating Films. Part 3; Magnetron-Sputtered and Plasma-Assisted, Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Diamondlike Carbon Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Iwaki, Masanori; Gotoh, Kenichi; Obara, Shingo; Imagawa, Kichiro

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate commercially developed dry solid film lubricants for aerospace bearing applications, an investigation was conducted to examine the friction and wear behavior of magnetron-sputtered diamondlike carbon (MS DLC) and plasma-assisted, chemical-vapor-deposited diamondlike carbon (PACVD DLC) films in sliding contact with 6-mm-diameter American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) 440C stainless steel balls. Unidirectional sliding friction experiments were conducted with a load of 5.9 N (600 g), a mean Hertzian contact pressure of 0.79 GPa (maximum Hertzian contact pressure of L-2 GPa), and a sliding velocity of 0.2 m/s. The experiments were conducted at room temperature in three environments: ultrahigh vacuum (vacuum pressure, 7x10(exp -7) Pa), humid air (relative humidity, approx.20 percent), and dry nitrogen (relative humidity, <1 percent). The resultant films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and surface profilometry. Marked differences in the friction and wear of the DLC films investigated herein resulted from the environmental conditions. The main criteria for judging the performance of the DLC films were coefficient of friction and wear rate, which had to be less than 0.3 and on the order of 10(exp -6) cu mm/N-m or less, respectively. MS DLC films and PACVD DLC films met the criteria in humid air and dry nitrogen but failed in ultrahigh vacuum, where the coefficients of friction were greater than the criterion, 0.3. In sliding contact with 440C stainless steel balls in all three environments the PACVD DLC films exhibited better tribological performance (i.e., lower friction and wear) than the MS DLC films. All sliding involved adhesive transfer of wear materials: transfer of DLC wear debris to the counterpart 440C stainless steel and transfer of 440C stainless steel wear debris to the counterpart DLC film.

  14. High-temperature degradation in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition Al2O3 surface passivation layers on crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnhold, Saskia; Saint-Cast, Pierre; Kafle, Bishal; Hofmann, Marc; Colonna, Francesco; Zacharias, Margit

    2014-08-01

    In this publication, the activation and degradation of the passivation quality of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited aluminum oxide (Al2O3) layers with different thicknesses (10 nm, 20 nm, and 110 nm) on crystalline silicon (c-Si) during long and high temperature treatments are investigated. As indicated by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, the concentration of tetrahedral and octahedral sites within the Al2O3 layer changes during temperature treatments and correlates with the amount of negative fixed charges at the Si/Al2O3 interface, which was detected by Corona Oxide Characterization of Semiconductors. Furthermore, during a temperature treatment at 820 °C for 30 min, the initial amorphous Al2O3 layer crystallize into the γ-Al2O3 structure and was enhanced by additional oxygen as was proven by x-ray diffraction measurements and underlined by Density Functional Theory simulations. The crystallization correlates with the increase of the optical density up to 20% while the final Al2O3 layer thickness decreases at the same time up to 26%. All observations described above were detected to be Al2O3 layer thickness dependent. These observations reveal novel aspects to explain the temperature induced passivation and degradation mechanisms of Al2O3 layers at a molecular level like the origin of the negative fixe charges at the Si/SiOx/Al2O3 interface or the phenomena of blistering. Moreover, the crystal phase of Al2O3 does not deliver good surface passivation due to a high concentration of octahedral sites leading to a lower concentration of negative fixed charges at the interface.

  15. In situ B-doped Si epitaxial films grown at 450‡ C by remote plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition: Physical and electrical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irby, J.; Kinosky, D.; Hsu, T.; Qian, R.; Mahajan, A.; Thomas, S.; Anthony, B.; Banerjee, S.; Tasch, A.; Magee, C.

    1992-05-01

    In situ boron doping of Si epitaxial films grown at 450‡ C by remote plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RPCVD) has been studied using secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), Hall effect measurements, defect etching in conjunction with Nomarski microscopy, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM), and current-voltage measurements. Boron incorporation is shown to be controllable and electrically active from 7 × 1017 to over 1020 cm-3, with no dependence on process parameters (temperature, rf power, and substrate bias) in the ranges studied, other than the B2H6/SiH4 gas-phase ratio. No change in deposition rate upon introduction of B2H6 dopant gas is seen, contrary to what has been observed in several higher-temperature CVD processes. No defects such as stacking faults are seen under Nomarski microscopy, but a visible haze covers some areas of in situ B-doped wafers. This haze appears to consist of amorphous cone-shaped structures with their apexes at the substrate-epilayer interface. The origin of the conical defects is believed to be related to some phenomenon at the initiation of growth. In order to evaluate the electrical quality of in situ B-doped epilayers, P +/N mesa diodes have been fabricated using both homoepitaxial and heteroepitaxial (GexSi1-x) p-type epitaxial films. The electrical junction in these diodes coincides with the (epi-substrate)—interface in the grown films. To avoid interdiffusion or annealing effects during diode fabrication, all processing temperatures were kept at or below 450‡ C. Ideality factors are 1.2-1.3 for all diodes, indicating diffusion-limited transport rather than recombination in the depletion region.

  16. Vibrational spectroscopy study of Ar+-ion irradiated Si-rich oxide films grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotto, G.; Das, G.; Quaranta, A.; Della Mea, G.; Corni, F.; Tonini, R.

    2005-06-01

    SiOx thin films with different stoichiometry degree were obtained by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on crystalline silicon substrates from SiH4 and N2O gas mixtures. Two twin sets of samples were irradiated by 380 keV Ar+ ions at a fluence of 5×1016ions/cm2 at room temperature and at 500 °C, respectively, and then annealed in vacuum at different temperatures, between 500 and 1100 °C. A set of unirradiated samples has been annealed in the same conditions in order to discriminate the contribution of ion irradiation and of thermal treatments to the changes of the film microstructure. The structural modification of the oxide network and the growth of Si nanoclusters have been studied by vibrational spectroscopy techniques. Fourier transform infrared absorption spectra evidenced that ion irradiation induces a hydrogen loss of about 50%, and that postirradiation thermal treatments lead to the recovery of the irradiation defects and to the out diffusion of the residual hydrogen. After heating at 800 °C, irradiated and unirradiated samples exhibit substantially the same structure from the point of view of infrared-absorption spectra. In the meanwhile, the Si-O-Si stretching peak blue shifts, but never reaches the wavenumber value of pure silica owing to the presence of nitrogen into the network. Raman spectra of as-irradiated films reveal the presence of an amorphous silicon phase within the damaged layer of the oxide matrix. Raman spectra of irradiated samples undergoing thermal treatments at high temperature indicate a rearrangement of the film microstructure with the progressive clustering of the amorphous silicon phase. However, no clear spectroscopic evidence is gained about the crystallization of silicon nanoclusters, even after annealing at the highest temperature. In fact, the Raman scattering from silicon nanocrystals is partially hidden by the Raman peak of the c-Si substrate.

  17. Synthesis and Characterization of High c-axis ZnO Thin Film by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition System and its UV Photodetector Application

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chung-Hua; Wei, Da-Hua

    2015-01-01

    In this study, zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films with high c-axis (0002) preferential orientation have been successfully and effectively synthesized onto silicon (Si) substrates via different synthesized temperatures by using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. The effects of different synthesized temperatures on the crystal structure, surface morphologies and optical properties have been investigated. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns indicated that the intensity of (0002) diffraction peak became stronger with increasing synthesized temperature until 400 oC. The diffraction intensity of (0002) peak gradually became weaker accompanying with appearance of (10-10) diffraction peak as the synthesized temperature up to excess of 400 oC. The RT photoluminescence (PL) spectra exhibited a strong near-band-edge (NBE) emission observed at around 375 nm and a negligible deep-level (DL) emission located at around 575 nm under high c-axis ZnO thin films. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) images revealed the homogeneous surface and with small grain size distribution. The ZnO thin films have also been synthesized onto glass substrates under the same parameters for measuring the transmittance. For the purpose of ultraviolet (UV) photodetector application, the interdigitated platinum (Pt) thin film (thickness ~100 nm) fabricated via conventional optical lithography process and radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering. In order to reach Ohmic contact, the device was annealed in argon circumstances at 450 oC by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) system for 10 min. After the systematic measurements, the current-voltage (I-V) curve of photo and dark current and time-dependent photocurrent response results exhibited a good responsivity and reliability, indicating that the high c-axis ZnO thin film is a suitable sensing layer for UV photodetector application. PMID:26484561

  18. Study on plasma assisted metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of Zr(C,N) and Ti(C,N) thin films and in situ plasma diagnostics with optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, S. J.; Nam, S.-H.; Jung, C.-K.; Jee, H.-G.; Boo, J.-H.; Kim, S.; Han, J. G.

    2008-07-15

    Zr(C,N) and Ti(C,N) films were synthesized by pulsed dc plasma assisted metal-organic chemical vapor deposition method using metal-organic compounds of tetrakis diethylamido titanium and tetrakis diethylamido zirconium at 200-300 deg. C. To change the plasma characteristics, different carrier gases such as H{sub 2} and He/H{sub 2} were used and, as the reactive gas, N{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} were added to the gas mixture. The effect of N{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} gases was also evaluated in the reduction of C content of the films. Radical formation and ionization behaviors in plasma were analyzed by optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry at various pulsed biases and gas conditions. The gas mixture of He and H{sub 2} as the carrier gas was very effective in enhancing the dissociation of molecular gases. In the case of N{sub 2} addition, N{sub 2} as reactive gas resulted in higher hardness. However, NH{sub 3} as reactive gas highly reduced the formation of CN radical, thereby greatly decreasing the C content of Zr(C,N) and Ti(C,N) films. The hardness of the film is 1400-1700 HK depending on gas species and bias voltage. Higher hardness can be obtained for a H{sub 2} and N{sub 2} gas atmosphere and bias voltage of -600 V. Plasma surface cleaning using N{sub 2} gas prior to deposition appeared to increase the adhesion of films on steel. The changes of plasmas including radicals and film properties are illustrated in terms of carrier and reactive gases, as well as pulsed power variation.

  19. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of metalboride interfacial layers as diffusion barriers for nanostructured diamond growth on cobalt containing alloys CoCrMo and WC-Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Jamin M.

    This work is a compilation of theory, finite element modeling and experimental research related to the use of microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) of diborane to create metal-boride surface coatings on CoCrMo and WC-Co, including the subsequent growth of nanostructured diamond (NSD). Motivation for this research stems from the need for wear resistant coatings on industrial materials, which require improved wear resistance and product lifetime to remain competitive and satisfy growing demand. Nanostructured diamond coatings are a promising solution to material wear but cannot be directly applied to cobalt containing substrates due to graphite nucleation. Unfortunately, conventional pre-treatment methods, such as acid etching, render the substrate too brittle. Thus, the use of boron in a MPECVD process is explored to create robust interlayers which inhibit carbon-cobalt interaction. Furthermore, modeling of the MPECVD process, through the COMSOL MultiphysicsRTM platform, is performed to provide insight into plasma-surface interactions using the simulation of a real-world apparatus. Experimental investigation of MPECVD boriding and NSD deposition was conducted at surface temperatures from 700 to 1100 °C. Several well-adhered metal-boride surface layers were formed: consisting of CoB, CrB, WCoB, CoB and/or W2CoB2. Many of the interlayers were shown to be effective diffusion barriers against elemental cobalt for improving nucleation and adhesion of NSD coatings; diamond on W2CoB2 was well adhered. However, predominantly WCoB and CoB phase interlayers suffered from diamond film delamination. Metal-boride and NSD surfaces were evaluated using glancing-angle x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), micro-Raman spectroscopy, nanoindentation, scratch testing and epoxy pull testing. COMSOL MultiphysicsRTM was used to construct a

  20. Nanocrystalline diamond thin films on titanium-6 aluminum-4 vanadium alloy temporomandibular joint prosthesis simulants by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, Marc Douglas

    A course of research has been performed to assess the suitability of nanocrystal-line diamond (NCD) films on Ti-6Al-4V alloy as wear-resistant coatings in biomedical implant use. A series of temporomandibular (TMJ) joint condyle simulants were polished and acid-passivated as per ASTM F86 standard for surface preparation of implants. A 3-mum-thick coating of NCD film was deposited by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) over the hemispherical articulation surfaces of the simulants. Plasma chemistry conditions were measured and monitored by optical emission spectroscopy (OES), using hydrogen as a relative standard. The films consist of diamond grains around 20 nm in diameter embedded in an amorphous carbon matrix, free of any detectable film stress gradient. Hardness averages 65 GPa and modulus measures 600 GPa at a depth of 250 nm into the film surface. A diffuse film/substrate boundary produces a minimal film adhesion toughness (GammaC) of 158 J/m2. The mean RMS roughness is 14.6 +/- 4.2 nm, with an average peak roughness of 82.6 +/- 65.9 nm. Examination of the surface morphology reveals a porous, dendritic surface. Wear testing resulted in two failed condylar coatings out of three tests. No macroscopic delamination was found on any sample, but micron-scale film pieces broke away, exposing the substrate. Electrochemical corrosion testing shows a seven-fold reduction in corrosion rate with the application of an NCD coating as opposed to polished, passivated Ti-6Al-4V, producing a corrosion rate comparable to wrought Co-Cr-Mo. In vivo biocompatibility testing indicates that implanted NCD films did not elicit an immune response in the rabbit model, and osteointegration was apparent for both compact and trabecular bone on both NCD film and bare Ti-6Al-4V. Overall, NCD thin film material is reasonably smooth, biocompatible, and very well adhered. Wear testing indicates that this material is unacceptable for use in demanding TMJ applications without

  1. Automated semiconductor vacuum chemical vapor deposition facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A semiconductor vacuum chemical vapor deposition facility (totally automatic) was developed. Wafers arrived on an air track, automatically loaded into a furnace tube, processed, returned to the track, and sent on to the next operation. The entire process was controlled by a computer.

  2. CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITED MATERIALS FOR ELECTRON TUBES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The combined techniques of chemical vapor deposition and photocopying offer the promise of new and useful slow -wave structures for microwave tubes...These slow -wave structures include conventional periodic structures such as the helix, meander line and interdigital line. In addition, structures

  3. Chemical vapor deposition of mullite coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, Vinod; Mulpuri, Rao

    1998-01-01

    This invention is directed to the creation of crystalline mullite coatings having uniform microstructure by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The process comprises the steps of establishing a flow of reactants which will yield mullite in a CVD reactor, and depositing a crystalline coating from the reactant flow. The process will yield crystalline coatings which are dense and of uniform thickness.

  4. Low-pressure, chemical vapor deposition polysilicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, B. D.; Crotty, G. C.

    1986-01-01

    The low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) of polycrystalline silicon was investigted. The physical system was described, as was the controlling process parameters and requirements for producing films for use as an integral portion of the solar cell contact system.

  5. Numerical modeling tools for chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Thomas J.; Childs, Edward P.

    1992-01-01

    Development of general numerical simulation tools for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was the objective of this study. Physical models of important CVD phenomena were developed and implemented into the commercial computational fluid dynamics software FLUENT. The resulting software can address general geometries as well as the most important phenomena occurring with CVD reactors: fluid flow patterns, temperature and chemical species distribution, gas phase and surface deposition. The physical models are documented which are available and examples are provided of CVD simulation capabilities.

  6. DuPont Chemical Vapor Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    MOORE, T.L.

    2003-10-03

    DuPont Safety Resources was tasked with reviewing the current chemical vapor control practices and providing preventive recommendations on best commercial techniques to control worker exposures. The increased focus of the tank closure project to meet the 2024 Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) milestones has surfaced concerns among some CH2MHill employees and other interested parties. CH2MHill is committed to providing a safe working environment for employees and desires to safely manage the tank farm operations using appropriate control measures. To address worker concerns, CH2MHill has chartered a ''Chemical Vapors Project'' to integrate the activities of multiple CH2MHill project teams, and solicit the expertise of external resources, including an independent Industrial Hygiene expert panel, a communications consultant, and DuPont Safety Resources. Over a three-month time period, DuPont worked with CH2MHill ESH&Q, Industrial Hygiene, Engineering, and the independent expert panel to perform the assessment. The process included overview presentations, formal interviews, informal discussions, documentation review, and literature review. DuPont Safety Resources concluded that it is highly unlikely that workers in the tank farms are exposed to chemicals above established standards. Additionally, the conventional and radiological chemistry is understood, the inherent chemical hazards are known, and the risk associated with chemical vapor exposure is properly managed. The assessment highlighted management's commitment to addressing chemical vapor hazards and controlling the associated risks. Additionally, we found the Industrial Hygiene staff to be technically competent and well motivated. The tank characterization data resides in a comprehensive database containing the tank chemical compositions and relevant airborne concentrations.

  7. Organo-Chlorinated Thin Films Deposited by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition for Adhesion Enhancement between Rubber and Zinc-Plated Steel Monofilaments.

    PubMed

    Vandenabeele, Cédric; Bulou, Simon; Maurau, Rémy; Siffer, Frederic; Belmonte, Thierry; Choquet, Patrick

    2015-07-08

    A continuous-flow plasma process working at atmospheric pressure is developed to enhance the adhesion between a rubber compound and a zinc-plated steel monofilament, with the long-term objective to find a potential alternative to the electrolytic brass plating process, which is currently used in tire industry. For this purpose, a highly efficient tubular dielectric barrier discharge reactor is built to allow the continuous treatment of "endless" cylindrical substrates. The best treatment conditions found regarding adhesion are Ar/O2 plasma pretreatment, followed by the deposition from dichloromethane of a 75 nm-thick organo-chlorinated plasma polymerized thin film. Ar/O2 pretreatment allows the removal of organic residues, coming from drawing lubricants, and induces external growth of zinc oxide. The plasma layer has to be preferably deposited at low power to conserve sufficient hydrocarbon moieties. Surface analyses reveal the complex chemical mechanism behind the establishment of strong adhesion levels, more than five times higher after the plasma treatment. During the vulcanization step, superficial ZnO reacts with the chlorinated species of the thin film and is converted into porous and granular bump-shaped ZnwOxHyClz nanostructures. Together, rubber additives diffuse through the plasma layer and lead to the formation of zinc sulfide on the substrate surface. Hence, two distinct interfaces, rubber/thin film and thin film/substrate, are established. On the basis of these observations, hypotheses explaining the high bonding strength results are formulated.

  8. Operating a radio-frequency plasma source on water vapor.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Sonca V T; Foster, John E; Gallimore, Alec D

    2009-08-01

    A magnetically enhanced radio-frequency (rf) plasma source operating on water vapor has an extensive list of potential applications. In this work, the use of a rf plasma source to dissociate water vapor for hydrogen production is investigated. This paper describes a rf plasma source operated on water vapor and characterizes its plasma properties using a Langmuir probe, a residual gas analyzer, and a spectrometer. The plasma source operated first on argon and then on water vapor at operating pressures just over 300 mtorr. Argon and water vapor plasma number densities differ significantly. In the electropositive argon plasma, quasineutrality requires n(i) approximately = n(e), where n(i) is the positive ion density. But in the electronegative water plasma, quasineutrality requires n(i+) = n(i-) + n(e). The positive ion density and electron density of the water vapor plasma are approximately one and two orders of magnitude lower, respectively, than those of argon plasma. These results suggest that attachment and dissociative attachment are present in electronegative water vapor plasma. The electron temperature for this water vapor plasma source is between 1.5 and 4 eV. Without an applied axial magnetic field, hydrogen production increases linearly with rf power. With an axial magnetic field, hydrogen production jumps to a maximum value at 500 W and then saturates with rf power. The presence of the applied axial magnetic field is therefore shown to enhance hydrogen production.

  9. Silicon refinement by chemical vapor transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, J.

    1984-01-01

    Silicon refinement by chemical vapor transport is discussed. The operating characteristics of the purification process, including factors affecting the rate, purification efficiency and photovoltaic quality of the refined silicon were studied. The casting of large alloy plates was accomplished. A larger research scale reactor is characterized, and it is shown that a refined silicon product yields solar cells with near state of the art conversion efficiencies.

  10. Making Ceramic Fibers By Chemical Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revankar, Vithal V. S.; Hlavacek, Vladimir

    1994-01-01

    Research and development of fabrication techniques for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of ceramic fibers presented in two reports. Fibers of SiC, TiB2, TiC, B4C, and CrB2 intended for use as reinforcements in metal-matrix composite materials. CVD offers important advantages over other processes: fibers purer and stronger and processed at temperatures below melting points of constituent materials.

  11. Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Diamond Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1999-01-01

    This chapter describes the nature of clean and contaminated diamond surfaces, Chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond film deposition technology, analytical techniques and the results of research on CVD diamond films, and the general properties of CVD diamond films. Further, it describes the friction and wear properties of CVD diamond films in the atmosphere, in a controlled nitrogen environment, and in an ultra-high-vacuum environment.

  12. Making Ceramic Fibers By Chemical Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revankar, Vithal V. S.; Hlavacek, Vladimir

    1994-01-01

    Research and development of fabrication techniques for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of ceramic fibers presented in two reports. Fibers of SiC, TiB2, TiC, B4C, and CrB2 intended for use as reinforcements in metal-matrix composite materials. CVD offers important advantages over other processes: fibers purer and stronger and processed at temperatures below melting points of constituent materials.

  13. Laser Velocimetry of Chemical Vapor Deposition Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Laser velocimetry (LV) is being used to measure the gas flows in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactors. These gas flow measurements can be used to improve industrial processes in semiconductor and optical layer deposition and to validate numerical models. Visible in the center of the picture is the graphite susceptor glowing orange-hot at 600 degrees C. It is inductively heated via the copper cool surrounding the glass reactor.

  14. Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, S. K.; Sodha, M. S.

    2014-04-15

    In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

  15. Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. K.; Sodha, M. S.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

  16. Chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial silicon

    DOEpatents

    Berkman, Samuel

    1984-01-01

    A single chamber continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor is described for depositing continuously on flat substrates, for example, epitaxial layers of semiconductor materials. The single chamber reactor is formed into three separate zones by baffles or tubes carrying chemical source material and a carrier gas in one gas stream and hydrogen gas in the other stream without interaction while the wafers are heated to deposition temperature. Diffusion of the two gas streams on heated wafers effects the epitaxial deposition in the intermediate zone and the wafers are cooled in the final zone by coolant gases. A CVD reactor for batch processing is also described embodying the deposition principles of the continuous reactor.

  17. The Optical Characteristics of Nitrogen-Doped Amorphous Carbon Thin-Films Grown on Novel Heat-Tolerant Flexible Plastic Substrates by a Newly Developed Microwave Surface Wave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusop, M.; Omer, A. M. M.; Adhikari, S.; Adhikary, S.; Uchida, H.; Soga, T.; Jimbo, T.; Umeno, M.

    Nitrogen-doped amorphous carbon (a-C:N) thin-films have been deposited on novel heat tolerant flexible plastic substrates by a newly developed microwave surface wave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MWSWP-CVD) method. Methane gas and also camphor dissolved with ethyl alcohol gas composition have been used as plasma source. Nitrogen gas has been used as a dopant material for a-C:N films. In this paper, the optical characteristics of absorption coefficients and band gaps for a-C:N are discussed. The optical band gap of a-C:N films was found to be approximately 1.7 eV, which is close to the suitable band gap for solar cell. The optical band gap of a-C:N was found to be dependent on the composition gas source pressures.

  18. Determination of As, Hg and Pb in herbs using slurry sampling flow injection chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tai, Chia-Yi; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Sahayam, A C

    2016-02-01

    Analysis of herbs for As, Hg and Pb has been carried out using slurry sampling inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) with flow injection vapor generation. Slurry containing 0.5% m/v herbal powder, 0.1% m/v citric acid and 2% v/v HCl was injected into the VG-ICP-MS system for the determination of As, Hg and Pb that obviate dissolution and mineralization. Standard addition and isotope dilution methods were used for quantifications in selected herbal powders. This method has been validated by the determination of As, Hg and Pb in NIST standard reference materials SRM 1547 Peach Leaves and SRM 1573a Tomato Leaves. The As, Hg and Pb analysis results of the reference materials agreed with the certified values. The precision obtained by the reported procedure was better than 7% for all determinations. The detection limit estimated from standard addition curve was 0.008, 0.003, and 0.007 ng mL(-1) for As, Hg and Pb, respectively.

  19. Surface Acoustic Wave Devices as Chemical Vapor Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-26

    Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposited Surfaces,” Advanced Materials, 2006. 45. S . C. Huang, K. D. Caldwell , J. N. Lin, H . K. Wang, and J. N. Herron...exposure, 45 s develop, titanium. 59 Figure 4.4: SEM image of one of the devices from Series 3. 4.2 Testing AFRL- Designed SAW Devices Through...Approach for the Detection of Explosives,” Jour- nal of Hazardous Materials,, vol. 144, pp. 15–28, June 2007. 4. M. H . Ervin, S . J. Kilpatrick, C

  20. Epitaxial growth of GaN by radical-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (REMOCVD) in the downflow of a very high frequency (VHF) N2/H2 excited plasma - effect of TMG flow rate and VHF power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yi; Kondo, Hiroki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Oda, Osamu; Takeda, Keigo; Sekine, Makoto; Amano, Hiroshi; Hori, Masaru

    2014-04-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) films have been grown by using our newly developed Radical-Enhanced Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition (REMOCVD) system. This system has three features: (1) application of very high frequency (60 MHz) power in order to increase the plasma density, (2) introduction of H2 gas together with N2 gas in the plasma discharge region to generate not only nitrogen radicals but also active NHx molecules, and (3) radical supply under remote plasma arrangement with suppression of charged ions and photons by employing a Faraday cage. Using this new system, we have studied the effect of the trimethylgallium (TMG) source flow rate and of the plasma generation power on the GaN crystal quality by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and double crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD). We found that this REMOCVD allowed the growth of epitaxial GaN films of the wurtzite structure of (0001) orientation on sapphire substrates with a high growth rate of 0.42 μm/h at a low temperature of 800 °C. The present REMOCVD is a promising method for GaN growth at relatively low temperature and without using costly ammonia gas.

  1. Slurry sampling flow injection chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of trace Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in cosmetic lotions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Ni; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Chen, Yen-Ling; Sahayam, A C

    2015-02-20

    A slurry sampling inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method has been developed for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in cosmetic lotions using flow injection (FI) vapor generation (VG) as the sample introduction system. A slurry containing 2% m/v lotion, 2% m/v thiourea, 0.05% m/v L-cysteine, 0.5 μg mL(-1) Co(II), 0.1% m/v Triton X-100 and 1.2% v/v HCl was injected into a VG-ICP-MS system for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi without dissolution and mineralization. Because the sensitivities of the analytes in the slurry and that of aqueous solution were quite different, an isotope dilution method and a standard addition method were used for the determination. This method has been validated by the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in GBW09305 Cosmetic (Cream) reference material. The method was also applied for the determination of Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi in three cosmetic lotion samples obtained locally. The analysis results of the reference material agreed with the certified value and/or ETV-ICP-MS results. The detection limit estimated from the standard addition curve was 0.025, 0.1, 0.2, 0.1, 0.15, and 0.03 ng g(-1) for Ge, As, Cd, Sb, Hg and Bi, respectively, in original cosmetic lotion sample.

