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Sample records for plasma coagulation factors

  1. Refreezing previously thawed fresh-frozen plasma. Stability of coagulation factors V and VIII:C.

    PubMed

    Dzik, W H; Riibner, M A; Linehan, S K

    1989-09-01

    With the growth in autologous blood programs and the increased scrutiny of the indications for transfusion of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP), an increase has been seen in the number of occasions on which FFP was requested and thawed but then not transfused. The coagulation properties of FFP units that were refrozen and then rethawed were therefore studied. Fifty-eight units of plasma were studied, with each experimental unit of FFP paired with an identical control unit. Experimental units were frozen, stored at -65 degrees C, thawed, stored at 1 to 6 degrees C for various periods of time up to 24 hours, and then refrozen, stored at -65 degrees C, rethawed, and stored again in the refrigerator for up to 24 hours. Control units were frozen once at the time the experimental units were first frozen and thawed once at the time of the second thaw of the experimental units. Aliquots of plasma were sampled periodically and were later batch-tested for prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), and factor V and VIII:C activity. The results of coagulation testing of the twice-frozen plasmas were always within the normal range. There was a slight but statistically valid prolongation of the PT and aPTT and a decrease in the factor V and VIII:C levels for twice-frozen plasma compared with control plasma. The greatest decline occurred in the level of factor VIII:C. The measured deterioration in coagulation of twice-frozen FFP is unlikely to be of clinical importance. Refreezing FFP may eventually prove useful for rare donor, autologous, and massive transfusion programs.

  2. Measurement of factor v activity in human plasma using a microplate coagulation assay.

    PubMed

    Tilley, Derek; Levit, Irina; Samis, John A

    2012-09-09

    In response to injury, blood coagulation is activated and results in generation of the clotting protease, thrombin. Thrombin cleaves fibrinogen to fibrin which forms an insoluble clot that stops hemorrhage. Factor V (FV) in its activated form, FVa, is a critical cofactor for the protease FXa and accelerator of thrombin generation during fibrin clot formation as part of prothrombinase (1, 2). Manual FV assays have been described (3, 4), but they are time consuming and subjective. Automated FV assays have been reported (5-7), but the analyzer and reagents are expensive and generally provide only the clot time, not the rate and extent of fibrin formation. The microplate platform is preferred for measuring enzyme-catalyzed events because of convenience, time, cost, small volume, continuous monitoring, and high-throughput (8, 9). Microplate assays have been reported for clot lysis (10), platelet aggregation (11), and coagulation Factors (12), but not for FV activity in human plasma. The goal of the method was to develop a microplate assay that measures FV activity during fibrin formation in human plasma. This novel microplate method outlines a simple, inexpensive, and rapid assay of FV activity in human plasma. The assay utilizes a kinetic microplate reader to monitor the absorbance change at 405 nm during fibrin formation in human plasma (Figure 1) (13). The assay accurately measures the time, initial rate, and extent of fibrin clot formation. It requires only μl quantities of plasma, is complete in 6 min, has high-throughput, is sensitive to 24-80 pM FV, and measures the amount of unintentionally activated (1-stage activity) and thrombin-activated FV (2-stage activity) to obtain a complete assessment of its total functional activity (2-stage activity - 1-stage activity). Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is an acquired coagulopathy that most often develops from pre-existing infections (14). DIC is associated with a poor prognosis and increases mortality

  3. [Plasma blood coagulation in mammals (domestic and zoo animals). Experience with screening tests and determinations of individual factor activities].

    PubMed

    Lutze, G; Lutze, G; Kutschmann, K; Wiens, L

    2007-08-01

    Plasma coagulation in mammals shows an essentially uniform structure. Differences are in species specific composition and quantity of coagulation factors. Many of the coagulation disorders occurring in humans have been observed in other mammals. Almost all the coagulation studies performed to date have been in domestic animals. For the majority of mammalian species, e.g. zoo animals, therefore, we have either no data at all or only isolated results. The methods used for coagulation testing in veterinary medicine have not yet been standardized. The significance and informative value of the screening tests are limited in animals compared with humans. The activities of individual factors in animals are determined by coagulometric tests. The results can be determined in relation to the activity in humans with the help of a human normal plasma or in relation to the activity of the respective animal with the help of a normal plasma from the same species. The problem is the parallelity of the dilution curves used as reference curves. The coagulation factor activities given for mammals usually differ more or less markedly from those in humans.

  4. Contributions of contact activation pathways of coagulation factor XII in plasma.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Kaushik; Guo, Zhe; Vogler, Erwin A; Siedlecki, Christopher A

    2009-07-01

    Activation of human blood plasma coagulation by contact with hydrophilic or hydrophobic surfaces (procoagulants) is dominated by kallikrein (Kal)-mediated activation of the blood zymogen FXII (Hageman Factor). Mathematical modeling of prekallikrein (PK)-deficient platelet-poor plasma (d(PK)PPP) and PK-reconstituted d(PK)PPP (Rd(PK)PPP) coagulation shows that autoactivation of FXII (FXII-->[surface]FXII) produces no more than about 25% of the total FXIIa produced by the intrinsic pathway. Autoactivation and reciprocal-activation increase in the same proportion with procoagulant surface energy (water-wettability), whereas total amount of FXIIa produced per-unit-area procoagulant remains roughly constant for any particular procoagulant. These results suggest that procoagulant surfaces initiate the intrinsic cascade by producing a bolus of FXIIa in proportion to surface energy or surface area but play no additional role in subsequent molecular events in the cascade. Results further suggest that reciprocal-activation occurs in proportion to the amount of FXIIa produced by the initiating autoactivation step.

  5. Fresh frozen plasma in the pediatric age group and in congenital coagulation factor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Muntean, Wolfgang

    2002-10-31

    Generally, the rules of good practice in transfusion medicine apply also to the pediatric age group. However, the frequency of specific diseases that might necessitate the administration of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) differs from that in adults. Physiologic differences to the later age exist in the neonatal period and in young infants, especially with respect to the hemostatic system, that must be recognized when considering administration of FFP. The plasma levels of many procoagulant factors and important anticoagulants are lower in neonates than in other age groups. Despite these findings, healthy neonates show no easy bruising, no increased bleeding during surgery, and excellent wound healing. The same discrepancy obtains between in vitro and clinical findings with primary hemostasis in neonates. The good primary hemostasis in neonates despite poor in vitro platelet function seems to be due mainly to a very high von Willebrand factor and the presence of more high-multimeric subunits of von Willebrand factor than later in life. We must assume that these particular plasma levels of procoagulant and anticoagulant proteins are essential for the correct function of neonatal hemostasis. Evidence that the hemostatic system of neonates works best with physiologic concentrations of procoagulants and anticoagulants can also be inferred from studies where the administration of clotting factor concentrates gave poor results.Since healthy neonates and young infants have excellent hemostasis, there is absolutely no indication to 'correct' these values to adult's norms prior to invasive procedures by administering FFP. Indications for FFP, met more frequently in the pediatric age group than later in life, are exchange transfusion and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Indications applying equally to adults are other extracorporeal life support systems, disseminated intravascular coagulation, hepatic coagulopathy, and 'complex unclear coagulopathies'. In congenital clotting

  6. Enhanced specificity of immunoblotting using radiolabeled antigen overlay: studies of blood coagulation factor XII and prekallikrein in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Laemmle, B.; Berrettini, M.; Griffin, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Immunoblotting of blood coagulation Factor XII and plasma prekallikrein in whole plasma was performed using radiolabeled antigen for detection. After sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of plasma and transfer to nitrocellulose sheets, the blots were first reacted with polyclonal goat anti-Factor XII or anti-prekallikrein antisera and then with /sup 125/I-Factor XII or /sup 125/I-prekallikrein, respectively. A major advantage of using radiolabeled antigen rather than radiolabeled secondary antibody was enhanced specificity of immunodetection of these antigens in plasma. This procedure was sensitive to approx.0.3 ng of either Factor XII or prekallikrein antigen and was useful for detection of Factor XII cleavage fragments in contact activated plasma. Radiolabeled antigen overlay may improve the specificity of immunoblotting of trace antigens in any complex mixtures.

  7. Use of Plasma for Acquired Coagulation Factor Deficiencies in Critical Care.

    PubMed

    Shah, Akshay; McKechnie, Stuart; Stanworth, Simon

    2016-03-01

    Coagulopathy in critically ill patients is common and often multifactorial. Fresh frozen plasma (FFP) is commonly used to correct this either prophylactically or therapeutically. FFP usage is mainly guided by laboratory tests of coagulation, which have been shown to have poor predictive values for bleeding. Viscoelastic tests are an attractive option to guide hemostatic therapy, but require rigorous evaluation. The past few years have seen a gradual reduction in national use of FFP potentially due to an increased awareness of risks such as transfusion-related acute lung injury, patient blood management strategies to reduce transfusion in general, and increased awareness of the lack of high-quality evidence available to support FFP use. Within critical care, FFP is administered before invasive procedures/surgery, to treat major traumatic and nontraumatic hemorrhage, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and for urgent warfarin reversal if first-line agents, such as prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) are not available. Alternative agents such as fibrinogen concentrate and PCC need further evaluation through large-scale clinical trials.

  8. [CONGENITAL DEFICIENCY OF COAGULATION FACTOR V].

    PubMed

    Kvezereli-Kopadze, M; Kvezereli-Kopadze, A; Chikovani, M

    2016-07-01

    The study was designed to investigate the 5 year old girl with rare bleeding disorder -deficiency of coagulation factor V. The diagnosis was based on detail family history, physical examination and para-clinical data analyses. The age of patient, purpura, this has been detected from early age, positive family history, non-controlled, longtime bleeding, inadequate trauma of the tongue, which did not resolve after surgery, strong hypocoagulation, which was slightly improved, after several plasma transfusions. This allowed us to suggest the existence of the congenital coagulopathy, which was confirmed by the investigation of coagulation factors - particularly the deficiency of factor V was detected. PMID:27661277

  9. Perioperative coagulation management--fresh frozen plasma.

    PubMed

    Kor, Daryl J; Stubbs, James R; Gajic, Ognjen

    2010-03-01

    Clinical studies support the use of perioperative fresh frozen plasma (FFP) in patients who are actively bleeding with multiple coagulation factor deficiencies and for the prevention of dilutional coagulopathy in patients with major trauma and/or massive haemorrhage. In these settings, current FFP dosing recommendations may be inadequate. However, a substantial proportion of FFP is transfused in non-bleeding patients with mild elevations in coagulation screening tests. This practice is not supported by the literature, is unlikely to be of benefit and unnecessarily exposes patients to the risks of FFP. The role of FFP in reversing the effects of warfarin anticoagulation is dependent on the clinical context and availability of alternative agents. Although FFP is commonly transfused in patients with liver disease, this practice needs broad reconsideration. Adverse effects of FFP include febrile and allergic reactions, transfusion-associated circulatory overload and transfusion-related acute lung injury. The latter is the most serious complication, being less common with the preferential use of non-alloimmunised, male-donor predominant plasma. FP24 and thawed plasma are alternatives to FFP with similar indications for administration. Both provide an opportunity for increasing the safe plasma donor pool. Although prothrombin complex concentrates and factor VIIa may be used as alternatives to FFP in a variety of specific clinical contexts, additional study is needed.

  10. Comparison of amino acid sequence of bovine coagulation Factor IX (Christmas Factor) with that of other vitamin K-dependent plasma proteins.

    PubMed

    Katayama, K; Ericsson, L H; Enfield, D L; Walsh, K A; Neurath, H; Davie, E W; Titani, K

    1979-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of bovine blood coagulation Factor IX (Christmas Factor) is presented and compared with the sequences of other vitamin K-dependent plasma proteins and pancreatic trypsinogen. The 416-residue sequence of Factor IX was determined largely by automated Edman degradation of two large segments, containing 181 and 235 residues, isolated after activating Factor IX with a protease from Russell's viper venom. Subfragments of the two segments were produced by enzymatic digestion and by chemical cleavage of methionyl, tryptophyl, and asparaginyl-glycyl bonds. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of Factor IX, Factor X, and Protein C demonstrates that they are homologous throughout. Their homology with prothrombin, however, is restricted to the amino-terminal region, which is rich in gamma-carboxyglutamic acid, and the carboxyl-terminal region, which represents the catalytic domain of these proteins and corresponds to that of pancreatic serine proteases.

  11. Contact activation of blood-plasma coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golas, Avantika

    Surface engineering of biomaterials with improved hemocompatibility is an imperative, given the widespread global need for cardiovascular devices. Research summarized in this dissertation focuses on contact activation of FXII in buffer and blood plasma frequently referred to as autoactivation. The extant theory of contact activation imparts FXII autoactivation ability to negatively charged, hydrophilic surfaces. According to this theory, contact activation of plasma involves assembly of proteins comprising an "activation complex" on activating surfaces mediated by specific chemical interactions between complex proteins and the surface. This work has made key discoveries that significantly improve our core understanding of contact activation and unravel the existing paradigm of plasma coagulation. It is shown herein that contact activation of blood factor XII (FXII, Hageman factor) in neat-buffer solution exhibits a parabolic profile when scaled as a function of silanized-glass-particle activator surface energy (measured as advancing water adhesion tension t°a=g° Iv costheta in dyne/cm, where g°Iv is water interfacial tension in dyne/cm and theta is the advancing contact angle). Nearly equal activation is observed at the extremes of activator water-wetting properties --36 < t°a < 72 dyne/cm (O° ≤ theta < 120°), falling sharply through a broad minimum within the 20 < t°a < 40 dyne/cm (55° < theta < 75°). Furthermore, contact activation of FXII in buffer solution produces an ensemble of protein fragments exhibiting either procoagulant properties in plasma (proteolysis of blood factor XI or prekallikrein), amidolytic properties (cleavage of s-2302 chromogen), or the ability to suppress autoactivation through currently unknown biochemistry. The relative proportions of these fragments depend on activator surface chemistry/energy. We have also discovered that contact activation is moderated by adsorption of plasma proteins unrelated to coagulation through an

  12. Coagulation of dust particles in a plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horanyi, M.; Goertz, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    The electrostatic charge of small dust grains in a plasma in which the temperature varies in time is discussed, pointing out that secondary electron emission might introduce charge separation. If the sign of the charge on small grains is opposite to that on big ones, enhanced coagulation can occur which will affect the size distribution of grains in a plasma. Two scenarios where this process might be relevant are considered: a hot plasma environment with temperature fluctuations and a cold plasma environment with transient heating events. The importance of the enhanced coagulation is uncertain, because the plasma parameters in grain-producing environments such as a molecular cloud or a protoplanetary disk are not known. It is possible, however, that this process is the most efficient mechanism for the growth of grains in the size range of 0.1-500 microns.

  13. The effect of surface contact activation and temperature on plasma coagulation with an RNA aptamer directed against factor IXa.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Anandi; Vogler, Erwin A; Sullenger, Bruce A; Becker, Richard C

    2013-01-01

    The anticoagulant properties of a novel RNA aptamer that binds FIXa depend collectively on the intensity of surface contact activation of human blood plasma, aptamer concentration, and its binding affinity for FIXa. Accordingly, anticoagulation efficiency of plasma containing any particular aptamer concentration is low when coagulation is strongly activated by hydrophilic surfaces compared to the anticoagulation efficiency in plasma that is weakly activated by hydrophobic surfaces. Anticoagulation efficiency is lower at hypothermic temperatures possibly because aptamer-FIXa binding decreases with decreasing temperatures. Experimental results demonstrating these trends are qualitatively interpreted in the context of a previously established model of anticoagulation efficiency of thrombin-binding DNA aptamers that exhibit anticoagulation properties similar to the FIXa aptamer. In principle, FIXa aptamer anticoagulants should be more efficient and therefore more clinically useful than thrombin-binding aptamers because aptamer binding to FIXa competes only with FX that is at much lower blood concentration than fibrinogen (FI) that competes with thrombin-binding aptamers. Our findings may have translatable relevance in the application of aptamer anticoagulants for clinical conditions in which blood is in direct contact with non-biological surfaces such as those encountered in cardiopulmonary bypass circuits. PMID:23054460

  14. Human plasma kallikrein releases neutrophil elastase during blood coagulation.

    PubMed Central

    Wachtfogel, Y T; Kucich, U; James, H L; Scott, C F; Schapira, M; Zimmerman, M; Cohen, A B; Colman, R W

    1983-01-01

    Elastase is released from human neutrophils during the early events of blood coagulation. Human plasma kallikrein has been shown to stimulate neutrophil chemotaxis, aggregation, and oxygen consumption. Therefore, the ability of kallikrein to release neutrophil elastase was investigated. Neutrophils were isolated by dextran sedimentation, and elastase release was measured by both an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and an enzymatic assay using t-butoxy-carbonyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-amino methyl coumarin as the substrate. Kallikrein, 0.1-1.0 U/ml, (0.045-0.45 microM), was incubated with neutrophils that were preincubated with cytochalasin B (5 micrograms/ml). The release of elastase was found to be proportional to the kallikrein concentration. Kallikrein released a maximum of 34% of the total elastase content, as measured by solubilizing the neutrophils in the nonionic detergent Triton X-100. A series of experiments was carried out to determine if kallikrein was a major enzyme involved in neutrophil elastase release during blood coagulation. When 10 million neutrophils were incubated in 1 ml of normal plasma in the presence of 30 mM CaCl2 for 90 min, 2.75 micrograms of elastase was released. In contrast, neutrophils incubated in prekallikrein-deficient or Factor XII-deficient plasma released less than half of the elastase, as compared with normal plasma. The addition of purified prekallikrein to prekallikrein-deficient plasma restored neutrophil elastase release to normal levels. Moreover, release of elastase was enhanced in plasma deficient in C1-inhibitor, the major plasma inhibitor of kallikrein. This release was not dependent upon further steps in the coagulation pathway, or on C5a, since levels of elastase, released in Factor XI- or C5-deficient plasma, were similar to that in normal plasma, and an antibody to C5 failed to inhibit elastase release. These data suggest that kallikrein may be a major enzyme responsible for the release of elastase during blood

  15. Nanoparticle coagulation in fractionally charged and charge fluctuating dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nunomura, Shota; Kondo, Michio; Shiratani, Masaharu; Koga, Kazunori; Watanabe, Yukio

    2008-08-15

    The kinetics of nanoparticle coagulation has been studied in fractionally charged and charge fluctuating dusty plasmas. The coagulation occurs when the mutual collision frequency among nanoparticles exceeds their charging and decharging/neutralization frequency. Interestingly, the coagulation is suppressed while a fraction (several percent) of nanoparticles are negatively charged in a plasma, in which stochastic charging plays an important role. A model is developed to predict a phase diagram of the coagulation and its suppression.

  16. Epistatic and pleiotropic effects of polymorphisms in the fibrinogen and coagulation factor XIII genes on plasma fibrinogen concentration, fibrin gel structure and risk of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Mannila, Maria Nastase; Eriksson, Per; Ericsson, Carl-Göran; Hamsten, Anders; Silveira, Angela

    2006-03-01

    An intricate interplay between the genes encoding fibrinogen gamma (FGG), alpha (FGA) and beta (FGB), coagulation factor XIII (F13A1) and interleukin 6 (IL6) and environmental factors is likely to influence plasma fibrinogen concentration, fibrin clot structure and risk of myocardial infarction (MI). In the present study, the potential contribution of SNPs harboured in the fibrinogen, IL6 and F13A1 genes to these biochemical and clinical phenotypes was examined. A database and biobank based on 387 survivors of a first MI and population-based controls were used. Sixty controls were selected according to FGG 9340T > C [rs1049636] genotype for studies on fibrin clot structure using the liquid permeation method. The multifactor dimensionality reduction method was used for interaction analyses. We here report that the FGA 2224G > A [rs2070011] SNP (9.2%), plasma fibrinogen concentration (13.1%) and age (8.1%) appeared as independent determinants of fibrin gel porosity. The FGA 2224G > A SNP modulated the relation between plasma fibrinogen concentration and fibrin clot porosity. The FGG-FGA*4 haplotype, composed of the minor FGG 9340C and FGA 2224A alleles, had similar effects, supporting its reported protective role in relation to MI. Significant epistasis on plasma fibrinogen concentration was detected between the FGA 2224G > A and F13A1 Val34Leu [rs5985] SNPs (p < 0.001). The FGG 9340T > C and FGB 1038G > A [rs1800791] SNPs appeared to interact on MI risk, explaining the association of FGG-FGB haplotypes with MI in the absence of effects of individual SNPs. Thus, epistatic and pleiotropic effects of polymorphisms contribute to the variation in plasma fibrinogen concentration, fibrin clot structure and risk of MI.

  17. Potentiation of thrombin generation in hemophilia A plasma by coagulation factor VIII and characterization of antibody-specific inhibition.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Bhavya S; Gangadharan, Bagirath; Doering, Christopher B; Meeks, Shannon L

    2012-01-01

    Development of inhibitory antibodies to coagulation factor VIII (fVIII) is the primary obstacle to the treatment of hemophilia A in the developed world. This adverse reaction occurs in 20-30% of persons with severe hemophilia A treated with fVIII-replacement products and is characterized by the development of a humoral and neutralizing immune response to fVIII. Patients with inhibitory anti-fVIII antibodies are treated with bypassing agents including recombinant factor VIIa (rfVIIa). However, some patients display poor hemostatic response to bypass therapy and improved treatment options are needed. Recently, we demonstrated that fVIII inhibitors display widely variable kinetics of inhibition that correlate with their respective target epitopes. Thus, it was hypothesized that for antibodies that display slow rates of inhibition, supplementation of rfVIIa with fVIII would result in improved thrombin generation and be predictive of clinical responses to this novel treatment regimen. In order to test this hypothesis, 10 murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with non-overlapping epitopes spanning fVIII, differential inhibition titers, and inhibition kinetics were studied using a thrombin generation assay. Of the 3 MAbs with high inhibitory titers, only the one with fast and complete (classically defined as "type I") kinetics displayed significant inhibition of thrombin generation with no improvement upon supplementation of rfVIIa with fVIII. The other two MAbs that displayed incomplete (classically defined as "type II") inhibition did not suppress the potentiation of thrombin generation by fVIII. All antibodies that did not completely inhibit fVIII activity demonstrated potentiation of thrombin generation by the addition of fVIII as compared to rfVIIa alone. In conclusion, fVIII alone or in combination with rfVIIa corrects the thrombin generation defect produced by the majority of anti-fVIII MAbs better than single agent rfVIIa. Therefore, combined fVIII/rfVIIa therapy

  18. Coagulation factor XII protease domain crystal structure

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, M; Wilmann, P; Awford, J; Li, C; Hamad, BK; Fischer, PM; Dreveny, I; Dekker, LV; Emsley, J

    2015-01-01

    Background Coagulation factor XII is a serine protease that is important for kinin generation and blood coagulation, cleaving the substrates plasma kallikrein and FXI. Objective To investigate FXII zymogen activation and substrate recognition by determining the crystal structure of the FXII protease domain. Methods and results A series of recombinant FXII protease constructs were characterized by measurement of cleavage of chromogenic peptide and plasma kallikrein protein substrates. This revealed that the FXII protease construct spanning the light chain has unexpectedly weak proteolytic activity compared to β-FXIIa, which has an additional nine amino acid remnant of the heavy chain present. Consistent with these data, the crystal structure of the light chain protease reveals a zymogen conformation for active site residues Gly193 and Ser195, where the oxyanion hole is absent. The Asp194 side chain salt bridge to Arg73 constitutes an atypical conformation of the 70-loop. In one crystal form, the S1 pocket loops are partially flexible, which is typical of a zymogen. In a second crystal form of the deglycosylated light chain, the S1 pocket loops are ordered, and a short α-helix in the 180-loop of the structure results in an enlarged and distorted S1 pocket with a buried conformation of Asp189, which is critical for P1 Arg substrate recognition. The FXII structures define patches of negative charge surrounding the active site cleft that may be critical for interactions with inhibitors and substrates. Conclusions These data provide the first structural basis for understanding FXII substrate recognition and zymogen activation. PMID:25604127

  19. Coagulation factors in chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, G W; Davies, S H; Darg, A; Richmond, J

    1969-03-01

    Coagulation studies were carried out on 30 patients with chronic liver disease. The clotting defect was complex and involved factors V, VII, IX (Christmas factor), and prothrombin. Some patients showed a significant depression of factor IX in the presence of a normal one-stage prothrombin time. Thrombotest was found to be a good indicator of factor IX deficiency in this group of patients and may be of use as an additional liver function test. The screening of patients with liver disease for surgery or liver biopsy should assess the coagulation factors involved in both intrinsic and extrinsic thromboplastin generation.

  20. Coagulation of Dust Particles in Argon Plasma of RF Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Mankelevich, Yu. A.; Olevanov, M. A.; Pal, A. F.; Rakhimova, T. V.; Ryabinkin, A. N.; Serov, A. O.; Filippov, A. V.

    2008-09-07

    The experiments on coagulation of poly-disperse particles with various size distributions injected into the argon plasma of the magnetron radio-frequency discharge are discussed. The experiments were carried out under the conditions similar to those using dusty plasma for technology applications. Within the created theory the threshold behavior of the coagulation process was explained for the first time, the estimation of the critical particle size for onset of a fast coagulation was made, and the analytical calculation of the coagulation rate of dust particles was performed. The proposed coagulation mechanism makes it possible to describe the typical features of coagulation processes observed in experiments and to explain the effects of attraction and coalescence of highly negatively charged microns size particles.

  1. Physiological levels of blood coagulation factors IX and X control coagulation kinetics in an in vitro model of circulating tissue factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tormoen, Garth W.; Khader, Ayesha; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2013-06-01

    Thrombosis significantly contributes to cancer morbidity and mortality. The mechanism behind thrombosis in cancer may be circulating tissue factor (TF), as levels of circulating TF are associated with thrombosis. However, circulating TF antigen level alone has failed to predict thrombosis in patients with cancer. We hypothesize that coagulation factor levels regulate the kinetics of circulating TF-induced thrombosis. Coagulation kinetics were measured as a function of individual coagulation factor levels and TF particle concentration. Clotting times increased when pooled plasma was mixed at or above a ratio of 4:6 with PBS. Clotting times increased when pooled plasma was mixed at or above a ratio of 8:2 with factor VII-depleted plasma, 7:3 with factor IX- or factor X-depleted plasmas, or 2:8 with factor II-, V- or VIII-depleted plasmas. Addition of coagulation factors VII, X, IX, V and II to depleted plasmas shortened clotting and enzyme initiation times, and increased enzyme generation rates in a concentration-dependent manner. Only additions of factors IX and X from low-normal to high-normal levels shortened clotting times and increased enzyme generation rates. Our results demonstrate that coagulation kinetics for TF particles are controlled by factor IX and X levels within the normal physiological range. We hypothesize that individual patient factor IX and X levels may be prognostic for susceptibility to circulating TF-induced thrombosis.

  2. Physiological levels of blood coagulation factors IX and X control coagulation kinetics in an in vitro model of circulating tissue factor

    PubMed Central

    Tormoen, Garth W.; Khader, Ayesha; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J.T.

    2013-01-01

    Thrombosis significantly contributes to cancer morbidity and mortality. The mechanism behind thrombosis in cancer may be circulating tissue factor (TF), as levels of circulating TF are associated with thrombosis. However, circulating TF antigen level alone has failed to predict thrombosis in patients with cancer. We hypothesize that coagulation factor levels regulate the kinetics of circulating TF-induced thrombosis. Coagulation kinetics were measured as a function of individual coagulation factor levels and TF particle concentration. Clotting times increased when pooled plasma was mixed at or above a ratio of 4:6 with PBS. Clotting times increased when pooled plasma was mixed at or above a ratio of 8:2 with factor VII-depleted plasma, 7:3 with factor IX- or factor X-depleted plasmas, or 2:8 with factor II-, V- or VIII-depleted plasmas. Addition of coagulation factors VII, X, IX, V and II to depleted plasmas shortened clotting and enzyme initiation times, and increased enzyme generation rates in a concentration-dependent manner. Only additions of factors IX and X from low-normal to high-normal levels shortened clotting times and increased enzyme generation rates. Our results demonstrate that coagulation kinetics for TF particles are controlled by factor IX and X levels within the normal physiological range. We hypothesize that individual patient factor IX and X levels may be prognostic for susceptibility to circulating TF-induced thrombosis. PMID:23585459

  3. CHARGING AND COAGULATION OF DUST IN PROTOPLANETARY PLASMA ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, L. S.; Land, V.; Hyde, T. W.

    2012-01-01

    Combining a particle-particle, particle-cluster, and cluster-cluster agglomeration model with an aggregate charging model, the coagulation and charging of dust particles in plasma environments relevant for protoplanetary disks have been investigated, including the effect of electron depletion in high dust density environments. The results show that charged aggregates tend to grow by adding small particles and clusters to larger particles and clusters, and that cluster-cluster aggregation is significantly more effective than particle-cluster aggregation. Comparisons of the grain structure show that with increasing aggregate charge the compactness factor, {phi}{sub {sigma}}, decreases and has a narrower distribution, indicating a fluffier structure. Neutral aggregates are more compact, with larger {phi}{sub {sigma}}, and exhibit a larger variation in fluffiness. Overall, increased aggregate charge leads to larger, fluffier, and more massive aggregates.

  4. Histology assessment of bipolar coagulation and argon plasma coagulation on digestive tract

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Teresa; Baba, Elisa R; Wodak, Stephanie; Sakai, Paulo; Cecconello, Ivan; Maluf-Filho, Fauze

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the effect of bipolar electrocoagulation and argon plasma coagulation on fresh specimens of gastrointestinal tract. METHODS: An experimental evaluation was performed at Hospital das Clinicas of the University of São Paulo, on 31 fresh surgical specimens using argon plasma coagulation and bipolar electrocoagulation at different time intervals. The depth of tissue damage was histopathologically analyzed by single senior pathologist unaware of the coagulation method and power setting applied. To analyze the results, the mucosa was divided in superficial mucosa (epithelial layer of the esophagus and superficial portion of the glandular layer of the stomach and colon) intermediate mucosa (until the lamina propria of the esophagus and until the bottom of the glandular layer of the stomach and colon) and muscularis mucosa. Necrosis involvement of the layers was compared in several combinations of power and time interval. RESULTS: Involvement of the intermediate mucosa of the stomach and of the muscularis mucosa of the three organs was more frequent when higher amounts of energy were used with argon plasma. In the esophagus and in the colon, injury of the intermediate mucosa was frequent, even when small amounts of energy were used. The use of bipolar electrocoagulation resulted in more frequent involvement of the intermediate mucosa and of the muscularis mucosa of the esophagus and of the colon when higher amounts of energy were used. In the stomach, these involvements were rare. The risk of injury of the muscularis propria was significant only in the colon when argon plasma coagulation was employed. CONCLUSION: Tissue damage after argon plasma coagulation is deeper than bipolar electrocoagulation. Both of them depend on the amount of energy used. PMID:25031789

  5. Plasmin-induced procoagulant effects in the blood coagulation: a crucial role of coagulation factors V and VIII.

    PubMed

    Ogiwara, Kenichi; Nogami, Keiji; Nishiya, Katsumi; Shima, Midori

    2010-09-01

    Plasminogen activators provide effective treatment for patients with acute myocardial infarction. However, paradoxical elevation of thrombin activity associated with failure of clot lysis and recurrent thrombosis has been reported. Generation of thrombin in these circumstances appears to be owing to plasmin (Plm)-induced activation of factor (F) XII. Plm catalyzes proteolysis of several coagulant factors, but the roles of these factors on Plm-mediated procoagulant activity remain to be determined. Recently developed global coagulation assays were used in this investigation. Rotational thromboelastometry using whole blood, clot waveform analysis and thrombin generation tests using plasma, showed that Plm (> or =125 nmol/l) shortened the clotting times in similar dose-dependent manners. In particular, the thrombin generation test, which was unaffected by products of fibrinolysis, revealed the enhanced coagulation with an approximately two-fold increase of peak level of thrombin generation. Studies using alpha2-antiplasmin-deficient plasma revealed that much lower dose of Plm (> or =16 nmol/l) actually contributed to enhancing thrombin generation. The shortening of clotting time could be observed even in the presence of corn trypsin inhibitor, supporting that Plm exerted the procoagulant activity independently of FXII. In addition, using specific coagulation-deficient plasmas, the clot waveform analysis showed that Plm did not shorten the clotting time in only FV-deficient or FVIII-deficient plasma in prothrombin time-based or activated partial thromboplastin time-based assay, respectively. Our results indicated that Plm did possess procoagulant activity in the blood coagulation, and this effect was likely attributed by multicoagulation factors, dependent on FV and/or FVIII.

  6. Blood plasma coagulation studied by surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikinge, Trine P.; Hansson, Kenny M.; Benesch, Johan; Johansen, Knut; Ranby, Mats; Lindahl, Tomas L.; Liedberg, Bo; Lundstoem, Ingemar; Tengvall, Pentti

    2000-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) apparatus was used to investigate blood plasma coagulation in real time as a function of thromboplastin and heparin concentrations. The response curves were analyzed by curve fitting to a sigmoid curve equation, followed by extraction of the time constant. Clotting activation by thromboplastin resulted in increased time constant, as compared to spontaneously clotted plasma, in a dose dependent way. Addition of heparin to the thromboplastin-activated plasma counteracted this effect. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) pictures of sensor surfaces dried after completed clotting, revealed differences in fibrin network structures as a function of thromboplastin concentration, and the fiber thickness increased with decreased thromboplastin concentration. The physical reason for the SPR signal observed is ambiguous and is therefore discussed. However, the results summarized in the plots and the fibrin network properties observed by AFM correlate well with present common methods used to analyze blood coagulation.

  7. Helical organization of blood coagulation factor VIII on lipid nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jaimy; Dalm, Daniela; Koyfman, Alexey Y; Grushin, Kirill; Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla

    2014-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM)(1) is a powerful approach to investigate the functional structure of proteins and complexes in a hydrated state and membrane environment(2). Coagulation Factor VIII (FVIII)(3) is a multi-domain blood plasma glycoprotein. Defect or deficiency of FVIII is the cause for Hemophilia type A - a severe bleeding disorder. Upon proteolytic activation, FVIII binds to the serine protease Factor IXa on the negatively charged platelet membrane, which is critical for normal blood clotting(4). Despite the pivotal role FVIII plays in coagulation, structural information for its membrane-bound state is incomplete(5). Recombinant FVIII concentrate is the most effective drug against Hemophilia type A and commercially available FVIII can be expressed as human or porcine, both forming functional complexes with human Factor IXa(6,7). In this study we present a combination of Cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM), lipid nanotechnology and structure analysis applied to resolve the membrane-bound structure of two highly homologous FVIII forms: human and porcine. The methodology developed in our laboratory to helically organize the two functional recombinant FVIII forms on negatively charged lipid nanotubes (LNT) is described. The representative results demonstrate that our approach is sufficiently sensitive to define the differences in the helical organization between the two highly homologous in sequence (86% sequence identity) proteins. Detailed protocols for the helical organization, Cryo-EM and electron tomography (ET) data acquisition are given. The two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) structure analysis applied to obtain the 3D reconstructions of human and porcine FVIII-LNT is discussed. The presented human and porcine FVIII-LNT structures show the potential of the proposed methodology to calculate the functional, membrane-bound organization of blood coagulation Factor VIII at high resolution.

  8. Helical Organization of Blood Coagulation Factor VIII on Lipid Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Koyfman, Alexey Y.; Grushin, Kirill; Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla

    2014-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM)1 is a powerful approach to investigate the functional structure of proteins and complexes in a hydrated state and membrane environment2. Coagulation Factor VIII (FVIII)3 is a multi-domain blood plasma glycoprotein. Defect or deficiency of FVIII is the cause for Hemophilia type A - a severe bleeding disorder. Upon proteolytic activation, FVIII binds to the serine protease Factor IXa on the negatively charged platelet membrane, which is critical for normal blood clotting4. Despite the pivotal role FVIII plays in coagulation, structural information for its membrane-bound state is incomplete5. Recombinant FVIII concentrate is the most effective drug against Hemophilia type A and commercially available FVIII can be expressed as human or porcine, both forming functional complexes with human Factor IXa6,7. In this study we present a combination of Cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM), lipid nanotechnology and structure analysis applied to resolve the membrane-bound structure of two highly homologous FVIII forms: human and porcine. The methodology developed in our laboratory to helically organize the two functional recombinant FVIII forms on negatively charged lipid nanotubes (LNT) is described. The representative results demonstrate that our approach is sufficiently sensitive to define the differences in the helical organization between the two highly homologous in sequence (86% sequence identity) proteins. Detailed protocols for the helical organization, Cryo-EM and electron tomography (ET) data acquisition are given. The two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) structure analysis applied to obtain the 3D reconstructions of human and porcine FVIII-LNT is discussed. The presented human and porcine FVIII-LNT structures show the potential of the proposed methodology to calculate the functional, membrane-bound organization of blood coagulation Factor VIII at high resolution. PMID:24961276

  9. Comparison of functional aspects of the coagulation cascade in human and sea turtle plasmas.

    PubMed

    Soslau, Gerald; Wallace, Bryan; Vicente, Catherine; Goldenberg, Seth J; Tupis, Todd; Spotila, James; George, Robert; Paladino, Frank; Whitaker, Brent; Violetta, Gary; Piedra, Rotney

    2004-08-01

    Functional hemostatic pathways are critical for the survival of all vertebrates and have been evolving for more than 400 million years. The overwhelming majority of studies of hemostasis in vertebrates have focused on mammals with very sparse attention paid to reptiles. There have been virtually no studies of the coagulation pathway in sea turtles whose ancestors date back to the Jurassic period. Sea turtles are often exposed to rapidly altered environmental conditions during diving periods. This may reduce their blood pH during prolonged hypoxic dives. This report demonstrates that five species of turtles possess only one branch of the mammalian coagulation pathway, the extrinsic pathway. Mixing studies of turtle plasmas with human factor-deficient plasmas indicate that the intrinsic pathway factors VIII and IX are present in turtle plasma. These two factors may play a significant role in supporting the extrinsic pathway by feedback loops. The intrinsic factors, XI and XII are not detected which would account for the inability of reagents to induce coagulation via the intrinsic pathway in vitro. The analysis of two turtle factors, factor II (prothrombin) and factor X, demonstrates that they are antigenically/functionally similar to the corresponding human factors. The turtle coagulation pathway responds differentially to both pH and temperature relative to each turtle species and relative to human samples. The coagulation time (prothrombin time) increases as the temperature decreases between 37 and 15 degrees C. The increased time follows a linear relationship, with similar slopes for loggerhead, Kemps ridley and hawksbill turtles as well as for human samples. Leatherback turtle samples show a dramatic nonlinear increased time below 23 degrees C, and green turtle sample responses were similar but less dramatic. All samples also showed increased prothrombin times as the pH decreased from 7.8 to 6.4, except for three turtle species. The prothrombin times decreased

  10. Comparison of functional aspects of the coagulation cascade in human and sea turtle plasmas.

    PubMed

    Soslau, Gerald; Wallace, Bryan; Vicente, Catherine; Goldenberg, Seth J; Tupis, Todd; Spotila, James; George, Robert; Paladino, Frank; Whitaker, Brent; Violetta, Gary; Piedra, Rotney

    2004-08-01

    Functional hemostatic pathways are critical for the survival of all vertebrates and have been evolving for more than 400 million years. The overwhelming majority of studies of hemostasis in vertebrates have focused on mammals with very sparse attention paid to reptiles. There have been virtually no studies of the coagulation pathway in sea turtles whose ancestors date back to the Jurassic period. Sea turtles are often exposed to rapidly altered environmental conditions during diving periods. This may reduce their blood pH during prolonged hypoxic dives. This report demonstrates that five species of turtles possess only one branch of the mammalian coagulation pathway, the extrinsic pathway. Mixing studies of turtle plasmas with human factor-deficient plasmas indicate that the intrinsic pathway factors VIII and IX are present in turtle plasma. These two factors may play a significant role in supporting the extrinsic pathway by feedback loops. The intrinsic factors, XI and XII are not detected which would account for the inability of reagents to induce coagulation via the intrinsic pathway in vitro. The analysis of two turtle factors, factor II (prothrombin) and factor X, demonstrates that they are antigenically/functionally similar to the corresponding human factors. The turtle coagulation pathway responds differentially to both pH and temperature relative to each turtle species and relative to human samples. The coagulation time (prothrombin time) increases as the temperature decreases between 37 and 15 degrees C. The increased time follows a linear relationship, with similar slopes for loggerhead, Kemps ridley and hawksbill turtles as well as for human samples. Leatherback turtle samples show a dramatic nonlinear increased time below 23 degrees C, and green turtle sample responses were similar but less dramatic. All samples also showed increased prothrombin times as the pH decreased from 7.8 to 6.4, except for three turtle species. The prothrombin times decreased

  11. Abnormal factor VIII coagulant antigen in patients with renal dysfunction and in those with disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, M J; Chute, L E; Schmitt, G W; Hamburger, R H; Bauer, K A; Troll, J H; Janson, P; Deykin, D

    1985-01-01

    Factor VIII antigen (VIII:CAg) exhibits molecular weight heterogeneity in normal plasma. We have compared the relative quantities of VIII:CAg forms present in normal individuals (n = 22) with VIII:CAg forms in renal dysfunction patients (n = 19) and in patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC; n = 7). In normal plasma, the predominant VIII: CAg form, detectable by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was of molecular weight 2.4 X 10(5), with minor forms ranging from 8 X 10(4) to 2.6 X 10(5) D. A high proportion of VIII:CAg in renal dysfunction patients, in contrast, was of 1 X 10(5) mol wt. The patients' high 1 X 10(5) mol wt VIII: CAg level correlated with increased concentrations of serum creatinine, F1+2 (a polypeptide released upon prothrombin activation), and with von Willebrand factor. Despite the high proportion of the 1 X 10(5) mol wt VIII:CAg form, which suggests VIII:CAg proteolysis, the ratio of Factor VIII coagulant activity to total VIII:CAg concentration was normal in renal dysfunction patients. These results could be simulated in vitro by thrombin treatment of normal plasma, which yielded similar VIII:CAg gel patterns and Factor VIII coagulant activity to antigen ratios. DIC patients with high F1+2 levels but no evidence of renal dysfunction had an VIII:CAg gel pattern distinct from renal dysfunction patients. DIC patients had elevated concentrations of both the 1 X 10(5) and 8 X 10(4) mol wt VIII:CAg forms. We conclude that an increase in a particular VIII:CAg form correlates with the severity of renal dysfunction. The antigen abnormality may be the result of VIII:CAg proteolysis by a thrombinlike enzyme and/or prolonged retention of proteolyzed VIII:CAg fragments. Images PMID:3932466

  12. Activation of coagulation after administration of tumor necrosis factor to normal subjects.

    PubMed

    van der Poll, T; Büller, H R; ten Cate, H; Wortel, C H; Bauer, K A; van Deventer, S J; Hack, C E; Sauerwein, H P; Rosenberg, R D; ten Cate, J W

    1990-06-01

    Tumor necrosis factor has been implicated in the activation of blood coagulation in septicemia, a condition commonly associated with intravascular coagulation and disturbances of hemostasis. To evaluate the early dynamics and the route of the in vivo coagulative response to tumor necrosis factor, we performed a controlled study in six healthy men, monitoring the activation of the common and intrinsic pathways of coagulation with highly sensitive and specific radioimmunoassays. Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor, administered as an intravenous bolus injection (50 micrograms per square meter of body-surface area), induced an early and short-lived rise in circulating levels of the activation peptide of factor X, reaching maximal values after 30 to 45 minutes (mean +/- SEM increase after 45 minutes, 34.2 +/- 18.2 percent; tumor necrosis factor vs. saline, P = 0.015). This was followed by a gradual and prolonged increase in the plasma concentration of the prothrombin fragment F1+2, peaking after four to five hours (mean increase after five hours, 348.0 +/- 144.8 percent; tumor necrosis factor vs. saline, P less than 0.0001). These findings signify the formation of factor Xa (activated factor X) and the activation of prothrombin. Activation of the intrinsic pathway could not be detected by a series of measurements of the plasma levels of factor XII, prekallikrein, factor XIIa-C1 inhibitor complexes, kallikrein-C1 inhibitor complexes, and the activation peptide of factor IX. The delay between the maximal activation of factor X and that of prothrombin amounted to several hours, indicating that neutralization of factor Xa activity was slow. We conclude that a single injection of tumor necrosis factor elicits a rapid and sustained activation of the common pathway of coagulation, probably induced through the extrinsic route. Our results suggest that tumor necrosis factor could play an important part in the early activation of the hemostatic mechanism in septicemia.

  13. Hepatocyte tissue factor activates the coagulation cascade in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Bradley P.; Kopec, Anna K.; Joshi, Nikita; Cline, Holly; Brown, Juliette A.; Bishop, Stephanie C.; Kassel, Karen M.; Rockwell, Cheryl; Mackman, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we characterized tissue factor (TF) expression in mouse hepatocytes (HPCs) and evaluated its role in mouse models of HPC transplantation and acetaminophen (APAP) overdose. TF expression was significantly reduced in isolated HPCs and liver homogenates from TFflox/flox/albumin-Cre mice (HPCΔTF mice) compared with TFflox/flox mice (control mice). Isolated mouse HPCs expressed low levels of TF that clotted factor VII-deficient human plasma. In addition, HPC TF initiated factor Xa generation without exogenous factor VIIa, and TF activity was increased dramatically after cell lysis. Treatment of HPCs with an inhibitory TF antibody or a cell-impermeable lysine-conjugating reagent prior to lysis substantially reduced TF activity, suggesting that TF was mainly present on the cell surface. Thrombin generation was dramatically reduced in APAP-treated HPCΔTF mice compared with APAP-treated control mice. In addition, thrombin generation was dependent on donor HPC TF expression in a model of HPC transplantation. These results suggest that mouse HPCs constitutively express cell surface TF that mediates activation of coagulation during hepatocellular injury. PMID:23305736

  14. Matriptase activation connects tissue factor-dependent coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Sylvain M; Szabo, Roman; Lee, Melody; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Craik, Charles S; Bugge, Thomas H; Camerer, Eric

    2016-06-23

    The coagulation cascade is designed to sense tissue injury by physical separation of the membrane-anchored cofactor tissue factor (TF) from inactive precursors of coagulation proteases circulating in plasma. Once TF on epithelial and other extravascular cells is exposed to plasma, sequential activation of coagulation proteases coordinates hemostasis and contributes to host defense and tissue repair. Membrane-anchored serine proteases (MASPs) play critical roles in the development and homeostasis of epithelial barrier tissues; how MASPs are activated in mature epithelia is unknown. We here report that proteases of the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation transactivate the MASP matriptase, thus connecting coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling. Exposure of TF-expressing cells to factors (F) VIIa and Xa triggered the conversion of latent pro-matriptase to an active protease, which in turn cleaved the pericellular substrates protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) and pro-urokinase. An activation pathway-selective PAR2 mutant resistant to direct cleavage by TF:FVIIa and FXa was activated by these proteases when cells co-expressed pro-matriptase, and matriptase transactivation was necessary for efficient cleavage and activation of wild-type PAR2 by physiological concentrations of TF:FVIIa and FXa. The coagulation initiation complex induced rapid and prolonged enhancement of the barrier function of epithelial monolayers that was dependent on matriptase transactivation and PAR2 signaling. These observations suggest that the coagulation cascade engages matriptase to help coordinate epithelial defense and repair programs after injury or infection, and that matriptase may contribute to TF-driven pathogenesis in cancer and inflammation. PMID:27114461

  15. The polyphosphate–factor XII pathway drives coagulation in prostate cancer-associated thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, Katrin F.; Ronquist, Göran; Langer, Florian; Labberton, Linda; Fuchs, Tobias A.; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Sauter, Guido; Graefen, Markus; Mackman, Nigel; Stavrou, Evi X.; Ronquist, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of thrombosis. We identify a new procoagulant mechanism that contributes to thromboembolism in prostate cancer and allows for safe anticoagulation therapy development. Prostate cancer-mediated procoagulant activity was reduced in plasma in the absence of factor XII or its substrate of the intrinsic coagulation pathway factor XI. Prostate cancer cells and secreted prostasomes expose long chain polyphosphate on their surface that colocalized with active factor XII and initiated coagulation in a factor XII-dependent manner. Polyphosphate content correlated with the procoagulant activity of prostasomes. Inherited deficiency in factor XI or XII or high-molecular-weight kininogen, but not plasma kallikrein, protected mice from prostasome-induced lethal pulmonary embolism. Targeting polyphosphate or factor XII conferred resistance to prostate cancer-driven thrombosis in mice, without increasing bleeding. Inhibition of factor XII with recombinant 3F7 antibody reduced the increased prostasome-mediated procoagulant activity in patient plasma. The data illustrate a critical role for polyphosphate/factor XII-triggered coagulation in prostate cancer-associated thrombosis with implications for anticoagulation without therapy-associated bleeding in malignancies. PMID:26153520

  16. Collaborative study for the establishment of replacement batches for human coagulation factor IX concentrate reference standards.

    PubMed

    Gray, E; Pickering, W; Hockley, J; Rigsby, P; Weinstein, M; Terao, E; Buchheit, K-H

    2008-12-01

    The European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) Biological Reference Preparation (BRP) batch 1, the World Health Organisation (WHO) 3rd International Standard, Human (IS, 96/854) and the FDA Standard for human blood coagulation Factor IX concentrate have been available since 1996, following their establishment by a common collaborative study. Due to dwindling stocks of all three standards, a new WHO-EDQM-FDA tri-partite collaborative study was launched to establish replacement batches. Thirty laboratories from fourteen countries took part in the collaborative study to assign potency values to candidate preparations. Three candidates, one of recombinant and two of human plasma-derived origins, were assayed against the 3rd IS for Blood Coagulation Factor IX, Concentrate, Human (96/854). The 3rd IS for Blood Coagulation Factors II, VII, IX and X, Plasma, Human (99/826) was also included to evaluate the relationship between the factor IX plasma and concentrate unitage. Thirty-two sets of clotting assay results and two sets of chromogenic assay data were analysed. There was a significant difference in potency estimates by these two methods for the recombinant candidate (sample B) and the plasma IS (sample P). Similar potency values were obtained for the plasma derived products (monoclonal antibody- and chromatography-purified factor IX, samples C and D) by clotting and chromogenic assays. For the clotting assays, intra-laboratory variability (GCV) was found to range from 0.5 - 21.7%, with the GCV for the majority of laboratories being less than 10%. Good inter-laboratory agreement, with the majority of the GCV being less than 10% (GCV range = 4.7 - 10.6 %) was also obtained. The mean potency values estimated by the clotting assay using plasma as pre-diluent (as directed by the Ph. Eur. general chapter method) did not differ from values obtained using buffer. Taking into account the preliminary stability data, the intra- and inter-laboratory variability, and the differences

  17. Studies on a family with combined functional deficiencies of vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors.

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, G H; Pence, R E; Ratnoff, O D; Adelstein, D J; Furie, B

    1982-01-01

    Two siblings with m ild hemorrhagic symptoms had combined functional deficiencies of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors. Prothrombin (0.18-0.20 U/ml) and Stuart factor (Factor X, 0.18-0.20 U/ml) and Stuart factor (Factor X, 0.18-0.20 U/ml) were most severely affected. Antigenic amounts of affected coagulation factors were normal and normal generation of thrombin activity occurred in the patients' plasmas after treatment with nonophysiologic activators that do not require calcium for prothrombin activation. Hepatobilary disease, malabsorptive disorders, and plasma warfarin were not present. Both parents had normal levels of all coagulation factors. The patients' plasmas contained prothrombin that reacted both with antibody directed against des-gamma-carboxyprothrombin and native prothrombin. Crossed immunoelectrophoresis of patients' plasmas and studies of partially purified patient prothrombin suggested the presence of a relatively homogeneous species of dysfunctional prothrombin, distinct from the heterologous species found in the plasma of warfarin-treated persons. These studies are most consistent with a posttranslational defect in hepatic carboxylation of vitamin K-dependent factors. This kindred uniquely possesses an autosomal recessive disorder of vitamin K-dependent factor formation that causes production of an apparently homogeneous species of dysfunctional prothrombin; the functional deficiencies in clotting factors are totally corrected by oral or parenteral administration of vitamin K1. Images PMID:7085873

  18. Surface-mediated molecular events in material-induced blood-plasma coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Kaushik

    Coagulation and thrombosis persist as major impediments associated with the use of blood-contacting medical devices. We are investigating the molecular mechanism underlying material-induced blood-plasma coagulation focusing on the role of the surface as a step towards prospective development of improved hemocompatible biomaterials. A classic observation in hematology is that blood/blood-plasma in contact with clean glass surface clots faster than when in contact with many plastic surfaces. The traditional biochemical theory explaining the underlying molecular mechanism suggests that hydrophilic surfaces, like that of glass, are specific activators of the coagulation cascade because of the negatively-charged groups on the surface. Hydrophobic surfaces are poor procoagulants or essentially "benign" because they lack anionic groups. Further, these negatively-charged surfaces are believed to not only activate blood factor XII (FXII), the key protein in contact activation, but also play a cofactor role in the amplification and propagation reactions that ultimately lead to clot formation. In sharp contrast to the traditional theory, our investigations indicate a need for a paradigm shift in the proposed sequence of contact activation events to incorporate the role of protein adsorption at the material surfaces. These studies have lead to the central hypothesis for this work proposing that protein adsorption to hydrophobic surfaces attenuates the contact activation reactions so that poorly-adsorbent hydrophilic surfaces appear to be stronger procoagulants relative to hydrophobic surfaces. Our preliminary studies measuring the plasma coagulation response of activated FXII (FXIIa) on different model surfaces suggested that the material did not play a cofactor role in the processing of this enzyme dose through the coagulation pathway. Therefore, we focused our efforts on studying the mechanism of initial production of enzyme at the procoagulant surface. Calculations for the

  19. Serial changes in the coagulation system following clotting factor concentrate infusion.

    PubMed

    Preston, F E; Winfield, D A; Malia, R G; Blackburn, E K

    1975-11-15

    Various parameters of the coagulation system have been monitored in patients with Christmas disease following the infusion of clotting factor concentrates. Significant reduction of clotting factor VIII and serum antithrombin III were observed in each of the five studies, whilst the plasma fibrinogen level fell in four subjects. The induced abnormalities were shortlived and there were no clinical sequelae. Further studies are required to assess the effects of similar concentrates in patients with liver disease.

  20. Coagulation-induced shedding of platelet glycoprotein VI mediated by factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Al-Tamimi, Mohammad; Grigoriadis, George; Tran, Huy; Paul, Eldho; Servadei, Patricia; Berndt, Michael C; Gardiner, Elizabeth E; Andrews, Robert K

    2011-04-01

    This study evaluated shedding of the platelet collagen receptor, glycoprotein VI (GPVI) in human plasma. Collagen or other ligands induce metalloproteinase-mediated GPVI ectodomain shedding, generating approximately 55-kDa soluble GPVI (sGPVI) and approximately 10-kDa platelet-associated fragments. In the absence of GPVI ligands, coagulation of platelet-rich plasma from healthy persons induced GPVI shedding, independent of added tissue factor, but inhibitable by metalloproteinase inhibitor, GM6001. Factor Xa (FXa) common to intrinsic and tissue factor-mediated coagulation pathways was critical for sGPVI release because (1) shedding was strongly blocked by the FXa-selective inhibitor rivaroxaban but not FIIa (thrombin) inhibitors dabigatran or hirudin; (2) Russell viper venom that directly activates FX generated sGPVI, with complete inhibition by enoxaparin (inhibits FXa and FIIa) but not hirudin; (3) impaired GPVI shedding during coagulation of washed platelets resuspended in FX-depleted plasma was restored by adding purified FX; and (4) purified FXa induced GM6001-inhibitable GPVI shedding from washed platelets. In 29 patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation, mean plasma sGPVI was 53.9 ng/mL (95% confidence interval, 39.9-72.8 ng/mL) compared with 12.5 ng/mL (95% confidence interval, 9.0-17.3 ng/mL) in thrombocytopenic controls (n = 36, P < .0001), and 14.6 ng/mL (95% confidence interval, 7.9-27.1 ng/mL) in healthy subjects (n = 25, P = .002). In conclusion, coagulation-induced GPVI shedding via FXa down-regulates GPVI under procoagulant conditions. FXa inhibitors have an unexpected role in preventing GPVI down-regulation.

  1. Coagulation-induced shedding of platelet glycoprotein VI mediated by factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Al-Tamimi, Mohammad; Grigoriadis, George; Tran, Huy; Paul, Eldho; Servadei, Patricia; Berndt, Michael C; Gardiner, Elizabeth E; Andrews, Robert K

    2011-04-01

    This study evaluated shedding of the platelet collagen receptor, glycoprotein VI (GPVI) in human plasma. Collagen or other ligands induce metalloproteinase-mediated GPVI ectodomain shedding, generating approximately 55-kDa soluble GPVI (sGPVI) and approximately 10-kDa platelet-associated fragments. In the absence of GPVI ligands, coagulation of platelet-rich plasma from healthy persons induced GPVI shedding, independent of added tissue factor, but inhibitable by metalloproteinase inhibitor, GM6001. Factor Xa (FXa) common to intrinsic and tissue factor-mediated coagulation pathways was critical for sGPVI release because (1) shedding was strongly blocked by the FXa-selective inhibitor rivaroxaban but not FIIa (thrombin) inhibitors dabigatran or hirudin; (2) Russell viper venom that directly activates FX generated sGPVI, with complete inhibition by enoxaparin (inhibits FXa and FIIa) but not hirudin; (3) impaired GPVI shedding during coagulation of washed platelets resuspended in FX-depleted plasma was restored by adding purified FX; and (4) purified FXa induced GM6001-inhibitable GPVI shedding from washed platelets. In 29 patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation, mean plasma sGPVI was 53.9 ng/mL (95% confidence interval, 39.9-72.8 ng/mL) compared with 12.5 ng/mL (95% confidence interval, 9.0-17.3 ng/mL) in thrombocytopenic controls (n = 36, P < .0001), and 14.6 ng/mL (95% confidence interval, 7.9-27.1 ng/mL) in healthy subjects (n = 25, P = .002). In conclusion, coagulation-induced GPVI shedding via FXa down-regulates GPVI under procoagulant conditions. FXa inhibitors have an unexpected role in preventing GPVI down-regulation. PMID:21252089

  2. Structural Biology Of Factor VIIa/Tissue Factor Initiated Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Vadivel, Kanagasabai; Paul Bajaj, S.

    2012-01-01

    Factor VII (FVII) consists of an N-terminal gamma-carboxyglutamic acid domain followed by two epidermal growth factor-like (EGF1 and EGF2) domains and the C-terminal protease domain. Activation of FVII results in a two-chain FVIIa molecule consisting of a light chain (Gla-EGF1-EGF2 domains) and a heavy chain (protease domain) held together by a single disulfide bond. During coagulation, the complex of tissue factor (TF, a transmembrane glycoprotein) and FVIIa activates factor IX (FIX) and factor X (FX). FVIIa is structurally “zymogen-like” and when bound to TF, it is more “active enzyme-like.” FIX and FX share structural homology with FVII. Three structural biology aspects of FVIIa/TF are presented in this review. One, regions in soluble TF (sTF) that interact with FVIIa as well as mapping of Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+ and Zn2+ sites in FVIIa and their functions; two, modeled interactive regions of Gla and EGF1 domains of FXa and FIXa with FVIIa/sTF; and three, incompletely formed oxyanion hole in FVIIa/sTF and its induction by substrate/inhibitor. Finally, an overview of the recognition elements in TF pathway inhibitor is provided. PMID:22652793

  3. Trimming a Metallic Biliary Stent Using an Argon Plasma Coagulator

    SciTech Connect

    Rerknimitr, Rungsun Naprasert, Pisit; Kongkam, Pradermchai; Kullavanijaya, Pinit

    2007-06-15

    Background. Distal migration is one of the common complications after insertion of a covered metallic stent. Stent repositioning or removal is not always possible in every patient. Therefore, trimming using an argon plasma coagulator (APC) may be a good alternative method to solve this problem. Methods. Metallic stent trimming by APC was performed in 2 patients with biliary Wallstent migration and in another patient with esophageal Ultraflex stent migration. The power setting was 60-100 watts with an argon flow of 0.8 l/min. Observations. The procedure was successfully performed and all distal parts of the stents were removed. No significant collateral damage to the nearby mucosa was observed. Conclusions. In a patient with a distally migrated metallic stent, trimming of the stent is possible by means of an APC. This new method may be applicable to other sites of metallic stent migration.

  4. Blood plasma coagulation studied by surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikinge, Trine P.; Hansson, Kenny M.; Benesch, Johan; Johansen, Knut; Ranby, Mats; Lindahl, Tomas L.; Lundstroem, Ingemar; Tengvall, Pentti

    1999-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) apparatus was used to investigate blood plasma coagulation in real-time as a function of thromboplastin and heparin concentrations. The physical reason for the SPR signal observed is discussed and 3 different models are proposed. The response curves were analyzed by multivariable curve fitting followed by feature extraction. Interesting parameters of the sigmoid curves were lag time, slope and maximum response. When thromboplastin concentrations were increased, the lag-time decreased and the slope of the curve increased. A prolonged clotting time was followed mostly by increased maximum response, with exception for samples with no or very little thromboplastin added. High heparin concentrations changed the clotting kinetics. As seen from the lag-time vs. slope relation. Atomic force microscopy pictures of sensor surfaces dried after completed clotting, revealed differences in fibrin network structures as a function of thromboplastin concentration, and fiber thickness increased with lower thromboplastin concentration. The results correlate well with present common methods.

  5. Positive feedback loops for factor V and factor VII activation supply sensitivity to local surface tissue factor density during blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Balandina, A N; Shibeko, A M; Kireev, D A; Novikova, A A; Shmirev, I I; Panteleev, M A; Ataullakhanov, F I

    2011-10-19

    Blood coagulation is triggered not only by surface tissue factor (TF) density but also by surface TF distribution. We investigated recognition of surface TF distribution patterns during blood coagulation and identified the underlying molecular mechanisms. For these investigations, we employed 1), an in vitro reaction-diffusion experimental model of coagulation; and 2), numerical simulations using a mathematical model of coagulation in a three-dimensional space. When TF was uniformly immobilized over the activating surface, the clotting initiation time in normal plasma increased from 4 min to >120 min, with a decrease in TF density from 100 to 0.7 pmol/m(2). In contrast, surface-immobilized fibroblasts initiated clotting within 3-7 min, independently of fibroblast quantity and despite a change in average surface TF density from 0.5 to 130 pmol/m(2). Experiments using factor V-, VII-, and VIII-deficient plasma and computer simulations demonstrated that different responses to these two TF distributions are caused by two positive feedback loops in the blood coagulation network: activation of the TF-VII complex by factor Xa, and activation of factor V by thrombin. This finding suggests a new role for these reactions: to supply sensitivity to local TF density during blood coagulation.

  6. Sequential coagulation factor VIIa domain binding to tissue factor

    SciTech Connect

    Oesterlund, Maria; Persson, Egon; Freskgard, Per-Ola . E-mail: msv@ifm.liu.se

    2005-12-02

    Vessel wall tissue factor (TF) is exposed to blood upon vascular damage which enables association with factor VIIa (FVIIa). This leads to initiation of the blood coagulation cascade through localization and allosteric induction of FVIIa procoagulant activity. To examine the docking pathway of the FVIIa-TF complex, various residues in the extracellular part of TF (sTF) that are known to interact with FVIIa were replaced with cysteines labelled with a fluorescent probe. By using stopped-flow fluorescence kinetic measurements in combination with surface plasmon resonance analysis, we studied the association of the resulting sTF variants with FVIIa. We found the docking trajectory to be a sequence of events in which the protease domain of FVIIa initiates contact with sTF. Thereafter, the two proteins are tethered via the first epidermal growth factor-like and finally the {gamma}-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain. The two labelled sTF residues interacting with the protease domain of FVIIa bind or become eventually ordered at different rates, revealing kinetic details pertinent to the allosteric activation of FVIIa by sTF. Moreover, when the Gla domain of FVIIa is removed the difference in the rate of association for the remaining domains is much more pronounced.

  7. Proteolytic processing of human coagulation factor IX by plasmin.

    PubMed

    Samis, J A; Ramsey, G D; Walker, J B; Nesheim, M E; Giles, A R

    2000-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that thrombin generation in vivo caused a 92% decrease in factor IX (F.IX) activity and the appearance of a cleavage product after immunoblotting that comigrated with activated F.IX (F.IXa). Under these conditions, the fibrinolytic system was clearly activated, suggesting plasmin may have altered F.IX. Thus, the effect(s) of plasmin on human F.IX was determined in vitro. Plasmin (50 nM) decreased the 1-stage clotting activity of F.IX (4 microM) by 80% and the activity of F.IXa (4 microM) by 50% after 30 minutes at 37 degrees C. Plasmin hydrolysis of F.IX yields products of 45, 30, 20, and 14 kd on reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and 2 products of 52 and 14 kd under nonreducing conditions. Plasmin-treated F.IX did not bind the active site probe, p-aminobenzamidine, or form an SDS-stable complex with antithrombin. It only marginally activated human factor X in the presence of phospholipid and activated factor VIII. Although dansyl-Glu-Gly-Arg-chloromethyl ketone inactivated-F. IXa inhibited the clotting activity of F.IXa, plasmin-treated F.IX did not. Plasmin cleaves F.IX after Lys43, Arg145, Arg180, Lys316, and Arg318, but F.IXa is not appreciably generated despite cleavage at the 2 normal activation sites (Arg145 and Arg180). Tissue plasminogen activator-catalyzed lysis of fibrin formed in human plasma results in generation of the 45- and 30-kd fragments of F.IX and decreased F.IX clotting activity. Collectively, the results suggest that plasmin is able to down-regulate coagulation by inactivating F.IX. PMID:10648407

  8. Coagulation of dust grains in the plasma of an RF discharge in argon

    SciTech Connect

    Mankelevich, Yu. A.; Olevanov, M. A.; Pal', A. F.; Rakhimova, T. V.; Ryabinkin, A. N.; Serov, A. O.; Filippov, A. V.

    2009-03-15

    Results are presented from experimental studies of coagulation of dust grains of different sizes injected into a low-temperature plasma of an RF discharge in argon. A theoretical model describing the formation of dust clusters in a low-temperature plasma is developed and applied to interpret the results of experiments on the coagulation of dust grains having large negative charges. The grain size at which coagulation under the given plasma conditions is possible is estimated using the developed theory. The theoretical results are compared with the experimental data.

  9. Plasma transfusions prior to insertion of central lines for patients with abnormal coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, David P; Estcourt, Lise J; Doree, Carolyn; Hopewell, Sally; Trivella, Marialena; Walsh, Timothy S

    2015-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the effect of different prophylactic plasma transfusion regimens prior to central line insertion in patients with abnormal coagulation. PMID:27057149

  10. Production of functional coagulation factor VIII from iPSCs using a lentiviral vector.

    PubMed

    Kashiwakura, Y; Ohmori, T; Mimuro, J; Madoiwa, S; Inoue, M; Hasegawa, M; Ozawa, K; Sakata, Y

    2014-01-01

    The use of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as an autologous cell source has shed new light on cell replacement therapy with respect to the treatment of numerous hereditary disorders. We focused on the use of iPSCs for cell-based therapy of haemophilia. We generated iPSCs from mesenchymal stem cells that had been isolated from C57BL/6 mice. The mouse iPSCs were generated through the induction of four transcription factor genes Oct3/4, Klf-4, Sox-2 and c-Myc. The derived iPSCs released functional coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) following transduction with a simian immunodeficiency virus vector. The subcutaneous transplantation of iPSCs expressing FVIII into nude mice resulted in teratoma formation, and significantly increased plasma levels of FVIII. The plasma concentration of FVIII was at levels appropriate for human therapy at 2-4 weeks post transplantation. Our data suggest that iPSCs could be an attractive and prospective autologous cell source for the production of coagulation factor, and that engineered iPSCs expressing coagulation factor might provide a cell-based therapeutic strategy appropriate for haemophilia.

  11. A loop of coagulation factor VIIa influencing macromolecular substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Bjelke, Jais R; Persson, Egon; Rasmussen, Hanne B; Kragelund, Birthe B; Olsen, Ole H

    2007-01-01

    Coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa) belongs to a family of proteases being part of the stepwise, self-amplifying blood coagulation cascade. To investigate the impact of the mutation Met(298{156})Lys in FVIIa, we replaced the Gly(283{140})-Met(298{156}) loop with the corresponding loop of factor Xa. The resulting variant exhibited increased intrinsic activity, concurrent with maturation of the active site, a less accessible N-terminus, and, interestingly, an altered macromolecular substrate specificity reflected in an increased ability to cleave factor IX (FIX) and a decreased rate of FX activation compared to that of wild-type FVIIa. In complex with tissue factor, activation of FIX, but not of FX, returned to normal. Deconvolution of the loop graft in order to identify important side chain substitutions resulted in the mutant Val(158{21})Asp/Leu(287{144})Thr/Ala(294{152})Ser/Glu(296{154}) Ile/Met(298{156})Lys-FVIIa with almost the same activity and specificity profile. We conclude that a lysine residue in position 298{156} of FVIIa requires a hydrophilic environment to be fully accommodated. This position appears critical for substrate specificity among the proteases of the blood coagulation cascade due to its prominent position in the macromolecular exosite and possibly via its interaction with the corresponding position in the substrate (i.e. FIX or FX). PMID:17182039

  12. Activation of the contact system of coagulation by a monoclonal antibody directed against a neodeterminant in the heavy chain region of human coagulation factor XII (Hageman factor).

    PubMed

    Nuijens, J H; Huijbregts, C C; Eerenberg-Belmer, A J; Meijers, J C; Bouma, B N; Hack, C E

    1989-08-01

    We studied the characteristics of two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), F1 and F3, against human coagulation factor XII (Hageman factor). Experiments with trypsin-digested 125I-factor XII revealed that the epitope for mAb F1 is located in the NH2-terminal Mr 40,100 portion of factor XII, whereas that for mAb F3 resides in the COOH-terminal Mr 30,000 portion of this protein. Factor XII in fresh plasma (single-chain factor XII) bound approximately 190 times less to mAb F1 than factor XII in dextran sulfate-activated plasma (cleaved factor XII). However, no difference in accessibility of the epitope for mAb F1 was observed between cleaved and single-chain factor XII when bound to glass. mAb F3 appeared to bind to both single-chain and cleaved factor XII in plasma as well as when bound to glass. Neither mAb F1, nor F3 affected the amidolytic activity of factor XIIa, whereas both mAb F1 and F3 inhibited factor XII-coagulant activity to about 15 and 70%, respectively, at a molar ratio of mAb to factor XII of 20 to 1. mAb F1, as well as F(ab')2 and F(ab') fragments of this antibody induced activation of the contact system in plasma, as reflected by the generation of factor XIIa. C1 inhibitor and kallikrein. C1 inhibitor complexes. Activation was induced neither upon incubation with mAb F3, nor with that of control mAbs. mAb F1-induced contact activation required the presence of factor XII, prekallikrein, and high molecular weight kininogen and, in contrast to activation by negatively charged surfaces, was not inhibited by the presence of Polybrene. Based on these results we propose that a conformational change in factor XII is a key event in the activation process of this molecule. This conformational change can be induced by binding of factor XII to a surface as well as by proteolytic cleavage. As mAb F1 can also induce this conformational change, this antibody may provide a unique tool in studies of the activation of factor XII.

  13. Effects of dietary fat quality and quantity on postprandial activation of blood coagulation factor VII.

    PubMed

    Larsen, L F; Bladbjerg, E M; Jespersen, J; Marckmann, P

    1997-11-01

    Acute elevation of the coagulant activity of blood coagulation factor VII (FVIIc) is observed after consumption of high-fat meals. This elevation is caused by an increase in the concentration of activated FVII (FVIIa). In a randomized crossover study, we investigated whether saturated, monounsaturated, or polyunsaturated fats differed regarding postprandial activation of FVII. Eighteen healthy young men participated in the study. On 6 separate days each participant consumed two meals (times, 0 and 1 3/4 hours) enriched with 70 g (15 and 55 g) of either rapeseed oil, olive oil, sunflower oil, palm oil, or butter (42% of energy from fat) or isoenergetic low-fat meals (6% of energy from fat). Fasting and series of nonfasting blood samples (the last at time 8 1/2 hours) were collected. Plasma triglycerides, FVIIc, FVIIa, and free fatty acids were analyzed. There were marked effects of the fat quantity on postprandial responses of plasma triglycerides, FVII, and free fatty acids. The high-fat meals caused, in contrast to the low-fat meals, considerable increases in plasma triglycerides. Plasma levels of FVIIc and FVIIa peaks were 7% and 60% higher after consumption of high-fat meals than after consumption of low-fat meals. The five different fat qualities caused similar postprandial increases in plasma triglycerides, FVIIc, and FVIIa. These findings indicate that high-fat meals may be prothrombotic, irrespective of their fatty acid composition. The postprandial FVII activation was not associated with the plasma triglyceride or free fatty acid responses.

  14. Blood coagulation factor XII drives adaptive immunity during neuroinflammation via CD87-mediated modulation of dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Göbel, Kerstin; Pankratz, Susann; Asaridou, Chloi-Magdalini; Herrmann, Alexander M.; Bittner, Stefan; Merker, Monika; Ruck, Tobias; Glumm, Sarah; Langhauser, Friederike; Kraft, Peter; Krug, Thorsten F.; Breuer, Johanna; Herold, Martin; Gross, Catharina C.; Beckmann, Denise; Korb-Pap, Adelheid; Schuhmann, Michael K.; Kuerten, Stefanie; Mitroulis, Ioannis; Ruppert, Clemens; Nolte, Marc W.; Panousis, Con; Klotz, Luisa; Kehrel, Beate; Korn, Thomas; Langer, Harald F.; Pap, Thomas; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Wiendl, Heinz; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Meuth, Sven G.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant immune responses represent the underlying cause of central nervous system (CNS) autoimmunity, including multiple sclerosis (MS). Recent evidence implicated the crosstalk between coagulation and immunity in CNS autoimmunity. Here we identify coagulation factor XII (FXII), the initiator of the intrinsic coagulation cascade and the kallikrein–kinin system, as a specific immune cell modulator. High levels of FXII activity are present in the plasma of MS patients during relapse. Deficiency or pharmacologic blockade of FXII renders mice less susceptible to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (a model of MS) and is accompanied by reduced numbers of interleukin-17A-producing T cells. Immune activation by FXII is mediated by dendritic cells in a CD87-dependent manner and involves alterations in intracellular cyclic AMP formation. Our study demonstrates that a member of the plasmatic coagulation cascade is a key mediator of autoimmunity. FXII inhibition may provide a strategy to combat MS and other immune-related disorders. PMID:27188843

  15. Blood coagulation factor XII drives adaptive immunity during neuroinflammation via CD87-mediated modulation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Göbel, Kerstin; Pankratz, Susann; Asaridou, Chloi-Magdalini; Herrmann, Alexander M; Bittner, Stefan; Merker, Monika; Ruck, Tobias; Glumm, Sarah; Langhauser, Friederike; Kraft, Peter; Krug, Thorsten F; Breuer, Johanna; Herold, Martin; Gross, Catharina C; Beckmann, Denise; Korb-Pap, Adelheid; Schuhmann, Michael K; Kuerten, Stefanie; Mitroulis, Ioannis; Ruppert, Clemens; Nolte, Marc W; Panousis, Con; Klotz, Luisa; Kehrel, Beate; Korn, Thomas; Langer, Harald F; Pap, Thomas; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Wiendl, Heinz; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Meuth, Sven G

    2016-05-18

    Aberrant immune responses represent the underlying cause of central nervous system (CNS) autoimmunity, including multiple sclerosis (MS). Recent evidence implicated the crosstalk between coagulation and immunity in CNS autoimmunity. Here we identify coagulation factor XII (FXII), the initiator of the intrinsic coagulation cascade and the kallikrein-kinin system, as a specific immune cell modulator. High levels of FXII activity are present in the plasma of MS patients during relapse. Deficiency or pharmacologic blockade of FXII renders mice less susceptible to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (a model of MS) and is accompanied by reduced numbers of interleukin-17A-producing T cells. Immune activation by FXII is mediated by dendritic cells in a CD87-dependent manner and involves alterations in intracellular cyclic AMP formation. Our study demonstrates that a member of the plasmatic coagulation cascade is a key mediator of autoimmunity. FXII inhibition may provide a strategy to combat MS and other immune-related disorders.