  2. Chemical vapor deposition of graphene single crystals.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zheng; Peng, Zhiwei; Tour, James M

    2014-04-15

    As a two-dimensional (2D) sp(2)-bonded carbon allotrope, graphene has attracted enormous interest over the past decade due to its unique properties, such as ultrahigh electron mobility, uniform broadband optical absorption and high tensile strength. In the initial research, graphene was isolated from natural graphite, and limited to small sizes and low yields. Recently developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques have emerged as an important method for the scalable production of large-size and high-quality graphene for various applications. However, CVD-derived graphene is polycrystalline and demonstrates degraded properties induced by grain boundaries. Thus, the next critical step of graphene growth relies on the synthesis of large graphene single crystals. In this Account, we first discuss graphene grain boundaries and their influence on graphene's properties. Mechanical and electrical behaviors of CVD-derived polycrystalline graphene are greatly reduced when compared to that of exfoliated graphene. We then review four representative pathways of pretreating Cu substrates to make millimeter-sized monolayer graphene grains: electrochemical polishing and high-pressure annealing of Cu substrate, adding of additional Cu enclosures, melting and resolidfying Cu substrates, and oxygen-rich Cu substrates. Due to these pretreatments, the nucleation site density on Cu substrates is greatly reduced, resulting in hexagonal-shaped graphene grains that show increased grain domain size and comparable electrical properties as to exfoliated graphene. Also, the properties of graphene can be engineered by its shape, thickness and spatial structure. Thus, we further discuss recently developed methods of making graphene grains with special spatial structures, including snowflakes, six-lobed flowers, pyramids and hexagonal graphene onion rings. The fundamental growth mechanism and practical applications of these well-shaped graphene structures should be interesting topics and

  3. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of wear resistant gradual a-Si{sub 1-x}:C{sub x}:H coatings on nickel-titanium for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Niermann, Benedikt; Boeke, Marc; Schauer, Janine-Christina; Winter, Joerg

    2010-03-15

    Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition has been used to deposit thin films with gradual transitions from silicon to carbon on Cu, Ni, stainless steel, and NiTi. Thus show low stress, elasticity, and wear resistance with excellent adhesion on all metals under investigation. Already at low Si concentrations of 10 at. % the intrinsic stress is considerably reduced compared to pure diamondlike carbon (DLC) films. The deposition process is controlled by optical emission spectroscopy. This technique has been applied to monitor the growth precursors and to correlate them with the film composition. The compositions of the films were determined by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and XPS measurements. Due to the elastic properties of the gradual transition and the excellent biocompatibility of DLC, the described film systems present a useful coating for biomedical applications.

  4. Impacts of light illumination on monocrystalline silicon surfaces passivated by atomic layer deposited Al2O3 capped with plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited SiN x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Fen; Toh, Mei Gi; Thway, Maung; Li, Xinhang; Nandakumar, Naomi; Gay, Xavier; Dielissen, Bas; Raj, Samuel; Aberle, Armin G.

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we investigate the impact of light illumination on crystalline silicon surfaces passivated with inline atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide capped with plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon nitride. It is found that, for dedicated n-type lifetime samples under illumination, there is no light induced degradation (LID) but enhanced passivation. The lifetime increase happened with a much faster speed compared to the lifetime decay during dark storage, resulting in the overall lifetime enhancement for actual field application scenarios (sunshine during the day and darkness during the night). In addition, it was found that the lifetime enhancement is spectrally dependent and mainly associated with the visible part of the solar spectrum. Hence, it has negligible impact for such interfaces applied on the rear of the solar cells, for example p-type aluminum local back surface field (Al-LBSF) cells.

  5. Synthesis and Mechanical Wear Studies of Ultra Smooth Nanostructured Diamond (USND) Coatings Deposited by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition with He/H2/CH4/N2 Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, S.; Borham, J.; Catledge, S. A.; Eberhardt, A. W.; Johnson, P. S.; Vohra, Y. K.

    2008-01-01

    Ultra smooth nanostructured diamond (USND) coatings were deposited by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) technique using He/H2/CH4/N2 gas mixture. The RMS surface roughness as low as 4 nm (2 micron square area) and grain size of 5–6 nm diamond coatings were achieved on medical grade titanium alloy. Previously it was demonstrated that the C2 species in the plasma is responsible for the production of nanocrystalline diamond coatings in the Ar/H2/CH4 gas mixture. In this work we have found that CN species is responsible for the production of USND coatings in He/H2/CH4/N2 plasma. It was found that diamond coatings deposited with higher CN species concentration (normalized by Balmer Hα line) in the plasma produced smoother and highly nanostructured diamond coatings. The correlation between CN/Hα ratios with the coating roughness and grain size were also confirmed with different set of gas flows/plasma parameters. It is suggested that the presence of CN species could be responsible for producing nanocrystallinity in the growth of USND coatings using He/H2/CH4/N2 gas mixture. The RMS roughness of 4 nm and grain size of 5–6 nm were calculated from the deposited diamond coatings using the gas mixture which produced the highest CN/Hα species in the plasma. Wear tests were performed on the OrthoPOD®, a six station pin-on-disk apparatus with ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) pins articulating on USND disks and CoCrMo alloy disk. Wear of the UHMWPE was found to be lower for the polyethylene on USND than that of polyethylene on CoCrMo alloy. PMID:19112519

  6. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOEpatents

    Erbil, Ahmet

    1989-01-01

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula (I) ##STR1## where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula I is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula I and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  7. Chemical Vapor Deposition Of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. Anthony; Larkin, David J.; Matus, Lawrence G.; Petit, Jeremy B.

    1993-01-01

    Large single-crystal SiC boules from which wafers of large area cut now being produced commerically. Availability of wafers opens door for development of SiC semiconductor devices. Recently developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process produces thin single-crystal SiC films on SiC wafers. Essential step in sequence of steps used to fabricate semiconductor devices. Further development required for specific devices. Some potential high-temperature applications include sensors and control electronics for advanced turbine engines and automobile engines, power electronics for electromechanical actuators for advanced aircraft and for space power systems, and equipment used in drilling of deep wells. High-frequency applications include communication systems, high-speed computers, and microwave power transistors. High-radiation applications include sensors and controls for nuclear reactors.

  8. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOEpatents

    Erbil, A.

    1989-11-21

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula given in the patent where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula 1 is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula 1 and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  9. Chemical agent simulant release from clothing following vapor exposure.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Robert J

    2010-02-01

    Most ambulatory victims of a terrorist chemical attack will have exposure to vapor only. The study objective was to measure the duration of chemical vapor release from various types of clothing. A chemical agent was simulated using methyl salicylate (MeS), which has similar physical properties to sulfur mustard and was the agent used in the U.S. Army's Man-In-Simulant Test (MIST). Vapor concentration was measured with a Smiths Detection Advanced Portable Detector (APD)-2000 unit. The clothing items were exposed to vapor for 1 hour in a sealed cabinet; vapor concentration was measured at the start and end of each exposure. Clothing was then removed and assessed every 5 minutes with the APD-2000, using a uniform sweep pattern, until readings remained 0. Concentration and duration of vapor release from clothing varied with clothing composition and construction. Lightweight cotton shirts and jeans had the least trapped vapor; down outerwear, the most. Vapor concentration near the clothing often increased for several minutes after the clothing was removed from the contaminated environment. Compression of thick outerwear released additional vapor. Mean times to reach 0 ranged from 7 minutes for jeans to 42 minutes for down jackets. This simulation model of chemical vapor release demonstrates persistent presence of simulant vapor over time. This implies that chemical vapor may be released from the victims' clothing after they are evacuated from the site of exposure, resulting in additional exposure of victims and emergency responders. Insulated outerwear can release additional vapor when handled. If a patient has just moved to a vapor screening point, immediate assessment before additional vapor can be released from the clothing can lead to a false-negative assessment of contamination.

  10. Prediction of TiO2 thin film growth on the glass beads in a rotating plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Joo; Kim, Kyo-Seon

    2010-05-01

    We calculated the concentration profiles of important chemical species for TiO2 thin film growth on the glass beads in the TTIP + O2 plasmas and compared the predicted growth rates of thin films with the experimental measurements. The film thickness profile depends on the concentration profile of TiO(OC3H7)3 precursors in the gas phase because TiO(OC3H7)3 is the main precursor of the thin film. The TTIP concentration decreases with time, while the TiO(OC3H7)3 concentration increases, and they reach the steady state about 2 approximately 3 sec. The growth rate of TiO2 film predicted in this study was 9.2 nm/min and is in good agreements with the experimental result of 10.5 nm/min under the same process conditions. This study suggests that a uniform TiO2 thin film on particles can be obtained by using a rotating cylindrical PCVD reactor.

  11. The influence of vapor pressure of chemicals on dermal penetration.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Dermal exposure is an important route of entry for chemicals in occupational and consumer settings. Key to this exposure is the penetration of the skin's barrier, and key to this penetration is a chemical's vapor pressure. Until now, vapor pressure and its effects on the skin have yet to be widely studied. This review aims to provide some historical background on early work on dermal penetration for volatile materials, which has helped form later research into the effects of vapor pressure on chemical risk assessment for dermal exposures. This review should be the start of an investigation into more in-depth coverage of vapor pressure and current prediction models.

  12. Chemical vapor deposition coating for micromachines

    SciTech Connect

    MANI,SEETHAMBAL S.; FLEMING,JAMES G.; SNIEGOWSKI,JEFFRY J.; DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; IRWIN,LAWRENCE W.; WALRAVEN,JEREMY A.; TANNER,DANELLE M.; DUGGER,MICHAEL T.

    2000-04-21

    Two major problems associated with Si-based MEMS devices are stiction and wear. Surface modifications are needed to reduce both adhesion and friction in micromechanical structures to solve these problems. In this paper, the authors will present a process used to selectively coat MEMS devices with tungsten using a CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) process. The selective W deposition process results in a very conformal coating and can potentially solve both stiction and wear problems confronting MEMS processing. The selective deposition of tungsten is accomplished through silicon reduction of WF{sub 6}, which results in a self-limiting reaction. The selective deposition of W only on polysilicon surfaces prevents electrical shorts. Further, the self-limiting nature of this selective W deposition process ensures the consistency necessary for process control. Selective tungsten is deposited after the removal of the sacrificial oxides to minimize process integration problems. This tungsten coating adheres well and is hard and conducting, requirements for device performance. Furthermore, since the deposited tungsten infiltrates under adhered silicon parts and the volume of W deposited is less than the amount of Si consumed, it appears to be possible to release stuck parts that are contacted over small areas such as dimples. Results from tungsten deposition on MEMS structures with dimples will be presented. The effect of wet and vapor phase cleanings prior to the deposition will be discussed along with other process details. The W coating improved wear by orders of magnitude compared to uncoated parts. Tungsten CVD is used in the integrated-circuit industry, which makes this approach manufacturable.

  13. Amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors using organic-inorganic hybrid films deposited by low-temperature plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition for all dielectric layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chao-Jui; Chang, Ching-Hsiang; Chang, Kuei-Ming; Wu, Chung-Chih

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the deposition of high-performance organic-inorganic hybrid dielectric films by low-temperature (close to room temperature) inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition (ICP-CVD) with hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO)/O2 precursor gas. The hybrid films exhibited low leakage currents and high breakdown fields, suitable for thin-film transistor (TFT) applications. They were successfully integrated into the gate insulator, the etch-stop layer, and the passivation layer for bottom-gate staggered amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O (a-IGZO) TFTs having the etch-stop configuration. With the double-active-layer configuration having a buffer a-IGZO back-channel layer grown in oxygen-rich atmosphere for better immunity against plasma damage, the etch-stop-type bottom-gate staggered a-IGZO TFTs with good TFT characteristics were successfully demonstrated. The TFTs showed good field-effect mobility (μFE), threshold voltage (V th), subthreshold swing (SS), and on/off ratio (I on/off) of 7.5 cm2 V-1 s-1, 2.38 V, 0.38 V/decade, and 2.2 × 108, respectively, manifesting their usefulness for a-IGZO TFTs.

  14. Interactions between Liquid-Wall Vapor and Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rognlien, T D; Rensink, M E

    2000-05-25

    The use of liquid walls for fusion reactors could help solve problems associated with material erosion from high plasma heat-loads and neutronic activation of structures. A key issue analyzed here is the influx of impurity ions to the core plasma from the vapor of liquid side-walls. Numerical 2D transport simulations are performed for a slab geometry which approximates the edge region of a reactor-size tokamak. Both lithium vapor (from Li or SnLi walls) and fluorine vapor (from Flibe walls) are considered for hydrogen edge-plasmas in the high- and low-recycling regimes. It is found that the minimum influx is from lithium with a low-recycling hydrogen plasma, and the maximum influx occurs for fluorine with a high-recycling hydrogen plasma.

  15. Chemical vapor deposited fiber coatings and chemical vapor infiltrated ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kmetz, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Conventional Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) and Organometallic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) were employed to deposit a series of interfacial coatings on SiC and carbon yarn. Molybdenum, tungsten and chromium hexacarbonyls were utilized as precursors in a low temperature (350[degrees]C) MOCVD process to coat SiC yarn with Mo, W and Cr oxycarbides. Annealing studies performed on the MoOC and WOC coated SiC yarns in N[sub 2] to 1,000[degrees]C establish that further decomposition of the oxycarbides occurred, culminating in the formation of the metals. These metals were then found to react with Si to form Mo and W disilicide coatings. In the Cr system, heating in N[sub 2] above 800[degrees]C resulted in the formation of a mixture of carbides and oxides. Convention CVD was also employed to coat SiC and carbon yarn with C, Bn and a new interface designated BC (a carbon-boron alloy). The coated tows were then infiltrated with SiC, TiO[sub 2], SiO[sub 2] and B[sub 4]C by a chemical vapor infiltration process. The B-C coatings were found to provide advantageous interfacial properties over carbon and BN coatings in several different composite systems. The effectiveness of these different coatings to act as a chemically inert barrier layer and their relationship to the degree of interfacial debonding on the mechanical properties of the composites were examined. The effects of thermal stability and strength of the coated fibers and composites were also determined for several difference atmospheres. In addition, a new method for determining the tensile strength of the as-received and coated yarns was also developed. The coated fibers and composites were further characterized by AES, SEM, XPS, IR and X-ray diffraction analysis.

  16. Modeling of Tungsten Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byunghoon; Akiyama, Yasunobu; Imaishi, Nobuyuki; Park, Heung-Chul

    1999-05-01

    Low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) of tungsten (W)film on silicon (Si) substrate was performed by reducting hexafluoride(WF6) with hydrogen. This CVD system is known for its nonlineardependence of growth rate on WF6 concentration. This study adopted asimple surface-reaction model which assumes that the precursor, i.e.,WF6, in the gas phase adsorbs on solid surfaces and then the adsorbedWF6 molecule is converted into tungsten solid film. The two kineticparameters involved in the model are derived from the experimentalresults. The solidification rate constant (ks) is equal to the growthrate at very high WF6 concentrations. The adsorption rate constant(ka) is derived from profile analyses of films grown in microtrenchesunder very low WF6 concentrations by applying the conventional MonteCarlo simulation code, which is valid for linear surface-reactionsystems. In the temperature range of 623 to 823 K, ka and ks haveactivation energies of 82 kJmol-1, 66.1 kJmol-1, respectively. A newlyproposed Monte Carlo simulation for nonlinear reaction systems, incombination with the two kinetic parameters, can quantitativelypredict the shape of film in microtrenches for a wide range oftemperatures and WF6 concentrations.

  17. Characterization of Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jesser, W. A.

    1998-01-01

    A series of experimental and numerical investigations to develop a more complete understanding of the reactive fluid dynamics of chemical vapor deposition were conducted. In the experimental phases of the effort, a horizontal CVD reactor configuration was used for the growth of InP at UVA and for laser velocimetry measurements of the flow fields in the reactor at LaRC. This horizontal reactor configuration was developed for the growth of III-V semiconductors and has been used by our research group in the past to study the deposition of both GaAs and InP. While the ultimate resolution of many of the heat and mass transport issues will require access to a reduced-gravity environment, the series of groundbased research makes direct contributions to this area while attempting to answer the design questions for future experiments of how low must gravity be reduced and for how long must this gravity level be maintained to make the necessary measurements. It is hoped that the terrestrial experiments will be useful for the design of future microgravity experiments which likely will be designed to employ a core set of measurements for applications in the microgravity environment such as HOLOC, the Fluid Physics/Dynamics Facility, or the Schlieren photography, the Laser Imaging Velocimetry and the Laser Doppler Velocimetry instruments under development for the Advanced Fluids Experiment Module.

  18. Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochrane, J. C.; Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the superior properties of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) could improve numerous devices such as electronics and sensors, many efforts have been made in investigating the growth mechanism of MWCNT to synthesize high quality MWCNT. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is widely used for MWCNT synthesis, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) are useful methods for analyzing the structure, morphology and composition of MWCNT. Temperature and pressure are two important growth parameters for fabricating carbon nanotubes. In MWCNT growth by CVD, the plasma assisted method is normally used for low temperature growth. However a high temperature environment is required for thermal CVD. A systematic study of temperature and pressure-dependence is very helpful to understanding MWCNT growth. Transition metal particles are commonly used as catalysis in carbon nanotube growth. It is also interesting to know how temperature and pressure affect the interface of carbon species and catalyst particles

  19. Mechanism of vaporization of yttrium and rare earth elements in electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goltz, D. M.; Grégoire, D. C.; Chakrabarti, C. L.

    1995-09-01

    The mechanism of vaporization of yttrium and the rare earth elements (REEs) has been studied using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The appearance temperatures for Y and the REEs obtained by GFAAS were generally identical to the appearance temperatures obtained using ETV-ICP-MS. At lower temperatures, Y and the REEs are predominantly vaporized in atomic form or as oxides, while at temperatures above 2500°C, the elements are vaporized as oxides and/or carbides. This accounts for the very high sensitivity of ETV-ICP-MS compared to GFAAS for the determination of these elements. Absolute limits of detection for Y and all of the REEs using ETV-ICP-MS ranged from 0.002 pg for Tm to 0.2 pg for Ce. The use of freon as a chemical modifier was effective in controlling analyte carbide formation and reducing memory effects.

  20. Preventing Chemical-Vapor Deposition In Selected Areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeley, Joseph T.; Goela, Jitendra Singh; Pickering, Michael A.; Taylor, Raymond L.

    1991-01-01

    Method for prevention of chemical-vapor deposition of material in selected areas developed. Gas shroud isolates specific area from rest of deposition system. Inert gas flowing from beneath substrate prevents deposition between substrate and outer ring. Method extremely successful in selective deposition of SiC in chemical-vapor-deposition reactor. Used in deposition of SiC mirror blanks in Large Mirror Substrate and Lidar Mirror programs. Critical element in overall chemical-vapor-deposition process for producing large, lightweight mirrors.

  1. Determining the microwave coupling and operational efficiencies of a microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition reactor under high pressure diamond synthesis operating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Nad, Shreya; Gu, Yajun; Asmussen, Jes

    2015-07-15

    The microwave coupling efficiency of the 2.45 GHz, microwave plasma assisted diamond synthesis process is investigated by experimentally measuring the performance of a specific single mode excited, internally tuned microwave plasma reactor. Plasma reactor coupling efficiencies (η) > 90% are achieved over the entire 100–260 Torr pressure range and 1.5–2.4 kW input power diamond synthesis regime. When operating at a specific experimental operating condition, small additional internal tuning adjustments can be made to achieve η > 98%. When the plasma reactor has low empty cavity losses, i.e., the empty cavity quality factor is >1500, then overall microwave discharge coupling efficiencies (η{sub coup}) of >94% can be achieved. A large, safe, and efficient experimental operating regime is identified. Both substrate hot spots and the formation of microwave plasmoids are eliminated when operating within this regime. This investigation suggests that both the reactor design and the reactor process operation must be considered when attempting to lower diamond synthesis electrical energy costs while still enabling a very versatile and flexible operation performance.

  2. Synthesis of ultrasmooth nanostructured diamond films by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition using a He/H(2)/CH(4)/N(2) gas mixture.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, S; Hillman, Damon A; Catledge, Shane A; Konovalov, Valery V; Vohra, Yogesh K

    2006-10-01

    Ultrasmooth nanostructured diamond (USND) films were synthesized on Ti-6Al-4V medical grade substrates by adding helium in H(2)/CH(4)/N(2) plasma and changing the N(2)/CH(4) gas flow from 0 to 0.6. We were able to deposit diamond films as smooth as 6 nm (root-mean-square), as measured by an atomic force microscopy (AFM) scan area of 2 μm(2). Grain size was 4-5 nm at 71% He in (H(2) + He) and N(2)/CH(4) gas flow ratio of 0.4 without deteriorating the hardness (~50-60 GPa). The characterization of the films was performed with AFM, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and nanoindentation techniques. XRD and Raman results showed the nanocrystalline nature of the diamond films. The plasma species during deposition were monitored by optical emission spectroscopy. With increasing N(2)/CH(4) feedgas ratio (CH(4) was fixed) in He/H(2)/CH(4)/N(2) plasma, a substantial increase of CN radical (normalized by Balmer H(α) line) was observed along with a drop in surface roughness up to a critical N(2)/CH(4) ratio of 0.4. The CN radical concentration in the plasma was thus correlated to the formation of ultrasmooth nanostructured diamond films.

  3. Synthesis of ultrasmooth nanostructured diamond films by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition using a He/H2/CH4/N2 gas mixture

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, S.; Hillman, Damon A.; Catledge, Shane A.; Konovalov, Valery V.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2008-01-01

    Ultrasmooth nanostructured diamond (USND) films were synthesized on Ti–6Al–4V medical grade substrates by adding helium in H2/CH4/N2 plasma and changing the N2/CH4 gas flow from 0 to 0.6. We were able to deposit diamond films as smooth as 6 nm (root-mean-square), as measured by an atomic force microscopy (AFM) scan area of 2 μm2. Grain size was 4–5 nm at 71% He in (H2 + He) and N2/CH4 gas flow ratio of 0.4 without deteriorating the hardness (~50–60 GPa). The characterization of the films was performed with AFM, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and nanoindentation techniques. XRD and Raman results showed the nanocrystalline nature of the diamond films. The plasma species during deposition were monitored by optical emission spectroscopy. With increasing N2/CH4 feedgas ratio (CH4 was fixed) in He/H2/CH4/N2 plasma, a substantial increase of CN radical (normalized by Balmer Hα line) was observed along with a drop in surface roughness up to a critical N2/CH4 ratio of 0.4. The CN radical concentration in the plasma was thus correlated to the formation of ultrasmooth nanostructured diamond films. PMID:18946515

  4. High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Sullivan, Nichole F; Badding, John V

    2016-07-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon can be produced at MPa pressures from silane without the use of plasma at temperatures as low as 345 °C. High pressure chemical vapor deposition may open a new way to low cost deposition of amorphous silicon solar cells and other thin film structures over very large areas in very compact, simple reactors.

  5. Ellipsometric investigation of nitrogen doped diamond thin films grown in microwave CH4/H2/N2 plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficek, Mateusz; Sankaran, Kamatchi J.; Ryl, Jacek; Bogdanowicz, Robert; Lin, I.-Nan; Haenen, Ken; Darowicki, Kazimierz

    2016-06-01

    The influence of N2 concentration (1%-8%) in CH4/H2/N2 plasma on structure and optical properties of nitrogen doped diamond (NDD) films was investigated. Thickness, roughness, and optical properties of the NDD films in the VIS-NIR range were investigated on the silicon substrates using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The samples exhibited relatively high refractive index (2.6 ± 0.25 at 550 nm) and extinction coefficient (0.05 ± 0.02 at 550 nm) with a transmittance of 60%. The optical investigation was supported by the molecular and atomic data delivered by Raman studies, bright field transmission electron microscopy imaging, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy diagnostics. Those results revealed that while the films grown in CH4/H2 plasma contained micron-sized diamond grains, the films grown using CH4/H2/(4%)N2 plasma exhibited ultranano-sized diamond grains along with n-diamond and i-carbon clusters, which were surrounded by amorphous carbon grain boundaries.

  6. Ellipsometric investigation of nitrogen doped diamond thin films grown in microwave CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ficek, Mateusz; Sankaran, Kamatchi J.; Haenen, Ken; Ryl, Jacek; Darowicki, Kazimierz; Lin, I-Nan

    2016-06-13

    The influence of N{sub 2} concentration (1%–8%) in CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} plasma on structure and optical properties of nitrogen doped diamond (NDD) films was investigated. Thickness, roughness, and optical properties of the NDD films in the VIS–NIR range were investigated on the silicon substrates using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The samples exhibited relatively high refractive index (2.6 ± 0.25 at 550 nm) and extinction coefficient (0.05 ± 0.02 at 550 nm) with a transmittance of 60%. The optical investigation was supported by the molecular and atomic data delivered by Raman studies, bright field transmission electron microscopy imaging, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy diagnostics. Those results revealed that while the films grown in CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} plasma contained micron-sized diamond grains, the films grown using CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/(4%)N{sub 2} plasma exhibited ultranano-sized diamond grains along with n-diamond and i-carbon clusters, which were surrounded by amorphous carbon grain boundaries.

  7. Chemical Vapor Deposition Epitaxy an Patternless and Patterned Substrates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takoudis, Christos G.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses chemical vapor deposition epitaxy on patternless and patterned substrates for an electronic materials processing course. Describes the processs types and features of epitaxy. Presents some potential problems of epitaxy. Lists 38 references. (YP)

  8. Fundamental studies of defect generation in amorphous silicon alloys grown by remote plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition. Final subcontract report, 1 July 1989--31 December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lucovsky, G.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes research to reduce the intrinsic bonding defects in amorphous and microcrystalline Si alloys by controlling the bonding chemistry and the microstructure via the deposition process reactions. The specific approach was to use remote plasma-enhanced, chemical-vapor deposition (PECVD) and reactive magnetron sputtering to limit the multiplicity of deposition inaction pathways, and thereby gain increased control over the thin-film chemistry and microstrucre. The research included (1) the deposition of amorphous and microcrystalline Si alloy materials by the PECVD process and by reactive magnetron sputtering, and (2) the evaluation of the material properties of these films for potential applications in PV devices. The focus of the research was on pining a fundamental understanding of the relationships between deposition reaction pathways, the bonding of dopant and alloy atoms, and the electrical provides of importance for PV applications. This involved studying the factors that contribute to defect generation and to defect removal and/or neutralization. In addition to the experimental studies, the research also included theoretical and modeling studies aimed at understanding the relationships between local atomic arrangements of Si and alloy atoms, and the electrical, optical, vibrational, and defect properties.

  9. Effect of Si and C concentration on the microstructure, and the mechanical, tribological and electrochemical properties of nanocomposite TiC/a-SiC:H/a-C:H coatings prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Duanjie; Hassani, Salim; Poulin, Suzie; Szpunar, Jerzy A.; Martinu, Ludvik; Klemberg-Sapieha, Jolanta E.

    2012-02-01

    The nanocomposite TiC/a-SiC:H/a-C:H (presented as Ti-Si-C) coatings attract considerable interest due to their possible applications such as wear protective coatings, diffusion barriers, and materials for solar cells and electrical contacts. In order to explore new film properties and open new opportunities, in the present work, we prepare a series of C-rich Ti-Si-C coatings with different Si and C concentrations using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and we systematically investigate the effect of elemental composition on the microstructure, and on the mechanical, tribological and electrochemical properties. XRD and XPS analyses demonstrate that the Ti-Si-C coatings mainly consist of nanocrystalline (nc-) TiC embedded in amorphous (a-) SiC:H and a-C:H matrices. Ti-Si-C coatings with a high Si concentration possess enhanced mechanical properties (high hardness), while those with additional C exhibit superior tribological behaviors. The increase of Si and/or C concentrations leads to a grain size refinement of the TiC nanocrystals and to an expansion of the amorphous phase. This in turn substantially enhances their corrosion resistance. Ti-Si-C coatings with the highest Si or C contents exhibit the best corrosion performance among the tested samples by improving the corrosion resistance of the SS410 substrate by a factor of ˜400.

  10. Investigations on the Role of N2:(N2 + CH4) Ratio on the Growth of Hydrophobic Nanostructured Hydrogenated Carbon Nitride Thin Films by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition at Low Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Khanis, Noor Hamizah; Ritikos, Richard; Ahmad Kamal, Shafarina Azlinda; Abdul Rahman, Saadah

    2017-01-01

    Nanostructured hydrogenated carbon nitride (CNx:H) thin films were synthesized on a crystal silicon substrate at low deposition temperature by radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Methane and nitrogen were the precursor gases used in this deposition process. The effects of N2 to the total gas flow rate ratio on the formation of CNx:H nanostructures were investigated. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), Raman scattering, and Fourier transform of infrared spectroscopies (FTIR) were used to characterize the films. The atomic nitrogen to carbon ratio and sp2 bonds in the film structure showed a strong influence on its growth rate, and its overall structure is strongly influenced by even small changes in the N2:(N2 + CH4) ratio. The formation of fibrous CNx:H nanorod structures occurs at ratios of 0.7 and 0.75, which also shows improved surface hydrophobic characteristic. Analysis showed that significant presence of isonitrile bonds in a more ordered film structure were important criteria contributing to the formation of vertically-aligned nanorods. The hydrophobicity of the CNx:H surface improved with the enhancement in the vertical alignment and uniformity in the distribution of the fibrous nanorod structures. PMID:28772460

  11. Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition of Carbon Coatings on LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 for Li-Ion Battery Composite Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Doeff, M.M.; Kostecki, R.; Marcinek, M.; Wilcoc, J.D.

    2008-12-10

    In this paper, we report results of a novel synthesis method of thin film conductive carbon coatings on LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} cathode active material powders for lithium-ion batteries. Thin layers of graphitic carbon were produced from a solid organic precursor, anthracene, by a one-step microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) method. The structure and morphology of the carbon coatings were examined using SEM, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy. The composite LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} electrodes were electrochemically tested in lithium half coin cells. The composite cathodes made of the carbon-coated LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} powder showed superior electrochemical performance and increased capacity compared to standard composite LiNi{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3}O{sub 2} electrodes.

  12. Performance enhancement of hybrid solar cells through chemical vapor annealing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Zhang, Genqiang

    2010-05-12

    Improvement in power conversion efficiency has been observed in cadmium selenide nanorods/poly(3-hexylthiophene) hybrid solar cells through benzene-1,3-dithiol chemical vapor annealing. Phosphor NMR studies of the nanorods and TEM/AFM characterizations of the morphology of the blended film showed that the ligand exchange reaction and related phase separation happening during the chemical vapor annealing are responsible for the performance enhancement.

  13. Chemical vapor deposition of copper films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgharkar, Narendra Shamkant

    We have studied the kinetics of copper chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for interconnect metallization using hydrogen (Hsb2) reduction of the Cu(hfac)sb2 (copper(II) hexafluoroacetylacetonate) precursor. Steady-state deposition rates were measured using a hot-wall microbalance reactor. For base case conditions of 2 Torr Cu(hfac)sb2, 40 Torr Hsb2, and 300sp°C, a growth rate of 0.5 mg cmsp{-2} hrsp{-1} (ca. 10 nm minsp{-1}) is observed. Reaction order experiments suggest that the deposition rate passes through a maximum at partial pressure of 2 Torr of Cu(hfac)sb2. The deposition rate has an overall half-order dependence on Hsb2 partial pressure. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate expression is used to describe the observed kinetic dependencies on Cu(hfac)sb2, Hsb2, and H(hfac). Based on the rate expression a mechanism is proposed in which the overall rate is determined by the surface reaction of adsorbed Cu(hfac)sb2 and H species. Additionally, the role of alcohols in enhancing the deposition rate has been investigated. Addition of isopropanol results in a six fold enhancement to yield a deposition rate of 3.3 mg cmsp{-2} hrsp{-1} (ca. 60 nm minsp{-1}) at 5 Torr of isopropanol, 0.4 Torr Cu(hfac)sb2, 40 Torr Hsb2, and 300sp°C. Ethanol and methanol give lower enhancements of 1.75 and 1.1 mg cmsp{-2} hrsp{-1}, respectively. A mechanism based on the ordering of the aqueous pKsba values of the alcohols is proposed to explain the observed results. Lastly, we have built a warm-wall Pedestal reactor apparatus to demonstrate copper CVD on TiN/Si substrates. The apparatus includes a liquid injection system for transport of isopropanol-diluted precursor solutions. At optimized conditions of precursor and substrate pre-treatments, we have deposited uniform films of copper on TiN/Si substrates at an average deposition rate of 3.0 mg cmsp{-2} hrsp{-1} (ca. 60 nm minsp{-1}).

  14. Differentiation of vapor mixture with chemical sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulki; Jung, Youngmo; Moon, Hi Gyu; Lee, Ji Eun; Shin, Bum Ju; Lim, Chaehyun; Choi, Jaebin; Seo, Minah; Kim, Jae Hun; Jun, Seong Chan; Kim, Sang Kyung; Kang, Chong Yun; Lee, Taikjin; Lee, Seok

    2015-07-01

    Arrays of partially selective chemical sensors have been the focus of extensive research over the past decades because of their potential for widespread application in ambient air monitoring, health and safety, and biomedical diagnostics. Especially, vapor sensor arrays based on functionalized nanomaterials have shown great promise with their high sensitivity by dimensionality and outstanding electronic properties. Here, we introduce experiments where individual vapors and mixtures of them are examined by different chemical sensor arrays. The collected data from those sensor arrays are further analyzed by a principal component analysis (PCA) and targeted vapors are recognized based on prepared database.

  15. Role of hydrogen on the deposition and properties of fluorinated silicon-nitride films prepared by inductively coupled plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using SiF{sub 4}/N{sub 2}/H{sub 2} mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Fandino, J.; Santana, G.; Rodriguez-Fernandez, L.; Cheang-Wong, J.C.; Ortiz, A.; Alonso, J.C.

    2005-03-01

    Fluorinated silicon-nitride films have been prepared at low temperature (250 deg. C) by remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using mixtures of SiF{sub 4}, N{sub 2}, Ar, and various H{sub 2} flow rates. The deposited films were characterized by means of single wavelength ellipsometry, infrared transmission, resonant nuclear reactions, Rutherford backscattering analysis, and current-voltage measurements. It was found that films deposited without hydrogen grow with the highest deposition rate, however, they result with the highest fluorine content ({approx}27 at. %) and excess of silicon (Si/N ratio{approx_equal}1.75). These films also have the lowest refractive index and the highest etch rate, and exhibit very poor dielectric properties. As a consequence of the high fluorine content, these films hydrolize rapidly upon exposure to the ambient moisture, forming Si-H and N-H bonds, however, they do not oxidize completely. The addition of hydrogen to the deposition process reduces the deposition rate but improves systematically the stability and insulating properties of the films by reducing the amount of both silicon and fluorine incorporated during growth. All the fluorinated silicon-nitride films deposited at hydrogen flow rates higher than 3.5 sccm resulted free of Si-H bonds. In spite of the fact that films obtained at the highest hydrogen flow rate used in this work are still silicon rich (Si/N ratio{approx_equal}1.0) and contain a considerable amount of fluorine ({approx}16 at. %), they are chemically stable and show acceptable dielectric properties.

  16. Quantum cascade laser investigations of CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} interconversion in hydrocarbon/H{sub 2} gas mixtures during microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Jie; Cheesman, Andrew; Ashfold, Michael N. R.; Hay, Kenneth G.; Wright, Stephen; Langford, Nigel; Duxbury, Geoffrey; Mankelevich, Yuri A.

    2009-08-01

    CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} molecules (and their interconversion) in hydrocarbon/rare gas/H{sub 2} gas mixtures in a microwave reactor used for plasma enhanced diamond chemical vapor deposition (CVD) have been investigated by line-of-sight infrared absorption spectroscopy in the wavenumber range of 1276.5-1273.1 cm{sup -1} using a quantum cascade laser spectrometer. Parameters explored include process conditions [pressure, input power, source hydrocarbon, rare gas (Ar or Ne), input gas mixing ratio], height (z) above the substrate, and time (t) after addition of hydrocarbon to a pre-existing Ar/H{sub 2} plasma. The line integrated absorptions so obtained have been converted to species number densities by reference to the companion two-dimensional (r,z) modeling of the CVD reactor described in Mankelevich et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 104, 113304 (2008)]. The gas temperature distribution within the reactor ensures that the measured absorptions are dominated by CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} molecules in the cool periphery of the reactor. Nonetheless, the measurements prove to be of enormous value in testing, tensioning, and confirming the model predictions. Under standard process conditions, the study confirms that all hydrocarbon source gases investigated (methane, acetylene, ethane, propyne, propane, and butane) are converted into a mixture dominated by CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. The interconversion between these two species is highly dependent on the local gas temperature and the H atom number density, and thus on position within the reactor. CH{sub 4}->C{sub 2}H{sub 2} conversion occurs most efficiently in an annular shell around the central plasma (characterized by 1400CH{sub 4} is favored in the more distant regions where T{sub gas}<1400 K. Analysis of the multistep interconversion mechanism reveals substantial net consumption of H atoms accompanying the CH{sub 4}->C{sub 2}H{sub 2

  17. Quantum cascade laser investigations of CH4 and C2H2 interconversion in hydrocarbon/H2 gas mixtures during microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jie; Cheesman, Andrew; Ashfold, Michael N. R.; Hay, Kenneth G.; Wright, Stephen; Langford, Nigel; Duxbury, Geoffrey; Mankelevich, Yuri A.

    2009-08-01

    CH4 and C2H2 molecules (and their interconversion) in hydrocarbon/rare gas/H2 gas mixtures in a microwave reactor used for plasma enhanced diamond chemical vapor deposition (CVD) have been investigated by line-of-sight infrared absorption spectroscopy in the wavenumber range of 1276.5-1273.1 cm-1 using a quantum cascade laser spectrometer. Parameters explored include process conditions [pressure, input power, source hydrocarbon, rare gas (Ar or Ne), input gas mixing ratio], height (z) above the substrate, and time (t) after addition of hydrocarbon to a pre-existing Ar/H2 plasma. The line integrated absorptions so obtained have been converted to species number densities by reference to the companion two-dimensional (r ,z) modeling of the CVD reactor described in Mankelevich et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 104, 113304 (2008)]. The gas temperature distribution within the reactor ensures that the measured absorptions are dominated by CH4 and C2H2 molecules in the cool periphery of the reactor. Nonetheless, the measurements prove to be of enormous value in testing, tensioning, and confirming the model predictions. Under standard process conditions, the study confirms that all hydrocarbon source gases investigated (methane, acetylene, ethane, propyne, propane, and butane) are converted into a mixture dominated by CH4 and C2H2. The interconversion between these two species is highly dependent on the local gas temperature and the H atom number density, and thus on position within the reactor. CH4→C2H2 conversion occurs most efficiently in an annular shell around the central plasma (characterized by 1400

  18. The chemical vapor deposition of zirconium carbide onto ceramic substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, John A, Jr.; Palmisiano, Nick, Jr.; Welsh, R. Edward

    1999-07-01

    Zirconium carbide is an attractive ceramic material due to its unique properties such as high melting point, good thermal conductivity, and chemical resistance. The controlled preparation of zirconium carbide films of superstoichiometric, stoichiometric, and substoichiometric compositions has been achieved utilizing zirconium tetrachloride and methane precursor gases in an atmospheric pressure high temperature chemical vapor deposition system.

  19. Advanced chemical heat pumps using liquid-vapor reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirol, L.

    Chemical heat pumps utilizing liquid-vapor reactions can be configured in forms analogous to electric drive vapor-compression heat pumps and heat activated absorption heat pumps. Basic thermodynamic considerations eliminate some heat pumps and place restrictive working fluid requirements on others, but two thermodynamically feasible systems have significant potential advantage over conventional technology. An electric drive reactive heat pump can use smaller heat exchangers and compressor than a vapor-compression machine, and have more flexible operating characteristics. A waste heat driven heat pump (temperature amplifier) using liquid-vapor chemical reactions can operate with higher coefficient of performance and smaller heat exchangers than an absorption temperature amplifying heat pump. Higher temperatures and larger temperature lifts should also be possible.

  20. Recirculating wedges for metal-vapor plasma tubes

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jerome P.; Sawvel, Robert M.; Draggoo, Vaughn G.

    1994-01-01

    A metal vapor laser is disclosed that recycles condensed metal located at the terminal ends of a plasma tube back toward the center of the tube. A pair of arcuate wedges are incorporated on the bottom of the plasma tube near the terminal ends. The wedges slope downward toward the center so that condensed metal may be transported under the force of gravity away from the terminal ends. The wedges are curved to fit the plasma tube to thereby avoid forming any gaps within the tube interior.

  1. Recirculating wedges for metal-vapor plasma tubes

    DOEpatents

    Hall, J.P.; Sawvel, R.M.; Draggoo, V.G.

    1994-06-28

    A metal vapor laser is disclosed that recycles condensed metal located at the terminal ends of a plasma tube back toward the center of the tube. A pair of arcuate wedges are incorporated on the bottom of the plasma tube near the terminal ends. The wedges slope downward toward the center so that condensed metal may be transported under the force of gravity away from the terminal ends. The wedges are curved to fit the plasma tube to thereby avoid forming any gaps within the tube interior. 8 figures.

  2. Study of Laser Created Metal Vapor Plasmas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-16

    Downsview, Ontario, 61102F 2301{A7, Canada, 11311 5T6 . I I. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS I4LQE1 Mf Air Force Office of Scientific Research ... RESEARCH OBJECTIVES 1 STATUS OF RESEARCH 3 LASES-Program 3 Lifetime Measurements 14 Ablation Plasma Studies 4 LIBORS - Theoretical Program 5 Comparative...PROFESSIONAL PERSONNEL 20 INTERACTIONS (COUPLING ACTIVITY) 21 NEW DISCOVERIES STEMMING FROM RESEARCH 22 APPENDIX A APPENDIX B • L ..t 1

  3. Chemical vapor deposition of magnetic oxide semiconductors for spintronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falco, Lucas

    2005-11-01

    Moore's law, which states that the number of transistor's per square inch on integrated circuits doubles every 18 months, has set the pace of progress for the electronics industry since the 1970's. This in turn has led to a significant reduction in the cost of computers and communications devices. However, because of quantum mechanic effects, a limit in the miniaturization of devices is rapidly approaching where any further reduction in size may hinder their operation. Taking advantage of the electron spin, a quantum effect, and integrating it with electronics design, a new field is emerging, known as spintronics. In this respect, a very active area of research is in dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS). In this work the author examines the use of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) as a method for the preparation of magnetic oxide semiconductors for spintronic applications. CVD has been used extensively as an efficient and inexpensive method to deposit magnetic and semiconducting thin films. The author examined the chemical, structural, and morphological properties of hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) thin films prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) on silicon oxide (SiO2) substrates. Using X-ray diffraction (XRD) it was determined that the films contain a alpha-Fe2O3 phase. The author also studied the deposition of SnO2 by atomic layer deposition (ALD) and CVD. The effect of SnI4 pulse time was analyzed and it was determined that ALD growth was achieved after an 8 second pulse time. Ultimately, the preparation of cobalt oxide and Co-doped SnO2 films was the objective of this work. After several cobalt precursors were tried, the author found a suitable precursor, cobalt (II) acetylacetonate, to grow cobalt oxide and Co-doped SnO2 films. Sn1-XCO XO2+delta films were epitaxial for Co at% < 1 and indicated ferromagnetism on both SiO2 and sapphire substrate. In general, it was observed that higher magnetic moments were found for samples with lower cobalt

  4. Chemical vapor deposited silica coatings for solar mirror protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, Daniel A.; Dever, Therese M.; Banholzer, William F.

    1988-01-01

    A variety of techniques is available to apply protective coatings to oxidation susceptible spacecraft components, and each has associated advantages and disadvantages. Film applications by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has the advantage of being able to be applied conformally to objects of irregular shape. For this reason, a study was made of the oxygen plasma durability of thin film (less than 5000 A) silicon dioxide coatings applied by CVD. In these experiments, such coatings were applied to silver mirrors, which are strongly subject to oxidation, and which are proposed for use on the space station solar dynamic power system. Results indicate that such coatings can provide adequate protection without affecting the reflectance of the mirror. Scanning electron micrographs indicated that oxidation of the silver layer did occur at stress crack locations, but this did not affect the measured solar reflectances. Oxidation of the silver did not proceed beyond the immediate location of the crack. Such stress cracks did not occur in thinner silica flims, and hence such films would be desirable for this application.

  5. Fundamental studies of the chemical vapor deposition of diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    The plasma or thermally enhanced low pressure chemical vapor deposition of diamond films is an exciting development with many challenging fundamental problems. The early stages of nucleation is relevant to the initial growth rate and the perfection and morphology of the deposit. To isolate one of the factors that influence nucleation, we have studied the effect of surface topography on the nucleation process. Our earlier work has shown preferential nucleation on sharp convex features and we have proposed several possible reasons for this behavior, including dangling bonds at the convex features. In our recent work, we have extended our investigation to include a novel patterning of silicon substrates used to pattern silicon solar cells. The results are consistent with our earlier observations that the majority of nucleation events occur on protruding surface features. In an effort to establish whether dangling bonds at the protruding surfaces may be responsible for the selective nucleation, we have evaluated the dangling bond concentration using electron spin resonance. We have carried out deposition under nominally identical surface topography, but with different concentrations of dangling bonds at or near the surface. The results of this study indicate that dangling bonds play a minor role in enhancing nucleation, in contrast to a substantial role played by special surface topographical features. In the course of the past year, we have submitted four manuscripts for publication and have made six presentations.

  6. Chemical vapor deposited silica coatings for solar mirror protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, Daniel A.; Dever, Therese M.; Banholzer, William F.

    1988-01-01

    A variety of techniques is available to apply protective coatings to oxidation susceptible spacecraft components, and each has associated advantages and disadvantages. Film applications by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has the advantage of being able to be applied conformally to objects of irregular shape. For this reason, a study was made of the oxygen plasma durability of thin film (less than 5000 A) silicon dioxide coatings applied by CVD. In these experiments, such coatings were applied to silver mirrors, which are strongly subject to oxidation, and which are proposed for use on the space station solar dynamic power system. Results indicate that such coatings can provide adequate protection without affecting the reflectance of the mirror. Scanning electron micrographs indicated that oxidation of the silver layer did occur at stress crack locations, but this did not affect the measured solar reflectances. Oxidation of the silver did not proceed beyond the immediate location of the crack. Such stress cracks did not occur in thinner silica films, and hence such films would be desirable for this application.

  7. Plasma-Powder Feedstock Interaction During Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwaar, Aleem; Wei, Lianglinag; Guo, Hongbo; Zhang, Baopeng

    2017-01-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition is a new process developed to produce coatings from the vapor phase. To achieve deposition from the vapor phase, the plasma-feedstock interaction inside the plasma torch, i.e., from the powder injection point to the nozzle exit, is critical. In this work, the plasma characteristics and the momentum and heat transfer between the plasma and powder feedstock at different torch input power levels were investigated theoretically to optimize the net plasma torch power, among other important factors such as the plasma gas composition, powder feed rate, and carrier gas. The plasma characteristics were calculated using the CEA2 code, and the plasma-feedstock interaction was studied inside the torch nozzle at low-pressure (20-25 kPa) conditions. A particle dynamics model was introduced to compute the particle velocity, coupled with Xi Chen's drag model for nonevaporating particles. The results show that the energy transferred to the particles and the coating morphology are greatly influenced by the plasma gas characteristics and the particle dynamics inside the nozzle. The heat transfer between the plasma gas and feedstock material increased with the net torch power up to an optimum at 64 kW, at which a maximum of 3.4% of the available plasma energy was absorbed by the feedstock powder. Experimental results using agglomerated 7-8 wt.% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powder as feedstock material confirmed the theoretical predictions.

  8. Plasma-Powder Feedstock Interaction During Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwaar, Aleem; Wei, Lianglinag; Guo, Hongbo; Zhang, Baopeng

    2017-02-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition is a new process developed to produce coatings from the vapor phase. To achieve deposition from the vapor phase, the plasma-feedstock interaction inside the plasma torch, i.e., from the powder injection point to the nozzle exit, is critical. In this work, the plasma characteristics and the momentum and heat transfer between the plasma and powder feedstock at different torch input power levels were investigated theoretically to optimize the net plasma torch power, among other important factors such as the plasma gas composition, powder feed rate, and carrier gas. The plasma characteristics were calculated using the CEA2 code, and the plasma-feedstock interaction was studied inside the torch nozzle at low-pressure (20-25 kPa) conditions. A particle dynamics model was introduced to compute the particle velocity, coupled with Xi Chen's drag model for nonevaporating particles. The results show that the energy transferred to the particles and the coating morphology are greatly influenced by the plasma gas characteristics and the particle dynamics inside the nozzle. The heat transfer between the plasma gas and feedstock material increased with the net torch power up to an optimum at 64 kW, at which a maximum of 3.4% of the available plasma energy was absorbed by the feedstock powder. Experimental results using agglomerated 7-8 wt.% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powder as feedstock material confirmed the theoretical predictions.

  9. Graphene-Based Chemical Vapor Sensors for Electronic Nose Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallon, Eric C.

    chemiresistor device and used as a chemical sensor, where its resistance is temporarily modified while exposed to chemical compounds. The inherent, broad selective nature of graphene is demonstrated by testing a sensor against a diverse set of volatile organic compounds and also against a set of chemically similar compounds. The sensor exhibits excellent selectivity and is capable of achieving high classification accuracies. The kinetics of the sensor's response are further investigated revealing a relationship between the transient behavior of the response curve and physiochemical properties of the compounds, such as the molar mass and vapor pressure. This kinetic information is also shown to provide important information for further pattern recognition and classification, which is demonstrated by increased classification accuracy of very similar compounds. Covalent modification of the graphene surface is demonstrated by means of plasma treatment and free radical exchange, and sensing performance compared to an unmodified graphene sensor. Finally, the first example of a graphene-based, cross-reactive chemical sensor array is demonstrated by applying various polymers as coatings over an array of graphene sensors. The sensor array is tested against a variety of compounds, including the complex odor of Scotch whiskies, where it is capable of perfect classification of 10 Scotch whiskey variations.

  10. SAW Sensors for Chemical Vapors and Gases

    PubMed Central

    Devkota, Jagannath; Ohodnicki, Paul R.; Greve, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology provides a sensitive platform for sensing chemicals in gaseous and fluidic states with the inherent advantages of passive and wireless operation. In this review, we provide a general overview on the fundamental aspects and some major advances of Rayleigh wave-based SAW sensors in sensing chemicals in a gaseous phase. In particular, we review the progress in general understanding of the SAW chemical sensing mechanism, optimization of the sensor characteristics, and the development of the sensors operational at different conditions. Based on previous publications, we suggest some appropriate sensing approaches for particular applications and identify new opportunities and needs for additional research in this area moving into the future. PMID:28397760

  11. Vaporization of a mixed precursors in chemical vapor deposition for YBCO films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Gang; Meng, Guangyao; Schneider, Roger L.; Sarma, Bimal K.; Levy, Moises

    1995-01-01

    Single phase YBa2Cu3O7-delta thin films with T(c) values around 90 K are readily obtained by using a single source chemical vapor deposition technique with a normal precursor mass transport. The quality of the films is controlled by adjusting the carrier gas flow rate and the precursor feed rate.

  12. Plasma Chemical Aspects Of Dust Formation In Hydrocarbon Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Berndt, J.; Kovacevic, E.; Stepanovic, O.; Stefanovic, I.; Winter, J.

    2008-09-07

    This contribution deals with some plasma chemical aspects of dust formation in hydrocarbon plasmas. The interplay between dust formation and plasma chemistry will be discussed by means of different experimental results. One specific example concerns the formation of benzene and the role of atomic hydrogen for plasma chemical processes and dust formation in hydrocarbon discharges.

  13. A novel chemically selective siloxane polymer for chemical vapor sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jia; Jiang, Yadong; Du, Xiaosong; Bi, Juan

    2010-10-01

    A new hydrogen-bond acidic carbosiloxane polymer for quartz crystal microbalance sensors (QCMs) application was synthesized via O-alkylation, Claisen rearrange, hydrosilylation reaction and functionalized the polysiloxane with trifluoroacetone groups (TFA). The trifluoroisopropanol functionalized polysiloxane was characterized by FT-IR and 1HNMR. And this novel siloxane polymer was coated onto AT-cut 8 MHz QCM sensors to investigate its gas sensitive responses to the organophosphorus nerve agent stimulant dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) vapor as well as other interfering organic vapors. The research work indicated that frequency shifts of the trifluoroisopropanol functionalized polysiloxane based QCM sensor to the DMMP vapor were completely linear, and with a regression coefficient of 0.9973 in the concentration range of 10-60 ppm. In addition, the sensitivity of the fabricated QCM sensors to DMMP was up to 10.64 Hz/ ppm, and much higher than the other interfering vapors, limits of detection (LODs) of the QCM sensors was 0.28 ppm, thus high selectivity to DMMP was demonstrated in this work.

  14. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Aluminum Oxide Thin Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vohs, Jason K.; Bentz, Amy; Eleamos, Krystal; Poole, John; Fahlman, Bradley D.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process routinely used to produce thin films of materials via decomposition of volatile precursor molecules. Unfortunately, the equipment required for a conventional CVD experiment is not practical or affordable for many undergraduate chemistry laboratories, especially at smaller institutions. In an effort to…

  15. A novel induction heater for chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, C. W.; Wong, H. K.; Sin, K. S.; Yip, S. T.; Chik, K. P.

    1989-06-01

    We report how an induction cooker for household use can be modified for heating substrate or heating gases to high temperature in a chemical vapor deposition system. Only minor changes of the cooker are necessary. Stable substrate temperature as high as 900 °C was achieved with input power of about 1150 W.