  16. Biological and analytical variations of 16 parameters related to coagulation screening tests and the activity of coagulation factors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Shou, Weiling; Wu, Wei; Guo, Ye; Zhang, Yujuan; Huang, Chunmei; Cui, Wei

    2015-04-01

    To accurately estimate longitudinal changes in individuals, it is important to take into consideration the biological variability of the measurement. The few studies available on the biological variations of coagulation parameters are mostly outdated. We confirmed the published results using modern, fully automated methods. Furthermore, we added data for additional coagulation parameters. At 8:00 am, 12:00 pm, and 4:00 pm on days 1, 3, and 5, venous blood was collected from 31 healthy volunteers. A total of 16 parameters related to coagulation screening tests as well as the activity of coagulation factors were analyzed; these included prothrombin time, fibrinogen (Fbg), activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, international normalized ratio, prothrombin time activity, activated partial thromboplastin time ratio, fibrin(-ogen) degradation products, as well as the activity of factor II, factor V, factor VII, factor VIII, factor IX, and factor X. All intraindividual coefficients of variation (CVI) values for the parameters of the screening tests (except Fbg) were less than 5%. Conversely, the CVI values for the activity of coagulation factors were all greater than 5%. In addition, we calculated the reference change value to determine whether a significant difference exists between two test results from the same individual.

  17. Inhibitors of propagation of coagulation: factors V and X

    PubMed Central

    Toschi, Vincenzo; Lettino, Maddalena

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are still the most important cause of morbidity and mortality in western countries and antithrombotic treatment is nowadays widely used. Drugs able to reduce coagulation activation are the treatment of choice for a number of arterial and/or venous thromboembolic conditions. Some of the drugs currently used for this purpose, such as heparins (UFH or LMWH) and VKA, have limitations consisting of a narrow therapeutic window and an unpredictable response with the need of laboratory monitoring in order to assess their efficacy and safety. These drawbacks have stimulated an active research aimed to develop new drugs able to act on single factors involved in the coagulation network, with predictable response. Intense experimental and clinical work on new drugs has focused on synthetic agents, which could preferably be administered orally and at fixed doses. The most advanced clinical development with new anticoagulants has been achieved for those inhibiting FXa and some of them, like fondaparinux, are already currently used in clinical practice. Other agents, such as rivaroxaban, apixaban, otamixaban and edoxaban are under development and have already been studied or are currently under investigation in large scale phase III clinical trials for prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism, atrial fibrillation and acute coronary syndromes. Some of them have proved to be more effective than conventional therapy. Data on some agents inhibiting FVa are still preliminary and some of these drugs have so far been considered only in patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation secondary to sepsis. PMID:21545479

  18. Tissue Factor, Blood Coagulation, and Beyond: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Arthur J.

    2011-01-01

    Emerging evidence shows a broad spectrum of biological functions of tissue factor (TF). TF classical role in initiating the extrinsic blood coagulation and its direct thrombotic action in close relation to cardiovascular risks have long been established. TF overexpression/hypercoagulability often observed in many clinical conditions certainly expands its role in proinflammation, diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular diseases, angiogenesis, tumor metastasis, wound repairs, embryonic development, cell adhesion/migration, innate immunity, infection, pregnancy loss, and many others. This paper broadly covers seminal observations to discuss TF pathogenic roles in relation to diverse disease development or manifestation. Biochemically, extracellular TF signaling interfaced through protease-activated receptors (PARs) elicits cellular activation and inflammatory responses. TF diverse biological roles are associated with either coagulation-dependent or noncoagulation-mediated actions. Apparently, TF hypercoagulability refuels a coagulation-inflammation-thrombosis circuit in “autocrine” or “paracrine” fashions, which triggers a wide spectrum of pathophysiology. Accordingly, TF suppression, anticoagulation, PAR blockade, or general anti-inflammation offers an array of therapeutical benefits for easing diverse pathological conditions. PMID:21941675

  19. Quality control in the development of coagulation factor concentrates.

    PubMed

    Snape, T J

    1987-01-01

    Limitation of process change is a major factor contributing to assurance of quality in pharmaceutical manufacturing. This is particularly true in the manufacture of coagulation factor concentrates, for which presumptive testing for poorly defined product characteristics is an integral feature of finished product quality control. The development of new or modified preparations requires that this comfortable position be abandoned, and that the effect on finished product characteristics of changes to individual process steps (and components) be assessed. The degree of confidence in the safety and efficacy of the new product will be determined by, amongst other things, the complexity of the process alteration and the extent to which the results of finished product tests can be considered predictive. The introduction of a heat-treatment step for inactivation of potential viral contaminants in coagulation factor concentrates presents a significant challenge in both respects, quite independent of any consideration of assessment of the effectiveness of the viral inactivation step. These interactions are illustrated by some of the problems encountered with terminal dry heat-treatment (72 h. at 80 degrees C) of factor VIII and prothrombin complex concentrates manufactured by the Blood Products Laboratory.

  20. Bloodcurdling movies and measures of coagulation: Fear Factor crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, Banne; Scheres, Luuk J J; Lijfering, Willem M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess whether, as has been hypothesised since medieval times, acute fear can curdle blood. Design Crossover trial. Setting Main meeting room of Leiden University’s Department of Clinical Epidemiology, the Netherlands, converted to a makeshift cinema. Participants 24 healthy volunteers aged ≤30 years recruited among students, alumni, and employees of the Leiden University Medical Center: 14 were assigned to watch a frightening (horror) movie followed by a non-threatening (educational) movie and 10 to watch the movies in reverse order. The movies were viewed more than a week apart at the same time of day and both lasted approximately 90 minutes. Main outcome measures The primary outcome measures were markers, or “fear factors” of coagulation activity: blood coagulant factor VIII, D-dimer, thrombin-antithrombin complexes, and prothrombin fragments 1+2. The secondary outcome was participant reported fear experienced during each movie using a visual analogue fear scale. Results All participants completed the study. The horror movie was perceived to be more frightening than the educational movie on a visual analogue fear scale (mean difference 5.4, 95% confidence interval 4.7 to 6.1). The difference in factor VIII levels before and after watching the movies was higher for the horror movie than for the educational movie (mean difference of differences 11.1 IU/dL (111 IU/L), 95% confidence interval 1.2 to 21.0 IU/dL). The effect of either movie on levels of thrombin-antithrombin complexes, D-dimer, and prothrombin fragments 1+2 did not differ. Conclusion Frightening (in this case, horror) movies are associated with an increase of blood coagulant factor VIII without actual thrombin formation in young and healthy adults. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02601053. PMID:26673787

  1. SV-IV Peptide1–16 reduces coagulant power in normal Factor V and Factor V Leiden

    PubMed Central

    Di Micco, Biagio; Lepretti, Marilena; Rota, Lidia; Quaglia, Ilaria; Ferrazzi, Paola; Di Micco, Gianluca; Di Micco, Pierpaolo

    2007-01-01

    Native Factor V is an anticoagulant, but when activated by thrombin, Factor X or platelet proteases, it becomes a procoagulant. Due to these double properties, Factor V plays a crucial role in the regulation of coagulation/anticoagulation balance. Factor V Leiden (FVL) disorder may lead to thrombophilia. Whether a reduction in the activation of Factor V or Factor V Leiden may correct the disposition to thrombophilia is unknown. Therefore we tested SV-IV Peptide 1–16 (i.e. a peptide derived by seminal protein vescicle number IV, SV-IV) to assess its capacity to inhibit the procoagulant activity of normal clotting factor V or Factor V Leiden (FVL). We found that SV-IV protein has potent anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties and also exerts procoagulant activity. In the present work we show that the SV-IV Peptide 1–16, incubated with plasma containing normal Factor V or FVL plasma for 5 minutes reduces the procoagulant capacity of both substances. This is an anticoagulant effect whereas SV-IV protein is a procoagulant. This activity is effective both in terms of the coagulation tests, where coagulation times are increased, and in terms of biochemical tests conducted with purified molecules, where Factor X activation is reduced. Peptide 1–16 was, in the pure molecule system, first incubated for 5 minutes with purified Factor V then it was added to the mix of phosphatidylserine, Ca2+, Factor X and its chromogenic molecule Chromozym X. We observed a more than 50% reduction in lysis of chromogenic molecule Chromozym X by Factor Xa, compared to the sample without Peptide 1–16. Such reduction in Chromozym X lysis, is explained with the reduced activation of Factor X by partial inactivation of Factor V by Peptide 1–16. Thus our study demonstrates that Peptide 1–16 reduces the coagulation capacity of Factor V and Factor V Leiden in vitro, and, in turn, causes factor X reduced activation. PMID:18154667

  2. Combined deficiency of coagulation factors V and VIII: an update.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chunlei; Zhang, Bin

    2013-09-01

    Combined deficiency of factor V (FV) and FVIII (F5F8D) is an autosomal recessive bleeding disorder characterized by simultaneous decreases of both coagulation factors. This review summarizes recent reports on the clinical presentations, treatments, and molecular mechanism of F5F8D. Genetic studies identified LMAN1 and MCFD2 as causative genes for this disorder, revealing a previously unknown intracellular transport pathway shared by the two important blood coagulation factors. LMAN1 and MCFD2 form a Ca2+-dependent cargo receptor complex that functions in the transport of FV/FVIII from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi. Disrupting the LMAN1-MCFD2 receptor, complex formation is the primary molecular defect of missense mutations leading to F5F8D. The EF-hand domains of MCFD2 are necessary and sufficient for the interactions with both LMAN1 and FV/FVIII. Similarly, the carbohydrate recognition domain of LMAN1 contains distinct and separable binding sites for both MCFD2 and FV/FVIII. Therefore, FV and FVIII likely carry duel sorting signals that are separately recognized by LMAN1 and MCFD2 and necessary for the efficient ER-to-Golgi transport. FV and FVIII likely bind LMAN1 through the high-mannose N-linked glycans under the higher Ca2+ conditions in the ER and dissociate in the lower Ca2+ environment of the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment. PMID:23852824

  3. Rectal ulcer: Due to ketoprofen, argon plasma coagulation and prostatic brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Koessler, Thibaud; Servois, Vincent; Mariani, Pascale; Aubert, Emilie; Cacheux, Wulfran

    2014-12-01

    Prostatic brachytherapy with permanent seed implants is a recent and safe radiation therapy technique associated with radiation-induced digestive disease. Argon plasma coagulation procedure is a validated modality in the management of haemorrhagic radiation proctitis, which is known to occasionally induce chronic rectal ulcers. We report here an original case report of an acute painful rectal ulcer as a consequence of the combination of short-term therapy with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs therapy, prostatic brachytherapy with malposition of seed implants and argon plasma coagulation procedure in a patient with haemorrhagic radiation proctitis. The description of this clinical observation is essential to recommend the discontinuation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs therapy and the control of the position of seed implants in case of prostatic brachytherapy before argon plasma coagulation for radiation-induced proctitis.

  4. Measurement of Blood Coagulation Factor Synthesis in Cultures of Human Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Stefan; Braspenning, Joris

    2015-01-01

    An important function of the liver is the synthesis and secretion of blood coagulation factors. Within the liver, hepatocytes are involved in the synthesis of most blood coagulation factors, such as fibrinogen, prothrombin, factor V, VII, IX, X, XI, XII, as well as protein C and S, and antithrombin, whereas liver sinusoidal endothelial cells produce factor VIII and von Willebrand factor. Here, we describe methods for the detection and quantification of most blood coagulation factors in hepatocytes in vitro. Hepatocyte cultures indeed provide a valuable tool to study blood coagulation factors. In addition, the generation and expansion of hepatocytes or hepatocyte-like cells may be used in future for cell-based therapies of liver diseases, including blood coagulation factor deficiencies.

  5. Determining the effect of freezing on coagulation testing: comparison of results between fresh and once frozen-thawed plasma.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Robert C; Dwyre, Denis W

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of the results from coagulation testing can be affected by numerous preanalytic and analytic variables including the stability of the citrated sample at room temperature. Samples not tested within 2-4 h of collection should be processed and frozen for later analysis. As limited data exist about the impact of freezing samples on coagulation testing, we sought to evaluate the effect of freezing on coagulation testing. Plasma samples into 3.2% sodium citrate tubes, centrifuged to yield platelet-poor plasma, were evaluated for prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), fibrinogen, D-dimer, antithrombin (AT) activity, factors V, VII, VIII, IX, lupus anticoagulant and anti-Xa measurements for both unfractionated and low-molecular-weight heparins. Samples were then frozen at -70°C for at least 1 week and testing was repeated using the same lot of material. All tests strongly correlated (R > 0.85) between fresh and frozen sample results. Using paired t test analysis, significant differences between fresh and frozen tested plasma existed for PT, APTT, factors V, VIII and AT. Significant differences existed between fresh and frozen lupus anticoagulant ratios (lupus anticoagulant screen but not lupus anticoagulant confirm), and single centrifugation process underestimated the presence of lupus anticoagulant as compared to double centrifugation processing. Freezing significantly affects the results for PT, APTT, factors V and VIII activity, and AT activity, although these differences were not considered to be clinically significant. Double centrifugation is required for accurate lupus anticoagulant testing, regardless of whether platelet-poor plasma is achieved with single centrifugation.

  6. Quantitative plasma proteome analysis reveals aberrant level of blood coagulation-related proteins in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Peng, Pei-Hua; Wu, Chih-Ching; Liu, Shu-Chen; Chang, Kai-Ping; Chen, Chi-De; Chang, Ya-Ting; Hsu, Chia-Wei; Chang, Yu-Sun; Yu, Jau-Song

    2011-05-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), one of the most common cancers in Southeast Asia, is not easily diagnosed until advanced stages. To discover potential biomarkers for improving NPC diagnosis, we herein identified the aberrant plasma proteins in NPC patients. We first removed the top-seven abundant proteins from plasma samples of healthy controls and NPC patients, and then labeled the samples with different fluorescent cyanine dyes. The labeled samples were then mixed equally and fractionated with ion-exchange chromatography followed by SDS-PAGE. Proteins showing altered levels in NPC patients were identified by in-gel tryptic digestion and LC-MS/MS. When the biological roles of the 45 identified proteins were assessed via MetaCore™ analysis, the blood coagulation pathway emerged as the most significantly altered pathway in NPC plasma. Plasma kallikrein (KLKB1) and thrombin-antithrombin III complex (TAT) were chosen for evaluation as the candidate NPC biomarkers because of their involvement in blood coagulation. ELISAs confirmed the elevation of their plasma levels in NPC patients versus healthy controls. Western blot and activity assays further showed that the KLKB1 active form was significantly increased in NPC plasma. Collectively, our results identified the significant alteration of blood coagulation pathway in NPC patients, and KLKB1 and TAT may represent the potential NPC biomarkers.

  7. Computational study of coagulation factor VIIa's affinity for phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Taboureau, Olivier; Olsen, Ole Hvilsted

    2007-02-01

    The interaction between the gamma-carboxyglutamic acid-rich domain of coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa), a vitamin-K-dependent enzyme, and phospholipid membranes plays a major role in initiation of blood coagulation. However, despite a high sequence and structural similarity to the Gla domain of other vitamin-K-dependent enzymes with a high membrane affinity, its affinity for negatively charged phospholipids is poor. A few amino acid differences are responsible for this observation. Based on the X-ray structure of lysophosphatidylserine (lysoPS) bound to the Gla domain of bovine prothrombin (Prth), models of the Gla domain of wildtype FVIIa and mutated FVIIa Gla domains in complex with lysoPS were built. Molecular dynamics (MD) and steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations on the complexes were applied to investigate the significant difference in the binding affinity. The MD simulation approach provides a structural and dynamic support to the role of P10Q and K32E mutations in the improvement of the membrane contact. Hence, rotation of the Gly11 main chain generated during the MD simulation results in a hydrogen bond with Q10 side chain as well as the appearance of a hydrogen bond between E32 and Q10 forcing the loop harbouring Arg9 and Arg15 to shrink and thereby enhances the accessibility of the phospholipids to the calcium ions. Furthermore, the application of the SMD simulation method to dissociate C6-lysoPS from a series of Gla domain models exhibits a ranking of the rupture force that can be useful in the interpretation of the PS interaction with Gla domains. Finally, adiabatic mapping of Gla6 residue in FVIIa with or without insertion of Tyr4 confirms the critical role of the insertion on the conformation of the side chain Gla6 in FVIIa and the corresponding Gla7 in Prth. PMID:17131117

  8. Ex vivo effects of low-dose rivaroxaban on specific coagulation assays and coagulation factor activities in patients under real life conditions.

    PubMed

    Mani, Helen; Hesse, Christian; Stratmann, Gertrud; Lindhoff-Last, Edelgard

    2013-01-01

    Global coagulation assays display variable effects at different concentrations of rivaroxaban. The aim of this study is to quantify the ex vivo effects of low-dose rivaroxaban on thrombophilia screening assays and coagulation factor activities based on the administration time, and to show how to mask possible interferences. Plasma samples from 40 patients receiving rivaroxaban 10 mg daily were investigated to measure activities of clotting factor II, V, VII, VIII, IX, XI, XII and XIII; protein C- and protein S-levels; lupus anticoagulants; anticardiolipin IgG and IgM; D-dimer, heparin-platelet factor 4 (HPF4) antibodies and screening tests for von Willebrand disease (VWD). Two hours after rivaroxaban administration, the activities of clotting factors were significantly decreased to different extents, except for factor XIII. Dilution of plasma samples resulted in neutralisation of these interferences. The chromogenic protein C activity assay was not affected by rivaroxaban. Depending on the timing of tablet intake in relation to blood sampling protein S activity was measured falsely high when a clotting assay was used. False-positive results for lupus anticoagulants were observed depending on the assay system used and the administration time of rivaroxaban. ELISA-based assays such as anticardiolipin IgG and IgM, D-dimer, HPF4-antibodies and the turbidimetric assays for VWD were not affected by rivaroxaban. Specific haemostasis clotting tests should be performed directly prior to rivaroxaban intake. Assay optimisation in the presence of rivaroxaban can be achieved by plasma dilution. Immunologic assays are not influenced by rivaroxaban, while chromogenic assays can be used, when they do not depend on factor Xa.

  9. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor dose-dependently inhibits coagulation activation without influencing the fibrinolytic and cytokine response during human endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, E; Dekkers, P E; Creasey, A A; Hack, C E; Paulson, S K; Karim, A; Kesecioglu, J; Levi, M; van Deventer, S J; van Der Poll, T

    2000-02-15

    Inhibition of the tissue factor pathway has been shown to attenuate the activation of coagulation and to prevent death in a gram-negative bacteremia primate model of sepsis. It has been suggested that tissue factor influences inflammatory cascades other than the coagulation system. The authors sought to determine the effects of 2 different doses of recombinant tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) on endotoxin-induced coagulant, fibrinolytic, and cytokine responses in healthy humans. Two groups, each consisting of 8 healthy men, were studied in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study. Subjects were studied on 2 different occasions. They received a bolus intravenous injection of 4 ng/kg endotoxin, which was followed by a 6-hour continuous infusion of TFPI or placebo. Eight subjects received 0.05 mg/kg per hour TFPI after a bolus of 0.0125 mg/kg (low-dose group), and 8 subjects received 0.2 mg/kg per hour after a bolus of 0.05 mg/kg (high-dose group). Endotoxin injection induced the activation of coagulation, the activation and subsequent inhibition of fibrinolysis, and the release of proinflammatory and antiinflammatory cytokines. TFPI infusion induced a dose-dependent attenuation of thrombin generation, as measured by plasma F1 + 2 and thrombin-antithrombin complexes, with a complete blockade of coagulation activation after high-dose TFPI. Endotoxin-induced changes in the fibrinolytic system and cytokine levels were not altered by either low-dose or high-dose TFPI. The authors concluded that TFPI effectively and dose-dependently attenuates the endotoxin-induced coagulation activation in humans without influencing the fibrinolytic and cytokine response. (Blood. 2000;95:1124-1129)

  10. In vitro carboxylation of a blood coagulation factor IX precursor produced by recombinant-DNA technology.

    PubMed

    Soute, B A; Balland, A; Faure, T; de la Salle, H; Vermeer, C

    1989-04-25

    Blood coagulation factor IX (Christmas factor) is a plasma protein which is required for normal haemostasis. A functional deficiency of factor IX results in haemophilia B, a bleeding disorder which is generally treated by infusions of factor IX concentrates prepared from pooled human plasma. The use of human blood products is connected with the risk of transmitting viral agents responsible for diseases such as hepatitis B and AIDS. Recombinant DNA techniques may provide the means to produce the required proteins without exposing the patients to these risks and at lower costs. One of the problems which has to be overcome before recombinant factor IX can be used for therapeutical purposes is related to the vitamin K-dependent carboxylation of its 12 NH2-terminal glutamate residues. In cell cultures this carboxylation, which is required to render the protein its procoagulant activity, is far from complete, especially at high expression levels. In this paper we describe the in vitro carboxylation of non and/or partly carboxylated recombinant factor IX produced by transformed Chinese hamster ovary cells. The identity of the newly formed Gla residues was verified and it could be demonstrated that all carboxyl groups had been incorporated into the recombinant factor IX.

  11. Platelet-Derived Short-Chain Polyphosphates Enhance the Inactivation of Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor by Activated Coagulation Factor XI

    PubMed Central

    Puy, Cristina; Tucker, Erik I.; Ivanov, Ivan S.; Gailani, David; Smith, Stephanie A.; Morrissey, James H.; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Factor (F) XI supports both normal human hemostasis and pathological thrombosis. Activated FXI (FXIa) promotes thrombin generation by enzymatic activation of FXI, FIX, FX, and FV, and inactivation of alpha tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPIα), in vitro. Some of these reactions are now known to be enhanced by short-chain polyphosphates (SCP) derived from activated platelets. These SCPs act as a cofactor for the activation of FXI and FV by thrombin and FXIa, respectively. Since SCPs have been shown to inhibit the anticoagulant function of TFPIα, we herein investigated whether SCPs could serve as cofactors for the proteolytic inactivation of TFPIα by FXIa, further promoting the efficiency of the extrinsic pathway of coagulation to generate thrombin. Methods and Results Purified soluble SCP was prepared by size-fractionation of sodium polyphosphate. TFPIα proteolysis was analyzed by western blot. TFPIα activity was measured as inhibition of FX activation and activity in coagulation and chromogenic assays. SCPs significantly accelerated the rate of inactivation of TFPIα by FXIa in both purified systems and in recalcified plasma. Moreover, platelet-derived SCP accelerated the rate of inactivation of platelet-derived TFPIα by FXIa. TFPIα activity was not affected by SCP in recalcified FXI-depleted plasma. Conclusions Our data suggest that SCP is a cofactor for TFPIα inactivation by FXIa, thus, expanding the range of hemostatic FXIa substrates that may be affected by the cofactor functions of platelet-derived SCP. PMID:27764259

  12. Novel aspects of blood coagulation factor XIII. I. Structure, distribution, activation, and function

    SciTech Connect

    Muszbek, L.; Adany, R.; Mikkola, H.

    1996-10-01

    Blood coagulation factor XIII (FXIII) is a protransglutaminase that becomes activated by the concerted action of thrombin and Ca{sup 2+} in the final stage of the clotting cascade. In addition to plasma, FXIII also occurs in platelets, monocytes, and monocyte-derived macrophages. While the plasma factor is a heterotetramer consisting of paired A and B subunits (A{sub 2}B{sub 2}), its cellular counterpart lacks the B subunits and is a homodimer of potentially active A subunits (A{sub 2}). The gene coding for the A and B subunits has been localized to chromosomes 6p24-25 and 1q31-32.1, respectively. The genomic as well as the primary protein structure of both subunits has been established. Plasma FXIII circulates in association with its substrate precursor, fibrinogen. Fibrin(ogen) has an important regulatory role in the activation of plasma FXIII, for instance the proteolytic removal of activation peptide by thrombin, the dissociation of subunits A and B, and the exposure of the originally buried active site on the free A subunits. The end result of this process is the formation of an active transglutaminase, which crosslinks peptide chains through {epsilon}({gamma}-glutamyl)lysyl isopeptide bonds. The protein substrates of activated FXIII include components of the clotting-fibrinolytic system, adhesive and contractile proteins. The main physiological function of plasma FXIII is to cross-link fibrin and protect it from the fibrinolytic enzyme plasmin. The latter effect is achieved mainly by covalently linking {alpha}{sub 2} antiplasmin, the most potent physiological inhibitor of plasmin, to fibrin. Plasma FXIII seems to be involved in wound healing and tissue repair, and it is essential to maintaining pregnancy. Cellular FXIII, if exposed to the surface of the cells, might support or perhaps take over the hemostatic functions of plasma FXIII; however, its intracellular role has remained mostly unexplored. 328 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Staphylococcal superantigen-like protein 10 (SSL10) inhibits blood coagulation by binding to prothrombin and factor Xa via their γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Saotomo; Yokoyama, Ryosuke; Kamoshida, Go; Fujiwara, Toshinobu; Okada, Hiromi; Takii, Takemasa; Tsuji, Tsutomu; Fujii, Satoshi; Hashizume, Hideki; Onozaki, Kikuo

    2013-07-26

    The staphylococcal superantigen-like protein (SSL) family is composed of 14 exoproteins sharing structural similarity with superantigens but no superantigenic activity. Target proteins of four SSLs have been identified to be involved in host immune responses. However, the counterparts of other SSLs have been functionally uncharacterized. In this study, we have identified porcine plasma prothrombin as SSL10-binding protein by affinity purification using SSL10-conjugated Sepharose. The resin recovered the prodomain of prothrombin (fragment 1 + 2) as well as factor Xa in pull-down analysis. The equilibrium dissociation constant between SSL10 and prothrombin was 1.36 × 10(-7) M in surface plasmon resonance analysis. On the other hand, the resin failed to recover γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain-less coagulation factors and prothrombin from warfarin-treated mice, suggesting that the Gla domain of the coagulation factors is essential for the interaction. SSL10 prolonged plasma clotting induced by the addition of Ca(2+) and factor Xa. SSL10 did not affect the protease activity of thrombin but inhibited the generation of thrombin activity in recalcified plasma. S. aureus produces coagulase that non-enzymatically activates prothrombin. SSL10 attenuated clotting induced by coagulase, but the inhibitory effect was weaker than that on physiological clotting, and SSL10 did not inhibit protease activity of staphylothrombin, the complex of prothrombin with coagulase. These results indicate that SSL10 inhibits blood coagulation by interfering with activation of coagulation cascade via binding to the Gla domain of coagulation factor but not by directly inhibiting thrombin activity. This is the first finding that the bacterial protein inhibits blood coagulation via targeting the Gla domain of coagulation factors.

  14. A cartridge based sensor array platform for multiple coagulation measurements from plasma.

    PubMed

    Cakmak, O; Ermek, E; Kilinc, N; Bulut, S; Baris, I; Kavakli, I H; Yaralioglu, G G; Urey, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a MEMS-based sensor array enabling multiple clot-time tests for plasma in one disposable microfluidic cartridge. The versatile LoC (Lab-on-Chip) platform technology is demonstrated here for real-time coagulation tests (activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (aPTT) and Prothrombin Time (PT)). The system has a reader unit and a disposable cartridge. The reader has no electrical connections to the cartridge. This enables simple and low-cost cartridge designs and avoids reliability problems associated with electrical connections. The cartridge consists of microfluidic channels and MEMS microcantilevers placed in each channel. The microcantilevers are made of electroplated nickel. They are actuated remotely using an external electro-coil and the read-out is also conducted remotely using a laser. The phase difference between the cantilever oscillation and the coil drive is monitored in real time. During coagulation, the viscosity of the blood plasma increases resulting in a change in the phase read-out. The proposed assay was tested on human and control plasma samples for PT and aPTT measurements. PT and aPTT measurements from control plasma samples are comparable with the manufacturer's datasheet and the commercial reference device. The measurement system has an overall 7.28% and 6.33% CV for PT and aPTT, respectively. For further implementation, the microfluidic channels of the cartridge were functionalized for PT and aPTT tests by drying specific reagents in each channel. Since simultaneous PT and aPTT measurements are needed in order to properly evaluate the coagulation system, one of the most prominent features of the proposed assay is enabling parallel measurement of different coagulation parameters. Additionally, the design of the cartridge and the read-out system as well as the obtained reproducible results with 10 μl of the plasma samples suggest an opportunity for a possible point-of-care application. PMID:25353144

  15. Utilization Patterns of Coagulation Factor Consumption for Patients with Hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Ok; Yu, Su-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia is a serious rare disease that requires continuous management and treatment for which the medicine is costly at the annual average of 100 million KRW for an individual. The aim of this study was to investigate trends in the utilization of coagulation factor (CF) used for hemophilia treatment using the National Health Insurance database from 2010 to 2013 in Korea and compare the utilization of CF with other countries. The consumption of CF per capita (IU) in Korea was not more than other countries with similar income to Korea. However, CF usage per patient IU was higher because the prevalence rate of hemophilia in Korea was lower than in other countries while the number of serious patients was much more. Therefore, it is difficult to say that the consumption of hemophilia medicine in Korea is higher than that in other countries. The consumption and cost of hemophilia medicine in Korea is likely to increase due to the increased utilization of expensive bypassing agents and the widespread use of prophylaxis for severe hemophilia. Even during the research period, it increased slightly and other countries show a similar trend. Thus, hemophilia patient management should accompany active monitoring on the health and cost outcomes of pharmaceutical treatment in the future. This study is expected to contribute to further insight into drug policies for other countries that face similar challenges with high price pharmaceuticals.

  16. Utilization Patterns of Coagulation Factor Consumption for Patients with Hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Ok; Yu, Su-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia is a serious rare disease that requires continuous management and treatment for which the medicine is costly at the annual average of 100 million KRW for an individual. The aim of this study was to investigate trends in the utilization of coagulation factor (CF) used for hemophilia treatment using the National Health Insurance database from 2010 to 2013 in Korea and compare the utilization of CF with other countries. The consumption of CF per capita (IU) in Korea was not more than other countries with similar income to Korea. However, CF usage per patient IU was higher because the prevalence rate of hemophilia in Korea was lower than in other countries while the number of serious patients was much more. Therefore, it is difficult to say that the consumption of hemophilia medicine in Korea is higher than that in other countries. The consumption and cost of hemophilia medicine in Korea is likely to increase due to the increased utilization of expensive bypassing agents and the widespread use of prophylaxis for severe hemophilia. Even during the research period, it increased slightly and other countries show a similar trend. Thus, hemophilia patient management should accompany active monitoring on the health and cost outcomes of pharmaceutical treatment in the future. This study is expected to contribute to further insight into drug policies for other countries that face similar challenges with high price pharmaceuticals. PMID:26770035

  17. Coagulation factor Xa inhibition: biological background and rationale.

    PubMed

    Leadley, R J

    2001-06-01

    Ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease are the leading causes of death in the world. Surprisingly, these diseases are treated by relatively antiquated drugs. However, due to our improved understanding of the underlying pathology of these diseases, and a number of technological advances in tools for drug discovery and chemical optimization, an exciting new wave of antithrombotic compounds is beginning to emerge in clinical trials. These agents, referred to as direct coagulation factor Xa inhibitors, appear to provide an enhanced risk-benefit margin compared to conventional therapy. Preclinical and early clinical data gathered over the past few years suggests that direct fXa inhibitors will provide the necessary advancements in efficacy, safety, and ease of use required to displace conventional therapy. Whether or not these agents will succeed will be determined as this class of agents advances through clinical trials in the near future. This review describes some of the key studies that sparked an interest in fXa as a therapeutic target, highlighting the findings that provided important rationale for continuing the development of potent and selective direct fXa inhibitors.

  18. Argon plasma coagulation therapy for a hemorrhagic radiation-induced gastritis in patient with pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Shukuwa, Kazutaka; Kume, Keiichiro; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Otsuki, Makoto

    2007-01-01

    Radiation-induced gastritis is a serious complication of radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer which is difficult to manage. A 79-year-old man had been diagnosed as having inoperable pancreatic cancer (stage IVa). We encountered this patient with hemorrhagic gastritis induced by external radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer that was well-treated using argon plasma coagulation (APC). After endoscopic treatment using APC, anemia associated with hemorrhagic radiation gastritis improved and required no further blood transfusion. PMID:17603236

  19. Moojenactivase, a novel pro-coagulant PIIId metalloprotease isolated from Bothrops moojeni snake venom, activates coagulation factors II and X and induces tissue factor up-regulation in leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Sartim, Marco A; Costa, Tassia R; Laure, Helen J; Espíndola, Milena S; Frantz, Fabiani G; Sorgi, Carlos A; Cintra, Adélia C O; Arantes, Eliane C; Faccioli, Lucia H; Rosa, José C; Sampaio, Suely V

    2016-05-01

    Coagulopathies following snakebite are triggered by pro-coagulant venom toxins, in which metalloproteases play a major role in envenomation-induced coagulation disorders by acting on coagulation cascade, platelet function and fibrinolysis. Considering this relevance, here we describe the isolation and biochemical characterization of moojenactivase (MooA), a metalloprotease from Bothrops moojeni snake venom, and investigate its involvement in hemostasis in vitro. MooA is a glycoprotein of 85,746.22 Da, member of the PIIId group of snake venom metalloproteases, composed of three linked disulfide-bonded chains: an N-glycosylated heavy chain, and two light chains. The venom protease induced human plasma clotting in vitro by activating on both blood coagulation factors II (prothrombin) and X, which in turn generated α-thrombin and factor Xa, respectively. Additionally, MooA induced expression of tissue factor (TF) on the membrane surface of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), which led these cells to adopt pro-coagulant characteristics. MooA was also shown to be involved with production of the inflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-8 and MCP-1, suggesting an association between MooA pro-inflammatory stimulation of PBMC and TF up-regulation. We also observed aggregation of washed platelets when in presence of MooA; however, the protease had no effect on fibrinolysis. Our findings show that MooA is a novel hemostatically active metalloprotease, which may lead to the development of coagulopathies during B. moojeni envenomation. Moreover, the metalloprotease may contribute to the development of new diagnostic tools and pharmacological approaches applied to hemostatic disorders. PMID:26026608

  20. Development of hyperplastic polyps following argon plasma coagulation of gastric antral vascular ectasia

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nihar; Cavanagh, Yana; Kaswala, Dharmesh H.; Shaikh, Sohail

    2015-01-01

    The etiology of gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE) syndrome or gastric hyperplastic polyps (HPs) is not fully understood. We report a case of gastric HP arising in a patient treated with argon plasma coagulation (APC) for GAVE syndrome. Despite unclear etiologic progression, this and previously reported cases suggest a temporal relationship between the treatment of GAVE and HP. A 68-year-old male with a history of coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure and diabetes type II who initially presented with symptomatic anemia 2 weeks after starting aspirin and clopidogrel therapy. Diagnostic esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) demonstrated diffuse GAVE. He was treated with 5 APC treatments, at 6-week intervals, over a 30 weeks period. 16 months after the initial APC treatment, an EGD performed secondary to persistent anemia demonstrated innumerable, large, bleeding polyps in the gastric antrum. Biopsy performed at that time confirmed hyperplastic gastric polyps. It has been proposed that HPs are regenerative lesions that arise at sites of severe mucosal injury. Our patient's treatment of GAVE with APC created significant mucosal injury, resulting in HP. Technique and genetic factors may have promoted hyperplastic changes during the regeneration of mucosa, at sites previously treated with APC. This case highlights the potential progression of GAVE to HP in a patient with persistent anemia after APC therapy. PMID:26283860

  1. Coagulation factor X activates innate immunity to human species C adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Doronin, Konstantin; Flatt, Justin W; Di Paolo, Nelson C; Khare, Reeti; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Acchione, Mauro; Sumida, John P; Ohto, Umeharu; Shimizu, Toshiyuki; Akashi-Takamura, Sachiko; Miyake, Kensuke; MacDonald, James W; Bammler, Theo K; Beyer, Richard P; Farin, Frederico M; Stewart, Phoebe L; Shayakhmetov, Dmitry M

    2012-11-01

    Although coagulation factors play a role in host defense for "living fossils" such as horseshoe crabs, the role of the coagulation system in immunity in higher organisms remains unclear. We modeled the interface of human species C adenovirus (HAdv) interaction with coagulation factor X (FX) and introduced a mutation that abrogated formation of the HAdv-FX complex. In vivo genome-wide transcriptional profiling revealed that FX-binding-ablated virus failed to activate a distinct network of nuclear factor κB-dependent early-response genes that are activated by HAdv-FX complex downstream of TLR4/MyD88/TRIF/TRAF6 signaling. Our study implicates host factor "decoration" of the virus as a mechanism to trigger an innate immune sensor that responds to a misplacement of coagulation FX from the blood into intracellular macrophage compartments upon virus entry into the cell. PMID:23019612

  2. Tissue factor is induced by interleukin-33 in human endothelial cells: a new link between coagulation and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Stojkovic, Stefan; Kaun, Christoph; Basilio, Jose; Rauscher, Sabine; Hell, Lena; Krychtiuk, Konstantin A; Bonstingl, Cornelia; de Martin, Rainer; Gröger, Marion; Ay, Cihan; Holnthoner, Wolfgang; Eppel, Wolfgang; Neumayer, Christoph; Huk, Ihor; Huber, Kurt; Demyanets, Svitlana; Wojta, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is the primary trigger of coagulation. Elevated levels of TF are found in atherosclerotic plaques, and TF leads to thrombus formation when released upon plaque rupture. Interleukin (IL)-33 was previously shown to induce angiogenesis and inflammatory activation of endothelial cells (ECs). Here, we investigated the impact of IL-33 on TF in human ECs, as a possible new link between inflammation and coagulation. IL-33 induced TF mRNA and protein in human umbilical vein ECs and coronary artery ECs. IL-33-induced TF expression was ST2- and NF-κB-dependent, but IL-1-independent. IL-33 also increased cell surface TF activity in ECs and TF activity in ECs-derived microparticles. IL-33-treated ECs reduced coagulation time of whole blood and plasma but not of factor VII-deficient plasma. In human carotid atherosclerotic plaques (n = 57), TF mRNA positively correlated with IL-33 mRNA expression (r = 0.691, p < 0.001). In this tissue, IL-33 and TF protein was detected in ECs and smooth muscle cells by immunofluorescence. Furthermore, IL-33 and TF protein co-localized at the site of clot formation within microvessels in plaques of patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis. Through induction of TF in ECs, IL-33 could enhance their thrombotic capacity and thereby might impact on thrombus formation in the setting of atherosclerosis. PMID:27142573

  3. Tissue factor is induced by interleukin-33 in human endothelial cells: a new link between coagulation and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Stojkovic, Stefan; Kaun, Christoph; Basilio, Jose; Rauscher, Sabine; Hell, Lena; Krychtiuk, Konstantin A.; Bonstingl, Cornelia; de Martin, Rainer; Gröger, Marion; Ay, Cihan; Holnthoner, Wolfgang; Eppel, Wolfgang; Neumayer, Christoph; Huk, Ihor; Huber, Kurt; Demyanets, Svitlana; Wojta, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is the primary trigger of coagulation. Elevated levels of TF are found in atherosclerotic plaques, and TF leads to thrombus formation when released upon plaque rupture. Interleukin (IL)-33 was previously shown to induce angiogenesis and inflammatory activation of endothelial cells (ECs). Here, we investigated the impact of IL-33 on TF in human ECs, as a possible new link between inflammation and coagulation. IL-33 induced TF mRNA and protein in human umbilical vein ECs and coronary artery ECs. IL-33-induced TF expression was ST2- and NF-κB-dependent, but IL-1-independent. IL-33 also increased cell surface TF activity in ECs and TF activity in ECs-derived microparticles. IL-33-treated ECs reduced coagulation time of whole blood and plasma but not of factor VII-deficient plasma. In human carotid atherosclerotic plaques (n = 57), TF mRNA positively correlated with IL-33 mRNA expression (r = 0.691, p < 0.001). In this tissue, IL-33 and TF protein was detected in ECs and smooth muscle cells by immunofluorescence. Furthermore, IL-33 and TF protein co-localized at the site of clot formation within microvessels in plaques of patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis. Through induction of TF in ECs, IL-33 could enhance their thrombotic capacity and thereby might impact on thrombus formation in the setting of atherosclerosis. PMID:27142573

  4. Expression of Functional Human Coagulation Factor XIII A-domain in Plant Cell Suspensions and Whole Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Johnway; Hooker, Brian S.; Anderson, Daniel B.

    2004-09-01

    Coagulation factor XIII, a zymogen present in blood as a tetramer (A2B2) of A- and B-domains, is one of the components of many ''wound sealants'' which are proposed for use or currently in use as effective hemostatic agents, sealants and tissue adhesives in surgery. After activation by ?-thrombin cleavage, coagulation factor XIII A-domain, a transglutaminase, is formed and catalyzes the covalent crosslinking of the ?- and ?-chains of linear fibrin to form homopolymers, which can quickly stop bleeding. We have successfully expressed the A-domain of factor XIII in both plant cell cultures and whole plants. Transgenic plant cell culture allows a rapid method for testing production feasibility while expression in whole plants demonstrates an economic production system for recombinant human plasma-based proteins. The expressed factor XIII A-domain had a similar size as that of human plasma-derived factor XIII. Crude plant extract containing recombinant factor XIII A-domain showed transglutaminase activity with monodansylcadaverine and casein as substrates and crosslinking activity in the presence of linear fibrin. The expression of factor XIII A-domain was not affected by plant leaf position.

  5. Conclusive evidence of abrupt coagulation inside the void during cyclic nanoparticle formation in reactive plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Wetering, F. M. J. H.; Nijdam, S.; Beckers, J.

    2016-07-01

    In this letter, we present scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results that confirm in a direct way our earlier explanation of an abrupt coagulation event as the cause for the void hiccup. In a recent paper, we reported on the fast and interrupted expansion of voids in a reactive dusty argon-acetylene plasma. The voids appeared one after the other, each showing a peculiar, though reproducible, behavior of successive periods of fast expansion, abrupt contraction, and continued expansion. The abrupt contraction was termed "hiccup" and was related to collective coagulation of a new generation of nanoparticles growing in the void using relatively indirect methods: electron density measurements and optical emission spectroscopy. In this letter, we present conclusive evidence using SEM of particles collected at different moments in time spanning several growth cycles, which enables us to follow the nanoparticle formation process in great detail.

  6. Structural and functional influences of coagulation factor XIII subunit B heterozygous missense mutants

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Anne; Biswas, Arijit; Ivaskevicius, Vytautas; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The coagulation factor XIII(FXIII) is a plasma circulating heterotetrameric protransglutaminase that acts at the end of the coagulation cascade by covalently cross-linking preformed fibrin clots (to themselves and to fibrinolytic inhibitors) in order to stabilize them against fibrinolysis. It circulates in the plasma as a heterotetramer composed of two homomeric catalytic Factor XIIIA2 (FXIIIA2) and two homomeric protective/carrier Factor XIIIB2 subunit (FXIIIB2). Congenital deficiency of FXIII is of two types: severe homozygous/compound heterozygous FXIII deficiency which results in severe bleeding symptoms and mild heterozygous FXIII deficiency which is associated with mild bleeding (only upon trauma) or an asymptomatic phenotype. Defects in the F13B gene (Factor XIIIB subunit) occur more frequently in mild FXIII deficiency patients than in severe FXIII deficiency. We had recently reported secretion-related defects for seven previously reported F13B missense mutations. In the present study we further analyze the underlying molecular pathological mechanisms as well as the heterozygous expression phenotype for these mutations using a combination of in vitro heterologous expression (in HEK293T cells) and confocal microscopy. In combination with the in vitro work we have also performed an in silico solvated molecular dynamic simulation study on previously reported FXIIIB subunit sushi domain homology models in order to predict the putative structure-functional impact of these mutations. We were able to categorize the mutations into the following functional groups that: (1) affect antigenic stability as well as binding to FXIIIA subunit, that is, Cys5Arg, Cys316Phe, and Pro428Ser (2) affect binding to FXIIIA subunit with little or no influence on antigenic stability, that is, Ile81Asn and Val401Gln c) influence neither aspects and are most likely causality linked polymorphisms or functional polymorphisms, that is, Leu116Phe and Val217Ile. The Cys5Arg mutation was the

  7. Structural and functional influences of coagulation factor XIII subunit B heterozygous missense mutants.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Anne; Biswas, Arijit; Ivaskevicius, Vytautas; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2015-07-01

    The coagulation factor XIII(FXIII) is a plasma circulating heterotetrameric protransglutaminase that acts at the end of the coagulation cascade by covalently cross-linking preformed fibrin clots (to themselves and to fibrinolytic inhibitors) in order to stabilize them against fibrinolysis. It circulates in the plasma as a heterotetramer composed of two homomeric catalytic Factor XIIIA2 (FXIIIA2) and two homomeric protective/carrier Factor XIIIB2 subunit (FXIIIB2). Congenital deficiency of FXIII is of two types: severe homozygous/compound heterozygous FXIII deficiency which results in severe bleeding symptoms and mild heterozygous FXIII deficiency which is associated with mild bleeding (only upon trauma) or an asymptomatic phenotype. Defects in the F13B gene (Factor XIIIB subunit) occur more frequently in mild FXIII deficiency patients than in severe FXIII deficiency. We had recently reported secretion-related defects for seven previously reported F13B missense mutations. In the present study we further analyze the underlying molecular pathological mechanisms as well as the heterozygous expression phenotype for these mutations using a combination of in vitro heterologous expression (in HEK293T cells) and confocal microscopy. In combination with the in vitro work we have also performed an in silico solvated molecular dynamic simulation study on previously reported FXIIIB subunit sushi domain homology models in order to predict the putative structure-functional impact of these mutations. We were able to categorize the mutations into the following functional groups that: (1) affect antigenic stability as well as binding to FXIIIA subunit, that is, Cys5Arg, Cys316Phe, and Pro428Ser (2) affect binding to FXIIIA subunit with little or no influence on antigenic stability, that is, Ile81Asn and Val401Gln c) influence neither aspects and are most likely causality linked polymorphisms or functional polymorphisms, that is, Leu116Phe and Val217Ile. The Cys5Arg mutation was the

  8. Point of Care and Factor Concentrate-Based Coagulation Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Theusinger, Oliver M.; Stein, Philipp; Levy, Jerrold H.

    2015-01-01

    In the last years it has become evident that the use of blood products should be reduced whenever possible. There is increasing evidence regarding serious adverse events, including higher mortality and morbidity, related to transfusions. The use of point of care (POC) devices integrated in algorithms is one of the important mechanisms to limit blood product exposure. Any type of algorithm, especially the POC-based ones, allows goal-directed transfusions of blood products and even better targeted factor concentrate substitutions. Different types of algorithms in different surgical settings (cardiac surgery, trauma, liver surgery etc.) have been established with growing interest in their use as they offer objective therapy for management and reduction of blood product use. The use of POC devices with evidence-based algorithms is important in the bleeding patient independent of its origin (traumatic vs. surgical). The use of factor concentrates compared to the classical blood products can be cost-saving, beneficial for the patient, and in agreement with the WHO-requested standard of care. The empiric and uncontrolled use of blood products such as fresh frozen plasma, red blood cells, and platelets without POC monitoring should no longer be followed with regard to actual evidence in literature. Furthermore, the use of factor concentrates may provide better outcomes and potential for cost saving. PMID:26019707

  9. Laboratory assessment of factor VIII inhibitor titer: the North American Specialized Coagulation Laboratory Association experience.

    PubMed

    Peerschke, Ellinor I B; Castellone, Donna D; Ledford-Kraemer, Marlies; Van Cott, Elizabeth M; Meijer, Piet

    2009-04-01

    Quantification of inhibitory antibodies against infused factor VIII (FVIII) has an important role in the management of patients with hemophilia A. This article summarizes results from the largest North American FVIII inhibitor proficiency testing challenge conducted to date. Test samples, 4 negative and 4 positive (1-3 Bethesda units [BU]/mL), were distributed by the ECAT Foundation in conjunction with the North American Specialized Coagulation Laboratory Association and analyzed by 38 to 42 laboratories in 2006 and 2007. Whereas laboratories were able to distinguish between the absence and presence of low-titer FVIII inhibitors, the intralaboratory coefficient of variation was high (30%-42%) for inhibitor-positive samples, and the definition of lower detection limits of the assay was variable (0-1 BU/mL). Most laboratories performed the Bethesda assay with commercially supplied buffered normal pooled plasma in a 1:1 mix with patient plasma. These data provide information for the development of consensus guidelines to improve FVIII inhibitor quantification.

  10. Defective glycosylation of coagulation factor XII underlies hereditary angioedema type III

    PubMed Central

    Björkqvist, Jenny; de Maat, Steven; Lewandrowski, Urs; Di Gennaro, Antonio; Oschatz, Chris; Schönig, Kai; Nöthen, Markus M.; Drouet, Christian; Braley, Hal; Nolte, Marc W.; Sickmann, Albert; Panousis, Con; Maas, Coen; Renné, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema type III (HAEIII) is a rare inherited swelling disorder that is associated with point mutations in the gene encoding the plasma protease factor XII (FXII). Here, we demonstrate that HAEIII-associated mutant FXII, derived either from HAEIII patients or recombinantly produced, is defective in mucin-type Thr309-linked glycosylation. Loss of glycosylation led to increased contact-mediated autoactivation of zymogen FXII, resulting in excessive activation of the bradykinin-forming kallikrein-kinin pathway. In contrast, both FXII-driven coagulation and the ability of C1-esterase inhibitor to bind and inhibit activated FXII were not affected by the mutation. Intravital laser-scanning microscopy revealed that, compared with control animals, both F12–/– mice reconstituted with recombinant mutant forms of FXII and humanized HAEIII mouse models with inducible liver-specific expression of Thr309Lys-mutated FXII exhibited increased contact-driven microvascular leakage. An FXII-neutralizing antibody abolished bradykinin generation in HAEIII patient plasma and blunted edema in HAEIII mice. Together, the results of this study characterize the mechanism of HAEIII and establish FXII inhibition as a potential therapeutic strategy to interfere with excessive vascular leakage in HAEIII and potentially alleviate edema due to other causes. PMID:26193639

  11. Levels of acarboxy prothrombin (PIVKA-II) and coagulation factors in warfarin-treated patients.

    PubMed

    Umeki, S; Umeki, Y

    1990-04-01

    PIVKA-II (protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonists-II) was determined and compared with other coagulation factors in normal subjects and patients treated with the anticoagulant warfarin. In 18 (60%) of 30 patients treated with warfarin, PIVKA-II values were 1 microgram/ml or more, although they were less than 1 microgram/ml in all 39 normal subjects (100%). In patients treated with warfarin, values of prothrombin time and partial thromboplastin time were significantly higher than those in normal subjects. However, values of hepaplastintest (normotest) and thrombotest in the patients were greatly lower than those in normal subjects. There were no significant differences between bleeding time or plasma fibrinogen values in the patients and normal subjects. The values of PIVKA-II were inversely correlated (P less than 0.01) with those of hepaplastintest and thrombotest. The measurement of PIVKA-II in the plasma should be useful in detecting vitamin K-deficient status among haemorrhagic disorders.

  12. [Condition setting for the measurement of blood coagulation factor XIII activity using a fully automated blood coagulation analyzer, COAGTRON-350].

    PubMed

    Kanno, Nobuko; Kaneko, Makoto; Tanabe, Kumiko; Jyona, Masahiro; Yokota, Hiromitsu; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2012-12-01

    The automated laboratory analyzer COAGTRON-350 (Trinity Biotech) is used for routine and specific coagulation testing for the detection of fibrin formation utilizing either mechanical principles (ball method) or photo-optical principles, chromogenic kinetic enzyme analysis, and immune-turbidimetric detection systems in one benchtop unit. In this study, we demonstrated and established a parameter for the measurement of factor XIII (FXIII) activity using Berichrom FXIII reagent and the COAGTRON-350 analyzer. The usual protocol used for this reagent, based on the handling method, was slightly modified for this device. The analysis showed that fundamental study for the measurement of FXIII activity under our condition setting was favorable in terms of reproducibility, linearity, and correlation with another assays. Since FXIII is the key enzyme that plays important roles in hemostasis by stabilizing fibrin formation, the measurement of FXIII is essential for the diagnosis of bleeding disorders. Therefore, FXIII activity assessment as well as a routine coagulation testing can be conducted simultaneously with one instrument, which is useful in coagulopathy assessment.

  13. Coagulation factor V mediates inhibition of tissue factor signaling by activated protein C in mice.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hai Po H; Kerschen, Edward J; Basu, Sreemanti; Hernandez, Irene; Zogg, Mark; Jia, Shuang; Hessner, Martin J; Toso, Raffaella; Rezaie, Alireza R; Fernández, José A; Camire, Rodney M; Ruf, Wolfram; Griffin, John H; Weiler, Hartmut

    2015-11-19

    The key effector molecule of the natural protein C pathway, activated protein C (aPC), exerts pleiotropic effects on coagulation, fibrinolysis, and inflammation. Coagulation-independent cell signaling by aPC appears to be the predominant mechanism underlying its highly reproducible therapeutic efficacy in most animal models of injury and infection. In this study, using a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus sepsis, we demonstrate marked disease stage-specific effects of the anticoagulant and cell signaling functions of aPC. aPC resistance of factor (f)V due to the R506Q Leiden mutation protected against detrimental anticoagulant effects of aPC therapy but also abrogated the anti-inflammatory and mortality-reducing effects of the signaling-selective 5A-aPC variant that has minimal anticoagulant function. We found that procofactor V (cleaved by aPC at R506) and protein S were necessary cofactors for the aPC-mediated inhibition of inflammatory tissue-factor signaling. The anti-inflammatory cofactor function of fV involved the same structural features that govern its cofactor function for the anticoagulant effects of aPC, yet its anti-inflammatory activities did not involve proteolysis of activated coagulation factors Va and VIIIa. These findings reveal a novel biological function and mechanism of the protein C pathway in which protein S and the aPC-cleaved form of fV are cofactors for anti-inflammatory cell signaling by aPC in the context of endotoxemia and infection.

  14. Inhibition of Hageman factor, plasma thromboplastin antecedent, thrombin and other clotting factors by phenylglyoxal hydrate (38500).

    PubMed

    Radnoff, O D; Saito, H

    1975-01-01

    Exposure of purified Hageman factor (HF, Factor XII) to phenylglyoxal hydrate (PHG), an agent reacting with arginine residues in protein, inhibited its coagulant properties upon subsequent exposure of negatively charged agents. Once HF had been exposed to kaolin or ellagic acid, however, subsequent addition of PHG was much less inhibitory. PHG had no effect upon the ability of HF to bind to negatively charged surfaces. PGH also inhibited preparations of activated PTA (Factor XI) and thrombin, and, when incubated with plasma, reduced the titer of coagulable fibrinogen, PTA Christmas factor (Factor IX), antihemophilic factor (Factor VIII), Factor VII, Stuart factor (Factor X), proaccelerin (Factor V) and prothrombin (Factor II), and to a lesser degres, HF.

  15. [Influencing factors and mechanism of arsenic removal during the aluminum coagulation process].

    PubMed

    Chen, Gui-Xia; Hu, Cheng-Zhi; Zhu, Ling-Feng; Tong, Hua-Qing

    2013-04-01

    Aluminum coagulants are widely used in arsenic (As) removal during the drinking water treatment process. Aluminium chloride (AlCl3) and polyaluminium chloride (PACl) which contains high content of Al13 were used as coagulants. The effects of aluminum species, pH, humic acid (HA) and coexisting anions on arsenic removal were investigated. Results showed that AlCl3 and PACl were almost ineffective in As(II) removal while the As(V) removal efficiency reached almost 100%. pH was an important influencing factor on the arsenic removal efficiency, because pH influenced the distribution of aluminum species during the coagulation process. The efficiency of arsenic removal by aluminum coagulants was positively correlated with the content of Al13 species. HA and some coexisting anions showed negative impact on arsenic removal because of the competitive adsorption. The negative influence of HA was more pronounced at low coagulant dosages. PO4(3-) and F(-) showed marked influence during arsenic removal, but there was no obvious influence when SiO3(2-), CO3(2-) and SO4(2-) coexisted. The present study would be helpful to direct arsenic removal by enhanced coagulation during the drinking water treatment.

  16. Removal of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) from water by coagulation: mechanisms and influencing factors.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yueping; Niu, Junfeng; Xu, Zesheng; Gao, Ding; Shi, Jianghong; Sun, Xiaomin; Huang, Qingguo

    2014-11-15

    In this study, alum (Al2(SO4)3⋅18H2O), ferric chloride (FeCl3⋅6H2O) and polyaluminium chloride (PACl) were used to remove perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) from water. The influencing factors, including pH and natural organic matter (NOM), were investigated. A positive correlation was found between the size of the flocs and the removal efficiency of PFOX (X=S and A). The removal ratios of PFOS and PFOA were 32% and ∼12%, respectively, when 50 mg/L of FeCl3⋅6H2O was added as the coagulant at the initial pH. Coagulation achieved high removal ratios for PFOX under acidic conditions (∼47.6% and 94.7% for PFOA and PFOS at pH 4, respectively). In addition, increasing NOM concentrations decreased the removal rates of PFOX because of the existence of competitive adsorption between NOM molecules and PFOX on the surface of the coagulants and flocs. The combination of adsorption by powdered activated carbon (PAC) and coagulation increased the removal ratios up to >90% for PFOX at the initial concentration of 1mg/L, implying that the adsorption enhanced coagulation. Meantime, the experiments with natural water showed that coagulation is a feasible method to remove PFOS and PFOA from surface water. PMID:25168583

  17. Removal of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) from water by coagulation: mechanisms and influencing factors.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yueping; Niu, Junfeng; Xu, Zesheng; Gao, Ding; Shi, Jianghong; Sun, Xiaomin; Huang, Qingguo

    2014-11-15

    In this study, alum (Al2(SO4)3⋅18H2O), ferric chloride (FeCl3⋅6H2O) and polyaluminium chloride (PACl) were used to remove perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) from water. The influencing factors, including pH and natural organic matter (NOM), were investigated. A positive correlation was found between the size of the flocs and the removal efficiency of PFOX (X=S and A). The removal ratios of PFOS and PFOA were 32% and ∼12%, respectively, when 50 mg/L of FeCl3⋅6H2O was added as the coagulant at the initial pH. Coagulation achieved high removal ratios for PFOX under acidic conditions (∼47.6% and 94.7% for PFOA and PFOS at pH 4, respectively). In addition, increasing NOM concentrations decreased the removal rates of PFOX because of the existence of competitive adsorption between NOM molecules and PFOX on the surface of the coagulants and flocs. The combination of adsorption by powdered activated carbon (PAC) and coagulation increased the removal ratios up to >90% for PFOX at the initial concentration of 1mg/L, implying that the adsorption enhanced coagulation. Meantime, the experiments with natural water showed that coagulation is a feasible method to remove PFOS and PFOA from surface water.

  18. Short communication: Factors affecting coagulation properties of Mediterranean buffalo milk.

    PubMed

    Cecchinato, A; Penasa, M; Gotet, C Cipolat; De Marchi, M; Bittante, G

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate sources of variation of milk coagulation properties (MCP) of buffalo cows. Individual milk samples were collected from 200 animals in 5 herds located in northern Italy from January to March 2010. Rennet coagulation time (RCT, min) and curd firmness after 30 min from rennet addition (a(30), mm) were measured using the Formagraph instrument (Foss Electric, Hillerød, Denmark). In addition to MCP, information on milk yield, fat, protein, and casein contents, pH, and somatic cell count (SCC) was available. Sources of variation of RCT and a(30) were investigated using a linear model that included fixed effects of herd, days in milk (DIM), parity, fat content, casein content (only for a(30)), and pH. The coefficient of determination was 51% for RCT and 48% for a(30). The most important sources of variation of MCP were the herd and pH effects, followed by DIM and fat content for RCT, and casein content for a(30). The relevance of acidity in explaining the variation of both RCT and a(30), and of casein content in explaining that of a(30), confirmed previous studies on dairy cows. Although future research is needed to investigate the effect of these sources of variation on cheese yield, findings from the present study suggest that casein content and acidity may be used as indicator traits to improve technological properties of buffalo milk. PMID:22459819

  19. Activation of coagulation factor XI, without detectable contact activation in dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    van Gorp, E C; Minnema, M C; Suharti, C; Mairuhu, A T; Brandjes, D P; ten Cate, H; Hack, C E; Meijers, J C

    2001-04-01

    A prospective cohort study was performed in 50 patients with dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) to determine the potential role of the contact activation system and factor XI activation (intrinsic pathway) in the coagulation disorders in DHF. To establish whether TAFI (thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor) was involved in the severity of the coagulation disorders, the TAFI antigen and activity levels were also determined. Markers of contact activation (kallikrein--C1-inhibitor complexes), the intrinsic pathway of coagulation (factor XIa--C1-inhibitor complexes) and TAFI were measured and correlated to thrombin generation markers (thrombin--anti-thrombin complexes (TAT), prothrombin fragment 1+2 (F1+2)) and a marker for fibrinolysis [plasmin--alpha 2--anti-plasmin complexes (PAP)]. Activation of the intrinsic pathway of coagulation was clearly demonstrated by elevated levels of factor XIa--C1-inhibitor complexes, without evidence of contact activation, reflected by undetectable kallikrein--C1-inhibitor complexes. Both TAFI antigen and activity levels were decreased in all patients, which may contribute to the severity of bleeding complications in DHF because of the impaired capacity of the coagulation system to protect the fibrin clot from fibrinolysis. These findings in a human viral infection model are in accordance with earlier findings in bacterial sepsis.

  20. Factor V deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... in blood plasma. These proteins are called blood coagulation factors. Factor V deficiency is caused by a ... Gailani D, Neff AT. Rare coagulation factor deficiencies. In: ... HE, Weitz JI, Anastasi J, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and ...

  1. [Proteins influencing the blood coagulation].

    PubMed

    Alberio, Lorenzo

    2011-11-01

    This review describes some natural proteins, which can be employed, either as factor concentrates derived from human plasma or as recombinant drug, to modulate the coagulation system. I will address some biochemical characteristics and the physiological role of von Willebrand factor, the coagulation factors of the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways, and the physiological anticoagulant protein C. In addition, I will detail the pharmacological compounds, which are available for influencing or substituting the coagulation proteins: desmopressin (DDAVP), single coagulation factor concentrates, prothrombin complex concentrates, and protein C concentrate. In particular, I will address some treatment topics of general medical interest, such as the treatment of massive bleeding, the correction of the coagulopathy induced by vitamin K-antagonists in patients with cerebral haemorrhage, and of the coagulopathy of meningococcemia. Finally, I will describe some properties and practical clinical applications of the recombinant anticoagulans lepirudin and bivalirudin, which are derived from hirudin, the natural anticoagulant of the medical leech.

  2. Polystyrene nanoparticles affecting blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Oslakovic, Cecilia; Cedervall, Tommy; Linse, Sara; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2012-08-01

    The association of nanoparticles (NPs) with blood coagulation proteins may influence the natural balance between pro- and anticoagulant pathways. We investigated whether polystyrene NPs, when added to human plasma, affected the generation of thrombin in plasma. Amine-modified NPs were found to decrease the thrombin formation due to binding of factors VII and IX to the NPs, which resulted in depletion of the respective protein in solution. In contrast, carboxyl-modified NPs were able to act as a surface for activation of the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation in plasma. These results highlight the influence of NPs on a biologically important pathway.

  3. Fitzgerald factor (high molecular weight kininogen) clotting activity in human plasma in health and disease in various animal plasmas.

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Goldsmith, G; Waldmann, R

    1976-12-01

    Fitzgerald factor (high molecular weight kininogen) is an agent in normal human plasma that corrects the impaired in vitro surface-mediated plasma reactions of blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and kinin generation observed in Fitzgerald trait plasma. To assess the possible pathophysiologic role of Fitzgerald factor, its titer was measured by a functional clot-promoting assay. Mean +/- SD in 42 normal adults was 0.99+/-0.25 units/ml, one unit being the activity in 1 ml of normal pooled plasma. No difference in titer was noted between normal men and women, during pregnancy, or after physical exercise. Fitzgerald factor activity was significantly reduced in the plasmas of eight patients with advanced hepatic cirrhosis (0.40+/-0.09 units/ml) and of ten patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation (0.60+/-0.30 units/ml), but was normal in plasmas of patients with other congenital clotting factor deficiencies, nephrotic syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, or sarcoidosis, or under treatment with warfarin. The plasmas of 21 mammalian species tested appeared to contain Fitzgerald factor activity, but those of two avian, two repitilian, and one amphibian species did not correct the coagulant defect in Fitzgerald trait plasmas. PMID:1000085

  4. Congenital combined deficiency of coagulation factors: a study of seven patients.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Majid; Tabibian, Shadi; Hosseini, Maryam Sadat; Alizadeh, Shaban; Hosseini, Soudabeh; Shamsizadeh, Morteza; Dorgalaleh, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Combined deficiency of coagulation factors is considered as an extremely rare bleeding disorder (RBD) inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. This disorder is more likely to occur in regions with a high rate of consanguineous marriages or in restricted communities. Sistan and Baluchistan, a province in southeast of Iran with a high rate of consanguinity, is a clear model of such regions with a very high prevalence of recessively inherited disorders. The aim of this study was to report the frequency of combined factor deficiency in this province. This descriptive study was conducted on 358 patients with RBD. Demographic information and medical history of each patient were recorded, and the patients were examined by a physician. Routine screening tests were carried out for all patients, and further coagulation tests including coagulation factor activity and antigen assays were subsequently performed for all suspected patients. Among 358 patients, four were found to be affected with combined factor (F)V and FVIII deficiency (F5F8D). In addition, one patient with combined deficiency of FVII-FXIII, one with combined FVII-FX and one with combined FVIII-FIX deficiency were identified. In Sistan and Baluchistan Province, coinheritance of recessively inherited disorders like combined coagulation factor deficiencies was surprisingly higher than expected.

  5. [Roles of coagulation pathway and factor Xa in chronic kidney disease (CKD)].

    PubMed

    Ono, Takahiko

    2012-01-01

    Considering that fibrin deposition is observed in glomerulonephritis as well as in diabetic nephropathy, we performed studies to clarify the roles of the coagulation pathway and the active type of coagulation factor X (factor Xa) in the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD) using animal models. Factor Xa activates various cell types through protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2). Several in vitro studies have demonstrated that PAR2 can mediate factor Xa signaling, but not thrombin signaling. Coagulation processes proceed together with the extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation through factor V expression in rat Thy-1 nephritis. DX-9065a, a factor Xa inhibitor, suppresses this type of glomerulonephritis. The factor Xa inhibitor danaparoid ameliorated proteinuria, cellular proliferation, and fibrin deposition in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-triggered activation of High IgA (HIGA) strain of ddY mice. Another factor Xa inhibitor, fondaparinux, suppressed urinary protein, glomerular hypertrophy, and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), and ECM protein deposition together with angiogenesis in diabetic db/db mice. Finally, in the model of peritoneal fibrosis, fondaparinux treatment decreased the thickness of submesothelial fibrotic tissue and angiogenesis. In consideration of the results to potential human therapy, factor Xa regulation may be promising for the treatment of the aggravation in glomerulonephritis and of the early phase of diabetic nephropathy. In the near future, novel factor Xa inhibitors with the characteristics of oral administration and biliary elimination may appear in the clinical use for treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:22465921

  6. The role of factor XI in coagulation: a matter of revision.

    PubMed

    Minnema, M C; Ten Cate, H; Hack, C E

    1999-01-01

    In 1991 it was demonstrated that, besides factor XII, thrombin is capable of activating factor XI in vitro. Thrombin-dependent activation of factor XI is an integral part of the revised theoretical model of coagulation in which coagulation is initiated by the extrinsic pathway and maintained by thrombin-induced activation of clotting factors V, VIII, and XI. In this review, special interest is given to the new role of factor XI in coagulation, with emphasise on data supporting the concept of thrombin-mediated factor XI activation in vivo. Furthermore, activation of factor XI in human disease, especially atherosclerotic disease, measured by newly developed immunologic assays, is discussed. The relation of factor XI to fibrinolysis through activation of the carboxypeptidase, thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) by thrombin provides an explanation for the bleeding tendency observed in factor XI-deficient patients. The probable link with factor XI-mediated TAFI activation may have clinical and therapeutic consequences and deserves further study.

  7. Platelet Surface-Associated Activation and Secretion-Mediated Inhibition of Coagulation Factor XII

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Natalia V.; Artemenko, Elena O.; Podoplelova, Nadezhda A.; Sveshnikova, Anastasia N.; Demina, Irina A.; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I.; Panteleev, Mikhail A.

    2015-01-01

    Coagulation factor XII (fXII) is important for arterial thrombosis, but its physiological activation mechanisms are unclear. In this study, we elucidated the role of platelets and platelet-derived material in fXII activation. FXII activation was only observed upon potent platelet stimulation (with thrombin, collagen-related peptide, or calcium ionophore, but not ADP) accompanied by phosphatidylserine exposure and was localised to the platelet surface. Platelets from three patients with grey platelet syndrome did not activate fXII, which suggests that platelet-associated fXII-activating material might be released from α-granules. FXII was preferentially bound by phosphotidylserine-positive platelets and annexin V abrogated platelet-dependent fXII activation; however, artificial phosphotidylserine/phosphatidylcholine microvesicles did not support fXII activation under the conditions herein. Confocal microscopy using DAPI as a poly-phosphate marker did not reveal poly-phosphates associated with an activated platelet surface. Experimental data for fXII activation indicates an auto-inhibition mechanism (ki/ka = 180 molecules/platelet). Unlike surface-associated fXII activation, platelet secretion inhibited activated fXII (fXIIa), particularly due to a released C1-inhibitor. Platelet surface-associated fXIIa formation triggered contact pathway-dependent clotting in recalcified plasma. Computer modelling suggests that fXIIa inactivation was greatly decreased in thrombi under high blood flow due to inhibitor washout. Combined, the surface-associated fXII activation and its inhibition in solution herein may be regarded as a flow-sensitive regulator that can shift the balance between surface-associated clotting and plasma-dependent inhibition, which may explain the role of fXII at high shear and why fXII is important for thrombosis but negligible in haemostasis. PMID:25688860

  8. Coagulation factors bound to procoagulant platelets concentrate in cap structures to promote clotting.

    PubMed

    Podoplelova, Nadezhda A; Sveshnikova, Anastasia N; Kotova, Yana N; Eckly, Anita; Receveur, Nicolas; Nechipurenko, Dmitry Yu; Obydennyi, Sergey I; Kireev, Igor I; Gachet, Christian; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Mangin, Pierre H; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2016-09-29

    Binding of coagulation factors to phosphatidylserine (PS)-exposing procoagulant-activated platelets followed by formation of the membrane-dependent enzyme complexes is critical for blood coagulation. Procoagulant platelets formed upon strong platelet stimulation, usually with thrombin plus collagen, are large "balloons" with a small (∼1 μm radius) "cap"-like convex region that is enriched with adhesive proteins. Spatial distribution of blood coagulation factors on the surface of procoagulant platelets was investigated using confocal microscopy. All of them, including factors IXa (FIXa), FXa/FX, FVa, FVIII, prothrombin, and PS-sensitive marker Annexin V were distributed nonhomogeneously: they were primarily localized in the "cap," where their mean concentration was by at least an order of magnitude, higher than on the "balloon." Assembly of intrinsic tenase on liposomes with various PS densities while keeping the PS content constant demonstrated that such enrichment can accelerate this reaction by 2 orders of magnitude. The mechanisms of such acceleration were investigated using a 3-dimensional computer simulation model of intrinsic tenase based on these data. Transmission electron microscopy and focal ion beam-scanning electron microscopy with Annexin V immunogold-labeling revealed a complex organization of the "caps." In platelet thrombi formed in whole blood on collagen under arterial shear conditions, ubiquitous "caps" with increased Annexin V, FX, and FXa binding were observed, indicating relevance of this mechanism for surface-attached platelets under physiological flow. These results reveal an essential heterogeneity in the surface distribution of major coagulation factors on the surface of procoagulant platelets and suggest its importance in promoting membrane-dependent coagulation reactions.

  9. Coagulation factors bound to procoagulant platelets concentrate in cap structures to promote clotting.

    PubMed

    Podoplelova, Nadezhda A; Sveshnikova, Anastasia N; Kotova, Yana N; Eckly, Anita; Receveur, Nicolas; Nechipurenko, Dmitry Yu; Obydennyi, Sergey I; Kireev, Igor I; Gachet, Christian; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Mangin, Pierre H; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2016-09-29

    Binding of coagulation factors to phosphatidylserine (PS)-exposing procoagulant-activated platelets followed by formation of the membrane-dependent enzyme complexes is critical for blood coagulation. Procoagulant platelets formed upon strong platelet stimulation, usually with thrombin plus collagen, are large "balloons" with a small (∼1 μm radius) "cap"-like convex region that is enriched with adhesive proteins. Spatial distribution of blood coagulation factors on the surface of procoagulant platelets was investigated using confocal microscopy. All of them, including factors IXa (FIXa), FXa/FX, FVa, FVIII, prothrombin, and PS-sensitive marker Annexin V were distributed nonhomogeneously: they were primarily localized in the "cap," where their mean concentration was by at least an order of magnitude, higher than on the "balloon." Assembly of intrinsic tenase on liposomes with various PS densities while keeping the PS content constant demonstrated that such enrichment can accelerate this reaction by 2 orders of magnitude. The mechanisms of such acceleration were investigated using a 3-dimensional computer simulation model of intrinsic tenase based on these data. Transmission electron microscopy and focal ion beam-scanning electron microscopy with Annexin V immunogold-labeling revealed a complex organization of the "caps." In platelet thrombi formed in whole blood on collagen under arterial shear conditions, ubiquitous "caps" with increased Annexin V, FX, and FXa binding were observed, indicating relevance of this mechanism for surface-attached platelets under physiological flow. These results reveal an essential heterogeneity in the surface distribution of major coagulation factors on the surface of procoagulant platelets and suggest its importance in promoting membrane-dependent coagulation reactions. PMID:27432876

  10. Preparation of factor IX deficient human plasma by immunoaffinity chromatography using a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Goodall, A H; Kemble, G; O'Brien, D P; Rawlings, E; Rotblat, F; Russell, G C; Janossy, G; Tuddenham, E G

    1982-03-01

    A murine hybridoma clone is described that grows continuously in culture and produces a monoclonal antibody we have called Royal Free Monoclonal Antibody to factor IX No. 1 (RFF-IX/1). This has high affinity for a coagulation site on factor IX. RFF-IX/1 immobilised on sepharose can be used to deplete factor IX from normal human plasma. This immunoaffinity depleted plasma is indistinguishable from severe Christmas disease plasma and can be used as the substrate in a one stage coagulation assay for factor IX. The affinity column has high capacity and can be regenerated so that large scale production from normal plasma of factor IX deficient plasma as a diagnostic reagent is now feasible.

  11. Inhibition of endotoxin-induced activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis by pentoxifylline or by a monoclonal anti-tissue factor antibody in chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Levi, M; ten Cate, H; Bauer, K A; van der Poll, T; Edgington, T S; Büller, H R; van Deventer, S J; Hack, C E; ten Cate, J W; Rosenberg, R D

    1994-01-01

    Knowledge of the pathogenetic mechanisms responsible for the activation of the coagulation system associated with endotoxemia is important for the development of improved modalities for prevention and treatment. We analyzed the appearance in plasma of TNF, IL-6, and indices of coagulation and fibrinolytic system activation in normal chimpanzees after intravenous infusion of endotoxin. Endotoxin infusion elicited reproducible and dose-dependent elevations in serum TNF and IL-6, as well as marked increases in thrombin generation in vivo as measured by immunoassays for prothrombin activation fragment F1 + 2, thrombin-antithrombin III complexes, and fibrinopeptide A. Activation of the fibrinolytic mechanism was monitored with assays for plasminogen activator activity and plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin complexes. To potentially intervene in the molecular pathways elicited by endotoxin, pentoxifylline, an agent that interrupts "immediate early" gene activation by monocytes, or a potent monoclonal antibody that neutralizes tissue factor-mediated initiation of coagulation, were infused shortly before endotoxin. Pentoxifylline markedly inhibited increases in the levels of TNF and IL-6, as well as the effects on coagulation and fibrinolysis. In contrast, the monoclonal antibody to tissue factor completely abrogated the augmentation in thrombin generation, but had no effect on cytokine levels or fibrinolysis. We conclude that the endotoxin-induced activation of coagulation appears to be mediated by the tissue factor-dependent pathway, the fibrinolytic response triggered by endotoxin is not dependent on the generation of thrombin, and that the release of cytokines may be important in mediating the activation of both the coagulation and the fibrinolytic mechanisms in vivo.

  12. Inherited disorders of blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Franchini, Massimo; Montagnana, Martina; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2012-08-01

    Hemostasis is traditionally defined as a physiological response to blood vessel injury and bleeding, which entails a co-ordinated process involving the blood vessel, platelets, and blood clotting proteins (i.e. coagulation factors). Hemostasis can be divided into primary and secondary components. The former rapidly initiates after endothelial damage and is characterized by vascular contraction, platelet adhesion, and formation of a soft aggregate plug. The latter is initiated following the release of tissue factor and involves a complex sequence of events known as the blood coagulation cascade, encompassing serial steps where each coagulation factor activates another in a chain reaction that culminates in the conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin. Patients carrying abnormalities of the coagulation cascade (i.e. deficiencies of coagulation factors) have an increased bleeding tendency, where the clinical severity is mostly dependent upon the type and the plasma level of the factor affected. These disorders also impose a heavy medical and economic burden on individual patients and society in general. The aim of this article is to provide a general overview on the pathophysiology, clinics, diagnostics, and therapy of inherited disorders of coagulation factors.