  16. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Aluminum Oxide Thin Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vohs, Jason K.; Bentz, Amy; Eleamos, Krystal; Poole, John; Fahlman, Bradley D.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process routinely used to produce thin films of materials via decomposition of volatile precursor molecules. Unfortunately, the equipment required for a conventional CVD experiment is not practical or affordable for many undergraduate chemistry laboratories, especially at smaller institutions. In an effort to…

  17. Quantitative Infrared Spectra of Vapor Phase Chemical Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Chu, P M.; Kleimeyer, J; Rowland, Brad; Gardner, Patrick J.

    2003-04-21

    Quantitative high resolution (0.1 cm -1) infrared spectra have been acquired for a number of pressure broadened (101.3 KPa N2), vapor phase chemicals including: Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), Tabun (GA), Cyclosarin (GF), VX, nitrogen mustard (HN3), sulfur mustard (HD) and Lewisite (L).

  18. Chemical vapor deposition for automatic processing of integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, B. W.

    1980-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition for automatic processing of integrated circuits including the wafer carrier and loading from a receiving air track into automatic furnaces and unloading on to a sending air track is discussed. Passivation using electron beam deposited quartz is also considered.

  19. The Chemical Vapor Deposition of Iridium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    accepted types are made of porous tungsten impregnated with barium calcium aluminates (Levi, 1955; Brodie and Jenkins, 1956). The emission capability of the...not only does the chemical composition of the pore ends and the bulk material undergo alteration, but the crystal structure of the tungsten (Maloney... hexafluoride to iridium metal or IrF 6 species. In our work, IrF 6 was prepared and stored in fluorine-passivated apparatus, and between runs maintained at

  20. 2D Plasma Photonic Crystals in resonantly pumped Cesium Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righetti, Fabio; Cappelli, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Plasma photonic crystals (PCs) afford the opportunity for dynamic reconfigurability. In this presentation we describe the conditions required for constructing an all-plasma PC that can interact with sub mm-wavelength radiation. Conditions required for this interaction are high plasma densities (>1014 cm-3) and small lattice constant (<1 mm). We describe the construction of a two-dimensional photonic crystal composed of several sub-millimeter plasma filaments in a 1 Torr heated cesium vapor cell. The cesium is ionized by 1 W continuous-wave laser excitation with the wavelength centered around the 852 nm resonance line. The filaments are produced by focusing the laser through a microlens array with a 500 µm pitch. Small departures from line center are found to produce a strong variation in the plasma filament structure and density. Stark broadening measurements of the cesium 9F-5D transition at 647.4 nm yield plasma density. We present preliminary terahertz transmission spectrum of the two-dimensional plasma photonic crystal structure. Experimental results are compared to numerical simulations which predict the presence of bandgaps in regions of both negative and positive plasma dielectric constant.

  1. Chemical vapor deposition reactor. [providing uniform film thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, S. S.; Maserjian, J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An improved chemical vapor deposition reactor is characterized by a vapor deposition chamber configured to substantially eliminate non-uniformities in films deposited on substrates by control of gas flow and removing gas phase reaction materials from the chamber. Uniformity in the thickness of films is produced by having reactive gases injected through multiple jets which are placed at uniformally distributed locations. Gas phase reaction materials are removed through an exhaust chimney which is positioned above the centrally located, heated pad or platform on which substrates are placed. A baffle is situated above the heated platform below the mouth of the chimney to prevent downdraft dispersion and scattering of gas phase reactant materials.

  2. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haven, Victor E.

    1999-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings extend the operating temperature range of actively cooled gas turbine components, therefore increasing thermal efficiency. Performance and lifetime of existing ceram ic coatings are limited by spallation during heating and cooling cycles. Spallation of the ceramic is a function of its microstructure, which is determined by the deposition method. This research is investigating metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of yttria stabilized zirconia to improve performance and reduce costs relative to electron beam physical vapor deposition. Coatings are deposited in an induction-heated, low-pressure reactor at 10 microns per hour. The coating's composition, structure, and response to the turbine environment will be characterized.

  3. Copper-vapor-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition of graphene on dielectric substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao; Wu, Tianru; Wang, Haomin; Zhang, Xuefu; Shi, Zhiyuan; Xie, Xiaoming

    2017-07-01

    Direct synthesis of high-quality graphene on dielectric substrates is important for its application in electronics. In this work, we report the process of copper-vapor-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition of high-quality and large graphene domains on various dielectric substrates. The copper vapor plays a vital role on the growth of transfer-free graphene. Both single-crystal domains that are much larger than previous reports and high-coverage graphene films can be obtained by adjusting the growth duration. The quality of the obtained graphene was verified to be comparable with that of graphene grown on Cu foil. The progress reported in this work will aid the development of the application of transfer-free graphene in the future.

  4. Vacuum-vapor-deposited films based on benzo(a)phenoxazine derivatives under surface plasma fluorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agabekov, Vladimir E.; Ignasheva, Olga E.; Belyatsky, Vladimir N.

    1997-07-01

    Modification of vacuum vapor deposited thin films based on benzo(a)phenoxazone-5 derivatives with C3F8 and SF6 plasma were investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) method was used to identify and study the distribution of surface functional groups of untreated and fluorinated films investigated. It was shown that fluor content in element composition of surface film layers and perfluorocarbon group content in Cls-lines of XP-spectra depended on chemical structure of the initial compounds. The more quantity and size of side substitutes were contained in the compound chemical structure the less was the content of fluor and perfluorocarbon groups in film surface fluorinated layer. The probable way of plasma active particle interaction with film surface is discussed. Using Kaelbe's method the influence of treatment conditions and initial compound chemical structure on surface properties of fluorinated films was studied.

  5. Plasma and Ion Assistance in Physical Vapor Deposition: AHistorical Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2007-02-28

    Deposition of films using plasma or plasma-assist can betraced back surprisingly far, namely to the 18th century for arcs and tothe 19th century for sputtering. However, only since the 1960s thecoatings community considered other processes than evaporation for largescale commercial use. Ion Plating was perhaps the first importantprocess, introducing vapor ionization and substrate bias to generate abeam of ions arriving on the surface of the growing film. Ratherindependently, cathodic arc deposition was established as an energeticcondensation process, first in the former Soviet Union in the 1970s, andin the 1980s in the Western Hemisphere. About a dozen various ion-basedcoating technologies evolved in the last decades, all characterized byspecific plasma or ion generation processes. Gridded and gridless ionsources were taken from space propulsion and applied to thin filmdeposition. Modeling and simulation have helped to make plasma and ionseffects to be reasonably well understood. Yet--due to the complex, oftennon-linear and non-equilibrium nature of plasma and surfaceinteractions--there is still a place for the experience plasma"sourcerer."

  6. High rate chemical vapor deposition of carbon films using fluorinated gases

    DOEpatents

    Stafford, Byron L.; Tracy, C. Edwin; Benson, David K.; Nelson, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    A high rate, low-temperature deposition of amorphous carbon films is produced by PE-CVD in the presence of a fluorinated or other halide gas. The deposition can be performed at less than 100.degree. C., including ambient room temperature, with a radio frequency plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition process. With less than 6.5 atomic percent fluorine incorporated into the amorphous carbon film, the characteristics of the carbon film, including index of refraction, mass density, optical clarity, and chemical resistance are within fifteen percent (15%) of those characteristics for pure amorphous carbon films, but the deposition rates are high.

  7. Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites made by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Caputo, A.J.; Lowden, R.A.; Stinton, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    A process was developed for the fabrication of ceramic-fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites by chemical vapor infiltration. The ceramic composites were prepared by making fibrous preforms from multiple layers of SiC cloth and forming the silicon-carbide matrix for each component specimen by infiltrating the fibrous preform by a chemical vapor deposition process. A major goal of the work was achieved when infiltration was accomplished in hours instead of weeks by combining the thermal-gradient and forced-gas-flow techniques. Composites that possessed moderate flexural strength and high strain to failure were produced. In addition, the strength of the composites decreased gradually after the maximum strength was obtained, demonstrating that the composites had the desired high toughness and avoided the typical brittle behavior of monolithic ceramics.

  8. Synthesis of mullite coatings by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Mulpuri, R.P.; Sarin, V.K.

    1996-06-01

    Formation of mullite on ceramic substrates via chemical vapor deposition was investigated. Mullite is a solid solution of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} with a composition of 3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}2SiO{sub 2}. Thermodynamic calculations performed on the AlCl{sub 3}{endash}SiCl{sub 4}{endash}CO{sub 2}{endash}H{sub 2} system were used to construct equilibrium chemical vapor deposition (CVD) phase diagrams. With the aid of these diagrams and consideration of kinetic rate limiting factors, initial process parameters were determined. Through process optimization, crystalline CVD mullite coatings have been successfully grown on SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrates. Results from the thermodynamic analysis, process optimization, and effect of various process parameters on deposition rate and coating morphology are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 Materials Research Society.}

  9. Metal Organic-Chemical Vapor Deposition fabrication of semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.

    1980-08-01

    The metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MO-CVD) process was studied and implemented in detail. Single crystal GaAs, and Ga(x)Al(1-x)As films were grown on GaAs by depositing metal organic alkyl gallium compounds in the presence of an arsine mixture. The metal organic chemical vapor deposition process allowed formation of the semiconductor compound directly on the heated substrate in only one hot temperature zone. With MO-CVD, semiconductor films can be efficiently produced by a more economical, less complicated process which will lend itself more easily than past fabrication procedures, to high quantity, high quality reproduction techniques of semiconductor lasers. Clearly MO-CVD is of interest to the communication industry where semiconductor lasers are used extensively in fiber optic communication systems, and similarly to the solar energy business where GaAs substrates are used as photoelectric cells.

  10. Finite Element Analysis Modeling of Chemical Vapor Deposition of Silicon Carbide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-19

    Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics . 6. de Jong, F. & M. Meyyappan. (1996). Numerical Simulation of Silicon Carbide Chemical Vapor Deposition...FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS MODELING OF CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION OF SILICON CARBIDE !! THESIS JUNE 2014 ! Brandon M. Allen...T-14-J-38 ! ! FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS MODELING OF CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION OF SILICON CARBIDE !! THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of

  11. Laser Induced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Gallium Arsenide Films.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-20

    be grown. The VPE processes can be subdivided into (a) the chloride and (b) the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) processes. The... chloride VPE processes, utilizing 1= AsCl 3 -Ga-H 2 or HC1-Ga-AsH3 . are capable of producing epitazial layers with low carrier concentrations and high...electron mobilities. However. the chloride systems have not been successful for the growth of aluminum- containing III-V alloys because of the reactivity

  12. Scale-up and modeling of forced chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; McLaughlin, J.C.; Starr, T.L.

    1994-09-01

    The forced flow-thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration (FCVI) process has been scaled-up from a maximum of 7.6 cm dia. disk to fabrication of 24 cm dia. disks, 1.6 cm in thickness. The components are turbine rotor subelements produced from polar weave Tyranno fibers preforms. The disks were subjected to non-destructive testing and spin-tested to high rpm. The processing conditions were modeled with the GTCVI code to aid in optimization.

  13. Processing Research on Chemically Vapor Deposited Silicon Nitride.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    the feasi- bility of synthesizing free-standing plate and figured geometries of phase-pure silicon nitride by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method...ates toward moisture and the probability that they all contain absorbed ammonium chloride and ammonia. A strong ammoniacal odor indicates that...solid (V- L -S) processes favored by high ammonia/silicon ratios, high concentrations and long times. Whisker formation would be favored by the opposite

  14. Combustion chemical vapor desposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B.

    1995-10-01

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings.

  15. Chemical vapor deposition coating of fibers using microwave application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Hoover, Gordon (Inventor); Jackson, Henry W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition coating is carried out in a cylindrical cavity. The fibers are heated by a microwave source that is uses a TM0N0 mode, where O is an integer, and produces a field that depends substantially only on radius. The fibers are observed to determine their heating, and their position can be adjusted. Once the fibers are uniformly heated, a CVD reagent is added to process the fibers.

  16. Extraordinary magnetoresistance in shunted chemical vapor deposition grown graphene devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    than 95% single-layer gra- phene using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on copper foils.12 These large-area films are transferable to any arbi- trary...graphene will reconcile with the need for higher mobility, as mobility coupled the cleanliness and defectiveness of the graphene. Nonetheless, such devices...Wiesendagner, Science 320, 82 (2008). 21A. L. Friedman, H. Chun, Y. J. Jung, D. Heiman, E. R. Glaser , and L. Menon, Phys. Rev. B 81, 115461 (2010). FIG. 3

  17. Fabrication and evaluation of chemically vapor deposited tungsten heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacigalupi, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    A network of lithium-filled tungsten heat pipes is considered as a method of heat extraction from high temperature nuclear reactors. The need for material purity and shape versatility in these applications dictates the use of chemically vapor deposited (CVD) tungsten. Adaptability of CVD tungsten to complex heat pipe designs is shown. Deposition and welding techniques are described. Operation of two lithium-filled CVD tungsten heat pipes above 1800 K is discussed.

  18. Capillary - Discharge Based Hand-Held Detector For Chemical Vapor Monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang

    2005-05-31

    A handheld/portable detector for chemical vapor monitoring includes a housing and a discharge chamber that is established therein. The plasma discharge has a relatively small volume, e.g., in the micro-liter range. A first electrode and a second electrode are disposed within the discharge chamber and a discharge gap is established therebetween. A sample gas tube is in fluid communication with the discharge chamber and provides a sample gas to the discharge chamber. Also, a plasma gas tube is in fluid communication with the discharge chamber and provides a plasma gas thereto. Accordingly, the plasma gas can be used to maintain microplasma discharge between the electrodes and the sample gas can be introduced into the microplasma discharge. A spectrometer optically connected to the handheld/portable detector is used to measure the radiation emitted by the sample gas when subjected to the microplasma discharge.

  19. Liquid-vapor equilibrium-states and critical properties of aluminum from dense plasma equation-of-state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghloul, Mofreh

    2016-10-01

    We present successful estimates of the critical properties and liquid-vapor equilibrium states of pure aluminum fluid as predicted from a chemical model for the equation-of-state of hot dense partially ionized plasma. The essential features of strongly-coupled plasma of metal vapors, such as, multiple ionization, Coulomb interactions among charged particles, partial degeneracy, and intensive short range hard core repulsion are taken into consideration. Internal partition functions of neutral, excited, and ionized species are thoughtfully evaluated in a statistical-mechanically consistent way implementing recent developments in the literature. Results predicted from the present model are discussed and carefully examined against available data and predictions in the literature.

  20. Research on chemical vapor deposition processes for advanced ceramic coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Daniel E.

    1993-01-01

    Our interdisciplinary background and fundamentally-oriented studies of the laws governing multi-component chemical vapor deposition (VD), particle deposition (PD), and their interactions, put the Yale University HTCRE Laboratory in a unique position to significantly advance the 'state-of-the-art' of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) R&D. With NASA-Lewis RC financial support, we initiated a program in March of 1988 that has led to the advances described in this report (Section 2) in predicting chemical vapor transport in high temperature systems relevant to the fabrication of refractory ceramic coatings for turbine engine components. This Final Report covers our principal results and activities for the total NASA grant of $190,000. over the 4.67 year period: 1 March 1988-1 November 1992. Since our methods and the technical details are contained in the publications listed (9 Abstracts are given as Appendices) our emphasis here is on broad conclusions/implications and administrative data, including personnel, talks, interactions with industry, and some known applications of our work.

  1. Chemical vapor deposition modeling: An assessment of current status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1991-01-01

    The shortcomings of earlier approaches that assumed thermochemical equilibrium and used chemical vapor deposition (CVD) phase diagrams are pointed out. Significant advancements in predictive capabilities due to recent computational developments, especially those for deposition rates controlled by gas phase mass transport, are demonstrated. The importance of using the proper boundary conditions is stressed, and the availability and reliability of gas phase and surface chemical kinetic information are emphasized as the most limiting factors. Future directions for CVD are proposed on the basis of current needs for efficient and effective progress in CVD process design and optimization.

  2. Investigation of opening switch mechanisms based on chemically reactive plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapatovich, W. P.; Piejak, R. B.; Proud, J. M.

    1985-11-01

    An investigation of discharge-induced chemical reactions resulting in high-density product vapors containing strongly attaching gases has been conducted to evaluate the feasibility and potential of such reactions in rapid opening plasma switches. This new concept of employing such reactions to limit and/or interrupt large currents on a microsecond time scale was studied in two element (electrodeless and electroded) devices and in three element (electroded) devices. Bimolecular and unimolecular reactions were considered. The plasma reaction between AlCl sub 3 and SiO sub 2 was studied. The electrical properties of one of the reaction products (SiCl sub 4) is reported.

  3. Chemical vapor deposition of conformal, functional, and responsive polymer films.

    PubMed

    Alf, Mahriah E; Asatekin, Ayse; Barr, Miles C; Baxamusa, Salmaan H; Chelawat, Hitesh; Ozaydin-Ince, Gozde; Petruczok, Christy D; Sreenivasan, Ramaswamy; Tenhaeff, Wyatt E; Trujillo, Nathan J; Vaddiraju, Sreeram; Xu, Jingjing; Gleason, Karen K

    2010-05-11

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) polymerization utilizes the delivery of vapor-phase monomers to form chemically well-defined polymeric films directly on the surface of a substrate. CVD polymers are desirable as conformal surface modification layers exhibiting strong retention of organic functional groups, and, in some cases, are responsive to external stimuli. Traditional wet-chemical chain- and step-growth mechanisms guide the development of new heterogeneous CVD polymerization techniques. Commonality with inorganic CVD methods facilitates the fabrication of hybrid devices. CVD polymers bridge microfabrication technology with chemical, biological, and nanoparticle systems and assembly. Robust interfaces can be achieved through covalent grafting enabling high-resolution (60 nm) patterning, even on flexible substrates. Utilizing only low-energy input to drive selective chemistry, modest vacuum, and room-temperature substrates, CVD polymerization is compatible with thermally sensitive substrates, such as paper, textiles, and plastics. CVD methods are particularly valuable for insoluble and infusible films, including fluoropolymers, electrically conductive polymers, and controllably crosslinked networks and for the potential to reduce environmental, health, and safety impacts associated with solvents. Quantitative models aid the development of large-area and roll-to-roll CVD polymer reactors. Relevant background, fundamental principles, and selected applications are reviewed.

  4. Using advanced oxidation treatment for biofilm inactivation by varying water vapor content in air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryota, Suganuma; Koichi, Yasuoka

    2015-09-01

    Biofilms are caused by environmental degradation in food factories and medical facilities. The inactivation of biofilms involves making them react with chemicals including chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, and ozone, although inactivation using chemicals has a potential problem because of the hazardous properties of the residual substance and hydrogen peroxide, which have slow reaction velocity. We successfully performed an advanced oxidation process (AOP) using air plasma. Hydrogen peroxide and ozone, which were used for the formation of OH radicals in our experiment, were generated by varying the amount of water vapor supplied to the plasma. By varying the content of the water included in the air, the main product was changed from air plasma. When we increased the water content in the air, hydrogen peroxide was produced, while ozone peroxide was produced when we decreased the water content in the air. By varying the amount of water vapor, we realized a 99.9% reduction in the amount of bacteria in the biofilm when we discharged humidified air only. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25630104.

  5. Model for the Vaporization of Mixed Organometallic Compounds in the Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition of High Temperature Superconducting Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, Guangyao; Zhou, Gang; Schneider, Roger L.; Sarma, Bimal K.; Levy, Moises

    1993-01-01

    A model of the vaporization and mass transport of mixed organometallics from a single source for thin film metalorganic chemical vapor deposition is presented. A stoichiometric gas phase can be obtained from a mixture of the organometallics in the desired mole ratios, in spite of differences in the volatilities of the individual compounds. Proper film composition and growth rates are obtained by controlling the velocity of a carriage containing the organometallics through the heating zone of a vaporizer.

  6. Chemical vapor deposition modeling for high temperature materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goekoglu, Sueleyman

    1992-01-01

    The formalism for the accurate modeling of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes has matured based on the well established principles of transport phenomena and chemical kinetics in the gas phase and on surfaces. The utility and limitations of such models are discussed in practical applications for high temperature structural materials. Attention is drawn to the complexities and uncertainties in chemical kinetics. Traditional approaches based on only equilibrium thermochemistry and/or transport phenomena are defended as useful tools, within their validity, for engineering purposes. The role of modeling is discussed within the context of establishing the link between CVD process parameters and material microstructures/properties. It is argued that CVD modeling is an essential part of designing CVD equipment and controlling/optimizing CVD processes for the production and/or coating of high performance structural materials.

  7. Kinetics, Chemistry, and Morphology of Syngas Photoinitiated Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Farhanian, Donya; De Crescenzo, Gregory; Tavares, Jason R

    2017-02-28

    Syngas is the product of gasification processes and is used for the production of petrochemicals. Little attention has been paid to its use in the production of oligomeric thin films under ambient conditions. Herein, the nature of the photoinitiated chemical vapor deposition of films made from syngas using high-wavelength ultraviolet light is discussed, including an exploration of the oligomeric films' structure, synthesis mechanism, and growth kinetics. Specifically, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry analyses provide insight into the chemical structure, illustrating the effect of photogenerated radicals in the formation of aliphatic, anhydride, and cyclic structures. The films are covalently bonded to the substrate and chemically uniform. Electron and atomic force microscopy identify an islandlike morphology for the deposit. These insights into the mechanism and structure are linked to processing parameters through a study on the effect of residence time and treatment duration on the deposition rate, as determined through profilometry.

  8. The response of the ionosphere to the injection of chemically reactive vapors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    As a gas released in the ionosphere expands, it is rapidly cooled. When the vapor becomes sufficiently tenuous, it is reheated by collisions with the ambient atmosphere and its flow is then governed by diffusive expansion. As the injected gas becomes well mixed with the plasma, a hole is created by chemical processes. In the case of diatomic hydrogen release, depression of the electron concentrations is governed by the charge exchange reaction between oxygen ions and hydrogen, producing positive hydroxyl ions. Hydroxyl ions rapidly react with the electron gas to produce excited oxygen and hydrogen atoms. Enhanced airglow emissions result from the transition of the excited atoms to lower energy states. The electron temperature in the depleted region rises sharply causing a thermal expansion of the plasma and a further reduction in the local plasma concentration.

  9. Electromagnetic Properties of Impact-Generated Plasma, Vapor and Debris

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, D.A.; Schultz, P.H.

    1998-11-02

    Plasma, vapor and debris associated with an impact or explosive event have been demonstrated in the laboratory to produce radiofrequency and optical electromagnetic emissions that can be diagnostic of the event. Such effects could potentially interfere with communications or remote sensing equipment if an impact occurred, for example, on a satellite. More seriously, impact generated plasma could end the life of a satellite by mechanisms that are not well understood and not normally taken into account in satellite design. For example, arc/discharge phenomena resulting from highly conductive plasma acting as a current path across normally shielded circuits may have contributed to the loss of the Olympus experimental communications satellite on August 11, 1993. The possibility of significant storm activity during the Leonid meteor showers of November 1998, 1999 and 2000 (impact velocity, 72 km/s) has heightened awareness of potential vulnerabilities from hypervelocity electromagnetic effects to orbital assets. The concern is justified. The amount of plasma, electrostatic charge and the magnitude of the resulting currents and electric fields scale nearly as the cube of the impact velocity. Even for microscopic Leonid impacts, the amount of plasma approaches levels that could be dangerous to spacecraft electronics. The degree of charge separation that occurs during hypervelocity impacts scales linearly with impactor mass. The resulting magnetic fields increase linearly with impactor radius and could play a significant role in our understanding of the paleomagnetism of planetary surfaces. The electromagnetic properties of plasma produced by hypervelocity impact have been exploited by researchers as a diagnostic tool, invoked to potentially explain the magnetically jumbled state of the lunar surface and blamed for the loss of the Olympus experimental communications satellite. The production of plasma in and around an impact event can lead to several effects: (1) the

  10. Hazardous Chemical Vapor Handbook for Marine Tank Vessels,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    M3/MIN) 99.41 ENTER DIAMETER OF BUTTERWORTH OPENING IN METERS 0.305 HOW DO YOU WANT TO CALCULATE HENRY S CONSTANT? 1. HENRY S CONSTANT BY MACKAY S...METHOD 2. HENRY S CONSTANT BY DILLING S METHOD 4 SELECT A 1 OR 2 1 INPUT GAMINF, ACTIVITY COEFFICIENT AT INFINITE DILUTION (CHEMICAL IN WATER)li 7.78 Ko...TEMPERATURE (K) VAPOR PRESSURE(rMM HG) DIFFUSION COEFCICIENT(CM2/SEC) KINEMATIC VISCOSITY OF AIR(CM2/SEC) SCHMIDT NUMBER RHOF(GM/CM3) MDOTXZ(GM/CM"-SEC) TAUB

  11. Modeling of chemical vapor infiltration for composite fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Besmann, T.M.

    1993-12-31

    We describe our ongoing efforts to develop a general, validated, 3-D, finite-volume model for the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process. The model simulates preform densification for both isothermal (ICVI) and forced flow-thermal gradient (FCVI) variations of the process, but is most useful for FCVI where specification and control of flow rates and temperature profiles are critical to rapid, uniform densification. The model has been validated experimentally for both ICVI and FCVI fabrication of SiC/SiC composites.

  12. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Matlin, W.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.

    1995-08-01

    A two-step forced chemical vapor infiltration process was developed that reduced infiltration times for 4.45 cm dia. by 1.27 cm thick Nicalon{sup +} fiber preforms by two thirds while maintaining final densities near 90 %. In the first stage of the process, micro-voids within fiber bundles in the cloth were uniformly infiltrated throughout the preform. In the second stage, the deposition rate was increased to more rapidly fill the macro-voids between bundles within the cloth and between layers of cloth. By varying the thermal gradient across the preform uniform infiltration rates were maintained and high final densities achieved.

  13. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; McLaughlin, J.C.; Probst, K.J.; Anderson, T.J.; Starr, T.L.

    1997-12-01

    Silicon carbide-based heat exchanger tubes are of interest to energy production and conversion systems due to their excellent high temperature properties. Fiber-reinforced SiC is of particular importance for these applications since it is substantially tougher than monolithic SiC, and therefore more damage and thermal shock tolerant. This paper reviews a program to develop a scaled-up system for the chemical vapor infiltration of tubular shapes of fiber-reinforced SiC. The efforts include producing a unique furnace design, extensive process and system modeling, and experimental efforts to demonstrate tube fabrication.

  14. Chemical Vapor Deposited Zinc Sulfide. SPIE Press Monograph

    SciTech Connect

    McCloy, John S.; Tustison, Randal W.

    2013-04-22

    Zinc sulfide has shown unequaled utility for infrared windows that require a combination of long-wavelength infrared transparency, mechanical durability, and elevated-temperature performance. This book reviews the physical properties of chemical vapor deposited ZnS and their relationship to the CVD process that produced them. An in-depth look at the material microstructure is included, along with a discussion of the material's optical properties. Finally, because the CVD process itself is central to the development of this material, a brief history is presented.

  15. Unusual thermopower of inhomogeneous graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Youngwoo; Sun, Jie; Lindvall, Niclas; Jae Yang, Seung; Rae Park, Chong; Woo Park, Yung; Yurgens, August

    2014-01-01

    We report on thermopower (TEP) and resistance measurements of inhomogeneous graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Unlike the conventional resistance of pristine graphene, the gate-dependent TEP shows a large electron-hole asymmetry. This can be accounted for by inhomogeneity of the CVD-graphene where individual graphene regions contribute with different TEPs. At the high magnetic field and low temperature, the TEP has large fluctuations near the Dirac point associated with the disorder in the CVD-graphene. TEP measurements reveal additional characteristics of CVD-graphene, which are difficult to obtain from the measurement of resistance alone.

  16. Highly sensitive wide bandwidth photodetectors using chemical vapor deposited graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goo Kang, Chang; Kyung Lee, Sang; Jin Yoo, Tae; Park, Woojin; Jung, Ukjin; Ahn, Jinho; Hun Lee, Byoung

    2014-04-01

    A photodetector generating a nearly constant photocurrent in a very wide spectral range from ultraviolet (UV) to infrared has been demonstrated using chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene. Instability due to a photochemical reaction in the UV region has been minimized using an Al2O3 passivation layer, and a responsivity comparable to that of Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite graphene photodetectors of ˜8 mA/W has been achieved at a 0.1 V bias, despite high defect density in the CVD graphene. A highly sensitive multi-band photodetector using graphene has many potential applications including optical interconnects, multi-band imaging sensors, highly sensitive motion detectors, etc.

  17. Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

  18. Josephson tunnel junctions with chemically vapor deposited polycrystalline germanium barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Kroger, H.; Jillie, D.W.; Smith, L.N.; Phaneuf, L.E.; Potter, C.N.; Shaw, D.M.; Cukauskas, E.J.; Nisenoff, M.

    1984-03-01

    High quality Josephson tunnel junctions have been fabricated whose tunneling barrier is polycrystalline germanium chemically vapor deposited on a NbN base electrode and covered by a Nb counterelectrode. These junctions have excellent characteristics for device applications: values of V/sub m/ (the product of the critical current and the subgap resistance measured at 2 mV and 4.2 K) ranging between 35--48 mV, ideal threshold curves, a steep current rise at the gap voltage, and Josephson current densities from 100 to 1100 A/cm/sup 2/.

  19. Spectroscopic Observation of Chemical Interaction Between Impact-induced Vapor Clouds and the Ambient Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugita, S.; Heineck, J. T.; Schultz, P. H.

    2000-01-01

    Chemical reactions within impact-induced vapor clouds were observed in laboratory experiments using a spectroscopic method. The results indicate that projectile-derived carbon-rich vapor reacts intensively with atmospheric nitrogen.

  20. Nanoimprint mold fabrication and replication by room-temperature conformal chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Patrick F.; Morton, Keith J.; Fu, Zengli; Chou, Stephen Y.

    2007-05-01

    The authors present a technique for the replication of molds for nanoimprint lithography (NIL) without solvents or etching. A thin hard amorphous silicon film is deposited onto imprinted or self-assembled polymer nanostructures by room-temperature conformal plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. After attachment to another substrate and separation from the polymer original, the thin hard film forms a NIL mold that is the inverse of the polymer original. Using this technology, the authors demonstrate the replication of a 200nm pitch grating mold and sub-50-nm features over wafer-scale areas without introducing additional line edge roughness associated with conventional replication methods.

  1. Rapid Chemical Vapor Detection Using Optofluidic Ring Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuze; Shopova, Siyka I.; White, Ian M.; Frye-Mason, Greg; Fan, Xudong

    The optofluidic ring resonator (OFRR) is a novel gas sensing technology platform. In an OFRR gas sensor, the OFRR interior surface is coated with a layer of vapor-sensitive polymer. The interaction between the polymer and the gas molecules flowing through the OFRR results in a change in polymer refractive index and thickness, which can be detected by the circulating waveguide modes supported by the circular cross section of the OFRR. Due to the excellent fluidics of a capillary, the OFRR is capable of detecting chemical vapors rapidly with very low sample volume. In addition, the OFRR is highly compatible with gas chromatography (GC) and is a promising platform for development of micro-GC (μGC) with unique multipoint, on-column detection capability. In this chapter, we will discuss the fundamental operational principles of the OFRR gas sensor, followed by examples of rapid detection of several representative vapor analytes. The development of an OFRR-based μGC system and its applications in explosive separation and detection will also be presented.

  2. Chemical etching of copper foils for single-layer graphene growth by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshihara, Naoki; Noda, Masaru

    2017-10-01

    Chemical etching on copper surface is essential as a pre-treatment for single-layer graphene growth by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Here, we investigated the effect of chemical etching treatment on copper foils for single-layer graphene CVD growth. The chemical etching conditions, such as the type of chemical etchants and the treatment time, were found to strongly influence the graphene domain size. Moreover, a drastic change in the layer structure of graphene sheets, which was attributed to the surface morphology of the etched copper foil, was confirmed by graphene transmittance and Raman mapping measurements.

  3. High activity redox catalysts synthesized by chemical vapor impregnation.

    PubMed

    Forde, Michael M; Kesavan, Lokesh; Bin Saiman, Mohd Izham; He, Qian; Dimitratos, Nikolaos; Lopez-Sanchez, Jose Antonio; Jenkins, Robert L; Taylor, Stuart H; Kiely, Christopher J; Hutchings, Graham J

    2014-01-28

    The use of precious metals in heterogeneous catalysis relies on the preparation of small nanoparticles that are stable under reaction conditions. To date, most conventional routes used to prepare noble metal nanoparticles have drawbacks related to surface contamination, particle agglomeration, and reproducibility restraints. We have prepared titania-supported palladium (Pd) and platinum (Pt) catalysts using a simplified vapor deposition technique termed chemical vapor impregnation (CVI) that can be performed in any standard chemical laboratory. These materials, composed of nanoparticles typically below 3 nm in size, show remarkable activity under mild conditions for oxidation and hydrogenation reactions of industrial importance. We demonstrate the preparation of bimetallic Pd-Pt homogeneous alloy nanoparticles by this new CVI method, which show synergistic effects in toluene oxidation. The versatility of our CVI methodology to be able to tailor the composition and morphology of supported nanoparticles in an easily accessible and scalable manner is further demonstrated by the synthesis of Pdshell-Aucore nanoparticles using CVI deposition of Pd onto preformed Au nanoparticles supported on titania (prepared by sol immobilization) in addition to the presence of monometallic Au and Pd nanoparticles.

  4. Metabonomics of Pig Blood Plasma Following Whole Body Exposure to Low Levels of Gb Vapor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    METABONOMICS OF PIG BLOOD PLASMA FOLLOWING WHOLE BODY EXPOSURE TO LOW LEVELS OF GB VAPOR Vicky L. H. Bevilacqua▲, Terrence G...DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Metabonomics Of Pig Blood Plasma Following Whole Body Exposure To Low Levels Of Gb Vapor 5a. CONTRACT...analysis of minipig blood plasma by high field NMR after low-level exposure to GB by whole body inhalation. EXPERIMENTAL METHODS 1. SARIN

  5. Modeling of InP metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, Linda R.; Clark, Ivan O.; Kui, J.; Jesser, William A.

    1991-01-01

    The growth of InP by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) in a horizontal reactor is being modeled with a commercially available computational fluid dynamics modeling code. The mathematical treatment of the MOCVD process has four primary areas of concern: 1) transport phenomena, 2) chemistry, 3) boundary conditions, and 4) numerical solution methods. The transport processes involved in CVD are described by conservation of total mass, momentum, energy, and atomic species. Momentum conservation is described by a generalized form of the Navier-Stokes equation for a Newtonian fluid and laminar flow. The effect of Soret diffusion on the transport of particular chemical species and on the predicted deposition rate is examined. Both gas-phase and surface chemical reactions are employed in the model. Boundary conditions are specified at the inlet and walls of the reactor for temperature, fluid flow and chemical species. The coupled set of equations described above is solved by a finite difference method over a nonuniform rectilinear grid in both two and three dimensions. The results of the 2-D computational model is presented for gravity levels of zero- and one-g. The predicted growth rates at one-g are compared to measured growth rates on fused silica substrates.

  6. Modeling of InP metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, Linda R.; Clark, Ivan O.; Kui, J.; Jesser, William A.

    1991-01-01

    The growth of InP by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) in a horizontal reactor is being modeled with a commercially available computational fluid dynamics modeling code. The mathematical treatment of the MOCVD process has four primary areas of concern: 1) transport phenomena, 2) chemistry, 3) boundary conditions, and 4) numerical solution methods. The transport processes involved in CVD are described by conservation of total mass, momentum, energy, and atomic species. Momentum conservation is described by a generalized form of the Navier-Stokes equation for a Newtonian fluid and laminar flow. The effect of Soret diffusion on the transport of particular chemical species and on the predicted deposition rate is examined. Both gas-phase and surface chemical reactions are employed in the model. Boundary conditions are specified at the inlet and walls of the reactor for temperature, fluid flow and chemical species. The coupled set of equations described above is solved by a finite difference method over a nonuniform rectilinear grid in both two and three dimensions. The results of the 2-D computational model is presented for gravity levels of zero- and one-g. The predicted growth rates at one-g are compared to measured growth rates on fused silica substrates.

  7. Nitridation of fine grain chemical vapor deposited tungsten film as diffusion barrier for aluminum metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kow-Ming; Yeh, Ta-Hsun; Deng, I.-Chung

    1997-04-01

    A novel tungsten nitride (WNx) film for diffusion barrier applications has been prepared by nitridation of a fine grain chemical vapor deposited tungsten (CVD-W) film. The fine grain CVD-W is deposited at 300 °C in a low pressure chemical vapor deposition reactor with a SiH4/WF6 flow rate of 12.5/5 sccm under a total gas pressure of 100 mTorr. The subsequent nitridation process is executed in nitrogen plasma at 300 °C without breaking vacuum. The thickness of WNx layer as examined by secondary ion mass spectroscopy is 50 nm after 5 min exposure to nitrogen plasma. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra shows that the atomic ratio of tungsten to nitrogen in WNx layer is 2:1. According to the analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy and the measurement of n+p junction leakage current, the Al/WNx/W/Si multilayer maintains excellent interfacial stability after furnace annealing at 575 °C for 30 min. The effectiveness of W2N barrier is attributed to stuffing grain boundaries with nitrogen atoms which eliminates the rapid diffusion paths in fine grain CVD-W films.

  8. Nitridation of fine grain chemical vapor deposited tungsten film as diffusion barrier for aluminum metallization

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, K.; Yeh, T.; Deng, I.

    1997-04-01

    A novel tungsten nitride (WN{sub x}) film for diffusion barrier applications has been prepared by nitridation of a fine grain chemical vapor deposited tungsten (CVD-W) film. The fine grain CVD-W is deposited at 300{degree}C in a low pressure chemical vapor deposition reactor with a SiH{sub 4}/WF{sub 6} flow rate of 12.5/5 sccm under a total gas pressure of 100 mTorr. The subsequent nitridation process is executed in nitrogen plasma at 300{degree}C without breaking vacuum. The thickness of WN{sub x} layer as examined by secondary ion mass spectroscopy is 50 nm after 5 min exposure to nitrogen plasma. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra shows that the atomic ratio of tungsten to nitrogen in WN{sub x} layer is 2:1. According to the analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy and the measurement of n{sup +}p junction leakage current, the Al/WN{sub x}/W/Si multilayer maintains excellent interfacial stability after furnace annealing at 575{degree}C for 30 min. The effectiveness of W{sub 2}N barrier is attributed to stuffing grain boundaries with nitrogen atoms which eliminates the rapid diffusion paths in fine grain CVD-W films. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Chemiluminescent chemical sensors for inorganic and organic vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, G.E.; Rose-Pehrsson, S.L.

    1995-12-31

    Chemiluminescent, chemical sensors for inorganic and organic vapors are being investigated via the immobilization of 3-aminophthalhydrazide (luminol) within hydrogels and polymeric, sorbent coatings. The films are supported behind a teflon membrane and positioned in front of a photomultiplier tube, permitting the sensitive detection of numerous toxic vapors. Some selectivity has been tailored into these devices by careful selection of the polymer type, pH and metal catalyst incorporated within the film. The incorporation of luminol and Fe(3) within a polyvinylalcohol hydrogel gave a film with superior sensitivity toward NO{sub 2} (detection limit of 0.46 ppb and a response time on the order of seconds). The use of the hydrogel matrix helped eliminate humidity problems associated with other polymeric films. Other chemiluminescent thin films prepared have demonstrated the detection of ppb levels of SO{sub 2}(g) and hydrazine, N{sub 2}H{sub 4}(g). Recently, the authors have begun investigating the incorporation of a heated Pt filament into the inlet line as a pre-oxidative step prior to passage of the gas stream across the teflon membrane. This has permitted the sensitive detection of ppm levels of CCl{sub 4}(g), CHCl{sub 3}(g) and CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}(g).

  10. Chemical vapor deposition coatings for oxidation protection of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnington, G. R.; Robinson, J. C.; Clark, R. K.

    1991-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of the oxidation protection afforded to Ti-14Al-21Nb and Ti-14Al-23Nb-2V titanium aluminides and Ti-17Mo-3Al-3Nb titanium alloy by aluminum-boron-silicon and boron-silicon coatings are presented. These coatings are applied by a combination of physical vapor deposition (PVD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The former is for the application of aluminum, and the latter is for codeposition of boron and silicon. Coating thickness is in the range of 2 to 7 microns, and coating weights are 0.6 to 2.0 mg/sq cm. Oxidation testing was performed in air at temperatures to 1255 K in both static and hypersonic flow environments. The degree of oxidation protection provided by the coatings is determined from weight change measurements made during the testing and post test compositional analyses. Temperature-dependent total normal emittance data are also presented for four coating/substrate combinations. Both types of coatings provided excellent oxidation protection for the exposure conditions of this investigation. Total normal emittances were greater than 0.80 in all cases.

  11. Quantitative infrared spectra of vapor phase chemical agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Chu, Pamela M.; Kleimeyer, James; Rowland, Brad

    2003-08-01

    Quantitative, high resolution (0.1 cm-1) infrared spectra have been acquired for a number of pressure broadened (101.3 KPa N2), vapor phase chemicals including: Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), Tabun (GA), Cyclosarin (GF), VX, nitrogen mustard (HN3), sulfur mustard (HD) and Lewisite (L). The spectra are acquired using a heated, flow-through White cell of 5.6 m optical path length. Each reported spectrum represents a statistical fit to Beer's law, which allows for a rigorous calculation of uncertainty in the absorption coefficients. As part of an ongoing collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), cross-laboratory validation is a critical aspect of this work. In order to identify possible errors in the Dugway flow-through system, quantitative spectra of isopropyl alcohol from both NIST and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are compared to similar data taken at the Dugway Proving Ground (DPG).

  12. Chemical vapor synthesis and characterization of aluminum nanopowder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin Won; Sohn, Hong Yong; Choi, Young Joon; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    Aluminum is a component in many promising hydrogen storage materials such as aluminum hydride and complex aluminum hydrides. In this research, Al and TiAl 3-containing Al nanopowders were prepared by a chemical vapor synthesis (CVS) process using Mg as the reducing agent. XRD and EDS results indicated that the produced powder was composed of Al or Al with TiAl 3. The shape of the powder was spherical with the average size in the range of 10-50 nm measured by SEM, TEM, BET and ZetaPALS compared with the typically larger than 100 nm for commercially available fine Al powders. In addition, the effects of the operating conditions such as Ar flow rate, precursor feed rate and reaction temperature on the properties of the product powder were investigated.

  13. Low Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition Of Thin Film Magnets

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Joel S.; Pokhodnya, Kostyantyn I.

    2003-12-09

    A thin-film magnet formed from a gas-phase reaction of tetracyanoetheylene (TCNE) OR (TCNQ), 7,7,8,8-tetracyano-P-quinodimethane, and a vanadium-containing compound such as vanadium hexcarbonyl (V(CO).sub.6) and bis(benzene)vanalium (V(C.sub.6 H.sub.6).sub.2) and a process of forming a magnetic thin film upon at least one substrate by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at a process temperature not exceeding approximately 90.degree. C. and in the absence of a solvent. The magnetic thin film is particularly suitable for being disposed upon rigid or flexible substrates at temperatures in the range of 40.degree. C. and 70.degree. C. The present invention exhibits air-stable characteristics and qualities and is particularly suitable for providing being disposed upon a wide variety of substrates.

  14. Chemical vapor deposition of low reflective cobalt (II) oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin-Chalhoub, Eliane; Duguet, Thomas; Samélor, Diane; Debieu, Olivier; Ungureanu, Elisabeta; Vahlas, Constantin

    2016-01-01

    Low reflective CoO coatings are processed by chemical vapor deposition from Co2(CO)8 at temperatures between 120 °C and 190 °C without additional oxygen source. The optical reflectivity in the visible and near infrared regions stems from 2 to 35% depending on deposition temperature. The combination of specific microstructural features of the coatings, namely a fractal ⿿cauliflower⿿ morphology and a grain size distribution more or less covering the near UV and IR wavelength ranges enhance light scattering and gives rise to a low reflectivity. In addition, the columnar morphology results in a density gradient in the vertical direction that we interpret as a refractive index gradient lowering reflectivity further down. The coating formed at 180 °C shows the lowest average reflectivity (2.9%), and presents an interesting deep black diffuse aspect.

  15. Creep of chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The creep, thermal expansion, and elastic modulus properties for chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers were measured between 1000 and 1500 C. Creep strain was observed to increase logarithmically with time, monotonically with temperature, and linearly with tensile stress up to 600 MPa. The controlling activation energy was 480 + or - 20 kJ/mole. Thermal pretreatments near 1200 and 1450 C were found to significantly reduce fiber creep. These results coupled with creep recovery observations indicate that below 1400 C fiber creep is anelastic with neglible plastic component. This allowed a simple predictive method to be developed for describing fiber total deformation as a function of time, temperature, and stress. Mechanistic analysis of the property data suggests that fiber creep is the result of beta-SiC grain boundary sliding controlled by a small percent of free silicon in the grain boundaries.

  16. Strain relaxation in graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Troppenz, Gerald V. Gluba, Marc A.; Kraft, Marco; Rappich, Jörg; Nickel, Norbert H.

    2013-12-07

    The growth of single layer graphene by chemical vapor deposition on polycrystalline Cu substrates induces large internal biaxial compressive strain due to thermal expansion mismatch. Raman backscattering spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to study the strain relaxation during and after the transfer process from Cu foil to SiO{sub 2}. Interestingly, the growth of graphene results in a pronounced ripple structure on the Cu substrate that is indicative of strain relaxation of about 0.76% during the cooling from the growth temperature. Removing graphene from the Cu substrates and transferring it to SiO{sub 2} results in a shift of the 2D phonon line by 27 cm{sup −1} to lower frequencies. This translates into additional strain relaxation. The influence of the processing steps, used etching solution and solvents on strain, is investigated.

  17. Measurement of gas transport properties for chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Hablutzel, N.

    1996-12-01

    In the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process for fabricating ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), transport of gas phase reactant into the fiber preform is a critical step. The transport can be driven by pressure or by concentration. This report describes methods for measuring this for CVI preforms and partially infiltrated composites. Results are presented for Nicalon fiber cloth layup preforms and composites, Nextel fiber braid preforms and composites, and a Nicalon fiber 3-D weave composite. The results are consistent with a percolating network model for gas transport in CVI preforms and composites. This model predicts inherent variability in local pore characteristics and transport properties, and therefore, in local densification during processing; this may lead to production of gastight composites.

  18. Rapid fabrication of ceramic composite tubes using chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Chiang, D.; Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P.; McLaughlin, J.C.; Matlin, W.M.

    1996-06-01

    Ceramic composite tubes can be fabricated with silicon carbide matrix and Nicalon fiber reinforcement using forced flow-thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration (FCVI). The process model GTCVI is used to design the equipment configuration and to identify conditions for rapid, uniform densification. The initial injector and mandrel design produced radial and longitudinal temperature gradients too large for uniform densification. Improved designs have been evaluated with the model. The most favorable approach utilizes a free-standing preform and an insulated water-cooled gas injector. Selected process conditions are based on the temperature limit of the fiber, matrix stoichiometry and reagent utilization efficiency. Model runs for a tube 12 inches long, 4 inches OD and 1/4 inch wall thickness show uniform densification in approximately 15 hours.

  19. Chemical vapor infiltration of TiB{sub 2} composites

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.

    1995-05-01

    This program is designed to develop a Hall-Heroult aluminum smelting cathode with substantially improved properties. The carbon cathodes in current use require significant anode-to-cathode spacing in order to prevent shorting, causing significant electrical inefficiencies. This is due to the non-wettability of carbon by aluminum which causes instability in the cathodic aluminum pad. It is suggested that a fiber reinforced-TiB{sub 2} matrix composite would have the requisite wettability, strength, strain-to-failure, cost, and lifetime to solve this problem. The approach selected to fabricate such a cathode material is chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). This program is designed to evaluate potential fiber reinforcements, fabricate test specimens, and test the materials in a static bath and lab-scale Hall cell.

  20. Chemical Vapor Deposition at High Pressure in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCall, Sonya; Bachmann, Klaus; LeSure, Stacie; Sukidi, Nkadi; Wang, Fuchao

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we present an evaluation of critical requirements of organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) at elevated pressure for a channel flow reactor in a microgravity environment. The objective of using high pressure is to maintain single-phase surface composition for materials that have high thermal decomposition pressure at their optimum growth temperature. Access to microgravity is needed to maintain conditions of laminar flow, which is essential for process analysis. Based on ground based observations we present an optimized reactor design for OMCVD at high pressure and reduced gravity. Also, we discuss non-intrusive real-time optical monitoring of flow dynamics coupled to homogeneous gas phase reactions, transport and surface processes. While suborbital flights may suffice for studies of initial stages of heteroepitaxy experiments in space are essential for a complete evaluation of steady-state growth.

  1. Mass transport measurements and modeling for chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Chiang, D.Y.; Fiadzo, O.G.; Hablutzel, N.

    1997-12-01

    This project involves experimental and modeling investigation of densification behavior and mass transport in fiber preforms and partially densified composites, and application of these results to chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process modeling. This supports work on-going at ORNL in process development for fabrication of ceramic matrix composite (CMC) tubes. Tube-shaped composite preforms are fabricated at ORNL with Nextel{trademark} 312 fiber (3M Corporation, St. Paul, MN) by placing and compressing several layers of braided sleeve on a tubular mandrel. In terms of fiber architecture these preforms are significantly different than those made previously with Nicalon{trademark} fiber (Nippon Carbon Corp., Tokyo, Japan) square weave cloth. The authors have made microstructure and permeability measurements on several of these preforms and a few partially densified composites so as to better understand their densification behavior during CVI.

  2. Gas transport model for chemical vapor infiltration. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.

    1995-05-01

    A node-bond percolation model is presented for the gas permeability and pore surface area of the coarse porosity in woven fiber structures during densification by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). Model parameters include the number of nodes per unit volume and their spatial distribution, and the node and bond radii and their variability. These parameters relate directly to structural features of the weave. Some uncertainty exists in the proper partition of the porosity between {open_quotes}node{close_quotes} and{open_quote}bond{close_quotes} and between intra-tow and inter-tow, although the total is constrained by the known fiber loading in the structure. Applied to cloth layup preforms the model gives good agreement with the limited number of available measurements.

  3. Synthesis of mullite coatings by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Mulpuri, R.P.; Auger, M.; Sarin, V.K.

    1996-08-01

    Formation of mullite on ceramic substrates via chemical vapor deposition was investigated. Mullite is a solid solution of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} with a composition of 3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{circ}2SiO{sub 2}. Thermodynamic calculations performed on the AlCl{sub 3}-SiCl{sub 4}-CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2} system were used to construct equilibrium CVD phase diagrams. With the aid of these diagrams and consideration of kinetic rate limiting factors, initial process parameters were determined. Through process optimization, crystalline CVD mullite coatings have been successfully grown on SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrates. Results from the thermodynamic analysis, process optimization, and effect of various process parameters on deposition rate and coating morphology are discussed.

  4. Development and study of chemical vapor deposited tantalum base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, G. H.; Bryant, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    A technique for the chemical vapor deposition of alloys was developed. The process, termed pulsing, involves the periodic injection of reactant gases into a previously-evacuated reaction chamber where they blanket the substrate almost instantaneously. Formation of alternating layers of the alloy components and subsequent homogenization allows the formation of an alloy of uniform composition with the composition being determined by the duration and relative numbers of the various cycles. The technique has been utilized to produce dense alloys of uniform thickness and composition (Ta- 10 wt % W) by depositing alternating layers of Ta and W by the hydrogen reduction of TaCl5 and WCl6. A similar attempt to deposit a Ta - 8 wt % W - 2 wt% Hf alloy was unsuccessful because of the difficulty in reducing HfCl4 at temperatures below those at which gas phase nucleation of Ta and W occurred.

  5. Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth of Graphene and Related Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaura, Ryo; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Xiang, Rong; Hone, James; Kong, Jing; Ruoff, Rodney S.; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2015-12-01

    Research on atomic layers including graphene, hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) and their heterostructures has attracted a great deal of attention. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) can provide large-area structure-defined high-quality atomic layer samples, which have considerably contributed to the recent advancement of atomic-layer research. In this article, we focus on the CVD growth of various atomic layers and review recent progresses including (1) the CVD growth of graphene using methane and ethanol as carbon sources, (2) the CVD growth of hBN using borazine and ammonia borane, (3) the CVD growth of various TMDCs using single and multi-furnace methods, and (4) CVD growth of vertical and lateral heterostructures such as graphene/hBN, MoS2/graphite, WS2/hBN and MoS2/WS2.

  6. Selective vapor detection of an integrated chemical sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Youngmo; Kim, Young Jun; Choi, Jaebin; Lim, Chaehyun; Shin, Beom Ju; Moon, Hi Gyu; Lee, Taikjin; Kim, Jae Hun; Seo, Minah; Kang, Chong Yun; Jun, Seong Chan; Lee, Seok; Kim, Chulki

    2015-07-01

    Graphene is a promising material for vapor sensor applications because of its potential to be functionalized for specific chemical gases. In this work, we present a graphene gas sensor that uses single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules as its sensing agent. We investigate the characteristics of graphene field effect transistors (FETs) coated with different ssDNAs. The sensitivity and recovery rate for a specific gas are modified according to the differences in the DNA molecules' Guanine (G) and Cytosine (C) content. ssDNA-functionalized devices show a higher recovery rate compared to bare graphene devices. Pattern analysis of a 2-by-2 sensor array composed of graphene devices functionalized with different-sequence ssDNA enables identification of NH3, NO2, CO, SO2 using Principle Component Analysis (PCA).