  13. The pro-coagulant fibrinogenolytic serine protease isoenzymes purified from Daboia russelii russelii venom coagulate the blood through factor V activation: role of glycosylation on enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Ashis K

    2014-01-01

    Proteases from Russell's viper venom (RVV) induce a variety of toxic effects in victim. Therefore, four new RVV protease isoenzymes of molecular mass 32901.044 Da, 333631.179 Da, 333571.472 Da, and 34594.776 Da, were characterized in this study. The first 10 N-terminal residues of these serine protease isoenzymes showed significant sequence homology with N-terminal sequences of snake venom thrombin-like and factor V-activating serine proteases, which was reconfirmed by peptide mass fingerprinting analysis. These proteases were found to be different from previously reported factor V activators isolated from snake venoms. These proteases showed significantly different fibrinogenolytic, BAEE-esterase and plasma clotting activities but no fibrinolytic, TAME-esterase or amidolytic activity against the chromogenic substrate for trypsin, thrombin, plasmin and factor Xa. Their Km and Vmax values towards fibrinogen were determined in the range of 6.6 to 10.5 µM and 111.0 to 125.5 units/mg protein, respectively. On the basis of fibrinogen degradation pattern, they may be classified as A/B serine proteases isolated from snake venom. These proteases contain ∼ 42% to 44% of N-linked carbohydrates by mass whereas partially deglycosylated enzymes showed significantly less catalytic activity as compared to native enzymes. In vitro these protease isoenzymes induce blood coagulation through factor V activation, whereas in vivo they provoke dose-dependent defibrinogenation and anticoagulant activity in the mouse model. At a dose of 5 mg/kg, none of these protease isoenzymes were found to be lethal in mice or house geckos, suggesting therapeutic application of these anticoagulant peptides for the prevention of thrombosis. PMID:24520323

  14. Na+ site in blood coagulation factor IXa: effect on catalysis and factor VIIIa binding.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Amy E; Stewart, Jonathan E; Mathur, Akash; Krishnaswamy, Sriram; Bajaj, S Paul

    2005-07-01

    During blood coagulation, factor IXa (FIXa) activates factor X (FX) requiring Ca2+, phospholipid, and factor VIIIa (FVIIIa). The serine protease domain of FIXa contains a Ca2+ site and is predicted to contain a Na+ site. Comparative homology analysis revealed that Na+ in FIXa coordinates to the carbonyl groups of residues 184A, 185, 221A, and 224 (chymotrypsin numbering). Kinetic data obtained at several concentrations of Na+ and Ca2+ with increasing concentrations of a synthetic substrate (CH3-SO2-d-Leu-Gly-Arg-p-nitroanilide) were fit globally, assuming rapid equilibrium conditions. Occupancy by Na+ increased the affinity of FIXa for the synthetic substrate, whereas occupancy by Ca2+ decreased this affinity but increased k(cat) dramatically. Thus, Na+-FIXa-Ca2+ is catalytically more active than free FIXa. FIXa(Y225P), a Na+ site mutant, was severely impaired in Na+ potentiation of its catalytic activity and in binding to p-aminobenzamidine (S1 site probe) validating that substrate binding in FIXa is linked positively to Na+ binding. Moreover, the rate of carbamylation of NH2 of Val16, which forms a salt-bridge with Asp194 in serine proteases, was faster for FIXa(Y225P) and addition of Ca2+ overcame this impairment only partially. Further studies were aimed at delineating the role of the FIXa Na+ site in macromolecular catalysis. In the presence of Ca2+ and phospholipid, with or without saturating FVIIIa, FIXa(Y225P) activated FX with similar K(m) but threefold reduced k(cat). Further, interaction of FVIIIa:FIXa(Y225P) was impaired fourfold. Our previous data revealed that Ca2+ binding to the protease domain increases the affinity of FIXa for FVIIIa approximately 15-fold. The present data indicate that occupancy of the Na+ site further increases the affinity of FIXa for FVIIIa fourfold and k(cat) threefold. Thus, in the presence of Ca2+, phospholipid, and FVIIIa, binding of Na+ to FIXa increases its biologic activity by approximately 12-fold, implicating its role

  15. Accumulation of functional recombinant human coagulation factor IX in transgenic soybean seeds.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Nicolau B; Murad, André M; Ramos, Gustavo L; Maranhão, Andréia Q; Brígido, Marcelo M; Araújo, Ana Cláudia G; Lacorte, Cristiano; Aragão, Francisco J L; Covas, Dimas T; Fontes, Aparecida M; Souza, Gustavo H M F; Vianna, Giovanni R; Rech, Elíbio L

    2011-08-01

    The seed-based production of recombinant proteins is an efficient strategy to achieve the accumulation, correct folding, and increased stability of these recombinant proteins. Among potential plant molecular farming systems, soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] is a viable option for the production of recombinant proteins due to its high protein content, known regulatory sequences, efficient gene transfer protocols, and a scalable production system under greenhouse conditions. We report here the expression and stable accumulation of human coagulation factor IX (hFIX) in transgenic soybean seeds. A biolistic process was utilised to co-introduce a plasmid carrying the hFIX gene under the transcriptional control of the α' subunit of a β-conglycinin seed-specific promoter and an α-Coixin signal peptide in soybean embryonic axes from mature seeds. The 56-kDa hFIX protein was expressed in the transgenic seeds at levels of up to 0.23% (0.8 g kg(-1) seed) of the total soluble seed protein as determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blot. Ultrastructural immunocytochemistry assays indicated that the recombinant hFIX in seed cotyledonary cells was efficiently directed to protein storage vacuoles. Mass spectrometry characterisation confirmed the presence of the hFIX recombinant protein sequence. Protein extracts from transgenic seeds showed a blood-clotting activity of up to 1.4% of normal plasma. Our results demonstrate the correct processing and stable accumulation of functional hFIX in soybean seeds stored for 6 years under room temperature conditions (22 ± 2°C).

  16. Rat prostate tumors express cancer procoagulant, an activator of coagulation factor X.

    PubMed

    Kamocka, Malgorzata; Pollard, Morris; Suckow, Mark; Mielicki, Wojciech P; Rosen, Elliot D

    2008-06-01

    Two common procoagulant activities associated with tumors are tissue factor and cancer procoagulant (CP), an activator of coagulation factor X. We have identified a convenient source of CP in transplanted Lobund-Wistar rat PA3 prostate tumors. CP activity was purified from 5 independent transplanted prostate tumors by column chromatography. The protein activated factor X in the absence of TF and factor VII. An antihuman CP antibody recognized rat CP in an ELISA and inactivated CP activity in a chromogenic assay. Lobund-Wistar prostate tumors may provide a convenient animal model useful in determining the role of CP in cancer development.

  17. Kinetics of the Factor XIa catalyzed activation of human blood coagulation Factor IX

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, P.N.; Bradford, H.; Sinha, D.; Piperno, J.R.; Tuszynski, G.P.

    1984-05-01

    The kinetics of activation of human Factor IX by human Factor XIa was studied by measuring the release of a trichloroacetic acid-soluble tritium-labeled activation peptide from Factor IX. Initial rates of trichloroacetic acid-soluble /sup 3/H-release were linear over 10-30 min of incubation of Factor IX (88 nM) with CaCl/sub 2/ (5 mM) and with pure (greater than 98%) Factor XIa (0.06-1.3 nM), which was prepared by incubating human Factor XI with bovine Factor XIIa. Release of /sup 3/H preceded the appearance of Factor IXa activity, and the percentage of /sup 3/H released remained constant when the mole fraction of /sup 3/H-labeled and unlabeled Factor IX was varied and the total Factor IX concentration remained constant. A linear correlation (r greater than 0.98, P less than 0.001) was observed between initial rates of /sup 3/H-release and the concentration of Factor XIa, measured by chromogenic assay and by radioimmunoassay and added at a Factor IX:Factor XIa molar ratio of 70-5,600. Kinetic parameters, determined by Lineweaver-Burk analysis, include K/sub m/ (0.49 microM) of about five- to sixfold higher than the plasma Factor IX concentration, which could therefore regulate the reaction. The catalytic constant (k/sub cat/) (7.7/s) is approximately 20-50 times higher than that reported by Zur and Nemerson for Factor IX activation by Factor VIIa plus tissue factor. Therefore, depending on the relative amounts of Factor XIa and Factor VIIa generated in vivo and other factors which may influence reaction rates, these kinetic parameters provide part of the information required for assessing the relative contributions of the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways to Factor IX activation, and suggest that the Factor XIa catalyzed reaction is physiologically significant.

  18. The structures of the carbohydrate moieties of bovine blood coagulation factor IX (Christmas factor).

    PubMed

    Mizuochi, T; Taniguchi, T; Fujikawa, K; Titani, K; Kobata, A

    1983-05-25

    Bovine blood coagulation factor IX (Christmas factor) contains four asparagine-linked sugar chains in one molecule. The sugar chains were quantitatively liberated as radioactive oligosaccharides from the polypeptide moiety by hydrazinolysis followed by N-acetylation and NaB3H4 reduction. The structures of these sugar chains were determined by sequential exoglycosidase digestion in combination with methylation analysis. Bovine factor IX contained two unique penta- and tetrasialyl triantennary sugar chains with the structures shown below in addition to tetra-, tri-, and disialyl biantennary sugar chains of Sia alpha 2 leads to 3 Gal beta 1 leads 3(Sia alpha 2 leads to 6)GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 2Man alpha 1 leads to 6[Sia alpha 2 leads to 3Gal beta 1 leads to 3(Sia alpha 2 leads to 6)GlcNac beta 1 leads to 2Man alpha 1 leads to 3]Man beta 1 leads to 4GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 4GlcNAc, Sia alpha 2 leads to 6Gal beta 1 leads to 4GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 2Man alpha 1 leads to 6[Sia alpha 2 leads to 3Gal beta 1 leads to 3(Sia alpha 2 leads to 6)GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 2Man alpha 1 leads to 3]Man beta 1 leads to 4GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 4GlcNAc, and Sia alpha 2 leads to 6Gal beta 1 leads to 4GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 2Man alpha 1 leads to 6(Sia alpha 2 leads to 6Gal beta 1 leads to 4GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 2Man alpha 1 leads to 3)Man beta 1 leads to 4GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 4GlcNAc and their partially desialized forms.

  19. Sepsis-induced coagulation in the baboon lung is associated with decreased tissue factor pathway inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Tang, Haiwang; Ivanciu, Lacramioara; Popescu, Narcis; Peer, Glenn; Hack, Erik; Lupu, Cristina; Taylor, Fletcher B; Lupu, Florea

    2007-09-01

    Increased tissue factor (TF)-dependent procoagulant activity in sepsis may be partly due to decreased expression or function of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI). To test this hypothesis, baboons were infused with live Escherichia coli and sacrificed after 2, 8, or 24 hours. Confocal and electron microscopy revealed increased leukocyte infiltration and fibrin deposition in the intravascular and interstitial compartments. Large amounts of TF were detected by immunostaining in leukocytes and platelet-rich microthrombi. TF induction was documented by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and coagulation assays. Lung-associated TFPI antigen and mRNA decreased during sepsis, and TFPI activity diminished abruptly at 2 hours. Blocking antibodies against TFPI increased fibrin deposition in septic baboon lungs, suggesting that TF-dependent coagulation might be aggravated by reduced endothelial TFPI. Decreased TFPI activity coincided with the release of tissue plasminogen activator and the peak of plasmin generation, suggesting that TFPI could undergo proteolytic inactivation by plasmin. Enhanced plasmin produced in septic baboons by infusion of blocking antibodies against plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 led to decreased lung-associated TFPI and unforeseen massive fibrin deposition. We conclude that activation of TF-driven coagulation not adequately countered by TFPI may underlie the widespread thrombotic complications of sepsis.

  20. Comparative pharmacokinetics of factor VIII and recombinant factor IX: for which coagulation factors should half-life change with age?

    PubMed

    Björkman, S

    2013-11-01

    The half-life of factor VIII (FVIII) increases with the age of the patient, while studies on recombinant factor IX (rFIX) and factor VIIa (rFVIIa) have not demonstrated corresponding age-related changes. The purpose of this analysis was to relate the changes in FVIII and rFIX pharmacokinetics (PK) with age to developmental changes in body size and fluid volumes and explain why the elimination half-life of FVIII, but not of rFIX, would change with age, and to consider how the findings could be applied prospectively to other coagulation factors. Published PK data for FVIII from 186 patients aged 1-74 years and for rFIX from 56 patients aged 4-56 years were used. The relationships of FVIII and rFIX clearance (CL) with body weight could be described by allometric expressions. Relative changes in CL with age or weight were similar for FVIII and rFIX. The age-related change in volume of distribution at steady state (V(ss)) of rFIX was parallel to the change in CL in the children while for FVIII the change was much less pronounced. Elimination half-life was clearly age-dependent for FVIII while only a very weak trend could be seen for rFIX. Limited data suggest that rFVIIa in this respect resembles rFIX, with parallel changes in CL and V(ss) producing insignificant change in half-life. To what extent the elimination half-life of a coagulation factor would show a correlation with age can in principle be predicted from the characteristics of its CL and distribution.

  1. Coagulation Factor Concentrates Fail to Restore Alterations in Fibrin Formation Caused by Rivaroxaban or Dabigatran in Studies With Flowing Blood From Treated Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Arellano-Rodrigo, Eduardo; Lopez-Vilchez, Irene; Galan, Ana M; Molina, Patricia; Reverter, Joan Carles; Carné, Xavier; Villalta, Jaume; Tassies, Dolors; Lozano, Miguel; Díaz-Ricart, Maribel; Escolar, Gines

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated the hemostatic alterations in blood from healthy individuals treated for 5 days with direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) rivaroxaban (20 mg/d) or dabigatran (150 mg/12 h) in a single-blind clinical trial with crossover assignment (NCT01478282). We assessed the potential of prothrombin complex concentrates, activated prothrombin complex concentrates, or recombinant activated factor VII, when added ex vivo, to reverse the alterations caused by these DOACs. Blood was drawn at maximum plasma concentration after the last dose of each DOAC, and modifications in coagulation biomarkers were evaluated using a series of tests performed under steady conditions including routine coagulation, thrombin generation, and thromboelastometry assays. Additional studies in standardized flow devices were applied to evaluate alterations on platelet deposition and fibrin formation on damaged vascular surfaces exposed to flowing blood. Both DOACs caused important modifications of all coagulation biomarkers and significantly reduced fibrin formation in flow studies. Alterations in biomarkers observed in steady laboratory tests were normalized and occasionally overcompensated by procoagulant strategies. In contrast, reductions in fibrin formation observed in studies with flowing blood were improved, although never completely restored to baseline levels. Effects of dabigatran in flow studies appeared more resistant to reversal strategies than those of rivaroxaban. Inconsistencies between results of coagulation studies in steady or flowing assays not only raise concerns about the adequacy of the earlier tests to predict the restoration of the coagulopathy induced by DOACs but also suggest limitations of nonspecific procoagulant strategies to control severe coagulopathy in patients inadvertently overexposed these agents.

  2. Coagulation Factor Concentrates Fail to Restore Alterations in Fibrin Formation Caused by Rivaroxaban or Dabigatran in Studies With Flowing Blood From Treated Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Arellano-Rodrigo, Eduardo; Lopez-Vilchez, Irene; Galan, Ana M; Molina, Patricia; Reverter, Joan Carles; Carné, Xavier; Villalta, Jaume; Tassies, Dolors; Lozano, Miguel; Díaz-Ricart, Maribel; Escolar, Gines

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated the hemostatic alterations in blood from healthy individuals treated for 5 days with direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) rivaroxaban (20 mg/d) or dabigatran (150 mg/12 h) in a single-blind clinical trial with crossover assignment (NCT01478282). We assessed the potential of prothrombin complex concentrates, activated prothrombin complex concentrates, or recombinant activated factor VII, when added ex vivo, to reverse the alterations caused by these DOACs. Blood was drawn at maximum plasma concentration after the last dose of each DOAC, and modifications in coagulation biomarkers were evaluated using a series of tests performed under steady conditions including routine coagulation, thrombin generation, and thromboelastometry assays. Additional studies in standardized flow devices were applied to evaluate alterations on platelet deposition and fibrin formation on damaged vascular surfaces exposed to flowing blood. Both DOACs caused important modifications of all coagulation biomarkers and significantly reduced fibrin formation in flow studies. Alterations in biomarkers observed in steady laboratory tests were normalized and occasionally overcompensated by procoagulant strategies. In contrast, reductions in fibrin formation observed in studies with flowing blood were improved, although never completely restored to baseline levels. Effects of dabigatran in flow studies appeared more resistant to reversal strategies than those of rivaroxaban. Inconsistencies between results of coagulation studies in steady or flowing assays not only raise concerns about the adequacy of the earlier tests to predict the restoration of the coagulopathy induced by DOACs but also suggest limitations of nonspecific procoagulant strategies to control severe coagulopathy in patients inadvertently overexposed these agents. PMID:26364029

  3. Effect of combined treatment with immunoadsorption and membrane filtration on plasma coagulation--Results of a randomized controlled crossover study.

    PubMed

    Biesenbach, Peter; Eskandary, Farsad; Ay, Cihan; Wiegele, Marion; Derfler, Kurt; Schaden, Eva; Haslacher, Helmuth; Oberbauer, Rainer; Böhmig, Georg A

    2016-02-01

    The combined use of immunoadsorption (IA) and membrane filtration (MF) may markedly enhance removal of IgM and complement component C1q, supporting its use as an element of recipient desensitization in antibody-incompatible transplantation. However, coagulation factor removal may contribute to altered hemostasis, posing a risk of bleeding in the perioperative setting. This secondary endpoint analysis of standard coagulation assays and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM®) was performed in the context of a randomized controlled crossover study designed to assess the effect of combined IA (GAM-146-peptide) and MF on levels of ABO antigen-specific IgM. Fourteen patients with autoimmune disorders were randomized to a single treatment with IA+MF followed by IA alone, or vice versa. MF was found to markedly enhance fibrinogen depletion (57% vs. 28% median decrease after IA alone, P < 0.001), whereby four patients showed post-treatment fibrinogen concentrations below 100 mg dL(-1). In support of a critical contribution of fibrinogen depletion to impaired coagulation, extrinsically activated ROTEM(®) analysis revealed a marked reduction in fibrinogen-dependent clot formation upon IA+MF (59% median decrease in FIBTEM mean clot firmness (MCF) as compared to 24% after IA alone, P < 0.001). Moreover, the addition of MF led to a substantial prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin time, possibly due to depletion of macromolecular coagulation factors contributing to intrinsically activated coagulation. Our study demonstrates substantial effects of combined IA+MF on clot formation, which may be mainly attributable to fibrinogen depletion. We suggest that the use of combined apheresis in the setting of transplant surgery may necessitate a careful monitoring of coagulation.

  4. Inhibitors of propagation of coagulation (factors VIII, IX and XI): a review of current therapeutic practice

    PubMed Central

    Franchini, Massimo; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2011-01-01

    The management of patients with congenital haemophilia who develop alloantibodies against factors of the propagation phase of blood coagulation, commonly known as inhibitors, is the most important challenge facing haemophilia caregivers at present, as this complication not only compromises the efficacy of replacement therapy but also consumes an enormous amount of economic resources. Development of inhibitors further complicates the clinical course of severe haemophilia, with a prevalence of up to 30% in patients with haemophilia A (factor VIII deficiency) and up to 5% in those with haemophilia B (factor IX deficiency) and haemophilia C (factor XI deficiency). While the short-term goal of treatment of patients who develop alloantibodies is the control of bleeding, the eradication of the inhibitor is the main long-term goal. The management of severe bleeding episodes and the eradication of the autoantibody are also the mainstays of treatment of patients with acquired haemophilia, a rare but life-threatening haemorrhagic condition characterized by the development of inhibitory autoantibodies against coagulation factor VIII. The most recent options available for treating patients with congenital haemophilia complicated by inhibitors and acquired haemophilia because of autoantibodies against factor VIII are summarized in this review article. PMID:21204915

  5. Disseminated intravascular coagulation in term and preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Veldman, Alex; Fischer, Doris; Nold, Marcel F; Wong, Flora Y

    2010-06-01

    Among critically ill patients, the risk of developing disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is probably highest in neonates. Low plasma reserves in pro- and anticoagulant coagulation factors, intravascular volume contraction after birth, and a high incidence of hypoxia and sepsis in critically ill newborns rapidly lead to a decompensation of the coagulation system in this population. Global coagulation tests and single-factor plasma levels have to be interpreted in the context of age-corrected normal ranges. Platelet consumption and reduced protein C plasma levels have diagnostic value; the latter also has prognostic potential in neonates with DIC and sepsis. Therapeutic success relies heavily on reversal of the underlying condition. Some coagulation-specific therapies have been explored in small studies and case series with varying success and sometimes conflicting results. Therefore, larger controlled trials in this common and serious condition are urgently needed.

  6. Safety of plasma-derived protein C for treating disseminated intravascular coagulation in adult patients with active cancer.

    PubMed

    Malato, Alessandra; Saccullo, Giorgia; Coco, Lucio Lo; Caracciolo, Clementina; Raso, Simona; Santoro, Marco; Zammit, Valentina; Siragusa, Sergio

    2012-02-01

    Cancer-related disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a life-threatening condition for which no effective treatment is currently available. Protein C (PC), a modulator of coagulation as well as the inflammatory system, has been successfully tested (in its activated recombinant form [a-rPC]) in sepsis-related coagulopathy, but with an increased risk for major bleeding. Plasma-derived PC (pd-PC) is more suitable than a-rPC in patients at high risk from bleeding due to its self-limiting process. We carried out a single-arm study evaluating the role of pd-PC in adult cancer patients with overt DIC. Over a period of 3 years, we treated 19 patients with overt DIC and a PC plasma concentration <50%; all received PC concentrate (Ceprotin(®), Baxter) for 72 hr in adjusted doses to restore normal PC values (70-120%). Blood coagulation, haematological tests, and the DIC score were recorded after 12, 24, 48 hr, 7 and 10 days, while clinical outcomes (bleeding, thrombosis and mortality) were recorded up to 28 days. Within 48 hr of starting pd-PC therapy, laboratory tests as well as the DIC score improved in all patients. At 28-days follow-up, no bleeding or thrombosis was observed. This is the first study to investigate the use of pd- PC for treatment of cancer-related overt DIC.

  7. Inflammation and the coagulation system in tuberculosis: Tissue Factor leads the dance.

    PubMed

    Caccamo, Nadia; Dieli, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, drives the formation of granulomas, structures in which both immune cells and the bacterial pathogen cohabit. The most abundant cells in granulomas are macrophages, which contribute as both cells with bactericidal activity and as targets for M. tuberculosis infection and proliferation during the entire course of infection. The mechanisms and factors involved in the regulation and control of macrophage microenvironment-specific polarization and plasticity are not well understood, as some granulomas are able to control bacteria growth and others fail to do so, permitting bacterial spread. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Venkatasubramanian et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2016. 46: 464-479] show that mice lacking the tissue factor gene in myeloid cells have augmented M. tuberculosis growth and increased inflammation in the lungs. This suggests that tissue factor, an initiator of coagulation, is important for the generation of fibrin, which supports granuloma formation. This article demonstrates for the first time the involvement of tissue factor in inducing effective immunity against M. tuberculosis, and sheds new lights on the complex interplay between host inflammatory response, the coagulation system, and the control of M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:26763085

  8. Lonomia obliqua caterpillar spicules trigger human blood coagulation via activation of factor X and prothrombin.

    PubMed

    Donato, J L; Moreno, R A; Hyslop, S; Duarte, A; Antunes, E; Le Bonniec, B F; Rendu, F; de Nucci, G

    1998-03-01

    In southern Brazil, envenomation by larvae of the moth Lonomia obliqua (Walker) may result in blood clotting factor depletion, leading to disseminated intravascular coagulation with subsequent haemorrhage and acute renal failure which may prove fatal. We have examined the effect of a crude extract of spicules from these caterpillars on in vitro hemostasis. The extract alone did not aggregate platelets and had no detectable effect on purified fibrinogen, suggesting that extract induces clot formation by triggering activation of the clotting cascade. In agreement with the presence of thrombin-mediated activity, hirudin prevented clot formation. The extract was found to activate both prothrombin and factor X, suggesting that the depletion of blood clotting factors results from the steady activation of factor X and prothrombin. Heating and diisopropylfluorophosphate abolished the procoagulant activity of the extract, indicating that the active component involved is a protein that may belong to the serine protease family of enzymes. The ability of hirudin to inhibit this coagulant activity suggests that this inhibitor could be beneficial in the treatment of patients envenomed by L. obliqua caterpillars. PMID:9531036

  9. The effect of substrate molecular mobility on surface induced immune complement activation and blood plasma coagulation.

    PubMed

    Berglin, Mattias; Andersson, Marcus; Sellborn, Anders; Elwing, Hans

    2004-08-01

    Changing the length of the alkyl ester side chain in poly(alkyl methacrylates) provides a unique opportunity to systematically vary the mobility of the polymer chains, or in other words vary the glass transition temperature (T(g)), without greatly affect the solid surface energy (gamma(s)) of the polymer. A series of poly(alkyl methacrylate) coatings was therefore analysed with regard to the human immune complement (IC) activation and the surface associated blood plasma coagulation cascade (CC) properties. For the IC and CC measurements we used a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) where we modified the chemistry of the sensor surface by applying 10-30 nm thick poly(alkyl methacrylate) coatings. The surface energy was calculated from water contact angles and small differences between the coatings were observed. The surface chemistry of the coatings, as determined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), showed no deviation from expected compositions. Tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM) measurements revealed that all coatings displayed similar morphology and the roughness was in the range of 0.7-0.9 nm. Increased polymer mobility correlated with a decrease in IC activation, measured as a decreased C3c deposition at the surface. The surface induced CC, measured as fibrin clot formation at the surface, was different between the different coatings but no correlation with molecular mobility was observed. Thus, the molecular mobility of the polymer chains had a major effect on both the IC and the CC and it seems that different aspects of the chemistry of the solid surface regulate activation of the IC and the CC.

  10. Pharmacogenetic typing for oral anti-coagulant response among factor V Leiden mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Nahar, Risha; Saxena, Renu; Deb, Roumi; Verma, Ishwar C.

    2012-01-01

    CONTEXT: Factor V Leiden mutation is the most common inherited predisposition for hypercoagulability and thereby a common genetic cause for initiation of oral anti-coagulation therapy. There is a dearth of knowledge of coumarin response profile in such thrombophilic population. AIMS: The current pilot study aims to estimate coumarin sensitivity in an Indian cohort with an inherited thrombophilia risk factor (Factor V Leiden mutation carriers) based on the observed frequency of CYP2C9 *2, *3 and VKORC1-1639G >A genotype combinations. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: A retrospective study carried out in a tertiary health care center in India. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Carriers of FVL mutation were genotyped for CYP2C9 (*2, F*3) and VKORC1 (-1639G >A) variants by PCR-RFLP technique. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: Chi-square test to analyze difference in expected and observed genotype frequency. RESULTS: Sixty-one (n = 61) unrelated carriers of FVL mutation were observed in the 13 years study period. The allele frequency of CYP2C9 *2, CYP2C9 *3, and VKORC1-1639A in this cohort was 0.06, 0.11, and 0.16, respectively. Six (9.7%) individuals had two of the three variant alleles (heterozygous or homozygous), and 28 (45.9%) were heterozygous for at least one polymorphism. CONCLUSIONS: Pre-prescription genotyping for coumarin drugs, if introduced in Indians with inherited thrombophilia (in whom oral anti-coagulant therapy may be necessary), is likely to identify 9.7% (hypersensitive) subjects in whom the optimum anti-coagulation may be achieved with reduced dosages, 44.3% (normal sensitivity) who may require higher dose and also 55.6% (hyper and moderate sensitivity) subjects who are likely to experience bleeding episodes. PMID:23716941

  11. Absence of in vitro Procoagulant Activity in Immunoglobulin Preparations due to Activated Coagulation Factors

    PubMed Central

    Oviedo, Adriana E.; Bernardi, María E.; Guglielmone, Hugo A.; Vitali, María S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Immunoglobulin (IG) products, including intravenous (IVIG) or subcutaneous (SCIG) immunoglobulins are considered safe and effective for medical therapy; however, a sudden and unexpected increase in thromboembolic events (TE) after administration of certain batches of IVIG products has been attributed to the presence of activated coagulation factors, mainly factor XIa. Our aims were to examine the presence of enduring procoagulant activity during the manufacturing process of IGs, with special focus on monitoring factor XIa, and to evaluate the presence of in vitro procoagulant activity attributed to coagulation factors in different lots of IVIG and SCIG. Methods Samples of different steps of IG purification, 19 lots of IVIG and 9 of SCIG were analyzed and compared with 1 commercial preparation of IVIG and 2 of SCIG, respectively. Factors II, VII, IX, XI and XIa and non-activated partial thromboplastin time (NAPTT) were assayed. Results The levels of factors II, VII, IX, X and XI were non-quantifiable once fraction II had been re-dissolved and in all analyzed lots of IVIG and SCIG. The level of factor XIa at that point was under the detection limits of the assay, and NAPTT yielded values greater than the control during the purification process. In SCIG, we detected higher concentrations of factor XIa in the commercial products, which reached values up to 5 times higher than the average amounts found in the 9 batches produced by UNC-Hemoderivados. Factor XIa in commercial IVIG reached levels slightly higher than those of the 19 batches produced by UNC-Hemoderivados. Conclusion IVIG and SCIG manufactured by UNC-Hemoderivados showed a lack of thrombogenic potential, as demonstrated not only by the laboratory data obtained in this study but also by the absence of any reports of TE registered by the post marketing pharmacovigilance department. PMID:26733772

  12. Factor B Is the Second Lipopolysaccharide-binding Protease Zymogen in the Horseshoe Crab Coagulation Cascade.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Shibata, Toshio; Ikeda, Shunsuke; Koshiba, Takumi; Mizumura, Hikaru; Oda, Toshio; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2015-07-31

    Factor B is a serine-protease zymogen in the horseshoe crab coagulation cascade, and it is the primary substrate for activated factor C, the LPS-responsive initiator of the cascade. Factor C is autocatalytically activated to α-factor C on LPS and is artificially converted to β-factor C, another activated form, by chymotrypsin. It is not known, however, whether LPS is required for the activation of factor B. Here we found that wild-type factor B expressed in HEK293S cells is activated by α-factor C, but not by β-factor C, in an LPS-dependent manner and that β-factor C loses the LPS binding activity of factor C through additional cleavage by chymotrypsin within the N-terminal LPS-binding region. Surface plasmon resonance and quartz crystal microbalance analyses revealed that wild-type factor B binds to LPS with high affinity comparable with that of factor C, demonstrating that factor B is the second LPS-binding zymogen in the cascade. An LPS-binding site of wild-type factor B was found in the N-terminal clip domain, and the activation rate of a clip domain deletion mutant was considerably slower than that of wild-type factor B. Moreover, in the presence of LPS, Triton X-100 inhibited the activation of wild-type factor B by α-factor C. We conclude that the clip domain of factor B has an important role in localizing factor B to the surface of Gram-negative bacteria or LPS released from bacteria to initiate effective proteolytic activation by α-factor C. PMID:26109069

  13. Factor B Is the Second Lipopolysaccharide-binding Protease Zymogen in the Horseshoe Crab Coagulation Cascade.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Shibata, Toshio; Ikeda, Shunsuke; Koshiba, Takumi; Mizumura, Hikaru; Oda, Toshio; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2015-07-31

    Factor B is a serine-protease zymogen in the horseshoe crab coagulation cascade, and it is the primary substrate for activated factor C, the LPS-responsive initiator of the cascade. Factor C is autocatalytically activated to α-factor C on LPS and is artificially converted to β-factor C, another activated form, by chymotrypsin. It is not known, however, whether LPS is required for the activation of factor B. Here we found that wild-type factor B expressed in HEK293S cells is activated by α-factor C, but not by β-factor C, in an LPS-dependent manner and that β-factor C loses the LPS binding activity of factor C through additional cleavage by chymotrypsin within the N-terminal LPS-binding region. Surface plasmon resonance and quartz crystal microbalance analyses revealed that wild-type factor B binds to LPS with high affinity comparable with that of factor C, demonstrating that factor B is the second LPS-binding zymogen in the cascade. An LPS-binding site of wild-type factor B was found in the N-terminal clip domain, and the activation rate of a clip domain deletion mutant was considerably slower than that of wild-type factor B. Moreover, in the presence of LPS, Triton X-100 inhibited the activation of wild-type factor B by α-factor C. We conclude that the clip domain of factor B has an important role in localizing factor B to the surface of Gram-negative bacteria or LPS released from bacteria to initiate effective proteolytic activation by α-factor C.

  14. Factor B Is the Second Lipopolysaccharide-binding Protease Zymogen in the Horseshoe Crab Coagulation Cascade*

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Shibata, Toshio; Ikeda, Shunsuke; Koshiba, Takumi; Mizumura, Hikaru; Oda, Toshio; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Factor B is a serine-protease zymogen in the horseshoe crab coagulation cascade, and it is the primary substrate for activated factor C, the LPS-responsive initiator of the cascade. Factor C is autocatalytically activated to α-factor C on LPS and is artificially converted to β-factor C, another activated form, by chymotrypsin. It is not known, however, whether LPS is required for the activation of factor B. Here we found that wild-type factor B expressed in HEK293S cells is activated by α-factor C, but not by β-factor C, in an LPS-dependent manner and that β-factor C loses the LPS binding activity of factor C through additional cleavage by chymotrypsin within the N-terminal LPS-binding region. Surface plasmon resonance and quartz crystal microbalance analyses revealed that wild-type factor B binds to LPS with high affinity comparable with that of factor C, demonstrating that factor B is the second LPS-binding zymogen in the cascade. An LPS-binding site of wild-type factor B was found in the N-terminal clip domain, and the activation rate of a clip domain deletion mutant was considerably slower than that of wild-type factor B. Moreover, in the presence of LPS, Triton X-100 inhibited the activation of wild-type factor B by α-factor C. We conclude that the clip domain of factor B has an important role in localizing factor B to the surface of Gram-negative bacteria or LPS released from bacteria to initiate effective proteolytic activation by α-factor C. PMID:26109069

  15. Physiotherapy, rehabilitation and sports in countries with limited replacement coagulation factor supply.

    PubMed

    Buzzard, B M

    2007-09-01

    It is well documented that physiotherapy and rehabilitation benefit people with haemophilia by strengthening the key muscle groups and protecting joints from the adverse effects of repeated haemorrhages. Rehabilitation, in conjunction with the availability of replacement coagulation factor products, has revolutionized approaches to the management of patients with haemophilia in developed countries and has led to a substantial decrease in both the morbidity and mortality rates among the haemophilic population. Modern treatment approaches have also enabled persons with haemophilia to participate in sporting activities along with their peers; however, these improvements in care have not been achieved in developing nations, where health-care resources and facilities are scarce and the supply of coagulation factor products is limited. This article attempts to address the following questions about the management of haemophilic patients in developing countries: Can physiotherapy, rehabilitation and sports prevent disabilities and preserve independence? Is participation in sports activities possible in developing countries? Do countries differ with regard to guidelines for participation in sports? Should we be encouraging participation in sports or allowing patients with haemophilia to do as they choose?

  16. Dimeric Organization of Blood Coagulation Factor VIII bound to Lipid Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dalm, Daniela; Galaz-Montoya, Jesus G; Miller, Jaimy L; Grushin, Kirill; Villalobos, Alex; Koyfman, Alexey Y; Schmid, Michael F; Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla

    2015-01-01

    Membrane-bound Factor VIII (FVIII) has a critical function in blood coagulation as the pro-cofactor to the serine-protease Factor IXa (FIXa) in the FVIIIa-FIXa complex assembled on the activated platelet membrane. Defects or deficiency of FVIII cause Hemophilia A, a mild to severe bleeding disorder. Despite existing crystal structures for FVIII, its membrane-bound organization has not been resolved. Here we present the dimeric FVIII membrane-bound structure when bound to lipid nanotubes, as determined by cryo-electron microscopy. By combining the structural information obtained from helical reconstruction and single particle subtomogram averaging at intermediate resolution (15-20 Å), we show unambiguously that FVIII forms dimers on lipid nanotubes. We also demonstrate that the organization of the FVIII membrane-bound domains is consistently different from the crystal structure in solution. The presented results are a critical step towards understanding the mechanism of the FVIIIa-FIXa complex assembly on the activated platelet surface in the propagation phase of blood coagulation.

  17. Dimeric Organization of Blood Coagulation Factor VIII bound to Lipid Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Dalm, Daniela; Galaz-Montoya, Jesus G.; Miller, Jaimy L.; Grushin, Kirill; Villalobos, Alex; Koyfman, Alexey Y.; Schmid, Michael F.; Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla

    2015-01-01

    Membrane-bound Factor VIII (FVIII) has a critical function in blood coagulation as the pro-cofactor to the serine-protease Factor IXa (FIXa) in the FVIIIa-FIXa complex assembled on the activated platelet membrane. Defects or deficiency of FVIII cause Hemophilia A, a mild to severe bleeding disorder. Despite existing crystal structures for FVIII, its membrane-bound organization has not been resolved. Here we present the dimeric FVIII membrane-bound structure when bound to lipid nanotubes, as determined by cryo-electron microscopy. By combining the structural information obtained from helical reconstruction and single particle subtomogram averaging at intermediate resolution (15-20 Å), we show unambiguously that FVIII forms dimers on lipid nanotubes. We also demonstrate that the organization of the FVIII membrane-bound domains is consistently different from the crystal structure in solution. The presented results are a critical step towards understanding the mechanism of the FVIIIa-FIXa complex assembly on the activated platelet surface in the propagation phase of blood coagulation. PMID:26082135

  18. Airway tissue factor-dependent coagulation activity in response to sulfur mustard analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Rancourt, Raymond C.; Veress, Livia A.; Guo, XiaoLing; Jones, Tara N.; Hendry-Hofer, Tara B.

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury is a principal cause of morbidity and mortality in response to mustard gas (SM) inhalation. Obstructive, fibrin-containing airway casts have recently been reported in a rat inhalation model employing the SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES). The present study was designed to identify the mechanism(s) causing activation of the coagulation cascade after CEES-induced airway injury. Here we report that CEES inhalation elevates tissue factor (TF) activity and numbers of detached epithelial cells present in lavage fluid (BALF) from rats after exposure (18 h). In vitro studies using 16HBE cells, or with rat BALF, indicated that detached epithelial cells could convert factor X (FX) to the active form FXa when incubated with factor VII and could elicit rapid clotting of plasma. In addition, immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated elevated cell surface (TF) expression on CEES-exposed 16HBE cells as a function of time. However, total cell TF expression did not increase. Since membrane surfaces bearing TF are important determinants of clot initiation, anticoagulants directed against these entities were tested for ability to limit plasma clotting or FX activation capacity of BALF or culture media. Addition of tifacogin, a TF pathway inhibitor, effectively blocked either activity, demonstrating that the procoagulant actions of CEES were TF pathway dependent. Lactadherin, a protein capable of competing with clotting factors for phospholipid-binding sites, was partially effective in limiting these procoagulant actions. These findings indicate that TF pathway inhibition could be an effective strategy to prevent airway obstruction after SM or CEES inhalation. PMID:21964405

  19. [Influence of reagent storage in Sysmex CA7000 for different time on 4 test RESULTS: of the plasma coagulation].

    PubMed

    Chen, Tong-Qing; Li, Zhen-Xing

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of blood coagulation reagents stored for different time on test results of the specimens prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT) and fibrinogen (Fib). A total of 21 patient plasma specimens was taken and measured for homeostasis by Sysmex CA7000 automated blood coagulation analyzer and supporting reagent. The PT, APTT, TT and Fib of specimens were measured with the reagents stored in Sysmex CA7000 for different time. The differences of PT, APTT, TT and Fib were analyzed between values measured of the reagents stored for 0 hour and different time (TS:12, 24, 36,48, 60, 72 h; DA:24, 48, 72, 96, 120 h; TT:2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 h; TR:4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24 h; OVB:1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ,6 h), respectively. The results showed that when coagulation reagent TS were stored for more than 48 h , DA 96 h, TT 10 h, TR 16 h and OVB 4 h, the values of PT, APTT, TT and Fib of samples were statistically different from the values measured with fresh coagulation reagent (P < 0.01), respectively. Compared 0 h with TS stored for 48-72, DA 96-120, TT 10-12, TR 16-24 and OVB 4-6 h, the percentage difference of PT, APTT, TT and Fib is in -2.6% ∼ 10.8%, -3.44% ∼ 4.8%, -3.9% ∼ 5.52%, -10.8% ∼ 3.3% and -17.2% ∼ 0.5%, the PT and Fib changes were more significant. Accordingly, the result of PT, APTT and TT had a uptrend as the reagent stored in Sysmex CA7000 analyzer for a long time, while Fib downtrend. It is concluded that the reagents showed be timely replaced when the plasma coagulation test is performed so as to obtain accurate results of examination.

  20. Efficacy of argon plasma coagulation in the management of portal hypertensive gastropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hanafy, Amr Shaaban; El Hawary, Amr Talaat

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Evaluation of the outcome and experience in 2 years of management of portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG) by argon plasma coagulation (APC) in a cohort of Egyptian cirrhotic patients. Methods: This study was conducted over a 2-year period from January 2011 to February 2013. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed to evaluate the degree and site of PHG. APC was applied to areas with mucosal vascular lesions. Results: In total, 200 cirrhotic patients were enrolled; 12 patients were excluded due to death (n = 6) caused by hepatic encephalopathy (n = 3), hepatorenal syndrome (n = 2), or chronic lymphatic leukemia (n = 1), or did not complete the treatment sessions (n = 6), so 188 patients completed the study. PHG was mainly fundic in 73 patients (38.8 %), corporeal in 66 patients (35.1 %), and pangastric in 49 patients (26.1 %) (P = 0.026). Patients were exposed to APC and received proton pump inhibitors together with propranolol at a dose sufficient to reduce the heart rate by 25 % or down to 55 beats/min. The mean (± standard deviation) number of sessions was 1.65 ± 0.8; six patients needed four sessions (3.2 %), 19 patients needed three sessions (10.1 %), 74 patients needed two sessions (39.4 %), and 89 patients needed one session (47.3 %). Patients with fundic and corporeal PHG required the lowest number of sessions (P = 0.000). Patients were followed up every 2 months for up to 1 year; the end point was a complete response with improved anemia and blood transfusion requirement which was achieved after one session in 89 patients (75.4 %), two sessions in 24 patients (20.3 %) and three sessions in five patients (4.3 %). A complete response was more prevalent in patients with corporeal and fundic PHG (P = 0.04). Conclusions: After 2 years’ experience in managing PHG, we found that a combination of APC and non-selective beta blockers was highly efficacious and safe in controlling

  1. Coagulation factor Xa drives tumor cells into apoptosis through BH3-only protein Bim up-regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Borensztajn, Keren S. . E-mail: K.S.Borensztajn@amc.uva.nl; Bijlsma, Maarten F.; Groot, Angelique P.; Brueggemann, Lois W.; Versteeg, Henri H.; Reitsma, Pieter H.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Spek, C. Arnold

    2007-07-15

    Coagulation Factor (F)Xa is a serine protease that plays a crucial role during blood coagulation by converting prothrombin into active thrombin. Recently, however, it emerged that besides this role in coagulation, FXa induces intracellular signaling leading to different cellular effects. Here, we show that coagulation factor (F)Xa drives tumor cells of epithelial origin, but not endothelial cells or monocytes, into apoptosis, whereas it even enhances fibroblast survival. FXa signals through the protease activated receptor (PAR)-1 to activate extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and p38. This activation is associated with phosphorylation of the transcription factor CREB, and in tumor cells with up-regulation of the BH3-only pro-apoptotic protein Bim, leading to caspase-3 cleavage, the main hallmark of apoptosis. Transfection of tumor cells with dominant negative forms of CREB or siRNA for either PAR-1, Bim, ERK1 and/or p38 inhibited the pro-apoptotic effect of FXa. In fibroblasts, FXa-induced PAR-1 activation leads to down-regulation of Bim and pre-treatment with PAR-1 or Bim siRNA abolishes proliferation. We thus provide evidence that beyond its role in blood coagulation, FXa plays a key role in cellular processes in which Bim is the central player in determining cell survival.

  2. Performance of coagulation tests in patients on therapeutic doses of rivaroxaban. A cross-sectional pharmacodynamic study based on peak and trough plasma levels.

    PubMed

    Francart, Suzanne J; Hawes, Emily M; Deal, Allison M; Adcock, Dorothy M; Gosselin, Robert; Jeanneret, Cheryl; Friedman, Kenneth D; Moll, Stephan

    2014-06-01

    Knowledge of anticoagulation status during rivaroxaban therapy is desirable in certain clinical situations. It was the study objective to determine coagulation tests most useful for assessing rivaroxaban's anticoagulant effect. Peak and trough blood samples from 29 patients taking rivaroxaban 20 mg daily were collected. Mass spectrometry and various coagulation assays were performed. "On-therapy range" was defined as the rivaroxaban concentrations determined by LC-MS/MS. A "misprediction percentage" was calculated based on how often results of each coagulation assay were in the normal reference range, while the rivaroxaban concentration was in the "on-therapy" range. The on-therapy range was 8.9-660 ng/ml. The misprediction percentages for prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), using multiple reagents and coagulometers, ranged from 10%-52% and 31%-59%, respectively. PT, aPTT and activated clotting time (ACT) were insensitive to trough rivaroxaban: 59%, 62%, and 80% of samples had a normal result, respectively. Over 95% of PT and ACT values were elevated at peak. Four different rivaroxaban calibrated anti-Xa assays had R² values >0.98, demonstrating strong correlations with rivaroxaban drug levels. In conclusion, PT, aPTT and ACT are often normal in patients on therapeutic doses of rivaroxaban. However, PT and ACT may have clinical utility at higher drug plasma levels. Rivaroxaban calibrated anti-factor Xa assays can accurately identify low and high on-therapy rivaroxaban drug levels and, therefore, have superior utility in all clinical situations where assessment of anticoagulation status may be beneficial.

  3. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha induces activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis in baboons through an exclusive effect on the p55 receptor.

    PubMed

    van der Poll, T; Jansen, P M; Van Zee, K J; Welborn, M B; de Jong, I; Hack, C E; Loetscher, H; Lesslauer, W; Lowry, S F; Moldawer, L L

    1996-08-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) can bind to two distinct transmembrane receptors, the p55 and p75 TNF receptors. We compared the capability of two mutant TNF proteins with exclusive affinity for the p55 or p75 TNF receptor with that of wild type TNF, to activate the hemostatic mechanism in baboons. Both activation of the coagulation system, monitored by the plasma levels of thrombin-antithrombin III complexes, and activation of the fibrinolytic system (plasma levels of tissue-type plasminogen activator, and plasminogen activator inhibitor type I), were of similar magnitude after intravenous injection of wild type TNF or the TNF mutant with affinity only for the p55 receptor. Likewise, wild type TNF and the TNF p55 specific mutant were equally potent in inducing neutrophil degranulation (plasma levels of elastase-alpha 1-antitrypsin complexes). Wild type TNF tended to be a more potent inducer of secretory phospholipase A2 release than the p55 specific TNF mutant. Administration of the TNF mutant binding only to the p75 receptor did not induce any of these responses. We conclude that TNF-Induced stimulation of coagulation, fibrinolysis, neutrophil degranulation, and release of secretory phospholipase A2 are predominantly mediated by the p55 TNF receptor.

  4. Pretreatment with a 55-kDa tumor necrosis factor receptor-immunoglobulin fusion protein attenuates activation of coagulation, but not of fibrinolysis, during lethal bacteremia in baboons.

    PubMed

    van der Poll, T; Jansen, P M; Van Zee, K J; Hack, C E; Oldenburg, H A; Loetscher, H; Lesslauer, W; Lowry, S F; Moldawer, L L

    1997-07-01

    Baboons (Papio anubis) receiving a lethal intravenous infusion with live Escherichia coli were pretreated with either a 55-kDa tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-IgG fusion protein (TNFR55:IgG) (n = 4, 4.6 mg/kg) or placebo (n = 4). Neutralization of TNF activity in TNFR55:IgG-treated animals was associated with a complete prevention of mortality and a strong attenuation of coagulation activation as reflected by the plasma concentrations of thrombin-antithrombin III complexes (P < .05). Activation of fibrinolysis was not influenced by TNFR55:IgG (plasma tissue-type plasminogen activator and plasmin-alpha2-antiplasmin complexes), whereas TNFR55:IgG did inhibit the release of plasminogen activator inhibitor type I (P < .05). Furthermore, TNFR55:IgG inhibited neutrophil degranulation (plasma levels of elastase-alpha1-antitrypsin complexes, P < .05) and modestly reduced release of secretory phospholipase A2. These data suggest that endogenous TNF contributes to activation of coagulation, but not to stimulation of fibrinolysis, during severe bacteremia.

  5. The Mechanisms of Coagulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurtz, Richard; Jesty, Jolyon

    1994-01-01

    Several topics such as heart disease, strokes, biochemical reactions, blood components, and genetics can be related to blood clotting. Introduces a simple, safe and inexpensive hands-on demonstration using bovine (cattle) blood plasma of normal and abnormal coagulation. (ZWH)

  6. UPLC-MRM Mass Spectrometry Method for Measurement of the Coagulation Inhibitors Dabigatran and Rivaroxaban in Human Plasma and Its Comparison with Functional Assays

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Joachim; Gripp, Tatjana; Flieder, Tobias; Dittrich, Marcus; Hendig, Doris; Busse, Jessica; Knabbe, Cornelius; Birschmann, Ingvild

    2015-01-01

    °C and even at RT for at least one week. A method comparison between our UPLC-MRM MS method, the commercially available automated Direct Thrombin Inhibitor assay (DTI assay) for dabigatran measurement from CoaChrom Diagnostica, as well as the automated anti-Xa assay for rivaroxaban measurement from Chromogenix both performed by ACL-TOP showed a high degree of correlation. However, UPLC-MRM MS measurement of dabigatran and rivaroxaban has a much better selectivity than classical functional assays measuring activities of various coagulation factors which are susceptible to interference by other coagulant drugs. Conclusions Overall, we developed and validated a sensitive and specific UPLC-MRM MS assay for the quick and specific measurement of dabigatran and rivaroxaban in human plasma. PMID:26699714

  7. Haem-assisted dityrosine-cross-linking of fibrinogen under non-thermal plasma exposure: one important mechanism of facilitated blood coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Zhigang; Huang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Although blood coagulation facilitated by non-thermal plasma has been reported several years ago, the insight to the involved mechanisms is still rather limited. In this work, we report our discovery of a new mechanism for the haem-promoted blood-coagulation caused by non-thermal plasma treatment. The reason for the haem role is due to that its oxidized form, namely, hematin, can promote the dityrosine cross-linking of fibrinogen, the most important coagulation protein, to form a membrane-like layer on the surface of the treated blood with plasma exposure. Both haem and non-thermal-plasma generated hydrogen peroxide are requisite for the cross-linking process. We confirmed that fibrinogen can coordinate with the haem iron to form a protein-haem complex which shows pseudo-peroxidase activity, and in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, the complex can induce the dityrosine formation between fibrinogen molecules, leading to the fibrin network necessary for the blood coagulation. Understanding of such an underlying mechanism can be useful to guide more efficient application of non-thermal plasma in the management of hemostasis, thrombosis and etc. PMID:27229173

  8. Ca2+ switches the effect of PS-containing membranes on Factor Xa from activating to inhibiting: implications for initiation of blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Koklic, Tilen; Majumder, Rinku; Lentz, Barry R

    2014-09-15

    Calcium (Ca2+) plays a pivotal role in cellular and organismal physiology. The Ca2+ ion has an intermediate protein-binding affinity and thus it can serve as an on/off switch in the regulation of different biochemical processes. The serum level of ionized Ca2+ is regulated with normal ionized Ca2+ being in the range 1.10-1.3 mM. Hypocalcaemia (free Ca2+<1.1 mM) in critically ill patients is commonly accompanied by haemostatic abnormalities, ranging from isolated thrombocytopenia to complex defects such as disseminated intravascular coagulation, commonly thought to be due to insufficient functioning of anticoagulation pathways. A small amount of fXa (Factor Xa) produced by Factor VIIa and exposed tissue factor is key to initiating blood coagulation by producing enough thrombin to induce the later stages of coagulation. fXa must bind to PS (phosphatidylserine)-containing membranes to produce thrombin at a physiologically significant rate. In the present study, we show that overall fXa activity on PS-containing membranes is sharply regulated by a 'Ca2+ switch' centred at 1.16 mM, below which fXa is active and above which fXa forms inactive dimers on PS-exposing membranes. Our data lead to a mathematical model that predicts the variation of fXa activity as a function of both Ca2+ and membrane concentrations. Because the critical Ca2+ concentration is at the lower end of the normal plasma ionized Ca2+ concentration range, we propose a new regulatory mechanism by which local Ca2+ concentration switches fXa from an intrinsically active form to a form requiring its cofactor [fVa (Factor Va)] to achieve significant activity.

  9. Ca2+ Switches the Effect of PS-containing Membranes on Factor Xa from Activating to Inhibiting: Implications for Initiation of Blood Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Koklic, Tilen; Majumder, Rinku; Lentz, Barry R.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) plays a pivotal role in cellular and organismal physiology. The Ca2+ ion has an intermediate protein-binding affinity, thus it can serve as an on/off switch in regulation of different biochemical processes. The serum level of ionized Ca2+ is regulated with normal ionized Ca2+ being in the range from 1.10 to 1.29 mM. Hypocalcaemia (free Ca2+ < 1.1mM) in critically ill patients is commonly accompanied by hemostatic abnormalities, ranging from isolated thrombocytopenia to complex defects such as disseminated intravascular coagulation, commonly thought to be due to insufficient functioning of anticoagulation pathways. A small amount of Factor Xa (fXa) produced by Factor VIIa and exposed tissue factor is key to initiating blood coagulation by producing enough thrombin to induce later stages of coagulation. FXa must bind to phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing membranes to produce thrombin at a physiologically significant rate. In this work, we show that overall fXa activity on PS-containing membranes is sharply regulated by a “Ca2+ switch” centered at 1.16 mM, below which fXa is active and above which fXa forms inactive dimers on PS-exposing membranes. Our data lead to a mathematical model that predicts the variation of fXa activity as a function of both calcium and membrane concentrations. Because the critical Ca2+ concentration is at the lower end of the normal plasma ionized Ca2+ concentration range, we propose a new regulatory mechanism by which local Ca2+ concentration switches fXa from an intrinsically active form to a form requiring its cofactor (fVa) to achieve significant activity. PMID:24920080

  10. Extending the pharmacokinetic half-life of coagulation factors by fusion to recombinant albumin.

    PubMed

    Metzner, H J; Pipe, S W; Weimer, T; Schulte, S

    2013-11-01

    The prophylactic treatment of haemophilia B and the management of haemophilia A or B with inhibitors demand frequent administrations of coagulation factors due to the suboptimal half-lives of the products commercially available and currently in use, e.g. recombinant factor IX (rFIX) and recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa), respectively. The extension of the half-lives of rFIX and rFVIIa could allow for longer intervals between infusions and could thereby improve adherence and clinical outcomes and may improve quality of life. Albumin fusion is one of a number of different techniques currently being examined to prolong the half-life of rFIX and rFVIIa. Results from a phase I clinical trial demonstrated that the recombinant fusion protein linking FIX to albumin (rIX-FP) has a five-times longer half-life than rFIX, and preclinical studies with the recombinant fusion protein linking FVIIa to albumin (rVIIa-FP) suggest that rVIIa-FP possesses a significantly extended half-life versus rFVIIa. In this review, we describe albumin fusion technology and examine the recent progress in the development of rIX-FP and rVIIa-FP.

  11. Alternative pathways of thromboplastin-dependent activation of human factor X in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Marlar, R.A.; Griffin, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    To determine the interrelationships of the major coagulation pathways, the activation of 3H-labeled factor X in normal and various deficient human plasmas was evaluated when clotting was triggered by dilute rabbit or human thromboplastin. Various dilutions of thromboplastin and calcium were added to plasma samples containing 3H-factor X, and the time course of factor X activation was determined. At a 1/250 dilution of rabbit brain thromboplastin, the rate of factor X activation in plasmas deficient in factor VIII or factor IX was 10% of the activation rate of normal plasma or of factor XI deficient plasma. Reconstitution of the deficient plasmas with factors VIII or IX, respectively, reconstituted normal factor X activation. Similar results were obtained when various dilutions of human thromboplastin replaced the rabbit thromboplastin. From these plasma experiments, it is inferred that the dilute thromboplastin-dependent activation of factor X requires factors VII, IX, and VIII. An alternative extrinsic pathway that involves factors IX and VIII may be the physiologic extrinsic pathway and hence help to explain the consistent clinical observations of bleeding diatheses in patients deficient in factors IX or VIII.

  12. From electrocautery, balloon dilatation, neodymium-doped:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser to argon plasma coagulation and cryotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Ashutosh; Pickering, Edward M; Lee, Hans J

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade, there has been significant advancement in the development/application of therapeutics in thoracic diseases. Ablation methods using heat or cold energy in the airway is safe and effective for treating complex airway disorders including malignant and non-malignant central airway obstruction (CAO) without limiting the impact of future definitive therapy. Timely and efficient use of endobronchial ablative therapies combined with mechanical debridement or stent placement results in immediate relief of dyspnea for CAO. Therapeutic modalities reviewed in this article including electrocautery, balloon dilation (BD), neodymium-doped:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser, argon plasma coagulation (APC), and cryotherapy are often combined to achieve the desired results. This review aims to provide a clinically oriented review of these technologies in the modern era of interventional pulmonology (IP).

  13. From electrocautery, balloon dilatation, neodymium-doped:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser to argon plasma coagulation and cryotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Edward M.; Lee, Hans J.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been significant advancement in the development/application of therapeutics in thoracic diseases. Ablation methods using heat or cold energy in the airway is safe and effective for treating complex airway disorders including malignant and non-malignant central airway obstruction (CAO) without limiting the impact of future definitive therapy. Timely and efficient use of endobronchial ablative therapies combined with mechanical debridement or stent placement results in immediate relief of dyspnea for CAO. Therapeutic modalities reviewed in this article including electrocautery, balloon dilation (BD), neodymium-doped:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser, argon plasma coagulation (APC), and cryotherapy are often combined to achieve the desired results. This review aims to provide a clinically oriented review of these technologies in the modern era of interventional pulmonology (IP). PMID:26807284

  14. Aestivation induces changes in transcription and translation of coagulation factor II and fibrinogen gamma chain in the liver of the African lungfish Protopterus annectens.

    PubMed

    Hiong, Kum C; Tan, Xiang R; Boo, Mel V; Wong, Wai P; Chew, Shit F; Ip, Yuen K

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to sequence and characterize two pro-coagulant genes, coagulation factor II (f2) and fibrinogen gamma chain (fgg), from the liver of the African lungfish Protopterus annectens, and to determine their hepatic mRNA expression levels during three phases of aestivation. The protein abundance of F2 and Fgg in the liver and plasma was determined by immunoblotting. The results indicated that F2 and Fgg of P. annectens were phylogenetically closer to those of amphibians than those of teleosts. Three days of aestivation resulted in an up-regulation in the hepatic fgg mRNA expression level, while 6 days of aestivation led to a significant increase (3-fold) in the protein abundance of Fgg in the plasma. Hence, there could be an increase in the blood-clotting ability in P. annectens during the induction phase of aestivation. By contrast, the blood-clotting ability in P. annectens might be reduced in response to decreased blood flow and increased possibility of thrombosis during the maintenance phase of aestivation, as 6 months of aestivation led to significant decreases in mRNA expression levels of f2 and fgg in the liver. There could also be a decrease in the export of F2 and Fgg from the liver to the plasma so as to avert thrombosis. Three to 6 days after arousal from 6 months of aestivation, the protein abundance of F2 and Fgg recovered partially in the plasma of P. annectens; a complete recovery of the transcription and translation of f2/F2 in the liver might occur only after refeeding.

  15. Argon Plasma Coagulation Therapy Versus Topical Formalin for Intractable Rectal Bleeding and Anorectal Dysfunction After Radiation Therapy for Prostate Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yeoh, Eric; Tam, William; Schoeman, Mark; Moore, James; Thomas, Michelle; Botten, Rochelle; Di Matteo, Addolorata

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the effect of argon plasma coagulation (APC) and topical formalin for intractable rectal bleeding and anorectal dysfunction associated with chronic radiation proctitis. Methods and Materials: Thirty men (median age, 72 years; range, 49-87 years) with intractable rectal bleeding (defined as ≥1× per week and/or requiring blood transfusions) after radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma were randomized to treatment with APC (n=17) or topical formalin (n=13). Each patient underwent evaluations of (1) anorectal symptoms (validated questionnaires, including modified Late Effects in Normal Tissues–Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic and visual analogue scales for rectal bleeding); (2) anorectal motor and sensory function (manometry and graded rectal balloon distension); and (3) anal sphincteric morphology (endoanal ultrasound) before and after the treatment endpoint (defined as reduction in rectal bleeding to 1× per month or better, reduction in visual analogue scales to ≤25 mm, and no longer needing blood transfusions). Results: The treatment endpoint was achieved in 94% of the APC group and 100% of the topical formalin group after a median (range) of 2 (1-5) sessions of either treatment. After a follow-up duration of 111 (29-170) months, only 1 patient in each group needed further treatment. Reductions in rectal compliance and volumes of sensory perception occurred after APC, but no effect on anorectal symptoms other than rectal bleeding was observed. There were no differences between APC and topical formalin for anorectal symptoms and function, nor for anal sphincteric morphology. Conclusions: Argon plasma coagulation and topical formalin had comparable efficacy in the durable control of rectal bleeding associated with chronic radiation proctitis but had no beneficial effect on anorectal dysfunction.

  16. Polyphenol compounds belonging to flavonoids inhibit activity of coagulation factor X.

    PubMed

    Bijak, Michal; Ponczek, Michal Blazej; Nowak, Pawel

    2014-04-01

    Blood coagulation consists of series of zymogens which can be converted by limited proteolysis to active enzymes leading to the generation of thrombin and conversion of fibrinogen into fibrin by this enzyme. The activated factor X (FXa) forms prothrombinase complex on phosphatidylserine containing surface which is responsible for conversion of prothrombin to thrombin. One molecule of FXa generates more than 1000 thrombin molecules. Therefore FXa is a novel target for modern anticoagulant therapy. The aim of our present study is to examine the effects of the well-known plant polyphenolic compounds on factor Xa amidolytic activity and characterization of these interactions using bioinformatic ligand docking method. We observed that only four polyphenols belonging to flavonoids group: procyanidin B2, cyanidin, quercetin and silybin, had inhibitory effect on FXa activity. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that procyanidin B2, cyanidin, quercetin and silybin bound in the S1-S4 pockets located in vicinity of the FXa active site and blocked access of substrates to Ser195. The results presented here showed that flavonoids might be potential structural bases for design of new nature-based, safe, orally bioavailable direct FXa inhibitors. PMID:24444877

  17. Novel coagulation factor concentrates: issues relating to their clinical implementation and pharmacokinetic assessment for optimal prophylaxis in haemophilia patients.

    PubMed

    Ljung, R; Auerswald, G; Benson, G; Jetter, A; Jiménez-Yuste, V; Lambert, T; Morfini, M; Remor, E; Sørensen, B; Salek, S Z

    2013-07-01

    Prophylaxis is considered the optimal treatment regimen for patients with severe haemophilia, and may be especially important in the prevention of joint disease. Novel coagulation factor concentrates with prolonged half-lives promise to improve patient treatment by enabling prophylaxis with less frequent dosing. With the call to individualize therapy in haemophilia, there is growing awareness of the need to use pharmacokinetic (PK) assessments to tailor prophylaxis. However, for new factor concentrates, it is not yet known which PK values will be most informative for optimizing prophylaxis. This topic was explored at the Eighth Zurich Haemophilia Forum. On the basis of our clinical experience and a discussion of the literature, we report key issues relating to the PK assessment of new coagulation factors and include suggestions on the implementation of PK data to optimize therapy. As both inter- and intra-individual variability in factor half-life have been reported, we suggest that frequent PK assessments should be conducted. However, to diminish the burden of more frequent sampling, sparser sampling strategies and the use of population modelling should be considered. Guidelines on how to assay new factor concentrates, and which PK parameters should be measured, are needed. Concerns were raised regarding the possibility of breakthrough bleeding, and current thinking on how to prevent breakthrough bleeding may no longer be appropriate. Finally, as treatment adherence may be more important to ensure that a therapeutic level of a new coagulation factor concentrate is maintained, behavioural techniques could be implemented to help to improve treatment adherence.

  18. Spatial localization of bacteria controls coagulation of human blood by 'quorum acting'.

    PubMed

    Kastrup, Christian J; Boedicker, James Q; Pomerantsev, Andrei P; Moayeri, Mahtab; Bian, Yao; Pompano, Rebecca R; Kline, Timothy R; Sylvestre, Patricia; Shen, Feng; Leppla, Stephen H; Tang, Wei-Jen; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2008-12-01

    Blood coagulation often accompanies bacterial infections and sepsis and is generally accepted as a consequence of immune responses. Though many bacterial species can directly activate individual coagulation factors, they have not been shown to directly initiate the coagulation cascade that precedes clot formation. Here we demonstrated, using microfluidics and surface patterning, that the spatial localization of bacteria substantially affects coagulation of human and mouse blood and plasma. Bacillus cereus and Bacillus anthracis, the anthrax-causing pathogen, directly initiated coagulation of blood in minutes when bacterial cells were clustered. Coagulation of human blood by B. anthracis required secreted zinc metalloprotease InhA1, which activated prothrombin and factor X directly (not via factor XII or tissue factor pathways). We refer to this mechanism as 'quorum acting' to distinguish it from quorum sensing--it does not require a change in gene expression, it can be rapid and it can be independent of bacterium-to-bacterium communication.

  19. Blood folate status and expression of proteins involved in immune function, inflammation, and coagulation: biochemical and proteomic changes in the plasma of humans in response to long-term synthetic folic acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Duthie, Susan J; Horgan, Graham; de Roos, Baukje; Rucklidge, Garry; Reid, Martin; Duncan, Gary; Pirie, Lynn; Basten, Graham P; Powers, Hilary J

    2010-04-01

    We used plasma proteomics to identify human proteins responsive to folate status. Plasma was collected from subjects treated with placebo or 1.2 mg of folic acid daily for 12 weeks in a randomized controlled trial. Homocysteine and folate were measured by immunoassay and uracil misincorporation by electrophoresis. The plasma proteome was assessed by 2-D gel electrophoresis, and proteins were identified by LC MS/MS. 5-methylTHF increased 5-fold (P = 0.000003) in response to intervention. Red cell folate doubled (P = 0.013), and lymphocyte folate increased 44% (P = 0.0001). Hcy and uracil dropped 22% (P = 0.0005) and 25% (P = 0.05), respectively. ApoE A-1, alpha-1-antichymotrypsin, antithrombin, and serum amyloid P were downregulated, while albumin, IgM C, and complement C3 were upregulated (P < 0.05). More than 60 proteins were significantly associated with folate pre- and postintervention (P < 0.01). These were categorized into metabolic pathways related to complement fixation (e.g., C1, C3, C4, Factor H, Factor 1, Factor B, clusterin), coagulation (e.g., antithrombin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, kininogen) and mineral transport (e.g., transthyretin, haptoglobin, ceruloplasmin). Low folate status pre- and post-treatment were associated with lower levels of proteins involved in activation and regulation of immune function and coagulation. Supplementation with synthetic folic acid increased expression of these proteins but did not substantially disrupt the balance of these pathways.

  20. International reference standards in coagulation.

    PubMed

    Raut, Sanj; Hubbard, Anthony R

    2010-07-01

    Measurement of coagulation factor activity using absolute physico-chemical techniques is not possible and estimation therefore relies on comparative bioassay relative to a reference standard with a known or assigned potency. However the inherent variability of locally prepared and calibrated reference standards can give rise to poor agreement between laboratories and methods. Harmonisation of measurement between laboratories at the international level relies on the availability of a common source of calibration for local reference standards and this is provided by the World Health Organization (WHO) International Standards which define the International Unit for the analyte. This article describes the principles, practices and problems of biological standardisation and the development and use of reference standards for assays of coagulation factors, with particular emphasis on WHO International Standards for both concentrates and plasma.

  1. The relevance of coagulation factor X protection of adenoviruses in human sera

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, M R; Doszpoly, A; Turner, G; Nicklin, S A; Baker, A H

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous delivery of adenoviruses is the optimal route for many gene therapy applications. Once in the blood, coagulation factor X (FX) binds to the adenovirus capsid and protects the virion from natural antibody and classical complement-mediated neutralisation in mice. However, to date, no studies have examined the relevance of this FX/viral immune protective mechanism in human samples. In this study, we assessed the effects of blocking FX on adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) activity in the presence of human serum. FX prevented human IgM binding directly to the virus. In individual human sera samples (n=25), approximately half of those screened inhibited adenovirus transduction only when the Ad5–FX interaction was blocked, demonstrating that FX protected the virus from neutralising components in a large proportion of human sera. In contrast, the remainder of sera tested had no inhibitory effects on Ad5 transduction and FX armament was not required for effective gene transfer. In human sera in which FX had a protective role, Ad5 induced lower levels of complement activation in the presence of FX. We therefore demonstrate for the first time the importance of Ad–FX protection in human samples and highlight subject variability and species-specific differences as key considerations for adenoviral gene therapy. PMID:27014840

  2. Cryo-electron microscopy of coagulation Factor VIII bound to lipid nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Parmenter, Christopher D.J.; Cane, Matthew C.; Zhang Rui; Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla

    2008-02-08

    Factor VIII (FVIII) is a key protein in blood coagulation, deficiency or malfunction of which causes Haemophilia A. The sole cure for this condition is intravenous administration of FVIII, whose membrane-bound structure we have studied by Cryo-electron microscopy and image analysis. Self-assembled lipid nanotubes were optimised to bind FVIII at close to native conditions. The tubes diameter was constant at 30 nm and the lipid bilayer resolved. The FVIII molecules were well defined, forming an 8.5 nm thick outer layer, and appeared to reach the hydrophobic core of the bilayer. The two known FVIII atomic models were superimposed with the averaged 2D protein densities. The insertion of the FVIII within the membrane was evaluated, reaffirming that the membrane-binding C2 or C1-C2 domain(s) fully penetrate the outer leaflet of the lipid layer. The presented results lay the basis for new models of the FVIII overall orientation and membrane-binding mechanism.

  3. A novel DFP tripeptide motif interacts with the coagulation factor XI apple 2 domain

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Szu S.; Østergaard, Søren; Hall, Gareth; Li, Chan; Williams, Philip M.; Stennicke, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Factor XI (FXI) is the zymogen of FXIa, which cleaves FIX in the intrinsic pathway of coagulation. FXI is known to exist as a dimer and interacts with multiple proteins via its 4 apple domains in the “saucer section” of the enzyme; however, to date, no complex crystal structure has been described. To investigate protein interactions of FXI, a large random peptide library consisting of 106 to 107 peptides was screened for FXI binding, which identified a series of FXI binding motifs containing the signature Asp-Phe-Pro (DFP) tripeptide. Motifs containing this core tripeptide were found in diverse proteins, including the known ligand high-molecular-weight kininogen (HK), as well as the extracellular matrix proteins laminin and collagen V. To define the binding site on FXI, we determined the crystal structure of FXI in complex with the HK-derived peptide NPISDFPDT. This revealed the location of the DFP peptide bound to the FXI apple 2 domain, and central to the interaction, the DFP phenylalanine side-chain inserts into a major hydrophobic pocket in the apple 2 domain and the isoleucine occupies a flanking minor pocket. Two further structures of FXI in complex with the laminin-derived peptide EFPDFP and a DFP peptide from the random screen demonstrated binding in the same pocket, although in a slightly different conformation, thus revealing some flexibility in the molecular interactions of the FXI apple 2 domain. PMID:27006387

  4. Revisiting the mechanism of coagulation factor XIII activation and regulation from a structure/functional perspective

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sneha; Biswas, Arijit; Akhter, Mohammad Suhail; Krettler, Christoph; Reinhart, Christoph; Dodt, Johannes; Reuter, Andreas; Philippou, Helen; Ivaskevicius, Vytautas; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The activation and regulation of coagulation Factor XIII (FXIII) protein has been the subject of active research for the past three decades. Although discrete evidence exists on various aspects of FXIII activation and regulation a combinatorial structure/functional view in this regard is lacking. In this study, we present results of a structure/function study of the functional chain of events for FXIII. Our study shows how subtle chronological submolecular changes within calcium binding sites can bring about the detailed transformation of the zymogenic FXIII to its activated form especially in the context of FXIIIA and FXIIIB subunit interactions. We demonstrate what aspects of FXIII are important for the stabilization (first calcium binding site) of its zymogenic form and the possible modes of deactivation (thrombin mediated secondary cleavage) of the activated form. Our study for the first time provides a structural outlook of the FXIIIA2B2 heterotetramer assembly, its association and dissociation. The FXIIIB subunits regulatory role in the overall process has also been elaborated upon. In summary, this study provides detailed structural insight into the mechanisms of FXIII activation and regulation that can be used as a template for the development of future highly specific therapeutic inhibitors targeting FXIII in pathological conditions like thrombosis. PMID:27453290

  5. Activation loop 3 and the 170 loop interact in the active conformation of coagulation factor VIIa.

    PubMed

    Persson, Egon; Olsen, Ole H

    2009-06-01

    The initiation of blood coagulation involves tissue factor (TF)-induced allosteric activation of factor VIIa (FVIIa), which circulates in a zymogen-like state. In addition, the (most) active conformation of FVIIa presumably relies on a number of intramolecular interactions. We have characterized the role of Gly372(223) in FVIIa, which is the sole residue in activation loop 3 that is capable of forming backbone hydrogen bonds with the unusually long 170 loop and with activation loop 2, by studying the effects of replacement with Ala [G372(223)A]. G372A-FVIIa, both in the free and TF-bound form, exhibited reduced cleavage of factor X (FX) and of peptidyl substrates, and had increased K(m) values compared with wild-type FVIIa. Inhibition of G372A-FVIIa.sTF by p-aminobenzamidine was characterized by a seven-fold higher K(i) than obtained with FVIIa.sTF. Crystallographic and modelling data suggest that the most active conformation of FVIIa depends on the backbone hydrogen bond between Gly372(223) and Arg315(170C) in the 170 loop. Despite the reduced activity and inhibitor susceptibility, native and active site-inhibited G372A-FVIIa bound sTF with the same affinity as the corresponding forms of FVIIa, and burial of the N-terminus of the protease domain increased similarly upon sTF binding to G372A-FVIIa and FVIIa. Thus Gly372(223) in FVIIa appears to play a critical role in maturation of the S1 pocket and adjacent subsites, but does not appear to be of importance for TF binding and the ensuing allostery. PMID:19490111

  6. Using a Systems Pharmacology Model of the Blood Coagulation Network to Predict the Effects of Various Therapies on Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Nayak, S; Lee, D; Patel-Hett, S; Pittman, D D; Martin, S W; Heatherington, A C; Vicini, P; Hua, F

    2015-07-01

    A number of therapeutics have been developed or are under development aiming to modulate the coagulation network to treat various diseases. We used a systems model to better understand the effect of modulating various components on blood coagulation. A computational model of the coagulation network was built to match in-house in vitro thrombin generation and activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (aPTT) data with various concentrations of recombinant factor VIIa (FVIIa) or factor Xa added to normal human plasma or factor VIII-deficient plasma. Sensitivity analysis applied to the model revealed that lag time, peak thrombin concentration, area under the curve (AUC) of the thrombin generation profile, and aPTT show different sensitivity to changes in coagulation factors' concentrations and type of plasma used (normal or factor VIII-deficient). We also used the model to explore how variability in concentrations of the proteins in coagulation network can impact the response to FVIIa treatment.

  7. Disseminated intravascular coagulation and hepatocellular necrosis due to clove oil.

    PubMed

    Brown, S A; Biggerstaff, J; Savidge, G F

    1992-10-01

    We describe the case of a 2-year-old child who suffered from disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and hepatocellular necrosis, following ingestion of clove oil. The patient was treated with heparin and fresh frozen plasma, and, following specific haemostasis assays, with appropriate coagulation factor and inhibitor concentrates. The case demonstrates how this approach can be successfully used in the management of DIC with coexisting liver failure. PMID:1450336

  8. [The pathogenesis of subclinical laminitis in dairy cattle: studies of the hoof status, rumen status and blood coagulation factors].