  7. Temperature-dependent morphology of chemical vapor grown molybdenum disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoyin; Wang, Yantao; Zhou, Jiadong; Liu, Zheng

    2017-04-01

    Monolayered molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is a 2D direct band gap semiconductor with promising potential applications. In this work, we observed the temperature dependency of the morphologies of MoS2 monolayers from chemical vapor deposition. At a low growing temperature below 850 °C, MoS2 flakes tend to be trianglular in shape. At 850–950 °C, hexagonal MoS2 flakes can be observed. While at a temperature over 950 °C, MoS2 flakes can form rectangular shapes. Complementary characterizations have been made to these samples. We also proposed a mechanism for such temperature-dependent shape evolution based on thermodynamic simulation.

  8. Quantitative Infrared Spectra of Vapor Phase Chemical Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Chu, P. M.; Kleimeyer, J.; Rowland, Brad

    2003-08-01

    Quantitative, moderately high resolution (0.1 cm-1) infrared spectra have been acquired for a number of nitrogen broadened (1 atm N2) vapor phase chemicals including: Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), Tabun (GA), Cyclosarin (GF), VX, Nitrogen Mustard (HN3), Sulfur Mustard (HD), and Lewisite (L). The spectra are acquired using a heated, flow-through White Cell1 of 5.6 meter optical path length. Each reported spectrum represents a statistical fit to Beer’s law, which allows for a rigorous calculation of uncertainty in the absorption coefficients. As part of an ongoing collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), cross-laboratory validation is a critical aspect of this work. In order to identify possible errors in the Dugway flow-through system, quantitative spectra of isopropyl alcohol from both NIST and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are compared to similar data taken at Dugway proving Grounds (DPG).

  9. Chemical vapor deposition fluid flow simulation modelling tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullister, Edward T.

    1992-01-01

    Accurate numerical simulation of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes requires a general purpose computational fluid dynamics package combined with specialized capabilities for high temperature chemistry. In this report, we describe the implementation of these specialized capabilities in the spectral element code NEKTON. The thermal expansion of the gases involved is shown to be accurately approximated by the low Mach number perturbation expansion of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The radiative heat transfer between multiple interacting radiating surfaces is shown to be tractable using the method of Gebhart. The disparate rates of reaction and diffusion in CVD processes are calculated via a point-implicit time integration scheme. We demonstrate the use above capabilities on prototypical CVD applications.

  10. Field emission properties of chemical vapor deposited individual graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Zamri Yusop, Mohd; Kalita, Golap; Yaakob, Yazid; Takahashi, Chisato; Tanemura, Masaki

    2014-03-03

    Here, we report field emission (FE) properties of a chemical vapor deposited individual graphene investigated by in-situ transmission electron microscopy. Free-standing bilayer graphene is mounted on a cathode microprobe and FE processes are investigated varying the vacuum gap of cathode and anode. The threshold field for 10 nA current were found to be 515, 610, and 870 V/μm for vacuum gap of 400, 300, and 200 nm, respectively. It is observed that the structural stability of a high quality bilayer graphene is considerably stable during emission process. By contacting the nanoprobe with graphene and applying a bias voltage, structural deformation and buckling are observed with significant rise in temperature owing to Joule heating effect. The finding can be significant for practical application of graphene related materials in emitter based devices as well as understanding the contact resistance influence and heating effect.

  11. Patterned growth of tungsten diselenide flakes by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhendong; Huang, Qi; Chen, Peng; Wang, Jianyu; Lu, Yan; Zhang, Sihong; Liang, Xuelei; Wang, Li

    2017-08-01

    By introducing prepatterned Pt/Ti dots, arrays of WSe2 flakes have been successfully grown on SiO2 substrates by chemical vapor deposition, opening a new pathway for the large-scale production of WSe2-based devices. The WSe2 flakes are high-quality single crystals characterized by transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Field-effect transistors were fabricated on these WSe2 flakes, and the field effect mobility was measured to be 11.0 cm2 V-1 s-1 and an on/off ratio of ˜106 was achieved. The growth of highly patterned WSe2 flake arrays facilitates the fabrication of WSe2 flake-based integrated devices.

  12. Direct synthesis of large area graphene on insulating substrate by gallium vapor-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Katsuhisa Hiyama, Takaki; Kuwajima, Tomoya; Fujita, Jun-ichi; Tanaka, Shunsuke; Hirukawa, Ayaka; Kano, Emi; Takeguchi, Masaki

    2015-03-02

    A single layer of graphene with dimensions of 20 mm × 20 mm was grown directly on an insulating substrate by chemical vapor deposition using Ga vapor catalysts. The graphene layer showed highly homogeneous crystal quality over a large area on the insulating substrate. The crystal quality of the graphene was measured by Raman spectroscopy and was found to improve with increasing Ga vapor density on the reaction area. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations showed that the synthesized graphene had a perfect atomic-scale crystal structure within its grains, which ranged in size from 50 nm to 200 nm.

  13. Chemical vapor deposited diamond-on-diamond powder composites (LDRD final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Panitz, J.K.; Hsu, W.L.; Tallant, D.R.; McMaster, M.; Fox, C.; Staley, D.

    1995-12-01

    Densifying non-mined diamond powder precursors with diamond produced by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is an attractive approach for forming thick diamond deposits that avoids many potential manufacturability problems associated with predominantly chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The authors developed techniques for forming diamond powder precursors and densified these precursors in a hot filament-assisted reactor and a microwave plasma-assisted reactor. Densification conditions were varied following a fractional factorial statistical design. A number of conclusions can be drawn as a result of this study. High density diamond powder green bodies that contain a mixture of particle sizes solidify more readily than more porous diamond powder green bodies with narrow distributions of particle sizes. No composite was completely densified although all of the deposits were densified to some degree. The hot filament-assisted reactor deposited more material below the exterior surface, in the interior of the powder deposits; in contrast, the microwave-assisted reactor tended to deposit a CVD diamond skin over the top of the powder precursors which inhibited vapor phase diamond growth in the interior of the powder deposits. There were subtle variations in diamond quality as a function of the CVI process parameters. Diamond and glassy carbon tended to form at the exterior surface of the composites directly exposed to either the hot filament or the microwave plasma. However, in the interior, e.g. the powder/substrate interface, diamond plus diamond-like-carbon formed. All of the diamond composites produced were grey and relatively opaque because they contained flawed diamond, diamond-like-carbon and glassy carbon. A large amount of flawed and non-diamond material could be removed by post-CVI oxygen heat treatments. Heat treatments in oxygen changed the color of the composites to white.

  14. Precursors for chemical and photochemical vapor deposition of copper metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Alicia Marie

    The colorless square-planar cluster [CuN(SiMe3)2] 4, which contains four Cu(I) ions with four bridging amide groups, was studied as a precursor for chemical and photochemical vapor deposition of Cu metal. The cluster phosphoresces in CH2Cl2 solution and in the solid state at room temperature. Its electronic spectrum in CH 2Cl2 consists of two intense bands which are assigned to symmetry-allowed 3d → 4p transitions; the phosphorescence is also likely to be metal-centered. Solid [CuN(SiMe3)2]4 luminesces with approximately the same spectrum as that of the CH2Cl2 solutions. At 77 K, the solid-state luminescence red-shifts slightly. The emission lifetime in glassy Et2O solution is 690 mus. [CuN(SiMe3) 2]4 deposits Cu metal via chemical vapor deposition under H2 carrier gas at substrate temperatures of 145--200°C. Deposition also occurs photochemically beginning at 136--138°C under near-UV irradiation. The preparation of monomeric derivatives of [CuN(SiMe3) 2]4 was attempted by using neutral donor ligands L (e.g. LnCuN(SiMe3)2; L = CO, PR3, CN-t-Bu; n = 1--3). The target compounds were expected to be more volatile than the copper cluster and still maintain photosensitivity. CuCl and [Cu(CH 3CN)4]PF6 were used as starting materials. Even in the presence of L, [CuN(SiMe3)2] 4 is a major product in reactions using CuCl and NaN(SiCH3) 2- [Cu(CH3CN)4]PF6 was a promising route for the monomeric Cu(I) complexes because of ready dissociation of its acetonitrile ligands. However, the characterization of these complexes was unsuccessful. Other Cu(I) amide clusters have been prepared; they may also be suitable for chemical and photochemical vapor deposition of Cu. [CuNEt2] 4, [CuN(i-Pr)2]4, and [CuN(t-Bu)(SiMe 3)]4 are phosphorescent though they are very air sensitive. They should be more volatile and produce Cu metal films more readily than [CuN(SiMe3)2]4 Cu(hfac)2 is a versatile Lewis acid, forming adducts with a variety of bases. The bases that were used were ethylene

  15. Nanostructure Engineered Chemical Sensors for Hazardous Gas and Vapor Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Lu, Yijiang

    2005-01-01

    A nanosensor technology has been developed using nanostructures, such as single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and metal oxides nanowires or nanobelts, on a pair of interdigitated electrodes (IDE) processed with a silicon based microfabrication and micromachining technique. The IDE fingers were fabricated using thin film metallization techniques. Both in-situ growth of nanostructure materials and casting of the nanostructure dispersions were used to make chemical sensing devices. These sensors have been exposed to hazardous gases and vapors, such as acetone, benzene, chlorine, and ammonia in the concentration range of ppm to ppb at room temperature. The electronic molecular sensing in our sensor platform can be understood by electron modulation between the nanostructure engineered device and gas molecules. As a result of the electron modulation, the conductance of nanodevice will change. Due to the large surface area, low surface energy barrier and high thermal and mechanical stability, nanostructured chemical sensors potentially can offer higher sensitivity, lower power consumption and better robustness than the state-of-the-art systems, which make them more attractive for defense and space applications. Combined with MEMS technology, light weight and compact size sensors can be made in wafer scale with low cost.

  16. Conversion Coatings for Aluminum Alloys by Chemical Vapor Deposition Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reye, John T.; McFadden, Lisa S.; Gatica, Jorge E.; Morales, Wilfredo

    2004-01-01

    With the rise of environmental awareness and the renewed importance of environmentally friendly processes, the United States Environmental Protection Agency has targeted surface pre-treatment processes based on chromates. Indeed, this process has been subject to regulations under the Clean Water Act as well as other environmental initiatives, and there is today a marked movement to phase the process out in the near future. Therefore, there is a clear need for new advances in coating technology that could provide practical options for replacing present industrial practices. Depending on the final application, such coatings might be required to be resistant to corrosion, act as chemically resistant coatings, or both. This research examined a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) mechanism to deposit uniform conversion coatings onto aluminum alloy substrates. Robust protocols based on solutions of aryl phosphate ester and multi-oxide conversion coating (submicron) films were successfully grown onto the aluminum alloy samples. These films were characterized by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Preliminary results indicate the potential of this technology to replace aqueous-based chromate processes.

  17. Correlation of chemical evaporation rate with vapor pressure.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Donald; van Wesenbeeck, Ian

    2014-09-02

    A new one-parameter correlation is developed for the evaporation rate (ER) of chemicals as a function of molar mass (M) and vapor pressure (P) that is simpler than existing correlations. It applies only to liquid surfaces that are unaffected by the underlying solid substrate as occurs in the standard ASTM evaporation rate test and to quiescent liquid pools. The relationship has a sounder theoretical basis than previous correlations because ER is correctly correlated with PM rather than P alone. The inclusion of M increases the slope of previous log ER versus log P regressions to a value close to 1.0 and yields a simpler one-parameter correlation, namely, ER (μg m(-1) h(-1)) = 1464P (Pa) × M (g mol(-1)). Applications are discussed for the screening level assessment and ranking of chemicals for evaporation rate, such as pesticides, fumigants, and hydrocarbon carrier fluids used in pesticide formulations, liquid consumer products used indoors, and accidental spills of liquids. The mechanistic significance of the single parameter as a mass-transfer coefficient or velocity is discussed.

  18. Oxidative chemical vapor deposition of polyaniline thin films.

    PubMed

    Smolin, Yuriy Y; Soroush, Masoud; Lau, Kenneth K S

    2017-01-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) is synthesized via oxidative chemical vapor deposition (oCVD) using aniline as monomer and antimony pentachloride as oxidant. Microscopy and spectroscopy indicate that oCVD processing conditions influence the PANI film chemistry, oxidation, and doping level. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicate that a substrate temperature of 90 °C is needed to minimize the formation of oligomers during polymerization. Lower substrate temperatures, such as 25 °C, lead to a film that mostly includes oligomers. Increasing the oxidant flowrate to nearly match the monomer flowrate favors the deposition of PANI in the emeraldine state, and varying the oxidant flowrate can directly influence the oxidation state of PANI. Changing the reactor pressure from 700 to 35 mTorr does not have a significant effect on the deposited film chemistry, indicating that the oCVD PANI process is not concentration dependent. This work shows that oCVD can be used for depositing PANI and for effectively controlling the chemical state of PANI.

  19. Advanced deposition model for thermal activated chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Dang

    Thermal Activated Chemical Vapor Deposition (TACVD) is defined as the formation of a stable solid product on a heated substrate surface from chemical reactions and/or dissociation of gaseous reactants in an activated environment. It has become an essential process for producing solid film, bulk material, coating, fibers, powders and monolithic components. Global market of CVD products has reached multi billions dollars for each year. In the recent years CVD process has been extensively used to manufacture semiconductors and other electronic components such as polysilicon, AlN and GaN. Extensive research effort has been directed to improve deposition quality and throughput. To obtain fast and high quality deposition, operational conditions such as temperature, pressure, fluid velocity and species concentration and geometry conditions such as source-substrate distance need to be well controlled in a CVD system. This thesis will focus on design of CVD processes through understanding the transport and reaction phenomena in the growth reactor. Since the in situ monitor is almost impossible for CVD reactor, many industrial resources have been expended to determine the optimum design by semi-empirical methods and trial-and-error procedures. This approach has allowed the achievement of improvements in the deposition sequence, but begins to show its limitations, as this method cannot always fulfill the more and more stringent specifications of the industry. To resolve this problem, numerical simulation is widely used in studying the growth techniques. The difficulty of numerical simulation of TACVD crystal growth process lies in the simulation of gas phase and surface reactions, especially the latter one, due to the fact that very limited kinetic information is available in the open literature. In this thesis, an advanced deposition model was developed to study the multi-component fluid flow, homogeneous gas phase reactions inside the reactor chamber, heterogeneous surface

  20. Novel Prospects for Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition of Columnar Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwaar, Aleem; Wei, Lianglinag; Guo, Qian; Zhang, Baopeng; Guo, Hongbo

    2017-09-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is an emerging coating technique that can produce columnar thermal barrier coatings from vapor phase. Feedstock treatment at the start of its trajectory in the plasma torch nozzle is important for such vapor-phase deposition. This study describes the effects of the plasma composition (Ar/He) on the plasma characteristics, plasma-particle interaction, and particle dynamics at different points spatially distributed inside the plasma torch nozzle. The results of calculations show that increasing the fraction of argon in the plasma gas mixture enhances the momentum and heat flow between the plasma and injected feedstock. For the plasma gas combination of 45Ar/45He, the total enthalpy transferred to a representative powder particle inside the plasma torch nozzle is highest ( 9828 kJ/kg). Moreover, due to the properties of the plasma, the contribution of the cylindrical throat, i.e., from the feed injection point (FIP) to the start of divergence (SOD), to the total transferred energy is 69%. The carrier gas flow for different plasma gas mixtures was also investigated by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) measurements of zirconium emissions. Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating microstructures were produced when using selected plasma gas compositions and corresponding carrier gas flows; structural morphologies were found to be in good agreement with OES and theoretical predictions. Quasicolumnar microstructure was obtained with porosity of 15% when applying the plasma composition of 45Ar/45He.

  1. "Tips and tricks" in secondary bladder neck sclerosis' bipolar plasma vaporization approach.

    PubMed

    Moldoveanu, C; Geavlete, B; Stănescu, F; Jecu, M; Adou, L; Bulai, C; Ene, C; Geavlete, P

    2013-09-15

    Secondary bladder neck sclerosis (BNS) represents a common late complication of prostate surgery, however so far insufficiently assessed in the available literature. More over, the previously attempted and analyzed therapeutic modalities failed to achieve acknowledgement as standard treatment for this particular pathology. The bipolar plasma vaporization (BPV) was introduced as a viable mean of removing the obstructing scar formation in a gradual fashion. Several "tips and tricks" were described as particularly useful in optimizing the plasma corona vaporization effect. The proper BPV technique is simple and safe while closely relying on certain surgical steps, the simultaneous vaporization and coagulation processes and a superior endoscopic vision. Recent technological advances created the premises for further improvements. The plasma-button vaporization is characterized by a satisfactory surgical speed, remote intraoperative bleeding risks, high-quality endoscopic visibility as well as the achievement of a complete sclerotic tissue removal. Within a short learning curve, a superior final aspect of the prostatic fossa and bladder neck is obtained at the end of surgery. The continuous plasma vaporization mode provides additional technical advantages. The previously described drawbacks of transurethral incision or resection seem to have been overcome by the practical features of the plasma vaporization process. The BPV technique outlines a promising modality of efficiently ablating the obstructing fibrous tissue in secondary BNS patients. The simplicity and safety of the bipolar vaporization approach, together with the thorough obstructing scar removal in a radical fashion, create the premises for a favorable long term BPV clinical outcome.

  2. "Tips and tricks" in secondary bladder neck sclerosis’ bipolar plasma vaporization approach

    PubMed Central

    Moldoveanu, C; Geavlete, B; Stănescu, F; Jecu, M; Adou, L; Bulai, C; Ene, C; Geavlete, P

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Secondary bladder neck sclerosis (BNS) represents a common late complication of prostate surgery, however so far insufficiently assessed in the available literature. More over, the previously attempted and analyzed therapeutic modalities failed to achieve acknowledgement as standard treatment for this particular pathology. Methods: The bipolar plasma vaporization (BPV) was introduced as a viable mean of removing the obstructing scar formation in a gradual fashion. Several "tips and tricks" were described as particularly useful in optimizing the plasma corona vaporization effect. The proper BPV technique is simple and safe while closely relying on certain surgical steps, the simultaneous vaporization and coagulation processes and a superior endoscopic vision. Recent technological advances created the premises for further improvements. Results: The plasma-button vaporization is characterized by a satisfactory surgical speed, remote intraoperative bleeding risks, high-quality endoscopic visibility as well as the achievement of a complete sclerotic tissue removal. Within a short learning curve, a superior final aspect of the prostatic fossa and bladder neck is obtained at the end of surgery. The continuous plasma vaporization mode provides additional technical advantages. The previously described drawbacks of transurethral incision or resection seem to have been overcome by the practical features of the plasma vaporization process. Conclusions: The BPV technique outlines a promising modality of efficiently ablating the obstructing fibrous tissue in secondary BNS patients. The simplicity and safety of the bipolar vaporization approach, together with the thorough obstructing scar removal in a radical fashion, create the premises for a favorable long term BPV clinical outcome. PMID:24146686

  3. Experimental investigation of vapor shielding effects induced by ELM-like pulsed plasma loads using the double plasma gun device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuma, I.; Kikuchi, Y.; Kitagawa, Y.; Asai, Y.; Onishi, K.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a unique experimental device of so-called double plasma gun, which consists of two magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) devices, in order to clarify effects of vapor shielding on material erosion due to transient events in magnetically confined fusion devices. Two ELM-like pulsed plasmas produced by the two MCPG devices were injected into a target chamber with a variable time difference. For generating ablated plasmas in front of a target material, an aluminum foil sample in the target chamber was exposed to a pulsed plasma produced by the 1st MCPG device. The 2nd pulsed plasma was produced with a time delay of 70 μs. It was found that a surface absorbed energy measured by a calorimeter was reduced to ∼66% of that without the Al foil sample. Thus, the reduction of the incoming plasma energy by the vapor shielding effect was successfully demonstrated in the present experiment.

  4. Water-assisted chemical vapor deposition synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes and their photoluminescence property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juan; Li, Jianbao; Yin, Yanchun; Chen, Yongjun; Bi, Xiaofan

    2013-09-01

    A novel water-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the efficient synthesis of boron nitride (BN) nanotubes is demonstrated. The replacement of metal oxide by water vapor could continuously generate intermediate boron oxide vapor and enhance the production of BN nanotubes. The nanotubes synthesized when an appropriate amount of water vapor was introduced had an average diameter of about 80 nm and lengths of several hundred μm. The diameter and yield of nanotubes could be controlled by tuning the amount of water vapor. This simple water-assisted CVD approach paves a new path to the fabrication of BN nanotubes in large quantities.

  5. Water-assisted chemical vapor deposition synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes and their photoluminescence property.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Li, Jianbao; Yin, Yanchun; Chen, Yongjun; Bi, Xiaofan

    2013-09-13

    A novel water-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the efficient synthesis of boron nitride (BN) nanotubes is demonstrated. The replacement of metal oxide by water vapor could continuously generate intermediate boron oxide vapor and enhance the production of BN nanotubes. The nanotubes synthesized when an appropriate amount of water vapor was introduced had an average diameter of about 80 nm and lengths of several hundred μm. The diameter and yield of nanotubes could be controlled by tuning the amount of water vapor. This simple water-assisted CVD approach paves a new path to the fabrication of BN nanotubes in large quantities.

  6. Large improvement of phosphorus incorporation efficiency in n-type chemical vapor deposition of diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtani, Ryota; Yamamoto, Takashi; Janssens, Stoffel D.; Yamasaki, Satoshi

    2014-12-08

    Microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is a promising way to generate n-type, e.g., phosphorus-doped, diamond layers for the fabrication of electronic components, which can operate at extreme conditions. However, a deeper understanding of the doping process is lacking and low phosphorus incorporation efficiencies are generally observed. In this work, it is shown that systematically changing the internal design of a non-commercial chemical vapor deposition chamber, used to grow diamond layers, leads to a large increase of the phosphorus doping efficiency in diamond, produced in this device, without compromising its electronic properties. Compared to the initial reactor design, the doping efficiency is about 100 times higher, reaching 10%, and for a very broad doping range, the doping efficiency remains highly constant. It is hypothesized that redesigning the deposition chamber generates a higher flow of active phosphorus species towards the substrate, thereby increasing phosphorus incorporation in diamond and reducing deposition of phosphorus species at reactor walls, which additionally reduces undesirable memory effects.

  7. Large improvement of phosphorus incorporation efficiency in n-type chemical vapor deposition of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, Ryota; Yamamoto, Takashi; Janssens, Stoffel D.; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Koizumi, Satoshi

    2014-12-01

    Microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is a promising way to generate n-type, e.g., phosphorus-doped, diamond layers for the fabrication of electronic components, which can operate at extreme conditions. However, a deeper understanding of the doping process is lacking and low phosphorus incorporation efficiencies are generally observed. In this work, it is shown that systematically changing the internal design of a non-commercial chemical vapor deposition chamber, used to grow diamond layers, leads to a large increase of the phosphorus doping efficiency in diamond, produced in this device, without compromising its electronic properties. Compared to the initial reactor design, the doping efficiency is about 100 times higher, reaching 10%, and for a very broad doping range, the doping efficiency remains highly constant. It is hypothesized that redesigning the deposition chamber generates a higher flow of active phosphorus species towards the substrate, thereby increasing phosphorus incorporation in diamond and reducing deposition of phosphorus species at reactor walls, which additionally reduces undesirable memory effects.

  8. Vertically aligned boron nitride nanosheets: chemical vapor synthesis, ultraviolet light emission, and superhydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Qin, Li; Hao, Yufeng; Kuang, Shengyong; Bai, Xuedong; Chong, Yat-Ming; Zhang, Wenjun; Wang, Enge

    2010-01-26

    Boron nitride (BN) is a promising semiconductor with a wide band gap ( approximately 6 eV). Here, we report the synthesis of vertically aligned BN nanosheets (BNNSs) on silicon substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition from a gas mixture of BF(3)-N(2)-H(2). The size, shape, thickness, density, and alignment of the BNNSs were well-controlled by appropriately changing the growth conditions. With changing the gas flow rates of BF(3) and H(2) as well as their ratio, the BNNSs evolve from three-dimensional with branches to two-dimensional with smooth surface and their thickness changes from 20 to below 5 nm. The growth of the BNNSs rather than uniform granular films is attributed to the particular chemical properties of the gas system, mainly the strong etching effect of fluorine. The alignment of the BNNSs is possibly induced by the electrical field generated in plasma sheath. Strong UV light emission with a broad band ranging from 200 to 400 nm and superhydrophobicity with contact angles over 150 degrees were obtained for the vertically aligned BNNSs. The present BNNSs possess the properties complementary to carbon nanosheets such as intrinsically semiconducting, high temperature stability, and high chemical inertness and may find applications in ultraviolet nanoelectronics, catalyst supports, electron field emission, and self-cleaning coatings, etc., especially those working at high temperature and in harsh environments.

  9. Generation of Shock-Wave Disturbances at Plasma-Vapor Bubble Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, N. S.; Yudin, A. S.; Voitenko, N. V.

    2015-11-01

    The complex physical and mathematical model describing all steps of plasma-vapor bubble evolution in the system of the water-ground condensed media is presented. Discharge circuit operation, discharge plasma channel expansion, its transformation into the vapor-plasma bubble and its pulsation, pressure wave generation and propagation of the mechanical stress waves in the ground are self-consistently considered in the model. The model allows investigation of the basic laws of stored energy transformation into the discharge plasma channel, next to the plasma-vapor bubble and transformation of this energy to the energy of pressure wave compressing the surrounding ground. Power characteristics of wave disturbances generated by gas-vapor bubble oscillation in liquid depending on the circuit parameters are analyzed for the prediction of the ground boundary displacement. The dynamics of the shock-wave propagation in water-ground condensed media depending on the rate of the plasma channel energy release is investigated. Simulation of the shock-wave phenomena at a plasma-vapor bubble oscillation in condensed media consecutively describes the physical processes underlying technology for producing piles by electro-discharge stuffing. The quantitative model verified by physical experimental tests will allow optimization of pulse generator parameters and electrode system construction of high-voltage equipment.

  10. Growth of graphene underlayers by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fabiane, Mopeli; Khamlich, Saleh; Bello, Abdulhakeem; Dangbegnon, Julien; Momodu, Damilola; Manyala, Ncholu; Charlie Johnson, A. T.

    2013-11-15

    We present a simple and very convincing approach to visualizing that subsequent layers of graphene grow between the existing monolayer graphene and the copper catalyst in chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Graphene samples were grown by CVD and then transferred onto glass substrates by the bubbling method in two ways, either direct-transfer (DT) to yield poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/graphene/glass or (2) inverted transfer (IT) to yield graphene/PMMA/glass. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to reveal surface features for both the DT and IT samples. The results from FE-SEM and AFM topographic analyses of the surfaces revealed the underlayer growth of subsequent layers. The subsequent layers in the IT samples are visualized as 3D structures, where the smaller graphene layers lie above the larger layers stacked in a concentric manner. The results support the formation of the so-called “inverted wedding cake” stacking in multilayer graphene growth.

  11. Modeling of forced flow/thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Smith, A.W. )

    1992-09-01

    The forced flow/thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process (FCVI) has proven to be a successful technique for fabrication of ceramic matrix composites. It is particularly attractive for thick components which cannot be fabricated using the conventional, isothermal method (ICVI). Although it offers processing times that are at least an order of magnitude shorter than ICVI, FCVI has not been used to fabricate parts of complex geometry and is perceived by some to be unsuitable for such components. The major concern Is that selection and control of the flow pattern and thermal profile for optimum infiltration can be a difficult and costly exercise. In order to reduce this effort, we are developing a computer model for FCVI that simulates the densification process for given component geometry, reactor configuration and operating parameters. Used by a process engineer, this model can dramatically reduce the experimental effort needed to obtain uniform densification. A one-dimensional process model, described in a previous interim report, has demonstrated good agreement with experimental results in predicting overall densification time and density uniformity during processing and the effect of various fiber architectures and operating parameters on these process issues. This model is fundamentally unsuitable for more complex geometries, however, and extension to two- and three-dimensions is necessary. This interim report summarizes our progress since the previous interim report toward development of a finite volume'' model for FCVI.

  12. Modeling of forced flow/thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Smith, A.W.

    1992-09-01

    The forced flow/thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process (FCVI) has proven to be a successful technique for fabrication of ceramic matrix composites. It is particularly attractive for thick components which cannot be fabricated using the conventional, isothermal method (ICVI). Although it offers processing times that are at least an order of magnitude shorter than ICVI, FCVI has not been used to fabricate parts of complex geometry and is perceived by some to be unsuitable for such components. The major concern Is that selection and control of the flow pattern and thermal profile for optimum infiltration can be a difficult and costly exercise. In order to reduce this effort, we are developing a computer model for FCVI that simulates the densification process for given component geometry, reactor configuration and operating parameters. Used by a process engineer, this model can dramatically reduce the experimental effort needed to obtain uniform densification. A one-dimensional process model, described in a previous interim report, has demonstrated good agreement with experimental results in predicting overall densification time and density uniformity during processing and the effect of various fiber architectures and operating parameters on these process issues. This model is fundamentally unsuitable for more complex geometries, however, and extension to two- and three-dimensions is necessary. This interim report summarizes our progress since the previous interim report toward development of a ``finite volume`` model for FCVI.

  13. Aerosol chemical vapor deposition of metal oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Ott, Kevin C.; Kodas, Toivo T.

    1994-01-01

    A process of preparing a film of a multicomponent metal oxide including: forming an aerosol from a solution comprised of a suitable solvent and at least two precursor compounds capable of volatilizing at temperatures lower than the decomposition temperature of said precursor compounds; passing said aerosol in combination with a suitable oxygen-containing carrier gas into a heated zone, said heated zone having a temperature sufficient to evaporate the solvent and volatilize said precursor compounds; and passing said volatilized precursor compounds against the surface of a substrate, said substrate having a sufficient temperature to decompose said volatilized precursor compounds whereby metal atoms contained within said volatilized precursor compounds are deposited as a metal oxide film upon the substrate is disclosed. In addition, a coated article comprising a multicomponent metal oxide film conforming to the surface of a substrate selected from the group consisting of silicon, magnesium oxide, yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide, sapphire, or lanthanum gallate, said multicomponent metal oxide film characterized as having a substantially uniform thickness upon said FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to the field of film coating deposition techniques, and more particularly to the deposition of multicomponent metal oxide films by aerosol chemical vapor deposition. This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  14. Temperature admittance spectroscopy of boron doped chemical vapor deposition diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Zubkov, V. I. Kucherova, O. V.; Zubkova, A. V.; Ilyin, V. A.; Afanas'ev, A. V.; Bogdanov, S. A.; Vikharev, A. L.; Butler, J. E.

    2015-10-14

    Precision admittance spectroscopy measurements over wide temperature and frequency ranges were carried out for chemical vapor deposition epitaxial diamond samples doped with various concentrations of boron. It was found that the experimentally detected boron activation energy in the samples decreased from 314 meV down to 101 meV with an increase of B/C ratio from 600 to 18000 ppm in the gas reactants. For the heavily doped samples, a transition from thermally activated valence band conduction to hopping within the impurity band (with apparent activation energy 20 meV) was detected at temperatures 120–150 K. Numerical simulation was used to estimate the impurity DOS broadening. Accurate determination of continuously altering activation energy, which takes place during the transformation of conduction mechanisms, was proposed by numerical differentiation of the Arrhenius plot. With increase of boron doping level the gradual decreasing of capture cross section from 3 × 10{sup −13} down to 2 × 10{sup −17} cm{sup 2} was noticed. Moreover, for the hopping conduction the capture cross section becomes 4 orders of magnitude less (∼2 × 10{sup −20} cm{sup 2}). At T > T{sub room} in doped samples the birth of the second conductance peak was observed. We attribute it to a defect, related to the boron doping of the material.

  15. Chemical vapor deposition of high T sub c superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, G. W.; Engelhardt, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The results are reported of an investigation into the synthesis and properties of high temperature superconducting materials. A chemical vapor deposition apparatus was designed and built which is suitable for the preparation of multicomponent metal films This apparatus was used to prepare a series of high T sub c A-15 structure superconducting films in the binary system Nb-Ge. The effect on T sub c of a variety of substrate materials was investigated. An extensive series of ternary alloys were also prepared. Conditions allowing the brittle high T sub c (approximately 18 K) A-15 structure superconductor Nb3A1 to be prepared in a low T sub c but ductile form were found. Some of the ways that the ductile (bcc) form can be cold worked or machined are described. Measurements of rate of transformation of cold worked bcc material to the high T sub c A-15 structure with low temperature annealing are given. Preliminary measurements indicate that this material has attractive high field critical current densities.

  16. Optical Diagnostics in the Combustion Chemical Vapor Deposition Proces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luten, Henry; Oljaca, Miodrag; Tomov, Trifon; Metzger, Timothy

    1999-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy and IR temperature measurements are used to investigate the structure of a sub-micron droplet spray flame in the Combustion Chemical Vapor Deposition (CCVD) process. The specific system examined in this study is the deposition of barium-strontium-titanate (BaxSr1-xTiO3), a high performance ferroelectric. Spectral measurements were used to determine the decomposition rates of the precursors as well as the lifetimes and relative concentrations of the primary decomposition products. The emissions from atomic and unimolecular species reach a maximum value early in the flame and then decrease sharply, indicating very fast reaction rates. This data, however, is a function of the flame temperature. In order to arrive at proper relative concentration data, the optical emission data must be normalized using measured temperature. Two-dimensional temperature maps were obtained using a non-contact, infrared temperature sensor with peak sensitivity at 4.5 microns. It was found that the sodium emission intensity correlates with the flame temperature, and the sodium emission was used as an internal standard for removing the temperature factor and isolating the relative concentration data. While the flame temperature reaches maximum value at approximately 2 cm, the normalized emission for most species reaches peak intensity closer to the nozzle exit.

  17. Growth of graphene underlayers by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fabiane, Mopeli; Khamlich, Saleh; Bello, Abdulhakeem; Dangbegnon, Julien; Momodu, Damilola; Manyala, Ncholu; Charlie Johnson, A. T.

    2013-11-15

    We present a simple and very convincing approach to visualizing that subsequent layers of graphene grow between the existing monolayer graphene and the copper catalyst in chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Graphene samples were grown by CVD and then transferred onto glass substrates by the bubbling method in two ways, either direct-transfer (DT) to yield poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/graphene/glass or (2) inverted transfer (IT) to yield graphene/PMMA/glass. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to reveal surface features for both the DT and IT samples. The results from FE-SEM and AFM topographic analyses of the surfaces revealed the underlayer growth of subsequent layers. The subsequent layers in the IT samples are visualized as 3D structures, where the smaller graphene layers lie above the larger layers stacked in a concentric manner. The results support the formation of the so-called “inverted wedding cake” stacking in multilayer graphene growth.

  18. Chemical vapor infiltration of TiB{sub 2} composites

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Miller, J.H.; Cooley, K.C.; Lowden, R.A.; Starr, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    Efficiency of the Hall-Heroult electrolytic reduction of aluminum can be substantially improved by the use of a TiB{sub 2} cathode surface. The use of TiB{sub 2}, however, has been hampered by the brittle nature of the material and the grain-boundary attack of sintering-aid phases by molten aluminum. In the current work, TiB{sub 2} is toughened through the use of reinforcing fibers, with chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) used to produce pure TiB{sub 2}. It has been observed, however, that the formation of TiB{sub 2} from chloride precursors at fabrication temperatures below 900 to 1000{degrees}C alloys the retention of destructive levels of chlorine in the material. At higher fabrication temperatures and under appropriate infiltration conditions, as determined from the use of a process model, a TIB{sub 2}THORNEL P-25 fiber composite, 45 mm in diam and 6 mm thick, has been fabricated in 20 h. The material has been demonstrated to be stable in molten aluminum in short-duration tests.

  19. Chemical vapor infiltration of TiB[sub 2] composites

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Miller, J.H.; Cooley, K.C.; Lowden, R.A. ); Starr, T.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Efficiency of the Hall-Heroult electrolytic reduction of aluminum can be substantially improved by the use of a TiB[sub 2] cathode surface. The use of TiB[sub 2], however, has been hampered by the brittle nature of the material and the grain-boundary attack of sintering-aid phases by molten aluminum. In the current work, TiB[sub 2] is toughened through the use of reinforcing fibers, with chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) used to produce pure TiB[sub 2]. It has been observed, however, that the formation of TiB[sub 2] from chloride precursors at fabrication temperatures below 900 to 1000[degrees]C alloys the retention of destructive levels of chlorine in the material. At higher fabrication temperatures and under appropriate infiltration conditions, as determined from the use of a process model, a TIB[sub 2]THORNEL P-25 fiber composite, 45 mm in diam and 6 mm thick, has been fabricated in 20 h. The material has been demonstrated to be stable in molten aluminum in short-duration tests.

  20. Development of chemical vapor composites, CVC materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-05

    Industry has a critical need for high-temperature operable ceramic composites that are strong, non-brittle, light weight, and corrosion resistant. Improvements in energy efficiency, reduced emissions and increased productivity can be achieved in many industrial processes with ceramic composites if the reaction temperature and pressure are increased. Ceramic composites offer the potential to meet these material requirements in a variety of industrial applications. However, their use is often restricted by high cost. The Chemical Vapor composite, CVC, process can reduce the high costs and multiple fabrication steps presently required for ceramic fabrication. CVC deposition has the potential to eliminate many difficult processing problems and greatly increase fabrication rates for composites. With CVC, the manufacturing process can control the composites` density, microstructure and composition during growth. The CVC process: can grow or deposit material 100 times faster than conventional techniques; does not require an expensive woven preform to infiltrate; can use high modulus fibers that cannot be woven into a preform; can deposit composites to tolerances of less than 0.025 mm on one surface without further machining.

  1. Application of chemical vapor composites (CVC) to terrestrial thermionics

    SciTech Connect

    Miskolczy, G.; Reagan, P.

    1995-01-20

    Terrestrial flame fired thermionics took a great leap forward in the earlier 1980`s with the development of reliable long-lived hot shells. These results were presented by Goodale (1981). The hot shell protects the fractory emitter from oxidizing in the combustion environment. In earlier efforts with supralloys emitters it was found that superalloys were poor thermionic emitters since they operated at too low a temperature for practical and economical use as discussed by Huffman (1978). With the development of Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) silicon carbide and CVD tungsten, it became possible to fabricate long-lived thermionic converters. These results were shown by Goodale (1980). Further improvements were achieved with the use of oxygen additives on the electrodes. These developments made thermionics attractive for topping a power plant or as the energy conversion part of a cogeneration plant as described by Miskolczy (1982) and Goodale (1983). The feasibility of a thermonic steam boiler and a thermionic topped gas turbine plant become a possibility, as shown by Miskolczy (1980). {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  2. Carbon-assisted chemical vapor deposition of hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismach, Ariel; Chou, Harry; Mende, Patrick; Dolocan, Andrei; Addou, Rafik; Aloni, Shaul; Wallace, Robert; Feenstra, Randall; Ruoff, Rodney S.; Colombo, Luigi

    2017-06-01

    We show that in a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system, the residual oxygen and/or air play a crucial role in the mechanism of the growth of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) films on Ni foil ‘enclosures’. Hexagonal-BN films grow on the Ni foil surface via the formation of an intermediate boric-oxide (BO x ) phase followed by a thermal reduction of the BO x by a carbon source (either amorphous carbon powder or methane), leading to the formation of single- and bi-layer h-BN. Low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) and diffraction (LEED) were used to map the number of layers over large areas; Raman spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) were used to characterize the structure and physical quality of the ultra-thin h-BN film. The growth procedure reported here leads to a better understanding and control of the synthesis of ultra-thin h-BN films.

  3. Testing of Wrought Iridium/Chemical Vapor Deposition Rhenium Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.; Schneider, Steven J.

    1996-01-01

    A 22-N class, iridium/rhenium (Ir/Re) rocket chamber, composed of a thick (418 miocrometer) wrought iridium (Ir) liner and a rhenium substrate deposited via chemical vapor deposition, was tested over an extended period on gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen (GO2/GH2) propellants. The test conditions were designed to produce species concentrations similar to those expected in an Earth-storable propellant combustion environment. Temperatures attained in testing were significantly higher than those expected with Earth-storable propellants, both because of the inherently higher combustion temperature of GO2/GH2 propellants and because the exterior surface of the rocket was not treated with a high-emissivity coating that would be applied to flight class rockets. Thus the test conditions were thought to represent a more severe case than for typical operational applications. The chamber successfully completed testing (over 11 hr accumulated in 44 firings), and post-test inspections showed little degradation of the Ir liner. The results indicate that use of a thick, wrought Ir liner is a viable alternative to the Ir coatings currently used for Ir/Re rockets.

  4. Chemical Vapor Deposition of an Organic Magnet, Vanadium Tetracyanoethylene

    PubMed Central

    Harberts, Megan; Lu, Yu; Yu, Howard; Epstein, Arthur J.; Johnston-Halperin, Ezekiel

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in the field of organic materials has yielded devices such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) which have advantages not found in traditional materials, including low cost and mechanical flexibility. In a similar vein, it would be advantageous to expand the use of organics into high frequency electronics and spin-based electronics. This work presents a synthetic process for the growth of thin films of the room temperature organic ferrimagnet, vanadium tetracyanoethylene (V[TCNE]x, x~2) by low temperature chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The thin film is grown at <60 °C, and can accommodate a wide variety of substrates including, but not limited to, silicon, glass, Teflon and flexible substrates. The conformal deposition is conducive to pre-patterned and three-dimensional structures as well. Additionally this technique can yield films with thicknesses ranging from 30 nm to several microns. Recent progress in optimization of film growth creates a film whose qualities, such as higher Curie temperature (600 K), improved magnetic homogeneity, and narrow ferromagnetic resonance line-width (1.5 G) show promise for a variety of applications in spintronics and microwave electronics. PMID:26168285

  5. Metal film deposition by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Jervis, T. R.; Newkirk, L. R.

    1986-06-01

    Dielectric breakdown of gas mixtures can be used to deposit thin films by chemical vapor deposition with appropriate control of flow and pressure conditions to suppress gas-phase nucleation and particle formation. Using a pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser operating at 10.6 ..mu.. where there is no significant resonant absorption in any of the source gases, homogeneous films from several gas-phase precursors have been sucessfully deposited by gas-phase laser pyrolysis. Nickel and molybdenum from the respective carbonyls representing decomposition chemistry and tungsten from the hexafluoride representing reduction chemistry have been demonstrated. In each case the gas precursor is buffered with argon to reduce the partial pressure of the reactants and to induce breakdown. Films have been characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, pull tests, and resistivity measurements. The highest quality films have resulted from the nickel depositions. Detailed x-ray diffraction analysis of these films yields a very small domain size consistent with the low temperature of the substrate and the formation of metastable nickel carbide. Transmission electron microscopy supports this analysis.

  6. High surface area graphene foams by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drieschner, Simon; Weber, Michael; Wohlketzetter, Jörg; Vieten, Josua; Makrygiannis, Evangelos; Blaschke, Benno M.; Morandi, Vittorio; Colombo, Luigi; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Garrido, Jose A.

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) graphene-based structures combine the unique physical properties of graphene with the opportunity to get high electrochemically available surface area per unit of geometric surface area. Several preparation techniques have been reported to fabricate 3D graphene-based macroscopic structures for energy storage applications such as supercapacitors. Although reaserch has been focused so far on achieving either high specific capacitance or high volumetric capacitance, much less attention has been dedicated to obtain high specific and high volumetric capacitance simultaneously. Here, we present a facile technique to fabricate graphene foams (GF) of high crystal quality with tunable pore size grown by chemical vapor deposition. We exploited porous sacrificial templates prepared by sintering nickel and copper metal powders. Tuning the particle size of the metal powders and the growth temperature allow fine control of the resulting pore size of the 3D graphene-based structures smaller than 1 μm. The as-produced 3D graphene structures provide a high volumetric electric double layer capacitance (165 mF cm-3). High specific capacitance (100 Fg-1) is obtained by lowering the number of layers down to single layer graphene. Furthermore, the small pore size increases the stability of these GFs in contrast to the ones that have been grown so far on commercial metal foams. Electrodes based on the as-prepared GFs can be a boost for the development of supercapacitors, where both low volume and mass are required.

  7. Thirty Gigahertz Optoelectronic Mixing in Chemical Vapor Deposited Graphene.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, Alberto; Mzali, Sana; Mazellier, Jean-Paul; Bezencenet, Odile; Larat, Christian; Molin, Stephanie; Morvan, Loïc; Legagneux, Pierre; Dolfi, Daniel; Dlubak, Bruno; Seneor, Pierre; Martin, Marie-Blandine; Hofmann, Stephan; Robertson, John; Centeno, Alba; Zurutuza, Amaia

    2016-05-11

    The remarkable properties of graphene, such as broadband optical absorption, high carrier mobility, and short photogenerated carrier lifetime, are particularly attractive for high-frequency optoelectronic devices operating at 1.55 μm telecom wavelength. Moreover, the possibility to transfer graphene on a silicon substrate using a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor-compatible process opens the ability to integrate electronics and optics on a single cost-effective chip. Here, we report an optoelectronic mixer based on chemical vapor-deposited graphene transferred on an oxidized silicon substrate. Our device consists in a coplanar waveguide that integrates a graphene channel, passivated with an atomic layer-deposited Al2O3 film. With this new structure, 30 GHz optoelectronic mixing in commercially available graphene is demonstrated for the first time. In particular, using a 30 GHz intensity-modulated optical signal and a 29.9 GHz electrical signal, we show frequency downconversion to 100 MHz. These results open promising perspectives in the domain of optoelectronics for radar and radio-communication systems.

  8. Chemical Vapor Deposition of an Organic Magnet, Vanadium Tetracyanoethylene.

    PubMed

    Harberts, Megan; Lu, Yu; Yu, Howard; Epstein, Arthur J; Johnston-Halperin, Ezekiel

    2015-07-03

    Recent progress in the field of organic materials has yielded devices such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) which have advantages not found in traditional materials, including low cost and mechanical flexibility. In a similar vein, it would be advantageous to expand the use of organics into high frequency electronics and spin-based electronics. This work presents a synthetic process for the growth of thin films of the room temperature organic ferrimagnet, vanadium tetracyanoethylene (V[TCNE]x, x~2) by low temperature chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The thin film is grown at <60 °C, and can accommodate a wide variety of substrates including, but not limited to, silicon, glass, Teflon and flexible substrates. The conformal deposition is conducive to pre-patterned and three-dimensional structures as well. Additionally this technique can yield films with thicknesses ranging from 30 nm to several microns. Recent progress in optimization of film growth creates a film whose qualities, such as higher Curie temperature (600 K), improved magnetic homogeneity, and narrow ferromagnetic resonance line-width (1.5 G) show promise for a variety of applications in spintronics and microwave electronics.

  9. Residual metallic contamination of transferred chemical vapor deposited graphene.

    PubMed

    Lupina, Grzegorz; Kitzmann, Julia; Costina, Ioan; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Wenger, Christian; Wolff, Andre; Vaziri, Sam; Östling, Mikael; Pasternak, Iwona; Krajewska, Aleksandra; Strupinski, Wlodek; Kataria, Satender; Gahoi, Amit; Lemme, Max C; Ruhl, Guenther; Zoth, Guenther; Luxenhofer, Oliver; Mehr, Wolfgang

    2015-05-26

    Integration of graphene with Si microelectronics is very appealing by offering a potentially broad range of new functionalities. New materials to be integrated with the Si platform must conform to stringent purity standards. Here, we investigate graphene layers grown on copper foils by chemical vapor deposition and transferred to silicon wafers by wet etching and electrochemical delamination methods with respect to residual submonolayer metallic contaminations. Regardless of the transfer method and associated cleaning scheme, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and total reflection X-ray fluorescence measurements indicate that the graphene sheets are contaminated with residual metals (copper, iron) with a concentration exceeding 10(13) atoms/cm(2). These metal impurities appear to be partially mobile upon thermal treatment, as shown by depth profiling and reduction of the minority charge carrier diffusion length in the silicon substrate. As residual metallic impurities can significantly alter electronic and electrochemical properties of graphene and can severely impede the process of integration with silicon microelectronics, these results reveal that further progress in synthesis, handling, and cleaning of graphene is required to advance electronic and optoelectronic applications.

  10. Plasma reforming and partial oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel vapor to produce synthesis gas and/or hydrogen gas

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Detering, Brent A.

    2003-08-19

    Methods and systems for treating vapors from fuels such as gasoline or diesel fuel in an internal combustion engine, to form hydrogen gas or synthesis gas, which can then be burned in the engine to produce more power. Fuel vapor, or a mixture of fuel vapor and exhaust gas and/or air, is contacted with a plasma, to promote reforming reactions between the fuel vapor and exhaust gas to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, partial oxidation reactions between the fuel vapor and air to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, or direct hydrogen and carbon particle production from the fuel vapor. The plasma can be a thermal plasma or a non-thermal plasma. The plasma can be produced in a plasma generating device which can be preheated by contact with at least a portion of the hot exhaust gas stream, thereby decreasing the power requirements of the plasma generating device.

  11. Plasma Reforming And Partial Oxidation Of Hydrocarbon Fuel Vapor To Produce Synthesis Gas And/Or Hydrogen Gas

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Detering, Brent A.

    2004-10-19

    Methods and systems are disclosed for treating vapors from fuels such as gasoline or diesel fuel in an internal combustion engine, to form hydrogen gas or synthesis gas, which can then be burned in the engine to produce more power. Fuel vapor, or a mixture of fuel vapor and exhaust gas and/or air, is contacted with a plasma, to promote reforming reactions between the fuel vapor and exhaust gas to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, partial oxidation reactions between the fuel vapor and air to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, or direct hydrogen and carbon particle production from the fuel vapor. The plasma can be a thermal plasma or a non-thermal plasma. The plasma can be produced in a plasma generating device which can be preheated by contact with at least a portion of the hot exhaust gas stream, thereby decreasing the power requirements of the plasma generating device.

  12. Antireflective silica nanoparticle array directly deposited on flexible polymer substrates by chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jungheum; Bae, Tae-Sung; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Lee, Sunghun; Lee, Gun-Hwan

    2012-11-21

    We report the direct coating of a novel antireflective (AR) nanoarray structure of silica nanoparticles on highly flexible polymer substrates by a conventional vacuum coating method using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Globular-shaped silica nanoparticles are found to be self-arranged in a periodic pattern on subwavelength scales without the use of artificial assemblies that typically require complicated nanolithography or solution-based nanoparticle fabrication approaches. Highly efficient AR characteristics in the visible spectral range are obtained at optimized refractive indices by controlling the dimensions and average distances of the silica nanoparticle arrays in a level accuracy of tens of nanometers. The AR nanoarrays exhibit sufficient structural durability against the very high strain levels that arise from the flexibility of polymer substrates. This simple coating process provides a cost-effective, high-throughput, room-temperature fabrication solution for producing large-area polymer substrates with AR characteristics.

  13. Vertical graphene nanosheets synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition and the field emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xin; Qin, Shengchun; Bai, Shuai; Yue, Hongwei; Li, Yali; Chen, Qiang; Li, Junshuai; He, Deyan

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we explored synthesis of vertical graphene nanosheets (VGNs) by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Through optimizing the experimental condition, growth of well aligned VGNs with uniform morphologies on nickel-coated stainless steel (SS) was realized for the first time by thermal CVD. In the meantime, influence of growth parameters on the VGN morphology was understood based on the balancing between the concentration and kinetic energy of carbon-containing radicals. Structural characterizations demonstrate that the achieved VGNs are normally composed of several graphene layers and less corrugated compared to the ones synthesized by other approaches, e.g. plasma enhanced (PE) CVD. The field emission measurement indicates that the VGNs exhibit relatively stable field emission and a field enhancement factor of about 1470, which is comparable to the values of VGNs prepared by PECVD can be achieved.

  14. CMOS compatible fabrication of micro, nano convex silicon lens arrays by conformal chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Haijie; Choi, Duk-Yong; Gai, Xin; Luther-Davies, Barry; Zhang, Baoping

    2017-02-20

    We present a novel CMOS-compatible fabrication technique for convex micro-nano lens arrays (MNLAs) with high packing density on the wafer scale. By means of conformal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) following patterning of silicon pillars via electron beam lithography (EBL) and plasma etching, large areas of a close packed silicon lens array with the diameter from a few micrometers down to a few hundred nanometers was fabricated. The resulting structure shows excellent surface roughness and high uniformity. The optical focusing properties of the lenses at infrared wavelengths were verified by experimental measurements and numerical simulation. This approach provides a feasible solution for fabricating silicon MNLAs compatible for next generation large scale, miniaturized optical imaging detectors and related optical devices.

  15. The effect of ultrasonic pre-treatment on nucleation density of chemical vapor deposition diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chi; Ingram, David C.

    1995-11-01

    Using statistical design of experiments, the effect of ultrasonic pre-treatment on the nucleation density of diamond was studied. The parameters investigated included ultrasonic excitation power, concentration of diamond powder in water, duration of ultrasonic excitation, and duration of cleaning with water after ultrasonic excitation. Diamond films were deposited on silicon (100) substrates using microwave assisted plasma chemical vapor deposition. The nucleation density varied from 106 nuclei/cm2 to 109 nuclei/cm2. The results illustrated that the dominant effect in ultrasonic pre-treatment was seeding. Moreover, scratches caused by the seeds during the treatment enabled more seeds to be retained on the surface. Based on these results, an optimized ultrasonic pretreatment has been developed. The new procedure yields a uniform nucleation density of 109 nuclei/cm2 on silicon (100) substrates.

  16. Artificial plasma experiments. Chemical release observations associated with the CRRES program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, Stephen B.

    1994-01-01

    This report submitted is the final report and covers work performed under the contract for the period Apr. 12, 1985 - Dec. 23, 1993. The CRRES program investigated earth plasma environment by active experiments in which metal vapors were injected into the upper atmosphere and magnetosphere. The vapor clouds perturb the ambient ionospheric / magnetospheric environment and the effects could be monitored by passive observing instruments. Our part of the CRRES program, the Artificial Plasma Experiment program, was a ground based and aircraft based investigation to observe artificial chemical releases by optical techniques.