    PubMed

    Brandejsky, F; Stanek, C; Schuh, M

    1994-02-01

    In 50 dairy cows of the breed "Braunvieh" (36 heifers, 14 cows) of one herd the claw score was recorded over a period of 2 months before parturition until 6 months after parturition. The claw scores were correlated with the clinical findings, the ruminal function and the blood coagulation factors calcium-thromboplastin (TPZ), partial thromboplastin time (PTT), thrombin time (TZ) and antithrombin III (AT III) evaluated one day and one week after calving. The claw score increased from the first to the second examination, remaining on the same level in the postpartal period. No correlation between the claw scores and the ruminal function was evident. In comparison with a control group, TPZ and PTT were found higher one day and one week after parturition in the experimental group. Blood coagulation factors and claw scores were found uncorrelated.

  9. Coagulation studies.

    PubMed

    Hazelzet, J A; Hack, C E; de Groot, R

    2001-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a complex acquired, coagulopathy resulting from excessive thrombin formation. Abnormal tissue factor (TF) expression is a major mechanism initiating DIC in many disorders, including obstetric complications, sepsis, cancer, and trauma. Numerous laboratory tests are available to monitor DIC, but most patients can be adequately managed using only routine hemostasis screening tests, and assays for fibrinogen and D-dimers. Treatment of DIC should focus on reversing the underlying disorder that initiated the coagulopathy. Novel treatments are being investigated for the treatment of DIC; many of these experimental modalities target the excessive TF activity that characterizes DIC.

  10. Contribution of a portable air plasma torch to rapid blood coagulation as a method of preventing bleeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, S. P.; Tarasenko, O.; Chang, J.; Popovic, S.; Chen, C. Y.; Fan, H. W.; Scott, A.; Lahiani, M.; Alusta, P.; Drake, J. D.; Nikolic, M.

    2009-11-01

    The effectiveness and mechanism of a low temperature air plasma torch in clotting blood are explored. Both blood droplets and smeared blood samples were used in the tests. The treated droplet samples reveal how blood clotting depends on the distance at which the torch operated, and for how long the droplets have been exposed to the torch. Microscopy and cell count of smeared blood samples shed light on dependencies of erythrocyte and platelet counts on torch distance and exposure time. With an increase of torch distance, the platelet count of treated blood samples increases but is less than that of the control. The flux of reactive atomic oxygen (RAO) and the degree of blood clotting decreased. With an increase of exposure time, platelet count of treated samples decreased, while the degree of clot increased. The correlation among these dependencies and published data support a blood clotting mechanism that RAO as well as other likely reactive oxygen species generated by the plasma torch activate erythrocyte-platelets interactions and induces blood coagulation.

  11. Ribavirin-induced intracellular GTP depletion activates transcription elongation in coagulation factor VII gene expression.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Atsuo; Miyawaki, Yuhri; Okuyama, Eriko; Murata, Moe; Ando, Yumi; Kato, Io; Takagi, Yuki; Takagi, Akira; Murate, Takashi; Saito, Hidehiko; Kojima, Tetsuhito

    2013-01-01

    Coagulation FVII (Factor VII) is a vitamin K-dependent glycoprotein synthesized in hepatocytes. It was reported previously that FVII gene (F7) expression was up-regulated by ribavirin treatment in hepatitis C virus-infected haemophilia patients; however, its precise mechanism is still unknown. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of ribavirin-induced up-regulation of F7 expression in HepG2 (human hepatoma cell line). We found that intracellular GTP depletion by ribavirin as well as other IMPDH (inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase) inhibitors, such as mycophenolic acid and 6-mercaptopurine, up-regulated F7 expression. FVII mRNA transcription was mainly enhanced by accelerated transcription elongation, which was mediated by the P-TEFb (positive-transcription elongation factor b) complex, rather than by promoter activation. Ribavirin unregulated ELL (eleven-nineteen lysine-rich leukaemia) 3 mRNA expression before F7 up-regulation. We observed that ribavirin enhanced ELL3 recruitment to F7, whereas knockdown of ELL3 diminished ribavirin-induced FVII mRNA up-regulation. Ribavirin also enhanced recruitment of CDK9 (cyclin-dependent kinase 9) and AFF4 to F7. These data suggest that ribavirin-induced intracellular GTP depletion recruits a super elongation complex containing P-TEFb, AFF4 and ELL3, to F7, and modulates FVII mRNA transcription elongation. Collectively, we have elucidated a basal mechanism for ribavirin-induced FVII mRNA up-regulation by acceleration of transcription elongation, which may be crucial in understanding its pleiotropic functions in vivo.

  12. Christmas factor: dosage compensation and the production of blood coagulation factor IX.

    PubMed

    FROTA-PESSOA, O; GOMES, E L; CALICCHIO, T R

    1963-01-25

    The amount of factor IX (Christmas factor) for different genotypic classes was determined by means of a variant of the thromboplastin generation test. The mean value for females heterozygous for the Christmas gene was about half the mean values for normal males and for normal homozygous females; means for the latter two groups were about equal. This dosage compensation is interpreted as evidence in support of Lyon's hypothesis, according to which one X chromosome is inactive in mammalian females.

  13. Using a Systems Pharmacology Model of the Blood Coagulation Network to Predict the Effects of Various Therapies on Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, S; Lee, D; Patel-Hett, S; Pittman, DD; Martin, SW; Heatherington, AC; Vicini, P; Hua, F

    2015-01-01

    A number of therapeutics have been developed or are under development aiming to modulate the coagulation network to treat various diseases. We used a systems model to better understand the effect of modulating various components on blood coagulation. A computational model of the coagulation network was built to match in-house in vitro thrombin generation and activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (aPTT) data with various concentrations of recombinant factor VIIa (FVIIa) or factor Xa added to normal human plasma or factor VIII-deficient plasma. Sensitivity analysis applied to the model revealed that lag time, peak thrombin concentration, area under the curve (AUC) of the thrombin generation profile, and aPTT show different sensitivity to changes in coagulation factors’ concentrations and type of plasma used (normal or factor VIII-deficient). We also used the model to explore how variability in concentrations of the proteins in coagulation network can impact the response to FVIIa treatment. PMID:26312163

  14. Impaired Activity of Blood Coagulant Factor XIII in Patients with Necrotizing Enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Tao, Guo-Zhong; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Rong; Liu, Gigi; Abdullah, Fizan; Harris, Mary Cay; Brandt, Mary L; Ehrenkranz, Richard A; Bowers, Corinna; Martin, Camilia R; Moss, R Lawrence; Sylvester, Karl G

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common gastrointestinal (GI) medical/surgical emergency of the newborn and a leading cause of preterm neonate morbidity and mortality. NEC is a challenge to diagnose since it often shares similar clinical features with neonatal sepsis. In the present study, plasma protein profiling was compared among NEC, sepsis and control cohorts using gel electrophoresis, immunoblot and mass spectrometry. We observed significant impairment in the formation of fibrinogen-γ dimers (FGG-dimer) in the plasma of newborns with NEC that could efficiently differentiate NEC and sepsis with a high level of sensitivity and specificity. Interestingly, the impaired FGG-dimer formation could be restored in NEC plasma by the addition of exogenous active factor XIII (FXIII). Enzymatic activity of FXIII was determined to be significantly lower in NEC subject plasma for crosslinking FGG when compared to sepsis. These findings demonstrate a potential novel biomarker and related biologic mechanism for diagnosing NEC, as well as suggest a possible therapeutic strategy. PMID:26277871

  15. Impaired Activity of Blood Coagulant Factor XIII in Patients with Necrotizing Enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Tao, Guo-Zhong; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Rong; Liu, Gigi; Abdullah, Fizan; Harris, Mary Cay; Brandt, Mary L; Ehrenkranz, Richard A; Bowers, Corinna; Martin, Camilia R; Moss, R Lawrence; Sylvester, Karl G

    2015-08-17

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common gastrointestinal (GI) medical/surgical emergency of the newborn and a leading cause of preterm neonate morbidity and mortality. NEC is a challenge to diagnose since it often shares similar clinical features with neonatal sepsis. In the present study, plasma protein profiling was compared among NEC, sepsis and control cohorts using gel electrophoresis, immunoblot and mass spectrometry. We observed significant impairment in the formation of fibrinogen-γ dimers (FGG-dimer) in the plasma of newborns with NEC that could efficiently differentiate NEC and sepsis with a high level of sensitivity and specificity. Interestingly, the impaired FGG-dimer formation could be restored in NEC plasma by the addition of exogenous active factor XIII (FXIII). Enzymatic activity of FXIII was determined to be significantly lower in NEC subject plasma for crosslinking FGG when compared to sepsis. These findings demonstrate a potential novel biomarker and related biologic mechanism for diagnosing NEC, as well as suggest a possible therapeutic strategy.

  16. Impaired Activity of Blood Coagulant Factor XIII in Patients with Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Guo-Zhong; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Rong; Liu, Gigi; Abdullah, Fizan; Harris, Mary Cay; Brandt, Mary L.; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Bowers, Corinna; Martin, Camilia R.; Moss, R. Lawrence; Sylvester, Karl G.

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common gastrointestinal (GI) medical/surgical emergency of the newborn and a leading cause of preterm neonate morbidity and mortality. NEC is a challenge to diagnose since it often shares similar clinical features with neonatal sepsis. In the present study, plasma protein profiling was compared among NEC, sepsis and control cohorts using gel electrophoresis, immunoblot and mass spectrometry. We observed significant impairment in the formation of fibrinogen-γ dimers (FGG-dimer) in the plasma of newborns with NEC that could efficiently differentiate NEC and sepsis with a high level of sensitivity and specificity. Interestingly, the impaired FGG-dimer formation could be restored in NEC plasma by the addition of exogenous active factor XIII (FXIII). Enzymatic activity of FXIII was determined to be significantly lower in NEC subject plasma for crosslinking FGG when compared to sepsis. These findings demonstrate a potential novel biomarker and related biologic mechanism for diagnosing NEC, as well as suggest a possible therapeutic strategy. PMID:26277871

  17. More efficient reversal of dabigatran inhibition of coagulation by activated prothrombin complex concentrate or recombinant factor VIIa than by four-factor prothrombin complex concentrate.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Tomas L; Wallstedt, Maria; Gustafsson, Kerstin M; Persson, Egon; Hillarp, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    The number of patients on antithrombotic treatment due to atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism is increasing fast due to an aging population. A growing proportion will be treated with novel oral anticoagulants, the first in clinical use was the direct oral thrombin inhibitor dabigatran (Pradaxa®). A small percentage of the patients on dabigatran will experience serious bleeding or be in need of urgent surgery. The aim of this study was to test the effects of different hemostatic agents in potentially reversing the anticoagulant effects in vitro in blood or platelet-rich plasma (PRP) spiked with dabigatran. Whole blood or PRP was spiked with the active substance dabigatran, 200 μg/L. We measured clotting time being induced by 1.4 pmol/L tissue factor using the instrument ReoRox2™ and initial clot growth velocity from a tissue factor covered surface using the instrument Thrombodynamics Analyzer T-2™. Dabigatran prolonged clotting time 5-fold but reduced clot growth velocity only slightly. The reversing effects of prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC), activated PCC (APCC) and recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) were then tested. APCC (1.8 U/mL) reduced the prolonged clotting time by 1/3, rFVIIa (2 μg/L) only slightly (n = 10-20). The reduction was not significant using Mann-Whitney test but significant using t-test with Bonferronis' correction for multiple comparisons, whereas PCC (0.56 U/mL) had no effect on clotting time. APCC doubled initial clot growth velocity, although even more in the absence of dabigatran. In conclusion, APCC and rFVIIa, but not PCC, seem to reverse, at least partially, some effects of dabigatran on coagulation parameters. Systematic evaluation of case reports, registries and, ultimately, randomized clinical trials are needed to elucidate potential benefit for patients.

  18. In vitro reversal of supratherapeutic rivaroxaban levels with coagulation factor concentrates

    PubMed Central

    Körber, Mareike K.; Langer, Elisabeth; Kaufner, Lutz; Sander, Michael; von Heymann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background A bleeding patient undergoing therapy with new oral anticoagulants is every clinician’s nightmare as no specific reversal agent is available yet. This in vitro study investigated the effect of prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC), recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) and activated prothrombin complex concentrate (aPCC) on supratherapeutic rivaroxaban concentrations using standard laboratory parameters (prothrombin time [PT], activated partial thromboplastin time [aPTT] and PT ratio) and thromboelastometry (clotting time [CT]). Materials and methods Blood samples from 10 healthy volunteers were collected and spiked with a supratherapeutic dose of rivaroxaban. Afterwards PCC, rFVIIa and aPCC were added in two doses. The laboratory parameters were measured and thromboelastometry was performed. Results The addition of the reversal agents had the following statistically significant effects (all p<0.01): +25 IU/kg PCC: CT −15 s, aPTT +5 s; +50 IU/kg PCC: aPTT +11 s; +90 μg rFVIIa: CT −141 s; +25 IU/kg aPCC: CT −142 s, aPTT −9 s, PT ratio +14%, PT −10.5 s; +50 IU/kg aPCC: CT −118 s, aPTT −7 s, PT ratio +17%, PT −12.2 s. Discussion rFVIIa and aPCC, but not PCC, appear to shorten coagulation times significantly in standard laboratory and thromboelastometry assays. These results need confirmation through evaluation of these agents in the clinical setting. PMID:27177413

  19. In silico designing of hyper-glycosylated analogs for the human coagulation factor IX.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Fahimeh; Zomorodipour, Alireza; Karkhane, Ali Asghar; Khorramizadeh, M Reza

    2016-07-01

    N-glycosylation is a process during which a glycan moiety attaches to the asparagine residue in the N-glycosylation consensus sequence (Asn-Xxx-Ser/Thr), where Xxx can be any amino acid except proline. Introduction of a new N-glycosylation site into a protein backbone leads to its hyper-glycosylation, and may improve the protein properties such as solubility, folding, stability, and secretion. Glyco-engineering is an approach to facilitate the hyper-glycosylation of recombinant proteins by application of the site-directed mutagenesis methods. In this regard, selection of a suitable location on the surface of a protein for introduction of a new N-glycosylation site is a main concern. In this work, a computational approach was conducted to select suitable location(s) for introducing new N-glycosylation sites into the human coagulation factor IX (hFIX). With this aim, the first 45 residues of mature hFIX were explored to find out suitable positions for introducing either Asn or Ser/Thr residues, to create new N-glycosylation site(s). Our exploration lead to detection of five potential positions, for hyper-glycosylation. For each suggested position, an analog was defined and subjected for N-glycosylation efficiency prediction. After generation of three-dimensional structures, by homology-based modeling, the five designed analogs were examined by molecular dynamic (MD) simulations, to predict their stability levels and probable structural distortions caused by amino acid substitutions, relative to the native counterpart. Three out of five suggested analogs, namely; E15T, K22N, and R37N, reached equilibration state with relatively constant Root Mean Square Deviation values. Additional analysis on the data obtained during MD simulations, lead us to conclude that, R37N is the only qualified analog with the most similar structure and dynamic behavior to that of the native counterpart, to be considered for further experimental investigations. PMID:27356208

  20. Requirements for Receptor Engagement during Infection by Adenovirus Complexed with Blood Coagulation Factor X

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Angela C.; Parker, Alan L.; Duffy, Margaret R.; Coughlan, Lynda; van Rooijen, Nico; Kähäri, Veli-Matti; Nicklin, Stuart A.; Baker, Andrew H.

    2010-01-01

    Human adenoviruses from multiple species bind to coagulation factor X (FX), yet the importance of this interaction in adenovirus dissemination is unknown. Upon contact with blood, vectors based on adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) binds to FX via the hexon protein with nanomolar affinity, leading to selective uptake of the complex into the liver and spleen. The Ad5:FX complex putatively targets heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). The aim of this study was to elucidate the specific requirements for Ad5:FX-mediated cellular uptake in this high-affinity pathway, specifically the HSPG receptor requirements as well as the role of penton base-mediated integrin engagement in subsequent internalisation. Removal of HS sidechains by enzymatic digestion or competition with highly-sulfated heparins/heparan sulfates significantly decreased FX-mediated Ad5 cell binding in vitro and ex vivo. Removal of N-linked and, in particular, O-linked sulfate groups significantly attenuated the inhibitory capabilities of heparin, while the chemical inhibition of endogenous HSPG sulfation dose-dependently reduced FX-mediated Ad5 cellular uptake. Unlike native heparin, modified heparins lacking O- or N-linked sulfate groups were unable to inhibit Ad5 accumulation in the liver 1h after intravascular administration of adenovirus. Similar results were observed in vitro using Ad5 vectors possessing mutations ablating CAR- and/or αv integrin binding, demonstrating that attachment of the Ad5:FX complex to the cell surface involves HSPG sulfation. Interestingly, Ad5 vectors ablated for αv integrin binding showed markedly delayed cell entry, highlighting the need for an efficient post-attachment internalisation signal for optimal Ad5 uptake and transport following surface binding mediated through FX. This study therefore integrates the established model of αv integrin-dependent adenoviral infection with the high-affinity FX-mediated pathway. This has important implications for mechanisms that define

  1. The M358R variant of α(1)-proteinase inhibitor inhibits coagulation factor VIIa.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, William P; Bhakta, Varsha

    2016-02-12

    The naturally occurring M358R mutation of the plasma serpin α1-proteinase inhibitor (API) changes both its cleavable reactive centre bond to Arg-Ser and the efficacy with which it inhibits different proteases, reducing the rate of inhibition of neutrophil elastase, and enhancing that of thrombin, factor XIa, and kallikrein, by several orders of magnitude. Although another plasma serpin with an Arg-Ser reactive centre, antithrombin (AT), has been shown to inhibit factor VIIa (FVIIa), no published data are available with respect to FVIIa inhibition by API M358R. Recombinant bacterially-expressed API M358R and plasma-derived AT were therefore compared using gel-based and kinetic assays of FVIIa integrity and activity. Under pseudo-first order conditions of excess serpin over protease, both AT and API M358R formed denaturation-resistant inhibitory complexes with FVIIa in reactions accelerated by TF; AT, but not API M358R, also required heparin for maximal activity. The second order rate constant for heparin-independent API M358R-mediated FVIIa inhibition was determined to be 7.8 ± 0.8 × 10(2) M(-1)sec(-1). We conclude that API M358R inhibits FVIIa by forming inhibitory complexes of the serpin type more rapidly than AT in the absence of heparin. The likely 20-fold excess of API M358R over AT in patient plasma during inflammation raises the possibility that it could contribute to the hemorrhagic tendencies manifested by rare individuals expressing this mutant serpin. PMID:26797521

  2. The Association of Coagulation Factor V (Leiden) and Factor II (Prothrombin) Mutations With Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Pirhoushiaran, Maryam; Ghasemi, Mohammad Reza; Hami, Javad; Zargari, Peyman; Sasan Nezhad, Payam; Azarpazhooh, Mahmood Reza; Sadr Nabavi, Ariane

    2014-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological studies indicate that over the past forty years, the stroke incidence rates has increased. Factors V and II mutations are established genetic-variant risk factors for venous thrombosis; however, their contribution to stroke is a controversial issue. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the potential association of FV and FII mutations with stroke in an Iranian population. Patients and Methods: The study population consisted of 153 patients of different stroke subtypes (except cryptogenic strokes), admitted to Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad, Iran. The control group included 153 age- and sex-matched subjects without a history of cerebrovascular or neurologic diseases. Mutations of FV and FII were determined by using a TaqMan SNP Genotyping technique. The chi-square and Exact Fisher tests were used to analyze the baseline characteristics. Results were as follows: The calculated P-value for sex and diabetes mellitus were 0.907 and 1.000, respectively. The case and control groups were also matched in low density lipoprotein (P = 0.816), high density lipoprotein (P = 0.323), triglyceride (P = 0.846), and total cholesterol (P = 0.079). Results: Analysis of the FV showed that none of the study subjects were AA homozygous for this mutation and only 6 heterozygous subjects were detected in the case and control groups. Regarding FII variants, none of the study subjects were AG heterozygous and only 1 AA homozygous was detected in the control group. Conclusions: The prevalence of both FV and FII variants are population based. Iran is an ethnically diverse country. Therefore, for a comprehensive analysis of a potential association of FV and/or FII mutations with stroke among Iranian population, epidemiological studies could be conducted among different ethnic groups. PMID:25763204

  3. Coagulation Changes during Presyncope and Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Cvirn, Gerhard; Schlagenhauf, Axel; Leschnik, Bettina; Koestenberger, Martin; Roessler, Andreas; Jantscher, Andreas; Vrecko, Karoline; Juergens, Guenther; Hinghofer-Szalkay, Helmut; Goswami, Nandu

    2012-01-01

    Orthostatic stress activates the coagulation system. The extent of coagulation activation with full orthostatic load leading to presyncope is unknown. We examined in 7 healthy males whether presyncope, using a combination of head up tilt (HUT) and lower body negative pressure (LBNP), leads to coagulation changes as well as in the return to baseline during recovery. Coagulation responses (whole blood thrombelastometry, whole blood platelet aggregation, endogenous thrombin potential, markers of endothelial activation and thrombin generation), blood cell counts and plasma mass density (for volume changes) were measured before, during, and 20 min after the orthostatic stress. Maximum orthostatic load led to a 25% plasma volume loss. Blood cell counts, prothrombin levels, thrombin peak, endogenous thrombin potential, and tissue factor pathway inhibitor levels increased during the protocol, commensurable with hemoconcentration. The markers of endothelial activation (tissue factor, tissue plasminogen activator), and thrombin generation (F1+2, prothrombin fragments 1 and 2, and TAT, thrombin-antithrombin complex) increased to an extent far beyond the hemoconcentration effect. During recovery, the markers of endothelial activation returned to initial supine values, but F1+2 and TAT remained elevated, suggestive of increased coagulability. Our findings of increased coagulability at 20 min of recovery from presyncope may have greater clinical significance than short-term procoagulant changes observed during standing. While our experiments were conducted in healthy subjects, the observed hypercoagulability during graded orthostatic challenge, at presyncope and in recovery may be an important risk factor particularly for patients already at high risk for thromboembolic events (e.g. those with coronary heart disease, atherosclerosis or hypertensives). PMID:22876309

  4. Evaluation of the metal binding sites in a recombinant coagulation factor VIII identifies two sites with unique metal binding properties.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Lars Anders; Thim, Lars; Olsen, Ole Hvilsted; Nicolaisen, Else Marie

    2013-06-01

    Coagulation factor VIII is a glycosylated, non-covalent heterodimer consisting of a heavy chain (A1-A2-B domains) and a light chain (A3-C1-C2 domains). The association of the chains, and the stability and function of the dimer depend on the presence of metal ions. We applied X-ray fluorescence, X-ray crystallographic structure determination with anomalous signals at different wavelengths, and colorimetric measurements to evaluate the metal binding sites in a recombinant factor VIII molecule, turoctocog alfa. We identified a metal binding site in domain A3 dominated by Cu(+) binding and a site in domain A1 dominated by Zn(2+) binding.

  5. The Massive Bleeding after the Operation of Hip Joint Surgery with the Acquired Haemorrhagic Coagulation Factor XIII(13) Deficiency: Two Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Akio; Kaneko, Kazuo; Obayashi, Osamu; Mogami, Atsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Two women, aged 81 and 61, became haemorrhagic after surgery. Their previous surgeries were uneventful with no unexpected bleeding observed. Blood tests prior to the current surgeries indicated normal values including those related to coagulation. There were no problems with the current surgeries prior to leaving the operating room. At 3 hours after the surgery, the 81-year-old patient had an outflow of the drain at 1290 grams and her blood pressure decreased. She had disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). The 61-year-old woman had repeated haemorrhages after her current surgery for a long time. Their abnormal haemorrhages were caused by a deficiency of coagulation factor XIII(13). The mechanism of haemorrhagic coagulation factor XIII(13) deficiency is not understood, and it is a rare disorder. The only diagnostic method to detect this disorder is to measure factor XIII(13) activity in the blood. In this paper, we used Arabic and Roman numerals at the same time to avoid confusion of coagulation factor XIII(13) with coagulation factor VIII(8) that causes hemophilia A. PMID:23533879

  6. Surface modification with poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate-co-acrylic acid) to reduce fibrinogen adsorption, platelet adhesion, and plasma coagulation.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Wei-Hsuan; Wang, Meng-Jiy; Chien, Hsiu-Wen; Wei, Ta-Chin; Lee, Chiapyng; Tsai, Wei-Bor

    2011-12-12

    Zwitterionic sulfobetaine methacrylate (SBMA) polymers were known to possess excellent antifouling properties due to high hydration capacity and neutral charge surface. In this study, copolymers of SBMA and acrylic acid (AA) with a variety of compositions were synthesized and were immobilized onto polymeric substrates with layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte films via electrostatic interaction. The amounts of platelet adhesion and fibrinogen adsorption were determined to evaluate hemocompatibility of poly(SBMA-co-AA)-modified substrates. Among various deposition conditions by modulating SBMA ratio in the copolymers and pH of the deposition solution, poly(SBMA(56)-co-AA(44)) deposited at pH 3.0 possessed the best hemocompatibility. This work demonstrated that poly(SBMA-co-AA) copolymers adsorbed on polyelectrolyte-base films via electrostatic interaction improve hemocompatibility effectively and are applicable for various substrates including TCPS, PU, and PDMS. Furthermore, poly(SBMA-co-AA)-coated substrate possesses great durability under rigorous conditions. The preliminary hemocompatibility tests regarding platelet adhesion, fibrinogen adsorption, and plasma coagulation suggest the potential of this technique for the application to blood-contacting biomedical devices. PMID:22077421

  7. Hydroxyurea increases plasma concentrations of microparticles and reduces coagulation activation and fibrinolysis in patients with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Brunetta, Denise Menezes; De Santis, Gil Cunha; Silva-Pinto, Ana Cristina; Oliveira de Oliveira, Luciana Correa; Covas, Dimas Tadeu

    2015-01-01

    Microparticles (MPs) are present in healthy subjects and their concentration increases in patients at high risk of thrombosis. We evaluated 10 patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) treated with hydroxyurea (HU) and 13 SCA patients without this treatment. MP concentrations were determined by flow cytometry. Coagulation was evaluated using the thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT) and D-dimers. Total MP concentrations were increased in the HU-treated group (265 × 10(6)/ml vs. 67.45 × 10(6)/ml; p = 0.0026), as well as MPs derived from RBC (67.83 × 10(6)/ml vs. 26.31 × 10(6)/ml; p = 0.05), monocytes (51.31 × 10(6)/ml vs. 9.03 × 10(6)/ml; p = 0.0084), monocytes with tissue factor (TF) expression (2.27 × 10(6)/ml vs. 0.27 × 10(6)/ml; p = 0.0058), endothelium (49.42 × 10(6)/ml vs. 7.23 × 10(6)/ml; p = 0.007) and endothelium with TF (1.42 × 10(6)/ml vs. 0.26 × 10(6)/ml; p = 0.0043). Furthermore, the concentrations of TAT (7.56 vs. 10.98 µg/l; p = 0.014) and D-dimers (0.65 vs. 1.29 µg/ml; p = 0.007) were reduced with HU. The MP elevation may suggest a direct cytotoxic effect of HU. Another explanation is a cell surface increase secondary to a megaloblastic process, resulting in increased vesicle release. In our opinion, the known benefits of HU on SCA patients, along with the reduction in coagulation activation, surpass its potential detrimental effect on MPs. Future studies should elucidate the role of MPs and demonstrate their significance in different contexts. PMID:25472687

  8. Inhibition of leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions and inflammation by peptides from a bacterial adhesin which mimic coagulation factor X.

    PubMed Central

    Rozdzinski, E; Sandros, J; van der Flier, M; Young, A; Spellerberg, B; Bhattacharyya, C; Straub, J; Musso, G; Putney, S; Starzyk, R

    1995-01-01

    Factor X (factor ten) of the coagulation cascade binds to the integrin CD11b/CD18 during inflammation, initiating procoagulant activity on the surface of leukocytes (Altieri, D.C., O.R. Etingin, D.S. Fair, T.K. Brunk, J.E. Geltosky, D.P. Hajjar, and T. S. Edgington. 1991. Science [Wash.DC]. 254:1200-1202). Filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), an adhesin of Bordetella pertussis also binds to the CD11b/CD18 integrin (Relman D., E. Tuomanen, S. Falkow, D.T. Golenbock, K. Saukkonen, and S.D. Wright. 1990. Cell. 61:1375-1382). FHA and the CD11b/CD18 binding loops of Factor X share amino acid sequence similarity. FHA peptides similar to Factor X binding loops inhibited 125I-Factor X binding to human neutrophils and prolonged clotting time. In addition, ETKEVDG and its Factor X analogue prevented transendothelial migration of leukocytes in vitro and reduced leukocytosis and blood brain barrier disruption in vivo. Interference with leukocyte migration by a coagulation-based peptide suggests a novel strategy for antiinflammatory therapy. PMID:7883955

  9. Hysteresis-like binding of coagulation factors X/Xa to procoagulant activated platelets and phospholipids results from multistep association and membrane-dependent multimerization.

    PubMed

    Podoplelova, Nadezhda A; Sveshnikova, Anastasia N; Kurasawa, James H; Sarafanov, Andrey G; Chambost, Herve; Vasil'ev, Sergey A; Demina, Irina A; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2016-06-01

    Binding of coagulation factors X (fX) and Xa (fXa) to activated platelets is required for the formation of membrane-dependent enzymatic complexes of intrinsic tenase and prothrombinase. We carried out an in-depth characterization of fX/fXa binding to phospholipids and gel-filtered, thrombin-activated platelets. Flow cytometry, surface plasmon resonance, and computational modeling were used to investigate interactions of fX/fXa with the membranes. Confocal microscopy was employed to study fXa binding to platelet thrombi formed in flowing whole blood under arterial conditions. Binding of fX/fXa to either vesicles or procoagulant platelets did not follow a traditional one-step reversible binding model. Their dissociation was a two-step process resulting in a plateau that was up to 10-fold greater than the saturation value observed in the association experiments. Computational modeling and experimental evidence suggested that this was caused by a combination of two-step association (mainly for fX) and multimerization on the membrane (mainly for fXa). Importantly, fX formed multimers with fXa, thereby improving its retention. The same binding/dissociation hysteresis was observed for annexin V known to form trimers on the membranes. Experiments with platelets from gray syndrome patients showed that alpha-granular factor Va provided an additional high-affinity binding site for fXa that did not affect the hysteresis. Confocal microscopy observation of fXa binding to platelet thrombi in a flow chamber and its wash-out confirmed that this phenomenon persisted under physiologically relevant conditions. This suggests its possible role of "locking" coagulation factors on the membrane and preventing their inhibition in plasma and removal from thrombi by flow.

  10. The Role of Putative Phosphatidylserine-Interactive Residues of Tissue Factor on Its Coagulant Activity at the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Shabbir A.; Pendurthi, Usha R.; Sen, Prosenjit; Rao, L. Vijaya Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the outer leaflet of the cell membrane is thought to play a critical role in tissue factor (TF) decryption. Recent molecular dynamics simulation studies suggested that the TF ectodomain may directly interact with PS. To investigate the potential role of TF direct interaction with the cell surface phospholipids on basal TF activity and the enhanced TF activity following the decryption, one or all of the putative PS-interactive residues in the TF ectodomain were mutated and tested for their coagulant activity in cell systems. Out of the 9 selected TF mutants, five of them -TFS160A, TFS161A, TFS162A, TFK165A, and TFD180A- exhibited a similar TF coagulant activity to that of the wild-type TF. The specific activity of three mutants, TFK159A, TFS163A, and TFK166A, was reduced substantially. Mutation of the glycine residue at the position 164 markedly abrogated the TF coagulant activity, resulting in ~90% inhibition. Mutation of all nine lipid binding residues together did not further decrease the activity of TF compared to TFG164A. A similar fold increase in TF activity was observed in wild-type TF and all TF mutants following the treatment of THP-1 cells with either calcium ionomycin or HgCl2, two agents that are commonly used to decrypt TF. Overall, our data show that a few select TF residues that are implicated in interacting with PS contribute to the TF coagulant activity at the cell surface. However, our data also indicate that TF regions outside of the putative lipid binding region may also contribute to PS-dependent decryption of TF. PMID:27348126

  11. Estimation of dabigatran plasma concentrations in the perioperative setting. An ex vivo study using dedicated coagulation assays.

    PubMed

    Douxfils, Jonathan; Lessire, Sarah; Dincq, Anne-Sophie; Hjemdahl, Paul; Rönquist-Nii, Yuko; Pohanka, Anton; Gourdin, Maximilien; Chatelain, Bernard; Dogné, Jean-Michel; Mullier, François

    2015-04-01

    The perioperative management of dabigatran is challenging, and recommendations based on activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and thrombin time (TT) are unsatisfactory. Dedicated coagulation tests have limitations at plasma concentrations < 50 ng/ml. Therefore, a more sensitive test, which is available 24/7, is required. It was the aim of this study to investigate the performance of the Hemoclot Thrombin Inhibitors® LOW (HTI LOW) kit, a diluted thrombin time, and the STA® - ECA II(ECA-II) kit, a chromogenic variant of the ecarin clotting time, that were developed to measure low dabigatran concentrations, compared to reference dabigatran analysis by liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This study included 33 plasma samples from patients treated with dabigatran etexilate who had plasma concentrations < 200 ng/ml. HTI LOW and ECA-II were performed along with HTI, aPTT (STA®-C. K.Prest® and SynthasIL®) and TT (STA® - Thrombin). All procedures were performed according to recommendations by the manufacturers. Linear (or curvilinear) correlations and Bland-Altman analyses were calculated. For free dabigatran concentrations < 50 ng/ml, the R² of linear correlations were 0.69, 0.84 and 0.61, with HTI, HTI LOW and ECA-II, respectively. The R² for TT, STA®-C. K.Prest® and SynthasIL® were 0.67, 0.42 and 0.15. For HTI, HTI LOW and ECA-II, Bland-Altman analyses revealed mean differences of -6 ng/ml (95 %CI: -25-14 ng/ml), 1 ng/ml (95 %CI: -18-19 ng/ml) and -1 ng/ml (95 %CI: -25-23 ng/ml), demonstrating that tests dedicated to measuring low concentrations are more accurate than HTI. In conclusion, the use of HTI LOW or ECA-II to assess low plasma dabigatran concentrations is supported by our findings.

  12. Estimation of dabigatran plasma concentrations in the perioperative setting. An ex vivo study using dedicated coagulation assays.

    PubMed

    Douxfils, Jonathan; Lessire, Sarah; Dincq, Anne-Sophie; Hjemdahl, Paul; Rönquist-Nii, Yuko; Pohanka, Anton; Gourdin, Maximilien; Chatelain, Bernard; Dogné, Jean-Michel; Mullier, François

    2015-04-01

    The perioperative management of dabigatran is challenging, and recommendations based on activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and thrombin time (TT) are unsatisfactory. Dedicated coagulation tests have limitations at plasma concentrations < 50 ng/ml. Therefore, a more sensitive test, which is available 24/7, is required. It was the aim of this study to investigate the performance of the Hemoclot Thrombin Inhibitors® LOW (HTI LOW) kit, a diluted thrombin time, and the STA® - ECA II(ECA-II) kit, a chromogenic variant of the ecarin clotting time, that were developed to measure low dabigatran concentrations, compared to reference dabigatran analysis by liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This study included 33 plasma samples from patients treated with dabigatran etexilate who had plasma concentrations < 200 ng/ml. HTI LOW and ECA-II were performed along with HTI, aPTT (STA®-C. K.Prest® and SynthasIL®) and TT (STA® - Thrombin). All procedures were performed according to recommendations by the manufacturers. Linear (or curvilinear) correlations and Bland-Altman analyses were calculated. For free dabigatran concentrations < 50 ng/ml, the R² of linear correlations were 0.69, 0.84 and 0.61, with HTI, HTI LOW and ECA-II, respectively. The R² for TT, STA®-C. K.Prest® and SynthasIL® were 0.67, 0.42 and 0.15. For HTI, HTI LOW and ECA-II, Bland-Altman analyses revealed mean differences of -6 ng/ml (95 %CI: -25-14 ng/ml), 1 ng/ml (95 %CI: -18-19 ng/ml) and -1 ng/ml (95 %CI: -25-23 ng/ml), demonstrating that tests dedicated to measuring low concentrations are more accurate than HTI. In conclusion, the use of HTI LOW or ECA-II to assess low plasma dabigatran concentrations is supported by our findings. PMID:25519251

  13. Minimum wound size for clotting: flowing blood coagulates on a single collagen fiber presenting tissue factor and von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu; Tomaiuolo, Maurizio; Diamond, Scott L

    2016-08-01

    It is unknown if a lower size limit exists for human blood coagulation under flow over physiological vessel wall triggers as small as a single collagen fiber. Prior determinations of the smallest sized surface stimuli necessary for clotting of human blood, defined as the patch size threshold, have not deployed whole blood, hemodynamic flow, and platelet adhesive stimuli. For whole blood perfused in microfluidic devices, we report that steady venous flow (wall shear rate, 100 s(-1)) was sufficient to drive platelet deposition on 20 micron long zones of collagen fibers or on a single fiber. With tissue factor (TF)-coated collagen, flowing blood generated robust platelet deposits, platelet-localized thrombin, and fibrin on a single collagen fiber, thus demonstrating the absence of a physiological patch size threshold under venous flow. In contrast, at arterial wall shear rate (1000 s(-1)) with TF present, essentially no platelet or fibrin deposition occurred on 20 micron collagen zones or on a single collagen fiber, demonstrating a patch threshold, which was overcome by pre-coating the collagen with von Willebrand factor (vWF). For venous flows, human blood can clot on one of the smallest biological units of a single collagen fiber presenting TF. For arterial flows, vWF together with TF allows human blood to generate thrombin and fibrin on a patch stimulus as limited as a single collagen fiber. vWF-dependent platelet adhesion represents a particle-based sensing mechanism of micron-scale stimuli that then allows amplification of the molecular components of TF-driven thrombin and fibrin production under arterial flow. PMID:27339024

  14. Minimum wound size for clotting: flowing blood coagulates on a single collagen fiber presenting tissue factor and von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu; Tomaiuolo, Maurizio; Diamond, Scott L

    2016-08-01

    It is unknown if a lower size limit exists for human blood coagulation under flow over physiological vessel wall triggers as small as a single collagen fiber. Prior determinations of the smallest sized surface stimuli necessary for clotting of human blood, defined as the patch size threshold, have not deployed whole blood, hemodynamic flow, and platelet adhesive stimuli. For whole blood perfused in microfluidic devices, we report that steady venous flow (wall shear rate, 100 s(-1)) was sufficient to drive platelet deposition on 20 micron long zones of collagen fibers or on a single fiber. With tissue factor (TF)-coated collagen, flowing blood generated robust platelet deposits, platelet-localized thrombin, and fibrin on a single collagen fiber, thus demonstrating the absence of a physiological patch size threshold under venous flow. In contrast, at arterial wall shear rate (1000 s(-1)) with TF present, essentially no platelet or fibrin deposition occurred on 20 micron collagen zones or on a single collagen fiber, demonstrating a patch threshold, which was overcome by pre-coating the collagen with von Willebrand factor (vWF). For venous flows, human blood can clot on one of the smallest biological units of a single collagen fiber presenting TF. For arterial flows, vWF together with TF allows human blood to generate thrombin and fibrin on a patch stimulus as limited as a single collagen fiber. vWF-dependent platelet adhesion represents a particle-based sensing mechanism of micron-scale stimuli that then allows amplification of the molecular components of TF-driven thrombin and fibrin production under arterial flow.

  15. Neutrophil elastase cleavage of human factor IX generates an activated factor IX-like product devoid of coagulant function.

    PubMed

    Samis, J A; Kam, E; Nesheim, M E; Giles, A R

    1998-08-15

    In preliminary studies, the generation of thrombin in vivo was found to induce a 92% loss of functional activity of factor IX (F.IX) despite the detection by Western blotting of a product resembling activated F.IX (F.IXa) and a 25% increase in F.IX antigen levels (Hoogendoorn et al, Thromb Haemost 69:1127, 1993 [abstr]). These changes were associated with evidence of increased elastase availability. To study the possibility that these two observations were related, a detailed physical and functional characterization of the hydrolysis of purified human F.IX by human neutrophil elastase (HNE) was performed in vitro. An activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) clotting assay demonstrated that, although HNE eliminated the potential of F.IX to be activated, it only marginally reduced the F.IXa activity. Reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) indicated that HNE treatment of F.IX generated cleavage products of 30 and 20 kD that could not be distinguished from the respective heavy and light chain peptides that were identified in parallel studies when F.IX was activated by activated bovine F.XI (F.XIa), one of its physiological activators. In addition, nonreducing SDS-PAGE demonstrated that HNE-treated F.IX formed no complexes with antithrombin III (ATIII) in the presence of heparin. Furthermore, HNE-treated F.IX was unable to (1) bind the active site probe p-aminobenzamidine; (2) hydrolyze the synthetic peptide substrate CH3SO2-Leu-Gly-Arg-p-nitroanilide; and (3) activate human factor X (F.X). In contrast to dansyl-Glu-Gly-Arg-chloromethyl ketone (dEGR)-inactivated F.IXa, HNE-treated F.IX (0.01 to 10,000 pmol/L) failed to inhibit the clotting activity of F.IXa (10 pmol/L) in the aPTT. NH2-terminal sequencing indicated that HNE cleaved human F.IX at Thr140, Thr144, Ile164, Thr172, and Val181. The cleavages at Thr140/Thr144 and at Thr172/Val181 are both very close to the normal F.XIa alpha-(Arg145) and beta-(Arg180) cleavage sites

  16. Impact of experimental haemodilution on platelet function, thrombin generation and clot firmness: effects of different coagulation factor concentrates

    PubMed Central

    Caballo, Carolina; Escolar, Gines; Diaz-Ricart, Maribel; Lopez-Vílchez, Irene; Lozano, Miguel; Cid, Joan; Pino, Marcos; Beltrán, Joan; Basora, Misericordia; Pereira, Arturo; Galan, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Haemodilution during resuscitation after massive haemorrhage may worsen the coagulopathy and perpetuate bleeding. Materials and methods Blood samples from healthy donors were diluted (30 and-60%) using crystalloids (saline, Ringer’s lactate, PlasmalyteTM) or colloids (6% hydroxyethylstarch [HES130/0.4], 5% human albumin, and gelatin). The effects of haemodilution on platelet adhesion (Impact R), thrombin generation (TG), and thromboelastometry (TEM) parameters were analysed as were the effects of fibrinogen, prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC), activated recombinant factor VII (FVIIa), and cryoprecipates on haemodilution. Results Platelet interactions was already significantly reduced at 30% haemodilution. Platelet reactivity was not improved by addition of any of the concentrates tested. A decrease in TG and marked alterations of TEM parameters were noted at 60% haemodilution. HES130/0.4 was the expander with the most deleterious action. TG was significantly enhanced by PCC whereas rFVIIa only caused a mild acceleration of TG initiation. Fibrinogen restored the alterations of TEM parameters caused by haemodilution including those caused by HES 130/0.4. Cryoprecipitates significantly improved the alterations caused by haemodilution on TG and TEM parameters; the effects on TG disappeared after ultracentrifugation of the cryoprecipitates. Discussion The haemostatic alterations caused by haemodilution are multifactorial and affect both blood cells and coagulation. In our in vitro approach, HES 130/0.4 had the most deleterious effect on haemostasis parameters. Coagulation factor concentrates did not improve platelet interactions in the Impact R, but did have favourable effects on coagulation parameters measured by TG and TEM. Fibrinogen notably improved TEM parameters without increasing thrombin generation, suggesting that this concentrate may help to preserve blood clotting abilities during haemodilution without enhancing the prothrombotic risk. PMID

  17. Positive selection during the evolution of the blood coagulation factors in the context of their disease-causing mutations.

    PubMed

    Rallapalli, Pavithra M; Orengo, Christine A; Studer, Romain A; Perkins, Stephen J

    2014-11-01

    Blood coagulation occurs through a cascade of enzymes and cofactors that produces a fibrin clot, while otherwise maintaining hemostasis. The 11 human coagulation factors (FG, FII-FXIII) have been identified across all vertebrates, suggesting that they emerged with the first vertebrates around 500 Ma. Human FVIII, FIX, and FXI are associated with thousands of disease-causing mutations. Here, we evaluated the strength of selective pressures on the 14 genes coding for the 11 factors during vertebrate evolution, and compared these with human mutations in FVIII, FIX, and FXI. Positive selection was identified for fibrinogen (FG), FIII, FVIII, FIX, and FX in the mammalian Primates and Laurasiatheria and the Sauropsida (reptiles and birds). This showed that the coagulation system in vertebrates was under strong selective pressures, perhaps to adapt against blood-invading pathogens. The comparison of these results with disease-causing mutations reported in FVIII, FIX, and FXI showed that the number of disease-causing mutations, and the probability of positive selection were inversely related to each other. It was concluded that when a site was under positive selection, it was less likely to be associated with disease-causing mutations. In contrast, sites under negative selection were more likely to be associated with disease-causing mutations and be destabilizing. A residue-by-residue comparison of the FVIII, FIX, and FXI sequence alignments confirmed this. This improved understanding of evolutionary changes in FVIII, FIX, and FXI provided greater insight into disease-causing mutations, and better assessments of the codon sites that may be mutated in applications of gene therapy.

  18. Positive Selection during the Evolution of the Blood Coagulation Factors in the Context of Their Disease-Causing Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Rallapalli, Pavithra M.; Orengo, Christine A.; Studer, Romain A.; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Blood coagulation occurs through a cascade of enzymes and cofactors that produces a fibrin clot, while otherwise maintaining hemostasis. The 11 human coagulation factors (FG, FII–FXIII) have been identified across all vertebrates, suggesting that they emerged with the first vertebrates around 500 Ma. Human FVIII, FIX, and FXI are associated with thousands of disease-causing mutations. Here, we evaluated the strength of selective pressures on the 14 genes coding for the 11 factors during vertebrate evolution, and compared these with human mutations in FVIII, FIX, and FXI. Positive selection was identified for fibrinogen (FG), FIII, FVIII, FIX, and FX in the mammalian Primates and Laurasiatheria and the Sauropsida (reptiles and birds). This showed that the coagulation system in vertebrates was under strong selective pressures, perhaps to adapt against blood-invading pathogens. The comparison of these results with disease-causing mutations reported in FVIII, FIX, and FXI showed that the number of disease-causing mutations, and the probability of positive selection were inversely related to each other. It was concluded that when a site was under positive selection, it was less likely to be associated with disease-causing mutations. In contrast, sites under negative selection were more likely to be associated with disease-causing mutations and be destabilizing. A residue-by-residue comparison of the FVIII, FIX, and FXI sequence alignments confirmed this. This improved understanding of evolutionary changes in FVIII, FIX, and FXI provided greater insight into disease-causing mutations, and better assessments of the codon sites that may be mutated in applications of gene therapy. PMID:25158795

  19. Ontogenetic variation of metalloproteinases and plasma coagulant activity in venoms of wild Bothrops atrox specimens from Amazonian rain forest.

    PubMed

    López-Lozano, Jorge Luis; de Sousa, Marcelo Valle; Ricart, Carlos André O; Chávez-Olortegui, Carlos; Flores Sanchez, Eladio; Muniz, Emiro G; Bührnheim, Paulo F; Morhy, Lauro

    2002-07-01

    A comparative study of venoms from juvenile, sub-adult and adult wild Bothrops atrox specimens captured in Manaus region (Brazil) was performed. All venoms tested had acidic pH (5.5) and the human plasma coagulant activity was higher in venoms from juvenile and sub-adult specimens than in adults. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed that the most intense bands in adult venoms corresponded to polypeptides of 23 and 50kDa. The 23kDa protein was not detected in juvenile venoms. The 23 and 50kDa proteins were purified by two steps of reversed phase-HPLC followed by size exclusion HPLC. Partial amino acid sequence of the 23kDa protein showed homology to metalloproteinases from other snake venoms. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometric analysis (ESI-MS) showed that the 23kDa band contained at least three isoforms of 23030, 23300 and 23645Da. The 50kDa polypeptide was N-terminally blocked for Edman degradation and presented molecular masses ranging from 46.8 to 49.4kDa by ESI-MS. Both proteins were detected by anti-mutalysin II antibodies in immunoblotting assay indicating that they belong to the metalloproteinase family. Immunoblotting analysis also showed that the 23kDa band increased in intensity from juvenile to adult specimens.SDS-PAGE analysis of juvenile and adult venoms following autoproteolysis in pH 7.4 suggested that endogenous venom metalloproteinases can digest the 50kDa metalloproteinase, originating a new protein band of 27kDa. It was also demonstrated in juvenile venoms that the 23kDa band was not the result of proteolytic processing of the 50kDa metalloproteinase. PMID:12076654

  20. Ontogenetic variation of metalloproteinases and plasma coagulant activity in venoms of wild Bothrops atrox specimens from Amazonian rain forest.

    PubMed

    López-Lozano, Jorge Luis; de Sousa, Marcelo Valle; Ricart, Carlos André O; Chávez-Olortegui, Carlos; Flores Sanchez, Eladio; Muniz, Emiro G; Bührnheim, Paulo F; Morhy, Lauro

    2002-07-01

    A comparative study of venoms from juvenile, sub-adult and adult wild Bothrops atrox specimens captured in Manaus region (Brazil) was performed. All venoms tested had acidic pH (5.5) and the human plasma coagulant activity was higher in venoms from juvenile and sub-adult specimens than in adults. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed that the most intense bands in adult venoms corresponded to polypeptides of 23 and 50kDa. The 23kDa protein was not detected in juvenile venoms. The 23 and 50kDa proteins were purified by two steps of reversed phase-HPLC followed by size exclusion HPLC. Partial amino acid sequence of the 23kDa protein showed homology to metalloproteinases from other snake venoms. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometric analysis (ESI-MS) showed that the 23kDa band contained at least three isoforms of 23030, 23300 and 23645Da. The 50kDa polypeptide was N-terminally blocked for Edman degradation and presented molecular masses ranging from 46.8 to 49.4kDa by ESI-MS. Both proteins were detected by anti-mutalysin II antibodies in immunoblotting assay indicating that they belong to the metalloproteinase family. Immunoblotting analysis also showed that the 23kDa band increased in intensity from juvenile to adult specimens.SDS-PAGE analysis of juvenile and adult venoms following autoproteolysis in pH 7.4 suggested that endogenous venom metalloproteinases can digest the 50kDa metalloproteinase, originating a new protein band of 27kDa. It was also demonstrated in juvenile venoms that the 23kDa band was not the result of proteolytic processing of the 50kDa metalloproteinase.

  1. Nattokinase decreases plasma levels of fibrinogen, factor VII, and factor VIII in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Chien-Hsun; Shen, Ming-Ching; Lin, Jen-Shiou; Wen, Yao-Ke; Hwang, Kai-Lin; Cham, Thau-Ming; Yang, Nae-Cherng

    2009-03-01

    Nattokinase, a serine proteinase from Bacillus subtilis, is considered to be one of the most active functional ingredients found in natto. In this study, we hypothesized that nattokinase could reduce certain factors of blood clotting and lipids that are associated with an increase risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Thus, an open-label, self-controlled clinical trial was conducted on subjects of the following groups: healthy volunteers (Healthy Group), patients with cardiovascular risk factors (Cardiovascular Group), and patients undergoing dialysis (Dialysis Group). All subjects ingested 2 capsules of nattokinase (2000 fibrinolysis units per capsule) daily orally for 2 months. The laboratory measurements were performed on the screening visit and, subsequently, regularly after the initiation of the study. The intent-to-treat analysis was performed on all 45 enrolled subjects. By use of mixed model analysis, a significant time effect, but not group effect, was observed in the change from baseline of fibrinogen (P = .003), factor VII (P < .001), and factor VIII (P < .001), suggesting that the plasma levels of the 3 coagulation factors continuously declined during intake; also, the extents of decrease were similar between groups. After 2 months of administration, fibrinogen, factor VII, and factor VIII decreased 9%, 14%, and 17%, respectively, for the Healthy Group; 7%, 13%, and 19%, respectively, for the Cardiovascular Group; and 10%, 7%, and 19%, respectively, for the Dialysis Group, whereas blood lipids were unaffected by nattokinase. No significant changes of uric acid or notable adverse events were observed in any of the subjects. In summary, this study showed that oral administration of nattokinase could be considered as a CVD nutraceutical by decreasing plasma levels of fibrinogen, factor VII, and factor VIII.

  2. [Modern coagulation management reduces the transfusion rate of allogenic blood products].

    PubMed

    Weber, Christian Friedrich

    2012-06-01

    Evaluating the patient's individual bleeding history with a standardized questionnaire, using "point-of-care" - methods for coagulation analyses and providing autologous transfusion techniques are preconditions of a modern coagulation management. Therapy of coagulopathic patients should be based on structured hemotherapy algorithms. Surgical haemostasis and the maintenance of the basic conditions for haemostasis are elementary requirements for an effective therapy. In cases of diffuse bleeding, early antifibrinolytic therapy should be considered. Coagulation factor deficiencies should be corrected "goal-directed" using coagulation factor concentrates. Transfusion of fresh frozen plasma is only indicated in the clinical setting of massive transfusions. DDAVP and transfusion of platelet concentrates are options to optimize primary haemostasis. In cases of on-going bleeding, recombinant activated coagulation factor VII represents an option for "ultima-ratio" therapy.

  3. Breeding of transgenic cattle for human coagulation factor IX by a combination of lentiviral system and cloning.

    PubMed

    Monzani, P S; Sangalli, J R; De Bem, T H C; Bressan, F F; Fantinato-Neto, P; Pimentel, J R V; Birgel-Junior, E H; Fontes, A M; Covas, D T; Meirelles, F V

    2013-02-28

    Recombinant coagulation factor IX must be produced in mammalian cells because FIX synthesis involves translational modifications. Human cell culture-based expression of human coagulation factor IX (hFIX) is expensive, and large-scale production capacity is limited. Transgenic animals may greatly increase the yield of therapeutic proteins and reduce costs. In this study, we used a lentiviral system to obtain transgenic cells and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) to produce transgenic animals. Lentiviral vectors carrying hFIX driven by 3 bovine β-casein promoters were constructed. Bovine epithelial mammary cells were transduced by lentivirus, selected with blasticidin, plated on extracellular matrix, and induced by lactogenic hormones; promoter activity was evaluated by quantitative PCR. Transcriptional activity of the 5.335-kb promoter was 6-fold higher than the 3.392- and 4.279-kb promoters, which did not significantly differ. Transgenic bovine fibroblasts were transduced with lentivirus carrying the 5.335-kb promoter and used as donor cells for SCNT. Cloned transgenic embryo production yielded development rates of 28.4%, similar to previous reports on cloned non-transgenic embryos. The embryos were transferred to recipient cows (N = 21) and 2 births of cloned transgenic cattle were obtained. These results suggest combination of the lentiviral system and cloning may be a good strategy for production of transgenic cattle.

  4. A comparative study of tissue factor and kaolin on blood coagulation assays using rotational thromboelastometry and thromboelastography.

    PubMed

    Peng, Henry T; Grodecki, Richard; Rizoli, Sandro; Shek, Pang N

    2016-01-01

    Rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) and thromboelastography (TEG) have been increasingly used to diagnose acute coagulopathy and guide blood transfusion. The tests are routinely performed using different triggering activators such as tissue factor and kaolin, which activate different pathways yielding different results. To optimize the global blood coagulation assays using ROTEM and TEG, we conducted a comparative study on the activation methods employing tissue factor and kaolin at different concentrations as well as standard reagents as recommended by the manufacturer of each device. Key parameter values were obtained at various assay conditions to evaluate and compare coagulation and fibrinolysis profiles of citrated whole blood collected from healthy volunteers. It was found that tissue factor reduced ROTEM clotting time and TEG R, and increased ROTEM clot formation time and TEG K in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, tissue factor affected ROTEM alpha angle, and maximum clot firmness, especially in the absence of kaolin activation, whereas both ROTEM and TEG clot lysis (LI30, CL30, and LY30) remained unaffected. Moreover, kaolin reduced ROTEM clotting time and TEG R and K, but to a lesser extent than tissue factor, in-tem and ex-tem. Correlations in all corresponding parameters between ROTEM and TEG were observed, when the same activators were used in the assays compared with lesser correlations between standard kaolin TEG and ROTEM (INTEM/EXTEM). The two types of viscoelastic point-of-care devices provide different results, depending on the triggering reagent used to perform the assay. Optimal assay condition was obtained to reduce assay time and improve assay accuracy.

  5. Serum Proteome Signature of Radiation Response: Upregulation of Inflammation-Related Factors and Downregulation of Apolipoproteins and Coagulation Factors in Cancer Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy—A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Widlak, Piotr; Jelonek, Karol; Wojakowska, Anna; Pietrowska, Monika; Polanska, Joanna; Marczak, Łukasz; Miszczyk, Leszek; Składowski, Krzysztof

    2015-08-01

    features of serum proteome. The signature included upregulation of factors involved in acute or inflammatory response but also downregulation of plasma apolipoproteins and factors involved in blood coagulation.

  6. Improvement of Short-Term Outcomes for High-Risk Bleeding Peptic Ulcers With Addition of Argon Plasma Coagulation Following Endoscopic Injection Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huay-Min; Tsai, Wei-Lun; Yu, Hsien-Chung; Chan, Hoi-Hung; Chen, Wen-Chi; Lin, Kung-Hung; Tsai, Tzung-Jiun; Kao, Sung-Shuo; Sun, Wei-Chih; Hsu, Ping-I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A second endoscopic method together with injection therapy is recommended to treat high-risk bleeding peptic ulcers. This study investigated whether additional argon plasma coagulation (APC) treatment could influence hemostatic efficacy following endoscopic injection therapy to treat high-risk bleeding ulcers. From October 2010 to January 2012, eligible patients with high-risk bleeding ulcers were admitted to our hospital. They prospectively randomly underwent either APC therapy along with distilled water injection or distilled water injection alone. Episodes of rebleeding were retreated with endoscopic combination therapy. Patients in whom retreatment was ineffective underwent emergency surgery or transarterial embolization (TAE). A total of 116 enrolled patients were analyzed. The hemostatic efficacy in 58 patients treated with APC along with distilled water injection was compared with that in 58 patients treated with distilled water injection alone. The 2 treatment groups were similar with respect to all baseline characteristics. Initial hemostasis was accomplished in 56 patients treated with combined therapy, and 55 patients treated with distilled water injection therapy (97% vs 95%, P = 0.648). Bleeding recurred in 2 patients treated with combined therapy, and 9 patients treated with distilled water injection (3.6% vs 16%, P = 0.029). Treatment method was the only independent prognostic factor for recurrent bleeding (odds ratio 0.17; 95% confidence interval 0.03–0.84; P = 0.029). The 2 groups did not differ significantly in hospital stay, TAE, surgery, and mortality. Endoscopic therapy with APC following distilled water injection is more effective than distilled water injection alone for preventing rebleeding of peptic ulcer. PMID:26266385

  7. The effects of danaparoid, dalteparin and heparin on tissue factor-induced experimental disseminated intravascular coagulation and bleeding time in the rat.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Y; Yokota, K; Fujishima, Y; Sukamoto, T

    2001-07-01

    Danaparoid and heparin, on the basis of anti-activated factor X (anti-FXa) activity, were equipotent in accelerating the rate of interaction of FXa and antithrombin III. In rat tissue factor-induced disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) models, an intravenous administration of danaparoid inhibited the decrease in plasma fibrinogen and platelet counts and the increase in serum fibrinogen degradation products. Expressed on the basis of anti-FXa activity, these effects were comparable with those of dalteparin and heparin. In rat mesenteric small artery and vein, less bleeding was observed after intravenous administration of danaparoid than after dalteparin or heparin. Danaparoid did not affect adenosine diphosphate- or collagen-induced platelet aggregation, and showed weaker inhibitory effects on aggregation induced by thrombin, or collagen + thrombin, than did dalteparin or heparin. These findings suggest that danaparoid may be useful for the prevention of DIC and has less tendency to cause bleeding than dalteparin or heparin, probably as a result of its weaker ability to inhibit platelet aggregation. PMID:11505077

  8. In vitro secretion deficits are common among human coagulation factor XIII subunit B missense mutants: correlations with patient phenotypes and molecular models.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Arijit; Thomas, Anne; Bevans, Carville G; Ivaskevicius, Vytautas; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2013-11-01

    Coagulation factor XIII (FXIII) proenzyme circulates in plasma as a heterotetramer composed of two each of A and B subunits. Upon activation, the B subunits dissociate from the A subunit dimer, which gains transglutaminase activity to cross-link preformed fibrin clots increasing mechanical strength and resistance to degradation. The B subunits are thought to possess a carrier/protective function before FXIII activation. Mutations in either A or B subunits are associated with pathological patient phenotypes characterized by mild to severe bleeding. In vitro expression of FXIII B subunit (FXIIIB) missense variants in HEK293T cells revealed impaired secretion for all seven variants studied. To investigate the likely molecular environments of the missense residues, we created molecular models of individual FXIIIB Sushi domains using phylogenetically similar complement factor H Sushi domain structural templates. Assessment of the local molecular environments for the models suggested surface or buried positions for each mutant residue and possible pathological mechanisms. The in vitro expression system and in silico analytical methods and models we developed can be used to further investigate the molecular basis of FXIIIB mutation pathologies. PMID:23913518

  9. The Coagulation Factor XIIa Inhibitor rHA-Infestin-4 Improves Outcome after Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Krupka, Jennifer; May, Frauke; Weimer, Thomas; Pragst, Ingo; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Stoll, Guido; Panousis, Con; Dickneite, Gerhard; Nolte, Marc W.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Ischemic stroke provokes severe brain damage and remains a predominant disease in industrialized countries. The coagulation factor XII (FXII)-driven contact activation system plays a central, but not yet fully defined pathogenic role in stroke development. Here, we investigated the efficacy of the FXIIa inhibitor rHA-Infestin-4 in a rat model of ischemic stroke using both a prophylactic and a therapeutic approach. Methods For prophylactic treatment, animals were treated intravenously with 100 mg/kg rHA-Infestin-4 or an equal volume of saline 15 min prior to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) of 90 min. For therapeutic treatment, 100 mg/kg rHA-Infestin-4, or an equal volume of saline, was administered directly after the start of reperfusion. At 24 h after tMCAO, rats were tested for neurological deficits and blood was drawn for coagulation assays. Finally, brains were removed and analyzed for infarct area and edema formation. Results Within prophylactic rHA-Infestin-4 treatment, infarct areas and brain edema formation were reduced accompanied by better neurological scores and survival compared to controls. Following therapeutic treatment, neurological outcome and survival were still improved although overall effects were less pronounced compared to prophylaxis. Conclusions With regard to the central role of the FXII-driven contact activation system in ischemic stroke, inhibition of FXIIa may represent a new and promising treatment approach to prevent cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:26815580

  10. Interaction between Fibrinogen and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Binding Protein-1 in Human Plasma under Physiological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Gligorijević, N; Nedić, O

    2016-02-01

    Fibrinogen is a plasma glycoprotein and one of the principle participants in blood coagulation. It interacts with many proteins during formation of a blood clot, including insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their binding proteins (IGFBP). Fibrinogen complexes were found as minor fractions in fibrinogen preparations independently of the coagulation process, and their presence influences the kinetics of polymerization. The idea of this work was to investigate whether fibrinogen in human plasma interacts with IGFBPs independently of the tissue injury or coagulation process. The results have shown that fibrinogen forms complexes with IGFBP-1 under physiological conditions. Several experimental approaches have confirmed that complexes are co-isolated with fibrinogen from plasma, they are relatively stable, and they appear as a general feature of human plasma. Several other experiments excluded the possibility that alpha-2 macroglobulin/IGFBP-1 complexes or IGFBP-1 oligomers contributed to IGFBP-1 immunoreactivity. The role of fibrinogen/IGFBP-1 complexes is still unknown. Further investigation in individuals expressing both impaired glucose control and coagulopathy could contribute to identification and understanding of their possible physiological role. PMID:27260393

  11. Detection of activation of the contact system of coagulation in vitro and in vivo: quantitation of activated Hageman factor-C-1-inhibitor and kallikrein-C-1-inhibitor complexes by specific radioimmunoassays.

    PubMed

    Nuijens, J H; Huijbregts, C C; Cohen, M; Navis, G O; de Vries, A; Eerenberg, A J; Bakker, J C; Hack, C E

    1987-08-01

    Radioimmunoassays (RIAs) for the detection of C-1-inhibitor (C-1-Inh) complexed to either kallikrein or activated Hageman factor (factor XIIa) are described. Kallikrein-C-1-Inh or factor XIIa-C-1-Inh complexes were bound to Sepharose to which monospecific antibodies against (pre)kallikrein or factor XII, respectively, were coupled. Bound complexes were subsequently detected by an incubation with affinity purified 125I-labeled antibodies against C-1-Inh. These RIAs were used to detect activation of the contact system of coagulation in vitro and in vivo. Addition of dextran sulfate (DXS) (20 micrograms/ml) to fresh plasma resulted at 37 degrees C in the rapid generation of amidolytic kallikrein activity, which was maximal after 1 to 2 min of incubation and subsequently decreased within a few minutes. The generation of kallikrein activity coincided with the appearance of both kallikrein-C-1-Inh and factor XIIa-C-1-Inh complexes. However, in contrast to kallikrein activity, both types of complexes remained detectable in the incubation mixtures during the incubation period. Experiments with purified kallikrein. C-1-Inh and partly purified beta-factor XIIa, and activation experiments in plasmas deficient in either factor XII or prekallikrein, demonstrated the specificity of both RIAs. The minimal amount of DXS that resulted in the generation of measurable amounts of both types of complexes in plasma was 2-3 micrograms per ml. Similar experiments with kaolin showed that with limiting amounts of activator (1-2 mg/ml), only kallikrein-C-1-Inh complexes were detected in plasma. When larger amounts of kaolin were added to plasma, factor XIIa-C-1-Inh complexes were additionally detected in plasma.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Overview of the coagulation system

    PubMed Central

    Palta, Sanjeev; Saroa, Richa; Palta, Anshu

    2014-01-01

    Coagulation is a dynamic process and the understanding of the blood coagulation system has evolved over the recent years in anaesthetic practice. Although the traditional classification of the coagulation system into extrinsic and intrinsic pathway is still valid, the newer insights into coagulation provide more authentic description of the same. Normal coagulation pathway represents a balance between the pro coagulant pathway that is responsible for clot formation and the mechanisms that inhibit the same beyond the injury site. Imbalance of the coagulation system may occur in the perioperative period or during critical illness, which may be secondary to numerous factors leading to a tendency of either thrombosis or bleeding. A systematic search of literature on PubMed with MeSH terms ‘coagulation system, haemostasis and anaesthesia revealed twenty eight related clinical trials and review articles in last 10 years. Since the balance of the coagulation system may tilt towards bleeding and thrombosis in many situations, it is mandatory for the clinicians to understand physiologic basis of haemostasis in order to diagnose and manage the abnormalities of the coagulation process and to interpret the diagnostic tests done for the same. PMID:25535411

  13. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in patients with coagulation disorders].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Marcellán, F J; Mauri Cunill, A; Cabré Fabré, P; Argentino Gancedo Rodríguez, V; Güell Oliva, J A; Ibarz Servio, L; Ramón Dalmau, M

    1992-03-01

    During treatment of renal lithiasis with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) hemorrhagic events, especially renal hematoma, may present. A coagulation study is warranted in order to institute hemotherapy for blood factor deficiencies. We reviewed the records of 4,000 patients that had undergone ESWL. Of these, 17 (12 males, 5 females) presented coagulation disorders. The bleeding diatheses were due to platelet deficiency in 6 cases, plasma defects in 5, platelet and plasma disorders in 2, and capillary wall defects in 5 cases. The underlying cause was hepatosplenic disease in 12 cases, iatrogenic in 1, connectivopathy and corticoids in 2, and capillary purpura of unknown cause in 2 cases. Due to this protocol, no patient presented hemorrhage or hematoma from shock wave-induced lesions. These results show that a complete coagulation study must be performed in order to institute the necessary measures in patients with disorders of hemostasis due to the high risk of hematoma repeatedly reported in the literature.

  14. Interpreting coagulation assays.

    PubMed

    Green, David

    2010-09-01

    The interpretation of coagulation assays requires knowledge of the principal clotting pathways. The activated partial thromboplastin time is sensitive to all hemostatic factors except FVII, whereas the prothrombin time reflects levels of prothrombin and FV, FVII, and FX. Using the two tests in concert is helpful in identifying hemophilia, the coagulopathy of liver disease, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. In addition, the activated partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time are used for monitoring anticoagulant therapy with heparin and warfarin, respectively. Measurement of D-dimer is informative in patients suspected of having thrombotic disorders and determining the risk of thrombosis recurrence. Mixing tests distinguish clotting factor deficiencies from circulating anticoagulants such as heparin, the lupus anticoagulant, and antibodies directed against specific clotting factors. The modified Bethesda assay detects and provides an indication of the strength of FVIII inhibitors. However, interpreting the results of coagulation assays is not always straightforward, and expert consultation is occasionally required to resolve difficult clinical situations. PMID:20855988

  15. Thrombin generation and fibrin clot formation under hypothermic conditions: an in vitro evaluation of tissue factor initiated whole blood coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Whelihan, Matthew F.; Kiankhooy, Armin; Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite trauma-induced hypothermic coagulopathy being familiar in the clinical setting, empirical experimentation concerning this phenomenon is lacking. In this study we investigated the effects of hypothermia on thrombin generation, clot formation and global hemostatic functions in an in vitro environment using a whole blood model and thromboelastography (TEG) which can recapitulate hypothermia. Methods Blood was collected from healthy individuals through venipuncture and treated with corn trypsin inhibitor, to block the contact pathway. Coagulation was initiated with 5pM tissue factor at temperatures 37°C, 32°C, and 27°C. Reactions were quenched over time with soluble and insoluble components of each time point analyzed for thrombin generation, fibrinogen consumption, factor (f)XIII activation and fibrin deposition. Global coagulation potential was evaluated through TEG. Results Data showed that thrombin generation in samples at 37°C and 32°C had comparable rates while 27°C had a much lower rate (39.2 ± 1.1 and 43 ± 2.4 nM/min vs 28.6 ± 4.4 nM/min, respectively). Fibrinogen consumption and fXIII activation were highest at 37°C followed by 32°C and 27°C (13.8 ± 2.9 percent/min vs 7.8 ± 1.8 percent/min, respectively). Fibrin formation as seen through clot weights also followed this trend. TEG data showed clot formation was fastest in samples at 37°C and lowest at 27°C. Maximum clot strength was similar for each temperature. Also, percent lysis of clots was highest at 37°C followed by 32°C and then 27°C. Conclusions Induced hypothermic conditions directly affect the rate of thrombin generation and clot formation while global clot stability remains intact. PMID:24331944

  16. Amino acid sequence and posttranslational modifications of human factor VII sub a from plasma and transfected baby hamster kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thim, L.; Bjoern, S.; Christensen, M.; Nicolaisen, E.M.; Lund-Hansen, T.; Pedersen, A.H.; Hedner, U. )

    1988-10-04

    Blood coagulation factor VII is a vitamin K dependent glycoprotein which in its activated form, factor VII{sub a}, participates in the coagulation process by activating factor X and/or factor IX in the presence of Ca{sup 2+} and tissue factor. Three types of potential posttranslational modifications exist in the human factor VII{sub a} molecule, namely, 10 {gamma}-carboxylated, N-terminally located glutamic acid residues, 1 {beta}-hydroxylated aspartic acid residue, and 2 N-glycosylated asparagine residues. In the present study, the amino acid sequence and posttranslational modifications of recombinant factor VII{sub a} as purified from the culture medium of a transfected baby hamster kidney cell line have been compared to human plasma factor VII{sub a}. By use of HPLC, amino acid analysis, peptide mapping, and automated Edman degradation, the protein backbone of recombinant factor VII{sub a} was found to be identical with human factor VII{sub a}. Asparagine residues 145 and 322 were found to be fully N-glycosylated in human plasma factor VII{sub a}. In the recombinant factor VII{sub a}, asparagine residue 322 was fully glycosylated whereas asparagine residue 145 was only partially (approximately 66%) glycosylated. Besides minor differences in the sialic acid and fucose contents, the overall carbohydrate compositions were nearly identical in recombinant factor VII{sub a} and human plasma factor VII{sub a}. These results show that factor VII{sub a} as produced in the transfected baby hamster kidney cells is very similar to human plasma factor VII{sub a} and that this cell line thus might represent an alternative source for human factor VII{sub a}.

  17. [Regulation of Membrane-Dependent Reactions of Blood Coagulation].

    PubMed

    Podoplelova, N A; Kotova, Y N; Lipets, E N; Ataullakhanov, F I; Panteleev, M A

    2015-01-01

    All major coagulation reactions do not occurs in blood plasma itself, these processes are actually two-dimensional reactions localized to thephospholipid membranes. Almost all blood cells, lipoproteins, and microparticles provide assembly of protein complexes. A central role among them are played by platelets and platelet-derived microparticles. On their membranes occurs the most important coagulation reactions such as activation of prothrombin by prothrombin complex, activation of factor X by complexes intrinsic and extrinsic tenase. This reactions are important for processes activation of the contact path coagulation, activation factor XI by thrombin, appearance of enzymatic activity of factor VIIa etc. This review is focused on the membrane-dependent reactions, here are discussed mechanisms and regulation these reactions and the possible prospects of the study.

  18. Disseminated intravascular coagulation in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zeerleder, Sacha; Hack, C Erik; Wuillemin, Walter A

    2005-10-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation is a frequent complication of sepsis. Coagulation activation, inhibition of fibrinolysis, and consumption of coagulation inhibitors lead to a procoagulant state resulting in inadequate fibrin removal and fibrin deposition in the microvasculature. As a consequence, microvascular thrombosis contributes to promotion of organ dysfunction. Recently, three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials investigated the efficacy of antithrombin, activated protein C (APC), and tissue factor pathway inhibitor, respectively, in sepsis patients. A significant reduction in mortality was demonstrated in the APC trial. In this article, we first discuss the physiology of coagulation and fibrinolysis activation. Then, the pathophysiology of coagulation activation, consumption of coagulation inhibitors, and the inhibition of fibrinolysis leading to a procoagulant state are described in more detail. Moreover, therapeutic concepts as well as the three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies are discussed.

  19. A Prospective Randomized Experimental Study to Investigate the Eradication Rate of Endometriosis after Surgical Resection versus Aerosol Plasma Coagulation in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Rothmund, Ralf; Scharpf, Marcus; Tsaousidis, Christos; Planck, Constanze; Enderle, Markus Dominik; Neugebauer, Alexander; Kroeker, Kristin; Nuessle, Daniela; Fend, Falko; Brucker, Sara; Kraemer, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the eradication rate of endometriosis after surgical resection (SR) vs. thermal ablation with aerosol plasma coagulation (AePC) in a rat model. Methods In this prospective, randomized, controlled, single-blinded animal study endometriosis was induced on the abdominal wall of 34 female Wistar rats. After 14 days endometriosis was either removed by SR or ablated by AePC. 14 days later the rats were euthanized to evaluate the eradication rate histopathologically. Intervention times were recorded. Results Eradication rate of endometriosis after 14 days did not significantly differ between AePC and SR (p=0.22). Intervention time per endometrial lesion was 22.1 s for AePC and 51.8 s for SR (p<0.0001). Conclusions This study compares the eradication rate of the new aerosol plasma coagulation device versus standard surgical resection of endometriosis in a rat model. Despite being a thermal method, AePC showed equality towards SR regarding eradication rate but with significantly shorter intervention time. PMID:26941579

  20. Proteome of human plasma very low-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein exhibits a link with coagulation and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dashty, M; Motazacker, M M; Levels, J; de Vries, M; Mahmoudi, M; Peppelenbosch, M P; Rezaee, F

    2014-03-01

    Apart from transporting lipids through the body, the human plasma lipoproteins very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) are also thought to serve as a modality for intra-organismal protein transfer, shipping proteins with important roles in inflammation and thrombosis from the site of synthesis to effector locations. To better understand the role of VLDL and LDL in the transport of proteins, we applied a combination of LTQ ORBITRAP-XL (nLC-MS/MS) with both in-SDS-PAGE gel and in-solution tryptic digestion of pure and defined VLDL and LDL fractions. We identified the presence of 95 VLDL- and 51 LDL-associated proteins including all known apolipoproteins and lipid transport proteins, and intriguingly a set of coagulation proteins, complement system and anti- microbial proteins. Prothrombin, protein S, fibrinogen γ, PLTP, CETP, CD14 and LBP were present on VLDL but not on LDL. Prenylcysteine oxidase 1, dermcidin, cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide, TFPI-1 and fibrinogen α chain were associated with both VLDL and LDL. Apo A-V is only present on VLDL and not on LDL. Collectively, this study provides a wealth of knowledge on the protein constituents of the human plasma lipoprotein system and strongly supports the notion that protein shuttling through this system is involved in the regulation of biological processes. Human diseases related to proteins carried by VLDL and LDL can be divided in three major categories: 1 - dyslipidaemia, 2 - atherosclerosis and vascular disease, and 3 - coagulation disorders. PMID:24500811

  1. Isolation and properties of a blood coagulation factor X activator from the venom of king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah).