  17. Vaporization Rate of Cesium from Molten Slag in a Plasma Melting Furnace for the Treatment of Simulated Low-Level Radioactive Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Yasui, Shinji; Amakawa, Tadashi

    2003-02-15

    The vaporization phenomena of cesium (Cs) from molten slag have been investigated in a plasma melting process for simulated radioactive waste materials. A direct current transfer-type plasma with a maximum output of 50 kW was used to melt carbon steel and granular oxide mixtures (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2}, CaO, and MgO) containing nonradioactive cesium nitrate, to measure Cs vaporization. These materials are the main components of low-level miscellaneous solid wastes. The vaporization rate of Cs from the molten slag during the plasma melting was observed and was compared with the vaporization rate obtained in an electric resistance furnace. The apparent vaporization rate of Cs was found to follow the first-order rate equation with respect to the molten slag's Cs content, and its rate constant values varied (3.5 to 21.0) x 10{sup -6} m/s varying with the chemical composition of the miscellaneous solid wastes. These rate constants were about one order larger than those obtained in the electric resistant furnace and also the diffusion coefficients of basic elements in the molten slag. These results suggest that the vaporization rate of Cs is controlled by the vaporization step from the free molten slag furnace to the gas phase and depends predominantly on the thermodynamic properties of the molten slag.

  18. Properties of chemical vapor infiltration diamond deposited in a diamond powder matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Panitz, J.K.G.; Tallant, D.R.; Hills, C.R.; Staley, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    Densifying non-mined diamond powder precursors with diamond produced by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is an attractive approach for forming thick diamond deposits that avoids many potential manufacturability problems associated with predominantly chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The authors have developed two techniques: electrophoretic deposition and screen printing, to form nonmined diamond powder precursors on substrates. They then densify these precursors in a hot filament assisted reactor. Analysis indicated that a hot filament assisted chemical vapor infiltration process forms intergranular diamond deposits with properties that are to some degree different from predominantly hot-filament-assisted CVD material.

  19. Chemical Vapor-Deposited (CVD) Diamond Films for Electronic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Diamond films have a variety of useful applications as electron emitters in devices such as magnetrons, electron multipliers, displays, and sensors. Secondary electron emission is the effect in which electrons are emitted from the near surface of a material because of energetic incident electrons. The total secondary yield coefficient, which is the ratio of the number of secondary electrons to the number of incident electrons, generally ranges from 2 to 4 for most materials used in such applications. It was discovered recently at the NASA Lewis Research Center that chemical vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond films have very high secondary electron yields, particularly when they are coated with thin layers of CsI. For CsI-coated diamond films, the total secondary yield coefficient can exceed 60. In addition, diamond films exhibit field emission at fields orders of magnitude lower than for existing state-of-the-art emitters. Present state-of-the-art microfabricated field emitters generally require applied fields above 5x10^7 V/cm. Research on field emission from CVD diamond and high-pressure, high-temperature diamond has shown that field emission can be obtained at fields as low as 2x10^4 V/cm. It has also been shown that thin layers of metals, such as gold, and of alkali halides, such as CsI, can significantly increase field emission and stability. Emitters with nanometer-scale lithography will be able to obtain high-current densities with voltages on the order of only 10 to 15 V.

  20. Chemical Vapor-Deposited (CVD) Diamond Films for Electronic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Diamond films have a variety of useful applications as electron emitters in devices such as magnetrons, electron multipliers, displays, and sensors. Secondary electron emission is the effect in which electrons are emitted from the near surface of a material because of energetic incident electrons. The total secondary yield coefficient, which is the ratio of the number of secondary electrons to the number of incident electrons, generally ranges from 2 to 4 for most materials used in such applications. It was discovered recently at the NASA Lewis Research Center that chemical vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond films have very high secondary electron yields, particularly when they are coated with thin layers of CsI. For CsI-coated diamond films, the total secondary yield coefficient can exceed 60. In addition, diamond films exhibit field emission at fields orders of magnitude lower than for existing state-of-the-art emitters. Present state-of-the-art microfabricated field emitters generally require applied fields above 5x10^7 V/cm. Research on field emission from CVD diamond and high-pressure, high-temperature diamond has shown that field emission can be obtained at fields as low as 2x10^4 V/cm. It has also been shown that thin layers of metals, such as gold, and of alkali halides, such as CsI, can significantly increase field emission and stability. Emitters with nanometer-scale lithography will be able to obtain high-current densities with voltages on the order of only 10 to 15 V.

  1. Chemical vapor deposition and characterization of tungsten boron alloy films

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.M.; Fleming, J.G.; Lujan, R.D.; Roherty-Osmun, E.; Reid, J.S.; Hochberg, A.K.; Roberts, D.A.

    1993-11-01

    A low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) process for depositing W{sub X}B{sub (1-X)} films from WF{sub 6} and B{sub 2}H{sub 6} is described. The depositions were performed in a cold wall reactor on 6 in. Si wafers at 400C. During deposition, pressure was maintained at a fixed level in the range of 200 to 260 mTorr. Ratio of WF{sub 6}/B{sub 2}H{sub 6} was varied from 0.05 to 1.07. Carrier gas was either 100 sccm of Ar with a gas flow of 308 to 591 sccm, or 2000 sccm of Ar and 2000 sccm of H{sub 2} with the overall gas flow from 4213 to 4452 sccm. Two stable deposition regions were found separated by an unstable region that produced non-uniform films. The B-rich films produced in one of the stable deposition regions had W concentrations of 30 at.% and resistivities between 200 and 300 {mu}ohm{center_dot}cm. The W-rich films produced in the other stable deposition region had W concentrations of 80 at.% and resistivities of 100 {mu}ohm{center_dot}cm. As-deposited films had densities similar to bulk material of similar stoichiometry. Barrier properties of the films against diffusion of Cu to 700C in vacuum were measured by 4-point probe. Also, annealing was carried out to 900C in order to determine phases formed as the films crystallize. These studies indicate that W{sub X}B{sub (1-X)} films may be useful barriers in ULSI metallization applications.

  2. Investigation of diamond deposition by chemical vapor transport with hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piekarczyk, Wladyslaw; Messier, Russell F.; Roy, Rustum; Engdahl, Chris

    1990-12-01

    The carbon-hydrogen chemical vapor transport system was examined in accordance with a four-stage transport model. A result of this examination is that graphite co-deposition could be avoided when diamond is deposited from gas solutions under-saturated with respect to diamond. Actual deposition experiments showed that this unusual requirement can be fulfilled but only for the condition that the transport distance between the carbon source and the substrate surface is short. In such a case diamond can be deposited equally from super-saturated as well as from under-saturated gas solutions. On the basis of thermodynamic considerations a possible explanation of this unusual phenomenon is given. It is shown that there is a possibility of deposition of diamond from both super-saturated as well as under-saturated gas solutions but only on the condition that they are in a non-equilibrium state generally called the activated state. A model of the diamond deposition process consisting of two steps is proposed. In the first step diamond and graphite are deposited simultaneously. The most important carbon deposition reaction is C2H2(g) + 2 H(g) C(diamond graphite) + CH(g). The amount of co-deposited graphite is not a direct function of the saturation state of the gas phase. In the second step graphite is etched according to the most probable reaction C(graphite) + 4 H(g) CH4(g). Atomic hydrogen in a super-equilibrium concentration is necessary not only to etch graphite but also to precipitate and graphite. 1.

  3. Metal film deposition by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Jervis, T.R.

    1985-01-01

    Dielectric breakdown of gas mixtures can be used to deposit homogeneous thin films by chemical vapor deposition with appropriate control of flow and pressure conditions to suppress gas phase nucleation and particle formation. Using a pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser operating at 10.6 microns where there is no significant resonant absorption in any of the source gases, we have succeeded in depositing homogeneous films from several gas phase precursors by gas phase laser pyrolysis. Nickel and molybdenum from the respective carbonyls and tungsten from the hexafluoride have been examined to date. In each case the gas precursor is buffered to reduce the partial pressure of the reactants and to induce breakdown. The films are spectrally reflective and uniform over a large area. Films have been characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, pull tests, and resistivity measurements. The highest quality films have resulted from the nickel depositions. Detailed x-ray diffraction analysis of these films yields a very small domain size (approx. 50 A) consistent with rapid quenching from the gas phase reaction zone. This analysis also shows nickel carbide formation consistent with the temperature of the reaction zone and the Auger electron spectroscopy results which show some carbon and oxygen incorporation (8% and 1% respectively). Gas phase transport and condensation of the molybdenum carbonyl results in substantial carbon and oxygen contamination of the molybdenum films requiring heated substrates, a requirement not consistent with the goals of the program to maximize the quench rate of the deposition. Results from tungsten deposition experiments representing a reduction chemistry instead of the decomposition chemistry involved in the carbonyl experiments are also reported.

  4. Metal film deposition by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jervis, T. R.

    1985-01-01

    Dielectric breakdown of gas mixtures can be used to deposit homogeneous thin films by chemical vapor deposition with appropriate control of flow and pressure conditions to suppress gas phase nucleation and particle formation. Using a pulsed CO2 laser operating at 10.6 microns where there is no significant resonant absorption in any of the source gases, we have succeeded in depositing homogeneous films from several gas phase precursors by gas phase laser pyrolysis. Nickel and molybdenum from the respective carbonyls and tungsten from the hexafluoride have been examined to date. In each case the gas precursor is buffered to reduce the partial pressure of the reactants and to induce breakdown. The films are spectrally reflective and uniform over a large area. Films have been characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, pull tests, and resistivity measurements. The highest quality films have resulted from the nickel depositions. Detailed X-ray diffraction analysis of these films yields a very small domain size (approx. 50 A) consistent with rapid quenching from the gas phase reaction zone. This analysis also shows nickel carbide formation consistent with the temperature of the reaction zone and the Auger electron spectroscopy results which show some carbon and oxygen incorporation (8% and 1% respectively). Gas phase transport and condensation of the molybdenum carbonyl results in substantial carbon and oxygen contamination of the molybdenum films requiring heated substrates, a requirement not consistent with the goals of the program to maximize the quench rate of the deposition. Results from tungsten deposition experiments representing a reduction chemistry instead of the decomposition chemistry involved in the carbonyl experiments are also reported.

  5. Review of chemical vapor deposition of graphene and related applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Luyao; Zhou, Chongwu

    2013-10-15

    Since its debut in 2004, graphene has attracted enormous interest because of its unique properties. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has emerged as an important method for the preparation and production of graphene for various applications since the method was first reported in 2008/2009. In this Account, we review graphene CVD on various metal substrates with an emphasis on Ni and Cu. In addition, we discuss important and representative applications of graphene formed by CVD, including as flexible transparent conductors for organic photovoltaic cells and in field effect transistors. Growth on polycrystalline Ni films leads to both monolayer and few-layer graphene with multiple layers because of the grain boundaries on Ni films. We can greatly increase the percentage of monolayer graphene by using single-crystalline Ni(111) substrates, which have smooth surface and no grain boundaries. Due to the extremely low solubility of carbon in Cu, Cu has emerged as an even better catalyst for the growth of monolayer graphene with a high percentage of single layers. The growth of graphene on Cu is a surface reaction. As a result, only one layer of graphene can form on a Cu surface, in contrast with Ni, where more than one layer can form through carbon segregation and precipitation. We also describe a method for transferring graphene sheets from the metal using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). CVD graphene has electronic properties that are potentially valuable in a number of applications. For example, few-layer graphene grown on Ni can function as flexible transparent conductive electrodes for organic photovoltaic cells. In addition, because we can synthesize large-grain graphene on Cu foil, such large-grain graphene has electronic properties suitable for use in field effect transistors.

  6. Plasma Spray-PVD: A New Thermal Spray Process to Deposit Out of the Vapor Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Niessen, Konstantin; Gindrat, Malko

    2011-06-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is a low pressure plasma spray technology recently developed by Sulzer Metco AG (Switzerland). Even though it is a thermal spray process, it can deposit coatings out of the vapor phase. The basis of PS-PVD is the low pressure plasma spraying (LPPS) technology that has been well established in industry for several years. In comparison to conventional vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) or low pressure plasma spraying (LPPS), the new proposed process uses a high energy plasma gun operated at a reduced work pressure of 0.1 kPa (1 mbar). Owing to the high energy plasma and further reduced work pressure, PS-PVD is able to deposit a coating not only by melting the feed stock material which builds up a layer from liquid splats but also by vaporizing the injected material. Therefore, the PS-PVD process fills the gap between the conventional physical vapor deposition (PVD) technologies and standard thermal spray processes. The possibility to vaporize feedstock material and to produce layers out of the vapor phase results in new and unique coating microstructures. The properties of such coatings are superior to those of thermal spray and electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) coatings. In contrast to EB-PVD, PS-PVD incorporates the vaporized coating material into a supersonic plasma plume. Owing to the forced gas stream of the plasma jet, complex shaped parts such as multi-airfoil turbine vanes can be coated with columnar thermal barrier coatings using PS-PVD. Even shadowed areas and areas which are not in the line of sight of the coating source can be coated homogeneously. This article reports on the progress made by Sulzer Metco in developing a thermal spray process to produce coatings out of the vapor phase. Columnar thermal barrier coatings made of Yttria-stabilized Zircona (YSZ) are optimized to serve in a turbine engine. This process includes not only preferable coating properties such as strain tolerance and erosion

  7. Thermal and chemical vapor deposition of Si nanowires: Shape control, dispersion, and electrical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Colli, A.; Fasoli, A.; Beecher, P.; Servati, P.; Pisana, S.; Fu, Y.; Flewitt, A. J.; Milne, W. I.; Robertson, J.; Ducati, C.; De Franceschi, S.; Hofmann, S.; Ferrari, A. C.

    2007-08-01

    We investigate and compare complementary approaches to SiNW production in terms of yield, morphology control, and electrical properties. Vapor-phase techniques are considered, including chemical vapor deposition (with or without the assistance of a plasma) and thermal evaporation. We report Au-catalyzed nucleation of SiNWs at temperatures as low as 300 deg. C using SiH{sub 4} as precursor. We get yields up to several milligrams by metal-free condensation of SiO powders. For all processes, we control the final nanostructure morphology. We then report concentrated and stable dispersions of SiNWs in solvents compatible with semiconducting organic polymers. Finally, we investigate the electrical response of intrinsic SiNWs grown by different methods. All our SiNWs exhibit p-type behavior and comparable performance, though in some cases ambipolar devices are observed. Thus, processing and morphology, rather than the growth technique, are key to achieve optimal samples for applications.

  8. Chemical reaction between water vapor and stressed glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soga, N.; Okamoto, T.; Hanada, T.; Kunugi, M.

    1979-01-01

    The crack velocity in soda-lime silicate glass was determined at room temperature at water-vapor pressures of 10 to 0.04 torr using the double torsion technique. A precracked glass specimen (70 x 16 x 1.6 mm) was placed in a vacuum chamber containing a four-point bending test apparatus. The plotted experimental results show that the crack propagation curve in water agrees fairly well with that of Wiederhorn (1967). Attention is given to the effect of water vapor pressure on crack velocity at K(I) = 550,000 N/m to the 3/2 power, with (Wiederhorn's data) or without N2 present. The plotted results reveal that the present crack velocity is about two orders of magnitude higher than that of Wiederhorn at high water-vapor conditions, but the difference decreases as the water-vapor concentration diminishes or the crack velocity slows down.

  9. Performance characteristics of a chemical oxygen-iodine laser without a water vapor trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Toshio; Tsuruyama, Toru; Uchiyama, Taro

    1988-09-01

    The effect of water vapor on the operation of a chemical oxygen-iodine laser without a water vapor trap is described. The maximum CW laser power of 87 W was obtained without the water vapor trap at a Cl2 flow rate of 740 mmol/min. An alkaline H2O2 solution (90 wt pct H2O2, 50 wt pct KOH) was cooled down to about -30 C in order to control the saturated H2O2-H2O vapor pressure to less than 100 mTorr. Two porous pipes made of carbon were utilized as a singlet oxygen generator.

  10. CHEMICALLY VAPOR DEPOSITED YTTRIA-STABILIZED ZIRCONIA (YSZ) FOR THERMAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL BARRIER COATING

    SciTech Connect

    Varanasi, V.G.; Besmann, T.M.; Lothian, J.L.; Xu, W.; Starr, T.L.

    2003-04-22

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is used as a thermal barrier coating (TBC) to protect super-alloy blades such as Mar-M247 or Rene-N5 during engine operation. The current method for YSZ fabrication for TBC applications is by air-plasma spraying (APS) or electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) (Haynes 1997). APS gives reasonable deposition rates, but has a limited life and aging effects due to its porous and lamellar structure. The EB-PVD coatings are more stable and can accommodate thermomechanical stresses due to their characteristic strain-tolerant, columnar microstructure. EB-PVD, however, is primarily line-of-sight, which often leaves ''hidden areas'' uncoated, has low throughput, and has high capital cost. The process of metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) is investigated here as an economical alternative to EB-PVD and APS, with the potential for better overall coverage as well as the ability to produce thick (100-250 {micro}m), strain-tolerant, columnar coatings. MOCVD of YSZ involves the use of zirconium and yttrium organometallic precursors reacting with an oxygen source. Previous researchers have used diketonate or chloride precursors and oxygen (Wahl et al. 2001a, Wahl et al. 2001b, Yamane and Harai 1989). These precursors have low transport rates due to their low carrier solvent solubility (Varanasi et al. 2003). Solvated zirconium and yttrium butoxide precursors were investigated here due to their higher vapor pressures and high solvent solubility. This work uses predictive equilibrium modeling and experiments involving butoxide precursors for tetragonal YSZ fabrication.

  11. Linearization of calibration curves by aerosol carrier effect of CCl 4 vapor in electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kántor, Tibor; de Loos-Vollebregt, Margaretha T. C.

    2005-03-01

    Carbon tetrachloride vapor as gaseous phase modifier in a graphite furnace electrothermal vaporizer (GFETV) converts heavy volatile analyte forms to volatile and medium volatile chlorides and produces aerosol carrier effect, the latter being a less generally recognized benefit. However, the possible increase of polyatomic interferences in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (GFETV-ICP-MS) by chlorine and carbon containing species due to CCl 4 vapor introduction has been discouraging with the use of low resolution, quadrupole type MS equipment. Being aware of this possible handicap, it was aimed at to investigate the feasibility of the use of this halogenating agent in ICP-MS with regard of possible hazards to the instrument, and also to explore the advantages under these specific conditions. With sample gas flow (inner gas flow) rate not higher than 900 ml min -1 Ar in the torch and 3 ml min -1 CCl 4 vapor flow rate in the furnace, the long-term stability of the instrument was ensured and the following benefits by the halocarbon were observed. The non-linearity error (defined in the text) of the calibration curves (signal versus mass functions) with matrix-free solution standards was 30-70% without, and 1-5% with CCl 4 vapor introduction, respectively, at 1 ng mass of Cu, Fe, Mn and Pb analytes. The sensitivity for these elements increased by 2-4-fold with chlorination, while the relative standard deviation (RSD) was essentially the same (2-5%) for the two cases in comparison. A vaporization temperature of 2650 °C was required for Cr in Ar atmosphere, while 2200 °C was sufficient in Ar + CCl 4 atmosphere to attain complete vaporization. Improvements in linear response and sensitivity were the highest for this least volatile element. The pyrolytic graphite layer inside the graphite tube was protected by the halocarbon, and tube life time was further increased by using traces of hydrocarbon vapor in the external sheath gas of the graphite furnace. Details

  12. Experimental Study of Diamond Nucleation by Plasmon Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-18

    REPORT Final Technical Report for Proposal Number 59187MSDRP: Experimental Study of Diamond Nucleation by Plasmon Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition 14...chemical vapor deposition , characterization of diamond nanoparticles, and direct conversion of the polymer poly(hydridocarbyne) to diamond. We adapted the...Raman spectroscopy. With the addition of the filament, we were able to observe carbon deposition and etching of amorphous carbon. We were 1. REPORT

  13. Year 2 Update: Investigation of Chemical Vapor Deposited Aluminum as a Replacement Coating for Cadmium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-24

    1/29/2007 1 Year 2 Update: Investigation of Chemical Vapor Deposited Aluminum as a Replacement Coating for Cadmium Dr. Elizabeth Berman and Dr. Eric...Investigation of Chemical Vapor Deposited Aluminum as a Replacement Coating for Cadmium 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 27th Replacement of Hard Chrome and Cadmium Plating Program Review Meeting, January 23-25, 2007, New Orleans, LA. Sponsored

  14. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Atomically-Thin Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    UNCLASSIFIED AD-E403 625 Technical Report ARMET-TR-14041 CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION OF ATOMICALLY -THIN MOLYBDENUM...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION OF ATOMICALLY -THIN MOLYBDENUM DISULFIDE (MoS2) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...materials, in their bulk form exist as lamellar structures, they can be exfoliated into individual, atomically -thin layers . While the exfoliated 2D materials

  15. Polymer-coated symmetrical metal-cladding waveguide for chemical vapor detection with high sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, PingPing; Deng, ManLan

    2012-11-01

    An optical platform for sensitive detection of chemical vapor based on a polymer-coated symmetrical metal-cladding waveguide is proposed. The diffusion of chemical vapor usually leads to a combinational effect in the polymer layer, i.e., swelling and refractive index change. Owing to the high sensitivity of ultrahigh-order modes, the vapor-induced effect will give rise to a dramatic variation of the reflected light intensity. For proof-of-concept, a good linearity and a low detection limit of toluene and benzene are experimentally demonstrated with an amorphous Teflon AF polymer layer.

  16. Ethanol vapor above skin: determination by a gas sensor instrument and relationship with plasma concentration.

    PubMed

    Giles, H G; Meggiorini, S; Renaud, G E; Thiessen, J J; Vidins, E I; Compton, K V; Saldivia, V; Orrego, H; Israel, Y

    1987-06-01

    Studies with a new instrument show that blood ethanol concentrations in rats and humans can be estimated by measurement of ethanol vapor above the skin. After intravenous bolus administration of ethanol (1 g/kg) to rats a novel device based on the Figaro sensor was placed above the animal's abdomen. Plasma and skin vapor ethanol concentrations, analyzed by gas chromatography and sensor, respectively, declined in parallel (r = 0.96). In healthy human subjects, plasma and skin vapor concentrations, measured on the palm, also declined in parallel after intravenous ethanol infusion (1 hr, 0.5 g/kg), r = 0.99. In 10 alcoholic liver disease outpatients attending clinic in whom plasma ethanol concentrations ranged from 32-304 mg/dl, the correlation of plasma ethanol determined directly by gas chromatography and indirectly by skin vapor analysis was slope = 0.93, intercept = 1.8, r = 0.94. In controlled studies, skin vapor measurements are comparable with breathalyzer determinations; they may be performed in situations where breathalyzer measurements are inconvenient or where continuous monitoring is desirable.

  17. Laser initiation and decay processes in an organic vapor plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Guowen

    A large volume organic molecular plasma (hundreds of cm3) is created by a 193 nm laser ionizing an organic molecule, Tetrakis-(dimethylamino)-ethylene (TMAE). The plasma is found to be characterized by high electron density (10 13-1011cm-3), low electron temperature (~0.1 eV), fast creation (~10 ns) and rapid decaying (electron-ion recombination coefficient ~10-6 cm3/s). Fast Langmuir probe (LP) techniques are developed for diagnosing this plasma, including a novel probe design and fabrication, a fast detection system, sampling, indirect probe heating, electro-magnetic shielding and dummy probe techniques. Plasma physical processes regarding fast LP diagnostics for different time scales (t> and <100 ns) are studied. A theory for the correction due to a rapidly decaying plasma to LP measurements is developed. The mechanisms responsible for the plasma decay are studied, and a delayed ionization process is found to be important in interpreting the decay processes. It is also found that nitrogen can enhance the delayed emission of a TMAE Rydberg state from the TMAE plasma. This result strongly suggests that a long-lifetime highly-excited state is important in the TMAE plasma decay process. This result supports the delayed ionization mechanism. A model combining electron-ion recombination and delayed ionization processes is developed to calculate the delayed ionization lifetime.

  18. Dielectric properties of hydrogen-incorporated chemical vapor deposited diamond thin films.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Xiao, X.; Wang, J.; Shi, B.; Auciello, O.; Carlisle, J. A.; Carpick, R.; Adiga, V.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison; Univ. of Pennsylvania

    2007-01-01

    Diamond thin films with a broad range of microstructures from a ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) form developed at Argonne National Laboratory to a microcrystalline diamond (MCD) form have been grown with different hydrogen percentages in the Ar/CH{sub 4} gas mixture used in the microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The dielectric properties of the CVD diamond thin films have been studied using impedance and dc measurements on metal-diamond-metal test structures. Close correlations have been observed between the hydrogen content in the bulk of the diamond films, measured by elastic recoil detection (ERD), and their electrical conductivity and capacitance-frequency (C-f) behaviors. Addition of hydrogen gas in the Ar/CH{sub 4} gas mixture used to grow the diamond films appears to have two main effects depending on the film microstructure, namely, (a) in the UNCD films, hydrogen incorporates into the atomically abrupt grain boundaries satisfying sp{sup 2} carbon dangling bonds, resulting in increased resistivity, and (b) in MCD, atomic hydrogen produced in the plasma etches preferentially the graphitic phase codepositing with the diamond phase, resulting in the statistical survival and growth of large diamond grains and dominance of the diamond phase, and thus having significant impact on the dielectric properties of these films.

  19. Upstream Density for Plasma Detachment with Conventional and Lithium Vapor-Box Divertors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldston, Rj; Schwartz, Ja

    2016-10-01

    Fusion power plants are likely to require detachment of the divertor plasma from material targets. The lithium vapor box divertor is designed to achieve this, while limiting the flux of lithium vapor to the main plasma. We develop a simple model of near-detachment to evaluate the required upstream plasma density, for both conventional and lithium vapor-box divertors, based on particle and dynamic pressure balance between up- and down-stream, at near-detachment conditions. A remarkable general result is found, not just for lithium-induced detachment, that the upstream density divided by the Greenwald-limit density scales as (P 5 / 8 /B 3 / 8) Tdet1 / 2 / (ɛcool + γTdet) , with no explicit size scaling. Tdet is the temperature just before strong pressure loss, 1/2 of the ionization potential of the dominant recycling species, ɛcool is the average plasma energy lost per injected hydrogenic and impurity atom, and γ is the sheath heat transmission factor. A recent 1-D calculation agrees well with this scaling. The implication is that the plasma exhaust problem cannot be solved by increasing R. Instead significant innovation, such as the lithium vapor box divertor, will be required. This work supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  20. Chemical vapor deposition of fluorine-doped zinc oxide

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Roy G.; Kramer, Keith; Liang, Haifan

    2000-06-06

    Fims of fluorine-doped zinc oxide are deposited from vaporized precursor compounds comprising a chelate of a dialkylzinc, such as an amine chelate, an oxygen source, and a fluorine source. The coatings are highly electrically conductive, transparent to visible light, reflective to infrared radiation, absorbing to ultraviolet light, and free of carbon impurity.