    PubMed

    Lee, W H; Zhang, Y; Wang, W Y; Xiong, Y L; Gao, R

    1995-10-01

    A specific blood coagulation factor X activator was purified from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah by gel filtration and two steps of FPLC Mono-Q column ion-exchange chromatography. It showed a single protein band both in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and alkaline polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The mol. wt was estimated to be 62,000 in non-reducing conditions and 64,500 in reducing conditions by SDS-PAGE. The isoelectric point was found to be pH 5.6. The enzyme had weak amidolytic activities toward CBS 65-25, but it showed no activities on S-2266, S-2302, thrombin substrate S-2238, plasmin substrate S-2251 or factor Xa substrate S-2222. It had no arginine esterase activity toward substrate benzoylarginine ethylester (BAEE). The enzyme activated factor X in vitro and the effect was absolutely Ca2+ dependent, with a Hill coefficient of 6.83. It could not activate prothrombin nor had any effect on fibrinogen and thus appeared to act specifically on factor X. The procoagulant activity of the enzyme was almost completely inhibited by serine protease inhibitors like PMSF, TPCK and soybean trypsin inhibitor; partially inhibited by L-cysteine. Metal chelator EDTA did not inhibit its procoagulant activity. These results suggest that the factor X activator from O. hannah venom is a serine protease.

  2. Blood coagulation and metabolic profiles in middle-aged male and female ob/ob mice.

    PubMed

    Ohkura, Naoki; Oishi, Katsutaka; Atsumi, Gen-ichi

    2015-07-01

    Obese and diabetic states in humans are associated with an increased incidence of thrombotic diseases caused by various coagulation abnormalities. Genetically obese ob/ob mice produce metabolic abnormalities similar to those associated with type 2 diabetes. However, little is known about their coagulation features or sex differences. The present study aimed to determine the effects of obese and diabetic complications on blood coagulation and vascular diseases by exploring correlations between blood coagulation and metabolic profiles in middle-aged male and female ob/ob mice. Plasma levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) were significantly increased, whereas those that of platelet factor-4 (PF-4) was slightly, but significantly increased in male and female ob/ob mice compared with lean counterparts. Prothrombin time (PT) was significantly shortened in female ob/ob mice and activated partial thrombin time (APTT) significantly differed between male and female ob/ob mice. Plasma levels of antithrombin (AT) were significantly increased in male and female ob/ob mice. None of the other coagulation and fibrinolytic factors examined significantly differed between ob/ob mice and lean counterparts. On the contrary, factors such as body weight and cholesterol levels significantly differed between ob/ob and lean mice, whereas glucose, fructosamine and insulin levels significantly differed only in one sex of each strain. These results provided fundamental information about blood coagulation and metabolic features for exploring the function of altered blood coagulation states in ob/ob mice.

  3. Optical factors determined by the T-matrix method in turbidity measurement of absolute coagulation rate constants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shenghua; Liu, Jie; Sun, Zhiwei

    2006-12-01

    Turbidity measurement for the absolute coagulation rate constants of suspensions has been extensively adopted because of its simplicity and easy implementation. A key factor in deriving the rate constant from experimental data is how to theoretically evaluate the so-called optical factor involved in calculating the extinction cross section of doublets formed during aggregation. In a previous paper, we have shown that compared with other theoretical approaches, the T-matrix method provides a robust solution to this problem and is effective in extending the applicability range of the turbidity methodology, as well as increasing measurement accuracy. This paper will provide a more comprehensive discussion of the physical insight for using the T-matrix method in turbidity measurement and associated technical details. In particular, the importance of ensuring the correct value for the refractive indices for colloidal particles and the surrounding medium used in the calculation is addressed, because the indices generally vary with the wavelength of the incident light. The comparison of calculated results with experiments shows that the T-matrix method can correctly calculate optical factors even for large particles, whereas other existing theories cannot. In addition, the data of the optical factor calculated by the T-matrix method for a range of particle radii and incident light wavelengths are listed.

  4. Bacteria under stress by complement and coagulation.

    PubMed

    Berends, Evelien T M; Kuipers, Annemarie; Ravesloot, Marietta M; Urbanus, Rolf T; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M

    2014-11-01

    The complement and coagulation systems are two related protein cascades in plasma that serve important roles in host defense and hemostasis, respectively. Complement activation on bacteria supports cellular immune responses and leads to direct killing of bacteria via assembly of the Membrane Attack Complex (MAC). Recent studies have indicated that the coagulation system also contributes to mammalian innate defense since coagulation factors can entrap bacteria inside clots and generate small antibacterial peptides. In this review, we will provide detailed insights into the molecular interplay between these protein cascades and bacteria. We take a closer look at how these pathways are activated on bacterial surfaces and discuss the mechanisms by which they directly cause stress to bacterial cells. The poorly understood mechanism for bacterial killing by the MAC will be reevaluated in light of recent structural insights. Finally, we highlight the strategies used by pathogenic bacteria to modulate these protein networks. Overall, these insights will contribute to a better understanding of the host defense roles of complement and coagulation against bacteria.

  5. Hevea latex lectin binding protein in C-serum as an anti-latex coagulating factor and its role in a proposed new model for latex coagulation.

    PubMed

    Wititsuwannakul, Rapepun; Pasitkul, Piyaporn; Jewtragoon, Pattavuth; Wititsuwannakul, Dhirayos

    2008-02-01

    A distinct protein specifically recognized by its strong interaction with Hevea latex lectin (HLL) was detected in the aqueous C-serum fraction of centrifuged fresh latex. This C-serum lectin binding protein (CS-HLLBP) exhibited strong inhibition of HLL-induced hemagglutination. The CS-HLLBP was purified to homogeneity by a protocol that included ammonium sulfate fractionation, size exclusion and ion exchange chromatography. The purified CS-HLLBP had a specific HI titer of 0.23microg ml(-1). Its M(r)s analyzed by SDS-PAGE was ca. 40kDa and that by gel filtration was ca. 204kDa. It has a pI value of 4.7, an optimum activity between pH 6 and10 and was heat stable up to 50 degrees C. The HI activity of CS-HLLBP was abolished upon treatment with chitinase. The CS-HLLBP inhibited HLL-induced rubber particle aggregation in a dose dependent manner. A highly positive correlation between CS-HLLBP activity and rubber yield per tapping was found. The correlations for fresh latex (r=0.98, P<0.01) and dry rubber (r=0.95, P<0.01) were both highly significant. This indicated that the CS-HLLBP might be used as a reliable marker for the mass screening of young seedlings to identify and select clones with potential to be superior producers of rubber. A latex anti-coagulating role of the CS-HLLBP is proposed. The findings described in this 3 paper series have been used to propose a new model of rubber latex coagulation that logically describes roles for the newly characterized latex lectin and the two lectin binding proteins. PMID:17983633

  6. The Eph Tyrosine Kinase Receptors EphB2 and EphA2 Are Novel Proteolytic Substrates of Tissue Factor/Coagulation Factor VIIa*

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Oskar; Ramström, Margareta; Hörnaeus, Katarina; Bergquist, Jonas; Mokhtari, Dariush; Siegbahn, Agneta

    2014-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) binds the serine protease factor VIIa (FVIIa) to form a proteolytically active complex that can trigger coagulation or activate cell signaling. Here we addressed the involvement of tyrosine kinase receptors (RTKs) in TF/FVIIa signaling by antibody array analysis and subsequently found that EphB2 and EphA2 of the Eph RTK family were cleaved in their ectodomains by TF/FVIIa. We used N-terminal Edman sequencing and LC-MS/MS analysis to characterize the cleaved Eph isoforms and identified a key arginine residue at the cleavage site, in agreement with the tryptic serine protease activity of FVIIa. Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) signaling and downstream coagulation activity was non-essential in this context, in further support of a direct cleavage by TF/FVIIa. EphB2 was cleaved by FVIIa concentrations in the subnanomolar range in a number of TF expressing cell types, indicating that the active cellular pool of TF was involved. FVIIa caused potentiation of cell repulsion by the EphB2 ligand ephrin-B1, demonstrating a novel proteolytical event to control Eph-mediated cell segregation. These results define Eph RTKs as novel proteolytical targets of TF/FVIIa and provide new insights into how TF/FVIIa regulates cellular functions independently of PAR2. PMID:25281742

  7. Recombinant epidermal growth factor-like domain-1 from coagulation factor VII functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted glioma magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Heng; Chen, Xiao; Xue, Wei; Chu, Chengchao; Liu, Yu; Tong, Haipeng; Du, Xuesong; Xie, Tian; Liu, Gang; Zhang, Weiguo

    2016-01-01

    The highly infiltrative and invasive nature of glioma cells often leads to blurred tumor margins, resulting in incomplete tumor resection and tumor recurrence. Accurate detection and precise delineation of glioma help in preoperative delineation, surgical planning and survival prediction. In this study, recombinant epidermal growth factor-like domain-1, derived from human coagulation factor VII, was conjugated to iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) for targeted glioma magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The synthesized EGF1-EGFP-IONPs exhibited excellent targeting ability toward tissue factor (TF)-positive U87MG cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro, and demonstrated persistent and efficient MR contrast enhancement up to 12 h for preclinical glioma models with high targeting specificity in vivo. They hold great potential for clinical translation and developing targeted theranostics against brain glioma. PMID:27785017

  8. Quantification of plasma factor XIIa-Cl(-)-inhibitor and kallikrein-Cl(-)-inhibitor complexes in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Nuijens, J H; Huijbregts, C C; Eerenberg-Belmer, A J; Abbink, J J; Strack van Schijndel, R J; Felt-Bersma, R J; Thijs, L G; Hack, C E

    1988-12-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that activation of the contact system of intrinsic coagulation plays a role in the pathogenesis of septic shock. To monitor contact activation in patients with sepsis, we developed highly sensitive radioimmunoassays (RIAs) for factor XIIa-Cl(-)-inhibitor (Cl(-)-Inh) and kallikrein-Cl(-)-Inh complexes using a monoclonal antibody (MoAb Kok 12) that binds to a neodeterminant exposed on both complexed and cleaved Cl(-)-Inh. Plasma samples were serially collected from 48 patients admitted to the intensive care unit because of severe sepsis. Forty percent of patients on at least one occasion had increased levels of plasma factor XIIa-Cl(-)-Inh (greater than 5 x 10(-4) U/mL) and kallikrein-Cl(-)-Inh (greater than 25 x 10(-4) U/mL), that correlated at a molar ratio of approximately 1:3. Levels of factor XII antigen in plasma and both the highest as well as the levels on admission of plasma factor XIIa-Cl(-)-Inh in 23 patients with septic shock were lower than in 25 normotensive patients (P = .015: factor XII on admission; P = .04: highest factor XIIa-Cl(-)-Inh; P = .01: factor XIIa-Cl(-)-Inh on admission). No significant differences in plasma kallikrein-Cl(-)-Inh or prekallikrein antigen were found between these patients' groups. Elevated Cl(-)-Inh complex levels were measured less frequently in serial samples from patients with septic shock than in those from patients without shock (P less than .0001). Based on these results, we conclude that plasma Cl(-)-Inh complex levels during sepsis may not properly reflect the extent of contact activation.

  9. Establishment of reference intervals for von Willebrand factor antigen and eight coagulation factors in a Korean population following the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ja-Hyun; Seo, Ja-Young; Bang, Sung-Hwan; Park, In-Ae; Kim, Hee-Jin; Kim, Sun-Hee

    2010-04-01

    Establishment of reference intervals for coagulation molecules is important but is costly and sometimes not feasible. Since reference intervals from manufacturers or the literature are mostly out of date or involved Western populations, the authors determined reference intervals for VWF: Ag and eight factors in a Korean population. VWF: Ag, factor VIII (FVIII), FII, FV, FVII, FIX, FX, FXI, and FXII were determined in Korean individuals visiting for routine checkup following the CLSI (Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute) guidelines. Reagents by Diagnostica Stago were used on the STA Compact Analyzer (Diagnostica Stago). Exclusion criteria were medical history or laboratory findings that could affect the factor levels. Influence of demographic factors was analyzed. Mean +/- 2 x SD or central 95 percentile was used, as appropriate. We obtained data from 266 adults for VWF: Ag, 371 adults for FVIII, and minimum 136 adults for the rest. Reference interval for VWF was 51-176% (52-155% in blood group O and 71-186% for non-O). Reference interval for FVIII was 64-197% (55-150% in O and 77-205% in non-O). Reference interval for FII was 77-121%, FV 81-160%, FVII 68-149%, FIX 67-154%, FX 69-126%, FXI 59-138%, and FXII 48-177%. The medians of VWF: Ag, FVIII, and FIX were significantly higher in the elderly group (> or =60 years). We established local reference intervals for VWF: Ag and eight coagulation factors in a Korean population according to the CLSI guidelines. Significantly, different reference intervals were obtained in blood group O vs. non-O for VWF: Ag and FVIII. The reference intervals obtained in this study could be adopted in other clinical laboratories after appropriate validation.

  10. Bothrops jararaca Venom Metalloproteinases Are Essential for Coagulopathy and Increase Plasma Tissue Factor Levels during Envenomation

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Karine M.; Alves, André F.; Barbaro, Katia C.; Santoro, Marcelo L.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Bleeding tendency, coagulopathy and platelet disorders are recurrent manifestations in snakebites occurring worldwide. We reasoned that by damaging tissues and/or activating cells at the site of the bite and systemically, snake venom toxins might release or decrypt tissue factor (TF), resulting in activation of blood coagulation and aggravation of the bleeding tendency. Thus, we addressed (a) whether TF and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), an oxireductase involved in TF encryption/decryption, were altered in experimental snake envenomation; (b) the involvement and significance of snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMP) and serine proteinases (SVSP) to hemostatic disturbances. Methods/Principal Findings Crude Bothrops jararaca venom (BjV) was preincubated with Na2-EDTA or AEBSF, which are inhibitors of SVMP and SVSP, respectively, and injected subcutaneously or intravenously into rats to analyze the contribution of local lesion to the development of hemostatic disturbances. Samples of blood, lung and skin were collected and analyzed at 3 and 6 h. Platelet counts were markedly diminished in rats, and neither Na2-EDTA nor AEBSF could effectively abrogate this fall. However, Na2-EDTA markedly reduced plasma fibrinogen consumption and hemorrhage at the site of BjV inoculation. Na2-EDTA also abolished the marked elevation in TF levels in plasma at 3 and 6 h, by both administration routes. Moreover, increased TF activity was also noticed in lung and skin tissue samples at 6 h. However, factor VII levels did not decrease over time. PDI expression in skin was normal at 3 h, and downregulated at 6 h in all groups treated with BjV. Conclusions SVMP induce coagulopathy, hemorrhage and increased TF levels in plasma, but neither SVMP nor SVSP are directly involved in thrombocytopenia. High levels of TF in plasma and TF decryption occur during snake envenomation, like true disseminated intravascular coagulation syndrome, and might be implicated in engendering

  11. [Polymorphism (353)R>Q of Gene of Blood Clotting Factor FVII and Plasma Hemostasis].

    PubMed

    Bairova, T A; Gommellya, M V; Dolgich, V V; Philippov, E S; Kolesnikova, L I

    2016-02-01

    A comparative estimation was conducted to assess the prevalence of genotypes and alleles of the (353)R>Q polymorphism of the coagulation factor FVII gene between a group of the Russian adolescents with essential arterial hypertension and a group of Russian adolescents without such health problems. The RR genotype was diagnosed in 55 adolescents (75.34%) of the control group and in 99 adolescents (84.61%) of the adolescents suffering from essential arterial hypertension (χ2 = 1.949, p = 0.163). The frequency of the R-allel was 85% and 91.9%, respectively (χ2 = 3.110, p = 0.078). The role of the FVII gene in the determination of the F7 plasma activity was defined in adolescents with essential arterial hypertension and holders of different alleles. Holders of the R allele had significantly higher activity of coagulation factor F7 (97.66 ± 15.48 against 83.37 ± 15.16, p = 0.002) and factor F2 (107.45 ± 6.03 against 103.75 ± 6.81, p = 0.023) than holders of the Q allele. This relationship was not found in adolescents of the control group.

  12. Shotgun Proteomic Analysis of Plasma from Dairy Cattle Suffering from Footrot: Characterization of Potential Disease-Associated Factors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dongbo; Zhang, Hong; Guo, Donghua; Sun, Anguo; Wang, Hongbin

    2013-01-01

    The plasma proteome of healthy dairy cattle and those with footrot was investigated using a shotgun LC-MS/MS approach. In total, 648 proteins were identified in healthy plasma samples, of which 234 were non-redundant proteins and 123 were high-confidence proteins; 712 proteins were identified from footrot plasma samples, of which 272 were non-redundant proteins and 138 were high-confidence proteins. The high-confidence proteins showed significant differences between healthy and footrot plasma samples in molecular weight, isoelectric points and the Gene Ontology categories. 22 proteins were found that may differentiate between the two sets of plasma proteins, of which 16 potential differential expression (PDE) proteins from footrot plasma involved in immunoglobulins, innate immune recognition molecules, acute phase proteins, regulatory proteins, and cell adhesion and cytoskeletal proteins; 6 PDE proteins from healthy plasma involved in regulatory proteins, cytoskeletal proteins and coagulation factors. Of these PDE proteins, haptoglobin, SERPINA10 protein, afamin precursor, haptoglobin precursor, apolipoprotein D, predicted peptidoglycan recognition protein L (PGRP-L) and keratan sulfate proteoglycan (KS-PG) were suggested to be potential footrot-associated factors. The PDE proteins PGRP-L and KS-PG were highlighted as potential biomarkers of footrot in cattle. The resulting protein lists and potential differentially expressed proteins may provide valuable information to increase understanding of plasma protein profiles in cattle and to assist studies of footrot-associated factors. PMID:23418487

  13. [Samples in Coagulation Test].

    PubMed

    Komiyama, Yutaka

    2015-12-01

    An understanding and ability to develop a strategy to prevent pre-analytical errors of laboratory tests in the hemostasis area are two of the most important skills of medical technologists and related doctors. Recently, the working group for standardization of sampling in coagulation tests is working towards a consensus. This article reviews a summary of the consensus: (1) The anticoagulant for coagulation tests is 3.13-3.2% sodium citrate at a ratio of 1:9 to whole blood and the accuracy of the ratio is within 10%. (2) Blood sampling is achieved with the use of a 21-23G needle and coagulation. Blood sampling can be achieved by both a syringe and vacuum tube system. After taking blood, laboratory tests such as of the prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) should be completed within one hour and the storage temperature should be at room temperature, not ice-cold conditions. 3) To prepare a plasma sample, citrated blood is centrifuged at 1,500 x g for 15 min at room temperature to minimize the remaining platelets in plasma (below 10,000/microL at least).

  14. Extrahepatic sources of factor VIII potentially contribute to the coagulation cascade correcting the bleeding phenotype of mice with hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Zanolini, Diego; Merlin, Simone; Feola, Maria; Ranaldo, Gabriella; Amoruso, Angela; Gaidano, Gianluca; Zaffaroni, Mauro; Ferrero, Alessandro; Brunelleschi, Sandra; Valente, Guido; Gupta, Sanjeev; Prat, Maria; Follenzi, Antonia

    2015-07-01

    A large fraction of factor VIII in blood originates from liver sinusoidal endothelial cells although extrahepatic sources also contribute to plasma factor VIII levels. Identification of cell-types other than endothelial cells with the capacity to synthesize and release factor VIII will be helpful for therapeutic approaches in hemophilia A. Recent cell therapy and bone marrow transplantation studies indicated that Küpffer cells, monocytes and mesenchymal stromal cells could synthesize factor VIII in sufficient amount to ameliorate the bleeding phenotype in hemophilic mice. To further establish the role of blood cells in expressing factor VIII, we studied various types of mouse and human hematopoietic cells. We identified factor VIII in cells isolated from peripheral and cord blood, as well as bone marrow. Co-staining for cell type-specific markers verified that factor VIII was expressed in monocytes, macrophages and megakaryocytes. We additionally verified that factor VIII was expressed in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and endothelial cells elsewhere, e.g., in the spleen, lungs and kidneys. Factor VIII was well expressed in sinusoidal endothelial cells and Küpffer cells isolated from human liver, whereas by comparison isolated human hepatocytes expressed factor VIII at very low levels. After transplantation of CD34(+) human cord blood cells into NOD/SCIDγNull-hemophilia A mice, fluorescence activated cell sorting of peripheral blood showed >40% donor cells engrafted in the majority of mice. In these animals, plasma factor VIII activity 12 weeks after cell transplantation was up to 5% and nine of 12 mice survived after a tail clip-assay. In conclusion, hematopoietic cells, in addition to endothelial cells, express and secrete factor VIII: this information should offer further opportunities for understanding mechanisms of factor VIII synthesis and replenishment.

  15. Extrahepatic sources of factor VIII potentially contribute to the coagulation cascade correcting the bleeding phenotype of mice with hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Zanolini, Diego; Merlin, Simone; Feola, Maria; Ranaldo, Gabriella; Amoruso, Angela; Gaidano, Gianluca; Zaffaroni, Mauro; Ferrero, Alessandro; Brunelleschi, Sandra; Valente, Guido; Gupta, Sanjeev; Prat, Maria; Follenzi, Antonia

    2015-07-01

    A large fraction of factor VIII in blood originates from liver sinusoidal endothelial cells although extrahepatic sources also contribute to plasma factor VIII levels. Identification of cell-types other than endothelial cells with the capacity to synthesize and release factor VIII will be helpful for therapeutic approaches in hemophilia A. Recent cell therapy and bone marrow transplantation studies indicated that Küpffer cells, monocytes and mesenchymal stromal cells could synthesize factor VIII in sufficient amount to ameliorate the bleeding phenotype in hemophilic mice. To further establish the role of blood cells in expressing factor VIII, we studied various types of mouse and human hematopoietic cells. We identified factor VIII in cells isolated from peripheral and cord blood, as well as bone marrow. Co-staining for cell type-specific markers verified that factor VIII was expressed in monocytes, macrophages and megakaryocytes. We additionally verified that factor VIII was expressed in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and endothelial cells elsewhere, e.g., in the spleen, lungs and kidneys. Factor VIII was well expressed in sinusoidal endothelial cells and Küpffer cells isolated from human liver, whereas by comparison isolated human hepatocytes expressed factor VIII at very low levels. After transplantation of CD34(+) human cord blood cells into NOD/SCIDγNull-hemophilia A mice, fluorescence activated cell sorting of peripheral blood showed >40% donor cells engrafted in the majority of mice. In these animals, plasma factor VIII activity 12 weeks after cell transplantation was up to 5% and nine of 12 mice survived after a tail clip-assay. In conclusion, hematopoietic cells, in addition to endothelial cells, express and secrete factor VIII: this information should offer further opportunities for understanding mechanisms of factor VIII synthesis and replenishment. PMID:25911555

  16. Low cost industrial production of coagulation factor IX bioencapsulated in lettuce cells for oral tolerance induction in hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin; Zhu, Liqing; Sherman, Alexandra; Wang, Xiaomei; Lin, Shina; Kamesh, Aditya; Norikane, Joey H; Streatfield, Stephen J; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2015-11-01

    Antibodies (inhibitors) developed by hemophilia B patients against coagulation factor IX (FIX) are challenging to eliminate because of anaphylaxis or nephrotic syndrome after continued infusion. To address this urgent unmet medical need, FIX fused with a transmucosal carrier (CTB) was produced in a commercial lettuce (Simpson Elite) cultivar using species specific chloroplast vectors regulated by endogenous psbA sequences. CTB-FIX (∼1 mg/g) in lyophilized cells was stable with proper folding, disulfide bonds and pentamer assembly when stored ∼2 years at ambient temperature. Feeding lettuce cells to hemophilia B mice delivered CTB-FIX efficiently to the gut immune system, induced LAP(+) regulatory T cells and suppressed inhibitor/IgE formation and anaphylaxis against FIX. Lyophilized cells enabled 10-fold dose escalation studies and successful induction of oral tolerance was observed in all tested doses. Induction of tolerance in such a broad dose range should enable oral delivery to patients of different age groups and diverse genetic background. Using Fraunhofer cGMP hydroponic system, ∼870 kg fresh or 43.5 kg dry weight can be harvested per 1000 ft(2) per annum yielding 24,000-36,000 doses for 20-kg pediatric patients, enabling first commercial development of an oral drug, addressing prohibitively expensive purification, cold storage/transportation and short shelf life of current protein drugs.

  17. Targeting of the Human Coagulation Factor IX Gene at rDNA Locus of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junlin; Xue, Jinfeng; Hu, Youjin; Feng, Mai; Niu, Wenbin; Yang, Qiurui; Lei, Ming; Xia, Jiahui; Wu, Lingqian; Liang, Desheng

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic modification is a prerequisite to realizing the full potential of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in human genetic research and regenerative medicine. Unfortunately, the random integration methods that have been the primary techniques used keep creating problems, and the primary alternative method, gene targeting, has been effective in manipulating mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) but poorly in hESCs. Methodology/Principal Findings Human ribosomal DNA (rDNA) repeats are clustered on the short arm of acrocentric chromosomes. They consist of approximately 400 copies of the 45S pre-RNA (rRNA) gene per haploid. In the present study, we targeted a physiological gene, human coagulation factor IX, into the rDNA locus of hESCs via homologous recombination. The relative gene targeting efficiency (>50%) and homologous recombination frequency (>10−5) were more than 10-fold higher than those of loci targeted in previous reports. Meanwhile, the targeted clones retained both a normal karyotype and the main characteristics of ES cells. The transgene was found to be stably and ectopically expressed in targeted hESCs. Conclusion/Significance This is the first targeting of a human physiological gene at a defined locus on the hESC genome. Our findings indicate that the rDNA locus may serve as an ideal harbor for transgenes in hESCs. PMID:22615895

  18. Low cost industrial production of coagulation factor IX bioencapsulated in lettuce cells for oral tolerance induction in hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin; Zhu, Liqing; Sherman, Alexandra; Wang, Xiaomei; Lin, Shina; Kamesh, Aditya; Norikane, Joey H; Streatfield, Stephen J; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2015-11-01

    Antibodies (inhibitors) developed by hemophilia B patients against coagulation factor IX (FIX) are challenging to eliminate because of anaphylaxis or nephrotic syndrome after continued infusion. To address this urgent unmet medical need, FIX fused with a transmucosal carrier (CTB) was produced in a commercial lettuce (Simpson Elite) cultivar using species specific chloroplast vectors regulated by endogenous psbA sequences. CTB-FIX (∼1 mg/g) in lyophilized cells was stable with proper folding, disulfide bonds and pentamer assembly when stored ∼2 years at ambient temperature. Feeding lettuce cells to hemophilia B mice delivered CTB-FIX efficiently to the gut immune system, induced LAP(+) regulatory T cells and suppressed inhibitor/IgE formation and anaphylaxis against FIX. Lyophilized cells enabled 10-fold dose escalation studies and successful induction of oral tolerance was observed in all tested doses. Induction of tolerance in such a broad dose range should enable oral delivery to patients of different age groups and diverse genetic background. Using Fraunhofer cGMP hydroponic system, ∼870 kg fresh or 43.5 kg dry weight can be harvested per 1000 ft(2) per annum yielding 24,000-36,000 doses for 20-kg pediatric patients, enabling first commercial development of an oral drug, addressing prohibitively expensive purification, cold storage/transportation and short shelf life of current protein drugs. PMID:26302233

  19. Coagulation factor V Leiden mutation in sudden fatal pulmonary embolism and in a general northern European population sample.

    PubMed

    Kuismanen, K; Savontaus, M L; Kozlov, A; Vuorio, A F; Sajantila, A

    1999-12-01

    The R506Q point mutation in the gene coding for coagulation factor V (Leiden mutation) is the major underlying defect in resistance to activated protein C (APC), which predisposes to venous thrombosis. The risk of deep vein thrombosis is clearly elevated in carriers of the mutation, but the risk for pulmonary embolism has not been demonstrated to be as high. The aim of our study was to determine the frequency of the Leiden mutation in an autopsy series of sudden fatal pulmonary embolism cases. PCR and subsequent restriction enzyme digestion were applied for genotyping 164 cases of pulmonary embolism. According to our data, the allele frequency of the Leiden mutation is not higher in sudden fatal pulmonary embolism cases (0.8%, 95% CI 0-1.9%) than in the general Finnish population (1.5%, 95% CI 0-3.3%). In addition to the 97 Finns, we determined the frequency of the Leiden mutation in 255 individuals from the neighbouring populations (Saami, Komi, and Karelians from Russia and Estonians), and found the Saami to have the highest frequency of the Leiden mutation (6.3%, 95% CI 3.2-9.2) in the general northern European population sample studied here.

  20. Coagulation in Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Maureane

    2015-07-01

    The liver plays a key role in hemostasis as the site of synthesis of many of the proteins involved in the coagulation, antithrombotic and fibrinolytic systems that interact to both establish hemostasis, and preventing thrombosis. The common laboratory tests, prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), evolved from studies of plasma clotting in test tubes. Such studies laid the basis for the coagulation cascade model of hemostasis. However, thought has evolved to place a greater emphasis on the active roles of cells in localizing and regulating hemostasis. The PT and aPTT do not reflect the roles of cellular elements in hemostasis, nor do they reflect the crucial roles of antithrombotic and fibrinolytic systems. Thus, though the PT may indeed reflect the synthetic capacity of the liver, it does not accurately reflect the risk of bleeding or thrombosis in patients with liver failure.

  1. Chromogenic assay of human coagulation factor VIII: statistical comparison of 2 working dilution procedures.

    PubMed

    Alonso, C; Gonzalez, A; Frutos, G

    2005-08-01

    The effect of 2 different practices for preparation of working dilutions in the chromogenic substrate method for potency assay of factor VIII was evaluated. In this study the potency of several concentrate materials was shown to be statistically equivalent, whether performing the assay with independent or serial working dilutions.

  2. Two major proteins from locust plasma are involved in coagulation and are specifically precipitated by laminarin, a beta-1,3-glucan.

    PubMed

    Duvic, B; Brehélin, M

    1998-12-01

    Incubation of plasma of the locust Locusta migratoria, with laminarin induced the precipitation of two major proteins with molecular masses of about 260,000 (P260) and 85,000 Da (P85). This precipitation was not observed when other polysaccharides, such as curdlan, dextran, chitin, cellulose or mannan were used. P260 and P85 were purified to homogeneity by a single step on heparin-sepharose chromatography. Since all attempts to separate P260 from P85, other than the use of sodium dodecyl sulfate, were unsuccessful, it is likely that these two molecules form a complex non-covalently associated. Treatment of P260-P85 complex with N-glycosidase F showed that P260 did not appear to be glycosylated whereas 6% of P85 molecular mass was due to N-linked carbohydrates. On the other hand, no change in molecular masses of P260 or P85 was observed once the complex had been treated with lipase. SDS-PAGE and Western blots of plasma and serum stained with blue Coomassie for proteins or with highly specific polysera to P260 or P85, respectively, showed that P260 was only present in plasma and P85 remained in both samples. This indicates that P260 is likely to be one of the most abundant plasma proteins directly involved in the coagulation process in Locusta migratoria. The addition of plasma or P260-P85 complex to a hemocyte lysate supernatant prior to its activation by laminarin induced a lower protease as well as phenoloxidase activity compared with the control. This reduction of activities was not observed in the presence of serum or when P260-P85 complex was added to a fully activated proPO system. PMID:9887512

  3. Aptamer RA36 inhibits of human, rabbit, and rat plasma coagulation activated with thrombin or snake venom coagulases.

    PubMed

    Savchik, E Yu; Kalinina, T B; Drozd, N N; Makarov, V A; Zav'yalova, E G; Lapsheva, E N; Mudrik, N N; Babij, A V; Pavlova, G V; Golovin, A V; Kopylov, A M

    2013-11-01

    RA36 DNA aptamer is a direct anticoagulant prolonging clotting time of human, rabbit, and rat plasma in the thrombin time test. Anticoagulant activity of RA36 is lower than that of recombinant hirudin. During inhibition of human plasma clotting activated with echitox (coagulase from Echis multisquamatus venom), the aptamer presumably binds to meisothrombin exosite I. The sensitivity of human plasma to the aptamer 5-fold surpasses that of rat plasma. Analysis of RA36 binding to coagulase of Agkistrodon halys venom (ancistron) is required for proving the effect of aptamer on polymerization of human fibrinogen. PMID:24319726

  4. Extrinsic blood coagulation pathway and risk factors for thrombotic events in patients with essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Stankowska, Katarzyna; Gadomska, Grażyna; Boinska, Joanna; Michalska, Małgorzata; Bartoszewska-Kubiak, Alicja; Rość, Danuta

    2016-05-31

    INTRODUCTION    The clinical course of essential thrombocythemia (ET) is varied, and some patients do not exhibit any clinical signs of the disease at the time of diagnosis. The most frequent complications that occur during the course of ET are hemostasis abnormalities manifesting as hemorrhagic or thrombotic events. The mechanism of thrombotic events in patients with ET is complex and not fully understood. OBJECTIVES    The aim of the study was to evaluate the concentration and activity of tissue factor (TF) and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), depending on the most important risk factors of thrombotic complications (age >60 years, history of thrombotic episodes, presence or absence of the JAK2 V617F mutation, and increased leukocyte count). PATIENTS AND METHODS    The study group included 113 patients with diagnosed ET, and the control group, 30 healthy volunteers matched for age and sex. The concentration and activity of TF and TFPI were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. RESULTS    Patients with ET had a significantly higher activity and concentration of TF and increased activity of TFPI, as compared with controls. The analysis of the studied parameters in relation to risk factors revealed that patients with ET with a history of thrombotic events had a significantly higher concentration of TF, and patients with the JAK2 V617F mutation had a lower TFPI activity, as compared with patients without the mutation. CONCLUSIONS    Our study showed that in patients with ET who have a history of thrombosis or the JAK2 V617F mutation, the enhanced risk of thrombosis may result from an increased TF concentration or decreased TFPI activity. PMID:27243342

  5. Factors influencing lopinavir and atazanavir plasma concentration

    PubMed Central

    Stöhr, Wolfgang; Back, David; Dunn, David; Sabin, Caroline; Winston, Alan; Gilson, Richard; Pillay, Deenan; Hill, Teresa; Ainsworth, Jonathan; Gazzard, Brian; Leen, Clifford; Bansi, Loveleen; Fisher, Martin; Orkin, Chloe; Anderson, Jane; Johnson, Margaret; Easterbrook, Philippa; Gibbons, Sara; Khoo, Saye

    2010-01-01

    Background The protease inhibitors lopinavir and atazanavir are both recommended for treatment of HIV-infected patients. Considerable inter-individual variability in plasma concentration has been observed for both drugs. The aim of this study was to evaluate which demographic factors and concomitant drugs are associated with lopinavir and atazanavir plasma concentration. Methods Data from the Liverpool TDM (therapeutic drug monitoring) Registry were linked with the UK Collaborative HIV Cohort (CHIC) study. For each patient, the first measurement of lopinavir (twice daily) or atazanavir [once daily, ritonavir boosted (/r) or unboosted] plasma concentration was included. Linear regression was used to evaluate the association of dose, gender, age, weight, ethnicity and concomitant antiretroviral drugs or rifabutin with log-transformed drug concentration, adjusted for time since last intake. Results Data from 439 patients on lopinavir (69% 400 mg/r, 31% 533 mg/r; 3% concomitant rifabutin) and 313 on atazanavir (60% 300 mg/r, 32% 400 mg/r, 8% 400 mg) were included. Multivariable models revealed the following predictors for lopinavir concentration: weight (11% decrease per additional 10 kg; P = 0.001); dose (25% increase for 533 mg/r; P = 0.024); and rifabutin (116% increase; P < 0.001). For atazanavir the predictors were dose (compared with 300 mg/r: 40% increase for 400 mg/r, 67% decrease for 400 mg; overall P < 0.001) and efavirenz (32% decrease; P = 0.016) but not tenofovir (P = 0.54). Conclusions This analysis confirms that efavirenz decreases atazanavir concentrations, and there was a negative association of weight and lopinavir concentrations. The strong impact of rifabutin on lopinavir concentration should be studied further. PMID:19897506

  6. The Intrinsic Pathway of Coagulation as a Target for Antithrombotic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Allison P; Gailani, David

    2016-10-01

    Plasma coagulation in the activated partial thromboplastin time assay is initiated by sequential activation of coagulation factors XII, XI, and IX. While this series of proteolytic reactions is not an accurate model for hemostasis in vivo, there is mounting evidence that factor XI and factor XII contribute to thrombosis, and that inhibiting them can produce an antithrombotic effect with a small effect on hemostasis. This article discusses the contributions of components of the intrinsic pathway to thrombosis in animal models and humans, and results of early clinical trials of drugs targeting factors IX, XI, and XII. PMID:27637310

  7. Long-Acting Recombinant Fusion Protein Linking Coagulation Factor IX with Albumin (rIX-FP) in Children

    PubMed Central

    Chambost, Hervé; Male, Christoph; Lambert, Thierry; Halimeh, Susan; Chernova, Tatiana; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Curtin, Julie; Voigt, Christine; Li, Yanyan; Jacobs, Iris; Santagostino, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Summary A global phase 3 study evaluated the pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety of a recombinant fusion protein linking coagulation factor IX with albumin (rIX-FP) in 27 previously treated male children (1–11 years) with severe and moderately severe haemophilia B (factor IX [FIX] activity ≤2 IU/dl). All patients received routine prophylaxis once every seven days for up to 77 weeks, and treated any bleeding episodes on-demand. The mean terminal half-life of rIX-FP was 91.4 hours (h), 4.3-fold longer than previous FIX treatment and clearance was 1.11 ml/h/kg, 6.4-fold slower than previous FIX treatment. The median (Q1, Q3) annualised spontaneous bleeding rate was 0.00 (0.00, 0.91) and was similar between the <6 years and ≥6 years age groups, with a weekly median prophylactic dose of 46 IU/kg. In addition, patients maintained a median trough level of 13.4 IU/dl FIX activity on weekly prophylaxis. Overall, 97.2% of bleeding episodes were successfully treated with one or two injections of rIX-FP (95% CI: 92% to 99%), 88.7% with one injection, and 96% of the treatments were rated effective (excellent or good) by the Investigator. No patient developed FIX inhibitors and no safety concerns were identified. These results indicate that rIX-FP is safe and effective for preventing and treating bleeding episodes in children with haemophilia B with weekly prophylaxis. Routine prophylaxis with rIX-FP at treatment intervals of up to 14 days are currently being investigated in children with severe and moderately severe haemophilia B. Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01662531) PMID:27583313

  8. Structure-based design of inhibitors of coagulation factor XIa with novel P1 moieties.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Donald J P; Smallheer, Joanne M; Corte, James R; Austin, Erin J D; Wang, Cailan; Fang, Tianan; Smith, Leon M; Rossi, Karen A; Rendina, Alan R; Bozarth, Jeffrey M; Zhang, Ge; Wei, Anzhi; Ramamurthy, Vidhyashankar; Sheriff, Steven; Myers, Joseph E; Morin, Paul E; Luettgen, Joseph M; Seiffert, Dietmar A; Quan, Mimi L; Wexler, Ruth R

    2015-04-01

    Compound 2 was previously identified as a potent inhibitor of factor XIa lacking oral bioavailability. A structure-based approach was used to design analogs of 2 with novel P1 moieties with good selectivity profiles and oral bioavailability. Further optimization of the P1 group led to the identification of a 4-chlorophenyltetrazole P1 analog, which when combined with further modifications to the linker and P2' group provided compound 32 with FXIa Ki=6.7 nM and modest oral exposure in dogs.

  9. Coagulation changes following vasectomy: a study in primates.

    PubMed

    Kisker, C T; Alexander, N J

    1978-05-01

    Thirty vasectomized rhesus monkeys were tested for changes in coagulation factors that might reflect an increased incidence of thrombosis. The results of tests on these monkeys were compared with results of tests on 18 control rhesus monkeys; there were no significant differences between control and vasectomized animals for any of the parameters tested. One vasectomized animal had increased levels of fibrin monomer in his plasma on repeated samples, but no evidence of thrombosis on postmortem examination.

  10. Coagulation tests show significant differences in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tas, Faruk; Kilic, Leyla; Duranyildiz, Derya

    2014-06-01

    Activated coagulation and fibrinolytic system in cancer patients is associated with tumor stroma formation and metastasis in different cancer types. The aim of this study is to explore the correlation of blood coagulation assays for various clinicopathologic factors in breast cancer patients. A total of 123 female breast cancer patients were enrolled into the study. All the patients were treatment naïve. Pretreatment blood coagulation tests including PT, APTT, PTA, INR, D-dimer, fibrinogen levels, and platelet counts were evaluated. Median age of diagnosis was 51 years old (range 26-82). Twenty-two percent of the group consisted of metastatic breast cancer patients. The plasma level of all coagulation tests revealed statistically significant difference between patient and control group except for PT (p<0.001 for all variables except for PT; p=0.08). Elderly age (>50 years) was associated with higher D-dimer levels (p=0.003). Metastatic patients exhibited significantly higher D-dimer values when compared with early breast cancer patients (p=0.049). Advanced tumor stage (T3 and T4) was associated with higher INR (p=0.05) and lower PTA (p=0.025). In conclusion, coagulation tests show significant differences in patients with breast cancer.

  11. Neonatal Plasma Transfusion: An Evidence-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Keir, Amy K; Stanworth, Simon J

    2016-10-01

    Several clinical scenarios for plasma transfusion are repeatedly identified in audits, including treatment of bleeding in association with laboratory evidence of coagulopathy, correction of disseminated intravascular coagulation, prevention of intraventricular hemorrhage, management of critically ill neonates (eg, during sepsis or as a volume expander), or correction of markers of prolonged coagulation in the absence of bleeding. The findings of at least one national audit of transfusion practice indicated that almost half of plasma transfusions are given to neonates with abnormal coagulation values with no evidence of active bleeding, despite the limited evidence base to support the effectiveness of this practice. Plasma transfusions to neonates should be considered in the clinical context of bleeding (eg, vitamin K dependent), disseminated intravascular coagulation, and very rare inherited deficiencies of coagulation factors. There seems to be no role for prophylactic plasma to prevent intraventricular hemorrhage or for use as a volume expander. PMID:27473518

  12. Involvement of coagulation and hemostasis in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Stadnicki, Antoni

    2012-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (UC) are idiopathic, intestinal and systemic inflammatory disorders which are immunologically mediated with the activation of plasma proteolytic cascades. The activation of coagulation in IBD is related to the activity and colonic extension of the disease, but may still be persistent in a quiescent stage. Factor XIII seems to be as much a coagulation factor as a connective tissue factor which may contribute to intestinal healing. Fibrinolytic capacity is reduced in systemic circulation of IBD patients. Platelets activation is a feature of IBD which contributes to a pathogenic inflammatory sequel. There is evidence that coagulation activation may in turn mediate and amplify inflammatory cascades in IBD, especially via activating PARs related pathways. The etiology of thromboembolism in IBD seems to be multifactorial but is largely attributable to the coagulation activation and platelet aggregation during systemic inflammation. Thromboembolic (TE) complications in both Crohn's disease and UC appear to have at least 3-4 fold increased risk of developing compared to control patients. Currently, no single TE laboratory marker has a predictive value, but a recently developed endogenous thrombin potential test may have a potentially predicative value in IBD. At present, no interaction between IBD and inherited factors of thrombophilia has been found. An efficacy of heparin treatment in UC is still controversial, although heparin is safe in UC flare. Prophylactic anticoagulation against TE is currently not fully defined, however, high - risk patients should be considered for using a moderate dose of heparin. PMID:22272910

  13. Characterization of a human coagulation factor Xa-binding site on Viperidae snake venom phospholipases A2 by affinity binding studies and molecular bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Grazyna; Gowda, Veerabasappa T; Maroun, Rachid C

    2007-01-01

    Background The snake venom group IIA secreted phospholipases A2 (SVPLA2), present in the Viperidae snake family exhibit a wide range of toxic and pharmacological effects. They exert their different functions by catalyzing the hydrolysis of phospholipids (PL) at the membrane/water interface and by highly specific direct binding to: (i) presynaptic membrane-bound or intracellular receptors; (ii) natural PLA2-inhibitors from snake serum; and (iii) coagulation factors present in human blood. Results Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) protein-protein interaction measurements and an in vitro biological test of inhibition of prothrombinase activity, we identify a number of Viperidae venom SVPLA2s that inhibit blood coagulation through direct binding to human blood coagulation factor Xa (FXa) via a non-catalytic, PL-independent mechanism. We classify the SVPLA2s in four groups, depending on the strength of their binding. Molecular electrostatic potentials calculated at the surface of 3D homology-modeling models show a correlation with inhibition of prothrombinase activity. In addition, molecular docking simulations between SVPLA2 and FXa guided by the experimental data identify the potential FXa binding site on the SVPLA2s. This site is composed of the following regions: helices A and B, the Ca2+ loop, the helix C-β-wing loop, and the C-terminal fragment. Some of the SVPLA2 binding site residues belong also to the interfacial binding site (IBS). The interface in FXa involves both, the light and heavy chains. Conclusion We have experimentally identified several strong FXa-binding SVPLA2s that disrupt the function of the coagulation cascade by interacting with FXa by the non-catalytic PL-independent mechanism. By theoretical methods we mapped the interaction sites on both, the SVPLA2s and FXa. Our findings may lead to the design of novel, non-competitive FXa inhibitors. PMID:18062812

  14. Advances in Oral Coagulants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews current and future treatment practices concerning oral anticoagulants. In the second decade of the 21st millennium clinicians can finally treat thrombotic disease with long-awaited new oral anticoagulant medications. In addition, improvements have been made in managing warfarin, the traditional but far from obsolete medication. The first part of this review will cover current advances with warfarin treatment. The second portion will discuss specific active coagulation factor inhibitors, the new oral anticoagulants.

  15. Coagulation inhibitors in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Esmon, C T

    2005-04-01

    Coagulation is triggered by inflammatory mediators in a number of ways. However, to prevent unwanted clot formation, several natural anticoagulant mechanisms exist, such as the antithrombin-heparin mechanism, the tissue factor pathway inhibitor mechanism and the protein C anticoagulant pathway. This review examines the ways in which these pathways are down-regulated by inflammation, thus limiting clot formation and decreasing the natural anti-inflammatory mechanisms that these pathways possess. PMID:15787615

  16. Plasma binding proteins for platelet-derived growth factor that inhibit its binding to cell-surface receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Raines, E W; Bowen-Pope, D F; Ross, R

    1984-01-01

    Evidence is presented that the binding of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) to plasma constituents inhibits the binding of PDGF to its cell-surface mitogen receptor. Approximately equivalent amounts of PDGF-binding activity were found in plasma from a number of different species known by radioreceptor assay to contain PDGF homologues in their clotted blood. Activation of the coagulation cascade did not significantly alter the PDGF-binding activity of the plasma components. Three molecular weight classes of plasma fractions that inhibit PDGF binding to its cell-surface receptor were defined by gel filtration: approximately equal to 40,000, 150,000, and greater than 500,000. Specific binding of 125I-labeled PDGF to the highest molecular weight plasma fraction could also be demonstrated by gel filtration. The binding of PDGF to these plasma components was reversible under conditions of low pH or with guanidine X HCl, and active PDGF could be recovered from the higher molecular weight fractions. Immunologic and functional evidence is presented that the highest molecular weight plasma fraction may be alpha 2-macroglobulin. A model is proposed in which the activity of PDGF released in vivo may be regulated by association with these plasma binding components and by high-affinity binding to cell-surface PDGF receptors. PMID:6203121

  17. Acquired coagulation inhibitor-associated bleeding disorders: an update.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Veneri, Dino

    2005-12-01

    Acquired blood coagulation inhibitors are circulating immunoglobulins that neutralize the activity of a specific coagulation protein or accelerate its clearance from the plasma, thus causing a bleeding tendency. In this review, we focus on the nonhemophilic inhibitors of coagulation, i.e. the autoantibodies occurring in individuals without a pre-existent coagulation defect, reporting the most recent advances in the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of these rare acquired bleeding disorders.

  18. Coagulation Factors Test

    MedlinePlus

    Advertisement Proceeds from website advertising help sustain Lab Tests Online. AACC is a not-for-profit organization ... for trustworthy health information. Verify Compliance . Produced by Advertisement

  19. Molecular intercommunication between the complement and coagulation systems.

    PubMed

    Amara, Umme; Flierl, Michael A; Rittirsch, Daniel; Klos, Andreas; Chen, Hui; Acker, Barbara; Brückner, Uwe B; Nilsson, Bo; Gebhard, Florian; Lambris, John D; Huber-Lang, Markus

    2010-11-01

    The complement system as well as the coagulation system has fundamental clinical implications in the context of life-threatening tissue injury and inflammation. Associations between both cascades have been proposed, but the precise molecular mechanisms remain unknown. The current study reports multiple links for various factors of the coagulation and fibrinolysis cascades with the central complement components C3 and C5 in vitro and ex vivo. Thrombin, human coagulation factors (F) XIa, Xa, and IXa, and plasmin were all found to effectively cleave C3 and C5. Mass spectrometric analyses identified the cleavage products as C3a and C5a, displaying identical molecular weights as the native anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Cleavage products also exhibited robust chemoattraction of human mast cells and neutrophils, respectively. Enzymatic activity for C3 cleavage by the investigated clotting and fibrinolysis factors is defined in the following order: FXa > plasmin > thrombin > FIXa > FXIa > control. Furthermore, FXa-induced cleavage of C3 was significantly suppressed in the presence of the selective FXa inhibitors fondaparinux and enoxaparin in a concentration-dependent manner. Addition of FXa to human serum or plasma activated complement ex vivo, represented by the generation of C3a, C5a, and the terminal complement complex, and decreased complement hemolytic serum activity that defines exact serum concentration that results in complement-mediated lysis of 50% of sensitized sheep erythrocytes. Furthermore, in plasma from patients with multiple injuries (n = 12), a very early appearance and correlation of coagulation (thrombin-antithrombin complexes) and the complement activation product C5a was found. The present data suggest that coagulation/fibrinolysis proteases may act as natural C3 and C5 convertases, generating biologically active anaphylatoxins, linking both cascades via multiple direct interactions in terms of a complex serine protease system.

  20. Disorders of coagulation in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Katz, D; Beilin, Y

    2015-12-01

    The process of haemostasis is complex and is further complicated in the parturient because of the physiological changes of pregnancy. Understanding these changes and the impact that they have on the safety profile of the anaesthetic options for labour and delivery is crucial to any anaesthetist caring for the parturient. This article analyses current theories on coagulation and reviews the physiological changes to coagulation that occur during pregnancy and the best methods with which to evaluate coagulation. Finally, we examine some of the more common disorders of coagulation that occur during pregnancy, including von Willebrand disease, common factor deficiencies, platelet disorders, the parturient on anticoagulants, and the more rare acute fatty liver of pregnancy, with a focus on their implications for neuraxial anaesthesia.

  1. Levels of prolactin in relation to coagulation factors and risk of venous thrombosis. Results of a large population-based case-control study (MEGA-study).

    PubMed

    Stuijver, Danka J F; Debeij, Jan; van Zaane, Bregje; Dekkers, Olaf M; Smit, Jan W A; Büller, Harry R; Rosendaal, Frits R; Gerdes, Victor E A; Cannegieter, Suzanne C

    2012-09-01

    The pituitary hormone prolactin is thought to influence coagulation. We aimed to study the relation between prolactin levels, coagulation factors and risk of venous thrombosis (VT). We used data from a large population based case-control study into aetiology of first VT (MEGA-study). Prolactin levels were determined in 2,068 patients with VT and 2,785 age- and sex matched control subjects. The relation between levels of coagulation factors and prolactin was studied among the controls. In addition, odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were calculated for the risk of VT for different cut-off points of prolactin levels based on percentiles determined in the controls. Restricted analysis was performed among cases in whom blood was sampled within six months after VT. We found a rise in factor VIII and von Willebrand factor with increasing levels of prolactin in the controls. An increased risk of VT was observed when blood was sampled within six months after thrombosis (OR 2.9, 95%CI 1.1-8.1) for prolactin levels above the 99th percentile (42.6 μg/l) relative to levels between the 20th to 80th percentile. When blood was sampled more than six months after VT no clear association could be observed (OR 1.3, 95%CI 0.7-2.3). In conclusion, we found a modest association between prolactin and symptomatic venous thromboembolism, particularly when blood was sampled close to the event. This may be explained by a causal relation or by prolactin being a marker of stress due to the thrombotic event.

  2. POST-BARIATRIC SURGERY WEIGHT REGAIN: EVALUATION OF NUTRITIONAL PROFILE OF CANDIDATE PATIENTS FOR ENDOSCOPIC ARGON PLASMA COAGULATION

    PubMed Central

    CAMBI, Maria Paula Carlini; MARCHESINI, Simone Dallegrave; BARETTA, Giorgio Alfredo Pedroso

    2015-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery is effective treatment for weight loss, but demand continuous nutritional care and physical activity. They regain weight happens with inadequate diets, physical inactivity and high alcohol consumption. Aim To investigate in patients undergoing Roux-Y-of gastroplasty weight regain, nutritional deficiencies, candidates for the treatment with endoscopic argon plasma, the diameter of the gastrojejunostomy and the size of the gastric pouch at the time of treatment with plasma. Methods A prospective 59 patients non-randomized study with no control group undergoing gastroplasty with recurrence of weight and candidates for the endoscopic procedure of argon plasma was realized. The surgical evaluation consisted of investigation of complications in the digestive system and verification of the increased diameter of the gastrojejunostomy. Nutritional evaluation was based on body mass index at the time of operation, in the minimum BMI achieved after and in which BMI was when making the procedure with plasma. The laboratory tests included hemoglobin, erythrocyte volume, ferritin, vitamin D, B12, iron, calcium, zinc and serum albumin. Clinical analysis was based on scheduled follow-up. Results Of the 59 selected, five were men and 51 women; were included 49 people (four men and 44 women) with all the complete data. The exclusion was due to the lack of some of the laboratory tests. Of this total 19 patients (38.7%) had a restrictive ring, while 30 (61.2%) did not. Iron deficiency anemia was common; 30 patients (61.2%) were below 30 with ferritin (unit); 35 (71.4%) with vitamin B12 were below 300 pg/ml; vitamin D3 deficiency occurred in more than 90%; there were no cases of deficiency of protein, calcium and zinc; glucose levels were above 99 mg/dl in three patients (6.12%). Clinically all had complaints of labile memory, irritability and poor concentration. All reported that they stopped treatment with the multidisciplinary team in the first year after

  3. Surface-loop residue Lys316 in blood coagulation Factor IX is a major determinant for Factor X but not antithrombin recognition.

    PubMed

    Kolkman, J A; Mertens, K

    2000-09-15

    The active site of activated Factor IX (FIXa) and related blood-coagulation enzymes is surrounded by a number of highly variable surface loops, which contribute to the characteristic substrate specificity of each individual enzyme. FIX residue Lys(316) is located in one of these loops and mutation of this residue to Glu is associated with haemophilia B. In the present study we investigated the functional role of Lys(316) in human FIXa by analysing the purified and activated FIX mutants FIXa-K316E and FIXa-K316A. FIXa-K316E was indistinguishable from normal FIXa in binding the competitive active-site inhibitor p-aminobenzamidine. In addition, substitution of Glu for Lys(316) had no significant effect on the reactivity towards various synthetic tripeptide substrates. Inhibition by the macromolecular inhibitor antithrombin was only slightly reduced for both FIXa mutants (less than 2-fold). In contrast, proteolytic activity of FIXa-K316E towards the natural substrate Factor X (FX) was virtually lacking, while the Lys(316) to Ala mutation resulted in a more than 10-fold reduction in FX activation. Thus residue Lys(316) plays a key role in FIXa activity towards FX. The requirement for Lys at position 316 for FX activation was also evident in the presence of the cofactor activated Factor VIII, although to a lesser extent than in its absence. These data demonstrate that Lys(316) specifically determines the reactivity of FIXa towards its natural substrate FX, but not to synthetic peptide substrates or antithrombin. PMID:10970782

  4. Human plasma epidermal growth factor/beta-urogastrone is associated with blood platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Y; Orth, D N

    1983-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) has previously been isolated from urine and probably is identical to human beta-urogastrone (hUG). Immunoreactive hEGF/UG has been found in the plasma of normal subjects. In this study, using immunoaffinity chromatography to extract hEGF/UG from plasma, we found that immunoreactive hEGF/UG in blood was associated with blood platelets. It was present in platelet-rich, but not platelet-poor plasma and serum, and was found predominantly in the platelet fraction of whole blood. Sephadex G-50 Fine gel-exclusion chromatography of an extract of outdated blood bank platelets revealed two hEGF/UG components, one of which eluted in the void volume, and the other of which coeluted with purified standard hEGF/UG. The former hEGF/UG component was a high-molecular weight form that was cleaved into hEGF/UG by incubation with either mouse EGF/UG-associated arginine esterase or trypsin. It appeared to be identical to the high-molecular weight hEGF/UG previously reported in human urine, except for its apparently equal activities in radioimmunoassay and radioreceptor assay. The latter hEGF/UG component was immunologically, biologically, and physiochemically indistinguishable from highly purified hEGF/UG from human urine and was immunologically different from purified human platelet-derived growth factor. Platelet-associated hEGF/UG may account for the mitogenic activity of serum in cell lines in which platelet-derived growth factor is not active. Since hEGF/UG appears to be liberated from platelets during coagulation, platelet-associated EGF/UG may be involved in normal vascular and tissue repair and in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic lesions. The discovery that the EGF/UG in plasma is associated with blood platelets raises important new possibilities for its role in human health and disease. PMID:6603475

  5. Disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Gando, Satoshi; Levi, Marcel; Toh, Cheng-Hock

    2016-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is an acquired syndrome characterized by widespread intravascular activation of coagulation that can be caused by infectious insults (such as sepsis) and non-infectious insults (such as trauma). The main pathophysiological mechanisms of DIC are inflammatory cytokine-initiated activation of tissue factor-dependent coagulation, insufficient control of anticoagulant pathways and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1-mediated suppression of fibrinolysis. Together, these changes give rise to endothelial dysfunction and microvascular thrombosis, which can cause organ dysfunction and seriously affect patient prognosis. Recent observations have pointed to an important role for extracellular DNA and DNA-binding proteins, such as histones, in the pathogenesis of DIC. The International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) established a DIC diagnostic scoring system consisting of global haemostatic test parameters. This scoring system has now been well validated in diverse clinical settings. The theoretical cornerstone of DIC management is the specific and vigorous treatment of the underlying conditions, and DIC should be simultaneously managed to improve patient outcomes. The ISTH guidance for the treatment of DIC recommends treatment strategies that are based on current evidence. In this Primer, we provide an updated overview of the pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of DIC and discuss the future directions of basic and clinical research in this field. PMID:27250996

  6. Distinct Roles of Ser-764 and Lys-773 at the N Terminus of von Willebrand Factor in Complex Assembly with Coagulation Factor VIII*

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Núñez, Lydia; Bloem, Esther; Boon-Spijker, Mariëtte G.; van der Zwaan, Carmen; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B.

    2013-01-01

    Complex formation between coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) and von Willebrand factor (VWF) is of critical importance to protect FVIII from rapid in vivo clearance and degradation. We have now employed a chemical footprinting approach to identify regions on VWF involved in FVIII binding. To this end, lysine amino acid residues of VWF were chemically modified in the presence of FVIII or activated FVIII, which does not bind VWF. Nano-LC-MS analysis showed that the lysine residues of almost all identified VWF peptides were not differentially modified upon incubation of VWF with FVIII or activated FVIII. However, Lys-773 of peptide Ser-766–Leu-774 was protected from chemical modification in the presence of FVIII. In addition, peptide Ser-764–Arg-782, which comprises the first 19 amino acid residues of mature VWF, showed a differential modification of both Lys-773 and the α-amino group of Ser-764. To verify the role of Lys-773 and the N-terminal Ser-764 in FVIII binding, we employed VWF variants in which either Lys-773 or Ser-764 was replaced with Ala. Surface plasmon resonance analysis and competition studies revealed that VWF(K773A) exhibited reduced binding to FVIII and the FVIII light chain, which harbors the VWF-binding site. In contrast, VWF(S764A) revealed more effective binding to FVIII and the FVIII light chain compared with WT VWF. The results of our study show that the N terminus of VWF is critical for the interaction with FVIII and that Ser-764 and Lys-773 have opposite roles in the binding mechanism. PMID:23168412

  7. Distinct roles of Ser-764 and Lys-773 at the N terminus of von Willebrand factor in complex assembly with coagulation factor VIII.

    PubMed

    Castro-Núñez, Lydia; Bloem, Esther; Boon-Spijker, Mariëtte G; van der Zwaan, Carmen; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B

    2013-01-01

    Complex formation between coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) and von Willebrand factor (VWF) is of critical importance to protect FVIII from rapid in vivo clearance and degradation. We have now employed a chemical footprinting approach to identify regions on VWF involved in FVIII binding. To this end, lysine amino acid residues of VWF were chemically modified in the presence of FVIII or activated FVIII, which does not bind VWF. Nano-LC-MS analysis showed that the lysine residues of almost all identified VWF peptides were not differentially modified upon incubation of VWF with FVIII or activated FVIII. However, Lys-773 of peptide Ser-766-Leu-774 was protected from chemical modification in the presence of FVIII. In addition, peptide Ser-764-Arg-782, which comprises the first 19 amino acid residues of mature VWF, showed a differential modification of both Lys-773 and the α-amino group of Ser-764. To verify the role of Lys-773 and the N-terminal Ser-764 in FVIII binding, we employed VWF variants in which either Lys-773 or Ser-764 was replaced with Ala. Surface plasmon resonance analysis and competition studies revealed that VWF(K773A) exhibited reduced binding to FVIII and the FVIII light chain, which harbors the VWF-binding site. In contrast, VWF(S764A) revealed more effective binding to FVIII and the FVIII light chain compared with WT VWF. The results of our study show that the N terminus of VWF is critical for the interaction with FVIII and that Ser-764 and Lys-773 have opposite roles in the binding mechanism. PMID:23168412

  8. A structural locus for coagulation factor XIIIA (F13A) is located distal to the HLA region on chromosome 6p in man.

    PubMed

    Olaisen, B; Gedde-Dahl, T; Teisberg, P; Thorsby, E; Siverts, A; Jonassen, R; Wilhelmy, M C

    1985-01-01

    Linkage between the locus for coagulation factor XIIIA (F13A) and HLA-region genes has been revealed during a linkage study between F13A and approximately 40 other polymorphic marker genes. In males, the maximum lod score between F13A and HLA-region genes (HLA-A, -C, -B, -DR; C4A, -B; Bf; and/or C2) is 7.60 at theta 1 = .18. To GLO, the maximum lod score is 2.37 at theta 1 = .19; to PGM3, .22 at theta 1 = .35. Female data indicate a clear sex difference in recombination frequency between F13A and HLA. The present findings, in combination with earlier knowledge of PGM3/GLO/HLA localization and gene distances, show that F13A is distal to HLA on the short arm of chromosome 6 in man. It is thus likely that by including FXIIIA typing in linkage studies, the whole male 6p is within mapping distance of highly polymorphic, classical marker genes. Earlier findings that the Hageman factor gene (F12) is located in the same chromosomal region may indicate the presence of a coagulation factor gene cluster in this region.

  9. A structural locus for coagulation factor XIIIA (F13A) is located distal to the HLA region on chromosome 6p in man.

    PubMed Central

    Olaisen, B; Gedde-Dahl, T; Teisberg, P; Thorsby, E; Siverts, A; Jonassen, R; Wilhelmy, M C

    1985-01-01

    Linkage between the locus for coagulation factor XIIIA (F13A) and HLA-region genes has been revealed during a linkage study between F13A and approximately 40 other polymorphic marker genes. In males, the maximum lod score between F13A and HLA-region genes (HLA-A, -C, -B, -DR; C4A, -B; Bf; and/or C2) is 7.60 at theta 1 = .18. To GLO, the maximum lod score is 2.37 at theta 1 = .19; to PGM3, .22 at theta 1 = .35. Female data indicate a clear sex difference in recombination frequency between F13A and HLA. The present findings, in combination with earlier knowledge of PGM3/GLO/HLA localization and gene distances, show that F13A is distal to HLA on the short arm of chromosome 6 in man. It is thus likely that by including FXIIIA typing in linkage studies, the whole male 6p is within mapping distance of highly polymorphic, classical marker genes. Earlier findings that the Hageman factor gene (F12) is located in the same chromosomal region may indicate the presence of a coagulation factor gene cluster in this region. Images Fig. 1 PMID:2858156

  10. [Acute lung injury as a consequence of fresh frozen plasma administration in a patient with factor XII deficiency].

    PubMed

    San Juan-Álvarez, M; Sánchez-Zamora, P; de la Flor-Robledo, M

    2014-10-01

    Along with the complete blood count, the coagulation tests are those most demanded before a surgical procedure. The activated partial thromboplastin time (APPT) quantifies the intrinsic and common coagulation pathways, including factors XII, XI, IX, VIII, X, V and II. Factor XII deficiency is associated with a prolonged APPT and an increase in thromboembolic phenomena, without increasing the intraoperative bleeding risk. A 20 year old man with factor XII deficiency was receiving two units of fresh frozen plasma because of an APPT of 100 seconds, with the intention of normalizing it before an urgent surgery procedure, and the fear of intraoperative bleeding. An hour after starting the transfusion the patient developed an acute lung injury (ALI) compatible with the diagnosis of a transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). The surgery continued without complications, and the patient was admitted to the resuscitation unit for 72 h, needing respiratory support. If the APTT is prolonged in the absence of bleeding, the presence of a non-specific circulating anticoagulant, a deficiency of factor XI, XII and VIII (associated to Von Willebrand disease) must be ruled out. Therefore, in the case presented here, the administration of hemoderivatives was unnecessary and can have consequences as serious as the one that the patient presented, a transfusion related acute lung injury.

  11. Coagulation Changes During Graded Orhostatic Stress and Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Nandu; Cvirn, Gerhard; Schlagenhauf, Aaxel; Leschnik, Bettina; Koestenberger, Martin; Roessler, Andreas; Jantscher, Andreas; Waha, James Elvis; Wolf, Sabine; Vrecko, Karoline; Juergens, Guenther; Hinghofer-Szalkay, Helmut

    2013-02-01

    Background: Orthostatic stress has been introduced as a novel paradigm for activating the coagulation system. We examined whether graded orthostatic stress (using head up tilt, HUT + lower body negative pressure, LBNP) until presyncope leads to anti / pro-coagulatory changes and how rapidly they return to baseline during recovery. Methodology: Eight male subjects were enrolled in this study. Presyncopal runs were carried out using HUT + LBNP. At minute zero, the tilt table was brought from 0° (supine) to 70 ° head-up position for 4 min, after which pressure in the LBNP chamber was reduced to -15, -30, and -45 mm Hg every 4 min. At presyncope, the subjects were returned to supine position. Coagulatory responses and plasma mass density (for volume changes) were measured before, during and 20 min after the orthostatic stress. Whole blood coagulation was examined by means of thrombelastometry. Platelet aggregation in whole blood was examined by using impedance aggregometry. Thrombin generation parameters, prothrombin levels, and markers of endothelial activation were measured in plasma samples. Results: At presyncope, plasma volume was 20 % below the initial supine value. Blood cell counts, prothrombin levels, thrombin peak, endogenous thrombin potential (ETP), and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) levels increased during the protocol, commensurate with hemoconcentration. The markers of endothelial activation (tissue factor, TF, tissue plasminogen activator, t-PA) and the markers of thrombin generation (Prothrombin fragments 1 and 2, F1+2, and thrombin-antithrombin complex, TAT) increased significantly. During recovery, all the coagulation parameters returned to initial supine values except F1 +2 and TAT. Conclusion: Head-up tilt/LBNP leads to activation of the coagulation system. Some of the markers of thrombin formation are still at higher than supine levels during recovery.

  12. An investigation of the coagulant activity of the venom of the saw-scaled viper (Echis carinatus) from Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Kamiguti, A S; Theakston, R D; Tomy, S C

    1988-10-01

    Unlike the venom of Echis carinatus from India, Pakistan, Nigeria, Kenya, Iran and Oman, Saudi Arabian E. carinatus venom is a poor activator of prothrombin. However, it possesses similar defibrinogenating activity to the other venoms. This is because the venom from Saudi Arabian snakes contains a calcium-dependent factor X activator. It is suggested that in future studies of the coagulant activity of venoms, the determination of plasma coagulant activity should be carried out in the presence of added calcium ions. This applies particularly to those venoms which do not act on plasma or fibrinogen, but which do cause in vivo defibrinogenation. PMID:3257079

  13. Influence of single nucleotide polymorphisms in factor VIII and von Willebrand factor genes on plasma factor VIII activity: the ARIC Study.

    PubMed

    Campos, Marco; Buchanan, Ashley; Yu, Fuli; Barbalic, Maja; Xiao, Yang; Chambless, Lloyd E; Wu, Kenneth K; Folsom, Aaron R; Boerwinkle, Eric; Dong, Jing-fei

    2012-02-23

    Factor VIII (FVIII) functions as a cofactor for factor IXa in the contact coagulation pathway and circulates in a protective complex with von Willebrand factor (VWF). Plasma FVIII activity is strongly influenced by environmental and genetic factors through VWF-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the coding and promoter sequence in the FVIII gene have been extensively studied for effects on FVIII synthesis, secretion, and activity, but impacts of non-disease-causing intronic SNPs remain largely unknown. We analyzed FVIII SNPs and FVIII activity in 10,434 healthy Americans of European (EA) or African (AA) descent in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Among covariates, age, race, diabetes, and ABO contributed 2.2%, 3.5%, 4%, and 10.7% to FVIII intersubject variation, respectively. Four intronic FVIII SNPs associated with FVIII activity and 8 with FVIII-VWF ratio in a sex- and race-dependent manner. The FVIII haplotypes AT and GCTTTT also associated with FVIII activity. Seven VWF SNPs were associated with FVIII activity in EA subjects, but no FVIII SNPs were associated with VWF Ag. These data demonstrate that intronic SNPs could directly or indirectly influence intersubject variation of FVIII activity. Further investigation may reveal novel mechanisms of regulating FVIII expression and activity. PMID:22219226

  14. Derangements of coagulation and fibrinolysis in critically ill patients with sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Vervloet, M G; Thijs, L G; Hack, C E

    1998-01-01

    In patients with sepsis and septic shock, both coagulation and fibrinolysis are activated frequently leading to the syndrome of diffuse intravascular coagulation (DIC). The different mechanisms leading to abnormalities in coagulation and fibrinolysis are discussed in detail. The coagulation and fibrinolytic system appear to be influenced by the septic process largely independently, leading to a procoagulant imbalance between these systems. Coagulation is initiated by mediator-induced expression of tissue factor and is associated with consumption of the natural coagulation inhibitors antithrombin III, protein C, and protein S. As a result, high plasma levels of thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT) can be found. The effects on fibrinolysis are dominated by (highly) increased levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1), leading to inadequate fibrinolysis. Although levels of plasminogen activator antigen are increased, its activity is almost completely inhibited by PAI-1. The resulting effects predispose to a procoagulant state, with widespread fibrin deposition, which may be an important mechanism contributing to multiple organ failure. A thorough understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the DIC-syndrome is a prerequisite for a rational approach and future therapy for this severe complication of sepsis.

  15. Coagulation in patients with severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Levi, Marcel; Poll, Tom van der

    2015-02-01

    In the majority of patients with severe sepsis, systemic activation of coagulation is present. Increasing evidence points to an extensive cross-talk between coagulation and inflammation that may play an important role in the pathogenesis of sepsis. Inflammation not only leads to activation of coagulation, but coagulation also considerably affects inflammatory activity. Molecular pathways that contribute to inflammation-induced activation of coagulation have been precisely identified. Proinflammatory cytokines and other mediators are capable of activating the coagulation system and downregulating important physiological anticoagulant pathways. Activation of the coagulation system and ensuing thrombin generation is dependent on expression of tissue factor on activated mononuclear cells and endothelial cells, and is insufficiently counteracted by TFPI. Simultaneously, endothelial-bound anticoagulant mechanism, in particular the protein C system, is shutoff by proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, fibrin removal is severely inhibited, because of inactivation of the fibrinolytic system, caused by an upregulation of its main inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1). Increased fibrin formation and impaired removal lead to (micro)vascular thrombosis, which may result in tissue ischemia and subsequent organ damage. The cornerstone of the management of coagulation in sepsis is the specific and vigorous treatment of the underlying disorder. Strategies aimed at the inhibition of coagulation activation may theoretically be justified and have been found beneficial in experimental and initial clinical studies. Heparin may be an effective anticoagulant approach and alternative strategies comprise restoration of physiological anticoagulant pathways. PMID:25590524

  16. Radioimmunoassay of factor V in human plasma and platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, P.B.; Eide, L.L.; Bowie, E.J.W.; Mann, K.G.

    1982-07-01

    Homogeneous, single-chain human factor V was used to develop a double antibody competition radioimmunoassay to measure factor V concentrations in plasma and platelets. Standard curves were constructed that allow for the detection of as little as 20 ng factor V/ml of plasma. Normal factor V concentrations range from 4 to 14 ..mu..g/ml of plasma with an average value of 7.0 +/- 2.0 ..mu..g/ml (n = 64). No correlation was observed between antigen levels and age or sex. The radioimmunoassay data are consistent with factor V clotting assays, providing freshly drawn plasma is used in the bioassay. Radioimmunoassay of washed platelets indicate that 0.63-1.93 ..mu..g of factor V is present per 2.5 X 10/sup 8/ platelets (6412-14128 molecules of factor V per platelet). When normalized to individual hematocrits and platelet count, the data indicated that platelets contribute approximately 18%-25% of the factor V found in whole blood. In addition, two individuals with functionally deficient factor V were examined and found to be deficient in both antigen and activity.

  17. Elevated plasma tissue factor levels in neonates with umbilical arterial catheter-associated thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Tay, S P; Cheong, S K; Boo, N Y

    2006-06-01

    Catheterization of the umbilical artery has been a useful aid in the management of sick neonates for the past few decades. However, it is associated with various complications. Reported studies strongly suggest a significant role of intravascular catheterization in the development of aortic thrombi. Increase in thrombosis of large vessels is believed to be related to mechanical injury in the catheterized vessels, which provide direct exposure of blood to tissue factor (TF), the primary cellular initiator of the extrinsic coagulation pathway. This study was conducted to determine the levels of plasma TF, tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) and D-dimer (DD) in infants with umbilical arterial catheter (UAC)-associated thrombosis. Quantification of TF was carried out using an in-house sandwich ELISA, whereas TFPI and DD levels were measured with commercial immunoassay kits. Infants with UAC inserted were found to have significantly higher levels of plasma TF (p < 0.001) than baseline levels. However, there were no significantly elevated levels of TFPI or DD. Infants with UAC-associated thrombosis demonstrated a greater increase of TF level (median: 414.5 pg/mL; range: -76.0, 6667.0) than infants without UAC-associated thrombosis (105.0 pg/mL; -976.0, 9480.0; p = 0.009) following UAC insertion. Our findings indicate that quantification and monitoring of TF levels could predict thrombus formation in infants with indwelling UAC. Following umbilical arterial catheterisation, infants with an approximately 3-fold rise in plasma TF levels were most at risk of developing abdominal aorta thrombosis as confirmed by real-time abdominal ultrasonography.

  18. Platelets and coagulation in infection

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Rachelle P; Miller-Dorey, Sarah; Jenne, Craig N

    2016-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a frequent complication in sepsis that is associated with worse outcomes and higher mortality in patients. In addition to the uncontrolled generation of thrombi throughout the patient's vasculature, DIC often consumes large quantities of clotting factors leaving the patient susceptible to hemorrhaging. Owing to these complications, patients often receive anticoagulants to treat the uncontrolled clotting, often with mixed outcomes. This lack of success with the current array of anticoagulants can be partly explained by the fact that during sepsis clotting is often initiated by the immune system. Systemic inflammation has the capacity to activate and amplify coagulation and, as such, potential therapies for the treatment of sepsis-associated DIC need to address the interaction between inflammation and coagulation. Recent studies have suggested that platelets and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are the key mediators of infection-induced coagulation. This review explores current anticoagulant therapies and discusses the development of future therapies to target platelet and NET-mediated coagulation. PMID:27525062

  19. Thrombin-activable factor X re-establishes an intrinsic amplification in tenase-deficient plasmas.

    PubMed

    Louvain-Quintard, Virginie B; Bianchini, Elsa P; Calmel-Tareau, Claire; Tagzirt, Madjid; Le Bonniec, Bernard F

    2005-12-16

    Classical hemophilia results from a defect of the intrinsic tenase complex, the main factor X (FX) activator. Binding of factor VIIa to tissue factor triggers coagulation, but little amplification of thrombin production occurs. Handling of hemophilia by injection of the deficient or missing (thus foreign) factor often causes immunological complications. Several strategies have been designed to bypass intrinsic tenase complex, but none induce true auto-amplification of thrombin production. In an attempt to re-establish a cyclic amplification of prothrombin activation in the absence of tenase, we prepared a chimera of FX having fibrinopeptide A for the activation domain (FX(FpA)). We reasoned that cascade initiation would produce traces of thrombin that would activate FX(FpA) (contrary to its normal homologue). Given that the activation domain of FX is released upon activation, thrombin cleavage would produce authentic FXa that would produce more thrombin, which in turn would activate more chimeras. FX(FpA) was indeed activable by thrombin, albeit at a relatively low rate (5 x 10(3) M(-1) s(-1)). Nevertheless, FX(FpA) allowed in vitro amplification of thrombin production, and 100 nM efficiently corrected thrombin generation in tenase-deficient plasmas. A decisive advantage of FX(FpA) could be that the artificial cascade is self-regulating: FX(FpA) had little influence on the clotting time of normal plasma, yet corrected that of tenase deficiency. Another advantage could be the half-life of FX(FpA) in blood; FX has a half-life of about 30 h (less than 3 h for FVIIa). It is also reasonable to expect little or no immunogenicity, because FX and fibrinopeptide A both circulate normally in the blood of hemophiliacs.

  20. Investigation of plasma induced electrical and chemical factors and their contribution processes to plasma gene transfection.

    PubMed

    Jinno, Masafumi; Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Motomura, Hideki; Kido, Yugo; Satoh, Susumu

    2016-09-01

    This study has been done to know what kind of factors in plasmas and processes on cells induce plasma gene transfection. We evaluated the contribution weight of three groups of the effects and processes, i.e. electrical, chemical and biochemical ones, inducing gene transfection. First, the laser produced plasma (LPP) was employed to estimate the contribution of the chemical factors. Second, liposomes were fabricated and employed to evaluate the effects of plasma irradiation on membrane under the condition without biochemical reaction. Third, the clathrin-dependent endocytosis, one of the biochemical processes was suppressed. It becomes clear that chemical factors (radicals and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species) do not work by itself alone and electrical factors (electrical current, charge and field) are essential to plasma gene transfection. It turned out the clathrin-dependent endocytosis is the process of the transfection against the 60% in all the transfected cells. The endocytosis and electrical poration are dominant in plasma gene transfection, and neither permeation through ion channels nor chemical poration is dominant processes. The simultaneous achievement of high transfection efficiency and high cell survivability is attributed to the optimization of the contribution weight among three groups of processes by controlling the weight of electrical and chemical factors. PMID:27136710

  1. Patient preference and ease of use for different coagulation factor VIII reconstitution device scenarios: a cross-sectional survey in five European countries

    PubMed Central

    Cimino, Ernesto; Linari, Silvia; Malerba, Mara; Halimeh, Susan; Biondo, Francesca; Westfeld, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Hemophilia A treatment involves replacing the deficient coagulation factor VIII. This process may involve multiple steps that might create a barrier to adherence. A new dual-chamber syringe (DCS; FuseNGo®) was recently introduced with the aim of simplifying reconstitution. Aim This study aimed to identify factors associated with adult patients’ preferences for different coagulation factor VIII reconstitution systems and to test ease of use and patient preference for the DCS. Methods A cross-sectional survey of adults with hemophilia A in five European countries was conducted; a subset of subjects also participated in a practical testing session of the DCS. Results Among the 299 survey participants, the device scenario requiring the least equipment and reconstitution steps (the DCS) received a median preference rating of 71 out of 100 (0 being “the least desirable” and 100 “the most desirable” rating). This was significantly higher than the other scenarios (the next highest achieved a median of 50 points; P<0.001). Participants would be more likely to use this device prophylactically (P<0.001). Among the 98 participants who tested the DCS, 57% preferred this device over their current device, 26% preferred their current device, and 17% had no preference. The DCS was rated as easier to use than current treatment devices (median score 9/10 versus 7/10 for current treatment, P=0.001). Conclusion The survey indicates that the prefilled DCS, FuseNGo®, requiring the least equipment and fewest reconstitution steps, was preferred by patients and was the device most likely to be used prophylactically; the practical device testing supports these results. PMID:25525348

  2. Interleukin-6 stimulates coagulation, not fibrinolysis, in humans.

    PubMed

    Stouthard, J M; Levi, M; Hack, C E; Veenhof, C H; Romijn, H A; Sauerwein, H P; van der Poll, T

    1996-11-01

    The role of IL-6 as a mediator of haemostatic changes during severe inflammation is controversial. To assess the effect of IL-6 on haemostasis we conducted a controlled cross-over study in eight patients with metastatic renal cell cancer. In all subjects coagulation and fibrinolysis were monitored during and after a 4-h infusion of either 150 micrograms recombinant human (rh) IL-6, or during infusion of saline (control study). Mean maximum IL-6 concentrations were 1418.0 +/- 755.8 pg/ml. Compared to the control study, rhIL-6 induced activation of coagulation as reflected by a 190 +/- 55% increase in the plasma levels of thrombin-antithrombin III complexes (p < 0.001) and by a 24 +/- 11% increase in the plasma levels of in the prothrombin activation fragment F1 + 2 (p < 0.001). In contrast, fibrinolysis was not affected. We conclude that in severe inflammation IL-6 may contribute to the activation of coagulation, whereas other factors mediate changes in fibrinolysis.

  3. Plasma PIVKA proteins in rabbits given warfarin.

    PubMed

    Zivelin, A; Rao, L V; Rapaport, S I

    1996-06-01

    The presence of partially carboxylated forms of the vitamin K dependent coagulation factors (PIVKA) was evaluated in the plasma of rabbits treated with warfarin. Excess antigen over activity as measured in rabbit specific assays was taken as evidence for PIVKA. Our data confirm a previous report of the absence of plasma PIVKA prothrombin. In contrast, plasma PIVKA factors VII, IX, and X were demonstrable. A striking excess of plasma factor IX antigen over activity was measured and a large fraction of the factor IX antigen persisted in the plasma after its adsorption with barium citrate.

  4. A cross-reactive material positive variant of coagulation factor XI (FXIP520L) with a catalytic defect.

    PubMed

    Gailani, D; Schmidt, A; Sun, M-F; Bolton-Maggs, P H; Bajaj, S P

    2007-04-01

    Inherited deficiency of the trypsin-like protease factor (F) XI is associated with a mild to moderate bleeding diathesis. In most cases, FXI protein is reduced in plasma, and examples of dysfunctional circulating FXI variants are rare. We characterized the defect in one such variant with a proline to leucine substitution at residue 520. FXI Pro520 corresponds to chymotrypsin Pro161, and is conserved in most members of the chymotrypsin protease family. Recombinant FXI containing this substitution will be referred to as FXI(P161L). k(cat) for cleavage of chromogenic substrates and for activation of the natural FXIa substrate FIX is approximately 3-fold lower for activated FXI(P161L) (FXIa(P161L)) than for wild-type FXIa (FXIa(WT)), consistent with an abnormal protease active site. Inhibition of FXIa(P161L) by diisopropyl fluorophosphate is 2.4-fold slower than for FXIa(WT), suggesting distortion of the protease oxyanion hole. Binding to p-aminobenzamidine, a probe for the integrity of the S1 substrate-binding site, was similar for FXIa(WT) and FXIa(P161L). Rates of carbamylation of Ile16 were also similar for FXIa(WT) and FXIa(P161L), indicating that the critical salt bridge between Ile16 and Asp194 forms normally during protease activation. Cumulatively, the data demonstrate that Pro161 is required for normal active site oxyanion hole conformation in FXIa. Examination of the FXIa crystal structure and modeling studies indicate that Pro161 forms several hydrophobic contacts with adjacent amino acids that stabilize active site conformation. Leucine can be incorporated at position 161 in FXIa, but would not form the extensive stabilizing network of hydrophobic interactions formed by Pro161. PMID:17229051

  5. Release kinetics of platelet-derived and plasma-derived growth factors from autologous plasma rich in growth factors.

    PubMed

    Anitua, Eduardo; Zalduendo, Mari Mar; Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Orive, Gorka

    2013-10-01

    Many studies have evaluated the biological effects of platelet rich plasma reporting the final outcomes on cell and tissues. However, few studies have dealt with the kinetics of growth factor delivery by plasma rich in growth factors. Venous blood was obtained from three healthy volunteers and processed with PRGF-Endoret technology to prepare autologous plasma rich in growth factors. The gel-like fibrin scaffolds were then incubated in triplicate, in a cell culture medium to monitor the release of PDGF-AB, VEGF, HGF and IGF-I during 8 days of incubation. A leukocyte-platelet rich plasma was prepared employing the same technology and the concentrations of growth factors and interleukin-1β were determined after 24h of incubation. After each period, the medium was collected, fibrin clot was destroyed and the supernatants were stored at -80°C until analysis. The growth factor delivery is diffusion controlled with a rapid initial release by 30% of the bioactive content after 1h of incubation and a steady state release when almost 70% of the growth factor content has been delivered. Autologous fibrin matrix retained almost 30% of the amount of the growth factors after 8 days of incubation. The addition of leukocytes to the formula of platelet rich plasma did not increase the concentration of the growth factors, while it drastically increased the presence of pro-inflammatory IL-1β. Further studies employing an in vitro inflammatory model would be interesting to study the difference in growth factors and pro-inflammatory cytokines between leukocyte-free and leukocyte-rich platelet rich plasma.

  6. Bradykinin: Inflammatory Product of the Coagulation System.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Zonne; de Maat, Steven; Hack, C Erik; Maas, Coen

    2016-10-01

    Episodic and recurrent local cutaneous or mucosal swelling are key features of angioedema. The vasoactive agents histamine and bradykinin are highly implicated as mediators of these swelling attacks. It is challenging to assess the contribution of bradykinin to the clinical expression of angioedema, as accurate biomarkers for the generation of this vasoactive peptide are still lacking. In this review, we will describe the mechanisms that are responsible for bradykinin production in hereditary angioedema (HAE) and the central role that the coagulation factor XII (FXII) plays in it. Evidently, several plasma parameters of coagulation change during attacks of HAE and may prove valuable biomarkers for disease activity. We propose that these changes are secondary to vascular leakage, rather than a direct consequence of FXII activation. Furthermore, biomarkers for fibrinolytic system activation (i.e. plasminogen activation) also change during attacks of HAE. These changes may reflect triggering of the bradykinin-forming mechanisms by plasmin. Finally, multiple lines of evidence suggest that neutrophil activation and mast-cell activation are functionally linked to bradykinin production. We put forward the paradigm that FXII functions as a 'sensor molecule' to detect conditions that require bradykinin release via crosstalk with cell-derived enzymes. Understanding the mechanisms that drive bradykinin generation may help to identify angioedema patients that have bradykinin-mediated disease and could benefit from a targeted treatment. PMID:27122021

  7. Bradykinin: Inflammatory Product of the Coagulation System.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Zonne; de Maat, Steven; Hack, C Erik; Maas, Coen

    2016-10-01

    Episodic and recurrent local cutaneous or mucosal swelling are key features of angioedema. The vasoactive agents histamine and bradykinin are highly implicated as mediators of these swelling attacks. It is challenging to assess the contribution of bradykinin to the clinical expression of angioedema, as accurate biomarkers for the generation of this vasoactive peptide are still lacking. In this review, we will describe the mechanisms that are responsible for bradykinin production in hereditary angioedema (HAE) and the central role that the coagulation factor XII (FXII) plays in it. Evidently, several plasma parameters of coagulation change during attacks of HAE and may prove valuable biomarkers for disease activity. We propose that these changes are secondary to vascular leakage, rather than a direct consequence of FXII activation. Furthermore, biomarkers for fibrinolytic system activation (i.e. plasminogen activation) also change during attacks of HAE. These changes may reflect triggering of the bradykinin-forming mechanisms by plasmin. Finally, multiple lines of evidence suggest that neutrophil activation and mast-cell activation are functionally linked to bradykinin production. We put forward the paradigm that FXII functions as a 'sensor molecule' to detect conditions that require bradykinin release via crosstalk with cell-derived enzymes. Understanding the mechanisms that drive bradykinin generation may help to identify angioedema patients that have bradykinin-mediated disease and could benefit from a targeted treatment.

  8. Silica Nanoparticles Effects on Blood Coagulation Proteins and Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Gryshchuk, Volodymyr; Galagan, Natalya

    2016-01-01

    Interaction of nanoparticles with the blood coagulation is important prior to their using as the drug carriers or therapeutic agents. The aim of present work was studying of the primary effects of silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) on haemostasis in vitro. We studied the effect of SiNPs on blood coagulation directly estimating the activation of prothrombin and factor X and to verify any possible effect of SiNPs on human platelets. It was shown that SiNPs shortened coagulation time in APTT and PT tests and increased the activation of factor X induced by RVV possibly due to the sorption of intrinsic pathway factors on their surface. SiNPs inhibited the aggregation of platelet rich plasma induced by ADP but in the same time partially activated platelets as it was shown using flow cytometry. The possibility of SiNPs usage in nanomedicine is strongly dependant on their final concentration in bloodstream and the size of the particles that are used. However SiNPs are extremely promising as the haemostatic agents for preventing the blood loss after damage. PMID:26881078

  9. Randomized controlled study of endoscopic band ligation and argon plasma coagulation in the treatment of gastric antral and fundal vascular ectasia

    PubMed Central

    Mosaad, Samah; Alkhalawany, Walaa; Abo-Ali, Lobna; Enaba, Mohamed; Elsaka, Aymen; Elfert, Asem A

    2015-01-01

    Background Gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE) is characterized by mucosal and submucosal vascular ectasia causing recurrent hemorrhage and thus, chronic anemia, in patients with cirrhosis. Treatment with argon plasma coagulation (APC) is an effective and safe method, but requires multiple sessions of endoscopic therapy. Endoscopic band ligation (EBL) was found to be a good alternative for APC as a treatment for GAVE, especially in refractory cases. The aim of this prospective randomized controlled study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of EBL, as compared to APC, in the treatment of GAVE and gastric fundal vascular ectasia (GFVE). Patients and methods A total of 88 cirrhotic patients with GAVE were prospectively randomized to endoscopic treatment with either EBL or APC, every 2 weeks until complete obliteration was accomplished; then they were followed up endoscopically after 6 months, plus they had monthly measurement of hemoglobin levels during that period. Results We describe the presence of mucosal and submucosal lesions in the gastric fundal area that were similar to those found in GAVE in 13 patients (29.5%) of the EBL group and 9 patients (20.5%) of the APC group; we named this GFVE. In these cases, we treated the fundal lesions with the same techniques we had used for treating GAVE, according to the randomization. We found that EBL significantly decreased the number of sessions required for complete obliteration of the lesions (2.98 sessions compared to 3.48 sessions in the APC group (p < 0.05)). Hemoglobin levels increased significantly after obliteration of the lesions in both groups, compared to pretreatment values (p < 0.05), but with no significant difference between the two groups (p > 0.05); however, the EBL group of patients required a significantly smaller number of units of blood transfusion than the APC group of patients (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in adverse events nor complications between the

  10. Argon plasma coagulation for the endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal tumor bleeding: A retrospective comparison with a non-treated historical cohort

    PubMed Central

    Wodak, Stephanie; Gusmon, Carla C; Safatle-Ribeiro, Adriana Vaz; Kawaguti, Fabio Shiguehissa; Baba, Elisa Ryoka; Pennacchi, Caterina MP; Lima, Marcelo Simas; Ribeiro, Ulysses; Maluf-Filho, Fauze

    2015-01-01

    Background The endoscopic use of argon plasma coagulation (APC) to achieve hemostasis for upper gastrointestinal tumor bleeding (UGITB) has not been adequately evaluated in controlled trials. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of APC for the treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding from malignant lesions. Methods Between January and September 2011, all patients with UGITB underwent high-potency APC therapy (up to 70 Watts). This group was compared with a historical cohort of patients admitted between January and December 2010, when the endoscopic treatment of bleeding malignancies was not routinely performed. Patients were stratified into two categories, grouping the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status scale: Category I (ECOG 0–2) patients with a good clinical status and Category II (ECOG 3–4) patients with a poor clinical status. Results Our study had 25 patients with UGITB whom underwent APC treatment and 28 patients whom received no endoscopic therapy. The clinical characteristics of the groups were similar, except for endoscopic active bleeding, which was more frequently detected in APC group. We had 15 patients in the APC group whom had active bleeding, and initial hemostasis was obtained in 11 of them (73.3%). In the control group, four patients had active bleeding. There were no differences in 30-day re-bleeding (33.3% in the APC group versus 14.3% in the control group; p = 0.104) and 30-day mortality rates (20.8% in the APC group, versus 42.9% in the control group; p = 0.091). When patients were categorized according to their ECOG status, we found that APC therapy had no impact in re-bleeding and mortality rates (Group I: APC versus no endoscopic treatment: re-bleeding p = 0.412, mortality p = 0.669; Group II: APC versus no endoscopic treatment: re-bleeding p = 0.505, mortality p = 0.580). Hematemesis and site of bleeding located at the esophagus or duodenum were associated with a higher 30-day

  11. Textile wastewater purification through natural coagulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán-Heredia, J.; Sánchez-Martín, J.; Rodríguez-Sánchez, M. T.

    2011-09-01

    A new coagulant obtained through polymerization of Acacia mearnsii de Wild tannin extract has been characterized in the removal of two dangerous dye pollutants: Alizarin Violet 3R and Palatine Fast Black WAN. This coagulant is lab-synthesized according to the etherification of tannins with glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride and formaldehyde and its performance in dye removal in terms of efficiency was high. Reasonably low coagulant dosages (ca. 50 mg L-1) reaches high capacity levels (around 0.8 for Alizarin Violet 3R and 1.6 for Palatine Fast Black WAN mg dye mg-1 of coagulant) and pH and temperature are not extremely affecting variables. The systems coagulant dyes were successfully modeled by applying the Langmuir hypothesis. q max and b parameters were obtained with an adjusted correlation factor ( r 2) above 0.8.

  12. Effect of Crocus sativus L. (saffron) on coagulation and anticoagulation systems in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ayatollahi, Hossein; Javan, Atefeh Ordoei; Khajedaluee, Mohammad; Shahroodian, Masood; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2014-04-01

    Saffron showed some effects on blood coagulation and platelet aggregation in in vitro and in vivo studies. In a clinical trial with a limited number volunteers, saffron tablets influenced on bleeding time. In this study, the effect of saffron on plasma level of fibrinogen, factor VII (as coagulant agent), C and S protein (as anti-coagulant agent), PT and PTT in a larger sample size was evaluated. The study was a double-blind, placebo-controlled study consisting of 1 week treatment with 200 mg and 400 mg saffron tablets. Sixty healthy volunteers (age range 20-50 years) were selected for the study. The volunteers were divided into three groups of 20 each. Group 1 received placebo; Groups 2 and 3 received 200 mg and 400 mg saffron tablets, respectively, for 7 days (1 tablet per day). Before and after 7 days treatment and also 1 month after that, blood samples were taken. The plasma levels of fibrinogen, factor VII, C and S protein, PT and PTT were evaluated. Statistical analysis showed no difference between groups for any of evaluated factors. This study rejected any effect of saffron with dose of 200 and 400 mg for 1 week on coagulant and anticoagulant system.

  13. Obstetric hemorrhage and coagulation: an update. Thromboelastography, thromboelastometry, and conventional coagulation tests in the diagnosis and prediction of postpartum hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Natascha M; Lancé, Marcus D; de Groot, Reneé; Beckers, Erik A M; Henskens, Yvonne M; Scheepers, Hubertina C J

    2012-07-01

    Globally, postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is the leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. In the current treatment of severe PPH, first-line therapy includes transfusion of packed cells and fresh-frozen plasma in addition to uterotonic medical management and surgical interventions. In persistent PPH, tranexamic acid, fibrinogen, and coagulation factors are often administered. Secondary coagulopathy due to PPH or its treatment is often underestimated and therefore remains untreated, potentially causing progression to even more severe PPH. In most cases, medical and transfusion therapy is not based on the actual coagulation state because conventional laboratory test results are usually not available for 45 to 60 minutes. Thromboelastography and rotational thromboelastometry are point-of-care coagulation tests. A good correlation has been shown between thromboelastometric and conventional coagulation tests, and the use of these in massive bleeding in nonobstetric patients is widely practiced and it has been proven to be cost-effective. As with conventional laboratory tests, there is an influence of fluid dilution on coagulation test results, which is more pronounced with colloid fluids. Fibrinogen seems to play a major role in the course of PPH and can be an early predictor of the severity of PPH. The FIBTEM values (in thromboelastometry, reagent specific for the fibrin polymerization process) decline even more rapidly than fibrinogen levels and can be useful for early guidance of interventions. Data on thromboelastography and thromboelastometry in pregnant women are limited, particularly during the peripartum period and in women with PPH, so more research in this field is needed. PMID:22926249

  14. Treatment of Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation.

    PubMed

    Makruasi, Nisa

    2015-11-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a syndrome characterized by systemic activation of blood coagulation, generation of thrombin, and leading to disturbance of the microvasculature. In this article, definition and diagnostic criteria of DIC depend on the International Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH). There is no gold standard for diagnosis of DIC, only low quality evidence is used in general practice. Many diagnostic tests and repeated measurement are required. For the treatment of DIC, there is no good quality evidence. The most important treatment for DIC is the specific treatment of the conditions associated DIC. Platelets and/or plasma transfusion may be also necessary if indicated. Nevertheless, there is no gold standard for diagnosis and treatment of DIC, we use only low quality evidence in general practice.

  15. Effect of nano-scale curvature on the intrinsic blood coagulation system.

    PubMed

    Kushida, Takashi; Saha, Krishnendu; Subramani, Chandramouleeswaran; Nandwana, Vikas; Rotello, Vincent M

    2014-11-01

    The intrinsic coagulation activity of silica nanoparticles strongly depends on their surface curvature. Nanoparticles with higher surface curvature do not denature blood coagulation factor XII on its surface, providing a coagulation 'silent' surface, while nanoparticles with lower surface curvature show denaturation and concomitant coagulation.

  16. Sulfated Low Molecular Weight Lignins, Allosteric Inhibitors of Coagulation Proteinases via the Heparin Binding Site, Significantly Alter the Active Site of Thrombin and Factor Xa Compared to Heparin

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Brian L.; Desai, Umesh R.

    2014-01-01

    Sulfated low molecular weight lignins (LMWLs) have been found to bind in the heparin binding sites of coagulation proteinases. LMWLs represent a library of diverse non-carbohydrate, aromatic molecules which are structures different from heparin, but still potently inhibit thrombin and factor Xa. To better understand their mechanism of action, we studied the effects of three sulfated LMWLs (CDSO3, FDSO3, and SDSO3) on the active sites of thrombin and factor Xa. LMWLs were found to uniformly inhibit the catalytic activity of thrombin and factor Xa, regardless of the substrate used. Michaelis-Menten kinetic studies indicate that maximal velocity of hydrolysis of each chromogenic substrate decreases significantly in the presence of sulfated LMWLs, while the effect on Michaelis constant is dependent on the nature of the substrate. These studies indicate that LMWLs inhibit thrombin and factor Xa through allosteric disruption of the catalytic apparatus, specifically through the catalytic step. As opposed to heparin, LMWLs significantly alter the binding of the active site fluorescent ligand p-aminobenzamidine. LMWLs also had a greater effect on the molecular orientation of fluorescein-labeled His 57 than heparin. The molecular geometry surrounding the most important catalytic amino acid, Ser 195, was significantly altered by the binding of LMWLs while heparin had no measurable effect on Ser 195. These results further advance the concept of sulfated LMWLs as heparin mimics and will aid the design of anticoagulants based on their novel scaffold. PMID:25242245

  17. Sulfated low molecular weight lignins, allosteric inhibitors of coagulation proteinases via the heparin binding site, significantly alter the active site of thrombin and factor xa compared to heparin.

    PubMed

    Henry, Brian L; Desai, Umesh R

    2014-11-01

    Sulfated low molecular weight lignins (LMWLs) have been found to bind in the heparin binding sites of coagulation proteinases. LMWLs represent a library of diverse non-carbohydrate, aromatic molecules which are structures different from heparin, but still potently inhibit thrombin and factor Xa. To better understand their mechanism of action, we studied the effects of three sulfated LMWLs (CDSO3, FDSO3, and SDSO3) on the active sites of thrombin and factor Xa. LMWLs were found to uniformly inhibit the catalytic activity of thrombin and factor Xa, regardless of the substrate used. Michaelis-Menten kinetic studies indicate that maximal velocity of hydrolysis of each chromogenic substrate decreases significantly in the presence of sulfated LMWLs, while the effect on Michaelis constant is dependent on the nature of the substrate. These studies indicate that LMWLs inhibit thrombin and factor Xa through allosteric disruption of the catalytic apparatus, specifically through the catalytic step. As opposed to heparin, LMWLs significantly alter the binding of the active site fluorescent ligand p-aminobenzamidine. LMWLs also had a greater effect on the molecular orientation of fluorescein-labeled His 57 than heparin. The molecular geometry surrounding the most important catalytic amino acid, Ser 195, was significantly altered by the binding of LMWLs while heparin had no measurable effect on Ser 195. These results further advance the concept of sulfated LMWLs as heparin mimics and will aid the design of anticoagulants based on their novel scaffold. PMID:25242245

  18. Effects of Al-coagulant sludge characteristics on the efficiency of coagulants recovery by acidification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Jui; Wang, Wen-May; Wei, Ming-Jun; Chen, Jiann-Long; He, Ju-Liang; Chiang, Kung-Yuh; Wu, Chih-Chao

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluated the effects of Al-coagulant sludge characteristics on the efficiency ofcoagulant recovery by acidification with H2SO4. Two sludge characteristics were studied: types of coagulant and textures of the suspended solid in raw water. The coagulant types are aluminium sulphate and polyaluminium chloride (PACl); the textures of the suspended solid are sand-based and clay-based. Efficiency of aluminium recovery at a pH of 2 was compared for different sludges obtained from water treatment plants in Taiwan. The results showed that efficiency of aluminium recovery from sludge containing clayey particles was higher than that from sludge containing sandy particles. As for the effect of coagulant types, the aluminium recovery efficiency for sludge using PACl ranged between 77% and 100%, whereas it ranged between 65% and 72% for sludge using aluminium sulphate as the coagulant. This means using PACl as the coagulant could result in higher recovery efficiency of coagulant and be beneficial for water treatment plants where renewable materials and waste reduction as the factors for making decisions regarding plant operations. However, other metals, such as manganese, could be released with aluminium during the acidification process and limit the use of the recovered coagulants. It is suggested that the recovered coagulants be used in wastewater treatment processes.

  19. Ovarian cancer, the coagulation pathway, and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xipeng; Wang, Ena; Kavanagh, John J; Freedman, Ralph S

    2005-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) represents the most frequent cause of death in the United States from a cancer involving the female genital tract. Contributing to the overall poor outcome in EOC patients, are the metastases to the peritoneum and stroma that are common in this cancer. In one study, cDNA microarray analysis was performed on fresh tissue to profile gene expression in patients with EOC. This study showed a number of genes with significantly altered expression in the pelvic peritoneum and stroma, and in the vicinity of EOC implants. These genes included those encoding coagulation factors and regulatory proteins in the coagulation cascade and genes encoding proteins associated with inflammatory responses. In addition to promoting the formation of blood clots, coagulation factors exhibit many other biologic functions as well as tumorigenic functions, the later including tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Coagulation pathway proteins involved in tumorigenesis consist of factor II (thrombin), thrombin receptor (protease-activated receptors), factor III (tissue factor), factor VII, factor X and factor I (fibrinogen), and fibrin and factor XIII. In a recent study we conducted, we found that factor XII, factor XI, and several coagulation regulatory proteins, including heparin cofactor-II and epithelial protein C receptor (EPCR), were also upregulated in the peritoneum of EOC. In this review, we summarize evidence in support of a role for these factors in promoting tumor cell progression and the formation of ascites. We also discuss the different roles of coagulation factor pathways in the tumor and peritumoral microenvironments as they relate to angiogenesis, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. . Since inflammatory responses are another characteristic of the peritoneum in EOC, we also discuss the linkage between the coagulation cascade and the cytokines/chemokines involved in inflammation. Interleukin-8, which is considered

  20. Ovarian cancer, the coagulation pathway, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xipeng; Wang, Ena; Kavanagh, John J; Freedman, Ralph S

    2005-06-21

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) represents the most frequent cause of death in the United States from a cancer involving the female genital tract. Contributing to the overall poor outcome in EOC patients, are the metastases to the peritoneum and stroma that are common in this cancer. In one study, cDNA microarray analysis was performed on fresh tissue to profile gene expression in patients with EOC. This study showed a number of genes with significantly altered expression in the pelvic peritoneum and stroma, and in the vicinity of EOC implants. These genes included those encoding coagulation factors and regulatory proteins in the coagulation cascade and genes encoding proteins associated with inflammatory responses. In addition to promoting the formation of blood clots, coagulation factors exhibit many other biologic functions as well as tumorigenic functions, the later including tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Coagulation pathway proteins involved in tumorigenesis consist of factor II (thrombin), thrombin receptor (protease-activated receptors), factor III (tissue factor), factor VII, factor X and factor I (fibrinogen), and fibrin and factor XIII. In a recent study we conducted, we found that factor XII, factor XI, and several coagulation regulatory proteins, including heparin cofactor-II and epithelial protein C receptor (EPCR), were also upregulated in the peritoneum of EOC. In this review, we summarize evidence in support of a role for these factors in promoting tumor cell progression and the formation of ascites. We also discuss the different roles of coagulation factor pathways in the tumor and peritumoral microenvironments as they relate to angiogenesis, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. Since inflammatory responses are another characteristic of the peritoneum in EOC, we also discuss the linkage between the coagulation cascade and the cytokines/chemokines involved in inflammation. Interleukin-8, which is considered an

  1. Coagulation abnormalities in the cirrhotic patient.

    PubMed

    Muciño-Bermejo, Jimena; Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Uribe, Misael; Méndez-Sánchez, Nahum

    2013-01-01

    The clotting process is a dynamic array of multiple processes which can be described in four phases: platelet plug initiation and formation, clotting process propagation by the coagulation cascade, clotting termination by antithrombotic mechanisms and clot removal by fibrinolysis. The liver plays a central role in each of these phases of clotting process, as it synthesizes the majority of coagulation factors and proteins involved in fibrinolysis as well as thrombopoeitin, which is responsible for platelet production from megakaryocytes. Many pathological processes associated with cirrhosis, such as portal hypertension and endothelial dysfunction, as well as co-morbid conditions, may also alter the coagulation process. Consequently, patients with liver disease have a disturbed balance of procoagulant and anti-coagulant factors which deviates from the normal coagulation cascade. This situation poses an additional problem in the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to this group of patients, since traditional coagulation test may not be reliable for assessing bleeding or thrombotic risk and traditional transfusional strategies may not be applicable in cirrhotic patients. In this article, we review the pathophysiological bases of coagulation abnormalities, in cirrhotic patients, the diagnostic therapeutic strategies to be followed and its impact on the clinical outcome in the cirrhotic patient.

  2. Transfusion and coagulation management in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Clevenger, Ben; Mallett, Susan V

    2014-01-01

    There is wide variation in the management of coagulation and blood transfusion practice in liver transplantation. The use of blood products intraoperatively is declining and transfusion free transplantations take place ever more frequently. Allogenic blood products have been shown to increase morbidity and mortality. Primary haemostasis, coagulation and fibrinolysis are altered by liver disease. This, combined with intraoperative disturbances of coagulation, increases the risk of bleeding. Meanwhile, the rebalancing of coagulation homeostasis can put patients at risk of hypercoagulability and thrombosis. The application of the principles of patient blood management to transplantation can reduce the risk of transfusion. This includes: preoperative recognition and treatment of anaemia, reduction of perioperative blood loss and the use of restrictive haemoglobin based transfusion triggers. The use of point of care coagulation monitoring using whole blood viscoelastic testing provides a picture of the complete coagulation process by which to guide and direct coagulation management. Pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include the use of anti-fibrinolytic drugs to reduce fibrinolysis, and rarely, the use of recombinant factor VIIa. Factor concentrates are increasingly used; fibrinogen concentrates to improve clot strength and stability, and prothrombin complex concentrates to improve thrombin generation. Non-pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include surgical utilisation of the piggyback technique and maintenance of a low central venous pressure. The use of intraoperative cell salvage and normovolaemic haemodilution reduces allogenic blood transfusion. Further research into methods of decreasing blood loss and alternatives to blood transfusion remains necessary to continue to improve outcomes after transplantation. PMID:24876736

  3. Conformational change path between closed and open forms of C2 domain of coagulation factor V on a two-dimensional free-energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sangwook; Lee, Chang Jun; Pedersen, Lee G.

    2009-04-01

    We test a hypothesis that the closed form of the C2 domain of coagulation factor V is more stable than the open form in an aqueous environment using a two-dimensional free-energy calculation with a simple dielectric solvent model. Our result shows that while the free-energy difference between two forms is small, favoring the closed form, a two-dimensional free-energy surface (FES) reveals that a transition state (1.53 kcal/mol) exists between the two conformations. By mapping the one-dimensional order parameter ΔQ onto the two-dimensional FES, we search the conformational change path with the highest Boltzmann weighting factor between the closed and open form of the factor V C2 domain. The predicted transition path from the closed to open form is not that of simple side chain movements, but instead concerted movements of several loops. We also present a one-dimensional free-energy profile using a collective order parameter, which in a coarse manner locates the energy barriers found on the two-dimensional FES.

  4. Formation of tissue factor activity following incubation of recombinant human tissue factor apoprotein with plasma lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, T.; Kisiel, W. )

    1990-11-01

    Incubation of recombinant human tissue factor apoprotein (Apo-TF) with human plasma decreased the recalcified clotting time of this plasma in a time-and dose-dependent manner suggesting relipidation of the Apo-TF by plasma lipoproteins. Incubation of Apo-TF with purified preparations of human very low density, low density and high density lipoproteins resulted in tissue factor activity in a clotting assay. The order of effectiveness was VLDL greater than LDL much greater than HDL. Tissue factor activity generated by incubation of a fixed amount of Apo-TF with plasma lipoproteins was lipoprotein concentration-dependent and saturable. The association of Apo-TF with lipoprotein particles was supported by gel filtration studies in which {sup 125}I-Apo-TF coeluted with the plasma lipoprotein in the void volume of a Superose 6 column in the presence and absence of calcium ions. In addition, void-volume Apo-TF-lipoprotein fractions exhibited tissue factor activity. These results suggest that the factor VIII-bypassing activity of bovine Apo-TF observed in a canine hemophilic model may be due, in part, to its association with plasma lipoproteins and expression of functional tissue factor activity.

  5. Functional role of residue 193 (chymotrypsin numbering) in serine proteases: influence of side chain length and beta-branching on the catalytic activity of blood coagulation factor XIa.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Amy E; Sun, Mao-fu; Ogawa, Taketoshi; Bajaj, S Paul; Gailani, David

    2008-02-01

    In serine proteases, Gly193 (chymotrypsin numbering) is conserved with rare exception. Mutants of blood coagulation proteases have been reported with Glu, Ala, Arg or Val substitutions for Gly193. To further understand the role of Gly193 in protease activity, we replaced it with Ala or Val in coagulation factor XIa (FXIa). For comparison to the reported FXIa Glu193 mutant, we prepared FXIa with Asp (short side chain) or Lys (opposite charge) substitutions. Binding of p-aminobenzamidine (pAB) and diisopropylfluorphosphate (DFP) were impaired 1.6-36-fold and 35-478-fold, respectively, indicating distortion of, or altered accessibility to, the S1 and oxyanion-binding sites. Val or Asp substitutions caused the most impairment. Salt bridge formation between the amino terminus of the mature protease moiety at Ile16 and Asp194, essential for catalysis, was impaired 1.4-4-fold. Mutations reduced catalytic efficiency of tripeptide substrate hydrolysis 6-280-fold, with Val or Asp causing the most impairment. Further studies were directed toward macromolecular interactions with the FXIa mutants. kcat for factor IX activation was reduced 8-fold for Ala and 400-1100-fold for other mutants, while binding of the inhibitors antithrombin and amyloid beta-precursor protein Kunitz domain (APPI) was impaired 13-2300-fold and 22-27000-fold, respectively. The data indicate that beta-branching of the side chain of residue 193 is deleterious for interactions with pAB, DFP and amidolytic substrates, situations where no S2'-P2' interactions are involved. When an S2'-P2' interaction is involved (factor IX, antithrombin, APPI), beta-branching and increased side chain length are detrimental. Molecular models indicate that the mutants have impaired S2' binding sites and that beta-branching causes steric conflicts with the FXIa 140-loop, which could perturb the local tertiary structure of the protease domain. In conclusion, enzyme activity is impaired in FXIa when Gly193 is replaced by a non

  6. Nanoparticles and the blood coagulation system. Part I: benefits of nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Ilinskaya, Anna N; Dobrovolskaia, Marina A

    2013-05-01

    Nanotechnology is proven to provide certain benefits in drug delivery by improving solubility, increasing uptake to target sites and changing pharmacokinetics profiles of traditional drugs. Since properties of many materials change tremendously at the nanoscale levels, nanotechnology is also being explored in various industrial applications. As such, nanoparticles are rapidly entering various areas of industry, biology and medicine. The benefits of using nanotechnology for industrial and biomedical applications are often tempered by concerns about the safety of these new materials. One such area of concern includes their effect on the immune system. While nanoparticle interactions with various constituents of the immune system have been reviewed before, little attention was given to nanoparticle effects on the blood coagulation system. Nanoparticle interface with the blood coagulation system may lead to either benefits to the host or adverse reactions. This article reviews recent advances in our understanding of nanoparticle interactions with plasma coagulation factors, platelets, endothelial cells and leukocytes. Part I is focused on desirable interactions between nanoparticles and the coagulation system, and discusses benefits of using nanotechnology to intervene in coagulation disorders. Undesirable interactions posing safety concerns are covered in part II, which will be published in the June issue of Nanomedicine.

  7. Modification of a commercial thromboelastography instrument to measure coagulation dynamics with three-dimensional biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Hawker, Morgan J; Olver, Christine S; Fisher, Ellen R

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional synthetic constructs with complex geometries have immense potential for use in a multitude of blood-contacting applications. Understanding coagulation phenomena is arguably the most critical aspect for applications involving synthetic biomaterials; however, real-time evaluation of the clot formation while interfacing with these materials is difficult to achieve in a reproducible and robust manner. Here, work representing first steps toward addressing this deficit is presented, wherein modified consumables for a clinical instrument (a Thromboelastograph(®)) have been fabricated. Thromboelastography (TEG) measures viscoelastic properties throughout clot formation and therefore provides clinically relevant coagulation measurements in real time (i.e., kinetics and strength of clot formation). Through our modification, TEG consumables can readily accommodate three-dimensional materials (e.g., those for regenerative tissue applications). The authors performed proof-of-concept experiments using polymer scaffolds with a range of surface properties and demonstrated that variations in surface properties resulted in differences in blood plasma coagulation dynamics. For example, the maximum rate of thrombus generation ranged from 22.2 ± 2.2 (dyn/cm(2))/s for fluorocarbon coated scaffolds to 8.7 ± 1.0 (dyn/cm(2))/s for nitrogen-containing scaffolds. Through this work, the ability to make real-time coagulation activity measurements during constant coagulation factor interface with biomedically relevant materials is demonstrated. PMID:27126596

  8. [New oral anticoagulants - influence on coagulation tests].

    PubMed

    Simeon, L; Nagler, M; Wuillemin, W A

    2014-01-01

    The new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) represent alternative antithrombotic agents for prophylaxis and therapy of thromboembolic diseases. They act either by inhibition of the clotting factor Xa or IIa (thrombin). As a consequence, they influence several coagulation assays (for example prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time). Because of the short half-life of these new agents, these changes show great variations in the course of 24 hours. Furthermore, there are significant differences of laboratory results depending on the used reagents. We explain the influence of apixaban, rivaroxaban (factor Xa inhibitors) and dabigatran (thrombin inhibitor) on the most commonly used coagulation assays. Besides we show that this influence depends on the way of action of the drug as well as on the principle of the coagulation assay. Being aware of this relationships helps to interpret the results of coagulation assays under influence of NOACs correctly.

  9. Effects of calcium signaling on coagulation factor VIIa-induced proliferation and migration of the SW620 colon cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Hong; Yu, Xiaoyan; Hu, Lichao; Meng, Fanlu; Jiang, Shuanghong

    2014-12-01

    Tissue factor (TF)/VIIa/protease‑activated receptor 2 (PAR2) has been shown to trigger the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. This was shown to be closely associated with the proliferation and migration of SW620 colon cancer cells; however, the detailed mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the effects of calcium signaling on the proliferation and migration of SW620 cells induced by coagulation factor VIIa. The results demonstrated that VIIa and PAR2 agonist PAR2‑AP increased [Ca2+]i in SW620 cells. In addition, VIIa‑and PAR2‑AP‑induced ERK1/2 activation was inhibited by thapsigargin (TG)‑induced depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores and EGTA‑mediated removal of extracellular Ca2+. It was also identified that VIIa and PAR2‑AP‑induced proliferation and migration of SW620 cells was modulated by EGTA and TG. Taken together, the present results indicate that VIIa triggers calcium signaling in SW620 cells, in a TF‑dependent manner, which is critical for VIIa‑induced ERK1/2 activation in SW620 cells. These results suggested that calcium signaling had a vital role in the proliferation and migration of SW620 cells.

  10. Platelet-rich plasma preparation for regenerative medicine: optimization and quantification of cytokines and growth factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is nowadays widely applied in different clinical scenarios, such as orthopedics, ophthalmology and healing therapies, as a growth factor pool for improving tissue regeneration. Studies into its clinical efficiency are not conclusive and one of the main reasons for this is that different PRP preparations are used, eliciting different responses that cannot be compared. Platelet quantification and the growth factor content definition must be defined in order to understand molecular mechanisms behind PRP regenerative strength. Standardization of PRP preparations is thus urgently needed. Methods PRP was prepared by centrifugation varying the relative centrifugal force, temperature, and time. Having quantified platelet recovery and yield, the two-step procedure that rendered the highest output was chosen and further analyzed. Cytokine content was determined in different fractions obtained throughout the whole centrifugation procedure. Results Our method showed reproducibility when applied to different blood donors. We recovered 46.9 to 69.5% of total initial platelets and the procedure resulted in a 5.4-fold to 7.3-fold increase in platelet concentration (1.4 × 106 to 1.9 × 106 platelets/μl). Platelets were highly purified, because only <0.3% from the initial red blood cells and leukocytes was present in the final PRP preparation. We also quantified growth factors, cytokines and chemokines secreted by the concentrated platelets after activation with calcium and calcium/thrombin. High concentrations of platelet-derived growth factor, endothelial growth factor and transforming growth factor (TGF) were secreted, together with the anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-4, IL-8, IL-13, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-α. No cytokines were secreted before platelet activation. TGF-β3 and IFNγ were not detected in any studied fraction. Clots obtained after platelet coagulation

  11. Coagulation profile and platelet parameters of the Arabian sand gazelle (Gazella subgutturosa marica): comparison with humans and camels.

    PubMed

    Hussein, M F; Aljumaah, R S; Homeida, A M; Alhaidary, A A; Alshaikh, M A; Gar Elnabi, A; Mohammed, O B; Omer, Sawsan A; Macasero, W V

    2010-10-01

    During March 2009, we evaluated the hemostatic profile and platelet indices of 18 Arabian sand gazelles (Gazella subgutturosa marica) and compared the results with those from humans and camels (Camelus dromedarius). Gazelles and camels had shorter activated partial thromboplastin times, lower proconvertin and higher antihemophilic factor coagulation activity, and plasma fibrinogen levels than humans. Prothrombin time was longer in sand gazelles and shorter in camels than it was in humans. Plasma thromboplastin component, Stuart factor, and plasma thromboplastin antecedent were similar in gazelles, humans, and camels, whereas the platelet count of the sand gazelle was significantly higher than it was for camels and humans. PMID:20966267

  12. A comparison of coagulation factor replacement with and without prednisolone in the treatment of haematuria in haemophilia and Christmas disease.

    PubMed

    Rizza, C R; Kernoff, P B; Matthews, J M; McLennan, C R; Rainsford, S G

    1977-02-28

    A double-blind controlled study was carried out to investigate the effectiveness of treatment with factor VIII or factor IX concentrate and a reducing dose of prednisolone in contolling haematuria in patients with haemophilia and Christmas disease. 41 episodes of haematuria were studied in 30 different patients. No appreciable benefit was observed in the treated, as compared with the control group and this is at variance with the results of the few studies reported elsewhere.

  13. Soluble Proteins Form Film by the Treatment of Low Temperature Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikehara, Sanae; Sakakita, Hajime; Ishikawa, Kenji; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Nakanishi, Hayao; Shimizu, Nobuyuki; Hori, Masaru; Ikehara, Yuzuru

    2015-09-01

    It has been pointed out that low temperature plasma in atmosphere was feasible to use for hemostasis without heat injury. Indeed, earlier studies demonstrated that low temperature plasma played an important role to stimulate platelets to aggregate and turned on the proteolytic activities of coagulation factors, resulting in the acceleration of the natural blood coagulation process. On the other hands, our developed equips could immediately form clots upon the contact with plasma flair, while the histological appearance was different from natural coagulation. Based on these findings in formed clots, we sought to determine if plasma flair supplied by our devices was capable of forming film using a series of soluble proteins Following plasma treatment, films were formed from bovine serum albumin, and the other plasma proteins at physiological concentration. Analysis of trans-electron microscope demonstrated that plasma treatment generated small protein particles and made them fuse to be larger aggregations The combined results demonstrated that plasma are capable of aggregating soluble proteins and that platelets and coagulation factors are not necessary for plasma induced blood coagulation. Supported in part by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Priority Area (21590454, 24590498, and 24108006 to Y. I.).

  14. Blood coagulation reactions on nanoscale membrane surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pureza, Vincent S.

    Blood coagulation requires the assembly of several membrane-bound protein complexes composed of regulatory and catalytic subunits. The biomembranes involved in these reactions not only provide a platform for these procoagulant proteins, but can also affect their function. Increased exposure of acidic phospholipids on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane can dramatically modulate the catalytic efficiencies of such membrane-bound enzymes. Under physiologic conditions, however, these phospholipids spontaneously cluster into a patchwork of membrane microdomains upon which membrane binding proteins may preferentially assemble. As a result, the membrane composition surrounding these proteins is largely unknown. Through the development and use of a nanometer-scale bilayer system that provides rigorous control of the phospholipid membrane environment, I investigated the role of phosphatidylserine, an acidic phospholipid, in the direct vicinity (within nanometers) of two critical membrane-bound procoagulant protein complexes and their respective natural substrates. Here, I present how the assembly and function of the tissue factor˙factor VIIa and factor Va˙factor Xa complexes, the first and final cofactor˙enzyme complexes of the blood clotting cascade, respectively, are mediated by changes in their immediate phospholipid environments.

  15. Advances in the treatment of inherited coagulation disorders.

    PubMed

    Escobar, M A

    2013-09-01

    Inherited coagulation disorders constitute a broad spectrum of coagulation factor deficiencies that include X-linked factor (F)VIII or FIX deficiency that causes haemophilia, and autosomal recessive disorders producing heterogeneous deficiencies in fibrinogen (FI), prothrombin (FII), FV, FVII, FX, FXI, FXIII and combined FV+FVIII. Significant advances in treatments for patients with congenital haemophilia A (FVIII deficiency) and B (FIX deficiency) over the last two decades have resulted from improvements in the production, availability and patient access to factor replacement products. Translation of advances in biotechnology, namely recombinant protein technology, targeted protein modifications to improve function and potentially reduce immunogenicity, and advanced formulations to optimize bioavailability and sustain activity offer promisingly new treatments for haemophilia as well as recessively inherited bleeding disorders in patients who otherwise have few therapeutic options. Though a theoretical risk remains for blood-borne viral infections with pooled plasma-derived products, this concern has diminished with breakthroughs in purification and viral inactivation methods. Development of inhibitory antibodies is still the most daunting problem for patients with inherited bleeding disorders, complicating treatment approaches to control and prevent bleeding, and posing risks for allergic and anaphylactic reactions in susceptible patients. The objectives of this review are to (i) highlight emerging advances in hemostatic therapies that are bioengineered to improve pharmacokinetic properties and bioavailability, sustain functional activity, and possibly eliminate immunogenicity of recombinant factor proteins; and (ii) present an overview of key clinical trials of novel factor products currently in the development pipeline.

  16. Prevalence of coagulation factor XIII and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene polymorphisms among Egyptian women suffering from unexplained primary recurrent miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Elmahgoub, Iman Rifaat; Afify, Reham Abdelaleem; Abdel Aal, Asmaa Ahmed; El-Sherbiny, Walid Sayed

    2014-06-01

    Recurrent miscarriage (RM) is an obstetric challenge. Polymorphisms of factor XIII (FXIII) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) may cause an imbalance between coagulation and fibrinolysis that can end in RM. The aim of the work was to determine the prevalence of FXIII Val34Leu and PAI-1 4G/5G gene polymorphisms in Egyptian women presenting with unexplained primary first trimester RM. Genotyping of 120 unexplained primary first trimester RM patients and 130 healthy controls by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of target genes followed by the allele-specific restriction enzyme digestion (RFLP technique). Among the cases, 67.5% of individuals had wild-type FXIII; 21.7% were heterozygous and 10.8% were homozygous for the FXIII Val34Leu polymorphism. Among controls, the proportions were 89.2%, 8.5% and 2.3% respectively. In addition, comparison between the two groups regarding Leu and 4G allele frequencies showed statistically significant differences (P values=0.0001 and 0.027 respectively). RM is more frequent in women with combined polymorphisms than in women with a single gene polymorphism (RR=3.91; OR=4.51; 95% CI=1.79-11.38; P=0.002). FXIII Val34Leu and PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphisms are prevalent in Egyptian women, with unexplained primary first trimester RM and combined polymorphisms statistically increasing the risk.

  17. Comparison of the rates of joint arthroplasty in patients with severe factor VIII and IX deficiency: an index of different clinical severity of the 2 coagulation disorders.

    PubMed

    Tagariello, Giuseppe; Iorio, Alfonso; Santagostino, Elena; Morfini, Massimo; Bisson, Ruggero; Innocenti, Massimo; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Mazzucconi, Maria Gabriella; Pasta, Gian Luigi; Radossi, Paolo; Rodorigo, Giuseppina; Santoro, Cristina; Sartori, Roberto; Scaraggi, Antonio; Solimeno, Luigi Pier; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2009-07-23

    Data from the Italian Hemophilia Centres were collected to perform a retrospective survey of joint arthroplasty in patients with severe hemophilia. Twenty-nine of 49 hemophilia centers reported that 328 of the 347 operations were carried out in 253 patients with severe hemophilia A (HA) and 19 in 15 patients with severe hemophilia B (HB). When results were normalized to the whole Italian hemophilia population (1770 severe HA and 319 severe HB), patients with HA had a 3-fold higher risk of undergoing joint arthroplasty (odds ratio [OR], 3.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.97-5.77; P < .001). These results were confirmed after adjustment for age, HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV), and inhibitor in a Cox regression model (HR, 2.65; 95% CI, 1.62-4.33; P < .001). The survival analysis of time to joint arthroplasty in the subset of patients with severe HA was not affected by the severity of factor VIII (FVIII) gene mutations. A systematic review of literature articles reporting joint arthroplasties in HA and HB showed that the proportion of HA patients who had undergone arthroplasties was higher than that of HB patients, in agreement with the findings in our Italian cohort. These data suggest that the 2 inherited coagulation disorders have a different severity of clinical phenotype.

  18. In vitro/in vivo effect of Citrus limon (L. Burm. f.) juice on blood parameters, coagulation and anticoagulation factors in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Azra; Khan, Rafeeq Alam; Mirza, Talat; Mustansir, Tazeen; Ahmed, Mansoor

    2014-07-01

    The genus Citrus of the family Rutaceae includes many species e.g. Citrus indica, Citrus aurantifolia and Citrus limon, among which Citrus limon L. Burm. f. has been reported to have highest antimicrobial activity. It is used as antidote against certain venom, due to its platelet inhibitory effect and also reported to have hypocholesterolemic effect. However its anticoagulant and thrombolytic effect were not been investigated, hence a prospective in-vitro/in-vivo study was designed to determine the effect of Citrus limon on blood parameters, coagulation and anticoagulation factors. In-vitro tests revealed highly significant increase in thrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time by Citrus limon, whereas fibrinogen concentration was significantly reduced in comparison to control, however prothrombin time was not affected significantly. In-vivo testing of Citrus limon was done at three different doses i.e. 0.2ml/kg, 0.4ml/kg and 0.6ml/kg in healthy rabbits. Significant changes were observed in hematological parameters such as erythrocytes, hemoglobin and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration. Bleeding time and thrombin time was significantly prolonged and there was increase in protein C and thrombin antithrombin complex levels. These results may be due to inactivation of thrombin because it significantly decreases fibrinogen concentration and inhibit platelet aggregation. Citrus limon showed maximal anticoagulant effect at 0.4ml/kg, which suggest that Citrus limon possesses an anti-thrombin component and could prevent thrombosis playing a cardio protective role.

  19. The coagulation characteristics of humic acid by using acid-soluble chitosan, water-soluble chitosan, and chitosan coagulant mixtures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Yu; Wu, Chung-Yu; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan is a potential substitute for traditional aluminium salts in water treatment systems. This study compared the characteristics of humic acid (HA) removal by using acid-soluble chitosan, water-soluble chitosan, and coagulant mixtures of chitosan with aluminium sulphate (alum) or polyaluminium chloride (PACl). In addition, we evaluated their respective coagulation efficiencies at various coagulant concentrations, pH values, turbidities, and hardness levels. Furthermore, we determined the size and settling velocity of flocs formed by these coagulants to identify the major factors affecting HA coagulation. The coagulation efficiency of acid- and water-soluble chitosan for 15 mg/l of HA was 74.4% and 87.5%, respectively. The optimal coagulation range of water-soluble chitosan (9-20 mg/l) was broader than that of acid-soluble chitosan (4-8 mg/l). Notably, acid-soluble chitosan/PACl and water-soluble chitosan/alum coagulant mixtures exhibited a higher coagulation efficiency for HA than for PACl or alum alone. Furthermore, these coagulant mixtures yielded an acceptable floc settling velocity and savings in both installation and operational expenses. Based on these results, we confidently assert that coagulant mixtures with a 1:1 mass ratio of acid-soluble chitosan/PACl and water-soluble chitosan/alum provide a substantially more cost-effective alternative to using chitosan alone for removing HA from water. PMID:25362971

  20. Confirmation of warfarin resistance of naturally occurring VKORC1 variants by coexpression with coagulation factor IX and in silico protein modelling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background VKORC1 has been identified some years ago as the gene encoding vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) – the target protein for coumarin derivates like warfarin or phenprocoumon. Resistance against warfarin and other coumarin-type anticoagulants has been frequently reported over the last 50 years in rodents due to problems in pest control as well as in thrombophilic patients showing variable response to anticoagulant treatment. Many different mutations have already been detected in the VKORC1 gene leading to warfarin resistance in rats, mice and in humans. Since the conventional in vitro dithiothreitol (DTT)-driven VKOR enzymatic assay often did not reflect the in vivo status concerning warfarin resistance, we recently developed a cell culture-based method for coexpression of VKORC1 with coagulation factor IX and subsequent measurement of secreted FIX in order to test warfarin inhibition in wild-type and mutated VKORC1. Results In the present study, we coexpressed wild-type factor IX with 12 different VKORC1 variants which were previously detected in warfarin resistant rats and mice. The results show that amino acid substitutions in VKORC1 maintain VKOR activity and are associated with warfarin resistance. When we projected in silico the amino acid substitutions onto the published three-dimensional model of the bacterial VKOR enzyme, the predicted effects matched well the catalytic mechanism proposed for the bacterial enzyme. Conclusions The established cell-based system for coexpression of VKORC1 and factor IX uses FIX activity as an indicator of carboxylation efficiency. This system reflects the warfarin resistance status of VKORC1 mutations from anticoagulant resistant rodents more closely than the traditional DTT-driven enzyme assay. All mutations studied were also predicted to be involved in the reaction mechanism. PMID:24491178

  1. Markers of Endothelial Dysfunction, Coagulation and Tissue Fibrosis Independently Predict Venous Thromboembolism in HIV

    PubMed Central

    MUSSELWHITE, Laura W.; SHEIKH, Virginia; NORTON, Thomas D.; RUPERT, Adam; PORTER, Brian O.; PENZAK, Scott R.; SKINNER, Jeff; MICAN, JoAnn M.; HADIGAN, Colleen; SERETI, Irini

    2015-01-01

    Objective HIV infection is associated with coagulation abnormalities and significantly increased risk of venous thrombosis. It has been shown that higher plasma levels of coagulation and inflammatory biomarkers predicted mortality in HIV. We investigated the relationship between venous thrombosis and HIV-related characteristics, traditional risk factors of hypercoagulability and pre-event levels of biomarkers. Design A retrospective case-control study of 23 HIV-infected individuals who experienced an incident venous thromboembolic (VTE) event while enrolled in National Institutes of Health studies from 1995–2010 and 69 age and sex-matched HIV-infected individuals without known VTE. Methods Biomarkers of inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, coagulation, tissue fibrosis, and cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation were assessed by ELISA-based assays and PCR using plasma obtained prior to the event. Results VTE events were related to nadir CD4 count, lifetime history of multiple opportunistic infections, CMV disease, CMV viremia, immunological AIDS, active infection and provocation (i.e. recent hospitalization, surgery or trauma). VTE events were independently associated with increased plasma levels of P-selectin, P=0.002; D-dimer, P=0.01; and hyaluronic acid, P=0.009 in a multivariate analysis. No significant differences in antiretroviral or interleukin 2 exposures, plasma HIV viremia, or other traditional risk factors were observed. Conclusion Severe immunodeficiency, active infection and provocation are associated with venous thromboembolic disease in HIV. Biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction, coagulation and tissue fibrosis may help identify HIV-infected patients at elevated risk of VTE. PMID:21412059

  2. Dust coagulation in ISM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chokshi, Arati; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Hollenbach, David

    1989-01-01

    Coagulation is an important mechanism in the growth of interstellar and interplanetary dust particles. The microphysics of the coagulation process was theoretically analyzed as a function of the physical properties of the coagulating grains, i.e., their size, relative velocities, temperature, elastic properties, and the van der Waal interaction. Numerical calculations of collisions between linear chains provide the wave energy in individual particles and the spectrum of the mechanical vibrations set up in colliding particles. Sticking probabilities are then calculated using simple estimates for elastic deformation energies and for the attenuation of the wave energy due to absorption and scattering processes.

  3. Human Full-Length Coagulation Factor X and a GLA Domain-Derived 40-mer Polypeptide Bind to Different Regions of the Adenovirus Serotype 5 Hexon Capsomer

    PubMed Central

    Sumarheni, Sudir; Hong, Saw See; Josserand, Véronique; Coll, Jean-Luc; Boulanger, Pierre; Schoehn, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The interaction of human adenovirus (HAdV)-C5 and many other adenoviruses with blood coagulation factors (e.g., human factor X, FX) involves the binding of their GLA domain to the hexon capsomers, resulting in high levels of hepatotropism and potential hepatotoxicity. In this study, we tested the possibility of preventing these undesirable effects by using a GLA-mimicking peptide as a competitor. An FX GLA domain-derived, 40-mer polypeptide carrying 12 carboxyglutamate residues was synthesized (GLAmim). Surface plasmon resistance (SPR) analysis showed that GLAmim reacted with free and capsid-embedded hexon with a nanomolar affinity. Unexpectedly, GLAmim failed to compete with FX for hexon binding, and instead significantly increased the formation of FX–hexon or FX–adenovirion complexes. This observation was confirmed by in vitro cell transduction experiments using HAdV-C5-Luciferase vector (HAdV5-Luc), as preincubation of HAdV5-Luc with GLAmim before FX addition resulted in a higher transgene expression compared with FX alone. HAdV-C5 virions complexed with GLAmim were analyzed by cryoelectron microscopy. Image reconstruction demonstrated the bona fide hexon–GLAmim interaction, as for the full-length FX, although with considerable differences in stoichiometry and relative location on the hexon capsomer. Three extra densities were found at the periphery of each hexon, whereas one single FX molecule occupied the central cavity of the hexon trimeric capsomer. A refined analysis indicated that each extra density is found at the expected location of one highly variable loop 1 of the hexon, involved in scavenger receptor recognition. HAdV5-Luc complexed with a bifunctional GLAmimRGD peptide showed a lesser hepatotropism, compared with control HAdV5-Luc alone, and efficiently targeted αβ-integrin-overexpressing tumor cells in an in vivo mouse tumor model. Collectively, our findings open new perspectives in the design of adenoviral vectors for biotherapy

  4. Long-acting recombinant coagulation factor IX albumin fusion protein (rIX-FP) in hemophilia B: results of a phase 3 trial

    PubMed Central

    Martinowitz, Uri; Lissitchkov, Toshko; Pan-Petesch, Brigitte; Hanabusa, Hideji; Oldenburg, Johannes; Boggio, Lisa; Negrier, Claude; Pabinger, Ingrid; von Depka Prondzinski, Mario; Altisent, Carmen; Castaman, Giancarlo; Yamamoto, Koji; Álvarez-Roman, Maria-Teresa; Voigt, Christine; Blackman, Nicole; Jacobs, Iris

    2016-01-01

    A global phase 3 study evaluated the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of recombinant fusion protein linking coagulation factor IX with albumin (rIX-FP) in 63 previously treated male patients (12-61 years) with severe hemophilia B (factor IX [FIX] activity ≤2%). The study included 2 groups: group 1 patients received routine prophylaxis once every 7 days for 26 weeks, followed by either 7-, 10-, or 14-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 50, 38, or 51 weeks, respectively; group 2 patients received on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes for 26 weeks and then switched to a 7-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 45 weeks. The mean terminal half-life of rIX-FP was 102 hours, 4.3-fold longer than previous FIX treatment. Patients maintained a mean trough of 20 and 12 IU/dL FIX activity on prophylaxis with rIX-FP 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks, respectively. There was 100% reduction in median annualized spontaneous bleeding rate (AsBR) and 100% resolution of target joints when subjects switched from on-demand to prophylaxis treatment with rIX-FP (P < .0001). The median AsBR was 0.00 for all prophylaxis regimens. Overall, 98.6% of bleeding episodes were treated successfully, including 93.6% that were treated with a single injection. No patient developed an inhibitor, and no safety concerns were identified. These results indicate rIX-FP is safe and effective for preventing and treating bleeding episodes in patients with hemophilia B at dosing regimens of 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT0101496274. PMID:26755710

  5. Long-acting recombinant coagulation factor IX albumin fusion protein (rIX-FP) in hemophilia B: results of a phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Santagostino, Elena; Martinowitz, Uri; Lissitchkov, Toshko; Pan-Petesch, Brigitte; Hanabusa, Hideji; Oldenburg, Johannes; Boggio, Lisa; Negrier, Claude; Pabinger, Ingrid; von Depka Prondzinski, Mario; Altisent, Carmen; Castaman, Giancarlo; Yamamoto, Koji; Álvarez-Roman, Maria-Teresa; Voigt, Christine; Blackman, Nicole; Jacobs, Iris

    2016-04-01

    A global phase 3 study evaluated the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of recombinant fusion protein linking coagulation factor IX with albumin (rIX-FP) in 63 previously treated male patients (12-61 years) with severe hemophilia B (factor IX [FIX] activity ≤2%). The study included 2 groups: group 1 patients received routine prophylaxis once every 7 days for 26 weeks, followed by either 7-, 10-, or 14-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 50, 38, or 51 weeks, respectively; group 2 patients received on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes for 26 weeks and then switched to a 7-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 45 weeks. The mean terminal half-life of rIX-FP was 102 hours, 4.3-fold longer than previous FIX treatment. Patients maintained a mean trough of 20 and 12 IU/dL FIX activity on prophylaxis with rIX-FP 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks, respectively. There was 100% reduction in median annualized spontaneous bleeding rate (AsBR) and 100% resolution of target joints when subjects switched from on-demand to prophylaxis treatment with rIX-FP (P< .0001). The median AsBR was 0.00 for all prophylaxis regimens. Overall, 98.6% of bleeding episodes were treated successfully, including 93.6% that were treated with a single injection. No patient developed an inhibitor, and no safety concerns were identified. These results indicate rIX-FP is safe and effective for preventing and treating bleeding episodes in patients with hemophilia B at dosing regimens of 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT0101496274.

  6. Factors affecting plasma aluminum concentrations in nonexposed workers.

    PubMed

    House, R A

    1992-10-01

    In this study, the distribution and determinants of plasma aluminum concentrations were examined in 71 office employees not occupationally exposed to aluminum. The samples were analyzed by Zeeman graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy and were found to be log normally distributed. After using the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) recommended procedure for removal of likely aberrant values, the 95th percentile value was 198 nmol/L (90% CI:165-238); when those using antacids were also excluded, the 95th percentile value fell to 175 nmol/L (90% CI:147-208). Multiple regression analysis indicated that the factors most predictive of log plasma aluminum were the batch in which the sample was analyzed and the use of antacids containing aluminum. The statistical significance of the batch variable likely indicates the well-recognized problem of contamination in sampling and analyzing aluminum. PMID:1403189

  7. Factors affecting plasma aluminum concentrations in nonexposed workers

    SciTech Connect

    House, R.A. )

    1992-10-01

    In this study, the distribution and determinants of plasma aluminum concentrations were examined in 71 office employees not occupationally exposed to aluminum. The samples were analyzed by Zeeman graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy and were found to be log normally distributed. After using the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) recommended procedure for removal of likely aberrant values, the 95th percentile value was 198 nmol/L (90% CI:165-238); when those using antacids were also excluded, the 95th percentile value fell to 175 nmol/L (90% CI:147-208). Multiple regression analysis indicated that the factors most predictive of log plasma aluminum were the batch in which the sample was analyzed and the use of antacids containing aluminum. The statistical significance of the batch variable likely indicates the well-recognized problem of contamination in sampling and analyzing aluminum.35 references.

  8. Effect of nano-scale curvature on the intrinsic blood coagulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushida, Takashi; Saha, Krishnendu; Subramani, Chandramouleeswaran; Nandwana, Vikas; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2014-11-01

    The intrinsic coagulation activity of silica nanoparticles strongly depends on their surface curvature. Nanoparticles with higher surface curvature do not denature blood coagulation factor XII on its surface, providing a coagulation `silent' surface, while nanoparticles with lower surface curvature show denaturation and concomitant coagulation.The intrinsic coagulation activity of silica nanoparticles strongly depends on their surface curvature. Nanoparticles with higher surface curvature do not denature blood coagulation factor XII on its surface, providing a coagulation `silent' surface, while nanoparticles with lower surface curvature show denaturation and concomitant coagulation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Physical properties and scanning electron micrographs (SEM) of silica NPs, intrinsic coagulation activity after 3 h. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04128c

  9. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)

    MedlinePlus

    Levi M. Disseminated intravascular coagulation. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, et al, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap ...

  10. Guidelines for the use of fresh frozen plasma. British Committee for Standards in Haematology, Working Party of the Blood Transfusion Task Force.

    PubMed

    Contreras, M; Ala, F A; Greaves, M; Jones, J; Levin, M; Machin, S J; Morgan, C; Murphy, W; Napier, J A; Thomson, A R

    1992-03-01

    Fresh frozen plasma should only be used to treat bleeding episodes or prepare patients for surgery in certain defined situations. Definite indications for the use of FFP: 1. Replacement of single coagulation factor deficiencies, where a specific or combined factor concentrate is unavailable. 2. Immediate reversal or warfarin effect. 3. Acute disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). 4. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Conditional uses: FFP only indicated in the presence of bleeding and disturbed coagulation: 1. Massive transfusion. 2. Liver disease. 3. cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. 4. Special paediatric indications. No justification for the use of FFP: 1. Hypovolaemia. 2. Plasma exchange procedures. 3. 'Formula' replacement. 4. Nutritional support. 5. Treatment of immunodeficiency states.

  11. Viscoelastic coagulation testing: technology, applications, and limitations.

    PubMed

    McMichael, Maureen A; Smith, Stephanie A

    2011-06-01

    Use of viscoelastic point-of-care (POC) coagulation instrumentation is relatively new to veterinary medicine. In human medicine, this technology has recently undergone resurgence owing to its capacity to detect hypercoagulability. The lack of sensitive tests for detecting hypercoagulable states, along with our current understanding of in vivo coagulation, highlights the deficiencies of standard coagulation tests, such as prothrombin and partial thromboplastin times, which are performed on platelet-poor plasma. Viscoelastic coagulation analyzers can provide an assessment of global coagulation, from the beginning of clot formation to fibrinolysis, utilizing whole blood. In people, use of this technology has been reported to improve management of hemostasis during surgery and decrease usage of blood products and is being used as a rapid screen for hypercoagulability. In veterinary medicine, clinical use of viscoelastic technology has been reported in dogs, cats, foals, and adult horses. This article will provide an overview of the technology, reagents and assays, applications in human and veterinary medicine, and limitations of the 3 viscoelastic POC analyzers in clinical use.

  12. Viscoelastic coagulation testing: technology, applications, and limitations.

    PubMed

    McMichael, Maureen A; Smith, Stephanie A

    2011-06-01

    Use of viscoelastic point-of-care (POC) coagulation instrumentation is relatively new to veterinary medicine. In human medicine, this technology has recently undergone resurgence owing to its capacity to detect hypercoagulability. The lack of sensitive tests for detecting hypercoagulable states, along with our current understanding of in vivo coagulation, highlights the deficiencies of standard coagulation tests, such as prothrombin and partial thromboplastin times, which are performed on platelet-poor plasma. Viscoelastic coagulation analyzers can provide an assessment of global coagulation, from the beginning of clot formation to fibrinolysis, utilizing whole blood. In people, use of this technology has been reported to improve management of hemostasis during surgery and decrease usage of blood products and is being used as a rapid screen for hypercoagulability. In veterinary medicine, clinical use of viscoelastic technology has been reported in dogs, cats, foals, and adult horses. This article will provide an overview of the technology, reagents and assays, applications in human and veterinary medicine, and limitations of the 3 viscoelastic POC analyzers in clinical use. PMID:21446994

  13. [Incidental finding of pathological coagulation parameters].

    PubMed

    Luxembourg, B; Lindhoff-Last, E

    2014-10-01

    Pathological coagulation parameters may reflect life-threatening hemorrhagic or thromboembolic diseases but may also be a laboratory result without any clinical significance, result from in vitro phenomena or preanalytical errors. This article gives an overview of potential pitfalls in coagulation diagnostics, lists the differential diagnoses of pathological coagulation parameters and describes further steps in the diagnostic approach to clarify pathological results. The focus lies on coagulation parameters that are frequently determined in routine clinical investigations, e.g. platelet count, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and fibrinogen. Besides heparin, fondaparinux, danaparoid, and vitamin K antagonists, direct factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors are nowadays available for therapeutic anticoagulation. This article gives an overview of the influence of anticoagulants on coagulation parameters which depends on the dose, the time of the last administration, as well as the method used for the determination of coagulation parameters. Moreover, common reasons for elevation of the fibrin degradation product D-dimer are presented. The clinical utility of D-dimer assays is limited by their poor specificity. Elevated D-dimer concentrations can be found in various diseases and also under normal physiological circumstances (e.g. in the elderly). Thus, the most useful clinical application of D-dimer is evidence of normal values to essentially rule out venous thromboembolism. PMID:25190093

  14. Factor II deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood. It leads to problems with blood clotting (coagulation). Factor II is also known as prothrombin. ... blood clots form. This process is called the coagulation cascade. It involves special proteins called coagulation, or ...

  15. Blood coagulation in falciparum malaria--a review.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Shetty, Shrimati

    2008-03-01

    Falciparum malaria infection influences blood coagulation by various interacting pathobiological mechanisms, the most important being the overwhelming response of the host to sepsis resulting in a cytokine storm. In addition, the parasite infects the red cells leading to changes in the red cell phospholipid composition which supports blood coagulation. Red cells infected with Plasmodium falciparum also adhere to deeper tissue capillary endothelium leading to profound damage to endothelial cells leading to further activation. This results in widespread consumption of platelets and activation of blood coagulation which at times culminates in a clinically and pathologically detectable disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Monocyte-macrophage system also gets activated in this infection compounding the hypercoagulable state. Heavy parasitaemia leading to occlusion of hepatic microcirculation leads to abnormalities in synthesis and secretion of coagulation factors and their inhibitors. Drugs used in the treatment for falciparum malaria can cause thrombocytopaenia, bone marrow suppression and haemolytic anaemia, all of which can interfere indirectly with blood coagulation. Microparticle formation from platelets, red cells and macrophages also causes widespread activation of blood coagulation, and this recently observed mechanism is the focus of intense research in many other inflammatory and neoplastic conditions where there is activation of blood coagulation system. Thus, in severe falciparum malaria, there is activation of blood coagulation system along with thrombocytopaenia, even before widespread DIC and coagulation failure occur.

  16. [Pitfall in coagulation tests].

    PubMed

    Gähler, Anita; Wuillemin, Walter A

    2013-08-01

    Coagulation assays are prone to pre-analytical problems and results may be influenced by varying clinical and pharmaceutical aspects. Particularly anticoagulants interact with coagulation testing in many ways. Thromboplastin time will be prolonged dose-dependently in patients taking vitamin K antagonists; moreover the new oral anticoagulants have been shown to have variable impact on the results of the thromboplastin time as well as on other coagulation tests, depending on the mechanism of action of these new drugs as well as on the mechanism of the coagulation test. When measuring anti-Xa activity it should be realised that all drugs with anti-Xa activity will influence the result, which means not only heparins but also the new anti-Xa inhibitors. Respective calibration curves are an indispensable condition to provide the clinician with valuable results. On the other hand this implies that the laboratory knows which anticoagulant is given to the patient. This is an example among others that clinical aspects are important to know for proper interpretation of the results of coagulation testing. Other examples are e. g. bleeding disorders, actual bleeding status or thromboembolic events. Several cases are discussed which exemplify possible pitfalls in the interpretation of coagulation testing.

  17. Neprilysin Inhibits Coagulation through Proteolytic Inactivation of Fibrinogen

    PubMed Central

    Burrell, Matthew; Henderson, Simon J.; Ravnefjord, Anna; Schweikart, Fritz; Fowler, Susan B.; Witt, Susanne; Hansson, Kenny M.; Webster, Carl I.

    2016-01-01

    Neprilysin (NEP) is an endogenous protease that degrades a wide range of peptides including amyloid beta (Aβ), the main pathological component of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We have engineered NEP as a potential therapeutic for AD but found in pre-clinical safety testing that this variant increased prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The objective of the current study was to investigate the effect of wild type NEP and the engineered variant on coagulation and define the mechanism by which this effect is mediated. PT and APTT were measured in cynomolgus monkeys and rats dosed with a human serum albumin fusion with an engineered variant of NEP (HSA-NEPv) as well as in control plasma spiked with wild type or variant enzyme. The coagulation factor targeted by NEP was determined using in vitro prothrombinase, calibrated automated thrombogram (CAT) and fibrin formation assays as well as N-terminal sequencing of fibrinogen treated with the enzyme. We demonstrate that HSA-NEP wild type and HSA-NEPv unexpectedly impaired coagulation, increasing PT and APTT in plasma samples and abolishing fibrin formation from fibrinogen. This effect was mediated through cleavage of the N-termini of the Aα- and Bβ-chains of fibrinogen thereby significantly impairing initiation of fibrin formation by thrombin. Fibrinogen has therefore been identified for the first time as a substrate for NEP wild type suggesting that the enzyme may have a role in regulating fibrin formation. Reductions in NEP levels observed in AD and cerebral amyloid angiopathy may contribute to neurovascular degeneration observed in these conditions. PMID:27437944

  18. Activation of coagulation and angiogenesis in cancer: immunohistochemical localization in situ of clotting proteins and vascular endothelial growth factor in human cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, M.; Hancock, W. W.; Abe, K.; Micko, C.; Casper, K. A.; Baine, R. M.; Wilcox, J. N.; Danave, I.; Dillehay, D. L.; Matthews, E.; Contrino, J.; Morrissey, J. H.; Gordon, S.; Edgington, T. S.; Kudryk, B.; Kreutzer, D. L.; Rickles, F. R.

    1998-01-01

    Thrombin-catalyzed, cross-linked fibrin (XLF) formation is a characteristic histopathological finding in many human and experimental tumors and is thought to be of importance in the local host defense response. Although the pathogenesis of tumor-associated fibrin deposition is not entirely clear, several tumor procoagulants have been described as likely primary stimuli for the generation of thrombin (and XLF) in the tumor microenvironment (TME). In a previous study of a variety of human tumors we have shown that tissue factor (TF) is the major procoagulant. However, the relative contribution to fibrin deposition in the TME of tumor cell TF and host cell TF (eg, macrophage-derived) was not established. In addition, recent evidence has implicated TF in the regulation of the synthesis of the pro-angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by tumor cells. In the current study we used in situ techniques to determine the cellular localization of XLF, TF, VEGF, and an alternative tumor procoagulant, so-called cancer procoagulant (CP), a cysteine protease that activates clotting factor X. In lung cancer we have found XLF localized predominantly to the surface of tumor-associated macrophages, as well as to some endothelial cells and perivascular fibroblasts in the stromal area of the tumors co-distributed with TF at the interface of the tumor and host cells. Cancer pro-coagulant was localized to tumor cells in several cases but not in conjunction with the deposition of XLF. TF and VEGF were co-localized in both lung cancer and breast cancer cells by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical staining. Furthermore, a strong relationship was found between the synthesis of TF and VEGF levels in human breast cancer cell lines (r2 = 0.84; P < 0.0001). Taken together, these data are consistent with a highly complex interaction between tumor cells, macrophages, and endothelial cells in the TME leading to fibrin formation and tumor angiogenesis. Images Figure 1

  19. Optimal use of fresh frozen plasma.

    PubMed

    DomBourian, Melkon; Holland, Lorne

    2012-01-01

    Fresh frozen plasma contains a number of therapeutically useful substances, most notably coagulation factors. As with any transfusion, there are risks associated with plasma transfusion. Ironically, the risk of viral transmission (human immunodeficiency virus or hepatitis), although widely publicized, is extremely small. On the other hand, less well-known, noninfectious complications are common. Indeed, these noninfectious complications are the most significant cause of morbidity and mortality following transfusion. Although certain patients undeniably benefit from plasma transfusion, the benefit for many patients is less clear. This review will discuss indications for plasma transfusion, the associated risks, and special considerations for plasma administration.

  20. Influence of coagulation factor x on in vitro and in vivo gene delivery by adenovirus (Ad) 5, Ad35, and chimeric Ad5/Ad35 vectors.

    PubMed

    Greig, Jenny A; Buckley, Suzanne Mk; Waddington, Simon N; Parker, Alan L; Bhella, David; Pink, Rebecca; Rahim, Ahad A; Morita, Takashi; Nicklin, Stuart A; McVey, John H; Baker, Andrew H

    2009-10-01

    The binding of coagulation factor X (FX) to the hexon of adenovirus (Ad) 5 is pivotal for hepatocyte transduction. However, vectors based on Ad35, a subspecies B Ad, are in development for cancer gene therapy, as Ad35 utilizes CD46 (which is upregulated in many cancers) for transduction. We investigated whether interaction of Ad35 with FX influenced vector tropism using Ad5, Ad35, and Ad5/Ad35 chimeras: Ad5/fiber(f)35, Ad5/penton(p)35/f35, and Ad35/f5. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) revealed that Ad35 and Ad35/f5 bound FX with approximately tenfold lower affinities than Ad5 hexon-containing viruses, and electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) demonstrated a direct Ad35 hexon:FX interaction. The presence of physiological levels of FX significantly inhibited transduction of vectors containing Ad35 fibers (Ad5/f35, Ad5/p35/f35, and Ad35) in CD46-positive cells. Vectors were intravenously administered to CD46 transgenic mice in the presence and absence of FX-binding protein (X-bp), resulting in reduced liver accumulation for all vectors. Moreover, Ad5/f35 and Ad5/p35/f35 efficiently accumulated in the lung, whereas Ad5 demonstrated poor lung targeting. Additionally, X-bp significantly reduced lung genome accumulation for Ad5/f35 and Ad5/p35/f35, whereas Ad35 was significantly enhanced. In summary, vectors based on the full Ad35 serotype will be useful vectors for selective gene transfer via CD46 due to a weaker FX interaction compared to Ad5.

  1. Change in blood coagulation indices as a function of the incubation period of plasma in a constant magnetic field. [considering heparin tolerance and recalcification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yepishina, S. G.

    1974-01-01

    The influence of a constant magnetic field (CMF) with a strength of 250 and 2500 oersteds on the recalcification reaction and the tolerance of plasma to heparin was studied as a function of the exposure time of the plasma to the CMF. The maximum and reliable change in the activation of the coagulatory system of the blood was observed after a 20-hour incubation of the plasma in a CMF. As the exposure time increased, the recalcification reaction changed insigificantly; the difference between the mean arithmetic of the experiment and control values was not statistically reliable. The tolerance of the plasma to heparin as a function of the exposure time to the CMF of the plasma was considerably modified, an was statistically reliable.

  2. Size-dependent effects of nanoparticles on enzymes in the blood coagulation cascade.

    PubMed

    Sanfins, Elodie; Augustsson, Cecilia; Dahlbäck, Björn; Linse, Sara; Cedervall, Tommy

    2014-08-13

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are increasingly used in diagnostic and drug delivery. After entering the bloodstream, a protein corona will form around NPs. The size and curvature of NPs is one of the major characteristics affecting the composition of bound protein in the corona. Key initiators of the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation, the contact activation complex, (Kallikrein, Factor XII, and high molecular weight Kininogen) have previously been identified on NPs surfaces. We show that the functional impact of carboxyl-modified polystyrene NPs on these initiators of the intrinsic pathway is size dependent. NPs with high curvature affect the enzymatic activity differently from NPs with low curvature. The size dependency is evident in full blood plasma as well as in solutions of single coagulation factors. NPs induce significant alteration of the enzymatic activity in a size-dependent manner, and enzyme kinetics studies show a critical role for NPs surface area and curvature.

  3. Quantification of sphingosine 1-phosphate by validated LC-MS/MS method revealing strong correlation with apolipoprotein M in plasma but not in serum due to platelet activation during blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Frej, Cecilia; Andersson, Anders; Larsson, Benny; Guo, Li Jun; Norström, Eva; Happonen, Kaisa E; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2015-11-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a signalling sphingolipid affecting multiple cellular functions of vascular and immune systems. It circulates at submicromolar levels bound to HDL-associated apolipoprotein M (apoM) or to albumin. S1P in blood is mainly produced by platelets and erythrocytes, making blood sampling for S1P quantification delicate. Standardisation of sampling is thereby of great importance to obtain robust data. By optimising and characterising the extraction procedure and the LC-MS/MS analysis, we have developed and validated a highly specific and sensitive method for S1P quantification. Blood was collected from healthy individuals (n = 15) to evaluate the effects of differential blood sampling on S1P levels. To evaluate correlation between S1P and apoM in different types of plasma and serum, apoM was measured by ELISA. The method showed good accuracy and precision in the range of 0.011 to 0.9 μM with less than 0.07 % carryover. We found that the methanol precipitation used to extract S1P co-extracted apoM and several other HDL-proteins from plasma. The platelet-associated S1P was released during coagulation, thus increasing the S1P concentration to double in serum as compared to that in plasma. Gel filtration chromatography revealed that the platelet-released S1P was mainly bound to albumin. This explains why the strong correlation between S1P and apoM levels in plasma is lost upon the clotting process and hence not observed in serum. We have developed, characterised and validated an efficient, highly sensitive and specific method for the quantification of S1P in biological material.

  4. Coagulation, Protease Activated Receptors and Viral Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Antoniak, Silvio; Mackman, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    The coagulation protease cascade plays an essential role in hemostasis. In addition, a clot contributes to host defense by limiting the spread of pathogens. Coagulation proteases induce intracellular signaling by cleavage of cell surface receptors called protease-activated receptors (PARs). These receptors allow cells to sense changes in the extracellular environment, such as infection. Viruses activate the coagulation cascade by inducing tissue factor expression and by disrupting the endothelium. Virus infection of the heart can cause myocarditis, cardiac remodeling and heart failure. Recent studies using a mouse model have shown that tissue factor, thrombin and PAR-1 signaling all positively regulate the innate immune during viral myocarditis. In contrast, PAR-2 signaling was found to inhibit interferon-β expression and the innate immune response. These observations suggest that anticoagulants may impair the innate immune response to viral infection and that inhibition of PAR-2 may be a new target to reduce viral myocarditis.. PMID:24203054

  5. Manipulating Adenovirus Hexon Hypervariable Loops Dictates Immune Neutralisation and Coagulation Factor X-dependent Cell Interaction In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jiangtao; Duffy, Margaret R.; Deng, Lin; Dakin, Rachel S.; Uil, Taco; Custers, Jerome; Kelly, Sharon M.; McVey, John H.; Nicklin, Stuart A.; Baker, Andrew H.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses are common pathogens, mostly targeting ocular, gastrointestinal and respiratory cells, but in some cases infection disseminates, presenting in severe clinical outcomes. Upon dissemination and contact with blood, coagulation factor X (FX) interacts directly with the adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) hexon. FX can act as a bridge to bind heparan sulphate proteoglycans, leading to substantial Ad5 hepatocyte uptake. FX “coating” also protects the virus from host IgM and complement-mediated neutralisation. However, the contribution of FX in determining Ad liver transduction whilst simultaneously shielding the virus from immune attack remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that the FX protection mechanism is not conserved amongst Ad types, and identify the hexon hypervariable regions (HVR) of Ad5 as the capsid proteins targeted by this host defense pathway. Using genetic and pharmacological approaches, we manipulate Ad5 HVR interactions to interrogate the interplay between viral cell transduction and immune neutralisation. We show that FX and inhibitory serum components can co-compete and virus neutralisation is influenced by both the location and extent of modifications to the Ad5 HVRs. We engineered Ad5-derived HVRs into the rare, native non FX-binding Ad26 to create Ad26.HVR5C. This enabled the virus to interact with FX at high affinity, as quantified by surface plasmon resonance, FX-mediated cell binding and transduction assays. Concomitantly, Ad26.HVR5C was also sensitised to immune attack in the absence of FX, a direct consequence of the engineered HVRs from Ad5. In both immune competent and deficient animals, Ad26.HVR5C hepatic gene transfer was mediated by FX following intravenous delivery. This study gives mechanistic insight into the pivotal role of the Ad5 HVRs in conferring sensitivity to virus neutralisation by IgM and classical complement-mediated attack. Furthermore, through this gain-of-function approach we demonstrate the dual

  6. Impact of source water quality on multiwall carbon nanotube coagulation.

    PubMed

    Holbrook, R David; Kline, Carly N; Filliben, James J

    2010-02-15

    Potable water treatment facilities may become an important barrier in limiting human exposure to engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) as ENPs begin to contaminate natural aquatic systems. Coagulation of ENPs will likely be a major process that controls the ENP fate and the subsequent removal in the aqueous phase. The influence that source water quality has on ENP coagulation is still relatively unknown. The current study uses a 2(3) x 2(4-1) fractional factorial design to identify seven key surface water constituents that affect multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) coagulation. These seven factors include: influent concentrations of kaolin, organic matter (OM), alginate, and MWCNTs; type and dosage of coagulant; and method of MWCNT stabilization. MWCNT removal was most affected by coagulant type and dosage, with alum outperforming ferric chloride at circumneutral pH. None of the other factors were universally significant but instead depended on coagulant type, dose, and method of stabilization. In all cases where factors were found to have a significant impact on MWCNT removal, however, the relationship was consistent: higher influent concentrations of kaolin and alginate improved MWCNT removal while higher influent concentrations of OM hindered MWCNT coagulation. Once MWCNTs are released into the natural environment, their coagulation behavior will be determined by the type and quantity of pollutants (i.e., factors) present in the aquatic environment and are governed by the same mechanisms that influence the colloidal stability of "natural" nanoparticles. PMID:20092299

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Levi, M

    2014-06-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a condition in which systemic activation of coagulation without a specific localization occurs, resulting in extensive formation of intravascular fibrin, particularly in small and midsize vessels. Disseminated intravascular coagulation may lead to several altered coagulation parameters, including a low platelet count, abnormal global clotting assays, low levels of physiological anticoagulant proteases, or increased fibrin degradation products. Also, more complex assays for activation of coagulation factors or pathways may indicate involvement of these molecules in DIC. None of these tests alone, however, can accurately ascertain or rebuff a diagnosis of DIC. Nonetheless, a combination of readily available routine assays may be instrumental in establishing a diagnosis of DIC and can also be useful to point to a subset of patients with DIC that may need definite, often costly, interventions in the hemostatic system. Current insights on relevant etiological pathways that may contribute to the occurrence of DIC have led to innovative therapeutic and adjunctive approaches to patient with DIC. Management options directed at the amelioration of hemostatic activation may tentatively be indicated and were found to be advantageous in experimental and clinical investigations. These treatments encompass elimination of tissue factor-mediated thrombin generation or restitution of normal anticoagulant function.

  8. Effect of oral administration of unfractionated heparin (UFH) on coagulation parameters in plasma and levels of urine and fecal heparin in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Malathi; Hiebert, Linda M.; Carr, Anthony P.; Stickney, Jocelyn D.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of heparin administration, by the oral route, were evaluated in dogs. In single and multiple dose studies (single 7.5 mg/kg, multiple 3 × 7.5 mg/kg per 48 h), plasma, urine, and fecal samples were collected at various times up to 120 h after oral administration of unfractionated heparin. Changes in plasma and urine anti-Xa activity, plasma and urine anti-IIa activity, plasma activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and antithrombin (ATIII), and chemical heparin in urine and feces were examined with time. There was support for heparin absorption, with significant differences in APTT, heparin in plasma as determined by anti-Xa activity (Heptest) in the single dose study and plasma anti-Xa activity, anti-IIa activity and ATIII; and chemical heparin in urine in the multiple dose study. No clinical evidence of bleeding was detected in any dog during the studies. Oral heparin therapy may be applicable for thromboembolic disease in animals. Further studies are warranted to determine the effects of oral heparin at the endothelial level in the dog. PMID:24982550

  9. Purification of human plasma platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Stafforini, D.M.; Prescott, S.M.; McIntyre, T.M.

    1986-05-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF;1-0-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine is synthesized by a variety of cells. It induces hypotension, and activates platelets, neutrophils, and macrophages at nanomolar concentrations. Removal of the acetate abolishes biological activity, and is catalyzed by a specific PAF acetylhydrolase present in plasma and tissues. The authors developed a rapid assay, based on separation of (/sup 3/H)acetate from (/sup 3/H-acetyl)PAF by reversed-phase chromatography. In human plasma the enzyme exhibits an apparent Km of 5.7..mu..M, with a Vmax of 0.027..mu..mol/h/mg. Ultracentrifugation in density gradients showed that 30% of the activity is associated with high density lipoproteins (HDL) and 70% with low density lipoproteins (LDL). The enzyme was purified from LDL by precipitation with Na phosphotungstate and MgCl/sub 2/, solubilization with Tween 20, column chromatography and electrophoresis. This procedure resulted in a preparation that was 21,000-fold purified from plasma (spec. act. 575..mu..mol/h/mg) with a recovery of 10%. The purified enzyme has a molecular weight of about 43,000, a broad pH optimum (peak 7.5-8.0), and a pl of 4.6. It has greater activity when PAF is in a micellar, as compared to monomeric, and exhibits surface dilution kinetics, which may be important in vivo. The purification and characterization of this enzyme will allow detailed studies of its role in PAF metabolism.

  10. High duty factor plasma generator for CERN's Superconducting Proton Linac.

    PubMed

    Lettry, J; Kronberger, M; Scrivens, R; Chaudet, E; Faircloth, D; Favre, G; Geisser, J-M; Küchler, D; Mathot, S; Midttun, O; Paoluzzi, M; Schmitzer, C; Steyaert, D

    2010-02-01

    CERN's Linac4 is a 160 MeV linear accelerator currently under construction. It will inject negatively charged hydrogen ions into CERN's PS-Booster. Its ion source is a noncesiated rf driven H(-) volume source directly inspired from the one of DESY and is aimed to deliver pulses of 80 mA of H(-) during 0.4 ms at a 2 Hz repetition rate. The Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) project is part of the luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider. It consists of an extension of Linac4 up to 5 GeV and is foreseen to deliver protons to a future 50 GeV synchrotron (PS2). For the SPL high power option (HP-SPL), the ion source would deliver pulses of 80 mA of H(-) during 1.2 ms and operate at a 50 Hz repetition rate. This significant upgrade motivates the design of the new water cooled plasma generator presented in this paper. Its engineering is based on the results of a finite element thermal study of the Linac4 H(-) plasma generator that identified critical components and thermal barriers. A cooling system is proposed which achieves the required heat dissipation and maintains the original functionality. Materials with higher thermal conductivity are selected and, wherever possible, thermal barriers resulting from low pressure contacts are removed by brazing metals on insulators. The AlN plasma chamber cooling circuit is inspired from the approach chosen for the cesiated high duty factor rf H(-) source operating at SNS. PMID:20192392

  11. High duty factor plasma generator for CERN's Superconducting Proton Linac.

    PubMed

    Lettry, J; Kronberger, M; Scrivens, R; Chaudet, E; Faircloth, D; Favre, G; Geisser, J-M; Küchler, D; Mathot, S; Midttun, O; Paoluzzi, M; Schmitzer, C; Steyaert, D

    2010-02-01

    CERN's Linac4 is a 160 MeV linear accelerator currently under construction. It will inject negatively charged hydrogen ions into CERN's PS-Booster. Its ion source is a noncesiated rf driven H(-) volume source directly inspired from the one of DESY and is aimed to deliver pulses of 80 mA of H(-) during 0.4 ms at a 2 Hz repetition rate. The Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) project is part of the luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider. It consists of an extension of Linac4 up to 5 GeV and is foreseen to deliver protons to a future 50 GeV synchrotron (PS2). For the SPL high power option (HP-SPL), the ion source would deliver pulses of 80 mA of H(-) during 1.2 ms and operate at a 50 Hz repetition rate. This significant upgrade motivates the design of the new water cooled plasma generator presented in this paper. Its engineering is based on the results of a finite element thermal study of the Linac4 H(-) plasma generator that identified critical components and thermal barriers. A cooling system is proposed which achieves the required heat dissipation and maintains the original functionality. Materials with higher thermal conductivity are selected and, wherever possible, thermal barriers resulting from low pressure contacts are removed by brazing metals on insulators. The AlN plasma chamber cooling circuit is inspired from the approach chosen for the cesiated high duty factor rf H(-) source operating at SNS.

  12. Selective Plasma Exchange for Critically Ill Patients Accompanied With Thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Nakae, Hajime; Fukuda, Hirokazu; Okuyama, Manabu; Igarashi, Toshiko

    2016-08-01

    Selective plasma exchange is a blood purification therapy in which simple plasma exchange is performed using a selective membrane plasma separator (pore size of 0.03 µm). Seven critically ill patients accompanied with thrombocytopenia were treated with selective plasma exchange using fresh frozen plasma. The total bilirubin levels and prothrombin time international normalized ratios decreased significantly after treatment. The total protein, albumin, and fibrinogen levels increased significantly after treatment. Selective plasma exchange may be a useful blood purification therapy for removing causal substances and retaining coagulation factors in patients accompanied with thrombocytopenia. PMID:27523072

  13. [Current views of activating and regulatory mechanisms of blood coagulation].

    PubMed

    Osaki, Tsukasa; Ichinose, Akitada

    2014-07-01

    Coagulation factors play essential roles in not only hemostasis but also thrombosis. The coagulation reaction consists of a stepwise sequence of proteolytic reactions of the coagulation factors, and is generally divided into two pathways, a tissue factor(TF)-dependent "extrinsic pathway" and a contact factor-dependent "intrinsic pathway". The extrinsic pathway is responsible for the initiation of the clotting reaction, while the intrinsic pathway most likely amplifies it. Elevated levels of various coagulation factors such as TF, factor VIII and prothrombin have been linked to an increased thrombotic risk. To prevent thrombus formation, endothelial cells express several receptors and activators for anticoagulant factors such as antithrombin, TF-pathway inhibitor, protein C and protein S. Defects in this anticoagulant system also increase the risk of thrombosis.

  14. Coagulation of monodisperse aerosol particles by isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, J.; Koch, D. L.

    2005-02-01

    The rate of coagulation of initially monodisperse aerosols due to isotropic turbulence is studied with particular emphasis on the effects of noncontinuum hydrodynamics and particle inertia. The prevalence of these two factors distinguishes aerosol coagulation from the coagulation of colloidal particles. The turbulent flow seen by an interacting pair of particles is modelled as a stochastically varying flow field that is a linear function of position. This approximation is valid because the 1-10 micron diameter particles for which turbulence dominates coagulation are much smaller than the smallest eddies of a typical turbulent flow field. It is shown that the finite mean-free path of the gas enhances the rate of coagulation and leads to a finite coagulation rate even in the absence of van der Waals attractions. The coupled effects of turbulent shear and Brownian motion are treated. As in the case of laminar shear flows, it is found that Brownian motion plays an important role in the coagulation process even when the Peclet number is moderately large. It is shown that particle inertia increases the coagulation rate in two ways. First, preferential concentration increases the radial distribution function on length scales intermediate between the Kolmogorov length scale and the particle diameter. Second, the greater persistence of particles' relative motion during their local interaction leads to an increase in coagulation rate with increasing particle Stokes number.

  15. Coagulation and fibrinolysis in capybara (Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris), a close relative of the guinea-pig (Cavia porcellus).

    PubMed

    Leitão, D P; Polizello, A C; Rothschild, Z

    2000-01-01

    Fibrinolytic and coagulation properties of capybara (Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris, LINNAEUS, 1766) plasma were analysed and the results compared to the guinea-pig (Cavia porcellus), a close relative. Capybara fibrinogen was isolated and fibrinolysis of its plasma was carried out in a homologous system and with bovine fibrin. Undiluted plasma did not have fibrinolytic activity on fibrin plates; euglobulins gave a dose-related response. Zymography of capybara and guinea-pig plasma gave the same patterns of activity as human or bovine plasma. Human urokinase (UK) and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) produced lysis in capybara fibrin plates. Streptokinase (SK) (500 IU/ml) did not activate capybara or guinea-pig plasma. In this system, human plasma was extensively activated. Coagulation tests for both species of rodent were prolonged. The capybara showed values for prothrombin time (PT) shorter than activated thromboplastin time (APTT). The guinea-pig, as already shown, had longer PT values. Factors X and VII were very low for capybara and guinea-pig when tested using reference curves and diagnostic kits for human plasma. It is suggested that the capybara could be a valuable laboratory animal considering its size and closeness to the guinea-pig, and this could allow for the provision of materials from one single animal when convenient or necessary.

  16. Measurement of the viscoelastic properties of blood plasma clot formation in response to tissue factor concentration-dependent activation.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Ramji S; Efremov, Vitaly; O'Donnell, James S; Killard, Anthony J

    2016-09-01

    The coagulation of blood plasma in response to activation with a range of tissue factor (TF) concentrations was studied with a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), where frequency and half width at half maximum (bandwidth) values measured from the conductance spectrum near resonant frequency were used. Continuous measurement of bandwidth along with the frequency allows for an understanding of the dissipative nature of the forming viscoelastic clot, thus providing information on the complex kinetics of the viscoelastic changes occurring during the clot formation process. Using a mathematical model, these changes in frequency and bandwidth have been used to derive novel QCM parameters of effective elasticity, effective mass density and rigidity factor of the viscoelastic layer. The responses of QCM were compared with those from thromboelastography (TEG) under identical conditions. It was demonstrated that the nature of the clot formed, as determined from the QCM parameters, was highly dependent on the rate of clot formation resulting from the TF concentration used for activation. These parameters could also be related to physical clot characteristics such as fibrin fibre diameter and fibre density, as determined by scanning electron microscopic image analysis. The maximum amplitude (MA) as measured by TEG, which purports to relate to clot strength, was unable to detect these differences. PMID:27311950

  17. Relationship between circulating tumor cells, blood coagulation, and urokinase-plasminogen-activator system in early breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Mego, Michal; Karaba, Marian; Minarik, Gabriel; Benca, Juraj; Sedlácková, Tatiana; Tothova, Lubomira; Vlkova, Barbora; Cierna, Zuzana; Janega, Pavol; Luha, Jan; Gronesova, Paulina; Pindak, Daniel; Fridrichova, Ivana; Celec, Peter; Reuben, James M; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Mardiak, Jozef

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a risk factor for venous thromboembolism (VTE) and plasma d-dimer (DD) and tissue factor (TF) are established VTE associated markers. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are associated with the risk of VTE in metastatic breast cancer. This study aimed to correlate CTCs, blood coagulation and the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) system in primary breast cancer (PBC) patients. This prospective study included 116 PBC patients treated by primary surgery. CTCs were detected by quantitative RT-PCR assay for expression of epithelial (CK19) or epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) genes (TWIST1, SNAIL1, SLUG, ZEB1, FOXC2). Plasma DD, TF, uPA system proteins were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, while expressions of uPA system in surgical specimens were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. CTCs were detected in 27.6% patients. Patients with CTCs had a significantly higher mean plasma DD (ng/mL) than those of patients without CTCs (632.4 versus 365.4, p = 0.000004). There was no association between plasma TF and CTCs. Epithelial CTCs exhibit higher expression of uPA system genes compared to EMT_CTCs. Patients with CTCs had higher plasma uPA proteins than those of patients without CTCs; there was no correlation between tissue expression of uPA system, CTCs, DD or TF levels. In multivariate analysis CTCs and patients age were independent factors associated with plasma DD. We found association between plasma DD and CTCs indicating a potential role for activation of the coagulation cascade in the early metastatic process. CTCs could be directly involved in coagulation activation or increased CTCs could be marker of aggressive disease and increased VTE risk.

  18. Comparison of human coagulation factor VIII expression directed by cytomegalovirus and mammary gland-specific promoters in HC11 cells and transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Hao, Siguo; Ma, Liyuan; Zhang, Wenhao; Wan, Jiangbo; Deng, Xiaohui

    2015-10-01

    Hemophilia A is an inherited X-linked recessive bleeding disorder caused by coagulant factor VIII (FVIII) deficiency. The conventional treatment involves the administration of recombinant human FVIII (rhFVIII) preparations. In this study, the mammary gland 'bioreactor' is designed to specifically and efficiently express a foreign protein hFVIII in the mammary glands of transgenic mice. We constructed a P1A3-hFVIIIBD vector directed by the mammary gland-specific P1A3 promoter, and transiently transfected HC11 cells and mouse mammary glands with P1A3-hFVIIIBD or CMV-hFVIIIBD vectors directed by a ubiquitous cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter, respectively. We also generated P1A3-hFVIIIBD and CMV-hFVIIIBD transgenic mice by microinjection, respectively. Our data indicated that both vectors effectively expressed hFVIIIBD in HC11 cells at the transcription level, and hFVIIIBD protein was efficiently expressed in mouse milk after the injection of the hFVIIIBD vectors into mouse mammary glands during lactation. In both CMV-hFVIIIBD and P1A3-hFVIIIBD transgenic mice, hFVIIIBD proteins were efficiently expressed in the mammary glands at the mRNA and protein levels. No significant difference was observed in hFVIIIBD levels between the CMV-hFVIIIBD and P1A3-hFVIIIBD transgenic mice (P > 0.05). However, the activity of hFVIII in CMV-directed transgenic mice was slightly higher than that in P1A3-directed transgenic mice (P < 0.05). While hFVIIIBD was present in multiple organs in CMV-hFVIIIBD mice, P1A3-hFVIIIBD mice showed negligible hFVIIIBD expression in organs other than the mammary glands. This study demonstrated that the mammary gland-specific P1A3-hFVIIIBD vector was more suitable for the generation of hFVIIIBD mammary gland bioreactor.

  19. Structural role of Gly(193) in serine proteases: investigations of a G555E (GLY193 in chymotrypsin) mutant of blood coagulation factor XI.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Amy E; Ogawa, Taketoshi; Gailani, David; Bajaj, S Paul

    2004-07-01

    In serine proteases, Gly(193) is highly conserved with few exceptions. A patient with inherited deficiency of the coagulation serine protease factor XI (FXI) was reported to be homozygous for a Gly(555) --> Glu substitution. Gly(555) in FXI corresponds to Gly(193) in chymotrypsin, which is the numbering system used subsequently. To investigate the abnormality in FXI(G193E), we expressed and purified recombinant FXIa(G193E), activated it to FXIa(G193E), and compared its activity to wild type-activated FXI (FXIa(WT)). FXIa(G193E) activated FIX with approximately 300-fold reduced k(cat) and similar K(m), and hydrolyzed synthetic substrate with approximately 10-fold reduced K(m) and modestly reduced k(cat). Binding of antithrombin and the amyloid beta-precursor protein Kunitz domain inhibitor (APPI) to FXIa(G193E) was impaired approximately 8000- and approximately 100000-fold, respectively. FXIa(G193E) inhibition by diisopropyl fluoro-phosphate was approximately 30-fold slower and affinity for p-aminobenzamidine (S1 site probe) was 6-fold weaker than for FXIa(WT). The rate of carbamylation of NH(2)-Ile(16), which forms a salt bridge with Asp(194) in active serine proteases, was 4-fold faster for FXIa(G193E). These data indicate that the unoccupied active site of FXIa(G193E) is incompletely formed, and the amide N of Glu(193) may not point toward the oxyanion hole. Inclusion of saturating amounts of p-aminobenzamidine resulted in comparable rates of carbamylation for FXIa(WT) and FXIa(G193E), suggesting that the occupied active site has near normal conformation. Thus, binding of small synthetic substrates or inhibitors provides sufficient energy to allow the amide N of Glu(193) to point correctly toward the oxyanion hole. Homology modeling also indicates that the inability of FXIa(G193E) to bind antithrombin/APPI or activate FIX is caused, in part, by impaired accessibility of the S2' site because of a steric clash with Glu(193). Such arguments will apply to other

  20. Coagulation activation in sickle cell trait: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Amin, Chirag; Adam, Soheir; Mooberry, Micah J; Kutlar, Abdullah; Kutlar, Ferdane; Esserman, Denise; Brittain, Julia E; Ataga, Kenneth I; Chang, Jen-Yea; Wolberg, Alisa S; Key, Nigel S

    2015-11-01

    Recent epidemiologic data suggest that sickle cell trait (HbAS; AS) is a risk factor for venous thromboembolism. We conducted an exploratory study of healthy subjects with AS under baseline conditions to determine whether a chronic basal hyperactivation of coagulation exists, and if so, what mechanism(s) contribute to this state. Eighteen healthy AS individuals were compared to 22 African-American controls with a normal haemoglobin profile (HbAA; AA) and 17 patients with sickle cell disease (HbSS; SS). Plasma thrombin-antithrombin complexes and D-dimer levels were elevated in AS relative to AA patients (P = 0·0385 and P = 0·017, respectively), and as expected, were much higher in SSversusAA (P < 0·0001 for both). Thrombin generation in platelet poor plasma was indistinguishable between AA and AS subjects, whereas a paradoxical decrease in endogenous thrombin potential was observed in SS (P ≤ 0·0001). Whole blood tissue factor was elevated in SS compared to AA (P = 0·005), but did not differ between AA and AS. Plasma microparticle tissue factor activity was non-significantly elevated in AS (P = 0·051), but was clearly elevated in SS patients (P = 0·004) when compared to AA controls. Further studies in larger cohorts of subjects with sickle cell trait are needed to confirm the results of this preliminary investigation.

  1. Disseminated intravascular coagulation in burn injury.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Ippolito, Luigi; Cervellin, Gianfranco

    2010-06-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a complex and multifaceted disorder characterized by the activation of coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways, consumption of coagulation factors, and depletion of coagulation regulatory proteins. The introduction into the circulation of cellular debris characterized by strong thromboplastic activity due to tissue factor exposition or release (in or from burned tissues), which can thereby activate extrinsic pathway of coagulation system and trigger massive thrombin generation when present in sufficient concentration, represents the most plausible biological explanation to support the development of intravascular coagulation in patients with burn injury. Severe burns left untreated might also lead to an immunological and inflammatory response (activation of the complement cascade), which can amplify fibrinolysis and blood clotting. Overall, the real prevalence of DIC in patients with burns is as yet unclear. Postmortem, retrospective, and even longitudinal investigations are in fact biased by several factors, such as the objective difficulty to establish whether DIC might have occurred as a primary complication of burns or rather as a consequence of other superimposed pathologies (e.g., sepsis, multiple organ failure), the different diagnostic criteria for assessing DIC, and the heterogeneity of the patient samples studied. Nevertheless, the current scientific evidence is consistent with the hypothesis that biochemical changes suggestive for DIC (hypercoagulability, hypo- and hyperfibrinolysis) are commonplace in patients with burn trauma, and their severity increases exponentially with the severity of injury. Overt DIC seems to occur especially in critically ill burn patients or in those with severe burns (up to third degree) and large involvement of body surface area, in whom an appropriate therapy might be effective to prevent the otherwise fulminant course. Although early prophylaxis with antithrombin concentrates

  2. Blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in aortic valve stenosis: links with inflammation and calcification.

    PubMed

    Natorska, J; Undas, A

    2015-08-01

    Aortic valve stenosis (AS) increasingly afflicts our aging population. However, the pathobiology of the disease is still poorly understood and there is no effective pharmacotherapy for treating those at risk for clinical progression. The progression of AS involves complex inflammatory and fibroproliferative processes that resemble to some extent atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence indicates that several coagulation proteins and its inhibitors, including tissue factor, tissue factor pathway inhibitor, prothrombin, factor XIII, von Willebrand factor, display increased expression within aortic stenotic valves, predominantly on macrophages and myofibroblasts around calcified areas. Systemic impaired fibrinolysis, along with increased plasma and valvular expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, has also been observed in patients with AS in association with the severity of the disease. There is an extensive cross-talk between inflammation and coagulation in stenotic valve tissue which contributes to the calcification and mineralisation of the aortic valve leaflets. This review summarises the available data on blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in AS with the emphasis on their interactions with inflammation and calcification.

  3. Inflammation-associated activation of coagulation and immune regulation by the protein C pathway.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Hartmut

    2014-05-01

    The inflammation-induced activation of the protein C pathway provides negative feedback inhibition of coagulation and exerts coagulation-independent anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects. The balance between these activities of aPC modulates the outcome of diverse inflammatory diseases such as encephalitis, diabetes, and sepsis; and is affected by naturally occurring aPC-resistance of coagulation factor V Leiden.

  4. Management of cancer-associated disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Levi, Marcel

    2016-04-01

    Cancer may be complicated by the occurrence of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). DIC is characterized by a widespread and intravascular activation of coagulation (leading to intravascular fibrin deposition) and simultaneous consumption of coagulation factors and platelets (potentially resulting in bleeding). Clinically, DIC in cancer has in general a less fulminant presentation than the types of DIC complicating sepsis and trauma. A more gradual, but also more chronic, systemic activation of coagulation can proceed subclinically. Eventually this process may lead to exhaustion of platelets and coagulation factors and bleeding (for example at the site of the tumor) may be the first clinical symptom indicating the presence of DIC. In some cases, the clinical presentation of DIC in cancer may be reminiscent of thrombotic microangiopathies, which is understandable in view of the role of endothelium in both conditions. The therapeutic cornerstone of DIC is treatment of the underlying disorder but supportive treatment, specifically aimed at the hemostatic system may be required. PMID:27067981

  5. Activation of blood coagulation in autoimmune skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Cugno, Massimo; Tedeschi, Alberto; Crosti, Carlo; Marzano, Angelo V

    2009-09-01

    The immune system and blood coagulation are simultaneously activated in several inflammatory systemic disorders, such as lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel diseases. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and TNF-alpha, induce the expression of tissue factor, the main initiator of blood coagulation. Activated proteases of coagulation in turn act on protease-activated receptors, inducing the expression of various proinflammatory cytokines. This cross-talk between inflammation and coagulation amplifies and maintains the activation of both systems. This review focuses on three skin disorders: chronic urticaria (CU), which is considered autoimmune in approximately 50% of cases, bullous pemphigoid (BP), which is the prototype of autoimmune blistering disease, and psoriasis, which is an immune-mediated dermatitis. In CU, the activation of coagulation, which is due to the involvement of eosinophils and tissue factor pathways with the generation of thrombin, has local implications by increasing dermal vascular permeability. Preliminary data indicate that anticoagulant treatment with heparin and warfarin may be effective in reducing the symptoms of this disorder. In BP, the activation of coagulation seems to have both local and systemic implications. Locally, eosinophils and thrombin participate in bulla formation and tissue damage; systemically, the activation of coagulation may explain the increased thrombotic risk observed in these patients. In psoriasis, the activation of coagulation seems to be mainly systemic, potentially contributing to the increased cardiovascular risk associated with this disease. PMID:20477646

  6. Crystal Structure of Human Plasma Platelet-Activating Factor Acetylhydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, U.; Bahnson, B

    2008-01-01

    Human plasma platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase functions by reducing PAF levels as a general anti-inflammatory scavenger and is linked to anaphylactic shock, asthma, and allergic reactions. The enzyme has also been implicated in hydrolytic activities of other pro-inflammatory agents, such as sn-2 oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. This plasma enzyme is tightly bound to low and high density lipoprotein particles and is also referred to as lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A{sub 2}. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been solved from x-ray diffraction data collected to a resolution of 1.5{angstrom}. It has a classic lipase {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase fold, and it contains a catalytic triad of Ser{sup 273}, His{sup 351}, and Asp{sup 296}. Two clusters of hydrophobic residues define the probable interface-binding region, and a prediction is given of how the enzyme is bound to lipoproteins. Additionally, an acidic patch of 10 carboxylate residues and a neighboring basic patch of three residues are suggested to play a role in high density lipoprotein/low density lipoprotein partitioning. A crystal structure is also presented of PAF acetylhydrolase reacted with the organophosphate compound paraoxon via its active site Ser{sup 273}. The resulting diethyl phosphoryl complex was used to model the tetrahedral intermediate of the substrate PAF to the active site. The model of interface binding begins to explain the known specificity of lipoprotein-bound substrates and how the active site can be both close to the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface and at the same time be accessible to the aqueous phase.

  7. Effect of citrate anticoagulants on factor VIII levels in plasma.

    PubMed

    Rock, G; Tittley, P; Fuller, V

    1988-01-01

    The citrate anticoagulants used during blood collection have been developed for their benefits to red cells. The concentrations in which they are used are strictly regulated in the United States: citrate-phosphate-dextrose-adenine (CPDA) is used in a 1:8 ratio for the collection of whole blood, whereas 4 percent sodium citrate (NaCit) is used in a 1:10 ratio for manual plasmapheresis. Acid-citrate-dextrose formula A (ACD-A) or formula B (ACD-B) and NaCit are commonly used in a 1:12 or 1:15 ratio during automated plasmapheresis. These anticoagulants have different initial and final pH values and citrate concentrations and different effects on the recovery of factor VIII (FVIII) in the plasma. NaCit has a higher initial pH (6.64) than ACD-A (4.98), ACD-B (5.60), or CPDA (5.12). The effects of these different anticoagulants on plasma constituents obtained from six healthy subjects were studied. In standard citrate concentrations, the FVIII level was significantly lower (p less than 0.05) in the NaCit used for manual plasmapheresis than in either of the ACD solutions used in automated plasmapheresis (104 U/dl vs. 153 and 160 U/dl). When various ratios of NaCit to blood were used, the pH increased from 7.62 at a 1:10 dilution to 7.65 at a 1:50 dilution. As expected, a progressive decrease in anticoagulant level was associated with an increase in ionized calcium and also in the level of FVIII, with the latter values rising from 104 U per dl at 1:10 to 137 at 1:20 and 148 U per dl at 1:30. Clot formation was detected only at a ratio of 1:35.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. [In vitro effects of hemocoagulase atrix and its effective components on blood coagulation of patients with bleeding disorders].

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Juan; Wang, Zhao-Yue; Jiang, Ming-Hua; Zhang, Wei; Cao, Li-Juan; Sun, Xiong-Hua; Zhang, Jian; Bai, Xia; Ruan, Chang-Geng

    2012-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the pro coagulation effects of hemocoagulase atrix and its effective components (batroxobin and factor X activator) on plasma of normal subjects and patients with bleeding disorders and their mechanisms. Activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and prothrombin time (PT) were measured. The factor (F)X activation and thrombin generation were analyzed by using chromogenic substrate method. The results showed that the plasma APTT of normal subjects was shortened by hemocoagulase atrix, batroxobin and FX activator, and the effect of FX activator was found to be concentration-dependent (r = 0.889, P < 0.05). The prolonged APTT of plasma from patients with bleeding disorders could be corrected by hemocoagulase atrix, batroxobin and FX activator, but PT showed no great changes resulted from the treatments. FX activator could promote FX activation and thrombin generation, while neither hemocoagulase atrix nor batroxobin showed such abilities. It is concluded that hemocoagulase atrix promotes coagulation process, and corrects coagulation abnormalities in patients with bleeding disorders, its main component batroxobin directly acts on fibrinogen, and FX activator promotes thrombin generation through activating FX.

  9. Ipomoea dasysperma seed gum: an effective natural coagulant for the decolorization of textile dye solutions.

    PubMed

    Sanghi, Rashmi; Bhattacharya, Bani; Dixit, Awantika; Singh, Vandana

    2006-10-01

    An investigation of dye decolorization from synthetic dye solutions using the non-ionic, water-soluble, high molecular weight seed gums Ipomoea dasysperma and guar gum as coagulants was undertaken. The use of galactomannans derived from plants in this system presents a sustainable method of textile effluent treatment. These natural coagulants extracted from plants proved to be workable alternatives to conventional coagulants like polyaluminum chloride, as they are biodegradable, safe to human health, are cost effective when compared to imported chemicals and have a wider effective dosage range for flocculation of various colloidal suspensions. Coagulant dose and coagulation pH are important factors influencing the mechanism of coagulation. Also the type and chemical structure of the dye plays an important role in the coagulation process. The seed gums alone were found to be effective for decolorization of direct dye and in combination with PAC their coagulation efficiency was well extended even for reactive and acid dyes.

  10. Analysis of Coagulation Processes for the Groundwater Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrektiene, Ramune; Rimeika, Mindaugas; Jurkiene, Anzelika

    2013-06-01

    Coagulation process is widely used for removal of natural organic matters (NOM) and for water color intensity reduction. The efficiency of coagulation process depends on many different factors. Aim of this research is to investigate coagulation process under different conditions. During the research coagulation process was held at different pH values (5.5; 6.0; 6.5), at different water alkalinity and at different water turbidity. It was found that removal of NOM and water color intensity reduction is most effective at pH values from 5.5 to 6.0. At these conditions water color intensity reduction is most efficient, but removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is the lowest. During the research it was also found that different water alkalinity and turbidity do not make significant influence on efficiency of coagulation process.

  11. [Effects of Interaction of Ozonation and Coagulation on Coagulation Results].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-long; Guo, Xue-feng; Wang, Min-hui; Jiao, Ru-yuan; Shi, Jian

    2015-09-01

    Two strategies, ozonation-coagulation combination (OCC, ozone and coagulant dosed at meantime) and preozonation coagulation (PC, coagulant dosed after ozone died away) were used to treat synthesized water. Different effects of oxidation and coagulation, disinfection by-products formation potentials (DBPFP) in the same water were detected in order to study the influence of interaction of ozonation and coagulation (IOC) on treated water characteristics. Results show that there are remarkable differences between OCC and PC. IOC effects take place during OCC process, which results in variations of the distribution of hydrolyzed species of coagulant. And this is an important reason which impairs efficiency of coagulation. Turbidity after OCC was higher than that of PC. One of the main reasons is that ozone reduced the content of Alb species which was built during coagulant hydrolyzation. Cl-DBPFP in OCC outlet water were lower than those in PC because oxidized destruction of DBP precursors were enhanced by catalyzed ozonation by AlCl3 along with its other hydrolyzed species. Removals of MCAA and CF formation potentials by OCC were significantly higher than those by PC, MCAAFP were 5. 6 µg . L-1 and 16. 9 µg . L-1 respectively, and CFFP were 12. 5 µg . L-1 and 24. 1 µg . L-1 respectively. Coagulation results and DBP formations are significantly affected by interaction of ozonation and coagulation; and it should be a noticeable point of water safety if ozonation and coagulation are employed together. Thus times and spots between ozone and coagulant should be defined clearly in correlational researches and water treatment application. PMID:26717689

  12. sup 1 H NMR assignment and secondary structure of the Ca sup 2+ -free form of the amino-terminal epidermal growth factor like domain in coagulation factor X

    SciTech Connect

    Selander, M.; Persson, E.; Stenflo, J.; Drakenberg, T. )

    1990-09-04

    Blood coagulation factor X is composed of discrete domains, two of which are homologous to the epidermal growth factor (EGF). The N-terminal EGF like domain in factor X (fX-EGF{sub N}), residues 45-86 of the intact protein contains a {beta}-hydroxylated asparatic acid and has one Ca{sup 2+}-binding site. Using 2D NMR techniques, the authors have made a full assignment of the 500-MHz {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of Ca{sup 2+}-free fX-EGF{sub N}. On the basis of this assignment and complementary NOESY experiments, they have also determined the secondary structure of Ca{sup 2+}-free fX-EGF{sub N} in water solution. Residues 45-49 are comparatively mobile, whereas residues 5-56 are constrained by two disulfide bonds to one side of an antiparallel {beta}-sheet involving residues 59-64 and 67-72. Another antiparallel {beta}-sheet involves residues 76-77 and 83-84. A small, parallel {beta}-sheet connects residues 80-81 and 55-56 and thereby orients the two antiparallel {beta}-sheets relative to each other. Four {beta}-turns are identified, involving residues 50-53, 56-59, 64-67, 73-76. Residues 78-82 adopt an extended bend structure. On the basis of secondary structure and the location of the three disulfide bonds, they find that Asp 46, Asp 48, and Hya 63 are sufficiently close to each other to form a Ca{sup 2+}-binding site. However, the amino terminus of the Ca{sup 2+}-free form of fX-EGF{sub N} is not part of a triple-stranded {beta}-sheet as in other EGF like peptides. Differences and similarities between fX-EGF{sub N} and murine EGF with respect to secondary structure and conformational shifts are discussed.

  13. The role of carrier number on the procoagulant activity of tissue factor in blood and plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tormoen, G. W.; Rugonyi, S.; Gruber, A.; McCarty, O. J. T.

    2011-12-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is a transmembrane glycoprotein cofactor of activated blood coagulation factor VII (FVIIa) that is required for hemostatic thrombin generation at sites of blood vessel injury. Membrane-associated TF detected in circulating blood of healthy subjects, referred to as intravascular or circulating TF has been shown to contribute to experimental thrombus propagation at sites of localized vessel injury. Certain disease states, such as metastatic cancer, are associated with increased levels of intravascular TF and an elevated risk of venous thromboembolism. However, the physiological relevance of circulating TF to hemostasis or thrombosis, as well as cancer metastasis, is ill-defined. This study was designed to assess whether the spatial separation of intravascular TF carriers in blood, demonstrated with TF-inducible human monocytic cell line U937 or TF-coated polymer microspheres, affected procoagulant activity and hence thrombogenic potential. Experiments were performed to characterize the effects of TF-carrier number on the kinetics of clot formation in both open and closed systems. The procoagulant activity of TF carriers was found to correlate with spatial separation in both closed, well-mixed systems and open, flowing systems. TF carriers enhanced the amidolytic activity of FVIIa toward the chromogenic substrate, S-2366, as a function of carrier count. These results suggest that TF-initiated coagulation by circulating TF is kinetically limited by mass transport of TF-dependent coagulation factors to the TF-bearing surface, a constraint that may be unique to circulating TF. Spatial separation of circulating TF carriers is therefore a critical determinant of the procoagulant activity of circulating TF.

  14. Influence of plasma volume expansion with saline on the plasma levels of an ouabain-like factor

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, A.L.; Morris, M.; Buckalew, V.M. Jr.

    1986-03-05

    Plasma volume expansion with saline activates the cardiopulmonary baroreflex and causes the release of natriuretic factors(s). One putative natriuretic factor has ouabain-like activity (OLA). To examine the relationship between this factor and plasma volume expansion, the OLA of plasma was examined in rats that were volume expanded with 0.9% saline at a rate of 150..mu..l/min/100 g of rat for 15, 30, 60 and 120 minutes. Plasma OLA was quantitated with a radioreceptor assay utilizing /sup 3/H-ouabain and erythrocytes ghosts. The OLA and hematocrit of control rats were 18.2 +/- 2.93 pmoles of OLA/ml of plasma and 43.7 +/- 0.65. After plasma volume expansion for 15 and 30 minutes, plasma OLA was not significantly altered (27.1 +/- 6.64 and 15.3 +/- 2.80, respectively). However, the hematocrit was reduced 13.9% (37.6 +/- 1.34, p < 0.05) and 33.6% (29.0 +/- 1.92, p < 0.01) for 15 and 30 minutes of volume expansion, respectively. After 60 minutes of volume expansion the hematocrit began to recover (33.7 +/- 2.16) although it was still significantly depressed (p < 0.01). At this time point the OLA was increased 248% to 63.4 +/- 22.7 pmoles of OLA/ml of plasma (p < 0.01). At 120 minutes of volume expansion the hematocrit was 38.3 +/- 1.24 and the OLA returned to control values (13.4 +/- 5.17). This data indicates that volume expansion causes an increase in plasma OLA and this increase in activity may contribute to the recovery of hematocrit that is seen with continued volume expansion.

  15. Effect of plasma rich in growth factors on alveolar osteitis

    PubMed Central

    Haraji, Afshin; Lassemi, Eshagh; Motamedi, Mohammad Hosein Kalantar; Alavi, Maryam; Adibnejad, Saman

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The high prevalence of dry socket or alveolar osteitis (AO) is of concern in surgical removal of third molars. The aim of the present study was to assess the preventive effect of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) on AO and also its effect on pain management and healing acceleration in third molar extraction sockets of high-risk patients. Materials and Methods: This split-mouth, double-blind clinical trial included 40 bilateral third molar extractions (80 sockets) with at least one identified risk factor for AO. PRGF was obtained from patient's own blood, based on manufacturer's instruction, and blindly placed in one of the two bilateral sockets (PRGF group; n = 20) of each patient. The contralateral socket was treated with a placebo (control group; n = 20). Samples were evaluated for AO and pain incidence on days 2, 3 and 4 and healing and infection on days 3 and 7. Data were analyzed in SPSS v16 using Wilcoxon test. Results: There was a significant difference in dry socket and pain incidence and healing rate between the two groups. Intensity of pain and occurrence of dry socket in the study group was lower than the controls. Also the healing rate was higher (P < 0.05) for the PRGF group. No sign of infection was seen in either group. Conclusion: The application of PRGF may significantly reduce the incidence of AO or its associated pain and may accelerate healing. The prophylactic use of PRGF following third molar extraction may be suggested especially in the patients at risk of AO. PMID:23251056

  16. Asthma and coagulation.

    PubMed

    de Boer, J Daan; Majoor, Christof J; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Bel, Elisabeth H D; van der Poll, Tom

    2012-04-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway disease characterized by paroxysmal airflow obstruction evoked by irritative stimuli on a background of allergic lung inflammation. Currently, there is no cure for asthma, only symptomatic treatment. In recent years, our understanding of the involvement of coagulation and anticoagulant pathways, the fibrinolytic system, and platelets in the pathophysiology of asthma has increased considerably. Asthma is associated with a procoagulant state in the bronchoalveolar space, further aggravated by impaired local activities of the anticoagulant protein C system and fibrinolysis. Protease-activated receptors have been implicated as the molecular link between coagulation and allergic inflammation in asthma. This review summarizes current knowledge of the impact of the disturbed hemostatic balance in the lungs on asthma severity and manifestations and identifies new possible targets for asthma treatment.

  17. Asthma and coagulation.

    PubMed

    de Boer, J Daan; Majoor, Christof J; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Bel, Elisabeth H D; van der Poll, Tom

    2012-04-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway disease characterized by paroxysmal airflow obstruction evoked by irritative stimuli on a background of allergic lung inflammation. Currently, there is no cure for asthma, only symptomatic treatment. In recent years, our understanding of the involvement of coagulation and anticoagulant pathways, the fibrinolytic system, and platelets in the pathophysiology of asthma has increased considerably. Asthma is associated with a procoagulant state in the bronchoalveolar space, further aggravated by impaired local activities of the anticoagulant protein C system and fibrinolysis. Protease-activated receptors have been implicated as the molecular link between coagulation and allergic inflammation in asthma. This review summarizes current knowledge of the impact of the disturbed hemostatic balance in the lungs on asthma severity and manifestations and identifies new possible targets for asthma treatment. PMID:22262775

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of coagulation factor IX-binding protein from habu snake venom at pH 6.5 and 4.6

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Shikamoto, Yasuo; Fujimoto, Zui; Morita, Takashi; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    Crystals of habu coagulation factor IX-binding protein have been obtained at pH 6.5 and 4.6 and characterized by X-ray diffraction. Coagulation factor IX-binding protein isolated from Trimeresurus flavoviridis (IX-bp) is a C-type lectin-like protein. It is an anticoagulant protein consisting of homologous subunits A and B. The subunits both contain a Ca{sup 2+}-binding site with differing affinity (K{sub d} values of 14 and 130 µM at pH 7.5). These binding characteristics are pH-dependent; under acidic conditions, the affinity of the low-affinity site was reduced considerably. In order to identify which site has high affinity and also to investigate the Ca{sup 2+}-releasing mechanism, IX-bp was crystallized at pH 6.5 and 4.6. The crystals at pH 6.5 and 4.6 diffracted to 1.72 and 2.29 Å resolution, respectively; the former crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.7, b = 63.5, c = 66.9 Å, β = 117.0°, while the latter belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with a = 134.1, b = 37.8, c = 55.8 Å, β = 110.4°.

  19. Laboratory testing in disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2010-06-01

    The diagnosis of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) relies on clinical signs and symptoms, identification of the underlying disease, the results of laboratory testing, and differentiation from other pathologies. The clinical features mainly depend on the underlying cause of the DIC. The laboratory diagnosis of DIC uses a combination of tests because no single test result alone can firmly establish or rule out the diagnosis. Global tests of hemostasis may initially provide evidence of coagulation activation and later in the process provide evidence of consumption of coagulation factors, but their individual diagnostic efficiency is limited. Fibrinolytic markers, in particular D-dimer, are reflective of activation of both coagulation and fibrinolysis, so that a normal finding can be useful for ruling-out DIC. Decreased levels of the natural anticoagulants (in particular, antithrombin and protein C) are frequently observed in patients with DIC, but their measurement is not normally incorporated into standard diagnostic algorithms. New tests are being explored for utility in DIC, and some additional tests may be useful on a case-by-case basis, depending on the proposed cause of the DIC or their local availability. For example, clot waveform analysis is useful but currently limited to a single instrument. Also, procalcitonin is an inflammatory biomarker that may be useful within the context of septic DIC, and activated factor X clotting time is an emerging test of procoagulant phospholipids that also seems to hold promise in DIC.

  20. Studies on the purification of antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). II. Separation of partially purified antihemophilic factor by gel filtration of plasma.

    PubMed

    Ratnoff, O D; Kass, L; Lang, P D

    1969-05-01

    A high degree of purification of antihemophilic factor was achieved by filtration of chylomicronpoor human plasma through columns of agarose. The final product contained, on the average, 67 units of antihemophilic activity per mg of protein, and was 3360-fold purified compared with the filtered plasma. The molecular weight of antihemophilic factor appeared to be at least two million. Preparations separated by gel filtration were contaminated with appreciable amounts of plasma thromboplastin antecedent (PTA), and traces of Christmas factor and Hageman factor, but no detectable fibrinogen was present. Similar fractions of plasma prepared from the blood of patients with classic hemophilia, von Willebrand's disease, or a circulating anticoagulant directed against antihemophilic factor contained, on the average, somewhat less protein than normal plasma; whether this difference was significant is not yet known. The purified fractions were partially stabilized by the addition of 1% gelatin. Adaptation of the technique of gel filtration to purification of antihemophilic factor for clinical use remains to be explored.

  1. Plasma therapy in foals and adult horses.

    PubMed

    Tennent-Brown, Brent

    2011-10-01

    Although a range of plasma-based products (e.g., cryoprecipitate, albumin, platelet-rich plasma, individual coagulation factors) are available to human physicians, equine veterinarians are largely restricted to using whole blood, frozen plasma, and fresh frozen plasma for transfusions. The indications for frozen or fresh frozen plasma in human medicine are relatively limited, and there is little evidence supporting the efficacy of these products in many cases. Furthermore, many human physicians have concerns regarding disease transmission and anaphylactic reactions after administration of any plasma product. In equine medicine, plasma products have been used (1) to treat failure of passive transfer (FPT); sepsis; and coagulopathies; (2) as "antiendotoxin" agents; and (3) to provide colloidal support. The use of plasma should be carefully considered before administration because of potential (although rare) adverse reactions as well as expense. In addition, the benefits are uncertain in some equine patients.

  2. Tailoring the surface properties of polypropylene films through cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAPP) assisted polymerization and immobilization of biomolecules for enhancement of anti-coagulation activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navaneetha Pandiyaraj, K.; Ram Kumar, M. C.; Arun Kumar, A.; Padmanabhan, P. V. A.; Deshmukh, R. R.; Bah, M.; Ismat Shah, S.; Su, Pi-Guey; Halleluyah, M.; Halim, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Enhancement of anti-thrombogenic properties of polypropylene (PP) to avert the adsorption of plasma proteins (fibrinogen and albumin), adhesion and activation of the platelets are very important for vast biomedical applications. The cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAPP) assisted polymerization has potential to create the specific functional groups such as Osbnd Cdbnd O, Cdbnd O, Csbnd N and Ssbnd S. on the surface of polymeric films using selective precursor in vapour phase to enhance anti-thrombogenic properties. Such functionalized polymeric surfaces would be suitable for various biomedical applications especially to improve the blood compatibility. The eventual aspiration of the present investigation is to develop the biofunctional coating onto the surface of PP films using acrylic acid (AAc) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a precursor in a vapour phase by incorporating specific functional groups for immobilization of biomolecules such as heparin (HEP), chitosan (CHI) and insulin (INS) on the surface of plasma modified PP films. The surface properties such as hydrophilicity, chemical composition, surface topography of the surface modified PP films were analyzed by contact angle (CA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Furthermore the anti-thrombogenic properties of the surface modified PP films were studied by in vitro tests which include platelet adhesion and protein adsorption analysis. It was found that the anti-thrombogenic properties of the PP films are effectively controlled by the CAPP grafting of AAc and PEG followed by immobilization of biomolecules of heparin, chitosan and insulin. The grafting and immobilization was confirmed by FTIR and XPS through the recognition of specific functional groups such as COOH, Csbnd O, Ssbnd S and Csbnd N. on the surface of PP film. Furthermore, the surface morphology and hydrophilic nature of the PP films also tailored

  3. Quartz crystal microbalance-with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) for real time measurements of blood coagulation density and immune complement activation on artificial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Marcus; Andersson, Jonas; Sellborn, Anders; Berglin, Mattias; Nilsson, Bo; Elwing, Hans

    2005-07-15

    A recently developed variant of quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) called QCM-with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) allows simultaneous and simple measurements of changes in adsorbed mass as well as the viscoelastic property (D-factor) of deposited protein layers on the sensor surface. We have taken the QCM-D technology a step further and demonstrated its advantages in the study of protein assembly as a consequence of surface induced immune complement activation, or contact activated blood coagulation. In the present study we have continued our QCM-D investigations of surface assembly of fibrin clot formation and complement activation and incubated differently modified quartz sensor surfaces in blood plasma and sera. Polymer surfaces used were spin-coated polyethylene, poly(ethylene terephtalate), poly(methylmetacrylate) and poly(dimethylsiloxane). Also used were sputtered titanium and heparin grafted surfaces. In this investigation we found that we could describe the surface induced coagulation with four independent parameters: (1) Time of onset of coagulation, (2) fibrin deposition rate, (3) total frequency shift at stable plateau, and (4) fibrin clot density. The most important finding was that the blood plasma clot density can be assessed with the use of D determinations and that the clot density varied significantly with the chemical composition of the surface. However, the D-factor did not give any new analytical information about the possible complement activation mechanisms. Nevertheless, the QCM-D was found to be a reliable tool for the analysis of surface induced complement activation. We also compared the QCM-D technique with traditional enzyme immuno assay (EIA) measurements of soluble products from the surface activation of the complement and coagulation systems. We found that the results from EIA and QCM-D measurements corresponded well for the complement activation but not for the coagulation, probably due to the biological complexity of the coagulation

  4. Coagulation and complement system in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Helling, H; Stephan, B; Pindur, G

    2015-01-01

    Activation of coagulation and inflammatory response including the complement system play a major role in the pathogenesis of critical illness. However, only limited data are available addressing the relationship of both pathways and its assessment of a predictive value for the clinical outcome in intense care medicine. Therefore, parameters of the coagulation and complement system were studied in patients with septicaemia and multiple trauma regarded as being exemplary for critical illness. 34 patients (mean age: 51.38 years (±16.57), 15 females, 19 males) were investigated at day 1 of admittance to the intensive care unit (ICU). Leukocytes, complement factors C3a and C5a were significantly (p <  0.0500) higher in sepsis than in trauma, whereas platelet count and plasma fibrinogen were significantly lower in multiple trauma. Activation markers of coagulation were elevated in both groups, however, thrombin-antithrombin-complex was significantly higher in multiple trauma. DIC scores of 5 were not exceeded in any of the two groups. Analysing the influences on mortality (11/34; 32.35% ), which was not different in both groups, non-survivors were significantly older, had significantly higher multiple organ failure (MOF) scores, lactate, abnormal prothrombin times and lower C1-inhibitor activities, even more pronounced in early deaths, than survivors. In septic non-survivors protein C was significantly lower than in trauma. We conclude from these data that activation of the complement system as part of the inflammatory response is a significant mechanism in septicaemia, whereas loss and consumption of blood components including parts of the coagulation and complement system is more characteristic for multiple trauma. Protein C in case of severe reduction might be of special concern for surviving in sepsis. Activation of haemostasis was occurring in both diseases, however, overt DIC was not confirmed in this study to be a leading mechanism in critically ill patients

  5. [Basic values of blood coagulation parameters in pigs (Sus scrofa domesticus)].

    PubMed

    Hahn, N; Popov-Cenic, S; Dorer, A

    1996-01-01

    On 23 clinical healthy pigs (2-4 months of age, body weight 13-42 kg) under ketamin-pentobarbital anaesthesia blood plasma coagulation parameters have been investigated. To obtain basic values 26 parameters were measured: number of thrombocytes, parameters of thrombelastogram and resonance-thrombogram, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, reptilase time, factors I, II, V, VII, VIII, X, antithrombin III, plasminogen, alpha 1-antitrypsin, alpha 2-antiplasmin, alpha 2-macroglobulin, fibrin degradation products D and E and euglobulin lysis-time. Parameters calculated in percent should be measured against a pig plasma pool. Measurement against a human plasma pool are hardly valid in values higher than 100%. In comparison to man the results indicate modifications of fibrinogenesis and fibrinolysis in pigs.

  6. Blood coagulation as an intrinsic pathway for proinflammation: a mini review.

    PubMed

    Chu, Arthur J

    2010-03-01

    Blood coagulation could be recognized as intrinsic inflammation. The coagulant mediators (FVIIa, FXa, thrombin (FIIa), FXIIa) and fibrin(ogen) activate cellular signaling, eliciting the production of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and other proinflammatory mediators. Hypercoagulability with elevated coagulant mediators would certainly trigger hyper-inflammatory state not to mention about the direct hypercoagulable actions on thrombosis, and platelet and complement activations, all of which contribute to inflammatory events. Furthermore, anticoagulant's anti-inflammatory effects readily reinforce the proposal that blood coagulation results in inflammation. The observations on protease activated receptor (PAR) activation and PAR antagonists modulating inflammation are also in line with the concept of coagulation-dependent inflammation.

  7. A short contemporary history of disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Levi, Marcel; van der Poll, Tom

    2014-11-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a syndrome characterized by systemic intravascular activation of coagulation, leading to a widespread deposition of fibrin in the circulation. There is ample experimental and pathological evidence that the fibrin deposition contributes to multiple organ failure. The massive and ongoing activation of coagulation may result in depletion of platelets and coagulation factors, which may cause bleeding (consumption coagulopathy). The syndrome of DIC is well known in the medical literature for centuries, although a more precise description of the underlying mechanisms had to await the 20th century. Initial ideas on a role of the contact activation system as the primary trigger for the systemic activation of coagulation as well as a presumed hyperfibrinolytic response in DIC have been found to be misconceptions. Experimental and clinical evidence now indicate that the initiation of coagulation in DIC is caused by tissue factor expression, which in combination with downregulated physiological anticoagulant pathways and impaired fibrinolysis leads to widespread fibrin deposition. In addition, an extensive bidirectional interaction between coagulation and inflammation may further contribute to the pathogenesis of DIC.

  8. Evidence for indications of fresh frozen plasma.

    PubMed

    Stanworth, S J; Hyde, C J; Murphy, M F

    2007-12-01

    There continues to be a general but unfounded enthusiasm for fresh frozen plasma (FFP) usage across a range of clinical specialties in hospital practice. Clinical use of plasma has grown steadily over the last two decades in many countries. In England and Wales, there has not been a significant reduction in the use of FFP over the last few years, unlike red cells. There is also evidence of variation in usage among countries--use in England and Wales may be proportionately less per patient than current levels of usage in other European countries and the United States. Plasma for transfusion is most often used where there is abnormal coagulation screening tests, either therapeutically in the face of bleeding, or prophylactically in non-bleeding subjects prior to invasive procedures or surgery. Little evidence exists to inform best therapeutic plasma transfusion practice. Most studies have described plasma use in a prophylactic setting, in which laboratory abnormalities of coagulation tests are considered a predictive risk factor for bleeding prior to invasive procedures. The strongest randomised controlled trial (RCT) evidence indicates that prophylactic plasma for transfusion is not effective across a range of different clinical settings and this is supported by data from non-randomised studies in patients with mild to moderate abnormalities in coagulation tests. There are also uncertainties whether plasma consistently improves the laboratory results for patients with mild to moderate abnormalities in coagulation tests. There is a need to undertake new trials evaluating the efficacy and adverse effects of plasma, both in bleeding and non-bleeding patients, to understand whether the "presumed" benefits outweigh the "real risks". In addition, new haemostatic tests should be validated which better define risk of bleeding.

  9. Pathogen reduction in human plasma using an ultrashort pulsed laser.

    PubMed

    Tsen, Shaw-Wei D; Kingsley, David H; Kibler, Karen; Jacobs, Bert; Sizemore, Sara; Vaiana, Sara M; Anderson, Jeanne; Tsen, Kong-Thon; Achilefu, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Pathogen reduction is a viable approach to ensure the continued safety of the blood supply against emerging pathogens. However, the currently licensed pathogen reduction techniques are ineffective against non-enveloped viruses such as hepatitis A virus, and they introduce chemicals with concerns of side effects which prevent their widespread use. In this report, we demonstrate the inactivation of both enveloped and non-enveloped viruses in human plasma using a novel chemical-free method, a visible ultrashort pulsed laser. We found that laser treatment resulted in 2-log, 1-log, and 3-log reductions in human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis A virus, and murine cytomegalovirus in human plasma, respectively. Laser-treated plasma showed ≥70% retention for most coagulation factors tested. Furthermore, laser treatment did not alter the structure of a model coagulation factor, fibrinogen. Ultrashort pulsed lasers are a promising new method for chemical-free, broad-spectrum pathogen reduction in human plasma.

  10. Monocyte tissue factor–dependent activation of coagulation in hypercholesterolemic mice and monkeys is inhibited by simvastatin

    PubMed Central

    Owens, A. Phillip; Passam, Freda H.; Antoniak, Silvio; Marshall, Stephanie M.; McDaniel, Allison L.; Rudel, Lawrence; Williams, Julie C.; Hubbard, Brian K.; Dutton, Julie-Ann; Wang, Jianguo; Tobias, Peter S.; Curtiss, Linda K.; Daugherty, Alan; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Luyendyk, James P.; Moriarty, Patrick M.; Nagarajan, Shanmugam; Furie, Barbara C.; Furie, Bruce; Johns, Douglas G.; Temel, Ryan E.; Mackman, Nigel

    2012-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis. It also is associated with platelet hyperactivity, which increases morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. However, the mechanisms by which hypercholesterolemia produces a procoagulant state remain undefined. Atherosclerosis is associated with accumulation of oxidized lipoproteins within atherosclerotic lesions. Small quantities of oxidized lipoproteins are also present in the circulation of patients with coronary artery disease. We therefore hypothesized that hypercholesterolemia leads to elevated levels of oxidized LDL (oxLDL) in plasma and that this induces expression of the procoagulant protein tissue factor (TF) in monocytes. In support of this hypothesis, we report here that oxLDL induced TF expression in human monocytic cells and monocytes. In addition, patients with familial hypercholesterolemia had elevated levels of plasma microparticle (MP) TF activity. Furthermore, a high-fat diet induced a time-dependent increase in plasma MP TF activity and activation of coagulation in both LDL receptor–deficient mice and African green monkeys. Genetic deficiency of TF in bone marrow cells reduced coagulation in hypercholesterolemic mice, consistent with a major role for monocyte-derived TF in the activation of coagulation. Similarly, a deficiency of either TLR4 or TLR6 reduced levels of MP TF activity. Simvastatin treatment of hypercholesterolemic mice and monkeys reduced oxLDL, monocyte TF expression, MP TF activity, activation of coagulation, and inflammation, without affecting total cholesterol levels. Our results suggest that the prothrombotic state associated with hypercholesterolemia is caused by oxLDL-mediated induction of TF expression in monocytes via engagement of a TLR4/TLR6 complex. PMID:22214850

  11. Comparison of the blood coagulation profiles of ferrets and rats.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Saya; Hirai, Norihiko; Shirai, Mitsuyuki; Ito, Katsuaki; Asai, Fumitoshi

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the blood coagulation profiles of ferrets and compare them with those of rats. The ferret activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) was slightly longer than the rat aPTT. In contrast, the ferret prothrombin time and thrombin time were profoundly shorter than the corresponding rat values. The fibrinogen level in ferret plasma was 2 times higher than that in rats. Heparin prolonged all blood coagulation times in a concentration-dependent manner in both ferret and rat plasma. A significantly (P<0.01) higher concentration of heparin was required to double the aPTT in ferrets than rats. These blood coagulation data for ferrets will be useful in experimental animal studies.

  12. The coagulation system and its function in early immune defense.

    PubMed

    van der Poll, Tom; Herwald, Heiko

    2014-10-01

    Blood coagulation has a Janus-faced role in infectious diseases. When systemically activated, it can cause serious complications associated with high morbidity and mortality. However, coagulation is also part of the innate immune system and its local activation has been found to play an important role in the early host response to infection. Though the latter aspect has been less investigated, phylogenetic studies have shown that many factors involved in coagulation have ancestral origins which are often combined with anti-microbial features. This review gives a general overview about the most recent advances in this area of research also referred to as immunothrombosis.

  13. Plasma and Plasma Protein Product Transfusion: A Canadian Blood Services Centre for Innovation Symposium.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Michelle P; Al-Habsi, Khalid S; Golder, Mia; Walsh, Geraldine M; Sheffield, William P

    2015-07-01

    Plasma obtained via whole blood donation processing or via apheresis technology can either be transfused directly to patients or pooled and fractionated into plasma protein products that are concentrates of 1 or more purified plasma protein. The evidence base supporting clinical efficacy in most of the indications for which plasma is transfused is weak, whereas high-quality evidence supports the efficacy of plasma protein products in at least some of the clinical settings in which they are used. Transfusable plasma utilization remains composed in part of applications that fall outside of clinical practice guidelines. Plasma contains all of the soluble coagulation factors and is frequently transfused in efforts to restore or reinforce patient hemostasis. The biochemical complexities of coagulation have in recent years been rationalized in newer cell-based models that supplement the cascade hypothesis. Efforts to normalize widely used clinical hemostasis screening test values by plasma transfusion are thought to be misplaced, but superior rapid tests have been slow to emerge. The advent of non-vitamin K-dependent oral anticoagulants has brought new challenges to clinical laboratories in plasma testing and to clinicians needing to reverse non-vitamin K-dependent oral anticoagulants urgently. Current plasma-related controversies include prophylactic plasma transfusion before invasive procedures, plasma vs prothrombin complex concentrates for urgent warfarin reversal, and the utility of increased ratios of plasma to red blood cell units transfused in massive transfusion protocols. The first recombinant plasma protein products to reach the clinic were recombinant hemophilia treatment products, and these donor-free equivalents to factors VIII and IX are now being supplemented with novel products whose circulatory half-lives have been increased by chemical modification or genetic fusion. Achieving optimal plasma utilization is an ongoing challenge in the interconnected

  14. [Therapeutic use of fresh plasma and "virus-safe" plasma].

    PubMed

    Seyfert, U T; Lorenz, C; Espig, J; Heinrich, H; Grund, S; Rupp, K H; Wenzel, E

    1991-01-01

    The use of plasma and factor concentrates for the treatment of coagulation disorders is well established, but many questions remain. The indications for fresh frozen plasma are still not clearly established and excessive use is rampant. The safety of all blood products has not yet been firmly established. Peer review of transfusion practice in a hospital can be achieved by a Hospital Transfusion Committee. The review and analysis of the statistical reports of the transfusion service and strategies for enhancing quality of patient care will be presented.

  15. Monitoring the effects of fibrinogen concentration on blood coagulation using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and its comparison with thromboelastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmanan, Ramji S.; Efremov, Vitaly; Cullen, Sinéad; Byrne, Barry; Killard, Anthony J.

    2013-05-01

    Fibrinogen has been identified as a major risk factor in cardiovascular disorders. Fibrinogen (340 kDa) is a soluble dimeric glycoprotein found in plasma and is a major component of the coagulation cascade. It has been identified as a major risk factor in cardiovascular disorders. The time taken for its conversion to fibrin is usually used as an "endpoint" in most clot-based assays, without any information on dynamic changes in physical properties or kinetics of a forming clot. A global coagulation profile as measured by Thromboelastography® (TEG®) provides information on both the time and kinetics of changes in physical property of the forming clot. In this work, Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), which is a piezoelectric resonator has been used to study coagulation of plasma and compared with TEG. The changes in resonant frequency (Δf) and half width at half maximum (HWHM or ΔΓ) were used to evaluate effect of fibrinogen concentration. It has been shown that TEG is less sensitive to low concentrations of fibrinogen and dilution while QCM is able to monitor clot formation in both the circumstances.

  16. Arsenic removal by coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, K.N.; Green, J.F.; Do, H.D.; McLean, S.J.

    1995-04-01

    This study evaluated the removal of naturally occurring arsenic in a full-scale (106-mgd) conventional treatment plant. When the source water was treated with 3--10 mg/L of ferric chloride or 6, 10, or 20 mg/L of alum, arsenic removal was 81--96% (ferric chloride) and 23--71% (alum). Metal concentrations in the sludge produced during this study were below the state`s current hazardous waste levels at all coagulant dosages. No operational difficulties were encountered.

  17. Thermophoretically Dominated Aerosol Coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosner, Daniel E.; Arias-Zugasti, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    A theory of aerosol coagulation due to size-dependent thermophoresis is presented. This previously overlooked effect is important when local temperature gradients are large, the sol population is composed of particles of much greater thermal conductivity than the carrier gas, with mean diameters much greater than the prevailing gas mean free path, and an adequate “spread” in sizes (as in metallurgical mists or fumes). We illustrate this via a population-balance analysis of the evolution of an initially log-normal distribution when this mechanism dominates ordinary Brownian diffusion.

  18. Surface-mediated control of blood coagulation: the role of binding site densities and platelet deposition.

    PubMed Central

    Kuharsky, A L; Fogelson, A L

    2001-01-01

    A mathematical model of the extrinsic or tissue factor (TF) pathway of blood coagulation is formulated and results from a computational study of its behavior are presented. The model takes into account plasma-phase and surface-bound enzymes and zymogens, coagulation inhibitors, and activated and unactivated platelets. It includes both plasma-phase and membrane-phase reactions, and accounts for chemical and cellular transport by flow and diffusion, albeit in a simplified manner by assuming the existence of a thin, well-mixed fluid layer, near the surface, whose thickness depends on flow. There are three main conclusions from these studies. (i) The model system responds in a threshold manner to changes in the availability of particular surface binding sites; an increase in TF binding sites, as would occur with vascular injury, changes the system's production of thrombin dramatically. (ii) The model suggests that platelets adhering to and covering the subendothelium, rather than chemical inhibitors, may play the dominant role in blocking the activity of the TF:VIIa enzyme complex. This, in turn, suggests that a role of the IXa-tenase pathway for activating factor X to Xa is to continue factor Xa production after platelets have covered the TF:VIIa complexes on the subendothelium. (iii) The model gives a kinetic explanation of the reduced thrombin production in hemophilias A and B. PMID:11222273

  19. Evaluation and performance characteristics of the Q Hemostasis Analyzer, an automated coagulation analyzer.

    PubMed

    Toulon, Pierre; Fischer, Florence; Appert-Flory, Anny; Jambou, Didier

    2014-05-01

    The Q Hemostasis Analyzer (Grifols, Barcelona, Spain) is a fully-automated random-access multiparameter analyzer, designed to perform coagulation, chromogenic and immunologic assays. It is equipped with a cap-piercing system. The instrument was evaluated in a hemostasis laboratory of a University Hospital with respect to its technical features in the determination of coagulation i.e. prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), thrombin time, fibrinogen and single coagulation factors V (FV) and VIII (FVIII), chromogenic [antithrombin (AT) and protein C activity] and immunologic assays [von Willebrand factor antigen (vWF:Ag) concentration], using reagents from the analyzer manufacturer. Total precision (evaluated as the coefficient of variation) was below 6% for most parameters both in normal and in pathological ranges, except for FV, FVIII, AT and vWF:Ag both in the normal and pathological samples. No carryover was detected in alternating aPTT measurement in a pool of normal plasma samples and in the same pool spiked with unfractionated heparin (>1.5 IU/mL). The effective throughput was 154 PT, 66 PT/aPTT, 42 PT/aPTT/fibrinogen, and 38 PT/aPTT/AT per hour, leading to 154 to 114 tests performed per hour, depending of the tested panel. Test results obtained on the Q Hemostasis Analyzer were well correlated with those obtained on the ACL TOP analyzer (Instrumentation Laboratory), with r between 0.862 and 0.989. In conclusion, routine coagulation testing can be performed on the Q Hemostasis Analyzer with satisfactory precision and the same apply to more specialized and specific tests.

  20. Activation of Blood Coagulation in Two Prototypic Autoimmune Skin Diseases: A Possible Link with Thrombotic Risk.

    PubMed

    Cugno, Massimo; Tedeschi, Alberto; Borghi, Alessandro; Bucciarelli, Paolo; Asero, Riccardo; Venegoni, Luigia; Griffini, Samantha; Grovetti, Elena; Berti, Emilio; Marzano, Angelo Valerio

    2015-01-01

    Coagulation activation has been demonstrated in two prototypic autoimmune skin diseases, chronic autoimmune urticaria and bullous pemphigoid, but only the latter is associated with increased thrombotic risk. Two markers of coagulation activation (prothrombin fragment F1+2 and fibrin fragment D-dimer) were measured by immunoenzymatic methods in plasma samples from 30 patients with active chronic autoimmune urticaria, positive for autologous serum skin test, 30 patients with active bullous pemphigoid and 30 healthy subjects. In skin biopsies, tissue factor expression was evaluated by both immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. F1+2 and D-dimer levels were higher in active chronic autoimmune urticaria (276.5±89.8 pmol/L and 5.56±4.40 nmol/L, respectively) than in controls (145.2±38.0 pmol/L and 1.06±0.25 nmol/L; P=0.029 and P=0.011) and were much higher in active bullous pemphigoid (691.7±318.7 pmol/L and 15.24±9.09 nmol/L, respectively) (P<0.0001). Tissue factor positivity was evident in skin biopsies of both disorders with higher intensity in bullous pemphigoid. F1+2 and D-dimer, during remission, were markedly reduced in both disorders. These findings support the involvement of coagulation activation in the pathophysiology of both diseases. The strong systemic activation of coagulation in bullous pemphigoid may contribute to increase the thrombotic risk and provides the rationale for clinical trials on anticoagulant treatments in this disease.

  1. How Is Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Treated? Treatment for disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) depends ... and treat the underlying cause. Acute Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation People who have acute DIC may have severe ...

  2. Nanoparticles and the blood coagulation system. Part II: safety concerns.

    PubMed

    Ilinskaya, Anna N; Dobrovolskaia, Marina A

    2013-06-01

    Nanoparticle interactions with the blood coagulation system can be beneficial or adverse depending on the intended use of a nanomaterial. Nanoparticles can be engineered to be procoagulant or to carry coagulation-initiating factors to treat certain disorders. Likewise, they can be designed to be anticoagulant or to carry anticoagulant drugs to intervene in other pathological conditions in which coagulation is a concern. An overview of the coagulation system was given and a discussion of a desirable interface between this system and engineered nanomaterials was assessed in part I, which was published in the May 2013 issue of Nanomedicine. Unwanted pro- and anti-coagulant properties of nanoparticles represent significant concerns in the field of nanomedicine, and often hamper the development and transition into the clinic of many promising engineered nanocarriers. This part will focus on the undesirable effects of engineered nanomaterials on the blood coagulation system. We will discuss the relationship between the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles (e.g., size, charge and hydrophobicity) that determine their negative effects on the blood coagulation system in order to understand how manipulation of these properties can help to overcome unwanted side effects.

  3. A critical survey of fresh-frozen plasma use.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, N; Laczin, J; McMican, A; Heal, J; Arvan, D

    1986-01-01

    The use of 534 units of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) during 160 transfusion episodes in 135 consecutive patients was reviewed. Only 27 percent of transfusions were indicated by a need for replacement of labile coagulation factors. Other uses included volume repletion (31%), intraoperative bleeding or massive transfusion without coagulopathy (19%), and miscellaneous indications unrelated to labile coagulation factors (23%). Data from other institutions and national sources support the hypothesis that much of the increase in FFP use over the last decade is related to decreases in whole blood availability rather than to use for labile coagulation factor replacement. The use of FFP and red cells as a substitute for, or in preference to, whole blood may have significant adverse implications in terms of the cost and safety of blood transfusion.

  4. Mechanisms during suspended solids and phosphate concentration variations in wastewater coagulation process.

    PubMed

    Manamperuma, Lelum Duminda; Ratnaweera, Harsha Chandima; Martsul, A

    2016-10-01

    Coagulation-flocculation process is one of the most commonly used treatment process in water and wastewater treatment. Particles (PA) and phosphates (P) removal are the main objectives in wastewater coagulation. There is a general agreement on the dominant mechanism of PA and P removal during coagulation. While it is agreed that the PA and P removal reactions are competitive and takes place simultaneously, there is no clear understanding on the ratio of distribution of coagulants among the PA and P removal. The ratio can be significantly influenced by the content of PA and P, in addition to other water and coagulant quality factors. This paper attempts to provide a qualitative ratio of coagulant distribution based on PA:P proportion in raw water and OH:Al ratio in coagulants.

  5. Mechanisms during suspended solids and phosphate concentration variations in wastewater coagulation process.

    PubMed

    Manamperuma, Lelum Duminda; Ratnaweera, Harsha Chandima; Martsul, A

    2016-10-01

    Coagulation-flocculation process is one of the most commonly used treatment process in water and wastewater treatment. Particles (PA) and phosphates (P) removal are the main objectives in wastewater coagulation. There is a general agreement on the dominant mechanism of PA and P removal during coagulation. While it is agreed that the PA and P removal reactions are competitive and takes place simultaneously, there is no clear understanding on the ratio of distribution of coagulants among the PA and P removal. The ratio can be significantly influenced by the content of PA and P, in addition to other water and coagulant quality factors. This paper attempts to provide a qualitative ratio of coagulant distribution based on PA:P proportion in raw water and OH:Al ratio in coagulants. PMID:26857441

  6. The effect of nine common polymorphisms in coagulation factor genes (F2, F5, F7, F12 and F13) on the effectiveness of statins: the GenHAT study

    PubMed Central

    Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse; Peters, Bas J.M.; Lynch, Amy I.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Arnett, Donna K.; Cheng, Suzanne; Davis, Barry R.; Leiendecker-Foster, Catherine; Ford, Charles E.; Eckfeldt, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Pharmacogenetic research has shown that genetic variation may influence statin responsiveness. Statins exert a variety of beneficial effects beyond lipid lowering, including antithrombotic effects, which contribute to the risk reduction of cardiovascular disease. Statins have been shown to influence the expression of coagulation factors II, V, VII, XII and XIII. AimData from a large randomized clinical trial of pravastatin, designed to show efficacy relative to usual care, were used to investigate whether a pharmacogenetic effect of polymorphisms in genes coding for coagulation factors II, V, VII, XII and XIII is associated with reduced fatal coronary heart disease (CHD) and nonfatal myocardial infarction, combined CHD and all-cause mortality. Methods The Genetics of Hypertension Associated Treatment is an ancillary study of the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial. The genotyped population in the lipid-lowering trial of Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial included 9624 participants randomly assigned to pravastatin or to usual care. The efficacy of pravastatin in reducing risk of all-cause mortality, CHD plus nonfatal myocardial infarction and combined CHD, was compared among genotype strata by examining an interaction term in a proportional hazards modelAQ2. Results None of the polymorphisms were associated with the clinical outcomes. For the F7 (−323) del/ins polymorphism there was no interaction with pravastatin for either outcome. For both the F5 Arg506Gln G>A (rs6025) polymorphism and F7 Arg353Gln G>A (rs6046) polymorphism there were no interactions with pravastatin in relation to all-cause mortality, but there were significant interactions with combined CHD [interaction hazard ratioλ=λ1.33, 95% confidence interval (1.01−1.76) and interaction hazard ratioλ=λ1.92, 95% confidence interval (1.00−3.65), respectively]AQ3. There were no interactions between the

  7. Time-dependent release of growth factors from implant surfaces treated with plasma rich in growth factors.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ilárduya, María Belén; Trouche, Elodie; Tejero, Ricardo; Orive, Gorka; Reviakine, Ilya; Anitua, Eduardo

    2013-05-01

    Plasma rich in growth factors (PRGFs) technology is an autologous platelet-rich plasma approach that provides a pool of growth factors and cytokines that have been shown to increase tissue regeneration and accelerate dental implant osseointegration. In this framework, the spatiotemporal release of growth factors and the establishment of a provisional fibrin matrix are likely to be key aspects governing the stimulation of the early phases of tissue regeneration around implants. We investigated the kinetics of growth factor release at implant surfaces functionalized either with PRGFs or platelet-poor plasma and correlated the results obtained with the morphology of the resulting interfaces. Our main finding is that activation and clot formation favors longer residence times of the growth factors at the interfaces studied, probably due to their retention in the adsorbed fibrin matrix. The concentration of the platelet-derived growth factors above the interfaces becomes negligible after 2-4 days and is significantly higher in the case of activated interfaces than in the case of nonactivated ones, whereas that of the plasmatic hepatocyte growth factor is independent of platelet concentration and activation, and remains significant for up to 9 days. Platelet-rich plasma preparations should be activated to permit growth factor release and thereby facilitate implant surface osseointegration.

  8. Coagulation disorders in septic shock.

    PubMed

    Thijs, L G; de Boer, J P; de Groot, M C; Hack, C E

    1993-01-01

    Abnormalities in coagulation and fibrinolysis are frequently observed in septic shock. The most pronounced clinical manifestation is disseminated intravascular coagulation. Recent studies in human volunteers and animal models have clarified the early dynamics and route of activation of both coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways. In healthy subjects subjected to a low dose of either endotoxin or TNF an imbalance in the procoagulant and the fibrinolytic mechanisms is apparent, resulting in a procoagulant state. Also in patients with septic shock a dynamic process of coagulation and fibrinolysis is ongoing with evidence of impaired fibrinolysis. These abnormalities have prognostic significance; the extent of disturbances of coagulation and fibrinolysis is related to the development of multiple organ failure and death.

  9. Perioperative pharmacology: blood coagulation modifiers.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Rodney W; Wanzer, Linda J; Goeckner, Bradlee

    2011-06-01

    Blood coagulation is the process that results in the formation of a blood clot to stop bleeding from a damaged blood vessel. Various pharmacologic agents can affect the coagulation process. The American College of Chest Physicians' evidence-based practice guidelines for perioperative management of antithrombotic therapy provide guidance for anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy and bridge therapy. Perioperative nurses must understand the pharmacologic principles of the most common blood coagulation modifiers related to perioperative use. The perioperative nurse's responsibilities regarding administration of blood coagulation modifiers include reviewing the patient's pertinent laboratory results (eg, prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, international normalized ratio), recognizing the underlying conditions that require blood coagulation therapy, and documenting all pertinent information. Perioperative nurses also should participate in development of detailed storage and retrieval policies related to heparin.

  10. Regulation of human amnion cell growth and morphology by sera, plasma, and growth factors.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, E V; Grimaldi, M A

    1981-01-01

    The requirements of human epithelial cells derived from the amnion membrane for serum factors were investigated. The growth promoting effects of human whole blood serum (WBS), platelet-poor defibrinogenated plasma, and plasma-derived serum (PDS) were examined in primary cultures of these ectodermal cells. The numbers of population doublings recorded after 10 days in the presence of 10% WBS, defibrinogenated plasma, or PDS were 2.3, 2.0 or 1.5, respectively. Although dialysis of sera or plasma had little effect on growth promotion, it markedly decreased the capacity of plasma to maintain cells in culture beyond 10 days. The differences in growth activities could not be attributed to the presence of anticoagulant in plasma and PDS or to the presence of excess calcium in PDS. Platelet lysates and purified platelet-derived growth factor had no effect on growth. Amnion cell growth was enhanced by epidermal growth factor (EGF) or hydrocortisone, but the glucocorticoid did not condition cells to respond to growth factors. Insulin and fibroblast growth factor singly or in combination had no effect on cell replication. Giant cell formation accompanied maintenance in hydrocortisone with defibrinogenated plasma and PDS. Discrete regions of dense population appeared in the presence of hydrocortisone, EGF, and undialyzed supplements.

  11. [Dependence of haemostasis system response from initial blood coagulation activity under total joints replacement].

    PubMed

    Antropova, I P; Iushkov, B G

    2012-03-01

    Effect of the initial state of the plasma hemostasis on the hemocoagulation changes after the total arthroplasty surgery was studied in 100 patients with osteoarthritis. Indicators of coagulation, fibrinolysis, and physiological anticoagulants were determined before and after completion of the surgery, at days 1, 3, 7, and 13-14 postoperatively. Increased coagulation activity befor surgery enhanced blood clotting within three days after the surgery. Enhanced consumption of physiological anticoagulants reduced the ability to recover their level a week after arthroplasty. The raised activity of the fibrinolysis inhibitor retained the effect during three postoperative days. Initial abnormalities in plasma hemostasis enhance blood coagulation dysfunction caused by surgical intervention on the large joints.

  12. [Ratio of erythrocyte and plasma in massive blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Wen, Xian-Hui; Liu, Feng-Xia; Zhang, Jun-Hua; Gui, Rong

    2014-06-01

    This study was purposed to explore the suitable ratio between fresh frozen plasma and erythrocyte by retrospective analysis of coagulation in patients with massive blood transfusion. The clinical data of 151 cases with massive blood transfusion from January 2011 to January 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. According to coagulation, patients were divided into coagulation normal group (138 cases) and coagulation dysfunction group (13 cases). Based on the ratio of 1:1 of fresh frozen plasma and erythrocyte, the patients were divided into high plasma group(2:1), medium plasma group (1:1) and low plasma (<1:1) subgroups. Coagulation was detected before and after 24 h of massive blood transfusion. The results showed that prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and thrombin time (TT) were prolonged, fibrinogen (FIB) level decreased significantly (all P < 0.05) in the low plasma subgroup of coagulation normal group after massive blood transfusion 24 h; the high plasma and the medium plasma group of coagulation normal group had no significant changes in coagulation (P > 0.05); prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time and fibrinogen level in the medium plasma and low plasma subgroup of coagulation dysfunction group after massive transfusion was still in abnormal levels (P > 0.05), coagulation function in high plasma subgroup was improved significantly (P < 0.05). It is concluded that the ratio of plasma to erythrocyte should be adjusted according to the patient's coagulation function during massive blood transfusion, the ratio between fresh frozen plasma and erythrocyte is recommended to be 2:1 in patients of coagulation dysfunction in order to improve the patient's coagulation function and to reduce the incidence of adverse event, the ratio of fresh frozen plasma to erythrocyte is recommended to be 1:1 in patients with normal coagulation so as to reduce the dilutional coagulopathy and hypervolemia of blood.

  13. Fibulin-1 purification from human plasma using affinity chromatography on Factor H-Sepharose.

    PubMed

    DiScipio, Richard G; Liddington, Robert C; Schraufstatter, Ingrid U

    2016-05-01

    A method is reported to purify Fibulin-1 from human plasma resulting in a 36% recovery. The steps involve removal of the cryoglobulin and the vitamin K dependent proteins followed by polyethylene glycol and ammonium sulfate precipitations, DEAE-Sephadex column chromatography and finally Factor H-Sepharose affinity purification. The procedure is designed to be integrated into an overall scheme for the isolation of over 30 plasma proteins from a single batch of human plasma. Results from mass spectroscopy, SDS-PAGE, and Western blotting indicate that human plasma Fibulin-1 is a single chain of the largest isotype. Functional binding assays demonstrated calcium ion dependent interaction of Fibulin-1 for fibrinogen, fibronectin, and Factor H. The procedure described is the first to our knowledge that enables a large scale purification of Fibulin-1 from human plasma. PMID:26826315

  14. Elimination of interleukin 6 attenuates coagulation activation in experimental endotoxemia in chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    van der Poll, T; Levi, M; Hack, C E; ten Cate, H; van Deventer, S J; Eerenberg, A J; de Groot, E R; Jansen, J; Gallati, H; Büller, H R

    1994-04-01

    The role of interleukin 6 (IL-6) in the toxic sequelae of sepsis is controversial. To assess the part of IL-6 in inflammatory responses to endotoxin, we investigated eight chimpanzees after either a bolus intravenous injection of Escherichia coli endotoxin (n = 4; 4 ng/kg) or after the same dose of endotoxin with a simultaneous bolus intravenous injection of an anti-IL-6 mAb (30 mg; n = 4). Anti-IL-6 did not affect the induction of the cytokine network (tumor necrosis factor [TNF], soluble TNF receptors types I and II, and IL-8) by endotoxin, nor did it influence the occurrence of a neutrophilic leukocytosis and neutrophil degranulation, as monitored by the measurement of elastase-alpha 1-antitrypsin complexes. In contrast, anti-IL-6 markedly attenuated endotoxin-induced activation of coagulation, monitored with the plasma levels of the prothrombin fragment F1+2 and thrombin-antithrombin III complexes, whereas activation of fibrinolysis, determined with the plasma concentrations of plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin complexes, remained unaltered. We conclude that IL-6 does not have a feedback effect on the release of other cytokines after injection of endotoxin, and that it is not involved in endotoxin-induced neutrophilia or neutrophil degranulation. IL-6 is, however, an important intermediate factor in activation of coagulation in low grade endotoxemia in chimpanzees.

  15. [Allele polymorphism analysis in coagulation factors F2, F5 and folate metabolism gene MTHFR by using microchip-based multiplex real time PCR].

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, K V; Nikitin, M M; Slyadnev, M N

    2015-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping methods are widely used for the detection of hereditary thrombophilias caused by genetic defects in the coagulation system. The hereditary thrombophilias are frequently associated with higher incidences of point mutations in hemostasis (F2 20210G>A, F5 1691G>A) and folate metabolism (MTHFR 677C>Т, MTHFR 1298A>C) genes. Moreover, the combination of gene abnormalities in F2 or/and MTHFR with F5 Leiden mutation leads to increased risk of developing thrombosis. Thus, simultaneous detection of the multiple gene mutations in a sample has important clinical relevance. The microchip-based multiplex real time PCR for estimation of allele specific polymorphism in hemostatic and folate metabolism genes presented here has a high efficiency and may be used for laboratory diagnosis. The optimized protocol for estimation of 4 different types of genetic polymorphisms allowed PCR to be performed with minimal quantity of DNA template and PCR reagents including Taq polymerase and a short-term thermocycling. PMID:26215413

  16. [Allele polymorphism analysis in coagulation factors F2, F5 and folate metabolism gene MTHFR by using microchip-based multiplex real time PCR].

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, K V; Nikitin, M M; Slyadnev, M N

    2015-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping methods are widely used for the detection of hereditary thrombophilias caused by genetic defects in the coagulation system. The hereditary thrombophilias are frequently associated with higher incidences of point mutations in hemostasis (F2 20210G>A, F5 1691G>A) and folate metabolism (MTHFR 677C>Т, MTHFR 1298A>C) genes. Moreover, the combination of gene abnormalities in F2 or/and MTHFR with F5 Leiden mutation leads to increased risk of developing thrombosis. Thus, simultaneous detection of the multiple gene mutations in a sample has important clinical relevance. The microchip-based multiplex real time PCR for estimation of allele specific polymorphism in hemostatic and folate metabolism genes presented here has a high efficiency and may be used for laboratory diagnosis. The optimized protocol for estimation of 4 different types of genetic polymorphisms allowed PCR to be performed with minimal quantity of DNA template and PCR reagents including Taq polymerase and a short-term thermocycling.

  17. Efficacy of plasma therapy in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome with complement factor H mutations.

    PubMed

    Lapeyraque, Anne-Laure; Wagner, Eric; Phan, Véronique; Clermont, Marie-José; Merouani, Aïcha; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Goodship, Timothy H J; Robitaille, Pierre

    2008-08-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) frequently results in end-stage renal failure and can be lethal. Several studies have established an association between quantitative or qualitative abnormalities in complement factor H and aHUS. Although plasma infusion and exchange are often advocated, guidelines have yet to be established. Long-term outcome for patients under treatment is still unknown. We describe a patient who, at 7 months of age, presented with aHUS associated with combined de novo complement factor H mutations (S1191L and V1197A) on the same allele. Laboratory investigations showed normal levels of complements C4, C3 and factor H. Plasma exchanges and large-dose infusion therapy resulted in a resolution of hemolysis and recovery of renal function. Three recurrences were successfully treated by intensification of the plasma infusion treatment to intervals of 2 or 3 days. This patient showed good response to large doses of plasma infusions and her condition remained stable for 30 months with weekly plasma infusions (30 ml/kg). Long-term tolerance and efficacy of such intensive plasma therapy are still unknown. Reported secondary failure of plasma therapy in factor H deficiency warrants the search for alternative therapeutic approaches. PMID:18425537

  18. Carbon dioxide pressure-induced coagulation of microalgae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Roland; Jessop, Philip G; Champagne, Pascale

    2015-12-28

    The move to a low-carbon economy has generated renewed interest in microalgae for the production of biofuels with the potential mutual benefit of wastewater treatment. However, harvesting has been identified as a limiting factor to the economic viability of this process. This paper explores the harvesting of microalgae using high-pressure gas without the addition of coagulants. Coagulation of microalgae under high-pressure gas was found to be an efficient method to separate algae from suspension. The critical coagulation pressures (CCPs) for H(2) and CO(2) were determined to be 6.1 and 6.2 MPa, respectively. The CO(2)-induced decrease in solution pH positively influenced coagulation rates, without appearing to affect the CCP. This approach could be beneficial for the economic removal of microalgae from solution for the production of both biofuels and biomedical compounds without the addition of non-environmentally friendly chemicals.

  19. Carbon dioxide pressure-induced coagulation of microalgae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Roland; Jessop, Philip G; Champagne, Pascale

    2015-12-28

    The move to a low-carbon economy has generated renewed interest in microalgae for the production of biofuels with the potential mutual benefit of wastewater treatment. However, harvesting has been identified as a limiting factor to the economic viability of this process. This paper explores the harvesting of microalgae using high-pressure gas without the addition of coagulants. Coagulation of microalgae under high-pressure gas was found to be an efficient method to separate algae from suspension. The critical coagulation pressures (CCPs) for H(2) and CO(2) were determined to be 6.1 and 6.2 MPa, respectively. The CO(2)-induced decrease in solution pH positively influenced coagulation rates, without appearing to affect the CCP. This approach could be beneficial for the economic removal of microalgae from solution for the production of both biofuels and biomedical compounds without the addition of non-environmentally friendly chemicals. PMID:26574522

  20. Prostaglandins in human seminal plasma. Prostaglandins and related factors 46.

    PubMed

    Hamberg, M; Samuelsson, B

    1966-01-25

    This study on human seminal plasma sought after the compounds which either possess the dienone chromophore or can be converted into it by treatment with sodium hydroxide. In addition, this investigation led to the isolation of 8 more (PGs) prostaglandins which were present in higher concentrations than the previously recognized PGs. Samples of human seminal plasma were subjected to silicic acid chromatography, reversed phase partition chromatography, thin layer chromatography, and gas liquid chromatography which isolated those 8 PGs not previously recognized. 4 of these compounds, PGE1-217, PGE2-217, PGE1-278, and PGE2-278 were known from earlier studies but had not been isolated from natural sources. The other 4 were 19 hydroxy derivatives of the 4 abovementioned compounds. The concentrations of the previously recognized PGs were recently determined and it was found that the 19 hydroxy derivatives were present in concentrations 4 times higher than the PGE compounds.

  1. Thymoquinone Modulates Blood Coagulation in Vitro via Its Effects on Inflammatory and Coagulation Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan-Chari, Vandhana; Kim, Jaehan; Abuawad, Ahlam; Naeem, Mubeena; Cui, Huadong; Mousa, Shaker A.

    2016-01-01

    Thymoquinone (THQ) is a major component of black seeds. Given that both THQ and black seeds exhibit anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities, we hypothesized that THQ will affect cancer-associated thrombosis (CAT), which is primarily triggered by tissue factor (TF) and inflammation. The effect of both black seed-extracted and purchased (“pure”) THQ on normal blood coagulation was tested with in vitro thromboelastography (TEG) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) coagulation assays. The effect of pure THQ on CAT was tested with aPTT assay using pancreatic cancer cell lines that are either positive or negative for TF, and with TEG assay using lipopolysaccharide as an inflammatory trigger. Additionally, the direct effect of THQ on the inactivation of factors IIa and Xa was assessed. Since TNF-α facilitates crosstalk between inflammation and thrombosis by triggering the NF-κB pathway, we tested THQ’s ability to interfere with this communication with a luciferase assay. Both extracted and pure THQ had minimal effects on normal blood coagulation. Pure THQ reversed CAT initiated by both TF and inflammation to basal levels (p < 0.001). Mechanistically, while THQ had minimal to no effect on factor IIa and Xa inactivation, it strongly reduced the effects of TNF-α on NF-κB elements (p < 0.001). THQ has a minimal effect on basal coagulation and can reverse CAT in vitro, possibly by interfering with the crosstalk between inflammation and coagulation. This study suggests the utility of THQ as a preventative anticoagulant and/or as a supplement to existing chemotherapies and anticoagulant therapies. PMID:27043539

  2. Thymoquinone Modulates Blood Coagulation in Vitro via Its Effects on Inflammatory and Coagulation Pathways.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan-Chari, Vandhana; Kim, Jaehan; Abuawad, Ahlam; Naeem, Mubeena; Cui, Huadong; Mousa, Shaker A

    2016-01-01

    Thymoquinone (THQ) is a major component of black seeds. Given that both THQ and black seeds exhibit anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities, we hypothesized that THQ will affect cancer-associated thrombosis (CAT), which is primarily triggered by tissue factor (TF) and inflammation. The effect of both black seed-extracted and purchased ("pure") THQ on normal blood coagulation was tested with in vitro thromboelastography (TEG) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) coagulation assays. The effect of pure THQ on CAT was tested with aPTT assay using pancreatic cancer cell lines that are either positive or negative for TF, and with TEG assay using lipopolysaccharide as an inflammatory trigger. Additionally, the direct effect of THQ on the inactivation of factors IIa and Xa was assessed. Since TNF-α facilitates crosstalk between inflammation and thrombosis by triggering the NF-κB pathway, we tested THQ's ability to interfere with this communication with a luciferase assay. Both extracted and pure THQ had minimal effects on normal blood coagulation. Pure THQ reversed CAT initiated by both TF and inflammation to basal levels (p < 0.001). Mechanistically, while THQ had minimal to no effect on factor IIa and Xa inactivation, it strongly reduced the effects of TNF-α on NF-κB elements (p < 0.001). THQ has a minimal effect on basal coagulation and can reverse CAT in vitro, possibly by interfering with the crosstalk between inflammation and coagulation. This study suggests the utility of THQ as a preventative anticoagulant and/or as a supplement to existing chemotherapies and anticoagulant therapies. PMID:27043539

  3. Thermophoretically modified aerosol brownian coagulation.

    PubMed

    Arias-Zugasti, Manuel; Rosner, Daniel E

    2011-08-01

    A theory of aerosol coagulation rates resulting from continuum-regime brownian coagulation in the presence of size-dependent particle thermophoresis is developed and explored here. We are motivated by a wide variety of applications in which particle brownian coagulation occurs in a nonisothermal gas where differential thermophoretic drift contributes to, but does not dominate, the encounter frequency between suspended spherical particles (e.g., mist droplets) of different sizes. We employ a Smoluchowski-like population-balance to demonstrate the relative roles of brownian diffusion and thermophoresis in shaping the short and long time (asymptotic or "coagulation-aged") mist-droplet size distribution (DSD) function. To carry out these combined-mechanism DSD-evolution calculations we developed a rational "coupled" coagulation rate constant (allowing for simultaneous brownian diffusion and relative thermophoretic drift) rather than simply adding the relevant individual coagulation "kernels." Dimensionless criteria are provided to facilitate precluding other coagulation mechanisms not considered here (such as simultaneous sedimentation or Marangoni-flow-induced mist-droplet phoresis) and potential complications not included in the present model [as finite-rate coalescence, initial departures from the continuum (Stokes drag-) limit, and even dense (nonideal) vapor effects]. PMID:21928988

  4. Thermophoretically modified aerosol brownian coagulation.

    PubMed

    Arias-Zugasti, Manuel; Rosner, Daniel E

    2011-08-01

    A theory of aerosol coagulation rates resulting from continuum-regime brownian coagulation in the presence of size-dependent particle thermophoresis is developed and explored here. We are motivated by a wide variety of applications in which particle brownian coagulation occurs in a nonisothermal gas where differential thermophoretic drift contributes to, but does not dominate, the encounter frequency between suspended spherical particles (e.g., mist droplets) of different sizes. We employ a Smoluchowski-like population-balance to demonstrate the relative roles of brownian diffusion and thermophoresis in shaping the short and long time (asymptotic or "coagulation-aged") mist-droplet size distribution (DSD) function. To carry out these combined-mechanism DSD-evolution calculations we developed a rational "coupled" coagulation rate constant (allowing for simultaneous brownian diffusion and relative thermophoretic drift) rather than simply adding the relevant individual coagulation "kernels." Dimensionless criteria are provided to facilitate precluding other coagulation mechanisms not considered here (such as simultaneous sedimentation or Marangoni-flow-induced mist-droplet phoresis) and potential complications not included in the present model [as finite-rate coalescence, initial departures from the continuum (Stokes drag-) limit, and even dense (nonideal) vapor effects].

  5. [Detection of alloantibodies against Factor VIII in plasma of patients with hemophilia A and its relationship with Factor VIIIC domain].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu-Lu; Yu, Zi-Qiang; Wan, Chu-Cheng; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Zheng-Hua; Ruan, Chang-Geng

    2013-10-01

    This study was purposed to detect the alloantibodies against Factor VIII (FVIII) by ELISA for estimating the incidence of the alloantibodies against Factor VIII (FVIII) in patients with hemophilia A, and to investigate the relationship between factor VIIIC domain and alloantibodies. Total of 140 patients with hemophilia A and 80 normal controls were enrolled in this study, among them plasma FVIII level of 84 patients was less than 1%, plasma FVIII level of 34 patients was between 1% and 5%, and plasma FVIII level of 22 patients was more than 5%. All patients were treated with plasma-derived FVIII concentrate or plasma before. The ELISA plate was coated with McAb (SZ-132) against FVIII prepared in our laboratory, then human recombinant FVIII concentrates were applied. After incubation in room temperature for 2 hours, diluted plasma samples and HRP-conjugated goat anti-human IgG were added successively, finally A490 was recorded. The threshold of alloantibody of patient plasma was set as mean value>3 SD more than control. The plate was coated with antibody against His, then human recombinant FVIII-C1C2 prepared in our laboratory was added. After incubation in room temperature for 2 hours, diluted plasma samples and HRP-conjugated goat anti-human IgG were added successively, finally A490 were recorded. The threshold was set as the mean value>3 SD more than control. The results showed that the alloantibodies against FVIII were found in 56 patients (40%) by ELISA, and 82.1% (46/56) of this kind of alloantibody could interact with the C domain of FVIII. It is concluded that C domain of FVIII is one of the primary binding sites for the alloantibodies against FVIII in Chinese patients with hemophilia A.

  6. The transcription factors IRF8 and PU.1 negatively regulate plasma cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Carotta, Sebastian; Willis, Simon N; Hasbold, Jhagvaral; Inouye, Michael; Pang, Swee Heng Milon; Emslie, Dianne; Light, Amanda; Chopin, Michael; Shi, Wei; Wang, Hongsheng; Morse, Herbert C; Tarlinton, David M; Corcoran, Lynn M; Hodgkin, Philip D; Nutt, Stephen L

    2014-10-20

    Activated B cells undergo immunoglobulin class-switch recombination (CSR) and differentiate into antibody-secreting plasma cells. The distinct transcriptomes of B cells and plasma cells are maintained by the antagonistic influences of two groups of transcription factors: those that maintain the B cell program, including BCL6 and PAX5, and plasma cell-promoting factors, such as IRF4 and BLIMP-1. We show that the complex of IRF8 and PU.1 controls the propensity of B cells to undergo CSR and plasma cell differentiation by concurrently promoting the expression of BCL6 and PAX5 and repressing AID and BLIMP-1. As the PU.1-IRF8 complex functions in a reciprocal manner to IRF4, we propose that concentration-dependent competition between these factors controls B cell terminal differentiation.

  7. Cosmic dust synthesis by accretion and coagulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praburam, G.; Goree, J.

    1995-01-01

    The morphology of grains grown by accretion and coagulation is revaled by a new laboratory method of synthesizing cosmic dust analogs. Submicron carbon particles, grown by accretion of carbon atoms from a gas, have a spherical shape with a cauliflower-like surface and an internal micro-structure of radial columns. This shape is probably common for grains grown by accretion at a temperature well below the melting point. Coagulated grains, consisting of spheres that collided to form irregular strings, were also synthesized. Another shape we produced had a bumpy non- spherical morphology, like an interplanetary particle collected in the terrestrial stratosphere. Besides these isolated grains, large spongy aggregates of nanometer-size particles were also found for various experimental conditions. Grains were synthesized using ions to sputter a solid target, producing an atomic vapor at a low temperature. The ions were provided by a plasma, which also provided electrostatic levitation of the grains during their growth. The temporal development of grain growth was studied by extinguishing the plasma after various intervals.

  8. Platelet-rich plasma, plasma rich in growth factors and simvastatin in the regeneration and repair of alveolar bone.

    PubMed

    Rivera, César; Monsalve, Francisco; Salas, Juan; Morán, Andrea; Suazo, Iván

    2013-12-01

    Platelet preparations promote bone regeneration by inducing cell migration, proliferation and differentiation in the area of the injury, which are essential processes for regeneration. In addition, several studies have indicated that simvastatin (SIMV), widely used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, stimulates osteogenesis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of treatment with either platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) in combination with SIMV in the regeneration and repair of alveolar bone. The jaws of Sprague Dawley rats (n=18) were subjected to rotary instrument-induced bone damage (BD). Animals were divided into six groups: BD/H2O (n=3), distilled water without the drug and alveolar bone damage; BD/H2O/PRP (n=3), BD and PRP; BD/H2O/PRGF (n=3), BD and PRGF; BD/SIMV (n=3), BD and water with SIMV; BD/SIMV/PRP (n=3), BD, PRP and SIMV; and BD/SIMV/PRGF (n=3), BD, PRGF and SIMV. Conventional histological analysis (hematoxylin and eosin staining) revealed that the BD/SIMV group showed indicators for mature bone tissue, while the BD/SIMV/PRP and BD/SIMV/PRGF groups showed the coexistence of indicators for mature and immature bone tissue, with no statistical differences between the platelet preparations. Simvastatin did not improve the effect of platelet-rich plasma and plasma rich in growth factors. It was not possible to determine which platelet preparation produced superior effects.

  9. [Transfusion of plasma: products-indications].

    PubMed

    Djoudi, R

    2013-05-01

    The use of therapeutic plasma has increased in France by more than 40% since 2002. This growth may be explained by the improvement in transfusion safety, the diminution of the risk of transmission of pathogens and the regained confidence of the physicians in blood products. Therapeutic plasma also benefits from additional procedures to reduce infectious (securisation) or immunological risks (selection of blood donors). Its application in massive transfusions has undergone a significant evolution over the last few years. A proactive attitude favouring early and important use of plasma on the basis of pre-established protocols is advocated henceforth. The prescription of therapeutic plasma for other indications must be guided by the results of biological tests and an evaluation of the haemorrhagic risk. Despite regular updating of the guidelines for good transfusion practice, plasma is still sometimes prescribed for prophylactic purposes in situations where the biological and/or clinical criteria do not justify it. Moreover, it is not recommended to use fresh frozen plasma in cases of deficiency of coagulation factors if the specific concentrates are available as intravenous fluids. Complementary clinical studies will be necessary to evaluate, in certain indications, the real benefits of the transfusion of plasma and the interest of replacing it by concentrates of coagulant factors (fibrinogen, prothrombin complex).

  10. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Coagulation instrument. 864.5400 Section 864.5400....5400 Coagulation instrument. (a) Identification. A coagulation instrument is an automated or semiautomated device used to determine the onset of clot formation for in vitro coagulation studies....

  11. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Coagulation instrument. 864.5400 Section 864.5400....5400 Coagulation instrument. (a) Identification. A coagulation instrument is an automated or semiautomated device used to determine the onset of clot formation for in vitro coagulation studies....

  12. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Coagulation instrument. 864.5400 Section 864.5400....5400 Coagulation instrument. (a) Identification. A coagulation instrument is an automated or semiautomated device used to determine the onset of clot formation for in vitro coagulation studies....

  13. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Coagulation instrument. 864.5400 Section 864.5400....5400 Coagulation instrument. (a) Identification. A coagulation instrument is an automated or semiautomated device used to determine the onset of clot formation for in vitro coagulation studies....

  14. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Coagulation instrument. 864.5400 Section 864.5400....5400 Coagulation instrument. (a) Identification. A coagulation instrument is an automated or semiautomated device used to determine the onset of clot formation for in vitro coagulation studies....

  15. Collision Rate and Symmetry Factor in Gluon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jian; Wang, Qun

    2013-03-01

    The elastic and inelastic collision rates in a gluon gas are calculated. The symmetry factor and the phase space integral are discussed in detail. With a symmetry factor and well constrained phase space, the same result can be obtained as that of the full phase space without the factor. Such an equivalence is illustrated by analytic and numerical calculations for gg → gg and gg → ggg processes.

  16. Coagulation abnormalities in dengue hemorrhagic Fever: serial investigations in 167 Vietnamese children with Dengue shock syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wills, Bridget A; Oragui, Emmanuelle E; Stephens, Alick C; Daramola, Olufunmilayo A; Dung, Nguyen Minh; Loan, Ha Thi; Chau, Nguyen Vinh; Chambers, Mary; Stepniewska, Kasia; Farrar, Jeremy J; Levin, Michael

    2002-08-01

    The pathophysiological basis of hemorrhage in dengue infections remains poorly understood, despite the increasing global importance of these infections. A large prospective study of 167 Vietnamese children with dengue shock syndrome documented only minor prolongations of prothrombin and partial thromboplastin times but moderate to severe depression of plasma fibrinogen concentrations. A detailed study of 48 children revealed low plasma concentrations of the anticoagulant proteins C, S, and antithrombin III, which decreased with increasing severity of shock, probably because of capillary leakage. Concurrent increases in the levels of thrombomodulin, tissue factor, and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) indicated increased production of these proteins. Thrombomodulin levels suggestive of endothelial activation correlated with increasing shock severity, whereas PAI-1 levels correlated with bleeding severity. Dengue virus can directly activate plasminogen in vitro. Rather than causing true disseminated intravascular coagulation, dengue infection may activate fibrinolysis primarily, degrading fibrinogen directly and prompting secondary activation of procoagulant homeostatic mechanisms.

  17. Factors controlling plasma renin and aldosterone during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bay, W H; Ferris, T F

    1979-01-01

    The response of plasma renin activity (PRA) and plasma aldosterone (PA) to change in sodium intake was evaluated in pregnant women during the third trimester. After 7 days on a 10 mEq sodium diet, PRA rose from 20.6 +/- 6.2 to 59.6 +/- 11.6 ng/ml/hr and PA from 47 +/- 11 to 127 +/- 27 ng% in pregnant women compared to PRA from 5 +/- 1.2 to 18.9 +/- 5.2 ng/ml/hr and PA from 7.7 +/- 1 to 42 +/- 3 ng% in nonpregnant controls. Pregnant women conserved sodium normally with urinary sodium excretion and weight loss similar to nonpregnant women. After 6 days on a 300 mEq sodium intake, PRA and PA in pregnant women were significantly higher, 10.2 +/- 1.4 ng/ml/hr and 22 +/- 3 ng%, respectively, compared to 1.5 +/- 0.3 ng/ml/hr and 7.3 +/- 1 ng% in controls. On both low- and high sodium intake there was a positive correlation between PRA and PA in pregnant women. Plasma prostaglandin E (PGE) was 0.45 +/- 0.06 ng/ml in pregnant women compared to 0.1 +/- 0.01 ng/ml in control women (p less than 0.01) and urinary PGE excretion was 2780 +/- 357 ng/24 hr in 28 pregnant women compared to 1191 +/- 142 ng/24 hrs (p less than 0.01) in 14 nonpregnant controls. These findings indicate that although renin and aldosterone secretion respond to change in sodium intake in pregnancy, the cause of the increased renin secretion of pregnancy may be secondary to the increase that occurs in prostaglandin synthesis.

  18. Thrombin generation by exposure of blood to endotoxin: a simple model to study disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Stief, T W

    2006-04-01

    Pathologic disseminated intravascular coagulation (PDIC) is a serious complication in sepsis. In an in-vitro system consisting of incubation of fresh citrated blood with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) or glucans and subsequent plasma recalcification plasmatic thrombin was quantified. Five hundred microliters of freshly drawn citrated blood of healthy donors were incubated with up to 800 ng/mL LPS (Escherichia coli) or up to 80 microg/mL Zymosan A (ZyA; Candida albicans) for 30 minutes at room temperature (RT). The samples were centrifuged, and 30 microL plasma were recalcified with 1 volume or less of CaCl(2) (25 micromoles Ca(2+)/mL plasma). After 0 to 12 minutes (37 degrees C), 20 microL 2.5 M arginine, pH 8.6, were added. Thirty microliters 0.9 mM HD-CHG-Ala-Arg-pNA in 2.3 M arginine were added, and the absorbance increase at 405 nm was determined. Fifty microliters plasma were also incubated with 5 microL 250 mM CaCl2 for 5, 10, or 15 minutes (37 degrees C). Fifty microliters 2.5 M arginine stops coagulation, and 50 microL 0.77 mM HD-CHG-Ala-Arg-pNA in 2.3 M arginine starts the thrombin detection. The standard was 1 IU/mL thrombin in 7% human albumin instead of plasma. Arginine was also added in the endotoxin exposure time (EET) or in the plasma coagulation reaction time (CRT). Tissue factor (TF)-antigen and soluble CD14 were determined. LPS at blood concentrations greater than 10 ng/mL or ZyA at greater than 1 microg/mL severalfold enhance thrombin generation, when the respective plasmas are recalcified. After 30 minutes EET at RT, the thrombin activity at 12 minutes CRT generated by the addition of 200 ng/mL LPS or 20 microg/mL ZyA is approximately 200 mIU/mL compared to approximately 20 mIU/mL without addition of endotoxin, or compared to about 7 mIU/mL thrombin at 0 minutes CRT. Arginine added to blood or to plasma inhibits thrombin generation; the inhibitory concentration 50% (IC 50) is approximately 15 mM plasma concentration. Endotoxin incubation of blood

  19. Elevated Transforming Growth Factor β1 in Plasma of Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kuchtey, John; Kunkel, Jessica; Burgess, L. Goodwin; Parks, Megan B.; Brantley, Milam A.; Kuchtey, Rachel W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To test the hypothesis that primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) patients have a systemic elevation of transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1). Methods. Plasma was prepared from blood samples drawn from patients of the Vanderbilt Eye Institute during clinic visits. Concentrations of total TGFβ1 and thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) in plasma were determined by ELISA. Statistical significance of differences between POAG and control samples was evaluated by Mann-Whitney test. Regression analysis was used to evaluate correlations between plasma TGFβ1 and patient age and between plasma TGFβ1 and TSP1. Results. Plasma samples were obtained from 148 POAG patients and 150 controls. Concentration of total TGFβ1 in the plasma of POAG patients (median = 3.25 ng/mL) was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) than in controls (median = 2.46 ng/mL). Plasma TGFβ1 was not correlated with age of patient (P = 0.17). Thrombospondin-1 concentration was also significantly higher (P < 0.0001) in POAG patients (median = 0.774 μg/mL) as compared to controls (median = 0.567 μg/mL). Plasma total TGFβ1 and TSP1 concentrations were linearly correlated (P < 0.0001). Conclusions. Plasma samples from POAG patients display elevated total TGFβ1 compared to controls, consistent with elevated systemic TGFβ1 in POAG patients. PMID:25061114

  20. Comparative study between atmospheric microwave and low-frequency plasmas: Production efficiency of reactive species and their effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Im Hee; Kim, Myoung Soo; Kim, Ho Young; Shin, Hyun Kook; Kwon, Hyoung Cheol; Sim, Jae Yoon; Lee, Jae Koo

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of low-frequency (LF) and microwave-powered plasmas were investigated. The optical emission of these two plasmas indicated that more chemicals were generated by microwave plasma than by LF plasma with the intensities being higher by factors of about 9, 3, 5, and 1.6 for OH (309 nm), O (777 nm), NO (247 nm), and Ca2+ (290 nm), respectively. Application experiments were also conducted. A steel plate became hydrophilic after 45 s of microwave plasma treatment. This is more than ten times faster than in the case of LF plasma treatment, an action related to the generation of reactive species (e.g., OH, O, and NO) as measured by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Ca2+ generation was verified by blood coagulation experiment. Microwave-plasma-induced coagulation was twice faster than LF-plasma-induced coagulation. Simulation results that explain the chemical generation in microwave plasma were also included. High-energy electrons were considered a major factor for microwave plasma characteristics.

  1. Obstetrical disseminated intravascular coagulation score.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takao

    2014-06-01

    Obstetrical disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is usually a very acute, serious complication of pregnancy. The obstetrical DIC score helps with making a prompt diagnosis and starting treatment early. This DIC score, in which higher scores are given for clinical parameters rather than for laboratory parameters, has three components: (i) the underlying diseases; (ii) the clinical symptoms; and (iii) the laboratory findings (coagulation tests). It is justifiably appropriate to initiate therapy for DIC when the obstetrical DIC score reaches 8 points or more before obtaining the results of coagulation tests. Improvement of blood coagulation tests and clinical symptoms are essential to the efficacy evaluation for treatment after a diagnosis of obstetrical DIC. Therefore, the efficacy evaluation criteria for obstetrical DIC are also defined to enable follow-up of the clinical efficacy of DIC therapy.

  2. Ab initio calculation of the non-relativistic free-free Gaunt factor incorporating plasma screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, G. S. J.; Colgan, J.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Magee, N. H.

    2014-03-01

    We present calculations of Gaunt factors for free-free absorption over a wide range of temperatures and densities. The calculations employ a partial wave expansion approach, which is able to account for plasma screening within the calculation of the free-free Gaunt factor. Much of the existing Gaunt factor data pertains to hydrogenic systems, and plasma screening is often incorporated in opacity calculations using approximate methods. The use of a more accurate method allows us to determine the accuracy of such approximations in calculations of the free-free monochromatic and mean opacities.

  3. Carbon monoxide and iron modulate plasmatic coagulation in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Vance G; Pretorius, Etheresia; Bester, Janette; Jacobsen, Wayne K; Boyle, Patrick K; Reinhard, Joao P

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a significant source of morbidity and mortality for millions of people worldwide, and multiple potential etiologies have been postulated to contribute to AD. Among these, spontaneous cerebral emboli and increased cerebral and circulating heme oxygenase (Hmox) activity in AD patients are of particular interest, as two of the products of Hmox activity, carbon monoxide (CO) and iron enhance plasmatic coagulation and modify the ultrastructure of thrombi. We hypothesized that patients afflicted with AD would have coagulation kinetics modulated by CO and iron. Using viscoelastic assessments of coagulation, it was determined with a small cohort (n=11) of AD patients that all had enhancement of coagulation by CO, iron, or both. In a complementary fashion, it was determined that a separate cohort (n=12) of AD patients had thrombi with ultrastructural features consistent with iron and CO exposure as assessed with scanning electron microscopy. Further, when stratified by normal or abnormally increased serum ferritin concentrations (which can be increased by Hmox), the AD patients with abnormal ferritin concentrations had significantly thinner fibrin fiber diameters, not unlike that noted when normal plasma is mixed with iron or CO. In sum, AD patients were noted to have plasmatic coagulation kinetic and thrombus ultrastructural changes consistent with exposure to CO and iron. Future investigation of CO and iron in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is warranted.

  4. Activation of blood coagulation in cancer: implications for tumour progression.

    PubMed

    Lima, Luize G; Monteiro, Robson Q

    2013-09-04

    Several studies have suggested a role for blood coagulation proteins in tumour progression. Herein, we discuss (1) the activation of the blood clotting cascade in the tumour microenvironment and its impact on primary tumour growth; (2) the intravascular activation of blood coagulation and its impact on tumour metastasis and cancer-associated thrombosis; and (3) antitumour therapies that target blood-coagulation-associated proteins. Expression levels of the clotting initiator protein TF (tissue factor) have been correlated with tumour cell aggressiveness. Simultaneous TF expression and PS (phosphatidylserine) exposure by tumour cells promote the extravascular activation of blood coagulation. The generation of blood coagulation enzymes in the tumour microenvironment may trigger the activation of PARs (protease-activated receptors). In particular, PAR1 and PAR2 have been associated with many aspects of tumour biology. The procoagulant activity of circulating tumour cells favours metastasis, whereas the release of TF-bearing MVs (microvesicles) into the circulation has been correlated with cancer-associated thrombosis. Given the role of coagulation proteins in tumour progression, it has been proposed that they could be targets for the development of new antitumour therapies.

  5. Activation of blood coagulation in cancer: implications for tumour progression

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Luize G.; Monteiro, Robson Q.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have suggested a role for blood coagulation proteins in tumour progression. Herein, we discuss (1) the activation of the blood clotting cascade in the tumour microenvironment and its impact on primary tumour growth; (2) the intravascular activation of blood coagulation and its impact on tumour metastasis and cancer-associated thrombosis; and (3) antitumour therapies that target blood-coagulation-associated proteins. Expression levels of the clotting initiator protein TF (tissue factor) have been correlated with tumour cell aggressiveness. Simultaneous TF expression and PS (phosphatidylserine) exposure by tumour cells promote the extravascular activation of blood coagulation. The generation of blood coagulation enzymes in the tumour microenvironment may trigger the activation of PARs (protease-activated receptors). In particular, PAR1 and PAR2 have been associated with many aspects of tumour biology. The procoagulant activity of circulating tumour cells favours metastasis, whereas the release of TF-bearing MVs (microvesicles) into the circulation has been correlated with cancer-associated thrombosis. Given the role of coagulation proteins in tumour progression, it has been proposed that they could be targets for the development of new antitumour therapies. PMID:23889169

  6. Association between plasma omega-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular disease risk factors.

    PubMed

    Garneau, Véronique; Rudkowska, Iwona; Paradis, Ann-Marie; Godin, Gaston; Julien, Pierre; Pérusse, Louis; Vohl, Marie-Claude

    2013-03-01

    The consumption of omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids (FA), namely eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), have been linked to reduced cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. The objective of this study was to examine the relation between n-3 FA in plasma phospholipid (PL) levels and CVD risk factors. n-3 FA levels in plasma PL were determined using gas chromatography in 100 obese (body mass index (BMI), ≥30 kg·m(-2)) and 100 nonobese selected individuals from the Quebec City metropolitan area. The CVD risk factors analysed were BMI, blood pressure, plasma lipids levels, and fasting plasma glucose. Significantly higher levels of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) were observed in obese subjects, whereas significantly higher levels of DHA were observed in nonobese subjects. For CVD risk factors, ALA levels were positively correlated with plasma triglyceride concentrations and negatively associated with diastolic blood pressure. None of the CVD risk factors studied was linked to EPA levels. In addition, DPA was negatively related to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and positively correlated with the total cholesterol/HDL-C ratio. DHA levels were negatively correlated with BMI, waist circumference, and plasma triglyceride levels, whereas a positive association was observed with HDL-C levels. Total n-3 FA percentages were negatively correlated with BMI. In conclusion, higher DHA percentages in plasma PL are associated with a more favourable CVD risk profile, whereas higher DPA percentages in plasma PL are associated with a more deteriorated CVD risk profile.

  7. Heparanase—A Link between Coagulation, Angiogenesis, and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nadir, Yona; Brenner, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Heparanase that was cloned from and is abundant in the placenta is implicated in cell invasion, tumor metastasis, and angiogenesis. Recently we have demonstrated that heparanase may also affect the hemostatic system in a non-enzymatic manner. Heparanase was shown to up-regulate tissue factor (TF) expression and interact with tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) on the cell surface, leading to dissociation of TFPI from the cell membrane of endothelial and tumor cells, resulting in increased cell surface coagulation activity. More recently, we have shown that heparanase directly enhances TF activity, resulting in increased factor Xa production and activation of the coagulation system. Data indicate increased levels and possible involvement of heparanase in vascular complications in pregnancy. Taking into account the prometastatic and proangiogenic functions of heparanase, overexpression in human malignancies, and abundance in platelets and placenta, its involvement in the coagulation machinery is an intriguing novel arena for further research. PMID:23908827

  8. Lactobacillus casei modulates the inflammation-coagulation interaction in a pneumococcal pneumonia experimental model

    PubMed Central

    Haro, Cecilia; Villena, Julio; Zelaya, Hortensia; Alvarez, Susana; Agüero, Graciela

    2009-01-01

    Background We have previously demonstrated that Lactobacillus casei CRL 431 administration improved the resistance to pneumococcal infection in a mouse model. Methods This study examined the effects of the oral administration of Lactobacillus casei CRL 431 (L. casei) on the activation of coagulation and fibrinolytic systems as well as their inhibitors during a Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in mice. Results The alveolo-capillary membrane was damaged and the coagulation system was also activated by the infection. As a consequence, we could see fibrin(ogen) deposits in lung histological slices, increased levels of thrombin-antithrombin complex (TATc) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and plasma, decrease in prothrombin activity (PT) and prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time test (APTT) values. Factor VII (FVII) and factor X (FX) were decreased in plasma, whereas fibrinogen (F) and factor VIII (FVIII) were increased. The low levels of protein C (PC) in BAL and plasma proved damage on inhibitory activity. The infected animals showed reduced fibrinolytic activity, evidenced by an increase in plasminogen activation inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in BAL and plasma. The pathogen induced an increase of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in BAL and serum a few hours after challenge followed by a significant decrease until the end of the assayed period. IL-4 and IL-10 in BAL and serum were also augmented, especially at the end of the experiment. The animals treated with L. casei showed an improvement of alveolo-capillary membrane, lower fibrin(ogen) deposits in lung and decrease in TATc. APTT test and PT, FVII and FX activity were normalized. L. casei group showed lower F levels than control during whole experiment. In the present study no effect of L. casei on the recovery of the inhibitory activity was detected. However, L. casei was effective in reducing PAI-1 levels in BAL and in increasing anti-inflammatory ILs concentration. Conclusion L. casei proved effective to regulate

  9. A unique precipitating autoantibody against plasma thromboplastin antecedent associated with multiple apparent plasma clotting factor deficiencies in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Poon, M C; Saito, H; Koopman, W J

    1984-06-01

    A 42-yr-old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus without bleeding diathesis developed a prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time that was not corrected by normal plasma. An inhibitor that acted rapidly and inactivated 0.5 U/ml plasma thromboplastin antecedent (PTA, factor XI) at a 1:200 plasma dilution was demonstrated. In addition to a low titer of PTA (less than 0.01 U/ml), plasma assayed at 20-fold dilution also showed low titers of Hageman (factor XII, 0.02 U/ml), Fletcher (plasma prekallikrein, 0.02 U/ml), and Fitzgerald (high molecular weight kininogen, less than 0.01 U/ml) factors. The titer of these factors, except PTA, returned to normal upon further plasma dilution or upon removal of the inhibitor by protein A adsorption. Thus, the inhibitor appeared to interfere with these clotting factor assays, possibly by inactivating PTA in the substrate plasmas in the test system. Its specificity was further confirmed. The inhibitor did not interfere with surface-induced proteolytic cleavage of Hageman factor. Surface-induced generation of plasma kallikrein activity (amidolysis of H-D-pro-phe-arg-pNa and cold-promoted factor VII activity enhancement) requires only Hageman, Fletcher, and Fitzgerald factors and was normal. Reactions requiring all 4 contact phase factors, including PTA, such as surface-induced generation of plasmin activity (amidolysis of H-D-val-leu-lys-pNa) and activated Christmas factor (factor IXa) activity, were defective. Furthermore, the inhibitor bound to agarose-protein A inactivated and removed PTA selectively from normal plasma. The inhibitor was an IgG-lambda autoantibody that precipitated PTA. The inactivated activated PTA (factor XIa) without the requirement for an additional cofactor. Furthermore, it inhibited surface-induced activation of PTA by interfering with its proteolytic cleavage upon glass surface exposure and with its binding onto the reactive surfaces.

  10. Pathogen inactivation and removal methods for plasma-derived clotting factor concentrates.

    PubMed

    Klamroth, Robert; Gröner, Albrecht; Simon, Toby L

    2014-05-01

    Pathogen safety is crucial for plasma-derived clotting factor concentrates used in the treatment of bleeding disorders. Plasma, the starting material for these products, is collected by plasmapheresis (source plasma) or derived from whole blood donations (recovered plasma). The primary measures regarding pathogen safety are selection of healthy donors donating in centers with appropriate epidemiologic data for the main blood-transmissible viruses, screening donations for the absence of relevant infectious blood-borne viruses, and release of plasma pools for further processing only if they are nonreactive for serologic markers and nucleic acids for these viruses. Despite this testing, pathogen inactivation and/or removal during the manufacturing process of plasma-derived clotting factor concentrates is required to ensure prevention of transmission of infectious agents. Historically, hepatitis viruses and human immunodeficiency virus have posed the greatest threat to patients receiving plasma-derived therapy for treatment of hemophilia or von Willebrand disease. Over the past 30 years, dedicated virus inactivation and removal steps have been integrated into factor concentrate production processes, essentially eliminating transmission of these viruses. Manufacturing steps used in the purification of factor concentrates have also proved to be successful in reducing potential prion infectivity. In this review, current techniques for inactivation and removal of pathogens from factor concentrates are discussed. Ideally, production processes should involve a combination of complementary steps for pathogen inactivation and/or removal to ensure product safety. Finally, potential batch-to-batch contamination is avoided by stringent cleaning and sanitization methods as part of the manufacturing process.

  11. Effects of Rivaroxaban on Platelet Activation and Platelet–Coagulation Pathway Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Heitmeier, Stefan; Laux, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Activation of coagulation and platelets is closely linked, and arterial thrombosis involves coagulation activation as well as platelet activation and aggregation. In these studies, we investigated the possible synergistic effects of rivaroxaban in combination with antiplatelet agents on thrombin generation and platelet aggregation in vitro and on arterial thrombosis and hemostasis in rat models. Materials and Methods: Thrombin generation was measured by the Calibrated Automated Thrombogram method (0.5 pmol/L tissue factor) using human platelet-rich plasma (PRP) spiked with rivaroxaban (15, 30, or 60 ng/mL), ticagrelor (1.0 µg/mL), and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA; 100 µg/mL). Tissue factor-induced platelet aggregation was measured in PRP spiked with rivaroxaban (15 or 30 ng/mL), ticagrelor (1 or 3 µg/mL), or a combination of these. An arteriovenous (AV) shunt model in rats was used to determine the effects of rivaroxaban (0.01, 0.03, or 0.1 mg/kg), clopidogrel (1 mg/kg), ASA (3 mg/kg), and combinations on arterial thrombosis. Results: Rivaroxaban inhibited thrombin generation in a concentration-dependent manner and the effect was enhanced with ticagrelor and ticagrelor plus ASA. Rivaroxaban and ticagrelor also concentration-dependently inhibited tissue factor-induced platelet aggregation, and their combination increased the inhibition synergistically. In the AV shunt model, rivaroxaban dose-dependently reduced thrombus formation. Combining subefficacious or weakly efficacious doses of rivaroxaban with ASA or ASA plus clopidogrel increased the antithrombotic effect. Conclusion: These data indicate that the combination of rivaroxaban with single or dual antiplatelet agents works synergistically to reduce platelet activation, which may in turn lead to the delayed/reduced formation of coagulation complexes and vice versa, thereby enhancing antithrombotic potency. PMID:25848131

  12. Chronic urticaria and coagulation: pathophysiological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, A; Kolkhir, P; Asero, R; Pogorelov, D; Olisova, O; Kochergin, N; Cugno, M

    2014-06-01

    Chronic urticaria (CU) is a widespread skin disease, characterized by the recurrence of transient wheals and itch for more than 6 weeks. Besides autoimmune mechanisms, coagulation factors, in particular tissue factor and thrombin, might also participate in the disease pathophysiology. Tissue factor expressed by eosinophils can induce activation of blood coagulation generating thrombin which in turn can increase vascular permeability both directly, acting on endothelial cells, and indirectly, inducing degranulation of mast cells with release of histamine, as demonstrated in experimental models. D-dimer, a fibrin degradation product, generated following activation of the coagulation cascade and fibrinolysis, has been found to be increased during urticaria exacerbations; moreover, it has been proposed as a biomarker of severity and resistance to H1-antihistamines in CU patients. The possible role of coagulation in CU is also supported by case reports, case series and a small controlled study showing the efficacy of anticoagulant therapy in this disease. The purpose of this review was to summarize the available data on the possible contribution of coagulation to the pathophysiology of CU focusing on clinical aspects and possible future therapeutic developments. PMID:24673528

  13. Platelet-rich plasma, plasma rich in growth factors and simvastatin in the regeneration and repair of alveolar bone

    PubMed Central

    RIVERA, CÉSAR; MONSALVE, FRANCISCO; SALAS, JUAN; MORÁN, ANDREA; SUAZO, IVÁN

    2013-01-01

    Platelet preparations promote bone regeneration by inducing cell migration, proliferation and differentiation in the area of the injury, which are essential processes for regeneration. In addition, several studies have indicated that simvastatin (SIMV), widely used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, stimulates osteogenesis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of treatment with either platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) in combination with SIMV in the regeneration and repair of alveolar bone. The jaws of Sprague Dawley rats (n=18) were subjected to rotary instrument-induced bone damage (BD). Animals were divided into six groups: BD/H2O (n=3), distilled water without the drug and alveolar bone damage; BD/H2O/PRP (n=3), BD and PRP; BD/H2O/PRGF (n=3), BD and PRGF; BD/SIMV (n=3), BD and water with SIMV; BD/SIMV/PRP (n=3), BD, PRP and SIMV; and BD/SIMV/PRGF (n=3), BD, PRGF and SIMV. Conventional histological analysis (hematoxylin and eosin staining) revealed that the BD/SIMV group showed indicators for mature bone tissue, while the BD/SIMV/PRP and BD/SIMV/PRGF groups showed the coexistence of indicators for mature and immature bone tissue, with no statistical differences between the platelet preparations. Simvastatin did not improve the effect of platelet-rich plasma and plasma rich in growth factors. It was not possible to determine which platelet preparation produced superior effects. PMID:24250728

  14. A putative inhibitory mechanism in the tenase complex responsible for loss of coagulation function in acquired haemophilia A patients with anti-C2 autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tomoko; Nogami, Keiji; Ogiwara, Kenichi; Shima, Midori

    2012-02-01

    Acquired haemophilia A (AHA) is caused by the development of factor (F)VIII autoantibodies, demonstrating type 1 or type 2 inhibitory behaviour, and results in more serious haemorrhagic symptoms than in congenital severe HA. The reason(s) for this remains unknown, however. The global coagulation assays, thrombin generation tests and clot waveform analysis, demonstrated that coagulation parameters in patients with AHA-type 2 inhibitor were more significantly depressed than those in patients with moderate HA with similar FVIII activities. Thrombin and intrinsic FXa generation tests were significantly depressed in AHA-type 1 and AHA-type 2 compared to severe HA, and more defective in AHA-type 1 than in AHA-type 2. To investigate these inhibitory mechanism(s), anti-FVIII autoantibodies were purified from AHA plasmas. AHA-type 1 autoantibodies, containing an anti-C2 ESH4-epitope, blocked FVIII(a)-phospholipid binding, whilst AHA-type 2, containing an anti-C2 ESH8-epitope, inhibited thrombin-catalysed FVIII activation. The coagulation function in a reconstituted AHA-model containing exogenous ESH4 or ESH8 was more abnormal than in severe HA. The addition of anti-FIX antibody to FVIII-deficient plasma resulted in lower coagulation function than its absence. These results support the concept that global coagulation might be more suppressed in AHA than in severe HA due to the inhibition of FIXa-dependent FX activation by steric hindrance in the presence of FVIII-anti-C2 autoantibodies. Additionally, AHA-type 1 inhibitors prevented FVIIIa-phospholipid binding, essential for the tenase complex, whilst AHA-type 2 antibodies decreased FXa generation by inhibiting thrombin-catalysed FVIII activation. These two distinct mechanisms might, in part, contribute to and exacerbate the serious haemorrhagic symptoms in AHA.

  15. von Willebrand Factor Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Platelet Count , Platelet Function Tests , Complete Blood Count , Coagulation Factor VIII , PT , PTT At a Glance Test ... a protein , one of several components of the coagulation system that work together to stop bleeding and ...

  16. Multiple congenital coagulation deficiencies.

    PubMed

    BONNIN, J A; HICKS, N D; INNIS, M D; SIMPSON, D A

    1960-07-01

    A 6-week-old infant is presented who suffered from a congenital haemorrhagic disorder which caused death from subdural haemorrhage following mild trauma. Haematological investigation revealed deficiencies of factor VII and Christmas factor. Prower-Stuart factor was probably also deficient although investigation of this clotting factor was carried out only on serum obtained at necropsy.

  17. Endotoxin Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, G. W.; McSherry, B. J.; Valli, V. E. O.

    1974-01-01

    Endotoxin administered intravenously to a group of four calves resulted in disseminated intravascular coagulation. A sublethal dose of piromen, a commercially available Pseudomonas spp endotoxin, was used. Serial measurements of total plasma fibrinogen, soluble fibrin levels, ethanol gelation tests, protamine sulfate tests, fibrinogen-fibrin-related antigen (FR-antigen) and prothrombin and thrombin times were done. Initial depression of plasma fibrinogen with a nadir of about 40% of pre-endotoxin levels at eight to 11 hours post-endotoxin (+8 to +11 hours) followed by an overcompensation to 180% at +60 to +108 hours was shown. Soluble fibrin was demonstrated in plasma from +2 to +22 hours with a peak of 100-114 mg/100 ml at +4 to +9 hours. Positive plasma ethanol gelation and protamine sulfate tests, as well as the presence of serum FR-antigen, occurred consistently following endotoxin administration. Significant increases in prothrombin times (PT) from +4 to +40 hours and in thrombin times (TT) from +4 to +16 hours were demonstrated. The peak increase of PT at +8 to +10 hours was 180%. The peak increase of TT at +6 to +9 hours was 260-290%. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4. PMID:4279765

  18. Nutritional and environmental factors affecting plasma ghrelin and leptin levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Keiko; Okame, Rieko; Katayama, Tetsuro; Miyazato, Mikiya; Kangawa, Kenji; Murakami, Noboru

    2010-10-01

    We examined which factors suppress the rise of ghrelin secretion under hunger in 16-h-starved rats, and compared the responses of plasma ghrelin and leptin levels to various exogenous and endogenous stimuli in intact rats. Although an acute expansion of the stomach by infusion of 6 ml air or 3 ml water in rats starved for 16 h did not change the level of plasma acyl-ghrelin 3 ml corn starch solution, corn oil, or 20% ethanol significantly decreased it. Vagotomy inhibited suppression by nutrients but not by ethanol. Chronic infusion of ethanol into the stomach for 3 weeks in free-feeding rats caused widespread injury of the stomach mucosa, and increased both plasma ghrelin levels and the number of ghrelin cells. In intact rats, low temperature did not change ghrelin levels, but increased leptin levels. On the other hand, restriction stress decreased plasma ghrelin levels, but had the reverse effect on plasma leptin levels. Although insulin decreased and 20% glucose increased plasma glucose levels, they both decreased plasma ghrelin levels. Insulin elevated plasma leptin levels, but glucose had no effect. These results indicate that 1) acyl-ghrelin secretion from the stomach under fasting condition is suppressed by nutrients but not by mechanical expansion of the stomach; 2) high and low environmental temperature, stress, or administration of insulin reciprocally affect plasma levels of ghrelin and leptin; and 3) an increase of stomach ghrelin cell number and plasma ghrelin levels after chronic ethanol treatment may be involved in restoration of gastric mucosae.

  19. Plasma levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, factor VIII, prothrombin activation fragment 1+2, anticardiolipin, and antiprothrombin antibodies are risk factors for thrombosis in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Molino, Daniela; De Santo, Natale G; Marotta, Rosa; Anastasio, Pietro; Mosavat, Mahrokh; De Lucia, Domenico

    2004-09-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease are prone to hemorrhagic complications and simultaneously are at risk for a variety of thrombotic complications such as thrombosis of dialysis blood access, the subclavian vein, coronary arteries, cerebral vessel, and retinal veins, as well as priapism. The study was devised for the following purposes: (1) to identify the markers of thrombophilia in hemodialyzed patients, (2) to establish a role for antiphospholipid antibodies in thrombosis of the vascular access, (3) to characterize phospholipid antibodies in hemodialysis patients, and (4) to study the effects of dialysis on coagulation cascade. A group of 20 hemodialysis patients with no thrombotic complications (NTC) and 20 hemodialysis patients with thrombotic complications (TC) were studied along with 400 volunteer blood donors. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and those with nephrotic syndrome were excluded. All patients underwent a screening prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen (Fg), coagulation factors of the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways, antithrombin III (AT-III), protein C (PC), protein S (PS), resistance to activated protein C, prothrombin activation fragment 1+2 (F1+2), plasminogen, tissue type plasminogen activator (t-PA), plasminogen tissue activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1), anticardiolipin antibodies type M and G (ACA-IgM and ACA-IgG), lupus anticoagulant antibodies, and antiprothrombin antibodies type M and G (aPT-IgM and aPT-IgG). The study showed that PAI-1, F 1+2, factor VIII, ACA-IgM, and aPT-IgM levels were increased significantly over controls both in TC and NTC, however, they could distinguish patients with thrombotic complications from those without, being increased maximally in the former group. The novelty of the study is represented by the significant aPT increase that was observed in non-systemic lupus erythematosus hemodialysis patients, and particularly in those with thrombotic events. In addition

  20. Influence of n-6 versus n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in diets low in saturated fatty acids on plasma lipoproteins and hemostatic factors.

    PubMed

    Sanders, T A; Oakley, F R; Miller, G J; Mitropoulos, K A; Crook, D; Oliver, M F

    1997-12-01

    Modification of dietary fat composition may influence hemostatic variables, which are associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). To address this question, we performed a controlled feeding study on 26 healthy male nonsmoking subjects with diets of differing fat composition. For the first 3 weeks, the subjects were given a diet calculated to supply 30% energy as total fat: 8% as monounsaturated, 4% as polyunsaturated, and 16% energy as saturated fatty acids, respectively (saturated diet). This was followed immediately by two diets taken in random order, each of 3-week duration and separated by an 8-week washout period on the subject's usual diet. Both diets were calculated to supply 30% of energy as fat: 14% monounsaturated, 6% as polyunsaturated, and 8% energy as saturated fatty acids. They both provided 5 g (approximately 1.7% energy) more of polyunsaturated fatty acids than the saturated fat diet; in one diet as long-chain n-3 fatty acids (n-3 diet) and in the other as linoleic acid (n-6 diet). Fasting plasma lipids, lipoproteins, and hemostatic factors were measured on the final 3 days of each dietary period. In a subset of 9 subjects the postprandial responses to a test meal were studied on the penultimate day of each period, each meal having the fat composition of its parent diet. On the n-3 diet compared with the n-6 diet, plasma triglyceride, HDL3 cholesterol, apoprotein AII, and fibrinogen concentrations were lower and HDL2 cholesterol concentration was higher (P = .0001, P = .003, P = .0001, P = .004, and P = .001, respectively). On both the n-3 and n-6 diets compared with the saturated diet, fasting plasma total and LDL cholesterol, apoprotein B, beta-thromboglobulin concentrations, and platelet counts were lower (P < .0001, P < .0001, P < .001, P < .01, and P < .05 respectively) and plasma Lp(a) and von Willebrand factor concentrations were higher (P = .02 and P < .01, respectively). Fasting factor VII coagulant activity (VIIc) was

  1. Spontaneous electromagnetic fluctuations in unmagnetized plasmas. II. Relativistic form factors of aperiodic thermal modes

    SciTech Connect

    Felten, T.; Schlickeiser, R.; Yoon, P. H.; Lazar, M.

    2013-05-15

    General expressions for the electromagnetic fluctuation spectra in unmagnetized plasmas are derived using fully relativistic dispersion functions and form factors for the important class of isotropic plasma particle distribution functions including in particular relativistic Maxwellian distributions. In order to obtain fluctuation spectra valid in the entire complex frequency plane, the proper analytical continuations of the unmagnetized form factors and dispersion functions are presented. The results are illustrated for the important special case of isotropic Maxwellian particle distribution functions providing in particular the thermal fluctuations of aperiodic modes. No restriction to the plasma temperature value is made, and the electromagnetic fluctuation spectra of ultrarelativistic thermal plasmas are calculated. The fully relativistic calculations also provide more general results in the limit of nonrelativistic plasma temperatures being valid in the entire complex frequency plane. They complement our earlier results in paper I and III of this series for negative values of the imaginary part of the frequency. A new collective, transverse, damped aperiodic mode with the damping rate γ∝−k{sup −5/3} is discovered in an isotropic thermal electron-proton plasma with nonrelativistic temperatures.

  2. A Phase II clinical trial of a mixture of plasma-derived factor VIIa and factor X (MC710) in haemophilia patients with inhibitors: haemostatic efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics.

    PubMed

    Shirahata, A; Fukutake, K; Takamatsu, J; Shima, M; Hanabusa, H; Mugishima, H; Amano, K; Takedani, H; Tamashima, S; Matsushita, T; Tawa, A; Tanaka, I; Higasa, S; Kosaka, Y; Fujii, T; Sakai, M; Migita, M; Kawakami, K; Ohashi, Y; Saito, H

    2013-11-01

    MC710, a mixture of plasma-derived activated factor VII and factor X at a protein weight ratio of 1:10, is a novel bypassing agent for haemostasis in haemophilia patients with inhibitors. In a Phase II trial, we evaluated the haemostatic efficacy and safety of single doses of MC710, and investigated pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters in nine joint bleeding episodes in six male haemophilia patients with inhibitors. This trial was a multi-centre, open-label, non-randomized study of two doses (60 and 120 μg kg(-1) as FVIIa dose), allowing the re-administration of different MC710 dosages to the same subjects. Haemostatic efficacy was assessed by evaluating reduction in pain and swelling, as well as increase in range of motion in a bleeding joint. The results of the study showed that in nine bleeding episodes, seven treatments were rated as 'excellent' or 'effective' according to investigator's rating system of efficacy at 8 h after administration. No serious or severe adverse events were observed after administration; furthermore, measurement of several diagnostic markers revealed no signs or symptoms of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). The haemostatic potential of MC710 was confirmed at doses of 60 and 120 μg kg(-1) in this trial. MC710 is thus expected to be a safe and efficacious novel bypassing agent for controlling bleeding in haemophilia patients with inhibitors. PMID:23738888